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Suwannee Democrat
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00007
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: January 26, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00007
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text

FANS YOUNGAND OLDWILL
GET A KICK OUT OF THIS TASTY
MEDITERRANEAN FEAST
Page 7D


Suwannee County Museum Bulldog basketball at
e., Chili Challenna - Paae


****3-DIGIT 326 000000
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SERIAL SECTION FL HISTORY
PO BOX 117007


uTUIt 1ra


Serving Suwannee County since 1884


Midweek Edition - January 26, 2005


120th YEAR, NO. 26


50 CENTS


TOP: In what may have
been a classic case of road
rage, a Tallahassee man
drove his vehicle
into one driven by an
off-duty US Air Marshall
Jan. 21 on US 90 west.
BOTTOM: Charles Douglas,
Franklin, 44, seated on the
ground, fills out paperwork
for Suwannee County
Fire/Rescue after he
refused transport to the
hospital. Franklin couldn't
refuse the offer he got later
when Deputy Shawn
Larney charged him with
throwing a deadly missile
and aggravated assault
with a vehicle and gave
him a ride to the
Suwannee County Jail.
- Photo: Susan K. Lamb


Road rage



incident leaves



one jailed


Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
It may have been a clas-
sic case of road rage Jan. 21
when a Tallahassee man
rammed an off-duty US Air
Marshall's vehicle head-on
on US 90 near the Falmouth
Crossing store.
By the time the crash
happened, the two had been
sparring for some time, ac-
cording t the defendant,
Charles Douglas Frarinklin,
44, of Tallahassee. Franklin
was telling his story to any-
one who would listen at the
scene late Friday afternoon
while he sat on the ground
next to his and the Mar-
shall's wrecked vehicles.
Franklin said he and the
man had both been headed


westbound on Interstate 10
for some time before the
head-on crash occurred on
US 90. He told bystanders
the Marshall initiated a
quarrel as the two drove
westbound. Franklin said he
responded by throwing a
beer bottle at the back of
the other vehicle. From then
on, it was nonstop as they
headed westward and then
exited US 90 with the Mar-
shall chasing Franklin.
Franklin told bystanders
he was just trying to get
home to Tallahassee after
working all week out of
town.
The US Marshall was not
identified by name because
of Homeland Security laws.
According to a report

SEE ROAD, PAGE 3A


After B1 years, a wrong is nearly righted I


Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
Sixty-one years and 14 days after
Willie James Howard died he was given
a proper funeral and a headstone was fi-
nally placed on-his grave. It happened
Jan. 16, 2005 when family members and
otliers from the black community gath-
ered to set things right after all those
years in a moving memorial service


where God was called upon to always
lead those who gathered to remember
the teenager.
At a special service held at Springfield
Baptist Church in Live Oak at 3 p.m.
Jan. 16, Howard, who died in the
Suwannee River Jan. 2, 1944 at age 15,
was. lauded as a young man. who. was
well liked in his community and attend-
ed Sunday School at his church regular-
ly. An only child, the eighth grader is
still remembered by family members as


bright and having a beautiful singing
voice.
But, it's his tragic death they remem-
bered the most and was what brought
about 75 people together for this warm
service on a sunny, cold winter after-
noon.
The circumstances around Howard's
death appear clear to some, to others it's
not. Regardless of how and why the

SEE 61 YEARS, PAGE 3A


Cowboy preacher working hard to rebuild


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democril R.-pnerl r
Dale Gallo .ia,, is the pst,:,r
of a little coLuntr, church :iut
SR 51 called (Caltjar. Ba.ptisr
About three and a. half \ears
ago, Gallowa, v.j a dilagnos'ed
with cancer. The doctors sent
him home with sl. months to
live. Gallowa-i didn't gi-e up
He didn't go Sit in hi, chair
and die. He pia.,ed, and he
fought his disease and 'ilth
help from God. lie \on. But.
as a result of hi�, lon, illness.
treatment and coi .alesc~ence.
his little church ,r.tried tc die


Pictured right, the Rev Dale
Galloway Pastor of Calvary
Baptist and his trusly horse.
Photo Janlel Schri err i:.:a- jll:


'.,',
. . ' -;


" -,^ ' . ,
4�-�





S !i
i


'During thi Inrter. ie\. Gallo('a:,
often quoted the bible He's a hiue nmarn
with an electric pcrsuorialit, and a sirec
knowledge ofr tlhe King Jaiies ' 161 Bible.
"'When the sheplierd's. snmren. the sheep scaticr.'"
Galloway quoted from the book of Nlatlhet\ And
that's what happened Gallok a'.'s flock drifted
away from :he church A.lhen Gallo I a, '..a. illI he
said. Now, he and his '.',ife Bonnie ire '.. orkiiirg hard to
rebuild.
Galloway ,t.lned Cal.air, Baptti- 14-1 ,e:irs a. j' 1H re-
turned home from '. ietliatnt and 1a stint in the il.irine Corp_; a
hard-living nian Butll Gall,''.j', .,ias b,,rni .,.ain and irLalied


SEE COWBOY, PAGE 3A


. I~ I . i ". . .",
Lodal ministers pray after a headstone was placed on Willie
James Howard's grave Jan. 16 at Eastside Cemetery.
- Photo: Susan K. Lamb

WINTER SLAMS
SUWANNEE WITH
BITTER COLD: The sun
blazed down Monday on
this beautiful winter scene
created by spraying water
on a tree when
temperatures dropped to
S ,.. ,. . 19 degrees early Jan. 24.
S. "' . Temperatures dipped
into the 20s Tuesday
morning and then higher
" i, this morning with
warm days expected.
For up to the minute
weather information go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com

SEE TODAY'S WEATHER
FEATURED ON PAGE 5B


Come SEE why more and more people 20I0
are finding their best deal at Ch





WES HANE Y Clltt
t Ea st AN 3Aiver kF.LJF
e E t f D Family OnLed & Operated Since 1967
Just East Of Downtown. 362-2976 Live Oak, FL 2994JRS-F


INDEX
Classifieds ....................................1-4D
School .........................9................ 9B
Sports ................................. 1 .. -8B
Suwannee Living ..............................5A
V iew po int ..........................................4A
Legal Notices ................... .............. 11B

AREA DEATHS
Cora Lee Coppedge, 73, O'Brien
Laurence Kenneth Smith, 92, Live Oak
Elizabeth R. Searls, 85, Yellville, Ark.
John L. Sullivan, 75, Live Oak
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 6A


(Iile 1muaitr.,e nmucrat/
Dairy Queen
Business of the Week
S,; " " Winner of a
v , . Complimentary
- Do� Frozen
SCake from

m . .*


SEE THIS SPECIAL SECTION FEATURED INSIDE


www.suwanneedemocrat.com,


W�Cy


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ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Managing Editor,
Susan K. Lamb, ext. 131
SSports Reporter,
Janet Schrader-Seccafico, ext. 134
* Reporter,
Yvette Hannon, ext. 130
* Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, ext. 132



ADVERTISING
* Retail Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
I Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
* Advertising Representative,
JoelTurner, ext. 109
M Advertising Representative,
Kathy Sasser, ext. 160
* Classified Advertising Manager /
Telesales Ad Representative,
Myrtle Parnell, ext. 103
I Classified/Legal,
Louise Sheddan, ext. 102
I Classified/Legal,
Elizabeth Halloran, ext. 100


CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
1 Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $30 Out-of-county, $40





Semmrora


Serving Suwannee
County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$30 in county, $40 out of county and
$40 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


Editor's note: The Suwan-
nee Democrat prints the en-
tire arrest record each week.
If your name appears here
and you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be happy to
make note of this in the news-
paper when judicial proof is
presented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriffs Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police
Department.
FDLE-Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway Pa-
trol.
DOT-Department of Trans-
portation
P and P-Probation and Pa-
role
Jan. 20, Dennis Allen, 40,
Cape Coral, possession of
cocaine - two counts, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia -
two counts, possession of
less than 20 grams cannabis,
attempt to manufacture
cannabis, possession of pre-
scription drugs with intent to
sell, SCSO T.K. Roberts.
Jan. 20, Kenneth Cooks, 35,
618 Walker Ave., violation of
probation on original charges
of possession of cocaine, dri-
ving while license suspended,
P and P S. O'Hara.
Jan. 20, Robert Edward El-
lis, 49, 15384 CR 250, viola-
tion of probation on original
charge of driving while li-
cense permanently revoked,
SCSO S. Law.
Jan. 20, Algie Scott, 51,
Sneeds, return for court, vio-
lation of probation on origi-
nal charge of felony retail
theft, SCSO S. Law.
Jan. 20, James McGuire
Thomas, 24, Lake Butler,
failure to appear on original
charges of grand theft III
specified property, felony
criminal mischief, SCSO S.
Law.
Jan. 20, Hector Vega-
Agapito, 31, 9993 80th Terr.,
aggravated battery, SCSO
T.E. Roberts.
Jan. 21, Bonnie Lee Bur-
den, 33, White Springs, bat-
tery FHP J. Clark.
Jan. 21, Brandon Tyler
Foster, 20. Wooster, Ohio, vi-
olation of probation on origi-
nal charges of possession of
controlled substance, posses-
sion of marijuana, SCSO T.
Smith.
Jan. 21, Charles Douglas
Franklin, 85, Tallahassee, ag-


gravated assault with motor
vehicle, throwing deadly
missile, SCSO S. Larney.
Jan. 21, Curtis Eugene
Jackson, 43, 12910 US 90
West, No. 100, violation of
probation on original charges
of burglary, grand theft
(Leon County), P and P J.D.
Holton.
'Jan. 21, Jeannie Lorraine
Love, 36, Ft. White, bond
surrendered on original
charges of possession of
methamphetamine, manufac-
ture of methamphetamine,
trafficking in methampheta-
mine, manufacture of
cannabis, aggravate child
abuse, SCSO T. Lee.
Jan. 21, Martin Wesley
Lowe Jr., 23, 20300 68th St.,
sentenced to 10 days on
weekends, SCSO H. Tucker.
Jan. 21, Theodore Richard-
son, 30, 199 Johnson Blvd.,
criminal mischief, FHP J.
Clark.
Jan. 22, Percy Lee Owens,
19, 826 Eighth St., posses-
sion of cocaine, possession
of cannabis, possession of
narcotic paraphernalia, viola-
tion of probation on original
charges of possession of co-
caine and cannabis, LOPD D.
Slaughter.
Jan. 22, Robert Earl Scott,
27, Suwannee St., possession
of cocaine with intent to sell,
possession of cannabis, pos-
session of narcotic parapher-
nalia, violation of probation
on original charges of pos-
session of cocaine/ posses-
sion of cannabis, LOPD D.
Slaughter:
Jan. 23, Sharon Elaine
Giles, 44, 215 Woods Ave.,
violation of probation on
original charge of sale of co-
caine, failure to appear on
original charge of no drivers
license, violation of proba-
tiond'trorig'ih�l'chargff at-
tached tag not assigned, ex-
pired tag over six months, no
drivers license, LOPD D.
Slaughter.
Jan. 23, Deborah Snyder
Klotzsche, 49, Ft. White,
possession of cocaine, pos-
session of less than 20 grams
marijuana, SCSO B. Akey.
Jan. 23, Rory Carl Thomas,
44, Gainesville, driving
while license suspended or
revoked, possession of co-
caine, possession of less than
20 grams marijuana, SCSO
B. Akey.
Jan. 24, Jose Mendez Cruz,
42, 520 Helvenston St., dis-
orderly intoxication, LOPD
T. Rodriguez.


Touchton's


Sales * Service * Installation
10156 U.S. Hwy. 90 East, Live Oak,
[ Commitment to Excellence
Owners: Jan www.Touchtons.com
& Sarah Touchton CAC058747
133220JRS-F


- i HMI E IE I1



Plajaj Locji,,n 54 E Hw:, ard Str ct 135, 362-1244
S,:uilh O .J Square Lo, nallr. 1521:1 S Oh]i:, ,i 't, 362-2591
Medical Equipment Dis: I3861 362-44I14
Houbr. S.30 am-6.30 PhM MulonFri., S.3u amin3.i . pm Sat.
by Kathy Fletcher, PharmD Drive-up window

Gallstones Prevention and Treatment
Gallstones form inside the gallbladder when the digestive juices become
solid rather than liquid. These stones are typically made up of cholesterol and
bile salts. Researchers indicate more than 20 million Americans have
gallstones but that over half of those who have gallstones never know the
stones are there. However, when one or more stones move from the
gallbladder and get stuck in the bile duct passageway, they experience what
we refer to as a gallbladder attack. For some reason, women are much more
likely to develop gallstones than are men. Obesity is a risk factor and health
experts claim that losing weigh reduces the risk of stone formation. The
symptoms include nausea and vomiting and pain in the back between the
shoulder blades or under the shoulder. The pain is described as being steady
and severe in the upper abdomen. In many instances, the attack follows a
meal that is high in fat.
Surgical removal of the stones by way of laparoscopic technique after
having one or more attacks is recommended as the treatment of choice by
many physicians. An alternative to surgery is a stone dissolving drug called
ursodiol (Actigall). The drug may take months of treatment to completely
dissolve stones in the gallbladder. Ultrasound evaluation may be used to see
if stones do dissolve. 133235JRS-F


Jan. 24, Crystal Karen Hill,
21, 12910 US 90 West Lot
58, order imposing sanction
sentenced to six days in
county jail, SCSO D. Falgo-
ut.
Jan. 24, Patricia Ann McK-
night, 50, Branford, bond re-
vocation, SCSO T. Roberts.
Jan. 24, Stephen Ashley
Lapidus, 20, Trenton, bur-
glary, grand theft III - two
counts, dealing in stolen
property, SCSO S.Law.
Jan. 24, Scott K. Logan,
30, 3467 Tower Rd., viola-
tion of probation on original
charge of burglary 'of a
dwelling, grand theft - two
counts, possession of short
barrel shot gun, SCSO D.
Falgout.
Jan. 24, Jennifer Anne
McMillan, 19, 8998 58th
Pass, violation of probation
on original charge of grand
theft - two counts, uttering
forgery (Columbia County),
SCSO D. Downing.
Jan. 24, Terry McDaniel,
42, Lee, writ of bodily at-
tachment, SCSO D. Falgout.
Jan. 24, Michaela John
Solomon, 20, 8786 98th
Place, order imposing sanc-
tions sentenced to five days in
county jail, SCSO D. Falgout.
Jan. 24, Comeneche Nicole
Walker, 20, 608 Scriven Ave.
NW, violation of probation
on original charge of driving
while license suspended,
SCSO D. Downing.


The Family

CAFE Bistro

comes to

Lake City

Jan. 29
The Family CAFE Bistro
a free cont'erence tor stu-
dents and adults with dis-
abilities, their families and
friends will be held at the
Columbia County School
Board Administration Coin-
plex on Saturday, Jan. 29.
from S a.n to 12:30 p m. A
free continental breakfast
will be prolvded The regis-
tration deadline has passed.
For more information, call
FDLRS.Gateway toll free at
800-227-0050.





CASH 3 PLAY 4
1/24/05.. 0,8,2 1/24/05 . .3,4,5,9
FANTASY 5
1/24/05............ 1,7,8,22,32
MEGA MONEY ... 8,14,28,34,14
LOTTO ....... 7,24,33,35,40,43


Support Our Troops Prayer
Service, VA Medical Center,
Lake City Jan. 27
With the upcoming elec-
tions in Iraq and the chance for
increased terror activity, the
North Florida/South Georgia
Veterans Health System Chap-,
lain Service will hold Support
Our Troops Prayer Services at
both the Gainesville and Lake
City VA Medical Centers on
Thursday, Jan. 27 beginning at
Noon, at the flag pole area at
both facilities. The public is
invited to attend.

Lady of the Lake Quilters'
Guild will exhibit quilts at
the Columbia County
Library, Lake City
Jan. 26-Feb. 2I1
Attention: Quilters and
Lover of Quilts! The members
of the Lady of the Lake Quil-
ters' Guild will exhibit some
their quilts at the Columbia
County Library, 308 NW Co-
lumbia Avenue, Lake City
from. Jan. 26 until Feb. 21.
Come by for a visual treat!

Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley will hold volunteer
training in Jasper
Whether you like to 'work
with patients or "behind the
scenes," come and learn how
you can use your talents and
extra time to help those facing
a terminal illness. If you
would like to volunteer, please
join other volunteers for this
12-hour training series from 1-
4 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday,
\\ednesday and Friday, Feb.
14. 15, 16 and 18, at the Jasper
Public Library, 311 Hatley St.
NE. Jasper. Registration re-
qtilmed. To register or for more
info. contact Carolyn Long at
35h-752-9191.

Dog Obedience School
t ITD6WliigP ark"
begins Feb. 1
A 10-week school in dog
obedience training will be
held at Rumph Pavilion at
Camp Suwannee at Dowling
Park beginning Feb. 15 at 5
p in The cost is $20 for ACV
Inembers and $23 for non-
nmemnbers. The sessions are
open to the public. Register at
Copeland Community Center
ICCC) on Marvin Jones Blvd.
or call 386-658-5555. Upon
registering, request an instruc-
lion sheet. The instructor is
Gloria Gram, a certified dog
trainer. David Burch, CCC Di-
rector.

Lake City Speedway will
host the Florida Racers
Party of the Year! Jan. 28-30
Lake City Speedway will
host The Florida Racers Party
of the Year! Friday, Saturday
and Sunday, Jan. 28-30. Class-
es competing: non-winged


sprints, super late model,
mini-stocks-Florida-U.M.P.
Imca type modifieds, K.O.I L.
Legends, mini sprints, hobby
stock, pure stock and street
stock; Schedule of events:
Thursday, Jan. 27, 5-10 p.m.,
campers move in, music and
bonfire; Friday, Jan. 28, 10
a.m.-8:30 p.m. sign-in, hot
laps: all divisions 4-7 p.m.;
Qualifications: all cars, rene-
gade, four-car dashes, mini car
derby (Racers Party); Satur-
day, Jan. 29, gates open at 9
a.m., sign-in until 2 p.m., auc-
tion begins at 10 a.m., vintage
car races 11 a.m. -2 p.m., heat
races 2:30 p.m., big car demo
7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 30,
gates open at 10 a.m., church
service 10:30 a.m. features all
day starting at noon-entry fee
all classes: Pits - all four days
$45 or $20 per day; general
admission $15 per day or $35
for all three days, kids under
six free, six-12 $5 per day. For
rules and questions, call 812-
689-1046, 812-871-7728,
859-581-8579 or the track at
386-754-8800.

The Florida Museum of
Natural History will host a
Science Sunday lecture on
wild orchids Jan. 30
The Florida Museum of
Natural History in Gainesville
will host a Science Sunday
lecture on wild orchids by
Connie Bransilver, author .of
"Wild Love Affair: Essence of
Florida's Native Orchids,"
from 2-3 p.m. on Jan. 30. The
event is free and open to the
public. The Florida Museum
also will offer a new program
"Sunday Snoop," where muse-
um staff entertain children
ages 4-10 for an hour with fun
activities and a guided tour
while adults enjoy the lec-
ture/book signing. Registra-
"'tion for "SuindaN Snoop" is $5
and pre-registration is re-
quired. 'For more info or, to
register for "Sunday Snoop,"
call 352-846-2000, ext. 277.

Helping Hands Volunteer
Orientation Feb. 2
Make a difference in some-
one's life! After attending ori-
entation and completing the
screening process, you will be
eligible for volunteering in the
Hospice Attic thrift store, ad-
ministrative offices as well as
helping at special events, edu-
cational fairs, community
events and fund raising. You
must register for orientation.
Orientation will be held from
10-11 a.m. on Wednesday,
Feb. 2 (first Wednesday of
every month) at Hospice of
the Suwannee Valley, 618 SW
FL Gateway Drive, Lake City.
To register or for more info
contact Carolyn Long, 386-
752-9191.


. .. ..i.





IN CONCERT


Saturday, March 19, 2005

7:30 pm at the

Suwannee County Fair


Tickets on Sale


NOW!!
VIP & General Admission
Tickets available

Order by phone...

1,NOW taking Visa/MC

SI , Call for more info.

S,(386) 362-7366
138576-F


Arrest Record


BRIEFLY


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGE 2A






VWVlIC-Lul- 1S , IA l , SUWANNEE D- -OAK PAGE


Continued From Page 1A

teenager died, it's evident he
was a victim of the long ago
segregated South, where histo-
ry shows even in Suwannee
County, tolerance was not of-
ten abided by, being black and
young could be fatal, African
Americans feared exercising
their rights to vote, couldn't
eat in "white" restaurants,
couldn't use "white" re-
strooms and be considered
equal. That's changed today, a
fact noted during the service
as community members and a
history professor from FAMU
shared about Howard's life
and death. "These reflections
are not meant to cause people
to hate," said one woman.
"Anyone not rooted and
grounded in the Word of God
might do some of the same
things," she added reverently.
"We are a blessed people.
There was a reason, and we'll
understand by and by," anoth-
er woman said of Howard's
drowning. "The death of
Willie James Howard has only
served to make a people
stronger," said another.
Dr. Tameka Bradley-Hobbs
of FAMU said Howard was
among the many who lost


their lives during the struggle
to gain freedom for African-
Americans in America. "Death
is ...... a part of our past as
tragic as it is," Dr. Bradley-
Hobbs told the audience.
It was pointed out during
the memorial service that
when Howard died in the
Suwannee River, his body was
retrieved by order of the local
sheriff at that time and buried
without a marker or service. It
was said no story was pub-
lished in the local newspaper
about his death at the time nor
any obituary. But, those who
knew remembered where his
body was laid, and it was there
the headstone was placed and
local pastors brought commit-
tal words.
During the memorial sei-
vice for Howard, those present
sang Farther Along, a tradi-
tional Christian hymn:
Farther along, we'll know
all about it,
Farther along we'll under-
stand why,
Cheer up, my brother, live
in the sunshine;
We'll understand it all by
and by;
Tempted and tried, we're oft
made to wonder
Why it should be this all the


Cowboy


Suwannee County


Museum Chili


Challenge
The Suwannee County Mu-
seum Association is planning its
second Chili Challenge. The
event will be held on Saturday,
Jan. 29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on the loading dock of the old
Atlantic Coastline Freight De-
pot.
This year there will be three classes in the competition.
Restaurants and businesses will compete for a handsome
trophy. Civic organization will compete for cash prize of
$100. This year, individuals will compete, in their own
class, for a trophy. There will also be trophies for the Peo-
ple's Choice Award and for the best presentation (table dec-
oration).
There will be entertainment and an art exhibit by the Live
Oak Artist Guild.
Chili must be prepared and heated to 140 degrees F. when
competitors check in. The temperature of the chili will be
checked before the judging. You may use crock-pots or hot
plates to keep your chili up to temperature. Electrical out-
lets are available.
If you have questions about the Chili Challenge, please
call 386-362-1776 and ask for Carol or Richard. After
hours, please leave a message and we will get back to you.
Proceeds from the event will go to support the Suwannee
County Historical Museum.


day long,
While there are others living
about us,
Never molested, though in
the wrong
When we see Jesus.coming
in glory,
When He comes from His
home in the sky,
Then we shall meet Him in
that bright mansion,
We'll understand it all by
and by.
Joining the group by invita-
tion was Suwannee County
Sheriff Tony Cameron and
Suwannee Democrat Manag-
ing Editor Susan K. Lamb.
County Commissioner
Doug Udell was thanked for
his part in making the memor-
ial possible. Udell purchased a
granite headstone for
Howard's grave and had it en-
graved. After the service at
Springfield, the group moved
to Eastside Cemetery where
the headstone was placed and
a proper committal was given
for the teenager who never
had a proper burial until 61
years and 14 days after his
tragic death.
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan.lamb@ gaflnews. com,


Continued From Page 1A

God had a purpose for him.
His passion now is saving
souls.
The church first met in the
old Antioch Woman's Club.
But when the owner died, new
owners had plans for the
property that didn't include
the church. Someone men-
tioned the land on SR 51 was
available, and the church was
able to buy it. There were a
few acres and a building that
is now the church sanctuary.
Galloway had many obsta-
cles in the way of his goal to
build a new church home.
First; he had to get the land re-
zoned. When the church
bought it, it had been recently
zoned commercial. But, ac-
cording to Galloway, through
several miracles, the re-zon-
ing was accomplished.
Then, Galloway discovered
another legal problem involv-
ing back taxes that could have
led to the church losing the
property. But, another miracle
later and more aid from God,
the money was found to pay
all the back taxes and save the
property.
After all this, Galloway be-


came sick. "I was praying
about our new building," Gal-
loway said. "About the time, I
was stricken with cancer. We'd
already taken up around
$18,000 for the building."
Plans for the new church
were put on hold as Galloway
fought for his life. Galloway
defeated cancer in the face of a
deadly prognosis. He's been
cancer free for three years and
with a loan from First Federal,
the new fellowship hall is
ready to go up.
Galloway's church is some-
times called a "cowboy
church." On any given Sunday,
you can walk through the doors
for the 11 a.m. service and find
the majority of the men wear-
ing cowboy boots and that in-
cludes Galloway and his two
sons.
Galloway said he has always
had horses. He was raised on a
dairy and his father was a
horseman. Galloway currently
has too many horses, according
to wife Bonnie. He has seven.
"I'm constantly fussed at
about how many horses I
have," Galloway mourned. "I
had the best childhood imagin-
able. I grew up on horseback,
and I loved to watch Roy
Rogers. It was a sad day for me
when I realized I couldn't wear
my six gun on my hip."
The church flock has grown
some since Galloway won his
battle with cancer.
"The church is excited
again," Galloway said. "We're
constantly looking at the door
to see who's coming in."
Because it's a small church,
Bonnie Galloway feels many
people looking for a church


home pass them by. "It's a
shame that people pass us up
because we don't have a big
fine building," Bonnie said.
Well, as soon as the permits
are issued, that will be all in
the past. A 60'x40' fellowship
hall sits awaiting Gamble
Construction to put into place.
After the fellowship hall, Gal-
loway plans a new church
sanctuary.
Even with all the excite-


ment in the church because of
the new building and his
amazing recovery from can-
cer, Galloway's main focus is
still on Jesus Christ. "Make
this story about Jesus," Gal-.
loway said. "That's what's
important."
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
386-362-1734 ext. 134
or by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews. com.


Road


Continued From Page 1A

filed by the Suwannee County
Sheriffs Office on the inci-
dent, the Marshall followed
Franklin off the interstate
westbound onto US 90.
Deputy ,.Shawn Larney said.
the Marshall was trying to get
Franklin's tag number and had
the Florida Highway Patrol
on the phone the entire time.
Franklin drove about 10 miles
westbound before turning
around near the Suwannee
River State Park, Larney said,
then headed eastbound on US
90, the Marshall behind him
the entire time. Franklin
pulled over in the area of Fal-
mouth Springs where the
Marshall pulled his vehicle in
front of him. Franklin, ac-
cording to Larney, drove


away and continued east-
bound to just beyond the Fal-
mouth Crossing store where
Franklin told Larney he was
tired of being followed so he
turned his vehicle around and
faced it westbound in the
eatbo'itnd . l.a~ue ,of traffic.
Franklin told Larney the Mar-
shall stopped his vehicle, but
began to "inch towards him,"
so Franklin "rammed him
head-on" with his vehicle,
causing extensive damage to
both vehicles.
Bystanders at the scene said
once the Marshall showed his
badge, Franklin hit the ground
and remained there as a Flori-
da Department of Agriculture
officer, then deputies and lat-
er a FHP trooper arrived at the
scene.
One bystander said when he


got to the scene, Franklin was
"beating on" the Marshall, but
at that time, the bystander said
he didn't know the man was an
Air Marshall. A report of a gun
being involved kept the
Suwannee County Fire/Rescue
units from approaching the
scene until it j a seculed.
No. one reported injuries
and no one was transported to
the hospital.
Franklin was charged with
aggravated assault with a mo-
tor vehicle and throwing a
deadly missile at a vehicle.
Franklin was taken to the
Suwannee County Jail where
he's being held on the
charges.
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan.lamb@gaflnews.com.


Instead of usng



that ice pack,




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-,,. - .--



Pastor Dale Galloway is an electrifying speaker filled with energy
and the love of God. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


61 Years


PAGE 3A


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


E E DAYJANUARY 26 2 5






PAGE 4A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"Be not forgetful to entertain

strangers: for thereby
some have entertained

angels unawares."
--Hebrews 13:2


umwauunnere remnrat
MYRA C. REGAN errors l te Suwanne
Publisher Democrat editorial bor ard e Myra
C Regan, publisher, and Susan K
SUSAN K. LAMB Lamb, managing editor. Our
Managing Editor View is formed by that board.

OUR VEIW

Let's take personal

responsibility for

our own garbage
Suwannee County roadsides are looking pretty
nasty. Yes, that's right, nasty, as in trash and
household garbage. It's everywhere. It's on the
sides of the roads all over Suwannee County.
There are cardboard boxes, pieces of paper, plastic
bags, Styrofoam cups, cans and large samplings oj
whatever has started out as household garbage
headed to local collection centers but just never
made the entire trip. Plastic bags hang from tree
limbs, waving to all who pass by in the winter
wind.
Roads leading to some of the collection centers
around the county are particularly effected as bags
of household garbage fall off vehicles on the way
to the centers. Somehow, no one ever notices
they've just lost one, two or three bags of garbage
or even entire large boxes.
Who is responsible for picking up this household
garbage and trash? You? The county? Inmates?
Strangers?
There was a day when groups banded together
and spent an occasional Saturday morning out
picking up trash on the sides of rgads' as 'ia gesture
of good will. That seems to have faded, although
some groups still do carry out their promises on
occasion.
Some senior citizens; armed with trash bags or
cans, sticks with pointed ends bounce along the
roads on golf carts, trying to keep their neighbor-
hoods clean. A special thanks to these folks.
But, back to the problem.....who is responsible
for keeping this trash picked up? Why, it's you!
You knew that, didn't you? When you get to the
collection center and you're short a bag or two of
household garbage, or the box your new refrigera-
tor came in is gone, you know what happened.
Even if you don't go back then, you can take that
route upon returning home and look for those bags
and actually stop, get out and gather up your own
garbage. You say, it's dangerous, you might get
dirty, your friends might see you? Well, hopefully
they will and admire you for what you're doing
and feel compelled to do the same the next time
their garbage count is short when they arrive at the
collection center.
Of course, we're making light, just a bit, of a
very serious situation here to get your attention.
It's just not right to fling your garbage in the back
of your pickup and hit the road at 70 mph, letting
the garbage fly out and splat, hit the side of the
road and scatter everywhere and then remain there
for someone else to have to pick up.
Suwannee County is beautiful and our citizens
care about how our county looks. Making a better
effort to get to the collection centers with the
garbage would greatly enhance the chances of re-
duction of garbage along side the roadways.
When spring arrives and the grass starts to grow,
the county will have to pay to have all this garbage
picked up so the' mowers can do their job without
sending the litter everywhere in millions of tiny
pieces. This costs money.
The people can reduce this problem by being
more careful and then if there is an accident and
garbage bags fall off vehicles on the way to the
collection centers, stopping to reclaim your own
garbage.
Keep Suwannee County beautiful, be responsible
and make sure your garbage gets to the collection
centers, not on the sides of the roads.

Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


Now that the elections are
over, there's little political gain . :
to for demagoguery over about I ,,.
jobs, but let's prepare ourselves
for the next time. Losing a job
means a financial crunch and ,.
readjustment regardless of the
source of job loss. If it's not ,20
from an economic down turn, BY WALTE
the loss might be a result of out-
sourcing, but much more likely, it's a result of tech-
nological innovation. Job destruction and job creation
through natural market forces is are enriching. Call-
ing for Congress to save or create jobs is to court dis-
aster.
Let's look at a bit of job job-loss history. Anthony
B. Bradley, a research associatefellow, at the Grand
Rapids, Mich.-based Acton Institute, has written an
article on the subject, "Productivity and the Ice Man:
Understanding Outsourcing." Citing research from
the work of Forrester Research Inc., a technology re-
search firm, Mr. Bradley says, "Of the 2.7 million
jobs lost over the past three years, only 300,000 have
resulted from outsourcing." Job losses and job gains
have always been a part of our history.
Let's look at some of the history of job loss de-
scribed in Mr. Bradley's article. We might also pon-
der whether measures should have been taken to save
those these jobs. In 1858, Lyman Blake patented his
a shoemaking machine that ultimately destroyed jobs
hand making shoes. In 1919, General Motors started
selling Frigidaire. As Bradley says, "This 'electric ice
box' wiped out a whole set of occupations, including
ice-box manufacturers, ice gatherers, and the manu-
facturers of the tools and equipment needed to handle
large blocks of ice." "electric ice box" wiped out mil-
lions of jobs in the ice industry, including those of ice
box manufacturers, ice gatherers, manufacturers of
the tools and equipment needed to handle large
blocks of ice, and many other jobs involved in the
care of horses and wagons
Auto manufacturers use thousands of robots for
tasks that people used to do such as spot welding,
painting, machine loading, parts transfer, and assem-
bly. Robots have replaced thousands of workers in
electronic assembly and mounting microchips on cir-
cuit boards, reports Bradley.
We could probably think of hundreds of jobs that ei-
ther don't exist or exist in far fewer numbers than in
the past -jobs such as elevator operator, TV repair-
man and coal deliveryman. "Creative destruction" is
a discovery process where we find ways to produce
goods and services more cheaply. That in turn makes


thi s week in the democrat


The first month of the New Year is almost
past and many of us are asking where did
the time go. New Year's resolutions and in
my case suggestions have either taken hold
or been cast aside. One young woman that
works for me comes in each day with a new
story to tell about her resolution to get
healthier this year. One day she came in and
could hardly walk from all the exercise. To-
day, she's telling us to "release the endor-
phins" and is full of energy. I tell this story
simply to illustrate there are many facets to
life and we need to enjoy each one. As for
me, I'm holding my own and struggling
each day to eat healthier and I'll start exer-
cising as soon as it warms up or cools
down, or .....
Things I need to tell you about in this
week's Suwannee Democrat are many
faceted as well. Take a look inside, I'm sure
you'll find something to read and enjoy as
you walk the treadmill.
The Suwannee County Museum Associa-
tion is planning its second Chili Challenge.
.The event will be held this Saturday, Jan.
29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the loading
dock of the old Atlantic Coastline Freight
Depot. This year there will be three classes
in the competition. Proceeds from the event
will go to support the Suwannee County
Historical Museum. See page 3A for de-
tails.
See page 7B for information about the
Florida Prepaid College Plan. Florida fami-
lies can lock in the cost of college right now
and avoid paying the 7.5 percent hike in
university tuition recommended this week.
The application deadline this year is Mon-
day, Jan. 31, 2005.
Race fans can expect pre-race coverage of


Speedweeks 2005 each week in the Suwan-
nee Democrat. Our "Racing Zone" pages
are full of racing news close to home since
Daytona is less than three hours away. Lots
of Suwannee County folks attend races
each year and tell me they enjoy reading
about upcoming events. See pages 6-8B.
There's lots more sports news, closer to
home inside today's Suwannee Democrat
sports section starting on page lB.
Three Suwannee High School art students
are winners in the 19th Annual Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire Student Art and Essay Con-
test. More than 300 kindergarten through
high school students from surrounding
counties submitted artwork based on the
medieval theme "The Adventures of King
Arthur." See the winners listed, page 6A.
In Suwannee County several agencies, or-
ganizations and individuals have formed a
committee to plan Step Up, Florida events.
Suwannee County's participation in Step
Up, Florida will take place on Feb. 5. "Step
Up, Florida - On our way to healthy living!"
is a statewide initiative promoting physical
activity and healthy lifestyles to Florida's
citizens ard visitors. See details page 7A
Be sure to see Friday's Democrat as we
bring you "2004 In Review." This special
feature will give you a recap of news and
events in Suwannee County as we lived,
worked and played through the times of our
lives, in this place we call home.
Until next time . . . keep reading and "re-
lease the endorphins."
Myra C. Regan, publisher
Suwannee Democrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 x 122
www. suwanneedemocrat. com


A
MINORITY
VIEW


005 Creators Syndicate
;R WILLIAMS


us all richer.
That same principle applies
when it's outsourcing serving
as the engine for creative de-
struction. Daniel W. Drezner,
assistant professor of political
science at the University of
Chicago, discusses outsourcing
in "The Outsourcing Bogey-
man," (Foreign Affairs,


May/June 2004). Professor Drezner reports that for
every dollar spent on outsourcing to India, the United
States reaps between $1.12 and $1.14 in benefits.
Why? U.S. firms save money and become more prof-
itable, benefiting shareholders and increasing returns
on investment. In the process, U.S. workers are real-
located to more competitive, mostly better-paying
jobs.
Drezner also points out that large software compa-
nies such as Microsoft and Oracle have increased out-
sourcing and used the savings for investment and
larger domestic payrolls. Nationally, 70,000 comput-
er programmers lost their jobs between 1999 and
2003, but more than 115,000 computer software en-
gineers found higher-paying jobs during that same
period. By the way, when outsourcing doesn't work,
companies backtrack, as have Dell and Lehman
Brothers, who which have moved some of their call
centers back to the United States from India because
of customer complaints.
The last election campaign featured great angst
over the loss of manufacturing jobs. The number of
U.S. manufacturing jobs has fallen, but it has little to
do with outsourcing and a lot to do with technologi-
cal innovation - and it's a worldwide phenomenon.
During the last seven years from 1995 through 2002,
Drezner notes, U.S. manufacturing employment fell
by 11 percent. Globally, manufacturing jobs fell by 11
percent. China lost 15 percent of its manufacturing
jobs, and Brazil lost 20 percent. But guess what.
Globally, manufacturing output rose by 30 percent
during the same period. Technological progress is the
primary cause for the decrease in manufacturing jobs.
What should a person do when innovation or inter-
national trade costs him his job? Do what the iceman
did when Frigidaire cost him his job. Instead of call-
ing on Congress to enact job protectionist measures,
he did what was necessary to find another job.
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at
George Mason University. To find out more about
Walter E. Williams and read features by other Cre-
ators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Cre-
ators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


COMMENTARY

Should we save jobs?


PAGE 4A


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5A




JUWANNEE LIVING


Ash - Bass


plan April 16 vows
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ash of Mayo are pleased to announce the
approaching marriage of their daughter, Sandy, to Clint Bass, the
son of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Bass of Live Oak.
Sandy is a 1993 graduate of Lafayette High School, graduated
in 1997 with a B.S. degree and in 2002 with her Master's. She is
a first grade teacher at Lafayette Elementary School.
Clint is a 1993 graduate of Suwannee High School. He is a
plant operator with Progressive Energy at the Suwannee Plant.
A wedding is being planned for April 16, 2005 at Mt. Paran
Baptist Church.


Alfred Lloyd Hughes III and Lindsey Marie Williams

Williams - Hughes

to wed March 12
Lindsey Marie Williams and Alfred Lloyd Hughes III invite you
to share in celebration on their wedding day, Saturday, March 12,
2005, at 3 p.m. The ceremony will take place at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park in White Springs.
The bride-elect is the daughter of Richard C. and Juana Williams
of Jasper. Paternal grandparents, are Carlie and Alethia Williams of
Jasper. Maternal grandparents are Shirley D. Allen and the late
Bryant Allen Jr. of Jasper.
Lindsey is a 2001 graduate of Hamilton County High School and
received her Registered Nursing degree from Lake City Commulity
College. She is currently employed by Lake City Medical Center.
The future groom is the son of Alfred L. Hughes Jr. of Bumsville,
N.C., and Hope J. Hughes of Live Oak. Paternal grandparents are Al-
fred L. Hughes Sr. and the late Sarah B. Hughes of Madison. Mater-
nal grandparents are Geneva Fennell of Flint, Mich., and the late
James C. Jones Sr.
Al is 1991 graduate of Suwannee County High School. He re-
ceived an A.A. degree from North Florida Junior College in 1994
and a B.S. degree in criminology from Florida State University in
1996. He is currently employed by Madison Correctional Institution
as a classifications officer and is a reserve deputy with the Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office.
No local invitations will be sent.



Santa %\ ishesi to lhank the following angels fio their gen-
erous donate rons and continuing support for our annual
Christm.as project.
Think ,ou to. Li\c. Oak .Clev. e\. NMohlc 's( Cui.om
Cuti. John Pa.rkler - Stit. nrnee \Valle'. Title Set-, ices. K.iy at
Dr Arthur'-, office. Stephanie Ljid,, at the Li, e Oak Po-
lice Departnmenm. Suir.'.iiMan \.ille\ Quiliei' ' Guild, jand
Sandia ILiasi-. attorney. .
Your i.ener,.,sii, and love intake children happy) eier:,
,,ear Mla, God blesi vou 10 fold for v.jiha ,ou do
April and Da.id Pinkard



The family of Louise Brannan would like to thank our com-
munity, our town, our church and our friends for all the love and
support for us in this sorrowful period of our lives. We appreci-
ate each and everyone of you. Thank you and God bless you.
The Brannan's
Bobby Sr., Regina, Gwen, Bobby Jr. and Terry


If tears could build-a stairway, and
memories a lane. I would walk right
to heaven and bring you home again.
I l,.', i , 'l ,lnI. l i#,li i.' I , ' i ,l i lllu/
D ad II. i/it lti. . ' i t [t 'a I ,.I ._ Jt i il



H/./.lll, Bnil,,hi\ D..&I. ;


S 4-
t' ;;j.


( ii,~i*,l


Clint Bass and Sandy Ash


19th Annual
Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire
comes to life in
Gainesville on
Jan 29-30 and
Feb. 4-6
The Alachua County Fair-
grounds come to life as the
19th Annual Hoggetowne Me-
dieval Faire brings the magic
of the past to Gainesville. Join
hundreds of actors, artisans
and volunteers for two week-
ends of merriment Jan. 29-30
and Feb. 4-6. Faire hours are
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
and Sundays and 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Friday. Admission is
$10 for adults, $5 for children
ages 5-17 and free for children
4 and younger. For more infor-
mation call 352-334-ARTS or
v i s i t
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.


,-
I.2







Jordan Anne Tessier

Happy 1 st

Birthday

Jordan Anne

Tessier
Daddy's Little Angel. God has rich I,
blessed us with your arrival. You are the
apple of our eye.
Love,
Mom, Dad, Grannie Wilma, Grannie
Betty and brothers, Shannon, Aaron
and Josh.


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Welcome to a free seminar on the iedcitation
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Thursday, January 27
6:30-10:00 pm

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Saturday, January 29
1:30-5:00 pm
LAKE CITY
PUBLIC LIBRARY
1t' i' , '. .. ,i ma eou
Sunday, January 30
7:30-5:00 pm
HIGH SPRINGS
BRANCH LIBRARY
1 ii V 1 W '.er,1 nu1 .


Free of Charge - Beneficial for persons of all beliefs
Oeffred bi authorizeJ representatives, cof Sant Thakar Singh

(386) 842-2221 or 1-877-MEDITATE '. . '. , /'-. ,.,
www.knowthyselfassoul.org ' ' F u t h e a s
a i ,' f r. non-secrarian organization
137173-F


: Love, Alommiy, Daddl and famil


Douglas an4d haree e/n/ey celebrate
50th wedding anniversary,
On Saturday, Jan. 29, between the hours of 2-3:30 p.m. in
the afternoon, their children remind you of a reception to
honor their 50th wedding anniversary at the Live Oak Garden
Club.
No gifts, please
Melanie and Bill Kretzman
Beverly and Mike Commander
Doug and Belinda Cheney


Lordy, Lordy,


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Compassion


OBITUARIES


Laurence Kenneth Smith
May 5, 1912 -
Jan.22,2005

L aurence Kenneth
Smith, 92, of Live
Oak, entered into rest
on Saturday, Jan. 22, 2005, at
the residence of his daughter in
Martinez, Ga. A native of En-
deavor, Wisc., he lived in Live
Oak for the last 20 years.
Smith was a graduate of the
University of Iowa. He served
in the U.S. Army as a Captain.
Smith was always active in
Christian service and from
1974 to 1977 he served with
the Wycliffe Bible Translators
in Brazil. He retired as vice-
president and actuary with
Mutual Trust Life Insurance
Company. Smith was an asso-
ciate member of Bixler Memo-
rial Church in Dowling Park
and Calvary Community
Church in Williams Bay, Wisc.
Survivors include his son,
Laurence A. Smith of New
Berlin, Wisc.; daughters, Dr.
Sharon Smith McCormick of
Green Mountain Falls, Colo.
and Carolyn Jean Ziegler of
Martinez, Ga.; his brother, Dr.
Roland T. Smith of Gulfport,
Miss.; five grandchildren; and
three great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
held later at Bixler Memorial
Church, Dowling Park. Burial
will be in Bixler Memorial
Gardens East in Dowling Park.
Memorials may be made to
Calvary Community Church,
P.O. Box 1200, Williams Bay,
WI 53191 or to Bixler Memo-
rial Church, P.O. Box 4314,
Dowling Park, FL 32064.
Thomas Poteet and Son of
Augusta, Ga. is in charge of all
arrangements.





J and i

Bait &

i~ Ckle_
All types of baits
including minnows
and shiners
Hwy. 252 31st Road 1''
Taylorville, FL
c "L- 32094
S(386) 9631444 ~


Sincere


Daniels,
Director


Elizabeth R. Searls
Sept. 30, 1919 -
Jan. 19, 2005

Slizabeth R. Searls,
85, of Yellville, Ark.,
passed away on
Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2005, at
North Arkansas Medical Cen-
ter, Harrison, Ark. The Butler,
Penn. native previously
resided in Live Oak and re-
tired as a floral designer. She
was a member of the Peel Full
Gospel Church and a member
of the Palm Harbor Chapter,
Order of the Eastern Star.
Survivors include two sons,
Dale Riddle of Virginia
Beach, Va. and Ernest Riddle
of Tarpon Springs; six daugh-
ters, Ann Quick of Yellville,
Ark., Barbara Pozek of Kim-
berling City,' Mo., Louise
Goldsmith of Austin, Texas,
Linda Brennan of Jack-
sonville, Ruth Lemmons of
Holiday, and Wanda Lem-
mons of Alabama; one broth-
er, Richard Sedoris, of Merid-
ian, Pa.; 14 grandchildren;
and eight great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her parents and husband,
James W. Searls.
Graveside services will be
conducted at 2 p.m. on Thurs-
day, Jan. 27, at Live Oak
Cemetery, Live Oak, with the
Rev. Wilbur Woods officiat-
ing.
In lieu of flowers, family
requests donations to Ameri-
can Cancer Society, 1599
Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA
30329.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.


John L. Sullivan
Oct. 9, 1929 -
Jan. 13, 2005

Y ohn L Sullivan, 75,
of Live Oak, passed
away on Thursday,
Jan. 13, 2005 in Shands at
Live Oak Hospital. A native
of Chicago, Ill., he made
Live Oak his home eight
years ago moving from Cas-
selberry. A U.S. Army veter-
an, he was of the Baptist
faith and a truck driver.
Survivors include his wife,
Shirle Usher Sullivan of
Live Oak; one daughter,
Michaelynn Johnson of Live
Oak; one brother, Albert
Halper of Apopka; three
grandchildren; and for great-
grandchildren.
Graveside services were
held at 3 p.m. on Friday, Jan.
21 in All Faiths Memorial
Park, Casselberry.
Suwannee Funeral Home,
Live Oak served the Sullivan
family.


DEATH
NOTICE
Cora Lee Coppedge
March 11, 1931 -
Jan. 22, 2005

C ora Lee Coppedge,
73, of O'Brien
passed away on Sat-
urday, Jan. 22, 2005 in the
Surrey Place Care Center in
Live Oak after a long illness.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Branford was in charge of all
arrangements.


OH-SO swEET

f UFFE


-PAGE 7D


Stone Serious,
Behind Domino's Pizza, Lake City,* (386) 755-5600

20 oz. C02 . , ' , .L Weekly
:Oo-02-: Woods
Ball
$25.95 S^^' ^^
.Paintball Special
w/Air & 4 Orings 5 Case
*53.00 savings 2000
"We are Stone Serious about price"


James
"Jim " B.
Daniels, III,
Funeral Director


-


* Personal Service


* A name you can trust

DANIELS FUNERAL HOMES
Live Oak Branford
S. 416 E. Howard St. 408 Suwannee Ave.
386-362-4333 386-935-1124
Web Page: www.danielsfuneralhome.com ' E-Mail: danielsfuneralhome@hotmail.com
UI


Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
proudly presents
The 57th Annual Meeting and Installation
Banquet, Dinner and Entertainment
with Special Guest Speaker Luther Beauchamp,
Lawyer, Humorist and Author
Thursday,
February 10, 2005
6:30 pm at the
First Baptist Church,
Family Ministry
Building
$25.00 per person
RSVP by 2/,/2005
For More Info mation call
.the Chamber at 362-3071
(table and guest speaker
sponsorships available)
137345DH-F


VENTURE CREW RECEIVES RELIGIOUS AWARDS: After months of studying and preparation
eight members of the Venture Crew 693 Scouts received their God and Life religious awards Jan.
9 during the Sunday morning worship service at First Advent Christian Church. The crew mem-
bers and mentors would like to thank pastor Tim Carver for taking the time to worship, train and
guide the youth throughout the program. A special thank you to the family of the late Bill Mor-
ris for the generous donation in his memory to purchase the religious medals for the crew. Pic-
tured I - r, Venture Crew members Rickie Hannon, Katie Hughes, Lynn Papapetrou, Rhiannon
Roach, Angela Zimmerman and Robert Roach. Not pictured Danny Hunter and Walter Roach.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon

Hoggetowne Medieval Faire Student

Art and Essay Contest local winners


Please join the City of
Gainesville in recognizing our
region's winners of the 19th
Annual Hoggetowne Medieval
Faire Student Art and Essay
Contest. More than 300
kindergarten through high
school students from Alachua
and surrounding counties sub-
mitted artwork based on the
medieval theme "The adven-
tures of King Arthur." The
works include two-dimension-
al and three-dimensional
pieces such as paintings and
castles, as well as creative
writings submitted for the es-
say portion of the contest.
We hope you will visit the
Alachua County Library Head-
quarters to view the works of
the 52 winners. This display
will be featured in downtown
Gainesville through Feb. 2.
During the Faire, the works of
all 300 students will be dis-
played in the Student Art and
Essay area, located in front of
the covered pavilion. At the
Royal Court on Saturday, Jan.


29 at 2:30 p.m., the King and
Queen of Hoggetowne will
hold a special awards ceremo-
ny to honor each of the win-
ners. Our sponsor, Campus
USA Credit Union, will pre-
sent three $50 Savings Bonds
to the Grand Prize Winners.
Fifty-six prizes will be pre-
sented to the first-, second- and
third-place winners of six dif-
ferent age groups.
This incredibly popular
show will enchant Gainesville
for two consecutive weekends,
Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6, at the
Alachua County Fairgrounds.
Faire hours are Friday from 9-
4, and Saturdays and Sundays
from 10-6. Admission is $8 for


adults and $4 for children ages
5-17; Friday admission is half
price. Advance tickets are
available at Omni Bookstore
on 34th Street. For more infor-
mationr, iisit our Web site 'at
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org or
call 352-334-ARTS.
Two-dimensional art catego-
ry
High School
Third Place: Danielle Byer-
ly, Suwannee High School
Third Place: Heath Spicer,
Suwannee High School
Three-dimensional art cate-
gory
High School
First Place: Angela DeBono,
Suwannee High School


INFO RMATION
WHO: City of Gainesville
WHAT: the King and Queen of 19th Annual Hoggetowne Me-
dieval Faire Student Art and Essay Contest will hold a special
awards ceremony to honor each of the winners
'WHEN: At the Royal Court on Saturday, Jan. 29 at 2:30 p.m.
WHERE: downtown Gainesville
CONTACT:. visit www.gvlculturalaffairs.org or call 352-334-ARTS


Local Boy Scouts of America, Suwannee River

Area Council honored 65 New Eagle Scouts


The Suwannee River Area
Council of the Boy Scouts of
America held its annual Eagle
Scout Banquet recognizing 65
Boy Scouts who earned their Ea-
gle Scout rank in 2004. The Ea-
gle Scout rank is the highest rank
in Boy Scouts and is attained by
less than four percent of the boys
who enter the Boys Scouts. The
Eagle Scout rank is a lifetime
achievement. An often cited fact
is that every man that has walked
on the moon is an Eagle Scout.
The Suwannee River Area
Boy Scout Council covers 13
counties in North Florida and
South Georgia and has 169


scouting units with more than
4,000 boys participating in
scouting activities.
Prior to the banquet the Eagle
Scouts showcased their commu-
nity projects, which were judged


by officials from the National
Eagle Scout Association.
The guest speaker at the Eagle
Scout Dinner was the former
Florida Senate President Mallo-
ry Home.


The family CAFE Bistro comes to Lake City


'The Family CAFE, a confer-
ence for individuals with disabil-
ities and the people who support
them, has been held yearly in
Orlando for six years. In May,
2004 over 7,000 people attend-
ed. This year regional confer-
ences are being held around the
state.
The regional conference for


Northeast Florida will be held at
the Columbia County School
Board Administration Complex,
on Saturday, Jan. 29, from 8 a.m.
to 12:30. p.m. A free continental
breakfast will be provided. The
registration deadline has passed.
For more information call
FDLRS/Gateway toll free at
800-227-0059.


Earned Income Tax Credit.


Did you know you might qualify for the Earned Income Tax Credit?
If you do, you could significantly increase your refund. H&R Block
always gets you the maximum refund you're entitled to, guaranteed. "'

386-362-3757
6826 Suwannee Plaza Lane, H&R OCK�
Wal-Mart Shopping Center, Live Oak, FL 32060
Additional fee disclosed at an interest rate, charged by H&R Bank, the lender. Limited availability based on credit acceptance. Those not qualifying for
Instant Money may qualify for a classic refund anticipation loan in as little as one day. At participating locations. �2004 H&R Block Tax Services, Inc.



i' .






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SMelody Christian Academy K3-12

* Revolution Youth Ministries

SNew Praise & Worship Radio WMLO 97.1


Hwy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800
19R~Afn.A


James B. Daniels, Jr
Founder
Our family serving yours since 1948.


Ask aron d. You [S 'llJS di scover s'b ~' why families
I al sinter ieafned


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGE 6A






WVL-NF!)flAY%. .IA- I , ru IR 2-, 20 UW NEEDEORA/IVE AKPAG.


A happy anniversary to my
husband. On Saturday he will
have been married 45 years. Oh,
yes, I'm that person he's been
married to all these years.
Wow! Tomorrow I'll be an-
other day older as well as anoth-
er year older. When you reach
my age, you don't celebrate,
you get on bended knees and
thank God you're still kicking!
Just kidding....well, maybe not!
One thing is certain, I now have
seniority at work...no one is old-
er than I am here at the Democ-
rat! There are few who are com-
ing on rapidly.
That brings up the birthday of
Candy McCallister. Someone
told me she turned the big 40 on
Sunday! Black balloons, her
photo (from much younger
days) in the paper, teasing by
her fellow employees....getting
older can be heck, Candy! But,
don't you let them get you
down. Just tell them to wait un-
til THEIR birthdays come
around! Some of those people
you work with are LOTS older
than you, Candy!
Welcome home to all the


Suwannee
The Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society (a no kill shelter)
and a limited space shelter.
They depends on adoptions for
availability of space. Adoption
fee of $45 includes spay/neuter,
deworming, heartworm/feline
(leukemia) testing and rabies
shot. Please visit the shelter, the
animals would love to meet
you. The shelter is located two
miles south of Lee in Madison
County, just of CR 255 on Bis-
bee Loop. (Exit 262 off I-10 or
from US 90 turn onto CR 255,
g6 South to Bisbee Loop.) Call
for directions. You must check
with them prior to bringing a
drop-off animal to the shelter.
Visit the Suwannee Valley
Humane Society web-site and
see the animals that need a real-
ly good home at
geocities.com/suwanneehs.
Attention: If you have lost a
pet or found one, the humane
society will help you find your
pet. Call 850-971-9904 or toll-
free at 866-236-7812. Leave a
message if we are closed, we
will return your call. They will
do what they can to help you
find your pet. Please check with
your local animal control if you
have lost a pet.
LOST OR FOUND ANI-
MALS:
LOST: MAGGIE - Six year
old, black, female, Cocker


"Step Up, Florida - On our
way to healthy living!" is a
statewide initiative promoting
physical activity and healthy
lifestyles to Florida's citizens
and visitors. This initiative also
showcases the numerous oppor-
tunities to be physically active
in Florida. In addition, there is
an annual celebration that will
take place in the month of Feb-
ruary to give families and the
general public an opportunity to
have fun and take part in a com-
munity-wide event to promote
physical activity in their area.
In Suwannee County, several
agencies, organizations, and in-
dividuals have formed a com-
mittee to plan the Step Up,
Florida events. Suwannee
County's participation in Step
Up, Florida will take place on
Feb. 5. Activities will begin
with a bicycle group riding
from the Lafayette County line
to the First Federal Sportsplex.
Various groups will continue
the chain of activities through-
out the day until reaching the
Hamilton County line.
This event is an excellent
way for Suwannee County resi-
dents to start the New Year out
with a greater commitment to
physical activity and healthy


folks from Westwood Baptist
who traveled to Tampa last
Monday to board a cruise ship
for a week. All ages were in-
cluded in this trip, including
Miss Tessa Ferreria who was the
youngest Westwood member to
make the trip. I hear she had a
grant time and entertained the
entire group, that included my
granddaughter Shelly Monroe
and my daughter, Shelly's
mother, Kathy Hals, Tessa's
mom, dad and grandmother,
Blaze and Patty Ferreria and
Martha Branch, along with a
host of others from the church.
They report a wonderful time
with no incidents along the way,
no Norwalk virus and no lost
passengers. All returned safely
and soundly. On Sunday Kathy
and I had lunch together and sat
next to two couples who over-
heard Kathy's before lunch
prayer thanking God for the safe
journey. They immediately
asked where she had been and
what ship. They too were just
returning from the exact same
trip, but left from Port Canaver-
al and were on the ship that had


living. The Step Up, Florida
committee invites you to join in
the celebration. If you would
like to have a team or partici-
pate in the county-wide events,
call Melinda Scott at 386-362-
2708 ext. 221. If you would like
to make a cash donation or con-
tribute items such as bottled wa-
ter, please call Mary Taylor
(Suwannee County Youth Ad-


*




BY SUSAN K. LAMB
Democrat Managing Editor


Valley Humane Society


Spaniel, no collar. Lost near
Midway Church Road and CR
53.
LOST: Eight year old, silver
grey Poodle, neutered, two
pound female. Healthy with old
hind leg injury. Lost near
Frier's Mobile Home Park.
These are just a few of the
kittens and cats, puppies and
dogs available. Featured ani-
mals for adoption:
DOGS:
#2677 - HAYES - Eight
weeks old, light beige, male.
Even at his young age he seems
to know that love makes the
world go around. Look in his
eyes and fall in love.
#2678 - DILLON - Eight
weeks old, beige with brown
markings, male. Enough love
for someone twice his size.
Ready for some mutual affec-
tion.
#2679 - ANITA - Eight
weeks old, black and brown, fe-
male. One of a trio of new resi-
dents here at the shelter. A
sweet addition to any house-
hold.
#2682 - TEDDY - Seven
weeks old, white with brown,
male. The other half of this dy-
namic duo is Rusty. These guys
were made to cuddle.
#2683 - RUSTY - Seven
weeks old, chocolate and white,
male. One of a pair of fun-lov-


ing boys. There is a lot of en-
thusiasm for life in a small
package.
Many more beautiful puppies
and large dogs to choose from.
CATS:
# 2609 - SPOOKY - Nine
months old, grey, male. An af-
fectionate lad who will bask
with joy when he finds his in-
tended home. Come meet me!
#2644 - FROSTY - Five
months old, solid white, male.
Cats are known for their inde-
pendent spirits and 'this hand-
some boy is CAT personified.
He loves to play attack and can
juggle with all four feet.
#2666 - DOROTHY - Four
months old, orange - with white
around the eyes, female. Frisky
and playful .., and wants a per-
son to call her own.
#2680 - KIPP - Four months
old, tabby, male, brother to
Kimmie and a charming fellow
he is. Ready to take care of his
own human family.
#2681 - KIMMIE - Four
months old, tabby, white, fe-
male ... a lovely young lady
with an eye to a loving home.
Sister to Kipp.
Many more kittens and cats
available for adoption.
Please help care for the ani-
mals.
Visit our newly expanded
thrift store. Tuesday - Saturday,


vocacy Partnership) at 386-364-
5791.
The beauty of Step Up, Flori-
da! is that each county can use
their creativity to implement it
any way they like as long as
they meet the next county on
the route to hand off the flag.
Dust off your exercise shoes
and get ready to Step Up
Suwannee County!


Craft Rendezvous at Stephen Foster State Park

- Regional artists demonstrate their craft-


a pretty good outbreak of the
Norwalk Virus from a guest
who had it upon arrival on the
ship. They were healthy Sunday
but said they were sick for a
short time on the ship before re-
covering. Bad stuff, that Nor-
walk Virus, glad none of our
folks had it.
Our deepest sympathy to Eula
Ross on the loss of her husband,
Frank Ross, suddenly last week.
Frank was a great guy and had
so many friends. He worked
with Farmer's Co-Op for more
than 30 years and knew every
farmer in the county.
In spite of all the photos, arti-
cles and a reward for finding
Pumpkin and Rapunzal, there
remain lost to their owner, Tesha
Howard. Please, if you see an
orange, long-haired cat and/or a
long-haired calico anywhere
within a mile or so of the area
just east of 185th and Mitchell
Road, let me know by phone or
e-mail. If they or either one of
them are living at your house
temporarily, the Howard family
thanks you for taking good care
of the two family pets adored by
their two little girls who still cry
about the loss df the cats as they
go out regularly and ride around
looking for the pets. However,
they do want to get them back
(they accidentally got out of the
house they were staying out
while the Howards moved one
day around Dec. 1, 2004) and
will be happy to check out any
possibilities so don't hesitate to
call. Here's the number (remem-
ber, REWARD) 364-8345.


GOURDS: Gourd carving and
decorating will be demonstrat-
ed at the Craft Rendezvous at
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park in White
Springs on Jan. 29.
- Photo: John Moran


Adoptables
10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Closed Sunday
and open by appointment only
on Monday. ALL PROCEEDS
SUPPORT THE HUMANE
SOCIETY.
The Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society also recycles alu-
minum cans. Take them to the
shelter.
Recycle, recycle, recycle!
Please recycle newspapers
for the Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society. The recycle
dumpster is located at 305
Piri '.c. ,-od Dr. in Live Oak, iext
to.Johnson's Appliance Center.
ALL PROCEEDS SUPPORT
THE HUMANE SOCIETY.


cated on US 41, three miles
from 1-75 and nine miles from
1-10.
The list of demonstrations
includes pewter smithing,
blacksmithing, stained glass,
pine needle baskets, home-
made jelly, spinning, painting
Russian eggs, decorated
gourds, and marquetry and
parquetry.


Demonstrations are free
with general park admission
of $4 for a vehicle with up to
eight passengers. For more de-
tails, visit on-line at
www.stephenfostercso.org or
call Craft Square at 386-397-
1920. Learn more about the
park's activities by visiting the
web site at www.FloridaS-
tateParks.org/stephenfoster.


BLACKSMITH: Blacksmith Ken Platt from Jasper will be among
the artists demonstrating their craft at Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park's Craft Square on Jan. 29. - Photo: John Moran


BASKETS: Natural fibers artist Nancy Gildersleeve from
Gainesville demonstrates how to make pine needle baskets.
Demonstrations byregional artists will be held in Craft Square at
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park on Jan. 29.
- Photo: John Moran


Suwannee County Schools &
The Florida Department of Education

present


"Families Building Better


Readers Parent Workshop"


Help your child earn higher FCAT scores!!





^^B ^^K l fl;l II[Rii














Free parent tool kit estimated value $25




*Free materials for parents who attend.


*Provide parents with simple instructional activities
R that will improve reading performance.
Provide parent resourcesthat will help improve








*Provide parent resources that will help improve
children's literacy throughout life.





Child care provided


PreK-5th Grade
138442JRS-F


Explore the crafts of more
than 20 regional artists when
jewelry makers, weavers,
herbalists, basket makers and
others demonstrate their skills
during a Craft Rendezvous
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on
Saturday, Jan. 29, in Craft
Square at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park,
White Springs. The park is lo-


INFORMATION
WHO: Craft Rendezvous
WHAT: Craft demonstrations
WHEN: 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 29
WHERE: Craft Square at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park, White Springs
COST: Free with general park admission of $4 for a vehicle with up to eight passengers
CONTACT: Visit on-line at www.stephenfostercso.org or call Craft Square at 386-397-1920


Step Up, Florida! is coming

to Suwannee County


wcistoefloridaBm


PAGE 7A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJANUARY 2 5









CIVIC SUWANNEE


GFWC Woman's Club of Live Oak annual Christmas meeting and concert


-.'.
-&,* (-



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VOCAL ENSEMBLE MEMBERS: Pictured, Ito r, front row, Terin LeBrecque, Tammy Michal, Doris Fischer, Lilli Hodges and Margaret
Boatright; back row, Patt Slaughter, Liz Scott, Janet Theriaujt, Gladys Cason, Erie Lane and Margaret Howard. - Photo: Submitted


The GFWC Woman's
Club of Live Oak held its
annual December Christmas
meeting on Dec. 3. This an-
nual December meeting is
devoted entirely to a Christ-
mas music concert by the
Woman's Club Ladies Vocal
Ensemble.
The club house was fes-
tively decorated with the,
Christmas theme. President
Nancy Allen welcomed
members and a large num-
ber of guests. A delicious
lunch was served with lun-
cheon music provided by
Pat Roberts.
The Ladies Vocal Ensem-
ble, under the direction of
Patt Slaughter, with Tammy
Michal, piano accompanist,
started the music with "I
Saw Three Ships," an Old
English Carol; and contin-
ued with "Christmas Lulla-
by of Joy," Jill Galina;
"Still, Still, Still," German
Carol; "Christ Child in the
Snow," Lois Rhea; "Silent
Night," song in German,
Mohr-Gruber - this was a
presentation with Erie Lane
narrating the story of the


origin of Silent Night, with
soloist Lilli Hodges, and
Teri LaBrecque on the gui-
tar; "What Child is This,"
Old English Carol - soloist,
Gladys Cason; "Ave
Maria," Bach-Gounod - pi-
ano trio, with Tammy
Michal on the piano, Patt
Slaughter on the violin and
Karen Jackowski on the cel-
lo; "Merry Christmas
Waltz," Lana Walter; "Let it
Snow," Cahn-Tyne; "I'll Be
Home for Christmas" -
soloist Tammy Michal; "Fe-
liz Navidad;" and "Merry
Christmas Polka," Roddy
ended the program, a fa-
vorite among the club mem-
bers.
Gifts of Christmas cactus
were presented to Patt
Slaughter and Tammy
Michal and the home life
department presented gifts
to the entire vocal ensem-
ble.
Joyce Collins was wel-
comed as a new member.
Alma West won the door
prize. The meeting ended
with all wishing each other
a Merry Christmas.


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PIANO TRIO: Pictured, I to r, Tammy Michal,
owski. - Photo: Submitted


Patt Slaughter and Karen Jack-


,lo + , ,
" L , NIGH.T," ,,,,. , ' "," , ,,,,:




"SILENT NIGHT" PRESENTATION: Pictured, I to r, Teri LaBrecque, Lilli Hodges and Erie
Lane. - Photo: Submitted


"WHAT CHILD IS THIS" SOLO:
Soloist Gladys Cason.
- Photo: Submittedd

Randy Wilkes


I _Diamond Rio &
wJimmy Wayne Concerts & Events

i ...ar,.E a lM v.r'r, n . . . . . .
I Boviing tor Soup American HI-Fi RUdIIn Kids & MG
S-r Trr Clar . Jo.zh Turr . .
3 3 8 Special & The Marshall Tue-Lher Band..


,- . . . , i

N',,"
Un'11-1 .^


is the Rotary

Club raffle

Ticket winner
The Rotary Club of Live Oak
'i' '" " will help celebrate Rotary Inter-
national's 100th Anniversary
with the construction of the Ro-
tary Pavilion at the First Federal
Sportsplex. The Club's Centen-
nial Project Committee, dubbed
the "Dream Team," is headed by
past District Governor Ronnie
Poole, and has been meeting
since June, 2003 to work on this
important project for our com-
munity.
The Dream Team determined
a pavilion at the First Federal
Sportsplex was the best project
for Rotary to undertake to meet
the criteria established by Rotary
International.
Once completed, the pavilion
will become part of the Suwan-
nee County/Live Oak Recreation
Department's ever-expanding
facilities.
The estimated cost for this
project is $95,000 and the Rotary
Club has secured funding com-
mitments from the Suwannee
County County Commission,
Live Oak City Council and the
Suwannee County Tourist De-
velopment Council. As part of
'' the Club's fund-raising, major
contributors have pledged more
than $36,600 for the project. The
Rotary Club also sold more than
$13,000 in raffle tickets for ei-,
'" ./a, ,s M their a 4-wheeler ATV or $5,000
cash.
Rotary is proud to announce
S that Randy Wilkes is the winner.
Sg ' ,'.':'i Surprised, Randy said, "I can't

actly what I'm going to do with
lt idi the prize. The Rotary Centenni-
',te al Pavilion is such a great pro-
ject, and I'm really pleased with
t p3rk the support we have received
from the community and my fel-
' low Rotarians."
The Rotary Club of Live Oak
invites you to participate in its
Centennial Project as a major
SperC o contributor, an individual con-
'pA4t ad-,, tributor or by providing in-kind
services.
If you would like to be a con-
tributor call Marjorie
Cannichael at 362-1888 or Ron-
1.3r06 nie Poole at 362.4539.


. ..Feb 12
Lars.. Feb 19
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Mar r


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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGF 8A


B


, .--*s-


- -.: 7 --
f-i, -.^is





PAGE 9A


W J


WdY LL' L-L'- jjlJW


BY JINNY WILSON

BY JINNY WILSON
ail,


1 '.N I..


These were the Wellborn
folks in St. Augustine on Nik-
ki Fralick's wedding day last
Saturday: five Duvals, a Wil-
son, a Kranz, three Roaches,
four Belibasis family, two
Brimms and at least four
more members of the Louis
Berry family, two Youngs,
two Smiths and two Zobels.
All of us were very grateful to
participate in the happiness
when Nikki Fralick married
Anthony Suttton. The Roach
threesome, Jerry, Patty and
Rhiannon, made a mini-holi-
day weekend of it as did the
bride's immediate family
which included Nikki's par-
ents Ted and Goldie Marie
Fralick and brother Chad and
Nikki's grandparents Goldie
and Fred Gaylord. Two pas-
tors and eight bridesmaids
and add in Anthony Sutton's
crowd of folks plus friends
from all over these United
States, all combined into a
great celebration. Years of
prayer as two singles asking
God's guidance for mate
choosing preceded this day.
They found one another at
Flagler College. A year of ac-
tual planning this just right
wedding day included hours
of talk with one another, with
their friends and with each of
their pastors. We were treated
to pictures on the sanctuary
screen of the planning year


Bulldog basketball at
hoinmp!lisday, Jan. 27
- SPORTS PAGE 1B


and also another sequence of
photos of each ones baby,
childhood and young adult-
hood as family members. The
two Pastors charged us to rec-
ognize a miracle at this wed-
ding, too. I saw it. When one
sees with ones heart that two
become one by God's action
it is a miracle enabling an en-
trance into the highest halls of
human happiness now and
forever. At the country club
reception after the church part
we enjoyed the best man and
the maid of honor through
their good stories in apprecia-
tion of our Nikki and her new
husband.
Nikki's pastor, the Rev.
Cheryl Pingel, cherishes Nik-
ki and her contemporaries.
She remembers them as a
Youth Fellowship she loved
during her eight year pas-
torate in Wellborn. She pic-
tures a reunion of the kids
who were part of the Well-
born Methodist Youth Min-
istry history, at first led by
Pastor Cheryl and later by
Youth Pastor David Smith
and after that by Youth Direc-
tor Michael Smith. Colleen
and Russell Smith's home off
Bulb Farm Road was a place
for Teen Time Sunday after-
noons for years. Kids names
came to mind and that led to
wondering if locating them
for a reunion is possible.
Colleen Smith said she bets
there are hundreds and in the
glow of reminiscing they
mentioned names like the
three Hatch brothers, Tran
brother and sister, Clint Gris-
wold, Melissa, Amber and
Dustin Duval, Geiger sisters,
Johnson, Morgan brothers,
Watkins. It soon sounded to
me as though come late sum-
mer or maybe early fall there


r--I


could be a reunion of Teen
Timers with spouses and ba-
bies invited. Call Smiths at
386-963-3165 if you are in
favor. Lets give this good idea
some nourishment.
Margaret McLeran Owens
died on Jan. 22, Nikki's wed-
ding day. There is a closeness
between Nikki's extended
family and their "Miss Mar-
garet" so it was special that
we were talking of and ap-
preciating Miss Margaret at
the family time brought about
by Nikki's wedding. Margaret
was born as the oldest of four:
Thurston Jr., Virginia Jane
and Leonard are her sorrow-
ing siblings. Daddy operated
the McLeran General Mer-
chandise store, the shell of
which can be seen today as
the greenish two story build-
ing north of and facing the
railroad track. Margaret told
wonderful stories about the
good old days in Wellborn
and indeed was a key person
when a committee was
formed to write a history of
Wellborn. It is "Wellborn, My
Hometown" and was written
in 1997 and can be purchased
today at the Kornucopia or at
the Wellborn Community
Building or on any Tuesday
morning at the McLeran
Wellborn Public Library at
the Methodist Fellowship
Hall, 12005 CR 137. She
taught in Wellborn school and
she must hold a longevity
record of years in the Grace
Chapter No. 8 of the Eastern
Star. Margaret held just about
every job of responsibility at
her home church through the
years with perhaps the most
colorful one being the years
she traveled to all eight of the
little Methodist churches that
were clustered on one circuit
and served by one pastor.
Margaret had two children,
two grandchildren and lived
to see one great-grandson,
Jake Wooley. She will be
missed by many. Her funeral
was Tuesday at 2 p.m. at her
home church, Wellborn
Methodist, and burial was at
Wellborn Cemetery. Coffee
and afternoon tea afterwards
in the church hall for those
able to linger.


Farmers, fishermen and oth-
er producers of raw agricultur-
al commodities have approxi-
mately two weeks left to take
advantage of financial and
technical training benefits of-
fered by the US Department
of Agriculture (USDA) if their
commodity suffered a signifi-
cant price decline in the past
year, due to foreign imports.
Through the USDA's Trade
Adjustment Assistance (TAA)
Program for Farmers, impact-
ed producers of such com-
modities must file a formal
petition with the USDA's For-
eign Agricultural Service
(FAS) to establish eligibility
for assistance. "The petition -
available through the USDA
web-site or by calling a toll-
free number - is a relatively
simple process," said USDA
Trade Adjustment Assistance
Coordinator Jean-Louis Pajot.
"But the paperwork must be
filed and submitted to our
Washington, D.C. offices no
later than Jan. 31, 2005."
According to Pajot, the pro-
gram, now in its third year of
operation, has benefited sev-
eral industries across the na-
tion.
"Last year, wild Maine
blueberries became the first
agriculture crop to qualify for
Trade Adjustment Assis-
tance," Pajot said. Since that
time, benefits in the form bf
cash disbursements and tech-
nical training have benefited
salmon fishermen in Washing-
ton and Alaska, shrimp pro-
ducers in South Carolina and
Louisiana, and lychee farmers
in Florida.


According
to David Bell,
Executive Di-
rector of the
Maine Wild
Blueberry
Commission,


the benefits to impacted farm-
ers in his state have been con-
siderable; and he should know
since his organization filed the
petition on behalf of his con-
stituents.
"For years, the blueberry in-
dustry in Maine was extreme-
ly profitable, increasing from
just under 20 million pounds
annually to more than 75 mil-
lion pounds in the 1990s," he
said. But over the last decade,
increased production and im-
ports from Canada severely
impacted our production, re-
sulting in a major price de-
pression for 2002. "Thanks to
the petition process, all of our
producers were eligible to re-
ceive technical training and
some even collected cash ben-
efits."
To obtain such aid, Bell pe-
titioned the USDA under the
Trade Adjustment Assistance
program. Through an exten-
sive--yet timely investiga-
tive process that is conducted
within 40 days of a petition
being accepted, FAS deter-
mined that, from January
through December 2002, im-
ports did, in fact, contribute
significantly to a decline in
domestic prices for Maine
blueberry producers, when
compared with the previous
five-year average. Under
TAA, established by the Trade
Act of 1974 as amended in
2002, the USDA certified the
Commission's petition, mak-
ing all wild blueberry produc-
ers in Maine eligible to apply
for TAA benefits.
According to FAS figures,
several other producers of raw


'l8 *Agricultural
^ TRADE
ADJUSTMENT
ASSISTANCE


Flue-Cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization Corporation will
conduct a series of meetings to discuss business plans to for the 2005
marketing season. Stabilization will discuss the future role of the
cooperative and give interested farmers details of its 2005 marketing
agreements. Following are the two types of marketing agreements that
will be offered:


Exclusive Stabilization Marketing Agreement: For tobacco farmers
that plan to sell only at Stabilization Marketing Center auctions in
2005. Please provide all copies of 2004 form MQ-24.


Non-Exclusive Stabilization Marketing Agreement: Provides
tobacco farmers that plan to contract with a company other than
Stabilization an opportunity to sell excess tobacco at Stabilization
Marketing Centers at the end of the marketing season. Please provide
at least one copy of 2004 for MQ-24 to verify tobacco production in
2004.


Stabilization representatives will be available during and after each
meeting to answer questions and assist you in signing one of the two
Stabilization marketing agreements. Stabilization representatives can
provide further information about the deadline for signing and
returning an agreement, as well as who to contact if you have
additional questions.


Following is a list of meeting places and dates:


Mon.

Mon.


Florence, SC

Lumberton, NC

Wilson, NC

Clinton, NC

Williamston, NC

South Hill, VA.


Timberlake, NC Thurs.

Timberlake, NC Thurs.

Rural, Hall, NC . Fri.


Tifton, GA


1-24-05 10 am Pee Dee Research Station


1-24-05


2 pm Southeastern Farmers Market


Tues. 1-25-05 10 am Wilson Agricultural Center

Tues. 1-25-05 2 pm Sampson County Ag Expo Center

Wed. 1-26-05 10 am Martin County Ag Center

Wed. 1-26-05 2 pm . American Legion Building


1-27-05 10 am US F.C. Tob. Growers Factory


1-27-05


2 pm US F.C. Tob Growers Factory


1-28-05 10 am Old Belt Co-op Warehouse


Sat. 1-29-05 10 am Rural Development Center


Please tell other farmers about these meetings.
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134529DH-F


Jan. 31 deadline looms for farmers and

fishermen seeking compensation for price

declines due to foreign imports in 2005

- Raw commodity producers who experienced a 20 percent drop in
price as a result of foreign imports still eligible to petition to the
Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Program through month's end -


WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 26, 2005


commodities have seen their
prices decline in recent years,
prompting those groups to ex-
plore the benefits offered un-
der TAA.
"But to be eligible for trade
adjustment benefits in the cur-
rent fiscal year, groups of
farmers and fishermen or their
representatives must file their
petitions no later than January
31," Pajot said. "To ensure a
prompt response, fax and e-
mail are the recommended de-
livery methods."
Once the petition is filed,
the agency will spearhead an
investigation to determine if
the commodity meets the cri-
teria for the Trade Adjustment
Assistance Program. If a peti-
tion is, in fact, certified, pro-
ducers then have 90 days to
contact the nearest office of
the USDA's Farm Service
Agency to apply for assis-
tance.
According to Pajot, all eli-
gible producers receive tech-
nical training and may receive
cash benefits up to $10,000,
depending on the amount of
production marketed and if
they meet certain income cri-
teria. Technical training bene-
fits are designed to help pro-
ducers and fishermen explore
additional commodities, mar-
keting opportunities, and al-
ternative enterprises.
The petition form, Pajot
said, is available on-line at
www.fas.usda.gov/itp/taa/FAS
0930.pdf. It may also be re-
quested by phone at 202-720-
2916 or by e-mail at trade.ad-
justment@fas.usda.gov. Com-
pleted petitions may be faxed
to 202-720-0876. Petitions
may be filed by a group of
three or more producers or an
authorized repre-entarti e. and
they may be made on behalf of
a state, region or the nation as
a whole.


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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGE 10A






. miuanlt c Detrn rat Bulldog basketball at home Thursday, Jan. 27


Section B
Wednesday, January 26, 2005


The Bulldog basketball team is undefeated in the Dog House.
Come out and watch as they face Ft. White and try to maintain
that perfect record. Game time is 7:30 p.m. , PO S1


Speed Weeks

opener at

Lake City

Speedway
The beginning of Florida
Speed Weeks begins the last
weekend of January at Lake
City Speedway. The racers
party of the year will feature
10 divisions of race cars,
two demo derbies, many
vendors, a trade show, a rac-
ers auction and non-stop
racing action. Each evening
entertainment will take
place after the races. Racers
and campers can move in on
Thursday, Jan. 27 with rac-
ing beginning Friday, Jan.
28 at 4 p.m. For rules or
classes, you can call 812-
689-1946, 859-581-8579, or
812-87\1-7728. Many late
model entries are expected
from all Ever the Midwest
and over 200 entries will be
on hand for t s event. Come
enjoy yourself at Lake City
Speedway!





", Beac\)

HSHING,

REPORT
This week's report will be
brief, no very brief . . as
very few have caught much
and a few more have caught
less. The W-I-N-D took over
and ran everyone off the wa-
ter then the cold front
topped off that misery.
Melvin Autry of Lenox,
Ga. had his limit last week,
Wednesday fishing a Mir-
rOlure Top Dog in three feet
of water.
Charlie and Sherri Harris
of Valdosta, Ga. had their
limit both da.S this week-
end and reported they had to
work to get them. They
caught a few on plugs Satur-
day and used shrimp and
Cajuns and plugs on Sun-
day.
That's it!
Don't forget
The Taylor County High
School Senior class is hav-
ing a Saltwater Fishing
Tournament to raise money
for their Senior Trip to New
York City. The Tournament
will be held in Keaton
Beach, Saturday, March 5,
2005 and will award prizes
to the top trout, redfish and
grouper. Tickets are $10 per
person and all proceeds go
towards the senior trip. For
more information call
Sandy Beach Manning at
Go Fish Collectibles 850-
578-2897 ext. 611.

2005 Lafayette

Baseball Golf

Tournament
The 2005 Lafayette Base-
ball Golf Tournament will
be held at 9 a.m. on Satur-
day, Feb. 26, at the Suwan-
nee Country Club, Live
Oak. (Note: Rescheduled
from Feb. 12) Four man
scramble with prizes to the
top three teams. Cost: $50
per player or $200 per team.
Come and support Hornet
Baseball. For more info,
contact Derek Garland, 386-
294-3025 or Joann Page,
386-294-2834.


SHS Basketball still undefeated in the Dog House


, ., . ....r ,, .. ... . ...z . , . .- - - '-
#4 Nate Herring has come on strong this year. Herring was the leading scorer against Florida High
with 17 points. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


*-%"

i�'B' I


Heather Be

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Heather Benson has been a
Su\% annee High athlete for the past
four ..ears even though she is
home-schooled. This is allowed
per the Suwannee County School
Board. Benson has played softball,


Heather Besnon signs to attend
NFCC on a softball scholarship.
* Phoio .Ianet Schrader-Seccafico
ADDITIONAL PHOTO PAGE 3B


1"~


- ..�-' f.,


Suwannee wrestling team

mauls Bishop Kenny 56-18


weightclass. Wright took out
his opponent in the first peri-
od with a pin that got things
rolling for Suwannee.
Next up was Kris Kerns.
Kerns wrestles heavyweight,
and nine times out of 10, his
opponents outweigh him by
50 pounds. BK was no dif-
ferent. According to
wrestling coach David Lax-
ton, Kerns pinned his 256-


pound opponent in the first
round in 56 seconds.
The match moved to the
lightweights. First up for
Suwannee was the Dogs' 105
man, Corey Riley. Riley was
winning in the third round 8-
1. The official made was
Laxton thought was a suspi-
cious call. Riley lost the

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 4B


,Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
The Bulldog wrestling
team traveled to Bishop
Kenny High Thursday, Jan.
20, where they proceeded to
maul the BK squad. The fi-
nal score was 56-18.
The match began with Big
Mike Wright in the 215


Greg Boyle gets the pin. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
According to coach Chris
Martello, Suwannee's game
plan was to control Florida
High's number-four. The Bull-
dogs did a great job on defense,
holding the Florida High Baby
Seminoles to a meager 16 points
in the first half. Florida High did
better in the second half, but the
Dogs soundly defeated them 64-
52 to maintain their undefeated
status at home.
Starting for the Bulldogs
against Florida High were Nate
Herring, Mario Hawthorne, Q-
Man Quaramous Ross, Jevon
Smith and Shaun Brewer. The
Dogs began implementing their
game plan from the first mo-
ment. Suwannee's Dogs held
Florida High to a pathetic six
points in the first period. The
score at the end of the first was
11-6.
The second period went much
the same for Florida High.
Suwannee double and triple-
teamed number four preventing
Florida High from scoring.
Florida High added 10 points to
their six of the first period for a
sad half-time score of 28-16.
But after the half, Florida
High came out energized. The
Baby Seminoles closed to with-
in six points of the Dogs in the
third period. But Suwannee held
and increased their lead to 15
points. The third period ended
with the Dogs up 44-31.
The Dogs' defense was awe-


nson signs
volleyball, basketball and now
soccer every season. She's an ac-
tive teen and a member of the
Suwannee County 4-H Club. Re-
cently, she's taken up riding and
joined Saddles and Spurs Riding
Club as well. Now Benson will be
attending North Florida Communi-
ty College to play softball on
scholarship.
Jan. 19, Benson signed a letter
of intent to attend NFCC. NFCC
held open try-outs and Benson at-
tended. The coach was ready to
sign her up then and there.
Benson was roamed MVP this


some in the fourth. It seemed
like a strange combination of
zone and man-to-man with Dogs
switching back and forth to cov-
er number-four and their zones.
It looked like a choreographed
dance, with the Dog players
switching positions automatical-
ly to maintain a solid defense.
According to Martello, it was
just a way for Suwannee to han-
dle number-four. Even covered
as he was, the Baby Seminoles'
number four player began hit-
ting outside shots in the fourth
for three-point goals. But it was
a matter of too little too late.
Suwannee polished off the Baby
Seminoles with a great fourth
period. The final score was 64-
52. Florida High never had a
chance.
Nate Herring, Suwannee's
own number-four, was the high
scorer for the game with 17.
Ross was second with 15
points. Jevon Smith had 14
points. Brewer, Philip Clark and
Hawthorne all collected six
points.
The Bulldogs take on Ft.
White in the Dog House tomor-
row night, Thursday, Jan. 27.
Game time is 7:30 p.m. Come
out and see if the Dogs can hang
on to their undefeated-at-home
status. Go Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico may
be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or by e-
mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com.
Go to page 28 ti see
SHS Men's Basketball photos


rith NFCC
r for volleyball. Last year she
Named to the Gainesville
.'s All-Area All-Star volleyball
orable mention team. Benson
ered eight times as a Suwannee
h athlete and won many acade-
awards.
enson played first base for the
ly Dog softball team. She's
n playing softball since she was

*ood luck Heather!
anet Schrader-Seccafico may
reached by calling 1/386/362-
4 ext. 134 or by e-mail, at
et. schrader@gaflnews.com.


Bulldog soccer

handles Florida High

with four goals from

forward Billy Moran

Danny Hales
Special to the Democrat


uOn a cold luesday night
of Jan. 18th. The Suwannee
Boys Soccer team traveled
to Florida High in Southeast
Tallahassee, for an impor-
tant district match. As it
turned out although the tem-
perature was cold Suwannee
Bulldog Billy Moran and as-
sist machine Will Posey,
were anything but that.
The Bulldogs coming off
a great 3-2 victory at always
tough Wakulla High on the
preceding Friday, knew that
this second important trav-
el game in five days was vi-
tal in their efforts to stay un-
defeated in the District and
repeat as first seeds in the
District playoffs.
Initial play saw both


I SEE BULLDOG, PAGE 5B


Billy Moran scored four goals
against Florida High matching
his district title game in 2004
where he scored four goals.
- Photo: Paul Buchanan


4-.


..........







SPORTS



SHS Basketball still undefeated in the Dog House


'Suwannee's




Suwannee's



9


Look at Mario go! Mario Hawthorne, #5, snags some air as he
goes for another basket. Hawthorne had six points against Flori-
da High. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


#24 Jevon Smith is another up-and-coming player for Suwannee
basketball. Smith had 14 points against Florida High.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


' - i #33 Shaun Brew


,.,' , 4 + ,4' ","


,i.


basketball cheerleaders - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
".'-. - 1'


er goes up for two. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


''1


. _-. - ' - - - . . <*L . ', ' .yw ^ !

#50 Philip Clark gets fouled going forthe lay-up. - Photo: Janet Schrad- #3 Quaramos Ross dribbles for a lay-up. Ross had 15 points
er-Seccafico against Florida High. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


#50 Philip Clark and #4 Nate Herring under the basket.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


#24 Jevon Smith shows his style with two points.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Shaun Brewer was the starting
center against Florida High.-
Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGF PR


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ia~kSirLr t~v.. ~?;: . -.~ ..








SPORTS


NFCC women's basketball


falls to Gulf Coast


SPORTS


The North Florida Commu-
nity College Lady Sentinels
lost to undefeated Gulf Coast
Community College, the num-
ber one team in the nation, Jan.
19 in Madison, 41-87.
"Gulf Coast forced us out of
our offense and doubled up on
our two scoring threats Ashley
Williams (Jacksonville) and
Wikneka Gorsuch (Adel,
Ga.)," said Clyde Alexander,
NFCC women's basketball
coach. "We made them make
some mistakes but we could
not capitalize."
NFCC women's basketball
record is currently 7-12.
"We are having our best sea-
son in quite some time," said
Alexander. "Our goal is to fin-
ish with a winning record. Last
night's loss was no indicator as
to how far we have come as a
team."
The Lady Sentinels are on
the road through the end of Jan-
uary. The next home game


NFCC women's basketball continues


- Lady Sentinels


The North Florida Commu-
nity College women's basket-
ball team is playing hard this
season with several players
making outstanding accom-
plishments on the court.
Ashley Williams, No. 12,
continues to lead the Lady
Sentinels and the Florida
Community College Athletic
Association polls in
scoring. As of mid-January,
Williams was also ranked
third in field goal percentage,
14th in steals average and
19th in free throw percentage
in the Panhandle Conference
by the FCCAA.
Wikneka Gorsuch, No. 20,
ranked second in blocked
shots average and 13th in
field goal percentage; Nina
Green, No. 15, ranked fourth
in three-point field goal per-
centage; and Trina Goodman,
No. 32, ranked seventh in re-
bounds averages and assists
averages and 18th in steals
average.
"Ashley Williams and
Wikneka Gorsuch are unstop-
pable," said Clyde Alexander,
NFCC basketball coach. "Tri-
na Goodman has started to
assume the role of leader on
the floor."
But even with such out-
standing players the Lady
Sentinels fell just shy of vic-
tory during conference play
Jan. 12 at home against
Chipola losing 64-86 and
again during an on the road,
double loss to Okaloosa-Wal-
ton Jan. 14-15.
"The Lady Sentinels lost a
hard fought battle to Chipo-
la," said Alexander.
Williams and Gorsuch led
scoring with 26 and 23
points. Goodman played a
tough floor game with 8 as-


sists. A tragic blow to NFCC
was an injury to Green that
will have her off the court for
the remainder of the season.
"We lost Nina Green for
the season against Chipola
and we needed her marks-
manship against Okaloosa-
Walton," said Alexander.
On Jan. 14 NFCC struggled
taking an 85-62 loss against
Okaloosa-Walton. The Lady
Sentinels returned Jan. 15
with a renewed spirit but
were still unable to claim vic-
tory losing 83-74.
According to Coach
Alexander, he has witnessed
improvement in many of his
players during the season and
would like to see that trans-
late into more team victories.
Upcoming games are: Sat-
urday, Jan. 29, Chipola at
Marianna. 5:30 p.m.;
Wednesday, Feb. 2,
Okaloosa-Walton at Madison,
5:30 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 5,
Gulf Coast at Panama City,
5:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Feb.
9, Tallahassee at Madison,
5:30 p.m., Friday/Saturday,
Feb. 11-12, Pensacola at
Madison, 5:30-2 p.m.;
Wednesday, Feb. 16, Chipola
at Madison, 5:30 p.m.; Mon-
day, Feb. 21, Gulf Coast at
Madison, 5:30 p.m.; Wednes-
day, Feb. 23, Tallahassee at
Tallahassee, 5:30 p.m.; Satur-
day, Feb. 26, Pensacola at
Pensacola, 2 p.m.
Home games of the NFCC
women's basketball team,
played at NFCC's Colin P.
Kelly Gymnasium, are open
to the public and free of
charge. For more information
visit Athletics at
www.nfcc.edu or contact
Coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609.


presents the
2004-2005
Lyceum Series


February 4 + 7:30 p.m.

Alfonso Levy
Performing Arts Center
General admission $14
Senior citizens $13
LCCC staff, students & students $12
from other schools
Tickets on sale througZ? PveinP oQ'/ithe
performance at the Box mi. . *' a.m.-4p.m.
Dinner Served at 6 p.m. in the Lobo Cafe
Spanish chicken & rice, salad, dinner roll, dessert and
beverage, $6 including tax - seating is limited, so please make
reservations February 1-4.


For Ticket Information call
(386) 754-4340
If you have a disability and need assistance,
you may contact (386) 754-4340


LAKE CITY
COMMtHITY E[lItf[
135158-F


NFCC LADY SENTINEL: Trina
Goodman, No. 32, as of mid-
January, ranked seventh in re-
bounds averages and assists
averages and 18th in steals av-
erage in the Panhandle Confer-
ence by the FCCAA.
- Photo: Submitted


rank in state polls


ppr a Yn~~


A. i


I ROI-123"


NFCC LADY SENTINEL LEADS
IN SCORING IN THE PANHAN-
DLE CONFERENCE: Ashley
Williams, No. 12, as of mid-
January, also ranked third in
field goal percentage, 14th in
steals average and 19th in free
throw percentage in the Pan-
handle Conference by the FC-
CAA. - Photo: Submitted


NFCC LADY SENTINEL: Wikne-
ka Gorsuch, No. 20, as of mid-
January, ranks second in
blocked shots average and 13th
in field goal percentage in the
Panhandle Conference by the
FCCAA. - Photo: Submitted


NFCC LADY SENTINEL: Nina
Green, No. 15, as of mid-Janu-
ary, ranked fourir in three-
point field goal percentage in
the Panhandle Conference by
the FCCAA. - Photo: Submitted


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Limited-time offer In participating markets. *Pricing: Charge is $29.95/month for first 12 months and includes DSL transport and Internet access, In select markets you may choose a different Internet Service Provider
for your Internet access, in which case the charge for DSL transport may be less but the combined charge from ALLTEL and your ISP may be more. Monthly service charge will change after 1 year of service & varies
by market. Free Router: Free router available with 1-year DSL agreement. A $9.95 shipping & handling fee applies. DSL Speeds: Speeds may vary by exchange. ALLTEL cannot guarantee DSL speeds or that DSL service
will be uninterrupted or error-free. Additional Information: Offer available to new DSL customers only. Must be an ALLTEL wirellne customer. A router is required for DSL service. Taxes, fees & other charges, including
Universal Service Fund, apply. ALLTEL reserves the right to cancel or discontinue this plan at any time. Other restrictions may apply. Offers are subject to the ALLTEL Terms & Conditions for Communications Services
available at any ALLTEL store or at www.alltel.com. Contact an ALLTEL representative for details. �2005 ALLTEL Communications, Inc.
133598bmv


S � I , , C ,'.




HEATHER BENSON SIGNS A LETTER OF INTENT TO ATTEND NFCC IMMEDIATELY: Benson will be starting school at North Flori-
da Community College right away. She was home-schooled and is eligible to attend college. Front row I to r: Friend and soccer
teammate Erica Sparks, father Greg Benson, Heather Benson, mother Trudi Benson. Back row I to r: Girls head soccer coach Kathy
Wood, girls assistant soccer coach Jon Wood, sister Courtney Benson, brother Justin Benson, girls assistant soccer coach Ed
Harris and girls assistant soccer coach Cecil Cheshire. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


is Feb. 2 against Okaloosa-
Walton at 5:30 p.m., Colin P.
Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to the
public.
Upcoming games are: Satur-
day, Jan. 29, Chipola at Mari-
anna. 5:30 p.m.; Saturday, Jan.
29, Chipola at Marianna at 5:30
p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 5, Gulf
Coast at Panama City at 5:30
p.m.; Wednesday, Feb. 9, Talla-
hassee at Madison at 5:30 p.m.;
Friday/Saturday, Feb. 11/12,
Pensacola at Madison at 5:30/2
p.m.; Wednesday, Feb. 16,
Chipola at Madison at 5:30
p.m.; Monday, Feb. 21, Gulf
Coast at Madison at 5:30 p.m.;
Wednesday, Feb. 23, Tallahas-
see at Tallahassee at 5:30 p.m.;
and Saturday, Feb. 26, Pen-
sacola at Pensacola at 2 p.m.
For more information visit
Athletics at www.nfcc.edu or
contact Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609.


PAGE 3B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


LAKE CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGEi rv~er


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SPORTS


Suwannee


Continued From Page 1B

match to the BK wrestler by
default.
After the Suwannee fans
had stopped booing the offi-
cial, Levi Wainwright hit the
mat in the 112 weightclass.
Wainwright had no trouble
pinning his man in the first
round.
Caleb Wainwright was up
next and won his match with
a technical fall.
David Sanders was
Suwannee's next entry. He
wrestled his opponent to a
12-1 victory using his signa-
ture move of a Russian with
an inside trip.
Tyler Townsend, filling in
for Barney Wainwright out
with a pulled muscle, lost
his match.
Peter Kind, in the 135
weightclass, displayed a bat-
tery of tilts and pinning
combinations to defeat his
BK opponent 17-2. this was
Kind's second varsity ap-
pearance this year and he is
2-0.


Smiling William "Willy
Mac" McCrimon had a
tough time with his oppo-
nent, Bishop Kenny's
coach's son. But McCrimon
hung on and won 7-3.
Greg Boyle, in the 145
weightclass, man-handled
his opponent. But in a flurry
of moves while heading out
of bounds, Boyle popped his
opponent in the head and
was assessed a point for un-
necessary roughness. It
made no difference as Boyle
pinned his man in the third
round.
In the 152 weightclass,
tough-guy Lee Laxton
buried his opponent's face in
the mat bursting the BK
wrestler's lip. Laxton used a
Japanese whizzer-throw and
the BK wrestler failed to
tuck and roll. He had to be
carried off on a back-board.
Laxton won the match.
Returning Suwannee
state-champion Preston Hart
was up next for Suwannee in
the 165 weightclass. Hart's
opponent was very athletic


and fought gamely, but Hart
pinned him in the first round
in 1:29 seconds.
Casey Osborne, in the 171
weightclass, started off well,
but slipped and was stuck,
pinned in the first round.
Justin Mowls, in the 189
weightclass, easily took care
of his opponent to finish off
BK 56-18.
A JV match was held to
start things rolling. Winning
by pins for the Suwannee JV
were Jeffrey Lee, Clay Mott,
Greg Jones and Octavious
Granville. Jarrod 'Sullivan
also wrestled for the Suwan-
nee JV.
Suwannee's Bulldog
wrestlers will start their run
for the state championships
at the beginning of February.
Look for a complete sched-
ule in future issues of your
Suwannee Democrat. Go
Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


Kris Kerns wrestles in the heavyweight division. He's having a great year. He pinned his Bishop Ken-
ny Opponent in the first round. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
ny opponent in the first round. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


< .%?,)-/-,' '-.- ;- - .


I ....'.-.

, - ' " '- '
4'.' *'


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i,'; ' " 'i' .'* ^ z. ' . '.
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: ' * ' '.:. ' .. '


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William McCrimon won his match 7-3. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico











SPEI



7reyt /our special someo
C .ltl


Big Mike handled his BK opponent, pinning him in the first round. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


N :I
� 1 1

, ,. ,.,
..,' L


..*-,..'~, �ry

':~ '''
"�8'" "'A M' ''8


* 'I llTine i' iis MonayFebuary 7 at 10 a~m.
Pubis in the Wensa, Feruay*9ediio


Tyler Townsend filled in for Barney Wainwright, wrestling varsity for the first time. - Photo: Janet Schrad-
er-Seccafico







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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGE 4B


.-- .--- --~

-~-~--~

---:.-
.'~?'�.i-:~_�:j.�~�~�

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SPORTS



Suwannee wrestling mauls Bishop Kenny 56-18


.., , % , . -,,
. , , ,- " ,,'": ," '- L '! . ' ' ' . . , :,'!: , :. : ,' ,,..


. "-ia'a *,;*". --"" '- ,, _-. - , .. ,,, ,


David Sanders gets the 12-1 victory with his signature moves.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


.~ ~~i ':. - L

, U
. . ...... ra .
Lee Laxton wasted his BK opponent. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Bulldog


Continued From Page 1B

teams moving the ball well.
Shots on goal however were
easily handled by both the
keepers as both defenses
kept advances off balance
and weak. Following 15
minutes of play, senior Will
Posey intercepted a Florida
High pass, and quickly
stuck a pass to Billy Moran.
Moran sped to the well
placed ball and booted in
Suwannee's first goal.
The rest of the half saw
neither team really provide
much threat. Although
Suwannee was getting into
position and launching
shots, they never beat the
keeper or were on mark
enough to hit an open net.
Florida High had fewer
chances but the -Suwannee
defense always was up to
the task of clearing the ball,
or keeper Nathan Moses
was always in position to
make the stop. Halftime
came and Suwannee held on
to a scant 1-0 lead.
In the second half,
Suwannee seemed some-
what more focused, as pass-
ing and play appeared more
spirited. After over eight
minutes of play senior co-
captain Reggie Johnson,
settled a ball near midfield,
and saw Billy Moran ad-
vancing toward the goal.
Johnson placed a nice pass
away from the defender to-
ward Moran. Moran beat
the defender and hammered
in Suwannee's second goal,
for a 2-0 lead.
Shortly thereafter, after
about 6 additional minutes
of play, the Florida High
team, who had picked up
play after Suwannee's sec-
ond goal, recieved a free
kick from 30 yards out on a
Suwannee foul. The play-
ers lined up, but the stong
legged Florida High player,
struck a long curving shot
over the wall of defenders,
and it traveled just over the
leaping Moses and just un-
der the crossbar, into the
Suwannee goal bringing the
score to 2-1.
Suwannee's determina-


tion and usual ability to re-
spond came forward,, as
senior Will Posey, once
again found Billy Moran in
scoring position. Moran
faked the defender and
placed a good shot away
from the keeper, who just
managed to knock it down.
Moran followed up his shot
and quickly shoved the
loose ball to the net with
his left foot. Suwannee
now had a 3-1 lead with
about 15 minutes left in the
match.
As play continued the
Suwannee defense held, and
with about five minutes re-
maining, the ever present
Will Posey took a corner
kick, to fellow senior Em-
manuel Acosta. Acosta
headed the ball forward to


the" man of the night," Bil-
ly Moran, who sealed Flori-
da High's fate with his
fourth goal of the night.
Moran's performance
matched his district title
game last year on the same
field as he also scored four
goals in the championship
game. His final score of the
night ended the scoring and
Suwannee came home with
the 4-1 victory. The Bull-
dogs now are only one
game short of an undefeated
District season.
Coach Johnson praised
his overall team play, espe-
cially in the second half.
He specifically mentioned
the improved passing and
field vision that many of the
players are improving upon.
He congratulated the entire


team and the defense,- who
without senior defensive
leader Miquel Rodriquez,
who was home battling the
flu, did a great job of
stalling the Florida High at-
tack. Johnson also ac-
knowledged the vital con-
tributions of Posey and
Moran in the victory.
The Dogs traveled to
Godby on Jan. 25 and then
to friendly rival Ft. White
on Jan. 27. The final home
game will be with Rickards
on Saturday, Jan. 29, with a
1 p.m. junior varsity match,
with a 3 p.m. varsity
match. The following
week will be the District
Tournament to be held at
Taylor County High in Per-
ry, Feb. 1 and Feb. 3....
times to be announced.


Octavious Granville wrestled JV and pinned his opponent. I
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico -l


. . ..3 . - -_-- . : . o :




JV wrestler Clay Mott gets the pin. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Today's Weather


Waed Thu Fri
1/26 1/27 1/28

S . . -. .

72/56 73/48 63/50
Considerable clouds More clouds than sun. Few showers. Highs in
early. Some decrease Highs in the low 70s the low 60s and lows
in clouds later in the and lows in the upper in the low 50s.
day. High 72F. Winds 40s.
WSW at 10 to 15 mph.


Sunrise: Sunrise: Sunrise:
7:26 AM 7:25 AM 7:25 AM
Sunset: Sunset: Sunset:
6-04 PM 6 05 PM 6 05 PM
S1We~' Celbrate Homneto ni: .
Si Srornes for and about homeowps ust like yours
LoQk for w each week in psp5per


Florida At A Glance

r..--7d-1 Tailahassee ,'--
' - Jacksonvlle
Pensacola Live Oak
- , . \ 72.' \


) Orlando


Tampa 3,6
_. - ,.



S Miami





Area Cities . -.
-Cearwater 72 57 pi sunny Ocala 73 54 pt sunny
Crestview 75 55 pt sunny Orlando 73 56 pt sunny
Daytona Beach 71 54 pt sunny Panama City 72 57 pt sunny
Fort Lauderdale 73 56 mst sunny Pensacola 71 55 pt sunny
Fort Myers 73 55 mst sunny Plant City 73 55 pt sunny
Gainesville 70 55 pt sunny Pompano Beach 73 56 mst sunny
Hollywood 74 .53 mst sunny Port Charlotte 73 54 pt sunny
Jacksonville 70 56 pt sunny Saint Augustine 69 54 pt sunny
Key West 71 61 mst sunny Saint Petersburg 70 60 pt sunny
Lady Lake 69 52 pt sunny Sarasota 71 55 pt sunny
Lake City 70 54 pt sunny Tallahassee 73 54 pt sunny
Madison 73 57 pt sunny Tampa 72 56 pt sunny
Melbourne 72 51 mst sunny Titusville 71 53 pt sunny
Miami 72 56 mstsunny Venice 72 56 pt sunny
N Smyrna Beach 70 54 pt sunny W Palm Beach 72 53 mst sunny

National Cities
Atlanta 61 35 pt sunny Minneapolis 20 3 pt sunny
Boston 22 4' snow New York 32 12 sn shower
Chicago 33 12 sn shower Phoenix 64 54 rain
Dallas 68 48 pt sunny San Francisco 56 45 rain
Denver 52 34 pt sunny Seattle 58 47 rain
Houston 79 57 pt sunny St. Louis 41 24 pt sunny
Los Angeles 63 51 rain Washington, DC 45 20 cloudy
Miami 72 56 mst sunny

Moon Phases





Full Last New First
Jan 25 Feb 2 Feb8 Feb16


UV Index
Wed Thu Fri
1/26 1/27 1/28
4 4 I
Moderate Moderate Moderate
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 11
with a higher UV index showing the need for greater " ' 11
Skih protection.

�2005 American Prolile Hometown Content Service


w;
'I.


A)?


134608JRS-F


ER


hEW


SHEAR SPIRIT FAMILY SALON

NEW ADDITION TO
THE SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
PARK FAMILY!!


OPEN Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 10 a.m. till 6:30 p.m.
Thursday's 10 a.m. till 5 p.m.
Saturday's 10 a.m. till I p.m.


LIZ BRINGS SEVENTEEN YEARS OF FAMILY HAIR CARE EXPERIENCE TO THE PARK
AND WILL FIX YOUR LOCKS FOR WEDDINGS, ANNIVERSARIES, PROMS, WORK,
EVERYDAY WEAR OR ANY SPECIAL OCCASION AT FAMILY AFFORDABLE PRICES.


-- -----*-*--*--
S Mention this coupon and bring in to obtain

10% OFF
of either a permanent hair coloring or hair
S streaking. Offer expires January 31, 2005. ,-'
Call the shop at (386) 364-6550 or Liz's cell phone -'
(386) 590-1104 to make an appointment.
I Walk-ins are Welcomed.
Sm - - - - - - - - m - - a


1


PAGE 5B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


1












The Racing Zone




Scott Riggs, Joe Nemechek opening eyes during testing


MB2/MBV Motorsports
drivers Joe Nemechek and
Scott Riggs surprised on-
lookers during a recent
three-day NASCAR NEX-
TEL Cup Series test session
in preparation for the 47th
annual Daytona 500 on Sun-
day, Feb. 20.
During the morningtesting
session, Nemechek, in the
No. 01 U.S. Army Chevro-
lets, and Riggs, in the No. 10
Valvoline Chevrolets, took
the top four spots. Ne-
mechek led with185.605
mph while Riggs came in a
close second at 185.601.
In the afternoon session,
'Nemechek and Riggs contin-
ued to set the pace. Riggs
finished fastest with a speed
of 186.097 while Nemechek
was third with a lap of
185.924.
During the first day of
testing, Riggs and Ne-
mechek swapped the top
spots with Riggs leading in


the morning and Nemechek
in the afternoon.
Riggs, entering his sopho-
more season in the NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup Series, credits
his Valvoline crew for the
speed.
"I'm just proud of all of
the guys," Riggs said. "Su-
perspeedway racing is all
about the guys in the shop
building great cars and
working together. Hendrick
horsepower under the hood.
That always helps no matter
where you go but especially
at these superspeedway
races. I know everybody
wishes the driver would get
out and say it was all me.
But you've got to give it to
the car. These guys did a
great job."
During the 2004 NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup Series season,
MB2/MBV Motorsports
stepped up their superspeed-
way program, particularly in
qualifying. In three of the


four races at Daytona Inter-
national Speedway and Tal-
ladega Superspeedway, Rig-
gs and Nemechek qualified
in the top 10 with Nemechek
capturing the pole for Octo-
ber's EA Sports 500.
In a first wave of NEX-
TEL Cup Series testing,
Boris Said, driving a third
MB2/MBV Motorsports
Chevrolet, was able to keep
his name near the top of the
speed chart.
"We've been getting pro-
gressively better every sin-
gle superspeedway race we
go to," Riggs said. "We
knew after getting these cars
together and taking them to
the wind tunnel, we had an
even better piece than what
we had at Talladega the last
race. We were really looking
forward to coming down to
testing and seeing what we
had."
Burton Likes New In-
field: Jeff Burton, who dri-


farnhardt Jr. shoots for fourth


straight win
There's no secret that Dale
Earnhardt Jr. will once again
be the race favorite for the
47th annual Hershey's Take 5
300 NASCAR Busch Series
race on Saturday, Feb. 19.
The driver the No. 8 Bud-
weiser Chevrolet in the
NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Se-
ries will moonlight once again
in the Busch Series' richest
and most prestigious event as
he shoots for his fourth
straight victory.
Ea; ardt Jr. is chasing the
t E btlf 6fi'e straight Her-
shey's Take 5 300 victories set
by his late father Dale Earn-
:hardt between 1990-94.
In last year's Hershey's
Take 5 300, Earnhardt Jr. had
to dig deep to pull off the vic-
tory.
The 120-lap, 300-mile race
held on the Saturday before
the Daytona 500 was red
flagged at Lap 31 due to rain.
The race couldn't be restarted
and was postponed until Mon-
day.
SEarnhardt Jr., who captured
the 2004 Daytona 500 the next
day, participated in the tradi-
tional car induction cere-
mnonies at DAYTONA USA on
early Monday morning and
then went inside the Speedway
to prepare for the finish of the
Hershey's Take 5 300.
.Earnhardt Jr., who led five
different times for 47 laps,
took the lead for the final time
on Lap 109 and held off the
pack of furious challengers to
earn his third win of Speed-
weeks 2004.
"It's a pretty good alarm
clock putting your car in
DAYTONA USA," Earnhardt


in Hershey's Take 5 300


Jr. said after the victory.
Despite a late night of cele-
brating, Earnhardt Jr. said he
had no problems getting fo-
cused for Monday's competi-
tive race.
"It's kinda like pick up
where you left off," Earnhardt
Jr. said.
In this year's edition of the
Hershey's Take 5 300, Earn-
hardt Jr. will once again get
plenty of competition from
both the stars of the NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup Series and be,
NASCAR Busch Series..
Among 'the their ' NASCAR '
NEXTEL Cup drivers expect-
ed join Earnhardt Jr. in the
Hershey's Take 5 300 include
Kevin Harvick, Joe Ne-
mechek, Kasey Kahne,
Michael Waltrip and Greg Bif-
fle.
Among the Busch Series
regulars expected to return in-
clude Earnhardt Jr.'s Chance 2
Racing teammate and 2004
NASCAR Busch Series cham-
pion Martin Truex Jr., David
Green, Ashton Lewis, David
Stremme, Kenny Wallace,
Clint Bowyer and Jason
Keller.
Green, who will wheel a
Ford for Brewco Motorsports,
is the 1994 Busch Series
champion but has never won
at Daytona. He says a good
finish in the season opener can
spark some momentum for the
year.
"I don't want to say it paints
a picture of your season, but it
sure leaves a good founda-
tion," said Green, who sat on
the pole in his first Hershey's
Take 5 300 start in 1991. "It's
almost like a footer on a


house. As you build upon that
nice expensive house, you
want a nice steady foundation.
I know as you go into each
year, you never know what's
around the next corner
throughout the season, but at
the same time, you're first pri-
ority is to get through Daytona
and have it sound.
"I've been through Daytona
and had unfortunately a 30th
place finish but our perfor-
mance and teamwork was
sound apd it really catapulted
our year. Eve also cope ut
with solid ~op-i 1siisies and
it relayed the same momen-
tum. I've yet to come away
with a win. I can only imagine
what that would seem like."
Lewis will be among the
many drivers making debuts
with new teams. After driving
for his family-owned team, the
Virginia native takes over the
driving duties at Team Rensi
Motorsports. Like Green,
Lewis is just looking for a sol-
id run.
"Everybody's goal is to go
there and win but if you can just
go there and get the season off to
a great start and you don't feel
like you're digging' yourself out
of a hole from the get-go,"
Lewis said. "You build up all
winter to go to Daytona and you
know what kind of race it is. You
know how prestigious it is and
you put a lot of emphasis on it
and to go there and run well
would mean a lot to this team."
Tickets for Speedweeks 2005
and the Hershey's Take 5 300
are available online at
http://www.daytonainteration-
alspeedway.com or by calling
1-800-PITSHOP.


ves the No. 31 Cingular
Wireless Chevrolet for
Richard Childress Racing,
gave a thumbs-up to the new
Daytona International
Speedway garages, which
include windows for fans to
look inside.
"What we need to do is we
need to build garages in in-
fields that provide security
and safety for the teams and
also provide opportunity to
fans to get up in it and see
what's going on and I don't
know how you could have
done it any better," Burton
said. "It's a little annoying
when you're trying to work
and there are 20 fans bang-
ing on the windows, I'll be
honest, because you're try-
ing to concentrate. But what
a great experience for the
fans to be able to see what's
going on and to be able to
watch what's happening in
the garage and really see it. I
think that's an awesome
idea. Daytona had kind of
fallen behind a lot of race
tracks and this needs to be
the best and I think they've
set a new standard for
garages."
Crown Royal IROC field
announced: Crown. Royal
IROC officials announced
the driver lineup for the
2005 Crown Royal IROC
Series, which kicks off its
29th season on Friday, Feb.
18 at historic Daytona Inter-
national Speedway.
The invitation-only series
will feature 12 champion
drivers from different forms
of auto racing in equally pre-
pared cars. The 2005 driver
field will feature seven dri-
vers who captured their re-
. * (; J -! ' . - i !1 ,. I .
spective series chapi-
onships'in'2604:
"Matt Kenseth: NASCAR


NEXTEL Cup (2004 Crown
Royal champion)
"Kurt Busch: NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup (2004 series
champion)
"Mark Martin: NASCAR
Nextel Cup (4-time Crown
Royal IROC champion)
"Sebastien Bourdais:
CHAMP CAR (2004 Series
champion)
"Bobby Hamilton:
NASCAR Craftsman Truck
(2004 Series champion)
"Steve Kinser: World of
Outlaws (2004 Series cham-
pion)
"Max Papis: Grand Ameri-
can Road Racing (2004 Se-
ries co-champion)
"Scott Pruett: Grand
American Road Racing
(2004 Series co-champion)
"Martin Truex Jr.:
NASCAR Busch Series
(2004 Series champion)
"Helio Castroneves: IRL
IndyCar Series (2-time Indi-
anapolis 500 champion)
"Buddy Rice: IRL IndyCar
Series (2004 Indianapolis
500 champion)
"Danny Lasoski: World of
Outlaws (2001 Series cham-
pion)
IROC President Jay Sig-
nore and Kenseth unveiled
the new paint scheme for the
Crown Royal cars that will
compete for the 25th time at
"The World Center of Rac-
ing."
Max Papis, Grand Ameri-'
can Rolex Sports Car Series
co-champion, was also pre-
sent for the announcement.
The Italian driver is accus-
tomed to racing on the 3.56-
mile road course at Daytona
International Speedway and
is excited about his new task
' turning l ps on t e2.--mile
tri-oval.
"It's going to be a dream


Morning speeds
1. Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 185.605
mph
2. Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 185.601
3. Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 185.185
4. Jeff Green, Dodge, 184.904
5. Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 184.843
6. Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 184.608
7. Mark Martin, Ford, 184.388
8. Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 184.366
9. Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 184.249
10. Johnny Sauter, Dodge. 184.124
11. Matt Kenseth, Ford, 184.102
12. Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 184.083
13. Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 183.557
14. John Andretti, Chevrolet, 183.187
15. Brian Vickers, Chevrolet, 183.094
16. Derrike Cope, Ford, 183.064
17. Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 183.035
18. Jeff Burton. Chevrolet, 183.001
19. Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 182.997
20. Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 182.711
21. David Stremme, Dodge, 182.035
22. Bobby Hamilton Jr.,
Chevrolet, 181.995
23. Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 181.910
24. Robby Gordon, Chevrolet, 181.752
25. Hermie Sadler, Ford, 181.415
26. Kerry Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 181.025
27. Kirk Shelmerdine, Ford, 178.504


for me," Papis said. "I'm go-
ing to make sure that I'm not
going to turn left right away
after the start/finish line as I
usually do. Daytona has re-
ally been the track that I
made my name in the states
with the Rolex 24. First of
all, I think it's going to be an
honor to compete in IROC
and second I'm really look-
ing forward to running flat
out in the bump draft."
Elliott To Compete In
Budweiser Shootout: Two-
time Daytona 500 champion
Bill Elliott announced he'll'
compete in the Feb. 12 Bud-
weiser Shootout at Daytona
International Speedway dri-
ving a Dodge for Chip
Ganassi Racing with Coors
Light sponsorship. The car
will carry the No. 39 and
feature a retro Coors Light
paint scheme that Elliott
made famous in the 1980s.
"I'm looking forward to
running it," said Elliott,
who'll also run in select
NEXTEL Cup Series events
for owner Ray Evernham.
"It's an opportunity for me
to get a little bit more seat
time. I don't want to run a
lot this year but I want to run
a little bit more than last
year."
Gordon announces spon-
sors: Robby Gordon, who is
owns and drives the No. 7
Chevrolet in the NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup Series, has
announced two sponsors for
the 2005 season. Fruit of the
Loom and Jim Beam will
serve as primary sponsors
during select races.
Tickets: For tickets to any
of the Speedweeks 2005
events, go online at
http://www.daytonintfeitina-
tionalspeedwiay.&I'coM m ' call
1-800-PITSHOP.


Afternoon speeds
1. Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 186.097 mph
2. Johnny Sauter, Dodge, 185.935
3. Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 185.924
4. Robby Gordon, Chevrolet, 185.300
5. Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 185.193
6. Jeff Green, Dodge, 185.060
7. Mike Wallace, Chevrolet. 185.006
8. Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 184.907
9. Matt Kenseth, Ford, 184.824
10. Kasey Kahne, Dodge, 184.733
11. Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 184.585
12. Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 184.528
13. Sterling Marlin, Dodge, 184.053
14. Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 183.944
15. Rusty Wallace, Dodge, 183.895
16. Brian Vickers, Chevrolet, 183.820
17. Kevin Lepage, Dodge, 183.700
18. John Andretti, Chevrolet, 183.621
19. Bobby Hamilton Jr.,
Chevrolet, 183.539
20. Derrike Cope, Ford, 183.486
21. Hermie Sadler, Ford, 183.408
22. Mark Martin, Ford, 183.385
23. Jeff Burton. Chevrolet. 183.180
24. David Stremme, Dodge, 182.604
25. Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 182.567
26. Greg Sacks, Dodge, 181.737
27. Kerry Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 181.294
28. Kirk Shelmerdine, Ford, 178.781


BET VT AE


1984 Isuzu Pup .............................$1,095

1987 Mazda B2000....................1...,495

1986 Plymouth Voyager.................$9,95

1987 Plymouth Voyager.................$1,295

1988 Dodge Work Van.................. $1,195

1989 Ford V150, Work Van............$1,195

1990 Plymouth Voyager.................$1,295

1995 Ford Probe............................$2,995

1995 Chevy C20, Work Van............. $2,195

1995 Olds Cutlass Supreme..........$2,495


1995 Chrysler LeBaron Conv.........$3,000

1996 Chevy Tahoe LT..................... $8,000

1996 Isuzu Pup..............................$3,495

1984 Ford Tempo.......................... $850

1996 Dodge Intrepid...................... $2,495

1992 Grand Prix............................$1,200

1995 Ford Escort........................... $1,195

1986 Ford F250............................. $2,500

1997 Grand Am............................. $2,495

1984 Futra..................................... $600


Kiwanis of Live Oak Annual Yard Sale is February 5, 2005
at the Old Train Depot Platform 8 a.m. til 12 p.m.



We will be happy to pick up the donations




S.!
k .d.,'


386-364-4110 * 386364-3206 * 386-590-6328


PAGE 6B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005











.The Racing Zone


Derek Bell named Grand Marshal for


Derek Bell, a three-time
Rolex 24 At Daytona cham-
pion and one of the most
popular drivers in interna-
tional sports car racing his-
tory, will serve as the Grand
Marshal of the 43rd an-
niversary of the Rolex 24
At Daytona at historic Day-
tona International Speed-
way.
"It's an honor to have
Derek Bell preside as Grand


Marshal in the toughest and
most demanding sports car
endurance race in the
world," Speedway Presi-
dent Robin Braig said. "His
success at Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway speaks for
itself and we're looking
forward to his starting com-
mand for the twice-around-
the-clock challenge."
"With his long and distin-
guished career in sports car


racing, we're delighted to
have Derek Bell serve as
grand marshal of America's
most historic road race,"
President and CEO Rolex
Watch USA Allen Brill said.
The Rolex 24, the season-
opening event for the Grand
American Rolex Sports Car
Series, will serve as the
Grand Opening to Daytona
International Speedway's
newly renovated infield,


When Carl Edwards cap-
tured the inaugural night-
time running of the Florida
Dodge Dealers 250
NASCAR Craftsman Truck
Series race during Speed-
weeks 2004 at Daytona In-
ternational Speedway, he
parked his No. 99 Super-
chips Ford on the start/finish
line and treated the crowd
with his traditional back flip
and cart wheel.
Said Edwards of his first
Daytona victory: "We're
here. We're at Daytona. I'm
standing in Victory Lane.
I'm living, the dream of
every racer on the planet."
Edwards, who will make
the move to the NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup Series and
Busch Series in 2005, is not
expected to return on Friday
night, Feb. 18 to defend his
victory, but there's plenty of
new competition on the
scene that will fight with the
best of the Craftsman Truck
Series in the 100-lap, 250-
mile race.
:. Ron Hqxriday, who cap-
tured two Craftsman Truck
Series championships with
Dale Earnhardt Inc., returns
to the series fulltime in 2005
driving the No. 6 GM Good-
wrench Chevrolet for Kevin
Harvick Inc.
"It's pretty cool to be com-
ing back to the NASCAR
Craftsman Truck Series,"
Hornaday said. "I just enjoy
it. I've got a lot of wins over
there and kind of made it my
home. When Dale (Earn-
hardt Sr.) gave me that call
seven or eight years ago to
come back to North Carolina
and drive his truck, it was
pretty cool. Right now, to
have Kevin Harvick and GM
Goodwrench on the side, to
come back and run the
Craftsman Truck Series is
going to be fun.
"It's going to be cool to
race at Daytona. That's
where the season is sup-
posed to start. That's a big
deal. Daytona's the neatest
track there ever was, and the
trucks definitely put on the
best show there, so.I'm real-
ly looking forward to it."
Hornaday is expected to
renew rivalries with three-


ASK DR. MANTOOTH

Q: What happens when a person gets
gum disease?
A: Bacteria in your mouth form a soft
white substance called plaque that
sticks to your teeth and gums.
Normally, brushing and flossing will
remove the plaque before it hardens
into tartar, which must be removed by
a dentist. The bacteria in tartar
produce toxins that attack the gum
tissue and bones that support your
teeth. This is called gingivitis, which is
the first stage gum disease. When
bacterial infection of the gums spreads
well below the gum line, the condition
is called periodontis. The gum starts to
pull away from the teeth, creating
pockets, Gum disease leads to tooth
loss, can complicate the problems
faced by diabetics and can cause other
health problems. Symptoms are often
mild and most people don't realize they
have gum disease until it is advanced.
A good program of brushing, flossing
and regular visits to the dentist can
minimize your chances of developing
gum disease.
Presented as a service to the community by
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
602 Railroad Ave.
Live Oak, FL
362-6556 |
(800)829-6506


time Craftsman Truck Series
champion Jack Sprague and
Mike Skinner, who won the
inaugural Craftsman Truck
Series championship in
1995.
Newcomers to the series
include Roush Racing's
Ricky Craven and Todd
Kluever and Billy Ballew
Motorsports' Kerry Earn-
hardt. Craven, who is a vet-
eran of the NASCAR NEX-
TEL Cup Series, is excited
about the prospects of racing
a truck underneath the lights
at Daytona.
"Racing at Daytona period
is exciting," said Craven,
who will wheel the No. 99
Superchips Ford formerly
driven by Edwards. "It's a
dream for any young racer
and as you get older, the
dream sort of transfers to the
reality. Being successful
and actually winning an
event at Daytona will be my
focus in February."
The returning cast of dri-
vers to the.Craftsman Truck
Series includes '2004, Crafts-
man Truck Series champion
Bobby Hamilton, 2003
Florida Dodge Dealers 250
winner Rick Crawford, Ted
Musgrave, Dennis Setzer,
Raybestos Rookie of the
Year David Reutimann and
David Starr.


Joining the tough trucks of
the Craftsman Truck Series
on the same night will be
Round 1 of the Crown Royal
IROC XXIX, the 25th con-
secutive year that the Crown
Royal Series has opened its
season at Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway.
The Crown Royal IROC
Series features 12 of the best
drivers in the world in iden-
tically prepared IROC cars
in a four-race season that
showcases the skill of the
drivers involved.
In last year's 40-lap event,
Ryan Newman slipped past
Kurt Busch on the last lap to
capture his second career
victory at "The World Cen-
ter of Racing." Newman
won the Advance Discount
Auto Parts 200 ARCA
RE/MAX Series race in
2001.
Entering the tri-oval,
Newman ducked his No. 12
car underneath the yellow
line to pass Busch's No. 97
:car., Officials. ruled the pass
legal because , uSph blocked
Newman's attempt to pass.
Tickets for Speedweeks
2005 and the 47th annual
Daytona 500 are available
online at http://www.dayton-
ainternationalspeedway.com
or by calling 1-800-PIT-
SHOP.


I THE WOOD STOVE
S AND FIREPLACE CENTER
611 N.MainSt. M-F 9:30 - 5:30 1-800-524-2675
Gainesville Sat. 9:30 - 4:00 Q*II.LL


L I Live Oak]
PAM I IT

U CENTER


\Ve are pulling laninenl Ilooring in our
* family room. There was carpet before with
* only cement under it. This is on the main
S level and we are wondering if we need to put
a protective plastic or a barrier on the cement
before the laminent. Also, the hallway area is uneven. It is
higher at the sides than the middle by,about 1/16th inch.
What way would be best way to even this out?

A Even, when there is no evidence of water
* problems with your slab floor, you should use
the poly film or a 2 in 1 foam. The hall should be
* OK, and will work best of you run the planks
linear to the hallway. The 1/16" shouldn't cause a problem.








1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
135096JRS-F


the 43rd Anniversary of the Rolex 24
which includes a Turn 1 International Speedway in commentator and occasion-
tunnel, FanZone, new the Crown Royal IROC Se- al competitor.
garages, waterfront special- ries, an invitation-only All- The 43rd anniversary of
ty vehicle parking and a Star series, and posted fin- the Rolex 24 At Daytona
new Gatorade Victory Lane ishes of fourth in 1985 and will be held at Daytona In-
and Daytona 500 Club. ninth in 1987. ternational Speedway on
Bell made the first of 20 "It's a great honor and I the weekend of Feb. 5-6,
starts in the Rolex 24 in hope to fulfill the role cor- 2005 and tickets can be pur-
1971 and was part of three rectly," Bell said. "Winning chased online; at
overall winning teams in the race three times was a http://www.daytonainterna-
1986, 1987 and 1990. In ad- great honor. I've had my tionalspeedway.com or by
edition, he won 19 IMSA share of luck obviously, but calling (386) 253-7223. Ad-
events including the 1984 I've had my share of bad ditional information on the
IMSA Finale at Daytona In- luck also." 2005 Rolex 24 and Rolex
ternational Speedway. Bell, 63, remains active Sports Car Series is avail-
The British driver has in the Motorsports commu- able online at
also competed at Daytona nity serving as a television www.grandamerican.com.


College tuition is increasing, lock in now!

Florida Prepaid Enrollment

ends Monday, January 31


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
With the Florida Prepaid
College Plan, Florida fami-
lies can lock in the cost of
college right now and avoid
paying the 7.5 percent hike
in university tuition recom-
mended this week. But
time is running out to se-
cure these cost savings for
newborn children through
the llth grade. The appli-
cation deadline for this
year is Monday, Jan. 31,
2005.
The Florida Prepaid Col-
lege Plan is financially
guaranteed by the State of
Florida, so it is a safe, af-
fordable way to save for
college. This year, the tu-


ition plan prices start as
low as $23 a month for the
two-year community col-
lege plan and $75 a month
for the four-year university
plan. The prices vary
based on the type of plan
and the age of the child.
Once enrolled, the plan
payments are fixed and
never increase. Sign up
now and your first payment
is not due until April 2005.
When the child is ready
for college, the program
covers the actual cost at
any Florida public univer-
sity or community college,
or the value of the plan may
be transferred to most pri-
vate colleges in Florida, se-


lect technical schools and
most out-of-state colleges.
To qualify, the child or
the child's parent/guardian
must be a.Florida resident.
Anyone, including parents,
grandparents, friends or
even businesses, can pur-
chase a plan.
Don't let another year:go
by and pay more for wiat
you can get now! To lock
in this year's prices, you
must submit an application
- online or by mail - by
Monday, Jan. 31, 2005. To
enroll online, visit
www.florida529plans.com
or call 1-800-552-GRAD
(4723) for an Enrollment
Kit and application.


Bulldog basketball at home Thursday, Jan. 271
The Bulldog basketball team is undefeated in the Dog
House. Come out and watch as they fape Ft. White and
try, nihti h that's perfecOt record:a 'am e 'eis 7:30 p.m..

o pof I


You must attend the registration session
Monday, January 31, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, February 2 at 9 a.m.
Call Lynn Lee at

364-27182
to sign up for registration.

Suwannee- Hamnilton'

'Technical Center
,:: 'i Live Oak, FL


Old faces, fresh faces ready to

mix it up in Florida Dodge

Dealers 250 at Daytona


Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!


"Kaleb Simmons" I wwai"

Thank you, Gloria Simmons of Live Oak
for submitting this week's SMILE photograph! '
Submit your photo for publication to:

uuwannie OentanratL
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 13697JRS
136997JR S F


I


PAGE 7B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


1:.' '., . ^. , I


7�1 t�








CIVIC SUWANNEE

wal Mart donates to community

-~ ~ el~i~i


WAL-MART DONATES TO CRIPPLED CHILDREN: Wal-Mart do-
nates a $2,500 check to the Live Oak Shrine Club for the Shriners
Crippled Children's Fund. Pictured I - r, Live Oak Shriners Don
Gilmore, Ray Madren, Wal-Mart Assistant Store Manager Larry
Dyal and Leo Conner. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


' -� ;- """ ' -
-"- - % . - .? . '." .


WAL-MART SUPPORTS GIRL SCOUTS: Wal-Mart donates a $300
check to local Girl Scout Troop 002. Pictured I - r, Zoe Janack, girl
scout, Audra Janack, Wal-Mart Assistant Manager Larry Dyal and
Girl Scout Megan Ellis. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


WAL-MART DONATES TO VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH: Wal-Mart
donates a $325 check to Angela Robinson who accepted on be-
half of Victory Baptist Church youth program. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


The Racing Zone



Motorcycle test wraps up; Hodgson makes return to Daytona


The three-day motorcycle
tire test at historic Daytona
International Speedway
wrapped up with more than
20 riders turning laps on the
new 2.95-mile road course
in preparation for Daytona
200 Week on March 3-12.
The test gave riders the
first opportunity to shake
down the new infield mo-
torcycle road course as well
as utilize the new amenities
from the multi-million,
multi-faceted infield reno-
vation.
For new Ducati Austin
rider Neil Hodgson, every-
thing at Daytona Interna-


tional Speedway seemed
new.
"It feels so different,"
Hodgson said during the
lunch break on Wednesday.
"My bike was just a priva-
teer Ducati. I spoke to the
technicians here and they
think the (1995) bike would
have less power than a 600
would have now. All I re-
member was going around
the bike comfortable and re-
laxed enjoying the ride.
Now we you get on those
beasts, it feels like warp
speed."
Hodgson made his first
and only visit to the "The


World Center of Racing"
back in 1995 when he com-
peted in the Daytona 200
finishing 16th aboard a pri-
vateer Ducati.
Since then, Hodgson won
the British Superbike cham-
pionship (2000) and World
Superbike championship
(2003) and has now re-
turned to America to com-
pete in the AMA Superbike
championship with Ducati
Austin.
Besides breaking in the
new infield motorcycle
course, Hodgson also no-
ticed all the changes in the
infield such as the new


garages, new Gatorade Vic-
tory Lane and.Daytona 500
Club, FanZone and massive
Turn 1 tunnel.
"I remember it was a bit
scruffy," Hodgson said of
his first visit to the track. "It
looked dated 10 years ago.
I'm glad they put all these
new garages in for me.
That's very kind. I really
impressed with that."
Hodgson will compete
aboard the 999 Ducati in the
opening round of the AMA
Superbike championship se-
ries at Daytona on Saturday,
March 12 as he tries to be-
come the first rider in histo-


ry to win World, British and
America championships.
He's ready for the chal-
lenges that Daytona pre-
sents.
"It's not a picnic," Hodg-
son said. "At this track,
there's nowhere to rest. Ob-
viously, the banking, you
can't relax on it. When you
come off the banking go to-
wards to the finish line,
you're going so fast and
there's so much wind on
you, you're just trying to
hold onto the thing."
This week's test was the
first with his new team. So
far, Hodgson has been im-


pressed.
"I think the team is really
looking promising," Hodg-
son said. "They've got fan-
tastic support from Italy.
They've got some fantastic
technicians here. I didn't
know what to expect. This
is my first test with the team
and I'm pleasantly sur-
prised. Everybody has been
extremely professional. I
think we've got a fair
chance."
Tickets for Daytona 200
Week are available online at
http://www.daytonainterna-
tio.nalspeedway.com or by
calling 1-800-PITSHOP.


Biffle, Busch and Kenseth familiarize themselves with Daytona


Prototype Trio of NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series Drivers prep for Rolex 24


Roush Racing drivers
Greg Biffle, Kurt Busch and
Matt Kenseth are use to
competing against each oth-
er in stock cars in the
NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Se-
ries.,
During the recent Rolex
24 At Daytona test session
at historic Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway, the trio of
drivers were educating
themselves on their new ride
- the Ford Multimatic Day-
tona Prototype.
Biffle, Busch and Kenseth
will team up with Scott
Maxwell to race the sleek
and stylish No. 49 car in the
Feb. 5-6 Rolex 24, the sea-


I
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son-opening event to the
Rolex Sports Car Series.
"I'm a rookie again,"
Busch said. "I won the
NASCAR NEXTEL Cup
championship a couple of
months ago and here I am a
rookie in the Rolex Series.
It's something that I'm look-
ing forward to challenging
myself with in learning this
car and the style of racing
you have to run on for 24
hours. It's a wonderful op-
portunity to race within this
group of guys. It seems like
the Rolex Series continues
to gain more and more speed
each and every year."
None of the NASCAR


I

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- Mart AC IY'MAR laa
Eyeglass Food IdpnetOomi
Express L


I


NEXTEL Cup veterans had
no hesitation about adding
another race onto their al-
ready busy schedule. Being
able to compete in a presti-
gious race such as the Rolex
24 and drive a completely
different type of car was just
too enticing.
"It's a great opportunity to
jump into a car that we've
never had a chance to race,"
Busch said. "It's free time,
it's fun. I'm excited about
learning a new track, a new
style of car and a working
with a different group of
guys. Yes, it does take away
time from our off-season,
but yet we're professional
racers and we love to be in
race cars."
Said Kenseth: "This is a


huge race. I've never raced
sports car stuff at all. I have
no road racing background
besides the two road courses
on the NEXTEL Cup sched-
ule. That's the only road
race that I've done. This is
definitely something that I
wanted to do and be a part
of for a few years."
Biffle, Busch and Kenseth
are spending the test session
learning both the ins and
outs of the historic 3.56-
mile road course and their
new race cars.
"This is a whole other
world for me," said Biffle,
who won the 2003 Pepsi 400
and the pole for the 2004
Daytona 500. "I've got
some experience road racing
in NASCAR and that's


/JC-Look

What

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...if you missed the last edition of
�le umannee emrnocrat
S'Bran ford tairents meet -:'ithi o.ficiaL'
' Suzannee ' coacli ''I I lls tired1 b 'Tift County, .Qza.
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- 'Traffic stop results in arrest for possession of
crack"cocaitne

To subscribe to muinaume eDetnorat call (386) 362-1734 or complete this
coupon and mail to: �Sumiitute' lnrocrat, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


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about all the experience I
have. I can't say enough
about the Multimatic team
and Scotty helping me tran-
sition into this car. He's
probably getting tired of me
asking him questions but
he's been very, very helpful.
I just need to keep it off the
grass and keep it on the race
track. There's a little bit
more traction there.
Jack Roush, who fields
Fords for Biffle, Busch and
Kenseth in the NEXTEL
Cup Series, isn't involved
'with the Rolex 24 effort, but
helped spark the interest in
competing.


Roush, as an owner,
earned 10 Rolex 24 class
victories.
"My main drive came
from Roush Racing's history
in this race," Busch said.
"Even though he's not di-
rectly affiliated with this
program, I race for Roush
Racing and it's an opportu-
nity for me to blend in to
some of the racing heritage
he's had."
Tickets for the Feb. 5-6
Rolex 24 At Daytona are
available online at
http://www.daytonainterna-
tionalspeedway.com or by
calling 1-800-PITSHOP.


_o, OH-SO SWEET





- PAGE 7D


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EYEGLASS

EXPREiSSTM


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGE 8B


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FORESTRY LENDS A HAND FOR ARBOR DAY: In recognition of Arbor Day Jan. 21, students from
the Suwannee Primary School listen as Brian Cobble from the Department of Forestry instructs the
students how to plant this tree properly. Two picnic tables were donated by Farmers Co-Op and Land
Creations donated the sycamore tree. - Photo: Yvette Hannon

Volunteer Positions


If you enjoy working with
children and have an hour or
two to donate each week,
Suwannee Primary School
needs you!
Tutors - School personnel
will train you for this posi-
tion. Each child requires 15
minutes of tutoring per
day. Contact Carol Yanoussi at
386-364-2650.
Cafeteria Buddys - Be a


friend to little ones as they eat
their lunch. Hand out stickers
for good behavior, help them
open their ketchup packets,
etc. Contact Betty Ann Sumner
at 386-364-2650.
Readers - For Books on Tape
program. Contact Carol
Yanoussi at 386-364-2650.
**Urgent Need!! Classroom
Helpers - Come on a scheduled
basis...one hour per day, one


hour per week, or even all day
every day! Contact Barbara
Barker at 386-362-9089.
Emergency Chaperones - Fill
in when a parent becomes ill or
has to work and can't chaperone
a field trip. Contact Barbara
Barker at 386-362-9089.
Library - Shelve books and/or
help children select books. Con-
tact Barbara Barker at 386-362-
9089.


McAlpin 4-H meeting for January
The agenda for the Janu- One of those items dis- hibit.
ary meeting of the McAlpin cussed was the upcoming A fund-raiser was also dis-
4-H Club included the dis- livestock show at the cussed to raise money for
cussion of the newsletter Suwannee County Fair. Each this years events.
from the 4-H Extension Of- member will be showing Submitted by Reporter:
fice. their animals during this ex- Steve Harris

"My One and Only" enormous fun


The Tony Award winning musical "My One and Only" will be
presented at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 4, in the Alfonso Levy Per-
forming Arts Center at Lake City Community College. It is a de-
lightful and entertaining story that concerns an aviator, an English
Channel swimmer and the America of 1927. The sensational
score of George and Ira Gershwin features the popular songs
"Funny Face," "Strike Up the Band," "Nice Work If You Can Get
It," and "How Long Has This Been Going On?" to name a few.
With gorgeous sets and costumes and the magical music of the
Gershwins, this is a musical every audience will enjoy and trea-
sure.
Tickets for the performance are: $14 general admission, $13
seniors, and $12 LCCC staff and students and students fiom oth-
er schools. Dinner before the show will start at 6 p.m. The cost is
$6 including tax for Spanish chicken and rice, salad, dinner roll,
dessert and beverage. Reservations are required.
For more information regarding the performance and the din-
ner, call the box office at 386-754-4340.


INFORMATION

WHO: Lake City Communiity
College
WHAT: Tony Award winning mu-
sical "My One and Only"
WHEN: 7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb.
4/Dinner at 6 p.m. - reservations
required for meal
WHERE: Alfonso Levy Perform-
ing Arts Center
COST: $14 general admission,
$13 seniors, and $12 LCCC staff
and students and students from
other schools and $6 for dinner -
reservations required for meal
CONTACT: 386-754-4340


Eleven local teachers honored in the eighth edition

of Who's Who Among America's Teachers�


A select group of America's
teachers are being honored by
their toughest critics - their
former students - in the eighth
edition of Who's Who Among
America's Teachers�.
Students were requested to
nominate the one teacher
from their entire academic
experience who made a dif-
ference in their lives by help-
ing to shape their values, in-
spire interest in a particular
subject and challenge them to
strive for excellence. Stu-
dents also mentioned enthusi-
asm about their subject and
the knowledge their nominat-
ed teachers demonstrated in
the classroom.
All of the 156,000 teachers


BL


BUISC i

UROi,]


honored in Who's Who
Among American Teachers
were nominated by former
students who themselves are
currently listed in Who's Who
Among American High
School Students�, Who's
Who Among American High
School Students - Sports Edi-
tion�, or The National
Dean's List�.
Parke H. Davis, Chairman,
National Academic Affairs,
has said, "There is no greater
honor teachers can receive
than to be recognized by for-
mer students for their excel-
lence and dedication. In this
publication, we clearly have
the best teachers in America
selected by the best students."


Teachers from the local
area featured in the Eighth
Annual Edition of Who's
Who Among America's
Teachers, 2004 are: Angela S.
Abercrombie - Suwannee
High School (SHS), Christine
Piehe Ash - Lafayette High
School (LHS), David Keith
Crutchfield - SHS, Tracy
Hickman Crutchfield - SHS,
Sandra Young Hurst - SHS,
Ashley S. Lundy - SHS,
Sharon Peppers Lundy -
(SHS), Margie McDonald
McLeod - Branford Elemen-
tary School (BES), Marcia M.
Norris - Suwannee Middle
School (SMS), Dale Leggett
O'Connor - SHS and Melissa
Grabe Woodrum - (SHS).


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.

ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
BOARD CERTIFIED UROLOGY AND
UROLOGICAL SURGERY


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men and urinary tract problems in women. All ages welcomed and each patient is treated as an
individual, with his or her needs specifically addressed.
Common Problems Treated - Infections * Prostrate Problems * Kidney Stones * Sexual Problems
* Genital Surgery * Cancer of the Urinary Tract * Impotence * Infertility * Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office * Cystoscopy * No Scalpel Vasectomy * Treatment of
Condyloma * Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy * Bladder Ultrasound * Penile Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Procedures in Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center - Prostate, Kidney
and Bladder Surgery * Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy * Microscopic Vasectomy Reversal
* Impotence Surgery


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SPECIALIZING IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF MALE IMPOTENCE
SURGICAL AND MEDICAL THERAPIES
All patients are given personal and confidential attention
Office Locations in Lake City and Live Oak
Toll Free 1-888-775-6853 ,1315JR


STUDENTS PLANT A TREE: Mrs. Athertons students at the Suwannee Primary School join together
to help plant a tree for Arbor Day Jan. 21. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Thirteen local high school


students included in


Who's Who Among American


High School Students�


Thirteen local .high
school students are includ-
ed in the 38th Annual Edi-
tion of Who's Who Among
American High School
Students, 2003-2004.
Who's Who, published
by Educational Communi-
cations, Inc., Austin,
Texas, is the largest recog-
nition program in the na-
tion honoring high achiev-
ing high school students.
Si tdenis aaremnornminated 'by
high school principals and
guidance counselors, na-
tional youth groups,
churches and educational
organizations based upon
students' academic
achievement and involve-
ment in extracurricular ac-
tivities. Traditionally, 97


percent of Who's Who stu-
dents are college bound.
The 38th Annual Edition
of Who's Who Among
American High School
Students, 2003-2004, pub-
lished in 15 regional vol-
umes, features nearly
600,000 students or just
five percent of the nation's
15 million high school stu-
dents. They represent ap-
proximately 20,000 of the
24.000. public, private-and
parochial high schools in
the country.
Who's Who students also
compete for $200,000 in
scholarship awards and
participate, in the publica-
tion's Annual Survey of
SHigh Achievers, an annual
opinion poll of teen atti-


tudes. The book is distrib-
uted on a complimentary
basis to up to 10,000 high
schools, colleges, universi-
ties and public libraries
throughout the country. To
learn more about Who's
Who Among American
High School Students�,
visit www.whoswho-high-
school.com.
Local students selected
include: Ke iineih Bricker, -
Haley Cleshire, Eveln:',\'V.
Crapps, April Ferguson,
Ashley R. Knieriem,
Kristy McManaway, Han-
nah B. Miller, Ashleigh
Pritchard, Bethany A.
Schmidt, Amanda Wain-
wright, Jamie Ward,
Colleen E. Welsh and
Tabitha Windham.


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PAGE 9B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


SCHOOL



Forestry lends hand for Arbor Day


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-.--








Christmas on the Square Parade winners


* .


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'6-


In Show ' award for her entry in the Christmas on the Square Pa-
rade Dec. 4. Pictured I - r, Christmas on the Square Chairman
Bruce Tillman, Joyce and parade chairman Vivian Starling.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon
, * .. .












W.B. HOWLANDS ON THE SQUARECOND PARADE WINNER: The horse
'Heart of Gold Earrier' float by Kyla 'Spring' Joyce won the 'Best










In Shoa award for her entry in thplae Christmas on the omm erial cate-
rade Dec. 4. Pictured - r, Christmas on the Square. Pictured I - r, Chairmas on
e Sre Chairman Bruce Tillman, Jolley, Kce and parade chairman Vivian Starling.
chairman Vivian Starling. - hoto: Yvette Hannon
carnVvnSaig ot:vtenn
- .._ - . . . z...,
e' : '; '_... 4 -Y !; - -
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chairman Vivian Starling. - Photo: Yvette Harmon


- P.M;i




GOLDKIST RECEIVES AWARD: Tammy Johns accepts an award
for GoldKist for first place in the commercial category and a tro-
phy for 'Best Overall'. Pictured I - r, Christmas on the Square
Chairman Bruce Tillman, Tammy Johns and parade chairman Vi-
vian Starling. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


RIDING CLUB TAKES SECOND IN NON COMMERCIAL: The Suwan-
nee River Riding Club takes second place in the non commercial cat-
egory during the Christmas on the Square Parade Dec. 4. Pictured
I - r, Christmas on the Square chairman Bruce Tillman, Kayla and
Kay Ratliff and parade Chairman Vivian Starling. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


, . . . . . . .-..'...'.



CLERK WINS FIRST PLACE IN NON COMMERCIAL: Suwannee
County Clerk of the Court, Kenneth Dasher, accepts a first place
trophy on behalf of the Suwannee County Clerk's Office in the non
commercial category for a float entered in the Christmas on the
Square Parade. Pictured I - r, Christmas on the Square Chairman
Bruce Tillman, Dasher and parade chairman Vivian Starling.
- Photo: Yvette Hannon ,


CHEEK AND SCOTT WINS THIRD PLACE: Jill Poole and Michelle
Cupp accept a trophy for third place in the commercial category;
for the Christmas on the Square Parade. Pictured I - r, Christmas,
on the Square Chairman Bruce Tillman, Poole, Cupp and parade-
chairman Vivian Starling. - Photo: Yvette Hannon
Conratulations to all

the parade winners.


The news readers



of today are the



. news makers of


tomorrow


Sa t PI r w y ih re


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P.O. Box 340, Live Oak, FL 32064


-- I


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


PAGE 10BR


.:I

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


BUSINESS




Local CPAs are featured speakers at Village Forum


On Jan. 13, local CPAs
Vickie C. Music, F. Eugene
Kish, Tamie C. DeBono and
Richard H. Jones of Collins
& Company, CPA's were the
featured speakers at the
weekly forum in the Phillips
Dining Room at the Advent
Christian Village. The fo-
rum content included
changes in the 2004 tax
laws as a result of two new
bills passed by Congress in
2004. Specifically, the
Working Families Tax Re-


lief Act of 2004 and the
American Jobs Creation Act
of 2004 were explained.
Topics discussed includ-
ed: revisions to individual
tax brackets; the new provi-
sion that allows sales tax to
be deducted as an itemized
deduction; extension of
time to contribute to Tsuna-
mi disaster recovery efforts;
Florida hurricane relief
granted by the Internal Rev-
enue Service; modifications
to, long-term capital gains


rates; as well as other perti-
nent information associated
with the upcoming tax-fil-
ing season.
Collins & Company,
CPAs was founded in 1977
by Steven W. Collins, CPA
and currently consists of
five CPAs, two professional
staff accountants and two
paraprofessionals. Collins
& Company is located at
325 South Ohio Avenue in
Live Oak and can be
reached at (386) 362-1040.


Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 612004CA0002870001XX

THE CIT GROUP/CONSUMER FINANCE,
INC.
Plaintiff,
V.
WILLIAM T. LISLE; , UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM T. LISLE;
CHARLES B. BROWN, III; and all unknown
parties claiming by, through, under or
against the herein named Defendants, who
are not known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties claims as heirs, de-
visees, grantees, assignees, lienors, credi-
tors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants;
TENANT #1 and/or TENANT #2, the parties
intended to account for the person or per-
sons in possession; SUWANNEE COUNTY,
a political subdivision of the STATE OF
FLORIDA
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: WILLIAM T. LISLE and UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM T. LISLE, and all un-
known parties claiming by, through, under or
against the herein named Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties claims as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, spouses, or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but whose last
known address was:
805 White Avenue, SE, Live Oak, Florida
32064
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following property in
SUWANNEE County, Florida, to-wit:
THE SOUTH 4.00 FEET OF LOT 3, ALL OF
LOT 4 AND THE N1/2 OF LOT 5, BLOCK 0,
OAKHURST SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO PLATTHEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 36, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SUWANNEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is 18830
U.S. Highway 19 North, Suite 300, Clearwater,
-i.:.i;.jvn -'-.. on , befor" , aI . r, 7, 2005 or
i r,, r. irin, i ,,n ,.j .3 ne an-, ir,. hi publication
of the Notice of Action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court at 200 South Ohio Av-
enue, Live Oak, FL 32064, either before ser-
vice of Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the Court on
this 20th day of January, 2005.
(SEAL) Kenneth Dasher
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/Arlene D. Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey
01/26, 02/02


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 61-2004-CP-0002580001XX
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUDITH MONTAG
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JUDITH
MONTAG, deceased, whose date of death was
January 10, 2002, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Suwannee County, Florida, Probate
division, File No. 61-2004-CP-0002580001XX,
the address of which is Suwannee County
Courthouse, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live
Oak, Florida 32064. The names and addresses
of the Personal Representative and the Per-
sonal Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons, who have claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice, must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OFTHE FIRST PUBLICATION OFTHIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OFTHIS ; NOTICE
ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons who have claims or demands against
the decedent's estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OFTHIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OFTHIS
NOTICE IS JANUARY 26, 2005.
Personal Representative:
/s/Sanford Monlag
SANFORD MONTAG
1 Faith Lane
Ardsley, New York
Attorney for Personal Representative:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTORNEYS, P.A.
By: /s/Mark E. Feaele
Florida Bar No. 0576905
Attorney for Personal Representative
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
01/26, 02/02

OH-SO SWEET




SGE
- PAGE 7D


Suwannee Legals


PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
CITY OF LIVE OAK, FLORIDA
ISSUE DATE: February 11, 2005
PROJECT: STORMWATER INPROVE-
MENTS-Hwy. 90 and The Suwannee Demo-
crat.
The project generally consist of the construc-
tion of approximately 2,817 LF of stormwater
piping, 15" RCP through 36" RCP with 22
stormwater structures, 70 LF of Jack and Bore
and asphalt paving in Base Bid I and 66,945
cubic yards of regular excavation (all on site),
an outfall structure and associated piping in
Base Bid II.
The project will be bid as Bade Bid I. Base Bid
II or the combination of Base Bid I and II. The
City reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all bids, and/or any portion of a bid.
PROCUREMENT OF DOCUMENTS: Plans,
bid documents and specifications are avail-
able at City Hall, 101 SE White Ave, Live Oak,
Florida. The cost for a set of plans, bid docu-
ments and specifications is $100.00 and is
non refundable.
BID OPENING DATE: February 11, 2005 at
2:00 in Live Oak City Hall.
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Live
Oak, Florida, until 2:00 p.m., local time, on the
bid opening date, at which time and place all
bids will be publicly opened and will be avail-
able for inspection upon notice of award or in-
tended award or within ten (10) days after bid
opening, whichever is earlier. Bid prices may
be read at the public bid opening, at the sole
discretion of City Administrator. Bids must be
in the possession of City Administrator pri-
or to bid call at 2:00 p.m. on the bid date
noted above. Possession is defined as being
physically received at City Hall, 101 SE White
Ave, Live Oak, Florida 32064. ANY BID RE-
CEIVED AFTER THE BID CALL WILL NOT
BE CONSIDERED. Bids shall be sealed and
plainly marked on the outside of the envelope
with both the bid number and the bid name.
Bids must be completed and signed in ink in
spaces) provided on the enclosed Bid form(s)
and submitted in duplicate or bid will be sub-
ject to rejection.
Any deviation from the specifications must be
explained in detail on sheets attached to the
Bid Form and labeled "Clarifications and Ex-
ceptions" and each deviation must be itemized
by number and must specifically refer to the
applicable specification paragraph and page.

ifications and the successful bidder will be
held responsible for meeting the specifica-
tions. A bidder who is aggrieved in connection
with the specifications of this bid may protest
in writing to Public Works Department prior to
the opening of bids. If Bidder wishes its Stan-
dard Terms and Conditions to be considered
as part of its bid, such terms and conditions
must be made part of the "Clarifications and
Exceptions." The City reserves the following
rights: to waive clarifications and exceptions in
awarding the bid in the best interest of the
City; to accept or reject any or all bids; to waive
any or all irregularities; and, to award the con-
tract to the responsible bidder whose bid is de-
termined by the City to be in its best interest.
Notice of intended award shall be posted at
City Hall. Protests in respect to intended
award must be filed within three calendar days
of posting for purchases which do not require
prior approval of the City Council and with sev-
en calendar days for purchases which require
prior approval of the City Council. It is the bid-
der's responsibility to be informed of the in-
tended award and specific protest procedures.
Further information may be obtained by call-
ing Mr. Robert Farley, Public Works Director
at (386) 362-2276, during normal office hours
or by faxing to (386) 362-2876.
Robert E. Farley
Public Works Director
01/19, 26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 61-2003-CA-0001940001XX
WACHOVIA BANK, N.A.,
AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE
Successor by Merger to FIRST UNION
NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JEFFREY M. SUCATO, NORISA R. SUCA-
TO,
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION
#1 and #2, et.al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 10, 2005. entered in Civil Case No61-
2003-CA-0001940001XX of the Circuit Court
of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Suwan-
nee County, Florida, wherein WACHOVIA
BANK, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE Suc-
cessor by Merger to FIRST UNION NATION-
AL BANK, Plaintiff, and JEFFREY M. SUCA-
TO, NORISA R. SUCATO, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2, at. al.,
are Defendants.

I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the
Front Steps of the Suwannee County Court-
house, 200 Ohio Avenue south, Live Oak, FL
32064, at 11:00 a.m.. on the 10lth day of Feb-
ruary, 2005 the following described real prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Summary Judg-
ment, to wit:
THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWN-
SHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, SUWAN-
NEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court
on January 10 2005.
(COURT SEAL) KENNETH DASHER
CLERK OF THE COURT
By: /s/Arlene D. Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Brian L. Rosaler, PA.
10 Fairway Drive
Suite 302
Deerfield Beach, FL 33441
Telephone: (954) 360-9030
Facsimile: (954) 420-5187
1/19, 1/26


Suwannee Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Auction to be held at:
Duncan Tire & Auto
422 East Howard St.
Live Oak, FI 32064
386-362-4743
Auction Time & Date:
February 21, 2005 @ 3:00 pm
1989 BUICK 1G4HP54CXKH418145
1984 PLYM 1P3AP64KORN102459
1992 OLDS 1G3AL54N2N6406087
1997 Honda JHLRD1852VC035603
1989 CHEVY 1G1LV14W2KE113708
01/26

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE is hereby given that the City of Live
Oak will hold a public hearing Tuesday, Febru-
ary 8, 2005 at 8:00 P.M. in the City Council
Meeting Room located in the Live Oak City
Hall, on the final reading of ORDINANCE NO:
1076.
AN ORDINANCE VOLUNTARILY ANNEXING
CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY INTO THE CITY
LIMITS OF LIVE OAK, FLORIDA AND RE-
DEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES OF THE
MUNICIPALITY TO INCLUDE SAID PROPER-
TY; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Real property description:
Part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4
of Section 22, Township 2 South, Range 13
East, Suwannee County, Florida, containing
0.28 acres more or less, and
The South 20.00 feet of Lot 2, Block 3 of Town
& Country'Estates, Unit 1 and the East 182.00
feet of Lot 1, Block 3 of Town & Country Es-
tates, Unit 1, less the East 100.00 Feet, said
subdivision recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 157,
of the Public Records of Suwannee County,
Florida.

-








The domplete-legal description by metes and
bounds and the ordinance can be obtained
from the office of the city clerk.
At the aforementioned hearing, all interested
parties may appear and be heard with respect
to the above matter.

Don Boyette
President of the Live Oak City Council


01/26, 02/04


ATTEST;
William J. McCullers, Sr.
City Clerk


PUBLIC NOTICE
The Suwannee County Code Enforcement
Board will hold a regular Meeting on THURS-
DAY, February 3, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. at the
Suwannee County Coliseum in the Exhibi-
tion 2 Building, 1302 11th Street (Newburn
Road), Live Oak, FI 32064.
01/26, 28, 02/02

SOLICITATION NO. 2005-01
REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF
QUALIFICATIONS FOR CIVIL
ENGINEERING CONSULTING SERVICES
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

THE SUWANNEE COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WILL RECEIVE
SEALED STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICA-
TIONS FROM CERTIFIED FLORIDA PRO-
FESSIONAL ENGINEERING FIRMS TO PRO-
VIDE CIVIL ENGINEERING/CONSULTING
SERVICES AS NEEDED FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT
ANY AND ALL STATEMENTS, WAIVE FOR-
MALITIES AND READVERTISE AND AWARD
THE STATEMENT IN THE BEST INTEREST
OF SUWANNEE COUNTY,

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE BECAUSE
OF RACE, CREED, COLOR, NATIONAL ORI-
GIN OR HANDICAP STATUS.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS REQUIRES A SWORN.STATEMENT UN-
DER SECTION 286.133(3)(A), F.S. ON PUB-
LIC ENTITY CRIMES.

ANYONE WISHING TO OBTAIN SPECIFICA-
TIONS FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICA-
TIONS FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING/CON-
SULTING SERVICES MAY CONTACT
KRISTIE HARRISON, SUWANNEE COUNTY
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DEPART-
MENT, (386) 362-6869. FOR ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION CONCERNING SPECIFICA-
TIONS, PLEASE CONTACT JERRY SIKES,
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, AT (386)
362-3992.

SEVEN COPIES OF THE STATEMENT OF
QUALIFICATIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AT
THE SUWANNEE COUNTY CLERK OF
COURT OFFICE, SUWANNEE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 200 S. OHIO AVENUE, LIVE
OAK, FL 32064 UNTIL WEDNESDAY, FEB-
RUARY 9, 2005 AT 4:30 P. M. ANY STATE-
MENTS RECEIVED AFTER THAT TIME WILL
NOT BE CONSIDERED. ALL STATEMENTS
MUST BE LABELED ON THE OUTSIDE OF
THE ENVELOPE AS SEALED SOLICITATION
2005-01 REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF
QUALIFICATIONS FOR CIVIL ENGINEER-
ING/ CONSULTING SERVICES.)

STATEMENTS WILL BE OPENED THURS-
DAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2005 AT 10:00 A. M. AT
THE SUWANNEE COUNTY CLERK OF
COURT OFFICE, SUWANNEE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 200 S. OHIO AVENUE, LIVE
OAK, FLORIDA 32064.

BILLY MAXWELL, CHAIRMAN
SUWANNEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
01/26


Local CPAs Vickie C. Music and F Eugene Kish, of Collins & Company, CPA's were two of the fea-
tured speakers at the weekly forum at Advent Christian Village. Pictured I-r areAdvent Christian Vil-
lage Resource Development Director Craig Carter, Music and Kish:- Photo-submitted



J.L. McMullen appointed



honorary chairman


J.L. McMullen has been ap-
pointed honorary chairman
for the 69th Annual Conven-
tion of the Crew, a national or-
ganization of former members
of the Junior Chamber of
Commerce (Jaycees) who
were active in local, state and
national activities.
The convention, first time
to be held in Florida, will be
held in Daytona Beach, March
18-20. The 2004 convention
was held in Tulsa, Okla. The
crew of over 1,200 serve as
mates on the mythical ship
S.S. Felloship.
McMullen has been a crew
member since 1959. He was
appointed honorary chairman
of the 69th Annual Conven-
t'II ij I.i tIc Ci-./ by Keeper of
the Log Robert F. Lindholm


of Falls Church, Va.
McMullen was the co-
founder of the first Jaycee or-
ganization in Suwannee
County, and served as board
chairman, in January of 1938.
He was a vice-president of the
Florida Jaycees 1938-39 and
chairman of the Florida
Jaycees Crime Prevention
Committee that was a co-
sponsor of the current Florida
Parole and Probation Com-
mission. McMullen co-
chaired Suwannee
County/Live Oak Jaycees
welcome station committee
that established Florida's first
Welcome Station, located on
US 41, near the Georgia/Flori-
da line, chaired a special leg-
islative committee of the
Florida Jaycees, that spon-


scored legislation, requested by
the military, that provided for
the three-day waiting period
between application for and
granting of a marriage license.
He developed and chaired a
national committee of the
United States Jaycees, "Good
Government Awards," created
by president Selden F. Waldo,
1946-47 and continued under
president John Ben Shep-
perd's administration, 1947-
48.
McMullen was president of
the Florida Jaycees, 1942-43
and a member of the United
States Jaycees board of direc-
tors, 1942-44.
He was inducted into the
United States Jaycees "Hall of
Leadership" inl Tula,. Okla. in
1983.


..P D.istrict Two, Florida

FinancialProrec ID3- Three SegmentID





S- - -. .


Ie/ -10e Mase P� laJCMiid3 �k LO W A

The Florida Department of Transportation is conducting a study called the Interstate 10 Master
Plan, designed to guide development of an intermodal interstate system that will serve the mobility
needs of people and freight and foster economic growth and development, while minimizing
transportation-related fuel consumption and air pollution. FDOT will be hosting five (5) public
workshops to seek input from the public on future plans for I-10 from the Jefferson/Madison County
Line east to 1-295 in Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida. Project team members will be on hand to
share and explain alternatives for improvements to the interstate and interchanges, as well as answer
any questions regarding the study.
Beginning at 5:00 p.m. at each of the workshops, Department personnel with maps, drawings
and other pertinent information will be available to discuss the project and to answer questions. Even
though the Department will not make a formal presentation, anyone desiring to make a
comment/statement at this workshop will be given the opportunity to do so at 7:00 p.m.


Tuesday, February 8, 2005
Quality Inn
US 90 & 1-75
Lake City, FL

Thursday, February 10, 2005
City Hall Council Chambers
101 SE White Ave.
Live Oak, FL


Monday, February 14, 2005
N. FL. Community College
1000 Turner Davis Drive
Madison, FL

Thursday, February 17, 2005
Baker County Middle School
211 E. Jonathan Street
Macclenny, FL


Tuesday, February 22, 2005
Baldwin Middle-Senior High
291 Mill Street
Baldwin, FL


The project is being developed in compliance with Titles VI and VIII of the Civil Rights Act.
Public participation is solicited without regard to face, color, religion, sex, age, national origin,
disability or familial status. Anyone needing project or public workshop information or special
accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, should write to the address or call
the telephone number below. Special accommodation requests under the Americans with Disabilities
Act should be made at least seven (7) days prior to the workshop.
Your attendance at this workshop is encouraged and any comments made are appreciated. If
you have any questions or comments please contact:


Suraya Z. Teeple, AICP, Florida Department of Transportation; District 2, Jacksonville Urban Office
2250 Irene Street, Mail Station 2812, Jacksonville, FL 32204
(904) 360-5683; Suraya.teeple@dot.state.fl.us
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 1
SFLORIDA DEPARTIVIENT OF: TRANSPORTATION 173-


PAGE 11B


~+4J _;~)~IS� tr 1-r_--~-
��� �-�
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PAG 12_ U_ SUANEDMCRTLV A WDEDY ANAY2,20
UlIIi


Wednesday, January 26, 8-7
SThursday, January 27, 8-7 tO
riday, January 28, 8-7 ,W E
Saturday, January 29, 9-6 US 90 WEST
Monday, January 31, 8-7 s

At our SUNBELT DODGE location

Hwy.H 9 West, Lake City

Call 386-755-3444 for more information


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Mitsubishi Eclipse '04 Dodge Durango
i'_, ,i . . .- " " '


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'04 Toyota Sequoia
L^ $


$433 / o.


'04 Chrysler Pacifica
A L.- ......4^^ -


$345-5mo.


O'2 Chevy S-10
, ' ^, ^'"'S


Fiberglass, bTnneau Cover, Low Miles
*84-9.2
/Mo.


Preowned payments based on $2,500 cash down or trade equity, plus tay, tag & title financed for 72 months @ 5.5% APR with 760 or higher beacon score. W.A.C.
*Based on 36 months lease, $1,928 due at inception on Civic, $2,038 due at inception on Accord. $3,173 due at inception on Pilot plus tax tag and registration.

O HWY 41 SOUTH, HONDA HILL
H ONA LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
ICn FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:
SF LAKE CITY (386) 755-6500 *(877) 619-2796


'00
w^�


I


I


I


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2005


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 12B


'03 Chevy S-10
b^S^^-^^ ^^H-ifft ' ' '''"I















Serving Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette Counties Live Oak Publications, Inc


Universal Studios kicks off Mardi Gras with largest concert line-up ever!

-Rock 'n' roll legends headline multi-act concert to open annual Mardi Party -


iIt's time to "Mardi" the
night away as Universal Stu-
jdios kicks off its annual
Mardi Gras celebration with
|its largest and most exciting
,concert series ever. Cele-
ibrating its 10th fun-filled
'year of Mardi party, Univer-
!sal Studios is proudly host-
ing a one-of-a-kind, multi-
iact concert headlined by
many legendary rock 'n' roll
musical performers.
SMardi Gras begins with an
'amazing concert by the Mu-
sicians 4 Disaster Relief Or-
ganization. The all-star line-
up includes: Bon Jovi's
Richie Sambora, Cheap
Trick's Robin Zander, Eddie
Money, Twisted Sister's Dee


Snider, Grand Funk Rail-
road's Mark Farner,
AC/DC's Brian Johnson,
Three Dog Night's Chuck
Negron, Rick Derringer, the
Allman Brothers' Dickey
Betts, and many more to
soon be announced.
The grand opening at Mar-
di Gras is about more than
just music. Guests will expe-
rience an intermission like
no other when the Mardi
Gras parade takes to the
streets of Universal Studios.
Revelers will dance the
night away amidst the ex-
citement of new floats, street
performers, stilt walkers and
costumed characters that
transform the theme park


into the greatest celebration
east of the Mississippi. .
Universal Studios' Mardi ..
Gras event has been expand-
ed to ten weekends and con-
tinues every Saturday
evening until April 9. Mardi ,* ,
Gras fuses the party atmos- :'
phere of the famous New"
Orleans festival with the op- .
portunity to experience the '
over-the-top theme park at-
tractions that Universal Stu-
dios is known for. The result !
is an event that includes one ' - .
of the largest parades in
Florida, confetti, New Or-
leans style cuisine and of
course, beads, beads, beads. -
Each week, the Mardi
Gras 2005 concert series
showcases some of the j
world's hottest musical per-
formers, including the 0'- -'
Jay's, Jason Mraz, O.A.R., i
the Go-Go's. The festivities
and the concert.series close







Suwannee River Cove

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MARDI THE NIGHT AWAY:
The world's biggest Mardi Gras
celebration outside of New
Orleans returns to Universal
Studios for 10 Saturdays
beginning Feb. 5. For the 10th
fun-filled year in a row, the
streets of Universal' Studios
come alive with the festivities
surrounding the world's
ultimate party. The Mardi Gras
2005 Concert Series features
some of the world's hottest
performers including the
O'Jays, Jason Mraz, O.A.R.,
the Go-Go's and Huey Lewis
and the News, along with one
of Florida's largest parades,
New Orleans style cuisine and
of course, beads, beads, beads.
The Mardi party concludes on
Saturday, April 9. �2005
Universal Orlando. All rights
reserved. - Photo: Submitted

Saturday, April 9 with a per-
formance by the "Heart of
Rock and Roll," Huey Lewis
and the News.
Universal Studios Mardi
Gras is included in the price
of theme park admission
(adults $54.75 plus tax, chil-
dren $44.95 plus tax), so
guests can enjoy all the great
theme park rides and attrac-
tions during the day and
continue to "Party BigTime"
throughout the night.
The Mardi Gras After 5
ticket is good for Saturday
nights Feb. 5 through April 9
and can be purchased for
$39.95 plus tax. Florida and
Georgia residents can save
$10 off a Mardi Gras After 5
Ticket with a specially-
marked Wendy's cup or
coupon from a Coca Cola
24-pack at select Winn-Dix-
ie locations. Florida and
Georgia ID required.
Florida and Georgia resi-
dents can also save $10 off a
2-Park Power Pass with a
Wendy's bag or trayliner. All
Universal Mardi Gras tickets
can be purchased on-line at
www.universalorlando.com
or by calling 407-224-5500.
Money-saving Mardi Gras
getaway packages including
hotel accommodations, ad-
mission to both Universal
Orlando theme parks includ-
ing the Mardi Gras Celebra-
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Access to your favorite rides
and attractions and more are
available on-line at
www.universalorlandovac-
tions.com.

SEE MARDI GRAS, PAGE 3C

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I






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 3C


Monthly Meetings
Allen Boyd (D-North Flori-
da) Staff - Live Oak - Third
Wednesday, City Council
Chambers, City Hall, 101 SE
White Ave., Live Oak, 9:30-
11:30 a.m. You may reach Con-
gressman Boyd by calling 202-
225-5235 or his web site at
www.house.gov/Boyd. Con-
gressman Boyd's staff visit so
that the people of Suwannee
County have the opportunity to
discuss in person issues of con-
cern to them. Congressman
Boyd's staff has been trained to
assist constituents with a variety
of issues related to various feder-
al agencies. It is important to the
Congressman that his staff make
themselves available for those
who are not able to travel to ei-
ther his Panama City or Talla-
hassee offices.
Alzheimer's Support Group
- Third Thursday, Marvin E.
Jones Building, Dowling Park,
3:30 p.m. Call Cindy Erskin at
386-658-5700.
American Legion Post 107 -
First Thursday, 12-2 p.m.,
Suwannee River Regional Li-
brary, South Ohio Ave. Call
Clair McLauchlin at 386-362-
3524 or Richard Buffington at
386-364-5985.
Branford Camera Club -
Regular club meetings, 7:30
p.m., third Thursday, Branford
Library, Contact Carolyn Hogue
386-935-2044.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408
Committee - meets monthly on
the second Tuesday, 6:30 p.m.,
ia tme L;'.e Oak Church of
Christ, 1497 Irvin Ave (SR 51
South). Anyone interested is
welcome to attend. Call Alan
Stefanik, Committee Chairman,
386-362-3032, e-mail:
commchair@pack408.net or
visit pack's website:
www.pack408.net, for addition-
al information. The Tiger, Wolf,
Bears, and Webelos dens (grades
one - five) meet every Thursday
at the church, 6:30-8 p.m., when
school is Mi session. In lieu of a
den meeting, the pack meeting is
held on the fourth Thursday at
the same time and place during
which the entire group meets for
awards, skits and fun. The pack
holds two or three activities dur-
ing the summer, as well as a
week of Day Camp.
Disabled American Veter-
ans Chapter No. 126 - Second
Thursday, 6 p.m., 226 Parshley
St., S.W. Call 386-362-1701.
Florida Gateway Charter
Chapter of the American Busi-
ness Women's Association -
will hold its regular meeting on
the second Thursday of each
month at 6 p.m. For more info'
please call Laura Skow 386-
362-2086 or visit
www.abwa.org.
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park - monthly board
meeting are held the second
Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.
at the Suwannee River State
Park. For info, contact Member-
ship Chair Walter Schoenfelder
850-971-5354 or e-mail
wbs@surfbest.net


Girl Scout Leaders - First
Monday, 7 p.m. Girl Scouts of
Gateway Council will meet at
the Woman's Club. Call Mary
Check-Cason, 386-362-4475.
Hamilton County Govern-
mental Monthly Meetings -
Bellville' Volunteer Fire'Resccue
executive board: second Mon-
day of each month at 7 p.m.
Hamilton County Alcohol
and Other Drug Prevention
Coalition - meet fourth Wednes-
day, 9:30-11 a.m., at the Hamil-
ton County School Board meet-
ing room, JRE Lee Administra-
tive Complex, Jasper. For more
info, contact Grace McDonald at
386-938-4911 or e-mail mcdon-
aldgl@alltel.net
Hamilton County Board of
Commissioners - First Tuesday,
9 a.m., and third Tuesday at 6
p.m., County Commissioners'
Board Room, courthouse,
Jasper.
Hamilton County Chamber
of Commerce, Inc. - meets first
Thursday, at 6 p.m., at 204 N.
Hatley St., Jasper. For more info,
call 386-792-1300.
Hamilton County Council
on Aging, Inc. - Needs volun-
teer drivers for the home-deliv-
ered meals program. If you en-
joy helping others and are inter-
ested or need more information,
please contact Dorsey Stubbs at
Council on Aging, 1509 S.W.
First Street in Jasper or call 386-
792-1136.
Hamilton County Develop-
ment Authority - meets the sec-
ond Thursday, at 7 p.m., at 204
NE 1st St.. Sandlin Building,
Jasper. For more into, call386-
792-6828.
Hamilton County Tourist
Development Council - meets
the second Wednesday, at 12
noon, at 204 NE 1st St., Sandlin
Building, Jasper. For more info,
call 386-792-6828.
Home and Community Ed-
ucators (HCE) - the council
meets on the first Friday of the
month at 9:30 a.m. at the Suwan-
nee County Extension Office,
Coliseum Complex, Eleventh
Street, Live Oak. They welcome
new members. For further infor-
mation call 386-362-2771.
Jasper City Council Meet-
ing - Second Monday, 6 p.m.,
Jasper City Hall.
JasperLions Club Meeting -
Second and fourth Tuesda\, 7
p.m., Roosters Diner. Call Jim
Taitt for further information at
386-938-3582.
Jennings Town Council
Meeting - First Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Jennings Town Hall.
MainStreet Hamilton Coun-
ty, Inc. - Third Thursday, Main-
Street Office. Jasper, 6 p.m..
School Board - Fourth Tues-
day, 6 p.m.
White Springs Town Coun-
cil Meeting: Third Tuesday, 7
p.m., White Springs Town Hall.
I Can Cope - Educational
support group for any type of
cancer for patients, families and
friends. Third Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Marvin E. Jones Building,
Dowling Park. Call Cindy 386-
658-5700.


Leona 4-H Community
Club - First Monday, 7 p.m.,
home of Avon and Betty Hicks,
6107 180th St., McAlpin. Call
Betty Hicks at 386-963-4205 or
Pam Nettles at 386-963-1236.
Lion's Club - Farm Bureau
meeting room, 7 p.m., second
Tuesday and fourth Tuesday.
Call Richard Tucker, 386-963-
4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild - 7
p.m., first Tuesday, St. Luke's
Episcopal Church. Contact Don
Strickland, 386-362-5146.
Live Oak Christian Home
Educators - meet first Thursday
of every month. If you are look-
ing for a strong home school
support group please contact
Pat, 386-364-1734.
Live Oak Garden Club -
Monthly from Sept.-May. The
Morning Glories day group-
third Friday and the Night
;.Bloomers night group-third
Tuesday, 1302 S.W. Eleventh
Street, Live Oak.
Live Oak Senior Citizens -
meet at 10:30 a.m., first Monday
of the month at the Exhibition II
Building, Coliseum Complex,
1302 SW Eleventh St., Live
Oak. Members have the oppor-
tunity to take part in escorted
tours. For more info, call Lula
Herring at 386-364-1510.
Suwannee Valley Humane
Society Animal Shelter - The
monthly meeting will be held on
the second Monday of the month
at noon at the shelter. For more
info, contact the toll-free num-
ber: 866-Adoptl2 (866-236-
7812). Located on Bisbee Loop
(use the south entrance). In Lee
off CR 255, Madison County.
Visit web-site at www.geoci-
ties.com/suwanneehs.
Live Oak, Suwannee Coun-
ty Recreation Board of Direc-
tors - Second Tuesday, 5:45
p.m.at the Suwannee Parks &
Recreation offices on Silas Dri-
ve.
MADD Dads - Third Thurs-
day at 7 p.m. at the Suwannee
County Courthouse.
Man To Man Group - Meets
regularly at 7 p.m., second
Thursday each month at the
Marvin E. Jones Building,
Dowling Park. Each program is
free ofchatfgeid refreshments
are provided. For further info,
call the American Cancer Soci-
ety toll-free at 800-ACS-2345 or
the local office toll-free at 888-
295-6787 (Press 2) Ext. 114.
Market Days - Advent Chris-
tian Village, first Saturday, 8
a.m. - 1 p.m. Space on first-
come, first-serve basis, $5 each.
Village Square shops open. Call
the Lodge Offite 386-658-5200.
McAlpin Community Club
- Regular monthly meetings are
held on the second Monday at 7
p.m., beginning with a covered
dish dinner. Everyone is wel-
come. The purpose of the Club is
to acquaint members of the com-
munity with all the services that
are available in the County. For
info on scheduled speakers, call
Grant Meadows Jr., 386-935-
9316 or Shirley Jones, 386-963-
5357. For info on renting the
building, call Kristie Harrison at
386-364-3400.
MOMS Club - Second
Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. at the
fellowship hall of Bethel Mis-
sionary Baptist Church. Go West
on US 90 - seven miles from I-
75, and 1-1/2 miles from the Co-
lumbia/Suwannee County line,
12 miles from Live Oak. For
more info, call 386-397-1254 or
e-mail MOMSClubofLiveOak-
LakeCityFl@alltel.net
Nursing Mom's Group -
Second Friday, 10 a.m., Suwan-
nee River Regional Library. Call
Michelle, 386-776-2955, for
more info.


Mardi Gras


Continued From Page 1C

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two dramatically distinct
and adjacent theme parks,
the Universal Studios mo-
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theme park and Islands of
Adventure, Orlando's next
generation theme park. Uni-
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CityWalk, a 30-acre dining,
shopping, club and live-en-
tertainment venue as well as
premier on-site Loews ho-


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Universal Pictures is a di-
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Universal Studios is part of
NBC Universal. NBC Uni-
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leading media and entertain-
ment companies in the de-
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a premier motion picture
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a leading television stations
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versal.


Remembering the Loss of
Your Baby - An open support
group for families who have ex-
perienced the loss of a baby
through miscarriage, ectopic
pregnancy, stillbirth, newborn
death or termination due to fetal
abnormality or maternal compli-
cations. Group meets the first
SThursday of each month, 11:30
a.m. - 1 p.m., at Hospice of
North Central Florida, North
Building Counseling Room,
4305 NW 90th Blvd.,
Gainesville. To register or for
more information contact Cheryl
Bailey at Hospice of North Cen-
tral Florida, 352-692-5107 or
toll-free, 800-816-0596.
SHINE - Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders - Vol-
unteers are needed in your area
to assist elders and their care-
givers receive information and
assistance on health insurance
and Medicare. Comprehensive
training is provided by the Flori-
da Department of Elder Affairs.
This service is provided at no
charge. Call the Elder Helpline
toll-free at 800-262-2243.
SHINE - Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders -
Branford - Library, US 129
North, Branford, 9-11 a.m. - first
Wednesday of every month. El-
ders and their caregivers in
Suwannee County who are try-
ing to understand Medicare and
other health insurance programs
can receive help from the Flori-
da Department of Elder Affairs'
SHINE (Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders) Program.
Specially trained SHINE volun-
teers help Medicare recipients
make informed decisions about
their health' insurance and
Medicare Prescription Drug
Cards. SHINE volunteers also
inform seniors about free and
discounted prescription drug
programs and eligibility require-
ments. This service is provided
at no charge. For more info or if
you can't travel to the site, con-
tact the Elder Helpline toll-free
at 800-262-2243, Monday - Fri-
day 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders - Ad-
vent Christian Village - Dowl-
ing Park - S.:l..:.t -,l'l.,int-
ment with SHINFc dulielbf' ~*
calling 386-658-3333 or 386-
658-5329. Elders and their care-
givers in Suwannee County who
are trying to understand
Medicare and other health insur-
ance programs can receive help
from the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serving
Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders) Program. Specially trained
SHINE volunteers help
Medicare recipients make in-
formed decisions about their
health insurance and Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards.
SHINE volunteers also inform
seniors about free and discount-
ed prescription drug programs
and eligibility requirements.
This service is provided at no
charge. For more info or if you


can't travel to the site, contact
the Elder Helpline toll-free at
800-262-2243,, p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders - Live
Oak - Suwannee River Region-
al Library, US 129 South, 12:30-
2:30 p.m. - second Monday of
every month. Elders and their
caregivers in Suwannee County
who are trying to understand
Medicare and other health insur-
ance programs can receive help
from the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serving
Health Insurance Needs of El-
ders) Program. Specially trained
SHINE volunteers help
Medicare recipients make in-
formed decisions about their
health insurance and Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards.
SHINE volunteers also inform
seniors about free and discount-
ed prescription drug programs
and eligibility requirements.
This service is provided at no
charge. For more info or if you
can't travel to the site, contact
the Elder Helpline toll-free at
800-262-2243, Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health In-
surance Needs of Elders -
Mayo - Library, SR 51, Mayo,
12:30-2:30 p.m. - first Wednes-
day of every month. Elders and
their caregivers in Lafayette
County who are trying to under-
stand Medicare and other health
insurance programs can receive
help from the Florida Depart-
ment of Elder Affairs' SHINE
(Serving Health Insurance
Needs of Elders) Program. Spe-
cially trained SHINE volunteers
help. Medicare recipients make
informed decisions about their
health insurance and Medicare
Prescription Drug Cards.
SHINE volunteers also inform
seniors about free and discount-
ed prescription drug programs
and eligibility requirements.
This service is provided at no
charge. For more info or if you
can't travel to the site, contact
the Elder Helpline toll-free at
800-262-2243, Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
Small Scale Farmers and
Craft Designers Market Com-
mittee - Third Thursday, 7 p.m.,
Coliseum extensioh'offices.
Suwannee Chapter of the
Florida Trail Association - Sec-
ond Monday, 7 p.m., Suwannee
River Water Management Dis-
trict. For more info, call Don
Neale, 386-362-4850 or Sylvia
Dunnam, 386-362-3256.
Suwannee County Tourist
Development Council - Fourth
Tuesday, 1 p.m., Chamber of
Commerce Building, 816 S.
Ohio Ave., P.O. Drawer C., Live
Oak, FL 32064
Suwannee County Cattle-
men's Association - Third
Thursday, 6:30 p.m., Farmers
Co-op meeting room,. Call Herb
Rogers, 386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Senior
Citizens - meet at 10:30 a.m.,
first Monday of the month at the


Exhibition II Building, Colise-
um Complex, 1302 SW
Eleventh St., Live Oak. For
more info call Lula Herring,
386-364-1510.
Suwannee Valley Builders
Association - Second Thursday,
6 p.m., Farm Bureau meeting
room, 407 Dowling Ave., Live
Oak, $5 per person for meal and
meeting.
Suwannee Valley Genealogi-
cal Society - First Thursday, 7
p.m., Wilbur St. Live Oak (be-
hind Mizell's). Open Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon and
1-5 p.m. Phone: 386-330-0110.
Suwannee Valley Quilters -
First and third Thursday, 10 a.m.
Jane, 386-776-2909 - after 4
p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club - Third Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.,
Hospitality and Recreational
Building, Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Lake City, P.O.
Box 2013, Lake City, FL 32056.
Tobacco-Free Partnership
of Suwannee County - meet
quarterly, call Mary Jordan Tay-
lor 386-362-2708, ext. 232.
Vivid Visions, Inc.- A shelter
and outreach agency for victims
of domestic violence meets the
first Monday of each month at
5:30 p.m., Douglass Center
Conference Room. All persons
interested in helping victims of
domestic violence are encour-
aged to attend. For more info,
call 386-364-5957.
Wellborn Community Asso-
ciation (WCA) - Second Thurs-
day, 7 p.m., Wellborn Commu-
nity Center. Contact Bonnie
Scott, 386-963-4952 or leave a
message at 386-208-1733.
WCA (building fund)-First
Saturday-Blueberry Pancake
Breakfast, center of Wellborn,
Andrews Square. Blueberry
pancakes, sausage, OJ, coffee.
Wellborn Neighborhood
Watch - last Thursday, 7 p.m.,
Blake Lowe Building, 1517 4th
Ave., Wellborn. For more info,
call Bruce or Jane, 386-963-
3196.
Weekly Meetings
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon
Group - meets each Thursday, 8
p.m., Mayo Manna House, Pine
Street - for family members and
friends to show support For
more info, call Barbara, 386-
294-3348 or Marcia, 386-208-
1008.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Branford - meets Tuesday and
Friday, 7:30 p.m., Branford
United Methodist Church, Ex-
press and Henry St., Branford.
For more info, call 386-935-
2242 or the District 16 Help
Line toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Live Oak - meets Tuesday and
Friday, 8 p.n., Precinct Voting
Building, Nobles Ferry Road,
Live Oak. For more info, call
District 16 Help Line toll-free,
800-505-0702.


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 4C





PAGE 4C, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 3C

Alcoholics Anonymous -
Mayo Group - meets Sunday,
Monday, Wednesday and Thurs-
days at 8 p.m. The meetings are
held at Manna House, Pine
Street, Mayo. For more info call
386-294-2423 or District 16
Help Line toll-free, 800-505-
0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
White Springs - Courage to
Change - meets Monday, 8
p.m., Methodist Church, White
Springs. For more info, call 386-
397-1410 or District 16 Help
Line toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Bluegrass Association - Sat-
urday, Spirit of the Suwannee
Park, 6 p.m. Covered dish.
SRBA members admitted free.
For info, call 386-364-1683.
Bridge Club - Monday, 6:45
p.m., Golden Corral Restaurant,
Live Oak. For information call
386-362-3200.
Boy Scout Troop #693 -
Every Monday, 7 p.m., Shrine
Club, Bass Road, until further


notice. Call 386-776-2863.
Live Oak Singles Group -
meets Friday, 7:30 p.m., Live
Oak Christian Church fellow-
ship hall on US 129 North, Live
Oak (next to Walt's Ford). Park-
ing is between church and ceme-
tery on church property or along
US 129 North. This not a church
sponsored event. For more info,
call Carla, 386-364-4756. Visit
web site at http://groups.ya-
hoo.com/group/SuwanneeSin-
gles/
Narcotics Anonymous - The
Gratitude Group - Meetings
held Monday, 7 p.m., at St.
Luke's Episcopal Church, 1391
S.W. Eleventh St. (in the back),
Live Oak, FL 32060.
Over Eaters Anonymous -
We care. Meets Mondays 11:35
a.m.- 12:50 p.m., Mondays, at
Suwannee River Regional Li-
brary, 129 South, Live Oak. For
more info, call 386-364-4749.
Quarterback Club Meeting
- Old Nettie Baisden school next
to the football stadium, 6:30
p.m., every Monday.


Square Dance - With
Vagabond Squares, Thursday, 7-
9:30 p.m., St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, Newbem Road. Loyce
Harrell, 386-963-3225, or Ralph
Beekman, 386-752-2544.
Suwannee River Riding
Club - Membership fee $25 per
.year. Team roping first and third
Friday night. Speed events first
and third Saturday night. Call
386-935-2622.
Suwannee Valley Barber-
shop Chorus - Every Tuesday,
Crapps Meeting Room, Suwan-
nee River Regional Library, US
129 South, Live Oak at 7 p.m.
Call Fred Phillips, 386-362-
1886.
TOPS - Take Off Pounds
Sensibly, the Live Oak Commu-
nity Church of God, every
Thursday, 8:30 a.m., weigh-in,
meeting, 9 a.m. Barbara Crain,
386-362-5933 or Sharon Martin,
386-364-5423.
Weight Watchers - Monday,
9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., St. Luke's
Episcopal, toll-free 800-651-
6000.


* IYI~~ 311Y�Y1


15


FYI
Advent Christian Village -
2004-2005 Artist Series -
Events include: 'History Jumps
Off the Page,' Friday, Jan. 28, at
the Phillips Dining Room, 6
p.m.; Donna Wissinger - flutist,
Saturday, March 12, at the
Phillips Dining Room, 7 p.m.,
'Cotton Patch Gospel,' Monday,
March 21, at the Village Church,
7 p.m. (Based on Clarence Jor-
dan's version of the book of
Matthew); The Phillips-Lassiter
Guitar Duo, Friday, April 22, at
the Village Church, 7 p.m. ACV
season tickets are available at
Advent Christian Village, The
Music Center in Live Oak, and
the Suwannee County Chamber
of Commerce. Cost: Adults $80;
Students (ages 13-18) $35; Chil-
dren (ages 5-12) $25.
Another Way, Inc. Support
Groups - Another Way, Inc. of-
fers support groups for victims
and survivors of domestic vio-
lence. For info regarding dates
and times, call 386-792-2747 or
the toll-free hotline at 800-500-
1119.
'Before You Tie The Knot' -
four-hour class for couples who
will marry soon. The cost is $10
per couple. Completion of this
course is required when couples


reduce their marriage license fee
by $32.50. Pre-registration is re-
quired. Registration forms are
available at the Clerk of the
Court's office or the Suwannee
County Extension Service of-
fice, 386-362-2771.
Childbirth classes - offered
at the Suwannee County Health
Department on Tuesdays from 6
- 8 p.m. Please call to register at
386-362-2708, ext. 218 - Coleen
Cody. The classes are free of
charge.
Department of Children
and Families - can assist you in
applying to register to vote or
update your voter registration
record. If you receive or apply
for public assistance benefits,
your local Department of Chil-
dren and Families service center
can assist you in completing a
voter registration application to
your local Supervisor of elec-
tions for you. Remember, voting
is a right. Your local service cen-
ter is at 501 Demorest St., Live
Oak, 386-362-1483.
Disaster Action Team Vol-
unteers Needed - The Ameri-
can Red Cross of Suwannee Val-
ley is looking for volunteers to
join the Disaster Action Team to
assist victims of fires and other
natural disasters. If you are inter-


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ested and would like to learn
more, call 386-752-0650.
The Story of Dowling Park -
Do you want to know more
about the Advent Christian Vil-
lage (ACV) at Dowling Park?
ACV representatives are avail-
able to meet with you and share
the story of Dowling Park. If
you're interested in arranging a
speaking engagement or a tour
for your organization, club or
church, please contact us at 386-
658-5110 or toll-free, 800-714-
3134 or e-mail ccarter@acvil-
lage.net. For an ACV preview,
visit www.acvillage.net. Or re-
quest a free videotape.
Downtown Craft Market,
High Springs - Brings talented
local artists together to showcase
their talents in the heart of
downtown High Springs and is
open each Saturday at the comer
of NW 1st Avenue and Main
Street. Admission and activities
are free. For more info, please
call 386-454-3950.
Experience Works - a na-
tional nonprofit organization,
(formerly Green Thumb) pro-
vides training and employment
services to older workers - over
55 and with a limited income - in

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 5C
POOL CHLORINE
$325
I Refill
SEAMAN'S AQUA CLEAN
. - 2'J: H. :.ard St., Live Oak
36252JRS-F 362-4043


Hwy 90 W., Lake City
752.0054
www.fire-Mart.com
Oil Change
Tire Rotation
Wheel Alignment

Tirestone
ZRIHnESHE� "


Get the credit you need...
for the tires you want today.
129910-F


Objects of Desire

in Suwannee Valley


------------

Classic meets modern in
the Europa Collection.
Live Oak Jewelry, Inc.
P.O. Box 189, Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-1140


Framed Art
Own this beautiful 20x39 framed "Tropical
Arrangment" one of an extensive line of
decorative framed art for the home.
Gwyn's Gifts & Home Decor
1031 West Howard St. - Hwy 90 W
(386) 364-1440


Fruit Basket


Fruit & Gourmet Baskets.
Stop by to order or pick up
an assorted fruit basket fror
Hayes Produce
Conveniently located
Corner of Hwy. 90 &
Walker Ave.
F364-5242




T-Shir
Save 50% to 80
Live Oak
... ,, Christian Oi
Wal-Mart P1
(386) 330-29




Bird Baths
Make your lawn birds happy this
spring with a bird bath from
John's Lawn Equipment
1629 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-5020


OD'l


LL V


Call and request for your
business to feature an item
in "Details"(386) 362-1734
i


ATTENTION ALL SUWANNEE


COUNTY FAIR PARTICIPANTS

- 8~ Remembe,; deadline for
�jp. . "
sign lup... for Dalm:

Goat, Rabbit, Beef Heifers
anl/d Poultri' ill be

FEBRUARY 18, 200 /



NO EXCEPTIONS

For more information on'-
Sgetting an entry form call th e
fair office 386-362-7366
wn.. z .


138570DH.F


................- ~......... .~~ .~..... ~...~~. -���� � �-���� � �




NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 5C


Calendar


Continued From Page 4C

Suwannee County through the
Senior Community Service Em-
ployment Program (SCSEP).
Participants are paid the mini-
mum wage for an average of 20
hours per week. For more info,
visit www.experienceworks.org
or call the Lake City One Stop,
386-755-9026, ext. 3129 for
Loretta or ext. 3134 for Ronald.
FoodSource - a Christian
based Christian food coopera-
tive, is in your area! Stretch your
food dollars! With the help of
dedicated volunteers, Food-
Source is able to provide quality
foods at low prices while pro-
moting Christian values and vol-
unteerism in your community.
This is NOT a needy only pro-
gram; it is for EVERYONE.
There are no qualifications to
participate! FoodSource accepts
cash, checks, Visa, Mastercard,
Debit, EBT and money orders.
Menu is subject to change! Each
item is proportioned for 4-6 peo-
ple. This months tentative menu
is: hamburger steaks, chicken
tenders, family sized Lil' Smok-
ies, family sized pizzas, green
bean casserole, Liberty Sweet
Peas, South Gate Red Beans &
Rice, mushroom gravy, Mrs.
Smith's Fire Roasted Apple Pie,
fresh eggs, cabbage, carrots,
sliced cheese, strawberry lemon-
ade, oranges, bananas, five
pounds fresh potatoes, and an
unknown produce item. Pick Up
Date: Feb. 26. Regular package
price - $25. Meat package avail-
able $25. Tentative meat box
menu: ribeye steaks, pork chops,
salmon fillets, ground beef,
teriyaki chicken breasts, smoked
sausage links and chicken
nuggets. TO ORDERAND PAY
BY CREDIT/DEBIT/CHECK
CARD, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-832-5020. PICK UP OR-
DER AT LOCAL SITE. For
questions or to order, call your
local coordinator. Live Oak:
Live Oak Church of God - 386-
362-2483; Wellborn United
Methodist Church - 386-963-


5023; Ebenezer AME Church -
386-362-6383 or 386-364-4323
or 386-362-4808; Jasper: 386-
792-3965; White Springs: 386-
752-2196 or 386-397-1228;
Bell: 352-463-7772 or 352-463-
1963; Lake City 386-752-7976
or FoodSource toll-free at 800-
832-5020 or visit website at
www.foodsource.org for ques-
tions or to become a local host
site.
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park - Join the Friends of
Suwannee River State Park, a
non-profit 501(c)3 charitable or-
ganization. Help keep the State
Park the gem of the Suwnnee.
River. The park is located 13
miles West of Live Oak off US
90. Quarterly newsletter; quar-
terly meetings, monthly board
meetings and an annual lun-
cheon meeting. Membership
brochures may be picked up at
the State Park or mail your
membership to: Friends of
Suwannee River State Park,
20185 CR 132, Live Oak, FL
32060. Phone: 386-362-2746.
Individual Friend-$15; Family-
$25; Business 'Sponsor-$50;
Corporate Friend-$100-$250;
Lifetime Friend-$300. For more
info contact the membership
chair Walter Schoenfelder at
850-971-5354, or e-mail him at
wbsesurfbest.net
Florida Museum of Natural
History - Florida's state natural
history museum, located near
the intersection of Southwest
34th Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cultural
Plaza in Gainesville. Hours are
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Satur-
day and 1-5 p.m. Sunday.
Closed on Thanksgiving and
Christmas. For more info, in-
cluding ticket prices, directions
and parking info, call 352-846-
2000. Visit www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
GED Tests - A person wanti-
ng to take the GED test must call
to reserve a seat in the registra-
tion session. Attendance in a
registration session is manda-
tory in order to take the GED
test. To reserve seat for registra-


tion session and pay fees, call
386-364-2782-Lynn Lee. To in-
quire about age waivers, call
386-384-2763-Lynne Roy,
counselor, and 386-364-2619-
Kim Boatright, GED examiner
at Suwannee-Hamilton Techni-
cal Center.
Grower's Market on Lake
Ella Drive, Tallahasee - open
Wednesday evenings from 3-
6:30 p.m. The growers will be
providing organic, local, season-
al, farm fresh produce for
sale: lettuces, Asian greens, sug-
ar cane, garlic, herbs, squash,
mustards, turnips, arugula, shi-
itake mushrooms, kale, cut flow-
ers, speciality flowers; food
demonstrations, and much,
much more. In collaboration
with our local small fanners,
The American Legion and Black
Dog Cafe. For additional info,
please contact Jennifer Taylor or
O. Reis, at FAMU Small Farm
Programs/Cooperative Exten-
sion Programs, 850-599-3546.
Harsonhill Inc., a prescrip-
tion information publishing
company - Financial help for
those who can't afford their pre-
scription drugs is available right
now. Steve Reynolds, President
of Harsonhill Inc., a prescription
information publishing compa-
ny, states assistance programs
have been established by more
than 100 U.S. drug manufactur-
ers to assist low income people.
These programs cover over
1,400 commonly prescribed
medicines. Reynolds states his
company publishes a 85+ page
manual that contains all the in-
formation required to apply to
these assistance programs. For
more information about these
programs or to obtain the manu-
al e-mail: harsonhill @earth-
link.net or contact Reynolds toll-
free at 888-240-9240 or write to
Harsonhill Inc., 22425 Ventura
Blvd., No. 190, Woodland Hills,
CA 91364. For immediate info,
v i s i t
www.Prescriptions4Free.com
Hearing Solutions - If you
are interested in communicating


with the deaf or hard of hearing
or if you are hard of hearing
yourself and would like to learn
sign language, now's your
chance. Every Wednesday 10-
11:30 a.m. or 2-3:30 p.m., at
Hearing Solutions (next door to
D.Q.), instructor Kay Butler.
Call 386-362-2904 for further
info.
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley - Helping Hands Volun-
teer Orientation - first Wednes-
day, 10-11 a.m. at Hospice of the
Suwannee Valley, 618 SW FL
Gateway Drive, Lake City. After
attending orientation and com-
pleting the screening process,
you will be eligible for volun-
teering in the Hospice Attic thrift
store, administrative offices as
well as helping at special events,
educational fairs, community
events and fund raising. To reg-
ister or for more info contact
Carolyn Long, 386-752-9191.
Lafayette County Veterans -
All veterans of Lafayette Coun-
ty for your protection, your mil-
itary records DD Form 214,
"Certificate of Release or Dis-
charge from Active Duty" can
be recorded in the Lafayette
County Courthouse. Please see
the Clerk of Court's office.
LillyAnswers Program -
Available to Floridians 65 and
older who are enrolled in
Medicare, have an annual in-
come below 200 percent of the
federal poverty level and have
no other drug coverage. Seniors
may apply for the program at no
cost by calling a toll-free num-
ber, 877-RX-LILLY, or by fill-
ing out an application. LillyAn-
swers card enables them to re-
ceive a 30-day supply of Lilly
pharmaceutical products that are
sold at participating retail phar-
macies for a flat fee of $12. Info
about the LillyAnswers program
is available at www.lillyan-
swers.com or by calling toll-free
877-RX-LILLY.
Love INC - A non-profit
Christian group that represents
local churches in finding help
for valid needs. Call Ginny.Pe-


ters, 386-364-4673, Monday-
Friday, 9 a.m. - noon
MDA - Assists people with
ALS through help with purchase
and repair of wheelchairs, sup-
port groups, expert-led semi-
nars, an ALS Web site
(www.als.mdausa.org) and
ALS-specific chat rooms
(www.mdausa.org/chat).
MOPS - Mothers of
Preschoolers - a gathering of
moms for encouragement and
fun. All mothers of children
from birth to age five are invited
to attend. The meetings are the
second and fourth Tuesday of
the month, September through
May, from 9:30 a.m. to noon.
They are held at the First Baptist
Church on Howard St. in Live
Oak. For more info, please call
386-362-1583.
Marine Corps League
meets in Lake City - First Tues-
day of each month The Suwan-
nee Valley Detachment of the
Marine Corps League of the
United States meets monthly in
Lake City. Even months are met
in Live Oak at the Shriners Club,
odd months are in Lake City at
Quality Inn (formerly Holiday
Inn). Marines in Suwannee
County should call Dale Condy,
386-776-2002 or John Meyers,
386-935-6784. Lake City repre-
sentatives, John Parker, 386-
754-1980 or'Bob Edgar, 386-
755-1354.
Marriage? Help me! - A pro-
gram presented by Solid Rock
Ministries, Inc. of Jasper; at no
charge to anyone. Call for ap-
pointment at 386-792-2603.
Helping to apply Christian prin-
ciples to our every day living...
Morningside Nature Center
Living History Farm,
Gainesville - Barnyard Buddies,
free admission, 3 p.m. every
Wednesday and Saturday to
meet and greet the farm animals.
After the animal introductions,
help with the afternoon feeding.
Toddlers. and preschoolers will
love learning about the barnyard
buddies. Meet at the bar. For
more info, call 352-334-2170 or


visit www.natureoperations.6rg.
Morningside Nature Center
Living History Farm,
Gainesville - Living History
Days, every Saturday,
from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. with staff
in period dress interpreting day-
to-day life on a Florida farm in
1870. Sample homemade bis-
cuits on the woodstove with
fresh butter and cane syrup
grown and made on the farm.
Help feed the farm animals at 9
a.m. and 3 p.m. daily. Free ad-
mission. For more info call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.nature-
operations.org.
Morningside Nature Center
Living History Farm,
Gainesville - Discover & Do,
third Sunday of the month, kids
bring your favorite adult for a
fun activity and make a cool
craft to take home. Meet at
Loblolly Environmental Facility
on NW 34th Street between
University and NW 8th Ave.
Reservations required. Free ed-
mission. For more info and to
RSVP call 352-334-2170 or vis-
it www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature Center
Living .History Farm,
Gainesville - Who's Who in the
Woods, las Saturday of the
month, naturalist-guided walk at
9 a.m. 1-1.5 hours walk, wear
comfortable walking shoes.
Meet at the education office,
3540 E. University Ave. Free ad-
mission. For more info call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.nature-
operations.org.
Morningside Nature Center
Living History Farm,
Gainesville - A Night at the
Owlery, By the light of the sil-
very moon with the owls and
frogs we'll croon...each Satur-
day nearest the full moon. Come
at 7 p.m. with family and friends
for a lively variety of talks,
songs, hikes, fires, and fun!
Florida Wildlife Care's Leslie
Straub will help us meet and
greet our noisy nocturnal neigh-
bors, the owls, at Boulware

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 6C


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PAGE 6C, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 5C

Springs Historic Waterworks,
3300 SE 15th St., Gainesville.
Free admission. For more info
call 352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
NFCC Artist Series 2004-
2005 - Performances will be
held on campus at the Van H.
Priest Auditorium, Madison.
This year's line-up includes:
Jan. 25, Glenn Miller Orchestra
- Glenn Miller Orchestra per-
form classics; Feb. 17, Mark
Twain on Stage: John Chappell
as Samuel L. Clemens - in look,
in voice, in gesture and above
all, in his own memorial words,
he lives again; March 3, Cham-
ber Orchestra Kremlin - Russia's
, internationally known ensemble
performs. Season passes $40 for
adults, $25 for children 12 and
under. Become a sponsor $100
individual to $500 corporate.
For more info, passes, or to
sponsor call 850-973-1653 or e-
mail artistseries@nfcc.edu/ Visit
on-line at
htpp://www.nfcc.edu/NewsEv-
enits/ArtistSeries/home.html.
NFCC Children's Theater
performances - NFCC will pre-
sent "The Adventures of Lewis
and Clark" by GMT Produc-
tions, Inc. on April 18, with two
performances for sixth - eighth
graders in NFCC's six county
service area. Performance will
be held at the Van H. Priest Au-
ditorium on the Madison cam-
pus. For, more info visit
www.nfcc.edu/NewsEvents/Art
istSeries/childrentheater.html or
contact the NFCC College Ad-
vancement Office, 850-973-
1613.
NFCC College Placement
Tests - NFCC will conduct Col-
lege Placement Tests (CPT) on
computer every Thursday at
8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. in the
NFCC Technical Center, Bldg.
13, on the Madison campus.
Persons taking the tests will be
required to register in NFCC
Student Services 24 hours be-
fore testing. There is a fee of $10
for the test. For more info,
please call 850-973-1612.
NFCC E-Spotlight provides
weekly information - Interested
in North Florida Community
College events? Have current
college news and happenings
delivered directly to your e-mail
address through NFCC's e-Spot-
light. Alumni, former faculty or
staff and community members
interested in keeping up with
NFCC's calendar of events and
news are invited to join the list
of e-Spotlight recipients. To re-
ceive NFCC's weekly e-Spot-
light call the Office of Institu-
tional Advancement at 850-973-
1613 or e-mail Kim Scarboro at
scarborok@nfcc.cc.
Narconon Arrowhead -
Drug addiction can leave an in-
dividual feeling helpless and out
of control. Especially if you are
the family member or friend of
an addict. Narconon Arrowhead
carl help. Narconon offers free
counseling, assessments and re-
ferrals to rehabilitation centers


nationwide by calling toll-free,
800-468-6933 or logging onto
www.stopaddiction.com. Don't
wait until it's too late. Call Nar-
conon now!
North Central Florida Sex-
ual Assault Center, Inc. - pro-
vides individual and group
counseling for victims of rape
and incest. Any man or woman
who is 18 years old or older and
is a victim of rape, sexual abuse
or incest is eligible to participate.
All services are free and confi-
dential. Call Victim Advocate,
Erica Nix toll-free at Pager
Number, 800-400-7140. For
other info, call 386-719-9287.
North Florida Workforce
Development - AWI personnel,
as part of the one-stop system,
strive to help dislocated workers
and other job seekers find em-
ployment in a prompt manner.
AWI staff now have office hours
at the One-Stop Centers in
Hamilton: 386-792-1229, Jeffer-
son: 850-342-3338, Lafayette:
386-294-1055, Madison: 850-
.973-9675, Suwannee: 386-364-
7952 and Taylor: 850-584-7604
counties as follows: 8 a.m.-5
p.m. Monday through Friday,
and alternate Saturdays 9 a.m.-1
p.m.
Parents of ADD and ADHD
Children - If you are interested
in joining a support group call
Lea-Anne Elaine, 386-362-
7339.
Pregnancy Crisis Center -
The Live Oak Pregnancy Crisis
Center at 112 Piedmont St. (be-
hind the Amoco) is open on
Wednesday through Friday from
9 a.m.-3 p.m. The center will of-
fer confidential counseling, free
pregnancy tests, clothes for ex-
pectant mothers and infants. The
center will also offer referrals to
pro-life doctors. Groups and
churches might want to have a
baby shower and donate all the
items to the center. Also needed:
Maternity clothes and hangers.
Telephone 386-330-2229; or
toll-free 800-696-4580.
Rainbow Acres Animal
Shelter - A nonprofit, no kill,
animal shelter, needs donations
of all kinds, shelter material,
wood, fencing, etc. Food, old
pots, pans, etc. Almost anything
you no longer need, we can put
to good use. Cash is also accept-
ed to keep our kittens and pup-
pies healthy. Our animals are
free. Donations accepted, not re-
quired. Free!!!!! Puppies and
Dogs. Kittens and Cats. Contact
Carolynn or Matt, 386-362-
3338.
Reach To Recovery - breast
cancer survivors visiting breast
cancer patients with information
and hope. One on one visits.
Free of charge. Call toll-free,
800-ACS-2345 to schedule a
visit. Sponsored by the Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
Regional Heart Disease and
Stroke Prevention Coalition -
serving Suwannee, Lafayette,
Hamilton, Madison, Jefferson
and Taylor counties - meets
quarterly. Please call Diana King
at 850-342-0170 ext. 220 for
more info.


. . . - '$ 4




* "^'2


II


JI


Spirit of the Suwannee Mu-
sic Park & Campground up-
coming events include - Jan. 15
- Lewis Family; Feb. 12 - Sun
Country Jamboree; Feb. 14 -
Valentines Day; Feb. 22-24 Best
of America by Horseback; Feb.
24 - Mark Newton Band; March
5 - Spring Fling Garage Sale;
March 12 - Sun Country Jam-
boree; March 18 - Cherry
Holmes Family; March 24-27 -
Suwannee Spring Fest; March
27 - Craft Village Easter Egg
Hunt. '
Stephen Foster State Cul-
ture Center State Park -
monthly Cracker Coffeehouse
from 7-9 p.m. in the Auditorium.
Upcoming events: Craft Ren-
dezvous - Jan. 29. Open stage
night held the first Saturday of
every month with songs, stories,
yodeling, music and much more.
Coffee and desserts available for
sale. Free admission at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center State
Park, White Springs. Located on
US 41, three miles from 1-75 and
nine miles from I-10. For info on
additional programs and times,
contact the park at 386-397-
4331, or visit www.FloridaS-
tateParks.org/stephenfoster/
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park - Hon-
ored as one of 10 "21st Century
American Heritage Parks" in
2003. For more info, call 386-
397-7009. Visit www.FloridaS-
tateParks.org/stephenfoster/
Suwannee Valley Bluegrass
Association - gets together at
the Pickin' Shed every Saturday
evening at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park & Camp-
ground, 3076 95th Dr., Live
Oak. For more info, call 386-
364-1683.
Suwannee Valley Builders
Association (SVBA) - A non
profit organization, is a group of
approximately 80 local citizens
dedicated to building a stronger
community, whose members
volunteer their time with active
involvement with associate
sponsorships of worthwhile
community activities and asso-
ciate members of the Council for
iProgress and ,Suwannee County
Chamber of Commerce. SVBA
donates two academic scholar-
ships each year, donates Christ-
mas gift/food baskets each year
and sponsor of the children's
playhouse raffle at Christmas.
Featured speakers from local
businesses and a catered dinner
are the highlights of the evening
at monthly meetings. The gener-
al public is invited to attend and
become members. Donations of
$5 a person are accepted at the
door to help cover catering ex-
penses. For more info on joining
the organization, contact Ronnie
Poole, 386-362-4539.
Wanted - Have an hour a
week to share? Volunteers need-
ed at Surrey Place for our exten-
sive seven-day-a-week activity
program. Many volunteers posi-
tions are now open. Calling out
bingo or pokeno, reading to res-
idents who no longer see well or
sharing scriptures, giving wheel
chair rides in the courtyard,
helping with special events or
being a "helper/partner" on out-
ings out of the facility. Our goal
is to keep our residents' lives ful-
filled by being busy and happy.
For more info, please call Karen


or Ellie at Surrey Place, 386-
364-5961.
Wild Adventures upcoming
events include: Snow Days -
Now-Feb. 28; Winter Jam: Tait,
TobyMac, Newsong, Building
429, Mathew West, Chaos on
Wheels - Jan 22; Diamond Rio
with Jimmy Wayne - Feb. 5;
Bowling for Soup - Feb. 19; Ter-
ri Clark and Josh Turner - Feb.
26. Wild Adventures Theme
Park is located at 3766 Old Cly-
attville Rd. Valdosta, Ga. For
more info visit www.wild-ad-
venture.com.
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Through Feb. 28
Driver's license and
vehicle inspection check-
points scheduled
The Florida Highway Patrol
will conduct driver's license and
vehicle inspection checkpoints
through Feb. 28, on Brown
Road, CR 252, CR 252-A, CR
252-B, CR 25-A, SR 47, SR
341, US 441, US 41, CR 245,
CR 238, CR 135, Turner Road,
SR 100, Trotter's Road, Fair-
field Farms Road, CR 250, CR
349, SR 247 and SR 25 in Co-
lumbia County; CR 132, CR
136, CR 136-A, CR 137, CR
249, CR 250, CR 252, CR 349,
CR 49, CR 795, SR 20, SR 247,
SR 10, SR 51, US 129 and
Mitchell Road in Suwannee
County; and CR 136, CR 152,
CR 143, CR 249, CR 137, CR
251, CR 146, CR 135, CR 141,
CR 150, CR 145 and US 41, SR
6, SR 25 in Hamilton County.
Recognizing the danger present-
ed to the public by defective ve-
hicle equipment, troopers will
concentrate their efforts on vehi-
cles being operated with defects
such as bad brakes, worn tires
and defective lighting equip-
ment. In addition, attention will
be directed to drivers who would
violate the driver license laws of
Florida. The Patrol has found
these checkpoints to be an effec-
tive means of enforcing the
equipment and driver's license
laws of Florida while ensuring
the protection of all motorists.
Register now
Hospice-of the Suwannee Val-
ley will hold volunteer train-
ing in Jasper
Whether you like to work
with patients or "behind the
scenes," come and learn how
you can use your talents and ex-
tra time to help those facing a
terminal illness. If you would
like to volunteer, please join oth-
er volunteers for this 12-hour
training series fiom 1-4 p.m. on
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday, Feb. 14, 15, 16 and.
18, at the Jasper Public Library,
311 Hatley St. NE, Jasper. Reg-
istration required. To register or
for more info, contact Carolyn
Long at 386-752-9191.
Register Now
Dog Obedience School at
Dowling Park begins Feb. 15
A 10-week school in dog obe-
dience training will be held at
Rumph Pavilion at Camp
Suwannee at Dowling Park be-
ginning Feb. 15 at 5 p.m. The
cost is $20 for ACV members
and $23 for non-members. The
sessions are open to the public.
Register at Copeland Communi-
ty Center (CCC) on Marvin
Jones Blvd. or call 386-658-
5555. Upon registering, request


an instruction sheet. The instruc-
tor is Gloria Gram, a certified
dog trainer. David Burch, CCC
Director.
Registration deadline Feb. 9
Customer services
training for rural providers
The Rural Health Partnership
of North Central Florida will
sponsor customer service train-
ings for rural providers in
Alachua, Bradford, Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Levy, Suwannee and Union
Counties. The training has been
scheduled for four different
days: Feb. 11, at Shands Home-
Care in Gainesville from 1-5
p.m., Feb. 25, at Camp Weed in
Live Oak from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
March 4, at Fanning Springs
City Hall from 8:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and March 11, at
Fanning Springs City Hall from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
SHANDS Human Resources
Development Department will
facilitate the training targeting
front line staff of rural clinics,
nursing homes, hospitals, EMS
units, county health departments
and others who regularly inter-
act with patients as customers.
There is small fee of $10 for
non Rural Health Partnership
members. The deadline for reg-
istration is Feb. 9. Please contact
Shannon Helle at 352-955-2264
ext. 327 or e-mail shelle@ncfh-
pc.org for more registration in-
formation.
Now - April 1
Ten Star All Star
Basketball Camp
Applications are now being
evaluated - thru April 1 - for The
Ten Star All Star Summer Bas-
ketball Camp. The camp is by
invitation only. Boys and girls
ages 10-19 are eligible to apply.
Past participants include:
Michael Jordan, Tim Duncan,
Vince Carter, Jerry Stackhouse,
Grand Hill and Antawn Jami-
son. Players from 50 states and
17 foreign countries attended the
2004 camp. College basketball
scholarships are possible for
players selected to the All-
American Team. Camp loca-
Stions include: Babson Park and
Atlanta, Ga. For a free brochure,
call 704-373-0873 anytime..
The 5th Army
Association tour of Italy,
departing
New York on June 15
The 5th Army Association
World War II, Italy, will conduct
a 10 day final tour of Italy, de-
parting New York on June 15
visiting Rome, Venice, Florence,
Pisa, Sorrento and a special stop
at the American Military Ceme-
tery near Anzio. Former mem-
bers of the many combat divi-
sions and support groups, their
families, friends and those inter-
ested in the history of the U.S.
5th Army can contact Sny Can-
ton at 5277B Lakefront Blvd.,
Delray Beach, FL 33484 or call
561-865-8495.
Calling all classmates
of SHS Class of 1986
Hello! To the graduating class
of 1986, our 20 year reunion is
fast approaching. It will be great
to see everyone. Preparation for
the reunion is in progress. Class
members please contact Angela
Hunter Mandrell at her e-mail
address: Mandr003@bell-
south.net. The class members


may also contact Catrena Fran-
cis at:
VanessaFrancis@msn.com as
soon as possible.
Tickets on sale now!
Riverdance
engagement rescheduled for
Feb. 4 - 6
The return engagement for
Riverdance, originally sched-
uled for Feb. 18-20, has been
rescheduled to Feb. 4-6, at the
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the
Performing Arts, Gainesville.
Tickets for performances of
Riverdance, scheduled February
4-6, are on sale now. Patrons
who already purchased tickets
for the performances may use
their tickets for the perfor-
mances at the same times: Feb.
18 tickets on Feb. 4; Feb. 19
tickets on Feb. 5; and Feb. 20
tickets on Feb. 6. For more info,
patrons can contact the Phillips
Center Box Office at 352-392-
ARTS (2787) or toll-free within
Florida at 800-905-ARTS
(2787). Riverdance is sponsored
by ERA Trend Realty and
Shands HealthCare. Visit the
Riverdance website at
www.riverdance.com. Tickets
are also available at the Univer-
sity Box Office, all Ticketmaster
outlets, www.ticketmaster.com
or by calling Ticketmaster at
904-353-3309. Cash, Visa and
MasterCard are accepted. The
Phillips Center Box Office is
open Monday - Saturday, noon
to 6 p.m. Performance dates,
times and programs are subject
to change.
Sign up now!
Live Oak Senior
Citizens schedule tours
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule escorted tours to: The
Dead Sea Scrolls Exhibit, The
Festival of Flowers and a river
boat cruise, Mobile, Ala., March
8-11; Carnival Cruise to Western
Caribbean, May 15-22; and a
San Antonio Experience, Oct.
19-23. Costs and deadlines for
payment vary for each trip. The
group meets the first Monday,
10:30 a.m., Extension Building
II, Agriculture Center. Visitors
welcome. For more info, contact
Lula Herring at 386-364-1510.
Jan. 26
Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild meeting
Do you need a quilting chal-
lenge? The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold its
monthly meeting on Wednesday,
Jan. 26, at 10 a.m. at the South-
side Recreation Center, 901
Saint Margaret Road, Lake City.
Marika Sevin, Development Di-
rector of the Arthritis Founda-
tion of Jacksonville, will present
"a call to entry" for quilted items
for the November Comfort for a
Cure Quilt Challenge to benefit
the Arthritis Foundation. The
Guild is an organization for any-
one interested in quilts and the
art of quilting. The public is wel-
come. For more details, contact
President Sandy Lindfors, 386-
362-6850, or e-mail river-
folk@alltel.net.
Jan. 27
American Red Cross
will hold a First Aid class
in Lake City
The American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley 'will hold a
First Aid class from 6-9 p.m.,

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 8C


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-






NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 7C
. r...., - -. I


We


Take


Health


to


Your




Heart


TREATS ALL
RESPIRATORY DISEASES
~ NEW PATIENTS WELCOME ~

M. Choudhury, M.D.


155 NW Enterprise Way, Suite A, Lake City
134761DH-F


Lake City
L, PEye

^^HIfor the ewire janf


Sherri A. Cole, L.D.O.
Owner
Licensed Optician


Reaves C. Cole, O.D.
Board Certified
Optometric Physician


621 SW Baya Drive, Suite 101
Lake City, FL 32025
(386 719-9292
or (386) 754-6616
www.coleoptics.com ,,-fc.


Assisted Living
-/ / ,

Sou LL Ff gLad you.
cami.

uiet, afasfette County, countCy setting.
P'ziat. room, fafiE.naciE, 24 hout caaze.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL. County Rd. 251-A (386) 294-5050
License #AL9863 ( 386) 29 4-5050



Treatment Centers
.s2ai 3as&Aalsia
ES . . T - , .,
' Lake Cm &
.Li\e ().ak

. - .- . c incerhupe c ni
w. . -""^--
Specializing in Oncology since 1989
Comprehensive and Personalized Care
*Best equipment
*Most advanced treatment
*Treat all types of cancers
*IMRT PET CT Eric C. Rost, M.D.
David S. Cho, M.D.
Purendra P. Sinha, M.D.
Board Certified - All Insurances Accepted - No Referral Necessary
Suwannee Valley CancerHope of
Cancer Center Live Oak
795 SW State Road 47 1500 Ohio Ave. North
Lake City, FL 32025 Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 758-SVCC (7822) (386)362-1174
131387JRS-F


'5�


To place an ad on this
page, please call Joel at
386-362-1734 Ext. 109

North Florida

Pharmacy of Branford

* Medical
Equipment
* Oxygen

"Everything For 'our
Home Recovery"
Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 , 1404JS


Families Peel the Pain

of Migraines
Like many of the 28 million Americans who experience migraines, Angie has
struggled for years to find relief from her pain.
"Since I was about 18 years old, I have had severe, incapacitating migraines
that interfered with almost everything I did," says Angie, a working mother in
her early thirties from St. Louis. "I took medication, but my headaches would
often come back, sometimes even worse than the first attack. Nothing seemed
to provide relief." The pain and debilitation that resulted affected both her
business and family relationships.
Migraine attacks are characterized by severe, even disabling pain, visual
disturbances such as bright flashing lights or blind spots, and sensitivity to light
and sound. Some people also experience feelings of exhaustion, muscle aches,
food cravings, mood swings, nausea and vomiting in addition to the pain.
Now, a new assessment tool called the Migraine Attack Profile (MAP) is
available from the National Headache Foundation (NHF) and allows migraine
sufferers to map the duration of each of the three phases of their migraine attack
-- from pre-headache to migraine to post-headache. Although attacks can
change over time, MAP can aid in the discovery of an overall migraine pattern,
which doctors analyze to select the most appropriate course of treatment. In
other words, MAP. _
helps patients
communicate
better with their
doctors who in
turn can develop a
more strategic
plan of attack
against migraine'
pain.
"Over time, most
people with
migraine have '
many different
types of attacks,"
says Timothy R.
Smith, M.D., WHEN A FAMILY MEMBER suffers from migraines, it can be a burden
R.Ph., a headache on everyone. A new tool from the National Headache Foundation helps
specialist at Ryan sufferers give doctors the information they need to develop the most
Headache Centeeffective course of treatment and help ease the pain.
Headache Center
in St. Louis and
one of the researchers involved in the development of MAP. "The real challenge
is to choose a medication that's best suited to each particular attack. The
Migraine Attack Profile facilitates patient communication about their headaches
and subsequently simplifies the treatment decision."
Although many medications are available to treat migraines, finding the right
one isn't always easy.
"Each medication has advantages and disadvantages that need to be evaluated
based on the individual patient," says Smith. "For example, if the patient's
attacks tend to start slowly but progress throughout the day, a drug with longer-
lasting effects may be a more suitable option than one that begins to work faster
but stops working sooner."
For Angie, completing the profile made a big difference in her life. "Even
though I've had migraines for years, it wasn't until I started using MAP that I
realized how long the headaches lasted. My doctor noticed a recurring pattern
and determined that a long-lasting therapy would work best for me. Now I
finally have the relief I need."
According to Suzanne Simons, executive director of the NHF, tools such as
MAP play a crucial role in headache management. "Anytime patients can
actively partner with their healthcare providers, they improve their chances of
finding a successful treatment outcome," she says.
In addition to using MAP, the NHF offers the following migraine management
tips:
Seek expert help. Find out if your doctor has experience treating migraine, or
consider seeing a headache specialist or a neurologist.
Learn all you can about headaches. Take advantage of the free resources at the
NHF to help you better communicate with your healthcare provider.
Be open and honest. Tell your healthcare provider every detail of your
headaches, symptoms and how they impact your life.
Ask questions. Don't leave the office until you understand all your treatment
options so you and your doctor can agree on realistic treatment expectations.
Follow up regularly. Track your treatment progress with a headache calendar,
and be prepared to discuss it during your next visit.
Accept family support. Let family members pitch in with daily chores and
other responsibilities. Less stress may lead to fewer migraines.
For more information about headaches and to get a free copy of the Migraine
Attack Profile, contact the National Headache Foundation at (888) NHF-5552
or visit www.headaches.org.


SEYE CENTER of North Florida
j General Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS * CATARACT SURGERY
GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
*DIABETES , LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon

Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
& Olher insurance arcepled
Se habla espafiol.

917 W. Duval St.
Lake City
386-755-7595


Dr. Rios
OBGYN
' N idwife Services Available
Marlene Summers, CNM

Hours:
Mon. - Thur. 8:30 - 5:00
Closed 12:30-1:30

(386) 755-0500
Fax (386) 755-9217

449 SE Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055 ,340


Cancer Care of North Florida


We are a
total care
medical
oncology &
hematology
practice.
131399DF-F


Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
1 0Welcoming New Patients at
- ,- our two offices at:
S Shands @ Live Oak or Lake City.
Please call (386) 755-1655
wascn Khan, M.D. for an appointment or information
All Chemotherapy administration and management


Specializing in:
*Anemia
*Thrombocytopenia
* Bleeding or clotting disorders
* Breast Cancer
SColon Cancer
* Ovarian Cancer
SMultiple Myeloma
SLeukemia
*Lymphoma
errcnlnn M�edicareW Mo l nra nn


Ophthalmology
GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937

Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, .
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 13139iJS-F

Occupational Medicine
General Orthopaedics

Edward J.
Sambey, M.D.
* Occupational Medicine The
* General Orthopaedics Orthopaedic
* Sports Medicine Center
Lake City Office - 4367 NW American Lane
Phone 386-755-9215 - Toll Free 1-888-860-7050
Workers compensation and
Most Insurance Plans Accepted 35952DH-F


Medicine




RENALDAS A. SMIDTAS, M.D. AND ASSOCIATES
American Board of Internal Medicine certified,
Fellow of American Board of Balance Medicine.
SHELIAY. ROBERTS, A.R.N.P., C.S.
KATHY NEWMAN, A.R.N.P
Heart, Cardiovascular Diseases * Diabetes management
Allergy and Asthma * Lung diseases * Women's Health
Invasive Pain Management for Arthritis of the Knee, Shoulders,
Back Pain * Ultrasound Diagnostic and More
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1437 N. Ohio Ave. 413 NW 5th Ave...A
Visa, MasterCard Accepted 131392JS-F

Physical Therapy

CT4 (^Cltco^ One.
" t(tnlag /Lt 'qyout Jarlhantilaste IVEELcL"
* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy * Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis * Fitr.mny.algia Geriatrics* Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries Work Injuries * Pediatrics
* Manual Therapy * Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 * Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 * Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 * Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore

Physical Therapy


Heardand!
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
PROFESSIONAL TOUCH
PHYSICAL THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis
Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS
Providers
1506 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051

Iirology, Urologic Surgery
I Impotence Center



ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
Common Problems Treated:
* Infections * Prostate Problems * Kidney Stones * Sexual
Problems � Genital Surgery * Cancer of the Urinary Tract *
Impotence Inl'cfertility * Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
* Cystoscopy * No Scapel Vasectomy * Treatment of
Condyloma * Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy * Bladder
Ultrasound * Penil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Sur ical Center:
* Prostate, Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surgery
* Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy * Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal * Impotence Surgery * Hernia Surgery


Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Male
Impotence Surgical and Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.
Lak Ciy &Liv*Oa


........ . � i, ",.. .. ...1. ........ . ..................


_ I _�






PAGE 8C, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 6C

Thursday, Jan. 27, at their office
at 264 NE Hernando Ave., Suite
102, Lake City. For info and to
register, call 386-752-0650.
Jan. 27. 29 and 30
Free meditation classes: The
Science of Inner
Harmony and the Art
of Meditation
A series of one-day medita-
tion workshops will be offered
free at the public libraries in
Live Oak, Lake City and High
Springs on January 27, 29 and
30. The workshops, sponsored
as a free public service by Know
Thyself as Soul Foundation will
be held: Thursday, Jan. 27, from
6:30-10 p.m. at the Suwannee
River Regional Library, 1848
Ohio Avenue South, Live Oak;
Saturday, Jan. 29, from 1:30-5
p.m. at the Lake City Public Li-
brary, 308 NW Columbia Av-
enue, Lake City; and Sunday,
Jan. 30, from 1:30-5 p.m. at the
High Springs Branch Library,
135 NW 1st Avenue, High
Springs. For more info, please
call toll-free 877-MEDITATE
(877-633-4828), or visit
www.knowthyselfassoul.org on
the Web.
Jan. 28-30
Lake City Speedway will host
the Florida Racers Party of
the Year!
Lake City Speedway will host
The Florida Racers Party of the
Year! Friday, Saturday and Sun-
day, Jan. 28-30. Classes compet-
ing: non-winged sprints, super
late model, mini-stocks-Florida-
U.M.P. Imca type mo.difieds,
K.O.I L. Legends, mini sprints,
hobby stock, pure stock and
street stock; Schedule of events:
Thursday, Jan. 27, 5-10 p.m.,
campers move in, music and
bonfire; Friday, Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-
8:30 p.m. sign-in, hot laps: all
divisions 4-7 p.m.; Qualifica-
tions: all cars, renegade, four-car
dashes, mini car derby (Racers
Party); Saturday, Jan. 29, gates
open~at~ 9 ia. ,4 ign in until 2
p.m., auction begins at 10 a.m.,
vintage car races 11 a.m. -2 p.m.,
heat races 2:30 p.m., big car
demo 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Jan.
30, gates open at 10 a.m., church
service 10:30 a.m. features all


day starting at noon-entry fee all
classes: Pits - all four days $45
or $20 per day; general admis-
sion $15 per day or $35 for all
three days, kids under six free,
six-12 $5 per day. For rules and
questions, call 812-689-1046,
812-871-7728, 859-581-8579 or
the track at 386-754-8800.
Jan. 29
Suwannee County
Museum Chili Challenge
The Suwannee County Muse-
um Association is planning its
second Chili Challenge. The
event will be held on Saturday,
Jan. 29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
the loading dock of the old At-
lantic Coastline Freight Depot.
This year there will be three
classes in the competition.
Restaurants and businesses will
compete for a handsome trophy.
Civic organizations will com-
pete for a cash prize of $100.
This year, individuals will com-
pete, in their own class, for a tro-
phy. There will also be trophies
for the People's Choice Award
and for the best presentation
(table decoration). There will be
entertainment and an art exhibit
by the Live Oak Artist Guild.
Chili must be prepared and heat-
ed to 140 degrees F. when com-
petitor checks in. The tempera-
ture of the chili will be checked
before the judging. You may use
crock pots or hot plates to keep
your chili up to temperature.
Electrical outlets are available. If
you have questions about the
Chili Challenge, please call 386-
362-1776 and ask for Carol or
Richard. After hours, please
leave a message, and we will get
back to you. Proceeds from the
event will go to support the
Suwannee County Historical
Museum.
Jan 29
The Family CAFE Bistro
comes to Lake City
The Family CAFt Bistro a
free conference for students and
adults with disabilities, their
families and friends will be held
Sat the Columbia County School ,
Board Administration Complex
on Saturday, Jan. 29, from 8 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. A fiee continental
breakfast will be provided. The
registration deadline is Jan. 24.
For more info or to register, call


FDLRS/Gateway toll free at
800-227-0059.
Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6
19th Annual Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire comes to life
in Gainesville on Jan 29-30
and Feb. 4-6
The Alachua County Fair-
grounds come to life as the 19th
Annual Hoggetowne Medieval
Faire brings the magic of the
past to Gainesville. Join hun-
dreds of actors, artisans and vol-
unteers for two weekends of
merriment Jan. 29-30 and Feb.
4-6. Faire hours are 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Saturday and Sundays and
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday. Ad-
mission is $10 for adults, $5 for
children ages 5-17 and free for
children 4 and younger. For
more information call 352-334-
ARTS or visit www.gvlcultur-
alaffairs.org.
Jan. 30
The Florida Museum of
Natural History will host a
Science Sunday lecture on
wild orchids
The Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History in Gainesville will
host a Science Sunday lecture on
wild orchids by Connie Bransil-
ver, author of "Wild Love Affair:
Essence of Florida's Native Or-
chids," from 2-3 p.m. on Jan. 30.
The event is free and open to the
public. The Florida Museum
also will offer a new program
"Sunday Snoop," where muse-
um staff entertain children ages
4-10 for an hour with fun activi-
ties and a guided tour while
adults enjoy the lecture/book
signing. Registration for "Sun-
day Snoop" is $5 and pre-regis-
tration is required. For more info
or to register for "Sunday
Snoop," call 352-846-2000, ext.
277.
Jan. 31
NFCC will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Educa-
tion)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
ioln londa.\. an ,3.3 it y.p m , in
the NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison campus. TABE is
required for acceptance into vo-
cational/technical
programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. To


register please call 850-973-
9451.
Feb. 1
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
on Tuesday, Feb. 1, at 1:30 p.m.,
in the NFCC Technical Center
on the Madison campus. TABE
is required for acceptance into
vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. To
register please call 850-973-
9451.
Feb. 2
Helping Hands Volunteer
Orientation
Make a difference in some-
one's life! After attending orien-
tation and completing the
screening process, you will be
eligible for volunteering in the
Hospice Attic thrift store, ad-
ministrative offices as well as
helping at special events, educa-
tional fairs, community events
and fund raising. You must reg-
ister for orientation. Orientation
will be held from 10-11 a.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 2 (first
Wednesday of every month) at
Hospice of the Suwannee Val-
ley, 618 SW FL Gateway Drive,
Lake City. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn Long,
386-752-9191.
Feb. 2
NFCC Lady Sentinels' next
home basketball game
The North Florida Communi-
ty College Lady Sentinels' next
home basketball game will be
played at 5:30 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Feb. 2, against Okaloosa-
Walton at Colin P. Kelly Gym-
nasium on the Madison campus.
All home games are free and
open to the public. For more
info, contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at 850-
973-1609 or visit athletics at
www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 3. 10 and 17
Free meditation classes:
Way of Life Seminar
The "Way of Life" Seminars,
will focus on practical tips for a
peaceful lifestyle, including
meditation, a vegetarian diet and
freedom from addictive habits,
will be offered at the Suwannee
River Regional Library, 1848
Ohio Avenue South at 6:30 p.m.
on Thursday evenings, Feb. 3,
10 and 17. The workshops,
sponsored as a free public ser-
vice by Know Thyself as Soul
Foundation. For more info,
please call toll-free 877-MEDI-
TATE (877-633-4828), or visit
www.knowthyselfassoul.org on
the Web.
Feb. 4
My One and Onl w' ill be
presented at LCCC
The To:nL -\\aard '.innuia mu-
sical "My One and Only" will be
presented at 7:30 p.m. on Friday,
Feb. 4, in the Alfonso Levy Per-
forming Arts Center at Lake
City Community College. The
musical will include the sensa-
tional score of George and Ira
Gershwin features the popular


songs "Funny Face," "Strike Up
the Band," "Nice Work If You
Can Get It," and "How Long
Has This Been Going On?" to
name a few. Tickets for the per-
formance are: $14 general ad-
mission, $13 seniors, and $12
LCCC staff and students and
students from other schools.
Dinner before the show will start
at 6 p.m. The cost is $6 includ-
ing tax for Spanish chicken and
rice, salad, dinner roll, dessert
and beverage. Reservations are
required. For more info regard-
ing the performance and the din-
ner, call the box office at 386-
754-4340.
Feb. 5
African American
Development Council will
hold its Fifth Annual Roast
and Toast
The African American Devel-
opment Council will hold its
Fifth Annual Roast and Toast to
honor four of Live Oak's finest
at 6 p.m., on Saturday, Feb. 5, at
Sheryl's Noon Buffet & Cater-
ing, Fifth Street, Live Oak. It
will be a night for the communi-
ty recognize and thank four local
residents, Vinnie King, Cora
Owens, Clayton "Pete" Sneed
and P.L. Owens, for their dedica-
tion and contributions to the
community. Tickets are $15
each and are available from
Yvonne Scott, 386-362-2789,
the Rev. Tommie Jefferson, 386-
647-5984 or Bill Leithead, 386-
658-3359.
Feb. 5 - May 30
"Microbes: Invisible
Invaders...Amazing
Allies," will be on
display at the Florida Mu-
seum of Natural
History, Gainesville
"Microbes: Invisible In-
vaders...Amazing Allies," will
be on display Feb. 5 - May 30 at
the Florida Museum of Natural
History, Gainesville. The exhib-
it, produced by Clear Channel
Exhibitions in collaboration
with the National Institutes of
Health, is an interactive, techno-
logically enhanced exhibit that
explores the hidden world of mi-
crobes, including bacteria, virus-
es and beneficial germs. For
more info call 352-846-2000,
ext. 277.
Feb. 7
NFCC will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
on Monday, Feb. 7, at 6 p.m., in
the NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison campus. TABE is
required for acceptance into vo-
cational/technical
programs. Photo ID required.
.Pre-regstration is required. T6o
register please call 850-9"3-
451 .
Feb. 8
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
on Tuesday, Feb. 8, at 1:30 p.m.,


in the NFCC Technical Center
on the Madison campus. TABE
is required for acceptance into
vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. To
register please call 850-973-
9451.
Feb. 8-10
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments -FCAT Writing
Test
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005 As-
sessments - FCAT Writing Test -
Feb. 8-10. FCAT is for grades 3-
10 (Grade 11-Adult RE-
TAKES). Each school has more
detailed testing information
available. Daily student atten-
dance is critical during these as-
sessment periods.
Feb. 9
NFCC Lady Sentinels next
home basketball game
The North Florida Communi-
ty College Lady Sentinels next
home basketball game will be
played at 5:30 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Feb. 9, against Tallahassee
at Colin P. Kelly Gymnasium on
the Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to the
public. For more info, contact
NFCC basketball coach Clyde
Alexander at 850-973-1609 or
visit athletics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 11-12
NFCC Lady
Sentinels next home
basketball game
The North Florida Communi-
ty College Lady Sentinels next
home basketball game will be
played at 5:30 p.m. on Friday
and 2 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11-
12, against Pensacola at Colin P.
Kelly Gymnasium on the Madi-
son campus. All home games
are free and open to the public.
For more info, contact NFCC
basketball coach Clyde Alexan-
der at 850-973-1609 or visit ath-
letics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 14
NFCC will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult,
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
on Monday, Feb. 14, at 6 p.m., in
the NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison campus. TABE is
required for acceptance into vo-
cational / technical
programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. To
register please call 850-973-
9451.
Feb. 15
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test, of Adult Basic Education)
on Tuesday, Feb. 15, at' 1:30
p.m.,' in the NFCC Technical
Center on the Madison
campus. TABE is required for
acceptance into vocational/tech-
nical programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register please call

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 9C


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-







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 9C


Calendar


Continued From Page 8C

850-973-9451.
Feb. 15
SCORE will sponsor a
financial management and
record keeping
workshop
SCORE will sponsor a work-
shop on financial management
and record keeping from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 15, at
the Quality Inn, US 90 and 1-75,
Lake City. The cost is $20 with
lunch and materials included.
Topics will include business
loans, credit, inventory manage-
ment, record keeping systems
and more. Seating is limited. For
reservations or more informa-
tion, call 386-755-9026 ext.
3214. SCORE is a non-profit or-
ganization which provides coun-
seling to small businesses by ex-
perienced local volunteers.
Feb. 16
ServSafe Program
will be held
The Suwannee County Ex-
tension Ser[\ iic, will be provid-
ing :'od ..f'ei. training on
Wednesday, Feb. 16, from 8:30
a.m.-5 p.m. at the Suwannee
County Extension Office, 1302
Eleventh Street, SW, Live Oak.
Certification is required in
Florida for food managers of all
establishments. The University
of Florida Food Safety and
Quality Program manages the
ServSafe Program training (in-
cluding all registrations and
material orders). More info is
available about this training by
calling toll-free 888-232-8723
or visit
http://foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu.
Feb. 14
Live Oak Garden Club
Caladium sale
order deadline
Live Oak Garden Club mem-
bers are taking orders for No. 1
Caladium bulbs to be delivered
in mid-March. Choose reds,
pinks, whites or a mix of all
three. All have green edges. Ten
bulbs for $5 to be paid as the
caladiums are picked up. Mem-
bers will be taking orders un-
til Feb. 14 Don't take a chance


on forgetting. Place your order
today by contacting any Garden
Club member or call Sheryl
Kirby at 386-364-4586. You'll
be glad you did!! Gardening
Tip: If you plant your bulbs in
stages it lengthens the colorful
display time. Plant some in late
April and May. Hold some out
to plant in late June to maintain
a fresh colorful display in your
garden into the fall months.
Feb. 16
NFCC Lady
Sentinels next home
basketball game
The North Florida Communi-
ty College Lady Sentinels next
home basketball game will be
played at 5:30 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Feb. 16, against Chipola at
Colin P. Kelly Gymnasium on
the Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to the
public. For more info, contact
NFCC basketball coach Clyde
Alexander at 850-973-1609 or
visit athletics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 19
Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park will host the Audubon
Great Backyard Bird Count
The Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park will host the
Audubon Great Backyard Bird
Count on Saturday, Feb. 19
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Come
help count the birds in its rather
large "backyard." All levels of
experience are welcome and
only 15-30 minutes of your
time is required to participate.
Bring binoculars and field
guides. Pick up and turn in data
sheets at the main office. Guid-
ed nature walk at 9:30 a.m. Free
workshop in the Basics of Bird-
watching at 1 p.m. For more
info contact Nancy Birming-
ham-Hague at 386-364-4373.
Feb. 19-20
A Wild Horse adoption
will be held at the
Jacksonville
Equestrian Center
A Wild Horse Adoption will
be held at the Jacksonville
Equestrian Center on Feb. 19-
20. Requirements: 12x12 feet
of adequate shelter and 20x20
feet of corral space with sturdy


fencing six-feet high (five-feet
for burrows). In order to trans-
port animalss, adopters must
have a solid constructed horse
trailer, preferably a stock trailer,
a halter and a leadrope. Appli-
cation required. Animals will be
adopted by competitive bid -
minimum bid $125. Schedule:
Preview all day on Feb. 18, bid
from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Feb. 19
and 8 a.m. - noon on Feb. 20.
Free admission! Walk-ups wel-
come! Bring your trailer and a
friend! Ask about the new
"Adopt a Buddy" Program. For
more info call U.S. Department
of the Interior, Bureau of Land
Management, 601-977-5400 or
toll-free, 888-274-2133.
Feb. 21
NFCC Lady Sentinels next
home basketball game
The North Florida Communi-
ty College Lady Sentinels next
home basketball game will be
played at 5:30 p.m. on Monday,
Feb. 21, against Gulf Coast at
Colin P. Kelly Gymnasium on
the Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to the
public. For more info, contact
NFCC basketball coach Clyde
Alexander at 850-973-1609 or
visit athletics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 22
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test ofAdult Basic Education)
on Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 1:30
p.m., in the NFCC Technical
Center on the Madison cam-
pus. TABE is required for.ac-
ceptance into vocational/tech-
nical programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register please call
850-973-9451.
Feb. 26
2005 Lafayette Baseball
Golf Tournament
The 2005 Lafayette Baseball
Golf Tournament will be held
at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 26,
at the Suwannee Country Club,
Live Oak. (Note: Original
scheduled for Feb. 12) Four
man scramble withh prizes to


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the top three teams. Cost:'$50
per player or $200 per team.
Come and support Hornet
Baseball. For more info, con-
tact Derek Garland, 386-294-
3025 or Joann Page, 386-294-
2834.
Feb. 28
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education)
on Monday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m.,
in the NFCC Technical Center
on the Madison campus. TABE
is required for acceptance into
vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required. To
register please call 850-973-
9451.
Feb. 28 - March 11
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments - FCAT Read-
ing, Math and Science Tests
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments - FCAT Reading,
Math and Science Tests - Feb.
28-March 11. FCAT is for
grades 3-10 (Grade 11-Adult
RETAKES). Each school has
more detailed testing informa-
tion available. Daily student at-
tendance is critical during these
assessment periods.


March 19
Third Annual New York
Day in Lake City
Ever lived in New York State?
If so, join us at New York Day,
from 12:30-4 p.m. on Saturday,
March 19, at Tucker's Fine Din-
ing in the Old Blanche Hotel
building in downtown Lake City
(just north of Olustee Park). We
will have happy hour with New
York snacks, dinner with both
Iris and German dishes, and
New York desserts. Tony
Buzzella will provide entertain-
ment throughout the afternoon
and we'll have a New York triv-
ia contest as well. Come and
meet other former New Yorkers.
The cost is $13 per person for all
food and non-alcoholic bever-
ages. A cash bar will be avail-
able. Call Maureen or Vern
Lloyd at 386-752-4885 or Ed
Pettie at 386-752-8520 for more
info and reservations.
March 21-23
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments - SAT 10
Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005 As-
sessments - SAT 10 - March 21-
23. SAT 10 is for Grade K-2.
Each school has more detailed
testing information available.
Daily student attendance is criti-
cal during these assessment peri-
ods.


April 1-2
3rd Annual Florida State
Bluegrass Festival
The Perry-Taylor County
Chamber of Commerce and the
Tourism Development Council
will present the 3rd Annual
Florida State Bluegrass Festival
at Forest Capital State Park in
Perry on Friday and Saturday,
April 1-2. This emerging popu-
lar event promises two days of
top bluegrass performers, ven-
dors with home-cooked food
and arts and crafts items. No en-
try fee! Headlining the event
will be Valerie Smith & Liberty
Pike. Southern Lite, Southern
Gentlemen, Capsized, Swinging
Bridge, Fifth Gear, River City
Connection and Palms Blue-
grass Band are scheduled to ap-
pear. Shows scheduled between
4-11 p.m., on Friday and noon-
11 p.m. on Saturday. Also to be
held the same weekend, the 3rd
Annual Rotary Club Chili Cook-
off. First place - $500 savings
bond, compliments of Citizens
Bank of Perry, Second place -
$200 savings bond and Third
place - $100 savings bond, as
well as the popular "People's
Choice Award." For more info
on the festival, call the Chamber
office and talk to Dawn Taylor,
toll-free at 866-584-5366. Food
vendors or arts and crafts ven-
dors call the Chamber.


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February 19, 2005 - Florida's Silver Spring Spend the day at Florida's Silver
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March 11-14, 2005 - Mobile Flower Show and The Dead Sea Scrolls
Visit historic Mobile for a special showing of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Festival of
Flowers, tours of historic homes and much more! Price: $535 per person, double
occupancy
April 11-16, 2005 - Washington, DC See the new World War II Memorial, US
Naval Academy and much more! Price: $849 per person, double
April 14-15, 2005 - Colquitt & Swamp Gravy Trip includes motorcoach
transportation, one night accommodations, Pebble Hill Plantation, some meals,
admission to Swamp Gravy and more! Price: $199 per person, double
May 18-25, 2005 - Discover Switzerland Discover the beauty and charm of
Switzerland on this deluxe escorted tour. Includes: airfare from Jacksonville, 7-night
escorted tour, some meals and much more! Price: $2449 per person, double
June 17-25, 2005 & August 19-27, 2005 - Alaska Cruise Set sail aboard Princess
Cruise Lines for this deluxe cruise to Alaska. Includes: airfare from Jacksonville,
pre-night in Seattle, 7-night cruise with meals, taxes and gratuities. Price: $2079 per
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PAGE 10C, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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,ON
PjIIS p %.. ISt"
('AiNT/ - 11 THE
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; Real Estates Listings


Section D
January 26-27, 2005

800-525-4182

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N. WHITE WATER TRAIL
S, 5 e secluded
� ,o,-dy ed parcel ir
S3mprn gand
rlrec re onali use
Atout t, mJlE roul
,,f M yr Car


--,. ' m ill
HOME & 5 ACRES


Mayo
(386) 294-1576
Toll Free: (800) 605-1576
Sooner of US 27 and Monroe St.
Mayo, FL 32066
Website: www.southernskyrealty.com


Live Oak
(386) 364-1576
Toll Free: (800) 822-1576
South Oaks Square Shopping Center
1554 South Ohio Avenue
Live Oak, FL 32062


' g :4i'~,l ,i0-' right home for you.
NEEDS A FAMILY 76 ACRE ILAY FARM


E' ,autljl 2 acre parcel country setting
n,.:li, landscaped and Granddaddy oaks
i.:.. Trns DWMH has 3 bdrm and 2 bath
3Ci r..i' plenty of room for the kids to run
nrd pla.. SAFELY!! MLS#39560 $35,000
SQUARE -4 ACRES


Seeded in Coastal Bermuda grass &
7,000 sq.ft. hay barn, numerous outbldgs.,
workshop, equip. barns. ADD TO THAT-
'99 3/2 Homes of Merit DWMH in Super
Condition. MLS#40501 $365,000
RIVER GET A'AY!


k -~ $i~ N


This 3/2 DWMH is very close to the Gold
Kist Plant and is on a very nice partly
wooded 5 ac. lot. Lot fronts and backs
193rd & 193rd Dr. MLS#41686 $72,500


RARE!!! Square 4 acres, fenced for your Great place to hide from the hustle and
animals and a barn to house them. Home bustle of daily life. Abundance of mature
needs some TLC but has great potential. trees shelter this T1-11 sided elevated
Many fruit trees a grape vine and flowering home from the elements. MLS#42029
shrubs. MLS#41815 $49,900 $149,900 128320JRS-F


For more information about this home, call the
associates of Southern Sky Realty at386-294-1576.


-ap C
F' ~


-w


S(ON\ ENIENI 1T II\ E OAk... t-'r'- ' btLr...:r,..,. o
2 bath manufactured home on 5 treed acres with
paved road frontage. Home offers spilt floor plan with
spacious rooms, dining room & utility room plus
outbuilding. $78,500. MLS#43040




BRAND NEW HOME... Spacious living area, 3
bedroom, 2 baths plus small "bonus" room, breakfast
bar, large covered front porch, and 2 car garage on .82
acres on paved road. $189,500. MLS#43657
\\ \V


SFind it, Buy it, Sell it


in the Classified

Marketplace

2806 West US Highway 90 M
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055
S..HYPERLINK
"http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
SB H DANIEL CRAPPS - 8 0 0 7 6
agency, inc. 1-800-805-7566

386-362-4539 (1) 20 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre - owner financing
800-C 557-"7478 available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84.50 (+/-) - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
IL - " l oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
FROIM UOLUR l;I \5a I)! (4) 155 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - gently rolling land located next to Peacock
I ..� .-. cl -. . -. . 1 ...- .rI 1.. .-, Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
S ,. ...n .. I I. ....: i (5) 210 (+/-) ACRES- SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located on State Road #51 about 3
I .I.. , ~.. . .. I-,I .?.nc miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site! $3,500 per acre
,i, ,_-**.... . *'.i- I. (Owner/Broker)
11.J *. ln ,' 3"L . , (6) 645 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
- L, 1) U RI >1 . R I .. meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
I. i.. .. .].' 1' . I .. ...,I.i pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal for hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
.. .i. '" ' ,i. .,,i , i 1 $2,725 per acre
.'. . ,,, i,,n, ...1 r, .11. (7) 674 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
1 i '4 ':. 2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
-1LI (Ol, I HN SI I f' IN, .. Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
4 .i "- -.'i "'. I ,'i . " ..I (Owner/Broker)
,,"i .. ' , , .. .. . I For additional information, contact r
. i . i _l ,i-I . .i..i, BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
. II' .1 ' i, ' 'i, E-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"
., I, , ._ 1%,,,,, 'P - :? ,
i LI RI P l'\MI I� lll .. ;+ ^ _ _ _

':- Lighthouse Realty
I LOL 0, 0 N . _ _1 _- ....I N..r[i ....1 j id ihi,,

. " . ieathe r NM. Neill, Broker
1','.I 'i." - ' I1 )4 2 11 N 16 II 1,h 5.1~4
l . 4 ,1 L',,, . | . IId. I tl l. MlI. NVL\,\.iLI(;IIIIIt) I.SrI'.\I ,Tl .I.. "


, ' . . - '. ,, ' -'


HISTORIC 3/2 HOME on .5 ac. inside city CONVENIENT LOCATION and lots of
limits. Well-kept and updated. Fenced, extras! 3/2 DW on two acres, 40x36
monthly termite treatment, home insulated barn, 20x24 carport, fireplace,
warranty, new 4-ton AC unit. $97,000. skylights, vaulted ceilings and walk-in
#43388. closets. $94,000. #42719.
,, , , ,,,, ;
, ' ,. ,. ,: . , , ,, ,


SPORTSMEN, LOOK - 2/1 SW, plus
bunkhouse, close to the Gulf, Suwannee
River and prime hunting land. Fenced, RV
hookup, dog pens w/auto feed. Seller
says bring all offers! $33,000. #43858.
-.


NEW LISTING - 3/2 home inside city
limits. Carport. Currently rented. Highway
frontage, can be used as commercial
nronprtv 47 nno. #43920


AFFORDABLE GETAWAY! Tidy 2/1 SW.
Carport, fenced yard with lots of flowers &
fruit trees. New water treatment system,
8x8 shed w/elec. $40,000. #41860.


, , , ,. ' , ^i


AFFORDABLE! Cozy 2/1 on one acre.
Paved road frontage, cleared lot. $35,000.
4AO 1 A


r


------------�----�--�-- ------ ----------------�- -----------------; --
^~*I.IW~U~U~~


~


'+,


i:: 1






PAGE 2D, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182


Mobile Homes

and

Land for sale.

Financed

by owner.

Ask for
Larry Olds.


386-362-2720


Brick Ranch Style Home'and 10+ Acres
Approx 4.5 miles East of Mayo on Hwy #27
Mayo (Lafayette Co.) FL


Property #1: Approx. 5.13 acre lot w/paved road
Property #2: * Approx. 2296 Sq Ft Brick home on
4.87+ acres * 5BR/2B *Formal LR & DR * Kitchen
Family Room * Laundry Room * Canning or
storage room. * Paved road frontage
Property #1 & #2 will be offered individually and in combination
Avon Collectibles Antique Linens
Plus Disney Collectibles Chenille Bedspreads
Contents Vintage Toys '50's Chrome table w/leaf
- Contents Sofa/Love Seat Misc Lamps
Misc Furniture Misc Books
Set of'47 "Spring Blossom" Framed Pictures/drawings
Misc Dishes, Bowls, Vases, etc Much, Much More!
Terms: Real Estate - 20% down day of auction, balance in 30 days.
Personal Property - Cash or good check day of auction.
10% Buyers Premium on all purchases.
Inspection: Open House Sunday, Feb. 6 from 2-4 pm or call for appointment
For More Information or Free Color Brochure
1-800-448-2074
ON e-mail: margieburton@,burtonrealtyandauction.corn
Bama gsp Iauction calendar: www.burtonrealtyandauction.com
REALTY AND AUCTION, INC. 3'
Quitman, GA Stephen F. Burton
AL 548 AB587AU649 AL1337 SC 3580R KY RP02456 Lie RE Broker/Auctioneer





529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. - M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on US
90 near I-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Building
containing approximately
12,500 with 11,500 sq. ft. of
packing. $250,000.
(2) 75 acres on paved road
on pasture with some live
oaks, fenced and cross fenced,
two wells, 1/4 mile on paved
Rd. 1/4 mile on county grade,
good area. $3,995 per acre.
(3) 177th Drive: 3 Bedroom,
2 bath central heat and air.
Home containing
approximately 1,350 sq. ft.
Kitchen furnished 225'137
lot. $72,000.
(4) Jasper, FL: 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath, CH/AC, brick, containing
approximately 1,700 sq. ft.,
tender roof. Kitchen furnished
147x97 lot, pool, $95,000..
(5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20 acres
wooded with large oaks, and a
3BR/2BA, CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under roof,
detached storage $149,500.
(6) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with
a four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home
containing approximately
2,500 sq. ft. under roof,
kitchen furnished, 3 car
garage. REDUCED to
$225,000.
(7) Off CR 249: 3 Bedroom,
1 1/2 bath, CH/AC, home
contains approximately 1,180
sq. ft. 1 1/2 acres of land
(paved road) $55,000. Would
work for S.H.I.P.
(8) Hunting Tract: 13 acres
+, wooded, Steinhatchee


Springs area, river access, and
Hwy. 51 access, recent survey.
$26,000.
(9) Near Walmart, 70th St.,
Skeen Rd.: 5.81 acres with a
3 bedroom, 2 bath CH&AC
1999 Doublewide mobile
home, kitchen furnished, 4"
well, double car canopy,
34x20 storage etc. Good Buy
@ $69,900.
(10) Camping Lot: One
acre riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(11) Off CR 252: 10 Acres
wooded on 61st Road
convenient to Lake City, can
be divided. $4,950 per acre.
(12) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick
home with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(13) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air, 218x170'
lot, nice trees, numerous
updates, new carpet, paint,
stove & refrig. 100%
financing. $61,900.
(14) Suwannee River: Four
plus acres with 220 ft. on the-
water, 4' well, septic tank,
20x32 and 10x20 buildings.
$110,000.
(15) Meadow Lake: Two
four acre tracts, $20,000 each.
Good area.
(16) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
(17) Off 208th: 4 Acres
wooded corner tract. Good
buy @ $11,995.
(18) Old Sugar Mill Farm:
Nice one acre tract on paved
road with a 2001 CH&AC
DW mobile home, kitchen
furnished. 12x20 storage
building. Good area. $67,500.
128445-F


ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
FOUND Female Jack Russell Terrior.
Near Rec. Dept. @ John Hale Park.
Call 386-963-2411 and identify.
Special Notices
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO
WORK23520750 you may be
entitled to money through social
security. Call Intergrated Family
Services at 1-866-4-SSI-USA




BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous

First Day
FOR SALE Beauty Equipment. 2
Island stations, mirrors, lights. 4
Hydraulic chairs. Like New! Call
(386) 792-3056.

First Day
FOR SALE Firewood-pickup or
delivery. Also, 350 plus big, tall,
pines. See @ 13366 Hwy 136 W. Call
386-362-3357.





FINANCIAL SERVICES

IM ( ii c iBS m


Real Estate
ENJOY NORTH FLORIDA LIVING
LIVE OAK, FLORIDA
15 Ac. Approx. 7 mi. W. of Live Oak
w/2001 Homes of Merit 2300+ sq. ft.
Mobile Home. 4BD/2BA, 2LR. Lots of
storage area, Lg. Kit, Lg. Deck on
back w/concrete patio. Home sits in
about 3 Ac. of Lg. Oak Trees w/the
bal. of prop. in pasture. Mostly fenced
& cross-fenced for cattle & horses.
Accessible from 2 roads: 1 paved, 1
dirt. Irrigation for garden spot or start
of a nursery. Asking $177,000.
CALL FOR APPT. TO SEE:
DAYTIME: 386-867-1888
AFTER 6PM: 386-330-2373

First Day
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
10 nicely wooded Acres, sq. lot on
high ground above 100 yr. flood
zone, approved, for MH or house.
Pwr. line @ front prop. line on road.
Nice hunting area. 3 mi. from dntwn
Jasper & 2 mi. from Hamilton Co.
Jail on Hwy. 51. Land located @
Hwy. 51 & 32nd take a right to
Hamilton Forrest Subdivision LOT
#9. Asking $3500.00 per acre. Call
Jim Strunk @(909) 376-8942.

First Day
Ten Acres Pasture/Oak Grove. 1994
23X40 DWMH. 3BD/2BA. New roof,
skirting, CH/A, W/D, Well, Septic &
Power Pole. Lg Shed. On paved rd. 8
mi. to Live Oak, FL, off Hwy 90.
Minutes to proposed year 2007 QH,
TB, Harness Track. Close to
Suwannee River & Falmouth
Springs. $75,000. Call 561-389-
7695. H. Claire Scott, Broker/Owner.
BK185655.


PERSONAL SERVICES




EDUCATIONAL SERVICES





j PETS


LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.




AGRICULTURE





MERCHANDISE

Garage/Yard Sales

YARD SALE @ Bethany House on
Hwy. 41 in White Springs, FL. Next to
Country Cafe. Various items, baby
items, VCR, knickknacks, clothes, all
items must go. Sat. 1/29/05 8 a.m.
until.


GOOD -BUY UCASHCASH L IMMEDI
CLASSES " I ' !EDS l, OI"UI


|0/ 1 8HOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED ADl
8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


What do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.
Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.
Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.
Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.
_____ _Whait's t N .L i ,,r . .T .,I ..i ,.d I offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


-FOR RENT-
3BR, Singlewide
mobile home.
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
133437-F


I Ocwe_ _a__aa


I J t1 W. Howard Street, Live Oak, lorida 32064 Bl iS
Office: (386) 362-3300 Toll Free: 1-888-821-0894


Have you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.

How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.

SE Call 1-800-525-4182 today!



o I ,,, - * ^ :.BUSINES 5
,4,5.�T' S U ,S,*". � ' ....... -. , - ,
."1 """ 1 EPi"EN l " '
alr1^-�"* �f "^"tWWW '* ~" ^ .^"3"


Touch of Class
Not just any mobile home.
This one has a lot to offer...
1,550 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, metal
roof, vinyl siding, new central
heat and air unit, new 40 gal.
hot water heater and Kinetico
water purifying system.
Kitchen & breakfast area has
been remodeled with a Tuscan
theme, family room has a
working fireplace with a gas
log. All rooms have been
freshly painted, and are ready
for you. Home also has a
, covered back porch and a new
front deck with rails. All this
on 2.5 acres with two deep
wells, metal storage building,
Planted Pines, Pecan, and
Oak Trees. Only 6 miles from
Live Oak. 13311-F


11


II


-r|




FOR SALE 1994 21.5' Montego by
TravelMaster. E350 Ford Chassis.
53K mi. Fully equipped, new tires.
Must see to appreciate! Asking
$13,500. OBO. 386-776-2309
Boats/Supplies
FOR SALE 1968 19 ft. Skiff Craft I/O
Boat , Motor & Trailer. $3500. OBO.
Like new. Call 386-364-5589.
FOR SALE 1996 Robalo 2120,
center console w/225 Mercury
w/warranty. Continental trailer. Many
extras. Asking $17,500. Call 386-
362-4775.
FOR SALE Houseboat, 29 ft.
Pontoon. Self-contained. Fridge,
stove, bed. 2001 hp. Honda 4-stroke,
tilt & trim. $6000. OBO. Call 727-421-
5207 or 727-526-0622.
Campers/Motor Homes
FOR SALE Camper, 1994 Prowler
24'. Separate bedroom, Queen Bed,
also sleeper couch. Very clean.
Hitch, awning. Must See! $4500.
firm. Phone 386-963-2817.




REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Apartments


FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


OH-SO SWffT






FANS YOUNG AND OLD WILL

GET A KICK OUT OF THIS TASTY

MEDITERRANEAN FEAST
-Page 7D




You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F


PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all



' EQUAL HOUSING I -,'-i P ' iO
OPPORTUNITY I '
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275


Houses for Rent
First Day
FOR RENT 3BD/2BA Brick Home.
Front yard has chain-link fence. 3
concrete dog pens. Secluded. 6 mi.
East of Mayo, Fl. $650./mo. plus
security deposit. Call 386-294-1884.

First Day
Four BD/3BA 2-Story House in
Hatchbend area, S. of Branford, FL.
Includes 10 ac. fenced pasture & 2
stall barns. $600./mo. + sec. dep. Call
(386) 362-2362.


Double and
single wide
mobile homes
for rent on
their own lots

in the

Live Oak area.

Ask for
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720
137196DH-F


-FOR RENT-
2 BR, singlewide
mobile-home,
central H/A.*'
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer, &
garbage included.
No pets
386-330-2567


Joan Holmes Radford

Swith tlariei Lee Realty ~ Marie Lee Broker
www.askrealtorjoan.com (386) 364-2828
' , , , . * , , , *,%

S ,/ p, ' , , ,.1 .-0!
, . .





Nice ni,.deratel pi icedJ ,n li I a per -I bed. .
I 1b.th Edge ,t ,o,'.n. C n1 cIie nti l\ cited. .
$51,uuO. MLS# 43135
SCommercial building and property. Room to
LARGE LOT in Jennings area. Mostly cleared, have your office and rent 2 out! Call for
Call for details. $10,000. MLS# 43565 details. $82,500. MLS#40481 138435JRS-F

on Maw M&TAITi


^. II


I1m -'-I


Gu. neraI .."
______I IlbRS-


z_-


SAVE SAVE SMIE, SAVE








* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


We Will Help You
GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!
With the



PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION ogo in the ClassfiedMarketla


EDUCAIOm S C R riEiTAEORN
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT ,
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


RCULPETS




AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WE ACCEPT" eyID'irel
� Money Orders � Personal Checks


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:


The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

PV& the Jasper News,

The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The.Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak 294 Mayo 303
White Springs 362, 364 Live Oak * 397 White
Springs 454 High Springs 497 Fort White * 658
Dowling Park -752, 755, 758 Lake City 776
Luraville * 792 Jasper. 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford * 938 Jennings
.961 Lake City * 963 Welborn 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosla * 224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville * 241,242, 244, 245, 247,
249, 251,253, 257, 259 Valdosla - 263 Ouitman
268 Vienna 268 Lilly 271,273 Cordele * 282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross 293 Valdosta * 324 Berlin
. 333 Valdosla - 345 Nicholls * 346 Coolidge ' 359
Ambrose * 362 Milan * 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle 367 Baxley * 375 Hazelhurst 377, 378
Cairo 381 Douglas 382 Tiflon * 383, 384
Douglas 385 Rhine 386, 387 Tifton 389, 393
Douglas 422 Pearson * 423, 424 Filzgerald 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City 7467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla . 472 Montezuma 472
Oglethorpe 482 Lakeland * 487 Homerville 498
Boston * 528 Omega 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma .
534 Willacoochee * 535 Warwick .546 Lenox
.549 Sparks - 559 Lake Park . 567 Ashburn , 574
Ocklochnee * 594 Uvalda 624 Pineview, 627
Unadilla 632 Alma s 637 Fargo 643 Rebecca
.648 Pits * 649 Buena Vista . 683 Meigs * 686
Nashville * 735 Barwick * 762 Whigham 769
Norman Park - 775 Morven 776 Sylvesler - 782
Doerun * 794 Hahira * 824 Plains * 831 Irwinville
. 833 Jacksonville . 846 Smithville. 853 Cobb �
859 Pavo * 863 Blackshear * 868 McRae - 873
Moultrie - 874 Leslie * 887 Richland 890, 891
Moultrie, 896 Adel 899 Moultrie, 924, 928
Americus * 929 Pinetta * 938 Jennings. 941
Funston . 973 Madison .985 Moultlrie


For Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,
I Friday (prior),
DEAD S I IN A i For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
'WeI I I [OR1ev al Uil Wednesday (prior).
*We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion in the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.'


HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA 1 mi.
from Live Oak. CHA, W/D. $450/mo,
1st, last & $300. sec. dep. NO PETS!
386-362-3002
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA Brand
New House CHA Screened Porch,
$600/mo, 1st, last & $300. sec. dep.
1 mi. from Live Oak, Fl city limits. NO
PETS! 386-362-3002

First Day
HOUSE FOR RENT in LIVE OAK,
1BR, 1BA, Screened Porch, Fenced
Yard, W/D Hookups, All major
appliances, Heat & A/C, Some pets
ok, $300/Mo, Deposit. Call 386-590-
0980
Mobile Homes for rent
First Day
FOR RENT 1BD/1BA SWMH on 5
quiet acres in the Dowling Park, FL
area. Very clean, furnished or not.
$295. + Sec. Dep. Call 386-658-
2673, Iv. msg w/ph#.

First Day
Three BD/2BA DWMH on 1.8 Acres.
Well & Septic tank. Less than 1 mi.
from Live Oak, FL city limits. No
pets.$600. per mo. plus $500. sec.
dep. Call 386-362-6718.
Vacation Rentals
First Day




-. ;. -. b

North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. (386) 330-4207
Lucy


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F




Rental Assistance
1, 2,, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments
( 705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity




HUD Vouchers Welcome!
1,2 &3 BR C & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Oportuniy


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


FOR SALE BY OWNER
WITH FINANCING
1) 4 AC. on 35th just off 137,
$30,000.
2) 5 AC. on 193rd just offf 90W
$30,000. (Well, Septic & Pwr. Pole).
3) 2 AC. two miles off 90 in Eastern
Madison Co. $12,500.00. 4) 1/4 AC.
Northern Suwannee Co. $5,000.
Mobile Homes or Houses.
(386) 935-2301

OWNER FINANCE
Jasper - 4BD/2&1/2BA DWMH on 1
ACRE, NICE PRIVACY, Lg. Front &
Rear decks, fireplace, new
carpet.Sm. down & $750/mo.
Call (386) 758-9785
OWNER FINANCE
O'Brien - Spacious 3BR/2BA on
2.03 acres. Beautiful Oak Trees Sm.
down & $695.00 mo.
Call (386) 758-9785
Homes for Sale
FOR SALE 3BD/1&1/2BA Brick
Home in Live Oak. Lg. den w/fpl,
closed carport, privacy fence. Nearly
2000 sq. ft. Also, separate 400 sq. ft.
room that could be used as guest
house, gameroom, etc. A must-see
@ 1453 Pearl Ave. Call 386-330-
2201.
First Day
FOR SALE 3BD/1&1/2BA home,
brick veneer. Recently renovated,
excellent condition. 630 Colonial
St., Live Oak, FL. $82,500.00. Call
386-963-3445 or 386- 365-1130.


Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Established full service co. D
WE BUY MORTGAGES.
tW00) 226-6044
6 i22 NW 43rd St, Suit A-I
Licensed Meg. Lender

TRAILER HARBOR
MOBILE HOME PARK
A Family Park with
rentals. Drug Free
in-town location.Single
iand Double lots
available. 362-3868
_128497JS-F


Retired
Telephone
Man
will do telephone
installation,repair,
TV Cable installation,
& phone wiring,
jacks and repairs
or other small jobs. 3
Call Tom @
658-2611.


FOR SALE by owner-N. Suwannee
County. 3/2 Cypress frame home-
1995. 2100 sq. ft. conditioned+lg.
screen porch & decks. Beautiful 6 ac.
of hardwood forest, high & dry. 3 min.
walk to Suwannee River w/gated
access to miles of state-owned river
frontage. $213,000. Call 386-362-
5979
Mobile Homes
OWNER FINANCE
E. of Branford-close to beautiful
Itchetucknee River- 3BD/2BA MH
Small down, $625/mo. 386-758-9785

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
First Day
Assistant Manager Needed.
Contact Advance Cleaners in Publix
Plaza in Lake City, FL (Hwy. 90
West). Benefits available. Apply in
person, no phone calls, please.

First Day
Carrier needed for Times-Union
Newspaper delivery in Live Oak, FL
area. Call (386) 752-5121.
Clerical/Industrial
HELP WANTED

MANY POSITIONS AVAILABLE
INDUSTRIAL/CLERICAL
APPOINTMENT NEEDED
CALL FOR INFO:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGROUND/DRUG SCREEN
REQUIRED


CHILDREN'S
THERAPIST

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch is
currently recruiting for a Children's
Therapist. Position requires a
Master's degree in counseling,
social work, psychology or related
human services field with a
preference of 2 years clinical
experience in providing services to
youth with emotional disturbances..
Please forward resume to:
Eileen McCowan
Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch
emccowan @ youthranches.org
P.O. Box 2000
Boys Ranch, Florida 32064
386/842-5555 (800/765-2697)
FAX . 3'3. .412.1i?', . " '' '
Licensed supervision available.
E.O.E./Drug Free Workplace

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO. INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
1 th St. or call (386) 362-1235.

Office Manager/
Patient Care Coordinator
Duties Required: Knowledge of A/P,
A/R, payroll, office management,
computer literacy, proficiency in
Quick Books and Microsoft
applications. Applicant needs to be
self motivated, dependable, can work
independently and multi-task well.
Related experience a plus. Fax
resume to 386-754-6713 and call
386-754-6711.
First Day
DRIVERS NEEDED. Full or part-
time. Flexible hours. Valid Driver's
License required. Call Trans-Care
Services @ 386-364-4474 for appt.
for interview.


Counselor, OPS
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
COUNSELOR, OPS needed at
North Florida Community College,
Madison, Fla. Grant funded, 28
hr/week. Coordinates College
Board Expanded Opportunity
Program and program for
improving FCAT scores and SAT
scores. Requires AA/AS degree,
experience working with at risk
youth; counseling or education
experience. Education majors
encouraged to apply. Strong
organizational and interpersonal
skills, some evenings and weekend
work. Application at www.nfcc.edu.
Send complete application packet
of cover letter, resume, application
and transcripts (unofficial OK) to:
HR Director, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Deadline 1/28/05. EOE

First Day
Domestic & Farm Help
2 PEOPLE
to work on quail hunting plantation.
Housing & Salary for both. Call 386-
755-0220 Ext. 834

First Day
EXPERIENCED DENTAL
ASSISTANT
Needed P/T for busy General
Practice (non-smoking office).
Great opportunity for a team
player.
Fax resume to 386-362-1319.
Resumes already received
need not re-apply.
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.
Housekeeper
Full time position in O'Brien area in
Suwannee County. Duties include
housecleaning, laundry and running
errands. Must be experienced, have
dependable transportation and
excellent references. Call 800-704-
7397.


farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.

Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.

LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.

First Day
ST. AUGUSTINE
YOUTH SERVICES
is seeking Houseparent Couples
for therapeutic group home for
emotionally handicapped boys.
Good pay, great benefits. Fax
resume to (904) 825-0604, call
(904) 829-1770, or apply in person
at 50 Saragossa Street, St.
Augustine, Florida. EOE/DFWP.


ii


for Something?



Look no further than




Inside, you '11 find great deals on merchandise you

can use, like a summer rental home or a new sofa



Classifieds anytime, any where, n1o computer

required. Pick up your copy today!





Classified Marketplace



386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182


ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES



FINANCIAL SERVICES
FINANCIAL SERVICES


acd Se7c~iee


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 3D


I


II I


-' I


'' I � I I


ur eay -r-


~uL=
_,laLE


00


G










362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182
------ --- -


First Day
medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking RN for Risk Management/
Staff Development

First Day
medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, Fl
Seeking Full Time/Part Time
RN's & LPN's


First Day
Multi positions available @
Jennings GP Motorsports Park.
Apply in person @ 4960 NW CR
152, Jennings, FL. or call Jamie or
Bill @ 386-938-1110.

First Day
Plumber needed. Mostly residential.
Office in Branford area. Good pay,
some benefits. Please call 386-935-
6531.


Truck Drivers
PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS
$1000.00 New Hire Bonus for
experienced drivers! Call about dry
bulk and flat bed positions @ our
Newberry terminal. 866-300-8759.
maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace.
Call (386) 330-2567


Pic T


Free to good home.
Call 000-000-000


Run your ad with a picture to sell your item fast.

1st Week $19.95 Picture with 4 lines

2nd Weel $14 Picture With 4 lines

Private party only. non-refundable. Must be pre-paid.


Contact our



Classified Marketplace


at 386-362-1734 or


800-525-4182 to lace your ad.


First Day



| TACO


JOIN OUR TEAM!
Actively seeking qualified
Managers
for our Lake City, Live Oak, &
Macclenny locations. Resumes
may
be faxed to (386) 755-2296 or
applications may be obtained at
any location.


First Day
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
The Lake City Reporter is seeking
Advertising Sales Rep.
Requirements include: successful
sales background, strong
presentation and organization
skills, ability to meet deadlines and
multi-task, dependable
transportation, team spirit with a
positive attitude.
Benefits include: Strong earnings
potential, great working
environment, paid holidays,
medical & 401K.
Interested applicants should send
resume to:
Advertising Director
Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
No phone calls please.

Mechanic
Full Time position open at
Spirit of the Suwannee. Starting
Salary $10.00 to $12.00 per hour
based on level of experience.
Apply in person@
3076 95th Dr., (Hwy 129 N.)
Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.


STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.

Tax Preparers
!!! EARN EXTRA MONEYII
JACKSON HEWITT
LIVE OAK & JASPER OFFICES
now hiring experienced tax
preparers.
(386)362-1633
945 N..Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL 32064


Service Aide full/part time. Assist
individuals with physical and
developmental disabilities; flexible
schedule, trains people in activities
of daily living in the community. One
year experience medical, psychiatric,
nursing, child care or working with
persons with developmental
disabilities. Good driving record,
background screenings.
ADA/EOE/Drug free. Apply at:
COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY
SERVICES
506 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL


First Day
MUSGROVE
CONSTRUCTION INC.
Has an immediate opening for
experienced mechanic. Hydraulic
knowledge a plus. Must have own
hand tools. Call 386-362-7048 or
come by the office of Musgrove
Construction, 8708 US 90 Live
Oak. Drug Free Workplace.


First Day
FOR SALE 1998 GMC Jimmy. Re-
built engine w/less than 10,000
miles, new tie rods. See @ 13366
Hwy 136W. Call 386-362-3357.
FOR SALE 2002 Ford Ranger.
$10,500.00. Good condition. Can be
seen @ 122 W. Duval, Live Oak,
across from bread store. Call for
more info 386-362-7084.

Vans for Sale
FOR SALE 1996 Dodge Co6Rerted
Van. Low Mileage. $6,000.00 OBO.
Must sell! Call 305-338-8990 or
leave msg. @ 386-330-0355.


ALL SOFTRA

SEVI sAvAj -L!
N.CyiT M(nr rDT!LT OGIG ^ ie.Dikbrkselcri sat,4


Motorcycles


MOWING - BUSH HOGGING bike. Disk brakes, electric start, 4-
SI G * speed trans. Like new. $800.00. Call
* AND MUCH MORE -* i. 386-362-4491.

FREE ESTIMATES hIi , By itFi, , Sell it

Sin the Classified

Marketplace

HEAVY EQUIPMENT
~BRMISTER: \OPERATOR
STRAINING FOR
A O 1TE-EMPLOYMENT

ATTE tN T'ION 'T'EC-HNICIANS
Bruister & Associates is now accepting
applications for technicians with electrical,
satellite, telephone, and alarm system
experience. Experience is preferred but
training is available for the right individual. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders,
Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
We offer great pay; 401K. paid training, Excavators
and insurance benefits. Brt.ister & Next Class: Feb. 14th
Associates is an EOE and a c,'** il ed drug -National Certification
I - -Financial Assistance
free work place. Candidates iUSt have a -Job Placement in your area
good driving record. Background checks 800-383-7364
required. Call Bertie at 888-2 18-2447. Associated Training Services
www.Equipment-School.com n

CITY OF DeLAND, FLORIDA
JOB OPPORTUNITIES

The City of DeLand, Florida (25 miles southwest of Daytona Beach) is hiring for
Building Inspector, Plans Examiner and Deputy Building Official. These positions
are 40 hours a week. Candidates for these positions must possess current Florida
Dept. BPR and or ICC licenses.

Starting salary: Building Inspector: $43,326
Plans Examiner: $47,326
Deputy Bldg Official: $52,116

The City of DeLand will pay an additional certification incentive up to $4,800.00 for
specific licenses.

Applicants MUST have the following licenses: Building Inspector: structural,
mechanical, plumbing, commercial electric, residential electric, one and two family
dwelling. Plans Examiner: Structural Plans, mechanical plans, plumbing plans,
electrical plans and one and two family plans. Deputy Bldg Official: Bldg Official
Certification. Relocation allowance is available.

Applications and specific job information can be obtained by fax (386) 740-6869 or
by calling the City of DeLand Human Resources Office, (386) 740-5700.
DeLand, Florida 32720. Applications can be obtained or by visiting the web site at
HYPERLINK "http://www.@deland.org" www.@deland.org. Positions will close on
February 18, 2005.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER/M/F/V/D 138319DH-F


FOR SALE 2004 50cc GY50 dirt


Sales
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Sales People
or Right People with no Experience
Will Train
*UpTo 35% Commissions
* Demo Program for Sales
People
* Health Insurance
* Great Work Environment
* Paid 3% on F&I
*Paid Salary During Training
Please call Bobby Cogswell
at 386-362-1112


First Day
Secretary/Asst. Office Manager.
Computer exp. a must.
Bookkeeping/payroll, sales exp. a
plus. Salary DOE. Fax Resume to:
(386) 346-2106.
Secretary/Receptionist
Full time position in busy real estate
office in Mayo. Must have excellent
computer skills with emphasis on
Windows, Word and Excel with
experience in general office duties.
Send resume to: PO Box 268, Mayo,
FL 32066





TRANSPORTATION

Autos for Sale
FOR SALE '98 Ford Contour SE
Sport, 4dr. Low mi., good condition,
clean, well maintained,good tires.
AC/AM/FM/CD/power everything.
Asking $4000. 386-842-2006
days/eves.

TAKE OVER PAYMENTS of $450.00
per month on a 2004 Chevy Max.
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.

Trucks for Sale


Great Summer Deal
Boat & Truck
Only $19,500.
Call 000-000-000


First Day
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF TRANSPORTATION *

Has an opening for an Automatic
Service Technician & Mechanic,
Level 2. Bi-Weekly Salary Range is
$801.93 -$1,100.00. Minimum
qualifications:
1. Knowledge of preventative
maintenance for automobiles,
trucks, diesel engines or related
equipment.
2. Knowledge of testing equipment
used in the repair of automotive
equipment.
3. Ability to lift 70 pounds.
4. Ability to perform oxygen,
acetylene and electric welding
related to automotive and
equipment repairs.
5. Ability to read, write and
understand shop manuals and
work orders.
6. Ability to climb, squat, stoop,
push, pull, crawl, bend and work in
all types of weather.
Special Requirement: Class A
Driver's License.
Please apply on-line att
https://iobs.mvflorida.com. Refer to
Requisition number 55010420.
Only State of Florida applications
will be accepted-no resumes,
please.
Closing date is February 1. 2005.
EO/AA/VP Employer


etaby Ceontest


Presented by Live Oak Publications


Ctest




sonable
Phot,


All entries
must be
received by
Feb. 28


SName:


Pa re n t:"

Birthday:


. Address:


SPhone:


Your baby' will have a
chance to iwin
one of /our prize packages


hr'i l..!,iT l .. III l,,: -.i-l-l..J inr .1 :['. I . , l.', lh l ',.I 11 rlur it, Irn ..
r . . ,r. '. .r- d . Ii . i r .... i .. �ir-

___________________,____ .. _. _ _ . . _ _ _ __ __ ^ ___________________'-"I- I:' r


Baby Con test~im~ii
FR. o 3,

- ie Oa, F 306
- e. ..BB^B


PAGE 4D, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


g CLASSIFIED MARKET ORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA







Don't forget to floss!


Your teeth are definitely
clean -- you brush them every
day. But do you floss? Floss-
ing daily is just as important
as brushing to prevent dental
decay and periodontal prob-
lems. Flossing helps clean be-
tween the teeth and under the
gumline, areas that brushing
alone can't reach.


There are many kinds of
dental floss, and one is no bet-
ter than another, so pick the
floss that works best for you.
There is waxed or unwaxed,
flavored or unflavored, and
regular or tape. Waxed floss
slides easily between the
teeth. Flavored floss leaves a
minty, fruity or other flavor in


your mouth. Tape floss is
thicker than regular floss,
making it popular among peo-
ple who have wide gaps be-
tween their teeth.
HOW TO FLOSS
Flossing won't be effective
unless you do it properly. Here
are some steps, courtesy of
floss.com:


1. Wrap 18 inches of dental
floss lightly around your mid-
dle fingers.
2. Firmly grasp the floss
with your index fingers.
3. Form a C shape, and slide
floss up and down the area be-
tween your tooth and gum
line.
4. Gently slide the floss in


between both sides of
your tooth. Repeat on all
teeth until finished. Don't
rush, or you will not reap
the benefits of flossing --
it should take two to
three minutes. For more
information on how to
floss, consult your den-
tist or hygienist.


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


ABBEY MINI STORAGE
All New Units
*5X15 *5X20*10X15*10X20 *15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak

364-5300






FIREWOOD
Seasoned Oak mid Cherri Cord $12.( 00
Half Cord $65.00
Split & Stacked
We Deliver
J & Frm
386658387


Clea'i' j f Live Oak
Roofs * Mobile Homes
* Brick Homes * Stucco Homes
SDecks * Driveways

N'o job Too Big... A'ojob Too Small
386-776-2067


JT's Transmissions
James Tullis, ()\\ner
I 2[Iiii N C'R 251
\Nellboin. Floidi i 2:''4-
"TA4KING CARE OF ALL YOUR
TRANSIISSION NEEEDS"


Phone: 3sh-9h3-3?1lb
Cell: 3sih-hY-9446


Trees. Trimmed or Removed
Insured * Free Estimates * Free Firewood


TREE WORK
Bucket Truck :a\nd Climbiii' .

963-5026





DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
Residential lMake-overs * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

SC'abineti;. Ceramic
For manor ol' our home Tile, Counter Tops,
repairs and needs call Floor Covering,
John & Trish Adams Painting. Decks,
1386) 362-7916 Screened Enclosures.


4 GEl iER TIOl 1S OF E 'PERIEI ICE"
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE

-3S^ Imimrii


Well Drilling
IE sFI .I LI,: #I 30


904mA Swan


ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
For Your
David HOME
McLaughlin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
KARDA V ENTERPRISES. INC. FEi.1 "0'.


LAKEWOOD
APARTMENTS
IN LIVE OAK

Quiet country\ living 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


Sers ISons M toi Meat un Interior
Exterior
O C's Ifnc[ Drywall
S Jasper, Florida Wallpaper
:.t-% ;;} 5#. * ; r . u Licensed
. Custom I * i I Insured
Slaughter. Culling Ilnrd I i II M ll t- L ,: --.m ,i:.t - r : ,, Pressure
Cleaning
\ rapping .lii illiI"iIr Office (386) 364-5045 site
& Sausage I- "9178"C-le'ai
Plant i. Iu SII lIrii , \ Mobile (386) 362-9178 Clean
I-:~11-: . I-;l09i-'! Ill Michael Guenther, ,:.,r., Up


S.


CARROLL

CONCRETE
SCurbing * Gutters * Monolithic Slabs
SPatios * Driveways & Sidewalks
SCommercial & Residential
SLicensed & Insured
Rt.2 Box 166 (386) 938-1156
Jennings, FL 32053


Stump Grinding

l-"l^~


, . ... . . . ... ! .. . ... -... .. ... ........ ..- .. I , ;


i ,.' .U ::..'. ,


W Metal Roofing
$$ s$ S $ s SAVE $ $
Quality AI etal Roofino & Accessones 4t Discount Prices!!
3' nie Qa3lalume Cut to \our desired lengths!
3 n depinlecd * Deli\ern Senice A\ailable.
2 Io 5"- 4sk a lou' ~lt tee/' t'uin,1 .
Gulf Coast Supply & fg Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


Plumb-Level
Construction Co., LLC.
Residential & Commercial
Construction
S Specializing in all your
roofing needs
('P " I I (New. Re-roofing.,
Shingles & MetalRoofs)
Screen Enclosures
S7924061 938-5588
or..... . Acs kfr Kmetv in


J.D. KASTOR INC.
* Pool A Panio Dic s * Lit ensed Cunactvr
* Sprat ri Iu'Rivl r Ro k * Highly E.xptrit ned
* Painting & StiunccO * Frec E riiatie
* iut erior Exiiriir , i i
386-362-3107 L-,'a' l'i' J
Li ; at. FL . I; l
386-330-4717 , i,,,, ,., ,-: ,,i
''I


E[cc kkeeipini
bly lEaren

k )i h d .illld nel k 11 M [11 . :(:OliNTINT
\ DISION Or hKHRD., I.NIhrRPRINN. INC..
1 OiNILL l i. IIIkLL'INI&, % \i iiiNIii\'; mliAI [S
MULt & M IiIMl.IMlN .IEs
MONTHLY REPORTING
STATE & FEDERAL SALES i PAYROLL RETURNS
STATE & FEDERAL BUSIIjESS RELATED INCOME TAX RETURNS


LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
S5x15 * 5x20 * 10x15 * 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 *5x10*10x10 10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Ofice: 121 \an Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626


........ --- �����~... ....... . ...
DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle "
Alignment Specialists

_^ ^^--- 3UCSW
24 HOUR TOWING
362-4743 1-888-362-2568
422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
LEN A. DUNCAN


ADKINS
LANDCLEARING LLC
Owner; Johni ..Adkins
Free Estimates
PIhone:
386-294-3837 .' .. .'
C el -l:III
386-5910-7005 ' . ..
't^Ip IjV-


BgE"


m7; :* -, "


Mmq


cmm-m


"Prrparl


I Sai; j .II I I


Ji-77-2
Jim Sellers 386- 776-2522I


'.aSSi *


IllJ"l" ill I


M CLASSIFIED MARKETPL DA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 5D


Upgri








PAGE 6D, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS * CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA.'


Baby,


it's cold outside!


How to stay warm, dry and comfortable this winter


--.2 .. .. I . .


People dread the coming of
winter, not only because it
means beautiful back yards
will soon turn into barren
landscapes, but because to
stay warm, they'll have to
sacrifice comfort. Instead of
shorts, t-shirts and sandals,


those who live in cooler cli-
mates will soon be bundling
up in layers before venturing
outside.
The typical winter ensem-
ble includes an inner layer or
long underwear, middle or in-
sulating layers including


turtlenecks sweaters or fleece
items, and finally an exterior
or protection layer, your coat
to serve as your guard against
the elements of winter -- rain,
snow, sleet and wind. Sounds
bulky, but when you first tep
outside, you'll be glad you


put all those layers onr. They
protect you from what would
otherwise be bone-chilling
cold.
When it comes to the layer
of clothing closest to your
skin, not all long underwear
is created equal. Traditional
thermals make you sweat, es-
pecially if you've been exert-
ing yourself shoveling snow
or participating in sports ac-
tivities. The moisture is ab-
sorbed into the fabric and
stays there. The Cuddl Duds
company has the solution to
this problem with the intro-
duction of their newest prod-
uct, warm underwear made
of Comfortech, a new light-
weight stretch material made
of polyester and Spande\
Comfortech, unlike chemii-
cally treated fabrics, pro-
vides temperature and mois-
ture management inherently.
"When you begin sweating
-- which you will definitely
do with all the extra layers on
-- traditional long underwear
will hold the moisture in,
keeping you damp anld there-
fore cold. With the' Corn-


fortech fabric, moisture actu-
ally moves through the hol-
low core, or microchannel
cross-section fibers of the
fabric's yarn and evaporates
into the air. The end result,
the wearer's clothes remain
dry and their skin stays
warm," says Enid Katze, se-
nior vice' president of mer-
chlndising for C'uddl Duds.
Shie jlso points out that un-
like long underwear made of
cotton that can be thick and
bulky, the modern design of
Comfortech is sleek, soft,
comfortable and tilin enough
to fit'under :any fashion
choices. :
,The middle. or inslllatingi
layers can consist of turtile-
necks. sx\eaterls. s\, eishirts
vests .and pullo\ ers. If you'lll
be spending a lot of time out-
doors ';\len it's cold, a good
material to look for is fleece,
a synthetic \Nhich maintains
its insulating ability even
when wet and spreads the
moisture out so it dries
quickly.
The exterior layer, your
jacket or coat, serves as your


final guard against the elen
ments. It will repel watex
from snow, sleet or rain and'
blodk wind.
You should also take steps
to protect your head, face,
neck and extremities from
the elements. A hat of some
kind is critical because up to
60 percent of your body'g
heat can escape from an uni
covered head. A scarf og'
fleece neck gaiter (like a col%
lar) is also suggested; as are,
insulated gloves or mittens.
and light- or medium-weight
socks. Boots complete tht
'utfit.
Shopping for winter geat|
should be a breeze now that
you've gotten a refresher
course. One last suggestion -
- don't wait until your fa-
vorite style or size is sol�
out! Shop early and be pre.'
pared.
You can find Cuddl Duds'
Comfortech warm underwear
for men and women in de-
partment stores across the
country. For more informa-
tion, log on to www.cuddl-,,
duds.com.


Stop energy bills and home comfort fromngoing through the roof


When winter sets in, home-
owners rush to close up their
homes -- the one thing they
think will keep them comfort-
able during an uncomfortable
season. Storm windows are
hammered in place, drafts are
sealed and the heating is
cranked up. What homeown-
ers don't realize is that this
can affect the ventilation in
your home and, as a result,
send your family right to the
doctor with sore throats, run-
ny noses and breathing prob-
lems.
But help is at hand. With
American Stardard's 3 Cs of
Co'fort.r. -:~i,4jn quickly
keep your energy costs and
your health in the comfort
zone all winter.


The 3 Cs of Comfort --
check, control and clean -- is
an easy way to remember the
critical steps needed to winter-
ize your home for your health
and your wallet. And by fol-
lowing these simple steps, you
can ensure optimum comfort
during the winter.
"Heating, ventilating and
air conditioning (HVAC) is
one of the most important
components of a home," ex-
plains Paul Trotter, vice presi-
dent of sales, American Stan-
dard. "But homeowners often
do not realize that HVAC is
the driving force in delivering
home comfort and clean'air.
Now, with the 3 Cs of Com-
fort, consumers have the in-
formation they need to pre-


pare their home and their fam-
ily for a comfortable, healthy
and money-saving winter."
Here is how to winterize
your home using the 3 Cs of
Comfort:
Check: Even if you think
your HVAC unit is working
fine, it is important to sched-
ule proactive maintenance at
least twice a year. Typically, it
is a good idea to schedule an
appointment for an HVAC
professional to perform sys-
tem maintenance in the fall
and then again in the spring. If
you are shopping around for a
new HVAC unit, ask the, in-
staller to conduct a heat-loss
heat-gain calculation of your
home before making a pur-
chase. This will help ensure


your new air conditioning and
heating system is the proper
size for you and your home.
It is easy for winter winds to
creep inside your home and
for heated air to leak out, so
check for potential problem
areas. Your windows and
doors are prime suspects when
it comes to infiltration and
leakage. Check around every
frame for cracks, gaps and
poor-fitting fixtures to make
sure they are 'sealed properly.
If they are not, use caulking or
weatherstripping to seal the
cracks, gaps and poor-fitting
fixtures. You can pick up both
for just a few dollars at any
hardware store.
Also make sure your home
is adequately insulated. This


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Week of January 24, 2005

133320-F


Home comfort doesn't just come down to home furnishings. Most-
homeowners don't realize HVAC is a key factor in creating year-
round comfort for your family and there are some simple ways to.
optimize your system before winter sets in.


will help keep the warm, com-
fortable air inside. American
Standard suggests the follow-
ing R-values, which represent
the thickness of insulation: R-
30 in the ceilings and R-13 in
the exterior walls.
Control: During the winter
months, when outdoor tem-
peratures drop, moisture in the
indoor air typically escapes
through any crack or crevice
in the outside wall of your
home, especially around win-
dows and doors. Moisture is
also exhausted outdoors
through bath and kitchen fans.
This makes the humidity level
of the indoor air increasingly
low. If this is a problem in
your home, you may notice
static electric shocks and the
drying of nasal passages as
well as changes to your wood-
work, furniture and plants. BVt
you can control tells issue b',
purchasing a 3ihole-lhoile hu-
midifier with automatic con-
trol. -.
Do, yodu feel like, you are
coInstantl', adlisiiig the tern-,
peraturf of your home? Let
tile thermostat do all of the
'\ ork for \ou. By. program-
inlng \our thermostat, you
will be,in control of your own
comfort A lot of toda\ 's better
models can be programmed to
run at different temperatures
throughout the day, depending
on your comfdritne1' s over a
24-hour period. Most' manu-
facturers recommend 70 de-
grees for cold winter climates.
Also, if you have ceiling fans
with reversible motors, the
overall comfort of your home
can be improved. When the
fan blades are reversed in the
winter, this pushes the com-
fortable, heated air down into
the room.
In the winter, the tempera-


rapidly because most furnaces
heat the home with a single-
stage heating system, which:
delivers a blast of warm air
followed by an off cycle and,
then another full blast of warm"
air, causing very noticeable"
temperature swings. You can.
even out the temperature 'A itCb.
an American Standard two-
stage heating system. The firsI
.stage operates more than l.S,
percent of the time for contin-
uous comfort and only switch-;
es to the second stage when
more heat is needed. Clean:
Believe it or not, the air inside
your home can sometimes b,
more polluted than what's out-s
side, causing potential prob'.
lems for your family's health.,
Changing the air filter in your'
HVAC unit is .one of the easir-
Pst -- and often most over-,
.looked -- steps you can take t4
improve the air quality inside
) o I home. It is a good rule of
thumb to change the air filter,
every 30 days. To help save onr
replacement filter costs, some&
manufacturers, such as Ameri-
can Standard, have cleanable
filters that can be rinsed o�:
vacuumed. The company also,
helps manage air quality with,
its Comfort-R technology';
which is found in furnaces.
With this technology, fan
..speeds are reduced, allowing
Imore unwanted particles --
dus.t, pollen, pet dander and-
the like -- to cling to the filter,~
so cleaner air can flow ,into
your home. 5
For more information on
winterizing your home or to
find an American Standard
dealer near you, visit,
www.americanstandardair.cod
m. Consumers can also visit"
the Web site to order a free
copy of American Standard's
At Home With Comfort DVD


ture in the home changes guide.


PAGE 6D, JANUARY 26-27, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


I


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA:,







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 26-27, 2005, PAGE 7D


(:l CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Cf


0 %en-Roasted
Vegetables
1/2 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
SSalt and black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped mixed fresh herbs (or 2 teaspoons
dried mixed herbs), such as thyme, oregano, rosemary
and marjoram
2 OSO Sweet Onions, peeled and cut into wedges
1 (1-pound) bag baby carrots
S1 (1-pound) bag butternut squash chunks
3 colorful bell peppers, cut into chunks
2 zucchini and/or yellow squash, cut into chunks
E1 eggplant, cut into chunks (optional)
Preeat oven to 425�F. Whisk together olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper and
helbs. Toss with vegetables. Arrange vegetables in single layer on baking
sheets. Roast 20 minutes, stir and then roast 10 minutes longer or until
browned and crusty.
8 servings
Clef's Tip: To get best brown crust, broil vegetables last 5 minutes of
cooking, keeping close eye on them so they don't burn.

Greek Meatballs With Yogurt Sauce
1I pint plain yogurt, preferably whole milk
S Juice of 1 lemon
1 tabl popion chopped fresh mint.(or 1 teaspoon crumbled drie. .
m ini i - -, .
Salt and black pepper to taste
�2 slices of bread without crusts, soaked in water till mushy
'2 pounds ground beef or pork
/2 OSO Sweet Onion, grated
!1 egg
'1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano (or 1 teaspoon dried
oregano)
Vegetable oil for browning
1 cup water
Whisk together yogurt, lemon juice, mint, salt and pepper. Store in refrig-
erator, up to 3 days.
Squeeze excess moisture from bread. Mix together bread, ground meat,
onion, egg, oregano, salt and pepper. Form into 6 dozen small meatballs.
-Heat oil in large skillet. Brown meatballs on all sides at moderate heat.
Pour off any fat from pan. Add water to pan and scrape up any browned
bits from bottom. Simmer meatballs about 10 minutes or until liquid is
syrupy. Serve with toothpicks and dunk into yogurt sauce.
6 dozen small meatballs
Chef's Tip: To form meatballs, use melon bailer to scoop mixture. Then,
dip, your hands in water and roll meatballs into rounded shape.














-, ,


*hu I -- -,.I- - '


i, . . % .


F FANS YOUNGANDOLD WILL

GET A KICK OUT OF THIS TASTY

MEDITERRANEAN FEAST

Onions are the essential vegetable...
"It's hard to imagine a civilization without onions."
- Julia Child
i MIL'I FE Fli.RES EDITORIAL SYNDICATE
by .4liza Green
People in the Mediterranean have been cooking with onions for thousands of years. The ancient
Egyptians ate lots of onions and even believed they were an aphrodisiac. Maybe that's why they ate
so many! The Israelites wandering in the wilderness longed for the onions they ate in Egypt. Too
bad they never had the chance to taste OSO Sweet Onions, grown at the foot of Chile's Andes
Mountains, where perfect growing conditions produce large, juicy, mild onions with record-high
sugar content, crisp texture and mild flavor that doesn't kick back.
Zesty OSO Sweet Onions are in season just in time for the big game - no tickets needed to en-
joy them in this hearty, healthy Mediterranean buffet. In Jacksonville, home of this year's Super
Sunday, and elsewhere in Florida, people eat more OSO Sweet Onions than anywhere else in the
country. These adaptable'onions are mild enough to use raw in salad, versatile enough to saute,
grill, fry or roast. Taste them caramelized atop a delectable onion pizza, and you'll be sure to cheer!
People who avoid ordinary onions go for OSO Sweets because they contain so little pyruvic acid,
the substance that causes tears, harshness and indigestion. So, you can use as much onion as you like
without tearing eyes or onion breath. Onions are always a winner because they contain naturally oc-
curring phytochemicals that reduce the risk of cancer and help protect against heart disease.
Help keep your New Year's resolution to eat healthier with this tasty make-ahead menu, which
gets extra points because the whole family gets to watch the game.


ZESY AHN JSATILE


* Dice sweet onions and mix with guacamole, salsa and
salads.
* Use diced sweet onion to flavor tomato sauce, soups,
chowders and stews.
* Top hot dogs, pizza, quesadillas and chili with diced
raw sweet onion.
* Burgers of all sorts - beef, turkey, tuna or vegetable -
all get a lift from sliced raw or grilled sweet onion.

Visit the award-winning website www.sweetonionsource.com
to learn more about sweet onions and to get health
information, quick tips and terrific recipes.


Aliza Green, a James Beard
Award-winning author, has been
a chef and food writer for more
than 30 years. Her recent books
include "Field Guide to Produce"
(Quirk Books) and "Beans: More
than 200 Wholesome, Delicious
Recipes from Around the World"
(Running Press).


Caramelized Onion Pizza
4 OSO Sweet Onions, sliced
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
(or 1 teaspoon dried thyme)
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
Salt and pepper to taste
,..1/4,, cup olive ojil . , ,-
1/2 cup pitted black olives, sliced
1 cup grated Romano cheese
1 pizza dough round
1/2 cup sliced sun-dried tomatoes
In large skillet, cook onions, thyme, allspice,
salt and pepper in olive oil at moderate heat
until juices are released. Keep cooking, stirring
occasionally, until onions are lightly browned.
about 30 minutes. Cool to room temperature.
Preheat oven to 425F. Spread onions over
dough round, leaving 1-inch border all around
Sprinkle with olives and cheese and bake 15 rnn-r
utes or until browned and bubbling. Just before
serving, sprinkle pizza with sun-dried tomatoes '
8 servings
Chef's Tip: Brush border of pizza with olive
oil for shiny brown crust.

Mediterranean White Bean Salad
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
to taste
2 cans or jars (15 ounces each) cooked
white beans
1/2 cup diced roasted red peppers
1/2 cup diced celery
1/2 OSO Sweet Onion, diced
1/2 cup chopped Italian parsley
Blend oil, vinegar, salt and pepper till smooth nJd
creamy. Drain and rinse beans. DMain again. To"s
beans, red peppers, celery, and onion with dre-ming
Taste for seasoning. Just before serving, toss \ ith
parsley.
Serves 8
Chef's Tip: If you make salad ahead, season .lu
before serving with few drops of vinegar and , pi inlk.l
or salt and pepper to brighten flavor.

Chicken Portobello
4 pounds chicken leg quarters (or 4-pound roster
chicken, cut-up)
Salt and pepper to taste
1/4 cup olive or vegetable oil
1 OSO Sweet Onion, sliced
1 tablespoon minced garlic
4 portobello mushroom caps, sliced
2 tablespoons fresh chopped oregano
(or 2 teaspoons dried oregano)
2 tablespoons flour


'. 1 cup red wine
1 (28-ounce) can chopped tomatoes
Preheat oven to 4250F. Drain and rinse chicken, trimming off any
-xcess fat. Pat dry. Sprinkle all over with salt and pepper. Arrange
in baking pan and roast 30 minutes, or until juices run clear when
pricked at thickest point.
Meanwhile, in Dutch oven, heht olive oil and lightly brown
-.nion. Stir in garlic, cook together'2 minutes and add mushrooms
and oregano. Continue cooking 5 minutes longer, or until mush-
rooms have softened. Stir in flour and cook 5 minutes. Add red wine
and tomatoes. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer 20 minutes or
until thickened. Add chicken and any cooking juices to pot. Simmer
together 10 minutes longer. Serve over steamed white rice.
8 servings
Chef's Tip: Substitute 1 cup chicken stock plus 1 tablespoon
cider vinegar for red wife.


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Brand New Lincoln Navigator Brand New Mercury Monterey
Was $51,115 ..


"Loaded"' luxury' Package. Mloonroof .4(
SAVE 12,000

g39 ,15


c Lincoln Aviator
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'05 Mercury Grand Marquis GS
America's Only Redr Wheel Drive Sedan


R.-. loaded Was $34.295
SAVE s11,000

S' y 5
coln LS '05 Mercury Mountaineer 1 '05 Lincoln Town Car


Was $25,150 Was$33,110 27 995 Was$33,550 25 2 55
After all rebates in lieu of special APR, financing through FMCC, owner loyalty, Plus Tax, Tag, Title and $249.95 ADM fee.


as $434,995


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