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Suwannee Democrat
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00006
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: January 21, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00006
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text



l_ o . T, -7 Look inside I Th
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'Dogs in
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Page 7C


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Serving Suwannee County since 1884 Weekend Edition - January 21, 2005


120th YEAR, NO. 25


50 CENTS


Branford parents meet with officials
community meeting in Branford Wednesday Randolph Allen Patrick Hosier, 12, James media, the sheriffs office and school offi-
Susan K. Lamb night to talk about the recent deaths of two "Jimmy" McCoy, 14, and Tevin Dwayne cials. Most of all, they were grieving over the
Democrat Managing Editor 12-year-olds and a 14-year-old by hanging. Touchton, 12, who all died of asphyxiation by loss of a young loved one whose death they
It was emotional to say the least, hanging in their homes over the past nine simply do not understand.
More than 100 parents, teachers and inter- Parents, grandparents and family members weeks, were at the meeting.
ested community members turned out for a of the three Branford Middle School students, Some of them were very angry at the news SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 9A


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BOROUGHS INVITED TO PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION: Jackie and Boyce Boroughs, right, proud-
ly display their invitation from President George W. Bush for the presidential inauguration on Jan.
20. The Boroughs are avid supportersof Bush's presidency, his campaign and even his family. Jack-
ie remembers the first family on all special occasions by sending birthday and anniversary cards. The
Boroughs decided not to make the trip to Washington for the inauguration due to the cold weather
but will be watching and taping the festivities from the comfort of their home. One Suwannee Coun-
ty native is participating in the Bush inauguration. Seaman Kate Lepper served as a United States
Coast Guard Honor Guard during the inauguration ceremony. Lepper is the daughter of Suwannee
Elementary School Assistant Principal Rhonda Lepper and husband Max. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Suwannee's coach Walls


hired by Tift County, Ga.
Iv-
I- appreciatethe honor -
and privilege to come
and coach Tift County.
- Coach Jay Walls said after he was -
unanimously approved Wednesday, '- - -
by the Tift County Board of Education -. -


By Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Suwannee Democrat reporter
and
Steve Carter
Tifton Gazette

Suwannee High's head football coach Jay
Walls has apparently been shopping for a bet-
ter position. He found it Jan. 19 in Tifton, Ga.
Early in Januiary. Walls applied for and in-
terviewed for the head coaching position at
Mosely High, a Class 5-A school near Pana-
ma City. One of five finalists, Walls declined
that position. But, the offer from Tift County
High School was too good to refuse. Walls
will be leaving the Suwannee High football
program and Suwannee High to become head
coach and athletic director in Tift County, Ga.
Walls leaves Live Oak and the Suwannee
Bulldogs after eight years and a 59-37 record.
"I appreciate the honor and privilege to
come and coach Tift (CutiIl\," Walls told the
Tift County Board of Education after he was


Suwannee High's head football


coach Jay Walls


unanimously approved Wednesday, Jan. 19 by
the board as the new head football coach and
athletic director at Tift County High School.
Walls then went on to thank his wife, Amy,
who was also present, as well as Tift County

SEE SUWANNEE'S, PAGE 3A


Interstate 10 master plan presented to county


A public hearing will be held
by FDOT at Live Oak City Hall
Feb. 10 at 5 p.m. where citi-
zens may attend and view
the plans. The formal work-
shop will begin at 7 p.m.
Comments may be made at
that time or mailed to Suraya
Z. Teeple, AICP, FDOT, District
2, Jacksonville Urban Office,
2250 Irene Street, Mail
Station 2812, Jacksonville, Fl
32204 or you may email her
at Suraya.teeple@dot.state


Traffic stop results in

arrest for possession

of crack cocaine
A Live Oak woman has been arrested and
charged with possession of cocaine after the
Live Oak Police Department stopped her ve-
hicle on a traffic stop.
The arrest came Jan. 13 when LOPD Sgt.
Jason Rountree conducted a traffic stop on a
vehicle being driven by Leslie N. Simmons,
36, of 6410 181 st Place. As a result, Rountree
learned that Simmons did not have a valid dri-
ver's license. Further investigation revealed
that Simmons was in possession of crack co-
caine, according to LOPD.
Simmons was arrested and transported to
the Suwannee County Jail.


Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
Interstate 10 won't see much upgrading in
the North Florida area near Suwannee Coun-
ty under the new I-10 Master Plan recom-


mended corridor improvements. And, the
plan as it stands now is only a recommenda-
tion with no specific dates set for any changes
listed.
Florida Department of Transportation Ur-
ban Planning Administrator Suraya Temple
and Sue Gratch with Post and Bradley pre-


sented the final improvement plan to Suwan-
nee County Commissioners this week.
"There are no new interchanges in rural
counties warranted," Gratch told the board
when questioned about the possibility for
Suwannee County. The only major change
recommended is adding of exit lanes on the
east and westbound sides of I-10 at the CR
137 interchange in Wellborn, she added, but
that has no time set to be done.
Commissioner Doug Udell asked that
FDOT consider putting an interchange at CR

SEE INTERSTATE 10, PAGE 3A


Identity theft:


It could happen to you

Yvette Hannon
Democrat Reporter
Would you like to go on a spending spree
using someone else's money?
Think again as it packs a whopping
penalty of 15 years in prison if convicted in
the state of Florida.
Identity theft is on the rise, according to
the Federal Trade Commission.
Florida ranked sixth in the nation with
more than 10,000 reported identity theft
victims in 2002.
Identity theft is defined as when a crimi-'
nal steals your personal identification in-
formation and uses it to make purchases,
obtain credit, apply for loans or even seek

SEE IDENTITY, PAGE 9A


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TODAY'S
WEATHER


Suwannee County should see partly cloudy skies
High today near 70�F. Winds W at 5 to 10 mph. .
For up to the minute weather information go to
www.suwanneedemocrat.com FEATURED ON PAGE 4B


INDEX
Business ........................................7A
Classifieds ....................................1-40
Church ........................................ 7-9B
School .......................... ...................8A
Sports ......................... ...........1-6B
Suwannee Living ... ...... ............. 5A
Viewpoint .......................................4A


TV Guide...........................10-11B
Legal Notices.................................. 4C


COOKIE
I For Kids I
iU 12 & Under .


www.suwanneedemocrat. com


soccer
It!
D 1B


..-!,, .. . . , '


LOPD HOLDS CAR SAFETY CHECK: Many children are put in car seats and secured improp-
erly or the seat is incorrectly insta!!ed in the vehicle. The Live Oak Police Department, Arrive
Alive Driving School and Shands Children's' Hospital have teamed up with 'Safe Kids of North
Central Florida' to provide free car seat safety checks throughout North Florida. Pictured I -r,
volunteer Earl Hodges, Dr. Morya Willis of Shands Children's' Hospital, and LOPD Victim Ad-
vocate Stephanie Laidig conduct car seat checks and educated parents on protecting their
children in vehicles Jan. 18. For more information www.shandssafekids.org
- Photo: Yvette Hannon


AREA DEATH I No Purchase Necessary
Sust Present Coupon
Paul Clemons S., 73, Live Oak Goo 1Pe/21/05 On
OBITURY ON PE 6Good 121105 Only
OBITUARY ON PAGE 6A - - - - - -


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


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PAGE 2A







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BRIEFLY Arrest Record


LifeSouth holds rock and
roll themed blood drive
In honor of Elvis Presley's
70th birthday everyone is invit-
ed to roll up their sleeves and
give blood at LifeSouth Com-
munity Blood Centers' "Rock
'N' Roll Up Your Sleeve" blood
drive. The blood drive began
Thursday, Jan. 20 and will run
through Saturday, Jan. 22 at
LifeSouth's Lake City Donor
Center, 83 SW SR 47. Donors
can celebrate by enjoying Elvis'
favorite goodies and they can
register to win autographed
photos, posters and CD's of fa-
mous rock and roll stars. All
donors receive a recognition T-
shirt and a cholesterol screen-
ing. Donors must be at least 17
years of age, weigh at least 110
pounds and show a valid photo
I.D. For donor center hours or
more info, please call 386-754-
0480.
Register now
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley will hold volunteer
training in Jasper
Whether you like to work
with patients or "behind the
scenes," come and learn how
you can use your talents and ex-
tra time to help those facing a


Suwannee's


Continued From Page 1A

School Superintendent Dr.
John Harper, Tift County High
Principal Mike Duck and the
school board.
"This is a great job and a
great opportunity. The founda-
tion has already been set here
to be successful," Walls said.
The "foundation" was one
of the things that attracted
Walls to Tift County.
"There is no question that
there has been a lot of hard
work here with the coaches
and the athletes. I know they
have worked hard, and I want
to build on it," Walls said.
"With the facilities and the tra-
dition, this is a great place to
be."
'Walls will leave Suwannee
High looking for a football
coach. According to Suwan-
-nee High Principal Dawn
Lamb, she hasn't received
Walls' resignation yet.
"I hesitate to make any plans
for filling the position until I
actually have his resignation
in hand," Lamb said. "But
we're making plans. I'm sure
we will have plenty of strong
applicants show interest."
Suwannee Quarterback
Club President Tim Carver
was sad to hear of Walls' resig-
nation. "I think that Suwannee
will find another quality
coach," Carver said. "I hate to
see Coach Walls leave because
he was a quality coach, every-
thing he did was for the boys.
I feel sorry for the boys who
are rising seniors for this next
season."
Carver said he knows very
little about the process of how
a new coach will be selected."
My son is a senior and
played for him for the past
four years," Carver said
Carver said a quarterback
club member told him Thurs-


day morning about Walls ac-
cepting the job and he had also
gone on the web to check out
the Tift County Gazette on the
matter.
"As a dad, I think the world
of the coach, he's just a fine
man, his character, every-
thing," Carver said.
Suwannee Quarterback
Club Vice President Billy
Maxwell said he was aware
Walls had been looking, al-
though Walls had not told the
Quarterback Club.
"I really hate it, he's a good
coach," Maxwell said Jan. 19.
"Walls had a good group of
boys to work with also. We
need to get busy and find a
new coach," Maxwell added.
"I thought he was doing a fine
job."
Maxwell said although
Walls is a good coach and is
now leaving Suwannee, it
won't change how Suwannee
feels about football. "We'll
carry on the football tradi-
tion," Maxwell said.
According to Harper, Walls
was impressive early on in the
hiring process. "There were a
lot of people we looked at dur-
ing this process. Mr. Duck and
I each thought coach Walls
was a good match for us. We
felt like coach Walls could
come in here and take care of
things," the superintendent
said.
"Mr. Duck and I each had a
score sheet that we kept on
each candidate,' Harper said.
"We kept those sheets away
from each other until the end
of the process. When we com-
pared them, we both had coach
Walls with the highest score."
Besides the scoring, several
attributes made Walls attrac-
tive to Harper as the next Tift
coach.
"He is an outstanding gen-
tleman. He is highly orga-


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nized. The coaches on his staff
love working for him. He has
high expectations for the kids,"
Harper said. According to
Harper, Walls' salary will be
right at $70,000. "That will en-
tail his teacher's salary scale
for teaching 15 years. He also
will get a local supplement, a
supplement for being athletic
director and football coach, as
well as 40 additional days of
teaching," the superintendent
said.
Walls played his college
football at Valdosta State,
where he was named perma-
nent team captain in 1985.
Having played college football
in the hotbed of Region 1-
AAAAA, Walls is familiar
with the competition he will be
'Seeing as the new Tift coach
Tom Daniels, long-time
Suwannee football supporter
and color-man for the Big 98's
Friday night football show, and
owner of the Sports Connec-
tion, said he had mixed feel-
ings about Walls leaving. "I'm
disappointed' because I think
he did an excellent job,"
Daniels said. "He took over a
team that was on the bottom of
the mountain, 0-10 and in four
years took them to the top of
the mountain."


Daniels said he felt Walls
was on the right track if his
goal is to coach at a collegiate
level. "If this is his goal, he's
taking the right steps," Daniels
said.
"I asked to be on the search
committee for a new coach,"
Daniels added.
WLVO DJ and local sports
fanatic Wayne Litrell also said
he'd love to be on the search
committee. "I'd be more than
willing to be on the search
committee if they'd have me,"
Litrell said. Litrell said the fa-
cility in Tift County is unbe-
lievable. "The locker rooms,
the stadiums, it's a gorgeous fa-
cility," Litrell said.
"We're losing a great coach.
He led the team to the play-
offs seven of his eight years atf
Suwannee High. I wish him
much success in Tifton,"
Litrell said. "It will be inter-
esting to see where we go
from here."
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
386-362-1734 ext. 134
or by mailing janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.
Steve Carter may be reached
by calling 229-382-4321 ext.
212 or by mailing
steve.carter@ gaflnews.com


WE

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YOUR APPROVED!
No Credit Applications Refused.

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I I


Interstate 10


Continued From Page 1A

136 and Interstate 10 in
Suwannee County. Commis-
sioner Randy Hatch agreed,
pointing out that it is a high
truck traffic area and it would
benefit both the truckers and
Suwannee County to have an
interchange there. Hatch said
an interchange would de-
crease truck traffic from
downtown Live Oak, a much-
.needed change that FDOT has
sought for some time.
SGratch ' said th&e main
change recommended in
Suwannee County would be
making better vertical railroad
clearance at the US 90 and I-
10 interchange by replacing
the bridges.
County Coordinator Johnny
Wooley reminded Gratch that


terminal illness. If you would
like to volunteer, please join
other volunteers for this 12-
hour training series from 1-4
p.m. on Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday, Feb.
14, 15, 16 and 18, at the Jasper
Public Library, 311 Hatley St.
NE, Jasper. Registration re-
quired. To register or for more
info, contact Carolyn Long at
386-752-9191.
Special videoconference:
Post-Storm Timber Tax and
Forest Health Issues to be
held Jan. 21
The 2004 hurricane season
was damaging to a large portion
of Florida's private timberlands.
Casualty loss and forest health
issues that thousands of private
timberland owners are now fac-
ing as a result of these storms
will be addressed by a special
videoconference: Post-Storm
Timber Tax and Forest Health
Issues. The videoconference
will be held on Friday, Jan., 21,
from 4:30-7 p.m. (EST) at 11
locations throughout Florida.
One of the eleven sites will be
held in Live Oak at: UF-IFAS
Suwannee Valley North Florida
REC, 7580 CR 136, 386-362-
1725. Space is limited, register


during times of disaster such
as hurricanes, I-10 is jammed
with those fleeing South and
Central Florida and planning
must be done to deal with
those issues for the future.
A public hearing will be
held by FDOT at Live Oak
City Hall Feb. 10 at 5 p.m.
where citizens can attend and
view the plans. The formal
workshop will begin at 7 p.m.
Comments may be made at
that time or mailed to Suraya
Z. Teeple, AICP, FDOT. Dis-
trict 2, Jacksonvillb Urban Of-
fice, 2250 Irene Street, Mail
Station 2812, Jacksonville, Fl
32204 or you may email her at
Suraya.teeple@dot.state.fl.us
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan. lamb@ gaflnews. com.


Broyhill Introduces


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PAGE 3A


. SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 21 5


A. JML AL AL lo k- %w V VMr 'e %' WW


early. For more info or to regis-
ter, contact Chris Demers at
352-846-2375 or
cdemers@ifas.ufl.edu. This
free program is a service of the
Florida Division of Forestry,
Forest Stewardship Program
University of Florida, IFAS,
Cooperative Extension Service.
Dowling Park Volunteer
Fire Fighters' training
meeting Jan. 22
Attention! The Dowling Park
Volunteer Fire Fighters' training
meeting will be held at 0900
hours (9 a.m.) on Saturday, Jan.
22 at the fire station located at
22992 CR 250. Chief James L.
O'Neill Jr. See you there.
Free estate planning seminar
will be conducted at the
Suwannee River Regional
Library in Live Oak Jan. 24
A free seminar on, estate
planning, wills, trusts, asset
protection, avoiding probate
and guardianship will be held at
7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 24, at
the Suwannee River Regional
Library in the Crapps Meeting
Room, 1848 Ohio Avenue
South, Live Oak. The seminar
will be conducted by Joseph F.
Pippen Jr. and Associates and
local attorney Frank Davis.


FAMU Cooperative
Extension Service will
host a local meat goat
producer meeting Jan. 25
The Florida A & M Universi-
ty (FAMU) Extension Service
will host a local meat goat pro-
ducer meeting at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 25, at the Suwan-
nee County Extension Service
Office, 1302 Eleventh St., Live
Oak. Les Harrison of the Flori-
da Department of Agriculture,
Division of Marketing and De-
velopment and Richard Esseck
of the Florida Meat Goat Asso-
ciation will be guest speakers.
The meeting is open to all meat
goat producers in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Madison and Co-
lumbia counties. No registra-
tion fee. Pre-register by calling
FAMU Small Farm Manage-
ment Specialist Phillip Petway,
386-362-2771.




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MEGA MONEY .....7,9,11,33,17
LOTTO ...... 15,19,22,32,41,51


Editor's note: The Suwannee
Democrat prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your name
appears here and you are later
found not guilty or the charges
are dropped, we will be happy to
make note of this in the newspa-
per when judicial proof is pre-
sented to us by you or the au-
thorities.
The following abbreviations
are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriffs Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police De-
partment.
FDLE-Florida Department of
Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway Patrol.
DOT-Department of Trans-
portation
P and P-Probation and Parole
Jan. 18, Kelvin Aubrey Bis-
pham, 18, 13153 Railroad St.,
burglary of a structure, SCSO J.
Cameron.
Jan. 18, Donald Sylvester
Gordon, 41, 808 West Maple
Street, failure to appear on orig-
inal charge of driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked,.
LOPD D. Slaughter.
Jan. 18, Tony C. Maldonado,
36, O'Brien, violation of proba-
tion on original charge of dri-
ving while license suspended or
revoked (Charlotte County), P
andP A. Tolle.
Jan. 18, Troy Pipkin, 37, 3249
161st Road, violation of com-
munity control on original
charge of lewd act upon a child
(Columbia County), P and P P.


Corbett.
Jan. 18, Jeremy Logan Ring,
24, 5383 Pinecrest, violation of
probation on original charge of
possession of drug without pre-
scription, possession of less than
20 grams cannabis, P and P
Blair.
Jan. 18, Johnna Briggitt
Williams, 41, McAlpin, viola-
tion of probation on original
charge of Family Services fraud,
P and P J. Holton.
Jan. 19, Jeana Marlene Davis,
19, 7292 119th Rd., violation of
probation on original charge of
no drivers license, SCSO J.
Bates.
Jan. 19, Ricky Dean Fletcher,
21, McAlpin, violation of proba-
tion on original charges, of pos-
session of cocaine, possession of
less than 20 grams cannabis,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, LOPD K. Hurst.
Jan. 19, Todd Anthony
Geritz, 33, Orlando, violation
of probation on original charge
of burglary of a dwelling, grand
theft, bond revoked, SCSO S.
Law.
Jan. 19, Patrick Hollingshead,
31, Lake City, passing worthless
bank check, SCSO L. Dykes.
Jan. 19, John Steven Lloyd,
41, O'Brien, grand theft, dealing
in stolen property, SCSO J.
Cameron/C. Fry.
Jan. 19, Valerio Ajanel Pastor,
34, 16790 82nd Place, Lot 4,
failure to appear on original
charge of no drivers license,
SCSO D. Leach.


iSs~:'*`







PAGE 4A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


VIEWPOINTS & ONIONS


1emocrat en onriai ao r iviayi
C. Regan. publisher, and Susan K
Lamb. managing editor. Our
View is formed by that board.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

BHS principal Ted


Roush speaks to


the community
Dear Editor;
In recent weeks Branford High School has suffered
the loss of three of our middle school students. We all
have individually searched for and asked ourselves
and others- "Why?...What are the facts?... What is go-
ing on?... Who is to blame?" The truth is, that we as a
community, no matter how passionate we are con-
cerning these losses, will never know all of the facts
and circumstances surrounding these recent and un-
fortunate situations. We may never have the definitive
answers that we so desperately desire. As a communi-
ty we must continue to talk to one another and lift
each other up and stay unified in our efforts to educate
our young people and not be distracted by those
would-be voices that would seek to place blame or re-
sponsibility for these tragic deaths. Rather, we must
focus on how we deal with tragedy, how we can help
and support each other, and what information is avail-
able for us to further educate ourselves in our roles as
students, parents, teachers, staff, and clergy concern-
ing prevention efforts.
As we continue to deal with and work through these
deaths of our young people, I would like to thank our
district office staff, counselors, and superintendent's
office for their support. In addition, our school level
counselors, teachers, and support personnel have
worked very hard to help counsel and console the
many students in need. I would also like to publicly
thank a very special group of community volunteers
that serve as members of our crisis response team.
Those individuals being the many youth pastors and
church pastors that have given many hours of their
time, offering assistance, prayer and support to use as
a Branford School family. We are blessed in this com-
munity to have among us many individuals that are
caring spiritual leaders. Many of our pastors and min-
isters have offered not only their time, but use of their
facilities. Many have called to say, "Call anytime day
or night." This level of support and availability in
many towns does not exist or is taken for granted. It
is a great comfort to me as a school principal to know
that we have some of the finest people among us to
help us through troubling times. On behalf of Bran-
ford High School, I thank each of those individuals
who are too numerous to list and the many others that
have assisted behind the scenes that I am not aware of
by name. Again, many thanks and may God bless.
Branford High School Principal Ted Roush

State Oficials


State Representative


(2-year terms)


Rep. Dwight Stansel (11th
Dist., D-Wellborn)
208 North Ohio Ave., Live
Oak, Fla. 32064
1/386/362-2136
1/850/488-9835
E-mail:
stansel.dwight@leg.state.fl.us


State Senator
(4-year terms)







',: . .


-.


State Sen. Nancy Argenziano
(R) Crystal River
6216 West Corporate Oaks Dr.
Crystal River, Fl 34429
Phone: 1/352/563-6003 or
Toll free 1/866/538-2831
E-mail:
nancy.argenziano.web@leg.state.fl.us


Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor,, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


CMA lie pARY

A little pro !mw h cn olh .-k.prehension


BIBLE VERSE

"When words are many, sin is not
absent, but he who holds his
tongue is wise." --Proverbs 10:19


uwaunnere DJemocrat
MYRA C. REGAN Members of Ihe Suwannee
Publisher Dlmw t i l a-,l bh rd r M Ir,


Suwannee County Commissioners
(4-vear-terms. partisan)


Dist. 1 - Jesse Caruthers,
362-5385


Dist. 2 - Doug Udell
362-4189


Dist. 3 - Ivie Fowler
Vice-Chairman 658-1602


Dist. 4 - Billy Maxwell
Clhairan 963-5460


.. . - -.._
. ,,, .. ,



Dist. 5 - Randy Hatch
935-1419


Suwannee County School Board
(4-year terms, non-partisan) School Board Office 386-362-2601


Superintendent
of Schools


I5 .






Walter Boatright Jr.
362-2601
Office 362-2601


Dist. 1 - Jerry Taylor
Chairman
362-4720


Dist. 2 -
Muriel Owens
364-5359


School Board Members


Dist. 3 -
Julie Blake Ulmer
362-7303


Dist. 4- Barbara Ceryak
Vice-Chairwoman.
362-5578


'Dist. 5 -
J.M. Holtzclaw,
935-1161


Dist. 1 -
John Yulee
362-5145


Dist. 2 -
Bennic Thomas
364-5535


Dist. 3 -
-Ken ucc
364- ]900


Dist. 4 -
George lake
362-3195


Dist. 5 - President
Don Boyette,
362- 182


I


On some very rare occa-
sions the feedback I get
" from the columns ! write is
,r.o . somewhat caustic, vulgar
and indicative of someone
who played hooky the day
they taught spelling and
grammar.
One such e-mail came to.
Sme recently in response to
my annual warning about
S mindless deer hunters-
Dwain Walden people who take to the
woods with little skill and
powerful weapons. Often these are novices, and
each year we hear of tragedies afield in this regard.
This person interpreted this year's column as an
indictment of all hunters. I would guess this person
also scored low on comprehension when he took
standardized tests, assuming of course he took
them. He called me stuff I would not repeat in this
column, basically challenging my maleness in
coarse tones. (My guess is, I've already lost him
should he be reading this.)
I've been a hunter all my life. That's been part of
my culture. I take and eat some wild game. I like
bird hunting. I enjoy fried quail or dove with a
platter of cathead biscuits, a bowl of soupy grits
and gravy. I was taught to respect nature and its
bounty and to respect firearms.
As a youngster while hunting squirrels with my
dad, he would often say, "Okay, we have enough.
Let's go home." I learned from him that preserv-
ing nature was a tandem with harvesting from it.
I don't hunt deer anymore. I did when I was
young. I don't care all that much for venison.and
after spending many cold days of my childhood
helping dress hogs and beef, I vowed never to kill
anything that would take me a half day to dress out.
That doesn't mean I'm opposed to deer hunting.
If you kill a deer and process the meat for food, 1
don't have a problem with that. If you kill a deer,
remove only the backstrap and leave the carcass
besie ,tgerq- 4 tp,,; , .,. well, hil',s .hiL cc.l yoq,,
and. God.'and iMother. Nj.' re. I think it, the big pic-
ture, they have a way offsetting things right.


SUSAN K. LAMB
Managing Editor


Live Oak City Council
(4-year terms)


.


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK .


PAGE 4A


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


Now since 1 wrote that column a couple of
months ago, there have been several reports of
carelessness in the woods. One report that gained
national and perhaps international attention was
that of the deer hunter who went berserk and killed
several other hunters. That typically is not the kind
of thing I warn about, although safety in the field
must cover a broad spectrum. But I really don't
know how to suggest for you detect a complete lu-
natic.
Then we had the person just recently who shot a
lama thinking it was a deer. Prior to those events,
the list is really weird. Careless hunters have killed
dogs, cows, horses and other people. So far, no one
has shot a Harley, but the season ain't over yet.
These are the kind of hunters I warn you about.
Even orange vests won't protect you from some of
these yahoos. They might argue that they thought
the deer they shot had mutated to have only two
legs and it had run under a clothes line where some
wet hunting vest was drying,and it got tangled on
his antlerless head.
I know many deer hunters who are just as con-
cerned as I am about these unskilled people with
guns. Many of them are good instructors to their
youngsters and to other adults. They practice cau-
tion and many of them are very selective of the
game they harvest. And they will not shoot an An-
gus bull, a pinto pony or another hunter just be-
cause the bushes moved.
Now to the person who responded to me so
crudely and monosyllabic, I did not direct that col-
umn to you personally. I did not suggest that the
dcodorizer hanging from your truck's rearview
mirror was "essence of buck urine" or that you
break out in hives while watching the Outdoors
channel. But should it apply, so be it.
Also, I hope your hunting skills are much better
than your comprehension of the written word. By
the way, monosyllabic is not something you treat
with penicillin.
Once again, "Y'all be careful out there, you
hear!"
()Iuaii. 1~ /,,!i,', i , editor/publisher of the Moul-
tr4 "�(6'T )Obs)erver; 229-985-4545. E-mail:
drainn. walde/'n (.gaflnews. coin.)


Iv


1-1-1)-


:i













P^UWANNEE LIVING
... . ., . .... .. .-- II DItI DI I DI lb I )i OOOODQ� iQ��Q�� �OIQQQO �II II I I I�


fralicf- Sutton
Ted and Goldie Fralick of Wellborn would like to remind you
of the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Nicole Marie Fral-
ick, to Anthony Curtis Sutton, son of Tonie and Susan Sutton of
Ft. Myers.
The ceremony will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Jan. 22, 2005 at
Anastasia Baptist Church in St. Augustine.

Performing Arts Center

Committee kicks-off Phase One


At a press conference held
on the twenty-second floor of
the Capitol recently, the Per-
forming Arts Center Com-
mittee (PACC) announced
the kick-off of Phase One:
Pre-Construction Planning
for the region's new perform-
ing arts center.
Phase One has two steps
and is scheduled to be com-
pleted in eight months. Step
One will take four months
and will be completed by the
end of April of this year.
During this time Theatre Pro-
jects Consultants (TPC)' will
meet with community arts,
government, business and
education leaders apart of a
community arts needs assess-
ment. A public input meeting
will also be held on Tuesday,
Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Flori-
da Department of Trans-
portation Auditorium. From
these meetings and assess-
ments, TPC will make a rec-
ommendation as to the type,
size and number of seats
needed.
Step two will take place
from May to August. During
this time TPC will take the
information gathered in step
one and make recommenda-
tions regarding the location
options available to the com-
munity. A second public
meeting will be held on
Monday, April 11 at 7 p.m. at
the LeRoy Collins Leon
County Public Library, Talla-
hassee.
The key to success is com-
munity dialogue. Local per-
forming groups and taxpay-
ers must guide decision-mak-
ing" said Paula Smith, Per-
forming Arts Center Com-
mittee Chair." At the heart of
Phase One is community par-


ticipation. Through this
process we will successfully
develop a plan and create a
performing arts center that is
both a cultural and an eco-
nomic asset."
The Performing Arts Cen-
ter Committee was appointed
as a special advisory com-
mittee for the City and Coun-
ty. They are charged with de-
veloping a plan for the con-
struction of a performing arts
venue. This plan is to make
recommendations regarding
site location and size as well
as design recommendations
and a timeline for construc-
tion phases. Additionally the
PACC will provide an oper-
ating, funding and manage-
ment plan.
In December the PACC an-
nounced the hiring of The-
atre Projects Consultants.
TPC is a consulting firm with
more than 47 years of experi-
ence with a staff of theatre
designers, planners, arts ad-
ministrators and technical
systems experts who collec-
tively offer a comprehensive
approach to performance
space design. TPC has been
hired to complete Phases
One of this project.
To learn more about the
Performing Arts Center
Committee call the Cultural
Resources Commission at
850-224-2500 or visit their
website at: www.OnWith-
TheShowTLH.com. Theatre
Projects Consultants can be
found online at: www.TPC-
world.com.


Are We There Yet? (PG) 1:40 4:251 7:15 19:35
Coach Carter (PG-13) 1:00 i 4:05 17:101 10:10
Elektra (PG-13) 1:3014:10 17:2019:50
Meet the Fockers (PG-13) 1:1514:1516:5519:45
Racing Stripes (PG) 1:20 14:2017:00 19:30 . .
White Noise (PG-13) 1:4514:40 7:2519:55 I --
129998-F



Happy 2nd Birfhdav, Reina!




























We can hardly believe you're two!
Love, Daddy, Mommie, Papa, Nana & Pops
_-.I









I . , ' " - 'a . I- . ... '--.,. .'









We can hardly believe you're two!
SLove, Daddy, Mommie, Papa, Nana & Pops *:


Florida Museum of Natural
History will exhibit
"Florida Bird Portraits"


By Jim Miller
The Florida Museum of
Natural History in Gainesville
will display a new galleria ex-
hibit titled "Florida Bird Por-
traits" by Jim Miller from Jan.
20 - May 22. The exhibit in-
cludes 19 color photographs
that focus on bird forms, col-
ors, rhythms and patterns.
The photographs depict the
aspects and behavior of birds
that create a strong emotional
response and include tech-
niques such as extreme close-
ups, tight cropping, vivid col-
ors, simple compositions and
plain backgrounds to reveal
birds as most people never see
them. The birds were pho-
tographed in Florida, primari-
ly at Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park.
Jim Miller, former Florida
state archaeologist, lives in
Tallahassee. He has worked in


nearly every part of the state
trying to understand Florida's
people and environments, and
has always carried a camera
for both work and fun. He has
taken photographs since mid-
dle school, but only recently
became a serious bird photog-
rapher after acquiring a quality
camera.
The Florida Museum of
Natural History is Florida's
state natural history museum
and is located near the inter-
section of Southwest 34th
Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cultural
Plaza in Gainesville. Hours are
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Sat-
urday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday.
For more information, includ-
ing ticket prices, directions
and parking information, call
352-846-2000, or visit the mu-
seum online,
www.flmnh.ufl.edu.






b\ ,~


Jordan twins

celebrate 7th birthday


Madison and Macy Jordan
Madison and Macy Jordan celebrated their 7th birthday Jan.
14, 2005. Madison and Macy iare the daughters of Ginger
Williams Warner.
Happy birthday wishes from mom, Trevor Smith, Tanner
Warner, Nana Williams and Papa and Mema Williams.

Gwinn receives her Master's degree
from Florida A & M University


Marvette Gwinn
Congratulations to Marvette Gwinn, wife of Clifford Gwinn
and mother of Prell Gwinn, who received her master's of educa-
tion degree in counselor education. Gwinn graduated Summa
Cum Laude at the fall commencement exercises of Florida A &
M University held Dec. 10, 2004, at the Leon County Civic Cen-
ter in Tallahassee.


SHappv 2nd


Birthday



Chloee


Sanders


Moma, Daddy

& Cayldei


* ,�'A


Oh no... the big


six,-


c?4ipry 6&t//ad


137835J.RS-F


Happy 1st Birthday

Clay Daniel Murray!




' 'vW.


Clay Daniel Murray
Love,
Mommy, Daddy and Austin


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5A


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


I







IAt f RA U% S


Special videoconference:

Post-Storm Timber Tax and Forest

Health Issues to be held Jan. 21


The 2004 hurricane season
was damaging to a large portion
of Florida's private timberlands.
Casualty loss and forest
health issues that thousands of
private timberland owners are
now facing as a result of these
storms will be addressed by a
special videoconference: Post-
Storm Timber Tax and Forest
Health Issues. The videoconfer-
ence will be held on Friday,
Jan., 21, from 4:30-7 p.m.
(EST) at 11 locations through-
out Florida.
The agenda (Eastern Standard
Time) will cover many topics:
4:30-5:15 p.m.; Post-Storm
Timber Tax Issues, USDA For-
est Service;


5:15-5:30 p.m.; Questions,
Discussion - Timber Tax Issues;
5:30-5:40 p.m.; Break;
5:40-6 p.m.: Pine Bark Beetle
Identification and Management,
Dr. Bud Mayfield, Florida Divi-
sion of Forestry (DOF);
6-6:10 p.m.; Questions, Dis-
cussion - Pine Bark Beetle Iden-
tification and Management;
6:10-6:25 p.m.; Cost-share
Availability for Storm Recov-
ery, Matt Donovan, DOF; and
6:25-6:45 p.m. Questions,
Discussion, Closing Remarks.
One of the eleven sites will be
held in Live Oak at: UF-IFAS
Suwannee Valley North Florida
REC, 7580 CR 136, 386-362-
1725.


Contact Chris Demers at 352-
846-2375 or
cdemers@ifas.ufl.edu for list of
other sites, to register and for di-
rections.
Space will be limited at most
sites so please register early.
Please share this announcement
with others who may be interest-
ed.
This free program is a service
of the Florida Division of
Forestry, Forest Stewardship
Program University of Florida,
IFAS, Cooperative Extension
Service.

FAMU Cooperative
Extension Service
will host a local
meat goat producer
meeting Jan. 25
The Florida A & M Uni-
versity (FAMU) Extension
Service will host a local
meat goat producer meeting
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 25, at the Suwannee
County Extension Service
Office, 1302 Eleventh St.,
Live Oak.
Les Harrison of the Flori-
da Department of Agricul-
ture, Division of Marketing
and. Development and
Richard Esseck of the Flori-
da Meat Goat Association
will be guest speakers.
The meeting is open to all
meat goat producers in
Suwannee, Hamilton, Madi-
son and Columbia counties.
No registration fee. Pre-reg-
ister by calling FAMU
Small Farm Management
Specialist Phillip Petway,
386-362-2771.

INFORMATION
WHO: Florida A & M University
(FAMU) Extension Service
WHAT: local meat goat pro-
ducer meeting
WHEN: 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 25
WHERE: Suwannee County
Extension Service Office, 1302
Eleventh St., Live Oak
COST: Free
CONTACT: FAMU Small Farm
Management Specialist Phillip
Petway, 386-362-2771


COMPLETED 1


Paul Clemons Sr.
Aug. 5, 1931 -
Jan. 17, 2005

aul Clemons Sr., 73, of
Live Oak, passed away
on Monday, Jan. 17,
2005 in his home after a long ill-
ness. The Suwannee County na-
tive retired from the U.S. Coast
Guard after 22 years of service.
He was a chief boiler technician
in Miami and also served during
the Korean Conflict. Clemons
was a member of the Mt. Olive
Church of Christ, Live Oak.
Survivors include his wife,
Jeanette Clemons of Live Oak;


one son, Freddie Cline Jr. of
Live Oak; one sister, Annie Bell
Ruckers of Lake City; one
brother, Byron Clemons ofVero
Beach; and four grandchildren,
Kelley, Amy, David and Mon-
tana.
Funeral services were con-
ducted at 3 p.m., Thursday, Jan.
20 at the Mt. Olive Church of
Christ with Mr. Melvin Barker
and Mr. John Arnold officiating.
Interment followed in the
church cemetery with military
honors.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak was in charge of all,
arrangements.


SS , � 'e I i
P s d2- 2


Peruvian & Fri. & Sa t Gala. Fugi.
Sweet Onions Roma, GreenG Red Delicious
Swet ons o'ine Ripe Grann Smith
SI Tomatoes Apples


SI LbI New 19x31A.G. poolw/
SI_ deck, fence, skimmer, liner,
filter & motor.
Nowv Accepting Debit. Credit and EBT Cards 100% financing.
Locally Owed & Operated 1-day installation.
By Ray Hayes
Conveniently located Comer
of Hwy 90 & WalkerAve. CL H
Open until 2 p.m. on Saturdays le0eoJRSF 1I8 i


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WtIsnMn


Instant Money. Nobody
gets you money fa star.
At H&R Block, you can walk in with your taxes and walk
out with a refund anticipation loan check. Get the money
you're looking for to pay off bills and other debt fast.

386-362-3757
6826 Suwannee Plaza Lane,
Wal-Mart Shopping Center, Live Oak, FL 32060


H&R BLOCK
I:


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,;''~ -------. ..--'--

SED Test Dates
February 7 & 8 at 4 p.m.
SMonday and Tuesday

You must attend the registration session
Monday, January 31, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, February 2 at 9 a.m.
\ Call Lynn Lee at

364-2782
to sign up for registration.

Suwannee-Hamilton,

. TechnicalC center
...


Social Sewing Club





. ;.. ' .-_ .. .. . .i



,. -

SOCIAL SEWING CLUB HOLDS PARTY: The social sewing club held is annual Christmas party
Dec. 22 at the club house. There was lots of food, fun and sharing gifts. Pictured front, I - r,
Dorothy Bradley, Ruth Linton, Christine Curry, Lafrance Stevens, Catherine Casun, Vicky Hines,
Benita Walker, Addie Cherry and Linda Linton. Seated. Ruby Royals and Christine Walker. Back
row, Lynda Owens, Marion Stevens and Dorothy Depass. - Pho tosubmrneo




5,,



CHRISTMAS SPIRIT FILLS SURREY PLACE: The .--
Christmas spirit is spread throughout Surrey Place SHARING THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT: Mem-
Center with a Christmas carol sing-along. The so- bers of the Social Sewing Club help spread
cial sewing club members distributed Christmas the Christmas spirit to residents at Suwannee
gifts to the residents. Phi.to submniird Healthcare. - Pholo urjmttei


, E - ,0.




We love dogs in

Suwannee County A..
The people in Suwannee Jack Russell Terrier knows all .
County sure do love their dogs. I about the bank. The saliva starts
knowr t -,hi b m tf is if thf o m;linte wer nulli ;nfto. --


Know mis because mere are
many, many people who take
their dogs with them every-
where.
I've seen dogs perched on top
of toolboxes on the backs of
pickups. How they stay where
they're put is beyond me.
I knew a lady who took her
dog everywhere with her in the
car and had a special seatbelt just
for the pooch! Where do you buy
such a gadget?
Dogs are so common in the
front seats of cars and pick-ups,
when you go through the drive-
through 'ii t baik, they 'haI e
biscuits for your dog right next to
the lollipops for your kids. My


Vuowg Lpll ill YeU ,LWUI ttiUV
the place.
The man of the house loads all
his dogs into the trailer with the
horse every time he leaves to go
work cows. They sit right under
the horse's feet happy as they can
be because they just love work-
ing cows. They can't wait to go.
When the man of the house starts
saddling his horse at 5 a.m., they
know what's going on and react
accordingly. That means they run
around wildly, dancing and
spraying slobber in all directions.
How many trucks do you
iag ine theIre :ue:ih SuiA.:nnee
County with dog boxes built into
the back? Hunting dogs load up


Janet Schrader
for deer hunting, hog hunting,
raccoon hunting and lots of other
hunting.
There are special breeds of
dogs for chasing, cows, chasing
pigs, chasing deer, chasing
coons, chasing sheep and chasing
people. We have them all in
Suwannee County. There are
plenty of dog breeders in the
county as well. I know a lady
who breeds miniature wiener
dogs. She has dozens of short-
legged, cute-as-a-bunon Dachs-
'hunds running amLuAc n her
property.
The residents of Suwannee
County love their dogs and you
can find almost every breed hid-
ing somewhere in this county
from Sharpeis to Shih Tzus.
Of course, there are also plenty
of cat lovers in the county as
well.
Me and the man of the house
currently have four dogs and one
cat. The number and variety
varies because the man of the
house will bring home a dog at
the drop of a hat. He gives them
away freely as well.
I'm sure if you live in Suwan-
nee County, you too have a dog,
Pat him on the head, cause we
love our dogs in Suwannee
County
Janet Schrader-Seccafico may
be reached by calling 1/386/362-
1734 ext. 134 or by e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com
Only in Suwannee County is
an occasional commentary by lo-
cal resident and Democrat re-
porter Janet Schrader-Seccafico
on the lives and times of Suwan-
nee countians and is intended to
remind us of the wonderful coun-
ty we live in.


THE SCIENCE OF

INNER HARMONY
and the art of

meditation
Welcome to a free seminar on the meditation
of the inner Light and Sound


Thursday, January 27
6:30-10o00 pm

LIVEOAK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
1848 Ohio Avenue South


Saturday, January 29

LAKE' Crr
PUBLIC LIBRARY
308 NW ColUmbma Avenue

Sunday, January 30
1:30-5siOopm
HIGH SPRINGSS
BRANCH LIBRARY
S s NW it Avenue


Free of Charge ~ Beneficial for persons of all beliefs
OffJred b)' authorioid reprcenuatives of Sant Trhakar Singh


(386) 842-2221 or 1-877-MEDITATE

v.k not selfasso u 1. o rg


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NOW sending Suwannee and Columbia counties
Tank Set
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E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


PAGF 6A


-�-









BUSINESS


"Because of Winn*Dixie," families


can enjoy award-winning story


of friendship and community

New movie puts Winn-Dixie in the spotlight


A Newberry medal-win-
ning children's story making
its way to the big screen
could have an impact at a su-
permarket near you. South-
eastern grocery chain, Winn-
Dixie Stores, Inc., is featured
as the namesake of the book -
and movie - "Because of
Winn-Dixie" and is sharing
its role as a movie star with
its customers through a shop-
ping rewards program and
book donations throughout its
operating areas.
"Because of Winn-Dixie,"
starring Jeff Daniels, Cicely
Tyson, Dave Matthews, Eva
Marie Saint, and introducing
AnnaSophia Robb, opens in
theaters nationwide Feb. 18.
Portions of the movie were
filmed at a Winn-Dixie store
in Louisiana. The story.
chronicles a girl who be-
friends several uncommon
characters in her new home of
Naomi, Fla. - including a
stray dog she meets at the
town's Winn-Dixie store.
Through her new friends, In-
dia Opal Buloni learns the
joys of friendship and family.
Winn-Dixie has partnered
with Twentieth Century Fox
to offer shoppers the ability to
earn points redeemable for
officially-licensed merchan-
dise, including a free copy of
the book that inspired the
movie, a plush look-alike toy
of the movie's canine star,
"Winn-Dixie," and two tick-
ets to see the movie.
Beginning this week, cus-
tomers can earn one point for
each dollar spent when using.


their Customer Rewards
Card. Points will accumulate
through Jan. 30. Beginning
Feb. 9 through Feb. 22, cus-
tomers who earn 200 points
can redeem these points for
two free movie tickets. Those
who earn 250 points can re-
deem them for the movie
tickets and a copy of the
book. Customers who earn
300 points or more can re-
deem them for the tickets and
book, as well as the plush
dog. Most Winn-Dixie stores
will also sell the officially-li-
censed merchandise.
"This is such a beautiful
story of friendship and com-
munity, and we are proud to
play a part in it," said Joanne
Gage, vice president of mar-
keting and advertising at
Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc.
"With the launch of the film,
we want to take an active role
in bringing this story to our
shoppers and communities.
The points program allows us
to share the magic of Kate
DiCamillo's story with our
customers and their families
just for doing what they al-
ready do - shopping with us."
"We're always looking for
organic promotional opportu-
nities, and this partnership
with Winn-Dixie is a natural.
We are delighted they are so
excited about the movie, and
that they recognize its special
magic," commented Jeffrey
Godsick, executive vice pres-
ident of marketing at Twenti-
eth Century Fox, which has
also provided Winn-Dixie the
rights to, use pronotjonal, im,-


ages from the movie for in-
store signage and point-of-
purchase materials.
Winn-Dixie plans to donate
thousands of copies of "Be-
cause of Winn-Dixie" to li-
braries in its operating areas
across the Southeast to pro-
mote literacy and give even
more people the opportunity
to'share in this wonderful sto-
ry of friendship.
"Winn-Dixie takes a spe-
cial pride in giving back to
causes and organizations that
support children and educa-
tion in the communities in
which we operate," said
Gage. "Our mission is to be
the best supermarket in every
neighborhood in which we
operate, offering the best val-
ue, freshest products and out-
standing customer service
every day. And this is just an-
other way we can deliver on
that mission."
One of the world's largest
producers and distributors of
motion pictures, Fox Filmed
Entertainment (FFE), pro-
duces, acquires and distrib-
utes motion pictures through-
out the world. These motion
pictures are produced or ac-
quired by the following unites
of FFE: Twentieth Century
Fox, Fox 2000, Fox Search-
light Pictures and Twentieth
Century Fox Animation.
Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. is
one of the nation's largest
food retailers. Founded in
1925, the Company is head-
quartered in Jacksonyille. For
more information, please vis-
it www.winn-dixje.com.


If you are over 55 and haxe
a limited income, you might
qualify for a program that
helps seniors get the training
they need to find a good job in
Su\\annee County.
Experience Works..a na-
tional nonprofit organization,
(formerly Green Thumb) pro-
vides training and employ-
ment services to older work-
ers through the Senior Com-


munit3 Senrice Employment
Program (SCSEP).
Experience Works collabo-
rates with nonprofit organiza-
tions and community service
agencies to provide paid w ork
experience, training and job-
placement sen ices to seniors
\\hh limited incomes. Partici-
pants are paid the minimum
wage for an average of 20
hours per week. Dedicated


staff can help you find the
right job. whether you are re-
turning to the \workforce...or
ha e never \worked.
Experience Works puts
your experience to work.
For more information. visit
x\ww-.experiencewvorks.org or
call the Lake City One Stop.
386-755-9026. ext. 3129 for
Loretta or el. 3134 for
Ronald.


Edward Jones ranks No. 1 in the


national survey of brokers for


the 12th consecutive year


For the 12th consecutive
year, Edward Jones ranked
No. 1 in Registered Repre-
sentative magazine's annual
survey of the nation's seven
largest financial-services
firms. The magazine ran-
domly selects brokers na-
tionwide and asks them to
rank their firms in various
categories.
"The firm received verbal
praise for its ethics, for its
unwavering business focus
and for its attention to the
needs of its reps, including
its long-standing policy of
providing a full-time assis-
tant paid for by the firm,"
according to the magazine's
December 2004 issue. The
firm's ranking on "support"
topped all other firms, the
magazine reported.
Edward Jones investment
representatives gave the
firm its highest scores in 17
of the 24 categories in
which it was rated. Some of
those categories include:
ongoing training, client ac-
count statements, quality of
the products offered, man-
agement and the firm's
strategic focus.
"The firm's steady, con-
servative approach was
consistently lauded by
reps," the magazine report-
ed.
While it's always an hon-
or to be recognized by a na-
tional publication, this par-
ticular ranking is significant
for a variety of reasons.
"This ranking is formed
by the opinions of our in-
vestment representatives -
the people who meet with
clients every day," said Kei-
l S :c.tt, the local Edward
Jones investment represen-
tative. "That makes it a
good measure of how well


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Keith Scott
we are serving our clients,
wllich give this ranking
even greater significance."
Scott said that he is par-
ticularly proud of the No. I
ranking because of the num-
ber of" years Edward Jones
has achieved this honor.
"Twelve years is no coin-
cidence," Scott said. "We
are doing things differently
at Edward Jones, and we are
proud of that distinction."
Edwaird Jones, the only
*major I iinanciIl-scrvices
'lPlhrm advvishig individual in-
vestors exclusively, traces
its roots to 1871 and cur-


rently serves more than six
million clients. The firm of-
fers its clients a variety of
investments, including cer-
tificates of deposit, taxable
and non-taxable bonds,
stocks and mutual funds.
The largest firm in the na-
tion in terms of branch of-
fices, Edward Jones cur-
rently has more than 9,000
offices in the U.S. and,
through its affiliates, in
Canada and lthi United
Kingdom.
The Edwvard Jones inter-
active Web site is located at
www.edwardjones.com.


Saturday's, January 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th


I l:00 ,
12:00,,,
1:001,,


How To install hardwood flooring
How To install closet organization systems
How To install ceramic tile


Thursday's in January
7:00pm How To faux finish with'texture

Tuesday, January 25th
7:00,,m Creative Ideas: How To create a modern bud vase


For the kids
January 8,h, 10:00.,,
February 12h1, 10:00&,


Bi-Plane
Valentine's Day Mailbox


The first 50 kids, grades 2-5, to sign up at the
Customer Service Desk will get to participate. PLUS,
we'll give you a FREE Lowe's apron that's just your size. ('
Visit the Customer Service Desk to pre-register or for "
rore information.




0 2005 by Lowvs. All rigl.s ItCcl. Lowcs aun the giabei design ame r gistercd imdcmnarks of LF, LLC.
131492bgv


P - Brothers -

,LECTRONIC


13358 US 90 West dl'..
Live Oak F i

S�"sL386-364-1557 -


Experience Works recruitment

for workers over 55


Physical therapy can play an important part in healing - whether
you're recovering from an injury or accident, you've had a stroke, or
you suffer from arthritis. Shands at Live Oak offers the full range of
physical therapy services to help you get back into action.


,'
hi


To make an appointment,
or for more information,
call us today and receive
a free tote bag.



1100 SW 11 Street S -H A NS

386.362.1413 yTAINDS
shands.org atLiveOak

135522DH-F


BIG SCREEN TV

SPECIALIST

* FREE ESTIMATES

* Fastest possible Repairs

* Pick up and Delivery Available
\ }


-


PAGE 7A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 21 20 5


...
-...
r:
Ji�I









SCHOOL


Take Stock In Children


wraps up another year


ALDA CACERES AND MENTOR SANDY
PER, RIGHT. - Photos Yvette Hannon


SKIP-


TRACY TILLMAN, LEFT, AND MENTOR CAR-
OLYN PURDY. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


, :


DOMINIQUE REED, LEFT, AND MENTOR
OLYN PURDY . - Photo: Yvette Hannon


JAMESE TOOTIN, LEFT, AND MENTOR KAREN
JACKSON. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


AJ SHULER AND MENTOR GARY EDWARDS,
RIGHT. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


, , ;'"



CAR- ASHLEY SAFREED, LEFT AND MENTOR NANCY
MCLEOD. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


CHELSEA YOUNG, LEFT, AND MENTOR NANCY
PAPAPETROU. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


MENTOR LT. JOE DALY AND
ROBERTS,RIGHT. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


ZAHIR


..-C. - .'.


January 24 at 7 p.m.

Will have special speaker

Hwy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800


Suwannee County Chamber of Commerce
proudly presents
The 57th Annual Meeting and Installation
Banquet, Dinner and Entertainment
with Special Guest Speaker Luther Beauchamp,
Lawyer, Humorist and Author
Thursday ;
February 10, 2005
6:30 pm at the
.- .. First Baptist Church,
Family Ministry
Building
$25.00 per person
RSVP by 2/7/2005
For More Information call
the Chamber at 362-3071
(table and guest speaker
sponsorships available)
137345DH-F
U


Suwannee Hamiton


Vo-Tech caps LPNs


SHANDS AT LIVE OAK HOSPITAL AUXILIARY PRESENTS FOUR SCHOLARSHIPS TO LPN STU-
DENTS: Pictured, Ito r, Goldie Fralick - Auxiliary representative presents scholarships to Suwan-
nee-Hamilton Technical Center LPN students Bob Phelps, Elizabeth Hawthorne, Erica Brown and
Ashley Fralick. - Photo: Submitted
- '* _-. -.'-.. .- -'


VERNA TODD SCHOLARSHIP: Suwannee-
Hamilton Technical LPN student Ashley Fralick
was presented with a $500 Verna Todd Scholar-
ship through the Shands at Live Oak Auxiliary.
- Photo: Submitted


---.--.
.. -.... .


LPN CAPPED: Suwannee-Hamilton Technical
Center LPN student Kylie Edwards receives her
cap from her instructor Marcia Dickey.
- Photo: Submitted


Home school class offered

at Florida Museum of

Natural History in Gainesville
The Florida Museum building a compost farm more information call
of Natural History,; and learning how, worns 352-846-2000, ext. 277.
Gainesville will offer a" benefit human commu- The class coincides


four-week home
class series ti-
tled "Squirmy
Science" from
9:30-11:30
a.m. on Jan.
24, 31 and
Feb. 7, 21 for
children ages
six-11.
The class
will explore
the mysteries
of the earth-
worm, inside
and out. Par-
ticipants will
observe life
cycles and
collect scien-
tific data on
worm mea-
surements,


with


school cities.


INFORMATION
lWho: Florida Museumn
of Natural Historn
What: FoLr-\\eek home school class
series titled "Squirmy Science"
When: 9:30-11:30 a.m. on
.lan. 24, 31 and Feb. 7, 21
Where: near the intersection of
Southwest 34th Street and
Hull Road in the Unixersitr of
Florida Cultural Plaza in Gainesville
Cost: $40 for members and
$45 for non members
Contact: 352-846-2000, ext. 277.
NOTE: Pre-registration required

favorite The class is $40 for plores


foods and preferred liv-
ing conditions. Hands-
on activities include


members and $45 for
nonmembers. Pre-regis-
tration is required. For


the Florida Muse-
um's next tem-
porary exhibi-
tion, "Mi-
crobes: Invisi-
ble In-
vaders...Amaz-
ing Allies," on
display Feb. 5
- May 30. The
exhibit, pro-
duced by Clear
Channel Exhi-
bitions in col-
laboration with
the National
Institutes of
Health, is an
interactive,
technological-
ly .enhanced
exhibit that ex-
s the hidden world


of microbes, including
bacteria, viruses and
beneficial germs.


IN CONCERT


Saturday, March 19, 2005
lit-a, 7:30 pm at the

Suwannee County Fair
'..)'' ^


Tickets on Sale


NOW!!


Reserve your

SVIP seating now!

.l;i C'all for more info.

362-7366


S ors Look for Seniors United
in the Jan. 26 edition of
untlad the Suwannee Democrat


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


PAGE 8A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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I IHn LI i, JrAuIN\7l T L1, -.


Identity


Continued From Page 1A

employment.
Identity theft has been a
hot topic for movies and
commercials but is a serious
tragedy for the victim who
has to rebuild their name
and credibility.
Criminals have stolen
money from bank accounts,
obtained credit cards by
stealing a victim's name, ad-
dress, bank account num-
bers and social security
numbers effecting all gen-
ders, ages and lifestyles. No
one is immune.
Your personal information
can be obtained from busi-
nesses, doctors, lawyers of-
fices and health insurance
carriers. Computer hackers
can steal employers records
by hacking into the compa-
nies computer. Criminals
can call for information pos-
ing as a potential landlord or
employer.With today's tech-
nology. valuable identifying
information is available
even on the internet.
Criminals can and do
stoop so low as to search
through a victim' garbage. A
criminal can learn a lot from
.a persons' garbage.
Imposters can open new
accounts with a victim's
identity and use their own
photo to apply for loans or
even file for bankruptcy.
Criminals also commit


crimes from traffic infrac-
tions to serious felonies us-
ing a false driver's license
and are capable of ruining
more than just your credit.
An innocent person could
actually end up in jail.
All a criminal needs is
your social security number,
date of birth, address and a
phone number to do some
serious damage. Never give
out this information to any-
one over the phone or sign
up for anything on the com-
puter.
Some things you can do to
prevent your identity from
being stolen:
* Use a shredder to de-
stroy all confidential infor-
mation such as bank slips,
store receipts, credit card
approval letters, utility bills
and credit card slips and
other personal .documenta-
tion.
* When you order new
checks for your bank ac-
count, use your initials in-
stead of your first name. If
someone does take your
checkbook they will not
know if you sign your
checks with your first name
or just your initials, but your
bank will know.
* Many times credit card
companies want you to in-
clude the account number in
the 'For' line on your check
when paying your bills. In-
stead use the last four digits


Branford


Continued From Page 1A

While cameras and record-
ing devices were not allowed
inside the meeting held at
Branford High School's audi-
torium, the media was al-
lowed inside. School officials
said before the meeting they
wanted to protect the dignity
of the meeting and allow peo-
ple who attended to feel free
to express their feelings can-
didly.
A -panel composed of Su-
perintendent of Schools Wal-
ter Boatright, world-renowned
psychologist in the area of
self-inflicted deaths Frank
Zenere, Frank Yanossy, BHS
Principal Ted Roush, Sheriff
Tony Cameron and others dis-
cussed how to prevent future
deaths from hanging, fielded
questions from the audience
and most of all, listened.
Some of the questions re-
garded how the investigations
of each death were handled.
Some family members of the
three who died expressed con-
cern over how the investiga-
tions and reports were han-
dled. They denied that suicide
was the motive in the deaths,
defining it as accidental. They
said the deaths which were
marked "suicide" were wrong-
ly categorized and wanted it
changed. Sheriff Cameron
said he will never know if the
deaths were intentional or not
since no one was with any of
the three boys when they died.
He also said a "very wise man
once told me to never mark
any death as suicide," a policy
he said he's always adhered to.
Touchton's death came after
Cameron took office. The oth-
er two deaths happened prior
to his taking office.
Many questioned the
school district's "lack of ac-
tion" in protecting children
by arming them with knowl-
edge about the "blackout
game" they say some have
been playing. One teacher
begged for information to use
to teach her students about
the dangers of the "game" be-
lieved to be at the bottom of
the hangings, saying she and
other teachers need direction
on what to say.
Zenere told her to look for
signs on the necks of children
where a rope may have
rubbed, or any marks around
the neck area, and watch for
strange or secretive behavior
as possible signs. Computers
can also be checked to see if
your children have accessed
any of the web sites that pro-
mote or discuss hangings,
blackout games or that discuss
the sexual side of some types


of these acts, autoerotic as-
phyxia, which officials say is
not the case in the three Bran-
ford deaths.
Sheriff Cameron said he
does not allow his children to
have computers in their rooms
but rather in a public area of
the home where they can be
monitored.
Boatright told the assem-
bled group that meetings
would continue within the
schools in Brariford through
Friday and-begin again Jan. 31
through Feb. 2 with specialists
being brought in to work with
students in small groups and
also with teachers. He said if
needed, another parent/com-
munity meeting would be
held.
School Board Chairman
Jerry Taylor and School Board
Member Muriel Owens both
attended the meeting, sitting
near the back of the auditori-
um and observing. While
Owens left early, Taylor
stayed until the end, talking
with various officials and oth-
ers.
Susan K. Lamb may be
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 131.or by mailing
susan. lamb @ gaflnews. com.


fUkdate


BenKely, MD.
BoardCertified
Dermatologist
USE OF SUNSCREEN
IN WINTER
During winter, when we might get
less sun exposure than in summer, it
is important to get outdoors. Sun
exposure helps the body generate
vitamin D, which is essential for
maintaining strong bones. Only
about ten minutes of sunshine, two
to three times a week is needed,
'however. The rest of the time, skin
should be protected against the
sun's ultraviolet rays, which bear
down on us in all seasons.
Sunscreen use is especially
important high up on the ski slopes.
Higher elevations and exposure to
reflective snow increase the risk of
sunburn and eventual sun damage
(wrinkles, premature aging, and
skin cancer). A full-spectrum
sunscreen with a sun protection
factor (SPF) of at least 15 should be
used.
In addition to wearing sunscreen,
be sure to use a moisturizer
everyday to prevent flaky, cracked
and chapped skin and lips. When
you require the care of a
dermatologist, call GAINESVILLE
DERMATOLOGY & SKIN
SURGERY. We are a'full-service
Dermatology practice, focusing on
medical and surgical care of the
skin, as well as laser and esthetic
treatments. Call (352) 332-4442 for
an appointment. Our office is
conveniently located at 114 N.W.
76th Drive. New patients are
welcome.
P.S6Clo u d offer no
prtcion roS thS sn'
ulrvilt as


as the credit card company
knows the rest of the account
number.Your check passes
through many hands once it
is written so the entire ac-
count number won't be total-
ly accessible.
* Use your work number
on your checks instead of
,your home phone number.
* Refrain from putting
checks and other identifying
information in your mailbox,
instead, take it to to athe
post office and drop it into
the secure drop box yourself.
* Use a post office box in-
stead of your home address,
if you do not have a post of-
fice box use your work ad-
dress.
* Never put your social se-
curity number on your
checks.
* Check your credit report
carefully, look for any unex-
plainable debts.
* Copy the contents of
your wallet including both
sides of your license and
credit cards.
* Keep your credit card ac-
count numbers and phone
numbers in a safe place in
case you have to call and
cancel them.
* Traveling abroad, always
carry a photo copy of your
passport.
* File a police report im-
mediately if your purse or
wallet is stolen
* Make sure your personal
information does not appear
in any public record at the


county clerk office.
* Report all mail theft to
the US Postal Inspection
Service.
If you fall victim to this
criminal behavior, you may
obtain an invaluable tool - a
Florida Identity Theft Victim
Kit - by contacting Florida's
Identity Theft Resource and
Response Center.
The kit is designed to help
the victim through the
process of resolving the theft
of their identity and help
clear that person's name and
rebuild their credit.
Victims should also call
the three national credit re-
porting organizations to
place a fraud alert on your
name and social security
number. An alert means any
company that checks your
credit will know the infor-
mation was stolen and you
will have to be contacted by
phone to authorize new cred-
it.
Also contact your local po-
lice and sheriffs office to
file a report.
For more information
about what you can do to
protect your personal infor-
mation, tips are available by
visiting the Federal Trade
Commission's Identity Theft
Website at: http://www.con-
sumer.gov/idtheft/recover-
ing_idt.html#16
Yvette Hannon may be
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 130 or by mailing
yvette.hannon @ gaflnews.com.


Touchton's


Sales * Service * Installation
10156 U.S. Hwy. 90 East, Live Oak.
Commitment to Excellence
Owners: Jan 'wwwTouchtons.com
& Sarah Touchton CAC058747
133220JRS-F


Suwannee County Animal
Services will hold open house
Feb. 5 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m
at 11150 144th Street (old
landfill road off US 129) with
free food, a yard sale, a live
radio remote and donated
prizes!
The public is invited and en-
couraged to come out and see
the facility, check out the ani-
mals that are up for adoption,
meet members of the govern-
ing board and register to win a
prize.
Among the prizes and con-
tributors are a carrier, collar,
pet toy, pig-ear leash and flea
comb donated by Branford Pet
Shop; Hoof-n-Paw, a pet sit-
ting service, is donating one
pet sitting; an aquarium and
set-up donated by Ralph's
Rainbow Birdland; a halter
and leadrope donated by Huff-


man and Gilmore as well as:
*Allsprings Veterinary hos-
pital - One free cat neuter and
one free dog neuter
*Live Oak Animal Clinic -
Free neuter of a dog or cat
*Companion Animal Hospi-
tal - $30 off a spay or neuter of
a dog or cat
*Suwannee Oaks Animal
Clinic - free cat spay
*Addison Animal Hospital
of Lake City - Spay or neuter
of a dog or cat
*Mayo Town and Country
Animal Hospital - $30 off spay
or neuter of dog or cat
*You must meet criteria for
spay/neuter raffle
There will also be free kit-
tens for adoption while they
last.
Your donations to the facili-
ty are tax deductible as it is a
501(C)(3) charity.


f oo



DEED
Driving to work Tuesday. Jan. -1. on CR 250, my car
stalled when I stopped at CR 51. M) engine was smok-
ing, so I got out ofthe car. Se\ eral kind gentlemen at the
Shell Station saw my situation. ran o~er with a fire ex-
tinguisher, put out the engine fire, and then pushed my
car out of the road. The onl) fellow's name I have is
Buster Greene. He helped me locate the engine trouble
and replace the faulty parts. I want to thank Buster and
all the anonymous fellows v.ho were Good Samari-
tans. I'll now carry a fire extinguisher!
Sincerely.
NanL v Meli:ger


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County

animal

shelter to

hold open

house


PAGE 9A


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 21 5


I
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n SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


PAGE 10AI







Mens' soccer tonight!
Suwannee men's soccer will be in Langford Stadium. The Bulldog soccer team
takes on Ocala Westport at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21. Come out and enjoy some
great soccer and to honor the senior players. 4 o DO ,1


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uumanntiee democrat

Section B
Friday, January 21, 2005






. . . .; ".'.~" 7 ' "


I?--,, ,,,' 4 4 .


" 7o ' . ; '..


Bruce Johnson

named

Gainesville Sun

Defensive Player

nf 2004


#8 Bruce Johnson named
Gainesville Sun Defensive
Player of the Year.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter

The 2004 Gainesville Sun
Players of the Year are out
and Bruce Johnson was
named Defensive Player of
the Year.
Johnson, #8 for the
Suwannee Bulldogs, has
had one heck of a year. He
signed his letter of intent to

SEE JOHNSON, PAGE 5B


It looks

like Green

is coming

back

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Last year Columbia Coun-
ty football coach Danny
Green, left the program fol-
lowing the 2002 season.
Green spent nine years as
head coach of the Columbia
County Tigers. He had a great
record of 89-26, and led the
Tigers to the third round of
the state play-offs or better,
seven times.
It appears Green will be
back as the Columbia Tiger's
head football coach. After the
final four applicants for the
job were interviewed Tues-
day, Jan. 11, school principal
Joann Chamberlin and super-
intendent Sam Markham rec-
ommended Green be re-
hired. The Columbia County
School Board has the last
word and will decide at their
.next meeting Jan. 25.
Green was replaced by
Scott Anderson. Anderson
lasted one game, the Colum-
bia home game Suwannee
won, taking the Oaken Buck-
et back to Live Oak. Ander-
son was suspended after a
practice incident with one of
the Tiger football players.
The suspension led to his dis-
missal.
Assistant Coach Frank
Beasely took over after An-
derson's dismissal. Beasely
won seven of 10 games he
coached.
There were four finalists
for the Columbia job, Green,
Beasely, Hamilton County
coach Mike Pittman and Lake
Mary coach Greg Stanton.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


Suwannee wrestling tops Baker


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Suwannee's heavyweight wrestler Kris Kerns battles with much heavieropponent from Baker. Kerns had no trouble
in the first round. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


pinning his man


The Dog
wrestlers had
eight pins and
a technical pin
for the evening.

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Suwannee wrestling
fought Baker County Thurs-
day, Jan. 13, in front of a big
crowd of fans. The fans were
slightly disappointed. Key
wrestlers Barney Wainwright
and Preston Hart were unable
to wrestle due to injury and
illness. But the show went on
without them and the
wrestlers that competed did
so well, the audience was
more than happy when they
left. The Bulldogs hammered
Baker winning all but one
match in the varsity ring. The
final score was 77-6.
The name of the game for
Suwannee was "pins." The
Dog wrestlers had eight pins
and a technical pin for the
evening with one loss and
four wins by forfeit.
The match got under way
with JV competition. Three
Suwannee JV wrestlers hit
the mat, with all but one win-
ning by a pin.
OClay Mott, performing as a I
wrestler for the fiIrs'PimNeVf
Suwannee. pinned his man in


Lady Dogs Soccer has strong showing

in Queen of Kings Tournament


I


Jon Wood
Special t tihe Demor.ra
The SHS Lad\ Bulldog soc-
cer team tra\,eled to Tallahassee

#12 Debra Craig is the girls soc-
cer Player or the Week. She was
nominated for her outstanding
play at the holding midfield posi-
tion and for her powerful and ac-
curate corner kicks and free kicks
Craig nailed the corner kick that
tied the game with Flagler Palm
Coast. - Pholi F.ul BUJ:h.jil.lri


last weekend to play in the sec-
ond Queen of Kings Cup Soccer
Tournament. The tournament
featured some of the best soccer
teams in North Florida and the
Lady Dogs were looking to pick
up some experience playing
tough opponents and perhaps
make a name for themselves as
one of the better teams in the re-
gion. Both objectives were
achieved, as the Lady Dogs
faced 4,-\ Pensacola Tate Friday
night and took them to a 1-1 tie,
6A Flagler Palm Coast on Satur-
day morning and tied them 1-1,


and lost to 3A Panama City
Arnold 1-i) on Saturday after-
noon
After some initial confusion
\\ith tournament scheduling on
FridaJ night. Su\\annee learned
the\ would face Pensacola Tate.
a strong class 4-A team. in their
fist round ,'ame A late starting
time, a \\et and mudd\ field and
\\indy. -40-degree temperatures
did not hamper the Lady Dogs.
\\ho came out siiong and domi-
nated the earlt minutes of the'


SEE LADY, PAGE 6B


U


Five Suwannee Lady Dog weightlifters advance

to second sectional meet


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter

Suwannee High girls'
weightlifting hosted the re-
cent sectional meet on Tues-
day, Jan. 11. The meet was
held during school hours in
front of over 500 paying stu-
dents. Two of the schools
scheduled to compete did
not show up, Mcclay and Ft.
White. Columbia County,
Wakulla County and Suwan-
nee competed. This was the
first sectional meet in the se-
ries of two. Girls that qualify
at this first meet, get to con-
tinue on and participate in
the second sectional meet on
their way to competing at
state.
Of the nine girls who par-
ticipated in the sectional
meet five qualified and will
advance to the second sec-
tional meet on Jan. 29, at
Keystone. The top three
from that meet will advance


to the state finals in Deland
on Feb. 12.
Tildra Howard in the 119
weightclass took first place
with a 165 total. Megan
Jansen would have taken
second place but fouled out
in the bench press. In the
129 class, Kayla Parker took
fourth with a 175 total. At
154 pounds, Alex Camunas
took second place with a 200
total and Keedra Virgil took
third place with a 195 total.
In the 199 class Kayla
Gandiana took first place
with a total of 250. Gandi-
ana was 15 pounds below
her normal total. She is un-
defeated so far this year.
Mindy Stever took fourth in
the 199 class with a total of
220.
In the unlimited weight
class, Jessica Nelson took
fourth with a 240 total. This
was Nelson's best showing
of the year.
Suwannee weightlifting's
star lifter, Danielle Smith,


took first again for the fifth
time this year in the unlimit-
ed class with a personal best
in the bench and the clean
and jerk. Smith lifted 170 in
the bench and 175 in the
clean and jerk giving her a
total of 345 pounds.
They do not give out team
awards in the sectional
meets. These meets are set
up to qualify girls to go to
the next level.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


Danielle Smith
concentrates before a big
bench press. Smith took first
place at the recent girls
weightlifting sectional meet.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico

GO TO PAGE 128
FOR MORE GIRLS
WEIGHTLIFTING PHOTOS


''V4 fa
�MIN E W- 111� ME MMMS-1


SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 3B


S-.�


a
a






ASr\(t OIY U S EC O


Golf


By T.J. TOMASI


Insider


BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
Predictions for 2005
* Jonathan Kaye will win
three times on the PGA Tour.
* At 15
years old,
Michelle
Wie will be-
come the
youngest
winner
ever of an
LPGA Tour
event.
SSteve
Williams,
Tiger
Woods' cad- WIE


tour for a
month over
a spectator
incident at
the USGA
Men's
Open at the
Pinehurst
Resort and
Country MONTGOMERIE
Club in
June. Tiger
will win three straight times
during his absence.
SColin Montgomerie will be
voted 2005 "comeback bachelor
of the year" for dating Spanish
supermodel Ines Sastre after
his unhappy and very public di-
vorce in 2004.


THE GOLF DOCTOR
Too many teachers
spoil the lesson
John Callahan, PGA teach-
ing professional at the presti-
gious Brae Burn Country Club
in Purchase, N.Y, recently re-
turned from teaching in the
Philippines and told me how
hard it was to teach there be-
cause of a difference in the
culture.
It was a case of too much of
good thing: The people are so
helpful that it can ruin a les-
son. When his students arrived
for lessons they were bombard-
ed by advice from everyone in
the area.
"It's part of their culture to
help," says Callahan. "When
my students went to the dri-
ving range they were sur-
rounded by people. Other
golfers, caddies, even the ap-
prentice caddies whose job it is
to tee up balls for the people on
the driving range - they all
had advice. It was impossible
to keep them away They had
good intentions, but it made it
much more difficult for my
students to learn."
How much more difficult
could be found in a thank-you
letter John shared with me
from a woman who took part
in his golf clinics. Here's an
excerpt:
"It is true that the way to de-
velop self-confidence is to do
the thing you fear, and I was
able to do this in the days I
practiced when you were in
the Philippines. But it wasn't
easy At first I was afraid to hit
the ball because it might not go
that far, or I might not hit it at
all. However, I was especially
fearful because of all the peo-
ple around me trying to help.
Sometimes I was not doing any
good because of the pressure
of trying to do well for these
people."
It's good that people care
enough to give advice, but it's
bad for your game if you lis-
ten. If there are 26 million
golfers, that means there are 26
million instructors, aka people
who can't resist the urge to
share their wisdom about the
golf swing, no matter how bad
their own game is.
Do yourself a favor and re-
move a big barrier to learning:
When someone offers you ad-
vice, just say no thanks, with
emphasis on the NO.


IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME


Note the position of my left arm and hands Swinging the club to the position above
over my toe line. I can draw an imaginary line teaches you how to release the leverage of
through the butt end of the club, which is your swing through the ball. Done correctly,
pointing approximately at the target line. this position is known as being "on plane."


in


eve ryi tr


f you lack consistency - some ABOUT THE WRITER
shots hook and others slice -
then you should take a close DrTJ Tomasi is di-
look at your timing. To have a rector of instruction
sound swing, the release of the club at Lyman Orchards
head into the ball and the rotation of * GolfClub inMiddle-
field, Conn. To ask
your body must be synchronized. him a question a
In this regard, it's helpful to know golf e-mail him at:
what a proper release of the club g TJInsider@aol.com.
head feels like. This can be learned
by doing the two-part "Plane Drill." -
* Part 1: From your address posi-
tion (for a right-handed golfer),
swing the club back until your left arm is parallel to the ground (second
arm is parallel to the ground, as I photo). Here your right arm and your
have done in the first photo here. hands should be over your toe line so
Your left arm and hands should be that an imaginary line drawn
over your toe line and an imaginary through the butt end of the club once
line drawn through the butt end of again points at the target line. Swing-
the club should be pointing approxi- ing the club to this position teaches
mately at the target line. This posi- you how to release the leverage of
tion teaches you how to swing the your swing through the ball. Again,
club "on plane" during the back- done correctly, this position is also
swing. known as being "on plane."
- Part 2: Swing the club down Learning the mechanics of the
from the top until a point after im- proper release of the club head into
pact is reached where your right the ball is only half the battle be-


GOLF BY THE NUMBERS


20
The number
of consecu-
tive rounds
Brad Faxon
played at one
stretch last
year without
a three-putt.


21
Vijay Singh
led the
PGA Tour
with 21
"hole-outs"
in 2004.


Is






inc


cause your body must keep pace
with your release. All the moving
parts must be rotating together, but
not at the same speed. Your club
head may be moving at 90 mph, your
hands at 15 mph and your chest at 2
mph, but they all must be moving at
the same rate of rotation.
If your body rotation is too slow
through the hitting area, your hands
will outrace your body, flipping the
club face closed and causing a hook
or a pull. If your rotation is too fast,
your release will be late, which holds
the club face open and causes a slice
or a push.
Obviously, to play your best golf
you must discover how fast you
should rotate your body to optimize
your release. I call this "calibrating
your time IQ." When you see experts
hitting balls one after another, they
are not practicing mechanics (there
is no such thing as muscle memory);
they are syncing their time IQ, work-
ing on the "when" rather than the
"what."


2
For the second year in a row, Annika Sorenstam was
voted the Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year.
Since 1931, golfers have been selected 21 times for this
award. The leader by far is Babe Didrikson, who was
chosen No. 1 five times for golf (1945, '46, '47, '50 and '54)
and once for track (1932). Sorenstam received 40 first-
place votes while Diana Taurasi, who led Connecticut
to the NCAA women's basketball title, finished second.


TEEING OFF


Get your


motor
S.


running

W whenever you play or practice,
you should always warm up
first. The purpose of warm-
- ing up is twofold: It gets the blood
flowing into the muscles you'll need to
execute your golf swing, and it allows
you time to put aside non-golf con-
cerns so your mind is free to focus on
the task at hand.
There are three stages to a proper
warm-up routine: stretching, practice
swings and hitting balls to gradually
increasing distances.
Stretching
Here is a quick program using your
golf cart that will stretch the most in-
jury-prone muscles used during your
golf swing. Consult your physician be-
fore you try any of them.
1. To stretch your lower back and
thighs, stand facing your cart and hold
on to the handle of the seat with both
hands. Then slowly bend both knees as
you stretch your lower body away
from the cart until your arms are fully
extended and you are in a squatting
position. Hold this position for 10 sec-
onds and then repeat the exercise
three times.
2. To stretch your hips, rest a golf
club shaft across your upper back and
stand about 30 inches away from the
side of your golf cart. Keeping your
right foot stationary, stride forward
with your left leg and plant your left
foot onto the floor of the golf cart.
Now, with your left leg bent, slowly
shift your weight until it's over your
left foot, making sure your left knee
does not extend past your toes. Adjust
your distance from the cart based on
the length of your legs and your flexi-
bility Repeat this stretch three times
with each leg.
3. To stretch your shoulders, stand
with your back to the cart about 18
inches from the side of the cart. Then,
with your left arm at shoulder height,
reach back with your left hand and
grasp one of the rails that support the
roof of your cart. Now, slowly turn
your body away from your extended
left arm until you feel the stretch in
your left shoulder. Repeat this stretch
three times with each arm.
Practice swings
Start slowly, using a sand wedge,
and make a continuous series of
swings without stopping. Start at the
address position and make a complete
swing and when you reach your finish,
swing the club back again and make
another full swing. Keep going for
about a minute.
Gradual increase in distance
Tee up 10 balls and, using a 7-iron,
start a series of progressively longer
swings. The first three balls should fly
about 20 yards, the next five in in-
creasing 10-yard increments (30, 40, 50
etc.), and hit the last using your full
swing. Teeing up the balls helps you
alleviate any worries about the lie. Re-
member, you're just trying to get loose.
This should be your warm-up proce-
dure whether you are about to start a
practice session or a round of golf.
Caution: If you are about to start a
round, don't turn your warm-up into a
swing overhaul session. Never search
for a swing just before you go to the
course. The best way to prepare for
play is to use a warm-up procedure
that readies you for solid contact.


0.03
The margin of victory for Grace Park,
who won the 2004 LPGA Vare Trophy
for the lowest scoring average on tour.
Grace finished at 69.99. Lorena Ochoa
was second at 70.02. It should be noted
that Annika Sorenstam had a 68.70
scoring average, but did not complete
enough rounds to qualify for the Vare.


81
The age of the oldest
person (Milwaukee
pro Dick Lynch) to
file an entry for last
year's USGA Men's
Open; he didn't show
up, but maybe this
year.,


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E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


DPAl(r OR








- 'T I F T ,


Suwannee

Continued From Page 1B

the second round. Tom
Cheek also pinned his man.
Jared Sullivan lost by a pin
to the Baker wrestler.
Corey Riley went unop-
'posed at 105 to start the
slugfest for Suwannee with
six free points. Levi Wain-
wright was next, wrestling
in the 119 class. Levi's op-
ponent was a girl! After few
moments of initial discom-
posure, Levi easily pinned
his female opponent in the
first round.
Caleb Wainwright was
also unopposed. At the end
of three matches, Suwannee
was up 18-0.
David Sanders wrestled
for Suwannee next in the
125 class. Sanders ended the
match early with a technical
fall when his score reached
16-0. The five points
Sanders earned sent Suwan-
nee's team score to 23-0.
Tyler Townsend fought for
Suwannee in the 132 weight
class. Townsend fought


hard, falling backwards and
almost losing to a pin. But
Townsend muscled his way
out of it and threw his oppo-
nent. The match went back
and forth. But Townsend
went over backwards again
and was finally pinned in the
third round. It was an excit-
ing match. The loss gave
Taylor their only points of
the evening. The score went
to 23-6.
Peter Kind wrestled next
for Suwannee in the 137 di-
vision. Kind's opponent
stalled for a good 10 minutes
with an injury that miracu-
lously disappeared as soon
as the match restarted. But
the stalling tactics didn't
work. Kind wrestled aggres-
sively and gave the audience
a great show, pinning his
man in the last seconds of
the match.
William McCrimon was
up next in the 142 class. Mc-
Crimon pinned his man in
the first seconds of the sec-
ond round.
Lee Laxton pinned his















- ;P-.,





- , , ,.
;-, '- ' . ,
3' "


.',, " , . � ,


William MCrimon pinned his opponent- Photo: Janet Shrader-eccafc
William McCrimon pinned his opponent - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


man in the second round. Af-
ter nine matches. Suwannee
was up 41-6.
Greg Boyle man-handled
his opponent, pinning him
easily in the second round.
Octavious Granville wres-
tled for the Dogs in the 172
class. Granville is usually
sidelined because this is Pre-
ston Hart's position. It was
fun to watch a new face en-
ter the ring. After the first
round Granville was up 2-0.
Granville fought hard and
almost pinned his man early
in the third round. The
crowd was on its feet urging
Granville to pin his oppo-
nent. And in the last sec-
onds, he did! Granville's
first varsity appearance and
he pinned his man. The
score for Suwannee went to
53-6.
Casey Osborne almost
pinned his man in the last
seconds of the first round,
got him down again and al-
most pinned him in the sec-
ond round, lost it but finally
pinned his Baker opponent
in the third round.
Justin Mowls and Michael
Wright went unopposed.
Kris Kerns was Suwannee's
final wrestler and heavy-
weight. Kern's opponent
must have out-weighed him
by 40 pounds. But Kerns is
strong and fast and manhan-
dled his opponent to the mat
for a pin in the first round.
Suwannee's final score was
77-6.
The Bulldog wrestlers
take on GHS at home Jan.
25. Come out and watch the
show. Dog wrestling is for
real. Forget, the WWF and
enjoy some live action in the
Dog House. The JV take the
mat at 6:30 p.m. and the var-
sity starts at 7:30 p.m. Go
Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext.. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.s'chrad-
er@gaflnews. com.


T' "-' - 0 -
. .

,, .-,- . .
,- / :,i. .


'Ad 33?A3


;g, ,,


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Greg Boyle gets ready to pin his Baker opponent - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


-- .
,.-o P J "e... -,ec f.-



William McCrimon - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


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Kris e gt t

Kris Kerns gets the pin - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


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Clay Mott wrestled for the JV against Baker and pinned his man. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico



Now THAT'S Something


To Smile About!























"F ish you could have been there

Thank you, Wanda Johnson of Live Oak

for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!




P.O. Box 370. Live Oak, FL 32064, 136997JRS-F
P.O.~~~~~rp Box 370 , Lv a, F 201!., a n-


David Sanders pinned his opponent - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico



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_,r


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_ ____________~,~____~,__


PAGE 3B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY JANUARY 21 20 5


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Suwannee wrestling tops Baker


Levi pins his . . . man. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Levi Wainwright, wrestling in the 119 weightclass, had to wrestle this female from Baker. He pinned
her in the first round. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
~""~s, -" , ..1


Peter Kind wrestled varsity for the first time this year.
match. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


He pinned his man in the last seconds of the


Casey Osborne sets his Baker opponent up for the pin. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Today's Weather


I Frl Sat Sun Mon Tue
1/21 1/22 1/23 - 1/24 1/25


70/48
Partly cloudy. High
near 70F. Winds W
at 5 to 10 mph.

Sunrise Sunset
7:28 AM 5:59 PM


73/47
Mostly Cloudy.
Highs in the low 70s
and lows in the up-
per 40s.
Sunrise Sunset
7:27 AM 6:00 PM


'c-


50/26
Considerably cloudy,
,windy. Highs in the
low 50s and lows in
the mid 20s.
Sunrise Sunset
7:27 AM 6:01 PM


, '



51/30
Abundant sunshine.
Highs in the low 50s
and lows in the low
30s.
Sunrise Sunset
7:27 AM 6:02 PM


63/39
Abundant sunshine.
Highs in the low 60s
and lows in the up-
per 30s.
Sunrise Sunset
7:26 AM 6:03 PM


r' W ao Ccrab-o rt HaIor Loto.Wn Lie
'". J^r B Stomrs r fc and about riorneuw m rust hkp ojffs Loo- tfar us& ea-h wr4 in "Es. paper- .


Florida At A Glance


Jacksonville
S 67/50


Moon Phases


First
Jan 17


Full
Jan 25


Last New
Feb 2 Feb 8


UV Index

Fn 1'21 4 Moderate

Sat 1,22 3 Moderate
Sun 1 23 4 Moderate

Mon 1!24 5 Moderate

Tue 1.'25 5 Moderale
The UV Index is measured on a 0-11
number scale, with a higher UV Index
showing the need for greater skin pro-
tection.0 i ' '~:,~Bgl11


Cl.ear..,aler 70 51 sunny Lalk Cily 6-
Crestview 71 49 pt sunny Madison 69
Daytona Beach 68 47 sunny Melbourne 68
Fort Lauderdale 71 56 sunny Miami 71
Fort Myers 73 48 sunny N Smyrna Beach 68
Gainesville 70 45 sunny Ocala 71
Hollywood 73 53 sunny Orlando 70
Jacksonville 67 50 mst sunny Panama City 69
Key West 73 62 sunny Pensacola 69
Lady Lake 69 47 sunny Plant City 71

National Cities


39 pt sunny
4 sunny
23 sn shower
56 ptsunny
30 pt sunny


houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


'I\k

Orlando
70/51 .


Tampa. .
70/52







Miami
71/56


.-,cl r


-4 rrml junn,
49 pt sunny
47 sunny
56 sunny
47 sunny
47 sunny
51 sunny
54 pt sunny
54 pt.sunny
50 sunny


61 clouay
53 mst sunny
56 sunny
17 snow
11 sunny


Pompano Beach 71
Port Charlotte 73
Saint Augustine 65
Saint Petersburg 69
Sarasota 70
Tallahassee 67
Tampa 70
Titusville 68
Venice 71
W Palm Beach 70


phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
ptsunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny


53 pt sunny
49 pt sunny
51 rain
36 cloudy
16 mst sunny


@2005 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Toni CheeI' pinned his mian in the ie."a'l/lIr.tilhit I1i-
/isionr of Ihe J%/ i alch 'ri , .-,' " 't l:': 1:1: .
'.,










Kris Kerns thoist-, his
heavier opponent up
jnd then sIlnms h1111m
dow n . IP'|,,|,, in [


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Free event sponsored by Women's Advantage


Tuesday, January 25, 2005 Noon to 1pm
Live Oak Garden Club, 11th Street, Live Oak
(Light lunch will be provided.)

Guest Speaker:

Joyce Cortes, MD
Shands Medical Group of Live Oak

Reservations required. Space is limited.


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HealthCare
shands.org


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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


PAGE 4BR


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Suwannee wrestling tops Baker





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Tyler Townsend tries to get the upper hand on his Baker opponent. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


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- . _ , .


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. .. . - - , - ,-
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Octavious Granville wrestles for the first time in a varsity match against Baker. Granville pinned his
man in the last seconds of the match. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico

-._- - . .,,--


Lee Laxton manhandles his opponent. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
". . ' . .. - g-


Casey Osborne pinned his man ' .. ,' .class in the third period.
Case , Oson pn, hsan,,,,e,3, eiht'- classrpe ,,'
Casey Osborne pinned his man in the 173 weight class in the third period.


- --
- r-

;.. -a-,- -..---.- --

Octavious Granville wrestling in the 162 weight class. Granville got his chance because Preston Hart
was out sick. Hart usually wrestles in that class. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Johnson


Continued From Page 1B

attend the University of Mi-
ami before the football sea-
son started, made the Cali-
fornia/Florida Bowl All-Star
team and now, Defensive
Player of the Year for Class
3A-5A in the Gainesville
Sun's area.
Johnson made 61 tackles
playing as a defensive cor-
nerback for Suwannee. He
had 12 pass break-ups, two


forced fumbles and two in-
terceptions.
Those statistics may not
sound all that impressive,
but most of Suwannee's op-
ponents did their best to
avoid his side of the field
whether he was catching a
punt or defending a pass re-
ceiver. Johnson had the abil-
ity to blow away the opposi-
tion with his blazing speed.
Johnson runs the 40-yard
dash in 4.4 seconds.


Offensively, as a wide re-
ceiver, Johnson caught 39
passes for 579 yards and
three Dog touchdowns.
Look for Johnson as he at-
tempts to win the state title
in the 110 high hurdles and
competes for the Bulldog
track team.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.corn.


,


( jct your sp/eci/l SOleCO/te ith a

seet lo e //ote tiffs alel/tie's Daf.


Please call M y rtle P arn e lla - 3 231 34 r 3 4 -7 68


Dealies onayFbrar 10a


a~1a: B6IM'i~ Vnl
"a , ' a ,','


PAGE 5B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 21 5







PAGE 6B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


as.i


v"r. '',. t."










#3 Kelsey Bowen, one of Suwannee's strong forwards.
- Photo: Paul Buchanan


,a,, , 1 .*,







#13 Katie Prevatt scored the only goal scored for the Lady Dogs
against Pensacola Tate. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


Defender #5 Candace Goodman - Photo: Paul Buchanan


A !~d.*~r


#15 Brook Ross was injured during the first game of the tourna-
ment. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


#16 Katherine Wilding was in the kicker rotation for the kick-off
after Suwannee tied Faer Palm Coast. hoto: Paul Buchanan
.' -' ?+:-. : . . , ' : �j,-;: - - . . :,' -,,,. ,.-
,,: ~.~ " ',_ ', , * ' - ,,�::": " .." " , , ,. ' . ,--.,,. - ' ,


#17 Amanda Mendez was also injured during the game against
Tate. - Photo: Paul Buchanan


Lady


Continued From Page 1B

game. As both teams set-
tled dowin, a very evenly
played match ensued, nei-
ther team gaining an advan-
tage and the teams went to
half-time tied 0-0. Tate was
able to put in a goal in the
second half on a crossed ball
that the defense couldn't
clear and a Tate attacker
poked it past keeper Alicia
Cash.
Suwannee was able to
knot the game at 1-1 min-
utes later when Katie Prevatt
took a Jenna Jordan pass and
blasted a long shot that beat
the Tate keeper. The game
ended in a 1-1 tie, but tour-
nament rules stated a winner
would be determined on
penalty kicks. The format


was "golden goal" PK's,
which meant pairs of kickers
from each team. would kick
until on, teamhad Oan advan-
tage.
Suwannee had to kick first
and the Tate keeper was able
to come up with the save
and, despite a 'tremendous
diving effort from Cash, the
Tate kicker put her shot in,
so Tate advanced and
Suwannee fell to the loser's
bracket.
The Lady Dogs ' next
match was at 8 a.m. Satur-
day morning against Flagler
Palm Coast, a class 6A
school from Central Florida.
Suwannee would be without
two players injured in the
Tate game, defender Brook
Ross and midfielder Aman-
da Mendez, and the playing


conditions weren't much
better than the night before.
SLu'.iiniec',s defense came
up-big -once igagi irlfntlMii-iig
the opponent to only a hand-
ful of shots that were easily
handled by Cash in goal, but
with six minutes remaining
in the half, Flagler Palm
Coast was able to put in a
goal on a corner kick.
Suwannee was able to con-
tain them for rest of the half,
and for the rest of the game,
but couldn't generate much
on offense. As it looked like
the Lady Dogs would lose
the game, Suwannee was
awarded a 'free kick with
less than two minutes re-
maining. Midfielder Debra
Craig took the kick, which
was about 20 yards out on
the right side of the field,


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and placed the ball into the
upper corner on the left side
of the goal. The keeper
caught the ball, but she had
stepped back into the goal,
giving Suwannee a last sec-
ond 1-1 tie. This game
would also be determined
by penalty kicks, but unlike
the previous night a more
conventional five-kicker ro-
tation was used. Suwan-
nee's kickers, Heather Ben-
son, Candace Goodman,
Katherine Wilding, Ashley
Harris and Kelsey Bowen,
along with Cash in goal,
took it to the last kick, but
ended up losing 3-2 on
PK's.
After these two physically
and emotionally draining
matches, Suwannee was to
face Panama City Arnold,
last season's district 1-3A
champion, in their final
match. Arnold and Suwan-
nee were very evenly
matched and the Lady Dogs
were able to get several


shots on goal in the first
half, but the Arnold keeper
kept coming upwith .saves
and kept them off fhe score,
board. The defense han-
dled the Arnold offense
well, but late in the first half
an Arnold attacker got off a
long shot from the left side
of the field that found the
right-side net of the goal.
The goal energized the
Arnold players, and the fa-
tigue of playing three games
in less than 24 hours was
starting to show as the Lady
Dogs offense was unable to
generatemany quality shots.
In the second half Arnold
was able to keep the Lady
Dogs from getting anything
started offensively and the
game ended with a 0-1 re-
sult.
Suwannee head coach
Kathy Wood was very happy
with her team's performance
during the tournament.
Wood said: "I think we real-
ly surprised some people


this weekend. We knew we
had a good team, but we
wanted to see how we fared
against some. of. the better
teams in the area. We were
able to hang with two very
powerful teams who were
one and two classes above
us. This was exactly the
kind of experience we want-
ed to gain heading into the
district playoffs."
Debra Craig was named
Player of the Week for her
outstanding play at the hold-
ing midfielder position and
for her powerful and accu-
rate corner kicks and free
kicks.
Suwannee plays three
non-district games this
week before hosting the dis-
trict 2-3A tournament here
next week. Suwannee will
play the #4 seed at 7 p.m.
Tuesday (January 25) night.
Come out and support the
Lady Dogs as they go for
the second district title in a
row. Go Lady Dogs!


Great Steaks!
S Killer Ribs

and Ice Cold Beer
Lunch and Dinner 7 Days A Week
US 90 West at 1-75 Lake City


t


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DIIHE GRIL


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


PAGE 6B


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W.--110,""9' " "







tI II l.'I, I uN ,l I,. I, W4DEL

CHURCH


It is not enough to be right


Derek Maul,
Sunbelt Newspapers,
maulhall@aol.com
My neighborhood is full of
children. I love to see them
play. You have to keep your
eyes open, though, because
they tend to dart out into the
street.
Just the other day, jogging, I
watched two small boys run
directly into the path of a ve-
hicle. Fortunately it was my
neighbor Richard and he was
hardly doing more than 20.
Even so he had to have his
wits about him to avoid an ac-
cident.
This is one reason it scares
me so much to see people dri-
ve as if such caution need not
apply to them.
Sunday I passed the exact


same spot on my way to the
store. Like Richard, I tend to
stay just below the posted 25
mph. The street winds some,
people park on the side of the
road, plus there are so many
children, bikes, joggers and
pets.
A large SUV came up be-
hind me - seemingly out of
nowhere. Impatient, the driver
veered to the left and - unbe-
lievably - passed my car be-
fore accelerating to the next
intersection. Instead of watch-
ing the road he was snarling at
me. I pointed to the speed sign
and shook my head.
This is where it gets weird.
The man - probably in his ear-
ly 50s, climbed out of his ve-
hicle and stalked back to my
window so he could berate me


for driving too slow!
Incredulous, I stayed behind
the wheel and listened to his
complaint. I did, however, feel
compelled to point out that his
Daytona 500 move was ill-
considered and unsafe. "You
used poor judgment," I re-
sponded. "Please don't drive
so recklessly in my neighbor-
hood."
This observation evidently
hit too close to home. In-
censed, Mr. Impatient reached
into his reservoir of vocabu-
lary and picked the filthiest
word he could think of (I don't
believe he had to dig too
deep). "You're a 'bleeping' id-
iot," he sneered, with the air of
one who has offered an ir-
refutable argument. He
stormed off.


I'm telling this story be-
cause on some level I know I
should have handled the situa-
tion with more grace. The man
was obviously angry, yet I did
nothing to help him with his
problem. He evidently be-
.lieves his anger is the fault of
other people. I imagine he
.. amed that segment of his
bad mood on the idiot who
slowed him down.
I wasn't rude; I didn't raise
my voice; I responded to his
bizarre behavior with a mix-
ture of concerned disapproval
and friendly censure. Yet he
was my peer, a middle-aged
man just a few years older
Than me. Instead of building
community all I achieved was
hostility and alienation.
He is angry, I am sad.


I wonder how many en-
counters we have with other
people that subtly yet relent-
lessly increase the distance be-
tween us? I wonder how often
we exchange the opportunity
to build community for the
transitory satisfaction of a bet-
ter place in line, a cheap shot,
a laugh at a stranger's expense
or the chance to score a politi-
cal point?
I know it was right for me to
ask the other driver to be more
careful. After all, he initiated
the conversation. Accountabil-
ity is important, and the child
who ran in front of my careful
neighbor would likely be dead
had he repeated the stunt with
Mr. Impatient playing race-car
on the wrong side of the street.
However, I wish I could


have earned his friendship in
the process. It is not enough to
be right, there is so much more
to living in community than
that.
Columnist Derek Maul is a
Tampa based writer. You can
reach him at
maulhall@aol.com, or check
out more of his work at Derek-
Maul.com

And hope does
not disappoint us,
because God has
poured out his
love into our
hearts by the
Holy Spirit, whom
he has given us.
~ Romans 5:5


CHURCH CALENDAR


V.I.B.E. - Youth
Ministries of the Live
Oak Church of God will
hold a barbecue pork
dinner fund-raiser
Jan. 21
V.I.B.E. - Youth Ministries
of the Live Oak Church of
God will hold a barbecue
pork dinner fund-raiser from
11 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Friday,
Jan. 21 at the church at 9828
US 129, South, 1/4 mile
south of the library. Menu:
barbecue pork, baked beans,
cole slaw, roll and dessert.
Cost: $5. All orders need to
be made by Wednesday, Jan.
19. For delivery, call 386-
362-2483.
FoodSource
A Christian based Christ-
ian food cooperative, is in
your area! Stretch your food
dollars! With the help of ded-
icated volunteers, Food-
Source is able to provide
quality foods at low prices
while promoting Christian
values and volunteerism in
your community. This is
NOT a needy only program;
it is tor EVERVYO'NE. There
are no qualifications to par-
ticipate! FoodSource accepts
cash, checks, Visa, Master-
card, Debit, EBT and money
orders. Menu is subject to
change! This months tenta-
tive menu is: whole chicken;
beef stew (all meat stew),
Ammons Brothers country
sausage, bologna, fresh eggs.
cheese, Quiznos broccoli
cheese soup (family sized),
oatmeal or cream of wheat,
7-layer sensation dessert.
peanut butter, 16-bean soup
mix, fresh tangelos, fresh
grapefruit, fresh broccoli,
fresh apples, fresh bananas,
fresh onions and fresh five-
pound bag of potatoes.Pick
Up Date: Jan. 22. Regular
package price - $a5. Meat
package available $25. Ten-
tative meat box menu:
boston butt, whole chicken
beef roast, hot dogs, ham-
burger patties and breakfast
sausage, TO ORDER AND
PAY ,. BY
CREDIT/DEBIT/CHECK
.CARD, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-832-5020. PICK UP
ORDER AT LOCAL SITE.
For questions or to order,
call your local coordinator.
Live Oak: Live Oak Church
of God - 386-362-2483;
Wellborn United Methodist
Church -, 386-963-5023;
Ebenezer AME Church -
386-362-6383 or 386-364-
4323 or 386-362-4808;
Jasper: 386-792-3965'; White
Springs: 386-752-2196 or
386-397-1228; Bell: 352-
463-7772 or 352-463-1963;
Lake City 386-752-7976 or
FoodSource toll-free at 800-
832-5020 or visit website at
www.foodsource.org for
questions or to become a lo-
cal host site.
Community Christian
Center Food Assistance
Program
Community Christian Cen-
ter's Food Assistance an-
nounces the addition of
breads and frozen meats. The
main program is set up on a
co-operative basis which al-
lows it to help others in need


on a weekly basis instead of'
periodic or monthly. The
program is open to.the public
as well. Community Christ-
ian Center is located five
miles west of 1-75 on US 90,
on the north side of the road.
For more info, call 386-
6113. "Faith without works
is dead" James 2:26
Live Oak Church
of God will hold "Prayer
at the Gates
of the City" from
7-9:45 a.m. on Fridays
Live Oak Church of God
will hold "Prayer at the
Gates of the City" every Fri-
day from 7-9:45 a.m., at the
church on 129 South, the
Roundabout and other loca-
tions. Volunteers will be
praying for everyone enter-
ing and leaving the city. Peo-
ple are being blessed and
have called to express their
gratitude for the prayers say-
ing it made a difference in
their lives. Bring your chair
join them each Friday to pray
at the gates of the city. For
more info, call 362-2483.
Word'Aii'et iurci wicl
host a monthly Preserve
Freedom Prayer Rally
Word Alive Church, 11239
SR 51, Live Oak, invites all
churches and the community
to a monthly Preserve Free-
dom Prayer Rally the third
Wednesday of every month
at 7:30 p.m. The prayer focus
will be elections, our federal,
state and local leaders, pend-
ing laws/anmendments, the
Supreme Court, local law en-
forcement personnel, local
schools, administrators and
students, local prisons and
chaplains, terrorism and the
military. If you would like to
submit names of loved ones
involved in any of the above,
please call the church at 386-
362-2092, and/or join us as
"requests, prayer, interces-
sion and thanksgiving is
made for everyone - kings,
and those in authority that
we may live peaceful and
quiet lives in all godliness
and holiness." I Timothy
2:1,2.
St. Luke's Episcopal
Church will hold
ALPHA sessions
Skeptics welcome! St.
Luke's Episcopal Church is
hosting ALPHA, a non-de-
nominational course explor-
ing Christianity in 11
thought-provoking sessions.
Each weekly session begins
with a free dinner, and a
nursery and youth program
are available. ALPHA is
open to anyone, Christian or
non-Christian. Listen, learn,
discuss and discover. Ask
anything! ALPHA is a place
where no questions is too
tough. St. Luke's is located
at 1391 Eleventh Street, just
across from the Coliseum.
They invite everyone to join
them in ALPHA on Wednes-
day evenings at 6:30 p.m.
Call 386-362-1837 for more
info.
First Advent Christian
Church of Live Oak
invites children K-5 to
join SWORD SEEKERS
on Wednesday
The First Advent Christ-


ian Church of Live Oak in-
vites your child (K-5) to join
SWORD SEEKERS, a pro-
gram of crafts, music, games
and Bible study from the
dismissal of school until
5:30 p.m. The program will.
continue on each Wednes-
day that school is in session.
For more info, call the
church office at 386-362-
1802. The Rev. Tim Carver
is pastor of the church locat-
ed at 699 Pinewood Drive,
Live Oak.
Wellborn United
Methodist Church
sponsors "Kid's Time"
on Wednesday
Wellborn United
Methodist Church sponsors
"Kid's Time" on Wednes-
days from 4-6 p.m. at the
fellowship hall on CR 137.
Adult supervision for pro-
grams, games - indoor and
out, age related groups, mu-
sic (maybe they will'do .spe-
cial music for our Sunday
worship service) and of
course we expect the chil-
dren attending to come up
with 'ots' 6 fii"'~hings they
would like to teach.us.The
school bus stops at the fel-
lowship hall and we will
supply transportation for
their return to home at 6
p.m. They will have a short
form for the children to
bring home, "Youth Protec-
tion Policy." Fill in and re-
turn to the "Overseer" (Pas-
tor Tim) who needs the in-
formation that is necessary
for us to have on hand in
case of any kind of emer-
gency. These must be filled
in to protect the children and
the church workers. We will
have snacks and drinks
available for all. Parents are
welcome to visit or work
along with us. We will have
a "prayer warrior" and "fun
master." If you would like to
attend and need transporta-
tion, please call our trans-
portation group - Christine
WhItmore :- 386-963-5289
or the church numbers: Pas-
tor Tim - 386-963-3071; fel-
lowship hall - 386-963-
2154.'All of this is FREE!
FREE! FREE!
Mothers Morning
Out program at First
Presbyterian Church
of Live Oak
The First Presbyterian
Church of Live Oak, 421
White Ave, Live Oak holds
its Mothers Morning Out
program twice a week, Tues-
days and Thursdays from 9
a.m. - 12:30 p.m. The
teacher/director is Elke Day,
Certified Pre-school
teacher/CDA 10 and 20
clock hours. For more info,
call the church office: 386-
362-3199.
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers, is a gathering
of moms for encouragement
and fun. All mothers of chil-
dren from birth to age 5 are
invited to attend. The meet-
ings are the second, and
fourth Tuesday of the
month, September through
May, from 9:30 a.m. to 12
noon. They are held at the


First Baptist Church on
Howard St. in Live Oak. For
more information, please
call 386-362-1583.
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys Meeting
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys meeting will be
held on the first Saturday of
every month at the SRRC
Arena in Branford at 5:30
p.m. The meetings also will
be held every second Satur-
day of every month at the
Suwannee County Coliseum
Arena in Live Oak at 5:30
p.m.
Coming to terms
with your divorce
Christ-Centered, lay-led
support group and a safe
confidential place to help
people deal with issues and
struggles they encounter.
This 9-week course is of-
fered by First Baptist
Church of Live Oak. If you
know someone who may be
interested in divorce recov-
ery, call 386-362-1583 for
more information.
Broken aince Church
SFirst Amlrerican Indi
Church in this area, open to


all persons, 9 miles south on
US 129, Live Oak. Church
services.at 10 and 11 a.m.
Call Broken Lance Church
at 386-364-5998 or 386-
364-6547 for more informa-
tion.
Every Wednesday
Noon Day Services at
Ebenezer AME Church
Ebenezer AME Church
holds noon day services
each Wednesday for one
hour a Praise, Prayer and
Deliverance service. All are
invited to attend and enjoy.
preaching, teaching, testify-
ing, gospel music, singing
and more. Lunch is always
served by the Ebenezer's
Church staff. The Rev.
Clifton Riley, pastor, Sister
Sonja Riley, coordinator,
Midweek Prayer and Bible
Study at 6 p.m., also on
Wednesday. Please consid-
er this an open invite to join
us in any of these services
and become acquainted with
the living Father. Read and
study His Word with us.
Practice Godly living as you
startto' put 'lis Word 'rito
your daily living. Don't


meet us there, beat us there
and let's lift up the name of
the Lord! If you live in the
city and do not have a
church to call home, seek
shelter with us, a 'spirit
filled church on the corner'
of Houston and Parshley
Street. We look forward to
Nothing less than a mighty
move of God during each of
these services. Every Sun-
day morning at 9:30 a.m.
Church School is in progress
followed by the morning
worship service at 11 a.m.
Wanted - Wanted
- Wanted!
Women who are interested
in being a part of a growing
ministry. The Live Oak
Pregnancy Crisis Center is
open and we are in need of
women to volunteer for var-
ious jobs. This is an excel-
lent opportunity to be a
blessing to others in need
and also a place to receive a
blessing. If this sounds like
something you would be in-
terested in please come by
the Live Oak Center at 112
Piedmont St. on aiiy Friday
between 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.


naby jCoutest


Presented by Live Oak Publications


OQCtest


A lost
'sOlable


All entries
must be
received by
Feb. 28


s:.


ur baby will have a
chance to win


one of four prize packages


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PAGE 7B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 21 5


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PAGE 8B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


E 7otLona


an


?ie muumannee semnorat


(386) 362-1734


,291,741s-


Beatv Auto Sales

Located next door to Beaty's Truck Parts
Off Hwy. 90W. - Live Oak
386-364-4110 ~ 386-364-3206
Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 12 p.m.-5 p.m.



Jiff Food Stores

LIVE OAK * WELLBORN * MAYO * BRANFORD
* DOWLING PARK

STORE ON NORTH OHIO OPEN 24 HOURS
"The Store Around The Corner From Where You Live"129145
i 14j SF


North Florida Printing Co., Inc.
P.O. Drawer 850,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Edward Howell, owner 362-1080 FLA. * WATS 1-800-431-1034 129147JSF


Duncan Tire & Auto
"Complete One Stop Service For bour Vehicle"
jph mmlsxl� LENA. DUNCAN
362-4743
S 422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
www.marketplace24.com
129159DH-F


TO;i dvertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


Howard Street Dry Clean

Quality Laundry and Dry Cleaning
* Same Day Service *


705 West Howard Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064


(386) 364-5211
'* _____ ' _______ 129164JS-F


SJORDAN AGENCY, INC.

SLife * Home * Car * Business

Joe Jordan & Bruce Tillman
203 E. Howard St. Branford
362-4724 935-6385
12916eJS-F




Dixie Grill
"Specializing in Steaks & Seafood"
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (WITH VEGETABLE)
Open 7 Days - 5:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
364-2810 CATERING SERVICE & PRIVATE PARTIES
129143JS-F


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


ADVENT CHRISTIAN


BIXLER MEMORIAL
ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Advent Christian Village, Dowling Park
Rev. Steve Lawson & Rev. Rosemary
Humbles & Rev. John Harper
SUNDAY
Christian Education Hour.................9:30 am
Morning Worship.......................... 10:45 am
Evening Service.......................... 6:00 pm
129035JS-F
FIRST ADVENT
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
699 Pinewood Street
(386) 362-1802
Rev. Tim Carver, Pastor
SUNDAY
Sunday School..............................9:15 am
Morning Service.............................. 10:30 am
Evening Service..........................6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Midweek Service...............................6:30 pm
129036JS-F


VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH
10475 State Rd. 51-Approx. 3 miles South
Jerry Ownes - Pastor
(386) 362-6357(386)362-5313
SUNDAY
Sunday School....... ......................... 10:00 am
Worship Service........................ 11:00 am
Evening Worship..............................7:00 pm
1" Sun. Morning Men's Breakfast 8:00 am
1ST & 3RD Monday Visitation 7:00 pm
2nd Friday Night Ladies Meeting 7:00 pm
(Quilting)
Sunday Evening
Children's Choir................................. 5:00 pm
Adult Choir........................................6:00 pm

WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Bible Study.....................6:45 pm
Master Clubs (Children's - Youth).....6:45 pm
SNursery Available All Services
S "Where there is life, there is growth"
129037JS-F

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF DOWUNG PARK
"Sharing the Joy of Jesus"
Rev. Shawn Johnson - Pastor
11274 235th Lane
(In Dowling Park on Hwy. 250)
Live Oak, FL 32060
or 6) 658236 386)658-3715
E-Mail: fbcdp@hotmail.com
www.dowlingparkbaptist.org
SUNDAY
Team Kids & Adult Life Study.....................9:45 am
W orship Service.......................................... 11:00 am
Evening Bible
Exploration Services.................................... 6:00 pm
* Nursery Available all Services
SPre-K to 2nd Grade Junior Church conducted
during 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship
Service
MONDAY
"Quilters for Christ"..................................... 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Mid Week Prayer Service.......................6:00 pm
129038JS-F


SUWANNEE STATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
Everybody Welcomed
3289 101st Lane, Live Oak, FL 32060
Bro. Wilbur Wood, (386) 362-2553
SUNDAY
Sunday School.................................10:00 am
Morning Worship............................. 11:00 am
Choir Practice... .................. ...... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship...........................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Worship..............................7:00 pm
Children & Youth Program................7:00 pm


BAPTIS (SOUTHERN)

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of U.S. 90 and Church Street
362-1583
Rev. Phillip Herrington
Minister of Students/Children
Rev. Clare Parker, Minister to Senior Adults
Rev. Alan Lott, Music and Worship
SUNDAY
Early W orship.........................................8:30 am
Sunday School..........................................9:45 am
Morning Worship.................................. 11:00 am
Live Broadcast on WLVO 106.1 FM
Discipleship Training............................. 6:00 pm
Evening Worship...........................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Music & Missions for Children................6:00 pm
Crossfire (Students)........................... 7:00pm
Mid-Week Bible Study...................7:00 pm
129039JS-F

PINEMOUNT BAPTIST CHURCH
US 129 South (Across from the S&S Store)
.Post Office Box 129-McAlpin, Florida
(386) 362-5634
Nursery provided for each worship service
Worship and Fellowship Opportunities of the Week
Pastor: Greg Vickers
SUNDAY
Bible School........................... ...... 9:45 am
Morning Worship..................................... 11:00 am
Choir Practice.................................. 5:30 pm
Evening Worship....................................... 6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Night Supper..................................6:00 pm
AWANA Club.............................................. 6:30 pm
Prayer Meeting......................... ....... 7:00 pm
THURSDAY
F.A.I.T.H. Ministry............................. 6:30pm
Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together... but encouraging one another.
Hebrews 10:25
129398,JS-F

WESTWOOD BAPTIST
920 11th Street, SW (Newbern Road)
362-1120
Pastor - Dr. Jimmy Deas
Rev. Jim McCoy
SUNDAY
Sunday School...............................9:30 am
Morning Worship Service............10:55 am
Discipleship Training
Adults & Youth........................5:10 pm
Children's Choirs...........................5:00 pm
Evening Worship Service.............6:30 pm
TUESDAY
Prayer Breakfast-Dixie Grill..........6:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Youth Group GA's, RA's, Mission Friends
& Youth Group............................6:30 pm
Mid-Week Service......................6:30 pm
Adult Choir Rehearsal ...................7:30 pm
129040JS-F

ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH
5203 County Road 795
362-3101- Church
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................... 9:45 am
Morning Worship...................... 11:00 am
Church Training...............................6:00 pm
Evening Worship...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Service.................................... 7:00 pm
129043JS-F

MOUNT OLIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Growing Together As Family"
5314 98th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060
(From US 90, take 137N to Hogan Road and follow signs)
Pastors Dan Allan and Brent Kuykendall
www.mtolivebaptistchurch.com
SUNDAY
Small Groups (Sunday School)......... 9:45 am
Celebration Worship..........................11:00 am
"G-Force" Children's
Family Worship................................. 6:00 pm
Youth Choir........................................ 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Supper.................................... 5:30 pm
Kidzclub/Graded Choirs....................6:00 pm
Adult Discipleship................ .....6:30 pm
Student "Impact" Worship.................:30 pm
Celebration Choir Rehearsal..............7:30 pm


BAPTIST SOUTHERNR)


Jesus tells us in the Bible that, "...whenever two of you
on earth agree about anything you pray for, it will be
done for you by my Father in Heaven. For where
two or three come together in my name, I am
there with them." These are such comforting O
verses for us to know that God is with us
whenever we are praying and meeting with fellow
believers. However, this verse by no means
denotes that God is not with us when we are
praying alone, because God is always with us
and He has told us that He would never leave us.
or forsake us. .
In this verse, I believe Jesus is stressing how
important it is for us to continue meeting and
praying together. Going to church services,
attending various religious gatherings, or meeting
together as a family to pray are all good and honored by our
Father in Heaven. Building each other up and strengthening our faith
are very important and necessary for us to live a victorious life.

For where two or three come together
in my name, I am there with them.
Good News Bible Matthew 18:20


EPISCOPAL
ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
11th and Coliseum Streets
Rev. Don Woodrum, Rector, 362-1837
SUNDAY
Sunday School...................................9:45 am
Worship................................ 9:00 & 11:00 am
WEDNESDAY
Holy Communion...........................10:00 am
& 6:00 pm
THURSDAY
Holy Communion...........................7:00 am
129116JS-F


CHURCH
Pastor Gill Roser 362-7800
Gold Kist Blvd. (across from armory)

SUNDAY
Sunday School.............................. 10:00 am
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Evening Worship............................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Service.........................7:30 pm
129120JS-F


To advertise on this page,

please call Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


129029JS-F


" t


WELLBORN BAPTIST CHURCH
"A warm place in a Cold World."
Rev. Louis Gooch
U.S. 90 West & Lowe Lake Rd., Wellborn
Church Phone 963-2231
SUNDAY
Early Worship................................... 8:30 am
Sunday Bible Study........................................... 9:45 am
Second Morning Worship................................ 11:00 am
Evening W orship..............................................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Youth............................................................. 7:00 pm
Prayer Worship................................ ...... .....7:00 pm
"Come Worship With Us"
129044DH-F
SHADY GROVE
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
15 miles West Hwy.90 -
2 Miles Down River Road
Rev. David Hingson, 658-2547
SUNDAY
Sunday School..................................9:45 am
Worship.................................. .......1:00 am
Church Training.................................6:00 pm
Evening Worship...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Bible Study........................7:00 pm
129046JS-F
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST
CHURCH
(386) 362-5239
10413 Hwy. 129 South
Aaron Turner, Pastor
Clay Ross, Music
Hardy Tillman, Awana Commander
SUNDAY
Morning Worship.............................10:30 am
Awana.............................................. 6:00 pm
School of the Scriptures.....................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Care Group........................................7:00 pm
FRIDAY
*Singles Bible Study........................6:30 pm
(First Friday of each month)
SATURDAY
Nursing Home Ministry*
(First & third Saturday of each month)
[A pre-school nursery is provided at each worship service]
"Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting
one another: and so much the more, as you see
the day'approaching" (Hebrews 10:25).
129048JS-F
CATHOLIC
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHOLIC CHURCH
928 East Howard St. U.S. 90 East
, Rev. Michael Pendergraft.;
P.O. Box 1179 Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 364-1108
SUNDAY
Sunday Mass......................................9:00 am
Sunday (Spanish) Mass..................1:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Mass............................7:00 pm
THURSDAY
Thursday Mass...................................9:00 am
FRIDAY
Friday M ass...................... .......... 9:00 am
SATURDAY
Saturday (Vigil) Mass.......................6:00 pm
129114JS-F


"Quality Printing is the
Only Printing Worth
Buying"


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


PAGE 8B


NFCi









FRIDAY, JANUARY21, 2005 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 9B


izzako z


INTERDENOMINATIONAL
MELODY CHRISTIAN CENTER
& Melody Christian Academy K-12
Highway 129 South * Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-4800
Children's Ministry-Youth Ministry-Adults
Services:
Sunday 10:00 am and 6:00 pm
Wednesday 7:00 pm - Adults
Children's Ministry
Revolution Youth Church
Nursery Available All Services
Melody Christian Bookstore - Open daily
Pastor Frank C. Davis 129121J-F


WORD ALIVE CHURCH
11239 State Rd. 51 * Live Oak, FL 32060
Pastor's Dale and Connie Naiman
(386) 294-3100
SUNDAY
S Children's Ministrys........................10:45 am
Worship Service...........................10:45 am
Nursery provided
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study...................................... 7:30 pm
Youth services 2nd & 4th Sundays....6:00 pm
129123JS-F

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
1550 Walker Avenue SE * Live Oak, FL
(386) 208-1345
"A Church on the Move"
Sunday Morning....................... 10:30 am
Wednesday Night... ........................ 7:00 pm
Pastor Wayne Godsmark
Senior Pastor 129124DH-F


NAZARENE
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
915 Church Ave., SW 1 Block So. of Mayo
Road North of High School
Rev. Louis J. Medaris
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................... 9:45 am
Morning Worship............................11:00 am
Evening Worship............................ 6:00 pm
,' ,,-: WEDNESDAY :'
Evening Prayer Meeting....................7:00 pm
129125JS-F



LIVE OAK CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Joseph Schmidt, Minister
Corer of Hamilton and Ohio Aves.
(Hwy. 129 N)
(386) 362-1085 (386) 362-3982
SUNDAY
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Evening Worship.......... ...................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study........................................ 7:00 pm
129126JS-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF CHRIST
Minister: Craig Williams
Home: (386) 362-6409
1497 Irvin (S.R. 51) &
P.O. Box 281 Live Oak, FL 32060
Church: (386) 364-5922
Bible Classes...............................10:00 am
Morning Worship.......................... 11:00 am
Evening Worship..............................6:00 pm
Wednesday Bible Class..................7:00 pm
Featuring Mentoring Program for Youth
129127JS-F
SUWANNEE RIVER
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Rev. Ray Brown
17750 16th Street, Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 842-2446

SERVICES
Sunday School.................................10:00 am
Sunday Morning Worship................ 11:00 am
The distance makes the difference.
12 miles North of CR249, Nobles Ferry Rd.
129352JS-F


PENTECOSTAL
DOWLING PARK
CHURCH OF GOD
658-1158/658-3151
Pastor: Frank D. Jones
SUNDAY
Sunday School......................... ............ 9:45 am
M morning Worship................................... 11:00 am
Children's Church.................................. 11:00 am
Sunday Evening.........................................6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Dinner...................................... 5:30 pm
Family Hour........................................... 7:00 pm
Nursery Provided
129136JS-F
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF GOD
US 129 South
Rev. Fred R. Watson 362-2483
SUNDAY
Sunday School..........................9:45 am
Children's Church..........................10:45 am
Morning Worship.............................10:45 am
Evening Worship...............................6:30 pm
Children Choir................................6:00 pm
Sunday Evening Childrens Church...6:30 pm
Wednesday Night -
Family Training Hour...............7:00 pm
Wednesday Night Dinner...................5:45 pm
Children's Classes, V.I.B.E. Youth Church,
Adult Bible Study129131J
129131JS-F
LIVE OAK FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
13793 76th St. (Mitchell Rd.)
Live Oak, FL
Rev. Donald Suggs
362-2189
SUNDAY


Sunday School....'.9...................... 9
Children's Church........................10
Morning Worship............................. 10
Evening W orship.............................6:
Wednesday Night.............................7
1:
REFUGE PENTECOSTAL
TABERNACLE
12280 Co. Rd. 137
(386) 688-2791
Wellborn, FL
Pastor: Darin Wilson
SUNDAY
S inda y '...'.' .. ..... . . ... ..... ....... 10:(
Sunday Eveming...',;............. ........6
Wednesday Night............................ 7::


METHODIST

WELLBORN METHODIST
12005 CR 137
963-3071, 963-2154
Pastor Timothy Plant
Music: Geiger Family
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................ 10:(
W orship............................................11 :(
Prayer Request Boxes
at Jiffy, Annettes, All Springs and a
Dumpsters
PRAYER INTERCESSION
Tuesday at the altar
at 7 a.m., noon, and at 7 p.m.
CHURCH OPEN ALL DAY
Everyone Welcome
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study......................................7:00
1293!

PINE GROVE UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
5300 CR 136A, Live Oak
**Need Panist/Organlst*
Phone (386) 362-5595
SUNDAY
Sunday School.............................
M morning Worship.............................1
Evening W orship.............................
TUESDAY
Men's Digging Deeper Bible Study..i
Women for Christ Bible Study..........
WEDNESDAY
Mid-Week Service.............................
"COME WORSIIIP WITHIN US
I


PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
U.SA.
421 White Avenue, Live Oak
(386) 362-3199
Rev. Pedro Rivera
SUNDAY
Sunday School.... ............... ..... .... 9:45 am
W orship............................................. 11:00 am
Communion First Sunday of every month
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study................................ 7:00 pm
129133DH-F


SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST

LIVE OAK SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Pastor
Brandon White
364-6540

SATURDAY SERVICES
Sabbath School........9:30 am......Bible Study
Worship Service ..................:............ 1,1:00 am
Call for more information on Prayer Meeting
15451 129 South, Live Oak, FL
129134JS-F


UNITED METHODIST

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
311 S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak * 362-2047
Pastor: Jim Wade
"COME WORSHIP WITH US"

SUNDAY
Early W orship.................................... 8:30 am
Sunday School Assembly..................9:30 am
Sunday School................................... 9:45 am
Worship................................ 11:00 am
Youth Fellowship........................... 4:30 pm

TUESDAY
Children's.Choir................................ 5:00 pm


)0 pm fA-D * AE i
30 pm Bible Study.................................. 10:00am
12 -F Youth Fellowship............................. :00 pm
Chancel Ringers (Adult)....................6:00 pm
Men's Chorus.................................. 7:00 pm
Chancel Choir..................................7:30 pm
r 129141JS-F
NEW HARMONY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
10 am Phone (386) 776-1806
)0 am
SUNDAY
it Sunday Worship..:.......................... 9:30 am
Bible Study.....................................10:30/am

WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study...........................10 am
129158JS-F

p.m. To place your church
on this page, please
call Myrtle Parnell at
F (386) 362-1734
ext. 103


H4ae pow A fftq PerPsn?


Are you usually a happy person? Do others see you as cheerful and
content, and do they enjoy being around you? These may seem to,
be easy questions for us to answer; however, we should be
aware that those around us may see us quite differently from


how we see ourselves.
Happiness could be defined as a feeling of peace, O
contentment and well-being, and the absence of
disappointment and sadness. We are living in a world where
good, as well as bad things are happening to us and around
us all the time, and the way we handle these different
situations helps to develop our attitude. Developing a
complete trust in God for the joys and disappointments in
life will not only help to improve our outlook, but will
draw us closer to our Lord and help to make our lives
more pleasurable and less stressful.
Although we may not be able to control the unpleasant
things of life, our faith and reliance on God will help us
accept those things that we cannot change. God wants
only the very best for us, and in return, He is only
asking that we love and trust Him.
Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for
his help, whose hope is in the Lord his God.
K.J. V Psalms 146:5


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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Friday Evening January 21, 2005

WTXLABC 8 Simple Savages Hope Fail Less Than J 20 0Local LO:.ii |L:ocal Local
WCTVICBS Joan of Arcadia JAG CSI Lc.al Laie Show Late Lale
WTWC/NBC Lalelin Third Walchh Medical Invesligation Local Tonigh Show Conan
WTLH/FOX Berni- Ma Bernie Ma Johnny Zero Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Biographv ,, Arieicnll Ju.i,_____ Biography_
AMC De-aith Wih 3 Thre Omen l. CluL, Prala Sunr... al Island
CMT lulkMlalta TV Great Ball ol Fire In The r.:.rneri .1jMu.I:
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ESPN PGA Tour NJB.A Frida., Coa.i T Co.-[
ESPN2 NBA Frda, Coast To Coast Figure Saing LCal
FAM She Ge-s Whai She Wants Who.s Whose The -"h( Clu' Faily Mailer-
FOOD Emerl Live Insile Dis. $-10 A Day Kiir:hen Ac'complishel Iron _ne-.r, _-merlI L.ive
FX Fear Facior Fear FacFtor Fear Facior Fear Facior Cops C.,ops
Keri Russell Skeet Ulrich Sun Jan 30 9/8c

Magic Days -CBS

HGTV D Travis TBA TBA Pant |Chi- D Travis
LIFE Her Hidden Truih Sex Lies & Oblsesio Wlr.re , What Should You Do'
MTV Real World XV ITBA PiPmp My
SCI Siarqate SG-1 Siargate Allan.tis Bartleslar Galactic3 Slargale SG-I-1 Stargate Alla ntis
TBS Friends Friends Divine Secrels ol the Ya Ya Sisterhocod Sle:nicnn,
TCM Court-r.lanial nt Billy Mitchell The Pa'.nbrc.er Cr,, Terror
TLC Ov.erhiau Orhaln au O.raulin .erha .erhaaulin
TNT Ertlraprnient Eniraprnenl r.lurder At 160Ci
USA Mrl.nk Monk Monk Law & Or.ler S'VL Mc.In

, Oi The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Unscripted A Big Steaming Pile of
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Saturday Evening January 22, 2005
- I I1 II I S II
WTXiAB Aladdin Desperate Housewive Local Local Local Local
I The Will Without A Trace 48 Hours Local Local Local Local
: NfB Law & Order Law & Order Cl Law & Order SVU Local SNL
jWTLH/Fx Cops Cops America's Most Wante Local Local MAD TV Local Local

A&E Cil, C, ntir-rnal Cold Case FiPes r.l- . |meran .i r,: C , C'.11'rinf:denil.
AMC Hal. '.-e-r Resurrcltion Hall:'.v'ee 4 Hall:.een 5
CMT Greail eal o1 Fire r[.luiKrn.ma Slt iacl Cr:.:.r,:4'n id.er In Ithe t.lo
DISN Brandy Brandy Lilo IDaCe Ra'.en PrI Lizzie B:., Kim Braceiace
ESPN PGA Tour Sr:rt-i::ice IJFL Prim Gamenigh
ESPN2 SlrorngesI Man Compelillon
FAM Hall A Dozen Bables Whose. Line' Funriie.i ViJ,-.-E.
FOOD Emeril Live Unwrapped Iron Chel Unwr.ippe IT.':p 5 Emeril Live
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LIFE TBA TBA Sir, r..n l:inre TBA
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TBS M.is S Crriternialit Drne Se:-.relts .:t Ite *''a - . s.ler .,d IAngel Eve
TCM Sincin in Trie Rain Severn Bric:es For Se-en Brolr Carajde
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USA La,_w v Order SVUI Law & Order SVLU La & OLaw OrrLer Cle TheT Di.,irict

HBO Tre Rundown WCB Carnivale
�2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Sunday Evening January 23, 2005

WTXAC Extreme Makeover Ho DesperateHousewive BostonLegal Local Local Local Local
NWT/C NFL On CBS: AFC Championship Local Local Local Local
WTWC/NCAmerican Dreams Bridget Jones's Diary Local Local Local
WTHI1OX Simpsons Arrested Fam Guy Fam Guy Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E D.g . c.grisler . B i all . MI C:,.D g ir, nsier s
AMC Addanm Famiiv, Values Steje rlartin Tritbuil RH-li.rn I t.he FPinI.. Panrher
CMT Kennry Che-ney Tolal Release Cr:ssrc'ad [blu:il.rriai T'p r2, C':unl':'wn
DISN Disney Movie TBA Ravn .,ei r Phil Bi.j .lJlie. Lizzie Bi'y I.leets Br:.elace
ESPN '04 Worlds Strongels Man Competition Spo:irl-n.riler Primelime
ESPN2 World Supercross rP Ausiralian Open Faslbreak
FAM The Facts oi Lile Reunion Whose Lin Whose Lin Fiuirir.Z-l Furnnie,;l l':'el Osle Feed
FOOD Erneril Live ITBA TBA TBA Emeril Live
FX Joy Ride rlNip Tuck TITh S51ireld iFear Factor
HGTV Designed |Curb Extreme Homes Ol Eu Subterraniarn G&re Ren Kii:her, Tr De.signd Curtb
LIFE TOOr, YrOunq To Be A Dad r.lsirg rnq.is:,inl Wild Card
MTV The Arshlee Simpson Sho:.' rewiy,,we, - ,i ck Jes, ,.,ar.nce RW' RR
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TBS De.'.'ne Secrei. cl ihe Ya- Ya Sislerh'ood |Dr'inre Secrel. rl . a .-i i [e-rh:- .1j j
TCM Tre Slranrte Woanm.i Thre UIinrr.. Ie. The Garden of Eden
TLC David Blane - Streel Jump London, Spon:,. Dis.asters _ Tradini S~.pac. Farrni David Blane
TNT Enrraprmenie Trie Haunling Th- GiII
USA FRi.-irng The Bullel Monk La.v & Order SvU Riding Tne Bullet

HBO Se,: and ihe CiIl Carnivale 15 _ Unscriple Stlick Orn /i'ou Taxicab
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


ACROSS
1. Ltr. addenda
4. One on the beat
7. Rug cleaner,
for short
10. Unfilled, on a'
TV sched.
13. Well put
14. City near
Oakland
16. Bard's nightfall
17. Dove's sound
18. Raw material for
steel mills
19. Former Leno
announcer Hall
20. Be an expert
23. Frozen waffle brand
24. One behind bars
26. Involve again
31. Folk's Pete
32." Mio"
34. Duffel bag filler
35. Perform up to snuff
40. Barn topper
41. Harder to find
42. Holds-tight-' i
45. Margin jotting
50. TV's Geraldo
51. "Picnic"
playwright
52. Find oneself in big
trouble
58. Mangy mutt
59. Showy perennials
60. Hippie's home
61. "Treasure Island"
monogram
62. Shade provider
63. Bullfight bravo
64. _ kwon do
65. Easter egg colorer
66. Before, to bards
67. Wee bit


DOWN
1. Green Bay gridder
2. Spill picker-upper
3. Moe, for one
4. Mafia kingpin
5. Lena of "Chocolat"
6. D.C. gofer
7. _ Beach, Fla.
8. Handsome fellow
9. Wolf or fox
10. New driver, usually
11. Mattress support
12. "Go on..."
15. Mal- relative
21. Took the prize
22. Greek alphapbet
ender
25. Drop an easy one
27. Understood
28. Volcanic spew
29. Attendee's suffix
30. Violinist Mischa
33. Lira's replacement
35. Roman emperor,
.37-41
36. It's all there is
37. Basic principle
38. Get firm
39. La-la lead-in
40. Tape player
43. Bellyached
44. With a level head
46. Muscle spasm
47. Letter-writer's
container of old
48. Crazy Horse, for
one
49. Had to have
53. "Sock it !"
54. Toronto's prov.
55. Suffix with
concession
56. Use a spyglass
57. "Understood!"
58. PC monitor


Crossword Puzzle Anwers
9HOSO


sjaddol jae6jn

TIME WARNER Current Channel Line-Up L-353 AK

CABLE LIVE OAK

2 ShopNBC 21 Information 38 Discovery Channel 55 Cartoon Network
3 WCJB (ABC) Gainesville (20) 22 Marketplace 39 TBS 56 Fox Sports Net
4 WJXT (IND) Jacksonville (4) 23 Home Shopping Network 40 Headline News 57 PAXtv
5 WUFT (PBS) Gainesville (5) 24 CNN 41 Fox News 58 Sci-fi Channel
6 WCTV (CBS) Tallahassee (6) 25 TNT 42 MSNBC 59 Game Show Network
7 WFXU (UPN) Live Oak (57) 16 Nickelodeon 43 CNBC 60 AMC
8 Community Bulletin Board 27 MTV 44 C-Span 2 61 Lifetime Movie Network
9 WB 28 Spike TV 45 E! 62 Comedy Central
10 WTLH (FOX) Tallahassee (49) 29 A&E 46 The Travel Channel 63 CMT
11 The Weather Channel 30 ABC Family 47 HGTV 64 Oxygen
12 WTWC (NBC) Tallahassee (40) 31 Disney Channel 48 The Learning Channel 65 Bravo
13 QVC 32 Lifetime 49 The History Channel 66 WE (Women's Entertainment)
14 C-Span .33 USA Network 50 Animal Planet 67 FX
15 TV-Guide 34 BET 51 Food Network 68 CNBC
16 WGN (IND) Chicago 35 ESPN 52 TBN 69 TV Land
17 Special Events 36 ESPN2 53 INSP 70 Fit tv
20 Local 37 S!nshine Network 54 VH-1 4 71 Discovery Health


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGF 10BR









S.The Diet Detective

S' ii'I --'-" ' "- -'-
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Monday Evening January 24, 2005

WTXLA S Extreme Makeover Ho The Bachelorette . Super Nanny Local Local Jimmy K
WCTCBS StillStand Listen Up Raymond Two Men CSI Miami Local Late Show Late Late
TWC/NBC Fear Factor Las Vegas Medium Local Tonight Show Conan
W Trading Spouses 24 Local local Local LLocal Local Local

A & E Arline Goh Gotti Caesars 24 7 Crossing Jordan Airline
AMC / Smokey & The Bandit Smokey & The Bandi1 II Smokey & The Bandit
CMT lost Shocking |MuzikMaiia TV M music Mosi Shockingk MuzikMalia TV
DISN Disie P.' 1..r TBA Raven Sias Bug Juice Lizzle Boy Meelts Even
ESPN Bi, Ea~. Ccninerernce Basketball Big 12 Conference Ba Spornscenter Mlounlain West Conrer
ESPN2 '..':,mirenS Colloge Badkelb ,all 2005 Australian Open
FAM i\'.'.-.5. Line is i An.ay-' Brat Camp The "00 Club Funnes Funniesl
FOOD Enmerl Li. e IUnwrapped Secret Lite Iron Crel Errneri L.'.e
FX From Hell Fear Facior King King Cops
HGTV Homes Ac Dec Cents Kit Trends Sens Cnic Desg Fina Dsgnr Fin D Travis Hunters Homesr Ac Dec Cenis
LIFE Perleci Crime Widow on Ire Hill How Clea How Clea aranny Golden
MTV RW.RR Room Raiders Wanna '
SCI Stargale SG-1 Siargate SG-1 Behind Stargale SG-1 Toial Realily
TBS Friends Friends Fam Guy Fam Guy Raymond Raymond Grumpier Old Men
TCM The Quiller Memorandum Fall of the Roman Empire
TLC Trauma Incredible Medical Mysleries Trauma Incredible Medical My
TNT Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order Wilroul A Trace NYPD Blue
USA Law & Order SVU Substilute 4 Law & Order SVU Monk

g o-.7-i The Rainmaker The Transporter Along Came Polly
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service'


Tuesday Evening January 25, 2005

WTXUIABC WieKids G Lopez According| Rodney NVPD Blue Local Local iJimm, Kimmel
WCTV/CBS NCIS Amazing Race 6 Judgind Amy Local Late Snow Late Lale
WTWCINBC Most Oulrageous Mo Scrubs ICommihe Law & Order SVU Local Toniqrt Snow Conan
WTLHIFOX American 0dol House ocal Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Cold Case Files Cold Case Files Dog the Bounly Hunle Crossing Jordan Cold Case Files
AMC Jaws 3-D Jaw The Revenge T TBA
CMT Gr-eat Balls ci Fire MuzKmali Great Balls of Fire
DISN Di-.nev t.loie TBA Raen Si, SI Bug Juice ILizzie Boy leels E..en
ESPN Biq 10 Conierence Baskeiball Soutneastern Conrere Sponrscenter Jim Rome
ESPN2 S3ouireat-l Conference Baskelbali Australian Open
FAM tilgqrh ol the Twisters Who-se Lin Whose Lin Tne 700 Clut. Family Mailers
FOOD Emeril Li.'e Roker ISuccess $40 A Day Iron Crie Battle Emeril Live
FX Ste aling Hrarard Fear Factor King oi the Hill Cops Cops
HGTV To Sell Design Fl IDecor Ce Divine Ds Dsgn ChaI IDsgn Cnal D Travis Crahers To Sell Design Fi
LIFE The Unsaid Layover Nanny Golden Nanny Golden
MTV Real World Sweet 16 The Ashlee Simpson Show
SC Merlin PI 1 Merlin Pt 2 Riverworld
TBS Friends Friends Sex/Ciy Sex.Cty Sleepless in Seattle City of Angels
TCM Double lIemnity Postman Always Rings Twice The Lady From Shang
TLC Malea lMac hin-s Overhaulin Rides Mega Machines Overhaulin'
TNT La.w Order Law & Order Charmr ed Law . Order X Files
USA4A . L3. Order .,'. U hi.J'ig T ,iC Bullel L j'. -1. . ii.Il Z.. U TIi U.-iJd i-ne

i! The Rundown Real Sports Carnivale 15 From Dusk Till Dawn
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Wednesday Evening January 26, 2005

Wt Lost Alias Wife Swap Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
WTc 60 Minutes King Universe CSI: NY Local Late Show Late Late
Sl: Swimsuit Model S West Wing Law & Order L6cal Tonight Show Conan
American Idol Simple Life 3 Local Local local Local Local Local

A American Justice The Cruelty Connectio Biography Crossing Jordan American Justice
AMC Carrie The Exorcist III
CMT K. Chesney- Be As Yo Sexlest Men First Videos Kenny Chesrinev Sexiest Men
DISN Disney Movie: TBA Raven Sis. Sis Bug Juice Lizzie Boy Even
ESPN Conlerence USA Basketball Atlantic Coast Confer Sponscenler Outside Gamenigh
ESPN2 Big Eas.: Conference Basketbaii Australian Open
FAM Searching For David's Heart Whose Lin Whose Lin The 700 Club Funniesl Funniest
FOOD Erreril Live Bobbie FI Food Natl Good Eal Good Eai Iron Chef Emeril Live
FX Theres Something Aboul Mary TBA King or the Hill
Keri Russell Skeet Ulrich Sun Jan 30 9/8c

Sa -Magic Days uJCBS

HGTV New Spac |Blg Char Drm Hous Mirssion CurbAppe CurbAppe D Travis Mdrn Mast New Spac BIdg Char
LIFE What Girls Learn The Virgin Suicides Nanny Golden fjNannv Golden
MTV rJewlvwers .nlick & Jessica Real Worl Rm Rdrs
SCI Rpley Ripi'ley Ghrost Hunters Conan The Barbarian
TBS Friends Friends Seinteld Seinleld Sex & The City Sugar and Spice
TCM Crossnre The Lost Weekend Smash-Up, the Slory of a Woman
TLC In A Fix While You Were Out Always A Bridesmaid In A Fix While You Were Out
TNT Law & Order Law & Order Dead Calm X Files.
USA Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Substilute 3

HBO Rape in a Small Town Carnivale 15 Inside the rIFL Unscripled Sluck on Y'ou1
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service

Thursday Evening January 27, 2005

TiLgnIlB In Style: Celebrity We Extreme Makeover Primetime Live Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
WCOy/1BP Wickedly Perfect CSI Without A Trace Local Late Show , Late Late
WtWfiNBC Joey IWill/Grace The Apprentice ER Local Tonight Show Conan
lWFOX.r l The O.C. Point Pleasant Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Cold Case Fiies The First 48 The First 48 Croi.sing Jordnr, Cold Case Files
AMC Towering Inlerno |Earlhquake
CMT Top 20 Countdown Top 20 Counidown Muzlkmal
DISrJ Disney Movie TBA Raven Sis Bug Juice Lizzie Boy Meets Even
ESPN Big Ten Conlerence Baskelball Till Sportscenler Till
ESPN2 Conlireence USA Baskelball Conference USA Bas Gamenigh |Auslralian Open The Willia
FAM Auslin Powers International Man of Mystery Whose Lin Whose Lin Tne 700 Club Fam Mall Fam Mall
FOOD Emeril Li..'e TBA Good Eal Secret LiI Iron Chel Emerni Live
FX King Hill ing Hiill Kin H King Hill King. Hill King Hill Fear Facior Cops Cops
HGTV Wa.rrnrs Land Chai D'.,rine Ds Dsn Chall Ho:use- Hu House Hu D Trais On A Dirri Warriors Land Ch.al
LIFE A Itarriage of Conr,.eniernce Widocw or Ihe Hill N.lann', Golden Nanny Goldenr
MTV .lade IRW RR .lade Aslee Simpsron Sh, Sweetl 1i.
SCI They [lest Lar. a Bugs
TBS Friends |Frriends ISugar and Spice Lillle i,. .,
TCM The Bliue Gardenia The -Violent r.len Peylon Pla,-e
TLC O..erhaulin t.lumrnm Delec.,ive r..lummy Delective |'.erhauiln .1lummy De-ecti..e


r1BA :on TIlT


INBA on TIHT


TNIrT Sporls


USA Law & Order SVJU Queen o Ithe DamneId Law & Order SVU The Exorci-s

HBO Insre ire tiFL Dirty War Unscriple Real Sex Inside the NFL
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


By Charles Stuart Platkin
What if I told you it didn't have
to be so hard to lose weight per-
manently? What if you could lose
that weight - well, automatical-
ly? Skeptical? Why'wouldn't you
be! After all, magical claims of in-
stant, effortless weight loss have
proliferated for decades without
delivering.
However, successful dieters
share a common "secret" - they
aren't constantly thinking about
eating and exercise. They've fig-
ured out ways to make their be-
haviors and choices second na-
ture.
It's based on the concept of
automaticityy" - the ways we
perform our daily behaviors with-
out having to think about them.
Activities like setting your alarm
clock at night, putting on shoes
before you leave the house and
remembering how to drive to the
office do not require much
thought. The idea is to apply the
same principle to your diet.
TOO MUCH EFFORT
Most failed dieters complain
that maintaining a diet is just too
much work. "Attempting to con-
sciously perform a novel task or
alter a behavior requires effort
and utilization of almost the entire
control network portion of the
brain, whereas, when you've
learned a behavior and it's auto-
matic, you can reduce the
amount of brainpower by as much
as 85 percent," says Walter
Schneider, Ph.D., a professor and
researcher in psychology at the
University of Pittsburgh.
In terms of dieting, the amount
of information and control re-
quired can be extremely difficult
for the average person to sustain.
This becomes especially impor-
tant when our control systems are
weakened - like when we are
sleep-deprived or stressed. It's an
opening for our previous, more
comfortable, negative eating
habits to resurface. "When there
are distractions or concerns com-
peting for your attention, the men-
tal workload can be overwhelm-
ing. This could be a reason why
we fall off of our diets," offers
Schneider.
REPEAT, REPEAT,
REPEAT
Making your diet automatic
doesn't happen overnight. "It
takes a couple hundred execu-
tions of a new behavior to make it
automatic," says Schneider. For
instance, if you want to start auto-
matically ordering a vegetable
egg-white omelet for breakfast at
the diner instead of buttered
toast, greasy eggs and sausage,
you can't just do it a few mornings
and expect it to stick. Plus, there
are many different areas of your
eating and exercise behavior that
need adjustment - you need to
inspect each part of your day and
come up with compromises that
work, and then repeat them often.
According to Amy A. Gorin,
Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry
and human behavior at Brown
University Medical School, one of
the primary predictors of weight
gain or maintenance is dietary
consistency. "Those who maintain
the same diet regimen across the
week and year are more likely to
maintain their weight loss over
the following year than those who
diet more strictly on weekdays
and/or during non-holiday peri-
ods," says Gorin. One possible
explanation is that dietary consis-
tency is a characteristic that de-
velops naturally over time in peo-
ple who maintain their .weight
loss. So giving yourself a break
once in a while in the beginning
stages of learning to automate
your diet is probably not a good
idea.
EASIER OVER TIME
Automated behavior is essen-
tial for permanent weight control,
but a study of the National Weight
Control Registry (individuals who
have lost at least 30 pounds and
kept it off for five years or more)
reported in "Obesity Research"
found that after losing weight and
maintaining it for more than a few
years, weight maintenance gets
easier.
AVOID THE FLASHING


NEON SIGN
"Going on a diet" traditionally
involves food deprivation. As
soon as we decide to diet, we
come up with lists of foods we
can't eat - we might as well put
up a neon sign flashing, "EAT -
EAT - EAT." "Any time you try
telling yourself not to do some-
thing - that's exactly what you'll
find yourself doing," explains Dan
Wegner, Ph.D., professor of psy-
chology at Harvard University.


If we try not to think about
something, just remembering not
to think about it brings it to the
front of our consciousness - ex-
actly the opposite of what we
want. In fact, Wegner did an ex-
periment in which he told partici-
pants NOT to think about white
bears, and then talked with them
for the next 30 minutes. The re-
sult: All they talked about were
white bears - they mentioned
them 30 times on average.
"People think they should have
'willpower' to go against their na-
ture, but the human mind is just
not constructed that way," says
Wegner. Actually, there's a good
reason why we can't just shut out
the desire for food: We need it for
survival. It's just that our bodies
have a hard time distinguishing
healthy from unhealthy foods.
DON'T BE A DIET HERO
In the beginning, set yourself
up to succeed by arranging your
environment so you can execute
your new behaviors. "You need to
rearrange your world so it can op-
erate as if it's on autopilot," sug-
gests Wegner.
The key is to arrange your en-
vironment to maximize your
chances of losing and maintain-
ing weight and minimize your
chances of slipping up. Avoid
cues that tempt you. For instance,
if you can't resist the fries when
you take your kids to McDonald's
or Burger King, take them to Sub-
way instead. Sounds simple, but
most people won't make a
change like this unless they think
about it first.
CREATE YOUR OWN
MENTAL BUTLER
Let your subconscious mind do
the work for you. Set up detailed
associations, reminders and trig-
gers to help develop your new be-
haviors. For example, when your
alarm goes off, associate that
with putting on your shoes and
going out for a walk. Or when you
see 12:30 p.m. on the clock at
work, automatically order a very i
specific, healthy lunch from an al-
ready designated "healthy"
restaurant. These detailed asso-
ciations are called implementa-
tion intentions.
REPLACE IT
Schneider suggests replacing
a few of your old eating behaviors
with new, more healthful ones. It's
much easier to replace an old be-
havior than to rid yourself of a
negative behavior on its own.
Take a peek at your eating be-
haviors and zero in on foods
you're willing to substitute with
"Calorie Bargains" - foods low in
calories that still taste great. For
instance, if you typically eat high-
calorie cereal every morning,
shop around for a few that are
lower in calories but still make
you happy - then stock your
pantry with only these lower-calo-
rie cereals.
In order to alleviate stressing
all day about weight loss, devise
a plan for dealing with your "Eat-
ing Alarm Times"- the one or
two hours when you consume the
majority of your high-calorie and
high-fat foods. (Midmorning
munchies? Prime-time TV snack-
ing? Late-night noshing?) Again,
look for Calorie Bargains to sub-
stitute at those times when you
tend to overeat.
INEVITABLE
TEMPTATIONS
Rehearse scenarios in your
mind for difficult eating situations,
such as unconscious eating, trav-
eling, special occasions (wed-
dings, family dinners), dining out,
nighttime snacking, etc. Develop
a rough sketch of how you'd like
to change your behavior in that
scenario - including the
thoughts, emotions and actions
you want in your "ideal" version.
Mentally prepare for when you
slip up, since slip-ups are in-
evitable.
CREATE A STRATEGY
Part of making your diet auto-
matic is evaluating your own eat-
ing and physical activity. Send in
any unique strategies you've de-
veloped to make your diet auto-
matic or any real-life innovative
dieting tips to info@thedietdetec-
tive.com - if we publish it, you


will receive a free copy of "The
Automatic Diet."
Charles Stuart Platkin is a nu-
trition and public health advocate,
author of the best-selling book
"Breaking the Pattern" (Plume,
2005), the book "The Automatic
Diet" (Hudson Street Press/Pen-
guin Group USA, 2005) and
founder of Integrated Wellness
Solutions. Copyright 2005 by
Charles Stuart Platkin. Write to
info@thedietdetective.com


I


I


PAGE 11B


0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 21 20 5








Five Suwannee Lady Dog weightlifters advance to second sectional meet

.; . ,
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Kayla Gandiana is undefeated so far this year. She took first place in
her weightclass lifting 250 pounds total. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico




- ,. . b--5 '







Tildra Howard took first place in her class lifting 165 total. -hoto:
Janet Schrader-Seccafico


The meet was held in front of over 500 students who paid to attend and watch the girls lift. They cheered and enjoyed the action.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


M


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Jessica Nelson had her best showing of the year, taking fourth in
her class with a 240 total. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Mindy Stever placed fourth in her class with 220 total.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Alex Camunas placed second in her class with a 200-pound total
weight lifted. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


ShreIII th P1aprithyu ,Cild


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musun 4D rutorrat


P.O. Box 340, Live Oak. FL 32064


The news readers



of today are the



News makers of



tomorrow


4.

*'


1 Year
In County
Subscription


I Year
Out of Coiiunty


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PAGE 12B


N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


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PAGE 13B


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


FFA AG

CONNECTION










Now in its 101st year, the
Florida State Fair--always
in Tampa and always in Feb-
ruary, is organized under the
leadership of Florida Agri-
culture Commissioner
Charles H: Bronson, Chair-


Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Com-
missioner Charles H. Bron-
son is warning homeown-
ers that this is the time of
year when termites begin to
"swarm" or leave their
colonies to search for new
nesting sies. Many home-
owners discover that they
have a termite problem
when they find termite
swarmers i\ winged, black
insects about 1.4 inch long)
in their homes.
Termites can cause con-
sumers to lose their largest
economic asset - their
homes - and are responsi-
ble for over $700 million in
costs to consumers in
Florida each year for dam-
age and control costs. Ter-
mites are a fact of life in
Florida and people need to
actively protect their
homes by using a licensed
professional pest control
company ro provide termite
protection services.
"This is a good time of
)ear for consumers to
check their contracts with
licensed pest control com-
panies to make sure the,\
are cLul tll.," BL'IIon!o said.
"Anyone who has ques-
tions about their pest con-
trol contract or company
can call us at 1-800-


Don't top
A tree sometimes needs to
be pruned to avoid interfer-
ence with utility lines,
buildings, or parts of the
surrounding environment.
Whenever pruning is re-
quired, it is important to
avoid the practice of topping
- the removal of all parts of
a tree above a certain height
with no consideration for its
structure or health.
While long thought to re-
duce a hazard, topping is a
temporary and ineffective
solution that actually makes
a tree more hazardous in the
long run.
Topping "starves" trees by
robbing them of their food-
creating leaves.
Topped trees (in an act of
defense) create shoots that


HELPFLA Considering
the cost of a house, it's
frightening to think that
about half the homeowners
in Florida have not taken
steps to protect this invest-
ment from these damaging
insects."
People who do not have a
current termite protection
contract are urged to con-
tact several pest control
companies and request
written estimates and a
copy of the contract they
offer. Consumers should
not sign a contract until
they have compared at least
three companies. Pest con-
trol companies are required
by law to obtain a signed
contract prior to treating a
home. Consumers with
questions about contracts
or the performance of a
pest control company can
call 1-800-HELPFLA (1-
800-435-7352).
The two main types of
termites that affect Florida
consumers are subter-
ranean termites, which live
in soil and attack structures
from the ground up, and
drywood termites, which
Canii l e ir isolated piceaV
of wood in a structure such
as attic rafters and can go
undetected until they cause
extensive damage. Li-


Florida State Fair is rich in tradition


By Justin Johnson


man William H. Bowman,
and Executive Director C.
Pesano.
This year the theme is "Eat
Up The Fun." The Fair be-
gins Feb. 10 and ends on
Monday, Feb. 21. Local 4-H


and FFA members will be
competing at the Florida
State Fair in Livestock Judg-
ing, Horse Judging, Poultry
Judging and Rabbit Judging.
I will be showing a hog and
a steer. I will also be com-
peting in a Skilathon, Record
Book Skills Test and an Il-
lustrated Talk/Demonstra-
tion. The Florida State Fair
provides competitive events
where 4-H and FFA projects
help showcase Florida's
Livestock Industry. Empha-
sis is placed on the educa-
tional aspects of the program


with premiums being paid
for all competitions relating
to the animal and individual
exhibitor's participation.
When the fair was first be-
gun the attractions were sim-
ple, there were five races to
bet on, and the agricultural
exhibits were displayed in
just one building.
In 1904 T.J. Laud-Brown,
Manager of the Tampa Bay
Hotel, convinced the city fa-
thers and the rail line that
they needed to cooperate in
bringing about a south Flori-
da Fair to be held on the
grounds of the hotel.
By July of 1904 the South
Florida Fair Association was
formalized- and plans for a
new exhibition building 600
feet long and 100 feet wide
was proposed, but the excite-
ment could not be contained
in one building, there was
also a stadium, coliseum,
and stock stalls in the plans.
After a few short years it'
became known as the Mid-
Winter Festival. In 1915,


when Articles of Incorpora-
tion for the South Florida
Fair and Gasparilla Carnival
were filed with the Secretary
of state's office in Tallahas-
see, the fair became known
simply as the Florida State
Fair.
Except for a couple of
years during World War II,
when it would have been in-
appropriate to hold a festi-
val, the fair has been held
every year since its incep-
tion. In its first years, the
fair took place on a two-acre
plot in downtown Tampa,
near the University of Tam-
pa. At the time, Tampa's
renowned Grand Parade
started and ended at the fair-
grounds site.
In 1975, the Florida Legis-
lature created the Florida
State Fair Authority and des-
ignated the annual event in
Tampa as the official Florida
State Fair. The fair moved to
its current,319-acre site, sev-
en miles from its original
downtown location. In Feb-


ruary the first fair was held
at its current location.
In 1995, the Florida State
Legislature eliminated the
original Florida State Fair
Authority, putting the fair-
grounds and the Fair under
the administration of the
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices. The Legislature au-
thorized Agriculture Com-
missioner Bob Crawford to
appoint 21 members to serve
on the fair's board of direc-
tors and select an executive
director. Crawford named
George Steinbrenner to chair
the board and Rick Vymlatil
to serve as executive direc-
tor.
I have found the Florida
State Fair to be very educa-
tional and a whole lot of fun!
Make your plans to attend
the Florida State Fair--For
more information go to
"http://www.floridastate-
fair.com" or www.floridas-
tatefair.com or call 1-800-
345-FAIR.


*Winter tree care tips for homeowners


4 Throughout the country
winter brings .frigid tempera-
tures, icywinds, and plenty of
snow. Just as people battle
Mother Nature at .this time of
the year, so do trees, with one
major exception: trees can't
avoid exposure to the ele-
ments.
"While your trees seem to be
in a state of hibernation in the
winter, exposure to the tough
conditions can cause them ma-
jor stress," said Jim Skiera,
Executive Director of the In-
ternational Society of Arbori-
culture (ISA). "Minimize that
stress by helping your trees
through the cold months, a lit-
tle at a time. If you take care of
your trees in the winter, you'll
be rewarded in the spring."
1 . Put composted organic
mulch under your tree in the
fall or early winter to help re-
tain water and reduce tempera-


ture extremes. A thin layer of
mulch will act like a blanket
and give the tree's roots a little
extra winter protection.
2. Give your trees a drink.
Winter droughts require water-
ing as much as summer.
droughts. If temperatures per-
mit, an occasional watering
during the winter on young
trees can be a lifesaver. But be
sure to water only when soil
and trees are cool but not
frozen.
3. Prune your trees. Winter
is actually one of the best times
to prune because it is easier to
see the structure of trees with-
out their leaves. But limit
pruning to deadwood and
poorly placed branches in or-
der to save as many living
branches as possible.
4. Prevent mechanical in-
juries. Branch breakage or
splitting can be caused by ice


and snow accumulation, or
chewing and rubbing by ani-
mals. Prevent problems from
occurring on young trees by
wrapping the base of trees in a
hard, plastic guard or a metal
hardware cloth. Wrapping
trees with burlap or plastic
cloth also can prevent temper-
ature damage. Just remember
to remove the wraps and
guards in the spring to prevent
damage when the tree begins
to grow.
The International Society of
Arboriculture (ISA) is a non-
profit organization supporting
tree care research around the
world. Headquartered in
Champaign, Ill., ISA is dedi-
cated to the care and preserva-
tion of shade and ornamental
trees. For more information,
contact a local ISA Certified
Arborist or visit www.treesare-
good.com.


ANNOUNCING!! !

GM OWNER LOYALTY CA$H

S iIMni In Addition To


censed pest management
professionals have the ex-
pertise to inspect and treat
for infestations of these
termites and provide pro-
tective measures for home-
owners.
Companies that provide
termite control services are
licensed and inspected by
the Department and con-
sumers can call the toll free
number to determine
whether a company is prop-
erly licensed and to check
the complaint history of a
business.
Steps that consumers can
take to protect their homes
from this destructive pest:
-Remove wood piles
and other cellulose sources
from under and next to
their homes.
- Have an annual in-
spection of their homes by
a licensed professional pest
control company.
- Renew their termite
protection contract annual-
ly,
- Direct water sources,
such as air conditioner drip
lines and roof downspouts,
away from the structure
foundation.
- When purchasing
homes, carefully check the
termite protection history
of the home.


the trees, please!


grow quickly (up to 20 feet
in one year) and are prone to
breaking.
Topping makes trees more
susceptible to insects and
disease.
Topping creates "high
maintenance trees" that are
expensive to treat, repair,
and care for.
Tree-trimming basics
Reduction pruning is an
effective alternative to top-
ping. It reduces the size of
longer branches by cutting
back lateral ones. Some
branches are removed at
their point of origin.
Avoid excessive thinning
of interior branches. It can
lead to rapid growth of up-
right interior shoots and
limb breakage.


The best way to learn to
manage tree growth and
maintain tree health is to
consult a Certified Arborist.
These tree care profession-
als know how to safely
prune trees, and they can
teach homeowners how to
best maintain and care for
them.
The International Society
of Arboriculture (ISA) is a
nonprofit organization sup-
porting tree care research
around the world. Headquar-
tered in Champaign, .Ill.,
ISA is dedicated to the care
and preservation of shade
and ornamental trees. For
more information, contact a
local ISA Certified Arborist
or visit'.
www.treesaregood.com.


MILITARY NEWS


Navy Chief Petty Officer

Robert D. Moreland
Navy Chief Petty Officer al war on terrorism.
Robert D. Moreland, son of The primary mission of
David A. Moreland of Live Moreland's ship is to provide
Oak, recently returned from a multi-mission offensive and
routine, scheduled deploy- defensive capabilities. USS
ment, while assigned to the Spruance is capable of oper-
guided missile destroyer USS ating independently or as part
Spruance, homeported in of a carrier strike group. Its
Mayport. flexibility provides presence
Moreland's ship deployed with a purpose and strike
as part of the USS John F. power to support joint and al-
Kennedy carrier strike group lied forces afloat and ashore.
in support of America's on- Moreland joined the Navy
going operations in the glob- in February 1986.


Men's soccer tonight!
Suwannee men's soccer will be in Langford Stadi-
um. The Bulldog soccer team takes on Ocala
Westport at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 21. Come out
and enjoy some great soccer and to honor the se-
nior players.
�e9 D~4


Army Pvt.

Kenneth

Arroyo
Army Pvt. Kenneth.Arroyo
has graduated from basic.
combat training at Fort
Knox, Ky.
During the nine-week
training period, the trainee
received instruction in drill
and ceremony, weapons, rifle
marksmanship, and bayonet
training, chemical warfare,
field training and tactical ex-
ercises, armed and unarmed
combat, military courtesy,
military justice, physical fit-
ness, first aid, and Army his-
tory, traditions, and core val-
ues.
Arroyo's mother is Wanda
Sandoval of 96th St., Live
Oak.
The private is a 2004 grad-
uate of Suwannee High
School, Live Oak.


Bronson warns homeowners


that termite season is here


FHIUAY, JANUAIIY >'1, zuuo ,,m .............................


.... / A I I .,X/ "-f Or fr, -






PAGE 14B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


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Good Credit
U- Bad Credit SUNhE" CHRYSER
www.sunbeltcdj.com
US 90 West US 90
Toll Free 1-877-548-2488 Lake City, FL
_Prices net of all rebates & incentives plus $199.50 administrative fee, plus tax, tag & title. Photos for illustration purposes only. 13748-F


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ANNOUNCEMENTS
Special Notices
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO
WORK23520750 you may be
entitled to money through social
security. Call Intergrated Family
Services at 1-866-4-SSI-USA


Miscellaneous



First Day
FOR SALE Beauty Equipment. 2
Island stations, mirrors, lights. 4
Hydraulic chairs. Like New! Call
(386) 792-3056.


First Day
FOR SALE Firewood-pickup or
delivery. Also, 350 plus big, tall,
pines. See @ 13366 Hwy 136 W. Call
386-362-3357.





FINANCIAL SERVICES


Sio place your au in uLe

Classified Marketplace, call

BUSINESS SERVICES Louise at 386-362-1734 today!




SSky Florida, Ity


HUIJITIIIG P.ROPERT 1 I Ljaded ilr, Tr,,i- ri.:,me i being used as a duplex now Great Location!! Large 4/2 DWMH in Old
Deer, Turkey, and Hogs. Or a great place but can be turned into a single family Sugar Mill Subdivision. Lots of shade
for family camping and getaways. NOTE easily. The property also has 3 SWMHs trees. Close to school and shopping. All
Electric in area and close to fishing on the that are used as rentals. MLS#42216 this home needs is a new family!!
Gulf. MLS#42136 $35,000 $195,000 MLS#42253 $99,000
CAR WASH!! 24+ ACRES LAFAYETTE COUNTY


Coin operated car wash with a single wide This is a flog lot with 166+ feet of US
mobile home currently being rented for Highway 27 frontage. Possible to re-zone
additional income. MLS# 42319 $64,900 to commercial. MLS#42323 $114,900


1wIr, ac�n r 1 r- I.i fl,'r ,',:. ur r,,l.'..
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Located on SE Lynwood Dr., electric and
phone in the area. MLS#42330 $5,995
128308JRS-F


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For more information about this home, call the

associates of Sullivan Agency at386-362-1389.


Real Estate
ENJOY NORTH FLORIDA LIVING
LIVE OAK. FLORIDA

15 Ac. Approx. 7 mi. W. of Live Oak
w/2001 Homes of Merit 2300+ sq. ft.
Mobile Home. 4BD/2BA, 2LR. Lots of
storage area, Lg. Kit, Lg. Deck on
back w/concrete patio. Home sits in
about 3 Ac. of Lg. Oak Trees w/the
bal. of prop. in pasture. Mostly fenced
& cross-fenced for cattle & horses.
Accessible from 2 roads: 1 paved, 1
dirt. Irrigation for garden spot or start
of a nursery. Asking $177,000.
CALL FOR APPT. TO SEE:
DAYTIME: 386-867-1888
AFTER 6PM: 386-330-2373


PERSONAL SERVICES


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. - M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 84272372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on US
90 near 1-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing 'approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Building
containing approximately
12,500 with 11,500 sq. ft. of
packing. $250,000.
(2) 75 acres on paved road
on pasture with some live
oaks, fenced and cio,- fenced,
two wells, 1/4 mile on paved
Rd. 1/4 mile on county grade,
good area. $3,995 per acre.
(3) 177th Drive: 3 Bedroom,
2 bath central heat and air.
Home containing
approxaimtely 1,350 sq. ft.
Kitchen furnished 225'137
lot. $72,000.
(4) Jasper, FL: 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath, CH/AC, brick, containing
approximately 1,700 sq. ft.,
tender roof. Kitchen furnished
147x97 lot, pool, $95,000..
(5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20 acres
wooded with large oaks, and a
3BR/2BA, CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under
roof, detached storage
$149,500.
(6) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with
a four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home
containing approximatley
2,500 sq. ft. under roof,
kitchen furnished, 3 car
garage. REDUCED to
$225,000.
(7) Off CR 249: 3 Bedroom,
1 1/2 bath, CH/AC, home
contains approximately 1,180
sq. ft. 1 1/2 acres of land
(paved road) $55,000. Would
work for S.H.I.P.
(8) Hunting Tract: 13 acres


+, wooded, Steinhatchee
Springs area, river access, and
Hwy. 51 access, recent survey.
$26,000.
(9) CR 132: 13 acres wooded
on paved road with a 3
bedroom, 2 bath, CH/CA
DWMH in excellent
condition, cont. approx. 1450
sq. ft., heated area, will have
to see to appreciate.
$119,000. ...
(10) Camping Lot: One
acre riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(11) Off CR 252: 10 Acres
wooded on 61st Road
convenient to Lake City, can
be divided. $4,950 per acre.
(12) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick
home with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(13) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air, 218x170'
lot, nice trees, numerous
updates, new carpet, paint,
stove & refrig. 100%
financing. $61,900.
(14) Suwannee River: Four
plus acres with 220 ft. on the
water, 4' well, septic tank,
20x32 and 10x20 buidlings.
$110,000.
(15) 177th Road: 10 acres,
wooded 4' well, septic tank,
good county road. $4,200
per acre.
(16) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
(17) Off 208th: 4 Acres
wooded corner tract. Good
buy @ $11,995.
(18) 169th Place: 5 Acres
wooded with survey. $5,250
per acres. Terms.
128445-F


P'r


First Day
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
10 nicely wooded Acres, sq. lot on
high ground above 100 yr. flood
zone, approved, for MH or house.
Pwr. line @ front prop. line on road.
Nice hunting area. 3 mi. from dntwn
Jasper & 2 mi. from Hamilton Co.
Jail on Hwy. 51. Land located @
Hwy. 51 & 32nd take a right to
Hamilton Forrest Subdivision LOT
#9. Asking $3500.00 per acre. Call
Jim Strunk @(909) 376-8942.


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EDUCATIONAL SERVICES




ZPETS


LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.




AGRICULTURE
Cattle
First Day
Registered Polled Hereford Bulls.
For Sale. Ages: Weaning to 2 yrs.
Call 386-776-2163 evenings.


First Day
BIG GARAGE SALE 01/20,21,22,23
@ 8384 152nd Ter. Live Oak, FL.
Follow signs @ CR 252 & US 129 or
CR 49. Antiques/Collectibles, furn.,
elec. stove, dryer, living room set,
records- something for everyone.
386-364-6012.





RECREATION








FOR SALE 1994 21.5' Montego by
TravelMaster. E350 Ford Chassis.
53K mi. Fully equipped, new tires.
Must see to appreciate! Asking
$13,500. OBO. 386-776-2309


Boats/Supplies


00.96
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For more information about this home,
call The associates of J. W. Hill Realty at 386-362-3300.


MERCHANDISE
Garage/Yard Sales
HUGE YARD SALE Sat. 1/22 from 8
a.m. until. Lots of items. Take Hwy
90W to 133rd Rd. Follow signs.


FOR SALE 1968 19 ft. Skiff Craft I/O
Boat , Motor & Trailer. $3500. OBO.
Like new. Call 386-364-5589.
FOR SALE 1996 Robalo 2120,
center console w/225 Mercury
w/warranty. Continental trailer. Many
extras. Asking $17,500. Call 386-
362-4775.


FOR SALE Houseboat, 29 ft.
Pontoon. Self-contained. Fridge,
stove, bed. 2001 hp. Honda 4-stroke,
tilt & trim. $6000. OBO. Call 727-421-
5207 or 727-526-0622.

Campers/Motor Homes
First Day
FOR SALE Camper, 1994 Prowler
24'. Separate bedroom, Queen Bed,
also sleeper couch. Very clean.
Hitch, awning. Must See! $4500.
firm. Phone 386-963-2817.






REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race,.
color, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or . legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain of
discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275


Houses for Rent
FOR RENT 2BR/1BA Home, CH/A,
on 1 acre. 4 mi. S. of Live Oak, FL.
$450. per month and $450. Security
Deposit. References required. (386).
362-2453.

First Day
Four BD/3BA 2-Story House in
Hatchbend, area, S, of Branford, FL.
Includes 10 ac. fenced pasture & 2
stall barns. $600./mo. + sec. dep. Call
(386) 362-2362.

First Day
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA 1 mi.
from Live Oak. CHA, W/D. $450/mo,
1st, last & $300. sec. dep. NO PETSI
386-362-3002
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA Brand
New House CHA Screened Porch,
$600/mo, 1st, last & $300. sec. dep.
1 mi. from Live Oak, FI city limits. NO
PETS! 386-362-3002


[i1~I J.W. HILL
.1 1.& ASSOCIATES
1105 W. Howard Street, Live Oak, Florida 32064
Office: (386) 362-3300 Toll Free: 1-888-821-0894


Mobile Homes for rent

First Day
FOR RENT 1BD/1BA SWMH on 5
quiet acres in the Dowling Park, FL
area. Very clean, furnished or not.
$295. + Sec. Dep. Call 386-658-
2673, Iv. msg w/ph#.

First Day
FOR RENT 3BD/2BA MH on 5 quiet
acres. 50 ft. Porch. Washer & Dryer
hook-up. No smoking on premises.
$450.00 plus deposit. Call 386-364-
5007.


First Day
Three BD/2BA DWMH on 1.8 Acres.
Well & Septic tank. Less than 1 mi.
from Live Oak, FL city limits. No
pets.$600. per mo. plus $500. sec.
dep. Call 386-362-6718.


REAL


SALE


FOR SALE BY OWNER
WITH FINANCING
1) 4 AC. on 35th just off 137,
$30,000.
2) 5 AC. on 193rd just offf 90W
$30,000. (Well, Septic & Pwr. Pole).
3) 2 AC. two miles off 90 in Eastern
Madison Co. $12,500.00. 4) 1/4 AC.
Northern Suwannee Co. $5,000.
Mobile Homes or Houses.
(386) 935-2301

OWNER FINANCE
Jasper - 4BD/2&1/2BA DWMH on 1
ACRE, NICE PRIVACY, Lg. Front &
Rear decks, fireplace, new
carpet.Sm. down & $750/mo.
Call (386) 758-9785

OWNER FINANCE
O'Brien - Spacious 3BR/2BA on
2.03 acres. Beautiful Oak Trees Sm.
down & $695.00 mo.
Call (386) 758-9785


CLASSIFIED WORK!

2806 West US Highway 90
Suite 101, Lake City, FL 32055
HYPERLINK
"http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
DANIEL CRAPPS -80-85-
agency, inc. 1-oU8 -o05-75o6

(1) 20 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre - owner financing
available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84.50 (+/-) - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home sitel $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 155 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - gently rolling land located next to Peacock
Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 210 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located on State Road 451 about 3
miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site! $3,500 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
(6) 645 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal lor hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
$2,725 per acre
(7) 674 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
For additional information, contact
BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
E-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"


Homes for Sale
FOR SALE 3BD/1&1/2BA Brick
Home in Live Oak. Lg. den w/fpl,
closed carport, privacy fence. Nearly
2000 sq. ft. Also, separate 400 sq. ft.
room that could be used as guest
house, gameroom, etc. A must-see
@ 1453 Pearl Ave. Call 386-330-
2201.
FOR SALE by owner-N. Suwannee
County. 3/2 Cypress frame home-
1995. 2100 sq. ft. conditioned+lg.
screen porch & decks. Beautiful.6 ac.
of hardwood forest, high & dry. 3 min.
walk to Suwannee River w/gated
access to miles of state-owned river
frontage. $213,000. Call 386-362-
5979
Mobile Homes
OWNER FINANCE
E. of Branford-close to beautiful
Itchetucknee River- 3BD/2BA MH
Small down, $625/mo. 386-758-9785

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850.9-1.0024
First Day
Counselor, OPS
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
COUNSELOR, OPS needed at
North Florida Community College,
Madison, Fla, Grant funded, 28
hr/week. Coordinates College
Board Expanded Opportunity
Program and program for
improving FCAT scores and SAT
scores. Requires AA/AS degree,
experience working with at risk
youth; counseling or education
experience. Education majors
encouraged to apply. Strong
organizational and interpersonal
skills, some evenings and weekend
work. Application at www.nfcc.edu.
Send complete application packet
of cover letter, resume, application
and transcripts (unofficial OK) to:
HR Director, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Deadline 1/28/05. EOE

SI A


You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F


I


Not just any mobile home.
This one has a lot to offer...
1,550 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, metal
roof, vinyl siding, new central
heat and air unit, new 40 gal.
hot water heater and Kinetico
water purifying system.
Kitchen & breakfast area has
been remodeled with a Tuscan
theme, family room has a
working fireplace with a gas
log. All rooms have been
freshly painted, and are ready
for you. Home also has a
covered back porch and a new
front deck with rails. All this
on 2.5 acres with two deep
wells, metal storage building,
Planted Pines, Pecan, and
Oak Trees. Only 6 miles from
Live Oak. 133191 F
133 91-


*r ~c�
Ai1~Bri.-~


�-


Find it, Buy it, Sell it


in the Classified


Marketplace


FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


-FOR RENT-
2 BR, singlewide

mobile home,
central H/A.
First month's

rent plus deposit
to move in.

Water, sewer, &
garbage included.

No pets
386.33(02567


-FOR RENT-
3BR, Singlewide
mobile home.
Central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.

No pets.
386-330-2567
* ' 133437-F


qe ge 4zcx Touch o eClass
Touch of Class


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


5 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


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rHILYou JNUA ,are jut a cl a ... cl 1-8-5-4 , e. 12 to p e yur ad * FX 38-36-

You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPL ENT




R4lN ES ERV1CES




FNAtNGA SERVICES


We Will Help You
. . .GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE The First Day It Runs!
With the


PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION Logo in the Classified Marketplace



EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT : """ "


PETS




AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


uIr eacu-r
WOOS^*


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064

SVISA .-P,
WE ACCEPT:.
Money Orders � Personal Checks


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

Pla the Jasper News,

The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosta Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
"Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak 294 Mayo 303
White Springs * 362, 364 Live Oak * 397 White
Springs 454 High Springs* 497 Fort White * 658
Dowling Park - 752, 755, 758 Lake City - 776
Luraville - 792 Jasper 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) ' 935 Branford * 938 Jennings
S 961 Lake City 963 Welborn 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta 224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville ' 241,242, 244, 245, 247,
249, 251,253, 257, 259 Valdosta - 263 Quitlman
268 Vienna - 268 Lilly . 271, 273 Cordele - 282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross - 293 Valdosta * 324 Berlin
*333 Valdosta * 345 Nicholls * 346 Coolidge 359
Ambrose 362 Milan 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle 367 Baxley 375 Hazelhurst 377,378
Cairo, 381 Douglas * 382 Tilton 383, 384
Douglas * 385 Rhine * 386, 387 Tifon , 389, 393
Douglas * 422 Pearson ' 423, 424 Fitzgerald ' 433
Byromville 449 Blackshear 455 Ray City' 467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla 472 Montezuma 472
Oglethorpe 482 Lakeland * 487 Homerville * 498
Boston 528 Omega * 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma
534 Willacoochee 535 Warwick 546 Lenox
S549 Sparks * 559 Lake Park * 567 Ashburn *574
Ocklochnee 594 Uvalda * 624 Pineview * 627
Unadilla, 632 Alma ' 637 Fargo - 643 Rebecca
, 648 Pitts 649 Buena Vista 683 Meigs' 686
Nashville *735 Barwick 762 Whigham 769
Norman Park' 775 Morven * 776 Sylvester *782
Doerun 794 Hahira * 824 Plains 831 Irwinville
* 833 Jacksonville * 846 Smilhville 853 Cobb
859 Pavo 863 Blackshear * 868 McRae 873
Moultrie 874 Leslie - 887 Richland ' 890, 891
Moultrie 896 Adel *899Moultrie -924,928
Americus * 929 Pineta 938 Jennings ' 941
Funston ' 973 Madison '985 Moullie


g g l SF0R LI g ForrayF Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,

IrII FIr iUN U Wednesday (prior).
*We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion In the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.'


First Day





COTTAGE PARENTS

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, a
private residential childcare
program in North Florida, is looking
for couples to be full-time
professional Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities, include the direct

ages 8-18. We provide you with
specific professional skill based
training & support. Our model
helps children develop social,
academic, and independent living
skills. Salary $38,480.00 per
couple with housing, utilities,
board, and benefits provided. High
school diploma or GED and no
children living at home required.
For more information on this
challenging opportunity contact
Linda Mather at (386) 842-5555. E-
mail: Imather@youthranches.org
E.O.E./Drug Free Workplace
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.


First Day






LAKE CITY
CBNMUIITY CILLIIE
HUMAN RESOURCES
DEPARTMENT
149 S.E. Vocational Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007

Administrative Specialist
Administrative secretarial work of a
varied and highly responsible
nature within the office of the Dean
of Arts and Sciences. Duties
require working knowledge of
budgets and serves as personal
assistant to the Dean through
planning, initiating, and carrying to
completion all administrative
activities. Applicant needs
proficiency in Word, Excel, and
Microsoft Outlook. Requires High
School diploma, or its equivalent,
plus five years secretarial or
clerical experience. Education can
substitute year for year for required
experience. Special consideration
will be given to applicants with an
associate degree or certificate in a
related area.
Salary $22,692.00 Annually
plus benefits.
Deadline for receiving applications:
February 3, 2005
INQUIRIES:
HUMAN RESOURCES
DEVELOPMENT
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
149 S.E. VOCATIONAL PLACE
PHONE (386) 754-4314
FAX (386) 754-4594
E-MAIL:
Boettcherg@lakecitycc.edu
Applications available on WEB AT
www.lakecitycc.edu

VP/ADA/EA/EO COLLEGE IN
EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT


First Day
Administrative Sales Assistant
needed for a busy dealership. All
applicants must be proficient in
Word and Excel. Excellent
communication skills and
telephone skills a must. Great work
environment and benefit package,
health, dental and a 401k. E.O.E.
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS. Fax
resume to: 386-362-3541, Attn:
Dave Esco, Jr., General Manager
or mail to:
WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD
P. O. BOX N
LIVE OAK, FL 32064,


First Day
Assistant Manager Needed.
Contact Advance Cleaners in Publix
Plaza in Lake'City, FL (Hwy. 90
West). Benefits available. Apply in
person, no phone calls, please.


First Day
Carrier needed for Times-Union
Newspaper delivery in Live Oak, FL
area. Call (386) 752-5121.

CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.

Clerical/Industrial
HELP WANTED

MANY POSITIONS AVAILABLE
INDUSTRIAL/CLERICAL
APPOINTMENT NEEDED
CALL FOR INFO:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGROUND/DRUG SCREEN
REQUIRED

First Day
Domestic & Farm Help
2 PEOPLE
to work on quail hunting plantation.
Housing & Salary for both. Call 386-
755-0220 Ext. 834


First Day
DRIVER- Repeat This! 4 days off! 4
days off every 2 weeks!
KLLM - CDLA - EOE
Students Welcome
866-357-7351

First Day
DRIVERS NEEDED. Full or part-
time. Flexible hours. Valid Driver's
License required. Call Trans-Care
Services @ 386-364-4474 for appt.
for interview.


First Day
EXPERIENCED DENTAL
ASSISTANT
Needed P/T for busy General
Practice (non-smoking office).
Great opportunity for a team
S player.
Fax resume to 386-362-1319.
Resumes already received
need not re-apply.
Groundskeeper
VILLAGE OAKS APARTMENTS
has an immediate opening for a
groundskeeper-24 hours per week.
Must have experience in grounds
maintenance and grounds
equipment maintenance. Drug free
work place. Must have valid dr.
license & own car or truck. Some
travel will be required. Apply at the
rental office. 705 Northwest Drive,
Live Oak, FL. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Call 386-364-7936.
TDD/TTY 711.

First Day
Housekeeper
Full time position in O'Brien area in
Suwannee County. Duties include
housecleaning, laundry and running
errands. Must be experienced, have
dependable transportation and
excellent references. Call 800-704-
7397.
Housekeeping
Laundry & Bathhouses Attendant
position open. Experience preferred
but will train. Apply in person @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
MUSIC PARK
between 2pm-4pm @
3076 95th Dr. Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.


COMPREHENSIVE
COMMUNITY SERVICES, INC.

Is seeking a qualified individual to
fill Rest Area janitorial position.
Must be able to follow directions
and work independently. Physical
stamina to perform job
requirements. Must have
transportation and able to use
telephone, have good attitude..
ADA/EOE/Drug free work place.
Apply CCS, 506 S. Ohio Ave., Live
Oak, FL.

First Day




IBELLI


JOIN OUR TEAM!
Actively seeking qualified
Managers
for our Lake City, Live Oak, &
Macclenny locations. Resumes
may
be faxed to (386) 755-2296 or
applications may be obtained at
any location.


LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.
maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug. free
workplace.
Call (386) 330-2567
STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.


First Day
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF TRANSPORTATION

Has an opening for an Automatic
Service Technician & Mechanic,
Level 2. Bi-Weekly Salary Range is
$801.93 -$1,100.00. Minimum
qualifications:

1. Knowledge of preventative
maintenance for automobiles,
trucks, diesel engines or related
equipment.

2. Knowledge of testing equipment
used in the repair of automotive
equipment.

3. Ability to lift 70 pounds.
4. Ability to perform - oxygen,
acetylene and electric welding
related to automotive and
equipment repairs.

5. Ability to read, write and
understand shop manuals and
work orders.

6. Ability to climb, squat, stoop,
bush, pull, crawl, bend and work in
all types of weather.

Special Requirement: Class A
Driver's License.

Please apply on-line att
https://iobs.myflorida.com. Refer to
Requisition number 55010420.
Only State of Florida applications
will be accepted-no resumes,
please.

Closing date is February 1. 2005.

EO/AA/VP Employer

First Day
MUSGROVE
CONSTRUCTION INC.
Has an immediate opening for
experienced mechanic. Hydraulic
knowledge a plus. Must have own
hand tools. Call 386-362-7048 or
come by the office of Musgrove
Construction, 8708 US 90 Live
Oak. Drug Free Workplace.


&cc ee44ee4





aaL Sewecee

Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Established full service co.
WE BUY MORTGAGES.
NO0) 226-6044 n
r 622 NW43rd St, Suitc A-I
Licensed Mtg. Lender


TRAILER HARBOR
MOBILE HOME PARK LAKE WOOD
A Family Park with APARTMENTS IN
rentals. Drug Free LIVE OAK
in-town location.Single Quiet country living
and Double lots bedroom duplex. Call
available. 362-3868 362-3110.
128497JS-F 128545JS

caoo O g4

Rental Assistance HUD Vouchers Welcome
1, 2 & 3 BR HC.& Non-HC
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non- Accessible Apartments
HC Accessible Apartmentsle Aparmens

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL 705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 71 1 TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity -, uEqual Hoising Oppornily


General ^General

GOOD -BUY S CASH ** i """" MMEDIA',
CLASSIFIED " I



HOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED AD

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


What do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.

Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.

iCan the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.

A re you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.

What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising. f


Have you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.


How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.


Call 1-800-525-4112 today!






* DEPARTMENT * 11 * 11 * I *

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M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


-PAGE 4C . -u-.-- .. .. .... ...- - - --.,


FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


362-1734


MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO.
INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
11th St. or call (386) 362-1235.

Mechanic
Full Time position open at
Spirit of the Suwannee.
Experience Required.
Apply in person from
2pm-4pm @
3076 95th Dr., Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.

First Day
medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking RN for Risk Management/
Staff Developmerit

First Day

medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking Full Time/Part Time
RN's & LPN's


Member Service Representative
Suwannee River Federal
Credit Union
has an opening for a Member
Service Representative position
working in the Jasper and Live Oak
offices. Cash handling/teller
experience and computer experience
is a must. Applications can be
obtained at the Live Oak office
located at 203 Pinewood Way and
Jasper office at 102 Central Avenue
NW. Deadline for applications is
January 24, 2005.

PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Full/Part time Flex. Hrs.-
Competitive Salary- Paid
CEU/Licensure. Send resumes to
'more than words' PEDIATRIC
THERAPY ASSO, INC. fax 229
44-4244 or call 229-244-4545


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


Sales
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Sales People
or Right People with no Experience
Will Train

*Up To 35% Commissions
* Demo Program for Sales
People
* Health Insurance
* Great Work Environment
* Paid 3% on F&I
*Paid Salary During Training

Please call Bobby Cogswell
at 386-362-1112


First Day

Secretary/Receptionist
Full time position in busy real estate
office in Mayo. Must have excellent
computer skills with emphasis on
Windows, Word and Excel with
experience in general office duties.
Send resume to: PO Box 268, Mayo,
FL 32066


Adoption

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Full
service nationwide adoption agency specializing in
matching families with birthmothers. TOLL FREE
24/7 (866)921-0565. ONE TRUE GIFT
ADOPTIONS www.onetruegift.com.


Announcements


Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS by
Ron L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99
to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.


Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories.
Quick turn around! Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.


Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(800)814-6323 B02000033. CALL US: We will not
be undersold!

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You
approve Loc's-$10,670 (800)836-3464 #B02428.


Financial


AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW $
ProgramFL Company offers best cash now options.
Have money due from Settlements, Annuities, or
Lotteries? Call (800)774-3113 www.ppicash.com.


For Sale


CHURCH FURNITURE. Does your church need
pews, pulpit set, baptistery, steeple, windows, carpet?
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First Day
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'The Lake City Reporter is seeking
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skills, ability to meet deadlines and
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environment, paid holidays,
medical & 401K.
Interested applicants should send
resume to:
Advertising Director
Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
No phone calls please.


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1-800-525-4182


Service Aide full/part time. Assist
individuals with physical and
developmental disabilities; flexible
schedule, trains people in activities
of daily living in the community. One
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persons with developmental
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background screenings.
ADA/EOE/Drug free. Apply at:
COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY
SERVICES
506 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL








LAKE CITY
CIMNURlTY EILLIE

SIGN LANGUAGE
INTERPRETERS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY

Bachelor's or Associate's degree
preferred, high school diploma or
GED, minimum. Must be RID or
State of Florida certified at Level II
or above. Computer literate.
Knowledge of technical terms a
plus.
Contact: Janice Irwin
@ 386-754-4215 or
e-mail: Irwin@lakecitvcc.edu
To remain open until positions
are filled. Application available
on
WEB: www.lakecitycc.edu
AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION COLLEGE IN
EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT
VETERAN'S PREFERENCE


First Day

ST. AUGUSTINE
YOUTH SERVICES
is seeking Houseparent Couples
for therapeutic group home for
emotionally handicapped boys.
Good pay, great benefits. Fax
resume to (904) 825-0604, call
(904) 829-1770, or apply in person
at 50 Saragossa Street, St.
Augustine, Florida. EOE/DFWP.

Stable hand/trail guide rider
position open at
Spirit of the Suwannee Stables.
Experience necessary. Must have
reliable transportation and great
horse/people skills, available to
work weekends. Apply in person @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
MUSIC PARK
3076 95th Dr.
Live Oak, FI 32060
(North on Hwy. 129) E.O.E.

WAYNE FRIER
CORPORATE OFFICE
in Live Oak, FL is seeking a mature
individual to' fill multi-task posillon
Background in Banking, Finance' or
Mortgage Lending helpful. Call
Larry J. Olds at 386-362-2720.


First Day

Tax Preparers
i!! EARN EXTRA MONEY!!!
JACKSON HEWITT
LIVE OAK & JASPER OFFICES
now hiring, experienced tax
preparers.
(386) 362-1633
945 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL 32064


First Day
TEMPORARY ROAD
MAINTENANCE WORKER I

The Suwannee County Public
Works Department is currently
recruiting for two temporary Road
Maintenance Worker I positions.
Responsibilities include but are not
limited to performing manual
and/or semi-skilled labor as
directed by supervisor. May
perform minor repairs/adjustments
or maintenance on equipment.
These positions will primarily work
in the Live Oak area. Qualifications
include one year of manual labor
experience and education
equivalent to a partial high school
education. Must possess a valid
Florida Drivers License. Rate of
pay is $7.29 per hour. Interested
applicants are required to submit a
County application to the
Administrative Services
Department, 224 Pine Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, (386)
362-6869 no later than 5:00 p.m.
January 28, 2005. All applicants
are subject to a pre-employment
physical . and drug test.
EEO/AA/V/D

Truck Drivers
PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS
$1000.00 New Hire Bonus for
experienced drivers! Call about dry
bulk and flat bed positions @ our
Newberry terminal. 866-300-8759.






TRANSPORTATION

Autos for Sale
FOR SALE 1994 Chevy Lumina.
Runs good. Good tires. $1200.00
firm. Call 386-362-6479.

FOR SALE '98 Ford Contour SE
Sport, 4dr. Low mi., good condition,
clean, well maintained,good tires.
AC/AM/FM/CD/power everything.
Asking $4000. 386-842-2006
days/eves.

TAKE OVER PAYMENTS of $450.00
per month on a 2004 Chevy Max.
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.

Trucks for Sale
FOR SALE 2002 Ford Ranger.
$10,500.00. 'Good condition. Can be
seen @ 122 W. Duval, Live Oak,
across from bread store. Call for
more info 386-362-7084.


WITNESS my hand and official seal of said LAST KNOW RESIDENCE IS:
Court this 6th day of January, 2005.


(SEAL)


KENNETH DASHER
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY: /s/: Arlene D. Ivev
DEPUTY CLERK
Arlene D. Ivey


R. FRANKLIN RITCH, P.A.
POST OFFICE BOX 1143
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32602
(352) 377-2889
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
01/14; 21


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 612005CA0000040001XX

COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.
PLAINTIFF

VS.

JOSEPH R. NEES, IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD,
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND
ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST JOSEPH R. NEES; MONICA R.
NEES, IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD, THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES. ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS. TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MONICA
R. NEES; JP MORGAN CHASE BANK F/K/A
THE CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, AS
INDENTURE TRUSTEE; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)

RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order Granting the Motion to Reset
Foreclosure Sale dated January 13, 2005
entered in Civil Case No. 05-04CA of the
Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and
for SUWANNEE County, LIVE OAK, Florida, I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
at THE FRONT STEPS of the SUWANNEE
County Courthouse, 200 S. OHIO AVENUE,
LIVE OAK, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th
day of February, 2005 the following described
property as set forth ins said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:

COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE S 1/2 OF THE SE 1/4 OF
S 1/4 OF NE 1/4, SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, AND RUN
SOUTH 88034'40" WEST ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID S 1/2 A DISTANCE
OF 757.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 14038'21"
EAST 172.63 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
12053'57" WEST 119.13 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 76�35'29" WEST 121.02 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 62"58'48" WEST 290.87
FEET; THENCE NORTH 88043'16" WEST
203.44 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SE 1/4 OF, NE 1/4; THENCE NORTH
00012'40" WEST ALONG SAID WEST LINE
104.41 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SAID S 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF NE
1/4; THENCE NORTH 88�34'40" EAST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID S 1/2 A
DISTANCE OF 563.75 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; SUWANNEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Dated this 13th day of January, 2005.'

KENNETH DASHER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
by: /s/AleoeD.Ieyv
DEPUTY CLERK
Arlene D. Ivey

DAVID J. STERN, PA.
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE SUITE 500
PLANTATION, FL 33324
(954) 233-800
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons with
disabilities needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the SUWANNEE County Courthouse at 904-
758-2163, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
01/21,28


NOTICETO RECLAIM
ABANDONED PROPERTY

To: Al Vails. John Hernendez

Address of former Tepant: 10813 225th Rd.
Live Oak. Fl

When you vacated premises at:10813 2251h
Rd. Live Oak. FI
the following personal property remained:

Multiple Autos

You may claim this property at 10813 2251h
Rd Live Oak, FI

Unless you pay the reasonable costs of
storage and advertising, if any, for all the
above-described property and take
possession of the property which you claim,
not later than February 1..2005 (if personally
delivered not fewer than 10 days, not fewer
than 15 days after notice is deposited in the
mall) this property may be disposed of
pursuant to s. 715.109.

"If you fail to reclaim the property, it will be
sold at a public sale after notice of the sale
has b een given by publication. You have the
right to bid on the property at this sale. After
the property is sold and the costs of storage,
advertising, and sale are deducted, the


DONNA GAIL RITTER TIFFANY N.
CLIMACO
UNKNOWN UNKNOWN

PRESENT RESIDENCE IS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following property
in SUWANNEE County, Florida:

Lot 16, Section B, SUWANNEE
RANCHETTES, as recorded in Plat Book 1,
Page 111, public, records of Suwannee
County, Florida. Together with and including a
1981 Liberty mobile home, I.D. number
10L13918, which is located on and affixed to
the property.

has been filed against you. You are required to
file written defenses with the clerk of the court
and to serve a copy within thirty (30) days
after the first publication on or before February
28, 2005, of this notice on Plaintiff's attorney,
Golson Law Firm, 1230 South Myrtle Avenue,
Suite 105, Clearwater, FL 33756-3445,
otherwise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court
on this 13th day of January, 2005.


(SEAL) Kenneth Dasher
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/Arlene D. Ive
" De: ..uli, Clr,.
, rl.r.n 0 1.&,


01/21,28


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO. 01-004-CJ

IN THE INTEREST OF:
WHATLEY, Marlene (F) DOB: 09-20-92
WHATLEY, Shawn (M) DOB: 01-03-95
BRACKENBURY, Michael (M) DOB: 10-18-
89
MINOR CHILD

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF ADVISORY
HEARING FOR TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS AND GUARDIANSHIP

STATE OF FLORIDA

TO: Michael Brackenbury, Sr.
(Address Unknown)

Last Known Address:
18542 136th Street
Live Oak, Florida 32060

WHEREAS a Petition for Termination of
Parental Rights under oath has been filed in
this court regarding the above-referenced
children, a copy of which is available at the
office of the Suwannee County Clerk of Court
in Live Oak, Florida,

YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO
APPEAR BEFORE THE HONORABLE
WILLIAM R. SLAUGHTER, II, ACTING
CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR THIS COURT, AT THE
SUWANNEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, IN
LIVE OAK, FLORIDA ON FEBRUARY 21.
2005 AT 9:00 A.M. for a TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING.
You must appear on the date and at the time
specified.

FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT
THIS ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES
CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD (OR
CHILDREN). IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON
THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU MAY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE CHILD
(OR CHILDREN) NAMED IN THE PETITION
ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE. YOU ARE
ENTITLED TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY
PRESENT TO REPRESENT YOU IN THIS
MATTER. IF YOU WANT AN ATTORNEY BUT
ARE UNABLE TO AFFORD ONE, YOU MUST
APPEAR TO NOTIFY THE COURT AND THE
COURT MAY APPOINT AN ATTORNEY TO
REPRESENT YOU.

In the Interest of Whatley/Brackenbury

Witness my hand and seal of this court
at , , County, Florida, on
this _ day of 2005.

(Seal) Clerk of Circuit Court

By:
Deputy Clerk

Joann Humburg, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 831328
Attorney for the Department of
Children and Family Services
Child Welfare Legal Services
2649 U. S. Hwy 90, West
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS
WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a
special accommodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact Court
Administrator, no later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceeding, at 386-758-2163
01/14,21,28,02/04


To place your ad

in the Classified

Marketplace, call

Louise at 386-

362-1734 today.


FCAN



Week of January 17, 2005


1 133320-F
i I i u i 'i ' , * !l1


First Day

FOR SALE 1998 GMC Jimmy. Re-
built engine w/less than 10,000
miles, new tie rods. See-@ 13366
Hwy 136W. Call 386-362-3357.

Vans for Sale
FOR SALE 1996 Dodge Converted
Van. Low Mileage. $6,000.00 OBO.
Must sell! Call 305-338-8990 or
leave msg. @ 386-330-0355.

Motorcycles
FOR SALE 2004 50cc GY50. dirt
bike. Disk brakes, electric start, 4-
speed trans. Like new. $800.00. Call
386-362-4491.

Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 01-161-CA

THOMPSON GROUP, INC,
a Florida Corporation
Plaintiff,

vs.

PHYLLIS M. HALEY,
formerly known as
Phyllis M. Mauther,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure,
dated January 5, 2005, I will sell the property
situated in Suwannee County, Florida
described as follows:

Lot Sixteen (16) of Oak Hill Farms
Subdivision, a Subdivision as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 248 of the Public Records of
Suwannee County, Florida

at public sale, to the highest and best bidder
for cash at the steps of the front door of the
Suwannee County, Courthouse, located in
Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida, at 11:00
A.M. on the 4th day of February, 2005.


remaining move will be paid over to the
county. You may claim the remaining money at
any time within 1 year after the county
receives the money."

Dated: January 10. 2005
Is/Galogan
Name of Landlord

386-658-2623
Telephone Number of Landlord

10813 225th Rd. Live Oak FL

Address of Landlord
01/14,21


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THETHIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR SUWANNEE, COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 61-2004-CA-000251


WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA,
N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR SALOMON
BROTHERS MORTGAGE SECURITIES
VII, INC.

Plaintiff

vs.

DONNA GAIL RITTER, et al.
Defendants)

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: DONNA GAIL RITTER, TIFFANY N.
CLIMACO, AND, IF A NAMED DEFENDANT
IS DECEASED, THE SURVIVING SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
CREDITORS, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THAT DEFENDANT, AND THE
SEVERAL AND RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
ASSIGNS, SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST,
TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST ANY CORPORATION OR OTHER
LEGAL ENTITY NAMED AS A DEFENDANT,
AND ALL CLAIMANTS, PERSONS OR
PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR
WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS
UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF
THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED
DEFENDANTS


C)A'-E Af






R SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


America's farms and ranch
families produce a bounty of food
and fiber, allowing us to enjoy the
safest, most abundant and most
affordable food supply in the world.
This bounty clearly tips the scale
when compared in pounds produced
annually.
Total Livestock, Dairy and Eggs
(in billions of pounds)
Dairy products: 165.3


Food from America's farms


Poultry (turkeys and broilers): 50.2
Beef and veal: 26.4
Pork: 19.2
Eggs: 9.1
Fish (catfish and trout): .7
Lamb and mutton: .2
TOTAL: 271,172,725,000
pounds
Total Crops
(in billions of pounds)
Dry Beans, peas, lentils: 2.7


Potatoes, sweet potatoes,
coffee, ginger root,
hops, peppermint oil,
spearmint oil and taro: 46.0
Horticulture (vegetables,
citrus, non-citrus fruits
and nuts): 115.9
Cotton, tobacco,
sugarbeets, sugarcane: 132.0
Oilseeds (soybeans,
sunflowers, peanuts,


canola, cottonseed,
mustard seed, flaxseed,
rapeseed and safflower): 199.2
Hay and silage (hay, sorghum
and corn): 525.5
Grains (Corn, wheat, oats,
rice, barley, rye, sorghum
and proso millet): 708.4
TOTAL: 1,729,733,056,100 pounds
Total Livestock, Dairy, Eggs
and Crops Produced Annually


2,000,905,781, 100 pounds
(more than 2 trillion pounds)
While livestock products make up a
small percentage of pounds
produced, they account for almost
half the value of farm receipts.
Sources: American Farm Bureau
Federation; National Agricultural
Statistics Service - USDA;
Agricultural Statistics Board -
USDA.


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


W Metal Roofing
$ S$ SAVE SSSSS
Oualiti Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prces!!
3 ide gallalume Cul to your desired lengths!
3'vide painted Delivery Service Available,
2' ade 5-t 4sk about steel tldiwngs
Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg, Inc.
CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335


Trees. Trimmed or Removed
Insured * Free Estimates * Free Firewood


TREE WORK
Bucket Truck and Climbingll


963-5026


FIREWOOD
Seasoned Oak andi Cherr\ Cord $1 5.00
Half Cord $65.00(
Split & Stacked
We Deliver

* S




ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
" *For Your
S. David HOWE
McLaughin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
A Di 5sin o ,i,
KARDAV ENTERPRISES. INC. FE1061 - 2020






-4 GEl ER-.TI, I IS CF EYPERIEI ICE
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE

-gaa SGH|


;John's wr s:.iJrw
C:lanifni of Liv- Oak
Roofs * Mobile Homes
SBrick Homes * Stucco Homes
SDecks * Driveways
7free EStimate.
N'o ob Too Big... \o job Too Small
386-776-2067


J.D. KASTOR INC.


*Pool & Pntii Des 'i
* Spracrte 'RirK r Rock
* Paininlag & Stucco
* Il Iri,'ir.ExierTir
386-362-3107
386-330-4717


* Lictiind Contractor
* Highly E rperincied
* Free E'timates
Ial "l h' a i. ,.' S'-i ti ,
Li'_ OAik. FL ,"i0ii
L, |. " v ahl? , , ,.,f


m...........


DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
Residential Nlake-overs * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

SCabhinets. Ceramic
Fnr nnnmn ol iour 1me -r'l. -r .. -


repairs and needs call
John & Trish Adams
i3861 362-7916


I 1We. Counter lops,
Floor Co ering,
Painting. Decks.
Screened Enclosures.


To place
an ad on
this page,
please
call Myrtle
at
(386) 362-1734,
ext. 103.


Drivers & Sons Custom Mat Ci

0lo0s Jasper, Florida I
'^*'^J.W ^SA
l-!i:-'&'.1-14s''


C 'uslom *
Slaughter. Culling
\rapping
Plrani .& Sausage
I -: ti-.:i,- Il!l


Office (386) 364-5045
Mobile (386) 362-9178
Michael Guenther, :..,


NrME




Insured
Pressure
Cleaning
Site
Clean
Up
Up


CARROLL

CONCRETE
* Curbing * Gutters * Monolithic Slabs
* Patios * Driveways & Sidewalks
* Commercial & Residential
SLicensed & Insured
Rt. 2 Box 166 (386) 938-1156
Jennings, FL 32053(386) 938-1156


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PAGE 5C


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Picking produce: How to shop like a pro


. ,*s ,^ -. 1'. f Yi k E? '^.i ,v.:- , . .' . . .. ........ . .. . .. . -
KNOWING WHAT TO LOOK FOR when shopping for produce can make all the difference come
mealtime.


You are in the produce sec-
tion of your supermarket or
at the local produce stand,
feeling the melons and ana-
lyzing the tomatoes, but not
really sure what you should
be looking for.
The first sign to look for:
freshness. Fruits and vegeta-
bles should be bright in color
and in season. If they look
decayed, don't buy them.
You also shouldn't buy more
vegetables than you need.
Otherwise, they won't be
fresh by the time you are
ready to eat them.
Luckily, The United States
Department of Agriculture
has created grades to go by
for most vegetables and
fruits. Although you won't
always see them in the store,
they are used among grow-
ers, shippers and retailers.
All grades are healthy, but


differ in appearance and
quality. For veggies, U.S. No.
1 is the most common grade.
These vegetables are tender,
look fresh, have good color
and lack bruises or decay:
U.S. Fancy vegetables, an-
other grade, are more uni-
form in shape and have fewer
defects than U.S. No. 1 veg-
gies. U.S. No. 2 and U.S. No.
3 have lower quality require-
ments. For fruits, U.S. No. 1
indicates good quality and is
the most common grade. As
in vegetables, U.S. No. 2 and
U.S. No. 3 have lower quali-
ty standards. U.S. Fancy
fruits are premium quality
and few fruits earn this
grade.
These USDA guidelines
are helpful in choosing spe-
cific vegetables and fruits.
Remember that each individ-
ual vegetable and fruit has its


own characteristics, and,
over time, you'll be able to
distinguish between them all
and earn the title of an expe-
rienced produce shopper.
VEGETABLE
SHOPPING GUIDE
Artichokes: Look for
plump artichokes with thick,
green and fresh-looking
scales. Avoid artichokes with
grayish-black discoloration
and mold or brown areas on
the scales.
Asparagus: Look for
closed, compact tips and
smooth, round spears with a
rich green color. Avoid tips
that are open, moldy or de-
cayed.
Broccoli: Look for a firm,
compact cluster of small
flower buds which are not
opened enough to show the
bright-yellow flower. Bud
clusters should be dark green,


sage green or have a purple
tint. Avoid broccoli with
spread bud clusters, enlarged
or open buds, yellowish-
green color or that look wilt-
ed.
Carrots: Look for carrots
which are well formed,
smooth, firm and well col-
ored. Avoid ones with wilting
roots or that show signs of
rotting.
Cauliflower: Look for
cauliflower that is white to
creamy-white, compact, sold
and with clean curds. Curds
should not appear spread.
Celery: Look for ones that
are fresh and crisp. Stalks
should feel solid and rigid
and leaves should look fresh
and only slightly wilted.
Avoid ones with wilted
leaves or flabby upper
branches. Branches should
not show black, brown or
grey discoloration,
Corn: Look for corn with'
fresh husks, silk ends that are
not decayed and stem ends
(opposite from the silk) that.
are not discolored or dead.
Ear should be well-covered
with plump and not-too-ma-
ture kernels.
Cucumbers: Look for cu-
cumbers that are firm all 6ver
and well developed and not
too large in diameter. Avoid
ones that are yellowish and
large in diameter.
Lettuce: Look for fresh
lettuce with good, bright col-
or. Avoid heads with irregular
shapes and hard bumps on
the tops.
Mushrooms: Button
mushrooms should be small
to medium in size. Caps
should be closed around the
stem or open slightly with
pink or tan gills. Caps should
be white or creamy.
Onions: Look for hard or
firm onions without blemish-
es. Necks should be dry and
small. Avoid onions with wet
or soft necks or with fresh


sprouts.
Peppers: Peppers should
have a deep color, glossy
sheen, heavy weight and firm
walls or sides.
Potatoes: General purpose
and baking potatoes should
be smooth, firm and free
from blemishes, sunburn and
decay. Avoid potatoes with
large cuts, bruises, decay,
sprouts, shrivels or that are
green.
Tomatoes: Tomatoes
should be smooth, ripe and
free of blemishes. Avoid ones
that are soft, overripe,
bruised, moldy or have wa-
ter-soaked spots.
FRUIT SHOPPING
GUIDE
Apples: Look, for firm,
crisp, well-colored apples.
Avoid apples with bruises or
irregularly shaped tan or
brown areas.
Bananas:' Look for ba-
nan.as' lhich are firm, bright
ard without .bruises. Avoid
SQnes .hat, have discolored
skins or a dull, grayish, aged
appearance.
Blueberries: Look for
plump, firm, dry, uniformly
sized blueberries that are
dark-blue colored with a sil-
very waxy coating. Avoid
ones that are soft, mushy or
leaking.
Cantaloupe: Look for
melons without a stem and
with thick, coarse and corky
netting (or veining). 'Avoid
ones with large bruises or
mold.
Cherries: The most succu-
lent cherries will have bright,
glossy, plump surfaces and
fresh stems. Avoid cherries
that look shriveled, are dull
in color, moldy or have
brown discoloration.
Grapefruit: Look for firm
fruits, heavy for their size.
It's okay if the skin has scales
or discoloration. Avoid ones
with dull color and water-
soaked areas, and a soft, ten-


der peel that breaks easily
with the slightest finger pres-
sure.
Grapes: Look for well-
colored plump grapes that are
firmly attached to the stem.
Avoid grapes that are soft,
wrinkled or leaking or have
bleached areas around the
stems.
Honeydew: Look for mel-
ons that are soft and velvety
in texture. Avoid ones with
large, water-soaked, bruised
areas.
Lemons: Look for firm
and heavy lemons with a
rich, yellow color and a
smooth-textured skin with a
slight gloss. Avoid ones that
have a dark yellow color,
hard or shriveled skin, soft
spots, mold or punctured
skin.
Oranges: Oranges should
be firm and heavy with a
fresh, smooth, bright skin.
Avoid ones that have a rough,
dull skin and that are light-
weight and look discolored.
Pears: Look for hard
pears. Avoid ones that are
wilted or shriveled with dull
skin or spots. Pears will ripen
and soften at your home.
Pineapples: Look for ones
with bright color and a fresh
aroma. Avoid ones that look
dried or have a dull yellow
skin.
Strawberries: Look for
berries with a full red color,
bright luster, firm flesh and
stems still attached. Avoid
ones with large uncolored ar-
eas, a shrunken appearance,
softness or mold.
Watermelons: Watermel-
ons should have firm, juicy
flesh with good red color that
lacks any white streaks.
Seeds should be a dark brown
or black shade. (Seedless wa-
termelons may have small
white seeds.) Avoid ones
with pale-colored flesh,
white streaks and whitish
seeds.


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2005


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


P~rlAlr Ar^


419mmmr-








FR ILrI, uJu'4'A/I-Zi , Z U i


By The

NUMBERS 714 -

Games through Jan. 16
' ' ' * -' . * , ..,


Kentuck3
Florida
S. Carol
Vanderbi
Tennesse
Georgia


Miss. Sta
Alabama
Ole Miss
LSU
Arkansas
Auburn


-- f. -_ . , _- - = . .-
EASTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
y 3-0 12-2 1-2 74.7
3-0 11-3 0-1 82.7
ina 2-2 10-5 0-3 69.8
ilt 2-2 11-6 1-2 69.2
ee 2-2 9-7 1-2 65.5
0-4 6-8 0-2 57.0
WESTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
ite 3-1 15-3 3-1 80.0
a 2-1 13-3 2-1 64.3
2-2 11-6 2-2 65.0
1-1 8-5 0-2 68.5
s 1-3 13-4 0-3 64.8
0-3 9-7 0-1 67.7


' - v LEADERS
Average per game
FIELD-GOAL PCT.
Florida ................... .
Alabama. ....................
Arkansas. ....................
LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . .
Ole Miss. ....................
Tennessee ..................
Vanderbilt ...................
South Carolina ................
FIELD-GOAL PCT. DEFENSE


Miss. State. . ..............
Kentucky .. . . . . . . . . . . .
Arkansas. ................
Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
South Carolina ..... . . . . . . .
Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . .
Alabama. ..... . . . . . . . ...
FREE-THROW PCT.
LSU ......... ..........
Alabama. .................
Auburn .............. . ..
Vanderbilt ................
Tennessee ................
Miss. State. ...............
Florida ..................
REBOUNDING


Miss. State.
Kentucky .
Alabama. .
Florida. ..
Arkansas. .
LSU ....
Vanderbilt.
Auburn . .

Vanderbilt.
LSU. . . .
Florida. ..
Kentucky .
Arkansas. .
Ole Miss. .
Miss. State.


.. ... .. -. -, . ,_-: : - .- . . . .� - : . - ..' "




, , i . . " , " - . - .
' ." ' " - ' . -: -- --"
'. ' . : " '.. .: :. . . . -
- "~~~~~~� """' :--' -7;,

f ;_ 3 - :2-.-':; i


02005 Longwing Publications Inc.
GAME OF THE WEEK

Vanderbilt at Georgia


. . . .376
. . . .388
. . . .389
. . . .408
. . . .415
. . . .416
....417

. . . .754
. . . .743
. . . .718
. . . .693
. . . .682
....680
. . . .676

S. . 43.3
S. 38.5


38.3
37.0
35.8
35.4
34.4
34.4


ASSISTS

S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .




BLOCKS


Arkansas .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Kentucky . .................
Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Georgia. ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LSU. ...... . . . . . . . . . . . .

INDIVIDUAL :- Y :.
- --- SCORING
To-ne Dougli, Auburn . . . . . . .
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State . . . . . . . .
Anthony Roberson, Florida . . . . . . . . ..
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Kennedy Winston, Alabama . . . . . . . . .
Earnest Shelton, Alabama. . . . . . . . . . .
REBOUNDING
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State . . . . . . . .
Chuck Hayes, Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . .
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jermareo Davidson,Alabama . . . . . . . .
Glen Davis, LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
David Lee, Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FIELD-GOAL PCT.
Brandon Bass, LSU. ..... . . . ...
Carlos Powell, South Carolina . . . . . . . .
Chuck Davis, Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . .
Anthony Roberson, Florida . . . . . . . . ..
Londrick Nolen, Ole Miss . . . . . . . . . .
Ronnie Brewer, Arkansas . . . . . . . . . ..
FREE-THROW PCT.
Channing Toney, Georgia. . . . . . . . . . .
Anthony Roberson, Florida. . . . . . . . . .
Brandon Bass, LSU . . . .. . . . . . . . .
lan Young, Auburn ..............
Darrel Mitchell, LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chuck Davis, Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . .
ASSISTS


Tack Minor, LSU. . . . . . . .
Gary Ervin, Miss. State . . . .
C.J. Watson, Tennessee . . . .
Patrick Sparks, Kentucky . . .
Ronald Steele, Alabama . . . .
lan Young, Auburn . . . . . . .
BLOCKS


Steven Hill, Arkansas ... ........
Shagari Alleyne, Kentucky. .........
Chuck Davis, Alabama. ...........
Darian Townes, Arkansas . . . . . . . . . .
Brandon Wallace, South Carolina ......
Jermareo Davidson, Alabama . . . . . . . .


Illustration by Bruce Plante 0 2005



'Dogs in uphill battle


17.1 he sins of a previous administration have the University of
16.8 Georgia men's basketball team paying the price on the
16.6 court this season.
16.6 The Bulldogs are off to their worst start in conference play
16.1 since 1988, and some are even wondering if Georgia will win one
16.0 SEC game this season. Second-year head coach Dennis Felton is
16.0 trying to rebuild a Georgia program that will lose a scholarship a
year for the next four seasons because of rules infractions
� 6.7 committed under former head coach Jim Harrick, who was forced
. 5.4 out at the end of the 2002-03 season.
S5.1 Georgia may not have the depth or height to compete in the
. 4.7 SEC on a nightly basis. Levi Stukes, a sophomore, leads the
� 4.2 youngest team in the country and had a game-high 16 in last
S4.0 week's 76-55 loss to Kentucky, while freshman Sundiata Gaines
3.8 has been a solid contributor. The Bulldogs are scrappy and play
tough defense, which helps make up for a lack of height and gives
them a chance to pull an upset Saturday when Vanderbilt comes to
Siegeman Coliseum - - .
19.8 Coming off a run to last year's Sweet 16, Vanderbilt was picked
18.9 by the media to finish sixth in the SEC East. However, the
17.9 Commodores didn't look like a sixth-place team as they drilled
17.2 Alabama and Tennessee in their first two conference games.
16.9 Kevin Stallings' squad's success hinges on the ability to hit the
16.9 outside shot, and last week saw Vanderbilt suffer double-digit
losses to Kentucky and Florida. For the Commodores to avoid the
11.5 upset and pick up a crucial conference road win, they can't
S9.6 continue to live and die by the 3-pointer.
S8.5 E Records: Vanderbilt 11-6 (2-2 SEC East); Georgia 6-8 (0-4 SEC
S7.9 East). 0 Coaches: Vanderbilt's Kevin Stallings (219-138);
S7.7 Georgia's Dennis Felton (122-76). U Tip-off: 4 p.m. ET Saturday.
S7.4 TV: None.
Keys for Vanderbilt: Get something from the bench.
.606 Vanderbilt's reserves scored a season-low 10 points in last
.596 Saturday's 82-65 loss to Florida.... Do the little things, like
.561 getting defensive stops and grabbing rebounds.
.531 Keys for Georgia: Get production from Younes Idrissi. The
.515 freshman reserve from Morocco played well against Kentucky's
.508 interior players last Saturday .... Gaines has to make his free
throws. He went 1-for-5 from the line against Kentucky.


.905
.902
.883
.864
.837


The Rest of the Matchups

LSU at Kentucky


.829 N Records: LSU 8-5 (1-1 SEC West); Kentucky 12-2 (3-0 SEC
East). 0 Coaches: LSU's John Brady (217-174); Kentucky's
S6.0 Tubby Smith (327-116). 0 Tip-off: 1:30 p.m. ET Saturday. UTV:
. 5.9 CBS.
. 5.3 ' Keys for LSU: Good decision making by point guard Tack
. 5.1 Minor, the league leader in assists.... Defend the 3-point arc.
. 4.9 Ohio State hit a Maravich Center record 18 3-pointers last
. 4.5 Saturday.
Keys for Kentucky: Get ready to work against Brandon Bass
2.9 and Glen Davis. Kentucky's inside players won't have it as easy as
2.2 they did last Saturday against Georgia:... Slow down Darrel
S2.1 Mitchell.


1.8
1.7


Auburn at Arkansas


. 1.6 0 Records: Auburn 9-7 (0-3 SEC West); Arkansas 13-4 (1-3 SEC


West). a Coaches: Auburn's Jeff Lebo (124-70); Arkansas' Stan
Heath (64-45). & Tip-off: 1 p.m. CT Saturday. 1TV: Jefferson
Pilot.
Keys for Auburn: Find ways to compensate for a lack of height
and depth. Fatigue killed the Tigers down the stretch last week
against Florida and Ole Miss .... The Tigers can't be their own
worst enemy. Turnovers killed them against Ole Miss.
Keys for Arkansas: Jonathon Modica can't pass open looks like
he did in last Saturday's blowout loss at Mississippi State. ... Big
guys have to stay out of foul trouble. Starting center Steven Hill
had four fouls against the Bulldogs and played only 16 minutes,
while 6-foot-10 freshman Darian Townes played 13 minutes
before fouling out.'

Alabama at Ole Miss
IRecords: Alabama 13-3 (2-1 SEC West); Ole Miss 11-6 (2-2
SEC West). C-.:.hes- Alabama's Mark Gottfried (200-102); Ole
Mis' Rod Barnes (124-80). Tip-off: 3 p.m. CT Saturday.
* TV: Jefferson Pilot
Keys for Alabama: Find scoring options besides the Big Three
- Kennedy Winston, Earnest Shelton and Chuck Davis.... Hold
Ole Miss forward Londrick Nolen to less than 20 points.
Keys for Ole Miss: Maintain the hot hand. The Rebels shot
64.4 percent from the field against Auburn. ... Take better care of
the basketball. Ole Miss' hot shooting overcame 21 turnovers.

Tennessee at Louisville
Records: Tennessee 9-7 (2-2 SEC East); Louisville 14-3 (3-1
Conference USA). a Coaches: Tennessee's Buzz Peterson
(161-99); Louisville's Rick Pitino (430-157). Tip-off: 4 p.m.
ET Saturday. NTV: ESPN.
Keys for Tennessee: Don't be overly aggressive. The
Volunteers, who mostly defend with a zone, committed 24 fouls in
last Saturday's loss at South Carolina.... A big game from
Scooter McFadgon, who was 3-of-15 in last year's 65-62 loss to
the Cardinals.
Keys for Louisville: Francisco Garcia must bounce back after
hitting 2 of 13 shotsin Louisville's come-from-behind 69-66 win
over Cincinnati last Saturday. Garcia had a team-high 24 last year
against the Volunteers.... Get points off turnovers. The Cardinals
were only able to get 16,points off of 23 Tennessee turnovers last
year.

South Carolina at Mississippi State
M Records: South Carolina 10-5 (2-2 SEC East); Mississippi State
15-3 (3-1 SEC West). 8 Coaches: South Carolina's Dave Odom
(345-221); Mississippi State's Rick Stansbury (141-67). JiTip-
off: 5 p.m. CT Saturday. BTV:-Fox Sports Net/Sunshine
Network.
Keys for South Carolina: Compete down low. Tennessee
outscored the Gamecocks 34-18 in the paint and grabbed five
more rebounds. Mississippi State has outrebounded 15 of its first
18 opponents.... Harass Bulldog point guard Gary Ervin, who
had eight assists against 10 turnovers in two games last week.
Keys for Mississippi State: Try to generate some fast-break
opportunities. Since scoring 10 points off the break in the
conference opener against Auburn, the Bulldogs are averaging 3.3
fast-break points per game .... Reserves Dietric Slater and
Ontario Harper have to provide a spark


I I


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PAGE 7C


DI AY JANUARY 21 20 5


,IABAMA Earnest Shelton hit 7 of
11 shots and scored a
game-high 18 points in the Crimson Tide's
64-61 victory at Arkansas on Jan. 11. The
win gave Alabama consecutive road wins at
Arkansas for the first time since the
Razorbacks joined the SEC in 1991.
R MKANSAS For the first time this
season, Ronnie Brewer
was held under double digits as the
Razorbacks fell at Mississippi State 80-55
last Saturday. Brewer was 3-of-10 from the
field and finished with seven points in 32
minutes of action. Reserve Jonathon
Modica was the only Razorback to score at
least 10, racking up 14 points against the
Bulldogs.
UMk DrN Emanuel Willis, a 6-foot-S
I ttransfer from the
University of Southern California;has
enrolled at Auburn and should be eligible to
play next December. Willis averaged 1.5
points and one rebound in four games for
the Trojans this season. "He gives us some
size and athleticism at 6-foot-8, 220
pounds," Auburn head coach JeffLebo
said.
IR ID A Back problems may
sideline junior center
Adrian Moss for the rest of the season.
Back spasms forced Moss, who lost his
starting job to Al Horford five weeks ago, to
miss last Saturday's victory at Vanderbilt.
gScnORGIA In his first game against his
former coach, Dennis
Felton, Kentucky's Patrick Sparks scored
15 points and sparked his team to a 76-55
victory over Georgia. Sparks played for
Felton at Western Kentucky. When Felton
left Western Kentucky to coach the
Bulldogs. Sparks transferred to Kentucky
and sat out last season.
TUCI, 'Y Freshman Joe Crawford
left the team on Jan. 10
and announced his intention to transfer to a
school in his native Michigan. However,
Crawford may yet return to the Wildcats, as
Kentucky refused to grant him his release.
If he were to transfer, Crawford would lose
a year of eligibility and would be junior at
his new school.
Darrel Mitchell scored a career-
high 34 points, including a
3-pointer with eight seconds left in
regulation, as the Tigers defeated Ohio
State 113-101 in double overtime last
Saturday. Mitchell was one of 11 LSU
players in double figures. Three LSU
players had double-doubles: Brandon Bass,
Glen Davis and Tack Minor.
Wi slc SSIP PI :Senior Melvin Moore
IISISSIPPI set career bests with
23 points and 12 rebounds in the Rebels'
79-72 win atAuburn last Saturday. The
6-foot-6 Moore connected on 10 of his 13
attempts and grabbed seven offensive
rebounds. Moore's previous career highs
were 10 points and six rebounds.
ssinSS STATE In two games as the
S STAT Bulldgs' stariig
shooting guard, Jamall Edmondson has
averaged 7.0 points. Edmondson replaced
Winsome Frazier, who broke his left foot in
a victory over Ole Miss on Jan. 8 and is
expected to be out at least six weeks.
"We're going to miss (Frazier)." said head
coach Rick Stansbury after Tennessee
snapped the Bulldogs' 16-game road;
winning streak with a 64-63 victory on Jan.
12.

P sG ROLINA TreKelley hit a pair of
free throws with 20
seconds left for his only points in the
Gamecocks' 66-63 victory over Tennessee.
Kelley was 0 of 5 from the floor, grabbed
two rebounds and turned the ball over
twice. "Tre Kelley couldn't have had a
worse night," Gamecocks head coach Dave
Odom said. "He was horrendous. But, his
teammates wanted him in the game at the
end. He came off the bench and hit those
two big free throws. That says a lot about
him."
MMNNESSEE Head coach Buzz
Peterson took away
his team's practice jerseys following a'
25-point loss to Vanderbilt on Jan. 8.
Leading up to the victory over Mississippi
State, the Volunteers' practices
resemembled a shirts vs. skins pick-up
game. Peterson also used the same tactic to
motivate his teams when he coached at
Tulsa and Appalachian State.
�AnDERBILT Corey Smith banged
knees with a Florida
player and suffered a bruise to the tissue on
the inside of his right knee late in the first
half of last Saturday's 82-65 loss to the
Gators. Smith left the game with 3:43
remaining in the first half.


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