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Suwannee Democrat
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00005
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: January 19, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text


Recreation Department
Soccer opens with
Jamboree - Page 1B


Serving Suwannee County since 1884 Midweek Edition - January 19, 200


0 W D OW LING PARK

, SPECIAL SECTION FEATURED INSIDE




timn rrat


rTS


3 student

Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
The community of Branford in
-the southern part of Suwannee
County is in mourning after los-
ing three middle school boys ages
12 and 14 to self-inflicted hang-


hanging d
ing deaths since Nov. 8. The latest
death came ju't last week on Jan.
12 when Tevin Dwayne Touchton,
12, hanged hfiself from his bed
with a belt.
Prior to that, Touchton's friend,
Randolph Allen Patrick Hosier,
12, was found Nov. 8 in his home
by family members, hanging by


deaths stun Branford community


an electric power cord. On' Nov.
20, James "Jimmy" McCoy, 14,
was found by his mother hanging
in his bedroom closet.
All were students at Branford
High School where middle school
age students and high school age
students all attend the same
school. Both 12-year-olds were in


the sixth grade, while McCoy, 14,
was an eighth-grader. Touchton
had been good friends with
Hosier and attended his funeral.
"Our hearts and thoughts and
prayers are with not only with the
families, but the faculties and stu-
dents of Branford, and we're com-
mitted to doing whatever we can


to bring this thing to a close and
put a stop to it," Suwannee Coun-
ty Superintendent of Schools Wal-
ter Boatright said. "We can't af-
ford emotionally to lose another
child," said Boatright Monday
night regarding the tragedies.


SEE HANGING, PAGE 3A


Martin Luther King Jr.

Day celebrated with

parade, services


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter


"It's a very important holiday for people of all
races," said Suwannee County PAL Director GarN Edw yards
about Martin Luther King Jr. Day. "It's about equality."
;. Hundreds gathered in the cold Monday, Jan. 17, to start this
special day with a parade through the streets of Lil e Oak The
parade began at the Suwannee River Regional Librar and
oeund through Live Oak, took a left in the center of toi\ n on
SEE MARTIN, PAGE 11A

Father and son charged in

debris dumping scheme

landowner also charged
clearing debris minced with
Susan K. Lamb demolition waste for some
Democrat Managing Editor time in a large p on prop-
erty owned by a business
A father and son have associate. The business js-
been arrested in a Florida sociate was also anested,
Department of Environ- according to DEP, but that
mental Protection (DEP) arrest apparently took place


case where the two have re-
portedly been dumping land


SEE FATHER, PAGE11A


FREE AT LAST! It was cold, but that didn't stop John White from piloting his four-wheeler through the Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade tow-
ing a float. "Free at Last" is a famous and poignant quote from a great Martin Luther King Jr. speech. It symbolizes much for the black people of
the United StaleS and for White, tjlthluJly lowing the float through the freezing cold. The weather was beautiful just frigid, as hundreds of peo-
ple watched or rode and walked in the parade and celebrated the holiday. See additional photos Page 8-9A.- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccaiico


I t started out as a favorite pastime watching her mother
can bushels of peaches, but little did Jane Gruchacz of
Luraville know howwatching her mother would inspire
her creativity and start a fire within her that would last
a life time.
Like most youngsters, Gruchacz didn't pay much attention to
her mother's directions or the proper do's and don't of canning.
A determined Gruchacz would start from scratch years later by
picking up old canning instruction booklets and along with her
good friend Pat Bowen, they would start a self gratifying hobby
SEE CANNING, PAGE 10A


60-year-old crash victim

still in intensive care


Susan K. Lamb
Democrat Managing Editor
One victim of the two ve-
hicle crash at the intersec-
tion of CR 349 and 101st
Street is still hospitalized
and in critical condition, ac-


cording to his mother.
Marion Thornton said her
son, Archie J. "Jackie"
Thornton Jr., of O'Brien, re-
mains hospitalized ,at
Shands at UF in Gainesville
in the surgical intensive care

SEE 60-YEAR OLD, PAGE 11A


SIInauguration Day
Second Term for
President George W. Bush
Jan. 20. 2005
lining The 20th Amendment
entlhusist provides that "The terms of
e Grcaz the President and Vice
l displays her President shall end at
0 ouolyodrisplays her noon on the 20th day of
colorful and edible January.. and the
IF..W11 January.. and the
Story and photo treats Retred, Gruchacz terms of their successors
Story and photo by has taken canning shall then begin..."
Yvette Hannon ery seriously and See Speak Out Suwannee - Page 4A
Democrat Reporter thoroughly enjoys it.


Come SEE why more and more people 200i 5 C
are finding their best deal at Chei

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:S MAMYV AiAfERICAN_ R-VOIa

W S E, n iiH ANE Yamily Owned & Operated Since 1967,
-Just East Of Downtown. 362-2976 Live Oak, FL 129942JRS-F


TODAY'S
WEATHER


Suwannee County should see a mainly sunny sky. High today
around 60'F. Winds NW at 5 to 10 mph. For up to the minute
weather information go to www.suwanneedemocrat.com
FEATURED ON PAGE 6B


INDEX
Community Calendar ................ 3-9C
Classifieds ................................ 1-5C
S ports ....................... .................. 1-6B
Suwannee Living ............................. 5A
View point ........................................ 4A
Legal Notices................................. 7B


AREA DEATHS
Frank Ross, 82, Live Oak
Louise Brannan, 64, Branford
W.A. Green Jr., 67, Live Oak
Lorene Mitchell Weldon, 99, Live Oak
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 6A


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


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ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
N Managing Editor,
Susan K. Lamb, ext. 131
* Sports Reporter,
Janet Schrader-Seccafico, ext. 134
* Reporter,
Yvette Hannon, ext. 130
* Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, ext. 132



ADVERTISING
* Retail Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
* Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
* Advertising Representative,
Joel Turner, ext. 109
i'Advertising Representative,
Kathy Sasser, ext. 160
0 Classified Advertising Manager /
Telesales Ad Representative,
Myrtle Parnell, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,'
Louise Sheddan, ext. 102
* Classified/Legal,
Elizabeth Halloran, ext. 100


CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* Circulation
SService Hours, M-F 8 a m. -5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $30 Out-of-county, $40



Skuannre

Bemocrat


Serving Suwannee
County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located,
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064. Annual subscription rate is
$30 in county, $40 out of county and
$40 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


SPEAK OUT SUWANNEE
Call 386-208-8314. Comments to
Speak Out Suwannee MUST include
your name and day and evening '
phone numbers for verification. We will
include your name with your
comment. Speak Out Suwannee
comments can be -
limited to one comment '",-"'
per quarter per individual. i
Suv. nnre(Count~ Part of
"Thi Orrtiinil Florida" ',


BRIEFLY


Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff
in Live Oak Jan. 19
A member of Congressman
Allen Boyd's (D-North Florida)
staff will be visiting Live Oak
on the third Wednesday of
every month so the people of
Suwannee County have the op-
portunity to personally discuss
issues concerning them. Con-
gressman Boyd's staff is trained
to assist constituents with a va-
riety of issues relating to vari-
ous federal agencies. It is im-
portant to Congressman Boyd
that his staff is available for
those who are not able to travel
to either his Panama City or
Tallahassee 'offices. Office
hours with Congressman
Boyd's staff this month will be
Wednesday, Jan, 19, from 9:30
a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Live Oak
City Hall, Live Oak.
Gateway School Readiness
Coalition, Inc. quality and
executive committees will
meet Jan. 20
The Gateway School Readi-
ness Coalition, Inc. quality and
executive committees will meet
at 2 p.m. on ThursdaN. Jan. 20,
at the Gatewa) School Readi-
ness Coalition, 484 SW Com-
merce Drive, Suite 140, Lake
City. The coalition oversees the
state and federal funding for all
school readiness programs
birth to age five for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Suwan-


nee and Union Counties. They
encourage community partici-
pation and welcome any input.
If any persons) interested in at-
tending this meeting has a dis-
ability requiring special assis-
tance, please contact Heidi
Moore at 386-752-9770. No-
tice has been made of this
meeting, through publication,
to cover the "Government in
the Sunshine" law.
Jana Jae, a Hee Haw fiddle
player, and her blue fiddle
will perform in a free
concert at Wal-Mart in
Live Oak Jan. 20
Jana Jae, a Hee Haw fiddle
player and "The First Lady of
Country Fiddle!," will perform
with her blue fiddle and her
band Hotwire in a free concert
at Wal-Mart No. 2626, 6868
US 129, Live Oak beginning at
7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 20.
For more info, contact Robert
Bedenbaugh, 386-330-2488.
Situation Ethics
workshop Jan. 20
Q. Is it always right to tell the
truth or does it depend on the
situation? If you've ever strug-
gled with this question aid
many others like it [dealing
with - 'what is the right thing to
do?]...please join us for a brief
study in: Situation Ethics, Jan.
20, at 6:30 p.m. Led by Glenn
L. Jemigan at the Suwannee
River Regional Library, Com-
munity Meeting Room, US 129


52 - .1 T-i1 UaTriTe'4-i ki i
Q There are all types of
Q Lamenant flooring. How do
S� I decide which is the best
to purchase?


A The best deciding factor for
* purchasing Lamenant Flooring is
always the warranty. Longer warranty, better
quality. We at Live Oak Paint Center provide
the best & longest warranty available.


p.-- 7
l rjirrC*
I- * F'tff'


1512 Soul


S., Live Oak. Regardless of
your religious views, ethical
doctrine or philosophy of life -
everyone is welcome...as we
look at this sometimes contro-
versial but always interesting
ethical approach. This work-
shop is not library-sponsored. It
is educational in nature and
open to the public at large.
Again, all are welcome. No
charge. Free.
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida board of
directors meeting Jan. 20
Healthy Start of North Cen-
tral Florida board of directors
will meet at 2 p.m. on Thursday,
Jan. 20, at the United Way of
Alachua, 6031 NW 1st Place,
Gainesville. The public is invit-
ed. For more info, call Celia
Paynter at 352-955-2264, ext.
314.
Special videoconference:
Post-Storm Timber Tax and
Forest Health Issues to be
held Jan. 21
The 2004 hurricane season
was damaging to a large portion
of Florida's private timberlands.
Casualty loss and forest health
issues that thousands of private
timberland owners are now fac-
ing as a result of these storms
will beaaddressed by a special
videoconference: Post-Storm
Timber Tax and Forest Health
Issues. The videoconference
will be held on Friday, Jan., 21,
from 4:30-7:p.m. (EST) at 11
locations throughout Florida.
One of the eleven sites will be
'held in Live Oak at: UF-IFAS
Suwannee Valley North Florida
REC, 7580 CR 136, 386-362-
1725. Space is limited, register
early. For more info or to regis-
ter, contact Chris Demers at
352-846-2375 or
cdemers@ifas.ufl.edu. This free
program is a service of the
Florida Division of Forestry,
Forest Stewardship Program
Uiii'versity "'6' lodridi, I�AS,
Cooperative'Extension Service.




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Arrest Record


Editor's note: The Suwan-
nee Democrat prints the en-
tire arrest record each week.
If your name appears here
and you are later found not
guilty or the charges are
dropped, we will be happy to
make note of'this in the news-
paper when judicial proof is
presented to us by you or the
authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriffs Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police
Department.
FDLE-Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway Pa-
trol.
DOT-Department of Trans-
portation
,P and P-Probation and Pa-
role
Jan. 13, Robert Wade Bar-
nett, 45, Branford, violation
of injunction - two counts,
burglary, grand theft, SCSO
D. Poole.
Jan. 13, Donald Gene
Brown, 49, 517 Meadow St.,
possession of cocaine, SCSO
R. Sammons.
Jan. 13, Manuel Govea-
Solis, 20, Dobson, N.C., no
valid drivers license, failure
to stop at agriculture station,
OALE R. Baldwin.
Jan. 13, Timothy Eugene
Ingold, 48, White Springs,
driving while license sus-
pended permanently, FHP K.
Weaver.
Jan. 13, Tommy Russell
McDowell, 49, St. Peters-
burg, driving under the influ-
ence, FHP K.,Brookins.
Jan. 13, Cassandra Young
McGee, 35, Branford, manu-
facture of methamphetamine,
violation of probation op
original charges of trespass
of occupied structure, felony
'triririal ' riis'chief -'"'tWo
counts, domestic violence,
SCSO T. Ford.
Jan. 13, Cara Lee Nelson,
37, 12385 64th Street, failure
to appear on original charges
of possession of cocaine,
possession of more than 20
grams cannabis, possession
of drug paraphernalia, SCSO
M. Clark.
Jan. 13, Bernard New-
some, 48, Bradenton, viola-
tion of probation on original
charges of sale of cocaine,
possession of controlled sub-
stance, possession of drug
paraphernalia, SCSO' T.


Ford.
Jan. 13, Leslie Nannette
Simmons, 37, 6410 18'ist
Place, possession of cocaine,
LOPD J. Rountree. *i
Jan. 14, Cetoria Yvette
Brown, 24, 611 Seve;tth
Street, .littering, forgery, -tt-
tering a forgery, SCSO 1M.
Ramirez.
Jan. 14, Samuel Dillbn
Free, 21, Wellborn, sen-
tenced to 10 new days week-
ends, SCSO R. Ditter.
Jan. 14, Stanley Mark
Halonen, 36, McAlpin, dis-'
orderly intoxication, posses-
sion of less than 20 gramS:of
controlled substance , LOPD
T. Rodriguez.
Jan. 14, MerrillMax Raier
Jr., 25, Wellborn, battery dfo-L
mestic violence, resisting ar-
rest without violence, SOSO
B. Sears.
Jan. 14, Earnest Eugene
Tillman, 30, 417 Lo&kis
Blvd., resisting officer with-
out violence, driving while
license suspended or re-
voked, corruption by threat,
LOPD J. Rountree. '%
Jan. 14, Sanita Nidile
Walker, 22, Wellborn, failure
to appear on original charge
of grand theft, bond revoked
on original charge of grahd
theft, SCSO D. Downing.
Jan. 14, Frederick Antion
Williams, 30, 6445 119th
Road, gambling, SCSO T.
SDonaldson.
Jan. 15, Iris Mae JohnsOn,
43, 803 SW Walker Ave.,
Failure to appear on origifial
charge of petit theft, posses-
sion of crack cocaine, sale'of
crack cocaine, SCSO IL.
Rogers/R. Sammons. "'
Jan. 16, Kenneth Codks,
35, 618 Walker Ave., assault
domestic violence, LOPDIM.
Joseph.
Jan. 16, David Paul Hester
Jr. -32,'862 T1' l33iLd' aiffe, 's-
'saultdomestic violence; .te-
sisting without violence, vio-
lation of community control
on original charges of deol-
ing in stolen property - txio
counts, possession of fire
arm, burglary of dwelling,
SCSO M. Ramirez.
Jan. 17, George Junior
Hernandez, 18, 16533 104&h
St., battery domestic vio-
lence, SCSO L. Willis.
Jan. 17, Benjamin Gerald
Smith Jr., 20, 404 Anna Ar-
enue, Lot 34, battery dome-
tic violence, LOPD J. Rouh-
tree.


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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


PAGE 2A


I


~







WENSDY JNAR 9,205*SWANE EOCA/LV OKPAE3


Hanging
Continued From Page 1A

Services were held Mon-
'tday at Lebanon Baptist
.Church south of Branford for
Touchton.
Sheriff seeks answers
,. Sheriff Tony Cameron said
,. he's not going to point fin-
:.gers in this crisis, but rather
is going to work closely with
t.,he school system to try and
,;fix the problem. On Monday,
.,.Cameron was in Branford for
, the morning, meeting with a
specialist in self-inflicted
, deaths and shared with him
.11. he could to help get to the
Bottom of the deaths.
Cameron said he's recom-
; .mended that on in-service
.days, faculty be educated in
.self-inflicted death preven-
,,tion.
, . And, Cameron said, such
deaths are not new at all. "I
-,went to school specifically
.:.pn this very thing in 1984,"
_-Cameron said of when he
;,yas a deputy. But, he said,
during his time at Suwannee
H.,High as dean of students, he
_ianid the other faculty were
l,!ucky that students had a
.;good relationship with them
-and would come forward
,when they were worried
about the behavior of other
-.,students, and faculty would
'intervene., No cases of this
,,type of behavior were
-.recorded at SHS during his
yearss as dean, Cameron said.
Cameron said he's commit-
., ted to dealing with the issue.
r'; Activity may be
'- world-wide
According to a study by
- 0he Department of Pediatrics,
,University of British Colum-
;Nbia, Vancouver, Canada, par-
.,tial asphyxiation by hanging
',is a recognized thrill seeking
.behavior among youths. In a
report they posted on the In-
.-ternet, they say children as
,'.young as seven have died
.,vhile seeking this thrill
through various methods of
-.hanging one's self. However,
.in older males, the university
,said., autoerptic behavior in-
-ovplving partial strangulation
.i, !.


is recognized to occur, usual-
ly as a solitary act and may
be mistaken for attempted
suicide.
Community mourns,
seeks answers
The tragedies have con-
sumed the entire county in
grief and even adjoining
counties where residents are
stunned that two 12-year-
olds and a 14-year-old could
die at their own hands,
whether by accident or not,
and all within eight weeks
and two days of each. other.
But, say many, death may
not have been the intended
outcome.
Some of the parents of
those who died have -said
their children died from a
game they say many stu-
dents are playing where the
children are searching for a
"high" that is achieved and
enhanced by strangling one's
self just long enough before
stopping the game. If that is
the case, in the cases of
these three young men, the
game turned deadly and has
left an entire county in fear
that other children may do
the same thing.
Others say "blackout," is a
game they played in school
30-40 years ago that caused
a person to nearly pass out.
While some want immedi-
ate answers and education
for all the students in
Suwannee County and their
parents, others say they
don't want to share informa-
tion with children about
such a game, fearing knowl-
edge could lead the children
astray.
That may be bad advice.
In a newspaper article in an
area daily Sunday, Jan. 16, a
Gainesville Crisis center di-
rector, Marshall Knudson,
said parents should take a
pro-active stance in this sit-
uation and talk to their chil-
dren about the deaths. Knud-
son said it is no secret and
trying to make it one can
give the behavior, a power
unto itself instead of qorm-
municating that it's danger-


ous.
School District's crisis
plan
Boatright said a man
renowned world-wide for
his work with self-inflicted
death situations, Frank
Zenere of Ft. Lauderdale,.
will be in Branford High
School this week to help
search for answers. Boa-
tright said a staff member
met with Zenere Monday
evening in Lake City to map
out the plans for this week
before Zenere was to arrive
on Tuesday to begin work-
ing with the community.
"His goal is to meet with all
the stakeholders, including
the parents, community
leaders, clergy, faculty, ad-
ministration and support
staff, as well as counselors,
psychologists and law en-
forcement," Boatright stat-
ed. "We've invited Sheriff
Tony Cameron and any of
his staff he chooses to bring,
and Zenere will meet with
us and help us identify what
the problem is," Boatright
said. "Some way, somehow,
we've got to get to the bot-
tom of this."
Then, on Sunday, Jan. 30,
the North East Florida Edu-
cation Consortium, of which
Suwannee County Schools
are a member, will bring in
its staff member, Peggy Kel-
ly, who works in health-re-
lated areas. "She is putting
together a team of six people
who will come to Branford
and divide up and go into lo-
cal churches that night to get
a feel for the community,"
Boatright stated. Then, the
next week during teacher
work day, Boatright said
faculty would normally have
a motivational speaker come
in, but "in light of every-
thing that's happened, we're
.going to bring in someone to
speak to the faculty from the
entire county," he said. A
team headed up by Marie
Rogers of Nassau County
will also begin the Gate
Keepers program (a program
sponsored by the governor's


office) and conduct two-
hour awareness sessions that
are very, very structured to
assist our parents and faculty
in recognizing signs of po-
tential self-inflicted death,"
Boatright said. "These are
the things we're doing for
the immediate. Whatever
comes out of this, we'll chart
the long-term course," he
said. "Hopefully, we'll get
some answers this week."
When the third hanging
was discovered last Wednes-
day evening at about 5 p.m.,
it sent a chill through the
community as many resi-
dents were preparing to at-
tend Wednesday night prayer
services. The news went
through the community like
wildfire.
By the next morning, Boa-
tright had put an emergency
crisis plan into action and
sent the school district's two
social workers and two psy-
chologists to Branford to as-
sist in the schools. "We had
the Branford clergy set up in
various rooms. at BHS and


invited the children to go to
them," he said. There was a
good response, Boatright
added, but said it was the
students' choice to seek out
those available to listen or
not. "On Friday, I sent Rus-
sell Mapp (school psycholo-
gist) back to Branford be-
cause the faculty at Branford
are hurting and grieving, and
also the youth pastors and
ministers were on call if
needed." Other counselors
from other schools were also
on standby to go to Branford
if needed.


The four sixth grade teach-
ers held a group assembly
last week with the entire
sixth grade class of about 75-
80 students, of which Touch-
ton and Hosier were mem-
bers, Boatright said. "They
told the students in a very
eloquent way to make good
choices," Boatright said.

Susan K. Lamb may
be reached by calling
1-386-362-1734 ext. 131
or by mailing
susan. lamb @ gaflnews. con.


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1 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3A


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


. *i


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31










VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"We all stumble in many ways. If
anyone is never at fault in what he
says, he is a perfect man, able to keep
his whole body in check." --James 3:2


umwannere democrat
MYRA C. REGAN Members of the Suwanneel
Publisher IDemocrrat editorial board are Myra l


SUSAN K. LAMB
Managing Editor


C. Regan, publisher, and Susan K.
Lamb, managing editor. Our
View is formed by thai board.


OPINION

THE

1 BOYD
REPORT




BY CONGRESSMAN ALLEN BOYD

"Saving Social Security"
Since its establishment in 1935 by President Franklin D.
Roosevelt, Social Sccurily has been'one of the greatest
achievements of the American government and one of the
- deepest commilnment, to the American people. For more
Aian 60 years, it has protected our elderly against poverty
and assured young people of a more secure future. Social
Security works because it speaks to the uncertainties
brought on by old age and disability and provides millions
of people a stable lifestyle after retirement. However,
changing demographics have threatened to severely handi-
cap the Social Security program-a program in desperate
need of reform.
Contrary to what many people believe, Social Security
taxes are not saved in an account bearing their name. In-
stead, these taxes are used primarily to pay benefits to cur-
rent retirees, while the excess is placed into an account
known as the Social Security Trust Fund. It is often assumed
that this money has been saved in the Trust Fund as a way
of "pre-funding" the benefits of future retirees. In reality,
the money is loaned to the Treasury to pay for current gov-
ernment projects and programs. In other words, this money
has already been used and the Trust Fund contains IOUs.
In essence, Social Security is a pay-as-you-go
system. This system works best when there are many work-
ers paying taxes and just a few retirees collecting bene-
fits. The reason for this looming shortfall is entirely related
to demographics. In 1950, for example, there were 16 work-
ers for every one retiree. Today, Americans are living longer
after they retire and are having fewer children. This means
that the number of workers per retiree will decline from 3.3
per retiree today to 2.3 per retiree by 2025 and to 1.9 per re-
tiree by 2080.
In its current form, Social Security cannot last. In 2019,
only 15 years from now, Social Security benefits paid out
each year will exceed payroll taxes being collected by the
government. At this point, the Trust Fund will begin to re-
deem the IOUs for current retirees. This begins a rapid de-
cline in the financial state of Social Security, which will
reach complete insolvency in 2042 when all of the IOUs
plus interest will have been repaid. The year 2042 may seem
like a long way off, but today's young professionals in their
late 20s and early 30s will reach retirement age when the
Social Security Trust Fund becomes insolvent. This means
that they will not receive the benefits that are being
promised to them today. These are the facts. The question is
not whether there is a problem; the question is how we can
fix it.
I have cosponsored the Bipartisan Retirement Security
Act with Representative Jim Kolbe (R-Arizona) to address
the significant, long term shortfalls of Social Security. Our
plan takes the best of both worlds by preserving the basic
benefit while also encouraging personal responsibility. Al-
lowing younger workers to place a small portion of their
payroll tax into personal accounts is one of the options to
overcome this shortfall. Personal accounts'provide individ-
uals with ownership of and control over part of their retire-
ment assets-including the freedom to invest in safe, risk-free
Treasury securities. Under the Kolbe-Boyd plan, low in-
come workers, women, minorities and the disabled are also
protected from poverty through the reforms our bill makes
to the Social Security program.
The Kolbe-Boyd Bipartisan Retirement Security Act is
based on three principles that are essential for Social Secu-
rity reform. First, there must be a guaranteed benefit to pro-
tect low income retirees. Second, any plan must be honest
about the transition cost and how it will be paid. Third, the
plan should not make any changes to the benefits promised
to current retirees or those who are near the retirement age.
For years, the need for modernizing the Social Security
program has been a popular and often heated topic. In the
.past, both Republicans and Democrats have turned their
heads on this issue as there are difficult choices to be made
in order to fix the program. This has to end. The Social Se-
curity program has grown to become an essential aspect of
modern life. Ignoring the problem is no longer an option if
this invaluable program will continue to be beneficial for
our children and grandchildren.

Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime
phone number. We ask this so we can varify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


Sheriff
Tony Cameron
362-2222


COMMENTARY


Weaker than we think


"On Sept. 11, one in 3,000 New
Yorkers perished, but in the same year,
over one in 1,000 urbanites were mur-
dered in three major cities in the West-
ern Hemisphere alone," according to
Russell Seitz in his article "Weaker
Than We Think" in The American
Conservative (Dec. 6, 2004). He adds
that the terrorist attacks on the World
Trade Center and the Pentagon reign
supreme among media events not be-


A

MINORITY
VIIEW



'e' 2005 Creators Syndica
BY WALTER WILLIAM:


cause of the strategic impact of hi-
jacked planes but the power of the media.
Seitz, formerly of Harvard's Center for International Affairs
arid a Los Alamos National Laboratory consultant, has written
extensively on weapons of mass destruction and proliferation.
He argues: While information about WMDs is all over the place,
functional expertise is relatively rare. Building a nuclear
weapon, even in the absence of sanctions, entails hundreds of
Ph.D.s directing a small army of people. Seitz also says, "Steal-
ing hydrogen bombs, like breaking into Fort Knox, is hard
work; the score is still zero despite a half century of trying."
There's no doubt whatsoever that al-Qaeda and other Middle
East terrorist groups harbor hate for the United States and intend
to do great harm to Americans whenever they can. The impor-
tant point that Seitz makes in his article is that "policy must con-
sider the capacity for action, not intent alone."
According to Seitz, London's International Institute for
Strategic Studies estimates that since Sept. 11 Osama bin Laden
has recruited 18,000 men, while some U.S. Department of De-
fense officials say he's down to his last 3,000. Seitz says that the
average al-Qaeda grunt is not a bright young jihadi but a high
school dropout who lives at home. In the wake of a withering at-
tack by a hyperpower and its allies, al-Qaeda's main preoccupa-
tion is with its own security and survival and not its anti-west-
ern strategy..
Seitz concludes, "However tall bin Laden may loom as a
scourge of civilizations, it is increasingly clear that his arsenal is
as phony as his army is small - its shelves are bare of exper-
tise and material alike." Don't get me wrong. Neither Seitz nor


six people "Are you optimistic about the
direction of the country as George W.
Bush begins his second term as presi-
dent?" This is how they answered: Linda
Reed said she's not optimistic; Leonard
Hampton said neither is he, and Amy
"Are you optimistic


I seek to minimize the terrorist threat
that we face, but it surely should be
r evaluated realistically. Why? It's a re-
source-allocation question. It's non-
optimal to either underestimate or
overestimate the terrorist threat. I'm
sure that some might argue,
"Williams, the government can't
te make us too safe from terrorist
threats!" That's not smart.
S Being too safe from terrorist at-
tacks can be costly in at least a couple


of ways. The most costly is our willy-nilly acceptance of gov-
ernment intrusions on our liberties and privacy in the name df
security. For just one example, banks, brokerage houses, insur-
ers and other financial institutions have been turned into state ir-
formers who must notify the Treasury Department about "sus-
picious" transactions. A customer's attempt to maintain finari-
cial privacy can be seen and reported as a suspicious transaction.
Our financial records can be subpoenaed and examined even if
there is no evidence of wrongdoing.
Government officials have always wanted open access to our
financial records; the war against terrorism gives them the cov-
er to do so. Here's what might be proof: How about ari amend-
ment to the Patriot Act whereby any information gathered under
its provisions cannot be used in a court of law unless it can be
tied to terrorist activity? I'm guessing that few politicians and
law enforcement authorities would agree to such an amend-
ment.
Most vital to the conduct of any war, including a war on ter-
rorism, is a vibrant, flexible economy. There's a possibility that
massive volumes of security regulations and'massive security
expenditures can weaken our economy and thereby threaten na-
tional security. Al-Qaeda type terrorism is not our only national
security threat either now or in the future. Keep in mind it was
our productive capacity that ultimately won the Cold War.
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Ma-
son University. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and
read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoon-
ists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.co .


wards said he wasn't sure. "I'm just go- still much the same as the others. "I'rmt
ing to sit back and watch," Edwards said. not totally optimistic. I'm just hoping!"
The Rev. Tommie Jefferson echoed Ed- In Suwannee County, 11,145 voters,*
wards' feelings. "There's not much we the overwhelming majority of iegstered
can do about it pow," Jefferson said. voters,, chose George Bush as their pres.i-
'IHe's going to do: what he wants." Bill dent in NoVember of 2004.
about the direction of the country as


George W. Bush begins his second term as president?".

;C''': ..... i %1 "v,: ,'",_ ; ... ,' ',
O r,


": . .- .....
'~~ ',.-" ' ' -"':


Gary Edwards: I'm not sure. I'm just go-
-ing to sit back and watch.


Linda Reed - No


- -
The Rev. Tommie Jefferson: I don't know.
There's not much we can do about it now. Bill Leithead: I'm not totally optimistic.
He's aoina to do what he wants. I'm just hoping.


Leonard Hampton -.No


Amy Hancock - Not Sure


Suwannee County Commissioners
(4-year-terms, partisan)


^. ,
Dist. 1 - Jesse Caruthers,
362-5385


SDist. 2 - Doug Udell
362-4189


Dist. 3 - Ivie Fowler
Vice-Chairman 658-1602


Dist. 4 - Billy Maxwell
Chairman 963-5460


Dist. 5 - Randy Hatch,
935-1419


Clerk of Court
Kenneth Dasher
362-0500


i: ,





Property Appraiser
Lamar Jenkins
362-1385


Tax Collector
George Burnham
364-3414


362-2616


Suwannee County Constitutional Officiers


George Bush inauguration set for Jan. 20-Nation divided over his second term
In Live Oak, the question was asked of Hancock said she's not sure. Gary Ed-. Leithead had a little different attitude, but


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


DPAGE A A


t


I






PAGE 5A


vv -L.,'IIL.* ,,-nI) . 1. 1 C7 II I , ' 1 . .





UWUWANNEE LIVING
....... .. . ..0 0000000 0 0 0000000 0000000000 100000000 @q 00 0 O0000 S00O


ifty years ago, on a cold,
wintry day, Douglas and Ivoree
Cheney were united in mar-
riage.
On Saturday, Jan. 29, between the

f


Ivoree and Douglas Cheney on their wedding Day


hours of 2-3:30 pm in the afternoon,
their children cordially invite you to a
reception to honor their 50th wedding
anniversary at the Live Oak Garden
Club.


No gifts, please
Melanie and Bill Kretzman
Beverly and Mike Commander
Doug and Belinda Cheney


Douglas and Ivoree Cheney


Happy 1 st Birthday

Taylor Ja'Niece Clayton

Jan. 16, 2005


- - .6


- *.- " " ,
h - c.









Taylor Ja'Niece Clayton
Love,
Mom, Dad, Little TJ and Javon


.l..Wedding e9'mider

Fralick - Sutton
Ted and Goldie Fralick of Wellborn would like to remind you
.." of the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Nicole Marie Fral-
"' ick, to Anthony Curtis Sutton, son of Tonie and Susan Sutton of
Ft. Myers.
SThe ceremony will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Jan. 22, 2005 at
'4 Anastasia Baptist Church in St. Augustine.


Troy Edward Roberts III and Laura Katherine Bass

Bass- Roberts


to wed June 11

Stevan and Janet Bass of Live Oak and Martha and Eddie
RIoberts of Lake Park, Ga. are pleased to announce the en-
gagenent of their children, Laura Katherine Bass and Troy
Edward Roberts III.
'Laura Katherine is a 2001 graduate of Suwannee High
S'phool and received her B.S. degree in early childhood edu-
cation from Valdosta State University in December, 2004.
She is the granddaughter ofAnn.Wood and the late Lonnie B.
Wood and the late Nancy and Curtis Bass.
',,Troy graduated from Georgia Christian School in 2001 and
Will graduate from Valdosta State University in May, 2005
with a B.A. degree in professional writing. He is the grand-
son of Troy and Winona Roberts, Mildred Lehman and the
late Julian Lehman.
Troy and Laura Katherine will be married on Saturday,
June 11, 2005, at 3 p.m., at the First Advent Christian Church
in Live Oak.
All friends and family are invited to attend.


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Behind Domino's Pizza, Lake City * (386) 755-5600
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PUBLIC AUCTION
:The public auction of surplus items will
be held, at the Suwannee County School
Board Maintenance Department, 1729
South Walker Avenue, Live Oak, Florida,
on Tuesday, January 25, 2005,
beginning at 9:00 a.m. A list of sale
Sites may be picked up at the
Maintenance Department on Monday,
January 24th, 2005, and items can be
viewed the morning of the sale.
135555DH-F


'We will give you
. ", personal attention."
I' " '. Brian Metzger
,; ",' '.'. .. , .. ' .',,.": [..[ r hL .,um-_. 'mi\ E O u iln b.: , ,

1.. . I.llrc.uil Vc ItV ion .iL b,.it I bith
. ll^ ;f \..:rkld 1A[ the 0i.1Les 01 a much
'' ''''' .6
' '"' ' ' .''l - l \ , r 11k L', -. nk. plu; pc irs,.or.al rtt[en tion
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Happy 7tht
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laza Location: 542 E. Howard Street (386) 362-1244
South Oaks Square Location: 1520 S. Ohio (386) 362-2591
Medical Equipment Div: (386) 362-4404
Hours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri., 8:30 ain-3:00 pm Sat.
by Randy Johns, Pharm D Drive-up window
Treatment for Oral Thrush in Adults
One of the organisms found in the mouth is a fungus yeast called candida
albicans. An overgrowth of this yeast causes a condition called oral thrush.
Symptoms include painful, creamy white ulcers that have a cottage cheese
appearance on the tongue and/or inside the mouth. Uncontrolled overgrowth
ol oral yeast may result from hormonal changes that accompany pregnancy,
uncontrolled diabetes, long term steroid use and changes in the makeup of
organisms in the mouth due to antibiotic use. Sometimes oral thrush lesions
cause enough discomfort to interfere with eating. If the infection is not
treated in adults, it can spread to the esophagus, joints, brain, the eyes, or the
heart.
The best approach to oral thrush is to prevention through the proper
management of diabetes and other situations that have a tendency to bring on
yeast overgrowth. Topical and systemic antifungal drugs such as nystatin,
miconazole, or amphotericin are sometimes prescribed. The normal course of
treatment is usually 10-14 days unless resistance to these drugs becomes a
problem. Some physicians also recommend restoring the normal organism
makeup of the mouth and easing the condition by having the person eat
unsweetened yogurt or take a product called acidophilus in the form of a
liquid or capsules. 133235JRS-F


Calling all classmates
of SHS Class of 1986
Hello! To the graduating class of 1986, our 20 year re-
union is fast approaching. It will be great to see everyone.
Preparation for the reunion is in progress. Class members
please contact Angela Hunter Mandrell at her e-mail ad-
dress: Mandr003@beIlsouth.net. The class members may
also contact Catrena Francis at:
VanessaFrancis@msn.com as soon as possible.


FACTS.org
FACTS.org is Florida's
one stop student advising
system designed by the
Department of Education
to help high school and
college students make in-
formed choices about
their education. Students
can get all their informa-
tion in one place, such as
post secondary opportuni-
ties for high school gradu-
ates, online applications
for college and financial
aid, and even assistance
choosing a major.
FACTS.org provides ac-
cess to complete tran-
scripts and academic
counseling online at no
cost to students.


Irene Allen

We love and miss


you so much.
From your family
I a 6n C-


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJANUARY 1 5








rMAf P A


HG A 6A


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


The Suwannee County Sheriff's Office Vic- er Regional Library. Their donations at Christ-
tim Services Program would like to give a spe- mas were very generous and especially appre-
cial thank you to the staff of the Suwannee Riv- ciated by the children in the community.




' " -' '
. . t. .


.. .. ... .

, : - :: 1
COMMUNITY CHILDREN BENEFIT FROM DONATION: Suwannee River Regional Library staff makes
donations to the Suwannee County Sheriff's Office Victims Services Program. - Photo: Submitted

Special videoconference:

Post-Storm Timber Tax and Forest

Health Issues to be held Jan. 21


The 2004 hurricane season
was damaging to a large portion
of Florida's private timberlands.
Casualty loss and forest
health issues that thousands of
private timberland owners are
now facing as a result of these
storms will be addressed by a
special videoconference: Post-
Storm Timber Tax and Forest
Health Issues. The videoconfer-
ence will be held on. Friday,
Jan., 21, from 4:30-7 p.m.
(EST) at 11 locations through-
out Florida.
The agenda (Eastern Stan-
dard Time) will cover many
topics:
4:30-5:15 p.m.; Post-Storm


Timber Tax Issues, USDA For-
est Service;
5:15-5:30 p.m.; Questions,
Discussion - Timber Tax Issues;
5:30-5:40 p.m.; Break;
5:40-6 p.m.: Pine Bark Beetle
Identification and Management,
Dr. Bud Mayfield, Florida Divi-
sion of Forestry (DOF);
6-6:10 p.m.; Questions, Dis-
cussion - Pine Bark Beetle Iden-
tification,and Management;
6:10-6:25 p.m.; Cost-share
Availability for Storm Recov-
ery, Matt Donovan, DOF; and
6:25-6:45 p.m. Questions,
Discussion, Closing Remarks.
One of the eleven sites will be
held in Live Oak at: UF-IFAS


Suwannee Valley North Florida
REC, 7580 CR 136, 386-362-
1725.
Contact Chris Demers at 352-
846-2375 or
cdemers@ifas.ufl.edu for list of
other sites, to register and.for di-
rections.
Space will be limited at most
sites so please register early.
Please share this announcement
with others who may be inter-
ested.
This free program is a service
of the Florida Division of
Forestry, Forest Stewardship
Program University of Florida,
IFAS, Cooperative Extension
Service


OBITUARIES


Louise Brannan
July 28, 1940 -
Jan.16,2005

Souise Brannan, 64, of
Live Oak, went to be
0 with the Lord after a
lengthy illness on Sunday, Jan.
16, 2005. The Suwannee
County native retired after 10
years as a courier for Lab.
Corp. in Gainesville and was a
member of Friendship Baptist
Church, Live Oak.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Bobby Brannan Sr. of
Live Oak; two daughters,
Regina (Regi) Rathbun of Live
Oak and Gwen Brannan of
Live Oak; two sons, Bobby
(Rita) Brannan Jr. of O'Brien
and Terry (Michele) Brannan
of McAlpin; four sisters,
Margie Davis of Augusta, Ga.,
Ruby Fouraker of Jasper, Bar-
bara Shine and Voncile Skeen,
both of Live Oak; one brother,
Jimmy Wells of Lake City; six
grandchildren; and six great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death
by her parents, Woodrow and
Gladys Wells and son, Tomnly
Brannan.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11 a.m., today,
Wednesday, Jan. 19, at Friend-
ship Baptist Church of Live
Oak with the Rev. David
Teems officiating. Interment
will follow in the church
cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

W.A. Green Jr.
Feb. 5, 1937 -
Jan.17,2005

- .A. Green Jr., 67, of
If/Live Oak, passed
S away on Monday,
Jan. 17, 2005, in the Lake City
Medical Center after a long ill-
ness. He lived in Live Oak all
of his life, was the owner of
Green's Well Drilling in Live
Oak for 20 years and was, a
member of Shady Grove Bap-,,F
tist Church, Live Oak.
Survivors include his wife,.
Jeanie Green of Live Oak;
three daughters, Kathy Harris


and Cindy Young, both of Live
Oak and Peggy Dudley of
Branford; two sons, Buddy
Green of Live Oak and Steve
Green of Lake City; two sis-
ters, Ginger Wilbanks and
Sudie Taylor, both of Live
Oak; one brother, Barney
Green of Live Oak; 16 grand-
children; and seven great-
grandchildren.
SFuneral services will be con-
ducted at 10 a.m., today,
Wednesday, Jan. 19, at Corinth
Baptist Church, Hamilton
County, with the Rev. Louis
Berry officiating.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

Frank Ross
July 13, 1922 -
Jan.17, 2005

/ ank Ross, 82, of Live
SOak, passed away
Monday, Jan. 17,
2005, in North Florida Region-
al Medical Center in
Gainesville after a brief illness.
The Suwannee County native
retired after 30 years with
Farmers Co-Op in Live Oak as
assistant manager. Ross was a
U.S. Army veteran serving
during World War II, a mem-
ber of Westwood Baptist
Church in Live Oak and served
on the Suwannee Quarterback
Club board of directors.
Survivors include his wife,
Eula Ross of Live Oak; two
sons, John Wayne (Valerie)
Ross of Tifton, Ga. and James
Leon (Peggy) Ross of Valdos-
ta, .Ga.; two step-daughters,
Peggy (Jim) Bullock of Tampa
and Nancy (Keith) Daniels of
Live Oak; one sister, Angie
Mae Kidd of Victoria, Texas;
11 grandchildren; and 10
great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11 a.m., Thursday,


Jan. 20, at Westwood Baptist
Church with Dr. Jimmy Deas
and Mr. Bobby Harrell offici-
ating. Interment will follow in
Crawford Lake Cemetery,
McAlpin.
Daniels Funeral Home of
Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

Lorene Mitchell Weldon
Oct. 8, 1905-
Jan.16,2005.

Sorene Mitchell Wel-
don, 99, of Lynn
,/Haven, passed away
Sunday, Jan. 16, 2005, at a lo-
cal nursing facility. She was
born in Live Oak and moved to
the Lynn Haven area in 1946
after serving with the WAC's
as a dental assistant. Weldon
worked with her husband, the
late Ernest W. Weldon, DDS,
as a dental assistant for more
than 40 years. She was also a
longtime member of First Bap-
tist Church of Lynn Haven
where she sang with The Silver
Bells. She was preceded in
death by her husband in 1985.
Survivors include several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 20,
at Southerland Family Funeral
Home in Lynn Haven with the
Rev. Tom Daniels officiating.
Interment will follow at Forest
Lawn Mausoleum.
A time of visitation will be
held prior to services from 11
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorial contribu-
tions to First Baptist Church of
Lynn Haven.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted and viewed
at www.southerlandfamily.
com.
Southerland Family Funeral
Homes of Lynn Haven is in
charge of all arrangements.


Step Up To One Of Your

Greatest Challenges: The Scale.

"The Role Of Diet And Exercise In Weight Loss"


Free event sponsored by Women's Advantage

Tuesday, January 25, 2005 Noon to 1pm
Live Oak Garden Club, 11th Street, Live Oak
(Light lunch will be provided.)

Guest Speaker:

Joyce Cortes, MD
Shands Medical Group of Live Oak

Reservations required. Space is limited.


SHANDS
HealthCare
shands.org


Women's Advantage
A FREE wlirn'i, rdlip' pir ,.'ra
affiliated w.tl Saih, h, Hll,,hI( ace


* Sincere Compassion * Personal Service


SA name you can trust


DANIELS FUNERAL HOMES
Live Oak Branford
416 E. Howard St. 408 Suwannee Ave.
386-362-4333 386-935-1124
' Web Page: www.danielsfuneralhome.com E-Mail: danielsfuneralhome@hotmail.com



Now THAT'S Something


To Smile About!


136997JRS-F


Fo m mbrhi o esrvton, al 0074-42 adprss"


SJackson Thompson & Cade McKinley m

Thank you, Mimi Sansouci of Live Oak

for submitting this week's SMILE photograph!
Submit your photo for publication to:

nuuwann'i bnmocrat
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064








NUARY 19 2005


WEDNESDAY, JA ,


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Cold weather has set in and
doom and gloom really puts a
damper on my life. I hope
these cold days won't last long
because after the glorious
"spring" we've just experi-
enced, it just seems so awful
to have to put up with gloomy
days and/or cold weather!
President George W. Bush
will be inaugurated tomorrow
in Washington to begin his
second four-year term. And
they said he would never win
re-election! Yeah, yeah, but
the people of America vote,
not the polls that were taken.
It just goes to prove that
Americans don't tell the me-
dia everything...they use their
vote to speak.
This week got started off in
a big way with the annual
Martin Luther King Jr. parade.
and celebration in Live Oak as
it did across America Jan. 17.
Our local black community
celebrated with the parade, a
church service and then a big
luncheon on Monday in spite
of the freezing temperatures.
The County Commission is
slated to have an all-day meet-
ing at the Suwannee River
Water Management District
office Thursday (tomorrow),
Jan. 20, from 9 a.m. until 4
p.m. to talk about land devel-
opment rules (LDRs). This is a
public workshop and you may
attend if you like. Please do.
You need to inform yourself
about LDRs as they determine
how you will live in the future
in Suwannee County. LDRs
have to be tightened up arid
changed to allow for growth,
things like condominiums to
be built in the county, and es-
pecially to protect agriculture


as well as home owners.
Speak to your county commis-
sioner about what all this
means and express your views
to him. Chairman Billy
Maxwell is determined to get
this done during his time as
chairman and for that I ap-
plaud him. It's been on the
back burner for far too long
and should have already been
completed. Too many people
in positions to change this
have failed. Let's support
making proper changes that
will benefit the community for
years to come and help bring
in business without causing
long delays for these business-
es when they do try to locate
in Suwannee County.
Have you seen that person
buzzing around the county for
the last three weeks in a green
vehicle? It's new Sheriff Tony
Cameron! Boy, has he been
tried by fire since the first day
he was in office. There's been
almost no down time, and he's
stayed right in there, handling
everything as it's been thrown
at him. The guy's hardly had a
chance to get used to his new
office but he's trying. Any-
way, if he seems terribly busy
to you, it's because he is...and
there's likely to be no letup
any time soon.
If you've got kids in high
school, better get a calendar
from the school so you can jot
down all that's coming up so
you won't miss any banquets
for end of the year. End of the
year? Yep, it's just right
around the corer and by the
third week in May...just four
weeks away, it'll be all over
and a new class of seniors will
be taking over as the class of


BY SUSAN K. LAMB .u=1
Democrat Managing Editor


2005 waves goodbye and
heads out to find out what
life's all about! Unfortunately,
most of them will find out it's
nothing like they thought and
they'll have a hard time deal-
ing with life as we all know
it....work, work, and work.
Check out our Community
Calendar in today's paper in
the C section to see when
FCAT tests are slated so you
can make sure your students)
get plenty of rest to be ready
to take these important tests.
Already I've got the Lions
Club annual top 10 percent
banquet on my calendar for
May 10 at 7 p.m. at the Live
Oak Church of God. The Li-
ons Club always does a great
job of honoring the top 10 per-
cent of both Suwannee and
Branford seniors, presenting
them with certificates and pro-
viding a delicious banquet for
the chosen seniors and their
parents.
There will be banquets for
just about every type of ex-
tracurricular activity and
many for the senior class.
Don't miss out on these.
Check now to find out when
they are to be held and see if
the schools already have this
on their calendar.
One thing you can put on
your calendar now is Memori-
al Day, May 30. There is al-
ways an 11 a.m. service at the
Live Oak Cemetery to honor
those who gave their lives for
our country. Make plans now
to be part of this event this
year. Perhaps you lost a son, a
brother, a father, uncle, moth-
er, sister or aunt. Wouldn't it
be nice to honor them this
year? You won't regret mak-
ing this decision. It'll fill your
heart with pride and make you
glad you're an American when
you attend this special service.


-r







January 24 at 7 p.m.

Will have special speaker


Hwy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800


Fifth Annual Roast


and Toast set for Feb. 5


The African American De-
velopment Council will hold
its Fifth Annual Roast and
Toast to honor four of Live
Oak's finest.
This event will be held at 6
p.m., on Saturday, Feb. 5, at
Sheryl's Noon Buffet & Cater-
ing, Fifth Street, Live Oak.
It will be a night for the
community recognize and
thank four local residents for
their dedication and contribu-
tions to the community.
The four citizens who will
be the object of the roasters
and toasters are Vinnie King,


Cora Owens, Clayton "Pete"
Sneed and PL. Owens.
It will also be an evening of
fun and entertainment for all
with a delicious dinner as only
Sheryl's can serve.
Tickets are $15 each and
will help the council to contin-
ue and expand its scholarship
program for the future gradu-
ates that will continue their ed-
ucation..Come and join in the
fun. Tickets are available from
Yvonne Scott, 386-362-2789,
the Rev., Tommie Jefferson,
386-647-5984 or Bill Leit-
head, 386-658-3359.


Jana Jae and her blue fiddle

will perform in free concert at

Wal-Mart in Live Oak Jan. 20


Jana Jae "The
First Lady of
Country Fiddle!"
will perform in a
free concert at
Wal-Mart No.
2626, 6868 US
129, Live Oak
beginning at 7
p.m. on Thurs-
day, Jan. 20.
She is a pow-
erful whirlwind
on stage and,
with her. band
Hotwire, puts on
a show, that's
better than Bran-
son!
Jae, a Hee
Haw fiddle play-
er, has toured in
Japan, Australia
and the Philip-
pines. She is a
two-time Ladies
National Cham-


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MOST GLOVES ARE DESIGNED TO SAVE YOUR HANDS.
OURS ARE DESIGNED TO SAVE YOUR LIFE.


JANA JAE WILL PERFORM IN FREE CON-
CERT: Jana Jae, a Hee Haw fiddle player, with
her blue fiddle and her band "Hotwire" will
perform in a free concert beginning at 7 p.m.
at Wal-Mart in Live Oak on Jan. 22.
- Photo: Submitted


pion Fiddler. Jae has ap-
peared with many symphony
orchestras, as well as con-
ventions, fairs and in many
other public arenas.
"I am thrilled about com-


ing to Live Oak," Jana Jae
said. "We have a great fami-
ly show and a terrific concert
brought to our friends and
neighbors by Wal-Mart."
For more info, call Robert
Bedenbaugh 386-330-2488.


I

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1
I
IP


UF&Shands provides outstanding care for today s patients But we are always working
on ways to improve that care Which is why we are developing our surgical simulation
gloves. The revolutionary gloves will be programmed by master surgeons to help future
doctors perfect their surgical techniques before they ever enter the operating room
So we can provide tomorrow's patients with more highly trained surgeons and with
something even more precious - hope. rli IE:IL . L olH ilP'


UF&Shands
The Ui\ ersitv Of Florida Health System


134097-F


Ft


PAGE 7A


Live Oak Garden Club Caladium sale coming up






A A










-i-M

Live Oak Garden Club members are taking member or call Sheryl Kirby at 386-364-4586.
orders for #1 Caladium bulbs to be delivered in You'll be glad you did!!
mid-March. Choose reds, pinks, whites or a mix Gardening Tip: If you plant your bulbs in
of all three. All have green edges. Ten bulbs for stages it lengthens the colorful display time.
$5 to be paid as the caladiums are picked up. Plant some in late April and May. Hold some
Members will be taking orders until Feb. 14. out to plant in late June to maintain a fresh col-.
Don't take a chance on forgetting. Place your orful display in your garden into the fall
order today by contacting any Garden Club months.


* r -


1PARM-.


.c








* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade



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1929-1968


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PAGE 8A


- All Photos this page by Yvette Hannon


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PAGE 9A


Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade


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All Photos this pae by Janet hae
- All Photos this page by Janet Schrader-Seccafico


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAYJANUARY 1 2005


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MUMl I Vm . W-- N D A - WN


Continued From Page 1A

That would bring smiles to the
People they would encounter.
Gruchacz retired from GTE
telephone in St. Petersburg af-
ter 29 years as a supervisor of
equipment technician. What
leaves most people envious is
Gruchacz's, reward. Making.
wise investments, Gruchacz
was able to retire in her mid
40s and begin to enjoy the
fruits .of her labor.
Gruchacz's husband; Peter,
retired from Ratheon Compa-
ny, a government communica-
tions company in St. Peters-
burg.:
Family friend Pat Bowen,
also retired from GTE tele-
phone, and the three made
their way north to Live Oak to
build a house on the Suwan-
nee River.
In 1998 the Gruchaczes
built a temporary home in Lu-
raville which would be lived
in while they built their per-
manent home next door. At
5,000 square feet, their home
was fully equipped with all the
necessities of a canner or hob-
byist, including a 14 X 10 foot
pantry just for canning items.
The home includes a room,
\vith two huge freezers. an ex-
.tra refrigerator and plenty of
shelving space. Gruchacz says
after being in the house for a
year,. she could already use


more shelf space.
"Pete is already adding
more shelves in the garage for
me," Gruchacz said.
The kitchen includes a 14x3
island used as an assembly
line during canning, jelly
making, processing fruits and
vegetables or making candy.
Even the 1,200 square foot cabbage, cucumbers for pick-
screened-in back room is les, figs, maw haws, apples,
complete with an ice maker, persimmons, walnuts, chest- . - C.
sink and a huge stove to pre- nuts and the list goes on de-
vent heating up the main pending on the season.
house. A recent experiment that
Gruchacz easily cans 40 suddenly became an all-time
quarts of peaches just from favorite was mountain dew jel-.
one of her peach trees. A walk ly and rootbeerjelly.
-through her yard is an unfor- The days when canning was
gettable experience as a necessity are long gone, but
Gruchacz and Bowen point the thrill of accomplishment is -.
out their gardens rich in fresh still very rewarding. T
vegetables, fruits and nuts. It If canning is your forte',
is . ith these home grown del- Gruchacz welcomes anyone - ..
icacies Gruchacz and Bowen ' who 'wants to learn to prevent
find their creations. it from becoming a lost art.
'The freezers stay packed Bowen warns.that using'the
with. projects all year long. older canning techniques is'not
Besides vegetables, there are enough to kill all the food poi-. ''" '
blueberries and huckleberries soning ' organisms. "The
for jam, peaches, pears, elder- recipes were not perfected .
berries.for syrup and the latest back then,"' Bowen said.
experiment is some elderberry Methods for canning have '0 ".,,.-
wine, changed drastically. since in- , -,...
"We never get bored. There produced nearly two centuries
is always something to do," ago. .Today, there are simpler "-'-."
Gruchacz said.' ' techniques to preventmicro-
Iows of grapes and large organisms from entering and ..
gardens have to be tended, all contaminating'the food. GRUCHACZ DISPLAYS HER COLORFUL SHELVES: Canning enthusist Jane Grucnacz proudly dis-
packed fill .of ripe tomatoes, Today, the temporary home plays her colorful and edible treats. Retired, Gruchacz has taken canning very seriously while thor-
beans,. zucchini, eggplant, next door is used as, a quilt :oughly enjoying it. -Photo: Yvette Hannon


house, another favorite past
time of Gruchacz's. Inside is a
crafter's haven. Closets full of
eVery color, texture and pat-
teri of material are carefully
folded neatly on shelves. Bins
are stacked neatly with craft
supplies and threads of every
color.
SGruchacz proudl. display. s
a quilting template she created
called, the 'Perfect Patchwork
Template.' Gruchacz created
the templates because she was
dissatisfied with the quilting
template available today.
Gruchacz used her computer
skills and CAD program to
create her own. She found
someone -to laser cut the
acrylic templates for her. She
says the acrylic templates al-
low you to rotary-cut multiple


I



I


SUWANEEHAMILTON TECHNICAL CENTER

^ fd 415 SW Pinewood Dr.,
Live Oak, FL 32060.(386) 364-2750

SRegistration: January 10th & January llth,2005


I





p


:W, . . ;u- I;.Vuup.m.

COMMUNITY EDUCATION

SSeve Week Course Nine Week Course
1. Course cost is figured at the rate of $2.00 per hour, plus books
2. Full refunds will be issued, if the class is cancelled for insufficient enrollment (less than 10).,
3. A $5.00 processing fee will be charged for all other refunds,,
4. Classes with less than 10 may elect to continue, if the participants pay a prorated amount for less than 10 students enrolled.
5, All classes are from 6:00p.m. until 9:00 p.m. (unless noted otherwise),
COURSE ILE DA DATES 21.1 5 (COST The following classes ill be scheduled when at least 10 prisons indicate an interest.
* Cake Decorating, Monday January 24-March21 $43.00 . . Call in rcg uliat n atiLeplcd by lling 13i i 364-2759
* Corinetajiinal l Spanish MI:rndj ljrnujry 24.Mjr,.h 21 i.531 l Monday CPP U . I Il.ll.hMr t 1.: r, 4.nM.a ,1 1i$350 . Tuesday . Bicycle Repair $43.00
*FlorJ Design M,:,ndjvy linuasr 24-Mrth 21 .431Ill Monday IlrstAid (i4 ih l4.M.ir'I Alr I1 .liy't .2i 1ii)0 Tuedayv 'Intro to Photography '$43.00
ntroducilon i Cnmpuler leyboading Moinday anary 24-April I $58. In Monday: HobbyWoodworking $43.00 Tuesday Lamaze $50.00
Monday Anliqucs t Cillctibls $43.00 Thursday Genealogy $43.00
Inlroducllon t Inlndl -4 4 .eeks Monday january 24-April II 28 .tll Monday Basic Mechanics $43.00
Mkiciosof Access Mondjy IInuary 24-April II $58 ll Class enrollmeritmust be sufficient to support all programs. Enrollment is based on first
come, first serve basis. Equal opportunity employer. All 'computer classes have a
Microsoft Windows2000 Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00 prerequisite of Keybparding with the exception of Introduction to'Computer Ke., b...,rdmin
Classes andfees are subject to change.. Maximum of 15 for all computer classes.
MicrsoftWordforWindows.2000 Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00 Adult cation DAY DATS Times t
Quickbooks Pro 2001 (New.Class) .Monday January 24-April 11 $58.00 Adlt Edlcation/GED Prep/a Branford High School Monday &Wednesday Continuous 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Free
*SignLanguage 'Monday January 24-March 21 $43.00 Adult Education/GEDPrep Monday &Tuesday Continuous .5:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m. Free
..o. r e d s - t Job Preparatory
SBegiining.Bidge u Tuesday January 25-March 8 $43,00 A $50.00 non-refundable deposit is due at the time of application. The applicant must have the' deposit or a letter of
authorization from an agency that is sponsoring the student to have their name placed on the class roll. The deposit will
Introduction to Computer Keyboarding Tuesday Ilnuary' 25-March 22 $58.00 be applied to the tuition and fees of the participant. The deposit will be refunded if the class is cancelled. .
Micrci'sf E.cel Tuesday January 25-March 22 $58.00 10 HourChildCarePreschol Mon. &Tues. ' Feb.28, Mar, & 7,2005 6:00-9:30 p.m. !$27.50
10HiOrChildCare"BOS"' Mon.&Tues. .Mar.1421,&22,2005 6:00-9:00p.m. $26.72
Microsoft Office 2000 Tuesday January25-March22 $58.00 20HourChildares Mon. &Tues. Jan.24;25,31,Feb. l&t7,2005 6:00-10:00 p.m. $52.17
OilPainting Tuesday January25-March 8 $43.00 3OHourChildCare Mon.&Tues. See 1lOHrPreschol&20Hr'absve 6:00-9:30.p.m. $79.67
One 40HourChildCu I10hr.Preschool; 10hr. See0HrPreschool,10HrBOS,&20tHr 6:00-10100p.m. $106.39
*One Stroke by Donna Dewberry Tuesday ,January 25-March 8 $43.00 . BOS;20hr. Child Care Rues&Regulationsabove
iH Tu30rChildCariHoene Saurday Jan. 29,Fe.5,12,19,&26,2005 8a.m.-2 p.m. $86.48
Quickbooks Pro 002' ,Tuesday January 25-March22 $58.00 F daChildhaodFdurstion ndS A Tuesday , I Jan.3-Apil15,2W05 6:M-9:00.m. $584.75
Creative Writing Workshop, Poetry, & Thursday January 25-Feb. 24 $37.00 P. Ilttomy(s65hors) Mon,&Tues. la.24-April19,2005 6:00-9:00p.m. $216.75
Flash Fiction (Book Reg.) IVTherapy(30hams) Friday May6,13,20&27,2005 8a.m.-4:30p.m. $206.66

Dianne Westcott, Accredited by Council on Occupational Education George E, McKnight, SUVTW ANN EE-
Principal" 41 Perimeter Center East, NE, Suite 640 Evening Coordinator .HAM ILTOlN ,
(386)364.2750 Atlanta, Georgia 30346 (770) 396-3898 (386) 364.2759 TECHNICAL CENTER .,
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr., Live Oak, FL 32064
TABE TEST GED TEST HSCT TEST (386) 364-2750
364798 / 364 2782 364-27987 FINANCIALAID ISAVAILABLE AND ACCEPTED.
364 8, ' APPROVED FOR VA TRAINING BENEFITS.
ACCREDITED BY THE COUNCIL ON OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, INC.


layers of fabric at the same
'time.
Gruchacz's quilting friends
.saw her templates, and the in-
vention took off from there.
The, demand came in for new
patterns ard more and more
templates..
Gruchacz finally said, "I'm'
supposed to be retired!"
Gruchacz drove to .Atlanta,
Ga. to meet Marti Michell, an
entrepreneur, author and busi-
ness woman. Gruschacz asked:
if Michell would be interested
in developing the templates
that featured her precision cor-
ml",i , ' ' ',


ner concept and offer them on
her web site and quilting cata-
logs. Michell felt very hon-
ored and agreed.
Gruchacz admits she has a
lot to be thankful for. "I really
enjoy it!" Gruchacz said of her
life in retirement.
"Everyone has their own
idea of what they will do when
they retire, I am living my
dream, and I look forward to
every single day," she said.
Yvette Hannon may be
rcachedl by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 130 or by emailirig
yvette. hannon @ gaflnews. corn


Jane Gruchacz exhibits two of the huge pressure cookers she
uses for canning.
These are some of Gruchacz's favorite recipes.

Mountain Dew Jelly
,4 Cups Mountain Dew
1 package powdered pectin
2 Tbs. lemon juice
4 Cups sugar
Combine Mountain Dew, lemon juice and pectin in. large
saucepan, bring to a full boil. Stir in sugar, return to boil, boil 1
minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, skim. Pour into
sterilized hot jars to within 1/8 inch ofjar top. Wipe jar rim, ad-
just lids. Process in boiling water bath 5 minutes. Remove from
canner and complete seals unless closures are self sealing type.
Makes about 5-6 half pints. .

Aristocratic Pickles
6 Cup pickling salt
12 Quarts pickling cucumbers, thinly sliced, (4 or 5 inches
long)
12 Quarts water
3 Tbs. powdered alum
3 Tbs. ginger, ground
6 Cup vinegar, white
6 Cup water
18 Cup sugar
3 sticks cinnamon stick
1 Tbs. whole cloves
1 Tbs. celery seed
1/2 Tbs. whole allspice'
Dissolve salt in 12 quarts of boiling water, add cucumbers. Let
stand 8 days in a stone crocks glass, pottery or enameled-lined
(should not be chipped) pan. On the ninth day, drain well. Add
fresh unsalted water to cover, and alum. Simmer 30 minutes.
Drain well. Add fresh unsalted water to cover, add ginger. Sim-
mer again 30 minutes. Drain well. Mix vinegar. 6 cups water,
sugar and spices (tie spices in cloth bag). Add cucumbers and
simmer again until pickles are clear. Pack in hot, sterilized pint
jars, seal. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath. Makes about
6 pints. NOTE: 12 quarts of pickles is 3 times and the vinegar,
sugar solution is perfect quantities listed show a 3 times recipe.
serves 18


Gruchacz gets ready to prepare some pears for canning.


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


PADFC 1iA








VVTI.I'JlOL' e nl, u r ~ W Pd Ii I II v I .;, '-'4'." -' 1-- --


60-year-old"
Continued From Page 1A

unit with head injuries. "He's
still critical," she said of her
son's condition. On Monday,
his mother said, doctors told
them their son now has pneu-
monia to deal with, as well as
recovery from his other in-
juries,
Jackie Thornton, 60, was
injured Jan. 11 at about 12:12
p.m. when his mini van col-
lided with a pickup truck that
ran a stop sign at 101st Road,
according to the Florida
Highway Patrol. Thornton
was trapped inside his over-
turned vehicle while the two
teenage occupants of the
truck were ejected. Thornton
was transported by ambu-
lance to Lake City Medical
Center in Lake City and then
airlifted to Shands at UF, his


Father
Continued From Page 1A

in July.
Charged with commercial
dumping and unlawful dispos-
al.of solid waste at a non-per-
imitted site are William Larry
Norris Sr., 60, of Wellborn,
and his son, William Larry
Norris Jr., 34, of 3593 158th
St.
The commercial dumping
charge is a third degree felony,
while the unlawful disposal of
solid waste at a non-permitted,
site is a first degree misde-
meanor, according to Lucia
Ross of DEP.
Also charged was the owni-
er of the property where the
dumping allegedly took
place, Lewis G. Trotter, who
owns residential/commercial
property at 21536 136th St.,
Live Oak, DEP said. Accord-
ing to DEP, Trotter allowed
the father and son, and their
company, to dump' 'solid
waste (land clearing' debris
mixed with demolition
waste) into a largejpit (20'
deep with a 1/2 acri diame-
ter) on iii propel t\ oei a pe-
riod of years. Ross said.
SThe illegal practicee of


mother said.
The truck's driver and oc-
cupant were treated /at
.Shands at Live Oak. The
truck's driver, Joseph John-
son, 19, of Tampa, was ar-
rested later that day and
charged with burglary and
grand theft of items found at
the crash scene that had been
stolen from a home about
three miles away.
The Thointons, from Mia-
mi, are visiting their son
every day and hoping for his
recovery, but/for now, it's
just wait and see, Marion
Thornton said.
Johnson, meanwhile, re-
mains jailed in-the Suwannee
County ja il.
Susan K. Lamb may ,be"
reached by calling 1-386-362-
1734 ext. 131 or by mailing
susan. lamb@ gaflnews.com.



duminig off-site waste on pri-
\ate property is usually lucra-
tive1 for property owners and
trucking companies due to
a\ holding higher fees for prop-
er ,disposal at landfills, Ross'
added.
Warrants were served on the
Father and son Jan. 10 at the
Suwannee County Jail where
they had been asked to surren-
der to DEP officers. Accord-
ing to DEP, Trotter was arrest-
ed July 19, 2004 in connection
with this case.
SRoss said DEP began inves-
tigating the case Feb. 23, 2004
and filed affidavits with the
Third Circuit State Attorney's
Office Sept. 2, 2004 seeking
arrest warrants.
The'case' came about after a
confidential informant provid-
ed information about the al-
leged operation to the Stste.
Attorney's office and DEP.
Ross said she was unsure
what the penalty would be if,
the father and son are corvict-
ed.

Susan K. Lamb may be
,ICdlIJ db' calling 1-386-36.2-
1734 ei. 131 or by mailing
susan. lamb@gaflnews.com.


Martin


Continued From Page 1A

US 90 and ended up at the
African Baptist Church on
Walker Street. Jessie Philpot
was the parade committee
chairperson.
After the parade, locals
packed the African Baptist
Church for a remembrance
service. The Rev. Charles
Graham presided and the Rev.
Marvin C. Zanders was the
key speaker. Suwannee Mass
and Dr. King Youth Mass
Choir provided .the stirring
music that filled the church
with rejoicing.
A community luncheon was
ready foi any who cared to
partake at the Suwannee
County Coliseum after the
service.
The Rev. Tommie Jefferson
said Martin Luther King Jr.


Day is a day of remembrance
for him. He said he can still
remember when he \\as a boy
and wanted to drink one of
those small Coca Colas.
"We could ha\e RC. we
could ha\e Pepsi. but those
small Coca Colas were just for
� whites " Jefferson said As a
child, that hurt and confused
Jefferson. It's something lie
said he will ne\er forget. "I
might be only 45. but I re-
member." Jefferson said.
One ofseveral attending the
celebration. Bill Leitheid.
said, "Martin Luther King Jr.
Day means it's given America
a second chance to be the
country it should be."
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1.3.0/3)02-1734 a e.t. 134
or by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.copm.


A Hamilton session

with Gov. Bush on

tap for Jan. 28


On a first come first serve
basis, citizens, especially
Hamilton County residents,
may sign-up for a personal
chit-chat with either Florida
Governor Jeb Bush or Lt.
Gov. Toni Jennings when the
pair visits Jasper Jan. 28. A
designated 'Citizens Hour' is
designed to allow any resi-
dent of the community a
one-on-one opportunity to
sit with the Governor or Lt.
Governor and discuss issues
of concern or importance.
Sign-up and registration for
'Citizens Hour' will begin
the mornmig of'Jan. 28 at 7


Jasper. Staff members from
the Governor's office will be
on hand at that time to coor-
dinate the program. As re-
quested, residents can then
sit down with Gov. Bush or
Lt. Gov. Jennings and air
concerns during their five-
minute meeting. The ses-
sions will run from 8 a.m.
until noon Jan. 28. The pro-
gram is slated to be held in
Room 106 at the .court
house. The 'Citizens Hour'
concept, "gives us an invalu-
able opportunity to listen,
learn and serve lhpeple of
our gi .ita%'G.-Gov.


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60th day, unless cancelled by subscriber. Call 1-800-566-6111 for complete offer details. Not available to Major w/PL, Corporate,
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WRECK ON US 90 SENDS THREE TO THE HOSPITAL: Suwannee County Fire/Rescue and Live Oak Fire Department responded to
a two vehicle crash Friday, Jan. 7 afternoon in front of the flea market on US 90 east of Live Oak. Three victims had to be trans-
ported by ambulance to Shands at Live Oak. Bystanders were horrified when-they heard the crash and saw one of the vehicles spin-
ning toward the chain-link fence that surrounds the flea market. The names of the victims and those involved in the accident were
not available at press time. -, Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
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NUARY 19 2005


I


PAGE 11A


R SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


yi:

9-


Il.;",r t-i .>* ,TI 1







PAGE12AU SWANNE DMOCAT/LVE AK EDNEDAY JAUARY19,200


Bill and Natalie. Clowser
share our church pew and so we
were one of the first to know that
one of their 60 beautifully cared
for cows gave birth to twins just
before church time. Didn't even
know what sex or sexes yet and
could only report that one had
nursed and momma was licking
the surprise second calf, and
since momma cow. managed
beautifully through the birthing,
Bill and. Natalie came on to
thank God, make the birth an-
nouncement and share the joy.
Sunday afternoon we went to
Clowsers' 100 acre farm on CR
252 to'make a pasture visit and
see the twins. Only when we got
there Bill was with the nervous
momma cow and Natalie had
been dispatched to Tractor Sup-
ply to get some colostrum. The
boy baby calf had not nursed
and without the colostrum with-
in six to 10 hours a calf dies. Bill
grew up on a farm. His know-
how shows although he says it is
all trial and error. I saw confi-
dence, understanding and expe-
rience and a love demonstrated
while we waited for Natalie.
Jack went over to Duvals who
live off CR 252 hoping Patti's.
times with dairy calves might
have some remaining colostrum
powder stored in her barn. No
luck, but Jack did catch a
glimpse of several horse trailers
and friends gathered there to en-
joy one another trail riding on a
lovely Sunday afternoon. Natal-


ie won our Sunday afternoon
search for colostrum. Bill mixed
it up and then persuaded the
anxious momma to take her
newborn daughter off a distance
so Bill could bottle feed that lit-
tle guy. The calf drank nearly the
whole thing. A quiet hooray and
thanks be came from us in the
.cheering section. The last act.we
helped with was to herd momma
and daughter to the pasture clos-
est to the house. Then, we re-
turned to the content bottle fed
calf, sleeping and totally re-
laxed. Bill scooped himup, and
together, man and calf sat on the
tailgate of the Kawasaki mule
while we drove to the new nurs-
ery pasture nearest the Clowser
house. Over a cup of hot tea we
reviewed our afternoon adven-
tures. Learned that the fences
and cross fences needed 1,500
fence posts, and they did it
themselves. The most recent
something to be proud of is un-
Sderground waterlines from, two
wells at either side of the proper-
ty, another "did it ourselves" en-
abling them to water many new-
ly planted trees as well as filling
water troughs here and there.
The newest project is a welding
table for his \welder so he can fix
fence gate hinges himself. Bill
and Natalie have both experi-
eenced serious surgeries (heart
by pass while they were build-
ing, back surgery before that for
Bill and two hip replacements
due to crippling arthritis for Na-


talie). Both give bragging rights
to the doctors involved who re-
stored them and made this swell
retirement, chapter possible.
God's healing was real and is
recognized by these new friends
of ours. We saw evidence of grit,
perseverance, courage and lots
of work tob. And, we all got a
smile out of Natalie's story that
the guys at Tractor Supply sent a
doggy biscuit home to their Gin-
ger dog. We talked ugly about
the menace of vultures to new-
born calves. Bill said they will
peck eyes out of calves and Na-
talie added that she has shooed
them off her calves before.
A better side of birding was
experienced this week when
Jack identified purple finches,
both Mr. and Mrs., on our feed-
er along with the goldfinches.
Another surprise viewing was
three huge white birds hunched
at waters edge on Huntsman's
pond where we go walking
along. Black wing tips and bare
heads with big heavy down
turned bills made them wood
storks. Robins are hopping all
around now and ,one day our
cherry trees' naked limbs had
eight cardinals, all facing us like
Christmas ornaments.
The weekend will find many
homeowners traveling to St.
Augustine for the Fralick and
Sutton wedding. Amber Duval
Oliver and Nikki Fralick were
summer camp, counselors to-
gether after SuWannee High
School days. Amber flies in
from Long Island for the wed-
ding. It promises to be a beauti-
ful time. Eight bridesmaids and
a color scheme of red, black and
white. Nikki's former pastor, the
Rev. Cheryl Pingel, loved Nikki
as avivacious line girl. an ener-
getic and original youth and now
a delightful mature young
woman, and it is a pleasure for
Cheryl to officiate at'her wed-
ding Saturday.


The Florida Museum of Natural
History will host a Science Sunday
lecture on wild orchids
through 148 col-, children are returned to parents
orful orchid pho- at the end of the lecture portion
o a togr Arhea ef For more inform
orl ~ 77 W&e T -o" r to g se r fr to "Sun '
L-ii shops %ill day Snoop." call 352-4-lo-2u0,
ha\ e copies of her e\t.. 2.
book for sale dur-
ing the signing.
Bransilver is an
accomplished
Florida author, in-
lernationall or
known wildlife
photographer and
naturalist. She
serves on the
, board of the Na-
ti\e Orchid 01 Dodae Dakota
Restoration Pro-
LECTURE ON ORCHIDS: Book cover of "Wild, ject, received the
Love Affair: Essence of Florida's Native. Or- African Wildlife
chids". Author Cpnnie Bransilver will.highlight Foundation Pho-
her experiences surveying Florida orchids and tographer of the
discuss her book at the Florida Museum of Year Award in9
Natural History in Gainesville on Jan. 30.' 1999 and is wide-
- Photo: Submitted ly known for her


The Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History in Gainesville will
host a Science Sunday lecture
on wild orchids by Connie
Bransilver from 2-3 p.m. on
Jan. 30. The event is free and
open to the public. .,
Bransilver will highlight her
experiences surveying Florida
orchids and discuss her book,
"Wild Love Affair: Essence of
Florida's Native Orchids." Af-
terward, Bransilver will sign
copies of her book, which ex-
plores the Florida wetlands


multimedia music
and slide lecture presentations
on Florida conservation.
The Florida Museum also will
offer a new program for chil-
dren during the lecture, "Sun-
day Snoop." Adults can take a
break and enjoy the lecture
while museum staff entertain
children ages 4-10 for an hour
with fun activities and a guided
tour. Registration for "Sunday
Snoop" is $5 and pre-registra-
tion is required. 'When book
signing are held after a lecture,


Forrest Jackson Bass named to
Dean's Listt t Flagler College
, tine. The 2003 Suwannee least 12 hours of academic
�''* High School honor graduate work.
' ' ' is majoring in business ad- Flagler College is a four-
Sministration with a minor in year independent liberaL arts
pre-law. Bass plans to attend college offering programs
law school after his gradua- leading to the baccalaureate
Stion from Flagler College. :e degree. The college has an
is a member of American enrollment of 2,000 students.
MENSA and active in the Flagler College is continually
leadership team of Fusion, a ranked among the best prii
college ministry at Anastasia vate liberal arts colleges in
Baptist Church in St. Augus, the south by U.S. News &
ForrestJackson Bass ine. Bass is employed part, World Report. At an annual
time with the law firm oft cost of $12,760 (2004-05) tu-
Forrest Jackson Bass, soni Sellers, Prevatt and Robert- ition, room and board, Fla-
of.Carter and Vickie Bass of son.-Students on the Dean's ''gler is among the most af-
Live Oak, has been named to List attained a grade point av- fordable. Flagler College
the Fall 2004 Dean's List at erage of 3.4 or above on a 4.0 may be found on-line at
Flagler College in St. Augus- .grade scale and carried at .ww.flagler.edu.







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Suwannee County Museum


Chili Challenc
SThe Suwannee County Mu-
seum Association is planning
!its second Chili Challenge.
The event will be held on Sat-
urday, Jan. 29, from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m.: on the loading dock of
the old Atlantic Coastline
'Freight Depot.
This year there wil be three
classes in the competition.
Restaurants and businesses
will comepte .for a handsome
torph'. Civic organization will
compete for a cash prize of
$ (10(. This yar, individuals wil
compete, in their own class,
for a troph\. there will also be
trophies for the People's
Choice Award and for the best
presentation (table decora-
tion).


There will be entertainment
and an art exhibit by the Live
Oak Artist Guild.,
Chili must be prepared and
heated to 140 degrees.F. when
competitor check in. The tem-
perature of the chili will be
checked before the judging.
You may use crock pots or hot
plates to keep your chili up to
temperature. Electrical outlets
are available.
If you have questions about
the Chili Challenge, please
call 386-362-1776 and ask for
Carol or Richard. After hours,
please leave a message and we
will get back to you.
Proceeds from the event will
go to support the Suwannee
County Historical Museum.


SANTA PAYS VISIT
TO LOCAL FAMILY:
Santa Claus himself
stopped by during
Christmas to leave
some early gifts for
one special family in
Suwannee County,
Santa delivered the
gifts just in time to
make all the children
happy!
- Photo: Submitted


-L _


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L _ _ . .. I


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


PAGE 12A


8-







Basketball Marathon Thursday night!
Thursday, Jan. 20 Suwannee basketball plays four games in a basket-
ball marathon event. Suwannee basketball takes on Taylor County begin-
ning with the girls' JV at 3:30 p.m. The girls' varsity play at 6:30 p.m. and
the boys' varsity play at 8 p.m. Come out and enjoy some hoops!
4, DoS!


Lady Dogs

lose badly

to Florida

High

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
The Lady Dog basketball
team is still struggling to get
that first win this season. Flori-
da High blew in Friday, Jan. 7,
and blew away the Lady Dogs
19-57.
Suwannee didn't score until
the last seconds of the first peri-
od. The score at the end of the
first was a dismal 4-21.
The Lady Dogs did better in
the third scoring six points. In
the third period, the mercy rule
was enacted and the clock be-
gan to run continuously. The fit
nal score was 19-57.
Janet Schrader-Seccafico may
be reached by calling 1/386/362-
1734 ext. 134 or by e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com.

NFCC basketball

defeats Faulkner

State 65-61


NFCC'BASKETBALL: Wikneka
Gorsuch led the Lady Sen-
tinel's with 20 points and the
team defeated Faulkner State
65-61 during home play at
Colin P. Kelly Gymnasium on
the Madison campus on Jan.
10. - Photo: Submitted
The North Florida Commu-
nity College Lady Sentinels de-
feated Faulkner State 65-61
during home play at Colin P.
Kelly Gymnasium on the Madi-
son campus on Jan. 10.
NFCC"s Wikneka Gorsuch
led the team with 20 points.
Ashley Williams scored 12,
Nina Green had
14, Petrina Goodman 15,
Shanan Weeks 2 and Ronnisha
Jerido 2.
The win takes the Lady Sen-
tinels to a 6 and 9 record for the
season thus far. Upcoming
home games are against Gulf
Coast Jan. 19'at 5:30 p.m.;
Okaloosa-Walton Feb. 2 at 5:30
p.m.; Tallahassee Feb. 9 at 5:30
p.m.; Pensacola Feb. 11-12;
Chipola Feb. 16; and Gulf
Coast Feb. 21. All home games
are free and open to the public.
For more information, contact
NFCC basketball coach Clyde
Alexander at 850-973-1609 or
visit athletics at www.nfcc.edu.

2005 Lafayette
Baseball Golf
Tournament
The 2005 Lafayette
Baseball Golf Tournament
will be, held at 9 a.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 12, at the
Suwannee Country Club,
Live Oak. Four man scram-
ble with prizes to the top
three teams. Cost: $50 per
player or $200 per team.
Come and support Hornet
Baseball. For more info,
contact Derek Garland,
386-294-3025 or Joann
Page, 386-294-2834.


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
" It would have been his 100th% \%n.
Lincoln wrestling coach Mike Crosw-
der had the media in place to record
the 100th win of his career. He posted
a message on the Internet that he es-
pecially wanted this 100th win to be
against Su\annee. Too bad. Coach
Crowder. Suwannee won 36-26!
When the Bulldogs arrived in Tal-


lahassee at Lincoln High School. the
media \\as already in place to record
this historic 100th \\in for Coach
Mike Crowder. According to Suiman-
nee v.restling coach David La\ton,
the Dog's had a game plan. In plan
"A" they needed to win the coin toss
which decides which wrestler reports
to the mat first. Suwannee lost the
coin toss and had to revert to Plan
"B". In Plan "B" the Dogs had to se-
cure pins in three pivotal matches.
"But that did not happen either,"


#uuwannee ermnorat

Section B
Wednesday, January 19, 2005


Suwannee football celebrates season


Patrick Cherry received high honors at the recent 2004 Suwannee Tim Smith set a new Suwannee High record for the most field
High football banquet. Cherry was the Offensive Team Captain for goals in one game with four against East Gadsden. Smith was
2004, took home the Good Hands award and the Showtime also named permanent team captain for 2004 for the special
award. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico teams. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
J


Nick Beck was the most highly honored Suwannee football player
at the banquet for 2004. Beck took home the Quarterback Killer
award for the second year in a row, the Special Forces award for
most tackles for loss, Most Dedicated Senior, the Spirit Award and
was named the permanent team captain forthe 2004 defense.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Michael Wright won the newly created Charlie Crews Bulldog
Award. Wright started on both the offense and the defense and
played with great heart all year. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


We beat

Columbia.

We've got

the Bucket.

The kids

have a lot

to be proud

of."
Coach Jay Walls

Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
The annual Suwannee
High football banquet was
% ell attended Monday night,
Jan. 10. The brand-new audi-
torium at First Baptist was
packed with parents and
players waiting to find out
which players had been hon-
ored.
The Hustle Award was a
new award implemented this
year and sponsored by Mer-
cantile Bank. Brian Metzger
was on hand from Mercantile
Bank to hand out the presti-
gious award. The Hustle
Award recipient was decided
upon after each game by the
coaches and presented to the
player that gave 100 percent
during the game.
Matt Carver, Suwvannee's
center, received two Hustle
Awards. Rashard Fleming re-
ceived two. Billy Moran, Ja-
son Cherry, Bruce Johnson,
Patrick Cherry, Lee Laxton,
Michael Wright and Terrell
Roman all received awards.
Next on the program agen-
da was the presentation of
the Player of the Game
awards. These are sponsored
by First Federal. Money is
placed into the Steven Selph
scholarship fund for each
SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 2B


Laxton said.
The match began with the 171
\weight class. Case\ Osborne is
Su\annee's regular 171. Lincoln's
coach moved their regular 160-pound
wrestler up to wrestle at 171. expect-
ing an eas\ pin over Osborne. But
Osborne wrestled hard and Lincoln
only secured a decision 9-3 over Os-
borne. The Lincoln Trojans went
ahead 0-3.
Lincoln then moved their regular
171. Justin Kennett, up to wrestle


Justin lMowls at 189 weight class.
Lincoln expected another easy win.
but Mow ls had other ideas.
owlsws had prepared a can of whip
tail for Mr. Kennett." Laxton said.
NMowls won in a decision 9-4. which
tied the match at 3-3.
Michael Wright. Suwannee's big
215-pound wrestler, pinned his oppo-
nent in 27 seconds flat. That gave the
Dogs the lead 9-3. Kris Kerns wres-

SEE WRESTLING, PAGE 5B


Rereation Department Soccer opens with Jamboree

uwannee Recre- .
action Department ,
soccer opened . .
with a bang and a huge
jamboree Sat. Jan. 8. ..
Hordes of soccer play- ,
.r.+ni ,ii . , i 'i' i J ML i
dccer :', ', ,


i cmUIIIeLlU aII uay
long. There were fun
games and events
planned by the Recre-
ation Department for
kids of all ages. Rec
soccer is now in full
swing. Look inside the
Suwannee Democrat
on page ??? for a com-
plete schedule.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
LOOK FOR MORE
JAMBOREE PHOTS
ON PAGE 7B


..7.4"
. . * , , I, , - ,.

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Suwannee wrestling defeats Lincoln

for the first time in six years


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SPORTS


Suwannee


Continued From Page 1B

award; Sherri Ragans was on
hand from First Federal to


present each awa
Patrick Cherr
three Offensive P
Game Awards. B


Bruce Johnson takes home the Comeback Award alor
for the Sticky Fingers award'for most interception
Moran. Both had two. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


- .:
.1 '7 1.~
-� ,^-'- - -
.-: ?: .,i .,_ .^ ^,'
. , . .


. - .- .' . ,,
Lee Laxton'was named Most Dedicated Sophomore.
- Photo: Janet S


1984 Isuzu Pup ............................$1,095
1987 Mazda B2000.......................$1,495
1986 Plymouth Voyager.................$9,95
1987 Plymouth Voyager.................$1,295
1988 Dodge Work Van................... $1,195
1989 Ford V150, Work Van............ $1,195
1990 Plymouth Voyager.................$1,295
1995 Ford Probe............................$2,995
1995 Chevy C20, Work Van............ $2,195
1995 Olds Cutlass Supreme........ $2,495


rd. son received two Offensive
y received Player of the Game awards.
layer of the Matt Yanossy received a
3ruce John- Defensive Player of the
Game award. Billy Moran,
Shaun Brewer and Matt
Carver received Offensive
Player awards.
Rheed Baldwin and Ryan
Hight both received Offen-
sive Player of the Game
awards.
Delwyn Allen, Michael
Wright, A.J. Schuler, Jon
Bell, Nick Beck and Rashard
Fleming received Defensive
Player of the Game awards.
Justin Hancock, Tim
Smith and Ranard Fleming
received Offensive Player of
the Game awards.
The Sports Connection
sponsored several special
awards. Homecoming Player
of the Game went to Billy
Moralh for defense and
Bruce Johnson for offense.
Timmy Smith was hon-
oredfor breaking the school
field goal record for the
most field goals in one
g with tying game. Smith kicked four
ns with Billy field goals in the East Gads-
den game.
The. Sports Connection
also sponsored a special
Player of the Game award
for the big win against Co-
lumbia snagging the Oaken
Bucket trophy for Suwan-
nee. Patrick Cherry received
this award.
After these awards the se-
nior cheerleaders and foot-
ball players received a spe-
cial gift from the Suwannee
Quarterback Club. And the
S cheerleaders were honored.
The winner of this year's JV
S cheerleader Academic
Award was Stephanie Wind-
burn with a 3.5 GPA. The
* f varsity cheerleader Academ-
,ic Award went to Julianne
S. .' . Crapps with a 4.0 GPA.
S .' Coach Walls took the time
. to thank e er, one hho
.. helped ih'e football piograir,
Many people in Suwannee
County, many businesses,
chrader-Seccafico school officials and medical


1995 Chrysler LeBaron Cony........$3,000
1996 Chevy Tahoe LT................... $8,000
1996 Isuzu Pup..............................$3,495
1984 Ford Tempo........................... $850
1996 Dodge Intrepid..................... $2,495
1992 Grand Prix........................... $1,200

1995 Ford Escort........................ $1,195
1986 Ford F250........................... $2,500

1997 Grand Am............................. $2,495
1984 Futra.....................................$600


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personnel help the team dur-
ing the year.
Walls made a special
thanks to the local churches
that sponsor the weekly
Breakfast of Champions at
First Advent Christian
Church. First Advent started
the tradition of feeding the
football players breakfast on
game days in their church.
First Baptist, Melody Chris-
tian Church, Westwood Bap-
tist and First United
Methodist have joined First
Advent in feeding the play-
ers.
Walls commended the
players for a 6-4 winning
season and a winning 271
district record. Suwannee
also won back the Oaken
Bucket this year.
"We beat Columbia.
We've got the Bucket,"
Walls said. "The kids have a
lot to be proud of."
The players were all
awarded their certificates
arid letters next along with
some special statistic
awards.
Rheed Baldwin won the
Top Gun award. Billy Moran
took home the Running Man
award and tied for the Sticky
Fingers award with Bruce
Johnson for most intercep-
tions. Both had two.
Patrick Cherry took home
the Good Hands award for
54 receptions for 673 yards
and three TD's.
The Mr. T award for most
unassisted tackles went to
Rashard Fleming. Ranard
Fleming won the Green
Zone award for most touch-
downs with five.
For the second year in a
row, Nick Beck took home
the Quarterback Killer
award. Beck had 14 quarter-
back sacks. , Beck jlso
snagged the Special Foices
award for the most tackles
for loss with 12.
Jon Bell't on the Mir HLis-
tie award for defensive pla.
with the most tackle assists.
Matt Carver won the Pan-
cake Award for most big
hits.
There were two freshman
Academic Awards. Clax Ki-
nard and Jacob Williamn
took them home for a 4 0
GPA.
Austin Brewster won ihe
Academic Award for sopho-
mores with a 4.0 GPA.
Rheed Baldwin won the
Academic Junior award with


a 4.0 GPA and Matt Carver
won the Academic Award for
seniors.
The brand new Charlie
Crews Iron Dog award went
to Michael Wright. Wright
started on the defense and
offense this year' and is a ju-
nior.
The Defensive Scout
award went to Kris Kerns.
The Offensive Scout
award went to Emario
Tooten.
Most Improved Defensive
Player went to Rashard
Fleming.
Most Improved Offensive
Player went to Matt Carver.
Comeback Player of the
Year was awarded to Bruce
Johnson who played with a
back injury he received at
the beginning of the season.
Most Dedicated Freshman
was a tie. The winners were
Jarrett Yulee and Jason Cher-
ry.
Most Dedicated Sopho-
more went to Lee Laxton.
Most Dedicated Junior
went to Billy Moran.
Most Dedicated Senior
went to Nick Beck.
The Spirit Award is pre-
sented to the player that
shows the most heart and
emotion in every play. This
year it was awarded to Nick
Beck.
The Showtime Award went
to Patrick Cherry for the sec-
ond year. Last year he split it
with Bruce Johnson. This
year, he earned it for his
own.


The Hammer Award went
to Delwyn Allen, a defensive
tackle famous for hitting
hard.
The Trench Award went to
A.J. Schuler. Schuler plays
in the trenches of the offen-
sive and defensive lines and
comes out on top almost al-
ways.
The Bulldog Award went
to Delwyn Allen this year.
Allen was injured but re-
fused to give up and came
back strong in the last two
games of the season.
The 12th Man Award went
to Matt Yanossy.
There were no MVP
awards this year. Instead
team captain awards were
presented.
Special Teams Captain for
2004 went to Tim Smith,
Suwannee's four-year place
kicker.
Defensive Captain for
2004 went to Nick Beck.
Beck logged 29 tackles, 23
assisted tackles, 12 tackles
for loss, 14 sacks and two re-
covered fumbles.
Offensive Team Captain
went to Patrick Cherry.
Look for many of these
Suwannee players to be back
next year. Go Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.
See Pages 3B and 6B
for more 2005 Suwanne
Football Banquet photos.


L


,hk -;,


..-- ,;. . B,-,,-
N^. 'ya�'*


Jarrett Yulee named one of two most Dedicated Freshman.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


DAE- OR


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VV A-L/1M1U'� ,,I- / I, i iA i 1 9OO* iii .... E DEMO RATLIV OAK PAGE 3B
SPORTS


2005 Suwannee Football Banquet


Matt Carver takes home the Most Improved Offensive Player Rashard Fleming named Most Improved Defensive.Player. Flem-
award for 2004. Carver was also the senior Academic Award win- ing also took home the Mr. T award for most unassisted tackles.
ner. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccaiico - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


I 3


4 , -~~
k ~ , -


i-.l
9;�


Billy Moran Most Dedicated Junior and Moran also took home the
Running Man award for the running back with the most yards.
Moran also shared the Sticky Fingers Award with Bruce Johnson
for most interceptions. Both players had two.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico
See Page 6B for more 2005 Suwanne Football Banquet photos


FOOTBALL ACADEMIC AWARD WINNERS: L to r: Senior Matt Carver, Junior Rheed Baldwin, Sophomore Austin Brewster, freshmen
Jacob Williams and Clay Kinard. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


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presents the
2004-2005
Lyceum Series


February 4 * 7:30 p.m.
Alfonso Levy
Performing Arts Center
General admission $14
Senior citizens $13
LCCC staff, students & students $12
from other schools
Tickets on sale ihiirogh evening of the
peifnrmance at the Borx ticifi.e a n. -4p.m..


Dinner Served at 6 p.m. in the Lobo Cafe
Spanish chicken & rice, salad, dinner roll, dessert and
beverage, $6 including tax - seating is limited, so please make
reservations February 1-4.


For Ticket Information call
(386) 754-4340
If you have a disability and need assistance,
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CEMMUNIIY EICiLLa
135158-F


/4 ,Look

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Missed...
...if you missed the last edition of
i~te umwanne Remorrat
- Crash victim arrested; charged with burglary
- Donkey's nature's brave little watch dog
- 4a h(greens project moving forward
~ Suwannee 'Democrat commissions
"painted" newspaper coin racfs

To subscribe to ,nuant ee democratt call (386) 362-1734 or complete this
coupon and mail to: tunuannee Bentocrat, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064


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Emario Tooten wins the Offensive Scout award for 2004.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


~� I


PAGE 3B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


EDNESDAYJANUARY 5


D


I


~iW
rr










SUWANNEE PARKS & RECREATION


Weather Hotline - 208-1580
Concession Stand - 362-1750
5 - 6 Youth Soccer 2005 Game Schedule


All games will be played at First Federal Sportsplex. Admission - $1 per adult.
Concessions will be available. No food / pets allowed in the ball fields.
9 - 10 Youth Soccer 2005 Game Schedule


Team 1
Team 2
Team 3


The Storage Place
Lafayette State Bank
First Federal


Team 4 Walt's Live Oak Ford
Team 5 Southern Paint.& Collision


Team 6
Team 7
Team 8
Team 9


For Sale By Owner
Jackson Farms
Southern Metal Designs
Gill Tire Co.


Team 1 JT's Transmissions Gearjammers Team 4 Gold Kist
Team 2 Mike's Auto Body Team 5 G-N Construction
Team 3 Mercantile Bank


Games Played on Field 2


Games Played on Field 4


Date
Thursday, Jan. 20
Saturday, Jan. 22

Monday, Jan. 24
Tuesday, Jan. 25
Thursday, Jan. 27
Saturday, Jan. 29

Monday, Jan. 31
Tuesday, Feb. 1
Thursday, Feb. 3
Saturday, Feb. 5

Monday, Feb. 7
Tuesday, Feb. 8
Thursday, Feb. 10
Saturday, Feb. 12


Game Time
6 p.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
6 p.m.
6p.m.
6 p.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
6 p.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.


Field 4 A
2 vs. 8
7 vs. 6
9 vs. 4
6 vs. 8
4 vs. 1
3 vs. 7
3 vs. 2
9 vs. 6
3 vs. 5
3 vs. 9
7 vs. 1
5 vs. 7
4 vs. 6
9 vs. 2
8 vs. 3
8 vs. 1
1 vs. 9
7 vs. 2


Field 4 B


Date
Thursday, Jan. 20
Saturday, Jan. 22
Monday, Jan. 24
Tuesday, Jan. 25
Thursday, Jan. 27
Saturday, Jan. 29
Monday, Jan. 31
Tuesday, Feb. 1
Thursday, Feb. 3
Saturday, Feb. 5
Monday, Feb. 7.
Tuesday, Feb. 8
Thursday, Feb. 10
Saturday, Feb. 12
Monday, Feb. 14
Tuesday, Feb. 15
Thursday, Feb. 17
Saturday, Feb. 19
Playoffs, Feb. 21-24


6 vs. 3
5 vs. 4


7- 8 Youth Soccer 2005 Game Schedule


Team 1 Suwannee Salvage
Team 2 Golden Corral
Team 3 Wes Haney Chevrolet
Team 4 State Farm - Rob Cathcart


Team 5 Red Roof Services, Tax Prep
Team 6 Budget Storage
Team 7 Reliable Carpet Cleaning


Team 1 Dairy Queen
Team 2 Furst Automotive & Cycle
Team 3 Live Oak Jewelry


6:15 p.m.
2 vs. 4


vs. 5
vs. 2
vs. 1

vs. 4
vs. 3.
vs. 4

vs. 3
vs. 2
vs. 5

vs. 5
vs. 1
vs. 4


10 a.m.

1 vs. 3


Team 4
Team 5
Team 6


11:15 a.m.

5 vs. 4


4 vs. 3 5 vs. 2


2 vs. 1


5 vs. 2


5 vs. 4


3 vs. 5



4 vs. 1


1 vs. 3


Single. Elimination - Times to be determined!


Games Played on Field 5


Date
Thursday, Jan. 20-
Saturday, Jan. 22

Tuesday, Jan. 25
Thursday, Jan. 27
Saturday, Jan. 29

Tuesday, Feb. 1
Thursday, Feb. 3
Saturday, Feb. 5

Tuesday, Feb. 8
Thursday, Feb. 10
Saturday; Feb. 12

Tuesday, Feb. 15
Thursday, Feb. 17
Saturday, Feb. 19


Game Time
6:15 p.m.
10 a:m.
11 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
'6:15 p.m.
10 a.m.
6:15 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
,10 a.m.
11 a.m.


Field 5 A
3 vs. 2
1 vs. 3
7 vs. 4
4 vs. 6
2 vs. 1
7 vs. 6
2 vs. 4
7 vs. 2
5 vs. 2
5 vs. 4
7 vs. 1
6 vs. 2
4 vs. 1
7 vs. 4
-2 ivt. '3
4 vs. 6
4 vs. 2
3 vs. 5
6 vs. 7


Field 5 B
5 vs. 7
2 vs. 6


3
3
1

4
6
6

3
7
6

7
5
2


Date
Thursday, Jan. 20
Saturday, Jan. 22
Monday, Jan. 24
*Tuesday, Jan. 25
Thursday, Jan. 27
Saturday, Jan. 29
Monday, Jan. 31
Tuesday, Feb. 1
Thursday, Feb. 3.
Saturday, Feb. 5
Monday, Feb. 7
Tuesday, Feb. 8
Thursday, Feb. 10
Saturday, Feb. 12
Monday, Feb. 14
Playoffs, Feb. 21-24
A V,' 'if * *


6:15 p.m.
4 vs. 6


vs. 3
vs. 4
vs. 5

vs. 3
vs. 1
vs. 2

vs. 4
vs. 6
vs. 5


10 a.m.

2 vs. 6


5 vs. 4


4 vs. 6


1 vs. 3


1 vs. 4


6 vs. 3



3 vs. 2



6 vs. 5


6 .vs. 3
Single Elimination - Times to be determined!


,SP K



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Submit to:
Love Notes
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak. FL 32064
Attn: MNl.rtle Parnell


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11 - 13 Youth Soccer 2005 Game Schedule


Winbunm Landscaping
Little Caesars
PCS


Games Played on Field 1


11:15 a.m. 12:30 p.m.


3 vs. 5



1 vs. 2



1 vs. 5



2 vs. 4


Basketball Marathon
Thursday night!
Thursday, Jan. 20 Suwannee basketball plays four
games in a basketball marathon event. Suwannee J
basketball takes on Taylor County beginning with
the girls JV at 3:30 p.m. The girls varsity play at 6:30 :;I
p.m. and the boys varsity play at 8 p.m. Come out 3
and enjoy some hoops! ,Co Dot


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* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


DAGEC 4 R


"d4


e







WWENESDAY, J1AN'UARY 19, 2005U - --
SPORTS


JV wrestling has a good day against

Lincoln winning five of eight matches


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Caleb Sanders wrestled first
for Suwannee against the JV
Lincoln wrestlers. Sanders took
down the Lincoln wrestler and
pinned him in the first period.
Jeffrey Lee, wrestling in the
121 weight class gave up a pin
in the second period.
Clay Mott, wrestling in the
147 weight class, manhandled
his opponent, pinning him in
the second period.

Wrestling
Continued From Page. B l

tied next in the battle of the
heavy weights.
"Now for the battle of the
giants," Laxton said. "But
Kris Kerns is more like David
at 222 battling Gaizka Crow-
ley at 263 pounds,"
Laxton said it was a great
match, back and forth with
Kerns using every bit of his
strength to fend off the giant.
Kerns was behind 5-3 when
he made a final effort to take
Crowley down for the tie and
go into overtime. But he
slipped and stumbled and fell
onto his back and was pinned
by the giant. The match was
tied again at 9-9.
The match switched from
giants to light weights as
Corey Riley made his first
wrestling appearance in the
105 class for Suwannee. Ri-
ley fought hard but was
pinned late in the second peri-
od. Suwannee went down 9-
15.
Levi Wainwright was up
next for the Dogs in the 119
weight class. Levi loss 0-5 in
a decision, sending Lincoln
ooasing ahead 9-18.
Caleb Wainwright 'was


Nate Smith, wrestling for the
first year, was pinned by his
Lincoln opponent.
Jarrod Sullivan, wrestling in
the 171 weight division, wres-
tled a great match against his
Lincoln opponent. Sullivan lost
in the last seconds to a deci-
sion.
Gerry Torres, a freshman,
wrestled for the Dogs in the
189 class. Torres' match was
the most exciting match of the
night according to Coach
David Laxton. Torres won in
overtime after ending regular


Suwannee's next wrestler.
Caleb pinned his man in 48
seconds for the Dogs, evening
up the score a little to 15-18.
David Sanders at 127 wres-
tled hard in a very strategic
match but loss in a decision
4-6. The Trojans moved fur-
ther into the lead 15-21.
Tyler Townsend was
Suwannee's 132-pound entry.
This was Townsend's first
varsity dual meet. Townsend
lost 0-15, but was not pinned.
Lincoln scored their last
points of the match as the
Score went to 15-26.
It was now 'hammer time
for Suwannee. Barney Wain-
wright was Suwannee's next
wrestler. Wainwright knew
the team needed a pin. But ac-
cording to Laxton, the Lin-
coln wrestler stalled the entire
match. Barney .won a major
victory 18-8 but could not pin
the stall-king. The score went
to 19-26.
William "Willy Mac "Mc-
Crimon wrestled next and
won a 3-0 victory sending
Suwannee closer to Lincoln,
22-26.
Lee Laxton wrestled next


three rounds in a 13-13 tie.
Brett Perrin wrestling in the
215 weight class, hammered
him Lincoln opponent, pinning
him in the first round.
Heavyweight Tom Cheeks
won his match by forfeit.
The JV wrestling Bulldogs
take on Godby at home Jan. 25
at 6:30 p.m. Come out and
watch. Go Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico _
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or by
e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com.


Suwannee to within one point
of Lincoln, 25-26.
At 154, Greg Boyle was up
for the Dogs. Boyle had to
win to secure the victory for
Suwannee. Boyle won a tech-
nical pin, 15-0, giving
Suwannee their first lead of
the match 30-26.
Suwannee's state champion
Preston Hart was last up. Hart
put the icing on the cake for
the Dogs by pinning his oppo-
nent in 25 seconds. The Dogs
received six points for the pin
and a huge victory over the
Lincoln Trojans 36-26.
The victory denied Lin-
coln's Coach Crowder his
100th win and gave Suwan-
nee their first victory over
Lincoln in six years. Suwan-
nee wrestling is on top of its
game. Make sure you mark
Jan. 25 on your calendars
when Suwannee wrestling
will take on GHS at home.
The JV wrestlers take to the
mat at 6:30 p.m. and the Bull-
dogs start their match at 7:30
p.m. Go Dogs!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or by


in the 147.. \eigh .'.lWss. lH .,,e-nail l . ,,,.. . at
secured a 3-2 victory inching janiet. clhrader@gaflnews.com.


X$eatco ~'eacc


Recent warmer weather and
calm seas have boosted the flats
fishing for trout and the grouper
fishing offshore.
Trout are taking live shrimp
and plugs in 2-4 feet of water
while grouper are doing best in
40-60 feet on live porgies and
frozen cigar minnows and
Northern Mackerel.
Peggy and Richard Romine
and Carol and Forest Wright of
Lake City had their limit of trout
both days fishing in three feet of
water with live shrimp under
Cajun Thunders and using Salt-
water Assassins Green back
shiner split tail shads under Ca-
juns tipped with a bit of shrimp.
Jason Witherspoon and Paul
Wilson of Valdosta, Ga. had
their limit of 10 trout and two


9far 14, 15
reds fishing in three feet of wa-
ter with plugs and live shrimp
under Cajun Thunders, Thurs-
day.
Tony Mallory, Colby Alien
and Scott Waynic of Valdosta,
Ga. had their limits of trout in 3-
4- feet of water using live grubs
under a Cajun Thunder and fish-
ing with jerk baits, like Cordell
Rattlin' Redfins.
Sammy and Mary Lastinger
of Perry caught their limit of 10
trout both Sunday . and
Monday using live shrimp
fished under a Cajun Thunder in
2-3 feet of water.
Offshore, Torey Wingate and
Chuck Jones ofDoerun, Ga. had
seven grouper and a big pile of
pinkmouths while fishing frozen
cigar minnows in 42 feet of wa-


2005 -'
ter.
Billy Pillow and Rusty Smith
of Madison took Ben Barbee
and Alan Aultman of Sylvester
Ga. out grouper fishing Saturday
and they caught a limit using
live porgies.
� The Taylor County High
School Senior class is having a
Saltwater Fishing Tournament
to raise money for their Senior
Trip to New York City. The
Tournament will be held in
SKeaton Beach Saturday, March
5, 2005 and will award prizes to
the top trout, redfish and
grouper. Tickets are $10 per per-.
son and all proceeds go towards
the senior trip. For more infor-
mation call Sandy Beach Man-
ning at Go Fish Collectibles
850-578-2897 ext. 611'.


The news readers


of today are the




' 'ews makers of




^l tomorrow


Share the Pa( er w3 en


1 Year

In County

Subscription

$4 1 Year
J0 Out of County


I"Yar u I pti oISs


Zip


OCheck OlCash l Money Order I


I
Card No. E\p. Datle '


Mall to:


uuwaunnee emncrat
P.O. Box 340, Live Oak, FL 32064


a t - $ .


SHS Arbor Day Project
Submitted by Brian Cobble, the Suwannee High School (SHS) on Jan.
Suwannee County Forester 21.
As an Arbor Day Project, a large caliper A new parking lot was built in 2004 at
tree will be planted beside a playground at SHS, and a retention pond was created to
the Suwannee Elementary School, fol- divert and catch water from the newly con-
lowed by the planting of River Birch and structed area. The retention pond is highly
Cypress in and around a retention pond at visible and just over one-half acre in size.

,


''-. . " . . .. ... ' ' - ---- -

ARBOR DAY PROJECT: Draft map of are where,River Birch and .Cypress will be planted in and
around a retention pond at Suwannee High School on Jan. 21.-.Photo: Submitted


1


I Name


I Address


a 1


City_

I Phone


State


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PAGE 5B


M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


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-2005 Suwannee OD --Football Banquet



2005 Suwannee Football Banquet


A.J. Schuler took home the Trench Award for putting in the best
performance in the offensive line and defensive line trenches.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


"We beat Columbia.

We've got the Bucket.

The kids have a lot to

be proud of."

Coach Jay Walls


Today's Weather


Wed Thu Fr;
1/19 1/20 1/21

- .- ,. -: , . -


60/39 66/40 64/40
A rnainly sunny sky. Partly cloudy. Highs in More sun than clouds.
High around 60F. the mid 60s and lows Highs in the mid 60s
Winds NW at 5 to 10 in the low 40s. and lows in the low
mph. 40s.



Sunrise: Sunrise: Sunrise:
7:28 AM 7:28 AM 7:28 AM
Sunset: Sunset: . Sunset:
5:58 PM' 5:58 PM 5:59 PM
e~c Cll breit Hra loIretonril Life
Store for a.' id bout hoi-io eto.w ns just like yours,
Lookt f'r us ev h veek in tis paper.


Florida At A Glance

-.T Tallahassee
S)"' , Jacksonville
Pens.acola' Live Oak '



Onriando


Tampa I.




Miami
68.53


Area .._-.
Clearraler 63i
Crestview 60
Daytona Beach 62
Fort Lauderdale 68
Fort Myers 68
Gainesville 61
Hollywood 70
Jacksonville 59
Key West 68
Lady Lake 61
Lake City 59
Madison 59
Melbourne 64
Miami 68
N Smyrna Beach 62


urnny
sunny
mst sunny
rain
sunny
sunny
rain
sunny
pt sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
pt sunny
rain
pt sunny


Ocala 63
Orlando 64.
Panama City 58
Pensacola 59
Plant City 65
Pompano Beach 68
Port Charlotte 67
Saint Augustine 58
Saint Petersburg 61
Sarasota 64
Tallahassee 57
Tampa 63
Titusville 63
Venice 64
W Palm Beach 67


38 sunny
42 mst sunny
46 sunny
46 sunny
42 sunny
53 rain
43 sunny
39 sunny
49 sunny
44 sunny
38 sunny
44 sunny
40 ptsunny
44 sunny
49 rain


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


mst sunny
sn shower
ptsunny
sunny
mst sunny
ptsunny
sunny
rain


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


12 sn shower
26 sn shower
53 sunny
49 ptsunny
50 rain
32 pt sunny
25 sn shower


Moon Phases






First Full Last New
Jan 17 Jan 25 Feb 2 Feb 8


UV Index
Wed Thu Fri
1/19 1/20 1/21
4 4 4
Moderate Moderate Moderate
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale, 0 " "......" 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.

@2005 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Matt Yanossy received the 12th Man Award for coming off the
bench and playing whatever position was needed offense or de-
fense and doing a great job. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Delwyn Allen took home the Bulldog Award for being tough and
the Hammer Award for being the hardest hitter on the Bulldog
football team. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


-_ .* .


. �Js.

'-, , -.'
^aggv-
�:'/*^^ *


A-.-


Jason Cherry was named Most Dedicated Freshman at the recent Kris Kearns took home the Defensive Scout Award for 2004.
2004 football awards banquet.- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Sherri Ragans handed out the First Federal Players of the Game
awards at the recent Suwannee High Bulldog football banquet. -
Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


NEW.


SHEAR SPIRIT FAMILY SALON

NEW ADDITION TO
THE SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
PARK FAMILY!!


OPEN Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 10 a.m. till 6:30 p.m.
Thursday's 10 a.m. till 5 p.m.
Saturday's 10 a.m. till 1 p.m.


LIZ BRINGS SEVENTEEN YEARS OF FAMILY HAIR CARE EXPERIENCE TO THE PARK
AND WILL FIX YOUR LOCKS FOR WEDDINGS, ANNIVERSARIES, PROMS, WORK,
EVERYDAY WEAR OR ANY SPECIAL OCCASION AT FAMILY AFFORDABLE PRICES.


I Mention this coupon and bring in to obtain


10% OFF
of either a permanent hair coloring or hair
streaking. Offer expires January 31, 2005.
Call the shop at (386) 364-6550 or Liz's cell phone
(386) 590-1104 to make an appointment.
Walk-ins are Welcomed.


Brian Metzger of Mercantile Bank handed out the first ever Hustle
Awards sponsored by Mercantile Bank. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Congratulations

Suwannee High

School 2005

Football Team!


A, /al:$"
~ ~


ASK DR. MANTOOTH


Q: How safe does a patient-need to be
with aspirin?
A: Aspirin is an effective pain reliever.
Doctors also recommend for some
patients with heart problems a daily low
dose - 100 milligrams, for instance,
because it thins blood, however, there's
been some concern about whether a
patient should stop taking aspirin before
having oral surgery. Studies have shown
that patients who take a daily low dose
of aspirin for their heart may not have to
stop taking it before having a tooth
extracted. It's important to remember,
though, to never put aspirin directly on a
gum or on a sore in the mouth'because
the acid in aspirin can severely burn
the soft tissue of the mouth. And a study
published last summer in the Journal of
the American Dental Association found
that people who chew aspirin over a
long period suffer erosion to both the
enamel and dentin of the teeth they use
to crush aspirin. If you are a regular
aspirin user, talk to your dentist about
the proper way to use it and about any
concerns related to oral surgery.
Presented us a service to the community by
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
ni12 R.il.h,,.J d c
l '. , Li. .'Ol,. FL L
" 362-6556
(800) 829-6506.


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134608JRS-F


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M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


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DAYJANUARY 19 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7B


VVL.LWIENE L- I , UIMU- I ,.-- -1-




Recreation Department Soccer opens with Jamboree


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Lafayette State Bank scores against Jackson Farms. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


Wes Haney Chevrolet vs. State Farm Insurance - Rob Cathcart. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


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Antler scoring in Lake City


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's (FWC) Wildlife Re-
serve Officers will be scoring
deer antlers at Milton's Coun-
try Store Jan. 15 from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. The store is located
at 12049 N. U.S. 441 in Lake
City.
Hunters who have taken a
buck can have the antlers
scored to compare with other


Florida deer taken in previous
seasons. The deer must have
been taken in Florida by fair
chase methods.
Antlers scoring 100 points
or more qualify for the Florida
Buck Registry and the owner
will receive a certificate suit-
able for framing.
The Florida Buck Registry
was established in 1982 to
provide hunters with a record


of the number and quality of
white-tailed deer taken in
Florida and to afford recogni-
tion to Florida hunters. The
minimum antler score neces-
sary to qualify is 100 Boone
and Crockett inches for typical
antlers and 125 for non-typical
antlers.
For additional information,
call Coby at Milton's Country
Store at 386-755-6975.


S'4



















13.

















Watch out! Here


Suwannee Legals
physically received at City Hall, 101 SE White
Ave, Live Oak, Florida 32064. ANY BID RE-
CEIVED AFTER THE BID CALL WILL NOT
BE CONSIDERED. Bids shall be sealed and
plainly marked on the outside of the envelope
with both the bid number and the bid name.
Bids must be completed and signed in ink in
spaces) provided on the enclosed Bid form(s)
and submitted in duplicate or bid will be subject
to rejection.
Any deviation from the specifications must be
explained in detail on sheets attached to the
Bid Form and labeled "Clarifications and Ex-
ceptions" and each deviation must be itemized
by number and must specifically refer to the
applicable specification paragraph and page.
Otherwise, it will be considered that items of-
fered are in strict compliance with these speci-
fications and the successful bidder will be held
responsible for meeting the specifications. A
bidder who is aggrieved in connection with the
specifications of this bid may protest in writing
to Public Works Department prior to the open-
ing of bids. If Bidder wishes its Standard Terms
and Conditions to be considered as part of its
bid, such terms and conditions must be made
part of the "Clarifications and Exceptions." The
City reserves the following rights: to waive clar-
ifications and exceptions in awarding the bid in
the best interest of the City; to accept or reject
any or all bids; to waive any or all irregularities;
and, to award the contract to the responsible
bidder whose bid is determined by the City to
be in its best interest. Notice of intended award
shall be posted at City Hall. Protests in respect
to intended award must be filed within three
calendar days of posting for purchases which
do not require prior approval of the City Cqun-
cil and with seven calendar days for purchases
which require prior approval of the City Coun-
cil. It is the bidder's responsibility to be in-
formed of the intended award and specific
protest procedures.
Further information may be obtained by call-
ing Mr. Robert Farley, Public Works Director at
(386) 362-2276, during normal office hours or
by faxing to (386) 362-2876.
Robert E. Farley
Public Works Director
01/19, 26


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 61-2003-CA-0001940001XX
WACHOVIA BANK, N.A.,
AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE
Successor by Merger to FIRST UNION
NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JEFFREY M. SUCATO, NORISA R. SUCA-
TO,
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION
#1 and #2, et.al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE


Suwannee Legals
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated
January 10. 2005. entered in Civil Case No61-
2003-CA-0001940001XX of the Circuit Court
of the Third Judicial Circuit in and for Suwan-
nee County, Florida, wherein WACHOVIA
BANK, N.A., AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE Suc-
cessor by Merger to FIRST UNION NATIONAL
BANK, Plaintiff, and JEFFREY M. SUCATO,
NORISA R. SUCATO, UNKNOWN TENANTS)
IN POSSESSION-#1 and #2, et. al., are De-
fendants.
I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the
Front Steps of the Suwannee County Court-
house, 200 Ohio Avenue south, Live Oak, FL
32064, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th day of Feb-
ruarv 2005. the :i.:. i,, ', -i. t. ,e 1i ,rop-
erty as set forth .. r ' F-i- l iumn-rr.~ Judg-
ment, to wit:
THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWN-
SHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 15 EAST, SUWAN-
NEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court
on January 10. 2005.
(COURT SEAL) KENNETH DASHER
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/Arlene D Ivey
Deputy Clerk
Arlene D. Ivey
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Brian L. Rosaler, P.A.
10 Fairway Drive
Suite 302
Deerfield Beach, FL 33441
Telephone: (954) 360-9030
Facsimile: (954) 420-5187
1/19, 1/26

THE




DIGITAL

BEAN

PC Gaming & Cyber Center

362-2630-
* PC Gaming
* Fast Internet Surfing
* Research
* Office Applications
* Tournaments
* LAN Parties
* XEDX Gaming
* 90" Big Screen Display
137346DH-F


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.

ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.

BOARD CERTIFIED UROLOGY AND

UROLOGICAL SURGERY


Busch Urology offers comprehensive urological services-the care of Genitourinary problems in
men and urinary tract problems in women. All ages welcomed and each patient is treated as an
individual, with his or her needs specifically addressed.
Common Problems Treated - Infections * Prostrate Problems * Kidney Stones * Sexual Problems
SGenital Surgery * Cancer of the Urinary Tract * Impotence * Infertility * Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office * Cystoscopy * No Scalpel Vasectomy * Treatment of
Condyloma * Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy * Bladder Ultrasound * Penile Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Procedures in Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center - Prostate, Kidney
and Bladder Surgery * Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy * Microscopic Vasectomy Reversal
SImpotence Surgery


SPECIALIZING IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF MALE IMPOTENCE
SURGICAL AND MEDICAL THERAPIES
All patients are given personal and confidential attention
Office Locations in Lake City and Live Oak
Toll Free 1-888-775-6853 131558JS-F


Kiwanis of Live Oak Annual Yard Sale is February 5, 2005

at the Old Train Depot Platform 8 a.m. til 12 p.m.
We are ~ [I. look in]gLfo[.d mfaI ([a]forUthe]* y~ardz .sal[e
Plae alMyte anlla.62134 .6476


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Suwannee Legals
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS OR TRADE
NAME LAW
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned,
pursuant to the fictitious name statute, Chapter
20953, or Section 865.09, Florida Statutes,
1941, will register with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court in and for Suwannee County, Florida,
upon receipt of proof of publication of this no-
tice the fictitious name, to-wit:
LEONA'S SEAFOOD LIVE BAIT & TACKLE
under which we will engage in business in Live
Oak Florida and our address is 301 Hamilton
Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064.
The extent of ownership Is 50% Harve
Williams
50% Leona Williams
Dated this Bth day of January A.D. 2005.
/s/Leona Williams
/s/Harvev Williams
01/19


PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
CITY OF LIVE OAK, FLORIDA
ISSUE DATE: February 11, 2005
PROJECT: STORMWATER INPROVE-
MENTS-Hwy. 90 and The Suwannee Demo-
crat.
The project generally consist of the construc-
tion of approximately 2,817 LF of stormwater
piping, 15" RCP through 36" RCP with 22
stormwater structures, 70 LF of Jack and Bore
and asphalt paving in Base Bid I and 66,945
cubic yards of regular excavation (all on site),
an outfall structure and associated piping in
Base Bid II.
The project will be bid as Bade Bid I. Base Bid
II or the combination of Base Bid I and II. The
City reserves the right to accept or reject any
or all bids, and/or any portion of a bid.
PROCUREMENT OF DOCUMENTS: Plans,
bid documents and specifications are avail-
able at City Hall, 101 SE White Ave, Live Oak,
Florida. The cost for a set of plans, bid docu-
ments and specifications is $100.00 and is
non refundable.
BID OPENING DATE: February 11, 2005 at
2:00 in Live Oak City Hall.
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Live
Oak, Florida, until 2:00 p.m., local time, on the
bid opening date, at which time and place all
bids will be publicly opened and will be avail-
able for inspection upon notice of award or in-
tended award or within ten (10) days after bid
opening, whichever is earlier. Bid prices may
be read at the public bid opening, at the sole
discretion of City Administrator. Bids must be
in the possession of City Administrator pri-
or to bid call at 2:00 p.m. on the bid date
noted above. Possession is defined as being


BUSS Gy


UROLGYb


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*'The Racing Zone




NEXTEL Cup Series teams get first taste of New Daytona infield


The quest to win the 47th
annual Daytona 500 on Sun-
day, Feb. 20 began on Tues-
day. as the first round of
NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Se-
ries teams invaded newly ren-
ovated Daytona International
Speedway for a three-day test
session.
"The World Center of Rac-
ing" boasted a new look for
the arriving teams. Last July
following the Pepsi 400, the
Speedway underwent a multi-
faceted. multi-million infield
renovaton project that in-
cluded a net' Turn 1 tunnel,
new NASCAR NEXTEL Cup
Series and NASCAR Busch
Series garage, waterfront spe-
cialty vehicle parking, an
uniquely designed FanZone'
and a new Gatorade Victory
Lane and Daytona 500 Club.
All, 'the changes to the in-
field made the competitors
take a second look at the leg-


endary racing facility.
"I'm still lost," said Jeff
Gordon, a two-time Daytona,
500 champion. "It's definitely,
a,big change when you've
been coming here for a long
time. This is my 12th season
in the Cup Series anyway.
You get to where you work
your way into these tracks
and you have an area where
you like to park and you
know where your truck is and
where your team is.
"Today when I came, I did-
n't even know if my team was
here. I didn't see my car and I
was on the wrong side of the'
garage. But it's really awe-
some. We've got to work a lit-
tle bit on the flow of how the
cars come in and out of the
garage. But this is certainly
beautiful. I'm trying to get
coordinated with what was
here before and I'm sure
everybody is doing the same


thing."
Even NASCAR legend and
seven-time Daytona 500
champion.Richard Petty was
blown away by the changes
throughout the historic in-
field.
"I spent 15 minutes trying
to find the race track once I
got through the tunnel," Petty
said. "I'm overwhelmed with
it. This is Daytona. When I
came here for the first race in
1959, we didn't come down
here and test then. We just
came and ran the race. I came
through that tunnel as a 21-
year-old kid. (Turns) 1 and 2
must have been five miles
down there because there
were no buildings in the in-
field. It was just perfectly
flat. We didn't even have.the
garages to inspect the cars.
We had to park outside in the
grass. So the changes are un-
real.


"I'm going to have to spend
the rest of the day trying to
find where I'm at Daytona
and I've been coming since
they first opened the place."
Kyle Petty, who pilots the
No. 45 Georgia-Pacific
Dodge, gave a thumbs-up to
the FanZone, which features a
Fan Deck overlooking the
garages as well as windows
for fans to look inside the
garages.
"We've got to get to where
the fans can at least see a dri-
ver when they cgme to the
race track other than just sit-
ting in the race cat," Kyle
Petty said. "I think it's pretty
cool to have a place where
they can wonder around look
in through the windows and
see the cars and view the in-
spection process and some of
that. I think it's probably
something a lot of other race
tracks should look at in the


Results from Crossroads Motorplex


Briggs'Jr Sportsman Champ Heavy,
David Cody Smith, Holt
Brady Todd, Chatsworth, Ga
Adam Dye, Pell City, Al
Dillon Baker, Tampa
Tyler Dyer, Pell City, Al
Briggs Junior Heavy
Brandon Wells, Jacksonville
Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga
Bobby Ervie, St Petersburg
Evan Becton, Valdosta, Ga
Kyle Meeks, Valdosta, Ga
Bill Palmeri, St Cloud
Jacob Lecson, Ocala
Briggs Jr Champ Heavy
David Davis, Brookville
Tony Armstrong, Pell City, Al
A.J. Isbister, St Petersburg
Blake Lehr, Lakeland,
Sean Bernard, Largo
Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga
Briggs Junior Lite
Brandon Wells, Jacksonville,
Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga
Evaii Bectoh, Valdosta. Ga-- -"
Bobby Ervien, St Petersburg
Kyle Meeks, Valdosta, Ga
Jacob Lecson, Ocala
a .7 ;7 -."_.,i' "; -


Bill Palmeri, St Cloud
Briggs Jr Animal Champ
Blake Lehr, Lakeland
Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga
Briggs Lite
Corey Holley, Ocala,
Brian Davis, Jacksonville
Briggs Heavy
Kevin Tillman, Alma, Ga
Thomas Carter, Ocala
Briggs Junior Sportsman 1 Lite
Steven Keith, Omega, Ga
Briggs Jr Sports II Lite
Taylor Dyer, Pell City, Al
Adam Collins, Hoboken, Ga
Amber Colvin, Tallahassee
Justin Dodson, Pell City, Al
Briggs Super Heavy
Christopher Morrision, Rocky Face, Ga
Edwin Sides, Wetumpka, Al
Thomas Carter, Ocala
Lee Harrell, Dalton, Ga
Briggs Animal Heavy
Nathan Wendrick, Bradenton George
Steirrt, Thomas ille, Ga
Rocky Prosser, Coolidge, Ga
Briggs Jr Sports Champ Lite
Brady Todd, Chatsworth, Ga

T. ramra 0mL~ -Ivm. A


SDavid Cody Smith,'Holt Adam Dyer, Pell
City, AlDillon Baker, Tampa
Tyler Dyer, Pell City, Al
Briggs Jr Champ Lite
A.J. Isbister, St Petersburg
David Davis, Hudson
Tony Armstrong, Pell City, Al
Sean Bernard, Largo
Blake Lehr, Lakeland
Buck Ridley, Newnan, Ga" r
Briggs Medium
Corey Holley, Ocala ,
Nathan Wendrick, Bradenton,
Ricky Hill, Omega, Ga
Briggs Jr Sports 11 Heavy
Taylor Dyer, Pell City, Al
Justin Dodson, Pell City, Al
Adam Collins, Hoboken, Ga
Amber Colvin, Tallahassee,
Sr Champ Lite.
Lee Harrell, Dalton, Ga
Ryan Watkins, Tallahassee,
Christopher Morrison, Rocky Face, Ga
Rance Williams, Lithia
-Ryan \illiams, Lithia
Kid Kart
Austin Carter, Ocala


future."
Fastest of the day: Four-
time NASCAR champion Jeff
Gordon was the fastest after
the first day of testing. Gor-
don posted the top speed of
185.448 in the afternoon ses-
sion.
The Dodge Charger: Before
testing kicked off, Dodge un-
veiled the new Charger that
will be used in NASCAR
NEXTEL Cup Series compe-
tition in 2005. Jeremy May-
field drove the new Charger
around Turn 4 and parked
alongside a No. 43 STP
Dodge Charger formerly dri-
ven by Richard Petty.
"We never called it a
Dodge, we called it a Charg-
er," said Petty, who captured
three championships and a
record 37 victories in the car.
"The Charger sounds like rac-
ing to me. Hopefully some of
the Charger tradition will rub
off on the team. I know our
crew is excited. Hopefully the
name will excite the fans,
too."
First FanFest On Tap: The
Morning
1 Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet. 185 265 mph
2 Bons Said, Chevrolet 185 181
3 Jeremy Maytield, 184.506
4 Greg Biffle, Ford, 184 430
5 Kurt Busch, Ford, 184 419
6 Michael Wallnp, Chevrolel 184.158
7 Dale Jarrett, Ford, 183 993
8 Elliot Sadle, Ford. 183 824
9 Ricky Rudd, Ford. 183.666
10. Ryan Newman, Dodge, 183 411
11 Dale Earnhardi Jr., Chevrolel, 183.329
12 Jason Loflier, Chevrolet. 183 311
13 Mi e McLaugrhln Chevroleti 183 206
14 Travis Kvapil, Dodge, 183 098
15 rvle Busch, Chevrolelt 182 960
16 Kyle Petty Dodge, 182 886
17. Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, '82 778
18 Mike Bliss Chevroler 182.726
19. Carl Edards, Ford 182 685
20. Jamie McMunay, Dodge. 182 231
21. MKe Skinner, Dodge 181 701
22. Kerry Earnhardl Cherolel. 181 697
23 Casey Mears. Dodge. 181 459
24. Morgan Shepherd. Dodge, 181 419
25. Randy LaJoie. Chevrolel, 181 368
26. Jeff Fuller, Chevrolet, 176.585


first NASCAR Preseason
Thunder FanFest is scheduled
for Wednesday in the new
FanZone in the infield of the
Speedway. During the day,
fans that purchase a FanFest
ticket can watch testing from
the FanZone. Beginning at 5
p.m., the FanFest will begin
with bands, pit stop demon-
strations, auctions and inquis-
itive fan forums. Admission is
$15 and the proceeds from the
NASCAR Preseason Thunder
FanFest will also benefit Vic-
tory Junction Gang Camp and
The Women's Auxiliary of
Motorsports.
Tickets: For any events at
Daytona International Speed-
way, tickets can be purchased
online at http://www.dayton-
ainternationalspeedway.com
or by calling 1-800-PIT-
SHOP.
Tuesday's Speeds
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.,
- The speeds for the
NASCAR NEXTEL Cup test-
ing in preparation for the 47th.
annual Daytona 500 on Sun-
day, Feb. 20
Alernoon
1 Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 185.448 mpri
2 Randy LaJoie Chevrolet, 185.231
3. Boris Said, Chevrolet, 184 642
4 Ellion Sadler. Ford, 184.604
5 Greg Bittle. Ford. 184.456
6 Michael Walrip, Chevrolel, 184.170
7 Jeremy Mayfield. Dodge, 184.109
8 Kurt Busch, Ford, 184.042
9 Dale Jarrett Ford, 184 000
10. Mike Bliss. Chevrolet. 183.872
11 Morgan Shepherd, Dodge, 183.527
12 Ricky Rudd, Ford, 183 516
13 Dale Earnhardt Jr, 183.251
14 Travs Kvapil Dodge. 183 236
15. Carl Edwards, Ford, 183 228
16 Milke McLaughlin Chevrolet 183 214
17. Fenny Wallace, Chevrolet. 183 161
18 Kyle Busch, Chevrolet, 182994
19. Ryaan Newman, Dodge, 182.860
20. Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 182 838
21 Kyle Petty, Dodge, 182.745
22. Kerry Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 182.626
23. Jamie McMurray, Dodge, 182378
24. MIte SKinner, Dodge, 181.965
25 Casey Mears, Dodge, 181.954
26. Jefl Fuller, Chevrolet, 178 710


y~I A[ I AIgg ss
-Ia-*


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good for Lake City Store. Some restrictions apply.
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N SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2005


PAGE 8B


<












00
M IRE? :" ............. --: . - :


Serving Suwannee, Hamilton and Lafayette Counties Live Oak Publications, Inc. -



Historic days, medieval knights


�-y Scott Hunter
For two weekends each
year, the clear blast of trum-
'pets mingles with the laughter
*of children as the kingdom of
FHoggetowne opens its gates.
-Dancers and singers in me-
aleIjl garb perform to the de-
.ltght of passers-by. Vendors
iTawk their fine wares and
blacksmiths demonstrate their
,skills. Magicians amaze
.drowds -with their secret arts.
iiights battle one another
.from horseback and warriors
meet in combat as pieces in a
1,ling chessboard.
: The Hoggetowne Medieval
'Faire is a beloved Gainesville
'tradition, and for the 19th year
:it will delight many thousands


of guests over two weekends,
Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6. Hun-
dreds of actors, volunteers and
merchants work together to
produce the award-winning
event. The Faire features talent
from all over the country, but
it's not only the actors and
merchants who travel to
Hoggetowne.
"We're expecting upwards
of 50,000 guests this year,"
said Linda Piper, events coor-
dinator for the Faire. "Some
people wait all year to come to
the Faire, and we're thrilled to
have them."
On School Day, thousands
of children come to the Faire
to take a field trip back in time.
and learn about the medieval


doesn't get any easier!!"


ve Ice Cream
..$1.00
..$1. 50


oda Float.... $,.00
*plhis taxr -

, M' . _, Friday &
: Monday- Saturday
**Thursday ~: 8 am.-
8am.-11 p.m. Midnight

.:.. *. . ** -.l* ,. _ - '

305's .$1.46pk/$13:19 car.
Misty $2.44 pk/$22.49 car. Marlboro $3.09 pk/$26.99 car.
Pi all Mal $2.29 pk/$20.99 car...i. ...l $3.5 pk/$2.99 car.
K,-$2: '44i $ ,' ip,,c;r, Basic $2.70 pk/$24.95.car.
Viceroy $2.74 pk$24.95 car. Newport .$ 'i. pui r. 5 car.
Montclair $2.69 pk/$23.99 car. Camel $3.09 pk/$27.95 car.
Parliament $3.15 pk/$27.99 car. Winston $2.99 pk/$26.95 car.
GPC $2.54 pkl$23.49 car. Doral $2.55 pk/$24.45 car.

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. . . .


era first-hand.
Admission for the Faire is
$10 for adults and $5 for chil-
dren ages five-17. Children
under five enter free. Admis-
sion on School Day, Friday,
Feb. 4, is half-price. The Faire
is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on
the weekends and 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on.Friday's School Day.
The Faire offers attractions
for guests of all ages, and es-
pecially for the younger mem-
bers of the kingdom. Animal
rides, games of chance and
skill, and of course, the royal
pavilion await visitors.
The brightly colored pavil-
ion is erected near the entrance
of the Faire. A green overhang
shades the royal throne, upon
which sit the King and.Queen
of Hoggetowne, flanked by
their guards and heralds. It's
here where, over the course of
the Faire, more.than 1,000


children will become knights
and ladies, dragon slayers and
damsels of the royal court.
And as these children, new-
ly honored by the King and
Queen, wander through the
Faire, they'll be met by dozens
of different attractions, ven-
dors, and merchants.
Seven stages of continuous
entertainment feature jugglers,
jesters and magicians. Musi-
cians play medieval melodies
on period instruments and bel-
ly dancers perform in the
street. Thrilling human-pow-
ered push rides attract lines of
eager children and ,vendors
call out to the crowds to try
their hand at crossbow shoot-
ing and knife throwing. The
astounding "Birds of Prey"
show features trained hawks
and falcons who perform for
the pleasure of the crowds.
Guests can visit one of


JUGGLERS, JESTERS AND MAGICIANS: Entertainment at the
19th Annual Hoggetown Medieval Faire in Gainesville will feature
jugglers, jesters and magicians, and more.


rk-n4 m- = 1 - ...- ~0."1=
VENDORS WITH THEIR WARES: City of Gainesville Department of
Cultural Affairs sponsors the 19th Annual Hoggetown Medieval
Faire Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6. - Photo: Submitted


Hoggetowne's mysterious for-
tune-tellers to learn the secrets
of the future, or they may visit
artisans, have their hair braid-
ed or faces festively painted.
One of the Faire's most no-
table attractions is the joust,
where knights in full plate ar-.
mour, charge each other on
horseback, clashing in the
middle of the field and battling
for the honor of the King and
Queen. After the joust, chil-
dren are encouraged to meet
the kniiighs and thii steeds.
The marketplace has more
than 150 skilled artisans,
whose specialties include
weaving, jewelry making,
blacksmithing, leatherwork-
ing, woodcarving and ceram-
ics. It's here that guests will
see one-of-a-kind items not
available anywhere else in
Gainesville. Guests can make


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their own candles or even buy
a colorful wax replica of their
own hand.
Past the marketplace is the
food court, where the delicious
aromas of cooking food entice
those passing by. Tasty onion
blossoms, soups, fresh-baked
pastries and sweet potato fries
are the norn. It's not uncom-
mon to see a young lord of the
court munching happily on a
giant turkey leg or a sugary
funnel cake.
Visitors aie, etILotUrged to
arrive early for the "meet and
greet session" during the first
30 minutes of-the Faire, when
actors and dancers gather each
day at the front gate to enter-
tain the early crowds.
"That's my favorite part of
the day," Piper says. "It's great
to see all the performers at the
gate to greet the guests. The
sights and sounds are simply
breathtaking; I get so much
pleasure from watching the
faces of the visitors as they en-
ter Hoggetowne."
The Faire, which is pro-
duced by the City of
Gainesville Department of
Cultural Affairs, is one of
North Florida's most popular
events. The Alachua County
Fairgrounds is located east of
Gainesville, on 39th Avenue
and SR 24, adjacent to the
Gainesville Regional Airport.
For more information call 352-
334-ARTS or visit www.gvl-
culturalaffairs.org.

INFORMATION
.WHO: City of Gainesville
Department of Cultural
Affairs
WHAT: Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire
WHEN: Jan. 29-30 and
Feb. 4-6
WHERE: Alachua County
Fairgrounds is located
east of Gainesville, on
39th Avenue and SR 24,
adjacent to the
Gainesville Regional
Airport
COST: $10 for adults and
$5 for children ages five-
17. Children under five
enter free
CONTACT: 352-334-
ARTS or visit
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org


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PAGE 2C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 3C


Monthly Meetings
Allen Boyd (D-North
Florida) Staff - Live Oak -
Third Wednesday, City
Council Chambers, City
Hall, 101 SE White Ave.,
Live Oak, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
You may reach Congress-
man Boyd by calling 202-
225-5235 or his web site at
www.house.gov/Boyd. Con-
gressman Boyd's staff visit
so that the people of Suwan-
nee County have the oppor-
tunity to discuss in person
issues of concern to. them.
Congressman Boyd's staff
has been trained to assist
constituents with a variety
of issues related to various
federal agencies. It is im-
portant to the Congressman
that his staff make them-
selves available for those
'who are not able to travel to
either his Panama City or
Tallahassee' offices.
Alzheimer's Support
Group; -, Third Thursday,
Marvin E. Jones Building,
Dowling Park, 3:30 p.m.
Call Cindy Erskin at 386-
658-5700.
American ..Legion Post
107' : F.i"th'Thursda\, 12-2
p.m., Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, South Ohio
Ave. Call Clair McLauchlin
at 386-362-3524 or Richard
Buffington at 386-364-
5985.
Branford Camera Club -
Regular club meetings, 7:30
p.m., third Thursday, Bran-
ford Library, Contact Car-
olyn H0gue 386-935-:044.
Cub Scout Pack No. 408
Committee - meets monthly
on the second Tuesday, 6:30
p.m., at the Live Oak
Church of Christ, 1497
Irvin Ave (SR 51
South). Anyone interested is
welcome to attend. Call
Alan Stefanik, Committee
.Chairman, 386-362-3032, e-
m a i 1 :
commchair@pack408.net
or visit pack's website:,
www.pack408.riet, for addi-
tional information. The
Tiger, Wolf, Bears, and We-
belos dens (grades one -
five) meet every Thursday
at the church, 6:30-8 p.m.,
when school -is in,
session. In lieu of a den
meeting, the pack meeting
Sis held on the fourth Thurs-
- day at the same time and
place during which the en-
tire group meets for awards,
skits and fun. The pack
holds two or three activities
during the'summer, as well
as a week of Day Camp.
Disabled American Vet-
erans Chapter No. 126 -
Second Thursday, 6 p.m.,
226 Parshley St., S.W. Call
386-362-1701.
Florida Gateway Char-
ter Chapter of the Ameri-
can Business Women's As-
sociation - will hold its reg-
ular meeting on the second
Thursday of each month at 6
p.m. For more info please
call Laura Skow 386-362-
2086 or visit
www.abwa.org.,
Friends of Suwannee
River State Park - monthly
board meeting are held the
second Tuesday of the
month at 7 p.m. at the
Suwannee River State Park.
For info, contact Member-
ship Chair Walter Schoen-


fielder 850-971-535
mail wbs@surfbest.
Girl Scout Lea
First Monday, 7 p
Scouts of Gateway
will meet at the \
Club. Call Mary Ch
son, 386-362-4475.
Hamilton Count
ernmental Monthl
ings - Bellville V
Fire/Rescue eN
board: second Moi
each month at 7 p.m
Hamilton Count
hol and Other Dr
vention Coalition
fourth ,Wednesday,
a.m., at the Hamilto
ty School Board
room, JRE Lee Adn
tive Complex, Jasl
more info, contact
McDonald at 386-9
or e-mail mcdonald
tel.net
Hamilton Count)
of Commissioners
Tuesday, 9 a.m., ai
Tuesday at 6 p.m.,
Commissioners'
Room, courthouse,
Hamilton County
ber of Commerce.
meets first'f ltftisd
p.m., at 204 N. Ha
Jasper. For more in
386-792-1300.
Hamilton County
cil on Aging, Inc.
volunteer drivers
home-delivered me
gram. If you enjoy
others and are inter
need more infor
please,:; contact
Stubbs at Council ox
1509 S.W. First S
Jasper or call 3
1136.
Hamilton County
opment Authority
the second Thursda
p.m., at 204 NE 1st
dlin Building, Jasp
more info, call 3
6828.
Hamilton
Tourist Devel
Council - meets the
Wednesday, at 12
204 NE 1st St.,
Building, Jasper. F(
info, call 386-792-6
Home' and Com
Educators (HCE)
council meets on t
Friday of the month
a.m. at the Suwanne
ty Extension Office,
um Complex, E
Street, Live Oak. TI
come new membe
further information
386-362-2771.
Jasper City
Meeting - Second I
6 p.m., Jasper City I
Jasper Lions Clul
ing - Second and
Tuesday, 7 p.m., I
Diner. Call Jim Taitt
their information
938-3582.
Jennings Town
Meeting - First Tu
p.m., Jennings Town
MainStreet Ho
County, Inc. - Thirn
day, MainStreet
Jasper, 6 p.m.
School Board -
Tuesday, 6 p,m.
White Springs
Council Meeting:
Tuesday, 7 p.m.,
Springs Town Hall.
I Can Cope - Edu
support group for a


of cancer for patients, fami-
lies and friends. Third Tues-
day, 7 p.m., Marvin E. Jones
Building, Dowling Park.
Call Cindy 386-658-5700.
Leona 4-H Community
Club - First Monday, 7
p.m., home of Avon and
Betty Hicks, 6107 180th St.,
McAlpin. Call Betty Hicks
at 386-963-4205 or Pam
Nettles at 386-963-1236.
Lion's Club - Farm Bu-
reau meeting room, 7 p.m.,
second Tuesday and fourth
Tuesday. Call Richard
Tucker, 386-963-4577.
Live Oak Artist Guild -
7 p.m., first Tuesday, St.
Luke's Episcopal Church.
Contact Don Strickland,
386-362-5146.
Live Oak Christian
Home Educators - meet
first Thursday of every
month. If you are looking
for a strong home school
4 or e- support group please con-
net tact Pat, 386-364-1734.
aders - Live Oak Garden Club -
.m. Girl Monthly from Sept.-blay.
Council The Morning Glories day
Voman's group-third Friday and 'the
leck-Ca- Night Bloomers night
group-third Tuesday, 1302
:y Gov- S.W. Eleventh Street, Live
y Meet- Oak.
volunteer Live Oak Senior Citi-
xecutive zens - meet at 10:30 a.m.,
nday of first Monday of the month
i. at the Exhibition II Build-
y Alco- ing, Coliseum Complex,
ug Pre- 1302 SW Eleventh St., Live
- meet Oak. Members have the op-
9:30-11 portunity to take part in es-
n Coun- corted tours. For more info,
meeting call Lula Herring at 386-
ninistra- 364-1510.
per. For Suwannee Valley Hu-
t Grace mane Society Animal Shel-
38-4911 ter - The monthly meeting
dgl@all- will be held on the second
..Monday of the month at
y Board noon at the shelter. For
- First more info, contact the toll-
rd -third free number: 866-Adoptl2
County (866-236-7812). Located on
Board Bisbee Loop (use the south
Jasper. entrance). In Lee off CR
Cham- 255, Madison County. Visit
Inc. - web-site .... . . at
ay, at 6 ww-w.geocitf's.corti/suwan-
iley St., neehs.
nfo, call Live Oak, Suwannee
County Recreation Board
y Coun- of Directors - Second Tues-
- Needs day, 5:45 p.m.at the Suwan-
for the nee Parks & Recreation of-
als pro- fices on Silas Drive.
helping MADD. Dads - Third
ested or Thursday at 7 p.m. at the
mation, Suwannee County Court-
Dorsey house.
n Aging, Man To Man Group -
treet in Meets regularly at 7 p.m.,
86-792- second Thursday each
month at the Marvin E.
y Devel- Jones Building, Dowling
- meets. Park. Each program is free
ay, at 7 of charge and refreshments
St., San- are provided. For. further
)er. For info, call the American Can-
86-792- cer Society toll-free at 800-
ACS-2345 or the local of-
County fice toll-free at 888-295-
opment 6787 (Press 2) Ext. 114.
second Market Days - Advent
noon, at Christian Village, first Sat-
Sandlin urday, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Space
or more on first-come, first-serve
828. . basis, $5 each. Village
imunity Square shops open. Call the
- the Lodge Office 386-658-
:he first 5200.
at 9:30 McAlpin Community
e-Coun- Club - Regular monthly
Colise- meetings are held on the
seventhh second Monday at 7 p.m.,
ley wel- beginning with a covered
rs. For dish dinner. Everyone is
>n call welcome. The purpose of
the Club is to acquaint
Council members of the community
Monday, with all the services that are
Hall. available in the County. For
b Meet- info on scheduled speakers,
fourth call Grant Meadows Jr.,
Roosters 386-935-9316 or Shirley
for fur- Jones, 386-963-5357. For
at 386- info on renting the building,
call Kristie Harrison at 386-


Second Friday, 10 a.m.,
Suwannee River Regional
Library. Call Michelle, 386-
776-2955, for more info.
Remembering the Loss
of Your Baby - An open
support group for families
who have experienced the
loss of a baby through mis-
carriage, ectopic pregnancy,
stillbirth, newborn death or
termination due to fetal ab-
normality or maternal com-
plications. Group meets the
first Thursday of each
month, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.,
at Hospice of North Central
Florida, North Building
Counseling Room, 4305
NW 90th Blvd.,
Gainesville. To register or
for more information con-
tact Cheryl Bailey at Hos-
pice of North Central Flori-
da, 352-692-5107 or toll-
free, 800-816-0596.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders
-Volunteers are needed in
your area to assist elders
and their caregivers receive
information and assistance
on health insurance and
Medicare. Comprehensive
training is provided by the
Florida Department of Elder
Affairs. This service is pro-
vided at no charge. Call the
Elder Helpline toll-free at
800-262-2243.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders
- Branford - Library, US
129 North, Branford, 9-11
a.m. - first Wednesday of
every month. Elders and
their caregivers in Suwan-
nee County who are trying
to understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams can receive help from
the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serv-
ing Health Insurance Needs
of Elders) Program. Spe-
cially trained SHINE volun-
teers help Medicare recipi-
ents make informed deci-
Ssions about their health in-
surance and Me,dj,cas ,P-re-
scription ,Drug Cards.
SHINE voliunteeYs' aliso1d'fi
form seniors about free 'and
discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibili-
ty requirements. This ser-
vice is provided at no
charge. For more info or if
you can't travel to the site,
contact the Elder Helpline
toll-free at 800-262-2243,
Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SSHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders
- Advent Christian Village
- Dowling Park - Schedule
appointment with SHINE
'counselor by calling 386-
658-3333. or 386-658-5329 .
Elders and their caregivers
in Suwannee County who
are trying to understand
Medicare and other health
insurance programs can re-
ceive help from the Florida
Department of Elder Af-
fairs' SHINE (Serving
Health Insurance;Needs of
Elders) Program. Specially
.


Council 364-3400.
esday, 7 MOMS Club - Second
aHall. Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. at
amilton the fellowship hall of
d Thurs- Bethel Missionary Baptist
Office, Church. Go West on US 90 -
seven miles from 1-75, and
Fourth 1-1/2 miles from the Co-
lumbia/Suwannee County
Town line, 12 miles from Live
Third Oak. For more info, call
White 386-397-1254 or e-mail
MOMSClubofLiveOak-
cational LakeCityFl@alltel.net
ny type -Nursing Mom's Group -


trained SHINE volunteers
help Medicare recipients
make informed decisions
about their health insurance
and Medicare Prescription
Drug Cards. SHINE volun-
teers also inform seniors
about free and discounted
prescription drug programs
and eligibility require-
ments. This service is pro-
vided at no charge. For
more info or if you can't
travel to the site, contact the
Elder Helpline toll-free at
800-262-2243, Monday -
Friday 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders
- Live Oak - Suwannee
River Regional Library, US
129 South, 12:30-2:30 p.m.
- second Monday of every
month. Elders and their
caregivers in Suwannee
County who are trying to
understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams can receive help from
the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serv-
ing Health Insurance Needs
of Elders) Program. Spe-
cially; trained SHINE volun-
teers help Medicare recipi-
ents make informed deci-
sions about their health in-
surance and Medicare Pre-
scription Drug Cards.
SHINE volunteers also in-
form seniors about free and
discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibili-
ty requirements. This ser-
vice is provided at no
charge. For more info or if
you can't travel to the site,
contact the Elder Helpline
toll-free at 800-262-2243,
Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
SHINE - Serving Health
Insurance Needs of Elders
- Mayo - Library, SR 51,
Mayo, 12:30-2:30 p.m. -
first Wednesday of every
month. Elders and their
caregivers in Lafayette
County who are trying .to
understand Medicare and
other health insurance pro-
grams can receive help from
the Florida Department of
Elder Affairs' SHINE (Serv-
ing Health Insurance Needs
of Elders) Program. Spe-
cially trained SHINE volun-
teers help Medicare recipi-
ents make informed deci-
sions about their health in-
surance and Medicare Pre-
scription Drug Cards.
SHINE volunteers also in-
form seniors about free and
discounted prescription
drug programs and eligibili-
ty requirements. This ser-.
vice is provided at no
charge. For more info or if
you can't travel to the site,
contact the Elder Helpline
toll-free at 800-262-2243,
Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
Small Scale Farmers
and Craft Designers Mar-
ket Committee - Third
Thursday,.7 p.m., Coliseum
extension offices.
Suwannee Chapter of


the Florida Trail Associa-
tion - Second Monday, 7
p.m., Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management District.
For more info, call Don
Neale, 386-362-4850 or
Sylvia Dunnam, 386-362-
3256.
Suwannee County
Tourist Development
Council - Fourth Tuesday, 1
p.m., Chamber of Com-
merce Building, 816 S.
Ohio Ave., P.O. Drawer C.,
Live Oak, FL 32064
Suwannee County Cat-
tlemen's Association-
Third Thursday, 6:30 p.m.,
Farmers Co-op meeting
room,. Call Herb Rogers,
386-362-4118.
Suwannee County Se-
nior Citizens - meet at
10:30 a.m., first Monday of
the month at the Exhibition
II Building, Coliseum Com-
plex, 1302 SW Eleventh St.,
Live Oak. For more info
call Lula Herring, 386-364-
1510.,
Suwannee Valley
Builders Association - Sec-
ond Thursday, 6 p.m., Farm
Bureau meeting room, 407
Dowling Ave., Live Oak, $5
per person for meal and
meeting.
Suwannee Valley Ge-
nealogical Society - First
Thursday, 7 p.m., Wilbur St.
Live Oak (behind Mizell's).
Open Tuesdays and Thurs-
days, 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5
p.m. Phone: 386-330-0110.
Suwannee Valley Quil-
ters - First and third Thurs-
day, 10 a.m. Jane, 386-776-
2909 - after 4 p.m.
Suwannee Valley Kennel
Club - Third Tuesday, 7:30
p.m., Hospitality and Recre-
ational Building, Columbia
County Fairgrounds, Lake
City, P.O. Box 2013, Lake
City, FL 32056.
Tobacco-Free Partner-
ship of Suwannee County -
meet quarterly, call Mary
Jordan ,Taylor 386-362-
2708. ext. 232.
Vi id Visions. Inc. -A
shelter and outreach agency
for.victims of domestic vio-
lence meets the first Mon-
day of each month at 5:30
p.m., Douglass Center Con-
ference Room. All persons
interested in helping vic-
tims of domestic violence
are encouraged to attend.
For more info, call 386-
364-5957.
Wellborn Community
Association (WCA) - Sec-
ond Thursday, 7 p.m., Well-
born Community Center.
Contact Bonnie Scott, 386-
963-4952 or leave a mes-
sage at 386-208-1733.
WCA (building fund)-First
SSaturday-Blueberry Pan-
cake Breakfast, center of
Wellborn, Andrews Square.
Blueberry pancakes,
sausage, OJ, coffee.
Wellborn Neighborhood
Watch - last. Thursday, 7
p.m., Blake Lowe Building,


,,,,



|IN CONCERT



Saturday, March 19, 2005

7:30 pm at the


Suwannee County Fair



9 Tickets on Sale



NO W!!


Reserve your

VIP seating now!

Call for more info.


362-7366
136386-F


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 4C







PAGE 4C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 3C

1517 4th Ave., Wellborn.
For more info, call Bruce or
Jane, 386-963-3196.
Weekly Meetings
Al-Anon/Mayo Al-Anon
Group - meets each Thurs-
day, 8 p.m., Mayo Manna
House, Pine Street - for
family members and friends
to show support. For more
info, call Barbara, 386-294-
3348 or Marcia, 386-208-
1008.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Branford - meets Tuesday
and Friday, 7:30 p.m., Bran-
ford United Methodist
Church, Express and Henry
St., Branford. For more
info, call 386-935-2242 or
the District 16 Help Line
toll-free, 800-505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Live Oak - meets Tuesday
and Friday, 8 p.m., Precinct
Voting Building, Nobles
Ferry Road, Live Oak. For
more info, call District 16
Help Line toll-free, 800-
.505-0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
Mayo Group - meets Sun-
day, Monday, Wednesday
and Thursdays at 8 p.m.,The
meetings are held at Manna
House, Pine Street, Mayo.
For more.info call 386-294-
2423 or District 16 Help
Line toll-free, 800-505-
0702.
Alcoholics Anonymous -
White Springs - Courage
to Change - meets Monday,
8 p.m., Methodist Church,
White Springs. For more
info, call 386-397-1410 .or
District 16 Help Line toll-
free, 800-505-0702.
Bluegrass Association-
Saturday, Spirit of the
Suwannee Park, 6 p.m.
Covered dish. SRBA mem-
bers admitted free. For info,
call 386-364-1683.
Bridge Club - Monday,
6:45 p.m., Golden Corral
Restatwrratti ,;Lje. Oak. For
information call 386-362-
3200.
Boy Scout Troop #693 -
Every Monday, 7 p.m.,
Shrine Club, Bass'Road, un-


til further notice. Call 386-
776-2863.
Live Oak Singles Group
- meets Friday, 7:30 p.m.,
Live Oak Christian Church
fellowship hall on US 129
North, Live Oak (next to
Walt's Ford). Parking is be-
tween church and cemetery
on church property or along
US 129 North. This not a
church sponsored event. For
more info, call Carla, 386-
364-4756. Visit web site at
http://groups.yahoo.com/gr
oup/SuwanneeSingles/
Narcotics Anonymous -
The Gratitude Group -
Meetings held Monday, 7
p.m., at St. Luke's Episco-
pal Church, 1391 S.W.
Eleventh St. (in the back),
Live Oak, FL 32060.
Over Eaters Anonymous
- We care. Meets Mondays
11:35 a.m.- 12:50 p.m.,
Monday, at Suwannee Riv-
er Regional Library,. 129
South, Live Oak. For more
info, call 386-364-4749.
Quarterback. Club
Meeting - Old Nettie Bais-
den school next to the foot-
ball stadium, 6:30 p.m.,
every Monday.
Square Dance - With
Vagabond Squares, Thurs-
day, 7-9:30 p.m., St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, Newbern
Road. Loyce Harrell, 386-
963-3225, or Ralph Beek-
man, 386-752-2544.
Suwannee River Riding
Club - Membership fee $25
per year. Team roping first
and third Friday night.
Speed events first and third
Saturday night. Call 386-
935-2622.
Suwannee Valley Bar-
bershop Chorus - Every
Tuesday, Crapps Meeting
Room, Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, US 129
South, Live Oak at 7 p.m.
Call Fred Phillips, 386-362-
1886.
TOPS - Take Off Pounds
Sensibly,,litlhe , Live OQak
Community Church of God,
every Thursday, 8:30 a.m.,
weigh-in, meeting, 9 a.m.
Barbara Crain, 386-362-
5933 or Sharon Martin,


386-364-5423.
Weight Watchers - Mon-
day, 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.,
St. Luke's Episcopal, toll-
free 800-651-6000.
FYI
Advent Christian Vil-
lage - 2004-2005 Artist Se-
. ries - Events include: 'His-
tory Jumps Off the Page,'
Friday, Jan. 28, at the
Phillips Dining Room, 6
p.m.; Donna Wissinger -
flutist, Saturday, March 12,
at the Phillips Dining
Room, 7 p.m., 'Cotton
Patch Gospel,' Monday,
March 21, at the Village
Church, 7 p.m. (Based on
Clarence Jordan's version
of the book of Matthew);
The Phillips-Lassiter Guitar
Duo, Friday, April 22, at the
Village Church, 7 p.m. ACV
season tickets are available
at Advent Christian Village,
The Music Center in Live
Oak, and the Suwannee
County Chamber of Com-
merce. Cost: Adults $80;
Students (ages 13-18) $35;
Children (ages 5-12) $25.
Another Way, Inc. Sup-
port Groups - Another
Way, Inc. offers support
groups for victims and sur-
vivors of domestic vio-
lence. For info regarding
dates and times, call 386-
792-2747 or the toll-free
hotline at 800-500-1119.
'Before You Tie The
Knot' - four-hour class for
couples who will marry
soon. The cost is $10 per
couple. Completion of this
course is required when
couples reduce their mar-
riage license fee by $32.50.
Pre-registration is required.
Registration forms are
available at the Clerk of the,
Court's office or the
Suwannee County Exten-
sion Service office, 386-
362-2771.
Childbirth classes - of-
fered at the Suwannee
County;, Health, Department
on-Tuesdays from 6 - 8 p.m.
Please call to register at
386-362-2708, ext. 218 -
Coleen Cody. The classes.
are free of charge.


Department of Children
and Families - can assist
you in applying to register
to vote or update your voter
registration record. If you
receive or apply for public
assistance benefits, your lo-
cal Department of Children
and Families service center
can assist you in completing
a voter registration applica-
tion to your local Supervi-
sor of elections for you. Re-
member, voting is a right.
Your local service center is
at 501 Demorest St., Live
Oak, 386-362-1483.
Disaster Action Team
Volunteers Needed - The
American Red Cross of
Suwannee Valley is looking
for volunteers to join the
Disaster Action Team to as-
sist victims of fires and oth-
er natural disasters. If you
are interested and would
like to learn more, call 386-
752-0650.
The Story of Dowling,
Park - Do you want to
know more about the Ad-
vent Christian' Village
(ACV) at Dowling Park?
ACV representatives are
available to meet with you
and share the story of
Dowling Park. If you're in-
terested in arranging a
speaking engagement or a
tour for your organization,
club or church, please con-
tact us at 386-658-5110 or
toll-free, 800-714-3134 or
e - m a i 1
ccarter@acvillage.net. For
an, ACV preview, visit
www.acvillage.net. Or re-
quest a free videotape.
Downtown Craft Mar-
ket, High Springs - Brings
talented local artists togeth-
er to showcase their talents
in the heart of downtown
High Springs and is open
each Saturday at the corner
of NW 1st Avenue and Main
Street. Admission and ac-
tivities are free. For more
info, please .call 386-454-
3950. .
Experience Works - a
national nonprofit organiza-
tion, (formerly Green
Thumb) provides training
and employment services to
older workers - over 55 and
with a limited income - in
Suwannee County through
the Senior Community Ser-
vice Employment Program
(SCSEP). Participants are
paid the minimum wage for
an average of 20 hours per
week. For more info, visit
www.experienceworks.org
or call the Lake City One
Stop, 386-755-9026, ext.
3129 for Loretta or ext.
3134 for Ronald.
FoodSource - a Christian
based Christian food coop-
erative, is in your area!
Stretch your food dollars!
With the help of dedicated
volunteers, FoodSource is
able to provide quality
foods at low prices while
promoting Christian values
and volunteerism in your
community. This is NOT a
needy only program; it is
for EVERYONE. There are
no qualifications to partici-


pate! FoodSource accepts
cash, checks, Visa, Master-
card, Debit, EBT and mon-
ey orders. Menu is subject
to change! This months ten-
tative menu is: whole chick-
en, beef stew (all meat
stew), Ammons Brothers
country sausage, bologna,
fresh eggs. cheese, Quiznos
broccoli cheese soup (fami-
ly sized), oatmeal or cream
of wheat, 7-layer sensation
dessert, peanut butter, 16-
bean soup mix, fresh tange-
los, fresh grapefruit, fresh
broccoli, fresh apples, fresh
bananas, fresh onions and
fresh five-pound bag of
potatoes.Pick Up Date: Jan.
22. Regular package price -
$25. Meat package avail-
able $25. Tentative meat
box menu: boston butt,
whole chicken beef roast,
hot dogs, hamburger patties
and breakfast sausage. TO
ORDER AND PAY BY
CREDIT/DEBIT/CHECK
CARD, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-832-5020. PICK UP
ORDER AT LOCAL SITE.
For questions or to order,
call your local coordinator.
Live Oak: Live Oak Church
of God - 386-362-2483;
Wellborn United Methodist
Church - 386-963-5023;
Ebenezer AME Church -
386-362-6383 or 386-364-
4323 or 386-362-4808;
Jasper: 386-792-3965;
White Springs: 386-752-
2196 or 386-397-1228;
Bell: 352-463-7772 or 352-
463-1963;'Lake City 386-
752-7976 or FoodSource
toll-free at 800-832-5020 or
visit website at www.food-
source.org for questions or
to become a local host site.
Friends of Suwannee
River State Park - Join the
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, a non-profit
501(c)3 charitable organi-
zation. Help keep the State
Park the gem of the Suwn-
nee, River. The park is locat-
ed 13 miles West of Live
Oak off US 90. Quarterly
newsletter, quarterly meet-
ings, monthly board meet-
ings and an annual luncheon
meeting. Membership
brochures may be picked up
at the State Park or mail
your membership to:
Friends of Suwannee River
State Park, 20185 CR 132,
Live Oak, FL 32060. Phone:
386-362-2746. Individual
Friend-$15; Family-$25;
Business Sponsor-$50; Cor-
porate Friend-$100-$250;
Lifetime Friend-$300. For
more itifo contact the mem-
bership chair Walter
Schoenfelder at 850-971-
5354, or e-mail him at wb-
sesurfbest.net
Florida Museum of Nat-
ural History - Florida's
state natural history muse-
um, located near the inter-
section of Southwest 34th
Street and Hull Road in the
University of Florida Cul-
tural Plaza in Gainesville.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday-Saturday .and 1-5
.p.m. Sunday. Closed on
Thanksgiving and Christ-


mas. For more info, includ-
ing ticket prices, directions
and parking info, call 352-
846-2000. Visit
www.flmnh.ufl.edu.
GED Tests - A person
wanting to take the GED
test must call to reserve a
seat in the registration ses-
sion. Attendance in a reg-
istration session is manda-
tory in order to take the
GED test. To reserve seat
for registration session and
pay fees, call 386-364-
2782-Lynn Lee. To inquire
about age waivers, call 386-
384-2763-Lynne Roy, coun-
selor, and 386-364-2619-
Kim Boatright, GED exam-
iner at Suwannee-Hamilton
Technical Center.
Grower's Market on
Lake Ella Drive, Talla-
hasee - open Wednesday
evenings from 3-6:30 p.m.
The growers will be provid-
ing organic, local, seasonal,
farm fresh produce for
sale: lettuces, Asian greens,
sugar cane, garlic, herbs,
squash, mustards, turnips,
arugula, shiitake mush-
rooms, kale, cut flowers,
speciality flowers; . food
demonstrations, and much,
much more. In collabora-
tion with our local small
farmers, The American Le-
gion and Black Dog
Cafe. For additional info,
please contact Jennifer Tay-
lor or O. Reis, at FAMU
Small. Farm Programs/Co-
operative Extension Pro-
grams, 850-599-3546.
Harsonhill Inc., a pre-
scription information
publishing company - Fi-
nancial help for those who
can't afford their prescrip-
tion drugs is available right
now. Steve Reynolds, Presi-
dent of Harsonhill Inc., a
prescription information
publishing company, states
assistance programs have
been established by more
than 100 U.S. drug mnanu-
facturers to assist lowi in-
come people. These pro-
grams cover over 1,400
commonly prescribed medi-
cines. Reynolds states his
company publishes a 85+
page manual that contains
all the information required
to apply to these assistance
programs. For more infor-
mation about these pro-
grams, or to obtain the man-
ual e-mail: harsonhill
@earthlink.net or. contact
Reynolds toll-free at 888-
240-9240 or write to Har-
sonhill Inc., 22425 Ventura
Blvd., No. 190, Woodland
Hills, CA 91364. For imme-
diate info, visit www.Pre-
scriptions4Free.com
Hearing Solutions - If
you are interested in com-
municating with the deaf or
hard of hearing or if you are
hard of hearing yourself and
would like to learn sign lan-
guage, now's your chance.
Every Wednesday 10-11:30
a.m. or 2-3:30 p.m., at
Hearing Solutions (next
door to D.Q.), instructor

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 5C


ATTENTION ALL SUWANNEE


COUNTY FAIR PARTICIPANTS


S Reimembet; deadline for

sign up... for Dairy,

Goat, Rabbit, BeefHeifers

and Poultry will be


FEBRUARY 18,200!;




NO EXCEPTIONS


For more information ont
a getting an entry form call the

fair office 386-362-7366

,t ' - . -' * �,. --- . "- l.------ ,----- -, .
rr


FREEMAN Brothers 13358 US 90 West, Live Oak

ELECTRONICS 386-364-1557
Requires hubscr '! toi a minimum of Anmerla's Top 60 or 01 SH Llino programming to receive equlpmont credits. Your Social Security Number will be required for Identity verificaton purposes by DISH Network
at ime of account set-up. II a Social Security Number I not provided, you must provide the last lour digits of your Social Security Number and pay a $49.99 non-refundable fee to OISH Network at such tme.
Offer ends 0/30/04 and is available In the contlnenlal United Stalt. Must be a nlw, first-lime DISH Network resldenoia customer. Al prices, packages and programmmin subject to change twhout noth i e. local and state sales laxs may apply.
All DISH Network programming, and any other sovices that are provided, are subject to the terms and condlons o( tilo promotional agreement and Residential Cuslomet Agraeomelt available at www.dishlnelwork corn or upon request. Hardware
ald prograamlng sold sparately. AddlUanal receivers mst be acllslad n n conojoo with a primary receiver Local Channels packages by satellite re only available to customrs who reside in the specifild local Designaltd Markel Area
IDMA). Cortln local channels may require an addllnral dish antann Iro DISH Nelwor. Inloalod Ire ol any charges SupetSH apoelna may be reqilled to receive local channels and wdi be Iaduded at no additional charge wilth ubsicdp
Ibn to local channels Local channels normly priced atl $5,9n/io. S Ignilicant reslnclions apply to DISH Netwoak hardware and plrogranrming avwlabollty ao d fIa at l olfers. S l SSecurity Numbers e used for idenlly vification and colleton
purpose only and wilt nont ao talosd o1 Illld parnil ocapl lor stuci urpoaoses. aee your tISII tllwtI N olaloar, DISH Nwlmk ptuI lpleor lule at Illoe DISH Natonk wobl al0a wwe.dlrwls lwaolk.com for compllot dolatl and os lalllons. All
service mnrks and Isdrnaork helolngO lo Ihelr ospecv owners
128315-F


M.Jig I Im fl INAgiNll








NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 5C


Calendar


Continued From Page 4C

Kay Butler. Call 386-362-
2904 for further info.
Hospice of the Suwan-
nee Valley - Helping
Hands Volunteer Orienta-
tion - first Wednesday, 10-
11 a.m. at Hospice of the
Suwannee Valley, 618 SW
FL Gateway Drive, Lake
City. After attending orien-
tation and completing the
screening process, you will
be eligible for volunteering
in the Hospice Attic thrift
store, administrative offices
as well as helping at special
events, educational fairs,
community events and fund
raising. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long, 386-752-9191.
Lafayette County Veter-
ans - All veterans of
Lafayette County for your
protection, your military
records DD Form 214,
"Certificate of Release or
Discharge from Active
Duty" can be recorded in
the Lafayette County Court-
house. Please see the Clerk
of Court's office.
LillyAnswers Program -
Available to Floridians 65
and older who are enrolled
in Medicare, have an annual
income below 200 percent
of the federal poverty level
and have no other drug cov-
erage. Seniors may apply
for the program at no cost
by calling a toll-free num-
ber, 877-RX-LILLY, or by
filling out an application.
LillyAnswers card enables
them to receive a 30-day
supply of Lilly pharmaceu-
tical products that are sold
at participating retail phar-
macies for a flat fee of $12.
Info about the LillyAnswers
program is available at
www.lillyanswers.com or
by calling toll-free 877-RX-
LILLY.
Love INC - A non-profit
Christian group that repre-
sents'16cal'churches in find-
ing help for valid needs.


Call Ginny Peters, 386-364-
4673, Monday-Friday, 9
a.m. - noon
MDA.- Assists people
with ALS through help with
purchase and repair of
wheelchairs, support
groups, expert-led semi-
nars, an ALS Web site
(www.als.mdausa.org) and.
ALS-specific chat rooms
(www.mdausa.org/chat).
MOPS '- Mothers of
Preschoolers - a gathering
of moms for encouragement
and fun. All mothers of
children from birth to age
five are invited to attend.
The meetings are the second
and fourth Tuesday of the
month, September through
May, from 9:30 a.m. to
noon. They are held at the
First Baptist Church on
Howard St. in Live Oak.
For more info, please call
386-362-1583.
Marine Corps League
meets in Lake City - First
Tuesday of each month The
Suwannee Valley Detach-
ment of the Marine Corps
League of the United States
meets monthly in Lake City.
Even months are met in
Live Oak at the Shriners
Club, odd months are in
Lake City at Quality Inn
(formerly Holiday Inn).
Marines in Suwannee Coun-
ty should call Dale Condy,
386-776-2002 or John Mey-
ers, 386-935-6784. Lake
City representatives, John
Parker, 386-754-1980 or
Bob Edgar, 386-755-1354.
Marriage? Help me! - A
program presented by Solid
Rock Ministries, Inc. of
Jasper; at no charge to any-
one. Call for appointment at
386-792-2603. Helping to
apply Christian principles
to our every day living...
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville - Barn-
yard Buddies, free admis-
sion, 3 p.m.. every Wednes-
day and Saiturd'a�f to- indet
aid greet the farm animals.


After the animal introduc-
tions, help with the after-
noon feeding. Toddlers and
preschoolers will love
learning about the barnyard
buddies. Meet at the barn.
For more info, call 352-
334-2170 or visit www.na-
tureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville - Living
History Days, every Satur-
day,
from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. with
staff in period dress inter-
preting day-to-day life on a
Florida farm in 1870. Sam-
ple homemade biscuits on
the woodstove with fresh
butter and cane syrup grown
and made on the farm. Help
feed the farm animals at 9
a.m.'and 3 p.m. daily. Free
admission. For more info
call 352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville - Dis-
cover & Do, third Sunday
of the month, kids bring
your favorite adult for a fun
activity and make a cool
craft to take home. Meet at
Loblolly Environmental Fa-
cility on NW 34th Street be-
tween University and NW
8th Ave. Reservations re-
quired. Free admission. For
more info and to RSVP call
352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
Morningside. .Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville - Who's
Who in the Woods, last Sat-
urday of the month, natural-
ist-guided walk at 9 a.m. 1-
1.5 hours walk, wear com-
fortable walking shoes.
Meet at the education of-
fice, 3540 E. University
Ave. Free admission: For
more info call 352-334-
2170 or visit www.nature-
operations.org:
Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm, Gainesville '- A
Night at the Owlery, By the


light of the silvery moon
with the owls and frogs
we'll croon...each Saturday
nearest the full moon. Come
at 7 p.m. with family and
friends for a lively variety
of talks, songs, hikes, fires,
and fun! Florida Wildlife
Care's Leslie Straub will
help us meet and greet our
noisy nocturnal neighbors,
the owls, at Boulware
Springs Historic Water-
works, 3300 SE 15th St.,
Gainesville. Free admis-
sion. For more info call
352-334-2170 or visit
www.natureoperations.org.
NFCC Artist Series
2004-2005 - Performances
will be held on campus at
the Van H. Priest Auditori-
um, Madison. This year's
line-up includes: Jan. 25,
Glenn, Miller Orchestra -
Glenn Miller Orchestra per-
form classics; Feb. 17,
Mark Twain on Stage: John
Chappell as Samuel L.
Clemens - in look, in voice,
in gesture and above all, in
his own memorial words, he
lives again; March 3,
Chamber Orchestra Krem-
lin - Russia's international-
ly known ensemble per-
forms. Season passes $40
for adults, $25 for children
12 and under. Become a
sponsor $100 individual to
$500 corporate. For more
info, passes, or to sponsor
call 850-973-1653 or e-mail
artistseries@nfcc.edu/ Visit
on-line at
htpp://www.nfcc.edu/New-
sEvents/ArtistSeries/home.
html.
NFCC Children's The-
ater performances - NFCC
will present "The Adven-
tures of Lewis and Clark"-
by GMT Productions, Inc.
on April 18, with two per-
formances for sixth - eighth
graders in NFCC's six
county service area. Perfor-
mance will be held at the
Van H. Priest Auditorium
on the MhdisOdh carhipus.' Fbt
more info visit


www.nfcc.edu/NewsEv-
ents/ArtistSeries/chil-
drentheater.html or contact
the NFCC College Ad-
vancement Office, 850-973-
1613.
NFCC College Place-
ment Tests - NFCC will
conduct College Placement
Tests (CPT) on computer
every Thursday at 8:30 a.m.
and 1:30 p.m. in the NFCC
Technical Center, Bldg. 13,
on the Madison campus.
Persons taking the tests will
be required to register in
NFCC Student Services 24
hours before testing. There
is a fee of $10 for the test.
For more info, please call
850-973-1612.
NFCC E-Spotlight pro-
vides weekly information -
Interested in North Florida
Community College
events? Have current col-
lege news and happenings
delivered directly to your e-
mail address through
NFCC's e-Spotlight. Alum-
ni, former faculty or staff
and community members
interested in keeping up
with NFCC's, calendar of
events and news are invited
to join the list of e-Spot-
light recipients. To receive
NFCC's weekly e-Spotlight
call the Office of Institu-
tional Advancement at 850-
973-1613 or e-mail Kim
Scarboro at
scarborok@nfcc.cc.
Narconon Arrowhead -
Drug addiction can leave an
individual feeling helpless
and' out of control. Espe-
cially if you are the family
member or friend of an ad-
dict. Narconon Arrowhead
can help. Narconon offers
free counseling, assess-
ments and referrals to reha-
bilitation centers nation-
wide' by calling toll-free,
800-468-6933 or logging
o n t o
www.stopaddiction.com.
Don't wait until it's too
North Central Floridab6!
North Central Florida


Sexual Assault Center,
Inc. - provides individual
and group counseling for
victims of rape and incest.
Any man or woman who is
18 years old or older and is
a victim of rape, sexual
abuse or incest is eligible to
participate. All services are
free and confidential. Call
Victim Advocate, Erica Nix
toll-free at Pager Number,
800-400-7140. For other
info, call 386-719-9287.
North Florida Work-
force Development - AWI
personnel, as part of the
one-stop system, strive to
help dislocated workers and
other job seekers find em-
ployment in a prompt man-
ner. AWI staff now have of-
fice hours at the One-Stop
Centers in Hamilton: 386-
792-1229, Jefferson: 850-
342-3338, Lafayette: 386-
294-1055, Madison: 850-
973-9675, Suwannee: 386-
364-7952 and Taylor: 850-
584-7604 counties as fol-
lows: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday
through Friday, and alter-
nate Saturdays 9 a.m.-1
p.m.
Parents of ADD and
ADHD Children - If you
are interested in joining a
support group call Lea-
Anne Elaine, 386-362-
7339.
Pregnancy Crisis Center
- The Live Oak Pregnancy
Crisis Center at 112 Pied-
mont St. (behind the Amo-
co) is open on Wednesday
through Friday from 9 a.m.-
3 p.m. The center will offer
confidential counseling,
free pregnancy tests,
clothes for expectant moth-
ers and infants. The center
will also offer referrals to
pro-life doctors. Groups
and churches might want to
have a baby shower and do-
nate all the items to the cen-
ter. Also needed: Maternity
clothes and hangers. Tele-
phone 386-330-2229,; or

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 6C


I.I






- Fii-it"-RONTIER KING CAB:

- : -. - .. . . .


1 -800-504-6162


HWY 90 WEST LAKE CITY
Visit us on www.hmcautos.com
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PAGE 6C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 5C

toll-free 800-696-4580.
Rainbow Acres Animal
Shelter - A nonprofit, no
kill, animal shelter, needs
donations of all kinds, shel-
ter material, wood, fencing,
etc. Food, old pots, pans,
etc. Almost anything you no
longer need, we can put to
good use. Cash is also ac-
cepted to keep our kittens
and puppies healthy. Our
animals are free. Donations
accepted, not required.
Free!!!!! Puppies and Dogs.
Kittens and Cats. Contact
Carolynn or Matt, 386-362-
3338.
Reach To Recovery -
breast cancer survivors vis-
iting breast cancer patients
with information and hope.
One on one visits. Free of
charge. Call toll-free, 800-
ACS-2345 to schedule a
visit. Sponsored by the
American Cancer Society.
Regional Heart Disease
and Stroke Prevention
Coalition - serving Suwan-
nee, Lafayette, Hamilton,
Madison, Jefferson and
Taylor counties - meets
quarterly. Please call Diana
King at 850-342-0170 ext.
220 for more info.
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Camp-
ground upcoming events
include - Jan. 15 - Lewis
Family; Feb. 12 - Sun
Country Jamboree; Feb. 14
- Valentines Day; Feb. .22-
24 Best of'America by
Horseback; Feb. 24 - Mark
Newton Band; March 5 -
Spring Fling Garage Sale;
March 12 - Sun Country
Jamboree; March 18 - Cher-
ry Holmes Family; March
24-27 - Suwannee Spring
Fest; March 27 - Craft Vil-
lage Easter Egg Hunt.
Stephen Foster State
Culture Center State Park
- monthly Cracker Coffee-
,house from,7-9, pim. in-the
Auditorium. Upcoming
events: Craft Rendezvous -
Jan. 29. Open stage night
held the first Saturday of
every month with songs,
stories, yodeling, music and
much more. Coffee and
desserts available for sale.
Free admission at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park, White Springs.
Located on US 41, three
miles from 1-75 and nine
miles from 1-10. For info on
additional programs and
times, contact the park at
386-397-4331, or visit
www.FloridaStateParks.org
/stephenfoster/


Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
- Honored as one of 10
"21st Century American
Heritage Parks" in 2003.
For more info, call 386-
397-7009. Visit www.Flori-
daStateParks.org/stephen-
foster/
Suwannee Valley Blue-
grass Association - gets to-
gether at the Pickin' Shed
every Saturday evening at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Campground,
3076 95th Dr., Live Oak.
For more info, call 386-
364-1683.
Suwannee Valley
Builders Association
(SVBA) - A non profit orga-
nization, is a group of ap-
proximately 80 local citi-
zens dedicated to building a
stronger community,. whose
members volunteer their
time with active . involve-
ment with associate spon-
sorships of worthwhile
community activities and
associate members of the
Council for Progress and
Suwannee County Chamber
of Commerce. SVBA do-
nates two academic scholar-
ships each year, donates
Christmas gift/food baskets
each year and sponsor of
the children's playhouse
raffle at Christmas. Fea-
�tured speakers from local
businesses and a catered
dinner are the highlights of
the evening at monthly,
meetings. The general pub-
lic is invited to attend and
become members. Dona-
tions of $5 a person' are ac-
cepted at the door to help
cover catering expenses.
For more info on joining the
organization, contact Ron-
nie Poole, 386-362-4539.
Wanted - Have an hour a
week to share? Volunteers
needed at Surrey Place for
our extensive seven-day-a-
week activity program.
Many-volunteers -positions
are now open. Calling out
bingo or pokeno, reading to
residents who no longer see
well or sharing scriptures,
giving wheel chair rides in
the courtyard, helping with
special events or being a
"helper/partner" on outings
out of the facility. Our goal
is to keep our residents',
lives fulfilled by being busy
and happy. For more info,
please call Karen or Ellie at
Surrey Place, 386-364-
5961.
Wild Adventures up-
coming events include:
Snow Days - Now-Feb. 28;
Winter Jam: Tait, TobyMac,


Newsong, Building
Mathew West, Chac
Wheels - Jan 22; Dia
Rio with Jimmy Wa
'Feb. 5; Bowling for S
Feb. 19; Terri Clarn
Josh Turner - Feb. 26
Adventures Theme P
located at 3766 Old
attville Rd. Valdosta
For more info
www.wild-adventure.c
CALENDAR O
EVENTS
Through Jan. 3
Driver's license
vehicle inspect(
checkpoints schedu
The Florida Highwa
trol will conduct drive
cense and vehicle in
tion checkpoints th
Jan. 31, on Brown
CR 252, CR 252-A
252-B, CR 25-A, SR,4
341, US 441, US 41
245, CR 238, CR 135,
er Road, SR 100, Trc
Road, Fairfield
Road, CR 250, CR 34
247 and SR 25 in Col
County; CR 132, CR
CR 136-A, CR 137
249, CR 250, CR 25:
349, CR 49, CR 795, S
SR 247, SR 10, SR 5
129 and Mitchell Ro
Suwannee County; an
136, CR 152, CR 14
249, CR 137, CR 25
146, CR 135, CR 14
150, CR 145 and US 4
6, SR 25 in Hamilton
ty. Recognizing the d
presented to the publ
defective vehicle e
ment, troopers will co
trate their efforts on
,cles being operated wi
fects such as bad b
worn tires and defe
lighting equipment. In
tion, attention will b
rected to drivers who
violate ihe driver li
laws of Florida. The
has found these check]
to be an effective mei
enforcing the equip
and driver's license la
Florida while ensuring
protection of all motoi
Now - April 1
Ten Star All Sti
Basketball Cam
Applications are no
ing evaluated - thru A
- for The Ten Star Al
Summer Basketball C
The camp is by invi
only. Boys and girls
10-19 are eligible to
Past participants inc
Michael Jordan, Tim
can, Vince Carter,
Stackhouse, Grand Hi
Antawn Jamison. PI
from 50 states and 1'


Saturday, January 22nd, 11 am - 2pm


M&M Auto Sales
IMON0Oh


I


J.W. Hill & Associates
License #AB2083
SB (386) 362-3300
Auction beginning at LOO pm. All makes & models.
Bids beginning at '50. Cars, Trucks & SUVs will be sold.
All Vehicles will be sold as is.
Preview Beginning 12:00 noon- Friday. January 21.


429, eign countries attended the
os on 2004 camp. College basket-
amond ball scholarships are possi-
yne - ble for players selected to
;oup - the All-American Team.
k and Camp locations include:
. Wild Babson Park and Atlanta,
ark is Ga. For a free brochure, call
Cly- 704-373-0873 anytime.
i, Ga. The 5th Army Associa-
visit tion tour of Italy, depart-
:om. ing.New York on June 15
)F The 5th Army Association
World War II, Italy, will
I conduct a 10 day final tour
and of Italy, departing New
on York on June 15 visiting
filed Rome, Venice, Florence,
ly Pa- Pisa, Sorrento and a special
-r's li- stop at the American Mili-
nspec- tary Cemetery near Anzio.
rough Former members of the
Road, many combat divisions and
., CR support groups, their fami-
[7, SR lies, friends and those inter-
1, CR ested in the history of the
Turn- U.S. 5th Army can contact
otter's Sny Canton at 5277B Lake-
Farms front Blvd., Delray Beach,
9, SR FL 33484 or call 561-865-
umbia 8495.
S136, Calling all classmates of
, CR SHS Class of 1986
2, CR Hello! To the graduating
R 20, class of 1986, our 20 year
1, US reunion is fast approaching.
)ad in It will be great to see every-
id CR one. Preparation for the re-
3, CR union is in progress. Class
1, CR members please contact An-
1, CR gela Hunter Mandrell at her
*1, SR e-mail address: Man-
Coun- dr003@bellsouth.net. The
Langer class members may also
lic by contact Catrena Francis at:
-quip- VanessaFrancis@msn.com
)ncen- as soon as possible.
vehi- Tickets on sale now!
th de- Riverdance
rakes, engagement rescheduled
active for Feb. 4 - 6
addi- The return engagement
be di- for Riverdance, originally
would scheduled for Feb. 18-20,
cense has been rescheduled to
Patrol Feb. 4-6, at the Curtis M.
points Phillips Center for the Per-
ans of forming,,Ar,ts,. Gainesville,i
pment Tickets for performances,of
ws of Riverdance, scheduled Feb-
ig the ruary 4-6, are on sale now.
rists. Patrons who already pur-
chased tickets for the per-
ar formances may use their
ip tickets for the performances
w be- at the same times: Feb. 18
pril 1 tickets on Feb. 4; Feb. 19
1 Star tickets on Feb. 5; and Feb.
Camp. 20 tickets on Feb. 6. For,
station more info, patrons can con-
ages tact the Phillips Center Box
apply. Office at 352-392-ARTS
:lude: (2787) or toll-free within
Dun- Florida at 800-905-ARTS
Jerry (2787). Riverdance is spon-
11 and scored by ERA Trend Realty
ayers and Shands HealthCare.'
7 for- Visit the Riverdance web-
site at
F www.riverdance.coin. Tick-
ets are also available at the
University Box Office, all
Ticketmaster outlets,
www.ticketmaster.com or
by' calling Ticketmaster at
904-353-3309. Cash, Visa
and MasterCard are accept-
ed. The Phillips Center Box
Office is open Monday -
Saturday, noon to 6 p.m.
Performance dates, times
and programs are subject to
change.


Sign up now!
Live Oak Senior
Citizens schedule tours
Live Oak Senior Citizens
schedule escorted tours to:
The Dead Sea Scrolls Ex-
hibit, The Festival of Flow-
ers and a river boat cruise,
Mobile, Ala., March 8-11;
Carnival Cruise to Western
Caribbean, May 15-22; and
a San Antonio Experience,
Oct. 19-23. Costs and dead-


Truck

Accessories


lines for payment vary for
each trip. The group meets
the first Monday, 10:30
a.m., Extension Building II,
Agriculture Center. Visitors
welcome. For more info,
contact Lula Herring at
386-364-1510.
Jan. 19
NFCC will conduct
GED tests
North Florida Community
College will conduct GED
tests Jan. 19, at 6 p.m. in
the NFCC Technical Center
on the Madison
campus. Persons taking the
tests will be required to fur-
nish a photo ID. NFCC
holds GED preparation
courses free of charge;
there is a fee for the
test. Pre-registration is re-
quired. To register please
call 850-973-1629.
Jan. 19
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 19,
against Gulf Coast at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit ath-
letics at www.nfcc.edu.
Jan. 19
Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's
staff in Live Oak
A member of Congress-
man Allen Boyd's (D-North
Florida) staff will be visit-
ing Live Oak on the third
Wednesday of every month
so the people of Suwannee
County have the opporttui-
ty to personally discuss is-
sues concerning them. Con-
gressman Boyd's staff is
traiped to assist con-
,stituents,.,with a variety of
issues relating to various
federal agencies. It 'is im-
portant to Congressman
Boyd that his staff is avail-
able for those who are not
able to travel to either his
Panama City or Tallahassee
offices. Office hours with
Congressman Boyd's staff
this month will be Wednes-'
day, Jan. 19, from 9:30
a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Live Oak
City Hall, Live Oak.
Jan. 20
Gateway School'
Readiness Coalition, Inc.
quality and executive
committees will meet
The Gateway School
Readiness Coalition, Inc.
quality and executive com-
mittees will meet at 2 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 20, at the
Gateway School Readiness
Coalition, 484 SW Com-
merce Drive, Suite 140,
Lake City. The coalition
oversees the state and fed-
eral funding for all school
readiness programs birth to
age five for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Stbwannee and Union Coun-
ties. They encourage com-
munity participation and
welcome any input. If any
persons) interested in at-
tending this meeting has a
disability requiring special
assistance, please contact
Heidi Moore at 386-752-
9770. Notice has been made
of this meeting, through
publication, to cover the
"Government in the Sun-
shine" law.

Jan. 20
Jana Jae, a Hee Haw
fiddle player, and her
blue fiddle will perform
in free concert at


Wal-Mart in Live Oak
Jana Jae, a Hee Haw fid-
dle player and "The First
Lady of Country Fiddle!,"
will perform with her blue
fiddle and her band Hotwire
in a free concert at Wal-
Mart No. 2626, 6868 US
129, Live Oak beginning at
7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan.
20. For more info, contact
Robert Bedenbaugh, 386-
330-2488.


Jan. 20
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida board of
directors meeting
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida board of di-
rectors will meet at 2 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 20, at the
United Way of Alachua,
6031 NW 1st Place,
Gainesville. The public is
invited. For more info, call
Celia 'Paynter- at 352-955-
2264, ext. 314.
Jan. 20
American Red Cross
will hold an Adult
CPR/Firpt Aid class in
Lake City
SThe American Red Cross
of Suwannee Valley will
hold an'Adult CPR/First
Aid class from 6-9:30 p.m.,
Thursday, Jan. 20, at their
office at 264 NE Hernando
Ave., Suite 102, Lake City.
For info and td register, call
386-752-0650.
Jan. 20
Situation Ethics
Workshop
Q. Is it always right to
tell the truth or does it de-
pend on the situation? If
you've ever struggled with
this question and many oth-
ers like it [dealing with -
'what is the right thing to
do?]...please join us for a
brief study in: Situation
Ethics, Jan. 20, at 6:30 p.m.
Led by.Glenn L. Jernigan at
the Suwannee River Re-
gional Library, Community
Meeting Room, US 129 S.,
Live Oak. Regardless of
your religious views, ethi-
cal doctrine or philosophy
of life,- everyone is wel-
come...as we look at this
sometimes controversial but
always interesting ethical
approach. This workshop is
not 'library-sponsored. It is
educational in nature and
open to the public at large.
Again, all are welcome. No
charge. Free.
Jan. 20
The American Ciancer
Society will host a
Physicians' Outreach
Continuing Medical
Education credits event
The American Cancer So-
ciety will host a dinner and
presentation for Continuing
Medical Education (CME)
credits from 6-9 p.m. on
Jan. 20, at the Paramount
Plaza Hotel, '2900 SW 13th
Street in Gainesyille free of
charge for physicians and
other medical professionals
and just in time to meet the
Jan. 31 requirements for li-
censure in the State of
Florida. Two CME credits
will be offered: End-of-Life
and Palliative Care and Ge-
nomics and Proteomics for
Individualized Cancer
Treatment. Sponsors for
this event include the
American Cancer Society,
Community Cancer Center
of North Florida, MGI
PHARMA, AMGEN and
GENENTECH pharmaceu-
tical companies. To reserve
a seat at this event, please
call the American Cancer
Society at 352-376-6866
ext. 114.
Jan. 20
Branford Camera
Club will meet
The Branford Camera
Club will meet on Thurs-
day, Jan. 20; at the Branford
Public Library, 7:30
p.m. This month's program
will focus on basic photo-
graphic techniques applica-
ble to all levels of film and
digital cameras. Gilbert
Bernardo.will lead the dis-
cussion of composition,
lighting, accessories and
other topics of interest to
the' group. Yvonne Robel


will share pictures of her
"painting with light" exper-
iments, both from the De-
cember meeting and a per-
sonal project. If you got a
new camera for Christmas
or one of your New Year's
resolutions was to learn to
take better pictures in 2005,
please plan to join us. Bring
your holiday pictures to


SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 8C


Grill Guards, Fog Lamps
Roll Bars, Tool Boxes,
Bug Shields & More


Hwy 90 W., Lake City
752-0054
129906-F







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 7C

-I


We


Take


Your


Health


5-
pl-


TREATS ALL
RESPIRATORY DISEASES
~ NEW PATIENTS WELCOME -

M. Choudhury, M.D.


155 NW Enterprise Way, Suite A, Lake City
134761DH-F


CO Lake City
i Eye
I pcs Physicians


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


SherriA. Cole, L.D.O.
Owner
Licensed Optician


Reaves C. Cole, O.D.
Board Certified
Optometric Physician


621 SW Baya Drive, Suite 101
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 719-9292
or (386) 754-6616
wwwcoleopties.com ,



Assisted Living"
tdE4�ona /Ro,,n to

qc'u 'LL' L' L'ad LiyLL


QuiL, _Cafa~J ts olunty, cou.ntTi seting.
iucrat�. toooms, flaTienaei, 24 lowu aais.
Visit us on the web at www.oakridgealf.com
Email: oakridgealf@alltel.net
Mayo, FL County Rd. 251-A (386) 294-5050
License # AL9863 (386) 29145050


Lake City &
Live Oak

cancerhope.com


Specializing in Oncology since 1989
Comprehensiveand Personalized Care
*Best equipment
*Most advanced treatment
*Treat all types of cancers
*IMRT PET CT Eric C. Rost, M.D.
David S. Cho, M.D..
Purendra P. Sinha, M.D.
Board Certified - All Insurances Accepted - No Referral Necessary


Suwannee Valley
Cancer Center
795 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 758-SVCC (7822)


CancerHope of
Live Oak
1500 Ohio Ave. North
Live Oak, FL 32060.
(386)362-1174
131387JR.-F


or having a baby?
Now Providing
Prenatal & Obstetric Care

Dr. Frederick L. Vinson,
Board Certified OB/GYN
17 Years Experience Delivering

Women's Health Care
2806 W. Hwy. 90, Ste. 103,
Lake City
386-755-5060
Please call for appointment



North Florida

Pharmacy of Iranford

* Medical
Equipment
e Oxygen

"Everything For Your
Home Recovery"
Locally Owned & Operated
101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008
(386) 935-6905
S229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066
(386) 294-3777 ,131404J,.


to


Heart


determine which plan is right for you.

EYE CENTER of North Florida
O General Eye Care & Surgery
EYE EXAMS * CATARACT SURGERY
* GLAUCOMA MACULAR DEGENERATION
* DIABETES. LASERS
Eduardo M. Bedoya, MD
Board Certified, American Board of Ophthalmology
Eye Physician & Surgeon


Medicare, Medicaid, Avmed,
Blue Cross/Blue Shield
& olher insurance accepted.
Se habla espaflol.

917 W. Duval St. ,
iii, Lake City
386-7557595 I


Cancer Care of North Florida


We are a
total care
medical
oncology &
hematology
practice.
I31tIQnDF.F


Now seeing patients at Shands at Live Oak
Welcoming New Patients at
our two offices at:
Shands @ Live Oak or Lake City.
Please call (386) 755-1655
Wasee,n Khan,M.D. for an appointment or information
All Chemotherapy administration and management


Specializing in:
Anemia
*Thrombocytopenla
* Bleeding or clotting disorders
SBreast Cancer
SColon Cancer
SOvarian Cancer
* Multiple Myeloma
*Leukemia
*Lymphoma
hAC ,nan U ;1a jM r 5 U,& Insurnc


GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
Located In SHANDS At Live Oak
1100 SW llth St. Live Oak C
(904) 373-4300 or 1-800-435-3937 .

Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A.
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 131 OS-


Learn the differences
between the latest fad diets
A fast-food mentality. A preoccupation with slender figures. A sedentary lifestyle. What
do all of these statements have in common? These are leading factors in America's
infatuation with weight loss and dieting.
An estimated 50 million people will try a diet this year, according to the National Center
for Health Statistics. Most seek advice from books and television diet gurus. Some consult
support groups, doctors and clinical programs. In the end, we have turned the weight-loss
industry into a billion-dollar business, says the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Leading the weight-loss trend are fad diets that promise amazing results in relatively
short amounts of time. Millions try these diets with varying degrees of success. Their
effectiveness has been the subject of debate and their safety often questioned. However,
they're usually the first type of a diet a person will try in lieu of traditional calorie
reduction and exercise.
If you're thinking about going a diet, there is enough information out there to make your
head spin. Here is a breakdown of the top fad diets, listing their pros and cons and a brief
description of what they entail.
1. The Atkins Diet -- It's perhaps the most well-known and popular fad diet of our time.
This program has spawned a low-carbohydrate wave across the country. Now, most food
companies, fast-food restaurants and the like offer lower-carb options to complement the
program.
The plan: You eliminate most carbs
early in the program and then slowly '"
reintroduce some later on as Weight
loss milestones are achieved.
Emphasis is placed on eating high '
protein foods and certain foods high s.,,". ,,
in saturated fat.. ' '
Bad: Atkins encourages dieters to skip ,f '1'
some fruits and vegetables, which
many health experts feel can deprive
the body of much-needed vitamins,
fiber and water. Also, it has not yet
been proven if the permissible fatty
foods contribute to increased bad .
cholesterol levels or heart problems
down the road.
Good: Following the diet will make .
you lose weight -- at least 15 pounds
initially. However, some of this
weight loss is due to water loss and
reduced paloric intake, which occurs ';
by limiting the foods you eat.
2. The South Beach Diet -- Riding the
waves of Atkins' success, this diet is
the one on the market today. '
Celebrities and regular folks alike
have touted its wonders.
The plan: According to the Diet's
official Web site, "The South Beach Want to lose weight? Determine If one of the
Diet is not low-carb, nor is ilow-fat, popular fad diets might be the right choice for you.
Diet is not low-carb, nor is it low-fat.
Rather, it teaches you to rely on the
right carbs and the right fats and enables you to live quite happily without the bad carbs and
bad fats." Like Atkins, certain foods are "banned" initially and then reintroduced later on.
Bad: Giving up the foods you love cold turkey can discourage many dieters. They may feel
like they are being deprived.
Good: You do get to indulge in meats, cheeses and bacon. You will lose 8 to 13 pounds in
the first two-week phase but, again, this is probably attributed to water loss.
3. The Zone Diet -- Once a Hollywood staple (Brad and Jen were reported to have favored
it), still a favorite among dieters.
The plan: You control insulin production by balancing protein and carbohydrate
consumption at meals to help you metabolize foods more efficiently and lose weight. The
insulin-control component of the program can be described as a moderate-carbohydrate,
moderate-protein, and moderate-fat dietary program. It is a lifelong program.
Bad: This diet focuses on a limited caloric intake, which most nutritionists say is too
stringent to be healthy over the long haul. Experts agree that the 40 percent carbs, 30
percent protein and the 30 percent fat equation doesn't necessarily help youreach a
metabolic state that will keep you thin, but rather, eating smaller portions will.
Good: It's an easy-to-follow plan that will guide you on correct portion size and help you
control food intake.
4. The Slim-Fast Plan -- It's endured popularity for years and has had notable celebrity
endorsements.
The plan: Meal and snack replacements shakes and bars are enjoyed at breakfast and lunch
instead of regular foods , and the dieter eats a "sensible" dinner.
Bad: Deprivation feelings may be common with this diet. Many people do not feel full with
the diet's shakes and snack bars, which provide a controlled amount of calories. They may
then sneak snacks or food in addition to having the meal replacements:
Good: Packaged foods are pre-portioned and portable. Plus, the plan is simple to follow. An
emphasis is placed on eating a balance of healthy foods, combined with moderate exercise.
Most nutritionists agree that a healthy balance of portion control, reduced caloric intake and
exercise are the keys to weight loss. However, some feel that fad diets can be used to jump-
start weight loss when necessary. Before embarking on any diet program, consult with your
doctor for a health assessment and to I-- .- .- I


RENALDAS A. SMIDTAS, M.D. AND ASSOCIATES
American Board of Internal Medicine certified,
Fellow of American Board of Balance Medicine.
SHELIA Y. ROBERTS, A.R.N.P., C.S.
KATHY NEWMAN, A.R.N.P
Heart, Cardiovascular Disases * Diabetes management
Allergy and Asthma * Lung diseases * Women's Health
Invasive Pain Management for Arthritis of the Knee, Shoulders,
Back Pain * Ultrasound Diagnostic and More
Live Oak Jasper
362-5840 792-0753
1437 N. Ohio Ave.: 413NW5th:Ave ''i
Visa, MasterCard Accepted -; ; i iaB.-F


916 yEIaL'tF2o'ri, wnc.
"Il(EEek2~ �CJowr atdikak(i 7 JVr nk'
* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy * Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis * Fibromyalgia * Geriatrics * Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries * Work Injuries * Pediatrics
* Manual Therapy * Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated


Live Oak
Lake City
Jasper
Branford
Mayo


208-1414 * Medicare, Protegrity
755-8680 * Blue Cross, Av Med
792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
935-1449 * Workers Comp
294-1407 * Most Other Insurance Plans


A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency 8
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore

Physical Therapy


Heartland
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA

PROFESSIONAL TOUCH
PHYSICAL THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation,
Job/Workers Site Analysis
Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS
Providers
1506 South Ohio Ave. Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 131397J

Ur Impotence Suentrgery
D Impotence Center


ROBERT G. BUSCH, D.O.
ERIC ORDINARIO, D.O.
Board Certified Urology and Urological Surgery
Common Problems Treated:
* Infections * Prostate Problems * Kidney Stones * Sexual
Problems * Genital Surgery � Cancer of the Urinary Tract *
Impotence - Infertility � Urinary Incontinence
Common Surgical Procedures In Office:
* Cystoscopy * No Scapel Vasectomy * Treatment of
Condyloma * Prostate Ultrasound/Biopsy * Bladder
Ultrasound * Penil Vascular Studies
Common Surgical Problems In
Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center:
* Prostate, Kidney and Bladder Cancer Surgery
* Kidney Stone and Surgery Lithotripsy * Microscopic
Vasectomy Reversal * Impotence Surgery * Hernia Surgery
Specializing in the evaluation and treatment of Male
Impotence Surgical and Medical Therapies
All patients are given
personal and confidential attention.

S131382JS-F


Dr. Rios
OBGYN
Midwife Services Avail
0-MCN


ivlarlene Summers, tuNIVI

Hours:
Mon. - Thur. 8:30 - 5:00
Closed 12:30-1:30


(386) 755-0500
Fax (386) 755-9217


449 SE Baya Dr.
Lake City, FL 32055


* ienera urtnopaeaics rthopaedic
* Sports Medicine Center
Lake City Office - 4367 NW American Lane
Phone 386-755-9215 - Toll Free 1-888-860-7050
Workers compensation and
Most Insurance Plans Accepted 1952DH-F


�_�__II� � nsYIIJIV (I(_J_(s U I~IW( Ill*VIII11*s


-~� -i --


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L. j;
'� ��i^
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XTA X~


131407-F








PAGE 8C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


Calendar


Continued From Page 6C

share and your camera and
owner's manual if you'd
like help with your specific
camera questions. For more
info, please contact one of
the following: Carolyn
Hogue, Program Chairman,
386-935-2044; Gilbert
Bernardo, Technical Con-
sultant, 386-935-0340;
Dick Bryant, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-1977;
or Dick Madden, Technical
Consultant, 396-935-0296.
Jan. 21
Special video
conference: Post-Storm
Timber Tax and Forest
Health Issues to be held
The 2004 hurricane sea-
son was damaging to a large
portion of Florida's private
timberlands. Casualty loss
and forest health issues that
thousands of private timber-
land owners are now facing
as a result of these storms
will be addressed by a spe-
cial videoconference: Post-
Storm Timber Tax and For-
est Health Issues. The
videoconference will be
held on Friday, Jan., 21,
from 4:30-7 p.m. (EST) at
11 locations throughout
Florida. One of the eleven
sites will be held in Live
Oak at:.UF-IFAS Suwannee
Valley North Florida REC,
7580 CR 136, 386-362-
1725. Space is limited, reg-
ister early. For more info or
to register, contact Chris
Demers at 352-846-2375 or
cdemers@ifas.ufl.edu. This
free program is a service of
the Florida Division of
Forestry, Forest Steward-
ship Program University of

POOL CHLORINE
$325
^Refill
SEAMAN'S AQUA CLEAN
.y3 - 4 2_4 W H,.WHoard St., Live Oak
.1362524JS-F .. 3.62-4043


Florida, IFAS, Cooperative
Extension Service.
Jan. 22
Dowling Park
Volunteer Fire Fighters
training meeting
Attention! The Dowling
Park Volunteer Fire Fight-
ers training meeting will be
held at 0900 hours (9 a.m.)
on Saturday, Jan. 22, at the
fire station located at
22992 CR 250. Chief James
L. O'Neill Jr. See you
there.
Jan. 22
Annual Relay for
Life yard sale
Annual Relay for Life
yard sale will be held at
Camp Suwannee, Dowling
Park from 8 a.m. until 1
p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 22.
Jan. 24
Free estate planning
seminar will be
conducted at the
Suwannee River Regional
Library in Live Oak
A free seminar on estate
planning, wills, trusts, as-
set protection, avoiding
probate and guardianship
will be held at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 24, at the
Suwannee River Regional
Library in the Crapps
Meeting Room, 1848 Ohio
Avenue South, Live Oak.
The seminar will be con-
ducted by Joseph F. Pippen
Jr. and Associates and local
attorney Frank Davis.
Jan. 24. 31 and
Feb. 7. 21
Home school class
offered at Florida
Museum of Natural
History in Gainesvile
The Florida Museum of
Natural History,
Gainesville will offer a
four-week home school
class series titled "Squirmy
Science" from 9:30-11:30
a.m. on Jan. 24, 31 and
Feb. 7, 21 for children ages
six-11. Thec;lass iisr$40 1for


members and $45 for non-
members. Pre-registration
is required. For niore infor-
mation call 352-846-2000,
ext. 277.
Jan. 24
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Communi-
ty College will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) on Monday,
Jan. 24, at 6 p.m., in the
NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison campus. TABE
is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical
programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration is
required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.
Jan. 25
FAMU Cooperative Ex-
tension Service will' host
a local meat goat produc-
er meeting
The Florida A & M Uni-
versity (FAMU) Extension
Service will host a local
meat goat producer meeting
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 25, at the Suwannee
County Extension Service
Office, 1302 Eleventh St.,
Live Oak. Les Harrison of
the Florida Department of
Agriculture, Division of
Marketing and Develop-
ment and Richard Esseck of
the Florida Meat Goat As-
sociation will be guest
speakers. The meeting is
open to all meat goat pro-
ducers in Suwannee,
Hamilton, Madison and Co-
lumbia counties. No regis-
tration fee. Pre-register by
calling FAMU Small Farm
Management Specialist
Phillip Petway, 386-362-
2771.
Jan. 25
Glenn Miller Orchestra
swings at NFCC
World Famous Glenn
Miller Orchestra, one of the
most popular dance bands


in history, performs at 7
p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 25, at
the Van H. Priest Auditori-
um of North Florida Com-
munity College in Madi-
son. Tickets are $11 for
adults and $6 for children.
Tickets are available by
calling 850-973-1653 or e-
m a i 1
ArtistSeries@nfcc.edu.
Jan. 25
American Red Cross
will hold an Adult CPR
class in Lake City
The American Red Cross
of Suwannee Valley will
hold an Adult CPR class
from 6-9 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 25, at their office at
264 NE Hernando Ave.,
Suite 102, Lake City. For
info and to register, call
386-752-0650.
Jan. 25
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Community
College will conduct TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Educa-
tion) on Tuesday, Jan. 25, at
1:30 p.m., in the NFCC
Technical Center on the
Madison campus. TABE is
required for acceptance into
vocational/technical pro-
grams. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration is required.
To register please call 850-
973-9451.
Jan. 26
Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild meeting
Do you need a quilting
challenge? The Lady of the
Lake Quilting Guild will
hold its monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Jan. 26, at 10
a.m. at the Southside Recre-
ation Center, 901 Saint
Margaret Road, Lake City.
Marika Sevin, Development
Director of the Arthritis
Foundation of Jacksonville,
will present "a call to entry"
for quilted items for the No-
vember Comfort for a Cure
i II � j 3 . � I , ,... C',


D.lmr.d R.i S Jimmy Wane..... .... Feb 5
Raven, 85 & Maedynr ... . .. .........FRe12
aw: f -GiKt PE'Glwr.an fcr S.up, trmil.san HI.FI. Rldln .ili i & MLar. ..Febli
Terrl rl &Jo ht, Turner.. .. ...... .Feb'21
3 Special uarsnal Tuiuer .,......Mar 0
iLeAw Rime1 . 2 . ,, ,,.,. Mar 1 a" n '
cnllowsove �uul ... adA
hartlle Dantels &Trd Pvory..... . ...... . ...... ... APr T
Y cb a.i .. . .. . . ... . AprI


Quilt Challenge to benefit
the Arthritis Foundation.
The Guild is an organiza-
tion for anyone interested in
quilts and the art of quilt-
ing. The public is welcome.
For more details, contact
President Sandy Lindfors,
386-362-6850, or e-mail
riverfolk@alltel.net.
Jan. 27
American Red Cross
will hold a First Aid class
in Lake City
The American Red Cross
of Suwanree Valley will
hold a First Aid class from
6-9 p.m., Thursday, Jan.
27, at their office at 264
NE Hernando Ave., Suite
102, Lake City. For info
and to register, call 386-
.752-0650.
Jan. 28-30
Lake City Speedway will
host the Florida Racers
Party of the Year!
Lake City Speedway will
host The Florida Racers
Party of the Year! Friday,
Saturday and Sunday, Jan.
28-30. Classes competing:
non-winged sprints, super
late model, mini-stocks-
Florida-U.M.P. Imca type
modifieds, K.O.I L. Leg-
ends, mini sprints, hobby
stock, pure stock and street
stock; Schedule of events:
Thursday, Jan. 27, 5-10
p.m., campers move in,
music and bonfire; Friday,
Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-8:3,0 p.m.
sign-in, hot laps: all divi-
sions 4-7 p.m.; Qualifica-
tions: all cars, renegade,
four-car dashes, mini car
derby (Racers Party); Sat-
urday, Jan. 29, gates open
at 9 a.m., sign-in until 2
p.m., auction begins at 10
a.m., vintage car races 11
a.m. -2 p.m., heat races
2:30 p.m., big car demo
7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 30,
gates open at 10 a.m.,
church service 10:30 a.m.
features all day starting at
noon-entr3 fee ~ill clla.ies:
Pits - all four days $45 or
$20 per day; general ad-
mission $15 per day or $35
for all three days, kids un-
der six free, six-12 $5 per
day. For rules and ques-
tions, call 812-689-1046,
812-871-7728, 859-581-
8579 or the track at 386-
754-8800.
Jan. 29
Suwannee County
Museum Chili Challenge
The Suwannee County
Museum Association is
planning its second Chili
Challenge. The event will
be held on Saturday, Jan.
29, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on the loading dock of the
old Atlantic Coastline
Freight Depot. This year
there wil be three classes in
the competition. Restau-
rants and businesses will
comepte for a handsome
torphy. Civic organizations
will compete for a cash
prize of $100. This yar, in-
dividuals wil compete, in
their own class, for a tro-
phy. there will also be tro-
phies for the People's
Choice Award and for the
best presentation (table
decoration). There will be
entertainment and an art
exhibit by the Live Oak
Artist Guild. Chili must be
prepared and heated to 140
degrees F. when competitor
check in. The temperature
of the chili will be checked
before the judging. You.
may use crock pots or hot
plates to keep your chili up
to temperature. Electrical
outlets are available. If
you have questions about
the Chili Challenge, please
call 386-362-1776 and ask
for Carol or Richard. After


hours, please leave a mes-
sage and we will get back
to you. Proceeds from the
event will go to support the
Suwannee County Histori-
cal Museum.
Jan 29
The Family CAFE
Bistro comes to Lake
City
The Family CAFI Bistro
a free conference for stu-
dents and adults with dis-


abilities, their families and
friends will be held at the
Columbia County School
Board Administration
Complex on Saturday, Jan.
29, from 8 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. A free continental
breakfast will be provided.
The registration deadline is
Jan. 24. For more info or to
register, call FDLRS/Gate-
way toll free at 800-227-
0059.
Jan. 29
Sixth Annual Great Air
Potato Roundup
Join hundreds of volun-
teers to take back
Gainesville's natural areas
from invasive exotic
species! Modeled after a lit-
ter cleanup, pick up air
potatoes and other exotics
by the bushel! After potato
picking from 9 a.m.-I p.m.
on Saturday, Jan. 29, join in
the post-roundup celebra-
tion at Morningside Nature
Center Living History
Farm. Live music, free food
and t-shirts, prize drawings
and awards for the biggest
and wierdest potatoes and
the largest group!!! Great
fun for kids! Pre-registra-
tion recommended. For
more info call 352-334-
2170 or visit www.nature-
operations.org.
Jan. 29-30 and Feb. 4-6
19th Annual Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire comes to
life in Gainesville on Jan
29-30 and Feb. 4-6
The Alachua County Fair-
grounds come to life as the
19th Annual Hoggetowne
Medieval Faire brings the
magic of the past to
Gainesville. Join hundreds
of actors, artisans and vol-
unteers for two weekends of
merriment Jan. 29-3.0 and
Feb. 4-6. Faire hours are 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday
and Sundays and 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Friday. Admission
is $10 for adults, $5 for
children ages 5-1" and Tree
for children 4 and younger.
For more information call
352-334-ARTS or visit
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org.
Jan. 30
The Florida Museum of
Natural History will host
a Science Sunday lecture
on wild orchids
The Florida Museum of
Natural History in
Gainesville will host a Sci-
ence Sunday lecture on wild
orchids by Connie Bransil-
ver, author of "Wild Love
Affair: Essence of Florida's
Native Orchids," from 2-3
p.m. on Jan. 30. The event
is free and open to the pub-
lic. The Florida Museum
also will offer a new pro-
gram "Sunday Snoop,"
where museum staff enter-
tain children ages 4-10 for
an hour with fun activities
and a guided tour while
adults enjoy the
lecture/book signing. Reg-
istration for "Sunday
Snoop" is $5 and pre-regis-
tration is required. For more
info or to register for "Sun-
day Snoop," call 352-846-
2000, ,ext. 277.
Jan. 31
NFCC will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult
Basic Education)
North Florida Communi-
ty College will conduct
TABE (Test of Adult Basic
Education) on Monday,
Jan. 31, at 6 p.m., in the
NFCC Technical Center on
the Madison
campus. TABE is required
for acceptance into voca-
tional/technical
programs. Photo ID re-
quired. Pre-registration is
required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.


Feb. 2
Helping Hands
Volunteer Orientation
Make a difference in
someone's life! After attend-
ing orientation and complet-
ing the: screening process,
you will be eligible for vol-
unteering in the Hospice At-
tic thrift store, administra-
tive offices,-as well as help-

SEE CALENDAR, PAGE 9C
%, �7







NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 9C


Calendar


Continued From Page 8C

ing at special events, educa-
tional fairs, community
events and fund raising' You
must register for orientation.
Orientation will be held
from 10-11 a.m. on Wednes-
day, Feb. 2 (first Wednesday
of every month) at Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley, 618
SW FL Gateway Drive,
Lake City. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long, 386-752-9191.
Feb. 2,
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game ,
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady -Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 2,
against Okaloosa-Walton at
Colin P. Kelly Gymnasiuin
on the Madison campus. All
home games are free and
open to the public. For more
info, contact NFCC basket-
ball coach Clyde Alexander
at 850-973-1609' or visit ath-
letics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 5 - May 30
"Microbes: Invisible In-
vaders...Amazing Allies,"
will be on display at the
Florida Museum of Natur-
al History, Gainesville
"Microbes: Invisible In-
vaders...Amazing Allies."
wiill be on display Feb. 5 -
May 30 at the Florida Muse-.
um of Natural History,
Gainesville. The exhibit,
produced by Clear Channel
Exhibitions in collaboration
with the National Institutes
of Health, is an interactive,
technologically, enhanced
exhibit that explores the hid-
den world of microbes, in-
cluding bacteria, viruses and
beneficial germs. For mbre
info call 352-846-2000. ext.
277.
Feb. 8-10
Suwannee District Schools
sill administer Spring
ib65 Assessments -FCAT
Writing Test
Su\\annee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessmerits -
FCAT Writing Test - Feb. 8-
10. FCAT is for grades 3-10
(Grade 11-Adult RE-
TAKES). Eacfi school has
.more detailed testing infor-
mation available. 'Daily stu-
dent attendance is critical
during these assessment pe-
riods.
Feb. 9
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next honime basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball'
game will' be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday. Feb. 9,


against Tallahassee at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 11-12
NFCC Lady Sentinels
next home basketball
game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30.
p.m. on Friday and 2 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 11-12,
against Pensacola at ColinP.
Kelly Gymnasium on the'
Madison campus. All home'
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfec.edu.
Feb. 15
SCORE will sponsor a fi-
nancial management and
record keeping workshop
SCORE will sponsor a
workshop on financial man-
agement and record keeping
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Tuesday; Feb. 15-- the
Quality Inn, US 90 and 1-75,
Lake City. The cost is $20
with lunch and materials in-
c luded. Topics will include
business: loans, credit, in-
ventory management, record
keeping systems and more.
.Seating is limited. For reser-
vations or more information.
.call 386-755-9026 ext.
3214. SCORE is a non-prof-
it organization which pro-
vides counseling to small'
businesses by experienced
local volunteers.
Feb.16
ServSafe Program
will be held
The Suwannee County
Extension Service, will be
providing food safetyy train-
ing on Wednesday. Feb. 16.
from 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. at the
Suwannee County Extension
Office, 1302 Eleventh
Street, SW, Live Oak. Certi-
fication is required in Flori-
da for food managers of all
establishments. The Univer-
sity of Florida Food Safety
and Quality Program man-
ages the ServSafe Program
training (including all regis-
trations and material or-
ders). More info is available
about this training by calling
toll-free 888-232-8723 or
v . i . s , i t
htlp:, foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu

Feb. 12
2005 Lafayette Baseball
Golf Tournament
The 2005 Lafayette Base-
ball Golf Tournament will


be held at 9 a.m. on Satur-
day, Feb. 12, at the Suwan-
nee Country Club, Live Oak.
Four man scramble with
prizes to the top three teams.
Cost: $50 per player or $200
per team. Come and support
Hornet Baseball. For more
info, contact Derek Garland,
386-294-3025 or Joann
Page, 386-294-2834.
Feb. 16
NFCC Lady
Sentinels next home
basketball game
The North Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
tinels next home basketball
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb.
16, against Chipola at Colin
P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach Clyde Alexander at
850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 21
NFCC Lady
Sentinels next home
basketball game
The North 'Florida Com-
munity College Lady Sen-
*tinels next home basketball-
game will be played at 5:30
p.m. on Monday, Feb. 21,
against Gulf Coast at Colin
:P. Kelly Gymnasium on the
Madison campus. All home
games are free and open to
the public. For more info,
contact NFCC basketball
coach, Clyde Alexander at
.850-973-1609 or visit athlet-
ics at www.nfcc.edu.
Feb. 28 - March 11
Suwannee District Schools
will administer,Spring
2005 Assessments - FCAT
Reading, Math and Sci-
ence Tests
Suwannee . District
Schools .will. administer
Spring'2005 Assessments -
FCAT Reading, Math, and
Science Tests - Feb. 28-
March 11. FCAT is for
grades 3-10 (Grade 1 -Adult.
RETAKES). Each ,school
has more detailed testing in-
formation available. Daily
student attendance is critical
during these assessment pe-
riods.
March 21-23
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments
-SAT 10
Suwannee District
Schools will administer
Spring 2005 Assessments -
SAT 10 - March 21-23.
SAT 10 is for Grade K-2.
Each school has more de-
tailed testing information
available'.. Daily student
'attendance is critical dur-
ing these assessment peri-
ods.


Book now -don't delay!

Space is still available.

Departures available from Lake City

Live Oak & Dowling Park

January 22, 2005 - Gaither Homecoming Concert
Bopk now for an exciting evening filled with wholesome entertairunent
for everyone. SPACE IS LIMITED! Includes: motorcoach transportation,
Artist Circle Seats and driver gratuity. Price: $65 per person
February 19, 2005 -Florida's Silver Spring
Spend the day at Florida's Silver Spring and enjoy all this natural
attraction has to offer. Also included are reserved seats to Lee
Greenwood's show, Salute to America. Includes: motorcoach
transportation, admission to Silver Springs, reserved seats for Lee
Greenwood show and driver gratuity. Price: $75 per person
March 11-14 2005 - Mobile Flower Show and The Dead Sea Scrolls:
Visit historic Mobile for a special showing of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the
Festival of Flowers, tours of historic homes and much more! Includes:
motorcoach transportation, 3 nights accommodations, admission to the
Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit, Festival of Flowers, some meals and more.
Price: $535 per.person, double occupancy


I ' *-~ PV~'Ma.


American Travel

(800) 344-6769 or

Gerald & Lula Herring

(386) 364-1510


www.americantraveltours.com


1RR7Rn.H-F


Teach children proper

handwashing this

cold and flu season


With the cold and flu season
here, one of the most vulnera-
ble populations are young chil-
dren attending schools and
daycare. To keep kids healthy,
handwashing continues to be
one of the most simple; yet ef-
fective ways to fight disease,
according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Preven-
tion.
The main way that illnesses
like colds and flu are spread is
from person-to-person in respi-
ratory .droplets: of coughs or
sneezes, called "droplet
spread." This can happen when


"'. '




-, F
�� - ^i


droplets from a, cough or
sneeze of an infected person
move through the:air and come
in contact with the mouth or
nose of people nearby, or when
germs land on shared items
such as toys, desks and door-
knobs. Tfa person fails to wash
their hands after touching these
surfaces, they can become vul-
nerable ifthey touch their eyes,
mouth or nose.
To help kids protect them-
selves, kids and their parents
can how benefit by getting help
from The Scrub Club, an ani-
mated Web site (www.scrub-
club.org) developed by the not-
for-profit NSF International.
The new Web site teaches kids
and their parents the impor-
tance of washing hands in the
fight against infections arnd
food bormediseases through in-
teractive -ganes, activities; 'a
handwashnmgsong and even-an
animated webisode.


"The Scrub Club was created
to raise awareness about the
benefits ofhandwashing," says
William Fisher, vice president
at NSF International, a public
health and safety organization
that independently certifies
products and writes standards.
"By offering children, parents
and teachers a fun and educa-
tional Web site, our goal is to
reduce the number of school
sick days and ultimately im-
prove the overall hygiene, of
children and adults."
Six Steps to Proper Hand-
washing


The Scrub
Club Web
site features
s e v e n
" soa pe r-
hero" 'kids --
"Hot Shot,"
"Chill,"
"Squeaks,"
"Tak i , "
"Sc ruf f,"


."Tank" and
"P.T." - that transform to repre-
sent each of the six steps to
proper handwashing.
Step 1: Wash with warm wa-
tei. "Hot Shot" and "Chill" turn
into hot and cold faucets and
then combine 'to make the warm
water essential for proper hand-
\washing.
Step 2: Apply soap -.bar or
pump are both fine.'Squeaks"
can transform into various
forms of soap, from bars of all
sizes to pumps of all kinds.
Step 3: Wash for a full 20
.seconds, rubbing hands togeth-
er to lather soap. "Taki" be-
comes a clock that counts down
the required 20 seconds for
thorough handwashing.
Step 4: Clean around your,
fingernails, using a nail brush if
you have one."Scruff' reminds
kids that hands aren't clean un-
til the nails are clean.,
Step 5: Rinse away soap with
warm water. "Tank" turns into a


sink and serves as a reminder to
rinse away germs.
Step 6: Dry with paper towels
or warm air dryer. "P.T." trans-
forms herself into paper towels.
At xwww.scrubclub.org, kids
see the six steps to proper hand-
washing in action through an
interactive webisode and can
also sing along to the Scrub
Club theme song. The first we-
bisode, "The Good, the BAC
and the Ugly," finds the Scrub
Club battling the loathsome, but
lovable character BAC (from
the Partnership for Food Safety
Education's Fight BAC! food
safety public, education cam-
paign), and one of his partners
Sin "grime," "Sal MNonella," in a
Wild-West thened adventure.
Interactive games, including
one that features the evil vil-
lain "Influenza Enzo" called
"Stop Fluin' Around," teach
children how illnesses and
food borne diseases are spread
and how to prevent them. Ad-
ditionally, Scrub Club visitors
can also download materials
such as a Scrub Club member-
ship card,. posters, stickers,
games and activities as well
educational materials for
teachers and information for
parents that not only enhance
the site but also make it fun for
kids to return to the site time
and time again. For additional
information, visit w\\w.scrub-
club.org. Other helpful re-
sources ,: include
www.cdc.go flu. school.
www.fightbac.org -- '; and
\\www.cleanhandscoalition.org.


- ..' '�* .1


ANNOUNCING!!!

SM OWNER LOYALTY CA$N


04 GMC Canyon
Crew Cab 4x4


OffRoad, Pkg.
Very Low Miles!


03 Ford Expedition 04 GMC Yukon SLE
Eddie Bauer 4x4 I





Sunroof, Completely Loaded Loaded, Leather, Sunroof
80%0/ Off! New Save 40% 1 ffl New


Hometown People Doing BuslneIB Ohe Homotown

S... . iS.


EST Bob'roon Da-
* 10S , 3 I gga r.f *e , Jonun,,1 .athon w t 0in
Sa Managec Melton . McKl :"cy
G US 90 WEST 362.4
The GM Card LIVE OAK, FL J Mr,
,,w oCar,362.4012

10% Service Department Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8.5:30. Monda
1ta Se Hablia Escanol . 6;


'� ---


-7- . -





PAGE 10C, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


2005 For$
T" -1 f ____


$AVE $4,445


A._ L&a , U U UU Uy U I DIJE-SEL

05 Ford Sportrac '05 Ford F-150 Supercab ' P.'05 Ford Explorer
Auto, AC, PW PL, V8, Auto, Cruise, AC PW, PL, Tilt, Auto,
"-, 19y945 120,805 -22415
Was $25,495 as $23,4
SVERY FEW 2004'5 LEFT... 2005 Ford
2004 Ford 2004 Ford Focus
Ranger Expedition XL I. Was5
'Was36,095

Save...0. 0.. Save $9,000 SavOe 2,746

Brand New Lincoln Navigator Brand New Mercury Monterey
Was $51,115
"Loaded". Luxvur Package, .loonroof C .4 -- CBLoaded Was $34,295
SAVE 12,000 SAVE 41,000

sy~ g, g g g s23, 295
?,a Lincoln Aviator '05 Mercury Grand Marquis GS 2005 Lincoln LS '05 Mercury Mountaineer '05 Lincoln Town Car
America's Only Rear Wheel Drive Sedan


ss$532,99550 18,9527,995i s27,2F550s34,995
Was $44,030 U ,U Was $25 150 f eI Was $33,110 2 9 5 Was $33,550 2, Was $42,595 34,99
After all rebates in lieu of special APR, financing through FMCC, owner loyalty, Plus Tax, Tag,Title and $249.95 ADM fee.


~~ L~ L









January 19-20, 2005

| 800-525-4182

EED A RIDE?


Car, Trucks and Motorcycles


Planning to use color
in your ads is a great
way to build your bottom c . ,
line. It's a fact that more
o+ people reac
ads with color.
Color is bright,
attractive., attention-
getting-and
it sells! :

Classified Marketplace
386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182



u Sky RealtU y h Mrk
0-i.or Florida, Inc.


We'll find the right home for you.
INCOME PRODiriCrNG PRICED REDUCEDIn


HUNTING PROPERTY!!! Loaded with This home is being used as a duplex now Great Locationl! Large 4/2 DWMH in Old
Deer, Turkey, and Hogs. Or a great place but can be turned into a single family Sugar Mill Subdivision. Lots of shade
for family camping and getaways. NOTE easily. The property also has 3 SWMHs trees. Close to school and shopping. All
Electric in area and close to fishing on the that are used as rentals. MLS#42216 this home needs is a new family!!
Gulf. MLS#42136 $35,000 $195,000 MLS#42253 $99,000
CAR WASH!! 24+ ACRES LAFAYETTE COUNTY
manI


S a Nice 1/2 acre lot for your home.
Convenient to shopping and schools.
Coin operated car wash with single wide This is a flog lot with 166+ feet of US Located on SE Lynwood Dr., electric and
mobile home currently being rented for Highway 27 frontage. Possible to re-zone phone in the area.. MLS#42330 $5,995
additional income. MLS# 42319 $64,900 to commercial. MLS#42323 $114,900 128320JRS-F


For more information about this home, call the

associates of Sullivan Agency at386-362-1389.


A uI~~r~s~~


r.A . IL'v � l %II r lHU irC.... nira i re-.\ ii_.duuljl
home offers bright, open floor plan, eat in kitchen;
breakfast bar, covered porch, and 2 car attached
garage located in nice residential area on .82 of an
acre. $189,500. MLS#43657


KING SIZED COLONIAL HOME... Over 3300
sq.ft. Offers 3bd/3ba, family room, formal dining
room, living room, 3 fireplaces, loft & library.
Spacious kitchen with stainless appliances, granite
counter tops, built in wine cooler & fish aquarium.
Located on over 4 acres with large detached shop &


LAKtiL UAKS... AbouLnd on thf . + acres rain IY'"
3.'2 mnjrifctured home Offer s.plh il -oor plbr,, grea
roon brejfujil bOr a& c. rnji het & jir L..:',i:ed juil
\We-:.i ofLi, e Oak of pa. ed rojd F5r.ioi0 MLS#i43?-l(




ELEGANT NE\W HOME... In S'jiannah Planiaion
over 2000 sqft of living space, eat in kitchen plus
dining area, living room w/ stone fireplace, large
master suite, and 2 car garage. Located on 1 acre.
$215,000. MLS#43658
*\1Call Keflie Shirah
Poole Realty, Inc.
(386) 362-4539 or (386)208-3847
ke; II iles0tam cori1n28442JR-


To place your ad in the

Classified Marketplace, call

Louise at 386-362-1734 today!

2806 West US High , a. l90
Suite 101, Lake Ci . FL 72055
HYPERLINK,
"http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
DANIEL CRAPPS
agency, nc 1-800-805-7566

(1) 20 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre - owner financing
available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84:50 (+/-) - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home sitel $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 155 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - gently rolling land located next to Peacock
Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 210 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located on State Road #51 about 3
miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site! $3,500 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
(6) 645 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal for hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
$2,725 per acre
(7) 674 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood.hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
For additional information, contact
BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
E-mail: HYPERLINK "mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"


FROM A BYGONE ERA - Well-kep.
vintage home inside city limits. Sit a NEW SIDING, SKIRTING and
spell on the lovely screened porch and PANELING on this 3/2 home in a quiet,
admire the tidy, fenced yard. New AC family neighborhood. One-acre lot.
unit in '99. Monthly termite treatment. Appliances stay. $59,900. MLS 42075
Home warranty. Motivated Seller.
$97,000. #43388


NEAR THE RIVER - Well-kept SW on
fenced i-acre. Nice yard with lots of
flowers & fruit trees. Clean 8x8 shed
w/elec. New water treatment system.
$40,000. #41860.


0r

z


CONVENIENT TO LAKE CITY & LIVE
OAK - this 3/2 DW is on one wooded
acre. Walk-in closets, garden tub,
skylights, ceiling fans. Insulated 40x36
barn and 20x24 carport. Add'l acre
available. $84,000. #42719
128317JRS-F


386-362-1734


_ Section D


Real Estates Listings


S'I
, ,r ,'
* , , ;+ " ,-


, , *,t,,,.'.l








,-/Vur- 41,


Lost & Found
LOST DOG Black & White Pit Bull.
Four white paws. Last seen in
Dowling Park. Reward. Call 386-658-
3902.
Special Notices
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO
WORK23520750 you. may be
entitled to money through social
security. Call Intergrated Family
Services at 1-866-4-SSI-USA




BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
First Day
FIRE WOOD FOR SALE 1/2 cord
$75.00, cord $175.00. Will deliver
season or green oak wood. .Call
Eddie for more info. @ 386-590-
1096.
First Day
FOR SALE Treadmill - $40., Gas
Furnance - $100., 1 Window A/C unit.
- $50., Stainless Steel Range Hood -
$60., Couch - $40. Call 386-638-
1686


Real Estate
ENJOY NORTH FLORIDA LIVING
LIVE OAK. FLORIDA
15 Ac. Approx. 7 mi. W. of Live Oak
w/2001 Homes of Merit 2300+ sq. ft.
Mobile Home. 4BD/2BA, 2LR. Lots of
storage area, Lg: Kit, Lg. Deck on
back w/concrete patio. Home sits in
about 3 Ac. of Lg, Oak Trees w/the
bal. of prop. in pasture. Mostly fenced
& cross-fenced for cattle -& horses.
Accessible from 2 roads: 1 paved, 1
dirt: Irrigation for garden spot or start
of a nursery. Asking $177,000.
CALL FOR APPT. TO SEE:'
DAYTIME: 386-867-1888
AFTER 6PM: 386-330-2373
LOCATION, LOCATION,
LOCATION!.
www.suwanneecountyflorida.com
This cyber realestate for sale.
Wvvil race for property in Suwannee
County. 888-786-Q676




PERSONAL SERVICES
Convalescent Care
DIABETIC TESTING SUPPLIES
& Respiratory supplies at little or no
cost. Medicare approved supplier.
Extensive line of brand name
products. Satisfaction Guaranteed!
1-800-815-1577 Ext. 35


EDUCATIONAL SERVICES




_PETS
LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County
Animal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.





AGRICULTURE

Cattle

First Day
Registered Polled Hereford Bulls.
For Sale. Ages: Weaning to 2 yrs.
Call 386-776-2163 evenings.





MERCHANDISE

Building Materials


First Day
FOR SALE, 19 Attic trusses
designed for 24'x36' Garage. 2'x10'
ceiling joists. Buyer will need to pick
up. $500.00. Call 386-362-4491.

Garage/Yard Sales

First Day
BIG GARAGE SALE 01/20.21.22.23
@ 8384 152nd Ter Live Oak, FL
Follow signs @ CR 252 & US 129 or,
CR 49. Antiques/Collectibles, furn.,
elec. stove, dryer, living room set,
Srecords- something for everyone.
386-364-6012

MOVING SALE 3yr old mahogany 2-
pedestal dining table w/4 matching
side & 2 arm chairs. Matching buffet
w/granite top. Beautiful, like new
condition $2300. Antique cedar chest
w/very ornate carvings $400.
Commercial type treadmill in great
condition $400. Universal gym w/4
stations & all weights, great
condition. Has been kept indoors
$475. Please call 386-364-1234.


Are .you curious about the value
of your property?

Call Amy now for a FREE -
no obligation marketing analysis!
When professionalism and experience
matter.... Call Amy. she is the right
choice in today's world-wide market.


Au . ~ewi ,4wp, Apoe 386-984-5050 Cell
Realtor 386-364-1576 Office
w,..Nort, CentralFlRmalEstate.cmt


Southern Sky Realty
of Florida, Inc.1
_128316-F


I]


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
. S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. - M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on US
90 near 1-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof
together with a C.B.S.
Commercial Buildinig
containing approximately '
12,500 with 11,5!00 sq. ft. of
packing. $250,000. .
(2) 75 acres on paved road
on pasture with some' live
oaks, fenced and cross fenced,
two wells, 1/4 mile on paved
Rd. 1/4 mile on county grade,
good area. $3,995 per acre.
(3) 177th Drive: 3,Bedroom,
2 bath central heat and air.
Home containing
approxaimtely 1,350 sq. ft.
Kitchen furnished 225'137
lot. $72,000.
(4) Jasper, FL:, 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath, CH/AC, brick, containing
approximately 1,700 sq. ft.,
tender roof. Kitchen furnished
147x97 lot, pool, $95,000..
(5) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20 acres
wooded with large oaks, and a
3BR/2BA, CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office: 2000 sq. ft. under
roof, detached storage
$149,500.
(6) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with
a four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home
containing approximatley
2,500 sq. ft. under roof,,
kitchen furnished, 3 car
garage. REDUCED to
$225,000.
(7) Off CR 249: 3 Bedroom,
I 1/2 bath,, CH/AC, home
contains approximately 1,180
sq. ft. 1 1/2 acres of land
(paved road) $55,000. Would
work for S.H.I.P.
(8) Huntirg Tract: 13 acres


+, wooded, Steinhatchee
Springs area, river access, and
Hwy. 51 access, recent survey.
$26,000.
(9)'CR 132: 13 acres wooded
on paved road with a 3
bedroom, 2 bath, CH/CA
DWMH in excellent
condition, cont. approx.. 1450
sq. ft., heated area, will have
td see to appreciate.
$119,000.
(10) Camping Lot: One
acre riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(11) Off CR 252: 10 Acres
wooded on 61st Road
convenient to Lake City, can
be divided. $4,950 per acre.
(12) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick
home with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(13) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air, 218x170'
lot, nice trees; numerous
updates, new carpet, 'paint,
stove & refrig. 100%
financing. $61,900.
(14) Suwannee River: Four
plus acres with 220 ft. on the
water, 4' well, septic tank,
20x32 and 10x20 buidlings.
$110,000.
(15) 177th Road: 10 acres,
wooded 4' well, septic tank,
good county road. $4,200
per acre.
(16) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
(17) Off 208th: 4 Acres
wooded corner tract. Good
buy @ $11,995.
(18) 169th Place: 5 Acres
wooded with survey. $5,250
per acres. Terms.
124I 5-F


First Day


For more information about tis nome,
call The associates of J. W. Hill Realty at 386-362-3300.


Boats/Supplies
First Day
FOR SALE 1968 19 ft. Skiff Craft I/O
Boat , Motor & Trailer. $3500. OBO.
Like new. Call 386-364-5589.
FOR SALE 1996 Robalo 2120,
center console w/225 Mercury
w/warranty. Continental trailer. Many
extras. Asking $17,500. Call 386-
362-4775.


Campers/Motor Homes
First Day
FOR SALE Camper, 1994 Prowler
24'. Separate bedroom, Queen Bed,
also sleeper couch. Very clean.
Hitch, awning. Must See! $4500.
firm. Phone 386-963-2817.
FOR SALE Houseboat, 29 ft.
Pontoon. Self-contained. Fridge,
stove, bed. 2001 hp. Hohda 4-stroke,
tilt & trim. $6000. OBO. Call 727-421-
5207 or 727526-0622


FOR SALE 1994 21.5' Montego by L l11
TravelMaster. E350 Ford Chassis.
53K mi. Fully equipped. new tires.'
Must see to appreciate Asking I


j.. . '- . ? -- ----
$13,500. OBO. 386-776-2309








- ,








Look no further than

the Classifieds.


Inside, you'll find great deals on merchandise you

can use, like a summer rental home or a new sofa

for the living room. Best of all, you can shop the

Classifieds anytime, anywhere, no computer

required. Pick up your copy today!


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject io the Fair
HIousing Act wnich makes it illegal to
adverntse 'any preference limitation
or discriminahion based on race,
color, religion, sex, disabliry, familial
slaius or national origin. or an
intention, to make any such
preference, limitation . and
discrimination:' Familial status
includes children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
SThis newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real etalte
which is in violation of the law. 'Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis To. complain of
discrimination call HUD.toll-free 1-
800-669-9777. The toll-free number
for the hearing impaired is 1-800-
927-9275



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

Rooms
ROOMS FOR RENT Unfbrnshed 1
c.r 2 BR in my riome j~t NWV Live
Oak. Quality home fully fenced 1/2
ac. yard. Children, pets welcome. No
drinking, smoking, drugs on
premises. Share bath, kit, LR, yard.
Min. stay-2mos. $420. 1 BD, $47Q. 2
BD, +$100. dep. Call 386-362-3991.
Houses for Rent
First Day
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA 1 mi.
from Live Oak. CHA, W/D. $450/mo,
1st, last & $300. sec. dep. NO PETS!
386-362-3002
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA Brand.
New House CHA Screened Porch,
$600/mo, 1st, last & $300. sec. dep.
m.I rom - Ive- uas, 1=1ihiityiii. i's~.


~ i rmlve vK ldyImr.n
PETS! 386-362-3002
CMobile Homes~for rent
Classified Marketplace Mis fre


386-362-1734 or 800-525.4182


LOne


1105 W. Howard
LOffice: (386) 362


Double Wide
Mobile Home
and
Land for sale.
Financed
by owner.

Ask fbr
Larry Olds.

386-362-2720


Touch ofClass
Not just any mobile home.
This one has a lot to offer...
1,550 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, metal
roof, vinyl siding, new central
heat and air unit, new 40 gal.
hot water heater and Kinetico
water purifying system.
Kitchen & breakfast area has
been remodeled with a Tuscan
theme, family room has a
Sw-ar"-n fireplace with a gas
log., All rooms have been
freshly painted, and are ready
er is Only .Asking for you. Home also has' a
covered back porch and a new
front deck with rails. All this
on 2,5 acres with-two-deep
li J.W . HILL wells, metal storage building,
1 & Planted Pinei, Pecan, and
Ik. & ASSOCIATES Oak Trees., Only 6 miles from
I Street, Live Oak, Florida 32064
o.o33- Tonll Free: .. -21-894d Live Oak. .f


FOR RENT 3BD/2BA MH on 5 quiet
acres. 50 ft. Porch. Washer & Dryer
hook-up. No smoking'on premises.
$450.00 plus deposit. Call 386-364-
5007.
First Day
MH RENTAL SPECIAL
In Jasper & Live Oak areas.Jan/Feb.
1/2 mo. free with 1st/last plus sec. w/
12 mo. lease. $295.-$425. Call for
details: (386) 294-2600.




You can Reach
Over 4 Million
Potential Buyers
for your product
through our Internet
and Newspaper
Network in Florida
and throughout
the Nation.
Call Louise at

386-362-1734
134698DH-F

-FOR RENT-
3BR, Singlewide
mobile home.
Central HIA.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
No pets.
386-330-2567
133 7-


FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.'
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
* _133339-F


-FOR RENT-
2 BR, singlewide
mobile home,
central H/A.
First month's
rent plus deposit
to move in.
Water, sewer, &
garbage included.
No pets
386-330-2567


C.Sulfllvan Age


SAmVE SAVE mSAVEi' SAVE' SAVE Si*0i SAVE' Aii


PAGE 2DJANUARY 19-2020 RIDA FOCUS


g CLASSIFIED MARKE
PLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


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0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 3D


You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified m

We Will Help You 'Your
.____ .GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On ap
MERCHANDISE The First Day t Runs!
MERCHANDIith the

FirstMa The Su
INONCEMENTS PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION Logo in the Classified Marketplace On t


EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES




FINANCIAL SERVICES


EDUCATIONAL SERVICES




ICULPETS




AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


Ur reauY -y -
ai*^l


To Place Your Ad
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WE ACCEPT: Mone
- Money Orders � Personal Checks


P I

The]

The M

Thu

15,2(
Increase
potential
advertise
Times, TI
Lownde
County B
other public
over






I DEAD


marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com

Classified Ad can

)p ear in 5 paid FLORIDA(386) 208LiveOak. 294Mayo,303
White Springs -362,364 Live Oak 397 White
n ew sp ap ers: Springs454 HighSprings497FortWhie658
Dowling Park -752, 755, 758 Lake City -776
iw ann ee D em ocrat Luraville 792 Jasper42 FloridaSheriffsBoys
Ranch (Live Oak) ' 935 Branford ' 938 Jennings
oth W ed. & Fri.,961LakeCity 963 Welborn 965Lake Ci
foth W ed. & Fri., GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta - 224, 225, 226,
the Jasper N ew sC 227,228 Thomasville�241,242,244,245,247,
the Jasper N ew s, 249, 251,253, 257, 259 Valdosta 263 Quilman
268 Vienna-268 Lilly-27.1,273 Cordele-282,
B ra ord N ew s & 283, 285, 287 Waycross - 293 Valdosta -324 Berlin
S333 Valdosta* 345 Nicholls, 346 Coolidge* 359
[ayo Free Press on Amnbrose.362Milan 363LumberCity�365
Rochelle -367 Baxley 375 Hazelhurst, 377,378
Irsd ay; a total of Cairo381 Douglas'382 Titon -383,384
OTay Douglas, 385 Rhine, 386, 387 Tifton -389, 393
DO issues w weekly ! Douglas '422 Pearson '423, 424 Fitzgerald '433
Byrdmville- 449 Blackshear- 455 Ray City' 467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla 472 Montezuma 472
your promotional reach and tap into Oglethorpe.482 Lakeland 487 Homerville 498
new markets... Ask about placing your Boston 528 Omega 532 Alpaha 533 Enigma'
534 Willacoochee 535 Wanrick 546 Lenox
ing message into: The Valdosta Daily .549 Sparks *559 Lake Park 567 Ashburn, 574
SThma Time-E rr T Ocklochnee, 594Uvalda 624 Pineviewe 627
he Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The Unadilla. 632 Alma.637 Fargo 643 Rebecca
s Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas '648 Piltls 649 BuenaVistaa 683 Meigs 686
Nashville 735 Barwick 762 Whigham* 769
3uyer's Guide; or a network of over 20 Norman Park.775 Morven776 Sylvester782
ications, serving over 30 counties; with Doerun '794Hahira.824Plains831 Irwinville
' 833 Jacksonville ' 846 Smilhville * 853 Cobb h
20,000 readers in South Georgia. 859 Pavoe 863 Blackshear 8 868 McRae 873
Ask about oui Moultrie 874 Leslie 887 Richland0 890, 891
Ask about Moultrie 896 Adel 899 Moultrie 924,928
Service Directory" rates Americus '929 Pinetta 938 Jennings ,941
Funston.* 973 Madison 985 Moultrie
SS For Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,
Sl I Friday(prior),
Ill rl n IFor Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
I ltrl o Ia [lL i l l Wednesday (prior).
*We reserve the right to cancel anyspeclal offer or promotion In the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.'


Vacation Rentals






North Carolina. Easy access, great
view, 10 min to Maggie Valley, 30 min
to Cherokee, 2 min to Parkway,
Mountain Stream with picnic area,
Fireplace, Sleeps 10. All Amenities.
$500/wk, $1600/mo. (386) 330-4207
Lucy




REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
FOR SALE WIOWNER FINANCING
1 AC. buildable lot-near SR 247
$12,000. 2 AC. buildable lot near SR
247 $20,000. 4 AC. lot off 137 on
35th $30,000. 2 AC. lot 3 mi. off US
90 near Madison Co. line $12,500.
(386) 935-2301.
OWNER FINANCE
Jasper- 4BD/2&1/2BA DWMH on 1
ACRE, NICE PRIVACY, Lg. Front &
Rear decks, fireplace, new
carpet.Sm. down & $750/mo.
Call (386) 758-9785

OWNER FINANCE
O'Brien - Spacious 3BR/2BA on
2.03 acres. Beautiful Oak Trees Sm.
down & $695.00 mo.,
Call (386) 758-9785

Homes for Sale

First Day
FOR SALE 3BD/1&1/2BA Brick
Home in Live Oak. Lg. den w/fpl,
closed carport, privacy fence. Nearly
2000 sq. ft. Also, separate 400 sq. ft.
room that could be used as guest
house, gameroom, etc. A must-see
@ 1453 Pearl Ave. Call 386-330-
2201.


FOR
REIT
Rental Assistance
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936 .
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


FOR .
RENT
HUD Voucers Welcome!
1,2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments


705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F


FOR SALE by owner-N. Suwannee
County. 3/2 Cypress frame home-
1995. 2100 sq. ft. conditioned+lg.
screen porch & decks. Beautiful 6 ac.
of hardwood forest, high & dry. 3 min.
walk to Suwannee River w/gated
access to miles of state-owned river
frontage. $213,000. Call 386-362-
5979

Mobile Homes
OWNER FINANCE
E. of Branford-close to beautiful
Itchetucknee River- 3BD/2BA MH
Small down, $625/mo. 386-758-9785

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner
financing. Call 386-752-4339.'
www.deasbullardbkl.com






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted,
ACCOUNT PAYABLES
NEEDED
LIVE OAK AREA
CALL FOR APPT:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGRD
REQ.

COMPREHENSIVE
COMMUNITY SERVICES, INC.
Is seeking a qualified individual to
fill Rest Area janitorial position.
Must be able to follow directions
and work independently. Physical
stamina to perform job
requirements. Must have
transportation and able to use
telephone, have good attitude..
ADA/EOE/Drug free work place.
Apply CCS, 506 S. Ohio Ave., Live
Oak, FL.


Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages.
Established full service co.
WE BUY MORTGAGES.
0(R0) 226-6044
,j~ ,622 NW 43rd St. Suie A-I
1 s Licensed Mtg. Lender


TRAILER HARBOR
MOBILE HOME PARK
A Family Park with
rentals. Drug Free
in-town location.Single
and Double lots
available. 362-3868
128497JS-F

Retired
Telephone
Man
will do telephone
installation,repair,
TV Cable installation,
& phone wiring,
jacks and repairs
or other small jobs.
Call Tom @
658-2611.


First Day
Administrative Sales Assistant
needed for a busy dealership. All
applicants must be proficient in
Word .and Excel. Excellent
communication skills and
telephone skills a must. Great work
environment and benefit package,
health, dental and a 401k. E.O.E.
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS. Fax
resume to: 386-362-3541, Attn:
Dave Esco, Jr., General Manager
or mail to:
WALT'S LIVE OAK FORD
P. O. BOX N
LIVE OAK, FL 32064


First Day




CHILDREN'S
THERAPIST

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch is
currently recruiting for a Children's
Therapist. Position requires a
Master's degree in counseling,
social work, psychology or related
human services field with a
preference of 2 years clinical
experience in providing services to
youth with emotional disturbances..
Please forward resume to:
Eileen McCowan
Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch
emccowan @youthrariches.org
P.O. Box 2000
Boys Ranch, Florida 32064
386/842-5555 (800/765-2697)
FAX: 386/842-1029
Licensed supervision available.
E.O.E./Drug Free Workplace

CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.


First Day
Clerical/Industrial
HELP WANTED

MANY POSITIONS AVAILABLE
INDUSTRIAL/CLERICAL
APPOINTMENT NEEDED
CALL FOR INFO:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
BACKGROUND/DRUG SCREEN
REQUIRED'


First Day




COTTAGE PARENTS

The Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, a
private residential childcare
program in. North Florida, is looking
for couples to be full-time
professional Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the direct
care and development of 10 boys,
ages 8-18. We provide you with
specific professional skill based
training & support. Our model
helps children develop social,
academic, and independent living
skills. Salary $38,480.00 per
couple with. housing, utilities,
board, and benefits provided. High
school diploma or GED and no
children living at home required.
For more information on this
challenging opportunity contact
Linda Mather at (386) 842-5555. E-
mail: Imather@youthranches.org
E.O.E./Drug Free Workplace

First Day
Counselor, OPS
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

COUNSELOR, OPS needed at
North Florida Community College,
Madison, Fla. Grant funded, 28
hr/week. Coordinates College
Board Expanded Opportunity
Program and program for
improving FCAT scores and SAT
scores. Requires AA/AS degree,
experience working with at risk
youth; counseling or education
experience. Education majors
encouraged to apply. Strong
organizational and interpersonal
skills, some evenings and weekend
work. Application at www.nfcc.edu.
Send complete application packet
of cover letter, resume, application
and transcripts (unofficial OK) to:
HR Director, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Deadline 1/28/05. EOE

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO.
INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in person
@ Howlands corner of Walker &
11th St. or call (386) 362-1235.


First Day
DRIVERS
Are you getting a pay raise in 2005?
Roehl drivers are! Van drivers-up
to 390 plus bonus. Flatbed drivers-up
to 410 plus bonus, plus tarp. Up to
$2,000. sign-on bonus. Students
Welcome. Class A required. EOE
Call Roehl, "THE TAKE HOME
MORE, BE HOME MORE
CARRIER."
$$$ 800-626-4915 $$$
www.GoRoehl.com


First Day
drivers
NEW PAY PACKAGE
Home every Weekend
GUARANTEED'I
3 immediate Openings! Avg.
2444 mi. wkly.
CDL-A required
1-877-428-5627
www.ctdrivers.com
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to
enquire. Drug Free Work Place.
Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.

First Day
Housekeeper
Full time position in O'Brien area in
Suwannee County. Duties include
housecleaning, laundry and running
errands. Must be experienced, have
dependable transportation and
excellent references. Call 800-704-
7397.

Housekeeping
Laundry & Bathhouses Attendant
position open. Experience preferred
but will train. Apply in person @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
MUSIC PARK
between 2pm-4pm @
3076 95th Dr. Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.

LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.


Maintenance Director
Seeking individual with electrical,
plumbing, heating, carpentry, and
appliance repair background. Will
need to be able to work with people
as well as blue prints. Must have
stable job history. Responsible for
maintenance functions for seven
year old 60 bed health care facility.
Fax resumes to the attention of Rich
Wisdahl at 386-294-3301, or apply at
Lafayette Health Care Center, 512W.
Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066.



maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required.
Transportation a must. Drug free
workplace.
Call (386) 330-2567

Mechanic
Full Time position open at
Spirit of the Suwannee.
Experience Required.
Apply in person from
2pm-4pm @
3076 95th Dr., Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.

medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, Fl
Seeking Full Time/Part Time
RN's & LPN's

medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking RN for Risk Management/
Staff Development








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GOOD-BUY s CASH CASH$ s"-S . *IMMEDIAJ
CLASSIFIEDS -.,^ OP^^i' l J*'


HOW TO WRITE A CLASSIFIED AD

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


What do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.

Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.

Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.
- Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.

f What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


SHave you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why they should
buy it and how they can contact you for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.,

W How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.

(1 Call 1-800-525-4182 today!



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PAGE 4D, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS 0 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


362-1734 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE 1-800-525-4182

First Day First Day ,-------I . . .


Member Service Representative
Suwannee River Federal
Credit Union
has an opening for a Member
Service Representative position
working in the Jasper and Live Oak
offices. Cash handling/teller
experience and computer experience
is a must. Applications can be
obtained at the Live Oak office
located at 203 Pinewood Way and
Jasper office at 102 Central Avenue
NW. Deadline for applications is
January 24, 2005.
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Full/Part time Flex. Hrs.-
Competitive Salary- Paid
CEU/Licensure. Send resumes to
'more than words' PEDIATRIC
THERAPY ASSO, INC. fax 229-
44-4244 or call 229-244-4545

PC Support Spec.
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE

PC SUPPORT SPECIALIST, North
Florida - Community College,
Madison, FL. Assist manager in
planning, design, installation,
implementation, operation and
maintenance of all facets of
computer networking including
hardware, software and
infrastructure. Must also be willing
to serve on college committees
and participate in college and
departmental activities. Associate
degree (preferred), plus six (6)
months related paid experience.
Only complete applications will be
considered. Complete application
packet requires cover letter,
resume and application. Mail to
Director of HR, NFCC, 1000 Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL, 32340 or
email to HR-Dept@nfcc.edu.
Application and complete job
description available - at
www.nfcc.edu. Deadline 1/21/2005.
EOE

RECEPTIONIST NEEDED
LIVE OAK AREA
FAX RESUMES
(386) 755-7911
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGRD
REQ.

First Day
Truck Drivers
PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS
,$1000.00 New Hire Bonus for
experienced drivers! Call about dry
bulk and flat bed positions @ our
Newberry terminal. 866-300-8759.


Service Aide full/part time. Assist
individuals with physical and
developmental disabilities; flexible
schedule, trains people in activities
of daily living in the community. One
year experience medical, psychiatric,
nursing, child care or working with
persons with developmental
disabilities. Good -driving record,
background screenings.
ADA/EOE/Drug free. Apply at:
COMPREHENSIVE COMMUNITY
SERVICES
506 S. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL

Stable hand/trail guide rider
position,open at
Spirit of the Suwannee Stables.
Experience necessary. Must have
reliable transportation and great
horse/people skills, available to
work weekends. Apply in person @
SPIRIT OF THE SUWANNEE
MUSIC PARK
3076 95th Dr.
Live Oak, FI 32060
(North on Hwy. 129) E.O.E.

STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.

First Day
Tax Preparers
!!! EARN EXTRA MONEY!!!
JACKSON HEWITT
LIVE OAK & JASPER OFFICES
now hiring experienced tax
preparers.
(386) 362-1633
945 N. Ohio Ave.
Live Oak, FL 32064


Sales
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Sales People
or Right People with no Experience
Will Train
*Up To 35% Commissions
* Demo Program for Sales
People
* Health Insurance.
* Great Work Environment
* Paid 3% on F&I
*Paid Salary During Training
Please call Bobby Cogswell
at 386-362-1112


-.:"THERE'S MORE .-
$$$ IN THAT OLD CAR there's a handfulof change.
THAN YOU But you'll fill up with more
THOUGHT" cash, when you sell the old set
of wheels, or other items,
through the Classifieds.

AUTO SPECIAL


La 4 Lines for 1 Month
as

las
S Calltoplace yourad, now!

Classified Marketplace
t 386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182




ON-SITE



AUCTION

SAT., JAN 22 at 10 a.m.
10891 S. U.S. 441, LAKE CITY, FL
LOCATION: GO 10 MILES SOUTH OF LAKE CITY ON U.S. 441 TO SALE SITE

LOOK FOR SIGNS

PARTIAL LISTING
FARM EQUIPMENT: 2 FORD TRACTORS (1000 MODEL & 5600
MODEL), WOODS BUSHHOG, RHINO MOWER DECK, LONG
ROLLER DISC, COMB RAKE, DRAG BUCKET, DRAG BLADE,
CROSLEY 16' FLAT BED TRAILER

VEHICLES: 1983 FORD F250 DIESEL PICK-UP, 1983 20'
BAYLINER BOAT W/INBOARD MOTOR & TRAILER

TOOLS & SHOP EQUIPMENT: SNAP-ON 15 DRAWER
ROLLING CABINET W/SIDE CABINET, CRAFTSMAN TOOL
CABINETS & CHESTS, KENNEDY MACHINISTS BOX, SNAP-
ON TOOLS, CRAFTSMAN TOOLS, AIR TOOLS, 80 GAL. AIR
COMPRESSOR, DRILL PRESS, FLQOR JACKS, JACK STANDS,
VIKING 60,000# SHOP PRESS, GRINDERS, VISES, POWER
TOOLS, HAND TOOLS, TIRE CHANGER, MOTOR STANDS,
LADDERS, .LAWNMOWERS, TABLE SAWS, 4 TON CHAIN
HOIST, BICYCLES, PARTS CLEARNER, MISC. CAR PARTS &
MUCH MORE.

AUCTIONEERS NOTE: THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF SMALL
TOOLS. IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR QUALITY TOOLS, THIS IS
A MUST SALE.

PREVIEW: 8 A.M. TIL SALE TIME
REMOVAL: DAY OF SALE & SUNDAY A.M.

TERMS: CASH, APPROVED CHECK, M/C, VISA, DISCOVER,
AMEX

SALE CONDUCTED BY: LAKE CITY AUTION CO. AS584
COL. JERRY FRAZIER ' AU904
P.O. BOX 3064
LAKE CITY, FL 32056
I" 136761JRS-F


-irst uay
TEMPORARY ROAD
MAINTENANCE WORKER I
The Suwannee County Public
Works Department is currently
recruiting for two temporary Road
Maintenance Worker I positions.
Responsibilities include but are not
limited to performing manual
and/or semi-skilled labor as
directed by supervisor. May
perform minor repairs/adjustments
or maintenance on equipment.
These positions will primarily work
in the Live Oak area. Qualifications
include one year of manual labor
experience and education
equivalent to a partial high school
education. Must possess a valid
Florida Drivers License. Rate of
pay is $7.29 per hour. Interested
applicants are required to submit a
County application to the
Administrative Services
Department, 224 Pine Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, (386)
362-6869 no later than 5:00 p.m.
January 28, 2005. All applicants
are subject to a pre-employment
physical and drug test.
EEO/AA/V/D

First Day
Secretary/Receptionist
Full time position in busy real estate
office in Mayo. Must have excellent
computer skills with emphasis on
Windows, Word and Excel with
experience in general office duties.
Send resume to: PO Box 268, Mayo,
FL 32066


First Day
WAYNE FRIER
CORPORATE OFFICE
in Live Oak, FL is seeking a mature
individual to fill multi-task position.
Background in Banking, Finance or
Mortgage Lending helpful. Call
Larry J. Olds at 386-362-2720.





TRANSPORTATION
Autos for Sale
FOR SALE 1994 Chevy Lumina.
Runs good. Good tires. $1200.00
firm. Call 386-362-6479.

First Day
FOR SALE '98 Ford Contour SE
Sport, 4dr. Low mi., good condition,
clean, well maintained,good tires.
AC/AM/FM/CD/power everything.
Asking $4000. 386-842-2006
days/eves.
TAKE OVER PAYMENTS ot $450.00
per monlh on a 200-4 Chevy t.1lix
DVD, leather, sunroof, skid control,
XM satellite radio, 38 MPG. Call 386-
362-1734 ext. 107.
Trucks for Sale
First Day
FOR SALE 2002 Ford Ranger.
$10,500.00. Good condition. Can be
seen @ 122 W. Duval, Live Oak,
across from bread store. Call for
more info 386-362-7084.
Vans for Sale
FOR SALE 1996 Dodge Converted
Van. Low Mileage. $6,000.00 OBO.
Must sell! Call 305-338-8990 or
leave msg. @,386-330-0355.

Motorcycles

First Day
FOR SALE 2004 50cc GY50 dirt
bike. Disk brakes, electric start, 4-
speed trans. Like new. $800.00. Call
386-362-4491.


AS eaucation options


grow, more parents


opt for homeschooling


Parents face more choices
than ever when determining
how best to educate their
children.
A century ago, parents had
few educational options.
Then, in 1906, Virgil Hillyer,
a Harvard University-trained
scholar and head master of
Calvert School, a private
school in Maryland, gave
parents a new choice: a for-
mal elementary. school cur-
riculmin they-could use. to
teachl their children :,t home.
Soon, people all over the
United States, especially in
remote areas, as well as
those living abroad, flocked
to use lessons based on
classroom instruction at
Calvert School.
Almost a century later,
homeschooling continues to
flourish, even as newer edu-
cational options have
emerged. A recent Calvert
School study found more
than 1.8 million school-age
children in the United States
are educated in their homes,
an increase of 38 percent
since 2002.
"What makes homeschool-
ing so appealing is its afford-
ability coupled with how it


helps children reach their
full potential," said Jean C.
Halle, president of Calvert
School's distance-learning
operations. Since parents are
not professional teachers,
Calvert provides them with
daily, step-by-step lesson
plans, textbooks, workbooks
and supplies as well as acad-
emic support.
Homeschooling appeals to
people from various educa-
tion .evels..'Calvert School's
s~udvl cndu6ted irl spring
2004, found about 19 percent
of homeschooling parents
did not graduate from high
school; 45 percent took some
college courses; and the oth-
er 36 percent graduated from
college.
The income level of home-
schooling families also
varies. Sixty-three percent of
homeschoolers earn less than
$60,000 in household in-
come annually. Another 21
percent earn between
$60,000 and $90,000 annual-
ly, and about 16 percent of
homeschooling families earn.
more than $90,000 a year.
The majority (85 percent) of
homeschooling 'families
spend less than $900 a year,
on homeschooling, Calvert
School research found.
Calvert School suggests
parents ask the following six
questions to determine if
homeschooling is right for
their family.
Would one-on-one
instruction help
your child?
One-on-one instruction,
when delivered in a com-
plete program offering
placement assistance and
academic support, helps
many children to excel acad-
emically. Homeschooling
provides an alternative when'
the traditional academic set-
ting is not ideal. Home-
schooling also supports the
unique educational needs of
children who are academi-
cally advanced or in need of
remediation, those experi-


travel,
ics.


encing physical or
behavioral prob-
lems, or children
whose extra-curricu-
lar activities or fam-
ily situation make
attending daily
classroom instruc-
tion difficult.
Do you want
to?
Homeschooling
takes between 2 1/2
to 5 hours a day.
Successful: home-.
schooling families
structure their days
around their lessons.
By ' creating .a
"school room" with-
in the home, fami-
lies often quickly es-
tablish an atmos-
phere for learning.
In addition to find-
ing that educational
oppo rtunities
abound -- practicing
math at the store,
discussing science
concepts while
walking in the
woods-- these fami-
lies enjoy the free-
dom to pursue other
interests, including
performance, athlet-


Are you qualified
to teach?
Home teachers come from
all walks of life and educa-
tion levels. A curriculum
prepared specifically for
homeschoolers with detailed
lesson plans, incorporating
activities, assignments, and
discussion questions, helps
make sure you _teach the
right lessons in the-best se-
quence.
What do you teach?
Finding age-appropriate
textbooks, workbooks, and
other materials can be time-
consuming and complicated.
Although some, families
gather their own lessons,
many families opt for a com-
plete curriculum to ensure
there are no gaps in their
child's education. Relying
on educational professionals
to find the best educational
materials and guide your in-
struction maximizes your
teaching time - ,and gives
you the peace of mind that
comes when your child ex-
cels.
What grade is right?
Selecting the right grade is
critical. Completing a. pre-
enrollment assessment and
working closely with a cur-
riculum provider's educa-
tional experts for sugges-
tions accelerated or remedial
work, when necessary, helps
guarantee your child's suc-
cess in homeschooling.
Are there state
requirements?
Homeschooling ,is legal
throughout the United States,
although state regulations dif-
fer. Most states require fami-
lies to keep records, and some
curriculum providers offer
accredited programs that
meet state standards for
homeschooling. Contact the
state or local board of educa-
tion for more information or,
visit the Home School Legal
Defense Association at
ww\\.hslda.org or call them at
(540) 338-5600.
What will it cost?
Homeschooling's costs are
significantly less than a pri-
vate school education.. Most
programs cost less than
$1,000 a year per child. In ex-
change for your labor, home-
schooling, offers families the
reward of valuable time to-
gether -- which can be price-
less.
What about...
If you have more ques-
tions, contact Calvert School
at (888) 487-4652 or visit
www.calvertschoool.org.


Employment Opportunity

Lafayette County Rescue is seeking a Full-time
EMT-Basic or Paramedic (either may apply).
Benefits include medical, dental, vacation, sick & FRS options.
Safe driving record.required.
Applicants must hold a current Florida certification.
Serious inquiries may apply at the office of John Bell, Mon-Fri
from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. or may drop off an application at
the LCEMS station from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 7 days a week.
Deadline to apply for the position will be January 22, 2005.


Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders,
Dump Trucks, Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Next Class: Jan 24th
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement in your area
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
,www.Equipment-School.com O









Recognize the signs of a heart attack


Heart pain is nothing to take
lightly. Yet surprisingly, half
of all people having a heart at-
tack wait more than two hours
before getting help, according
to the American Heart Associ-
ation (AHA). While 250,000
people die each year from
heart-related problems before
they get to a hospital, immedi-


ate action can prevent many of
these tragedies.
Heart attacks can happen
suddenly and instantly. But
most come on slowly. Accord-
ing to AHA, you might be
having a heart attack if:
-- You feel uncomfortable
pressure, squeezing, fullness
or pain in the center of your


chest. It will last more than a
few minutes or go away and
then come back.
-- You have pain or discom-
fort in one or both arms, the
back, neck, jaw or stomach.
-- You may feel out of
breath along with chest dis-
comfort or before chest dis-
comfort.


-- You might have a cold
sweat, feel nauseous or light-
headed.
Not all these signs occur in
every heart attack, but if even
some are present it's worth it
to get help. If you think you
might be having a heart attack,
immediately call 911 or your
local emergency services. If


you can't reach help, have
someone drive you to the hos-
pital. Drive yourself only if
there's no other way to get
there.
You can't control factors
like a family history of early
heart disease, your age or pre-
existing heart disease, but
there are other ways you can


lower your risk of having a
heart attack. Watch what you
eat by following a diet low in
saturated fat, cholesterol and
salt. Keep your health in check
by managing your weight; get-
ting regular medical checkups;
monitoring your cholesterol
and blood-pressure levels; not
smoking; and exercising.


:These local businesses are



Shose. PI










ABBEY MINI STORAGE Me:
All New Units Quality Metal Roofing
* 5X15 * 5X20 * 10X15 * 10X20 * 15X20 3'widegaitalume
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd. 3' ide panted
S' \nf)ide 5 -lv
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 2 wide5-
3G4-5300 ulf Coast
364-5300 CALL TOLL F


here to take good care of you.


tal Roofing
5 $ $ SAVE $ $ $ $ $
Accessories At Discount Prices!!
Cut to your desired lengths!
*Delivery Service Available*
Ask about steel buildings
Supply & Mfg Inc.
:REE 1-888-393-0335


1Te , Tr..mmed ' r R aein ed


Trees. Trimmed or Removed
Insured * Free Estimates * Free Firewood

TREE WORK
Bucket Truck and Climnbin ".

963-5026


' - I


-"-mm


To place an ad on
this page, please call
Myrtle at










Mclaughin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386) 362-1734,






Licensed & Insured
D ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
. -. *- For Your
:,;.- , David HOME
McLaughlin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
A Division o0
KARDAV ENTERPRISES, INC. FEi 061 -20200


)D DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
125.00 Residential NMake-overs * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

Cabinets, Ceramic
For many of your home aile. Counter Tops,
repairs and needs call Floor Covering.
John & Trish Adams Painting. Decks.
(3861.362-7916 Screened Enclosures.


Sstot" 'Pre'tssr o'
Cleanix Roofs * Mobile Homes
SBrick Homes * Stucco Homes
* Decks * Driveways
r7ce EJtanate'i
No job Too Big... No Job Too Small
386-776-2067


_ __,_ _ _ _�_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _U," ,' .....=


A K KrU vu w16w


JT's Transmissions
James Tullis, Owner
120I.. N CR 250
\\ellborn. Florida 321.94
"TA KING CARE OF ALL YOUR
TRANSMISSION \'EEDS"


; -


Phone: 386-963-3616
Cell: 386-697-94-46


lFNJ~U~l


To place
an ad on
this page,
please
call Myrtle
at
(386) 362-1734,
ext. 103.


"4 GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE"
24 HR. EMERGENCY PUMP SERVICE
-,1111


Well Drilling
FI St Lic #2630


m . a


J.D. KASTOR INC.1


* Pool & Patio Decks
* Spracrete/River Rock
* Painting & Stucco
* Interior/Exterior
386-362-3107
386-330-4717


* Licensed Contractor
* Highly Experienced
* Free Estimates
Lii tl iKat FL -'-O 'lll
15/ 5 i .-M'1)St
Li t 0U,, FL 3L3 f)0
A ' ' 10 i L" \if ic(L ' i % C ,If/


C I" ., .''. , , ,-, .. ..... I... " .. .


LAKEWOOD
APARTMENTS
IN LIVE OAK

Quiet country li\iing 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


IIggrs Sons Custom Meat

Ho Jasper, Florida
' Custom*
Slaughter, Cutting InIrd & iperali',d bt
\\rapping ImmU) Iriilrs
S Plan o. & Sausage r -.l6-ll riW2-
I-38i-938-10l91 l-;, 1:i-!); ,S
- -.
.'-7..1


U~


L,:ern jo 59 30U90"~S
Office (386) 364-5045
Mobile (386) 362-9178
Michael Guenther, o'.,ner


-U~ (;':.


LIVE OAK

MINI STORAGE
*5x15 * 5x20 * 10x15 * 10x20
CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE
5x5 5x10 *10x10 *10x20
Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., LiB e Oak 364-6626


Interior
Exterior
Drywall
Wallpaper
Licensed
Insured
Pressure
Cleaning
Site
Clean
Up


CARROLL

CONCRETE
SCurbing * Gutters * Monolithic Slabs
SPatios * Driveways & Sidewalks
SCommercial & Residential
SLicensed & Insured
Rt.2O (386) 938-1156
Jennings, FL 32053 38 156


DUNCAN TIRE & AUTO
"Complete One Stop Service For Your Vehicle "
Alignment Specialists


24 HOUR TOWING
,1 62-4743 1-888-362-2568
422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
LEN A. DUNCAN


-E


Stump Grinding


I Jim Sellers 386-776-252


' . .. . ' '.


- $ ,, .'- i


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ADKINS
LANDCLEARING LLC
Owner; Johnny A.dkins
Free Estimates ,.'
Phone: A i ""'. :'
386-294-3837 a , ,i
cell:
386-590-7(005
; ipj~iiBMs.
IT MUZ


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NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 5D


M CLASSIFIED MARKET
GIA


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New laser makes kids' trip to the dentist less of a pain


Dr. Cory Evans, a Salt Lake City dentist who uses the Waterlase and 11-year old patient Eric Tsuchida. Eric had a cavity repaired with
the laser on Thursday, December 16, 2004, in Dr. Evans' office.


For many kids. going to a Colton, Calif. dentist and surgeries using only the Wa-
the dentist is as scary as that instructor at the Loma Linda terlase's combination of wa-
imaginary monster under the University School of Den- ter and laser -- no anesthesia
bed. Dentists, knowing this, tistry in Loma Linda,'Calif. is needed in most cases. The
have been trying to ease "I now use a water energized Waterlase MD is the most
children's dentistry fears for laser on my patients, the significant advancement to
years: Some dentists dole most advanced dental tool modem dentistry in over 50
out free pencils an4 costume available today. In most cas- -years.
jewelry. Others paint fun zoo es, the laser replaces' le While adults certainly en-
animal-filled scenes on need for a shot of No\ocain joy the benefits of the laser.
walls and install televisions and the traditional dental children may benefit the
playing children's movies. drill. One of my patients, most from, this technology
But. so far, no free gadget or who doesn't respond to since kids often fear going to
innovation has had the po- anesthesia, actually started the dentist because of pain
tential to fully cure kids' clapping after the procedure associated with previous vis-
(and even parents') fears of was completed. She said it its. "Avisit to the' dentist can
going to the dentist. Until didn't hurt a bit -- and that's be stressful, especially for
now, says one California without any anesthesia." kids. But with the laser, Dr.
dentist whose practice in- : The laser Jesse is referring Jesse is able to make the ex-
cludes patients from 12 to is the Waterlase MD, the perience much more posi-
months of age to age 100. latest pain-free dentistry de- tive," says Kristine Hunt, a
"I have had patients, my vice developed by San mother from Lemon Grove,
own daughter included, who 'Clemente. Califoria's Bio- "'Calif., whose'jnine-year old
don't respond' p'oitively to' 'lase Techhology.'Thik'~echtdi' 'lit-recently had a cavity
any kind of anesthesia. For nology allows patients, of filled using the Waterlase.
them, having dental work most any age, to undergo "No one really loves going
done is a horrible experi- cavity preparation, root to the dentist, but this tool
ence," says Dr: James Jesse, canals and even some mouth makes it much easier. My


Adoption

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Full
service nationwide adoption agency specializing in
matching families with birthmothers. TOLL FREE
24/7 (866)921-0565. ONE TRUE GIFT
ADOPTIONS www.onetruegift.com.


Announcements


Is Stress Ruining Vour Life? Read DIANETICS by
Ron L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send $7.99
to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.

Building Materials

METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy Direct From
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accessories."
Quick turn around! Delivery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
(800)814-6323 BO2000033. CALL US: We will not
be .undersold!

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hd. You
approve Loc's-$10,670: (800)836-3464 #B02428.

Financial

AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW $
ProgramFL Conpany offers best cash now options.
Have money due from Settlements, Annuities, or
Lotteries? Call (800)774-3113 www.ppicash.com.


For Sale


CHURCH FURNITURE. Does your church need
pews, pulpit set, baptistery, steeple, windows, carpet?
Big Sale on new cushioned pews and cushions for
hard pews. (800)231-8360.

SAWMILLS -$2,695.00 -LumberMate-2000 &
LumberLite-24. Norwood Industries also
manufactures utility ATV attachments, log skidders,
portable board edgers and forestry equipment.
www.norwoodindustries.com -Fiee information:
(800)578-1363 ext300N.

Help Wanted

Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent Pay
& Benefits for Experienced Drivers, O/O, Solos,
Teams & Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid Weekly.
Equal Opportunity Employer. (888)MORE PAY
(888-667-3729).

A COOL TRAVEL Job. Now hiring (18-24
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Paid 'training, transportation, lodging furnished:
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son had a completely differ-
ent dental experience with
the Waterlase than I had
when 1 was a child."
Often the first thought a
parent has about taking their
child to the dentist is their
own nervous recollections of
a shrieking drill and the
sting of a Novocain shot
The last thing they want to
do is put their child through
the same painful experience.
But with the Waterlase MD,
Jesse says patients have an
option for pain-free den-
tistry. "I use the Waterlase
on all of my patients, but it's
especially great for kids be-
cause they don't have to get
a shot and they don't have to
worry about biting numbed
lips," he says.
Waterlase dentists often
educate their child patients
by explaining to the kids
how the cavity will be
"sprayed away." Jesse says


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he first describes the laser to
his younger patients by
telling them that it's a laser,
"like in the movies." He then
sprays his arm with the laser,
so the kids can understand
that it's just water. Then, he
sprays the child's wrist to
show them that it doesn't
hurt at all. "This demonstra-
tion makes kids really com-,
fortable having their mouth
worked on. The\ know that
I'ri just using water and that
it didn't hurt Their arm so it
won't hurt in their mouth,"
he says. :.
Children also respond well
to the laser's gentle pulsing
sound, which is much differ-
ent than the high-pitched
screeching sound made by
the conventional dental drill.
The fact that the W\aterlase
doesn't create the uncom-
fortable vibrations that pa-
tients feel with the drill also
helps alleviate the nervous-
ness often felt by children.
"This technology offers
my patients the ability to be
more comfortable in the den-
tal chair having procedures
performed. They experience
less anxiety and the dental
work even becomes a pleas-
ant experience. There's less
trauma to the patient and less
trauma to the tooth. And.
they don't have to worry
about having their face numb
from the anesthesia." says
Jesse.
Before the Waterlase, the
mqst innovative recent ad-
vancement in dentistry was
50 years ago with the advent
of the power drill. Biolase
CEO Robert Grant says that
50 years is too long for pa-
tients to go without a major
dentistry breakthrough,
which is why it's so impor-
tant that the Waterlase MD is
ushering in the next genera-
tion of dentistry.
"There is obviously a need
to upgrade the dental care
available to American pa-
tients," says Grant. "The
feedback we're getting from
dentists across the country in
support of the Waterlase is
phenomenal. This technolo-
gy is changing their patients'
dental experience forever --
and for parents, it makes
their lives much easier,
know ing their child isn't go-
ing to experience pain and
fear at the dentist."
The Waterlase MID is the
latest product using: lasers
for the health benefit of pa-
tients. Along .with surgical
lasers,, dermatological lasers
and vision correction lasers,
patients seem responsive to
this new crop of less-inva-


sive medical treatments.
"Because the Waterlase
doesn't make much noise
and doesn't cause any pain,
my patients say a visit to the
dentist is now closer to a vis-
it to the spa. They just lay in
the chair and relax," says
SJesse.
Dr. Louis Malcmacher, of
Bay Village, Ohio, an inter-
national lecturer on dental
practice management, says
"the laser is also a key tool
in preventative dental care.
Much of the dental work we
see being performed on
adults today is a result of
work done when they were
,kids. It's not that the dental
work was bad, but the trau�
ma caused by drills de-
stroyed large portions of the
healthy tooth. In my on l
practice I find the laser is
precise. it actually helps po-
tect the patient's tooth from
problems that lead to root
canals, crowns and other ex-
tensive dental \\ork doW.I
the line."
With its laser precisi
the Waterlase NID largest
direct, small area of
mouth. So. when a den


tissue, such as gums. it ca
es.Minimal or no damage'
surrounding tissue. This s'
rounding tissue damage
typically been the culprit l
hind a dentist having
numb a patient's mouth
fore treatment, and the
tient experiencing pain and
sometimes long recoveries
after procedures.
Additionally, the Watel
lase reduces the possibility
of micro fractures, or tiny
cracks, in the patient's tooth,
unlike the traditional drill
dentists use today. Mie;ft
fractures can result in future
cavities and weakening -of
tooth structure as well as in-
fections inpatients' teen,
months or even years after
the cracks first occur.
The Waterlase MD em-
ploys the latest in modern
technology, including a de�
sign that contains materials
and technology used by Mer-
cedes Benz and NASA.
However, this high-tech talk
only means one thing -- bet-
ter dentistry:
What a relief for parents to
hear their children say, "Go-
ing to the dentist isn't scary
anymore. I didn't like the
drill or the shots. With the
Waterlase, it doesn't hurt."
To find a Waterlase den-
tist, visit www.NoPainDen,
tistry.com or
www.biolase.com.


10 tips to


keep you safe.


An assault is never a vic-
tim's fault. But it's important
to make safety a priority to
increase your likelihood of
,avoiding harm. Whether you
live in a city or in, a rural
area, you still should know
how to stay safe. Follow
these tips to help avoid dan-
gerous situations outside
your home.
I. Stay alert and be aware
'of your surroundings wher-
ever you are. Convey that
Feeling by acting cool, calm
and confident.
2. Know several routes
home. including ones on
well-lit, busy streets. This
way, 3ou can change your
route regularly and modify it
instantly if you 'feel threat-
ened. Take note of establish-
metts that stay open late and
could provide safe shelter.
3. Don't make yourself a.
target.' When alone, avoid
wearing conspicuous jewelry
that will draw attention to
you. Travel with a compan-
ion whenever possible. Car-
ry belongings in a way that
leaves your hands free.
4. Always wait for public
transportation in an area that
is well lit and full of people.
5. Choose your seat on
public transportation with


care. Select an aisle seat so
you won't be "blocked in" by
a potential assailant. During
off-peak hours, sit near the
most passengers, the driver
or the door.
< 6. Be alert in parking lots.
Always approach your vehi,
cle with your keys ready. In-
spect your car before enter-
ing. Don't be afraid to ask
someone to escort you to
your car.
7. Never leave your car
unlocked, even for a few
minutes.
8.8. Always check the ideni
tification of a taxi driver
(usually located near the vi-.
sor) and ensure that it match-
es the driver. Don't sit be-
hind the driver; it's easier for
him to lock the rear passen-
ger door.
9.'Always walk against
traffic so you can see what is
coming.
10. It is not as easy as4lt
used to be to get a strangeto
help you. Yell somethingA
like, "You in the red shirt, go{
call 911 now!" instead pl
screaming, "Please." Mak ild
clear that you don't know tX.
person who is harming yoU.
Many bystanders will steeI
clear of domestic disputes
so lie if necessary,


FCAN


Week of January 17, 2005


'-* * _____o__


PAGE 6DJANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


g CLASSIFIED MARKETPL g









CoT-rviN( n RTH FLOI ATH RN 1G


Sw ith a recommendation of 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day, there is plenty of
Room to add variety to a child's fruit choices. And.kids love fresh pears! Here are sever-
* al ideas on how to easily incorporate this fresh choice into children's meals. In fact, they
S are so easy, your kids will have fun making these pear treats for themselves!

wer-Packed With God Nutrition Nut 'n' Pear Sandwiches
Power-Packed With Good Nutrition These easy-to-create, bite-sized
F sh USA Pears grown in Oregon and Washington are sweet, juicy and nutritious. For such a sweet sandwiches are as fun to make as they are to eat. Use your favorite cookie cutters
compact package, USA Pears are loaded with good-for-you stuff. Pears are a good source of fiber, vita- to cut out shapes from whole wheat bread. Spread a teaspoon of nut butter
S in C and potassium, yet-they have no cholesterol, saturated fat or sodium and are low-calorie, with only (peanut, hazelnut, almond, etc.), add teaspoon of fruit jam and top with a cube �
p10 calories per serving. or ,slice of fresh, ripe pear. Serse.open-faced or top w ilh a matching breadth, ape�, .i
-. ?" ' - 'i " ' : ,,,' "- - . . * ll * I , " ; : ' ';


Pear Stack Snacks -
Kids love stacking and
snacking! Core and
slice/cube a fresh pear. Sliv-
er fresh cheese into bite-
sized pieces. Stack a small
pile of whole wheat or rice
crackers on a plate and pre-
sent all three to kids to stack
into snacks.


Check the Neck for Ripeness!


ears are a unique fruit that ripen best
off the tree i without getting technical.
pears left to ripen on the tree can become
gnnt 1: the,\ are meant to be ripened after pur-
chase
So. if \ou are faced with a bunch of rock-
hard pears, follow this easy 1. 2. 3 process to
get \our pears to their npe and juicy perfection:
1. Place hard pears in a paper bag or a covered
fruit bow I. and lea\e at room temperature.


2 Every da., "Check the Neck for Ripeness."
To do this, apple gentle pressure to the stem
end of the pear ith your thumb. When it
yields to the pressure, it's ready to eat (usual-
1 takes a fe% days).
3 Enjoy 'our ripe. juicy pears no", or store
them in the fridge unal you'ree read\ to use
them. The fndge will slo" down the ripening
process. but v.on't stop it ReadI-to-eat pears
w ill stay fresh in-the fndge for 3 to 5 days.


Oor "Kids"


Help Teach


Yor Kidsl
O ur mascots help us teach
kids of all ages about
sweet and healthy USA Pears. PearBear, a lovable
and friendly bear from the Pacific Northwest (who just so
happens to love pears!), teaches kids about the importance
of eating healthy, how to be a good neighbor and other
ways to be a good citizen. The PearBear Chronicles, a se-
ries of eight books, shares the -
Sadventures of PearBear and
his friends. The USA Pear
buddies like to say "fruit plus '
fitness equals fun," and they ,f.
show it by encouraging kids
to learn about and eat pears, . .
and to participate in active
play to get and stay
fit. USA Pear's nutrition
spokesPEAR, Auntie Oxidant,
presents pear nttrition information in a
way that kids can understand. A Pear Buddy
activity book called "Power Up With Pears" offers games
and activities that kids can play.
Visit www.usapears.com and navigate to the "Just for
Kids" pages for fun information about pears, stories, activ-
ities, games and more!


Quick Pear Sundae for Any Day
- Add a healthy sweet burst to,
a favorite dessert by coring and
slicing a fresh pear. Arrange the
pear slices vertically in sundae
dish or small cup with the bottom
points touching. Place a scoop of
vanilla or chocolate frozen yogurt
in the middle. Kids can use the
pears to scoop up the last melty
bites of yogurt! Yummy!


PearBear Starter
1 medium Northwest pear, cored
and diced
1/2 cup low-fat fruit-flavored yogurt
2 to 3 tablespoons granola
Stir diced pear into yogurt. Serve in
small bowl with granola over top. Makes
1 serving.
Nutritional Analysis per Serving:
286 calories, 7.4g protein, 5.9g fat
(18% calories from fat), 54.9g carbohy-
drate, 5mg cholesterol, 6.0g fiber and
67mg sodium

PearBear Picnic Blankets
1 medium Northwest pear, cored
add cut into 8 wedges
Lemon juice (optional)
8 thin slices cooked turkey
or lean ham
2 tablespoons cranberry sauce
Dip pear wedges in lemon juice, if desired.
Spread each turkey or ham slice with cran-
berry sauce. Wrap each pear wedge in
turkey or ham. Makes 8 snack servings.
Nutritional Analysis per Serving:
52 calories, 6.5g protein, 0.6g fat
(10% calories from fat), 5.3g carbohydrate,
1 mg cholesterol, 0.7g fiber and 408mg
sodium

Sunrise for PearBear
1 medium Northwest pear, cored
and cut into 1-inch chunks
1 medium orange, peeled and
quartered
1/4 cup orange juice
Combine fruits and orange juice; mix well.
Refrigerate I hour. Makes 2 servings.
Nutritional Analysis per Serving:
94 calories, 1.lg protein, 0.5g fat
(4% calories from fat), 23.6g carbohydrate,
Omg cholesterol, 3.8g fiber and Omg sodium


, MABEL'S OUTLIVED NINE PRESIDENTS, EIGHT DOGS AND TWENTY-SEVEN CATS.SM
BUT SHE'LL ALWAYS HAVE HER MARATHON.@
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There are very few things today still being made to withstand the test of time.
The Marathon" Water Heater is one of them. Or as Mabel likes to call it,
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�11:1 � � (


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0


NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS - JANUARY 19-20, 2005, PAGE 7D


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PAGE 8D, JANUARY 19-20, 2005 - NORTH FLORIDA FOCUS


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