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Suwannee Democrat
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028422/00002
 Material Information
Title: Suwannee Democrat
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: J.E. Pound
Place of Publication: Live Oak Fla
Creation Date: January 7, 2005
Frequency: semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
weekly[ former <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak
Coordinates: 30.294444 x -82.985833 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note: Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000398954
oclc - 33273856
notis - ACE4563
lccn - sn 95026787
lccn - 95026788
oclc - 33273861
System ID: UF00028422:00002
 Related Items
Preceded by: Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by: Suwannee leader
Preceded by: Suwannee citizen

Full Text



1ol See inside today's
Uiumj u DI I!i/ edition for
__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - ?American Profile


Si.,,' ,,:' ,,_ tlii- takes
.i',.,i , r'lace at huge Georgia
,.,' .,.,.nIt. Sports Page 1B


Cub Scouts
Christmas party.
Page 9A


Lady Bulldog
basketball
tonight! A


ENTS


Serving Suwannee County since 1884 Weekend Edition - January 7, 20


CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS TAKE OATH OF OFFICE: Before a packed courtroom of family, friends, employees and well-wishers, seven newly elected otlicials, one for the very first time, were sworn in
at 4 p.m. Jan. 4 by Third Circuit Judge Thomas J. Kennon to serve four year terms. Pictured I to r are Suwannee County Tax Collector George Burnham, first time Sheriff Tony Cameron, Third Circuit
State Attorney Jerry Blair, Property Appraiser Lamar Jenkins, Judge Kennon, Clerk of Court Kenneth Dasher, Elections Supervisor Glenda Williams and County Judge Bill Slaughter. A reception was held
inimnediately following the ceremony where congratulations were offered by those in the audience to all the newly sworn in officials. See Page 8A for more photos. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb


Local trooper

delivers baby

at Florida

Welcome Center

Staff

Florida Highway Patrol Corporal Phil
Sumner, a Suwannee County resident, got
the unlikely duty Tuesday of delivering a
Georgia woman's baby at an Interstate 75 rest
stop:.'
'-Around 5:20 p.m., a visiting motorist in
the'rest area approached Cpl. Sumner and
told him a woman was lying adjacent to her
vehicle in the parking lot of the 1-75 south-
bound Florida Welcome Center Parking lot
in labor, said FHP Lt. Mike Burroughs.
Cpl. Sumner quickly went over to the
woman and instructed FHP dispatch to sum-
mon a Hamilton County ambulance, but Se-
lfna E. Carter, 22, of Valdosta, Georgia, told
Cpl. Sumner she couldn't wait for an ambu-


SEE LL, PE 3A Burglary investigations lead to another arrest
Dr. King birthday the LOPD.


observance

plans revealed

Staff

SObserxance of Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr's birthday\ Jan. 17 is right around the cor-
ner and the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Ob-
ser ance Day Planning Committee has a
number of events planned in observance of
;hat i peciial day. The schedule of events are:-
"" Saturday, January 8, 2005
..'Annual Youth Explosion - Showcase of
Youib Talent and Essay Contest, 7 p.m.

.^ SEE DR. KING PAGE 3A


SblaT

Over the past several months numerous bur-
glaries have been reported to the Live Oak Po-
lice Department. An ongoing investigation by
LOPD Detectives Ron Shaw and Chuck
Tompkins has resulted in individuals being
charged with several counts of burglary, vehi-
cle burglary and theft. As a result of the con-
tinuing investigation an additional individual
has been identified and arrested.
Aaron C. Tessier, 17, 12131 N. Hamilton
Avenue, has been arrested and charged with
crimes which occurred from October to De-
cember 2004, which are the burglaries of El
Pueblo's Mexican Store, (three counts) 423 E.
Howard St.; J&K Food, Ohio Avenue; Jay's
Restaurant, 816 W. Howard St.; Walt's Live
Oak Ford, 611 Ohio Avenue; and Ken's
Seafood, 301 Hamilton Avenue, according to


Live Oak Police Chief Nolan McLeod said
Detectives Shaw and TompkinS have spent
countless hours investigating these crimes,
and their efforts are continuing as other crimes
are being investigated and more charges may
be forthcoming.


Diver drowns

in Peacock

Springs

Yvette Hannon
Democrat Reporter
David Benjamin Jones, 34, of Newberry,
went to Peacock Springs Jan. 4 to enjoy cave
diving with his instructor and a friend but
something went terribly wrong. Jones never
made it out of the cave alive and left behind
in his own handwriting his epitaph. When his
body was recovered, he had written on a slate


SEE DIVER, PAGE 3A

Trooper locates

stolen vehicles

on Interstate 10
Two stolen trucks, one of which may have
been involved in a South Florida shooting
and attempted kidnapping, were found aban-
doned early Monday on Interstate 10, accord-
ing to Florida Highway Patrol Office of Pub-
lic Affairs Lt. Mike Burroughs.
Around 4 p.m. Jan. 4, South Florida Law
Enforcement officials issued a "Be On the
Lookout" (BOLO) for a Silver 1996 Dodge


SEE TROOPER, PAGE 2A


Pediatric flu vaccine available


Based on recent changes, the high-risk
groups for flu vaccinee include children age 6
to 35 months.. I(This \\as previous, h-23
month,)
The pediatric flu vaccinee is available at the
Suv\annee Count\ Health Deparnment. In
Li, e Oak, the hours are fiom S - II a.m. and
1 - 4 p.m. In Branford, call fot a\ nilability of
hours. The numnher for Live Oak is 362-2708.


In Branford call 935-1133.
There is a limited number of this vaccinee
that has been pro\ ided b\ the Vaccine obr
Children Piogain and is a.'ailble free of
charge. .-\fter the Vaccine for Children suppl\
is depleted, the Health Department has :mn ad-
equiate suppIl that .� ill be .i llable for S12.
The peck season for flu disease in Florida
is February. It is not too late to vaccinate!


LAet's get to know one another.
New to the area? Unfamiliar with the Edward Jones way of
doing business? Take an hour or so to learn how we work
S.wilthmillions of individual investors to create and implement
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clients' current situations, objectives and risk tolerance. Call
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TODAY'S
Keith Scott.
l, ,WEATHER

I.i mber SIPC IN
., ,uornes.com INDEX
Classifieds .........
E dw ard Jones Church...............
�dw rd~ e Sports .................
Serving Individual Investors Since 1871 Suwannee Living
Call or stop by today. Viewpoint ..........
306 South Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL V Guide............
(386) 364-3699 * (800) 927-0734 | Legal Notices.


Suwannee County should see mostly cloudy skies. High
79.F. Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph. For up to the minute
,, ni:rmw.n o, to wwwsuwanneedemocratcom


I -


Vtf', Il, s 7 , ,,hk.Ur ,,. -pg J


...........................1-5C
............................5-7B
...... ................... 1-4B
............... : ..............5A
............. .. ............... 4A
............................8-9B
...............................4C


FEATURED ON PAGE SB RI

AREA DEATHS COOKIE
Rosalie "Sally" Hopkins, 69, Live Oak For Kids I
Mertie Box Mercer, 95, Live Oak , I ! 12 & Under
OBITUARIES ON PAGE 6A I
I No Purchase Necessary
. , lust Present Coupon s
Limit 1 Per Person
SGood 1/7/05 Only


www.suwanneedemocrat.com


NOTHING TO DO BUT WAIT


,"S " ~*'"
~J~p� Mr� �I�I�VIA? I~e
' "'$~ ~ ~ ." " " ?'' .' ~ � �r
.. t,. .. .. .v! . ' "* t~~i
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f"'. l, :".
There was nothing to do but wait Jan. 4 at Peacock Springs while rescue divers went down into
the deep cave to bring up the body of a Newberry diver who lost his life inside the cave. Suwan-
nee County Fire/Rescue members, along with visitors to the springs and park personnel await
the divers' return to the surface,'an all too familiar scene in Suwannee County which has some
of the most preferred caves for diving in the world. - Photo: Yvette Hannon


.--.


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ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US

Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, www.suwanneedemocrat.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
E Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH

YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, contact us by phone or
make contact through the
Internet through our web site at
wwwsuwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Managing Editor,
Susan K. Lamb, ext. 131
0 Sports Reporter,
Janet Schrader-Seccafico, ext. 134
* Reporter,
Yvette Hannon, ext. 130
* Editorial Clerk,
Marsha Hitchcock, ext. 132



ADVERTISING
* Retail Advertising Manager,
Monja Robinson, ext. 105
* Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 107
* Advertising Representative,
JoelTurner, ext. 109
* Advertising Representative,
Kathy Sasser, ext. 160
I Classified Advertising Manager /
Telesales Ad Representative,
Myrtle Parnell, ext. 103
I Classified/Legal,
Louise Sheddan, ext. 102



CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,

E Circulation
Servicee ijkurs, MrF8 aim.n. 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $28 Out-of-county, $40



watumnne

Srmnotrat


Serving Suwannee
County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual.subscription rate is
$28 in county, $40 out of county and
$40 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address, and day and evening
phone numbers for verification. '
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the Editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


SPEAK OUT SUWANNEE
Call 386-208-8314. Comments to
Speak Out Suwannee MUST include
your name and day and evening
phone numbers for verification. We will
include your name with your
comment. Speak Out Suwannee
comments can be ,----_..
limited to one comment. ',.a \
per quarter per individual. \
Su. winnr'C'ounL', Pai I :,.' .
' T'ti Onr irnl Fl.rid, '


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The Suwan-
nee Democrat prints the entire
arrest record each week. If
your name appears here and
you are later found not guilty
or the charges are dropped,
we will be happy to make note
of this in the newspaper when
judicial proof is presented to
us by you or the authorities.
The following abbrevia-
tions are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee County
Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police De-
.partment.
FDLE-Florida Department
of Law Enforcement.
FHP-Florida Highway Pa-
trol.
DOT-Department of Trans-
portation
P and P-Probation and Pa-
role
Jan. 4, Robert Carroll
Brock, 32, Lake City, battery
(domestic violence), trespass
while armed, SCSO S. Larney.
Jan. 4, Douglas Wayne But-
ler, 44, 6883 Walker Place,
battery, petit theft, witness ha-
rassment, SCSO'T. Lee.
Jan. 4, Agustine Jose
Gomez, 27, 510 Maple St.,
'sentence to 30 days in county
jail on original charge of no
drivers license, SCSO T.
Smith.
Jan. 4, Raymond E. Higgin-
botham, 47, McAlpin, bond
revocation on original charges
of corruption by threat, disor-
derly intoxication, obstruction
of justice, assault, State Attor-
ney office changed charges to
disorderly intoxication, as-'
sault, resisting officer without
violence and obstruction of


justice, driving under the in-
fluence - second offense, cor-
ruption by threat, resisting
without arrest; State Attorney
office changed to driving un-
der the influence and resisting
officer without violence,
(Hamilton County Tennessee
charges), failure to appear on
original charges of reckless
endangerment, resisting stop,
frisk halt, driving under the in-
fluence, SCSO H. Tucker.
Jan. 4, Jonathan Rile Huch-
ingson, 18, 10127 92nd Ter-
race, violation of community
control on original charges of
burglary of structure, grand
theft III, P and P P. Corbett.
Jan. 4, Elpidio Marrante,
44, Miami, violation of proba-
tion on original charges of dis-
play false" drivers license, fail-
ure to return rental property,
SCSO T. Smith.
Jan. 4, Alphonzo Willis
Williams, 35, Jacksonville,
grand theft III -specified
property, uttering, counterfeit
note, SCSO S. Law.
Jan. 5, Laci Liegh Albritton,
20, Wellborn, violation of pro-
bation on original charges of
grand theft III, uttering
forgery, SCSO D. Downing.
Jan. 5, Jerry Edwin Single-
tary, 48, Mulberry, violation
of probation' on original
charges of possession of para-
phernalia, attempted posses-
sion of methamphetamine, at-
tempted possession of darvo-
cet, SCSO S. Law.
Jan. 5, Andrew Williams,
45, 194 Johnson Blvd., viola-
tion of probation on original
charge of grand theft, SCSO
D. Leach.


NEW SHERIFF LISTENS TO 911 CALL: New Suwannee County Sheriff Tony Cameron, center, listens
carefully to a copy of a bomb threat call made to 911 Jan. 5 to see if he can recognize the voicespn
the tape, while dispatch supervisor Sheila Knight, left, and Suwannee County Sheriff's Deputy D'v.id
Crutchfield look on. Suwannee County school administrators, Sheriff's Office, Live Oak Police Delpatt-
ment, Live Oak Fire Department, Suwannee County Fire/Rescue and volunteers responded tblhe
scene to secure the area and help search the premises. When nothing was found, the all-clear ighial
was given and students filed back into the school to resume their classes. According to the Suwan-
nee County Sheriff's Office, Kenneth Moore, 16, and Trahern Alexander, 16, were charged with mak-
ing a false report of a bomb, a felony. The juveniles have been turned over to juvenile justice authori-
ties. - Photo: Yvette Hannon
_- _ ... _ _ L --n n '- - ' � - -- 3 - f'


Trooper


Continued From Page 1A

pickup truck to all Florida
Law enforcement agencies,
Burroughs said. The vehicle
was reportedly used in an at-
tempted shooting and kidnap-
ping incident in the Fort My-
ers area.
Around 8:45 p.m. that
evening, FHP Trooper Steve
Coody observed the suspected
vehicle while on routine patrol
on Interstate 10 near the
Suwannee/Columbia County
line, according to Burroughs.
The pickup truck was aban-
doned on the westbound


BRIEFLY


Pediatric flu
vaccine Alailable
1ased on 'recent -changes,
the high-risk groups for flu
vaccine include children age 6
to 35 months. (This was pre-
viously 6-23 months).The pe-
diatric flu vaccine is available
at the Suwannee County
Health Department. In Live
Oak, the hours are from 8 - 11
a.m. and 1 - 4 p.m., In Bran-
ford, call for availability of
hours. The number for Live
Oak is 386-362-2708. In
Branford call 386-935-1133.
There is a limited number of
this vaccine that has been pro-
vided by the Vaccine for Chil-
dren Program and is available


free,of charge. After the Vac-
cine or Childre supply is de-
;l~&'d, the Health'Department
has an adequate supply that
will be available for $12. The
peek season for flu disease in
Florida is February. It is not
too late to vaccinate!
Register now!
Pottery classes at Stephen
- Foster State Park
Pottery classes offered for
both advanced and beginner
students for eight weeks from
6-9 p.m., Jan. 17-March 7, by
master potter and craft
demonstrator Jean Davidoff at
Craft Square, Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park, White Springs. Several


Touchton's
Heai &Air i

Sales * Service * Installation
10156 U.S. Hwy. 90 East, Live Oak
1i Commitm'ent to Excellence I
Owners: Jan www.Touchtons.com
& Sarah Touchton CAC058747
133220JRS-F


methods of working with cla\,
iiWdlliiiij slab, coil, piich and
whde-'thirowfl pottbri will -be
taught for a fee of $100, plus
$25 for materials. Limited
space. Advance registration
required.
For more info, call 386-
397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfostercso.org.
NFCC late registration
for Spring term
now thru Jan. 11
Late registration for Spring
term through Jan. 11. North
Florida Community College,
Madison, 850-973-1622 or
www.nfcc.edu.
Haliegh Bates,
Miss Florida Rodeo USA
2004-2005 Benefit Jackpot
Barrel Race to be held in
Live Oak Jan. 7
Haliegh Bates, Miss Flori-
da Rodeo USA 2004-2005
Benefit Jackpot. Barrel Race
on Friday, Jan. 7, at the Bob
Holmes Rodeo Arena at the
Coliseum Complex in Live
Oak. $500 added money! $30
entry fee, $4 exhibition and a
75 percent payback. NBHA
rules apply. Exhibition from


shoulder of I-10 % ith die right
rear passenger window bro-
ken out. Further investigation
revealed the vehicle was
stolen from the Cape Coral
area, Burroughs said. .
Burroughs said Trooper
Coody confirmed the vehicle
as matching the earlier issued
"BOLO." An inventory of the
contents of the vehicle re-
vealed a .12 gauge shotgun
loaded with 5 rounds of am-
munition. Also discovered
was one box of shotgun shells.
One spent shotgun shell was
discovered within the truck's
cargo bed, Burroughs said.


5- 6:45 p.m. show begins at 7
pi��NbtE'Added Mones:
754'0o'fidebit = '$500) arid 4D
payout;, under 75' ridei =
$250 and 3D payout. Barrel
racers are asked to participate
in the fund-raiser to help send
her to Oklahoma to compete
in the Miss Rodeo USA
Pageant for the IRPA Rodeo.
For more info, call Sandy
Merritt at 386-590-0662, Rita
Bates at 386-752-9148 or
Darrel Summers at 386-935-
0447.
NFCC women's fast-pitch
softball try-outs Jan. 8
North Florida Community
College women's fast-pitch
softball tryouts will be held at
2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 8, at
the Frank Cantey Softball
Field on the Madison cam-
pus. Must be or plan to be a
student at NFCC this
Spring. For more info, ,con-
tact Joe Morabito, 850-973-
1671.
Elk's National Free
Throw "Hoop Shoot"
Contest Jan. 8
Elks National Free Throw
"Hoop Shoot" Contest for all


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TNT HD and local channels where available
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Burroughs said Trooper
Coody noticed another pickup
truck abandoned within the
same area; a white Dodge
pickup that had also beeo re-
ported as stolen. The cogtipu-
ing investigation has not, yet
linked the two vehicles,to-the
attempted kidnapping and
shooting.
FHP. officials cont eted
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE) Irlesti-
gators to process and secure
the two trucks and accompa-
nying evidence. All evidence
was secured and processed by
FDLE.


boys and girls ages 8-1'3, will
be 'held ir Su ail e nMiddle
Schdor~oa''l' Tim. Sanlrda\,
Jan. 8. Contestant age roups
will be determined by' their
age as of April 1, 2005.'Tbcal
winners advance to district,
state regional and ndtihnal
competition. National -'fials
are held in Springfield, Mthss.
For more info, contact your
local Elks "Hoop Sho'ot "di-
rector, Charles Walker;:86-
364-4601, or MVisit
www.elks.org/hoopsho 6tCifm
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley Volunteer Training
Jan. 10,11,12 and 14,
Hospice of the Suwannee
Valley will hold volunteer
training from 1-4 p.m.n Jan.
10, 11, 12 and 14 at their of-
fice located at 618 SWVFrori-
da Gateway Drive, Lak& City.
Whether you like to'"~ork
with patients or "behind 'the
f-
scenes," come and learn" ow
you can use your talents- hnd
extra time to help those fac-
ing a terminal illness. ff you
would like to voluhm~er,

SEE BRIEFLY, PAXE3A
C, �5


.~J I~WeCIIII ml i. , no.









'\ oHBO" onHBO ,
\ B �",
*. - - - ---F, *�


Lake City: 754-8302 Live Oak: 362-3535 thi ... TIME WARNER'
www.twnfl.com Now anygs poss CABLE "
*DIglal Equipment exra. $69.95/mo price Is good for 3 months, hen regular price applies. Offer available to new subscribers only Some retricons may apply. Not all channels available In all areas. Tils offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Taxes and fees apply to all services. HBO@ and HBO OnDemand� FREE for 2 nonrts.
After 2 months, regular pige applies. Offer expires Feb. 28, 2005, Up to twice as fast as DSLs standard package claim is based on Road Runner's maximum download speed versus DSLs 1.5 Mbps standard package maximum download speed. Actual speeds may vary, ODal-up speed comparison is based on average download speed
of 28K and 56K modems. HBO, HBO On DEMANDand Deadwood" are service marks of Home Box Office, Inc. TM & � Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (S05). �2004 DMS Marketing, Inc. All right reserved. 865E-T1LCO


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7,-,2X05


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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PAGE 3A


FIDAIUY, .JAN4UA~RY 7, 2005 ----
1


Martinez sworn in as Florida's


33rd US Sentor and is the first


Cuban-American senator in history


Senator Mel Martinez (R-
FL) on Jan. 4 assumed his role
as the 33rd senator to represent
the state of Florida in the Unit-
-ed States Senate. Accompa-
nied by former Florida senator
Paula Hawkins (R-FL,) former
Tennessee senator Bill Brock
(R-TN) and Senator Bill Nel-
son.(D-FL,) Martinez took the.
official oath of office on the
Senate floor administered by
Vic'President Dick Cheney.
I 'Forty-two years ago, I
canie''to America from com-
muiist Cuba so I might have a
bette way of life, a freer way
of life -- a more democratic
way'oflife," Martinez, the first
Cuban-American to serve as a
United States Senator, said. "I
wanted to live the American
Dream where if you worked
hard and put your mind to the
task; anything was possible. To
stand-here today and take the
oath of office to become Flori-
da's-next United States Senator
is truly the culmination of my
American Dream," he added.
"My life experiences have
had'a strong effect on my val-
ue system - I strongly believe
in a free and open government,
free' markets and freedom of
individuals to pursue their
dreams," Martinez told the au-
dience. "I believe in an owner-
ship-society where Americans


BRIEFLY-

Continued Frori Page 2A

please join us for this 12-hour
training series. Registration
required. To register or for
more info, contact Carolyriyn
Long at 386-752-9191.
Suwannee River Water
Management District's
Governing Board
will meet Jan. 11
SVSwannee River Water
Management District's Gov-
erning Board will meet at 9
a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 11, at
District headquarters, SR 49
and 'IS 90 East, Live Oak.
The meeting is to consider
District business and conduct
public hearings on regulatory
and,land acquisition matters.
A workshop will follow the
governing board meeting. All
meetings, workshops and
hearings are open to the pub-
lic.
Save Our Suwannee, Inc.
, will meet Jan. 11
Will Spring rains bring
morp flooding? Representa-
tives from the Suwannee Riv-
er Water Management Dis-
trict will speak at the Save
Our, Suwannee, Inc. January
meeting about the Suwannee
River Water Assessment Re-
gional Network (WARN)
Program with an emphasis on
recent hurricanes and flood-
ing. Bring your friends and
neighbors. The next general
meeting of the membership
will-be at 7:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, Jan. 11, at the Fort White
SCommunity Center on CR 47
S just north of Ft. White. The
public is especially invited.
The board will meet at :6:15
p.m. All are invited. Light re.
freshments will be served.
Commodity Distribution
Branford - Jan. 11 and
Live Oak - Jan. 12-13
Suwannee River Economic
Council. Inc. announces U.S
Department of Agriculture
surplus commodities will be
distributed to eligible resi


:ir. King-
Coitinued From Page 1A

Ebenezer AME Church
Saturday, January 15,
2005


Annual Dr. King Birthday
Banguet, Tickets - $12; 7
p.:ni'hurch of Christ on SR
51; Speaker - Pastor Raynet-
ta L.'Pandley, Allen Chapel
AME Church in Houston
Monday, January 17, 2005
Ninth Annual Parade an(
Church Service; Parade - 1(


make decisions about their in-
dividual lives - not the U.S.
government. I believe in less
taxes. I believe a strong and
ready U.S. military is the best
defense to an uncertain world,"
Martinez said. "I look forward
to fighting for these principles
in the United States Senate.
"I am honored to serve and
represent the people of Flori-
da. I intend to follow the great
example set by retiring Senator
Bob Graham and former Sena-
tor Connie Mack who worked
to build relationships across
party lines in order to do
what's best for the state of
Florida. From keeping our
tourism economy strong, to
preserving the Everglades, and
continuing our hurricane re-
covery, many important con-
cerns facing the Sunshine State
aren't red or blue, Republican
or Democrat. I intend to repre-
sent all Floridians and be a
clear voice on issues crucial to
our state," he concluded.
Martinez will serve on four
committees in the U.S. Senate:
Foreign Relations, Banking,
Energy and Aging. The com-
mittee assignments give Mar-
tinez the ability to influence a
broad range of policies impor-
tant to Florida.
Following the formal swear-
ing-in, Martinez participated


dents from 1-3 p.m. on Tues-
day, Jan. 11, at Town Hall,
Branford and from 8:30 a.m. -
3:30 p.m. on Wednesday and
Thursday, Jan. 12-13, at Coli-
seum Complex, Exhibition II
Building, Eleventh Street,
Live Oak. Proof of residence
is required. Rules for accep-
tance in the program are the
same for everyone without re-
gard to race, color, national
origin, age, sex or handicap.:
NFCC Disrict Board of
Trustees will meet Jan. 18
The District Board of
Trustees of North Florida
Community College (NFCC)
will hold its regular monthly
meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, Jan. 18, in the NFCC
Student Center Lakeside
Room on the Madison cam-
pus. A copy of the agenda
may be obtained by writing:
NFCC, Office of the Presi-
dent, 1000 Turner Davis Dr.,
Madison, FL 32340. For dis-
ability-related accommoda-
tions, contact the NFCC Of-
fice of College Advancement,
850-973-1653. NFCC is an
equal access/equal opportuni-
ty employer,
S National Association
of Retired Federal
Employees to hold lunch
S meeting, Jan. 18
National Association of Re-
1 tired Federal Employees
1 (N.A.R.F.E.) Chapter 1548
will meet for lunch at ioon,
.Tuesday, Jan. 18, at Quail
SHeights Country Club. Dis-
Strict 2 Vice President Harold
Bartlett will install 2005 offi-
. cers. All present and retired
Federal employees are invited
to attend. Present employees
and non-member retirees are
encouraged to come and
bring questions. For info call
386-755-0907 or 386-752-
4379.
S Situation Ethics
e 'workshop Jan. 20
e Q. Is'it always right to tell
- the truth or does it depend on




a.m.; Church Service - im-
mediately following parade
at African Baptist Church
(Walker Avenue); Speaker -
Pastor Marvin C. Zanders of
y St. Paul AME Church, Jack-
7 sonville
Luncheon - immediately
-following church service at
1 Suwannee County Coliseum
Exhibition IIFor more infor-
mation or to sign up for the
d parade, contact 364-1742
) Rhonda Herring.


in a traditional re-enactment of
the ceremony in the Old Sen-
ate Chamber flanked by his
wife, Kitty, their sons John and
Andrew, and their daughter
and son-in-law, Lauren and
Tim Shea, and their two chil-
dren. Although Senate rules
prohibit extended family
members from attending the
re-enactment, watching from
the sidelines was a group of
Martinez's closest family and
friends: Gladys Martinez,
Martinez's mother; Ralph
Martinez, Martinez's brother,
and his family; and Pepe
Racines, Martinez's childhood
friend from Sagua la Grande,
Cuba.
Martinez ended the after-
noon at a celebratory reception
for friends, family, supporters
and .volunteers. More than 700
people were expected to attend
the reception celebrating the
swearing-in of Senator Mar-
tinez, including chartered bus-
es of Cuban-Americans from
Miami and New Jersey who
traveled to Washington to wit-
ness the swearing-in of the
first Cuban-American Senator
in history.
Martinez will commute to
D.C. when the Senate is in ses-
sion and will reside in Orlando
with his wife, Kitty, and their
11-year-old son, Andrew.


the situation? If you've ever
struggled with this question
and many others like it [deal-
ing with - 'what is the right
thing to do?]...please join us
for a brief study in: Situation
Ethics, Jan. 20, at 6:30 p.m.
Led by Glenn L. Jernigan at
the Suwannee River Regional
Library, Community Meeting
Room, US 129 S., Live Oak.
Regardless of your religious
views,,ethical doctrine or phi-
losophy of life - everyone is
welcome...as we look at this
sometimes controversial but
always interesting ethical ap-
proach. This workshop is not
library-sponsored. It is educa-
tional in nature and open to
the public at large. Again, all
are welcome. No charge.
Free.
Helping Hands Volunteer
Orientation Jan. 18
Helping Hands Volunteer
Orientation will be held from
5:30-6:30 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 18, at Hospice of the
Suwannee Valley, 618 SW FL
Gateway Drive, Lake City.
sMake a difference in some-
one's life! After attending ori-
entation and completing the
screening process, you will
be eligible for volunteering in
the Hospice Attic - thrift
store, administrative offices
as well as helping at special
events, educational fairs,
community events and fund
raising. You must register for
orientation. To register or for
more info contact Carolyn
Long at 386-752-9191.


Local
Continued From Page 1A

lance.
SCpl. Sumner then delivered
the baby boy in the parking lot
- the first time Sumner, a 16-
year veteran of the FHP, has
ever delivered a baby. It was
Carter's fourth child.
The baby boy was named T.
J. Carter and both mother and
baby were transported to
South Georgia Medical Center
in good health, Burroughs
said. Burroughs said the fa-
ther is serving in the U.S.
Army.




CASH 3 PLAY 4
1/5/05... 8,2,2 1/5/05 .. .2,5,4,5
FANTASY 5
1/5/05............ 4,6,16,20,27
MEGA MONEY...... 1,12,15,27
LOTTO ... ... 2,9,21,22,33,49


Diver


Continued From Page 1-A

he carried the words, "I made
a mistake."
Jones' instructor, Alan
Heck, of Gainesville, and fel-
low student diver Gene Page
of Micanopy were at the
springs for Page to complete
some training when the
tragedy occurred.
According to a report filed
by Suwannee County Sher-
iff's Cpl. David Manning,
Heck said he, Page and Jones
had gone to Peacock Springs
III to do some diving and
complete a 'deep dive' Page
needed. According to Heck,
the plan was for the three
divers to descend 185 feet to a
cave system called 'Hendley's
Castle.' Heck told Manning
there are permanent ropes to
guide divers in afndi.oft' f the
cave. Heck, said all .three
divers carried 'buddy bottles'
of compressed air, and Jones
and Page dropped their bottles
off at a decompression stop
area approximately 400 - 500
feet from the entrance of the
cave.
Heck told Manning that
Jones was the only.one using a
single air tank system so Heck
kept his 'buddy bottle' in case
Jones needed it. Heck stated
during the exit of the cave
Jones was in front because he
had a bright light. Page was in
the middle because he did not
have a bright light, and Heck
was in the rear with his bright
light.
The divers descended to
Hendley's Castle, Heck said,
but added he was surprised
Jones descended with them.
Heck told the deputy that
Jones gave no indication of
any problem and the three de-
scended 185 feet. Heck said
after completing the dive, the
divers began their ascent and
that was when Jones signaled
he was running out of air.
Heck said he then gave Jones


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his 'buddy bottle,' Jones sig-
naled he was okay, and Jones
headed toward the cave's exit,
following the ropes on his
own.
SHeck stated Jones was 50 -
60 feet away when he and
Page lost sight of Jones and
assumed he was going to the
surface. When Heck got to the
decompression stop, he told
the deputy he noticed Jones'
'buddy bottle' \Was in the same
location where Jones left it.
Heck said he assumed Jones
had excited the water and
went to the surface to check
on Jones.
But, Jones was still inside
the cave, and Heck went back
in to look for him, first finding
his buddy bottle, then his stu-
dent inside a side tunnel.
Meanwhile, Page had gone to
call for help
In spite of efforts to revive
Jones when Heck located him,
Heck said Jones was not
breathing and eventually gave
up and secured Jones' body to
the guide rope inside the cave
and returned to the surface to
await help to retrieve the
body.
The. call came in to 911 dis-
patch at 2:04 p.m. from a fel-
low diver and 'Jacksonville
fire fighter requesting help for
an apparent drowning of a
cave diver. The Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office,
Fire/Rescue, Florida Park Ser-
vice and Fire/Rescue supervi-
sor Murel McDonald respond-
ed to the scene.
Rescue divers John Orlows-
ki of Live Oak and Daniel
Bouillon' of Quebec, Canada
brought Jones' body to the
surface at 3:35 p.m. Orlowski,
Bill Williams and Reggie
Ross of Gainesville were part
of the team that conducted the
recovery and paperwork after-
ward. Bill Williams and wife
Dawn are instructor divers
who were visiting the park
from Pennsylvania.


Orlowski told Manning he
found Jones inside the jump
tunnel lying face down on the
ground floor of the cave ap-
proximately 65 feet from the
entrance of the jump tunnel
and 1,000 feet from the en-
trance/exit of the cave. Other
divers reported to Manning
that Hendley's Castle is locat-
ed approximately 700 - 800
feet from the entrance of the
cave and depth starts at 55 feet
and ends at 190 feet. Orlowski
said Jones was wearing what
divers call a slate and written
on the second page of the slate
were the' words, "I made a
mistake.
Heck stated that, "David
never 'called the dive' which is
an indicator to cease the dive
and ascend immediately."
Jones' body was taken to the
. medical examiner'se dfficet n
SJacksonville ,where cause Of
death will be determined.
The North Florida Cave and
Technical Divers website
posts safety warnings for po-
tential cave divers to help pre-
vent loss of life, which is rare
among certified cave divers
and more apt to happen to
those not following the rules
or not fully trained. Among
the five warnings are 1) Be
trained for cave diving and re-
main within the limits of your
training, 2) Maintain a contin-
uous guideline to the. cave
exit, 3) Keep two thirds of
your starting gas volume in re-
serve to exit the cave, 4) Re-
main within the safest possi-
ble operating limits for your
breathing media, and 5) Use
three sources of light.
Why is proper training es-
sential to safe cave diving?
Because without proper train-
ing, you are sure to have a
cave diving accident and be-
come a statistic, says cavediv-
ing.org, a cave diving website
site.
An investigation into the
death is continuing.


Saturday's, January 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th


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Thursday's in January
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January 8th, 10:00am
February 12th, 10:00am


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TWO CARS INVOLVED IN
CRASH WEDNESDAY
EVENING: These two vehicles
were involved in a crash Jan. 5
at about 6 p.m. at US 129 and
Bass Road when one vehicle
pulled into the path of the oth-
er. An occupant of the white car
was ejected, while the black ve-
,hicle overturned down a slight
embankment on the southeast
side of US 129. Several people
were taken to Shands at Live
Oak. Other information on the
accident was unavailable at
press time. - Photos: Susan K. Lamb







PAGE 4A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


VIEWPOINTS & OPINIONS


BIBLE VERSE

"I will sing to the LORD all my life; I
will sing praise to my God as long as
I live. May my meditation be pleasing
to Him, as I rejoice in the LORD."
--Psalm 104:33-34



'ubitannet Ntm ocrat


MYRA C. REGAN
Publisher

SUSAN K. LAMB
Managing Editor'


Members of the Suwannee
Democrat editorial board are Myra
C. Regan, publisher, and Susan K.
Lamb, managing editor. Our
View is formed by that board.


OPINION

When deep

calls to deep:

The Tsunami

tragedy
By Derek Maul
In the original Star Wars movie (1977) the evil Empire
tests its powerful new weapon by targeting a peaceful pop-
ulated world. The planet Alderaan is utterly destroyed.
Elsewhere, unaware of what has transpired, Ben Obi-Wan
Kenobi (Alec Guinness) reels visibly. "I felt a great distur-
bance in the force, as if a mi llion voices suddenly cried out
in terror and were suddenly silenced," he explained.
The morning of September 11, 2001, my wife and I sat
in front of the television transfixed, stunned by unthink-
able horror. As the first tower collapsed she clutched at her
heart in conspicuous anguish. It was a visceral response -
a disturbance-- that meshed the emotional, the physical
and the spiritual
Over the past two weeks I have been trying to process
the intense feelings so many of us have experienced as a
result of the Indian Ocean tsunami. Why, I wonder, have
we been affected so profoundly?
People die every day. Countless innocent children suffer
in every conceivable way throughout our world. Oppres-
sion is the status quo for hundred of millions. Poverty, des-
peration'aid defeat define the existence of communities on
every continent.
So what makes this event different? I do not mean to
sound trite, but such a cataclysmic instantaneous loss of
human life is - in a sense - "A disturbance in The Force."
A disruption that is difficult even for us to ignore, those
who routinely pay little heed to.the rest of the world.
When an event of this magnitude occurs, principles are
set in motion that defy our most studied efforts to pretend
we are all simply biological accidents constructed of flesh
and blood.
We huddle in our blindered, cultivated worlds and insist
there is nothing more to humanity than a random assort-
ment of atoms that behave in response to the finite vicissi-
tudes of DNA and applied socialization. But what can we
say when the collective cry of unnumbered souls wakes us
from the other side of the planet?
Deep calls to deep. Something is crying out and it goes
much further than the genetic material that has boiled up
from the primordial soup of evolution.
It is not only that we are Americans, a free people called
to live as a beacon of light and hope in the darkness of our
troubled world.
It is more even than our identity as citizens of Earth, an
understanding that.we are brothers .and sisters as we hurtle
through.time and space on a volatile rock we are only now
beginning to understand.
It goes much deeper. The truth our collective emotional
response to this tsunami reveals is the truth about the
greatest story ever told. We are, on a more intrinsic level
than we often allow ourselves to contemplate, spiritual be-
ings.
The reason we here in the United States are responding
with generosity and grace - both privately and corporate-
ly, without strings attached, without regard to appearances
and without needing anything in response .-is because, at
the core of our character as a nation, we have a fundamen-
tal understanding of who we really are.
It is critical that we both acknowledge and cultivate that
understanding. My fear is that, if we allow the forces of
cynicism and unbelief to gain too strong a foothold, the
next time the world needs our leadership, our decency and
our character, we will discover too late that in trading faith
for mere humanism, we will have traded our very soul.
In the final analysis, that is our m eight. This world needs
America's spiritual foundation more than our billions, our
commerce or even our armies.
Derek Maul. maulhall@aol.com, Sunbelt Newspapers
Columnist Derek Maul is a Tampa based write. You can
reach him at maulhall@aol.com, or check out more of his
work at DerekMaul.com

Please address letters to:
Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370,' Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your name, full address and daytime phone
number. We ask this so we can varify your letter and dis-
cuss any questions about it with you.


COMMENTARY

Are we a republic or a democracy?


We often hear the claim that our
nation is a democracy. That wasn't
the vision of the founders. They
saw democracy as another form of
tyranny. If we've become a
democracy, I guarantee you that:
the founders would be deeply dis-
appointed by our betrayal of their
vision. The founders intended, and
laid out'the ground rules, for our


nation to be a republic.
The word democracy appears nowhere in the Declara-
tion of Independence or the Constitution - two most fun-
damental documents of our nation. Instead of a democra-
cy, the Constitution's Article IV, Section 4, guarantees "to
every State in this Union a Republican Form of Govern-
ment." Moreover, let's ask ourselves: Does our pledge of
allegiance to the flag say to "the democracy for which it
stands," or does it say to "the republic for which it
stands"? Or do we sing "The Battle Hymn of the Democ-
racy" or "The Battle Hymn of the Republic"?
So what's the difference between republican and demo-
cratic forms of government? Jolh Adams captured the-
essence of the difference when he said, "You have rights
antecedent to all earthly governments; rights that cannot
be repealed or restrained by human laws; rights derived
from the Great Legislator of the Universe." Nothing in our
Constitution suggests that government is a grantor of
rights. Instead, government is a protector of rights.
In recognition that it's Congress that poses the greatest
threat,to our liberties, the framers used negative phrases
against Congress 'throughout the Constitution such as:
shall not abridge, infringe, deny, disparage, and shall not
be violated, nor be denied. In a republican form of gov-
ernment, there is rule of law. All citizens, including gov-
ernment officials, are accountable to the :same laws. Gov-
ernment power is limited and decentralized through a sys-
tem of checks and balances. Go ernnment .intervenes in
civil society to protect its citizens against force and fraud
but does not intervene in the cases of peaceable..voluntary
exchange.
Contrast the framers' vision of a republic with that of a
democracy, In a democracy, the majority rules either di-
rectly or through its elected representatives. As in a
monarchy, the law is whatever the government determines


A
MINORITY
VIEW


it to be. Laws do not represent rea-
son. They represent power. The re-
straint is upon the individual in-
stead of government., Unlike that
envisioned under a republican
form of government, rights are
seen as privileges and permissions
that are granted by government
and can be rescinded by govern-
ment.


How about a few quotations,
demonstrating the disdain our founders held for democra-.
cy? James hladison. Federalist Paper No. 10: In a pure
democracy, "there is nothing to check the inducement to
sacrifice the weaker party or the obnoxious individual." At
the 1787 Constitutional Convention, Edmund Randolph
said, " ... that in tracing these evils to their origin every
man had found it in the turbulence and follies of democra-
cy." John Adams said, "Remember, democracy never lasts.:
long. It soon wastes, exhausts, and murders itself. There
was never a democracy yet that did not commit suicide."
Chief Justice John Marshall observed. "Between a bal-
anced republic and a democracy, the difference is like that
between order and chaos." In a word or two, the founders
knew that a democracy would lead to the same kind of
tyranny the colonies suffered under King George IllI.
The framers gave us a Constitution that is replete with
undemocratic mechanisms. One that, has come in for re-
cent criticism and calls for its elimination is the Electoral
College. In their wisdom, the framers gave us the Electoral
College so that in presidential elections large, heavily pop-
ulated states couldn't democratically run roughshod over
small, sparsely populated states..
Here's my question. Do Americans share the republican
N alues laid out by our founders, and is it simply a matter
of our being tunshooled about the differences between a
republic and a democracy? Or is it a matter of preference
and we now \want the kind of .tianny feared by the
founders where Congress can do anything it can muster a
majority vote to do?.I fear it's the latter.
Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at
George Miason University. To find out more aboit Wilter
E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syrndicate
,writers and cartoonists, visit the CreatorS Syndicate lteb
page at wiiww.creators.com. ' '


LETTER TO THE EDITOR
.Dear EIitor:. . This idea of personal retirement accounts not new.
I ca'n' help but echo the sentiments'of AARP- State Pres- W\'hat-do you call IRAs, or 401(k) acco uits to name a
ident Thames (Dec. 8) that we retain and strengthen the few\. There already are many types of personal retire-
current social security system. The article that appeared a ment accounts with tax ad\ antages to encourage people
few days later on Rep. Boyd and Rep. Kolbe cosponsoring to save money for their old age when they are no longer
social security legislation (Dec. 10) prompted me to share able to work. These have not beenteffective. First of all,
with you my opinions and passion to strengthen social se- most young people do not think they will ever be old and
curity, not replace it. One way to add money into social se- frail. Secondly,'many of us have debts and other ex-
curity is to tax all wages earned, not just the first $90,000 penses. In a pro business administration, will employer
.of wages. Remove the cap on both social security and matching contributions be eliminated without giving us
Medicare taxes. Also, of Congress hadito rely on social se- a chance to howl about it?
curity themselves, the .system would get shored up in a Personal retirement accounts are pricey to set up and
short time. As it is, they retire with full salary until they to administer and end up costing individuals dearly. In
die, while they tell us not to rely on government promises England \\here they have such retirement accounts, the
that may not' be fulfilled. Money has been withheld from government had to limit. the fees being charged to 20
our weekly \wages, plus matching amounts by our employ- percent. Then when an annuity is purchased to provide
ers, into named and numbered accounts for our retirement. an income stream, there goes another 5 to 10 percent. I
Social security is not welfare to be dished out ontlie whim can think of over a $100 billion the government is bor-
of an administration 'or. a particular political party, it was rowing for lesser moral values than the self-esteem of
paid into our very own accounts over years. Which ex' our older citizens who deserve to be free of fear of
penses will be put ahead of obligations to older and dis- poverty.
abled citizens? Georgia Goellner

Suwannee County Commissioners
(4-year-terms, partisan)


Dist. 1 - Jes
362


sse Caruthers, Dist. 2 - Doug Udell Dist. 3 - Ivie Fowler Dist. 4.- Billy Maxwell:, Dist 5 - Randy Hatch
-5385 . 362-4189 Vice-Chairman 658-1602 Chairman 963-5460 935-1419

Suwannee County Constitutional Officiers


Susannee County
Sheriff
Tony Cameron
362-2222


Clerk of Court
Kenneth Dasher
362-0500


Property Appraiser
Lamar Jenkiris
362-1385


Tax Collector
George Burnham,
364-3414


. "0 ' "" "






Supervisor of
Elections
Glenda' Williams
362-2616


.' *2005 Creators Syndicate
BY WALTER WILLIAMS


PAGE 4A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


1111'; ~B


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PAGE 5A


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UWANNEE LIVING
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Roy Edward "J.R." Lindblade Jr. and Kandace Nicole Douglas

Douglas ~ Lindblade


to wed March 19


Mr. and Mrs. Harold Skeen
of Live Oak and Rance Dou-
glas of Trenton are pleased to
announce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their
daughter, Kandace Nicole
Douglas, to, Roy Edward
"J.R." Lindblade Jr., son of
Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Lind-
blade of O'Brien.
Kandace is a 2001 graduate
ofSuwanneeHigh School and
is employed with Solutions in.
Live Oak. Her maternal.
grandparents are Bessie
Rodgers and the late Roy J.
Rodgers of Trenton. Paternal
grandparents are Elizabeth
Douglas and the late Argie
Douglas of Trenton.
J.R. is a 2001 graduate of
Branford High School and is
employed with the Hamilton
County Correctional Institute.
His material grandparents are

Fiftten local
students

included in

The National

Dean's IList�
Fifteen local students are
among the approximately
2514,000 students included in the
27th Annual Edition of The Na-
tional Dean's Lists, 2003-2004.
The National Dean's Lists�,
published by Educational Com-
munications, Inc., Austin,
Texas, is the largest recognition
program and publication in the
nation honoring .high achieving
college students.
Students are selected for this
honor by their college deans,
registrars or honor society advi-
sors and must be in.the upper 10
percent of their class, on their
school's "Dean's List," or ha e
earned a comparable honor.
Listed students are eligible to
compete for $50,000 in scholar-
ship awards funded by the pub-
lisher, ard may also use a refer-
ral service for future employ-
ment opportunities. More than
2.500 colleges and universities
nationwide use the publication
to recognize their academically
qualified students. To learn
more about The National
Dean's Lists� visit www.then-
ationaldeanslist.com.
Local students selected in-
clude: Adams, Jamie - North
Florida Community College
(NFCC), Linda Ball - Lake City
Community College (LCCC),
Laura K. Bass - Valdosta State
University. (VSU), Andrew
Chapman - Jacksonville Uni-
versity (JU), Jhony Cuenca -
Florida State University (FSU),
Nikki Ford (FSU), Teresa Gill -
Tallahassee Community Col-
lege (TCC), Brenda Horton
(NFCC), Shirley ' Hurst
(NFCC), Albert Mobley (FSU),
Michael C. Mobley - Florida
Agricultural and Mechanical
University i(FAMULi,Andrew C.
Polk - Iru.ersitN of. Flonda
(UF), Alyssa M., Serrano - Fla-
gler College (FC), Szczurowski,
Arkadiusz (LCCC) and Monica
G. Wolfe - Lee University (LU).


Mr. and Mrs. Curtis W.
Genaux Sr. of Lake City and
the late Elvira Genaux of
O'Brien. Paternal grandpar-
ents are Rodney Lampkin of
O'Brien and the late Sandra
Lampkin ofDahlonega, Ga.
The wedding will take place
at Westwood Baptist Church
Sin Live Oak at 5 p.m., March
19, 2005. A reception \%ill
follow at the Tram Depot,
Live Oak.
No local invitations will be
sent. All friends and relatives
are in ited to attend.


Wedding Reminder

Avery ~ Fitzgerald


Meghan Avery and Clark
Fitzgerald would like to remind
you of their approaching mar-
riage.
The ceremony will take place
at noon on Saturday, Jan. 8, at


the First Bapnst Church in Li\e
Oak. A reception \ ill follow at
the home of Allison T and Eliz-
abeth Scon.
A.ll inends and fanmil are in-
\ ned to anend.


A t



Marriage applications

for Dec. 1 - 31, 2004:
David Wayne Sherwood and Angela Renee Roberts
William Ross Wood and Samantha Renee Undern ood
Norman Russell Simpson and Janna L\ nn Bogle
Christophei Michael Trenary and Carmen Gavle Sulli\ an
Luis Noel Guzman and Patricia Hernandez Rojas
James Clayton Senea and Shari L\ nn Cro\\
Brian AlaniKorokna\ and Ami Nicole Severance
Tony Owens Jr. and Adrienne Denise Wallace
S Justin Aaron Young and Shellie Diane Milligan
Vinnie V Seccafico and Janet Edwina Schrader
Harry Cyrus Gray III and Nlon Hendrickson
Kenneth George Smazik and Gina Renee Mathews
Buster Dean Parris and Mist- Kay Hollingsworth
Kenneth Wayne Cason and Carol Marie Niszczak
Donald Paul Conner and Amanda L\nn Rex
Jonathan'Aaron Moody and Patience Rose Rosenberg
DaniefJames Basan and Kristen Jennifer Cooper






Nannly 8i

Birthday
January 2, 2005
Esfl,,,, 1,,


Love, Your Family




206 Duval Street NW
Sat., Jan. 8 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

No Early Birds!

S 1- 72" Shabby Chic Sideboard.
2- 30" Tables, 1- Drop Leaf Table,
Scarlet Velvet Settee & Chair, Antique '
Double Dry Sink, Antique Mirror,
3 Drawer Chest, Loads of glassware,
dishes, cups, saucers and tea pots!

Li 362-3520


!ill Brooke Buchana


If w ae have mssed anyone we apologize and hope you can forgive us. May
God Bless you all and nay he be with each and everyone of you always.


E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK '


rDlr'AV\ IAKII IADV 7 n00n







RIIILAY I


OBITUARIES


Mertie Box Mercer
Feb. 25, 1909 -
Jan. 5, 2005
IA iertie Box Mercer,
95, of Live Oak,


Ethel Mae Touchton, both of
Zephyrhills; one brother,
James Kirby of Live Oak; and
several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be


Live Oak is in charge of all
arrangements.

DEATH NOTICE


e/ Vy passed' away conducted at 11 a.m., today, Rosalie "Sally" Hopkins
wednesday, Jan. 5, 2005, in Friday, Jan. 7, at the Live Oak Sept. 29, 1935 -
the Lake City Medical Center. Church of God with the Rev. Jan. 2, 2005
The Suwannee County native Fred Watson and the Rev. . osalie "Sally" Hop-
was a homemaker and a mem- Clyde Ford officiating. Inter- kins, 69, of Live
ber of Live Oak Church of ment will follow in the / Oak, passed away on
God. Corinth Baptist Church Jan. 2, 2005.
Survivors include two sis- Cemetery, Lake City. Banks/Page-Theus Funeral
ters, Lorine Harback and Daniels Funeral Home of Home, Wildwood.


Suwannee Valley


Humane Society


The Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society (a no kill shel-
ter) and a limited space shel-
ter. They depends on adop-
tions for availability of
space. Adoption fee of $45
includes spay/neuter, de-
worming, heartworm/feline
(leukemia) testing and rabies
shot. Please visit the shelter,
the animals would love to
meet you. The shelter is lo-
cated two miles south of Lee
in Madison County, just of
CR 255 on Bisbee Loop.
(Exit 262 off I-10 or from US
90 turn onto CR 255, go
south to Bisbee Loop.) Call
for directions. You must
check with them prior to
bringing a drop-off animal to
the shelter.
REMINDER: DO NOT
LEAVE PETS IN VEHI-
CLES FOR ANY LENGTH
OF TIME DUE TO THE
HEAT/HUMIDITY OR
COLD!
Attention: If you have lost
a pet or found one, the hu-
mane society will help you
find your pet. Call 850-971-
9904 or toll-free at 866-236-
7812. Leave a message if we
are closed, we will return
your call. They will do what
they can to help you find
your pet. Please check with
your local animal.control if
yodtu ha6 lst' a ptet." -
LOST'OR FOUND
ANIMALS:
LOST - Wire-haired terri-
er, female, (BONNIE), white
with- black spots. Very
friendly...about 18 pounds.
Found in Madison near 53N
off Duncan Road.
LOST - Grey and white
long-haired with bobbed tail,
(ROCKY), male, about 10
pounds, lost near Dowling
Park.
FOUND - Tan with some
black, male, young - six to
eight months, healthy, wear-
ing a red collar. Found near
North Florida Community
College.
These are just a few of the
kittens and cats, puppies and
dogs available. Featured ani-
mals for adoption:
DOGS:
#2442 - LYDIA - Female,
red and white, 11 months






loll


old...doesn't understand why
so many people want a little
puppy when she has so much
love to give.
#2589 - LACEY - Female,
black, 11 months old...A bun-
dle of love with a lot of ener-
gy mixed in and adorable.
#2591 - BLEU - Female,
black and silver, 4-1/2 years
old. Beautiful blue eyes and a
heart of pure gold. She would
just love a home.
#2654 - SADIE - Female,
tricolor, 3-1/2 months
old...Who wants to snug-
gle?...Okay, then let's play
ball.
#2655 - POOH - Male,
cream color, 3-1/2 months
old...One blue eye, one
brown, through which he
views the world as a wonder-
ful place.
#2656 - SUSIE - Female,
tricolor, 3-1/2 months old...
Now here's a lady to be at the
heart of a happy home.
Many more beautiful pup-
pies and large dogs to choose
from.
CATS:
#2213 - CRICKET - Fe-
male, tortoise shell, 1-1/2
years old. Really wants to be
home for Christmas.
#2289 - KERINA - Fe-
male, black...A lovely dispo-
sition and likes to play.
#2608 - CASPER - Mdle,'


cream colored, eight months
old...a boy to love and ready
to love you back.
#2609 - SPOOKY - Male,
grey, eight months old...will-
ing to squeeze into a large
Christmas stocking in return
for a loving home.
#2648 - FELICITY - Fe-
male, black and white, three
months old...full of sunshine
and a bit of mischief.
#2653 - ESMERELDA -
Female, Calico, one year
old...sweet and lovable with
a touch of spice.
Many more kittens and
cats available for adoption.
Please help care for the an-
imals.
Visit our newly expanded
thrift store. Tuesday - Satur-
day, 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Closed
Sunday and open by appoint-
ment only on Monday. ALL
PROCEEDS SUPPORT THE
.HUMANE SOCIETY.
They also recycle alu-
minum cans. Take them to
the shelter.
Recycle, recycle, recycle!
Please recycle newspapers
for the Suwannee Valley Hu-
mane Society. The recycle
dumpster is located at 305
Pinewood Dr. in Live Oak,
next to Johnson's Appliance
Center. ALL PROCEEDS
SUPPORT THE HUMANE
SOCIEi Y" ! ,0'/ ",i'|!;:'i� rii.r,.


Suwannee District

Schools will administer

Spring 2005 Assessments


Suwannee District Schools
will administer Spring 2005
Assessments on the following
dates:
FCAT Writing Test - Feb.
8-10
FCAT Reading, Math and
Science Tests - Feb. 28-
March 11


SAT 10 - March 21-23
FCAT is for grades 3-10
(Grade 11-Adult RETAKES)
and SAT 10 is for Grade K-2.
Each school has more de-
tailed testing information
available. Daily student atten-
dance is critical during these
assessment periods.


Got news to send to the

Suwannee Democrat?


The Suwannee Democrat
has a new, permanent e-mail
address for all incoming
copy to be published such as
birthdays, anniversaries,
weddings, sports news,
church articles and news
and all other news articles.


This is a permanent address
accessible only by editorial
personnel. Please include
your telephone number and
name with copy. The perma-
nent address for news copy
is as follows: nf.editori-
al@gaflnews.com


::_.: ^-:. . --/ -�:-; :. ,- . r< .^- ---- :<-- . - (:. , 5- --., --- - ..... ,-- -- . ,^ -

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MANATEES WINTER IN CITRUS COUNTY: Manatees are endangered aquatic mammals.

Record number of manatees
,, , , . ,,,; ",;,,, ,- . . ..._._, - .
"�':' '!,'i,'i~~~~~~w,, , '.. , ,,,,....,, ' ', -_. - , ,-,-,
. . . ''' ' :Ip ��':6 d
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MAATE8WiTE I CTB$ OUT :''! ,Mnte r nageeautcmm as
Re;or nubromnte


Winter in Florida


A study by federal
gists has reported record
bers of endangered ma
in Citrus County.
Researchers based
area's Crystal
River National
Wildlife Refuge
spotted a record
430 of the rare,
marine mammals
in various loca-
tions during their
late-December
survey, part of a
twice-monthly
aerial study. The
biologists record-
ed the previous,
record of 393 manatee
about the same time lasi
That both records oc
at the end of the year is
incidence: North Ame
largest gathering of ma
occurs in the county,
winter. The warm, spri:
estuaries of Crystal Riv
Homosassa draw the n


cot


biolo- mammals away from the cold- services
I num- er Gulf of Mexico. ing tour
natees "Many Floridians associate The 1
winter with the arrival ofvisi- swimmi
in the tors from colder areas," said occur I


INFORMATION

Who: 19th Annual Florida
Manatee Festival
What: celebration of
manatees arrival each year
When: Jan. 8-9
Where: Crystal River
Contact: http://VISITCITRUS.COM/

ees at Mary Craven, Citrus County's end of
t year. tourism manager, "That's true viewing
curred for us, too, but our guests tainmen
no co- aren't exclusively human." vendors
erica's Visitors often come to the my Buf
natees area expressly to see the man- petition
every atees. Citrus County is the event.
hg-fed only place in America where To let
er and people can legally swim and ty's eco
marine snorkel'with them. Area guide http://V


unty
Sdo brisk business tak-
ists to the manatees.
best opportunities for
ng with the sea cows
midweek, when boat
traffic slackens,
Craven said.
Manatee
lovers celebrate
the animals' ar-
rival each year
with the Florida
Manatee Festi-
val in Crystal
River. This
year's festival,
the 19th annual
event, will take
place the week-
Jan. 8-9. Manatee-
Sboat trips, live enter-
.t, an art show, food
and the annual "Jim-
fet Soundalike" com-
will compose the

rn about Citrus Coun-
ilogy and events, visit
ISITCITRUS.COM/.


Regional Science

and Engineering Fair


The local Columbia Coun-
-ty Science and Engineering
Fair will be hosted by Lake
City Community College.
The annual fair will be held
Tuesday-Thursday, January
11-13 in the Howard Gym-
nasium on LCCC campus.
The fair includes projects
from elementary, middle,
and high schools in the coun-
ty.
The fair generally includes
approximately 120 student
projects in the fields of be-
havioral and social science,
chemistry, biochemistry,
botany, computer science,
earth and space science, en-
gineering, environmental,
medicine and health, micro-
biology, physics and zoolo-
gy.
LCCC students will judge
the elementary projects and
30 local community business
leaders will judge the middle
and high school projects.
First, second and third place
ribbons will be awarded at
each educational level. The
40 Best in Fair of the ad-
vanced levels will go on to
compete in the Regional Sci-
ence and Engineering Fair.
Judging of the projects


will take place on Wednes-
day, Jan. 12 from 9:30 a.m. -
3 p.m. with an open house
for the community 3-6 p.m..
The community will again be
able to view the projects on
Thursday, Jan. 13, 9 a.m.-3
p.m. The awards ceremony
will be held on Thursday,
Jan. 13, 6 - 7 p.m. for ele-
mentary projects and 7:30-
8:30 p.m. for middle and
high school projects in the
Alfonso Levy Performing
Arts Center on campus.
The Suwannee Valley Re-
gional Science and Engi-
neering Fair will also be held
on the Lake City Community
College campus February
22-24. The region is com-
prised of 10 counties: Co-
lumbia, Union, Suwannee,
Bradford, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Baker, Gilchrist,
Dixie, and Madison.
Judging of the projects
will take place on Wednes-
day, Feb. 23 from 8:30 a.m.-
3:30 p.m. with an open house
for the community 4-6 p.m.
The community will again be
able to view the projects on
Thursday, Feb. 24, 9 a.m.-3
p.m. The awards ceremony
will be held' on Thursday,


Feb. 24, 7 p.m. in Union
County at the high school.
The winners will be able
to participate in the State
Science and Engineering
Fair in Orlando, Florida on
April 6-8. Some students
from prior fairs have even
made it to the international
competition.
Jessica Stanton, a current
dual enrollment student at
Columbia High School and
LCCC, has made it to the in-
ternational fair. The 2005 In-
tel International Science and
Engineering Fair will be in
held in Phoenix, Arizona on
May 8-14.
The fairs are coordinated
by Charleen Kelley, Colum-
bia High School instructor,
Renae Allen, Union County
High School instructor and
facilitated by LCCC faculty
members Cheryl Boice, as-
sociate science professor,
and Dr. John Rowe, associ-
ate science professor.
For more information,
contact Charleen Keiley at
Columbia High School, Re-
nae Allen at Union County
High School (386) 496-
4811, or Cheryl Boice at
(386) 754-4251.


Enjoy $50 rebate on any
ArtCarved gold class ring
(excludes the Odyssey series).

Hurryl Offer valid 1/1/05
through 1/30/05.
www.artcarved.com
,----". rrr~q

ARTAIRVED.
CLASS RINGS
o receive rebate ask the storeassociate for a rebatefomr


Veweha Ism

106 Wet eoad Steet
362-1140 13DH-F


This Sunday, January 9 at 6 p.m.




The vision ofDavid's ministry is to take the saving and


nd to gather in the harvest one soul at a time with all
Glory going to God.
S Hy 129 South, Live Oak * 364-4800
wy 129 Sou:th,_ Live Oak_ �_13 364-4800-F


Cub So utsh Cs






-- ValdostaMemonals.com
.- "l "'li bhtild inure than mwiunents; we build memorials.
Granite * Marble * Bronze
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Look for
Seniors United S n p
in the Jan. 26 Selii
edition of the
Suwannee Democrat united


229-245-8858 Burton Fletcher, Owner


Is
;-� ~.�
.� i-
.�-


PAGE 6A


- SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 7 2005


I: "-~'d
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.I-'' ''







PAGE 7A


NFCC commemorates birthday of


Martin Luther King Jr. with nationally


known speaker, candlelight vigil


Motivational speaker Dela-
torro L. McNeal II will head-
line activities at North Flori-
da Community College to
honor Martin Luther King Jr.
McNeal will speak Tuesday,
Jan. 11 at Van H. Priest Audi-
torium from 10 a.m.-noon.
He will also be the guest
speaker at a candlelight vigil
6-7:30 p.m. that evening. The
vigil begins at NFCC's Ad-
ministration Building.
McNeal is an empower-
ment expert, professional
speaker and author. He was
most recently named "One of
the Top Four Best Campus
Speakers" of 2004. In addi-
tion, the Tampa Bay Business
Journal named Delatorro as
"One of the Top 30 Under
30" an award of distinction
given to the top 30 outstand-
ing business leaders in the
Tampa/St. Pete metropolis.
The local NFCC African
American Student Union
(AASU) is hosting civil
rights leader Martin Luther
King Jr. celebratory events.
Funding has been provided
by NFCC's Student Govern-


Florida test bull
The University of
Florida/Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences
(UF/IFAS) will hold its annu-
al Florida Bull Test Sale on
Saturday, Jan. 22, at 12:30
p.m. CDT. The sale will be
held at the North Florida Re-
search and Education Center
(NFREC-Marianna) Beef Re-
search Unit, one mile west of
Greenwood, at 4925 SR 162
North.
One objective of the Florida
Bull Test is to provide the
commercial cow/calf produc-
er a source of bulls that have
been gain tested and thor-
oughly evaluated at the same
location and have passed
stringent health requirements.
"We feel that our bulls are
superior to some of the other
bulls here in the area because
they have been performance
tested in a neutral environ-
ment where all bulls have an
equal chance to perform and
do well. Then we take those
bulls that performed well in
various areas, such as average
daily gain, ultra-sounded for
rib eye, and rump-fat thick-
ness and intra-muscular fat


Suwannee


County


officials


sworn


in see


photos


page 8A


! , ,,,

A. , . A ,










NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE TO HOST NATIONALLY
KNOWN SPEAKER: Motivational speaker Delatorro L. McNeal II will
be the guest speaker at NFCC on Tuesday, Jan. 11, to honor Martin
Luther King Jr. - Photo: Submitted
.. ..... ... .-y:ad ,







Luther King Jr. - Photo: Submitted


ment Association. All events
are free and open to the pub-
lic.
For more information
about upcoming Martin


percentage, and put those all
into an equation to find those
bulls that will perform out in
the industry the best," said Dr.
Gary Hansen, Faculty Super-
visor of the Florida Bull Test
and a UF/IFAS Assistant Pro-
fessor of Animal Science.
"These bulls are also fertili-
ty tested by a vet, this year
we'll include in the fertility
test a test for the fertility-asso-
ciated antigen. Those bulls
that have this antigen will usu-
ally impregnate between nine
percent and 17 percent more
cows, so we feel this is an im-
portant advantage of some of
the bulls that will be coming
out of the Florida Bull Test."
Approximately 100 perfor-
mance proven bulls will be


Luther King Jr. and black his-
tory events contact AASU
sponsor Andrea Oliver at
850-973-1635 or e-mail her
at olivera@nfcc.edu.


sold, including Angus, Beef-
master, Charolais, Hereford,
Limousin, Senepol and Sim-
mental breeds. Each of the
bulls in the Sale indexed 90 or
better based on a combination
of gain and weight per day of
age in the Test.
NFREC-Marianna is a large
unit of UF/IFAS that focuses
on agronomic, forestry, and
beef cattle programs. It is also
home to a modem 1,000 acre
cattle ranch and the Florida
Bull Test facility.
For more information and a
catalog contact Mary Chamb-
liss at 850-482-9904 or
mchambliss@mail.ifas.ufl.ed
u. Additional information can
also be found at
http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu.


WwltTiR lSE1g MWE';t. 0(W m ro I tleo rB5Kmt os f
.'' f OBism a UWeitd 'iatiW arid Citi il of c6hirroa 10 ywrs (il
aogr (r by 1 159 Pi: C1T oo . ISi Ry paI_7 rt1 f f.lil| nltiiifl, aIra.', l
t CWiolli Rumls lable ln .l /.,it'I I lran)ploild .cosn aw i? l
dtidr; of tit ol ItdtS. Al l u flAn; i nd o flU phiulOl bioriomi 1.ie
Ptroprt (i Am wrinA Proge .mnil ,:10tl te iurneiml


Do not buy cowboy boots


Democrat Reporter
The first Christmas I was
with my cowboy, I discovered
several major truths. A woman
cannot pick out boots, should
not pick out boots and from
now on, this woman, will not
pick out boots. I bought a pair
for the cowboy for Christmas
and returned them the day after.
Cowboy boots are a very
mystical part of the cowboy
wardrobe. No self-respecting
cowboy will be seen in public
without said boots. My cowboy
even wears them to church,
once complete with spurs.
Now as I discovered, there
are many different kinds of
cowboy boots. Some boots are
for roping, some for work,
some boots are regular riding
boots, some boots are for danc-
ing, and according.to my cow-
boy, some boots should not be
worn by anyone, anywhere, es-
pecially in public. Some boots


have flat heels (we don't like
this kind at all), some boots
have rubber soles, some boots
have a nice high heel. The
high-heeled variety are for rid-
ing.
There are plain leather work
boots, rhino hide boots, ostrich
hide boots and fancy colored
decorated leather boots. They
come in different heights. Polo
players wear boots that come
up over the knee. Those babies
are custom-made and very ex-
pensive.
My cowboy's boots were all
worn slap out. I mean run over,
run down, full of holes worn
out. So one day we went on a
boot-hunting trip. We-were go-
ing to Tampa. Along the way
there and the way back, we
stopped in every boot store and
western-wear shop there was.
The man of the house tried on
hundreds of pairs of boots and
even annoyed one shop-girl so
much she was rude to him. I
don't blame her at all. After
trotting out at least 10 pairs of
boots for him to try on, he told


...... ... .. . . . ... - . .. ... . .-
Janet Schrader Seccafico
her he wasn't interested. And
after visiting all those stores,
we got home with no new
boots. They either didn't fit, he
didn't like them or they were
too expensive.
The cowboy finally has a
new pair of boots. He also still
has about six pair of old boots.
They have some use left in
them yet. But I have learned
my lesson, I will never buy
boots for a cowboy again.
Janet Schrader Seccafico may be
reached by calling 1/386/362-1734
ext. 134 or by e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.com.
Only in Suwannee County is
an occasional commentary by
local resident and Democrat
reporter Janet Schrader Secca-
fico on the lives and times of
Suwannee countians and is in-
tended to remind us of the won-
derful county we live in.


Minimally invasive procedure effective

alternative for uterine fibroids


Hysterectomy remains the
most common treatment for
uterine fibroids. However, in-
terventional radiologists at
Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville,
say many women with fibroid-
related symptoms are candi-
dates for the minimally invasive
treatment known as uterine fi-
broid embolization (UFE).
"Women should be given the
option," says Dr. J. Mark McK-
inney, an interventional radiolo-
gist at Mayo Clinic who has
been performing UFE since
1999. "The problem is one of
communication. Women don't
always get the word that this is
a therapeutic option for uterine
fibroids."
The Society for Intervention-
al Radiology estimates that in
2004, about 200,000 women
had a hysterectomy (surgical re-
moval of the uterus) to cure
symptoms caused by uterine fi-
broids. On the other hand, the
society estimates only 13,000 to
14,000 women had UFE.
Uterine fibroids are non-
cancerous growths that develop
in the uterine wall. They can be
as small as the head of a pin and
grow as large as a cantaloupe.
Usually, they do not cause prob-
lems. However, as women age,
they are more likely to experi-
ence symptoms, which include
pain, bladder pressure, heavy or
prolonged menstrual periods
and unusual monthly bleeding.
An estimated 20 to 40 percent
of women over age 35 have fi-
broids large enough to cause
symptoms.
Nine years ago, Darlene
Melton had a surgical proce-
dure called myomectomy to re-


move uterine fibroids. When
bothersome symptoms re-
turned, she thought she would
need a hysterectomy. Mayo
Clinic gynecologist Dr. Paul Pe-
titt referred her to Interventional
Radiology. She was elated
when McKinney told her she
had an alternative.
"I felt there was no need to
lose my female organs if it was-
n't a life-threatening situation,"
Melton says. 'I can't describe
how much better I feel to have
found out about this procedure
and not to,have had a hysterec-
tomy.?' , . :: *, ,"
"A uterine-sparing procedure
is a very personal decision for
many women," McKinney
says. "UFE and myomectomy
are uterine-sparing procedures.
One advantage of UFE is it can
treat every fibroid, whereas my-
omectomy can only treat the
largest ones or the ones doctors
can see during the procedure."
Another advantage: UFE has a
higher success rate in relieving
symptoms than myomectomy.
About 85 percent of women ex-
perience marked improvement
in symptoms following UFE. "I
talk about the benefits of each
procedure with my patients,
even hysterectomy," McKinney
says. "I try to have an honest
discussion about the various op-
tions, and ultimately, the choice.
of procedure is their decision."
One issue McKinney dis-
cusses is future fertility. My-
omectomy preserves a woman's
fertility; UFE may not. "There
are reports in the literature of
women who have become preg-
nant after UFE," McKinney
says. "And there are some arti-


cles that state that UFE poses an
increased risk of pre-term labor
and Cesarean sections for those
women. But other women have
successfully gotten pregnant,
carried to term and delivered.
We just don't know yet. So I tell
women if they plan on future
pregnancies, they should con-
sider an alternative."
To undergo UFE, a woman is
sedated before doctors make a
small incision in the groin
above the femoral artery. They
insert a catheter into the artery
and guide it toinAftlfJitlhUterite
arteries. Then Lhey. inject ,-inx
plastichR'1el 'abi'tWtff fdie* of
sand grains, through the
catheter and into the artery. The
particles lodge in the tiny arter-
.ies branching off from the uter-
ine artery, which supplies blood
to the fibroids. Doctors then in-
ject the spheres into the oppo-
site uterine artery. The spheres
cut off the blood supply, and the
fibroids begin to shrink.
Patients stay overnight at St.
Luke's Hospital and are given
pain and anti-inflammatory
medications for discomfort and
cramping. These side effects
subside in a few days. The
physician's office follows up
with the patient over the phone
once she goes home, and return
visits are scheduled in two to
four weeks and again at six
months.
Women considering uterine
fibroid embolization must first
be evaluated by a gynecologist
to make sure their symptoms
are not caused by anything
more serious than fibroids. In-
terested patients may call 904-
296-3867.


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FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005










Suwannee County officials sworn in


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NO RETIREMENT IN SIGHT FOR BURNHAM: George Burnham takes
his oath as Suwannee County Tax Collector while his wife, Sheila,
smiles her approval while Third Circuit Judge Tom Kennon adminis-
ters the oath. Burnham then gave a rousing speech to the large
number of guests at the swearing in ceremony, sounding much like
he has no retirement in sight after 28 years in office.
- Photo: Susan K. Lamb


NEW SHERIFF: Newly installed Suwannee County Sheriff Tony
Cameron told the audience immediately after taking the ceremonial
oath that he is humbled by his new job and the support of the peo-
ple and will do his best to serve the public. Cameron's wife, Melissa,
proudly attached Cameron's new official badge as sheriff immedi-
ately after he took his oath as the audience gave its loud approval. -
- Photo: Susan K. Lamb


� ,.. 3
- ,,-,7


BEGINNING HER THIRD TERM: Glenda Williams began her third
term as supervisor of elections Jan. 4 when long-time friend Third
Circuit Judge Tom Kennon administers the oath while Williams' hus-
band, Wesley, holds the bible. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb
-- - ',--

All.> 3,
g.1.


TAKING THE OATH AFTER A LONG WAIT: Suwannee County Sheriff Tony Cameron takes the oath of of-
fice administered by Third Circuit Judge Tom Kennon, right, while Cameron's wife, Melissa, center, holds
the bible and their two children, Bo Garrett and Denver, watch with intensity. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb


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BEGINNING A SECOND TERM: Kenneth Dasher, second from left, raises his right hand to swear on the
bible held by his mother, Myrle Dasher that he will uphold the laws of the state as Suwannee County
Clerk of Court. Third Circuit Judge Tom Kennon, right, administers the oath, while Dasher's wife, Gar-
nett, left, looks on. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb


tv"'


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i'


HIS HONOR: His honor, Suwannee County Judge Bill Slaughter, left, takes his oath of office while Third
Circuit Judge Tom Kennon administers the oath. Slaughter's wife, Tina, holds the bible. Slaughter has
served 10 years as county judge. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb
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AFTER 26 YEARS, ONE MORE TERM TO GO: Third Circuit State Attorney Jerry M. Blair, left, takes his
oath from Third Circuit Judge Tom Kennon, right, as Blair's wife, Luanne, holds the bible Jan. 4 at the
Suwannee County Courthouse. Blair has served 26 years as state attorney and says he will retire after
this four-year term. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb


POLITICAL GIANT IN SUWANNEE COUNTY: Suwannee County
Property Appraiser Lamar Jenkins is a giant in the Suwannee Coun-
ty world of politics. Jenkins, shown here taking his oath from Third
Circuit Judge Tom Kennon while Jenkins' wife, Hazel, holds the
bible, has served for 32 years as property appraiser and took his
ninth oath of office Jan. 4 as he begins another four-year term.
- Photo: Susan K. Lamb


THE POLITICAL CAKE: The courtroom was packed Jan. 4 at the
Suwannee County Courthouse when seven elected officials took of-
fice, followed by a reception of punch and cake. This beautiful cake
was red, white and blue, well, maybe it was more green, inside but
was simply delicious and fed the more than 200 people who attend-
ed the event at 4 p.m. - Photo: Susan K. Lamb


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PAGE 8A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


. ' ., - ._ ,- , -.'- \, _ - '
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PAGE 9A


n I fLAY ,


Cub Scouts hold Christmas party at December pack meeting


Thomas R. Burnett
Webelos Den Leader

The pack meeting, which is
held monthly at the Live Oak
Church of Christ on SR 51 S.,
1497 Irvin Ave., opened with
the presentation of the flags by
two Scouts, followed by an in-
vocation by the Cubmaster
John Good.
Cubmaster Good presented
the Scouts who participated in
the recent popcorn fund-raising
with their prizes. In particular, a
special presentation was made
to Webelos Scout Collin
Shields for selling the most
within the pack.
After the individual awards


were presented, all the boys
gathered for a group
picture. Although many photos
were taken by numerous pho-
tographers, the boys' excite-
ment prevented there being a
perfect one in which everyone
was looking forward with a full
view of all faces. C'est la vie!
Then came the FUN! The
dens gathered in circles at the
front of the room. Each Scout
brought a present for another in
his den. Presents were moved
around a circle
while music played.. When the
music stopped, the present in
the lap of each scout belonged
to that scout. Lots of noise
cane with the opening of the
presents!


The "Guest of Honor" then
came with a bag full of
toys. The Cub Scouts, along
with their siblings, got into a
long line to tell Santa what they
wanted for Christmas as well as
to receive a toy to play with un-
til "The Day."
After all the children had fin-
ished giving their lists to Santa,
the Scouts and their
families enjoyed light refresh-
ments. Thank goodness a few
adults remained to clean up af-
ter an exciting evening!
The Cub Scout Wolf, Bear,
and Webelos dens weekly dur-
ing the school year on Thurs-
day nights at the church. The
Tiger Den (first graders) meet a
couple of times per m6nth, ei-


their at the church or at some
other convenient time at a dif-
ferent location. The monthly
pack meeting is usually held on
the fourth Thursday night,
6:30-8 p.m. during which time
the dens perform skits and the
scouts receive awards earned
during the previous
month. There are. numerous
pack activities during the
school year, e.g., hiking, pic-
nics, camping, bike trips, and
camping! Summertime activi-
ties include two or three pack
activities. The Cub Scouting
activities involve both the scout
and his family. All family
members are welcome to par-
ticipate in the activities such as
camping, bike rides, car wash-


es, etc.
While the Tiger Cub (first
graders) must have his adult
parent/guardian with him dur-
ing den meetings, the older
Scouts (second - fifth graders)
do not. First through third
graders must have a
parent/guardian along for cam-
pouts. Fourth and fifth graders
(Webelos scouts) may camp
without a parent/guardian. A
Scout may not sleep in a tent by
himself, nor with any adult that
is not his parent/guardian. He
may share a tent with other Cub
Scouts. For additional informa-
tion, visit the pack's web site at
www.pack408.net, or contact
the Cubmaster John Good,
386-362-3953, or by e-mail,


cubmaster@pack408.net.
Boy Scout Troop 693 meets
on Monday nights, 7 p.m.-8:30
p.m., at the Shriner's Club on
100th Street, just east of US
129 S., Live Oak. It is for boys
11 - 17. It has monthly activi-
ties, e.g., campouts. For addi-
tional information, contact the
Scoutmaster Harry Reeve, at
386-776-2863, or 386-590-
6121, or via e-
mail, smtroop693@alltel.net.
Venture Crew 693 is made
up of 14 - 18 year-old coeds
who plan their own activities
under the direction of adult
leadership. For additional in-
formation, contact Yvette Han-
non, 386-362-2275, or Patty
Roach, 386-963-4962.


, - ' ."
af@


CUB SCOUT PACK 408 PRIZES FOR HIGHEST SALES OF POPCORN:
Cubmaster John Good awards Collin Shields his prizes for having
the highest sales in the recent popcorn fund-raiser.


PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE: We-
belos 1 Scout C.J. Peaden pre-
sents U.S. flag during the
Pledge of Allegiance at opening
of December meeting of Cub
Scout Pack 408.


CUB SCOUT PACK 408 DECEMBER MEETING: Webelos den waiting
for the meeting to begin with Assistant Webelos Den, Leader, C.A.
Peaden.


PRESENTATION OF FLAGS:
Wolf Scout presents Pack 408
flag at December meeting of Cub
Scout Pack 408.


CUB SCOUT PACK 408 VISITED BY SANTA: Santa with waiting chil-
dren at the Christmas party.


WAITINGFOR THE MUSIC: Webelos Den wait for the music to be-
ginthe,"musical chairs of presents."


CUB SCOUT PACK 408 AWARD CEREMONY: Bear Den Leader Tere-
sa Collins presents awards to her Bear son, David Collins at the De-
cember meeting.


AWARD CEREMONY AT DECEMBER MEETING (
PACK 408: Bear Scout Cody Powell receives award
Den Leader Teresa Collins.


HELLO SANTA: Santa with Dawn Spivey attempts to coax her two-
year-old daughter to say hello to Santa at the Cub Scout Pack 408
Christmas party.


IF CUB SCOUT
Is from his Bear .




a-111


ELECTIONS ON GOOD TIMES: Assistant Webelos Den Leader C.A.
Peaden and his Webelos Scout son, C.J. Peaden, reflect on some
good times.


All photos
by Thomas R. Burnett


54-W
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The First 2005 GED Test will be given/

January 10 & 11 at 4:00 p.m.,

� Monday and Tuesday

a You must attend the registration session
Wednesday, Jan. 5 at 9 a.m. & 6 p.m.


Call Lynn Lee at


364-2782
to sign up for registration.


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BoardCertified
Dermatologist
SLOWED WOUND
HEALING
If you are a smoker, you are
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unhealthy effect that your habit has
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capillaries to compromise wound
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research also points to secondhand
smoke's ability to exert similar
unwanted effects. When researchers
examined the effects of passive
smoke on fibroblasts (cells that play
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they found that secondhand smoke
impairs the ability of the specialized
cells to migrate toward the wound
site. These effects contribute to
abnormal healing and may help
explain why people who are
consistently exposed to secondhand
smoke suffer from slow healing and
excessive scarring of wounds.
By now, nearly everyone is aware
of smoking's damaging health
effects. Not only does smoking have
serious effects on your skin, but also
increases the risk of developing
diseases and conditions in other
areas of the body. Quitting smoking
leads to immediate and long-term
health benefits. When you require
the care of a dermatologist, contact
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PAGE 10A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 7 2005


,


I


. -- tifi









Outuannt democrat Lady Bulldog basketball tonight!
The Lady Dogs take on Florida High Friday, Jan. 7 in the Dog House. Game time is
Section B 7:30 p.m. Come out and show your support for the Lady Dog basketball team
Friday, January 7, 2005


. . . , , - -. . .--


Four Bulldogs make All First Coast teams


Thc

EndZone!
With Jeffrey A. Burnam
College Football Columnist
Running off some more
at the computer .......Oh
my, I'm an upsetting 16-11
(60%) so far this bowl sea-
son, and trust me there have
been plenty of upsets. I still
can't believe that LSU was
beaten on the last play of the
game against Iowa, and Vir-
ginia blew a 14-point lead to
Fresno State. As for one of
the other bowl games, I spent
New Year's Day watching
Florida State play West Vir-
ginia in the 60th Gator Bowl
in Jacksonville: Even though
FSU won 30-18 over an av-
erage. West Virginia team, I
left the Gator Bowl with
some interesting thoughts:
First of all, it was one of the
most boring FSU football
games I have ever watched. I
don't know what Was worse,
all the 28 penalties, (includ-
ing A.J. Nickelson for throw-

SEE ENDZONE, PAGE 2B



lipcoming Ropirigs:
Jan. 21-22 Kenny' Viliafl~a
Memorial Roping
The National Team Roping
League is sponsoring a huge
roping Jan. 21-22 at the Tren-
ton Rodeo Arena in honor of
the late Kenny Williams.
Williams is the father ofeight-
time reigning world champion
roper Speedy Williams.

Feb.19 the NTRL is hosting
a roping at Smittys Western
Store rodeo arena.

FWC

WEEKLY

REPORT
Dec. 17-23, 2004
This report represents some
significant events the FWC
handled over the past week;
however, it does not include all
actions taken by the Division
of Law Enforcement.
DIXIE COUNTY
Dec. 17 - Officer Darby But-
ler worked the Horseshoe
Beach area of Dixie Count,. At
approximately 5 p.m., Butler
received information about a
man wvho had killed an illegal
deer. Butler located the man
and the deer remains tith
antlers approximately one inch
in length. Butler issued the
man a citation for taking
antlerless deer. A second man
was issued a warning for pos-
session of antlerless deer be-
cause he had allowed the
shooter to clean the deer on Iiis
property. The meat and carcass
were seized for evidence.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
Dec. 18 and 19 - FWC Offi-
cers Dennis Sharpe and Rod-
ney Boone worked Mallory
Swamp Wildlife Management
Area concentrating on hunting
in closed areas and illegally
hunting with dogs. Officers
have written several warnings
this year to individuals illegal-
ly hunting with dogs and try-
ing to :circumvent the nirule.
During the weekend detail, of-
ficers issued six citations for
illegal hunting with dogs.


H Uf--- aL' B1f.1 xI-� .... I .... ] #8 Bruce Johnson makes 'All-
#1 Patrick Cherry makes AllFirst #70 A.J. Schuler makes All First #10 Billy Moran makes All-First First Coast Honorable Mention
Coast Second Team as a wide re- Coast Second Team as.an offen- Coast Honorable Mention Team Team as a defensive back.


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Four Bulldogs were named
to the All-First Coast All-Star
teams. Patrick Cherry was
named to the Second Team Of-
fense as a wide receiver.
A.J. Schuler was named to
the Second Team Offense as an
offensive lineman.
Billy Moran was an honor-
able mention Athlete and
Bruce Johnson was an honor-
able mention defensive back.


ceiver. - Photo: Janet Schrader sive lineman. - Photo: Janet Schraderr as an athlete. - Photo: Janet Schrader - Photo: JanetSchrader SEE FOUR, PAGE 3B


Florida football players are tops in the nation again


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter

Florida's All-Stars defeated
the California high school All-
Stars for the fourth time in six
years Sunda\ night, Jan. 2, in
the Orange Bowl. The final
few seconds of the game were
exciting as California made a
last ditch effort to tie the game
with no minutes left to play.
But the final outcome proved
what all Florida high school
football fans have always
known, Florida has the best.
Florida beat California 24-22.
Suwannee's Bruce Johnson


Florida All-Stars. Johnson
played under his number-eight
as a corerback. It was excit-
ing for Suwannee fans to see
that familiar green and white
helmet with the big Suwannee
S flash across the TV screen.
Two players from Madison
competed, in the game with
Johnson and a host of players
chosen for their spectacular
skills and athletic ability.'Tal-
lahassee Lincoln head coach
David Wilson led the Florida
t , iif-m n ta r -, t o


team couacni ng sta
Many of the p
Johnson, have alri
letters of commit


X '3




* ' ,, ,',
4 . ..


)layers, like . ..1.... , .
eady signed ,'. . ' ,
ment to at-
Bruce Johnson wore his green and white helmet for the California/Florida Bowl. He was number-eight as
DA, PAGE 2B 1vWll'a 11a rnerbackfor the winning Florida All-Stars. - Pnoilo paul bu1hnan ',' ..

Suwannee wrestling takes

S second place at huge

J Georgia tournament


PRESTON HART-VOTED OUTSTANDING WRESTLER AGAIN! Hart has been voted Outstanding Wrestler
for the second tournament in a row. Here he tries to figure out how to completely incapacitate his oppo-
nent, something he's really good at doing. Prnio J J P nIr, rjjr.r .:,: ,...


~hIy I __________


Janet Schrader-Seccafico
Democrat Reporter
Suwannee wrestling trav-
eled to Kinmsland in South
Georgia Dec. 17-18 and
competed against some of
the largest and toughest
wrestling programs in Geor-
gia. Once again Suwannee's
state champ. Preston Hart,
aas named Outstanding
Wrestler of the tournament.


Suwannee had ' three
champs at the tournament.
Preston Hart won the 160
weight class. Michael
Wright was champ in the 215
weight class and Barney
Wainw right took the gold in
the 135 \\eight class.
The Bulldog wrestlers had
two second place wrestlers.
Le i Wainw\right placed sec-
ond in the 112 weight class

SEE SUWANNEE, PAGE 3B


Suwannee Lady Dog lifters do well:in three-way meet

I8 .:Janet Schrader-
".Seccafico
AAA Democrat Reporter


2004-05 Suwannee girls weightlifting team. Back row I to r: Keedra Virgil, Megan Jansen, Kayla Gandiana Tracy Minix and Coach Jimmy Clay.
Front row I to r: Tilda Howard, Mindy Stever, Alex Camunas and Jessica Nelson. In front is star lifter Danrielle Smith.
- Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Suwannee was outnum-
bered during the recent
three-w\ay meet between
Columbia, Baker and
Suwannee. According to
girls weightlifting coach
Jimm) Clay, Baker and Co-
lumbia's teams outnUm-
bered the Lady Dogs 2-1.
But Suwannee's lifters did
well, most placing in the
top three of their weight-
class.
Danielle Smith took first
place in the heavy-weight
division. Smith has taken
gold in every meet so far
this year. According to
Clay she is on her way to
doing well at the state
meet.
Jan. 11, Suwannee is
hosting a sectional meet. It
starts at 2 p.m. Come out
and cheer for the Lady
Dogs. Go Suwannee!
Janet Schrader-Seccafico
may be reached by calling
1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
by e-mail at janet.schrad-
er@gaflnews.com.


I- kV , ' , ,
,*.-" ' <1-"-.,







1 oni ULu U DMCA/ OARDY JNA 7 20


EndZone


Continued From Page 1B

ing the football in the stands
after he thought he had
scored a touchdown), the
thousands of empty seats, or
the way FSU continues to
play. They may have won
the game, but it was real
ugly, just like the entire sea-
son has been. But then
again, many college teams
and their fans would take a
nine win season, with a
bowl victory any time!
.......... As for Gator fans,
the Peach Bowl was not
much better, considering the
Miami Hurricanes pretty
much dominated the entire
game with a 27-10 victory.
This could not have been the
same Florida team that upset
FSU back on November 20.
For the third consecutive
year, the Gators finish the


season with five losses, in-
cluding three consecutive
bowl losses, and four out of
the last five years. As for
Chris Leak, he looked more
like Chris Rix. He was obvi-
ously rattled by the early
Miami pass rush; he had
trouble pulling the trigger
on many passes, and was
way off on his accuracy. Ru-
mor has it that Leak had
some arm problems. Speak-
ing of the Gator problems,
what in the world was
wrong with the Gator spe-
cial teams play, which had
been one of the strong
points this year? UF had a
blocked field goal returned
for a touchdown, and a punt
returned for a touchdown,
and a missed Gator field
goal, which I think had a
huge impact on the game.
Just for the, record, former


Florida


Continued From Page 1B

tend colleges under scholar-
ships. Johnson was playing on
his future home field as he has
signed for the University of
Miami.
Leading the Florida All-
Stars as quarterback for most
of the game was Harrison
Beck from Countryside High
near Tampa. Beck completed
12 of 18 passes for 94 yards
and led two first half touch-
down drives. Beck has com-
mitted to Nebraska.
Mark Sanchez led the Cali-
fornia team. Sanchez is the
nation's top-rated quarter-
back. He completed 13 of 25
passes for 234 yards with two
interceptions. Sanchez has
committed to USC. Derrick
Shaw, California's other quar-
terback has committed to Mi-


ami. He completed 6 for 10
for 31 yards and two intercep-
tions.
Florida's defense was the
name of the. game. Tyler
Roberts from Edgewater High
made two interceptions.
Kendrick Stewart of Lakeland
made two huge sacks.
Demetrice Morley of Mia-
mi Killian scored Florida's
last TD. Antwon Smith made
two touchdowns and rushed
for over 100 yards.
This was the first time for
the Cal/Florida Bowl to be
held in the Orange Bowl. Less
than 500 fans showed up to
watch. The game was broad-
cast on FSN.
Janet Schrader may be
reached by calling 1/386/362-
1734 ext. 134 or by e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.co
m.


Four


Continued From Page 1B

It's a huge honor to make
the tirs Coast teams because
Suwannee is really on the out-
skirts of the area which fea-
tures such schools as Bolles,


2004 Chevy Mal






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2004 Pontiac Su



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St. Augustine, Columbia, ease
and Jackson.
Janet Schrader may be
reached by calling 7/36/'362-
1734 ext. 134 or by e-mail at
janet.schrader@gaflnews.co


Florida's 2005 Football Schedule


Date
Sept. 3
Sept. 10
Sept. 17
Sept. 24
Oct. 1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15
Oct. 29
Nov. 5
Nov. 12
Nov. 26


head coach Ron Zook had
coached the special teams
play all year except in the
Peach Bowl. I still say if
Zook had coached the Gators
in the Peach Bowl, they
would have won ...........
With Miami's victory over
Florida in the Peach Bowl,
the Canes have now beaten
FSU and Florida each six
consecutive times. Before
Nole fans laugh at the
Gators, they might need to
know that FSU opens next
season against those same
old Canes in Tallahassee on
Labor Day evening on Sep-
tember 5. The early line has
Miami favored again by a
field goal! ....... Chris Rix's
FSU career ended on New
Year's Day, just about as I
expected it to end. He had
three turnovers, one touch-
down pass, and was almost
taken out at halftime by head
coach Bobby Bowden, which
sounds like his entire FSU.
career. Just for the Chris Rix
record, he finished with a 28-
11 record as the starting
quarterback, with 59
turnovers, including 40 inter-
ceptions, 63 touchdown
passes, 2 illegal parking tick-
ets in handicapped spaces, 2
speeding tickets on the same
day, and a missed Religion
final exam, which made him
ineligible for the 2002 Sugar
Bowl against Georgia. To say
the least, Rix has made a lot
of bad decisions off and on


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WES HANEY
Chevrolet |
Just East Of Downtown Live Oak, FL on Highway 90 (386) 362-2976 o


Opponent
Wyoming
La. Tech
Tennessee
Kentucky
Alabama
Mississippi State
LSU
Georgia
Vanderbilt
South Carolina
Florida State


the field. Is it ironic or what,
that his last collegiate pass at
FSU was an interception?
....... Question of the week:
What collegiate team has the
most victories in college
football history? ...... The
new "Urban Renewal" starts
this week as new Florida
head coach Urban Meyer be-
gins his official duties as the
head coach at the University
of Florida. He will meet with
all players, and hit the re-
cruiting trail. Meyer did fin-
ish his season at Utah with a
perfect 12-0, including a Fi-
esta Bowl win over Pitts-
burgh, 35-7. The very first
thing he will learn as head
Gator is that it's going to be
a lot whole tougher to finish
at 12-0 in the Southeastern
Conference than the Moun-
tain West Conference. Meyer
will begin his Gator coach-
ing career against Wyoming
on Sept. 3, in the Swamp
......... The Florida-Florida
State game has been changed
from the Saturday before
Thanksgiving to the Satur-
day after Thanksgiving,
which will be on November
26. Since the game will be in
Gainesville, UF officials can
change the date of the game


Site
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Lexington, Ky.
Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Gainesville
Baton Rouge, La.
Jacksonville, Fl.
Gainesville, Fl.
Columbia, S.C.
Gainesville


to the week after Thanksgiv-
ing. When the game is
played in Tallahassee in No-
vember 2006, look for FSU
officials to change the date
back to the week of the Sat-
urday before Thanksgiving.
Is there anything a Gator and
Seminole can agree on?
......... Last week, I said that
FSU head coach Bobby
Bowden had the best bowl
winning percentage of any
active coach. With the victo-
ry over West Virginia in the
Gator Bowl, Bowden is now
the all-time leader of all
coaches in college football
history in bowl games with a
winning percentage of 19-8-
1 (.692). The victory also
leaves Bowden only one vic-
tory behind all-time bowl
leader Joe Paterno, who has
20 bowl victories ........ I
bet that you did not know
that Bobby Bowden was the
offensive coordinator for 4
years at West Virginia before
being named head coach in
1970. As head coach, he
compiled an impressive
record of 42-26, before be-
ing named FSU head coach
in 1976 ........ Last week,
Texas head coach Mack
Brown signed a 10-year $25


million contract that would
keep him at the school
through 2014. 'Can you
imagine what his contract
would have been if he could
only just beat Oklahoma? I
still say that Mack Brown
will be the very first choice
to replace Bowden when he
finally decides to retire
....... Answer: Michigan
has won 842 college football
games in history. Just to
show you how crazy this
college football season has
been just consider this: Mia-
mi beat FSU, who beat
Clemson, who lost to Duke,
who lost to North Carolina,
who beat Miami, who lost.to
Clemson! From head coach-
ing firings to million dollar
contracts, and the controver-
sy of the BCS, it has truly
.been a crazy year, but an ex-
citing year of college foot-
ball. By the way, Whoever is
faithful in very little is also
faithful in much.
I will catch you next week
with the remaining bowl
coverage in .......... The
EndZone!
Jeffrey A. Burnam can be
reached for comments/sug-
gestions at jaburnam@all-
tel.net


4 The Racing lone


Haywood ready for Rolex 24 and

the newly renovated infield


It's hard to imagine any
driver that has turned more
laps at historic Daytona Inter-
national Speedway than five-
time Rolex 24 At Daytona
champion Hurley Haywood.
Haywood, who drives for
the No. 59 Porsche FABCAR
Daytona Prototype for Bru-
mos Racing in the Rolex
Sports Car Series, participat-
ed in the final monthly infield
renovation update with
Speedway President Robin
Braig, who reported that the
multi-faceted project remains
on schedule for the Grand
Opening with the 43rd an-
niversary of the Rolex 24 on
Feb. 5-6.
Haywood, who will make
his- 32nd start in the 2005
Rolex 24, says the multi-mil-
lion dollar renovation will
only enhance the twice-
around-the-clock challenge
for both competitors and
sports car fans.
"I'm really looking for-
ward to the Rolex 24 At Day-
tona," Haywood said. "Being
here for 36 years, you knew
where all the bathrooms and
the good parking spaces
were. I had my own secret
parking space with my secret
identification to get me in
here. Now it's all new and
God knows what I'm going to
do.
"The 24-hour race is going
to be special because this is
going to be the inaugural race
for this facility. Even though
the pavement is, not new, it's a
whole new look and it's go-
ing to be really exciting for
the competitors and the fans."
New amenities being added
to the historic facility in-
clude:
* New NASCAR NEXTEL
Cup and NASCAR Busch Se-
ries garages
* Waterfront specialty ve-


hide parking along the banks
of Lake Lloyd
* In Turn 1, a new massive
tunnel
* New Gatorade Victory
Lane and Daytona 500 Club
* FanZone with prime
viewing of the garages and
inspection bays
SSaid Haywood: "This is a
facility that has really *been
designed for the fans. The
fans are very important and
when you walk out there and
see it and see where the fans
can go and get as close to the
teams and drivers is truly re-
markable."
While looking at the ongo-
ing construction of the new
Daytona International Speed-
way infield, Haywood did re-
call some of his memories of
"The World Center of Rac-
ing" and how important
sports car racing is to the fa-
cility.
"I remember back very ear-
ly in my career, Bill (France)
Sr. was walking down the
front pits with me," Haywood
said. "He was very tall and
had his arm wrapped around
my shoulder. He was remi-
niscing about what he
thought was important and
why he liked sports car rac-
ing.
"The France family has
been so instrumental in the
development of sports car
racing. When you look at this
facility, you think of stock
car racing. But really the
France family has a love of
sports car racing and they
like that European flavor."
While Haywood's five
overall Rolex 24 victories
stand alone at the top of the
win's chart, he still wants to
win the world's toughest and
most demanding endurance
race at least one more time.
But he knows as the Daytona


Prototype class, the premier
division in the Rolex Sports
Car Series, continues to
grow, the competition will
only get tougher.
"Two years ago when we
started this Daytona Proto-
type, we had only six cars
running," Haywood said.
"People immediately saw
what a really good program
this was going to be. People
came on board and bought
new cars and this year, I think
we'll have close to 30 cars
for Rolex.
"The racing is-going to be
tight and any of those 30 cars
can win the race. We've got
drivers from all over the
world . . . Indy car drivers,
Formula One drivers and all
kinds of guys that are coming
here in some cases tasting
these cars for the first time.
I'm really looking forward to
it. Our team has two cars -
the 58 and 59 - and we've got
a good driver lineup and a
strong team. I'm hoping to
add one more 24 hour under
my belt. I'm going to keep
doing this until I get it. I want
that sixth overall win here."
Race fans hoping to catch a
glimpse of the massive con-
struction project can visit
DAYTONA USA and take
the Speedway Tour, which
costs $7.50 plus tax. The
Oldfield Grandstand is also
open and free to the public.
The Speedway's Web site,
www.daytonainternational-
speedway.com, will also have
weekly updates on the infield
renovation project.
Tickets for Speedweeks
2005 events, including the
47th annual Daytona 500 on
Sunday, Feb. 20, are avail-
able online at www.dayton-
ainternationalspeedway.com
or by calling 1-800-PIT-
SHOP.


I '


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


DAf' C OP






PAGE 3B


NFCC women's fast-pitch

softball try-outs Jan. 8 _ -


North Florida Community
College (NFCC) is holding
try-outs for the Lady Sen-
tinels fast-pitch softball
team on Saturday, Jan. 8 be-
ginning at 2 p.m. at the
Frank Cantey Softball Field,
located on the NFCC cam-


pus in Madison.
The try-out is open to fe-
male athletes in NFCC's six
county service area and be-
yond who are currently en-
rolled at NFCC or who plan
to attend NFCC this semes-
ter.


The Lady Sentinels com-
pete in the Panhandle Con-
ference. For more informa-
tion contact Joe Morabito at
850-973-1671 or e-mail
morabitoj@nfcc.edu. Visit
NFCC athletics, on-line at
www.nfcc.edu.


Haliegh Bates, Miss Florida

Rodeo USA 2004-2005 Benefit

Jackpot Barrel Race on Jan. 7


Haliegh Bates, Miss
Florida Rodeo USA 2004-
2005 Benefit Jackpot Barrel
Race on Friday, Jan. 7,
2005, at the Bob Holmes
Rodeo Arena at the Colise-
um Complex in Live Oak.
$500 added money! $30 en-
try fee, $4 exhibition and a


75 percent payback. NBHA
rules apply. Exhibition from
5- 6:45 p.m., show begins at
7 p.m. NOTE: Added Mon-
ey: 75-100 riders = $500
and 4D payout; under 75
riders = $250 and 3D pay-
out. Barrel racers are asked
to participate in the fund-


raiser to help send her to
Oklahoma to compete in the
Miss Rodeo USA Pageant
for the IRPA Rodeo. For
more info, call Sandy Mer-
ritt at 386-590-0662, Rita
Bates at 386-752-9148 or
Darrel Summers at 386-
935-0447.


Pro Trucks and Quick Kids added

to River Fest 300 at New Smyrna

Speedway Jan. 8


. The first race of the new
year at New Smyrna Speed-
way will be January 8 and the
River Fest 300, formerly
known as the Red Eye 100.
Not only will the Super Lates
go for 100 laps but also on the
program will be the Late Mod-
els, Open Wheel Modifieds,
Sportsman, Super Stock, Mini
Stock and Strictly Stock plus
FASCAR'S newest touring se-
ries the FASCAR Pro Trucks
and Quick Kids.
January 8 will mark the de-
but for the Pro Trucks and
Quick Kids before the Pro
Trucks go to Lakeland's USA
International and SpeedFest
2005. All Quick Kids drivers
are asked to call the speedway
386-427-4129 and let us know

Auto Body and
Auto Tech
Classes begin
January 3.
Call
(386) 364-2798
for more
information.

SUWANNEE--F
HAM TONPil
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 364-2750


you are coming On the 8th.
This way we will know how
many trucks are ready for the
new 2005 season and let our
fans know what to expect on
the 8th.
Last year's winner of the
Red Eye 100, now the River
Fest 300, was B.J. McLeod of
Wachulla. B.J. has spent
more time rebuilding his
hometown after Hurricane


Charley devastated it than rac-
ing in the latter part of 2004.
Hopefully B.J. will have an-
other good beginning in 2005
and take home another win.
Pro Trucks and Quick Kids
are asked to call New Smyrna
Speedway and let us know if
you are coming. Pit gates will
open at 2 p.m. on Saturday,
January 8th with racing at 7:30
p.m.


Barney Wainwright is tournament champion in the 135 weightclass. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico

,:....M - ...


.,,.,, -- ,..

kK,

Michael Wright takes the tournament championship in the 215 weight class. - Photo: Janet Schrader-Seccafico


Suwannee
Continued From Page 1B
and Caleb Wainwrigh
placed second in the 11I
weightclass.
William McCrimon an
Lee Laxton both place
third.
"As a team, I think ou
skills are starting to im
prove," Coach David Laxtoi
said. "Hopefully this wil


continue during Christmas 107.5, Fitzgerald and Cook
work-outs." County tied for fifth with 82
t North Gwinnette won the points each.
9 tournament with 219 points. Janet Schrader may be
Suwannee placed second reached by calling
d with 167 points. Valdosta 1/386/362-1734 ext. 134 or
d placed third with 134, Cam- by e-mail at janet.schrad-
den County fourth with er@gaflnews.com
r
-


n
11


49 BG 55
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JOHN'S LAWN EQUIPMENT

1629 Ohio Ave. N. * Live Oak, FL 32064
(386] 362-5020 * 1-800-648-285C


Are you read yfor a


4 /Look

+-v++ What


+a ^You

Missed...

...if you missed the last edition of
Gle 4rumanner emnorrat
~ 9-year-old dies after drivinglA'TV in front of
oncomirg semi
-'Tony Cameron taks over as newu sheriff
of ~uwanlnee County
- 'filitness' inme burns early1an. 3
~ Pediatric flu vaccine availa-&;,
- Legislative hearing for Ian. 6, 2005
- Purse snatchirit Iads to car chase, arrest
----------- -------------.------. -
To subscribe to huuanutne Blentorat call (386) 362-1734 or complete this
coupon and mail to: ,numaiere ilemonrat, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064
I 1 Year, In-County 0 1 Year, Out-of-County
128.00 140.00
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PAGE 4B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005





*The Racing Zone




Daytona Internaional Speedway re-opens or ARCA RE/MAX Series slng


For the first time since the
Pepsi 400 in July, the roar of
stock cars could be heard at
historic Daytona International
Speedway.
The ARCA RE/MAX Series
kicked off a two-day test ses-
sion on Saturday at "The
World Center of Racing" in
preparation for the season-
opening Advance Discount
Auto Parts 200 on Saturday,
Feb. 12.
The Speedway has been un-
dergoing a multi-million, mul-
ti-faceted infield renovation,


which included new
NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Se-
ries and Busch Series garages,
new Gatorade Victory Lane
and Daytona 500 Club, a mas-
sive Turn 1 tunnel, a uniquely
designed FanZone and water-
front specialty vehicle park-
ing.
SThe more than 30 ARCA
RE/MAX Series teams are
based out of the Busch Series
garages on the west end of the
Speedway for the two-day test
session. Many of the drivers
were impressed by all the in-


field renovations, which will
be completed in time for the
Grand Opening on Feb. 5-6 at
the Rolex 24 At Daytona.
"It's impressive what
they've done," said veteran
driver Mark Gibson, a Day-
tona Beach, native and the all-
time leader in Advance Dis-
count Auto Parts 200 starts
with 19. "The France family,
they're stepping up their deal.
It's going to make everybody
stand up and look. It looks
pretty fan friendly. The track
needed a renovation. It's been


TEST SPEEDS


Testing Speeds from Saturday's ARCA
RE/MAX Series test session in preparation
for the Feb. 12 Advance Discount Auto Parts
200 at Daytona International Speedway:
1. Johnn\ Leonard. Pontiac,
183.076 mph
2. Walt Brannen, Dodge. 183.046
3. Mike Harmon. Chevrolet, 182.589
4. Dan Shaver, Pontiac. 182.423
5. Christi Passmore, Ford, 182.386
6. TJ. Bell, Chevrolet, 182.002
7. Ryan Howard, Pontiac. 181.668
8. A.J. Henriksen, Ford. 181.565
9. David Ragan Dodge, 181.547
10. Kertus Davis. Chevrolet, 181.503
11. Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 181.496
12. Ken Weaver, Che\rolet. 181.251
13. Chad McCumbee.
Chevrolet, 181.134
14. Jerick Johnson. Ford. 180.832
15. Brandon Knupp, Ford. 180.712
16. Marc Mitchell, Chevrolet. 180.708


Joey Miller. Dodge, 180.567
Kyle KrisilotT, Chevrolet. 180.386
Billy Venturini, Chevrolet, 180.130
GR Smith. Ford, 179.993
Robert Richardson. Ford, 179.806
Bobby Gerhart, Chevrolet. 179.533
Nan Turbeville. Ford, 1'79.208
James Sejd. Ford, 178.699
Mario Gosselin. 178.600
Zack Chapel. Che\rolet. 178.235
Cory Witherill, Dodge, 177.788
Clair Zimmerman.
Chevrolet, 177.019
Brian Keselowski. Ford, 176.554
Bryan Gandy. Ford. 176.536
Butch Jar% is. Chevrolet, 176.318
Sam Beam. Pontiac, 175.922
Ed Kennedy, Chevrolet, 175.384
Steve Bramley, Chevrolet. 175.234
Andy Belmont. Ford. 173.980
Jason Basham, 166.509
Casey Dean, Ford. 152.947


like this ever since I've been
coming here in 1982. I'm get-
ting to the end of my career
and now their doing all these
renovations. I got to win Day-
tona before I retire."
Drivers also gave thumbs-
up to Turn 1, where the track
was patched up after the new
massive tunnel was built.
"It's fine," said Clint
Bowyer, who races Chevrolets
for Richard Childress Racing
in the NASCAR Busch Series
and will compete in Febru-
ary's Advance Discount Auto
Parts 200 for RCR. "It has
quite bit more grip right there
for a second but it's fine. It's
such a short patch. It's not go-
ing to cause any problems."
"I really couldn't tell (a dif-
ference)," said two-time'Ad-
vance Discount Auto Parts.
200 winner Bobby Gerhart.
"They did a nice job. It's go-
ing to be beautiful. The (in-
field) layout is one that is go-
ing to be more fan-friendly
and that's what we're here
for."
The fastest on the first day
of testing was Johnny
Leonard, who turned a speed
of 183.076 mph in a Pontiac.
Rounding out the top five
were Walt Brannen (183.046),
Mike Harmon (182.589), Dan
Shaver (182.423) and Christi
Passmore (182.3.86).
Testing continues on Sun-
day and is free and open to the
public with access to the Old-
field Grandstand through the


lobby of DAYTONA USA.
Gerhart shooting for No. 3
win: Gerhart will be shooting
for his third Advance Discount
Auto Parts 200 victory in Feb-
ruary. The Pennsylvania driver
who also handles the car own-
er duties was victorious in
1999 and 2002 and is always
considered one of the pre-race
favorites for the 80-lap ARCA
RE/MAX Series season-open-
ing event that precedes the
Budweiser Shootout.
"The engine that's in this
car was actually started in.
March of last year," Gerhart
said during the lunch break.
"We spend a lot of time get-
ting ready for this. We're nev-
er done. I'm never done. Sev-
en days a week as long as I can
stand some days just to get
everything we can. We try not
to leave too many rocks un-
turned.
"I've always felt (Daytona)
was our biggest shining mo-
ment as a series. For me grow-
ing up as a kid and'watching
all the races on television - if
,you're going to race and race
well, this is the place to do it."
Venturini not about to give
up: In his five Advance Dis-
count Auto Parts 200 starts,
Billy Venturini has been in the
hunt for a trip to Gatorade Vic-
tory Lane a couple of times.
The driver of the No. 25 Pon-
tiac has finished third in the
Advance Discount Auto Parts
200 the past two years and has
qualified on the outside pole


twice.
"We've run so well here the
last couple years," Venturini
said. "We're really expecting
to come here and win. That's
our goal. Obviously that's
everyone's goal but it's very
attainable. I've been right
there with a chance to win the
last two years and I think I've
got a really good hot rod this
year. It's a brand new car that
we just built in the off-season
and we're real excited about
it."
The 28-year-old Venturini,
who was watched, his father
Bill compete in the ARCA
RE/MAX Series at DIS, was
amazed by the new infield ren-
ovations.
"This place is awesome,"
Venturni said. "I'm used to
seeing the tin roofs (on the
Busch garages) here when we
come here,, The infield is
beautiful. This is my favorite
race track to come to in the
whole world. It's just the best
race track there is and there's
no other place better than Day-
tona."
First on track: Ken Weaver,
a native of Dallas Texas and
driver of the No. 20 Chevrolet,
had the distinction of being the
first to drive over the new
Turn 1 tunnel.
Tickets to the Advance Dis-
count Auto Parts 200 are avail-
able online at http://www.day-
tonainternationalspeedway.co
m or by calling 1-800-PIT-
SHOP.


Today's Weather




. . . - *'
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
1/7 1/8 1/9 1/10 1/11




79/58 81/51 79/50 80/50. 80/52
Considerable cloudi- Morning clouds fol- Mix of sun and Times of sun and Mix of sun and
ness..High 79F. lowed by afternoon clouds. Highs in the clouds. Highs in'the clouds. Highs in the
Winds SSE at 5 to sun. upper 70s and lows low 80s and lows in low 80s and lows in
10 mph. in the low 50s. the low 50s. the low 50s.
Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset
7:29 AM 5:47 PM 7:29 AM 5:48 PM 7:30 AM 5:49 PM 7:30 AM 5:50 PM 7:29 AM 5:51 PM





Florida At A Glance


Tallahassee
o 75/56
esacola .Live Oak
ensacola 9/58
70/60 ,' . 91
t:; ' nj


%-, -..'-

Moon Phases




Last New
Jan 3 Jan 10


SJacksonville
78/60
,. 78/60


Orlando
81/61


Tampa
78/60


First Full
Jan 17 Jan 25


UV Index


Moderate
Moderate


Sun 1/9 4 Moderate
Mon 1/10 4 Moderate
Tue 1/11 4 Moderate
Tre U'.' Inrde\ s measured on a 0-i 1
number sC, ale wir a r neIr UV Inae'
snowing the neea lot greater sin pro-
tection. 0 11

Area :,',,-


pt sunny
cloudy
pt sunny
mst sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny


clouay
sunny
cloudy
ptsunny
mstsunny


Lake City 78
Madison 78
Melbourne 79
Miami 79
N Smyrna Beach 78
Ocala 80
Orlando 81
Panama City 73
Pensacola 70
Plant City 80


Ltyn HIaLo -o .i


Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


56 ptsunny
59 cloudy
60 ptsunny
69 mst sunny
59 ptsunny
57 ptsunny
61 pt sunny
60 cloudy
60 cloudy
59 ptsunny


z2 52 t-storm
59 53 rain
79 69 mst sunny
22 6 pt sunny
44 33 mst sunny


4

Miami
79/69
* 1*


I..-


4.


\. -
,"' ' -.


Pompano Beacn 80
Port Charlotte 81
Saint Augustine 74
Saint Petersburg 76
Sarasota .77
Tallahassee 75
Tampa 78
Titusville 79
Venice 80
W Palm Beach 79


Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


I mfl sunny
i pt sunny
Spt sunny
i pt sunny
I pt sunny
i cloudy
I ptsunny
I ptsunny
) ptsunny
i mst sunny


rain
rain
mixed.
cloudy
pt sunny


@2005 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Ford Racing, multimatic enter


"Team of Champions," featuring Roush


Racing Nascar drivers in Rolex 24


Call it the "Team of Cham-
pions."
That's an appropriate name
for the new Crown Royal
Special Reserve/Multimatic
Ford entry in the Rolex 24 At
Daytona, the twice-around-
the-clock road racing classic
Feb. 5-6.
The special team will fea-
ture three NASCAR champi-
on drivers from Ford and
Roush Racing: 2004
NASCAR Nextel Cup Cham-
pion Kurt Busch, 2003
NASCAR Cup Champion
Matt Kenseth, and NASCAR
Busch (2002) and Craftsman
Truck (2000) Champion Greg
Biffle.
The three Roush Racing
Ford pilots will be joined by
Multimatic Ford driver Scott
Maxwell, who has won six
professional road racing
championships in his career,
but may be best known for
his victories in both the 24
Hours of LeMans and' the
Rolex 24 At Daytona.
The potent foursome will
look to capture an overall
victory in the 2005 season-
opener of the Grand Ameri-
can Rolex Sports Car Series,
it was announced today.
"It's a dream team, that's
for sure," said Dan Davis, di-
rector of Ford Racing Tech-
nology. "We started talking
last summer about getting a
chance to put this type of
team together for the Rolex
24, and because of the coop-
eration of Roush Racing,
Multimatic, and Crown Roy-
al Special Reserve, we have
an effort and a class of dri-
vers that will be able to make
a run for the overall win."
The Crown Royal Special
Reserve Multimatic Ford is
an updated version of the
race car that won the Daytona
Prototype class at the Rolex
24 At Daytona in 2003. A
Ford Modular Cammer V-8
motor prepared by Roush-
Yates Engines will power it.
"One of the first things I
knew about Jack Roush was
his heritage in the 24-hour
race at Daytona," said Busch,
noting that Roush Racing
Fords had won 10 class victo-


ries there. "Now to be a: onship for all 10 races after
mni'ber-'of Roush Racing ''"winning the Chase-opener at


with Greg and Matt, and to
team up with Multimatic and
Scott for this event gives me
a chance to be a part of histo-
ry.
"It's going to be an All-Star
effort for this Crown Royal
Special Reserve team, but
there are some fantastic dri-
vers in the Grand Am Series
that we'll be competing
against," Busch added.
"We're going to look to Scott
to lead us goofy oval guys
around those right turns in
Daytona, but we're definitely
going to have fun with it."
"I'm really excited about
this coming together as
quickly as it did," said
Kenseth. "I think with the
drivers we hae' lined up and
the support from Ford Rac-
ing, we're bound to have a
good showing."
"I'm privileged to have the
opportunity to compete in the
2005 Rolex 24 At Daytona,"
said Biffle. "When Dan
Davis approached me this
summer about the opportuni-
ty, Ijumped at the chance. I
love road racing and while
I'm excited, I'm also a little
nervous about what to ex-
pect. I've never driven this
type of car, so I'm anxious to
get down to Daytona and do
some testing, especially at
night.
"I'm really looking for-
ward to competing with my,
teammates, and having Scott
in the equation will certainly
bring it all together," Biffle
added. "He's got a lot of ex-
perience running these cars
and he's a past champion. I
appreciate all the hard work
that has gone into putting this
program together and we
plan on bringing home a vic-
tory."
Busch is fresh off captur-
ing the 2004 NASCAR Nex-
tel Cup crown in the
Sharpie/IRWIN Industrial
Tools Ford Taurus, giving
Roush Racing and Ford back-
to-back Nextel Cup champi-
onships. He captured three
victories, and led the Chase
for the Nextel Cup Champi-


New Hampshire. Busch won
by eight points over Jimmie
Johnson in the closest Cup
championship ever.
Kenseth, the 2003 champi-
on, was also one of 10 drivers
in the Chase for Champi-
onship. The DEWALT Tools
Taurus driver captured two
victories this past season, a
victory in the Nextel All-Star
Challenge and had 16 top-10
finishes along the way. He
competed part-time in the
Busch Series, capturing three
wins.
Biffle finished 17th in the
Nextel Cup standings, and
third in the Busch Series
standings, as he competed in
both championships. The
National Guard/Subway Tau-
rus driver won two Nextel
Cup races in 2004, including
a thrilling come-from-behind
win in the season-ending
Ford 400, which helped his
teammate clinch the champi-
onship. He also captured five
victories in Busch competi-
tion.
"I'm excited about having
a chance to run with Kurt,
Matt and Greg," said
Maxwell, who has done the
development work on the
Multimatic Ford and was one
of three drivers who won in
the car at the 2003 Rolex 24
At Daytona: "I've had a lot
of great teammates during
my career, but having a
chance to work with these
three guys will be a treat.
We'll have some fun, but
we're going to Daytona to
win."
"Multimatic is proud to be
working with Ford Racing
and Crown Royal Special Re-
serve to put together this
great entry for the Rolex 24,"
said Larry Holt, vice presi-
dent of engineering for Mul-
timatic, and the man who
oversees racing operations.
"We're happy to have such
great cooperation from
Roush Racing and its drivers
to come in and partner with
Scott on this program.
We're committed to going for
the overall win."


Fri 1/7
Sat 1/8


Clearwater
Crestview
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Hollywood
Jacksonville
Key West
Lady Lake


National Cities
li~~~mr ^ I~IITi I


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver


wam"Nommi"Ammm


L962VEMENROMWOMM


P







y -IrAV\ IAKI IIA"-\ 7 ' O0f


PAGE 5B


g SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


RIIUAY, JANI'UAMY , 2UUb 5 --

CHURCH


First Presbyterian Church 2004 Christmas Cantata


By Susan A. Burnett
The First Presbyterian
Church held its Christmas
Cantata, "Behold the Glory"
on Dec. 12, at its 11 a.m. ser-
vice. The Cantata was directed
by music director Larry Roush
with pianist and flutist Susan
Roush. The guest percussion-


ist was Charles "Chuck"
Finch.
The church was at almost
full capacity with approxi-
mately 100 attendees. Visitors
were recognized during the
service.
Of particular note were the
solos by Susan Roush, Myra


.. .. * , .:f* .' " '*t ,\


Regan and Larry Roush.
A light meal of sandwiches
and salad was enjoyed amid
fellowship after the musical
presentation.
The First Presbyterian
Church (PCUSA) is located at
421 White Avenue, just south
of the Live Oak City Hall. Its


pastor is the Rev. Pedro
Rivera. The church extends a
welcome to all, and invite
those living in the community
to become a member of its
church family. For more infor-
mation, call 386-362-3199,
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to
noon.


The Rev. Pedro Rivera ministers to the congregation.


Larry Roush, soloist, singing during the musical.
-
J * i
,' , ,
..... � *


,,, ' ' ' ,-" '' . , '-,'
"1 * *: - ' ^


Chuck Finch, drummer and Susan Roush, pianist playing during the
musical.


Ladies waiting to eat during fellowship after the musical.


Mary Ette Branch, reading her part during the musical.


John Day, reading his part during the musical.


Chuck Finch, drummer, was guest percussionist during me musical.


Susan Rbush, pianist and Lyhn Papapetrou, assistant playing during
the musical.


Choir presents musical "Behold the Glory." All Photos Tom Burnett
LOOK ON PAGE 10B FOR THE CHURCH CALENDAR


Children sitting at a table, waiting to eat during fellowship after the musical.


Fat Albert (PG) 1:4014:3017:30110:05
Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate
Events (PG) 1:30 4:2017:1519:50
Meet the Fockers (PG-13) 1:15 14:15 17:00 19:45
National Treasure (PG) 1:0013:5516:5519:55
Ocean's Twelve (PG-13) 4:2517:20110:10
Spanglish (PG-13) 1:20
White Noise (PG-13) 1:45 4:4017:10110:00
129998-F

Cosmetology

Classes

start

January 3.

Call

386-364-2798

for more

information.

SUWANNEE
HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 364-2750131200-F


"' -
"," ,' '' ' , L INI.
31 F�8.28(LIVE OAK
E. HOWARD STREET
1" -: STEAKS & SEAFO


J^ . Great Steaks'
Killer Ribs
and Ie eCold Beer
Lunch and Dinner 7 Days A Week
US 90 West at 1-75 Lake City


-,,








PAGE 6B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


/CTF


ar


0je n uwannter morrat


I ServI tn e


(386) 362-1734


129174JS-F


Beatv Auto Sales

Located next door to Beaty's Truck Parts
OffHwy. 90W. ~ Live Oak
386-364-4110 ~ 386-364-3206
Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 12 p.ni.-5 p.m.



Jifl Food Stores

LIVE OAK * WELLBORN * MAYO * BRANFORD
* DOWLING PARK

STORE ON NORTH OHIO OPEN 24 HOURS
"The Store Around The Corner From Where You Live"2914JS-F


, - . ^ ^Ulll -

North Florida Printing Co., Inc.
P.O. Drawer 850,
Live Oak, Florida 32060
Edward Howell, owner 362-1080 FLA. * WATS 1-800-431-1034 129147J-F


Duncan Tire & Auto


| a LENA. DUNCAN
362-4743
422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
P. s www.marketplace24.com
129159DH-F



To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


Howard Street Dry Clean

Quality Laundry and Dry Cleaning
* Same Day Service *


705 West Howard Street
Live Oak, Florida 32064


(386) 364-5211
129164JS-F


O JORDAN AGENCY, INC.

SLife * Home * Car * Business

Joe Jordan & Bruce Tillman


203 E: Howard St.
362-4724


Branford
935-6385
129s166J-F


Dixie Grill
"Specializing in Steaks & Seafood"
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (WITH VEGETABLE)
Open 7 Days - 5:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
364-2810 CATERING SERVICE & PRIVATE PARTIES
129143JS-F


To advertise on this page,

please call"

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


ADVENT CHRISTIAN


BIXLER MEMORIAL
ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Advent Christian Village, Dowling Park
Rev. Steve Lawson & Rev. Rosemary
Humbles & Rev. John Harper
SUNDAY
Christian Education Hour.................9:30 ai
Morning Worship... ........................ 10:45 a
Evening Service............................. 6:00 p
129035J


FIRST ADVENT
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
699 Pinewood Street
(386)362-1802
Rev. Tim Carver, Pastor


SUNDAY
Sunday School.................... .......9:15 am
Morning Service............................0:30 am
Evening Service.........................:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Midweek Service............................6;30 pm
12M936JSF ,
BI APlST

VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH
10475 State Rd. 51-Approx. 3 miles South
Jerry Ownes - Pastor
(386) 362-6357 (386) 362-5313
SUNDAY
Sunday School.....................;...........10:00 am
Worship Service............................. 11:00 am
Evening Worship..............................7:00 pm
1" Sun. Morning Men's Breakfast 8:00 am
1" & 3RD Monday Visitation 7:00 pm
2nd Friday Night Ladies Meeting 7:00'pm
(Quilting)
Sunday Evening
Children's Choir..............................:..5:00 pm
Adult Choir...................................... 6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Bible Study.....................6:45 pm
Master Clubs (Children's - Youth).....6:45 pm
Nursery Available All Services
"Where there is life, there is growth"
189037JS-F

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF DOWLING PARK
"Sharing the Joy of Jesus"
Rev. Shawn Johnson - Pastor
11274 235th Lane
(In Dowling Park on Hwy. 250)
Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 658-2360 or (386) 658-3715
E-Mail: fbcdp@hotmail.com
www.dowlingparkbaptist.org
SUNDAY
Team Kids & Adult Life Study......,.............9:45 am
Worship Service....................................... 11i00 am
Evening Bible
Exploration Services..... ............ .........6:00 pm
* Nursery Available all Services
* Pre-K to 2nd Grade Junior Church conducted
during 11:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship
Service
MONDAY
"Quilters for Christ"...................................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Mid Week Prayer Service........................6:00 pm
129038JS-F


SUWANNEE STATION
BAPTIST CHURCH
Everybody Welcomed
,3289 101st Lane, Live Oak, FL 32060
Bro. Wilbur Wood, (386) 362-2553
SUNDAY
Sunday School ........................ 10:00 am
Morning Worship........................ 11:00 am
Choir Practice..............................6:00pm
Evening Worship..........................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Worship..............................7:00 pm
Children & Youth Program................7:00 pm


BAPIST (SOUTHERN)

FIRST BAPIST CHURCH
Comer of U.S. 90 andChurch Street
362-1583
Rev. Phillip Herrington
Minister of Students/Children
Rev. Clare Parker, Minister to Senior Adults
Rev. Alan Lott, Music and Worship
SUNDAY
Early W orship...........................................8:30 am
Sunday School.........................................9:45 am
Morning Worship................................. 11:00 am
Live Broadcast on WLVO 106.1 FM
Discipleship Training...............................6:00 pm
Evening Worship.............. ................... 7:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Music & Missions for Children................6:00 pm
Crossfire (Students)................................7:00 pm
Mid-Week Bible Study...........................7:00 pm
129039JS-F

PINEMOUNT BAPTIST CHURCH
US 129 South (Across from the S&S Store)
Post O9fgqxfn ,2,iAilpiPn(Florida
(Q86)36g,5634
Nursery provided for each'worship service
Worship and Fellowship Opportunities of the Week
Pastor: Greg Vickers
SUNDAY
Bible School....................................... .......9:45 am
.Morning Worship.................................. 11:00 am
Choir Practice......... ..............................5:30 pm
Evening Worship... ......................................6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Night Supper....................................6:00 pm
AWANA Club....:;.................................. 6:30 pm
Prayer Meeting...... .............. ..............7:00 pm
THURSDAY
F.A.I.T.H. Ministry...................................... 6:30pm
Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together.., but encouraging one another.
Hebrews 10:25
129398JS-F

WESTWOOD BAPTIST
920 11th Street, SW (Newbern Road)
362-1120
Pastor - Dr. Jimmy Deas
Rev. Jim McCoy
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................. 9:30 am
Morning Worship Service............10:55 am
Discipleship Training
Adults & Youth..............................5:10 pm
Children's Choirs...........................5:00 pm
Evening Worship Service..............6:30 pm
TUESDAY
Prayer Breakfast-Dixie Grill..........6:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Youth Group GA's, RA's, Mission Friends
& Youth Group............................6:30 pm
Mid-Week Service......................630 pm
Adult Choir Rehearsal ...................7:30 pm
128040JS-F

ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH
5203 County Road 795
362-3101 - Church
SUNDAY
Sunday School...................................9:45 am
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Church Training................................6:00 pm
Evening Worship...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Service................................... 7:00 pm
129043JS-F

MOUNT OLVE BAPTIST CHURCH
"Growing Together As Family"
5314 98th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060
(From US 90, take 137N to Hogan Road and follow signs)
Pastors Dan Allan and Brent Kuykendall
www.mtolivebaptistchurch.com
SUNDAY
Small Groups (Sunday School)......... 9:45 am
Celebration Worship...................... 11:00 am
"G-Force" Children's
Family Worship..:............................. 6:00 pm
Youth Choir........................................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Family Supper.................................... 5:30 pm
Kidzclub/Graded Choirs....................6:00 pm
Adult Discipleship.............................6:30 pm
Student "Impact" Worship.................:30 pm
Celebration Choir Rehearsal..............7:30 pm


We tend to have a self-serving bias in many areas of daily life. To
illustrate this, the comedian George Carlin once said, "Why is it
thateveryone driving slower than me is an idiot and everyone
driving faster than me is a maniac?" The reason for this is our self-
" serving bias. We tend to see things our way, and to assume that
, others are just wrong. Consider how we tend to judge ourselves and
.''others: we often judge others harshly in exactly the same
Circumstances where we would judge ourselves charitably. For
example, when we give a small tip at a restaurant, we are likely to
rationalize that it is because of poor service; however, when
someone else leaves a small tip, we are likely to judge that the
person is cheap. Our judgements, whether about ourselves or others,
tend to be rationalizations, which are essentially defense
mechanisms designed to protect our ego. And that, in the final
analysis, may be the reason we have this self-serving bias: to
protect our egos. We are naturally selfish creatures, and the sooner
we realize this, the easier it is to overcome our self-serving biases.
Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye,
but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?
R.S.V. Luke 6:41


ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
11th and Coliseum Streets
Rev. Don Woodrum, Rector, 362-1837
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................... 9:45 am
Worship................................ 9:00 & 11:00 am
WEDNESDAY
Holy Communion........................ 10:00 am
& 6:00 pm
THURSDAY
Holy Communion.............................7:00 am
129116JS-F'


TABERNACLE BAPTIST
CHURCH
Pastor Gill Roser 362-7800
Gold Kist Blvd. (across from armory)

SUNDAY
Sunday School..............................10:00 am
Morning Worship............................. 11:00 am
Evening Worship...........................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Service........................7:30 pm
129120JS-F


To advertise on this page,

please call Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


I


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


PAGE 6B


I


I


BAPIST (SOUTHERN)

WELLBORN BAPTIST CHURCH
"A warm place in a Cold World."
Rev. Louis Gooch
U.S. 90 West & Lowe Lake Rd., Wellbom
Church Phone 963-2231
SUNDAY
Early Worship.......................................... 8:30 am
Sunday Bible Study.........................................9:45 am
Second Morning Worship..........................11:00 am
Evening Worship........................ .....6:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Youth....................................................... ..7:00 pm .
Prayer Worship............................... 7:00 pm
"Come Worship With Us"
129044DH-F
SHADY GROVE
MISSIONARY BAPTIST
15 miles West Hwy.90 -
2 Miles Down River Road
Rev. David Hingson, 658-2547
SUNDAY
Sunday School..................................9:45 am
Worship..................................11:00 am
Church Training.................................6:00 pm
Evening Worship ...............................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Prayer & Bible Study........................7:00 pm
129046JS-F
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST
CHURCH
(386) 362-5239
10413 Hwy. 129 South
SAaron Turner, Pastor
Clay Ross, Music
Hardy Tillman, Awana Commander
SUNDAY
Morning Worship...........................10:30 am
Awana...............................................6:00 pm
School of the Scriptures.....................7:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Care Group.................:..................... 7:00 pm
FRIDAY
*Singles Bible Study.........................6:30 pm
(First Friday of each month)
SATURDAY
Nursing Home Ministry*
(First & third Saturday of each month)
[A pre-school nursery is provided at each worship service]
"Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves
together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting
one another: and so much the more, as you see
the day approaching" (Hebrews 10:25).
129048JS-F
CATHOUC
ST. FRANCIS XAVIER
CATHOLIC CHURCH
928 East Howard St.-U.S. 90 East
"ii( �-- Re%. Michael Pendergta~l - '* ' '"
P.O. Box 1179 Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 364-1108'
SUNDAY
Sunday M ass......................................9:00 am
Sunday (Spanish) Mass.....................1:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Wednesday Mass............................7:00 pm
THURSDAY
Thursday M ass................................:..9:00 am
FRIDAY
Friday M ass.......................... .........9:00 am
SATURDAY
Saturday (Vigil) Mass........................6:00 pm
129114jS-F






PAGE 7B


,IA ,IA 7 200 U UWNE DEORTLV OAK


L7$Ck o


INTERDENOMINATIONAL

MELODY CHRISTIAN CENTER
& Melody Christian Academy K-12
Highway 129 South * Live Oak, FL
(386) 364-4800
Children's Ministry-Youth Ministry-Adults
Services:
Sunday 10:00 am and 6:00 pm
Wednesday 7:00 pm - Adults
Children's Ministry
'Revolution Youth Church
Nursery Available All Services
Melody Christian Bookstore - Open daily
Pastor Frank C. Davis 129121JS-F


WORD ALIVE CHURCH
11239 State Rd. 51 . Live Oak, FL 32060
Pastor's Dale and Connie Naiman
(386) 294-3100
SUNDAY
Children's Ministrys.......................10:45 am
Worship Service ...............................10:45 am
Nursery provided
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study........................................ 7:30 pm
Youth services 2nd & 4th Sundays....6:00 pm
129123JS-F


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
1550 Walker Avenue SE * Live Oak, FL
(386) 208-1345
"A Church on the Move"
Sunday Morning....................... 10:30 am
Wednesday Night.............................. 7:00 pm


Pastor Wayne Godsmark
Senior Pastor


NAZARENE
LIVE OAK CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
915 Church Ave., SW 1 Block So. of Mayo
Road North of High School
Rev. Louis J. Medaris
SUNDAY
Sunday School:................................. 9:45 am
Morning Worship...........................11:00 am
Evening Worship.........................6:00 pm
,,; .'... E WEDNESDAY
Evening PriayegrAeting.. ,,....7:00 pm
' )W l'r"- '' 129125JS-F


NON-DENOMINATIONAL

LIVE OAK CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Joseph Schmidt, Minister
Corner of Hamilton and Ohio Aves.
(Hwy. 129 N)
(386) 362-1085 (386)362-3982
SUNDAY
Morning Worship.............................11:00 am
Evening Worship...............................6:00 pm
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study................. ................7:00 pm
129126JS-F


LIVE OAK CHURCH OF CHRIST
Minister: Craig Williams
Home: (386) 362-6409
1497 Irvin (S.R. 51)
P.O. Box 281 Live Oak, FL 32060
Church: (386) 364-5922
Bible Classes.................................. 10:00 am
Morning Worship.. .....................11:00 am
Evening Worship ...............................6:00 pm
Wednesday Bible Class.....................7:00 pm
Featuring Mentoring Program for Youth
129127JS-F

SUWANNEE RIVER
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Rev. Ray Brown
17750 16th Street, Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 842-2446

SERVICES
Sunday School.............................10:00 am
Sunday Morning Worship............... 11:00 am
The distance makes the difference.
12 miles North of CR249, Nobles Ferry Rd.
129352JS-F


129124DH-F


DOWLING PARK
CHURCH OF GOD
658-1158/658-3151
Pastor: Frank D. Jones


SUNDAY
Sunday School......................... ............ 9:45 am
Morning Worship................................... 11:00 am
Children's Church............................. 11:00 am
Sunday Evening..................................6:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
Fellowship Dinner....................................5:30 pm
Family Hour.............................................7:00pm
Nursery Provided
129136JS-F


LIVE OAK CHURCH OF GOD
US 129 South
Rev. Fred R. Watson 362-2483
SUNDAY
Sunday School................................ 9:45 am
Children's Church..................... 10:45 am
Morning Worship.......................... 10:45 am
Evening Worship................................6:30 pm
Children Choir................................. 6:00 pm
Sunday Evening Childrens Church...6:30 pm
Wednesday Night -
Family Training Hour.................7:00 pm
Wednesday Night Dinner...................5:45 pm
Children's Classes, V.I.B.E. Youth Church,
Adult Bible Study 129131JS-F



LIVE OAK FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
13793 76th St. (Mitchell Rd.)
Live Oak, FL
Rev. Donald Suggs
362-2189
SUNDAY
Sunday School ..................................9:30 am
Children's Church ...........................10:30 am
Morning Worship............................10:30 am
Evening Worship..............................6:00 pm
Wednesday Night..............................7:00,pm
129132JS-F


REFUGE PENTECOSTAL
TABERNACLE
12280 Co. Rd. 137
(386) 688-2791
Wellborn, FL
;'" ,Paslor: Darin Wilson'
SUNDAY
Sunday .......................................10:00 am
Sunday Evening............................... 6:00 pm
Wednesday Night...............................7:30 pm
*129867-F


METHODIST

WELLBORN METHODIST
12005 CR 137
963-3071, 963-2154
Pastor Timothy Plant
Music: Geiger Family
SUNDAY
Sunday School............................... 10:00 am
Worship.............................11:00 am
Prayer Request Boxes
at Jiffy, Annettes, All Springs and at
Dumpsters
PRAYER INTERCESSION
Tuesday at the altar
at 7 a.m., noon, and at 7 p.m.
CHURCH OPEN ALL DAY
Everyone Welcome
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study.................................... 7:00 p.m.
A Two Church Charge 129399JS-F


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
U.SA.
421 White Avenue, Live Oak
(386) 362-3199
Rev. Pedro Rivera
SUNDAY
Sunday School.........................................9:45 am
Worship........................... ..........11:00 am
Communion First Sunday of every month
WEDNESDAY
Bible Study............... .......................... 7:00pm 3
129133DH-F


SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST


LIVE OAK SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
Pastor
Brandon White
364-6540

SATURDAY SERVICES
Sabbath School:.......9:30 am.......Bible Study
Worship Service...............................11:00 am
Call for more information on Prayer Meeting
15451 129 South, Live Oak, FL
129134JS-F



UNITED METHODIST

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
311 S. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak * 362-2047
Pastor: Jim Wade
"COME WORSHIP WITH US".

SUNDAY
Early Worship.................................... 8:30 am
Sunday School Assembly...................9:30 am
Sunday School............................... 9:45 am
Worship.. .......... ....................... 11:00 am
Youth Fellowship..............................4:30 pm
TUESDAY
Children's Choir........................5:00 pm

WEDNESDAY
Bible Study...................................... 10:00 am
Youth Fellowship...............................6:00 pm
Chincel Ringer, i Aduli~ . .... 6-001 pm
M en's Chorus...... ....................... 7:00 pm
Chancel Choir ........ .... . ......7.30 pm
129141JS-F
NEW HARMONY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
160th St.
(Go south on 51 to 160th, turn right)
Pastor: Stan Posey
Phone (386) 776-1806
SUNDAY
Sunday Worship..............................9:30 am
Bible Study.......................................10:30 am
WEDNESDAY
Women's Bible Study..................1........0 am
129158JS-F


To place your church
on this page, please
call Myrtle Parnell at
(386) 362-1734
ext. 103


7f mcl c6!hVe4c#4


al


To place your church
on this page, please
call Myrtle Parnell at
(386) 362-1734
ext. 103


Most everyone is involved with making numerous decisions
each and every day, and although most of them are fairly
simple ones, occasionally we are faced with more difficult
situations. What we eat for breakfast or what outfit we will
wear are fairly simple choices that we can usually make
without too much thought. However, decisions involving our
lifestyle, health problems, or financial matters, can affect us, or
our loved ones, in a more significant way, and usually require
more consideration and thought. Often, we may be reluctant to
be decisive because we are overly concerned about failing to
make the right choice. But, we must realize that everyone
makes wrong decisions from
time to time, and what is more
important is how we react
- when we have made a bad
choice. Do we fret and condemn
others or ourselves, or do we go
on with our lives and make the
" - best of our situation? The Bible
. tells us that, "in everything
God works for good with those
who love Him, who are called
according to His purpose
(Romans 8:28)." God has given
us the ability to use our free will
to make good, prayerful
decisions, and when we do, even
apparently wrong decisions can
often be turned around for
something good.


L


The Historic TELFORD
HOTEL-RESTAURANT

Monday -Thursday 11am -2:30prm
.r, Friday- Saturday 11am- 9pm
Sunday 11lam- 3pm
SP.O. Box 407, White Springs, FL 32096
(386) 397-2000 Fax: (386) 884-9902


b advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at

(386) 362-1734 ext. 103
.cvv .v- lu L~� Iv


N NAPA of Live Oak

Cars * Trucks * Imports * Farm * Auto paint
Machine Shop Service

209 Duval* (386) 362-2329 T

HEATING &AIR
TOUCHTON CONDITIONING
Service * Sales * Installation


386-362-4509


Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured


SPEN IIIME WITH Ci


Rob Cathcart
Agent
115 Grand St. NE
(Hw%%. 129N)
Live Oak, FL.
386-364-7900


7;~7 F E'~�


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M-F 8:30-6:0(


129168S-F


LAND BROKERAGE

D REALTOR

Annette B. Land Realtor
Specialiing In Real Estate Sales & Services In The Suwannee River Valley


S"" U.S. 27 EAST- P.O. BOX 394
386-935-0824 BRANFORD, FLORIDA 32008
S www.landbrokeragerealtor.com


1-800-426-8369
129161-F


Bayway Services

Steam Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning
* IICRC Certified * Fire & Water Damage
Restoration Specialists * 24 Hour Emergency Service
Residential & Commercial 362-2244 12=


129034DH-F


To advertise on this page,

please call

Myrtle Parnell at
(386) 362-1734 ext. 103


Opell S^^^^l-(I..I1
^byfiappmmmfflTe^^B


I


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 7 2005


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5 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY,. JANUARY 7, 20051"


ESPN2 NBA Friday Coast To Coast World Series of Poker
FAM The Sandlot Whose iWhose The 700 Club Family Matters
FOOD Emeril Live Inside Dis $40 A Day Kitchen Accomplished Iron Chef Emeril Live
FX Fear Factor Fear Factor Fear Factor Fear Factor Cops |Cops

We Celebrate Hometown Life
&IV Stories from hometowns just like yours. Look for us each week in this paper.
HOTV D Travis TBA ITBA Paint Chic D Travis
LirFE Sweet Temptation IThe Object of My Affe IMerge IWhat Should You Do?
: MTV Real Worla XV ITBA IPimp My
SCI Siargate Atlantis Stargate Atlantis |Stargate Atlantis Stargate Atlantis |Stargate Atlantis
'TBS Friends I Friends Serendipity Serendipity
TCM Arabesque ICome September IThe Rose Tattoo
TLC Overhaulin' : Overhaulin' IOverhaulin' Overhaulin' IOverhaulin'
TNT . Law & Order ITwister IDeep Blue Sea
uSA Law & Order SVU Monk IMonk Law & Order SVU Monk

;f X2 TX2 Writtenin Blood
�2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Saturday Evening January 8, 2005

Wild Card Playoff Game "Local Local 1Local ILocal
The Will , NCIS 148 Hours Local ILocal Local Local
Battlestar Galaotica Local SNL
Cops Cops America's Most Wante Local Local MAD TV 1Local -Local

City Confidential . Cold Case Files IM1-5 '7American Justice City Confidential
Girls! Girlsl Girlsl .G.I. Blues Fun in Acapulco "
gt Shobking Toby Keith - IStacked Insider Most Shdc
Brandy .r,[Brandy ILilo, [ 'Dave Raven ' Phil ILizzie Boy Kir ... Braceface
PGA Tour JSportscen NFL Prim Gamenigh
Who's #1 . Silver Anniversary Sp Next 25 Years Conference Basketbal
Rookie of the Year Whose Line? Funniest Videos
Emeril Live . Unwrapped Iron Chef Unwrappe |Top 5 IEmeril Live
Smallpox Fear Factor Excessive Force
Organizati Decor Ce Dsgn Fina IDsgn Chal Dsgn Dim IDivine Ds Smrt Dsn IHome2Go Organizati IDecor Ce
Into The Arms of Danger I IView of Terror Strong Medicine _ Bed of Lies
Battle For Ozzfest IRW/RR ITBA
BOA IKing Cobra . IProject Viper
Back To The Future IBack To The Future II
Dr. Strangelove Lolita
Trading Spaces |While You Were Out While You Were Out ITrading Spaces Trading Spaces
Twister .Turbulence ]Cliffhanger
Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order SVU Law & Order CI The District

S Along Came Polly Underworld Faceoff
0@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


ACROSS
1.Sgt.Friday's force
5.Sonny &Cher,et al.'
9.Surgery souvenir
13.Jai _
14. Park, Colorado
16.Bit of vocal fanfare
17.Locomotive's front
19.Touched ground
20._ Kennedy Shriver
21.Contest charge
23.Fouls up
25.Sigh of satisfaction
26.Coffee,slangily
27.Former Secretary
of State Madeleine
31."Star Trek" helmsman
33.Bud's comic buddy
34.Rid of rodents
36.Hostess Perle
39.Shed one's skin
41.Letter embellishment
43.Picket line defier
44.Book of maps
46.Brownie camera maker
48,Tell a whopper
49.Membership fees
51.Chain serving
Mexican food
53."The Simpsons"
storekeeper
55.Tit for
57.Shakespearean king
58.Graph consisting
of parallel rectangles
61.Singer Estefan
65.Jewish youth org.
66.Tower of London
guards
68.Duke it out,in practice
69.Missionary Junipero
70.Radio hobbyists
71." Time,Next Year"
72.Coal-rich ' .
German region
73.Launched a
watermelon seed


DOWN
1.Doily material
2.Baseball's
Moises or Felipe
3.One of sixteen on
a chessboard
4.More chancy
5.Cleanses
6.Football rival of UCLA
7.Will- _-wisp
8."...like you've
just _ghost!"
9.Collar support
10.Something an
athlete might pull
11."See you"
12.Gave four stars to,say
15.Sp.misses
18.Sharp-smelling
22.Baba au
24.Movie ogre
27._mater
28.Pirate's haul
29.Costner baseball film
30.Fortuneteller's card
32.Guitar pioneer Paul
35._wave
37.Comet or kite feature
38.Cain's victim
40.Greek T
S42.Kind of toothed disk
45.Younger brother
of 38-Down
47.Aussie
eucalyptus muncher
50.Swedish imports
52.Clear soups
53.Bottomless pit
54.Argentine plain
56.Orchard units
59.Give a hoot
60.Trillion:Prefix
62.Gather up
63."_la Douce"
64.Aide:Abbr.
67.Lobster _ Diavolo


Crossword Puzzle Anwers i
_oloso _
I d SIS v d S

E 1 3 1 WS~ L I 1TaevHL 1r W~S


2 8ipNBC 21 Information 38 Discovery Channel . 55 Cartoon Network
3 WCJB (ABC) Gainesville (20) 22 Marketplace 39 TBS 56 Fox Sports Net
4 WIXT (IND) Jacksonville (4) 23 Home Shopping Network 40 Headline News 57 PAXtv
5 WUFT (PBS) Gainesville (5) 24 CNN 41 Fox News 58 Sci-fi Channel
6 WCTV (CBS) Tallahassee (6) 25 TNT 42 MSNBC 59 Game Show Network
7 WFXU (UPN) Live Oak (57) 16 Nickelodeon 43 CNBC 60 AMC
8 Community Bulletin Board 27 MTV 44 C-Span 2 61 Lifetime Movie Network
9 WB 28 Spike TV 45 E! 62 Comedy Central
10 WTLH (FOX)Tallahassee (49) 29 A&E 46 The Travel Channel 63 CMT
11 The Weather Channel 30 ABCFamily 47 HGTV 64 Oxygen
_12 WTWC (NBC) Tallahassee (40) _31 Disney Channel .48 The Learning Channel 65 Bravo
1 QVC 32Lifetime 49 The History Channel 66 WE (Women's Entertainment)
S1 . '1.-"p 33 USA Network 50 Animal Planet 67 FX
15 TV-Guide 34 BET 51 Food Network 68 CNBC
.16 WGN (IND) Chicago . 5 PN 52 TBN 69 TV Land
17 Special Events 36 ESPN 2 5 INSP 70 Fit tv
20 Local_ 37 7Sunshine Network 54 VH-1 71 Discovery Health


TIME WARNER Current Channel Line-Up 6-33
CABLE LIVE OAK


i


@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service L-- .
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PAGE 9B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAYJANUARY 7 2 5


MI YiJru l, /ri -\i' 1, 4 - r ,


Monday Evening January 10, 2005

WTXL/ABC Exlrerne Makeo.er H The Bachelorette Local Local Jimmy
WCTV/CBS Sill Stand Listen Up Raymond Two Men CSI Miami Local Late Show Late Late
WTWC/NBC Fear Factor Las Vegas r.ledium Local Tonight Show Conan
WTLH/FOX 24 P 2 Local Local Lccal Local Local Local

A & E Airline Goni Goin Caesars 24 7 Crossing Jordan Airline
AMC A Civil Action Terms 01 Endearment
CMT JO Greatest Done Me Wrong Songs Inside Fame 140 Greatest Done Me Wrong Songs
DISN Disney Movie TBA Raven Sis Bug Juice |Lizzie Boy Meets Even
ESPN Big East Conference Basketball Big 12 Conference Ba Sponscenter Mountain West Confer
ESPN2 2004 WPBA Clasic Tour- National 9 Ball Championshi Fastbreak ESPN 100
FAM She Gel s What She Want's Brat Camp The 700 Club Funniest Funniest
FOOD Emeril Live Unwrapped Secret Life Iron Chel Emeil Live
FX Die Hard 2 Fear Factor King King Cops
HGTV Homes Ac Sens Chic Dec Cents IDsgn Chat Dsgn Dim Dsgn Dme D Travis Hunters Homes Ac Sens Chic
LIFE No Higher IDawn Anna IHow Clea How Clea Nanny Golden
MTV MTV Cribs RW.RR Ozztest Real World XV
SCI Stargate SG-1 Slargale SG-1 Stargate SG-1 Hidden II
TBS Friends Friends Fam Guy |Fam Guy Raymond Raymond Nolhing To Lose
TCM The Seven Year lich Diary of Anne Frank
TLC Trauma Incredible Medical Mysteries Trauma Incredible Medical My
TNT La- & Order Law & Order Law & Order Witnhout A Trace NYPD Blue
USA Law & Order SVU Jurassic Park Law & Order SVU

HBO Real Sports Deadwood Mystic River
iil),; Animerican Profile Hometown Content Service


Tuesday Evening January 11, 2005

T Wife/Kids G.Lopez According Rodney NYPD Blue Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
tLaw& Orde Lo Ta
NCIS Amazing Race 6 Judgind Amy Local Late Show Late Late
Biggest Loser ICommitte Law & Order SVU -,Local Tonight Show Conan
~F.x The Rebel Billionaire Local Local Local Local Local Local

A & E Cold Case Files Cold Case Files Dog the Bounty Hunte Caesars 24 7 Cold Case Files
AMC Lilorneart Carlito s Way
CMT Most Shocking Everybody s All American Most Shocking
DISN Disney Movie: TBA Raven ISis Sis Bug Juice ILizzie Boy Meets IEven
ESPN Big 10 Conlerence Baskelball Southeastern Confere Sportscenler Jim Rome
ESPN2 Conference USA Basketball NBA Nation Season W IMix Tape Fasibreak NFL Live
FAM National Lampoons European Vacation Whose Lin Whose Lin The 700 Club Family Matters
FOOD Emeril Live Roker Success $40 A Day Iron Cnel Banle Emenl Live
FX X-Men Fear Factor King of the Hill Cops Cops
HGTV To Sell Design Ft Decor Ce Divine Ds Dsgn Chal Dsgn Chal D Travis Crafers To Sell Design Fi
LIFE The Truth About Jane What Girls Learn Nanny Golden Nanny Golden
MTV Punk'd Real World Cnbs Made
SCO Rage Against the Mac Battlesiar Galactica Red Planet
TBS Friends Friends Sex'Cily Sex/City The Wedding Singer IThe Wedding Singer
TCM Siqce You Wenl A%%ay .. Mrs Miniver "- ; .
TLC Mega Machines Overhaulin Rides Mega MIachines Ov.erhaulih
TNT Law & Order Law & Order Charmed Law & Order X Files
USA Law & Order SVU The Relic Law & Order SVU Access Hollywood

8- 50 First DaLes Seabiscult Wild Thing
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Wednesday Evening January 12, 2005

4XA Lost Alias Wife Swap Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
S60 Minutes King Universe CSI: NY Local Late Show Late Late
SI: Swimsuit Model S West Wing Law & Order Local Tonight Show Conan
t 70's Show Quintuplet Nanny 911 Local local Local Local Local Local

A & E American Justice Bulited T Death Biography Crossing Jordan American Justice
AMC Malor League Smokey & The Bandil Malor League
CMT Everybody s All American In the Moment Most Shocking
DISN Disney Movie- TBA Raven Sis, Sis Bug Juice Lizzie Boy Even
ESPN Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball NBA Wednesday Sporiscenter
ESPN2 Big 12 Conlerence Baskelball Womens Athletic Conlerence Basketball Gamenign Fastbreak
FAM Problem Child Whose Lin Whose Lin The 700 Cluib Funniest Funniest
FOOD Emeril Live Bobbie FI Food Nali Good Eat Good Eat Iron Chef Emeril Live
FX Hart s War TBA King of Ihe Hill

Sr We Celebrate Hometown Life
Stories from hometowns just like yours. Look for us each week in this paper.

HOTV NewSpac Bldg Char Drm Hous Mission CurbAppe ICurbAppe D Travis Mdrn Mast New Spac Bldg Char
LIFE Evil Has A Face The Unsaid Nanny Golden Nanny Golden
MTV MTV Cribs J Lo Cribs RWRR Rm Rdrs Wanna'
SCI Banlestar Galactica Battlestar Galactica Star Trek- Generations
TBS Friends Fnends Seinfeld Seinfeld Sex & The City Fools Rush In
TCM Slage Door Canteen Hollywood Canteen Best Year
TLC In A Fix IWhile You Were Oul Always A Bridesmaid In A Fix While You Were Out
TNT Law & Order Crocodile Dundee Crocodile Dundee
USA Law & Order SVU Law & Order SOrd er S& Order SVU Law & Order SVU School Ties

HBO Harry Poller & The Chamber of Secrets Real Sports League of Extraordina
@2002 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Thursday Evening January 13, 2005

WTX LA Life As We Know It Extreme Makeover Primetime Live Local Local Jimmy Kimmel
WTVI Wickedly Perfect I CSI Without A Trace Local Late Show Late Late
WTWC Joey ICommitte Will & Gra |Will&Grac ER Local Tonight Show Conan
.... The O.C. North Shore Local Local Local . Local Local

A & E Cold Case Files The Firsl 48 The Firs -18 Crossing Jordan Cc'ld Case Files
SAMC ivhissing In Action 2 Hamburger Hill Apocalypse Now
CMT Top 20 Countdown Top 20 Counldown Music I
SDISN Disney Movie- TBA Raven Sis Bug Juice Lizzle Boy Meets Even
ESPN PGA Tour Tilt Sponrtscenler Till
ESPN2 C.:nlrerence Baskelball Conlerence USA Bas Figure S-:.aIntrg
FAM The Greal Ouldoors Whose Lin Whose Lin The 700 Club Fam Mall Fam Mall
FOOD Emeril.Live TBA Good Eat Secrel Lif Iron Chef Emeril Live
FX King, HII n King/Hill KingiHill King/Hill King/Hill King/Hill Fear Factor Cops Cops
HGTV Warriors Land Chal Divine Ds Dsn Chall House Hu House Hu D Travis On A Dim Warriors Land Chal
LIFE Scared Silent Dawn Anna Goodlellas
MTV True Life TBA
SCI Tales From the Cryptl Vampires Stigmata
TBS Friends |Friends Fools Rush In Ed TV
TCM Abe Lincolri in Illinois Railroaded' Secrel Life of Walter MitT'v
TLC O,.erhai r r..1,nimmy Delecir.'e lr.i.mmy Detectir.e Overnaulin |Murmmy Delec.ive
TNT JNBA On TIlT Neis *' Rockels INBA on TNT Cavaliers *j' Lakers
USA Law S Order SVU rMee the Parents Out l Sigle

HBO in si.3e thlle rFL ___ Welconie To Mouseport Thinking XXX Inside ine NFL
- ^^^�2002 Americar Profile Hometown Content Service


The Diet Detective

New Year's resolutions


By Charles Stuart Platkin
It happens every Jan. 1.
That's the one day we make
a commitment to "making a
.change." In fact, nearly half
of all American adults un-
dertake a behave ior change
program starting that same
day. We're ready to get go-
ing, yet most of us will not
make it past the first week.
And, according to the Jour-
nal of Clinical Psychology,
even among those who
make serious attempts at
change, 30 percent will
drop out within two weeks
and less than half will make
it past six months. Not very
encouraging, is it? Yet, by
following a few simple tips
we can significantly in-
crease our odds of losing
weight and keeping it off in
the New Year.
DON'T WAIT
If you don't make your
resolution in advance, you
reduce your chances of suc-
cess. About 65 percent of
people make their resolu-
tidns between Dec. 28 and
New Year's Day, according
to a University of Washing-
ton survey. Your best bet
for successis to make your
resolution sooner.
BE SERIOUS
Making half-hearted,
semi-serious resolutions
gets you half-hearted and
semi-serious results. In fact,
those who make a "seri-
ous" (and realistic) resolu-
tion to change are ten times
more likely to succeed than
those who make half-heart-
ed or overly ambitious at-
tempts. "Take your resolu-,
tions seriously or don't
make them at all," says
John C. Norcross, Ph.D.,
professor of psychology at
the University-of Scranton
in Pennsylvania and New
Year's resolution re-
searcher. "Those who are
serious increaile theit odd-c
ot _sT-ice -. in , t'e fi uturde
while those who don't de-
crease their chances," he
adds. Bottom line; If you're
"serious" about losing
weight (and that means cre-
ating a plan in advance),
keep trying - it pays.
BELIEVE IT
According to Norcross,
feeling confident that you
can change a behavior is the
single biggest predictor
that you will be able to
change. It's called "self-effi-
cacy," 'of an individual's
belief in his or her ability to
succeed at something - in
this case, changing an in-
grained negative pattern.
GETTING READY
Are you ready to make a
change? It takes more than
just saying you would like
to lose weight. You have to
think about it before you
start. "It's all about prepa-
ration," says Norcross. One
basic resolution-setting
piece of advice is to make
sure you set realistic, spe-
cific goals and have a writ-
ten plan of action. Goal-set-
ting is the cornerstone of
successful weight loss. That
means planning the details
and mapping them out in,
writing. We spend days
planning our vacations and
from six to nine months
planning a wedding,: which
is a four- to six-hour event.
Yet when it comes to losing
weight, we tend to "wing
it" and not tip the odds in
our. favor by planning and
setting goals.
RELAPSE PREVENTION
When you're attempting
to lose weight, or to change
any behavior for that mat-
ter, how yoti handle a lapse


can make a huge difference
between failure and long-
term success. Keep in mind
that a slip doesn't have to
become a fall, nor does a
lapse have to become a re-
lapse. Unsuccessful weight-
maintainers tend to have an
"all or nothing" attitude
and view a single "bad"
eating situation as verifica-
tion that they just can't lose


weight. "On the other
hand, a successful weight-
loss maintainer (or a person
who succeeds in changing
his or her behavior) thinks
in advance about situations
and obstacles that might
cause brief breakdowns,
such as having a bag of
potato chips or the weekly
doughnut gathering in the
office," says G. Alan Mar-
latt, Ph.D., director of the
University of Washington's
Addictive Behaviors Re-
search Center in Seattle.
Marlatt recommends
coming up with a relapse
prevention plan. Think in
advance about what com-
mon problems you might
encounter that will cause
you to slip up, and have a
plan. For instance, if you
normally have ,difficulty
staying on your diet when
you go out to dinner or
when you're visiting rela-
tives, come up with strate-
gies to avoid the slip-up, as
well as a plan of action to
follow if you actually do
slip up.
And it's a marathon, not
a 100-yard dash. "It takes
months, not days or weeks,
to establish a change." In
addition, "Resolutions are a
process, not a one-time ef-
fort, and even if people are
successful, they need to fol-
..low up on their behavior
over the years," says Mar-
latt.
THINK POSITIVE
State your New Year's
resolution in positive
terms. Don't say'things like
"I need to stop eating junk
food" or "I will never
watch television again" or
"I'm not going out to din-
ner three nights a week any
more." Pick things that are
positive, such as "I'm going
to start eating low-fat
frozen yogurt instead of ice
cream" or "I will. start, tak-
g- - -_ ' h - -- _
ing walks in the ev:eri'g.'-
Why? "It's easier to install
new behaviors then to sim-
ply get rid of old ones," ex-
plains Norcross.
BE AN
ENVIRONMENTALIST
Check out your personal
food environment. Those
who make successful
weight-loss resolutions re-
view and change their sur-
roundings by removing the
cues that cause them to
overeat and not exercise.
They use stiniulus control
- for instance, not getting
their morning coffee from
the bakery or removing
"diet buster" foods and
take-out menus for un-
healthy restaurants from
their homes.
That doesn't mean you
have to 'overhaul your en-
tire life - it just means you
should "remove people,
places, and things that
throw you completely off
track, but within reasori.
There are always certain
cues you can't remove. For
example, if you overeat late
at night, you can't remove
the time of day but you can
eliminate the 'toxic' foods
that create temptation,"
says Marlatt.
And don't just remove
negative stimuli or cues -
increase positive ones. For
example, hang out with
people who are supportive
of your weight-loss efforts,
surround yourself with
healthy foods, post re-
minder notices that you
"can lose weight," buy a
pedometer, join a gym and
make your personal envi-
ronment weight-loss
friendly.


Charles Stuart Platkin is a
nutrition and public health ad-
vocate, author of the best-sell-
ing book "Breaking the Pat-
tern" (Plume, 2005), the book
"The Automatic Diet" (Hud-
son Street Press/Penguin
Group USA, 2005) and
founder of Integrated Wellness
Solutions. Copyright 2004 by
Charles Stuart Platkin. Write
to info@thedietdetective.com








rPAG 10B S


Greater New Bethel
A.M.E. Church of Live Oak
will sponsor free annual
community health screening
Jan. 15
Greater New Bethel African
Methodist Episcopal Church of
Live Oak will sponsor free an-
nual community health screen-
ing from 8 a.m.-noon, Saturday,
Jan. 15, at the church fellow-
ship hall. All services are free
for adults and children. Valu-
able information provided. Co-
ordinators Drs. Tommy and
Athena Randolph. The Rev.
Charles Burke, pastor.
V.I.B.E. - Youth Ministries
of the Live Oak Church
of God will hold a
barbecue pork dinner
fund-raiser Jan. 21
V.I.B.E. - Youth Ministries of
the Live Oak Church of God
will hold a barbecue pork din-
ner fund-raiser from 11 a.m. - 2
p.m. on Friday, Jan. 21 at the
church at 9828 US 129, South,
1/4 mile south of the library.
Menu: barbecue pork, baked
beans, cole slaw, roll and
'dessert. Cost: $5. All orders
need to be made by Wednesday,
Jan. 19. For delivery, call 386-
362-2483.
FoodSource
A Christian based Christian
food cooperative, is in your
area! Stretch your food dollars!
With the help of dedicated vol-
unteers, FoodSource is able to
provide quality foods at low
prices while promoting Christ-
ian values and volunteerism in
your community. This is NOT a
needy only program; it is for
EVERYONE. There are no
qualifications to participate!
FoodSource. accepts cash,
checks, Visa, Mastercard, Deb-.
it, EBT and money orders.
Menu is subject to change! This
months tentative menu is:
whole chicken, beef stew (all
meat stew), Ammons Brothers
country sausage, bologna, fresh
eggs. cheese, Quiznos broccoli
cheese soup (family sized), oat-
meal or cream of wheat, 7-layer
sensation dessert, peanut butter,
I6b6arisJisoup'mix, fresh tange-


los, fresh grapefruit, fresh broc-
coli,' fresh apples, fresh ba-
nanas, fresh onions and fresh
five-pound bag ofpotatoes.Pick
Up Date: Jan. 22. Regular pack-
age price - $25. Meat package
available $25. Tentative meat
box menu: boston butt, whole
chicken beef roast, hot dogs,
hamburger patties and breakfast
sausage. TO ORDER AND
PAY BY
CREDIT/DEBIT/CHECK
CARD, CALL TOLL-FREE
800-832-5020. PICK UP OR-
DER AT LOCAL SITE. For
questions or to order, call your
local coordinator. Live Oak:
Live Oak Church of God - 386-
362-2483; Wellborn United
Methodist Church - 386-963-
5023; Ebenezer AME Church -
386-362-6383 or 386-364-4323
or 386-362-4808; Jasper: 386-
792-3965; White Springs: 386-
752-2196 or, 386-397-1228;
Bell: 352-463-7772 or 352-
463-1963; Lake City 386-752-
7976 or FoodSource toll-free at
800-832-5020 or visit website
at www.foodsource.org for
questions or to become a local
host site.
Community Christian
Center Food
Assistance Program
SCommunity Christian Cen-
ter's Food Assistance an-
nounces the addition of breads
and frozen meats. The main
program is set up on a co-oper-
ative basis which allows it to
help others in need on a weekly
basis instead of .periodic or
monthly. The program is open
to the public as well. Communi-
ty Christian Center is located
five miles west of 1-75 on US
90, on the north side of the road.
For more info, call 386-6113.
"Faith without works is dead"
James 2:26
Live Oak Church of God
will hold "Prayer at the
Gates of the City" from
7-9:45 a.m. on Fridays
Live Oak Church of God will
hold "Prayer at the Gates of the
City" every Friday from 7-9:45
a.m., at the church on 129
South, the Roundabout and oth-


CHURCH CALENDAR
er locations. Volunteers will be 6:30 p.m. Call 386-362-1837
praying for everyone entering for more info.
and leaving the city. People are First Advent Christian
being blessed and have called to Church of Live Oak invites
express their gratitude for the children K-5 to join SWORD
prayers saying it made a differ- SEEKERS on Wednesdays
ence in their lives. Bring your The First Advent Christian
chair join them each Friday to Church of Live Oak invites
pray at the gates of the city. For your child (K-5) to join
more info, call 362-2483. SWORD SEEKERS, a pro-
Word Alive Church will gram of crafts, music, games
host a monthly Preserve and Bible study from the dis-
Freedom Prayer Rally missal of school until 5:30 p.m.
Word Alive Church, 11239 The program will continue on
SR 51, Live Oak, invites all each Wednesday that school is
churches and the community to in session. For more info, call
a monthly Preserve Freedom the church office at 386-362-
Prayer Rally the last Wednes- 1802. The Rev. Tim Carver is
day of every month at 7:30 p.m. pastor of the church located at
The prayer focus will be the up- 699 Pinewood Drive, Live Oak.
coming elections,' our federal, Wellborn United Methodist
state and local leaders, pending Church sponsors "Kid's
laws/amendments, the Supreme Time" on Wednesdays
Court, local law enforcement Wellborn United Methodist
personnel, local schools, ad- Church sponsors "Kid's Time"
ministrators and students, local on Wednesdays from 4-6 p.m.
prisons and chaplains, terrorism at the fellowship hall on CR
and the military. If you would 137. Adult supervision for pro-
like to submit names of loved grams, games - indoor and out,
ones involved in any of the age related groups, music
above, please call the church at (maybe they will do special
386-362-2092, and/or join us as music for our Sunday worship
"requests, prayer, intercession service) and of course we ex-
and thanksgiving is made for pect the children attending to
everyone - kings, and those in come up with lots of fun things
authority that we may live they would like to teach us.The
peaceful and quiet lives in all school bus stops at the fellow-
godliness'and holiness." I Tim- ship hall and we will supply
othy 2:1,2. transportation for their return to
St. Luke's Episcopal 'home at 6 p.m. They will have a
Church will hold ALPHA short form for the children to
sessions bring home "Youth Protection
Skeptics welcome! St. Policy." Fill in and return to the
Luke's Episcopal Church is "Overseer" (Pastor Tim) who
hosting ALPHA, a non-denom- needs the information that is
national course exploring necessary for us to have on
Christianity in 11 thought-pro- hand in case of any kind of
evoking sessions. Each weekly emergency. These must be
session begins with a free din- filled in to protect the children
ner, and a nursery and youth and the church workers. We
program are available. ALPHA will have snacks and drinks
is open to anyone, Christian or available for all. Parents are
non-Christian. Listen, learn, welcome to visit or work along
discuss and discover. Ask any- with us. We will have a "prayer
thing! ALPHA is a place where warrior" and "fun master." If
no question is too tough. St. you would like to attend and
Luke's is located at 1391 need transportation, please call
Eleventh Street, just across our transportation group -
from the Coliseum. They invite Christine WhItmore - 386-963-
everyone to join them in AL- 5289 or the church numbers:
PHAon \Wednesdav e enings at Pastof Tim'- 386-9631307 1; fel-
, 4 .,


lowship hall - 386-963-2154.
All of this is FREE! FREE!
FREE!
Mothers Morning Out
program at First
Presbyterian Church
of Live Oak
The First Presbyterian
Church of Live Oak, 421 White
Ave, Live Oak holds its Moth-
ers Morning Out program twice
a week, Tuesdays and Thurs-
days from 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
The teacher/director is Elke
Day, Certified Pre-school
teacher/CDA 10 and 20 clock
hours. For more info, call the
church office: 386-362-3199.
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers
MOPS, Mothers of
Preschoolers, is a gathering of
moms for encouragement and
fun. All mothers of children
from birth to age 5 are invited to
attend. The meetings are the
second and fourth Tuesday of
the month, September through
May, from 9:30 a.m. to 12
noon. They are held at the First
Baptist Church on Howard St.
in Live Oak. For more informa-
tion, please call 386-362-1583.
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys Meeting
Fellowship of Christian
Cowboys meeting will be held
on the first Saturday of every
month at the SRRC Arena in
Branford at 5:30 p.m. The
meetings also will be held every
second Saturday of every
month at the Suwannee County
Coliseum Arena in Live Oak at
5:30 p.m.
Coming to terms with
your divorce
Christ-Centered, lay-led sup-
port group and a safe confiden-
tial place to help people deal
with issues and struggles they
encounter. This 9-week, course
is offered by First Baptist
Church of Live Oak. If you
know someone who may be in-
terested in divorce recovery,
call 386-362-1583 for more in-
formation. .
Broken Lance Church
First American Indian
"'Chiurih'i this area, open to all


The news readers


of today are the





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Zip


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Ex\p. Date - , " I
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P.O. Box 340, Live Oak, FL 32064


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persons, 9 miles south on US
129, Live Oak. Church services
at 10 and 11 a.m. Call Broken
Lance Church at 386-364-5998
or 386-364-6547 for more in-
formation.
Every Wednesday
Noon Day Services at
Ebenezer AME Church
Ebenezer AME Church hold
noon day services each
Wednesday for one hour''a
SPraise, Prayer and Deliverance
service. All are invited to atteiWd
and enjoy preaching, teaching;
testifying, gospel music.
singing and more. Lunch is al-
ways served by the Ebenezers
Church staff. The Rev. Clifton
Riley, pastor, Sister Sonja RileyO
coordinator. Midweek Pra er
and Bible Study at 6 p.m, also
on Wednesday. Please consid-
er this an open invite to join ;us
in any of these services and be:
come acquainted with the li\ ing
Father. Read and study Hiis
Word with us. Practice Godly
living as you start to pu: His
Word into your daily Jiving.
Don't rpeet us there, beat us
there and let's lift up the name.
of the Lord! If you li e in the
cityand do not have.a church to
call home, seek shelter with us,
a 'spirit filled church on the cor-
ner' of Houston and Parshle\
Street. We look forward to
nothing less than a mighty
move of God during each of
these services. Every Sunday
morning at 9:30 a.m. Church
School is in progress follow\ ed
by the morning worship sen ice
at 11 a.m.
Wanted - Wanted - Wanted!
Women who are interested
in being a part of a gro\ ing
ministry. The Live Oak Preg-
nancy Crisis Center is open
and we are in need of \ omen
to volunteer for various jobs.
This is an excellent opportum-
ty to be a blessing to others in
need and also a place to re-
ceive a blessing. If this sounds
like something you would be
interested in please come by
the Live Oak Center at 112
Piedmont St. on any Friday'
between 9 a.m. - 2jp m. '
3 1' , ':


I-


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


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M SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


D-rFiAY, JANUARY i, 2UU - --

FARM NEWS


Gold Kist, Inc.


PAGE 11B


honors top growers


Gold Kist, Inc. honored
broiler, breeder and pullet pro-
ducers with an appreciation
dinner in November. "Three
on a String" from Birming-
ham, Ala. entertained with
music and comedy.


Top growers were recog-
nized and awarded for their
outstanding performance
during 2004. The basis for
determining top broiler
growers is feed conversion,
mortality, condemnation and


chick cost for the entire year.
The top breeder grower is
determined by livability, pro-
duction, hatch and feed con-
version for the year. Chick
cost, livability and feed con-
version determines the top


pullet grower for the year.
We appreciate the hard
work these growers have put
forth during the past year.
This type effort enables Gold
Kist to remain a strong com-
pany.


OVERALL LARGE AND SMALL BIRD PRODUCER - TIM STEICHEN, WELLBORN: Pictured, I to r, back row, Tim and Kim Steichen and Gold
Kist Broiler Supervisor Gene Tomlinson; front row, Steichen children, Timberly and Kinley. - Photo: Submitted

T .





:.^ i ATTENTION i
j..T.

....s u FINANCII
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SECOND PLACE LARGE BIRD PRODUCER - CYNTHIA EDI
CINDY'S FARM, LIVE OAK: Pictured, I to r, Charles Edwards,
Edwards and Gold Kist Broiler Supervisor George Kelton. - Photo


FIRST PLACE LARGE BIRD PRODUCER- WILBUR HAND, HAPPY
ACRES, INC., MCALPIN: Pictured, I to r, Chris Hand and Wilbur
Hand. - Photo: Submitted

' 2." w "



















SECOND PLACE SMALL BIRD PRODUCER MORRIS DAY,
GREENVILLE: Pictured, I to r, Morris and Sarah Day and Gold Kist
Broiler Supervisor Elwyn McLeod. Not pictured, Robert Smith, Live
Oak - first place and Rufus O'Steen, R & R Ranch, Perry - third place
small bird producers. -Photo: Submitted
, . . '-












small bird producers. - Photo: Submitted


| Pontiac Vibe
M; 1500 SLE 04 GMC Yukon SLE
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tIRST PLACE HEN PRODUCER - PENNEY FARM, LEE: Pictured, I
Mo r, Gold Kist Breeder Supervisor Carson Cherry and Lester
thmas, Penney Farms, Lee. - Photo: Submitted


THIRD PLACE LARGE BIRD PRO-
DUCER - AL WAINWRIGHT,
NORTHSIDE FARM, MCALPIN:
Pictured is Al Wainwright.
- Photo: Submitted


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:Submitted







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SCrew Cab 4x4




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Very Low Miles! Nice, Ve

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E SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


SGolfl


By TJ. TOMASI


Insider


BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
Kite has it right
Tom Kite announced recently that he
will cut down his schedule on the Cham-
pions Tour this year to play more tour-
naments (about 15) on the regular PGA
Tour.
Insider Take: At 55, Kite has done
about everything in golf and he's still
got game. At his level, he's competing for
the history books. If he wins, he'd be-
come the oldest player to ever win on the
PGA Tour. SairiSnead holds the current
record: He won the 1965 Greater Greens-
boro Open when he was 52 years, 10
months and eight days old.It's just the
kind of record the great Tom Kite would
love to hold.

For tkeman who has
everything
He's got yachts, sports cars, palatial
digs, a wine label, his own clothing line
and just about everything else you can
think of except, it appears, a rule book.
Greg Norman was disqualified at two
tournaments last year - both times for
improper drops from a water hazard;
one on the PGA Tour at the Honda Clas-
sic and the other on the European Tour
at the BMW Asian Open. It kills the
sponsors when Norman goes home early
because he's still a big draw.

Show me the money
While there is no danger of Kendall-
mania breaking out, journeyman Skip
Kendall passed Jack Nicklaus on the all-
time PGA Tour money list. After the.
2004 golf season, Nicklaus now stands at
No. 103 on the list. Among the 14 who
passed him this year were Woody,
Austin, J.L. Lewis and Kendall, who has
never won a tournament on the PGA
Tour.

Mallon on
the move
Most of the
players on the
LPGA Tour. will
tell you that the
most popular play-
er out there is Meg
Mallon. That's why
her monster year
in 2004 was so well-
received. Meg won MALLON-
tfurl. ttes, in- ,
cluding the USGA
Women's Open at the Orchards Golf
Club in Massachusetts. Mallon is now
only 5 points short of automatic induc.
tion into the LPGA Hall of Fame, and at
age -11, she has a realistic chance to
reach that goal in 2005.

GOLF BY THE NUMBERS


25, .
The number of foreign-born players
who won onithe PGA Tour in 2004.
American-born players won 23 times.
Does this help explain our Ryder Cup
problems?


1.53
Thanks to ShotLink weknow that in
2004 Vijay Singh made putts totaling
1.53 miles.



17
The average age of the 144-player field
at the 2004 USGA Women's Amateur
Public Links Championship. As fur-
ther proof that female golfers are get-
ting younger and better: Michelle Wie
is the youngest winner of a USGA
event other than a junior event, hav-
ing won the 2003 USGA Women's Am-
ateur Public Links Championship
when she was a 13-year-old.


3
The number of national titles Ryan
Moore won in 2004. He became the first
golfer since Bobby Jones to win three
national titles in the same year, includ-
ing the U.S. Amateur at the famed
Winged Foot West Golf Club in Ma-
maroneck, N.Y. In all, Moore won nine
of the 17 tournaments he entered.


IT'S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME


The student in these photos is turning his hips about 40 degrees and his shoulders about
80 degrees - less than the 45 degrees and 90 degrees most commonly prescribed, but still
retaining the all-important 2-to-1 ratio for maximum coil.





2-to-I coil






delivers power


t may sound like a baseball
score, but 2-to-1 is the key
ratio that produces coil.
Here's how it works.
Your muscles are like lazy
'house guests: They won't do
anything unless you make them.
It's much easier to skip the big-
muscle shoulder turn and sim-
ply lift the club up to the top of
the backswing using the small
muscles of the arms and hands.
But it's the wrong way to reach
the top because'without a shoul-
!der turn you lose coil:
If your swing lacks power, it
may,well stem from alack of
coil..This is the problem that
teaching pro John Bierkan, is
working on with hisstudent in
the two accompanying photos.
The proper twisting or "coil"
has two main components.
First, the trail hip rotates over


ABOUT THE WRITER
Dr TJ. Tomasi is
director of instruc-
tion at Lyman Or-
chards Golf Club in
Middlefield, Conn.
To ask him a ques-
tion about golf, e-
mail him at: TJIn-
sider@aol.com.

the trail heel. To get his stu-
dent to satisfy this element
properly, John is utilizing a'
training aid. called the "spine
board.",
When his student was in the
proper address position, John
placed the'.board about 2 inches
behind him so that at the top of '
his swing, the student's right
cheek touches the board. To do
this correctly, the student must
rotate his right hip over his


right heel.
. This proper movement for a
right-handed player also in-
volves loading up on the right
heel. This ensures that there has
been a correct weight shift and
that you have turned behind the
ball with the pressure on your
right foot "heavy" on the heel.
The second component of a
good coil is the turning of the
shoulders more than the hips:
This is best seen in the front
,ew. Here, while the student
;maintains contact with.the
board (absent a spine board, a,
straight-backed chair'will work
just as well). John turns the stu-
dent's shoulders to the mas. '
Each student's maximum is
dependent on his or her individ-
ual flexibility. The important
thing to remember is the proper
coil ratio: 2-to-1.


TEEING OFF


European

Tour snubs


Jimenez

n 2004, Vijay Singh didn't play
in the required number of Eu-
ropean Tour tournaments to
retain playing status on the tour,'
he didn't win a single event on
that tour, and his best finish was
15th. But the winner of the Player
of the Year Award on the Euro-
pean Tour was Vijay Singh. Go fig-
ure.
The winner
was deter-
mined by a poll
of European
Tour officials,
golf writers
and golf broad-
casters who
completely
"dissed" their
own tour by not
choosing the Miguel Ange
player with the Jimenez
best record, moved up in'.:
Miguel Angel ial
Jimenez, who the Official ,.
Jimenez, who
won four Euro- World Golf '-
pean Tour titles Rankings
and was on the from 94th at'1
victorious Ry- the beginning:
der Cup team.
What are of the year to
these people 12th.
thinking? Singh
bothered to play in only four "
events while Jimenez was a full-
time supporter of the tour. '-
Granted, Singh had a mon- .
strous 2004, but he had it on the ,
PGA Tour. Selecting Singh as the:-
Player of Year on the European :',
Tour simply because he'd played i
years before going to the United:
States is ludicrous. It's like the *"
Baltimore Orioles naming Babe
Ruth as their "All-Time Slugger"
because they signed the Babe to
his first pro contract before he
moved on to the Boston Red Sox
and then the-New York Yankees.
The Player of the Year should
(1) have actually played regularly
on the tour during the year in
question, and (2) have played'the-
tour better than anyone else. And-
Singh failed to do either.
The choice was an insult to all
. European Tour members, but es-
pecially Jimenez, who finished
second in the voting. Besides play-
ing with distinction on the win-
ning Ryder Cup team, Jimenez
won the Johnnie Walker Classic,
the Algarve Open de Portugal
Caixa Geral de Depositos, the
BMW Asian Open and the BMW
International Open. He also
moved up in the Official World
Golf Rankings from 94th at the be-
ginning of the year to 12th!.
Maybe they didn't like
Jimenez's hairdo (or, in this case,
his "hair don't"), a god-awful con-
coction that culminates in an or-
ange pug, not quite worthy of be-
ing a pony tail. It's said that Euro-
pean Tour conditions are spartan,
with poor practice facilities the
norm, but surely they have mir-
rors.
In any case, leaving the choice'
to the opinion of a few officials
and some media folk doesn't cut
it. To paraphrase Shakespeare:
"Methinks there is a French judge
in there somewhere." '


THE GOLF DOCTOR


Surrender to the process.
To learn golf, y6u must be willing to
surrender to theprocess of learning. i.e.,
you have to put your ego in the trunk
andassume the role of student. This sur-
render is not quite as easy as one might
think.'Sometimes the very success
golfers have in their professional lives
distracts from their ability to learn golf
I work with a lot of people who are
successful in business, and as .ich. they
become used to controlling their ern'i-
ronment. Any part of the business
process that is out of their control is
dangerous to their livelihood, and there-


fore, they have built up a healthy aver-
sion to variables they can't manage.
SSo it makes good sense that included
in the successful person's business keys
are the three M's: monitoring, manipula-
tion and management, coupled with the
implicit belief that all problems, no mat-
ter how severe, can be brought to heel' by
strong and ongoing application of the ,
.i three M's. ' *
As effective as these keys may be in
business, the three M's are not always
helpful in learning golf because they of-
ten lead to impatience and unrealistic ex-
pectations, Golf is not a sport that yields
mastery on demand, for no matter who


and what you control in your non golf
life. in golf \ou still have to pay yowu
dues the old fashioned way: You have to
LEARN it. and that means submitting to
the process of learning.
A fewv years ago, a famous golf
teacher was instructing the king of an
eastern country and the king was not
happy with his progress. After too much
complaining by the royal chopper: the
teacher told hun: "Your Highness, you
know you're the king, I know you're the
.king, but the .ball - it doesn't know
you're the king!" Nor, he might have
added, does it care
S To be a good learner in golf you must


accept that your inferior ball flight is not
an act of insubordination to be dealt
with using anger, impatience and a ma-
jor dose of the three M's. If you think'.-
about it, you didn't learn anything you
do well without investing the requisite
time and energy into the process, to wit:
finding the model, learning the model,
repeating the model as perfectly as you
can under the auspices of a teacher or
facilitator who helps you through thle
process.
King or countryman, it's all the same':
To impose your will on the golf course,
you must first submit your will to'the :'
process of learning.


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JOHN'S LAWN EQUIPMENT
162, Ohio Ave. N. * Live Oak, FL 32064
[3816 362-5020o 1-800-648-2856 19947F


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For more information about this home,
call Kellie Shirah of Poole Realty at386-362-4539.


This 3 bdrm 1&1/2 bath home can either Tr, 12 ho4 n h as Loads o. Polernia
be used as commercial or as your Beautiiul 5 acre home ii5 Plenty ofi re-p. L' alid or a co irnr i jusi aitu\ 3 milei
residence. Has an adjacent building Great location. Close to Suwannee River from town off of Hwy 51. Large Oak Trees
currently-being rented for office space. and less than 60 miles to Gulf. MLS#43668 fill the yard. MLS#43693 $98,500
MLS#43617 $175,000 $35,000 128308JRS-F


IMake a big splash all
S Over town and attract
more customers with an
advertisement in color. It's
Sa fact that more people
read ads with color. Color
is lively, appealing,
* , assertive-and
it sells!

Call now for information.


Classified Marketplace

386-362-1734 or 800-525-4182




REALTOf
529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990
Realtor Assoc. - M. Elizabeth Elliott, Evening 842-2372


(1) Off 76th Street: 10 Acres
wooded, oaks and pines. Good,
buy @ $33,500.
(2) Lee, FL: 7.3 Acres on 'US
90 near 1-10 with a 3/4
bedroom CH/AC home
containing approximately
1,750 sq. ft. under roof together
with a C.B.S. Commercial
Building containing
approximately 12,500 with
11,500 sq. ft. of packing.
$250,000.
(3) 75 acres on paved road on
pasture with some live oaks,
fenced and cross fenced, two
wells, 1/4 mile on paved Rd.
1/4 mile on county grade, good
area. $3,995 per acre.
(4) 177th Drive: 3 Bedroom, 2
bath central heat and air. Home
containing approxaimtely
1,350 sq. ft. Kitchen furnished
225'137 lot. $72,000.
(5) Alapha River: Two one
acre wooded tracts with 200 ft.
on the water. Good country
road. $14,995. $100 Down.
(6) Jasper, FL: 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath, CH/AC, brick, containing
approximately 1,700 sq. ft., tender
roof. Kitchen furnished 147x97
lot, pool, $95,000..
(7) Off CR 51 S.W.: 20 acres
wooded with large oaks, and a
3BR/2BA, CH/CA DWMH in
excellent condition, contact
office. 2000 sq. ft. under roof,
detached storage $149,500.
(8) 161 /St Rd.: 10 acres with a
four bedroom, three bath,
CH/CA, brick home containing
approximatley 2,500 sq. ft.
under roof, kitchen furnished, 3
car garage. REDUCED to
$225,000.
(9) Duval & Scriven St.: 3


bedroom, 1 bath home cont.
/approx. 1650 sq. ft. under roof
240x106 corner lot. $49,000.
REDUCED!
(10) Hunting Tract: 13 acres
+, wooded, Steinhatchee
Springs area, river access, and
Hwy. 51 access, recent survey.
$26,000.
(11) CR 132: 13 acres wooded
on paved road with a 3
bedroom, 2 bath, CH/CA
DWMH in excellent condition,
cont: approx. 1450 sq. ft.,
heated area, will have to see to
appreciate. $119,000.
(12) Camping Lot: One acre
riverview lot in the Blue
Springs area, river access.
$5,995.
(13) 16th Street: 1 1/2 acres
with a 3 bedroom, 1 bath home
contains approx. 1180 sq. ft.
(paved Rd.) good area.
$45,000.
(14) Perry Fla: Nice two
bedroom, CH/CA, brick home
with garage, good area.
$51,900.
(15) Perry Fla: 3 bedroom,
central heat and air, 218x170'
lot, nice trees, numerous
updates, new carpet, paint,
stove & refrig. 100%
financing. $61,900.
(16) Suwannee River: Four
plus acres with 220 ft. on the
water, 4' well, septic tank,
20x32 and 10x20 buidlings.
$110,000.
(17) 177th Road: 10 acres,
wooded 4' well, septic tank,
good county road. $4,200 per
acre.
(18) US 90 West & 1-10: 32
Acres, zoned C.H.I., corner
tract, will divide.
gRd448.2


ESCAPE THE..HURR. ICANESI


1 -4=�-









PAGE 2C ( "-'' . ... . ......... .. . .


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


Real Estate
., First Day
ENJOY NORTH FLORIDA LIVING
LIVE OAK. FLORIDA

15 Ac. Approx. 7 mi. W. of Live Oak
w/2001 Homes of Merit 2300+ sq. ft.
Mobile Home. 4BD/2BA, 2LR. Lots of
storage area, Lg. Kit, Lg. Deck on
back w/concrete patio. Home sits in
about 3 Ac. of Lg. Oak Trees w/the
-bal. of prop. in pasture. Mostly fenced
&-�ross-fenced for cattle & horses.
Accessible from 2 roads: 1 paved, 1
dirt. Irrigation for garden spot or start
of a nursery. Asking $177,000.
CALL FOR APPT. TO SEE:
DAYTIME: 386-867-1888
AFTER 6PM: 386-330-2373

First Day
LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCA-
TION!
www.suwanneecountyflorida.com
This cyber realestate for sale.
Will trade for property in Suwannee
County. 888-786-0676


PERSONAL SERVICES
Child Care
First Day
Loving Family DayCare Home in
Peacock Lake area. Hot meals. Edu-
cational toys, large outdoor play
area. Registered with 4Cs-
R03SU0023. Call 386-364-7736 for
more info.




EDUCATIONAL SERVICES





PETS

LOST AN ANIMAL? WANT TO
ADOPT? Call Suwannee County An-
imal Control at 386-208-0072. M-F
from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.


PROPERTY FOR SALE


Madison County
70 Acres. Hunting Tract w/20 acre
lake and oak hammock. $2100. per
acre.

60 Acres. with duck pond and lots of
deer and turkey. $1200. per acre.
Lafayette County
6 Ea. 20 Acre parcels. with duck
pond or sand bottom lake. Large
Live Oaks. $3,000. per acre.
Suwannee River Frontage Lots
Madison County: 150' frontage-
with home ready to move into.
$175,000.
Lafayette County: 3 to choose
from with septic permits, $40,000.
each. 2 to choose from without sep-
tic permits, $30,000. each.

Suwannee County: 10.2 Acres with
850' frontage. Very private, no sep-
tic. $250,000.
Gilchrist County: 8.2 Acres with
275' frontage. With spring head, no
septic. $150,000.
Dixie County: Without septic tanks-
3 to choose from. $30,000. each.
Call Marvin Buchanan
Owner/Broker
(386) 294-1211


W-AGRICULTURE
Farm Equipment
Farm Equipment
1ST ANNUAL ICE BREAKER
SWAP MEET
Jan. 7-9, 2005
New & Old tractors, Antique En-
gines,
Lots of Rusty bits & pieces at
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
(386) 364-1683


Garage/Yard Sales
First Day
MOVING SALE 3yr old mahogany 2-
pedestal dining table w/4 matching
side & 2 arm chairs. Matching buffet
w/granite top. Beautiful, like new con-
dition $2300. Antique cedar chest
w/very ornate carvings $400. Com-
mercial type treadmill in great condi-
tion $400. Universal gym w/4 stations
& all weights, great condition. Has
been kept indoors $475. Please call
386-364-1234.


RECREATION



FOR SALE 2003 Honda Rancher.
All-time 4-wheel drive. 27" 589 mud
tires, ITP Aluminum wheels, elec-
tronic shift, 145 hrs, like brand new.
$5,500.00. Call 386-330-5352.

Boats/Supplies
FOR SALE 1996 Robalo 2120, cen-
ter console w/225 Mercury w/warran-
ty. Continental trailer. Many extras.
Asking $17,500. Call 386-362-4775.



FOR SALE Houseboat, 29 ft. Pon-
toon. Self-contained. Fridge, stove,
bed. 2001 hp. Honda 4-stroke, tilt &
trim. $6000. OBO. Call 727-421-5207
or 727-526-0622.






REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
Apartments
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal to
advertise "any preference, limitation
or discrimination based on race, col-
or, religion, sex, disability, familial
status or national origin, or an inten-
tion, to make any such preference,
limitation and discrimination" Famil-
ial status includes children under the
age of 18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of children
under 18.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this newspa-
per are available on an equal oppor-
tunity basis. To complain of discrimi-
nation call HUD toll-free 1-800-669-
9777. The toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


Rooms
First Day
ROOMS FOR RENT Unfurnished 1
or 2 BR in my home just NW Live
Oak. Quality home fully fenced 1/2!
ie- yard. Ohildren'"pels welcome PNo,
drinking, smoking, drugs on prdmis-'
es. Share bath, kit, LR, yard. Min.
stay-2mos. $420. 1 BD, $470. 2 BD,
+$100. dep. Call 386-362-3991.


-FOR RENT-

3BR, Singlewide

mobile home.

Central H/A.
First month's

rent plus deposit

to move in.

Water, sewer &

garbage included.

No pets.

386-330-2567
133437-


aJoan Holmes Radford
L ~ n with/ Mlarie Lee Realt - ~ Marie Lee Broker


LARGE LOT in Jennings area. Mostly cleared.
Call for details. $10,000. MLS# 43565


Commercial building and property. Room to
have your office and rent 2 out! Call for
details. $82,500. MLS#40481 13401A4RS-F


Touch of Class
Not just any mobile home.
This one has a lot to offer...
1,550 sq. ft. 3BR/2BA, metal
roof, vinyl siding, new central
heat and air unit, new 40 gal.
hot water heater and Kinetico
water purifying system.
Kitchen & breakfast area has
been remodeled with a Tuscan
theme, family room has a
?a working fireplace with a gas
log. All rooms have been
freshly painted, and are ready
Owner is Only Asking for you. Home also has a
..... covered back porch and a new
front deck with rails. All this
on 2.5 acres with two deep
II J. . I LL wells, metal storage building,
Planted Pines, Pecan, and
.llt L & ASSOCIATES Oak 'Trees. Only 6 miles from
1105 W. Howard Street,.Live Oak, Florida 32064
Office: (386) 362-3300 Toll Free: 1-888-821-0894 Live Oak. 133191-F


Houses for Rent
HOUSE FOR RENT 1BR/1BA Brand
New House CHA Screened Porch,
$600/mo, 1st, last & $300. sec. dep.
1, mi. from Live Oak, Fl city limits. NO
PETSI 386-362-3002
Mobile Homes for rent
First Day
FOR RENT 3BD/2BA DWMH,
CH&A, W&D Hookups, $550. mo. +
Sec. Dep. Call 386-364-5173.



First Day
FOR RENT 3BD/2BA MH on 5 quiet
acres. 50 ft. Porch. Washer & Dryer
hook-up. $450.00 plus deposit. Call
386-364-5007.



First Day
FOR RENT Nice, clean 3BD/2BA
DWMH w/fireplace & CHA on 2 ac.
Close to Gold Kist & Dowling Park.
No indoor pets or smoking on
premises. $500. per mo. $250.00
sec. dep. Call 386-658-6464 Iv. msg.
w/ph#.





REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


FOR SALE W/OWNER FINANCING
1 AC. buildable lot near SR 247
$12,000. 2 AC. buildable lot near SR
247 $20,000. 4 AC. lot off 137 on
35th $30,000. 2 AC. lot 3 mi. off US
90 near Madison Co.. line $12,500.
(386) 935-2301.


OWNER FINANCE
Jasper - 4BD/2&1/2BA DWMH on 1'
ACRE, NICE PRIVACY, Lg. Front &
Rear decks, fireplace, new
carpet.Sm. down & $750/mo.
Call (386) 758-9785


OWNER FINANCE
O'Brien - Spacious 3BR/2BA on
2.03 acres. Beautiful Oak Trees Sm.
down & $695.00 mo.
Call (386) 758-9785


To place yuor ad
in the Classified

Marketplace, call
Louise at 386-382-1134


FOR RENT-
3BR, 2BA DWMH,
CENTRAL H/A.
FIRST MONTH'S
RENT PLUS,
DEPOSIT TO
MOVE IN.
WATER, SEWER
& GARBAGE
INCLUDED.
NO PETS
386-330-2567
133339-F


-FOR RENT-

2 BR, singlewide

mobile home,

central H/A.

First month's

rent plus deposit

to move in.

Water, sewer, &

garbage included.

No pets

386-330-2567


Homes for Sale
FOR SALE by owner-N. Suwannee
County. 3/2 Cypress frame home-
1995. 2100 sq. ft. conditioned+lg.
screen porch & decks. Beautiful 6 ac.
of hardwood forest, high & dry. 3 min.
walk to Suwannee River w/gated ac-
cess to miles of state-owned river
frontage. $213,000. Call 386-362-
5979
Mobile Homes
OWNER FINANCE
E. of Branford-close to beautiful
Itchetucknee River- 3BD/2BA MH
Small down, $625/mo. 386-758-
9785

Lots
FIVE, TEN AND TWENTY ACRE
LOTS with well & septic. Owner fi-
nancing. Call 386-752-4339.
www.deasbullardbkl.com






EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
First Day





LAKE CITY
CIIAMNDM TY tUlE IE
HUMAN RESOURCES
DEPARTMENT
149 S.E. Vocational Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
ACCOUNT CLERK II
Collect student fees and prepare
daily bank deposits. Administers
petty cash, change funds and re-
ceipt books. High School graduate
plus three years business office ex-
perience, one of which is non-pro-
fessional accounting. Special con-
sideration will be given to appli-
cants with an Associate degree or
certificate in related area. Salary
$18,669.00 annually plus benefits.
Deadline for receiving applications
January 19, 2005.

Jobline: (386) 754-4505
FAX (386) 754-4594
E-MAIL:
Boettcherg @ lakecitycc.edu
Applications are available on WEB
at: www.lakecitycc.edu
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AF-
FIRMATIVE ACTION COLLEGE
IN EDUCATION AND EMPLOY-
MENT
VETERAN'S PREFERENCE

First Day
Bank tellers
Want to earn extra cash while the
kids are in school?
First Federal Savings Bank of Florida
has 30 hour a week teller positions
with flexible schedules. Must pos-
sess good interpersonal skills, orga-
nizational, computer skills and above
average math skills. Cash handling
experience is preferred. You may pick
up an employment application at any
First Federal Branch and forward to
Human Resources, PO. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056. Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Employer.


Help Wanted
First Day
ACCOUNT CLERK/GENERAL
LEDGER CLERK

CITY OF LIVE OAK
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

DUTIES:

Performs accounting work in main
training accounting and financial
records.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Graduation from a standard high
school and six months clerical-ac-
counting experience.
SALARY RANGE: $15,447.00

BENEFITS:

Including health and life insurance
paid by City, pension plan, paid holi-
days, sick leave and vacation leave.

CLOSING DATE:
Application must be submitted to the
office of the Finance Director by
5:00 p.m., January 18, 2005.
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE:

Successful applicant will be subject
o Drug Free Workplace Policy.

A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OP
PORTUNITY/ DRUG FREE WORK
PLACE/ HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
JURISDICTION

CITY MANAGER-
CITY OF JASPER

The City of Jasper (pop. 2000) is
requesting applications for the po-
sition of City Manager. Applications
should be submitted in the form of
a resume. Salary will be negotiable
and depend on qualifications. A
Bachelor degree or higher is pre-
ferred with 4 years of municipal
government experience. An equiv-
alent combination of training and
experience may be accepted. Pro-
fessional managerial or financial
experience may be substituted on
a year for year basis for the educa-
tion and experience requirement.
Work experience must show suc-
cessful professional management
and interpersonal relations skills.
The successful applicant will be re-
quired to live within the city limits of
Jasper. The city manager reports to
a five member City Council. The
Mayor and Vice Mayor are chosen
by the City Council. The city man-
ager is responsible for the day to
day operations of the city. The city
provides full services including po-
lice and fire protection natural gas,
water, wastewater collection and
treatment, parks/ recreation, street
maintenance-and garbage collec-
tion. Send resume to Mr. Matthew
Hawkins, Mayor, City of Jasper,
208 W. Hatley Street, Jasper, Flori-
da 32052. Only resumes received
by January 31,2005 will be consid-
ered. Evaluation of applicants will
begin as soon as resumes are re-
ceived. Resumes received are pub-
lic record. The City of Jasper is an
equal opportunity employer.


,wK4 IM_ 0_ 9 %@6


For more information about this home, call the associates
of Poole Realty at 386-362-4539.


S F:S.6 WVest US Highway 90
SMac 1 01: L.IKe City, FL 32055" " ,i - ."
H'iPERLINK
"http://www.FloridaAcreage.com"
DANIEL CRAPPS
agency, Inc. 1-800-805-7566

(1) 20 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located a short distance from
Charles Springs and a boat ramp on the Suwannee River. $3,350 per acre - owner financing
available (Owner/Broker)
(2) 84.50 (+1-) - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great home site! $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(3 65 ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property has frontage on CR #49 and has scattered
oak and pine trees. Great.home sitel $3,000 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(4) 155 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - gently rolling land located next to Peacock
Springs State Park. Ideal for home site or hunting! $2,995 per acre (Owner/Broker)
(5) 210 (+/-) ACRES - SUWANNEE COUNTY - property is located on State Road #51 about 3
miles north of the Suwannee River. Great location for home site! $3,500 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
(6) 645 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - gently rolling land with majestic hardwoods along the
meandering of a creek that runs through the property. Land is in 19 & 20 year old planted
pines and has paved road frontage. Ideal for hunting, other recreational uses or home site.
$2,725 per acre
(7) 674 ACRES - MADISON COUNTY - this tract has some cut over land, about 195 acres of
2001 planted sand pines and some beautiful hardwood hammocks surrounding the Sand Pond.
Ideal for deer and turkey hunting. Property is a short drive from 1-10. $1,995 per acre
(Owner/Broker)
For additional information, contact
BAYNARD WARD, KATRINA BLALOCK or CHUCK DAVIS
E-mail: HYPERLINK"mailto:ward@danielcrapps.com"


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5 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT K


FRIDAYJANUARY 7, 2005


-` ---~








FRIDAY, JANUARY 7,2005o majclw .,l,-525-41, ext....10t p y
FRIDAY JANUARY 7 2ca005llaway.. all 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad FAX 386-364-5578

You are just a call away... call 1-800-525-4182, ext. 102 to place your ad * FAX 386-364-5578


Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. *You are just a click away... find the classified marketplace online at www.nflaonline.com


We Will Help You.

GAIN EXTRA ATTENTION
To Your Classified Ad On
MERCHANDISE 1 The First Day It Runs!
MERCHANDISE Wthe the



PERSONAL SERVICES RECREATION Logo inthe lassifedMarketplce

h I c O The
IfITS A CAli Ut l us
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES REAL ESTATE FOR RENT '- t' .y_ s


CULPETU




AGRICULTURE


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE




TRANSPORTATION


To Place Your .
Monday through Friday by calling 386-362-1734 or
1-800-525-4182, faxing to 386-364-5578 or mailing to:
Classified Marketplace, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064



WE ACCEPT M rderPrsl Chcks
a Money Orders* Persoal Checks


Your Classified Ad can

appear in 5 paid

newspapers:

The Suwannee Democrat

on both Wed. & Fri.,

p; the Jasper News,

The Branford News &

The Mayo Free Press on

Thursday; a total of

15,200 issues weekly!
Increase your promotional reach and tap into
potential new markets... Ask about placing your
advertising message into: The Valdosth Daily
Times, The Thomasville Times-Enterprise; The
Lowndes Edition-Mailbox Post; The Thomas
County Buyer's Guide; or a network of over 20
other publications, serving over 30 counties; with
over 20,000 readers in South Georgia.
Ask about our
SI "Service Directory" rates


FLORIDA (386) 208 Live Oak 294 Mayo 303
While Springs * 362,364 Live Oak * 397 White
Springs 454 High Springs ' 497 Fort White . 658
Dowling Park - 752, 755, 758 Lake City * 776
Luraville * 792 Jasper 842 Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch (Live Oak) 935 Branford * 938 Jennings
S961 Lake City , 963 Welborn * 965 Lake City
GEORGIA (229) 219 Valdosta , 224, 225, 226,
227, 228 Thomasville 241,242, 244, 245, 247,
249, 251,253, 257, 259 Valdosta - 263 Quitman
268 Vienna * 268 Lilly - 271, 273 Cordele ' 282,
283, 285, 287 Waycross ' 293 Valdosta , 324 Berlin
* 333 Valdosta * 345 Nicholls *346 Coolidge , 359
Ambrose * 362 Milan * 363 Lumber City 365
Rochelle 367 Baxley * 375 Hazelhurst o 377, 378
Cairo 381 Douglas 382 Tion 383, 384
Douglas o 385 Rhine , 386, 387 Tllon 389,393
Douglas * 422 Pearson * 423,424 Fitzgerald 433
Byromvile 449 Blackshear *455 Ray City 467
Abbeville 468 Ocilla 472 Montezuma 472
Oglelhorpe 482 Lakeland�487 Homerville* 498
Boston 528 Omega 532 Alapaha 533 Enigma *
534 Willacoochee, 535 Warwick 546 Lenox
*549 Sparks * 559 Lake Park * 567 Ashburn * 574
Ocklochnee *594 Uvalda 624 Pineview , 627
Unadilla * 632 Alma *637 Fargo * 643 Rebecca
S 648 Pis * 649 Buena Vista 683 Meigs * 686
Nashville * 735 Barwick 762 Whigham *769
Norman Park 775 Morven * 776 Sylvester 782
Doerun * 794 Hahira 824 Plains 831 Irwinville
' 833 Jacksonville ' 846 Smithville * 853 Cobb '
859 Pavo0 863 Blackshear * 868 McRae , 873
Moullrie * 874 Leslie 887 Richland * 890, 891
Moultrie'896 Adel 899 Moutrie*924,928
Americus *929 Pinetta * 938 Jennings , 941
Funston 973 Madison-985 Moultrie


..i. gaboAder I I F OLI' I N A*fl g r
feature. For Wednesday Publication 11 a.m.,
dwthaborder I Friday (prior),
SO For Friday Publication, 11 a.m.,
v IIII f lU lllN:I U Wednesday (prior).
*We reserve the right to cancel any special offer or promotion in the Classified Marketplace upon a 30-day notice.'


Help Wanted


ACCOUNT PAYABLES
NEEDED
LIVE OAK AREA
CALL FOR APPT:
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGRD
REQ.

Administrative
Assistant II
(Pending Classification)

State position available with Courts
of the Third Judicial Circuit to pro-
vide administrative assistance in
mediation services. Prefer mini-
mum of five years of progressively
more responsible administrative
experience Knovwlege and/or ex-
perience in'court procedures and
programs, particularly in the field of
mediation, preferred. Must have
knowledge of standard administra-
tive practices as well as office
equipment and computer related
software. The ability to communi-
cate well and practice discretion re-
quired. Annual Salary $29,142.60.
Resumes must be received by
Jan. 12, 2005.

Submit resume w/State of Florida
application to:
Human Resources
P. O. Box 1569
Lake City, FL 32056
ADA Compliant/EOE.


First Day
Program Coordinator-from home.
Govt. monitored H. S.-Exchange
Student Program is seeking person
to work locally with community fami-
lies, schools and foreign teens. Back-
ground in student exchange, educa-
tion or travel. Full training and inter-
national travel opportunities. Re-
sume: dmdworld@comcast.net.
1/877-417-9600.


Help Wanted


First Day
ALTERNATE COLLECTION
SITE ATTENDANTS

SUWANNEE COUNTY is currently
accepting applications for two Al-
ternate Collection Site Attendant
positions. These positions will work
on an as needed basis. An employ-
ee allocated in this position en-
sures that refuse entering the col-
lection center is acceptable and
that sufficient area for disposal is
continuously available. Ensures
that proper procedures are fol-
lowed in disposal. Performs routine
cleaning of the site. Minimum qual-
ifications include high school edu-
cation or G.E.Dpreferred and one
year experience.in customer ser-
vice work; or al'equivalent combi-
nation of training and experience.
Must possess a valid Florida Dri-
vers License. Rate of pay is $5.44
per hour. The deadline for receiving
applications is January 14, 2005 at
5:00 p.m. For an application con-
tact the Administrative Services
Department, 224 Pine Avenue,
Live Oak, Florida 32064, (386)
362-6869. All applicants are sub-
ject to drug testing prior to employ-
ment. EE/AA/VD.

Bus Drivers
SUWANNEE DISTRICT
SCHOOLS
Transportation Department is
needing dependable people for
Substitute School Bus Drivers. Re-
quired: High School Diploma or
GED, excellent driving record, and
complete requirements mandated
by the State of Florida. We will train
interested people and help them
acquire the CDL Class B driver's li-
cense for school bus drivers. Excel-
lent hourly wages and the opportu-
nity to become full time. For more
information please call Marianne
Wood, .Driver Trainer at 386-364-
3575. Please call after January 3,
2005 for more details. Next class
scheduled for January 10, 2005.


Classsifieds Work!









a^ed Sewcee^


FOR

Rental Asstance
, 2, 3, & 4 BR HC & Non-
HC Accessible Apartments

705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY 711
Equal Housing Opportunity


FOR

HUD Vouchers Welcomel
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & Non-HC
Accessible Apartments
(^&!tape Oa II
705 NW Drive, Live Oak, FL
386-364-7936
TDD/TTY/711
Equal Housing Opportunity


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living 2.
bedroom duplex. Call
362-3110.
128545JS-F

TRAILER HARBOR
MOBILE HOME PARK
A Family Park with
rentals. Drug Free
in-town location.Single
and Double lots
available. 362-3868
. 128497JS-F


Help Wanted

RECEPTIONIST NEEDED
LIVE OAK AREA
FAX RESUMES
(386) 755-7911
SWAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGRD
REQ.

First Day
CLASS A CDL DRIVERS
needed, two (2) years experience
required Drug Free Work Place.
Call (386) 294-3411.



Clerical
FRONT OFFICE
People & deiaiis oriented full time,
flexible ho uin weekends
positions open. asic-math
and good phone voice needed.
Call & ask for Toni before
applying in person @
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
(386) 364-1683
E.O.E.


Driver
GOD TRANSPORT
is seeking Class A/CDL. 2 years ex-
perience, clean MVR. Home on the
weekends. FL/GA. Call 386-362-
2130


First Day
DRIVER: ALL YOURS!!!!
GUARANTEED Home every 2,
weeks with 4 days off. CDL-A. EOE
Lease or Purchase. KLLM
866-357-7351


First Day
Drivers
Company Drivers Needed
2 yrs. Experience. Must be at least
23 years old. Drug free workplace.
Must have Class A CDL. 386-208-
8075.

MECHANIC
W. B. HOWLAND CO.
INC.
Mechanic w/ diesel engine and
hydraulic experience needed
@ W.B. Howland Company.
Full time position with excellent
benefits package. Apply in per-
son @ Howlands corner of Walk-
er & 11th St. or call (386) 362-
1235.


Help Wanted
FAMILY MEDIATOR
(Pending Classification)

State position available with Courts
of the Third Judicial Circuit to pro-
vide family mediation services
throughout the circuit. Must have
knowledge of their Family Court
laws and procedures as well as ex-
tensive knowledge of problem solv-
ing techniques. Florida Supreme
Court certification as a Family Me-
diator required. Certification as a
County Mediator or Juvenile De-
pendency Mediator beneficial. An-
nual Salary $43,544.40. Resumes
must be received by Jan. 12,
2005.

Submii resume w/State of Florida,
applicationn to:
Human Resources
P0. Box 1569
Lake City, FL 32056
ADA Compliant/EOE.
farm help
HELP WANTED
Knowledge of tractor and equipment
is a must. Call 386-330-2567 to en-
quire. Drug Free Work Place.



Food Service
COUNTRY KITCHENS
Now hiring, all positions open.
Call 850-971-0024.



Groundskeeper
VILLAGE OAKS APARTMENTS
has an immediate opening for a
groundskeeper-24 hours per week.
Must have experience in grounds
maintenance and grounds equip-
ment maintenance. Drug free work
place. Must have valid dr. license &
own car or truck. Some travel will be
required. Apply at the rental office.
705 Northwest Drive, Live Oak, FL.
Equal Opportunity Employer. Call
386-364-7936. TDD/TTY 711.

LABORERS NEEDED
MANY POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
FOR MORE INFO CALL:
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
(386) 755-1991 APPT. ONLY
BACKGRD/DRUGSCREEN
REQ.


SWhat do you have to offer? Start your
advertisement by naming the item or service
you are presenting.

fd Are you being clear? Complete, concise
information will encourage a quick response
from readers.

in g Can the reader reach you? Be sure to include
your telephone number or address.
If necessary, list a preferred time to have
potential buyers contact you.
A Are you giving your ad enough exposure?
Consecutive publication of your ad will
generate the greatest amount of reader
attention. Generally, a 15-day run time is the
best and most cost-effective arrangement.

m What's the best part of your offer? Identify
and write about the most beneficial feature
of the product or service you are advertising.


Help Wanted
First Day
Maintenance Director
Seeking individual with electrical,
plumbing, heating, carpentry, and
appliance repair background. Will
need to be able to work with people
as well as blue prints. Must have sta-
ble job history. Responsible for main-
tenance functions for seven year old
60 bed health care facility. Fax re-
sumes to the attention of Rich Wis-
dahl at 386-294-3301, or apply at
Lafayette Health Care Center, 512
W. Main Street, Mayo, FL 32066.


maintenance
HELP WANTED maintenance man
with knowledge of plumbing, electric
and carpentry. Tools required. Trans-
portation a must. Drug free work-
place.
Call (386) 330-2567

STOCKING/INVENTORY
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
CALL FOR APPT.
(386) 755-1991
WAL-STAF PERSONNEL
DRUGSCREEN/BACKGROUND
REQ.

salesperson
W.B. HOWLAND CO. INC.
Rental Equipment Salesperson
Needed, Benefits,
Including Profit Sharing Plan,
401K,
Paid Vacation, etc.
W.B. Howland Co., Inc.
PO Box 700
Live Oak, FI 32064
(386) 362-1235

First Day
Shipping/Receiving
Help Wanted Part-time Office Pro-
duction Work As Needed. Flexible
hours. Non-smoking environment.
Call Don Blake @ 386-208-0887.




Wait Staff
SOS CAFE
has wait staff positions open. Basic
math & hospitality skills a must.
Experience preferred but will train.
Apply in person @ SOS CAFE
between 2pm-5pm @
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
3076 95th Dr. Live Oak, FL
E.O.E.


Help Wanted


First Day
TRUCK DRIVERS Needed Full and
Part-time at Garrison Farms. Good
CDL a must. Call 386-364-1493.


REGISTERED
NURSES
SHANDS AT LAKE SHORE

The following positions are
currently available
And we are seeking
qualified applicants

OB
ICU
MED/SURG
RN Per Diem Pool
$26.00 per hour plus
shift differential

For more information contact
Human Resources at
386-754-8147
Apply in person at 368 NE
Franklin St., Lake City, Florida
32055, or visit our website at
www.shands.org

An equal opportunity employer
M/F/D/V. Drug Free Workplace


First Day
medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, FI
Seeking RN for Risk Management/
Staff Development


Have you covered all of your bases? Make
sure you are providing sufficient information
about the merchandise or service you are
offering, including the price! Does the reader
know what you are selling, why the\ should
buy it and how they can contact) ou for more
information?out the most beneficial feature of
the product or service you are advertising.

s How can you reach the greatest number of
prospective buyers? Place your classified ad
with The Classified Marketplace.

E I Call 1-800-525-4182 today!



. . .S. . . USIN 19
AE __________ BOOMINGI
SCHEOULINGi * A *
C DEPARTMENT .
)*r
f I o n I * * M ) ." ' " "..". .'
m^ 'ppRUrr iii1'^'','1 "ia'S ^"'' M '^-"'"";""': ^? r^ 'rr!?,p


ANNOUNCEMENTS



EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS SERVICES




FINANCIAL SERVICES


Accepting Applications
Good, bad and no credit.
Call for 1st & 2nd mortgages. .
Established full service co.
WE BUY MORTGAGES.
f800) 226-6044
S.622 NW 43rd St, Suite A-I
Licensed Mtg. Lender


i General General I
GOOD-BUY CASH CASHss �,* " .'-' ,1 *IMMEDIA.r
CLASSIFIEDS I " s" "- ;. ." .' .? '"' :;3.... 8'



HOW TO WRITE A CLASSIAIFIED)1 AD

8 Simple Steps to Creating a Classified Ad That Sells:


I - -- . . . -


PAGE 3C


NEE DEMOCRAT/LIV K


~~-~'- ----


�ur








HPAG 4C _ -......- -- - -


362-1734


CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE


1-800-525-4182


.....


to Subscribe?


The Suwannee Democrat,


is online, so it's


easier than every


to stay informed.


SL1


Adoption

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION?
Full service nationwide adoption agency specializ-
ing in matching families with birthmothers. TOLL
FREE 24/7 (866)921-0565. ONE TRUE GIFT
ADOPTIONS, www.onetruegift.com.

Announcements

Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Read DIANETICS
by Ron L. Hubbard Call (813)872-0722 or send
$7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N. Habana Ave., Tampa
FL 33607.


Auctions


2SealedBidAcreageAuctions- Bidsdue: Jan. 10,
2PM, Abbeville, AL. 10% B.P. (800)942-6475
Yw!.tr.an.zo.cQr Tranzon H agen AL Lic.#l 194.


Automotive


AAA Rated Donation. DONATE YOUR CAR.,
Boat orRealEstate. IRS Tax Deductible Free Pick-
Up/Tow Any Model/ Condition. HelpUnderprivi-
leged Children (800)598-9211 Qutr shtLce.nterg,.


Building Materials


METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ Buy DirectFrom
Manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all Accesso-
ries. Quick turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.

Business Opportunities

ALl, CASH CANDYROT'E Do you earn $800/
day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995.
..S It - 14. - 23 B02000033: CALL US: We will
not be undersold!

#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending Machine Hid. You
approve Locations-$9,995 (800)836-3464
#B02428.


Financial


AS SEEN ON TV $ All Your CASH NOW $
ProgramFL Company offers best cash now options.
Have money due from Settlements, Annuities, or
Lotteries? Call (800)774-3113 w\ww. ppic-sh.com.

Cash Loans up to $1000.00. No Credit Check!
Cash in your checking account within 24 hrs.
EmployrnentRcq.Go to www.payvcheckttoday.com
or call (866)756-.0600.

$$$$$GET CASH NOW We buy STRUCTURED
SETTLEMENTS and insurance Annuities. Call
Structured AssetFunding NOW!! ! (877)966-8669
$$$$$


Help Wanted


Driver- COVENANT TRANSPORT. Excellent
Pay & Benefits for Experienced Drivers, 0/0,
Solos, Teams & Graduate Students. Bonuses Paid
Weekly, EqualOpportunity Employer. (888)MORE
PAY (888-667-3729).

Indiana company has new contracts inGeorgia
and Florida and is seekingdrivers to deliver motor
homes, busses and trucks. You will be most suc-
cessful if you possess a CDL B and have a small tow
vehicle. Backhauls available. Check us out at
qualitydriveaway.com or contact recruiting at
(800)695-9743.

ADVANCE YOUR DRIVING CAREER! In-
crease in PayPackage. Contractors & Company
Needed. Flatbed-Refiigcrated- Tanker. Over-the-
Road. Some Regional. Commercial Driver's Li-
cense Training. (800)771-6318.
wwwarimeing.&fcm

$1500 WEEKLY GUARANTEED NOW AC-
CEPTING APPLICATIONS $50 CASH HIR-
ING BONUS GUARANTEED IN WRITING
(888)318-1638 Ext 107
wwaIJS Mailin(rQus..cfmoL

UPTO$4,000 WEEKLY!! Exciting Weekly Pay-
check! Written Guarantee! 11 Year Nationwide
Company Now Hiring! Easy Work, Sending Out
Our Simple One Page Brochure! Free Postage,
Supplies! Awesome Bonuses!! FREE INFOR-
MATION, CALL NOW!! (800)242-0363 Ext.
3800.

Drivers/OTR-Tanker looking for Professional
drivers! NEW 2005 Equipment. Top Pay, BO-
NUSES, Prepass & EZ Pass, Rider Program &
Much more! North American Tank Lines (866)748-
6285.

Now Hiring2005 Postal PositionsFederal, State &
Local. $1.4.80/$48+/Hr. No experience necessary.
Entry Levels. Full Benefits. Paid Training. Call 7
days (888)826-2513 Ext. 201.


Legal Services

I)VORCE$1775-$75*COVERS children, etc.
Only one signature required! *Excludes govt. fees!
( 11 . LL li..lJ. I ~1i I4n1-:.-'i 1 ,ext.600). (8am-7pnm)
Divorce Tech. Established 1977.

Miscellaneous

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECTV SYSTEM includes
standard installation. 2 MONTHS FREE HBO &
Cinemrax! Access to over 225 channels! Limited
time offer. S&H. Restrictions Apply. (866)500-
4056.

SPA! Overstocked! New 7 person spa-Loaded!
Includes cover, delivery & warranty. $2999, was
$5999.(888)397-3529.

Real Estate

BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLINA. WIN-
TER SEASON IS HERE! MUST SEE BEAUTI.-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS OF WESTERN
NC MOUNTAINS. Homes, Cabins, Acreage &
Investments. Cherokee Mountain Realty GMAC
Real Estate, Murphy gchLaI.amtlBti ,igs
Call for Free Brochure (800)841-5868,

Mountain Golf Homesites! Prestigious commu-
nity weaving throughout Dye designed 18 hole;
championship course in breathtaking Blue Ridge
Mmns of South Carolina. Call for pkg (866)334-
3253, x759.

Your Ad Could Be Here

ONE CALL STANDS BETWEEN YOUR
BUSINESS and millions of potential customers.
Place youradvertisement in the FL Classified Ad-
vertising Network. For$450 your ad will be placed
in over 150 papers. Check outt our 2x2 and 2x4
display network too! Call this paper, or Heather
Mola, FL Statewide.Network Directorat (866)742-
1373, or e-mail hmola@flpress.com for more infor-
mation, (Out of State placement is also available.)
Visit us online at lywaLorida-aissifid.ggcom..
----------------------


Instruction


Heavy EquipmentOperatorCERTIFIED. Train-
ingat Central Florida Community College Campus.
Job Placement Assistance. (866)933-1575. Asso-
ciated Training Services 5177 Homnosassa Trail
Lecanto, Fl. 34461.


Week of January 3, 2005


FCAN



133320-F


LAKE CITY
COMMUNITY LLtEIf
HUMAN RESOURCES
DEPARTMENT
149 S.E. Vocational Place
Lake City, FL 32025-8703

SENIOR STAFF ASSISTANT
Secretarial work within the Allied
Health Programs performing typ-
ing, filing, and assisting Chairper-
son of Allied Health Programs and
Coordinator of Nursing Progranis
with administrative details. Profi-
cient in Word, Excel, and Microsoft
Outlook. Requires High School
diploma or its equivalent plus three
years secretarial or clerical experi-
ence. Special consideration will be
given to applicants with an associ-
ate degree or certificate in a relat-
ed area.
Salary $21,612.00'Annually
plus benefits.
Deadline for receiving applica-
tions:
January 19, 2005

INQUIRIES:
HUMAN RESOURCES
DEVELOPMENT
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
149 S.E. VOCATIONAL PLACE
JOBLINE (386) 754-4505
FAX (386) 754-4594
EMAIL:
Boettcherg @lakecitycc.edu
Applications available on WEB at
www.lakecitycc:edu

VP/ADA/EA/EO COLLEGE IN
EDUCATION AND EMPLOY-
MENT


NOTICE
I, Robert Eugene Adams, as of 12/13/04, am
no longer responsible for any debts incurred
by anyone other than myself.
/s/Robert Eugene Adams
12/17, 24, 31, 1/7


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,.
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 612004CP0002550001XX
IN RE: The Estate of
WILLIE RUTH PRIMM,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of WILLIE
RUTH PRIMM, File No.
612004CP0002550001XX is pending in the
Circuit Court for Suwannee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 200
South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064.
The name of the personal representative and
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required to file with
this court, WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE: (1)
all claims against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on whom this
notice was served that challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun on Janu-
ary 7, 2005.
Attorney for Personal Representative
SANDRA K. HAAS, ESQ.
P. 0. Box 520
Branford, FL 32008
Personal Representative:
LINDA RUTH PRIMM
2392 256th Terrace
O'Brien, FL 32071
01/07, 14


FIND IT, BUY IT,


AND SELL IT


IN THE CLASSIFIED


MARKETPLACE


WuI


Help Wanted
MEDIATION
COORDINATOR
(Pending Classification)

State position available with Courts
of the Third Judicial Circuit to coor-
dinate County, Family, and Depen-
dency Mediation services. Must
have knowledge of County, Family
and Dependency Mediation proce-
dures. Florida Supreme Court Cer-
tification in Family, County and De-
pendency Mediation required.
Knowledge of grant application
procedures preferred. Annual
Salary $43,544.40. Resumes
must be received by Jan. 12,
2005.

Submit resume w/State of Florida
application to:
Human Resources
P. O. Box 1569
Lake City, FL 32056
ADA Compliant/EOE.

First Day
medical
MADISON NURSING CENTER
2481 W. US 90, Madison, Fl
Seeking Full Time/Part Time
RN's & LPN's



Sales
WALT'S LIVE OAK
FORD-MERCURY

Looking for Experienced
Sales People
or Right People with no Experi-
ence
Will Train

*Up To 35% Commissions
* Demo Program for Sales Peo-
ple
* Health Insurance
* Great Work Environment
* Paid 3% on F&l
*Paid Salary During Training

Please call Bobby Cogswell
at 386-362-1112

First Day






LAUE CITY
COMNMfITY CILLEIL

SIGN LANGUAGE
INTERPRETERS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY

Bachelor's or Associate's degree
preferred,.high school diploma or
-. GED. minimum. Must be RID or
State.oJ Florida cert-iled at Level It
or above. 0Computerliterate.
Knowledge of technical'terms a
plus.
Contact: Janice Irwin
@ 386-754-4215 or
e-mail: Irwin@lakecitycc.edu
To remain open until positions
are filled. Application available
on
WEB: www.lakecitycc.edu
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AF-
FIRMATIVE ACTION COLLEGE
IN EDUCATION AND EMPLOY-
MENT
VETERAN'S PREFERENCE



First Day


__


FRIDAY, JANUARY 7, 2005


MA fl M A t-


MAlbWANNEE DEMOCRAT/ K


TRANSPORTATION
Autos for Sale
FOR SALE 1975 Chevy Nova
Straight 6, Cast Block, $1000.00 &
1985 Jeep Cherokee w/ automatic
trans. 2.8 engine. $2500.00. Both run
good. Call 386-364-1319

Honda Accord 2003 low miles auto-
matic. Shaky Credit or No Money
Down OK. Call local 386-867-0694,
ask for the OK Deal.

Mazda Millienia 2002 low miles, au-
tomatic, sunroof. Shaky Credit or No
Money Down OK. Call local 386-867-
0694, as for the OK Deal.

Mazda Protege 2002 good miles,
sunroof, automatic. Shaky Credit or
No Money Down OK. Call local 386-
867-0694, ask for the OK Deal.

Oldsmobile Intrigue 2000 nice car
low miles, automatic. Shaky Credit or
No Money Down OK. Call local 386-
867-0694, ask for the OK Deal.

Trucks for Sale
FOR SALE 2001 F150 Ford Pick-up
Truck 4x4 Lariat Super Crew. Asking
$16,000. OBO. Call 386-364-5164 or
386-208-6262.
Ford F-150 2001 good miles, auto-
matic. Shaky Credit or No Money
Down OK. Call local 386-867-0694,
ask for the OK Deal.
Utility
FOR SALE 1992 Suburban 4X4. 350
engine. Fully loaded. 108,000 mi. Ex-
cellent condition. $6,500.00. Call
386-658-3594.
Jeep Wrangler 2002 good miles, au-
tomatic. Shaky Credit or No Money
Down OK. Call local 386-867-0694,
ask for the OK Deal.

Vans for Sale
FOR SALE 1996 Dodge Converted
Van. Low Mileage. $6,000.00 OBO.
Must sell! Call 305-338-8990 or
leave msg. @ 386-330-0355.
Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 612004DR0008990001XX
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
WILLIAM ASARISI,
HUSBAND,
vs.
ELIZABETH L. ASARISI,
WIFE
NOTICE OF ACTION
.TO: ELIZABETH L. ASARISI
You are notified that an ci:.rn . K.r d.i lI.lulOn
of marriage has been filed against you and
you are required to served a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to WILLIAM ASARISI
whose address is 454 US 27 WEST MAYO,
FL 32066 on or before FEBRUARY 4, 2005
file the original with the clerk of this court ei-
ther before service on the plaintiff, or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in
the petition.
DATED ON December 20, 2004.
KENNETH DASHER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/Arlene D. Ive
COURT SUPERVISOR
ARLENE D. IVEY
12/24, 31,01/07,14






F-HIDAY, JANUAHY /7 ,UU m I ........ M-...........-.....-- Ae

S,- Floating floors primer


Laminate flooring manufacturers
have recognized the void of a cost-
effective product that offers ease of
installation and minimal tools and
know-how. Enter the popular float-
ing laminate wood floor.
The terms "floating" or "float-in"
mean that the laminate floor is not
attached to the floor underneath. In
a typical floating installation, only


the joints are glued or attached to
each other - leaving the body of
the floor unattached. However,
some varieties do not require glue at
all. Generally, a gap around the
perimeter is left to allow for expan-,
sion and contraction of the boards
which enables floor movement.
This gap is covered with a decora-
tive molding.


Typically, these floors can be in-
stalled over several different sub-
floors in various rooms of the
home, making them particularly at-
tractive to DIYs. Plywood, concrete
Sslab, sheet vinyl flooring, hardwood
flooring or just about any other flat
hard surface is suitable. Carpeting,
however, will need to be removed
in order to install laminate. Some


varieties are unsuitable for bath-
rooms or other areas with excess
moisture. Check the product care-
fully to see its room applications.
Installation can be handled by
one person, but moves much more
smoothly with an extra set of hands.
Depending upon the size of the
room, you may even complete it in
a weekend.


These local businesses are here to take good care of you.


pMetal Roofing
uiy Sl R g & AVc s At D t
OQuality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices!!


3'wide gaihalume
3' wde painted
2' ade 5-v
Gulf Coast


Cut to your desired lengths!
*Deliver Senice Available*
Ask about steel buildino
Supply & Mfg. Inc.
FREE 1-888-393-0335


Trees, Trimmed or Removed
Insured * Free Estimates * Free Firewood

TREE WORK
Bucket ITlick and Clirm inb'

963-5026


To place an ad on

this page, please

call Myrtle at (386)

362-1734, ext. 103.


FIREWOOD
Seasoned Oak and Cherr\ Cord $125.00
Half Cord $65.00
Split & Stacked
We Deliver


a LL


DREAM DESIGN
INCORPORATED
Residential l\ake-olers * Free Estimates
Licensed and Insured

SCabinets. Ceramic
- iF l f% U f hnul-; I1 -1...... .. t ,r - .


1 l' II Illdll} III IIUlIIll)Il
repairs and needs call
John & Trish Adams
(3861 362-7916


),:UL1 1 ;. .... ,..,.


ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
For Your
.. David HOME
McLaughlin Improvements & Repairs
Remodeling & Renovations
386-963-1391
Licensed & Insured
A D AOi Torn o r
KARDAV ENTERPRISES. INC. FEI 061720200


FIREWOOD
OAK & CHERRY - STACK & SPLIT
He nedero
Henderson
---" Enterprises

S386-842-554


Driers Sons ustomlMeatCttiig

NsA. Jasper, Florida ('o- i
* Custom *
Slaughter, Culting Ihnnild l1prililld by
\\rapping .JmniIIll ifiiiPIr
Pla i. & Sausage l-; l-98-52
I'l-an N11. Ilutsell IlrI- r.h
1-386-93S-1I1911 I-;[Xli-!l;, lll


To place an ad on

this page, please

call Myrtle at (386)

362-1734, ext. 103.


L,:ri.:[ I .:. :i9-j 309i -
Office (386) 364-5045
Mobile (386) 362-9178
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Fl St Lie #2630


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Units located on Gold Kist Road
Rental Oflice: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626


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Quiet country li\ine 2 bedroom duplex
Call 362-3110


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Rt. 2 Box 166938-1156
Jennings, FL 32053 ( 38-1156


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422 E. HOWARD ST. * LIVE OAK PLAZA
LEN A. DUNCAN


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PREFERRED PROPERTIES
OF WELLBORN, LLC
EQUINE PROPERTY SPECIALIST
t. ., ,*/,',. ....," l," l, l il , t,.,',,,�]A H i ,".,i l ,. t" .r l ho.
(386) 963-2403
CATH'i CO" LLIII S VV.ll..II.rr,PI.i �eir. :o' , 121'.5. . COULiTY ROAD 137
Bruoter iRi .-. -( ' *A .3111i, ..ei WELLBORN, FL 32094


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All New Units
*5X15 *5X20 *10X15 *10X20 *15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak

364-5300


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Create restaurant-style meals at home


Our days are often a whirl of
activity. With work, school,
sports and errands, it can be dif-
ficult to find quick, healthy and
tasty meals for busy families.
Too often we settle for less-
than-nutritious take-out or
frozen entrees. But with a little
planning and the right ingredi-
ents, great-tasting meals don't
have to be a chore. And when


you choose foods rich in antiox-
idants, you're doing your part to
preserve your family's health.
The humble tomato, long the
workhorse of sauces and soups,
has finally come into its own.
Emerging science suggests a
link between the consumption
of tomatoes and a decreased risk
of cancer, heart disease and
stroke. Tomatoes are a rich


Crabmeat Frittata with Herbs

(series 4 to 61
Ingredients
10 eggs
I teaspoon kosher salt
Fresh) ground black pepper
2 teaspoons minced garlic
3 tablespoons minced shallots
1 tablespoon oli e oil
1 1 3 cups Nluir Glen Organic Plum Tomatoes
1 3 cup thiln', sliced basil
2 teaspoons fish thilne le\aes
1 2 pound fresh lump o1 flake crabinea.t picked
over to reemo\ e ci.tilage

Directions-
1. In a bo\ I. \ hisk the eggs until fioithN and season with half
the salt and pepper.
2. In a nonstick Hl-inch skillet, cook the aim lie and shallots
in the oli\e oil for one mirinute oer moderate heat. Add the
tomatoe.. basil and th,,me. Raise the lieat jnd continue cook-
ing uiniil most o' the after r froni the plnlum toitiioes ha;s evap-
orated.
3. Stir in the crabmieat and season '. itli the remaining salt
and pepper. Cook for one minute to heat through.
4. Stir the eggs into the skillet. O\er high heat, continue stir-
ring with a \ooden spoon v while simultaneously shaking the
pan back and forth over the flame. The eggs \ ill begin to form
small curds. Continue stirring and shaking until the eggs are
set but still some\\ hat soft on top.
5. Loosed the frittata from the skillet with a rubber spanila
and slide it onto a large dinner plate. Cover the frittata with an-
other dinnei plate and invert the plates.
6. Slide the fritmita back into the skillet and continue cook-
ing oL er high heat to brov.in the other side, about t\o miiiiite.
7. Careful tr.nsmfer the frittata to a large dinner plate. cut
ino wedees, and ser e hot or at room temperature


source of lycopene, a beneficial
antioxidant found in all toma-
toes, but surprisingly, in higher
concentrations in cooked toma-
toes, such as pasta sauces and
canned products. This means
it's even easier to introduce this
garden superstar into your fami-
ly's diet. And now you only
need look as far as your pantry
for great garden-fresh taste.
For the most wholesome pos-
sible option, seek out organical-
ly grown brands, such as Muir


Glen tomatoes, which are certi-
fied organic -- and grown with-
out they use of synthetic pesti-
cides and fertilizers. Their new
canned plum tomatoes allow
cooks to enjoy the benefits of
vine-ripened tomatoes any time
of year. Muir Glen tomatoes are
the choice of top chefs who val-
ue the premium quality of toma-
toes processed within eight
hours of picking.
To fully enjoy the benefits of
tomatoes, think beyond pasta


sauce! Adding tomatoes, to
breakfasts or snacks is easy and
delicious. In fact, some of the
nation's most famous chefs
have created new takes on old
favorites, and made them more
healthful by adding canned
tomatoes. Muir Glen's new
recipe booklet, Discover Your
Inner Chef, allows home cooks
to create restaurant-quality
recipes by such culinary masters
as Nora Pouillon of Washing-
toi, DC's Restaurant Nora,


Michael Romano of New
York's Union Square Cafe and
John Ash of California's Fetzer
Vineyards.
For a light meal that's big on
flavor, try this update on the
classic frittata. Perfect for,
brunch or a quick supper, its.
unique combination of ingredi-'
ents work together to give your
taste buds and senses a savory
treat. Created by Union Square
Caf6's Michael Romano, this
dish is sure to please.


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ur weight loss resolution

Trying to lose weight in way America eats. And to do
2005? For millions of over- that, you need a variety of nutri-
weight Americans, New Year's tious foods that appeal to every-
N eight-loss resolutions often- .one." .'' "
' " c.e do\ ii ti a simple, ut ex. 0 'SouLi Bcaich' Diet" is
treme, answer -- no fat, no not a traditional low-carb diet.
carbs, no fim. But now, at a time Instead, it encourages people to
of year when many people are eat a variety of foods, such as
looking for an effective way to lean sources of protein, reduced
lose weight, a recent study sug- fat cheeses and dairy products,
gests that following an eating whole grains, fruits and vegeta-
plan that includes lean protein, bles, while decreasing saturated,
monounsaturated fats and, yes, fat and trans fats.
carbohydrates -- the complex Life is Better on the Beach
carbs from vegetables, fruits A variety of Kraft products
and whole grains -- can lead to have a "South Beach Diet Rec-
greater weight loss than a low- ommended" button to indicate
fat diet. The study, published in that the foods fit within the diet,
the Archives of Internal Medi- making shopping easier and
cine, showed that people who meal planning more convenient
followed the "The South Beach for many people. The "button"
Diet," lost nearly twice as much appears on favorites such as
weight than people who fol- Boca Burgers, Kraft 2% Milk
lowed a low-fat diet. and Fat Free Singles, certain
New Year -- New You Oscar Mayer Deli Meats,
It is projected that by March Planters assorted nuts, and
only one in five people will Light N' Lively Cottage
keep their New Year's resolu- Cheese, to name a few. For a
tion to lose weight. By teaming complete list of'products, visit
up with the author and creator www.krafthealthyliving.com.
of the best selling "The South "Our 'South Beach Diet Rec-
.' ..Beach Diet," Kraft is making ommended' products provide
weight management convenient consumers the added conve-
and enjoyable. And, The South nience necessary to make their
Beach Diet is a lifestyle that New Year's resolutions stick,"
will make it easier to keep those said Howard Brandeisky, vice
' ' resolutions. president, health & wellness,
"The New Year is an ideal Kraft. "These products are
time to start fresh and make a among people's favorites --
commitment to a healthy some of the great tasting foods
lifestyle," said Dr. Arthur Agat- they regularly add to their cup-
ston. "My goal is to change the - boards."


this year

Kraft and "The South Beach-
Diet" Booklet
In January 2005, a new Kraft
South Beach Diet booklet fea-^
turing delicious recipes-, easy
tips for choosing convenient,
great-tasting products and more'
than seven dollars in money-
saving coupons will be avail--
able at participating retailers.-
The 14-page booklet is free
with purchase of two participat-
ing Kraft products while sup-
plies last and is a great tool to,
help maintain those New Year's
resolutions.
Win a Trip to
South Beach, Miami
Find out firsthand how Life is
Better on the Beach. Celebrate
the New Year and New You.
with a trip for two to South,
Beach, Miami. Through Feb.
28, 2005, visit
www.krafthealthyliving.com tor
enter to win the "Life is Better
on the Beach" Sweepstakes. Or,
hand-print your name, complete
address and daytime and
evening telephone numbers on,
a 3 by 5 inches piece of paper,
and mail to: Kraft "Life is Bet-
ter on the Beach" Sweepstakes;
P.O. Box 1872, Elgin, IL
60121-1872. Mail-in entries
must be postmarked by Feb. 28;,
2005 and received by March 6,
2005. Limit one entry per regis-.
tered user/e-mail
address/stamped envelope per,
day. No purchase necessary to
win.


Getting in the qrame: Shape your child's healthy eating habits


Health,.,.professionals are
spreading the word that child-
hood obesity is an epidemic in
otir countr~. "Kids are not little
adults -. the, grow fast and
need food to fuel their activi-
tn." sa.cs Jane Kostelc, early
childhood specialist at Parents
as Teachers, an early childhood
parent education program inbaed
.n St.' Lduii Kids niy 'need t
eat "mini meals" during the day
to keep them going and it's ide-
al to choose nutritious foods.
Help them develop healthy eat-
ing habits early on that will fol-
low them into adulthood.
HIGH FIVE
"When you see professional
athletes' ralsc their arms and hit
each other's palms - the 'high
five' gesture - you know they
are celebrating! Thinking of


'high five' can help you score in. ed carrots on a child's frozen
the nutrition game, too," says ' pizza before baking.
Kostelc. The child development * Order vegetable toppings
specialists at Parents as Teach- on your child's fast food sand-
ers- help families across the wiches.
country balance children's need: LOWER THE FAT
for good nutrition with their' Fat plays a vital role in the
sometimes pick, eating habiti '' development of young children.
About 90C percent of kids .1ies 6 "You may not want to move to
to 1 do not meet the fie-a-da', no-fat foods, but you can use
"fruit nd \egetable recommen- low-fat alternatives," says
dation,'according to the Nation- Kostelc. "Remember, young
al Dairy Council. Here are four children are developing the
quick-fixes: tastes and .eating habits they'll
* Buy fresh fruits and.vegeta- carry into adulthood so it's wise
bles when they are in season for to get them started on the right
the best taste at the lowest cost. path early," she adds. Follow-
* Add vegetables to kid fa- ing these tips will naturally
vorites like spaghetti sauce or lower the fat in your family's
macaroni and cheese for extra diet:


punch.
* Sprinkle some cut-up broc-
coli, green pepper slices or grat-


* Bake coated chicken and
pork chops instead of frying
them.


* Remove the skin and bones
from chicken before cooking.
* Order small size fries and
burgers when eating at fast food
restaurants.
* Seive sauces and salad
dressings on the side and dip
foods into them.
REGULAR FAMILY
-MEALTIMES
"Hectic schedules contribute
to the obesity epidemic," says
Kostelc. "When families eat
together, children learn to slow
down, focus on the meal and
know when they are full, rather
than eating large portions just
because the food is available."
When your family sits down to
a meal, control portions and
encourage children to try
healthy foods by eating healthy
yourself. When you're on the


go before a team practice or
music lesson and eating at
home is not an option, consider


.p


packing healthy picnics and.
sack lunches that everyone can
eat together.


PRESCHOOLERS NEED SNACKS
Small children have small tummies.They may need as many as three
nutritious snacks throughout the day to help balance their diets and give
temn more energy to grow, play and learn. Here are some snack ideas
f'om the Parents as Teachers child development specialists:
- Ofer toddlers finger floods such as cut-up steamed vegetables or
unsweetened cereals like oat rings.
. Serve animal crackers and fig-stuffed cookies which have less tat
than other cookies.
M Mix salsa with low-lat sour cream for a fresh vegetable dip.
- Spread low-fat cream cheese on graham crackers and top with fruit
slices
' Create frozen pops by Ireezing 100 percent fruit juice in 5-ounce pa-
per cups Insert a craft slick when it's almost frozen. Peel off the cup to
enjoy the Ireal.
* Push fruit chunks onto a prelzel stick for a truity .abob.
� Make a veggie wrap by spreading low-lat cream cheese on soft tor-
tillas and sprinkling on chopped raw veggies. Roll it and it's ready to eat


FRIDAY. JANUARY 7, 2005


WANNEE DEMOCRAT


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FIDAUY, JANIUARYl 7, 2005 -- -


By The

NUMBERS IA

Games through January 2


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Arkansa
Mississi
Alabam
Auburn
Ole Mis
LSU


Kentuck
Florida
South C
Vanderb
Georgia
Tenness


SE - -
EASTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
as 0-0 12-1 0-1 81.2
ippi St. 0-0 12-2 0-2 75.0
a 0-0 11-2 0-2 83.2
0-0 9-4 0-1 79.5
as 0-0 9-4 0-0 70.1
0-0 6-3 0-0 79.8
WESTERN DIVISION
SEC All Top 25 PF
cy 0-0 9-1 1-1 77.5
0-0 8-3 0-1 83.7
;arolina 0-0 8-3 0-2 69.4
bilt 0-0 9-4 0-1 75.2
0-0 6-4 0-1 69.4
ee 0-0 7-5 0-2 72.8


02005 Longwing Publications Inc.

GAME OF THE WEEK

Mississippi State at Ole Miss


Average per game
RELD-GOAL PCT.
Florida. ........... ............. 519
Arkansas.................. . .504
Alabama . ................... . .488
Ole Miss.................. . . .487
Tennessee ........ . ....... . 483
Vanderbilt . .................. .477
tSU ................ ... .. . . . 472
FIELD-GOAL DEFENSE
Arkansas. ......... . ...... . . 370


Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Miss. State. ............... . ..
South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vanderbilt . ...... . . . . . . . . ...
Alabama. ................ ....
FREE-THROW PCT.
Alabama ............... .....
LSU ......................
Auburn ................ . ..
Vanderbilt ................. .
Tennessee .....................
Kentucky ........ . ..........
Florida. .................. ...
REBOUNDING
Miss. State.......... ..... . .
Alabama. ............ . ......
Kentucky . . . .......... . ... ..
Arkansas ....... . .............
LSU ................... ..
Florida ................... .
South Carolina .................
ASSISTS
Arkansas. ...................
Kentucky............. ........
LSU . .. ............. .. .
Florida. ................... .
Ole Miss. ....................
Vanderbilt ...................
Miss. State..................
BLOCKS


Arkansas . . . .
Kentucky . . . .
Florida . . . . .
Alabama ....
LSU. .......
South Carolina .
Tennessee.. . .


.370
.380
.398
.401
.405
.41.1

.738
.724
.718
.702
.692
.683
.679

43.9
40.4
38.7
37.6
37.4
36.9
36.1

17.5
17.3
17.2
17.0
17.0
16.5
16.1


. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.1
.. . . . . . . . . . . 5.7
. . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4
. ............. . 4.9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4.7
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0


J. -� i - - _ i. -
SCORING
Toney Douglas, Auburn. ........... 19.2
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State . . . . . . . . 18.4
Brandon Bass, LSU. . . . . . . . . . . ... 17.3
Earnest Shelton, Alabama. . . . . . . . . .17.3
Kennedy Winston, Alabama .. . . . . . . 17.0
Levi Stukes, Georgia . . .".. . . . .. . 16.0
REBOUNDING
Lawrence Roberts, Miss. State ........ 11.6
Chuck Hayes, Kentucky ............ 9.4
Brandon Bass, LSU ...... ...... .. .9.1
Jermareo Davidson, Alabama ......... 8.1
Chuck Davis, Alabama. .............7.6
Glen Davis, LSU .... ......... . 7.4
FIELD-GOAL PCT.
Brandon Bass, LSU ...............652
Brandon Crump, Tennessee. .. . ... . . . .606
Chuck Davis, Alabama . . . . . . . . . . .. .568
Carlos Powell, South Carolina ... ......565
Ronnie Brewer, Arkansas ........... .538
Matt Walsh, Florida. .............. .536
FREE-THROW PCT.
Matt Walsh, Florida. ...............868
Ian Young, Auburn .............. .863
Brandon Bass, LSU. ............... 844
Winsome Frazier, Miss. State .......... 844
Scooter McFadgon, Tennessee.. ....... 842
Chuck Davis, Alabama ............ .829
ASSISTS
Gary Ervin, Miss. State ............ 5.9
Tack Minor, LSU................ 5.9
C.J. Watson, Tennessee. ............. 5:4
Ronald Steele, Alabama . . . . . . . . . 5.2
Patrick Sparks, Kentucky . . . . . . . . . 5.2
Eric Ferguson, Arkansas . . . . . . . . . 4.5
BLOCKS
Steven Hill, Arkansas .......... . . . 2.9
ShagariAlleyne, Kentucky. .......... 2.8
Chuck Davis, Alabama ..... : ....... 2.2
Darian Townes, Arkansas ........... 2.2
Brandon Wallace, South Carolina ....... 1.7
Brandon Bass, LSU . ............. 1.7


Illustration by Bruce Plante � 2005



Magnolia State rivalry


S eady for another run at an outright Southeastern
Conference championship, Mississippi State will make the
journey from Starkville to Oxford on Saturday to face Ole
Miss in its first league road game of the 2004-05 season.
If last year proved anything, it's that a hostile environment at
Tad Smith Coliseum won't affect the Bulldogs. Mississippi State
found ways to win road games in one of the nation's toughest
conferences as it compiled a 26-4 season.
Six of the Bulldogs' eight conference road wins last season
were by single digits, including an 82-81 overtime victory at
Alabama in the regular season finale that allowed the Bulldogs to
edge East Division champion Kentucky for the outright title.
Mississippi State knows it has the proverbial bullseye on its
back as it attempts to win consecutive conference championships
for the first time in school history, but is ready for challengers.
Lawrence Roberts, last year's SEC Player of the Year and first-
team All-American, returned to school after a brief flirtation with
the NBA. Roberts has raised his level of play from last season,
when he averaged 16.9 points and 10.1 rebounds per game. This
season, the 6-foot-9 Baylor transfer is collecting 18.4 points and
11.6 rebounds per game.
Roberts, whose 44 career double-doubles are tops among active
NCAA Division I players, has fought through a broken nose
sustained in early season practice. He also tweaked his ankle in
last week's 71-65 victory over Virginia Tech, but it didn't stop him
from scoring 25 points and grabbing 19 boards.'
Mississippi State is far from a one-man team. Marcus
Campbell, a 7-foot center, is an inside threat. The play of guards
Gary Ervin, who took over at point guard for the graduated Timmy
Bowers, and Winsome Frazier is complemented by swingman
Shane Power.
This is a crucial year for Ole Miss as it looks to avoid a third
consecutive losing season. The 2004-05 campaign got off to an
inauspicious start for the Rebels, but they have won seven straight
and entered January with a 9-4 record.
The Rebels have struggled to find suitable replacements for last
year's leading scorers, Justin Reed and Aaron Harper, but have
picked up the slack with the defense.
Interest in the Ole Miss basketball program is declining, but a
win over a nationally ranked, bitter state rival could vault the.
Rebels into the SEC West race and reinvigorate the program.
0 Records: Mississippi State 12-2 (0-0 SEC West); Ole Miss 9-4
(0-0 SEC West). 0 Coaches: Mississippi State's Rick Stansbury
(138-66); Ole Miss' Rod Barnes (122-80). B Tip-off: 1 p.m. CT
Saturday. BTV: None.
Keys for Mississippi State: Half-court offense, something it
didn't have Against Virginia Tech.... Perform better at the free-
throw line. The Bulldogs allowed Virginia Tech to get back in the
game by hitting only 8 of 16 free-throw attempts in the first half.
Keys for Ole Miss: Grab defensive rebounds and don't give up
second and third shots. Mississippi State had 19 second-chance
points compared to five for Virginia Tech.... Prevent the
Bulldogs from getting easy baskets off the fast break.

The Rest of the Matchups

Arkansas at Florida
M Records: Arkansas 12-1 (0-0 SEC West); Florida 8-3 (0-0 SEC


East). 3 Coaches: Arkansas' Stan Heath (53-42); Florida's Billy
Donovan (212-107). ITip-off: Noon ET Saturday. ]TV:
Jefferson Pilot.
Key for Arkansas: Maintain the hot hand. The Razorbacks have
managed to shoot better than 50 percent six times this season,
including last week's 56.9 shooting performance against
Louisiana-Monroe.
Key for Florida: Senior forward David Lee has to be more
assertive. Lee took only two shots in last Sunday's loss at Florida
State.

Vanderbilt at Tennessee
0Records: Vanderbilt 9-4 (0-0 SEC East); Tennessee 7-5 (0-0
SEC East). 0 Coaches: Vanderbilt's Kevin Stallings (217-136);
Tennessee's Buzz Peterson (159-97). B Tip-off: 4 p.m. ET
Saturday. MTV: CBS.
Key for Vanderbilt: Defend the perimeter. Tennessee has shot
50 percent or better in five of its last seven games, and has four
players shooting better than 50 percent for the season.
Key for Tennessee: Beat Vanderbilt's bench. The Commodores'
reserves outscored Louisiana-Lafayette 44-9 in last Sunday's
27-point victory.
LSU at Alabama
M Records: LSU 6-3 (0-0 SEC West); Alabama 11-2 (0-0 SEC
West). 0 Coaches: LSU's John Brady (215-172); Alabama's Mark
Gottfried (198-101). gTip-off: 5 p.m. CT Saturday. MTV: Fox
Sports Net/Sunshine.
Key for LSU: Get the ball early and often to forward Brandon
Bass, who is among the league leaders in scoring, field goal
percentage and free-throw shooting.
Key for.Alabama: Gottfried has to make substitutions at the
right time. He admitted to over-substituting, which cost his team
some momentum last Saturday against New Orleans.

Georgia at South Carolina
0 Records: Georgia 6-4 (0-0 SEC East); South Carolina 8-3 (0-0
SEC East). I Coaches: Georgia's Dennis Felton (122-72); South
Carolina's Dave Odom (343-219). v Tip-off: 8 p.m. ET Saturday.
* TV: Fox Sports Net/Sunshine.
Key for Georgia: Don't get dominated inside. In two losses to
the Gamecocks last season, Georgia was outscored 72-38 in the
paint and outrebounded 71-49.
Key for South Carolina: Shut down Georgia's three-guard
attack of Channing Tony, Sundiata Gaines and Levi Stukes, who
are combining for more than 42 points per game.

Kansas at Kentucky
SRecords: Kansas 9-0 (0-0 Big 12); Kentucky 9-1 (0-0 SEC
East). 0 Coaches: Kansas' Bill Self (240-114); Kentucky's
Tubby Smith (324-115). U Tip-off: 4:30 p.m. ET Sunday. gTV:
CBS.
Key for Kansas: With star forward Wayne Simien out due to
thumb surgery, the Jayhawks have to find ways to stop Chuck
Hayes and Randolph Morris.
Key for Kentucky: Don't get beaten from outside. Kansas hit
12 of 26 of its 3-point attempts in last Saturday's 70-68 overtime
win over Georgia Tech.


.:RALABAMA Wisconsin extended the\
nation's longest home
winning streak to 36 games and handed
Alabama its second loss of the season with a
76-62 victory last Wednesday. Alabama was
just 9 of 28 from the floor in the first half,
including missing 13 of its first 17 shots.
"We didn't handle (the tempo) very well and
got impatient," head coach Mark Gottfried
said.
Bh ANSAS In his first game since the
birth of his daughter,
Mariah, freshman forward Charles Thomas
was 3 of 4 from the field and led the
Razorbacks with four rebounds in an 85-43
victory over Louisiana-Monroe on Dec. 31.
"Charles played pretty solid; he fouled a
little too much (four in 17 minutes), but that
was nothing but hustle," head coach Stan
Heath said.
_J J'URN Point guard Ian Young, who
is averaging 16.8 points and
4.4 assists per game, sat out the Tigers'
73-69 victory over Belmont on Dec. 28.
Young injured his ankle in practice. Head
coach JeffLebo said he hoped to have Young
back for the SEC opener at Mississippi State-
on Wednesday.
{RID'A Junior and leading scorer
Matt Walsh missed the first
game of his career, an 82-69 loss at Florida
State last Sunday, because of a severely
sprained left ankle. Florida head coach Billy
Donovan set no timetable for Walsh's return
to the lineup.
i RGi A The Bulldogs had their
five-game winning streak
snapped with a 56-52 loss to Stetson on Dec.
31. Georgia was 19 of 48 from the field,
including a 2-of-17 mark from behind the
3-point line, against the Hatters. Prior to the
Stetson loss, Georgia hit 14 of 28 of its
3-pointers in a 100-69 win over Savannah
State on Dec. 28, marking the first time in
four seasons that a Bulldogs team had scored'
100 points.
Wi TUCKY Tubby Smith became the
fourth coach in school
history to win 200 games when the Wildcats
defeated Campbell 82-50 on Dec. 29. "I'm
grateful for the people here at Kentucky, the
fans, the administration and the great players
I've had the chance to work with here, that's
the special part about it," Smith said.
Antonio Hudson surpassed the
1,000-point plateau for his career
in the Tigers' 67-50 victory over Florida
State in the Sugar Bowl Classic on Dec. 30.
Hudson, a 6-foot-6 senior, had 18 points
against the Seminoles and entered the Jan. 3
game at Utah with 1,004 career points.
Hudson is the 34th player in LSU history to
reach 1,000 career points.
M sissI'PP I The Rebels have held
two opponents under
50 points this season after recording a 64-48
victory over Southeastern Louisiana on Dec.
31. Southeastern Louisiana also committed
22 turnovers, the third Rebels opponent to
commit at least 22 turnovers this season. Ole
Miss held six opponents under 50 points last
season.
Wa SS STATE Despite holding
Virginia Tech scoreless
for the first seven minutes and 42 seconds,
the Bulldogs trailed 30-29 at halftime in the
Sugar Bowl Classic on Dec. 30. Mississippi
State put together a 19-4 run to take a 50-3 9
lead with 13:24 left and never trailed the rest'
of the way.
bGAROLINA In his last two games,
Josh Gonner hit 12 of
20 shots and scored 35 points in games
against Pittsburgh and Wofford. Gonner
scored a season-best 20 points in the
Gamecocks' 76-44 victory over Wofford on
Dec. 31.
0 lNNESSEE C.J. Watson was the
first Tennessee player
in five years to have 10 assists in a game
when he did so in the Volunteers' 62-61 loss
to Nebraska on Dec. 30. The Volunteers
rebounded with an 83-51 win over Coastal
Carolina last Sunday. Brandon Crump
registered the 100th blocked shot of his
career against Coastal Carolina. This also
was was his 100th career game.
nNDERBILTT The Commodores
DERBIL extended their non-
conference home game winning streak to 22
with a 71-44 victory over Louisiana-
Lafayette last Sunday. Freshman reserve
Alex Gordon hit5 of 8 shots in 18 minutes of
action and scored a season-high 17 points.
All eight ofGordon's shots came from
behind the 3-point arc.


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