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The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028421/00022
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: Sun (Belle Glade, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Independent Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2005
Publication Date: 1989-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Belle Glade (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Belle Glade
Coordinates: 26.685278 x -80.671389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 66, no. 44 (Dec. 7, 1989)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002051865
oclc - 33436726
notis - AKN9825
lccn - sn 95047260
System ID: UF00028421:00022
 Related Items
Preceded by: Belle Glade sun

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
    Classifieds
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
        page 24
Full Text



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, 51


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W~stneic~oun~lo'eti'w


Mom's neglect ends in injury


Prayer breakfast
The "Hearts of Peace" Mis-
sionary group of Mount Zion
AME Church will be hosting a
prayer breakfast on Saturday,
June 25 from 9-11 a.m. The
breakfast will be held at the
church Multi-Purpose Build-
ing located at 908 SW Ave. B.
Place, Belle Glade. The dona-
tion is $5 per person.

Farewell party
for Dr. Franke
You are invited to a
farewell reception for Dr.
Helen Franke, Provost
PBCC/Glades for 16 years.
PBCC is transferring her lo the
Lake Worth campus effective
July 1. The reception is
Wednesday, June 29 from 3-6
p.m. at the Dolly Hand Cultur-
al Arts Center on the Belle
Gladecampus

Workshop
meeting
The Belle Glade City Com-
mission will hold a workshop
meeting on Monday, July 18
at 5:45 p.m. or as soon there-
after as possible, at the Belle
Glade City Hall, 110 Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., Blvd., West,
Belle Glade to review regular
City Commission agenda.

Centro
Camptesino
Centro CamptesIno is
offering a financial fitness
class June 18. Call (561) 996-
3988 to reserve your seat.

Passion
for Fashion
Do you have style? Wear
the latest fashions? Would
you like to show off your per-
sonal style? Young ladies and
young men ages 12-18 this is
the event for you. Come and
show off your style at the
Clarence E. Anthony Library's
"Passion for Fashion" show.
Each participant will receive a
trophy and certificate of par-
ticipation. Refreshments will
be served to all participants.
Deadline for entry is June 17.
For more information contact
Elizabeth or Deborah at (561)
992-8393.

Registration
Glades Academy of Agri-
culture and Ecological Stud-
ies is located at 1200 E Main
Street, Pahokee, Florida
33476 and is a free Charter
Public School Grades Kg-5th.
Will be open for registration
for the 2005-2006 school year
Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. For more detailed
information please call us at
(561) 924-9402.


Lake Level

15.27
f feet
Above sea
level


Index
Arrests . . . .5
Classifieds ..... .20-23
Obituaries . . .2
Opinion ...........4.
See Page 4 for information about
howto contact the newspaper.




Online news & information



8 6 510 000 1 7


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
PAHOKEE A Pahokee
woman was arrested, accused of
child neglect, after her four-year-
old daughter was pinned under-
neath a neighbor's car as he
backed out.
The child suffered extensive
injuries to her head and was air lift-
ed to a hospital in West Palm
Beach for treatment.
The incident happened near
the family's trailer home, at 2815
East Main St. on June 7 a few min-
utes after 7 a.m.


A neighbor was on his way out,
a daily routine, when the accident
occurred.
Police say that, after backing up
and coming upon an obstacle in
the road, 25-year-old Samuel Pani-
agpia tried to maneuver his truck
onto the road.
The truck didn't budge and
Paniagua felt that something on
the ground blocked his progress,
police said. The rain had saturated
the ground hours before and the
dirt road had become a mess of
mud and rock the thought that


an object blocked the way was not
out of the question.
After quick attempts to free his
truck, accelerating without gain,
he stepped out of the vehicle and,
to his horror, found the girl under-
neath his truck.
Police believe the wheels of his
1995 Nissan truck had spun on the
girl's head.
Frantically, the man, who rec-
ognized the child, took her to her
home, where he made contact
with the child's mother.
The man later told police that


Young readers: Summer reading program in action


!/(


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
The children sat amazed at the magic show before them. Gary Midnight performed mag-
ical feats for the kids to officially kick off the Summer Reading Program at the Clarence
E. Anthony Library in South Bay.


Irv-7


i.an pnoLo/Jose /aragoza
There were many children at the South Bay Library participating in the Summer Read-
ing Program. On June 9, the children took part in arts and crafts, and a host of other
activities related to the program.


the child's mother did not seem
agitated or concerned at the con-
dition of her daughter, a statement
that would be supported by the
responding officer as well, and a
911 call was made to police.
When he arrived, Officer
Maxwell called for emergency
help after taking a look at the child,
whose head he said had swollen
out of proportion from the injuries
she received. Initially, at least, Offi-
cer Maxwell was worried whether
or not the child would survive.
. Holding her in her arms, and


with a cloth against the child's
face, the mother spoke to officers.
Robertson said she ordered the
four-year-old to get inside the car
so she could drive her to school
and didn't know exactly how long
the child had been outside the
home before her neighbor arrived
at her doorstep with the child.
Through the discussion with
Robertson, Officer Maxwell
remembered, he noted the
woman's inability to show emo-
See Neglect Page 12


City focuses



on road work



in South Bay


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
SOUT- BAY By their
own admission, city officials
say the roads in South Bay are
a terrible problem both a
safety hazard and an eyesore.
Citizens have long com-
plained about the roads,
though it hasn't been neces-
sary for them to do so.
Without the resources to
tackle such looming issues,
the city is simply unable to
address the issues of the roads
by themselves. But they
haven't given up and actively
seek the help of outside
organizations in finally com-
ing up with a solution to the
problem.


A video shot by the public
safety department throughout
the different streets in South
Bay produces a clear picture:
There is road shifting that
causes manholes to rise to
several feet above the road-
way; major portions of
asphalt from the streets are
missing and'create pot holes
through which cars can easily
be damaged and large bumps
created from the gradual oxi-
dation of the muck beneath
the streets jut out to endanger
drivers and their vehicles.
While some relief is avail-
able for the reparation of the
See Road Page 12


City makes



change to



billing format


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
BELLE GLADE In an
effort aimed at reducing the
frequency with which they
claim water and sewer bills
are lost in the shuffle at the
post office, Belle Glade city
officials have opted to change
the physical dimensions of the
water bills sent to customers.
A second portion of the
revamp sees the elimination
of reminder notices, a cour-
tesy the city has provided in
the past to its customers that
city staff said results in the


added expense of thousands
of dollars each year.
Commissioners approved
the new format for the water
bills unanimously at the June
6 city meeting in Belle Glade.
The city will switch to an 8- by
11-inch invoice to replace the
current invoice.
Assistant Director of
Finance Jim Shallman
explains the reasoning behind
the move in a memorandum
to the city commission and
See Billing-Page 12


Glades General hosts first


annual family health fair


BELLE GLADE On Satur-
day, May 21, Glades General
Hospital hosted its first annual
Community Family Health Fair.
Marking'the first anniversary of
the Health Care District's pur-
chase of the hospital, the
health fair proved to be a great
opportunity to offer free health
services to the community and
to partner with other organiza-
tions to provide information
on health and social services
available for Glades residents.
Held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
several hundred Glades resi-
dents stopped by the big tent
in front of the hospital for
refreshments, entertainment,
games for the children and
health and human services
information.


All the while their children
bounced in the Bounce House
or blew bubbles, hula-hooped
or chalked up the sidewalk,
parents were able to get their
blood pressure checked; take
a glucose test for diabetes,
have their cholesterol checked
or for men over 45, have a
prostate cancer test.
They were also able to
organize their medications
with a pharmacist, have their
grip strength tested, their back
screened and/or receive confi-
dential HIV testing.
There were several organi-
zations on hand to offer free
information to residents who
stopped by for information.
Participants included Healthy
Mothers/Healthy Babies,


Social Security Administration,
Hospice of Palm Beach Coun-
ty, Glades Medication Assis-
tance Program, Glades Asthma
Project, NAACP, Healthy Solu-
tions, Glades Health Initiative,
Sickle Cell Foundation, Work
Force Alliance, C.L. Brumback
Center, Health Care District,
Healthy Palm Beaches, Family
and Community Partnership,
Comprehensive Services, Belle
Glade Police Department,
Belle Glade Fire Department,
and Palm Beach County Sher-
iff's Explorers.
Trauma Hawk stopped by
in the morning to allow people
a tour inside the helicopter
See Fair -Page 12


courtesy pnoto
Children were happy as could be at the Glades General Health
Fair held May 21 in Belle Glade.


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Val. 75 Mv.54


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Graduates


Summer Lyn Miller
Summer Lyn Miller
Summer Lyn Miller graduated
from Florida State University, on
April 29, 2005.
Her degree was in English
with an emphasis in creative
writing. Summer is a 2001 grad-
uate of Glades Day School. She
is the daughter of Allen and
Shelly Miller of Belle Glade. Her
maternal grandmother is Ruby
Miller of South Bay. Summer is
currently employed at Smith
Barney in Belle Glade.


Leeann Murae Lamb
Leeann Murae Lamb
Leeann Lamb, a student at
Med Vance Institute in
Cookeville, Tenn. recently was
recognized for her 4.0 grade
point average. She was listed on
the President's list of students
for the term. Leeann is enrolled
as a Surgical Technician with
emphasis on Trauma Nursing in
the Bariatric field.
Leeann was in the class of
1993 at Clewiston High School.


She is married to Howard Lamb.
They have a daughter, Samara
and a son Marc.
The Med Vance Surgical Tech-
nology class, which Leeann is a
student recently traveled to
Nashville, Tenn. to put a bill in
place for higher wages in the
medical field. They experienced
the many steps of an initial bill
before it is signed into law. It
was a rewarding experience in
so much the bill was passed the
same day.
Dwayne Ryan Brown
The parents, family, and
friends of Mr. Dwayne "Ryan"
Brown would like to say how
proud we are of this young man
who on June of 2005 was nomi-
nated and inducted into Delta
Epsilon Iota Honor Society at
DeVry University.
Mr. Brown received a letter
from the President of DeVry Uni-
versity, Central Florida (Steve
Brown) congratulating Ryan on
his achievement. Mr. Brown
went on to say in his correspon-
dence that your achievement
represents an extraordinary
level of commitment to your.uni-
versity, your studies, your career,


Birth


Beck birth
Laune and Joey Beck of Moore
Haven are proud to announce the
birth of their son, Jyles Lee Beck.
He was born June 6, 2005 at
Heartland Hospital in Sebring. He
weighed eight pounds, three
ounces and was 21 inches long at
birth.
Jyles was welcomed home by


Heather, Amanda and Dustin.
Maternal grandparents are
Susan James and George Purks of
New Jersey and Ohio.
Paternal grandparents are
Wanda Faye and Teddy Beck of
Moore Haven. Great-grandpar-
ents are Loraine and Alan Gary of
Columbus, N.J. and Ruth Borland
of Florence, N.J.


Obituaries


Clark Hull Wilkinson
Clark Hull Wilkinson passed
away on Saturday, June 11,
2005. She was born on Sept. 18,
1922 in Plant City, Florida. Her
parents are the late Walter G.
and Lois Clark Hull. Clark came
to Pahokee in the 1930s; her
family were some of the early
pioneers.
She is a graduate of Pahokee
High School with the class of
1939. After high school, she
attended Florida Southern Col-
lege and Webb School of Busi-
ness.
She returned to Pahokee and
went to work for her father as a
bookkeeper for Hull Packing
Co., Inc. In 1946, she married
Ellis Floyd Wilkinson of Paho-
kee. Together, tfiey founded Red
Devon Ranch, Inc. where they
raised cattle and grew vegeta-
bles.
Clark was very active in her
lifetime in civic, social and
church groups. She was a mem-
ber of Xi Beta Tau, the Pahokee
Women's Club, PEO, and the
First United Methodist Church of
Pahokee. She was part of a pro-
gram in WWII that knitted
wraps for soldiers, for which she
received a nice citation from the
President of the United States.
She was also one of the
founders of Glades Day School,
the first private school in the
Glades area.
One of her greatest accom-
plishments was becoming the
first female mayor for the city of
Pahokee. She served from 1987
to 1992. She took great pride in
her community and always
strived to make it a better place
to live.
She was preceded in death by
her former husband Ellis Floyd
Wilkinson, her son Walter Ellis
Wilkinson, and her sister Ginny
Wilkinson. She is survived by
her daughter Anne W. Hatton
and her husband Travis of Okee-
chobee, and by her grandchil-
dren Cameron Hatton of Okee-
chobee and Kristin Hatton of
Cape Coral, Brad Wilkinson of
Wellington and Michelle
Hollingsworth of Wellington,
sisters Kathryn Barnes of Paho-
kee, Hilda Wilkinson of Paho-


kee, and Tinky Nason of Vero
Beach, and four great grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services will be held
at the First United Methodist
Church of Pahokee on Wednes-
day at 3 p.m. There will be visita-
tion held one hour prior to the
service at the First United
Methodist Church of Pahokee.
Donations may be made to
the following: Florida United
Methodist Children's House,
Hospice of Ralmrr Beach County,
or the First'i United Methodist
Church of Pahokee.

Gladolia "Bunny"
Marie Hunter
Gladolia "Bunny" Marie
Hunter, 84, of Lakeport, died
Wednesday, June 8, 2005, at
Raulerson Hospital in Okee-
chobee. Born April 16, 1920 in
Des Monies, Iowa, Mrs. Hunter
had been a resident of Lakeport
since 1980.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Ben Hunter.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Debbie Breski of Sebastian
and Audre (Bill) Sturtevant of
Cleveland, Arkansas; brother-in-
law, Glen (Lou) Hunter of Lake-
port; four grandchildren; and six
great grandchildren.
There will be no visitation or
services.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
Hospice of Okeechobee, P.O.
Box 1548, Okeechobee, FL
34973.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of the
Buxton Funeral Home and Cre-
matory.

Joe T. Maxwell
Joe T. Maxwell, 85, of Moore
Haven, died from a stroke on Fri-
day, June 3, 2005 at Bay Pines VA
Medical Center in St. Petersburg.
Born in Carroll County, Indiana,
on Aug. 14, 1919, Mr. Maxwell
came to Moore Haven from
Lakeland 15 years ago. He was a
partner of Pickard Maxwell Real-
tor in Lakeland for 15 years. He
was a WWII Army veteran. He
was a lifetime member of Real-
tors, and the Florida Association


of Realtors. He was of the
Methodist faith.
Mr. Maxwell is survived by his
son, Kevin Alderman, of Tampa;
daughter, Marilyn Dehne, of
Lafayette, Indiana; seven grand-
children; four great-grandchil-
dren.
Visitations was from 11 a.m.
to noon, Saturday, June 11, 2005
at Gentry-Morrison Southside
Chapel. Funeral Service fol-
lowed at noon at the funeral
home chapel.
In Lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Elk's Chil-
dren Therapy Service & Elk's
youth camp. Checks may be
made payable to the Elk's Asso-
ciation, P.O. Box 49, 24175 E.
HWY 450, Umatilla, FL 32784-
049.

James Paul Carroll
James Paul Carroll, 88, of
Moore Haven, died Wednesday,
June 8, 2005 at Hendry Regional
Medical Center in Clewiston.
Born Nov. 27, 1916 in Anderson,
Indiana, Mr. Carroll had been a
resident of Moore Haven since
1986. He served in the Army Air
Corps during WWII and was a
lifetime member of the Ameri-
can Legion.
He was preceded in death by
his nephew, Charles Johnson.
Survivors include his beloved
wife of 59 years, Thelma J. Car-
roll of Moore Haven; nephews,
James R. Johnson, Joe Lakey of
Anderson, Indiana, Ralph Wil-
son of Pierston, Indiana, Jerry
Spaulding of Anderson, Indiana;
nieces, Diane BanBuskirk, of
Anderson, Indiana, Linda Ball of
Crossville, Tennessee and Karen
Richaidson of Fort Lauderdale;
and a host of other nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were held on
Monday, June 13, 2005 at 11
a.m. at Buxton Funeral Home.
Rev. John Booher, Pastor of First
Christian Church in Moore
Haven officiated and interment
followed at Ortona Cemetery.
All arrangements were under
the direction and care of Bux-
ton's West Lake Funeral Home
and Crematory.


Szuxton's MCstw ak.


Serving The Lake Area Since 1980


Dwayne Hyan urown
and your community. We want-
ed to, as a family and a commu-
nity, let Ryan know how proud
we are of him. Ryan you have
been working so hard to stay on
track with you academics and it
has not gone unnoticed. We saw
great potential in you as a young
child and it has shadowed you
until this very day. Keep up the
good work and most of all; Keep
God first he will exalt you in due
' time. We love you "Boo".


Happy

Anniversary

Owens anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Owens
celebrated their first year of mar-
riage, we wish them many more
years of love and happiness -
they were married June 10, 2004.
Happy anniversary.


Summer

safety tips
Summertime is approaching.
Would your child know what to
do if he/she got lost at a shop-
ping mall? A nice, friendly
stranger offered him/her a ride
home? A babysitter wanted to
play a secret game that no one
would know about? A friend
dared him/her to hitchhike?
Start With The Basics
Rehearse with your child his
or her full name, address, and
phone number, including area
code, and how to make emer-
gency phone calls from home and
public phones. Try practicing on
an unplugged phone.
Teach your child to go to a
store clerk, security guard, or life-
guard and ask for help if you
become separated in a store,
shopping mall, or the beach. Tell
them never to go into the parking
lot alone. In addition, when possi-
ble, accompany your child to the
restroom.


e Glades Fordn LincolnMercury


SWE H.ENTLY RECEIVED A LARGE SHIPMENT OF
...'-. rNEW AN PREOWNED VEHICLES AND JUST DON'T
H-AVlE TIME r,' COUNT ALL OF THEM.
SO WE ARE PASSINC THE SAVINGS ON 10 YOU

, 800-726-8514


DeVaughn@gladesmotors.com


Memorial Tribute
Remember a loved one
"* who has departed with a special
.Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.

Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
together attractively and tastefully.
i
Visit www2.newszap.com/memorials for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.



HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS
AT HENDRY REGIONAL

Dr. Ed Humbert is a fellowship
trained hip and knee surgeon
specializing in joint replacement
and arthroscopy of the hip and knee.

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT


Dr. Ed Humbert
Next to Hendry Regional
in Suite B
530 W. Sagamore Avenue
Clewiston, FL 33440
http://www.jointimplant.com

(863) 983-2896


JOINT
IMPLANT

SURGEONS



OF FLORIDA


Do You HAVE ASTHMA?

Are you 25 64?
Have you ever been told by your healthcare provider that you have asthma?
Do you require daily long-term control medicine?
Do you have questions about how asthma affects your breathing, how asthma
medicines help to control your asthma, or what to do in an emergency?

The American Lung Association has a new program for you!

Breathe Well Live Well / Learn how to be free of symptoms

SLearn how to manage your asthma
and reduce your chances of letting
your asthma get out of control

/ Learn that you can do everything
that a person without asthma can
-" do!


Control your asthma; don't let your asthma control you!
The American Lung Association Breathe Well, Live Well program will be held at


CLADES GENERAL HOSPITAL

GLADES 1201 South Main Street
GENERAL
HOSPITAL

Orientation: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 from 5:15 pm 6:15 pm
Education Program: Saturday, June 25, 2005 from 8:00 am 12:30 pm
(Light breakfast available)
Space is limited, so register today by calling (561) 993-3632.

For participating and providing feedback on the new program, you will also
receive:
Orientation: Asthma Control Information Workbook
Education Program: Allergy Control Pillow Encasing
and Peak Flow Meter
Three-Month Follow-up: $25 Gift Certificate to Winn Dixie

AMERICAN
LUNG
ASSOCIATION
1IOOYEARS- 1904-2004


ft


.......................
.............. .. 1.;. 11 MT W w AN


Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee











Flooded ditches bring health hazards to children


The first few days of summer
break brought torrential rainfall to
South Florida. While it may be
impossible to keep kids out of the
mud and puddles, there are some
health concerns to keep in mind.
Never leave children unsuper-
vised, even when they are playing
in their own yard. Small children
can drown in a small amount of
water. An overflowing drainage
ditch can be tempting to a child,
and may be deeper than it looks.
Flooded pastures can make it
difficult to see exactly where a


A
Healthier
Life


with Katrina Elsken

pond starts and ends. Children
playing or riding ATVs in a flooded
area may find themselves falling


into a deep pond.
Floodwaters may also contain
bacteria and toxins. Rainwater
draining across backyards, pas-
tures and roadways may contain
animal feces, insecticides, herbi-
cides, fertilizers and fuel residue.
It will also pick up natural bacte-
ria, which is in the soil.
Children often see any water
as a place to play or swim, but
storm drainage is not clean water.
Swallowing any of the drainage
water could make them sick. If
they have any cuts or scrapes, it


could also lead to infection. If
despite your efforts to keep them
safe, you find your children have
been playing in the storm water,
make sure they shower well with
an anti-bacterial soap, and check
for any cuts or scrapes that might
be infected.
Another health hazard associ-
ated with flooding comes from
insects that breed in standing
water. Mosquitoes can carry dis-
eases such as West Nile Virus. If
you have standing water in your
yard, take precautions to protect


your family against mosquito
bites. Drain water from contain-
ers such as flowerpots and wad-
ing pools. If it is not possible to
drain the standing water, there are
some chemical treatments avail-
able that will kill insect larvae.
Another option for ponds is to
add more fish. Fish eat insect lar-
vae and help control the mosqui-
to population.
Keep children indoors at peak


mosquito-biting times, such as
the hour before and after sunset.
Outdoors, wear long sleeves and
use insect repellant.
Before making any change in
your diet or exercise plan, consult
your doctor. This is especially
important if you are on any pre-
scription medications. Some
drugs interact badly with foods
that would otherwise be consid-
ered "healthy".


,, W-10,dWesFord Licon-Mercury
IC-'4i> MA I r-i 0 r- m:
i- -- No* c> "ts 4P Li-t-


New, Used & Leased Car Sales
800-726-8514
jon@'gladesmotors.com


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
Libby Moya is the newest addition to ad services within the
South Lake Group, serving Clewiston, Glades County and
the Glades area.

Moya joins South Lake's ad

services department


The Belle Glade Sun, Clewis-
ton News and Glades County
Democrat office in Clewiston wel-
comes Libby Moya, its newest
staff addition.


and looks forward to taking on
more responsibilities. She is
preparing for the transition into
sales.
"l i;. ; it t'c nm 'thilnir irfr


Twenty-two-year-old Libby is ent," said Libby about her job.
on her third week on the job, said Libby about her job.
hired in late May to help out in the Supervisor Melissa Agee is
ad services department. happy with how good of a worker
A native of the Glades, born in Libby has proven to be. "She's
Pahokee, and a resident of very energetic and very motivat-
Clewiston, Libby is growing ed," Melissa said. "I know she is
accustomed to her new job duties going to do a good job."


Sitat polo laeyois uonzalez
Bill Fabian, a Clewiston native, has joined the editorial
staff for the South Lake Group, serving Clewiston,
Glades County, and the Glades area.


Fabian joins South


Lake editorial staff


Bill Fabian is a new addition
to the editorial staff. His duties
include reporting for the Clewis-
ton News and Glades County
Democrat.
Bill feels right at home in his
new profession. After finishing
up at Florida State in April 2005,
Bill moved back home to Clewis-
ton. Bill's family has lived in
Clewiston for 13 years. He defi-
nitely enjoys his new job and
responsibilities.
"I love what I've been doing
because you get the chance to
work hard on something and
then see the results, which is
very fun and rewarding," he
said. "Most importantly, it's great
to have the opportunity to serve
the town of Clewiston," he
added.


South Lake News Editor Mark
Young said that Bill has been a
nice surprise to the South Lake
staff.
"We basically struggled
through a month short on staff
waiting for Bill to graduate and
join the staff," he said. "All I can
really say is that it was worth the
wait. He is already writing stories
with a seasoned understanding
of what is important. I look for-
ward to watching him grow as a
journalist and am confident that
he has a very successful career
ahead of him."
If you would like to contact
Bill directly concerning a news
story, you may call him at (863)
228-3129, or send an email to
bfabian@newszap.com.


Green Thumbs Garden Club Minutes


Lovely day, lovely setting! Eigh-
teen members of Green Thumbs
Garden Club'rtlet on May 17 at the
Clewiston Country Club for a
delightful luncheon, concluding
their 2004-2005 year.
Using Genesis 2:8 as her devo-
tional reference, Kathy Hicks
reminded us that Eden was God's
Garden Masterpiece and that gar-
dens have always been a part of
His plan. Each garden has a pur-
pose in God's heart and in ours.
Dot Stacy reported a treasury
balance of $1,107.05.
Sue Phelps, Emily Drake and
Janet Summerlin excitedly report-
ed a fantastic District X meeting.
Winged Treasures was the theme
for the day. Dr. Ron Cave, from the
Indian River Research and Educa-
tion Center in Ft. Pierce, stressed
the importance of using insects to
save certain varieties of Bromili-
ads. Ken Gioeli, a Natural
Resource agent from the St. Lucie
County Extension Service spoke
about Bats;, Florida's Winged
Treasures. The women learned a
lot and thoroughly enjoyed their
presentations. Janet had a lucky
streak and walked away with sev-
eral prizes, including a large Bon-
zai tree.
The Habitat house was dis-


F 2a __
I-- JRLk^


cussed briefly, noting that we still
have landscaping work to do.
There will be a Museum open
house in the fall and the Green
Thumbs Garden Club is working
with the Clewiston Garden Club,
the Museum Board and the City
on the landscaping for the new
building.
The National Garden Club
Convention will be held in Orland
next year, May 24-28, 2006. All
clubs are asked to save tuna fish
cans, wash them and spray them
with flat black paint, to be used in
the table decorations.
Our club will observe the cele-
bration of National Garden Club
week, June 5-11, by placing an
arrangement in a prominent
place.
The Gardening and Design
Seminar will be held June 1-3 at
the University of Florida Confer-
ence Center.
We are sponsoring two girls
and two boys to Camp Wekiva at
Orlando.
Ninette Aker presented Ace
Hardware prizes to: Janet Sum-
merlin, Elizabeth Johnstone,
Shirley Perry, Marci Propes, Pat
mason, Vicki Austin and Dot
Stacy.
Officers for the new year are:


President, Linda Parker; First Vice-
President, Kathy Hicks; Second
Vice-President, Vicky Austin;
Recording Secretary, Mary Lenz;
Corresponding Secretary, Betty
Lebo and Sharon Coots; Treasur-
er, Dot Stacy; Chaplain, Sandy
Stitt; Historian, Emma Jane
Helvey.
President Sue Phelps passed
the gavel to Linda Parker, wishing


her a successful term as our new
president. A round of applause
was the response of club mem-
bers as they thanked Sue for the
superb job she did during her
term.
Next meeting will be at Sandy
Stitt's home, U.S. 27, for the new
'05-'06 year. Meeting is scheduled
for September and guests inter-
ested in gardening are welcome.


City of Pahokee


The city of Pahokee will issue
Requests for Proposals (RFP's) for
roofing work on a variety of city-
owned properties. The bid
requires contractors to visit the
sites and determine the extent of
repair and/or replacement.
There are approximately 11
buildings at seven locations that
need to be brought up to current
building code and inspection stan-
dards. The bidder will provide cer-
tification that the company is not
suspended, debarred, or other-
wise ineligible to receive govern-
ment contracts.
This process is to ensure the
safety and welfare of the city and
the citizens in the communities.


The city of Pahokee has the right
to reject all proposals submitted, if
needed. It is the intention of the
city to invite local and minority
owned businesses to apply. Any
contract awarded will be given to
the city commissioners at the rec-
ommendation of the city manag-
er.
Because of the extent of work
and the condensed timeline, any
contract may be terminated for
failure to perform as contracted.
This is a continuous step to help
improve the appearance of the
community in the city of Pahokee.
Questions should be directed to
the Pahokee City Clerk at (562)
924-5534 Ext. 28.


--p

'^ F M a:e f.

S 953 E. Sugarland Highway
_]; Clewiston, FL 33440
r /7 (863) 983-8051
Fres Sea/fiwda ko Tke- Out




-Daily Specials~ -
Tuesday Perm Day }, ,
Wednesday Color Day 1 ,
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Ne
Brl t
^alary mr


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S863-983-3508



Room Must see to apprecate! $2249K
Back onthe Marke Another chance at
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Se Habla Espaiol
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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


jou Mock
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Bege Glad 7








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Community Profile: Guillermo Rivera


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
Q: What is your name?
A: Guillermo Rivera.
Q: Where were you bom?
A: New York City. Moved down
from New York City eight years
ago, just got tired of the rate race.
We had a little boy. New York is a
nice place to live when you don't
have any kids and you're sort of
career-minded. When you have
children it changes.
Q:What doyou do?
A: I'm the director of programs
and services for New Hope Chari-
ties. I oversee the center here in
Pahokee and the expansion of the
centers, right now we're looking
to expand to South Bay. That cen-
ter will be providing initially as a
pilot after-school program, which
would be homework assistance,
tutoring, life skills classes. New
Hope Charities has been here
about 15 years, I've been here
eight years. My first job here in
Florida.
Q:Why?
A: Good question. When I first
came to work here, and I came to
this center, I thought, I could do
this for a year, just to give some-
thing back. I didn't have anything
set, I didn't have a plan in terms of
a job or anything. When this
came up and I was offered the
position, I thought I could do this
for a year while it gave me time
look for work in more what I was
doing in New York, which was
crunching numbers for the
department of health.
I found something seven
months after coming here. What I
discovered was that the job had
kind of grown on me. I was going
to miss what I had grown accus-.
tomed to here. When I
announced that I was going to
move on, the executive director


basically made it easier for me to
stay.
I guess what I saw was a lot of
me in the kids. I grew up in a
neighborhood on the lower east
side of Manhattan. The neighbor-
hood was, economically, sort of
on the low scale. We were poor.
There was a community center
there and that community center
was kind of my salvation in a way.
When I went to that community
center, I had people who were
like me but weren't thugs, they
were educated. That's kind of
where I learned, for the first time,
about college and things like that,
was in that community center. In
that sense, that community center
opened a whole new world for
me.
When I came here, I saw that a
lot of the kids had the same look
and I kind of saw myself in them.
It was kind of hard to walk away
from that. We live in a real world,
we've got to pay bills and a lot of
times these jobs don't pay
enough and you've got to be real-
ly dedicated. I do remember feel-
ing that. In the way that that cen-
ter had saved me, this center was
in a position where it could save
some kids.
Q: Can you describe yourself?
A: I am a little shy. I guess I
compensate by sometimes being
a little extroverted, That's just
something that I had to learn to
compensate for and get over. (Q:
Quick tempered?) Uh-oh. My wife
says I remind her of a pitbull
sometimes I guess you could
have said that when I was
younger. I just turned 46 Friday. I
think that as you get older, you
just kind of become wiser about
things and things just don't bother
you as much as they used to.
Another thing that is hap-


Pet Corner


Q: Dear Doc Savvy. Hello, my
name is Sean Bishop. I am doing
a project on eyesight for my fifth
grade class. Can you tell me why
dogs do not see in color. Thank
you.
A: Well hey there Sean! Thanks
for writing to me. I always love
helping with school projects. Ok,
here is your answer: Eyesight
boils down to two things, rods
and cones. Rods are responsible
for black and white vision and the
cones are responsible for color
vision.
Dogs have 99 percent rods,
and only roughly one percent
cones. This is primarily why they
do not see in color. I hope that
answers your question. Hope you
make an "A"! Best wishes, Doc
Savvy.
Q: Dear Doc Savvy. Help Doc, I
am having an algae problem in
our fish tank! It is getting greener
and greener. Yuk! It looks like
nasty swamp water. What do I
do? I'm ashamed to give my real
name, so just call me "Swamp
Thing."
A: Well alrighty then, helll-
looooo Swamp Thing! Huh, okay,
first we need to figure out why
you are having a problem with
algae. Is your tank getting too
much sunlight? Also, check the
content and ph of the water. I


3






guess you could start out fresh
arid cull out the fisFhand totally re-
do the tank? Not! Just kidding!
Okay, there are many anti-
algae products on the market.
The one I have the most success
is called "Algae Destroyer". Just
follow the directions and you
should be okay in about four or
five days. Also, you must take the
filter out of the cartridge daily and
rince it out. If that doesn't help
you Swampy, I don't know what
will. Take care and I hope you
don't have too many barnacles
growing on your hull! Doc Savvy.
E-mail your pet questions to
DOCSAVVY@aol.com and check
out your pet answers weekly in
the "Pet Corner"! Be sure to tune
into "The Savvy Pet Show" each
and every Thursday, at 10:30
a.m. on 95.5's The Big Dawg.


Speak Out

Speak out is our free 24-hour opinion line. Call 996-6636 to
express your opinion or ask a question about public issues.
You are not required to give your name. While we want you to
speak freely, the newspaper reserves the right to edit calls for
clarity, brevity, relevance and fairness.






The Sun


Our Purpose...
The Glades County Democrat is published by Independent Newspapers of
Florida. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspa-
per to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citizens of the commu-
nity. Since no dividends are paid. the company is able to thrive on profit
margins below industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in
Independent's mission of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of
the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the comm-
munity's delibertation of public issues. ,


We Pledge...
* I, operate this newspaper as a public trust
*' T help our community become a better
place to live and wrk, through our dedica
tic.r, Tu o)ricieriioua journalum
* To provide the inmormauon otiens need rt
make their own intelligent decisions abcut
public isues
' To report the news wth honesty, accuracey,
cblcntie, fearlessness and companion.
* To use our opinion page to fadiitate
:mmnity debate. ntto dominate It wth
:ur own oplnioita.
' To diatcle our own conflict of Intermt or
p,-ennai conrfliis to our readers
' To correct our errors and to gte each cor
ieion to. the prominence it deserves
* To provide a right to reply to those we write
about.
' To treat people with courtesy, respect and
compassion.


News Eda.)r Mark Young
Reponer Joe Zoreaa
Bill Fabian
Newi Clerk Ileybl iGcnratex

Adnrtiii
Adverbilig Dilrt.. Judy Kautan
Nadonil Accounts. Joy Parriih
Advernsing Serne, Mehsja Aee
Lauien Adrirr

Independnr Newsipupeis Inc
Charnan Joe Srryth
President Ed Duin
Vice Prevdent ol Flone Oprru.,ns TTom Byrd
Execur e Edtor Ktnna Elslen


Memberof


I-


Florida Press
Awendr~aln"


opened, as I've gotten older is that
you're not as quick to accept, not
failure, but you don't accept folks
who are not trying or not making
an effort. As a boss, I may come
off that way. If this was our goal
and you worked toward and you
gave it your all I don't have a prob-
lem if we didn't achieve that goal,
but if the effort wasn't there and
that kind of thing, I really don't
have a whole lot of patience for
that kind of stuff.
Q: What scares you?
A: Anything related to my kids,
anything happening to them. My
older son has asthma and it's pret-
ty bad. It was one of the reasons
we left New York, because of the
cold weather. His doctor recom-
mended that Florida may actually
be good for him. He was right,
he's done very good. When he
had his real first bad asthma
attack I was very, very worried. I
was very scared. Like it was yes-
terday, it was horrible. Just the
idea that he couldn't breathe -
complete helplessness because
you couldn't really do anything at
that moment. We didn't know
what was going on, we didn't
even know he had asthma. He
was a little boy he was two
years old. I've had other experi-
ences in my life where I've been
afraid, but that kind of deep-root-
ed fear that gets you to the core.
Q: What is your favorite song?
A: I'm 46, man, I've heard a lot.
I have a broad range appreciation
for music. From Salsa, Latin Salsa,
to Classical, to Rock. Genre that I
don't like? I'm not particularly
fond of that electronic, new age,
techno, to me it sounds repetitive.
Some people love it, I'm not real
crazy about it.
A song that takes me to the
past? A lot of them. There was



How to I
Pastor John Hicks
First United Methodist Church
What would you do if you saw
someone drowning? A number of
years ago I was driving over a
causeway when I saw a bike rider
suddenly drop his bike and jump
over the edge of the bridge.
Alarmed, I pulled over to the side
to check it out. Others drove on.
Even though it's been over 20
years, the events of that day still
remain with me.
A young boy was paddling
across the river when the boat he
was in capsized. Away from the
boat, he was struggling in the
water. It was his struggling and the
cries for help, which inspired the
bicyclist to drop his bike and jump
in to help. I arrived on the scene
just as several people were helping
them out of the water. While all of
this was going on, there were a
number of fishermen out there
who never put their rods down or
even made a motion to help. The
boy was drowning and they did
nothing. I couldn't believe it.
The reality is that there are a lot
of people around us who are


Guillermo Rivera
one song, a song that I heard
recently actually that brought me
back, I must have been about
eight or nine years old and there
was a song, Stone Soul Picnic by
the Fifth Dimension. I was about
eight years old and they were hav-
ing a concert in this park near
where we lived and they actually
performed there. That was the
very first time I actually saw a live
performance take place and
that's a song that they sang. For
some reason, that song has stuck
with me that whenever I hear it,
I'm right back at that spot looking
at these people perform.
Q: What irks you?
A: Pretty much everything, no.
In general, what could really mess
me up, people who cut the line
when I'm waiting to get gas at the
station; people who talk in the
movie theater when I'm trying to
watch a movie; people who cut
me off on the highway really irk



help savi
struggling to keep their head
above water for one reason or
another. There are a lot of people
who could use
a helping hand
to. keep them
from going?
under. A nd
unforturn ate Ik,. .
there are Ha o
of people just
going about
their business
'doing driothing
to help. Again Pastor
the question, John Hicks
"What would
you do if you saw someone
drowning?"
A story is told about a man who
was on a luxury liner and suddenly
fell overboard. He couldn't swim,
and in desperation began calling
for help. Hearing the cries for help,
one man reached into his brief-
case and pulled out a book on
swimming techniques. He tossed
it to the man in the water and he
yelled: "Now brother, you read
that and just follow the instruc-
tions and you will be alright."


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza


me. Don't cut me off and if you're
going to be in that left lane, don't
do 30 miles an hour. I won't honk
at you or 'anything, I'll just get
irked and go around you. What
irks me really is when the Yankees
lose. I get real upset. I'm a die-
hard Yankee fan. (Q: Watching
Boston go all the way isn't espe-
cially tempting, is it?) Oh, Boston,
that was heartbreaking. I don't
even want to talk about it.
Q: What is the memory you
hold dear to you?
A: There have been quite a
few, mostly involving my mother,
my sisters and brothers and
things, but I do remember one.
We were living on the lower east
side of New York City and it was
Christmastime and things were
particularly rough.
There were 10 of us, six girls,
four boys, 10 total. We didn't
always have a lot of finances to go
around and buy stuff. One of my


e a drowing man


Another man on deck saw the
man fall overboard and immedi-
ately started making swimming
motions with his arms. He yelled,
"Brother, watch my motions. Do
as I do and you will be fine."
A third man looked upon the
drowning man's plight with deep
concern, and yelled out, "Just hold
on friend. Help is on the way. We
are going to establish a committee
and discuss your problem. And
then, if we can come up with the
proper financing, we will resolve
your dilemma."
By this time the drowning man
was going down for the third time
and desperately started waving his
hand. Caught up in the excitement
of the moment, another man
yelled out, "Yes, brother, I see that
hand, is there another?" Finally,
someone on deck plunged into the
water at the risk of their own life
and pulled the victim to safety.
The moral of this little tail is that
if we are to be effective in helping
people who are struggling to keep
their heads above water in this
world, our evangelism and mis-
sion outreach must be pro-active,


relational in nature, and must
meet people at the point of their
need.
Francis of Assisi, the kindly 13th
century monk, informed his
brethren one day that he planned
to go into the nearby village on a
preaching mission. As legend tells
it, he invited a young monk to go
with him.
On their way, they passed an
injured man and Francis promptly
stopped, saw to the man's needs
and arranged medical care for
him. They went on and soon
passed a homeless man who was
near starvation. Again, Francis
stopped and ministered to the
man. All through the day, as they
encountered people in need, Fran-
cis cared for them the best he
could.
As the sun went down, Francis
said it was time to return to the
monastery for evening prayers.
Confused, the young monk
inquired, "Father, you said we
were coming to town to preach to
the people." Francis smiled and
replied, "My friend, that's what
we've been doing all day."


Actions can be worth thousands of lectures; good and bad


The Reverend Samuel S.
Thomas, Ph. D.+
Saint Martin's Church, Clewiston
I entered graduate school
about a year after my daughter
was born and for her first few
years I was a full-time student.
There was a chair in our living
room where I studied, and there
were also her playthings and
toys, as well as "her chair".
That was a
small, child- ,' ..
sized chair
made like a
bear, with eyes "
and ears that -
stood up, furry -
brown cover-
ing and paws
at the feet.
One day Rev. Samuel
while I was
studying, I S.Thomas
noted that my
daughter too was sitting in her
chair looking at a book. I was a
bit amused her book was
upside down. She-had no idea
about reading then, but there she
was, intently staring at this
upside-down book. I watched
this go on and suddenly was
stunned.
"What have I taught?" I said to
myself. This was amazing a
child about age three sitting still
for a long period of time, looking
at a book upside down and star-
ing at a printed page that could
not mean anything to her. I was
really taken aback that moment: I
had seen her copy what I was
doing day after day, hour after
hour, and she had obviously
learned that grown-ups stared at
books while sitting in their chairs.
I began to wonder what else I
had taught her to do at age three.
We didn't smoke. She didn't learn
that from her parents. We made
sure we went to Church, that was
important and a part of each
week. We noticed that the play
doctor's kit she had said on the


certificate that "HE was entitled
to practice play medicine" and
the play nurses' kit said that "SHE
was entitled to practice play nurs-
ing."
We didn't watch the football
.games or sports activities on TV
and she didn't watch them either.
I began to think about what we
really taught our daughter and
how she learned it and how this
would affect her throughout her
life.
There is a Biblical account of a
man with two sons (Matthew
21:28ff) where a father has two
sons and asks one to work in his
vineyard. The son says, "I will
not" but late goes. When he asks
the other one to go and work, he
says that he will, but does not.
The parable is about actions, not
words; the first son is counted as
having done the will of his father.
The children do what they see;
the act speaks much louder than
the word. We are admonished in
James; epistle to be 'doers of the
word and not hearers only,
deceiving yourselves (Chapter 1,
verse 22)."
With the recent violence on
television, the number of report-
ed assaults, the murders and
crimes against people, I wonder
about the homes where such
people grow up. I have never
heard of anyone saying, "go out
and attack someone" or "you
should shoot the people that
aggravate you." Where do such
things come from? I am con-
vinced that people are deeply
affected by what goes on around
them and what is shown to be
"normal" in their homes. I
believe watching what goes on in
their homes and neighborhoods.
When there is a difference
between what people say and
what they do, those around them
will always put the actions before
the words as signs of what they
really believe, what they really
think is important, what is really
the "right way" to act. One of my


professors wrote a book that he
called "Doing the Truth" because
he realized that our character is
shaped by our acts so much
more than by our words.
My daughter grew up liking
books and reading ,and I am
grateful for having shared that
with her even when I didn't real-
ize what I was doing. When I see
young people accused of com-


emitting acts of violence against
people or senselessly taking lives,
I wonder what examples were
set or who was a model that they
followed. I think they missed
something. I am my brother's
keeper and my children's keeper
too. I am responsible because
they will learn from me even
when I don't think about it.


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Serviin Western Palm Beach County Since 1929


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neighbors asked my parents if he
could take us to this local church
where they were going to be giv-
ing out toys. We went and we sat
through this whole service, must
have been three hours long. We
were kids, you know.
At the end of the service, they
brought out all these toys and we
got all happy because we thought
we were getting toys. They began
to call names. After they called
about 50 names, we didn't get
anything. We all kind of got very
upset, we were all crying that we
didn't get toys.
Jeffrey Dobbs, he was the son
of one of our neighbors, and he
felt really bad that he had told us
we were going to get toys and we
didn't and we all went home cry-
ing. My mother, when we got
home, she was like, "What hap-
pened?" He was like, "So sorry,
Mrs. Rivera, I thought they were
getting toys."
My parents managed to get us
a couple of things. That night, it
was Christmas Eve, that night
there was a knock on the door
and I looked through the peep-
hole. I had to climb up on the
thing to look cause we were all
very small kids. I see Jeffrey's face
there and I say, "Mom, it's Jef-
frey." She said, "Well, open the
door, see what he wants."
It was Jeffrey and his family
and he had a big sack. He came
into the house and they had gone
out on Christmas Eve and pur-
chased toys for all of us. They had
toys and they made our Christ-
mas. That was a very nice memo-
ry.
They didn't have much more
than we did. They didn't have any
children in their family, but they
went out, did that, it was real cool.
(Q: Isn't New Hope Charities
known for its Christmas Toy Give-
A-Way every Christmas?) Yeah.
It's funny how much things come
around like that.


Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee










SHall shooting considered to be justifiable


Staff photos/ Ideybis Gonzalez
Hendry County Sheriff investigators look over evidence,
which was found during a recent drug bust in Montura


A Hendry County Sheriff's deputy, along with a sheriff inves-
tigator, attempt to gain information from one of the person's
taken into custody following a recent drug bust.


State Attorney Steve Russell has
announced that the Hendry Coun-
ty Grand Jury has cleared six
Hendry County Sheriff's deputies
in the Sept. 22, 2004 shooting of
Deana K. Hall after a traffic pursuit
in LaBelle.
Ms. Hall survived her gunshot
wounds.
The Grand Jury issued a report
on May 31, which sets forth its fac-
tual findings in the case and the
conclusion that the actions of the
deputies were legally justified. The
report had been sealed under Flori-
da law until the Grand Jury's find-
ings were released on June 3. State
Attorney Steve Russell thanked the
Grand Jury for their diligent and
lengthy review of the facts.
"We believe through this
process this matter has been thor-
oughly reviewed," Mr. Russell said.
The Grand Jury also issued an
eight-count indictment charging
Ms. Hall, 28, which includes: Three
counts of aggravated assault on a
law enforcement officer and one
count each of aggravated fleeing to
elude, resisting an officer with vio-
lence, leaving the scene of a crash,
DUI causing property damage and
driving while license suspended.
Ms. Hall was taken into custody by
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE), which inves-
tigated the case. Ms. Hall is being
held at the Hendry County Jail
without bond pending arraign-
ment scheduled for July 11.


The following information
about the incident is taken from the
Grand Jury's statement of findings.
The allegations against Ms. Hall
stem from a Sept. 22, 2004, inci-
dent in which a GMC Yukon SUV
driven by Ms. Hall reportedly
rammed into the rear of a vehicle
driven by Delma Gonzales, at a red
light at the intersection of SR 80
and Bridge Street. Ms. Hall report-
edly got out and talked to Ms. Gon-
zales, then drove away as Ms. Gon-
zales reported the crash to the
Hendry County Sheriff's Office via
cell phone.
When the Yukon reappeared
and headed west onto SR 80,
deputies followed with lights and
sirens activated. A video camera
mounted in Sgt. Jamie Thorpe's
patrol car captured the pursuit.
By the time it was over eight
officers were involved in the pur-
suit: Deputy Perry Short, Sgt. Thor-
pe, Lt. Chad Schipansky, Sgt.
Andrew Drew, Deputy David Galle-
gos, Investigator Steven Maldona-
do, Deputy Martin Meyer and Sgt.
Curtis Clay. The Yukon continued
westbound for several miles then
made a U-turn across the grass
median, heading east toward
LaBelle.
According to the Grand Jury's
findings, three attempts to deploy
"stop sticks," designed to deflate
tires, were unsuccessful in stop-
ping the vehicle. Two of the driver's
side tires did go flat, but the Yukon


Crimestoppers

Crimestoppers of Palm Beach
County is seeking the public's assis-
tance in locating the whereabouts
of Sheneka Byrd, a.k.a. Nickie Byrd.
Born on Aug. 8, 1977, Byrd is
described as a black female with -- i
black hair and brown eyes. She is
listed as being 5'6" tall and weighs.
101 pounds.
Her last known address was 715
MHP, in Belle Glade. She is wanted
on one count of felony forgery.
If you have information on.the
whereabouts of Byrd, please call
(800) 458-TIPS (8477). You may
remain anonymous and could be Courtesy Photo
eligible for a cash reward. Shenka Byrd



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continued to ride on the wheel
rims.
At one point, the left front of Sgt.
Clay's vehicle got stuck in the right
front side of the Yukon, dragging
the sheriff's unit along with it. After
almost striking a west-bound pick-
up truck head-on, the Yukon
approached the Shell gas station at
Martin Luther King Blvd., forcing a
PT Cruiser driven by Patricia Nixon
to back up on SR 80 and around
the corner onto MLK, then forcing
her off the road. On MLK, Deputy
Meyer got in front of the Yukon,
where his vehicle was struck in the
rear, spinning it to the left with the
driver's side facing the front of the
Yukon. The Yukon stopped, but
struck the driver's door of Deputy
Meyer's vehicle, pinning it shut.
The other deputies got out of their
vehicles and approached, but
Deputy Meyer could not exit
through the passenger's door
because the computer console
blocked his way. The Yukon
lurched backwards, apparently
going over the door of one of the
sheriff'svehicles.
The Grand Jury reasoned that
Deputy Meyer may have thought


he was going to be rammed when
he felt his vehicle move and shot
one time from his .40 caliber Glock
pistol. At almost the same time, Lt.
Schipansky fired four times, Sgt.
Drew fired twice, Deputy Gallegos
fired four times and Inv. Maldona-
do fired five times, all using their
Glocks. Sgt. Clay fired twice with a
12-gauge shotgun.
Deputies then secured the
scene and Hall was taken into cus-
tody. She had been struck several
times by bullet fragments, shotgun
pellets and broken glass. Off-duty
medics on-scene began medical
attention and she was then trans-
ported to Lee Memorial Hospital.
According to the Grand Jury
report, Ms. Hall's blood alcohol
content tested at .139. She also
reportedly tested positive for
cocaine, opiates and benzodi-
azephine. Hall's driver's license
was suspended at the time of the
incident.
The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement began investigating
the incident that evening.
Editors note: Post your com-
ment on this issue at http V/news-
blog.info/0801/'


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By Ideybis Gonzalez
MONTURA On Wednesday,
June 8, at around 4:36 p.m. Hendry
County Sheriff Criminal Investiga-
tions Division, serving a search
warrant, arrived at a residence
located at 212 Avenida Del Club in
Montura Ranch.
During the search of the resi-
dence, investigators found an
excess of 10 grams of powder
cocaine, as well as paraphernalia
and packaging materials, which
were taken into evidence.
Following the, execution of the
search warrant and an on scene
investigation, sheriff investigators
arrested two individuals, one of
which was a Hispanic male identi-
fied as Doberti Sanchez. The sec-


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ond suspect taken into custody
was a Hispanic female identified as
Betty Sanchez.
Both were charged with posses-
sion of cocaine, possession of
cocaine with intent to sell, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and for
the sale of cocaine. They were both
booked into Hendry County Jail
and are awaiting bond.


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51


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005











Resident watched Clewiston grow from beginning


By Frances Nail
As told to MaryAnn Morris
I was born in Nashville Ten-
nessee in June, 1913. We moved to
Chicago for six years, then to Jack-
sonville and then to Orlando, but
when I was 16 years old, my father
moved us here to Clewiston. Oh, I
cried! I thought my father had done
the worst thing in the world to us.
There was nothing! Not even a road!
Now I wouldn't live anywhere else.
Clewiston is, I think, a very
unique small town, in that many of
the people who settled and formed
the town were important people in
other areas. One gentleman was
on the Board of Directors of Gener-
al Motors.
My father had the Western
Union office in town. Your com-
munications then were either let-
ters or telegrams. Everybody
would gather outside there at the
Western Union office and talk.
I'm a cat lover. We had a
Siamese cat here in 1936. People
heard about it and no one had ever
seen one. Someone came to see
"the twins" one time, not realizing
that we weren't talking about
Siamese twins.
Dr. Wells was the first real vet in
town. He had been vet for one of
the silent movie stars (it might have
been Norma Talmadge) when she
wintered in Florida. She had a
female Siamese cat who became
pregnant, but when the kittens
were born, one wasn't pure
Siamese. She didn't want that one,
so Dr. Wells asked us if we wanted
it. My mother was a great cat lover
and had a Persian cat named
Sweetheart at that time, so she
took the kitten and named him
"Doc" after Doctor Wells. But Doc-
tor Wells never really liked that cat.
He said that Doc always looked at
him as if he (Doc the cat) knew
more than he (Doc the vet) did!
Those were the days of the Big
Band Era. Everyone, young and old
alike, listened to the same music.
There wasn't the difference there is
now. When I say old, I mean the
young married people. They were
old to us. Every other week a band
would come to town to the old
Clewiston Inn and the Inn would


Recollections
A series about Florida's
pioneers and history


have a dance. In the weeks the
band didn't come to Clewiston Inn,
we went to Belle Glade to dance.
Two men got into a fight one night.
A fight usually ended the dance for
that night.
One night two of the band
members who were staying at the
Inn got in a fight in their room. Two
of them were sharing a room. One
punched the other one so hard it
knocked him right through the wall
onto Mr. Plunkett's desk where he
was sitting in the next room in the
room next door! Mr. Plunkett was
an employee for the sugar compa-
ny who lived at the Inn, as did
many of the young people. Rentals
were scarce then, as they are now!
I remember one night that I was
sitting with my husband in the
lounge of the old Clewiston Inn,
the one that burned down. All of a
sudden, a live raccoon came
bounding across the room People
screamed and climbed up on the
chair seats and tables! Dr. Shoop
was there that night with a mem-
ber of the Board of General Motors.
What a scene! As it turned out, two
of the hotel guests had been out
hunting and thought it would be a
good joke to let the raccoon go in
the lounge that night!
The old Clewiston Inn burned
down in 1937. You see, they didn't
plant sugar cane for the sugar at
first, but from the Celotex they
could make from the canes and
use to make building materials.
But, Celotex burned very easily,
and the Inn was built with Celotex.
There's a mural in the cocktail
lounge of the new Inn painted by J.
Clinton Shepherd in the 1940s. The
mural covers all four walls of the,
lounge. There is a raccoon shown
in the mural. When his daughter


This photo of the Clewiston School was taken in the 1940s.


had her 50th wedding anniversary,
she came out here to celebrate at
the Inn.
The original school building
was built from red brick and it's still
standing after all the hurricanes.
One of the first houses is still stand-
ing, too. It stands at the end of
Royal Palm Avenue and it was built
in 1928 by Clewiston's first mayor,
F. Dean Duff, who was mayor for
10 years. Dean Duff Avenue was
named after him.
The original office of the sugar
company was so friendly to every-
one here in town. They did so much
for this town. Anything they could
help with, they did. We had an 18-
hole golf course, a good library,
swimming pools and an auditori-
um. It's named John Boy Auditori-
um for Mr. John Boy who was a
president of U.S. Sugar. Clewiston
wouldn't be as nice as it is if they
hadn't been so nice to Clewiston.
I've lived this long and seen so.
many changes that I've come to
realize all the different things I'm
familiar with now. I'm so lucky. My
life has been so interesting.


Courtesy photo/Florida Archives
This photo from the 1920s shows Louise Groody with B.G. Dahlberg. Ms. Groody was the
star of "No, No, Nannette." Mr. Dahlberg was the president of Celotex Company and was
showing Ms. Groody plans for the Celotex bungalow.


Orchid popularity still growing in United States


DELRAY BEACH According
to the United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA) Floriculture
Crops Survey for the year 2004,
compiled by the National Agricul-
tural Statistics Survey, orchids are
growing in popularity in the United
States.
Currently second in potted flow-
ering plant sales with a wholesale
value of $128 million, orchid sales
increased by five percent this past
year. This is the second highest per-
centage increase of all the potted
flowering plants in the category.
Orchids are second in sales behind
poinsettias, which experienced a
one percent increase with $248 mil-
lion in sales, and they are signifi-
cantly ahead of third-ranked
chrysanthemums, which increased
eight percent to $75 million in sales.
There were more than 17.2 mil-
lion orchids sold in the United
States in 2004, an increase of 13
percent from the previous year.
"This reflects the growth of the
flowers popularity. People are
increasingly learning that orchids
are not the delicate plants that they
were once perceived to be, but are
hardy, easy-to-maintain plants that
have the ability to bloom all year
long," said Lee Cooke, executive
'director of the American Orchid
Society.
Orchids have been included as a
separate entry in the annual USDA
Floriculture Crops Summary
Report since 1995, when they were
first submitted by the nonprofit
AOS. Floriculture refers to plants in
the categories of bedding, cut culti-
vated greens, cut flowers, flowering
potted plants and foliage plants.


California -and Florida lead the
nation and are nearly tied in pro-
duction, accounting for 38.1 and
37.6 percent of the country's
orchids, respectively. Together,
these two states account for more
than 75 percent of the country's
orchids.
"Orchids are the largest group of
flowering plants in nature. There
are more than 25,000 identified
species, with the total number
probably reaching 30,000, and new
species are being discovered each
year," said Dr. Rob Griesbach,
genetic researcher of floral plants
for the U.S. National Arboretum,
and past president of the American
Orchid Society (AOS). "In addition
to that, there are more than 120,000
hybrids registered with the Royal
Horticultural Society. With so many
choices, there's an orchid for every
person's taste."
Long known as a flower of dis-
tinction, orchids have an undeni-
able mystique. Orchids are includ-
ed as backdrops in many cinema
and television scenes, and are fea-
tured in countless advertisements
for everything from clothing and
furniture to architecture and
design. Because of their beauty, rel-
ative low cost and heartiness,
orchids are also increasingly
becoming a central aesthetic touch
to the home lifestyle. Exceptional
plants are produced at low cost by
nurseries throughout the United
States, but the huge volume of
quality plants grown and marketed
by large commercial growers in
Florida and California contributed
to most of the sales boom.
For information concerning


membership, orchid-rylated topics Orchid Society's Web site at
such as orchid education, research www.aos.org or call the AOS Visi-
and conservation, orchid shows tors Center and Botanical Garden in
and events, ;:.Il-t ,re ';u-geslions -IM yBeachFlorida;at(561)404-
and more, i n..r '2000 of ...


courtesy photo
Hendry County executive Committee Pauline New Born
presents certificates of appreciation to Sen. Dave Aron-
berg and LaBelle Mayor Sherri Craichy.

Senator promises fellow

dems hope for the future


Sen. Dave Aronberg, who rep-
resents constituents in parts of
Lee, Glades, Palm Beach, Char-
lotte and Hendry Counties, spoke
at the annual Jefferson/Jackson
Day dinner the LaBelle Civic Cen-
ter Friday, June 11.
"Although I represent only a
triangle of Lake Okeechobee in
Hendry County," he said, "I still


represent you so you have two
Democrats representing Hendry
County. With Democrats on one
coast and Republicans on the
other, Hendry County is in
between.
"We can win if we don't give
up the fight. It's up to all of us. It is
not too early to start," he conclud-
ed.


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005








Thursday, June16, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Reading helps connect children to their fathers
Years ago, the roles of father something fun with your kids, Bones, the very man that lay dead on the edge of their seat through aloud: Age four and older Read another kind of fishing feed-
and mother were narrowly then make the day complete with in his parents' inn. all 95 pages. yourself: ages 7-8 and older Today the-fish fishing!
defined. That's not true anymore. a couple of good books. With the recent death of his Librarian's Choice was going to be an exciting day This warm father-and-son


Today, fathers and mothers wear
interchangeable hats, performing
many of the same functions.
Throughout, the goal is the same:
To love, care and provide for their
children.
Reading books with children is
as much a father's job as it is a
mother's, and many dads love
those special moments together.
Dads, make extra time on Father's
Day to snuggle with your kids and
read to them. Read more than
you typically do a couple of
good books instead of one, or
extra chapters. After all, if it
weren't for your kids, you would-
n't be celebrating Father's Day at
all. So celebrate together. Go do


Books to Borrow
The following book is avail-
able at many public libraries.
*"Treasure Island" by Robert
Louis Stevenson, adapted by Lisa
Norby, illustrated in black-and-
white by Paul Wenzel, Bullseye
Step into Classics/Random
House, 95 pages Read aloud: age
8 and older Read yourself: age 9
and older Flint and his fellow
pirates buried gold on an island
many years ago. They made a
map to remember where they hid
the treasure. Now, through
strange circumstances, young Jim
Hawkins has found the map in
the sea chest of the pirate Billy


father, Jim seeks the advice of the
trusted Dr. Livesey and the town's
wealthiest man, Squire
Trelawney. Together they encour-
age Jim to mount an expedition
to recover the buried treasure. In
agreeing to do so, Jim Hawkins
has no idea what a deadly game
he is about to play as they set sail
for Treasure Island.
In this marvelous adaptation
of Robert Louis Stevenson's clas-
sic novel, Lisa Norby has captured
all the suspense, adventure and
excitement of the full novel for
younger children. Pirates, buried
gold, adventure on the high seas -
it's all here in this fast-paced book
that is guaranteed to keep readers


Library: Chester Public
Library, 1784 Kings Highway,
Chester
Library director: Lynn Cop-
pers; children's librarian: Mau-
reen Jagos
Choices this week: "Brother
Eagle, Sister Sky" by Chief Seattle;
"The Empty Pot" by Demi; "The
Wide Mouthed Frog" by Keith
Faulkner.
Books to Buy
The following books are avail-
able at favorite bookstores.
*Piggy and Dad Go Fishing" by
David Martin, illustrated by Frank
Remkiewicz, Candlewick, 2005,
28 pages, $14.99 hardcover Read


because Piggy was going fnsing
with his dad for the very first time.
After packing a lunch and digging
up worms for bait, the two set off.
When it came time for Piggy to
bait his hook; he didn't like the
idea of putting a hook into the
smiling worm. So Piggy uses
bread balls for bait instead.
Fishing takes patience, and
after a long time of waiting and
recasting, Piggy felt a tug on his
line and he reeled in a beautiful
fish! But when Piggy took a look
at the fish, he thought it looked
sad and asked his dad if he could
throw it back into the water.
"Sure," said Dad. And from that
moment, Piggy and Dad did


story will have young and old
alike thinking about this sport in a
very different way.
"Daddy Hugs 1*2*3," written
and illustrated by Karen Katz,
McElderry Books, 2005, 28 pages,
$12.95 hardcover Read aloud:
ages 1-3 Read yourself: Age seven
and older.
How many daddy hugs does it
take to say I love you? Beginning
with "one 'I'm so glad you're my
baby' hug" to "two teeny, tiny fin-
ger hugs"' and all the way to 10
good-night hugs, this warm and
loving story about the love a
daddy has for his baby is just right
for Father's Day or any day of the
year.


The impact of the Bioterrorism threat WE CAN HELP REBUILD YOUR


By Douglas L Archer and
Fred H. Degnan
The events of September 11,
2001 and the aftermath anthrax
incidents have refocused the food
safety concerns and priorities of
regulatory agencies. The threat of.
terrorism aimed at the food supply
and assuring biosecurity have
become nightly news stories. Can
biosecurity be supplied by the reg-
ulatory agencies, or will responsi-
bility largely fall on the growers,
packers, shippers, and processors
of our food? The question almost
answers itself: the burden falls orn
the regulated industry to assure the
safety of its products.
What would such an attack on
the food supply accomplish? It is
difficult to envision that wide-
spread serious harm and death
would result, at least no more so
than we experience in large out-
breaks of food-borne disease. Nev-
ertheless, even if relatively little
harm to human health resulted-
economic consequences could be
great, and consumer confidence in
the food supply and the regulatory
agencies, shaken.
The Tylenol(r) tampering
episodes of the early 1980s provide
a good model of the types of con-
siderations and prophylactic steps
the industry should be considering.
The episodes energized FDA-regu-
lated industries to implement
meaningful anti-tampering plans,
including new or modified drug
forms, and tamper-resistant pack-
-aging. FDA and the regulated
industry developed a cooperative
relationship as never before-and


industry did the creative problem
solving. In the current situation,
FDA likely has its hands full in gen-
erally improving its state of pre-
paredness and ability to respond to
a bioterrorism emergency.
Increased inspection of imported
foods alone will stress FDA's exist-
ing work force, and its program pri-
orities will shift dramatically.
Recognizing that the level of
sophistication in the response to
potential bioterrorism will vary
with the size of a given company,
among other factors, there seem to
be some common points for food
growers, packers, shippers, and
processors to consider in light of
the current circumstances.
In the absence of better
knowledge about the nature and
seriousness of a threat, the distinc-
tion between under-reaction and
over-reaction is blurred.
A strong focus on facility and
personnel security is a must.
Where possible, background
checks for ALL personnel should
be required. NO ONE who is not so
authorized should have access to
the finished food product
Do you know who is deliver-
ing raw material to your facility,
and who is transporting finished
product out? What security precau-
tions are those entities taking?
Anti-tampering plans, if they
exist, should be re-evaluated. If
they don't exist, they should be
developed, adopted, and imple-
mented.
GAPs, GMPs, and HACCP
plans should be re-evaluated. Are
they sufficient to protect from pur-


poseful acts of food contamina-
tion? Do they cover the following
points?
1. raw material integrity
2. packaging integrity
3. air flow systems
4. end-line activities
5. storage and transportation
Consumer complaint han-
dling practices should be checked
and fine tuned.
Recall procedures should be
checked and fine tuned. Know
who you would contact at your
local FDA office and how to reach
them.
Know who could provide
quick access to analytical methods
or microbiological or chemical
analyses of your products on an
emergency basis. Have those con-
tact numbers readily available.
Improve preparedness
among all employees through reg-
ular training or drills. Develop a
heightened understanding of the
problem, its consequences, and
that increased awareness on the
part of all is an important compo-
nent of prevention.
Know that procedural
changes in handling a "possible
problem" are called for in the face
of a possible bioterrorism event.
The balance of internal (company)
investigation and FDA notification
favors early agency notification.
False alarms will be one price of
vigilance.
Be aware that FDA, CDC, and
state agriculture and health agen-
cies will likely be in a "help mode"
as previously seen in product tam-
pering incidents. Everyone recog-


Growth affects all Floridians


From traffic, taxes and tourism
to pollution, housing and jobs -
all are impacted by the rate of
growth and development occur-
ring in local communities across
the state of Florida.
More than 1,000 people a day
arrive in Florida, as new residents
of the state. Each requires water,
roads, landfills, police protection,
emergency care and a host of
other publicly funded services.
Local communities struggle daily
with how to meet the needs of
existing populations in addition to
those newly locating to the Sun-
shine State.
Lawmakers tackled parts of
the problem in their recent Leg-
islative Session, passing major
legislation that will soon become
state law. The legislation has
drawn a mix of reactions, from
those who will play a role in car-
rying it out and from others con-
cerned about Florida's growing
needs and quality of life.
Leading experts are analyzing
the new policy, and the state's
evolving needs, and will report on
their findings beginning June 15.
That is the start date for an inno-
vative and timely "virtual confer-
ence" on growth policy, issues,


impacts and solutions. "Growth
In Florida" is the theme for the
"event", an eight-week tele-semi-
nar series where both speakers
and participants will take part by
telephone. The program is set for
June 15 through August 3. Weekly
sessions will be held on an array
of growth topics and will feature a
faculty of over 40 experts on the
subjects.
Urban sprawl, housing
demands, water supplies, devel-
opment patterns, land conserva-
tion, citizen rights and an assort-
ment of other concerns affecting
everyday Floridians will be the
focus of the series. Local officials,
civic leaders, planners, develop-
ers, environmentalists and others
- anyone concerned about the
future of Florida will have an
interest in the series. Participants
will gain insights into Florida's
current standing and how to do
better in the future.
Participation in the event has
been made easy by organizers
since it will all be conducted by
phone, so anyone can call in from
virtually any area of the state or
country. The live sessions will also
be recorded and made available
through a playback line for those


who miss a call or want to hear a
session again. The approach is
unique in Florida and a new spe-
cialty of the sponsor, for public
awareness and involvement as
well as problem solving and
meeting the needs of Floridians.

In addition to informing Florid-
ians and helping improve the way
growth is addressed, the tele-
series is also a fundraising effort
for the sponsoring organization,
the Florida Public Interest Foun-
dation. The group is a nonprofit
that provides educational pro-
grams on major issues of concern
to Florida's future. Its Non-Profit
Institute also sponsors profession-
al development training services
for nonprofit groups to aid in their
effectiveness and success. Pro-
ceeds will enable the Foundation
to provide more such programs
throughout the state.

The Foundation has assem-
bled experts from diverse back-
grounds and professions and is
encouraging broad participation
in the calls. Registration fees have
been substantially discounted for
charitable and civic groups as
well as students.


Treasure Coast Dermatology
Specializing in the Treatment of Skin Cancer
Mohs Surgery Diseases of Skin, Hair & Nails *

Tim loannides, M.D. and Rick Romagosa, M.D.
are pleased to welcome

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D., PhD


Boad Cerfiled
A.lria Bowd
OfoffDnn~,igy


0
Felove
of The
Anurica Soclefy
W Mohe Surget


in addition to
Stuart Fort Pierce St. Lucle West Vero Beach
221-3330 464-6464 878-3376 778-7782
448 SE Osceola St. 1801 South 23rd St., #5 1100 St. Lucle West Blvd., #105 1995 39th Ave.
Medicare. Humana, Employers Mutual accepted
Se aBordCetiie ermaoloist..Evr Tie


nizes that terrorism is the fault of
the terrorists, not of a farm or a
food company.
The above list is certainly not
intended to be all-inclusive of pos-
sible preventive steps. Large com-
panies will likely have the
resources to take a risk-analysis
approach to their operation, and
use a team of experts to devise pre-
vention strategies, intervention
strategies, containment strategies,
and educational strategies-all
aimed at dealing with possible
bioterrorism. The sharing of strate-
gies and experience among com-
panies with similar attributes, or
sharing facilitated by trade organi-
zations, will strengthen the whole
of the effort, and should be encour-
aged by government. At all costs,
complacency needs to be avoided
for, as time passes, the specter of
possibly more and more sophisti-
cated terrorist acts looms.


A*7(p
L T 1 TELECOM jNC .

W>o-bamy tsa saop ty?


Immokalee
(Inside B&L Hardware)
301 N. 15th St.
239.657.1600


1-800- 579-0694










525c *w AVeneUs e $CHAGEaO, FF

www.gladesmnotors.com


LaBelle
(Next to Hungry Howies)
216 S. Main St y
863.675.3288


Clewiston
(Next to Clewiston Florist)
330 W., Sugarland
863.983.0436


NEXTEL I

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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


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Thursday, June 16,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Neighborhood Crime Watch to begin
By Jose Jesus Zaragoza for neighbors," explained Assis- lot of time or money," said Mr. Dowdell. According to the chief,
tant City Manager Gerald Adams. Adams. volunteers in the program will
BELLE GLADE The Belle "There's nothing wrong with Having an organized watch be briefed on several issues,
Glade Police Department contin- being a nosy neighbor." system in each neighborhood including increased vigilance for
ues making progress on its In a typical neighborhood comes in handy also during all types of crimes and how to
planned Neighborhood Crime crime watch program, neigh- times of emergencies, said city report them to the proper
Watch program, a program the bors band together and often officials. With the hurricanes last authorities and differentiate
department hopeswill see the select a block captain who year having left devastated much between the crimes and their
hfIf. I i ...-- n n ctn nxattr h h o lrtriitv thr. ,h,,t level of threat.


involvement of citizens through-
out Belle Glade.
The goal for the program is to
engage residents in watching
over each other especially dur-
ing times when most are away
from home. To have watchful
eyes in each neighborhood, city
officials said, will help curb
crime throughout the communi-
ty.
Police officials are taking the
first steps in implementing the
program. They are shooting for
an August start date and hope
now to interest enough residents
to participate.
"It's neighbors looking out


organizers te iinvoivement oI i te
residents in a specific block. If
neighbors see anything that's
out of the ordinary, or potential-
ly illegal, their aim is to notify the
police.
Neighbors have an increased
awareness of crime, and the
potential for residents to form
new friendships and acquain-
tances is greater, said Mr.
Adams.
Blocks become mini commu-
nities where everyone looks out
for everyone else and burglars
have a harder time pulling off
crime without notice.
"Crime watch does not take a


ou i e i ec iit y i iiroug Iui
Belle Glade, getting in touch
with emergency personnel was
a more difficult issue, especially
for older residents without
access to great mobility. An
established crime watch pro-
gram can even go beyond its
original scope and have laid out
the framework for organization
and help in more drastic times.
It s a win-win for every-
one, police officials said.
All that's left now is for resi-
dents to call in to volunteer for
the program.
"We'll do all the organizing
for you," said Police Chief Albert


Set to begin in the first week
in August, city officials said they
will take the program to different
neighborhoods one section at a
time. Work to identify the sites
has begun.
Detective S. Khan, with the
police department, will be the
facilitator in the program, work-
ing hand-in-hand with residents
in organizing the program
throughout the different neigh-
borhoods.
, If you would like to partici-
pate in the program, or would
like to learn more, you can con-
tact Detective Khan at 996-7251.


Florida's ancient past hidden near Kissimmee banks


The terrain is obscured by a
tangle of drooping oak limbs,
palmetto scrub and dense
underbrush, but Jim Fitch looks
into this thicket and sees clearly
the signs of a lost civilization and
its bygone culture.
"I just stumbled across this
Indian mound one day about 25
years ago," said Fitch, curator of
the Museum of Florida Art and
Culture at South Florida Com-
munity College in Sebring.
"The growth is such that I can
see it, but you cannot."
So you squint, look harder. It
is only then that you detect the
barely-perceptible upward slope
of the ground, beginning not 25
feet from where Fitch stands; it's
then you notice the climbing lay-
ers of the farthermost oak tree-
tops. Next you trudge up the
incline in Fitch's footsteps. A
couple of quick breathers and a
few branch scrapes later, you're
standing on a woodsy plateau 15
feet up. This is not a geographi-
cal anomaly in the local land-
scape, but a structure created by
human hands thousands of
years ago, Fitch said.
This Indian mound sits on
property now owned by the
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, not far from the


Kissimmee River. The District
acquired the land to serve as a
buffer for the Kissimmee River
restoration project. But District
officials agreed earlier this year
to let a team of archaeologists
investigate the mound for signs
of the peoples whom Fitch
believes called Florida home as
far back as 7,000 years ago.
Renowned Florida Archaeol-
ogist Dr. Robert Austin is leading
the investigation, which is spon-
sored by the Kissimmee Valley
Archaeological and Historical
Conservancy. The team, which
includes Fitch, has been doing
site clearing on the mound since
June and will get down to the
actual dig in early August. The
investigation could take six to
eight weeks.
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District officials believe it is
important to give the team
access to the site. The potential
that amateurs or treasure
hunters might locate the site,
damage it or sell artifacts to pri-
vate collectors is of particular
concern. Any artifacts found by
Austin's team become property
of the state.
"We just see this as an essen-
tial public service to make this
mound available to these


researchers to expand the
archaeological knowledge of the
state," said Jeff McLemore, a
District land steward for the
region. "We hope they gain valu-
able knowledge from the
mound, see what purposes it
served, who created it."
Who created it is the big mys-
tery, Fitch said. However, the
team recently found signs of an
earthen ramp adjacent to the
mound, which could indicate it
served ceremonial purposes, he
said.
With some luck and a great
degree of keen observation
skills, the team could uncover
signs that a tribal chieftain once
presided here. Perhaps they will
find artifacts crude clay pottery,
or animal bones and shells
formed into fishhooks, knives or
other tools. Postholes where
shelters were erected would be
a huge find, Fitch said.
Previous finds in the region
lead Fitch and others to con-
clude that the Kissimmee Valley
was once a primary trade route
as well as a place of permanent
and temporary settlements.
Those finds include a more
refined pottery than that pro-
duced by the locals, a style that
was indigenous to the Mississip-


pi Valley area and thus suggests
far-flung trade ties, he said. Still,
there is much more to learn
about these people who lived
long before recorded history
.which, in Florida, beginswith the
arrival of Spanish explorer
Ponce de Leon in 1513.
"We're talking pre-history
here," Fitch said. "The prehisto-
ry of this area could easily date
to 5,000 B.C. We're uncovering
great evidence that there was
undoubtedly an indigenous cul-
ture here. They were organized,
established... we just don't have
a name for them."
However, if they find direct
evidence of these people in the
form of human bones, the inves-
tigation will halt abruptly. "If it's
a burial mound, we'll leave out
of respect," he said.
The search begins by digging
a series of test pits, about 2
meters square and 2 to 3 meters
deep. Any evidence of the socie-
ty that built these mounds,
excluding skeletal remains,
would lead to more extensive
digging, he said.
"We know something hap-
pened here, we just don't know
what," Fitch said.


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
A supportive commission
In appreciation of their outstanding support for the annu-
al Afro Arts Festival in Belle Glade, city staff and com-
missioners were recognized at the June 6 meeting. Each
received a trophy for their overall contribution to the wor-
thy project.



Glades General Hospital


appreciating the nurses


BELLE GLADE On Friday,
May 6, Glades General Hospital
hosted a luncheon for nurses
who provide services to the
Glades. Nurses from doctors'
offices, C.L. Brumback Center
and local schools joined fellow
nurses from Glades General for a
well-deserved recognition.
Patty Hood, R.N., who has
been a nurse at Glades General
for almost 40 years, shared a
small part of her collection of


James

Fencing
Licensed & Insured


antique medical supplies. Nurses
were able to see instruments,
books, bandages, bedpans, and
more from Civil War, and some
pre-Civil War, days.
"Medical technology has cer-
tainly come a long way. Seeing
these antiques gives you an
appreciation for the working con-
ditions of doctors and nurses dur-
ing that time and an appreciation
for today's technology," said Ms.
Hood.


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Preserving the old school days along the Kissimmee


A few missing slats on the
faded white clapboard build-
ing's facade allow bright sun-
beams to streak inside and shed
light on a disheveled interior,
with its exposed beams, wasp
nests, spiderwebs and debris-
covered wooden floor. But first
appearances can be deceiving,
and historical experts are con-
vinced this old schoolhouse still
holds some lessons for us all.
The Fort Basinger school-
house, built in Highlands County
in the early 1900s, was recently
evaluated for historical signifi-
cance and deemed worthy of
preservation. Until a few weeks
ago it sat out of sight along US
98, separated from the road -
and the 21st century, it seems -
by a row of trees, a fence line
and an old pasture now dotted
with young pines.
The property where it stood is
owned and managed by the
South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, part of land
acquired for the Kissimmee
River environmental restoration
project. This plot sits above the
100-year floodplain and is not
needed for the project, accord-
ing to Marjorie Moore, senior
supervising planner in the Dis-
trict's land stewardship division.
However, the property may be
sold as surplus, and District offi-
cials could not bear to let the


schoolhouse become lost histo-
ry.
Neither could Florida's Divi-
sion of Historical Resources.
After the District commissioned
Janus Research, a Florida firm
specializing in historical preser-
vation, to conduct an assess-
ment, the two agencies agreed
with Janus' recommendation
that the humble building's archi-
tectural character, historical
value and social relevance to its
era make it worth saving. Based
on these findings, the rural
schoolhouse may even qualify
for inclusion in the National Reg-
ister of Historic Places.
Arrangements were made to
relocate the schoolhouse to
another parcel of District land-
the nearby historic Edna Pearce
Lockett Estate, former home-
stead of a long-time ranching
family. By consolidating histori-
cal structures at this location,
the District can efficiently man-
age their preservation. Eventual-
ly the buildings may be restored
and opened to the public-and
the entire riverfront estate used
as an educational or recreational
site.
"Moving the schoolhouse
was the right thing to do,"
Moore said. "We're protecting
this resource rather than allow-
ing it to be demolished. It has
historic value, and we recognize


that."
After the paperwork was in
place, the next step was to
secure the building and prepare
it for the precarious move. Fortu-
nately, it's a short trip. The
Pearce Lockett Estate is just
across US 98, less than half a
mile from where the school
stood for almost a century. Also
near the school were two out-
houses, found tipped over in the
woods. These were deemed
quaint but not genuinely historic
and so would not be making the
trip.
The building was in capable
hands for the move. Brownie
Moving has something of leg-
endary reputation for transport-
ing big buildings in the region,
having moved everything from
old houses down city streets to
historic Palm Beach mansions
down the Intracoastal Water-
way.
In early November, the
movers arrived with their heavy
equipment: hydraulic lifts, trac-
tors, winches, and I-beams.
They secured the beams under
the schoolhouse and raised it off
the foundation pilings. Then
they literally slid the building
slowly across the field toward
US 98. Thanks to a work crew
from the Okeechobee Correc-
tional Institution, a wide swath
of vegetation was cleared to


smooth the way. At roadside, a
big diesel truck slowly pulled the
school, now mounted on a trail-
er, onto the blacktop. Traveling
at about 3 mph, the Ft. Basinger
schoolhouse eased on down the
road, attentive movers walking
alongside to watch for trouble.
The school was taken flaw-
lessly to a shady part of the Lock-
ett Estate grounds, not far from
the ranch house and barns, a
small family cemetery and the
Kissimmee River. It rests tem-
porarily on I-beams while new
foundation pilings are prepared.
Then it will be sealed up and
properly "mothballed," as
preservation experts recom-
mend, until decisions are made
about restoration.
Although the Lockett Estate
lost a few big trees in the hurri-
canes, this site is still a shady
one. And it's not so far from the
road that passersby can't see the
newly-placed schoolhouse. In
fact, if they slow on the curve of
US 98 next to the river in High-
lands County and look to the
south, the schoolhouse is in
view under the spreading oaks.
It's a peek into Florida's history,
brought carefully into the pres-
ent by those who recognize that
inevitable change can some-
times provide opportunities to
preserve something of the past.


AMERICAN HOME CARE
A Home Health Agency has immediate openings
for the following positions in Clewiston:

Director of Nursing Fulltime Starting Salary $50,000
With Full Benefits Must Be RN, with Current Florida
License, has home health experience.

PRN Field Nurse RN $30.00/visit $55.00 Admission
and $60.00 for weekend admission plus mileage.

Data Entry Fulltime with Benefits.

PRN PT/OT/ST/MSW/Home Health Aide
Please call at.1-866-766-0033 or
fax your resume at 863-983-5655 or
visit our website at www.americanhomecare.org
for more information.


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Smith heads to national wrestling tourney History Of Father's Day


By Mark Young
CLEWISTON It's only his sec-
ond full year of ever competing in
wrestling, but Kris Smith, an
incoming Clewiston High School
junior, is making a big name for
himself in the sport.
Coming off a highly successful
sophomore season, Smith con-
cluded last year's high school com-
petition with a 25-10 overall record,
took third at the district tourna-
ment, was regional runner-up, and
made the top 12 during the state
finals while wrestling in the 140-
pound division.
Smith has been working hard
over the off season, staying active,
and successful in tournament
competition. Smith has picked up
a pair of gold medals this summer
already, qualifying him for the
National Open Wrestling Champi-
onships, to be held in Virginia
Beach, Virginia.
The tournament is scheduled to
kick off June 26 and will run
through June 29. In all, the trip will
be a seven-day event for the young
Tiger wrestler who already has
Cumberland University, in
Williamsburg, KY, eying him as a
potential scholarship prospect.
Cumberland and Clewiston
High School have a strong connec-
tion with head coach Jess Alford;


Michael Irving, a former national
champion, and Ryan Alfal all hail-
ing from Cumberland.
What Smith lacks in overall
experience, he more than makes
up. for in natural talent and the
national tournament will be a
means to gain the experience he
needs to emerge as a state threat
next year. He will be moving up to
the 152-pound division for this
tournament, but the move up in
weight is of little consequence to
this focused young grappler.
"I'm going into this tournament
with one thing on my mind," said
Smith. "Just don't lose."
Smith loves the challenges of
single combat action that wrestling
provides, but recognizes that his
new love can also provide a means
to further his education. He's
focused on succeeding in the sport
and wants the opportunity to
advance his education as well.
. Smith concluded his sopho-
more year with a 3.2 grade point
average, was nominated as a
Who's Who in student athletes.
The family is looking to the com-
munity for help in making this trip
possible and will be holding a
fundraising carwash Saturday,
June 18 at Clewiston Middle
School, beginning at 8 a.m.


It would be interesting to
know how this holiday came
into practice. Therefore here is a
short history on the holiday, and
meaning of the different colors
of roses to be worn that day.
Father's Day is celebrated on
the third Sunday in June. The
idea for creating a day for chil-
dren to honor their fathers
began in Spokane, Washington.
A woman by the name of Sonora
Smart Dodd thought of the idea
for Father's Day while listening
to a Mother's Day sermon in
1909.
Having been raised by her
father, Henry Jackson Smart,
after her mother died, Sonora


Staff photo/Lauren Adams
Kris Smith, an incoming CHS junior and Tiger wrestler, will
be take the national spotlight while competing in the Nation-
al Open Wrestling Championships beginning June 26.


wanted her father to know how
special he was to her. It was her
father that made all the parental
sacrifices and was, in the eyes of
his daughter, a courageous, self-
less, and loving man. Sonora's
father was born in June, so she
chose to hold the first Father's
Day celebration in Spokane,
Washington on the 19th of June,
1910.

In 1924 President Calvin
Coolidge proclaimed the third
Sunday in June as Father's Day.
Roses are the Father's Day flow-
ers: Red to be worn for a living
father and white if the father has
died.


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Sports Briefs


Tournament
registration
Registration for the Get Kids
Hooked on Fishing, not Drugs fish-
ing tournament will take place at 8
a.m.June 18, on the morning of the
tournament. Registration will take
place at the Clewiston boat ramp.
Contact the Clewiston Police
Department for more information.
Golf Tournament
The Boys and Girls Club is host-
ing a golf tournament June 18.at
the Belle Glade Golf Course, start-
ing at 8:30 a.m. They are seeking
foursomes to play in the tourna-
ment. It is $50 per individual to play.


Prizes for first, second, and third
place teams, as well as for the
longest drive, closest to the pin, and
a car for making a hole-in-one at
the designated hole will be award-
ed. You can also purchase Ball
Drop tickets for $5 each for a
chance to win $500. Contact Kathy
Miller at (561) 992-5399 for more
information.

Fishing Tournament
Horizons Fishing Tournament
benefiting Hospice of Palm Beach
County's (HPBC) Horizons Chil-
dren's Bereavement Program will
be taking place soon. Horizons
Fishing Tournament (Kingfish,
Wahoo, Dolphin) is presented by


the brokerage firm of Robert W.
Baird & Company, Inc.
A Captain's Meeting is planned
for Thursday, July 14, at 5 p.m. to
8:30 pm at the Newcomb Hall -
Riviera Beach Marina.

Fishing Tournament
Saturday, July 16, lines in at 7
a.m. lines out by 3 p.m. and an
awards ceremony from 5-6 p.m.
can be expected. Departing from
any inlet; weigh in at Riviera Beach
Marina, 1950 E 13th Street, Riviera
Beach, $175 per boat until June 15;
$200 per boat until July 10; $250
per boat until July 14. For more
information contact Beth Charbon-
neau at (561) 227-5157, Special


Events Coordinator Hospice of
Palm Beach County or Willie's Bait
and Tackle (561) 848-4484.

Summer
Tumbling Camp
Clewiston Performing Arts Cen-
ter with Mrs. Mammen and Ms.
Escobar, June 6-16 Monday- Thurs-
day, $45 plus $15 registration, if
new ,to CPAC, ages five and up.
Beginning 2:15-3:15 p.m., Interme-
diate 3:15- 4:15 p.m., Advance 4:15-
5:15 p.m. Registration will be
Thursday, April 28 and Thursday,
May 5, from 6-7 p.m. at 725 Central
Avenue, in Clewiston. For more
information call (239) 564-3473.


Boat ramp opens northernmost Everglades to public


Pay no mind to that hulking
gator floating on the water's sur-
face offshore from the new boat
ramp at the northern end of the
Loxahatchee National Wildlife
Refuge.. ,;
The leathery eight-footer is cer-
tainly no "Freddy," the affable ani-
mated alligator mascot of the South
Florida Water Management District.
It's just that this neck of the Ever-
glades has been closed to the pub-
lic for several years.
But maybe this cold-blooded
Jurassic throwback will eventually
become the unofficial greeter to
the northernmost boat access to
the Everglades. The District ramp is
expected to generate a lot of traffic
from anglers, sightseers, birders
and other outdoor lovers when it


opens in September. The facility
includes an adjacent fishing dock, a
covered kiosk and environmentally
friendly, composting restrooms.
There is a paved parking lot and the
ramp can accommodate two boats
at once.
The facility is an improved
replacement to the previous District
boat ramp that served this end of
the Refuge, which also encompass-
es the District's Water Conservation
Area 1 (WCA 1). The old facility,
which closed in 1997, attracted a
"conservative estimate" of 200
boaters a week, said Serena Rinker,
an interpretive specialist with the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
which oversees the Refuge.
"We put an announcement in
our newsletter and right off the bat


we got half a dozen calls," Rinker
said. "They all want to know when
it's going to open."
Public boat ramps on District
property are nothing new. There
are more than 160 ramps open to
the public throughout the 16-coun-
ty District, from the Everglades in
the sbuth to Lake Tohopekaliga in
the north. But this is the first "major
new ramp we've done in many
years," said Fred Davis, the District's
land stewardship director. Its con-
struction is being handled by the
District, but the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife service will operate it.
"After the old boat ramp was
lost, people had to drive all the way
to (the. refuge's main entrance)
west of Boynton Beach," Davis
said. "This will reconnect people in


western Palm Beach County to the
refuge. It's certainly the northern-
most boat access to the Everglades
system."
Entrance to the facility will be
monitored by a gate near 20-mile
Bend off of Southern Boulevard.
Admission will cost $5 per vehicle
and it will be open from sunrise to
sunset. A law enforcement official
will be on patrol or on call at all
times. And be sure to look for the
gator.
"Oh, yeah this is his home," a
construction worker at the boat
ramp said one recent afternoon.
For directions or additional
information, visit
loxahatchee.fws.gov or call (561)
734-8303.


Tune In on the Web! It's "Everglades Radio Network"


South Florida's famous wetland
now has its own 24-hour-a-day radio
broadcast. Everglades Radio Net-
work has hit the airwaves and the
Internet to keep listeners enter-
tained and informed with facts, sto-
ries and even music about the
unique Everglades environment.
Travelers along Alligator Alley
(1-75) in Collier County can tune in
on FM 98,7 and FM 107.9. But any-
one in Florida or even around the
world can-listen in by clicking onto
the radio network's Web site at
* www.dep.state.fl.us/ern.
The idea for Everglades radio
programming was proposed five
years ago by Senator Bob Graham.
In a letter to the secretary of Flori-
da's Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP), Sen. Graham
suggested the idea of an auto tour,
of sorts. Travelers could listen to an
informative and entertaining broad-
cast while looking out the window
and watching the Everglades envi-
ronment pass by. It was an idea that
drew a lot of interest and support.
John Outland, DEP staff mem-
ber and project coordinator,
described the collective efforts of
numerous state organizations that
made ENR a reality. "Several agen-
cies contributed their expertise,"
he said. "DEP paid for program-
ming. The Department of Trans-
portation, which issues highway
radio advisories across the state,
contributed hardware plus expert-


ise on radio broadcasting and
licensing. The Division of Emer-
gency Management added funding
so the station could be a source for
weather advisories, accident
reports along the interstate and
evacuation notices during storms."
Many other organizations par-
ticipated in launching ERN by con-
tributing material for original pro-
gramming, including the South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict. The District is partnered with
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
to carry out a:30-year plan for Ever-
glades restoration. Several pro-
gram segments describe this mon-
umental effort.
The Web site was an outgrowth
of the broadcast plan. It was creat-
ed by DEP staffer Krista Callen,
who updates it with a "Critter of the
Month" and other appealing items.
The site receives more than 10,000
hits every month. ERN is linked at
WGCU radio's Web site and at a
few environmental sites, but over-
all it is not widely promoted. That
may change if the word gets out to
educators. Outland would like to
see the site become a classroom
resource. "We're hoping that
teachers will start to tune in for
environmental education curricu-
lum," Outland said.
ERN is broadcast from the cam-
pus of Florida Gulf Coast University
in Ft. Myers, in the studio of WGCU.
There, Gene Craven, associate gen-


eral manager, supervises the auto-
mated system that broadcasts the
three hours of programming in a
continuous loop. A link on ERN's
Web site allows computer users to
tune in to the actual radio broad-
cast. Other links connect to each of
ERN's current programs.
Program topics include Ever-
glades animals, such as Florida
panthers, alligators and various
birds, as well as interesting plants-
both natives and unwanted exotics
that are invading the ecosystem.
Personality profiles include photog-
rapher Clyde Butcher and author
Marjory Stoneman Douglas, who
coined the famous phrase "River of
Grass" to describe the Everglades
landscape. A historical 'segment
describes President Harry Tru-
man's dedication of Everglades
National Park in 1947. Nature
sounds, music and lively interviews
round out the broadcast.
An immediate goal of Ever-
glades Radio Network is to add
more programming. There are cur-
rently six 30-minute segments,
repeated several times in the
course of a 24-hour period. Addi-
tional segments will add variety,
new information and freshness to
the network.
"The start-up budget for ERN
does not include additional dollars
for expanded programming," Out-
land said. "That's where we hope
community sponsors will step in


with their support."
Like National Public Radio and
other noncommercial networks,
ERN does not sell advertising. But
sponsors can be recognized on air
for the programs they underwrite.
"We would like to get annual spon-
sors at $20,000 or quarterly at
$7,500," said Outland. "However,
we will certainly consider other
proposals." Two 30-second under-
writing messages are available
every hour.
The network has submitted a
request for federal funding as well.
"While government funds would
be beneficial," said Outland, "it
would be great for ERN to have
local, regional and even national
sponsors that support the Ever-
glades and its restoration."
For roadway travelers on 1-75 -
or armchair travelers on the Inter-
net -you don't need to be actually
standing among the cypress trees
or researching stories on South
Florida's history or listening to
herons calling from the reeds to
experience the famed River of
Grass. Everglades Radio Network
can take you there.
Everglades Radio Network is on
the Internet at
www.dep.state.fl.us/ern. You can
listen to the broadcast or click on
links to hear any of the current pro-
grams.


Touching the
Glades one family

6 w*wst at a time.

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(863) 983-5123


Happy Father's Day












William Marcus Sutton Jr.
March 18, 1936 May 31, 1998


I'm awaiting the day when I see you again,


Your Daughter Cathy


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Community Events


H.O.PE Meetings
Citizens of the city of South Bay
have recently formed a group
called H.O.P.E. "Helping Others
Pursue Equality." This is due to the
monthly increase in our water and
sewer bills and will decide our
course of action. Meetings are
scheduled the first Wednesday of
every month in the Miracle by Faith
Fellowship Hall, 1035 N.W 1 Street,
South Bay. Your attendance will
make a difference.

PEPPI accepting
applications
PEPPI Head Start is now accept-
ing applications for three- and four-


Fair
Continued From Page 1
ambulance.

"We were very pleased with
the turn out for our first annual
health fair," says Dan Aranda,
Glades General CEO. "There
were a number of residents who
came to the fair to inquire about
hospital services. As a result, at
least 40 individuals received
multiple lab tests. The Glades
Asthma Project was also pleased
to receive five referrals from the
event! We look forward to host-
ing our second annual event
next year, which promises to be
bigger and better!"


Neglect
Continued From Page 1
tion or concern for her seriously
injured child.
Instead, she offered an explana-
tion.
Officer Maxwell in the report
wrote, "Robertson stated that
Colon was a wild child and did
whatever she wanted and was
hard to control."
According to the officer, the girl
was transported to the coast for
medical treatment and was expect-
ed to survive the ordeal and had
only a second test to complete, to
ensure her status before being
released a few days after the inci-


Road
Continued From Page 1.
roads, or at least the start of
repair work, within the Neigh-
borhood Strategy Area (NSA),
there is little else at the moment
to support work outside the des-
ignated zone. Streets in the NSA
fall under a city-county housing
and community development
program, which qualify them for
funding through Community
Development Block Grant
(CDBG) money.
The streets inside the NSA are
(ranked in .order of priority):
Southwest 12th Avenue; South-
west 10th Avenue; Southwest
9th Avenue; Southwest 11th
Street; Southwest 6th Street and
Southwest 7th Street.
During fiscal year 2005-2006,
the city received $269,000 in
CDBG money, supplemented by
an additional $50,000 from Palm
Beach County Commissioner
Tony Masilotti's District Gas Tax
Fund, for a total of $319,000 for
street improvements. The
money will be taken as far as it
will go down the list of streets
according to their rank and the
availability of funding.
The goal for the city now
becomes finding funding for
streets outside the NSA.


Billing

Continued From Page 1
the city manager.
"The letter sized bill will elim-
inate the sorting problem at the
Post Office which accounts for a
number of lost bills every
month," he wrote.
Prior to the commission
approving the new format, at the
city meeting last week, City Man-
ager Houston Tate said that the
size of the cards led to the fre-
quency with which they were


year-olds for free/full day childcare.
PEPPI is located at 301 Southwest
8th St. in Belle Glade. For more
information, please call 996-1718.

New Hope Charities
New Hope Charities is now
accepting applications for their Sum-
mer Camp Program for youth ages
10-17. Camp runs from June 6-Aug.
5. Registration cost is $1 per camper.
Stop by to pick up your application at
7450 State Rd. 15, Pahokee. For fur-
ther information, call (561) 924-7986.

Entertainment-
sought
Do you have a special talent that


you'd like to share with the com-
munity? Do you dance, participate
with a step team, sing, recite poetry
or do praise dances? If so, we want
you to come and show off your tal-
ent and win great prizes for each
category. If you are interested,
please contact Mrs. Jessie Terry at
(561) 202-7701 or Mrs. Lawanda
Harper at (561) 924-3126.

2005 Tri-cities
league meetings
Regular meetings will be held
the fourth Monday of each month
at 6 p.m. as follows: June 27, South
Bay City Hall, July 25, Belle Glade
City Hall, Aug. 22, Pahokee City
Hall, Sept. 26, South Bay City Hall,
Oct. 24, Belle Glade City Hall, Nov.
28.


Support our troops
The Woman's Club of Belle
Glade will be sending packages of
much needed items to our military
men in Iraq. If you have a friend or
a loved one serving in Iraq and
would like us to send them a pack-
age of supplies, give us their con-
tact information in Iraq. We want
to make sure our troops from the
Glades are receiving support from
their community. For more infor-
mation please contact Elizabeth
Cayson, Support-Our-Troops Wish
List Chairperson at 996-0129.

Childcare
program opens
New Hope Charities After
School Program is now open until
6 p.m. to better serve the commu-


.., .


Courtesy photo
A variety of services were provided to residents participating in the fair.


dent.
Her mother joined her at the
hospital, but was arrested
moments after stepping foot back
inside Pahokee and faced the
charge of child neglect resulting in,
great harm. Paniagua received a
traffic citation for improper back-
ing.
Police say the incident is the sec-
ond of its kind for the woman, 41-
year-old Susan Robertson, who
only a year earlier was arrested
when a motorist driving by her
home found the little girl wander-
ing in the center of a busy' thor-
oughfare.
Officers found the small child
alone, shivering on a cold night in
February.


The streets include (also
ranked in, order -of priority):
Northwest 1st Avenue (between
Northwest 3rd and U.S. Hwy
27); Southeast 3rd Street
(between Southeast 4th Avenue
and Southeast 1st Avenue);
Northwest 2nd Avenue
(between 100 and 200 block);
Northwest 12th Avenue
(between 100 and 200 block);
Northwest 11th Avenue
(between 100 and 200 block);
Northwest 8th Avenue (between
MLK and Northwest 1st Street);
Northwest 1st Street (between
U.S. Hwy 27 North and North-
west 8th Avenue); Southwest
3rd Avenue (between 100 and
200 block); Southwest 2nd
Street (between U.S. Hwy 27
South and Southwest 1st
Avenue).
In February, City Manager
Tony Smith submitted an appli-
cation to the Office of Commu-
nity Revitalization in the amount
of $1.2 million focused on the
area outside the NSA. If
approved, the money is a large
step forward in the realization of
the city's goal in the rehabilita-
tior of the roads and sees the
appropriation of $400,000 annu-
ally for the next three years. City
officials are hopeful that the
money will be awarded.
In the meantime, the county


lost in the routing system at the
post office. The new size will
help to avoid that the bills "won't
be held at the post office" any
longer.
The size of the new bills will
also give the city the opportunity
to send important information to
its residents on the card itself.
The bigger benefit, though,
Mr. Shallman told commission-
ers, is the extra money the city
will be saving in producing and
mailing the invoices. The annual
projected savings in postage and
materials is approximately


In each of the cases, officers
have noted the woman's uncon-
cerned attitude when confronted
with the charges.
Surprised at the fact that the
vehicle did not kill the child, Police
Chief Calipto Gonzalez said it had
been the soft mud that lessened
the impact of the truck against the
child's small frame.
"It was a miracle that she sur-
vived," he said. He said he was per-
haps most disturbed at the mother,
who he said remained, "cold, just
cold," through the ordeal.
According to the chief, the
police department notified the
Department of Children and Fami-
lies, which is expected to take fur-
ther action.


Courtesy photo
Susan Robertson


has stepped up, with Commis- pare ddwn the figure and con-
sioner Masilotti once again tak- centrate on the most pressing
ing the initiative to work with the aspects of the road construction.
city and pledging $100,000 The cost of the sidewalk in
annually for the next three years the estimate is shown as a sepa-
through his district gas tax fund rate figure, according to repre-
to begin work on the roads. Mr. sentatives with the road and
Masilotti also referred the city to bridge division, and is contin-
the county's road and bridge gent on sufficient right-of-way
division for engineering assis- being available. The figure
tance and design for roads locat- decreases without that addition.
ed outside the NSA; essential n any event, city officials are
services in furthering the city's In event, city officials are
work-on the issue. preparing for the positive result
Together, both funding of the application submission
sources represent $500,000 for the availability of the money
sonurcesfrtepr oadnw$and continue to reinforce their
enough, the city hopes, to deliv- ues ptoaguinrk t ugh the
er on their promise to residents
to work on fixing the roads. In a joint letter from Mayor
Representatives with the road Clarence Anthony and Mr.
and bridge division had been Smith, the two thanked Comn-
working on estimates for the missioner Masilotti for his help
proposed street improvements in addressing the condition of
outside the NSA a job com- the roads.
pleted late last month. Estimates "I commend you for your
provided include overlays to sensitivity and understanding of
improve ride ability throughout the needs and problems of the
the streets, and for complete Glades, in general, and South
reconstruction, including muck Bay, in particular. On behalf of
removal. The figures also includ- the commission, staff and resi-
ed the addition of five-inch side- dents of this city, we sincerely
walks for the roads. In total, the thankyou for assisting
amount is approximately $3.3 this community in modernizing
million. The city may decide to the streets and helping to
extend the initial money, as they enhance the quality of life in this
will inside the NSA, to as far as it municipality," read the joint let-
will go in order of priority, or ter.


$10,000. The figure does not
include the labor savings associ-
ated with eliminating the
reminder notices, he added.
Initially, the city will absorb a
one-time cost of $5,000 to cre-
ate, program and format the
invoices in the city's system, a
figure that will be offset by the
savings the new system will pro-
duce. It will pay for itself in the
first year of implementation.
Also, the reminder notices is
sometimes cause for confusion
in the due date. for the cus-
tomers' payments, city staff


noted. A single bill that also
includes the last 13 months'
worth of activity should help in
establishing a more fluid system
at city hall.
"Since the city began issuing
reminder utility notices, there
has been no measurable
improvement in customer satis-
faction, nor reduction in com-
plaints," informed Mr. Shallman.
"Staff feels that the new invoices,
coupled with a renewed effort at
providing superior customer
service will help to resolve both
issues."


nity. The program serves children
aged 10-18 and space is still avail-
able. Call for more information or
stop in to pick up an application.
Location: 7450 State Road 15,
Pahokee (behind RCMA). Tele-
phone: (561) 924-7947.

FCAT tutoring
The Urban League is hosting a
Weekend Warriors program at the
Weed and Seed Building, 224
Southwest 5th Street in Belle Glade.
The tutoring program pays special
attention to preparing students for
the FCAT test and will be held Sat-
urdays, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ele-
mentary and middle school stu-
dents are invited to participate. The
Weed and Seed Program also
offers parenting classes and a youth
mentoring program. For more
information, please contact Car-
leen Downing, 996-4220.

Children of promise
Christians reaching out to socie-
ty introduces their new C.O.P. pro-
gram, Children of Promise, to pro-
vide mentors for children having a
parent in the prison system. Both
children and mentors are needed
for the program. Please call Lee
Washington to refer a child needing
a mentor or a volunteer to be a
mentor at (561) 602-6146 (Glades
area). Background screening and
training are required.

Family counseling

available
Drug'saddiction can leave an
individual feeling helpless and out
of control, especially if you are the
family member or friend of an
addict. Narconon Arrowhead can
help. Narconon offers free counsel-
ing, assessments and referrals to
rehabilitation centers nationwide
by calling (800) 468-6933 or log
onto www.stopaddiction.com.
-Don't wait until it's too late. Call
Narconon now.


Rabies vaccinations
offered on Saturday
Palm Beach County's Animal
Care and Control Division is now
offering rabies vaccinations an addi-
tional day per week Saturdays.
Vaccinations will be given on Satur-
days between the hours of 10 am.-
4:30 p.m. at the Palm Beach County
Animal Care and Control shelter at
7100 Belvedere Road in West Palm
Beach. This will be a benefit to cus-
tomers who work Monday through
Friday and would otherwise have to
take time off from their jobs during
the week to get their pets vaccinat-
ed. Rabies shots will continue to be
administered between the hours of
11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday. If you have any questions,
please call (561) 233-1272 Cus-
tomer Services/Adoptions.

ECMHSP accepts
enrollment
East Coast Migrant Head Start
Project (ECMHP) is now accepting
enrollment applications. ECMHSP
is a federally funded non-profit
organization that serves migrant
workers' children ages six weeks to
five years. For more information or
for an application, please contact
Rosa or Maria at (561) 996-2232,
Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m. or visit us at
2050 Duda Rd. in Belle Glade.

ESOL classes
Through a grant from the J.P.
Morgan Foundation, GCDC is offer-
ing ESOL Classes for Haitian and
Hispanic residents in the Glades
community. These classes will be
held in the following locations. St.
Mary's Catholic Church-1200 E.
Main Street, Pahokee-Father John
Marricante, Priest; 1st Haitian Bap-
tist Church-200 S.W. Avenue B.
Belle Glade-Rev. Morales St. Hil-
iare, Pastor. Mary Ann Rogers-Bell
is the instructor for these classes.
Residents interested in attending
should contact Carmen Canales,
Elisabeth Joseph or Hilaria Cama-
cho at GCDC, (561) 992-9500.


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BEDROOM g DINING ROOM
SUITES SUITES

LIVINGROOM ODDS

SUITES 6 ENDS





A 0


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005









Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


1Lmur dWA


A T


I


a I


This is a special announcement to area residents! This is your

chance to go straight to the wholesaler! You will not pay retail!

Cars starting as low as $2,995!




Fleet Liquidators One of the nation's largest automobile whole-

salers, is announcing a one of a kind event being held at

Clewiston Old Kmart Parking Lot in Clewiston FL.




Due to our overwhelming success, major corporations all over

the country contract Fleet Liquidators to liquidate their excess

inventory. Due to the downward trend of travel, 2 major car com-

panies have excessive inventory that must be sold! Fleet

Liquidators has been ordered to conduct a final close-out of mil-

lions of dollars worth of inventory- Regardless of Loss of Profit!




#36 TERM CENTRIX NRSCRR NEXTEL CUP


SERIES CRR WILL BE RT THIS EVENT


SATURDAY


ONLY LOCATED AT


7 955 WEST SUGARLAND HWY -TWISLN oL )43


THE OLD K-MART PARKING OT







w w.gladesmotors.com Toll Free Hotline: 1(800)579-084


-- o


tOO


BUICK 01
BUICK 91
CHEVROLET 98
CHEVROLET 04
CHEVROLET 02
CHEVROLET 01
CHEVROLET 02
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 01
CHRYSLER 02
DODGE 03
DODGE 02
DODGE 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 05
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 97
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 92
FORD 93
FORD 03
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 01
FORD 01
FORD 00
FORD 03
FORD 99
FORD 01
FORD 01
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 04
FORD 03


vehifcltes must


Over,


CENTURY
LESABRE
ASTRO
IMPALA
MALIBU
PRIZM
SILVERADO 1500
CARAVAN
CONCORDE LX
PT CRUISER
DURANGO
DURANGO
NEON
E350 XLT
ECONOLINE El 50
ECONOLINE E350
ESCAPE
ESCAPE
ESCAPE
EXCURSION
EXCURSION
EXCURSION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION
EXPL SPORT TRAC
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPLORER SPORT
EXPRDITION 4X2
F150
F150
F150
F150
F150
F150
F150
F150
F150
F150
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F250
F25


250


BLUE
BLACK
SILVER
BLUE
WHITE

BLUE
GRAY
BLUE
RED
WHITE
WHITE
TAN
SILVER
GREEN
BLACK
WHITE



BLUE

WHITE
BLACK
GOLD
RED
BLUE
RED
WHITE
GREY

GOLD
WHITE
BLACK
WHITE
BLACK
WHITE



GREEN
GRAY
WHITE
WHITE
BLACK



BLUE
BLACK

WHITE
WHITE
BROWN
WHITE
RED


be soeld


ve hIicles


FORD 04
FORD 01
FORD 04
FORD 93
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 05
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 02
FORD 01
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 96
FORD 03
FORD 96
FORD 04
FORD 02
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 00
FORD 02
FORD 03
FORD 03
FORD 01
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 04
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD OS
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 05
FORD 99
FORD 98
GMC 93
GMC 00
HONDA 99
HONDA 98
HONDA 01
HONDA 98
HONDA 02
HYUNDAI04
HYUNDAI03
HYUNDAI04


during


to choo se


F250 WHITE
F250 EXT LARIAT RED
F3SO
F350
F350 BLACK
P350 SILVER
F350 BLUE
F-350 BLACK
F-450 WHITE
FOCUS GREY
FOCUS WHITE
FOCUS SILVER
FOCUS WHITE,
FOCUS SILVER
FOCUS WHITE
FOCUS RED
FOCUS SILVER
FOCUS RED
FOCUS
MUSTANG
MUSTANG GREY
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
MUSTANG
RANGER
RANGER BLUE
RANGER RED
RANGER WHITE
RANGER SILVER
SPORTTRACK
TAURUS
TAURUS
TAURUS / GOLD
TAURUS BLUE
TAURUS CHAMP
TAURUS SILVER
TAURUS WHITE
TAURUS GRAY
TAURUS BEIGE
TAURUS, BEIGE
TAURUS GOLD
TAURUS SILVER
TAURUS BEIGE
TAURUS MERLOT
TAURUS GOLD
TAURUS GOLD
WINDSTAR
WINDSTAR
SUBURBAN 2500
YUKON WHITE
ACCORD GOLD
CIVIC
CIVIC
CIVIC GREEN
CIVIC BLACK
ELANTRA WHITE
TIBURON GT RED
XG3SO


INFINITI
JEEP
JEEP
KIA
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
LINCOLN
MAZDA
MAZDA
MAZDA
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MERCURY
MITSUBISHI
MITSUBISHI
NAVISTAR INTL
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
OLDSMOBILE
PLYMOUTH
PLYMOUTH
PONTIAC
PONTIAC
PONTIAC
SATURN
SUZUKI
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
VOLKSWAGEN


thif o


from


01
02
99
01
04
99
01
02
03
02
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03
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01
96
03
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02
03
. 04
04
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03
03
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00
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01
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03
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00
01
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evn


G20 GOLD
CHEROKEE GRAY
GRAND CHEROKEE
SPORTAGE GRAY
AVIATOR
CONTINENTAL GRAY
CONTINENTAL WHITE
LS WHITE
LS SILVER
LS SILVER
MARK VIII GREEN
NAVIGATOR MAROON
NAVIGATOR
NAVIGATOR 4X4 SILVER
TOWN CAR BEIGE
TOWN CAR GREEN
TOWN CAR WHITE
TOWNCAR
MAZDA MPV ES SILVER
MELLENIUM
MPV
GRAND MARQUIS
MOUNTAINEER WHITE
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER SILVER
MOUNTAINEER GREEN
MYSTIQUE
SABLE .. WHITE
SABLE WHITE
TRACER' WHITE
VILLAGER WHITE
GALANT BLACK
MONTERO
WHITE
ALTIMA
ALTIMA GLE
MAXIMA
PATHFINDER RED
PATHFINDER WHITE
SENTRA GXE BLUE
ALERO GLS BLACK
RELIANT
VOYAGER SE FWD L/GREEN
FIREBIRD SILVER
GRAND PRIX GREY
GRAND PRIX GREEN
SC WHITE
AERIO BLACK
RUNNER SILVER
CAMRY LE BLUE
HIGHLANDER LTBLUE
RAV4
SIENNA BLUE
SOLARA SILVER
PASSAT WHITE


Down payments may vary for lender approval or including buy here, pay here. Limited quanity first come first served. With approved credit. Cehicle purchased, credit history and term determines down pay-
ment needed to reach $89 per month for first 3 months. Vehicles subject to prior sale. With beacon score of 750 or greater and monthly car noted may not exceed 15% of gross monthly income, 24 months
max term on select vehicles. All offers cannot be combined. All financed sales and leases subject to final lender approval


WEDNESDAY

JUNE 15 TH

10AM-7PM


IRL IRMNO NCO,



T CRR LIQUIDR
11


SUND77

JUNE_19TH

katan IOAM-SPM








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16, 2005


Senior happenings


Volunteer training
and opportunities
Faith in Action new volunteer
orientation will take place in
LaBelle June 28 at 2 p.m., and in
Clewiston at the Clewiston
Senior Center June 30 at 2 p.m.
Bring a friend. Faith in Action
program in Clewiston is still col-
lecting blankets to equip the Per-
sons with Special Needs Shelter
at John Boy auditorium. To help,
bring a new twin-sized blanket
to our Clewiston Senior Center
next to the auditorium between
8-5, M-F. Call Liz at (863) 983-
7088 for more information.

Flea market
The next Trash and Treasures
Flea Market will take place June


24, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
L.J. Nobles Senior Center in
Labelle. For more information or
to make a donation, call (863)
675-1446. All proceeds to benefit
the Faith in Action in Labelle
program.

Upcoming meetings
and events
Family Caregiver Support
Groups in June will feature the
new Social Security Medication
Program information. Join us to
learn about the new medication
program and get assistance fill-
ing out the paperwork properly.
The next meeting will take place
in Labelle June 15, at 4 p.m. at
the L.J. Nobles Senior Center,
(863) 675-1446; in Clewiston


June 22, at 4 p.m. at the Clewis-
ton Senior Center, (863) 983-
7088; in Moore Haven June 29 at
4 p.m. at the Moore Haven
Senior Center, (863) 946-1821.

Exercise classes
Exercise classes are every M-
W-F at LJ Nobles Senior Center
from 9-10 a.m. All are welcome.

Free services
to help elders
Insurance counseling with a
trained SHINE (Seniors Helping
with Insurance Needs of Elders)
counselor is available every
Wednesday morning free of
charge at Nobles Center and in
Moore Haven at Senior Connec-
tions offices.

Legal help
Legal help from Florida Rural


Legal Services is available at the
Nobles Senior Center in LaBelle
on the second Wednesday of
each month from 9:30-11:30
a.m. (Must call 675-1446 to
make appointment)

Post disaster
help for older adults
Disaster funds are still avail-
able to help older adults living in
Hendry and Glades Counties
who continue to need assistance
with such issues as roof repair,
debris removal, insurance
deductibles, appliance repair or
replacement, chore work, etc.
Elders in need of help due to the
hurricanes of last summer can
speak with a specially trained
outreach worker in Clewiston
on Monday and Tuesdays, (983-
7088) and LaBelle Wednesday
through Friday (675-1446.)


Beat the rush for required immunizations


TALLAHASSEE Officials
for the Florida Department of
Health urged parents to make
sure their children receive the
required immunizations before
the next academic school year.
Immunizations are vital to the
health and welfare of all Floridi-
ans especially children.
"Our children's health should
be our number one priority,"
said DOH Secretary John 0.
Agwunobi, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H.
"Ensuring your child's health
through proper immunizations,
is the best start you can give him
or her for a successful school
year."
Before children can register


for school, parents must provide
documentation (Department of
Health Form 680, Certification of
Immunization) showing proof
of vaccination against diphthe-
ria, tetanus, pertussis, measles,
mumps, rubella, varicella
(chickenpox), hepatitis B,' and
polio diseases.
Florida's effort to increase the
number of fully immunized chil-
dren continues to show positive
results. The recent goal of
immunizing 85 percent of two-
year old children this year was
exceeded, and new goals are
being established.
State officials point to Florida
SHOTS (State Health Online


Tracking System), the statewide
immunization registry, as a valu-
able tool in helping the state
reach immunization goals. The
mission of Florida SHOTS is to
develop public and private part-
nerships between health care
providers to share electronic
immunization data. This infor-
mation will be used as a tool to
increase and maintain child-
hood immunization levels, and
to help eliminate vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases.
Not only does Florida SHOTS
house immunization data, it also
helps health care providers iden-
tify children who are due or past
due for vaccinations, and facili-


states providers quick access
to a child's vaccination history to
determine the vaccines needed
on a particular visit.
For more information on all
back-to-school immunization
requirements, visit the Depart-
ment of Health's Web site at
www.doh.state.fl.us, and click
the immunization services link.
For additional information on
how to obtain required vaccina-
tions, contact your health care
provider or your local health
department. For more informa-
tion on Florida SHOTS, visit
www.flshots.com.


Senator Bullard's


staff to meet with


area constituents

Legislative session and future

economic development on agenda


Miami -.Senator Larcenia
J. Bullard (Dem.), District 39
will have staff in attendance at
the Belle Glade City Hall Com-
mission Chambers Monday,
June 13, at 5:30 p.m. for a post
2005 legislative session town
meeting. The senator's staff
will discuss highlights of the
recently completed legislative
session that affect Belle Glade,
South Bay and Pahokee.
Additionally, the Tri-Cities
Area has been designated a
rural area of economic con-
cern by Governor Jeb Bush.
This designation makes avail-
able funds, through the Rural
Economic Development Initia&
tive (REDI). Invited to partici-


pate in a discussion of the
areas future and how residents
can benefit are Mary Helen
Blakeslee, executive director
of REDI; Maurice Brazier of the
Small Business Association,
and Ted Kramer of the Small
Business Development Center
of Florida Atlantic University's
(FAU) School of Business. The
city hall is located at 110 Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.,
West Belle Glade, FL. Resi-
dents of South Bay, Pahokee,
Belle Glade and neighboring
areas are welcome to attend.
You may contact the office of
Senator Bullard at (305) 668-
7344 for additional informa-
tion.


CCCS provides the keys.to home ownership


WEST PALM BEACH -
Home is where the heart is, and
the path to home ownership
should include realistic goals,
sound advice, careful planning,
and a clear understanding of the
costs involved. The time you
spend preparing for home own-
ership is as important an invest-
ment as the home you purchase,
and will help ensure that you
make the best choices for you
and your family.
To help you on your path,
Consumer Credit Counseling
Service of Palm Beach County &
the Treasure Coast is offering
free workshops for prospective
homeowners. During the six-
hour workshop, you will assess
your readiness for homeowner-
ship, take a realistic view of the
costs involved in purchasing and
maintaining a home and evalu-
ate your credit and financial situ-
ation to determine how much
house you can really afford.
You will also learn about the
various mortgage options and
what to look for in a lender, and
explore the tremendous benefits
of home ownership, from stabi-
lized housing costs and appreci-
ation to the many tax benefits.
Workshops scheduled
through September include:
June 29 and 30: 6-9 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB-)


July 16: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Com-
munity Foundation (700 S. Dixie
Hwy., WPB)
July 25 and 26: 6-9 p.m. Boyn-
ton Beach Community Dev.
Corp. (2191 North Seacrest, BB)
August 20: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)
September 10: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB)
September 24:10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Community Foundation (700 S.
Dixie Hwy., WPB) IN SPAN-
ISH, ". ,, i .
To register, call (866) ,616-
3720. En espa-ol, (866) 616-
3719.
CCCS also offers free individ-
ual housing counseling sessions
by appointment; call (800) 330-
CCCS (2227).

About CCCS
Since 1975, families have'
turned to Consumer Credit
Counseling Service (CCCS) of
Palm Beach County & the Trea-
sure Coast for help with money
problems. CCCS is a nonprofit,
community service agency dedi-
cated to empowering con-
sumers to achieve a lifetime of
economic freedom. A United
Way partner, CCCS provides
free, confidential budget coun-
seling, community and personal
money management education,


debt management programs,
and comprehensive housing
counseling.
CCCS is accredited by the
Council on Accreditation of Ser-
vices for Families and Children
and is a member of the Better
Business Bureau and the Nation-
al Foundation for Credit Coun-
seling (NFCC). Governed by a
community-based board of
directors, CCCS is funded by
creditors, clients, contributors
and grants from foundations,
business and government agen-
cies. Service is available in Eng-
lish, and Spanish. CCCS has,
offices in West Palm Beach and'
Boca Raton, with satellite serv-


ice in Stuart and Port St. Lucie,
and offers around the-clock help
by phone at (800) 330-CCCS or
at www.cccsinc.org.

CCCS of Palm Beach County
& the Treasure Coast is a mem-
ber of the CredAbility Network, a
family of agencies serving con-
sumers in south Florida, north
Georgia, middle Mississippi and
east Tennessee. Florida head-
quarters is in the Community
Foundation Building in West
Palm Beach. Please contact us
any time our virtual office is
always, open at
www.cccsinc.org or (800) 330-
CCCS.


Build your dream home on this prime location in LaBelle. .50+/-
acre on CR 78 across from waterfront park and the
Caloosahatchee River. $155,000.
Call 863-517-0977


Farm Bureau, Tobacco


Growers Association offer


seminar on buyout options


Florida Farm Bureau Federa-
tion is partnering with the Flori-
da Farm Bureau Insurance com-
panies, the Florida Tobacco
Growers, Association and Farm
Bureau Bank to inform tobacco
growers and quota holders
about buyout options at a semi-
nar Thursday, June 23. The semi-
nar will begin at 6 p.m. at
Cheryl's Restaurant in Live Oak.
"Florida Farm Bureau is
proud of its role in achieving a
tobacco quota buyout," said
Kevin Morgan, director of the
Agricultural Policy Division.
"The buyout is now a reality and
will benefit our growers and the
communities where they live
and work."
Now that the buyout is a reali-
ty, Florida Farm Bureau is con-
centrating on providing growers
and quota owners with informa-
tion about options that will max-
imize profitability and minimize
tax burdens. At the June 23 sem-
inar, Larry Lanie, president of
Farm Bureau Bank, will discuss
options, including lump-sum
settlements.
The financial service is being
made available to all tobacco
growers and allotment holders.
The Farm Bureau Bank settle-
ment plan will allow buyout
recipients to be paid for the full
amount of their buyout pro-
ceeds through a single transac-
tion, less the cost to the bank of
financing the upfront payment.
Also at the seminar, a tax spe-
cialist will be available to answer
questions.
There is no registration
charge for the seminar, but reg-


istration is required by June 10.
Seating is limited. To register,
growers and quota holders
should contact Patti Brothers at
(352) 374-1544. Each registrant
should provide his/her name,
mailing address, phone and e-
mail address if available, and
indicate the total number of indi-
viduals attending from his/her
operation.
Farm Bureau is offering the
financial settlement through
Farm Bureau Bank as a service
to tobacco growers and allot-
ment holders. The Florida Farm
Bureau Federation will not
receive any compensation from
the plan.
"We are working to ensure
that, as a result of competition in
the marketplace, farmers will
receive the highest return possi-
ble for their buyout payments,"
Morgan said.
The Florida Farm Bureau Fed-
eration is the state's largest gen-
eral-interest agricultural associa-
tion with more than 150,000
member-families statewide.
There are Farm Bureaus repre-
senting 64 counties in Florida,
where agriculture comprises a
stable, vital leg of Florida's econ-
omy, rivaling the tourism indus-
try in economic importance.
Headquartered in Gainesville,
the Federation is an independ-
ent, non-profit agricultural
organization and is not associat-
ed with any arm of the govern-
ment. More information about
Florida Farm Bureau is available
on the organization's Web site,
http://FloridaFarmBureau.org.


Call anytime to anywhere in the nation.


uther monthly charges apply.


~Sprin1.


When you subscribe to a qualifying Sprint Solutionss" Standard plan, you can call
your friends and family just because. In the middle of the day. A weekday. Talk
about everything. Talk about nothing. With Sprint, you get unlimited nationwide
long distance. Even to Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam and the US Virgin Islands.
A clear, reliable connection. An affordable price. From a company you can trust.




Call 1-877-Sprint-2. Click sprint.com/local.


"Price excludes taxes and surcharges (including a carrier universal service charge of 11.1%, which may vary by month, carrier-cost-recovery surcharge of $0.99 and certain in-state surcharges).
Surcharges are not taxes or government-required charges. Offer: Must subscribe to a Sprint Solutions" Standard plan. If Sprint Solutions Standard plan is cancelled, the standard monthly fee for
unlimited long distance will apply and varies by state. Offer subject to change or cancel without notice. Additional restrictions may apply. Unlimited Nationwide Long Distance: For residential
voice service usage only. State-to-state and international long-distance services are governed by Sprint Terms & Conditions of Service. Local and in-state long-distance (including local toll) services
are governed by the applicable state tariffs and/or state terms and conditions of service. Monthly fee does not include usage for Directory Assistance, foncard' service or operator services. Service
not intended for commercial use, Internet, data or facsimile service. If Sprint determines that usage is not consistent with residential voice conversation, the service may be assessed a data usage
fee or disconnected. US residents only. Dial-1 service only. Calls to 900, 986, 555 and 700 NPAs are not considered unlimited interstate and intrastate Dial-1 calling. Monthly fee includes one phone
line. Customer's first invoice will include a partial monthlyfee and the first month billed in advance. International rates vary, and surcharges may apply, including surcharges on residential calls made to
foreign mobile phones. Call 1-888-255-2099 for international rates. Additional in-state and universal service charges will apply. Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls made from pay
phones in the US will be assessed a surcharge. All rates subject to change. Additional requirements and restrictions may apply. Some services included in previous calling plans may not be included
when converting to new unlimited long-distance plan. Contact Sprint fordetails. 2005 Sprint. All rights reserved. Sprint and the diamond logo are trademarks of Sprint Communications Company L.P


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


--


i I










T syJn 12 5ei teo u238 N. Bridge St. LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-8868
Lisa Andrews Lie. Real Estateu Broker
Associates: Rose Mason, Dwight Hatfield,
Sandra Alexander, James Tanner, Roxana
F lo l Cisneros, Linda Dekle I)avis Kevin Nelson
llit G roup u. Ih ..........i ...s..ntforidart......altis. om,.nm


Place your Call A Pro

today for only

$10 per week!

Call Lauren or Melissa at

863-983-9148, 863-946-

0511 or 561-996-4404


A NO ONE WILL WORK HARDER FOR YOU THEN
JAMIE NAVARRO GIVE HIM A CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
REAM, C. BAGANS FIRST
ORLD 30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936


I'VE SOLID) ALL MY

LISTINGS FAST!

LEIT ME SiLL

YOURS FAST TOO!

ml. S


VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WA'.OAKREALTYINC.COM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS SALES
CINDY L ALEXANDER
LIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
ASSOCIATES: EDITH MILLER
AND TIM SPENCER
675-0500



NEW LOCATION
I 1233 N. BRIDGE ST
IN C *ON THE CORNER OF

ttl SI X' t"!'. 0M'I'0 ill XiaS
1-_\RGE V2; 1 IN PORT I'A\ILE $S800I.M. tCRI ACE roR ii.uE
\() PI'S A MUST SELE! This 4kBd:2ltl.h mantufac
nHO, I.ofi n IV: rt-red home with carport on 3/- acres,
N\V I JSTFING \ I'OR I\-ABEH.II ihis includes lireplacc, breakfast nook. retiat offl
, 'it I o.,n 1' f iti ;* hi,- ;its on inasta hediroon i, [iolt and hack poivh,
t.al -l!h1\ !asn'l'.i :" I I,,[ t nd r h l>troperiy also hias 2,100 sq. fr barn. (Ctall todAly
prlztigcq o 2i : 11; .."..ij 'l ii ii r xcel i nh- t.Ii r. [ .i.,,'.,i, ri i .;- .;. '<2'? ,900.
tatid with hiipd. u ,';-p1,c \ing IN l l l l ilR I \I111 lANk. 101
$135,000. Acires +*- wilh wood frai hoiise. Heing sold
FBEI)ROOM\"2BATHf/I CAR GARt GE sits "-As Is- Call for nor details
oIn Ixeattutil rCici ln li !' with On ilt Ilecs COMv11riAL
.and jiisI a hlock ,i a',.v I n the II cO irse a i \ll I I i .1 .. d
t n. I MS lIuM A I Xig tIC Lr v. ii h t r .;[liSt not,x .. I .I ., il i I I : t*11 ilill
anid c 'c l ,li .\sl; g ,$189,9l00. lOT. )it FOR AI
11tl);211ATH 2 car gIt .ii in', '.itse Si, on BUSINSlSESS L.OT onl ordson Avenue with old
S app s i l. uiiidii' oi'k "As i ,..,. iil 'ili'
ii ... I aSis i ,t -. ului I .OTS AVAllABLE 1 '. II1('. li 'V\1
I II1111,,11 ,. -i ,, ',It IBuh ( 0 1 i mI1 :. ... .. si, 1 0 ,
i RS h'omk Mif... .- I lctro s,!klI ( I1 il',k \ I I' ill \. \IIABIE LOTS
S ',i i IN PORT IABfII.F.
Sl l 'i .lli III I I I I I'l 1 I -.11 i I I 1. 1 1;
I ,. pE.fil|i G. ,11 ',, -. ,Iii


-~nvsu1weti-.ura ygop'o
SF. HmiaeA ENPA'sOL


HOMES.

HOBIIME HSMLi.
* $249,000 i .:It ,'. ', t icanimil home.
* 'l.iOI 211B1)SIM8 iTifbiic home o 5 arc,
lhx's fcIstl, haSlot l S sl i pN1 !(n aindJ h ne stall,
* $160,000 HA21d t (ilec hoie witt lh firelApc,
s ot' x+i. ai, cn ithib. panty., frladl ditinhng tm .2.ad
wAk-in dfset.
*.i I Mtfis Tl, obilee
* $119,900 itsDi2Bl O',21 Amnutitlwcn.td hnme ea.
t!fts kM'Sics ,il lsaftttd, ttr aand abiJnct toragec
* $119,000 I Hard to imd 3B11,2BII manualiurcl
loi'ne on 1+ + +. sa .ith finccd backarIl.




* 1,02500 -'51+i, saudedts o trees
fm* o two6ds owefrt-ildivide, S
* $79,900 War11hu)/2, &dobi home aon 1ai+/c in


tiftcllth.
* ,1 Hw27 Jwtage.Curreidy an Auo




Salva, yaw...
* $1025,600- 1 +/-,ckr sa'luide !2eutifulr20
at'rc ps on Owt' r als oIs nr will tI Dont ss
* $998,025 tRirelt uoe & oflace ..n 1.38"1-} acre.
One .1f a kinil :til, Snalage yari. Or2niz.ed with clean
hill it, health.
* $668,500 H.s" 27 Ironuig. C;rrentho an AItI)
Salv'abe t01 .-
* $30,000 A c:n:(S tin, riot -iigt, tl! 2 heaulitil 20
ar5 iwtaies oIT Iet- tlcanch ots Of ts'es! DI)I't iast


*$300A00([ d s, t e-will in~mc, ti- v


*$55.000 -t.I5W+,. ttin w usl!won l's,uwv p c


- $38,000-.1,25+, 1' r. IXo1II,,l',l',tl ainlgc
coral In ttontttra B s InI5ucs,




*$33.9'SM C5TAK
$72,900 .2F '- i 5 Iirir.L tg cal




*~ ~ qr-9I ~ IXr n
Ealk Cte ~ tA~

LisleLI~


/ J ^Home

Builders

Port LaBelle

Exciting New Plans

Homes from Mid $100S

Spec Homes Available Now
















Lots Available, Seller Financing

Visit Our Model Center

2480 East State Road 80
863/612-0551

www.chlhomebuiiders.com


* This 3BR/.i mainfititrcdur home is in pris-
ttI ccdlitdoIW' Y .'ou will i is iovc with this
home thie mirtit: you step foot on this oak
filled property. Ca!l lor a private showing
tay x Wfo cm it's too late' Only $132,500.

gI _1 Ik.allM "m _|
* Solace at 1asr..tBR/2 home in LaBedkc,
i p i 2 1 1 r, i enor-
U NI ER eONTRD In caLi
rets Outsidke is a spacious screened porch,
fenced iack yard &. above ground pool.
RF tDUC i $195,900.
S? i ^. ..... .split
$149.900.L
* \\:hat a deal! 31BR;l51, CBS home in .alilelle
'olvy mhiccsl. ,i '," ., T T iFeaturesinclude
necw cer.mi icL. 'i. i-. a'nd Iots moe..
Only $147,900.
* Comly county living in this wonderfully
reNoIVatCLd chIarmi'er This 221RB id Florida
crackc Iomt in Orona sitsoon 772 acres and
is in Pristine condition trulv a Imust seec
$144,900.
* bedroom hon.ic in the BIl nont Sulx[ivision
with 2 htill hiths & 2 hall iahs. This homie
S i I r I'lDO ll h' ',I'

it ,'l for only $129,900


* Gulf access by community dock! Fr,'iii,
Sir :., -. i ,i s ri -h 1 ,. U l '.. i
lI-. a' '1.1 ,< ',.II f M .1ni t.inr dJ A IN N1"
mobile homoe i ii. li :i itl i.iiiin Ba' on
Pine Island C an'r ,,rit p.- I ,, -' I r
miss thisco=yr.hii, .:.. ,,.'$1 tY.911
i,. I I I i. ,I' i.. ,'lop 'p ,, j
S ,. '14 ,l ir, ilr i.. Ai i,4. h.-, .n 1 -
acres wi a great coui.ntry feel but only minutes
from town. $137,000
* This 3BR/J2B manufaetured home is in pris-
tine condition! You will fall in love with this
home the minute you step foot on this oak
filled property Call for a private showing
odavy before i.I ,e l.i1' I i, 112.500
* "W 'ell kept J ul1,I i i,l' Ialn' .- n '2 Il
ac F r, !i, ,i c,.ir,l p ,,_i !,r- >e
r. .r ir. i h.,ir t, ., .';I i.. .if l l-P ..fhl
S11.] Ti, a1iul.,[iurI.lh.,hm on 2 4i- -. res
lea ore ihlet r. c
walls. ., X ,,ifLU SllIklr,
master i ,r I 5I ,'0l
* Bty, r I l s. it ,I i l.* \
good place to start is with this 3BrilB manu,
Ii. .:,i.,- Itome sitting on spectacular 2ae cor-
nc).. I, t In 1llQ1,90 l.
* i' LL i lion,.. 1.-.
to I., I, i gll t l'
12',I '4 1lt InJ ul
$97,900.
* 4IBR'2 nnluactued hone with over 1.700

; u.ir, i ,1h U' I n, 1d I i[ O l)si]| 5Itl


* Partially cleared 5+i- acres on Case Rd,
$224,900.
* Beautiful homesite partial cleared 5+/-
acres on Case Road. $224,900.,
* I i I r. 'i,l ,, i lu., -don'tlet this


otk .r 5 acres o a paved road ior only
* Ieautiful wooded 12i+/' ac on Jasmine St.
in Monrra. Great for investment or homesite.
Only $46,000.
* Wooded 1.25+ acre. Lot in Montura.
$42,500,
* 125I UNi 1 OliMaWICT


.- _.. J
* Beautiful 25+/-acre comer lot in downtown
l.II, I. ". atr nr p [ 11 Currently zoned for
Juil L ,' ,in l. fir .j v. : hi '. of
1 1 .i.llii 1[ t',: [r, !r I i lh
* I 2 .J.IL'L 4 ., P,. -I I r $126,000.
* Hard au Sla Belle.
s84.0O0 nlillll0w llu ih wIl!
* 2 Lehigh Acre lots zoned for duplex. Great
rra tir i l1,r: I | l I. t ln, -',~N. 1O li.'h
* I l2 i ..a I', r m l t r- ; lU .' l, ii.nl !. '7
.nr ; .' r l7in ', t un' i .'
$54,900 each.
*Cottic Il,.[I i n I,t I2" i2- ,.u tleautiful
lotlfor; o 'n .-, h' r .. ',4 90I
* Triple lt in knit 6. $49,900 each
* )Doible lot in t'r it $4 411 i-. h
* L ir i I i,[ n Port LaBle $49,900.
0 2 lots i Wll lltliti jni L102.
$47,500.ac.
* 2 I iare rd
$42,0001 ..
* 1 1- 4N I O built

., .. ,i.



* 1.18- acres zoncd C-1 comnmerdal just
South of LaaBelle city limits with 175+ feet of
frontage on SR29 and frontage on Lckey
EI[ lOt in .4 l"OiW


I-


A DrAinclnve 061% 9130H H-Nlon
IInpon'e-efin-ce Inaiu-eiej3bfd-mnh,rE.
ealudgro"Is Lot~e in t Hnit rd.N- 3-1da
pipete, npqrlopd ool fltf,,MIfd rr-.1111lt
fleat i'oV'i h afjr.Lm teei t*.w
t. .,, CMCeICU '1.1. cMrPCrl. r-.PP role BainAlt
a rA .%Il loi .A. ta',nt,1""'W b e
jrn 'rone ,onaf l aose dww-31 osI I ,St'i
A Distinctive Oak-Shaded Home 6atsdalle tIi')56 lk'
,Bedrofn j 296MFrWf.m a a e i. ',* A,um aBaroot, '251.waon-.a.A4i '.54 is
fr,-49 T s o


3BRI213A CBS Hame!Ion I -I. mCrali [.t:a'a S 7'Caaii'a .w.a 'O.5Li


This Home is Perfea for a Gr w ir rltiy

$ 2 6 9 nz. I78h* i I









JV~2 %1 SQ)el338 A cre Bust'


... ic :' 4i i:?


Ear-t Fort Myers!
Extraordinary 3 Bedroom/2 Bath custom
intracoastal home located in a progres-
sive E Ft Myers riverfront Community
--.", ," ., oi..


3F.e.-,'.,an, )Rain,-,.ts, iS,,.; Cs,, i i; mist


BF~tifif't R'.Hfrnl Hv.,'E1:1IL In [bo~d Resltrictr ArmA
jBIA 84 Reoi anELt u
.~ -'a SI.-. fitS 3-, l CR I fBella 1l;4ALMf.







!mff., o& J



ieSLt A','3iSi tlx"'I .4 K ipB s ,ri c Li't


* *. r)~- )~-'.-/J I


Alva i'?ILER/CREEKFRONT HOME!
ONE-OF-A-KINDI 3Bedroom / 2
5Bathrooms / 3Garage Home Offered on
5+/- acres with 425' of riverfront
", V. -) % ,,


L iiaerinri anci Wooded, ia i-hi .L(.95-f.
ace hemiexsite 1 I(Is capa in le new
Gs'e n'ay.r. unity Lalokna Pre14ee~i
i-a~( 1C3~


xa-ad*fhDoats goby' ll' 1 1i,-' In La~ele' Only Giled Cor;nmunttyl
Fat v C wlo ron e~pansive reai ~de 17 ieBr IT


Thnia eaurtul oilAfillelIonlste inOrl f, Magnificent Towering Oaks'
jUbdiLdble 1110.llI/ Ao 3BR I 2BA ION 63.f ACRES
ifi-. ,O0!0 $2893,900


The Beauty You Long For! Development Potential! Build For Your Future
Lccalld in LeBalleon 2 1B8-1A Ms Located in LeBlll onr 511 -1.AAcres Loated in LsBelo on 2 55 -1. Acio
-4 .F .000 $1 ,895,000; $749,(,000


[Sherri Denning
Licensed-Real Estate Broker since 1985

Associates
i 1Vayne Mcquaig Lisa Herrero
Lisa Cleghorn Paul NIeador
Bonnie Denning, CPA Art Fry
Tracey Williams Greg Bone
Joyce Gerstman Jesse Wallace
SI Vone Ilalman
it -l m .


NEW
IA 67r B i -i|gE o :b rsln ie a




.you are thinking of buying or selling. give us a call! 19


{I


Commercial Potential
Located in Alva on 5 +1_ acres
$1 .900,000,


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


FELAYURED H i4m.











5 tal l n Amst vci l opinomt TI~nct Offfered in Parcels
.- .. .. Excellent VisIbility -'117 1 ae upwards, 236SJ ar wetlands


ply do not work to repel mosqui- Frontages 3 3.1on. 1.4 o o n the tritchangce 8 !*,6' on CR 557
toes. 1


Unless you just arrived from
another planet, you have proba-
bly noticed that summer rains
have begun to fill up our local
ditches canals and the chronic
wet spots in our Florida Yards.
Summertime has arrived, and
with it comes the "enjoyment" of
seeing and feeling the effects of
one of our unofficial state ani-
mals the mosquito.
Homeowners can play a role
in managing these pest popula-
tions, and today's column will
give you some tips on what you
can do in self-defense. Much of
this information comes to us from
Extension Specialist Dr. Roxanne
Rutledge of the University of Flori-
da's Medical Entomology Labora-
tory, which is located in Vero
Beach.
Dump Standing Water
Most but not all of our
pesky mosquitoes breed in
standing water. Even a small
amount of still water can provide
a place to a female mosquito to
lay a clutch of eggs and turn it
into a writhing mass of wrigglers.
Depending on the species, it may
only take a few days after a good
rainfall for the next generation to
emerge and look for bare flesh.
There are many water-holding
containers found in landscapes.
Can you get rid of them?Or, if you
do not want to remove them,
flush them out and replace the
water every 2-3 days. This will
remove mosquito larvae that are
in the container; larva will not'
live long out of water and will not
develop to the adult stage.
Here is a short list assembled
by Osceola County Master Gard-
ner Nancy Pfister and some ides
on how to deal with breeding


Summer rains likely to continue, forecast says


GAINESVILLE Recent rains
came just in time for Southeast-
ern cotton and peanut crops,
and farmers can look forward to
adequate rainfall throughout the
summer.
That's the word from the
Southeast Climate Consortium,
or SECC, which issues quarterly
forecasts to help farmers in
Alabama, Florida and Georgia
manage their crops.
"We had a wet start earlier in
the spring, but May was dry in
some peanut and cotton areas,"
said Clyde Fraisse, an extension
specialist and SECC researcher
at the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences in Gainesville.
"Peanut and cotton fields
were showing stress that could
have retarded plant develop-
.ment," Fraisse said.
The rest of the summer
should be hot, humid and hazy,
according to the SECC's summer
climate outlook, issued today.
"That's good news for agri-
culture throughout the .South-
east," Fraisse said.
Florida State University's Cen-
ter for Ocean-Atmospheric Pre-
diction Studies, or COAPS, pro-


duces the SECC climate fore-
casts. At the Tallahassee center,
researchers monitor surface
water temperatures in the Pacific
Ocean near the equator to pre-
dict potential weather effects in
the Southeastern United States.
Periodic warming or cooling
in those surface temperatures,
known respectively as El Ni-o
and La Ni-a, can affect U.S.
weather patterns. El Ni-os are
associated with increased winter
rainfall, while La Ni-as have the
opposite effect.
Currently, Pacific Ocean sur-
face temperatures are near nor-
mal, a situation..experts call a-
neutral phase, according to the
SECC. As with El Ninos and La
Ninas, ne!ihal phases affect
global weather, including condi-
tions in the Southeast.
"For the past two years, the
Southeast has been in a neutral
phase," said COAPS Director Jim
O'Brien. "People often assume
that a neutral phase will bring
average weather."
But, O'Brien said, that's not
necessarily true.
"Weather can be all over the
place from dry to wet or aver-
age in a neutral phase. Still,


there's currently no indication of
drought this summer, so
chances are good that crops will
have adequate moisture," he
said.
Rainfall in Jackson County,
Fla., averages 4.5 inches in May
of neutral-phase years. This year,
cotton plots monitored by the
Jackson County Extension Ser-
vice received only 1.7 inches of
rain during May, but received 2.2
inches in the first week of June
alone.
The SECC forecast of typical
summer conditions should help
peanut farmers use their
resources effectively, said John
Beasley, a University of Georgia
extension agronomist in Tifton.
"They know if there is a high-
er probability of rainfall they can
irrigate less, which saves
money," Beasley said. "On the
other hand, it's important for
them to keep up their fungicide
applications, since most dis-
eases thrive in wet conditions.
"We were in a neutral phase
last summer as well," he said.
"Peanut and cotton growers did
very well, and they're hoping for
another good year."
The forecast also indicates lit-


tle chance of wildfires this sum-
mer, due to three factors -
recent heavy rains, the likelihood
of a wet summer and the end of
the Southeast's traditional wild-
fire season, which runs from
January through early June.
SECC's fall outlook, due in
early September, will indicate
whether the neutral phase is
continuing, said David Zierden,
an SECC researcher at the Talla-
hassee center.
The consortium's Web site,
http://agclimate.org, is available
to the public and provides
monthly forecasts of rainfall and
temperature for all counties in
Alabama, Florida and Georgia.
Member institutions of SECC
are the University of Florida,
Florida State University, Universi-
ty of Miami, University of Geor-
gia, Auburn University and Uni-
versity of Alabama at Huntsville.
SECC is funded by the Nation-
al Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, the USDA Coop-
erative States Research, Educa-
tion and Extension Service and
the USDA's Risk Management
Agency.


"Freddy" to help hone hurricane preparedness


While the South Florida
Water Management District is
done monitoring tropical storm
Arlene, the first named storm of
the 2005 hurricane season, it is
also getting ready to hold its
yearly hurricane exercise to test
the District's preparedness. Next
Wednesday, June 15, Hurricane
Freddy will "strike" the District
with full force.
The annual "Hurricane Fred-
dy" exercise is scheduled from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., when Dis-
trict officials will rehearse
response and recovery plans.
The exercise will encompass the
District's 16-county jurisdiction
involving participation from
regional service centers and field


operations. Other agencies rep-
resented include the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection and Florida Power
and Light Co.
While Freddy is only an inter-
nal exercise for training purpos-
es, the storm will be a realistic
test for water managers. It is
designed to test district staff to
resolve complex issues under
crises conditions with district
resources and capabilities
stretched to the limit. Also partic-
ipating will be some of the agen-
cies who partner with the Dis-
trict in a real emergency, such as
Florida Power and Light, the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers and the


Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection.
The South Florida Water Man-
agement District is a regional,
governmental agency that over-
sees the water resources in the
southern half of the state 16
counties from Orlando to the
Keys. It is the oldest and largest


of the state's five water manage-
ment districts. The agency mis-
sion is to manage and protect
water resources of the region by
balancing and improving water
quality, flood control, natural
systems and water supply. A key
initiative is cleanup and restora-
tion of the Everglades.


mosquitoes:
Potted plants with pans -
Don't over water you plants, and
remove or turn the drip pan
upside down so it won't hold
water.
e Drainage ditches Remove
vegetation and obstructions to
water flow mosquitoes don't
like moving water.
Low spots that hold water
Fill and re-grade to move
standing water off your property.
Plugged roof gutters If they
haven't been blown away by the
storms, be sure to check them
and clean gutters clear of sticks,
leaves and other obstructions.
Pet dishes Change water
frequently.
Trash piles Remove or
cover them, but be sure that cov-
ers don't hold water in small
pockets.
Old tires Remove, dispose
of or cover tires, which are one of
the best places to grow mosqui-
toes.
Water holding containers -
Remove or cover pails, barrels,
grills, or even some kinds of plas-
tic play ground equipment.
* Poorly maintained pools or
spas Follow recommended
maintenance and keep up with
the pool chemical levels, which
kill mosquito larva.
Bromeliads Flush the hol-
low centers of these plants out
with a hose.
Tree holes Fill with sand
or concrete to keep water from
pooling inside or better yet,
remove these trees that will have
weakened trunks.
Debris on roofs Remove
debris; ripped and compromised
blue roof tarps can hold puddles


of water.
Ponds Keep them clear of
excessive aquatic vegetation, and
stock with minnows or tadpoles
to feed on the wrigglers.
Boats Cover or turn
upside down so the hulls don't
hold rainwater.
Birdbaths Flush at least
once per week.
If you must rely on chemical
control of breeding areas, or
insist on using pesticides to
reduce adult mosquitoes, please
check with us for the UF bulletin
on recommended, legal pesti-
cides.
Buying a Zapper?
Carefully evaluate the pur-
chase of mosquito control
devices. Dr. Rutledge has pio-
neered the evaluation of many of
the devices that are now on the
market to "eliminate" mosqui-
toes from your Florida Yard. Many
are not effective.
Some of these devices expel
carbon dioxide gas that attracts
these pests into a collection bag.
Research has not shown that they
actually eliminate local mosquito
populations. Other devices emit a
timed spray of insecticide. These
fail to consider differences in
mosquitoes and environmental
effects, and as a result will often
be too little, too late or kill a lot of
non-target organisms like birds,
pets and wildlife. They can also
lead to an increase pesticide
resistance among those mosqui-
toes that survive.
There are even devices being
sold that supposedly repel mos-
quitoes by emitting ultrasonic
waves. The Federal Trade Com-
mission has issued an order stop-
ping their sale because they sim-


Got Mosquitoes? Get DEET!
If you can avoid exposing
yourself to mosquitoes, do so.
Limit your outdoor activities
around dusk and dawn, when
mosquitoes are most likely to be
active. If you must be outside,
wear light colored loose fitting
long pants and long sleeved
shirts, complete with hats, and
use an effective mosquito repel-
lent.
Repellants containing
"DEET", an abbreviation for the
chemical name of the active
ingredient, work the best when
properly applied. Other "natural"
repellants such as citronella,
eucalyptus or picaridin (i.e. Skin-
so-SoftTM) will work for 20 min-
utes or so; some forms of DEET
can last for upwards of five hours.
Knowing how to apply and reap-
ply these repellents can make all
the difference in the world. Ask
for the recently revised UF bul-
letin, Mosquito Repellants if you
want the details.
A great place for mosquito
information is Dr. Rutledge's Web
page; I've placed a link to it and
more information on our Okee-
chobee Web page, http://okee-
chobee.ifas.ufl.edu chobee.ifas.ufl.edu/> If you
need additional information on
homeowner mosquito control,
email us at
okeechobee@ifas.ufl.edu or call
us at (862) 763-6469. Local resi-
dents can stop .by our office at
458 Hwy 98 North in Okee-
chobee, and visit our County
Master Gardeners from 1 to 5
p.m. on Tuesday afternoons.


Belle Glade
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I R u cID... -r, R) --


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___ to the Internet


OKEECHOBEE Louis E.
(Red) Larson, of Okeechobee, is
the Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo Flori-
da Farmer of the Year and will rep-
resent Florida in the competition
that will name the Southeastern
Farmer of the Year. Larson owns
and operates a large dairy farm in
Okeechobee.
Larson and his family were
selected as Florida Farm Bureau's
first Farm Family of the Year in
1977. In 1979 he was elected to
the Dairy Hall of Fame and two
years later was inducted into the
Florida Agricultural Hall of Fame.
The FFA Foundation presented
Larson with its Distinguished Ser-
vice Award in 1990 and the Palm
Beach Post named him the Dairy-
man of the Century in 1999.
Larson was nominated for the
Farmer of the Year award by Flori-
da Farm Bureau Assistant Director
of Field Services Tom Hill.
"It has been my privilege to


bring recognition to people such
as Red, who have done an out-
standing job for Florida agricul-
ture," said Hill. "Florida will have
a very strong candidate in the
Southeastern competition."
Larson will receive a cash
award of $2,500 for winning the
Florida competition. The South-
eastern winner will be
announced on Oct. 18 at the Sun-
belt Agricultural Exposition in
Moultrie, Ga. and will receive a
$14,000 cash award. The state
and Southeastern winners will
also receive additional prizes
from participating sponsors.
Sunbelt Agricultural Exposi-
tion, "North America's Premier
Farm Show," will run from Oct.
18-20. The show emphasizes
information, education and
implementation of the latest agri-
cultural technology. Information
about Sunbelt is available online
at http://www.sunbeltexpo.com.


Red Larson named

Lancaster/Sunbelt Expo

Florida Farmer of the year


Thursday, June 16, 2005


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'98 VOLVO S70 $ n
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'04 KIA SPECTRA $G ,99
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'03 PONTIAC GRAND AM $ 07900
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'02 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV. $4 f
GOLD, LOW MILES. STK#53870A........... 1,990
'02 DODGE STRATUS ES $1 990
SUNROOF, LEATHER, 20K MILES. STK#53895A...... I ,
'01 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE SPYDER GS $1 1 990
SILVER. STK#54285A ..............................................9


'99 LEXUS GS300 112,990
W HITE. STK#6064A ......................................... .
'03 PONTIAC AZTEK
BURGUNDY, LOW MILES. STK#50594A.... 12,990
'03 HONDA CIVIC 9 9
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'02 VW JETTA GLS TURBO
RED, SUNROOF. STK#53467A.......................... 13,990
'02 VW BEETLE GLS 13,990
SUNROOF, WHITE. STK#52924A..................
'05 HONDA ACCORD EX
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'04 LINCOLN LS
LOADED, 10K MILES. STK#6078A9.............. 9O,9, 0
'05 DODGE MAGNUM R/T HEMI .27,990
SILVER. STK#54478A......................................
'02 MERCEDES BENZ E320 $
GOLD, 29K MILES. STK#53334A.................... -8,99


'01 MAZDA MPV
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'02 CHRYSLER VOYAGER LX
SILVER, 31K MILES. STK#5961A................ .,990U
'03 FORD WINOSTAR sl 790
SILVER. STK#5-3986A 1,790
'02 CHEVROLET BLAZER 1 1990
STK#5926A 11,990
'02 JEEP LIBERTY 1
WHITE, AUTO. STK#54325B... ......................... 11 ,9 9 0
'03 DODGE DURANGO SLT 12,990
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'03 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 13990
SILVER. STK#5-3635A 13,990
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Five arrested in $2 million international scam


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist announced
the arrest of five individuals for their
involvement in an investment
scam that may have netted almost
$2 million from investors. The
defendants, who will be prosecut-
ed by the Attorney General's Office
of Statewide Prosecution, were
taken into custody on charges of
racketeering, conspiracy to com-
mit racketeering, 70 counts of
investment fraud, grand theft and
money laundering.
They are accused of operating
an investment scam that fraudu-
lently offered futures options on
the foreign exchange market but
never actually spent investors'
money for that purpose.
Victims of the scam would
receive unsolicited phone calls urg-
ing them to invest in futures
options on the foreign currency
exchange market. The victims
were promised lucrative returns on
their investments, and risk of loss


was minimized or glossed over by
the sellers. In addition, the callers
emphasized that time was of the
essence and the prospective
investors should immediately wire
money or send checks to a compa-
ny, which was actually operated by
those running the scam.
"Scams such as this one serve
to remind us that when something
seems too good to be true, it usual-
ly is," said Crist. "Investors should
always exercise the utmost caution
when choosing options that carry
such great financial weight,
because they can also carry great
financial risk."
Arrested were John Taddeo, 36,
of Lighthouse Point; Frank Desan-
tis, aka Josh Anthony, 38, of Light-
house Point; Erin Rose Desantis,
aka Erin Valko, 31, of Lighthouse
Point; Doreen Valko, 56, of
Coconut Creek, and Christopher
Boutchie, 36, of Coral Springs. The
Broward County Sheriff's
Office is still seeking Gavin Liv-


oti, 32, of Highland Beach, and
Daniel Ledoux, 40, of Richmond,
Virginia.
The five individuals were run-
ning the scam through a group of
four related companies: World
Banks Foreign Currency Traders,
Inc., International Investors Trad-
ing Group, Inc., and Compliance
and Customer Care, Inc., all based
in Florida, and International Invest-
ments Holding Corporation, an off-
shore company formed under
Bahamian laws. These companies
were established as part of the
criminal endeavor to defraud
investors.
Some of the victims did receive
transaction statements from
International Investments Hold-
ing Corporation informing them
about the "options" that had been
purchased in their name. However,
all of the victims eventually were
told that due to "unexpected mar-
ket conditions," they had lost all or
nearly all of their investment. The


losses typically ranged from $5,000
to $10,000, but in some cases were
much more. An investigation by
the Broward County Sheriff's
Office produced records that
revealed no money was trans-
ferred from the brokerage firms,
where the investors sent their
money, to the "clearing" bank,
where the purchases were sup-
posed to occur.
No options were purchased
and the money was going directly
to the defendants. Affidavits and
bank records were obtained show-
ing almost $2 million was sent to
the companies with little more
than $100,000 returned to
investors, a return of five cents on
the dollar.
If convicted of all charges, the
defendants could face maximum
prison terms ranging from 100 to
300 years, depending on each indi-
vidual's level of involvement in the
scam.


Free banners for boaters to help protect manatees


They're being used more and
more on the waterways by con-
cerned citizens bright yellow
banners from Save the Manatee
Club, designed to make it quick
and easy to communicate with
approaching boaters whenever
manatees are spotted in the area.
The free waterproof banner
which reads, "Please Slow: Mana-
tees Below," alerts boaters to the
presence of manatees with the
intent to slow boaters down to
help prevent manatee injuries and
deaths.
"The 4th of July weekend is one
of the busiest holiday weekends of
the year, and the waterways will be
very active," said Judith Vallee,
Save the Manatee Club's Executive
Director. "Manatees face ever-
increasing threats mostly from
human activities, and the largest


known cause of manatee mortality
is from collisions with boats. Hope-
fully, people will watch out for
manatees, and those who have the
banners will use them to help slow
down boat traffic if manatees are
spotted."
Those who plan to be out on
the waterways this 4th of July
weekend should follow some gen-
eral guidelines to help protect
these fascinating, endangered ani-
mals. Wear polarized sunglasses,
as they can help eliminate the glare
of the sun and can help you see
below the Water's surface. Stay in
deep water channels and follow all
posted boat speed regulations.
Avoid boating over shallow vegeta-
tion beds where manatees might
be feeding. Look for the manatee's
snout, back, tail, or flipper breaking
the surface of the water a swirl


or a flat spot on the water signals a
manatee may be swimming
below. And if you see a manatee
when operating a powerboat,
remain a safe distance away -
about 50 feet. If you want to
observe the manatee, cut the
motor, but don't drift over the ani-
minal.
Also, if you spot an injured,
dead, tagged or orphaned mana-
tee, or if you see a manatee who is
being harassed, call (888) 404-
FWCC (3922) or #FWC or *FWC
on your cellular phone, or use VHF
Channel 16 on your marine radio.
Florida boaters can request a
free "Please Slow: Manatees
Below" banner by contacting Save
the Manatee Club via e-mail at edu-
cation@savethemanatee.org, by
regular mail at 500 N. Maitland
Ave., Maitland, FL 32751, or by call-


ing toll free at (800) 432-JOIN
(5646). Just include your name,
mailing and e-mail addresses, and
the area where you boat in Florida.
Also, if you are a Florida shoreline
property owner, you can get a free
aluminum sign for your dock
which reads, "Please Watch for
Manatees: Operate With Care." Be
sure to include your name and
mailing address and the address
where the sign will be posted, if dif-
ferent.
Manatee protection tips are
available on the Club's Web site at
www.savethemanatee.org/boater-
tips.htm. For more information on
manatees, the Adopt-A-Manatee
program, or Save the Manatee Club
programs and activities, visit the
Club's Web site at www.savethem-
anatee.org, call the toll free num-
ber listed above, or send a request
via regular mail.


Restitution comes to

thousands defrauded

by TRG Marketing
TALLAHASSEE Attorney guilty to racketeering and four
-General Charlie Crist counts of unlawful transaction
announced that the principals of insurance, and will be sen-
of TRG Marketing, LLC tenced to four years in prison.
Carmelo Zanfei and William After they are released from
Paul Crouse have pled prison, both defendants will
guilty to charges relating to the also be sentenced to 20 years
sale of an unauthorized health of supervised probation with
plan to more than 7,000 special conditions that they
Floridians, which resulted in make full and complete resti-
millions of dollars of unpaid tuition to more than 7,000
Asserting that the self- Floridians. The restitution is
insured plan was exempt to expected to total $2.5 million
the licensing and certification and could be substantially
requirements of state' law, more.
Zanfei and Crouse marketed Formal sentencing of both
the health plan to citizens of defendants will be held in
Florida, and 43 other states, approximately 120 days
without seeking a certificate of before Ninth Judicial Circuit
authority to sell the plan. Judge Julie H. O'Kane in
Investigators determined Orlando.
the health plan was insuffi- Although the health plan
ciently funded and the group was illegally marketed in 43
failed to pay millions of dollars other states, Florida was the
of claims. only state to pursue criminal
"TRG Marketing duped charges. The case was prose-
thousands of trusting con- cuted by the Attorney Gener-
sumers and left them with mil- all's Office of Statewide Prose-
lions of dollars in unpaid med- cution and investigated by the
ical expenses," said Crist. Department of Financial Ser-
"Scams like this drive up the vices.
cost of legitimate health insur- Any citizen who believes he
ance, and consumers are left or she has been a victim
to carry the burden. We will or she has been a vctimorney Gen-
work to ensure that justice is should call the Attorney Gen-
served and restitution is made eral's Fraud Hotline toll free at
to these victims." 7(866) 9-NO-SCAM (866-966-
Zanfei pled guilty to con- 7226).
spiracy to commit racketeer- A copy of the arrest affidavit
ing and four counts of unlaw- is available at: http://rnyflori-
ful transaction of insurance, dalegal.com/webfiles.nsf/WF/
and will be sentenced to two MRAY-6D8LVM
years in prison. Crouse pled file/TRG_Affidavit.pdf.


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6500 Okeechit.ee Blvd.
West Okeechobee & The Turnpike
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330 W 8arlandClewitto

216 S, Main St, LaBelle
863-61753288
301 N. 15th St.
239-65M1600


LABOR ( FINDERS


DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
ALL TYPES OF WORK AVAILABLE
202(, S90rand 9 (tre ofi4fUton #)
(863) 902-9494


& IaJs 4e. alth
Care Center
230 S. Barfield Hwy.
Pahokee, FL 33476-1834
Phone: (561) 924-5561
Fax: (561) 924-9466
Email:
GladesCareffloridaCare.net


SUNRISE APPLIANCE
New, Used, Scratch & Dent

401 US Hwy 27
Moore Haven
863-946-2666






525 NW At 1, BLE GLADE

800-573-7983
www.gladesmotors.com



Brian Sullivan
OSA S Ge(nel Conlra0lor M(L061835

863-441-4202

863-465-1371r
Se Habla Espahol
fv.briuialliviraot'O cior.corel


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Licensed & Insured
We Can.....
Do installation or all types of fencing
rotc your dug witht qf0Jity Dog Pens
Rcpir all typts of fentingi
CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION
863-697-8462


MEICAI CENTER

58i WSu. m3 Cw2mm

86339121


GLENN J.
SNEIDER, LLC
Criminal Law
Bankruptcy Law
Immigration Law
200 S.W. 9" Street
Okeechobee, FL 34974
(863) 467-6570


n ow SL DODGE J P



M1 W, 01 d Hirh wie to








2501 W. 80th St. Suite 9

Hialeah, FL

1-800-901-2192






(Vest Cake
FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY
805 N. Hwy, 27
Moore Haven
(863) 946-1233


~IVI4MI

Rcich&
Ma&n0,

1-888-784-6724
We~tiera (w pe noit w ) Ies~anjuly

Pori, t. i lric
NNt, PalmlnIkwiui *Mi a aR~aI~lo


GLADES BACKHOE SERVICE
24 YEARS IN BUS E ESS
DITCH CLEANING & DIGGING
ROCK EXCAVATION
OWNER: BRENDA N PEACOCK

HOME 561-924-7123
CELL 561-261-0053
PAHOKEE, FL 3347.6


DR. MERCER'S DENTURE CLINIC

'BEST PRICES S* AME DAY

US 41 SOUTH' FT. MYERS



1-866-226-9400



FURNITURE
CLEARANCE CENTER
The Blocker Family has turned
their LaBelle Showroom into a
Furniture Clearance Center.
359 W Hickpoochee Ave
LaBelle, FL
863-675-2132


3Y~~ 'M'1~UJ *1 'J~{I~I ~ ~


BLUEWATER BOBCAT SI Lawn Service


CULVERTS DRIVEWAYS
LAND CLEARING PADS
ETC,

OFFICE 863-902.0477
CELL 863-228-2622


Free Estimates on leqaest




883.228.2813
or
8B20829D


Law Office of
Robert L. Vaughn, PA.
Bankruptcy Wrongful Death
Personal Injury Family Law/ Divorce
112 W.C. Owen, Clewiston
863-902-9211
530 Main St., LaBelle
863-675-7719
2080 Collier Ave., Ft. Myers
239-936f-9393
i, JOn. 1. n.-.I i,, .., ,d" e .l
1k ,ie',I s,,, ne, li


370 Holiday Isle Blvd
Clewiston
863-983-3181


Treasure Coast Dermatology
--- W ;,.--"*<>>)%';,{<''>
Tim loannides, M.D.
Rick Romagosa, M.D.
Robert S. Kirsner, M.D. PhD

1924 US Hwy. 441 N.
Okeechobee
863-467-9555






FURNITURE
APP'/I Ikt1 i. ,C l)H tC,;





lisbeth Garcia
lie. Mortgage Broker



(561)993.2338
Se kabla Espaiel
lisgartia@huesitarlefdlnf.met


tHIEF'S
AuTo
CARE
From Strat Camr to Rba Cars
Wees do it ll.
390 ECowboyWay 674-1010





Connections
I- ; ,\'M INsIM, .* BtLE
(NI ' l O t 11K l IK I I.I I)
CALL
(863) 612-0237
X singular.
7=1=ftiK
l=] q>.,.1.1M


Clewiston
(866) 549-2830
0-cb-b. (-3)4647T6
ft PIeM. (772)5095
Port St. Luciel 72) 335M490
SWMit (772) 21.2777
Palnm SON$t a* (001) 4944M
GRCR TR


GROCERY STORE & MEAT PROCESSING
863-946-2333
1205 EAST SR 78 Lakeport








J~i^^SLi^ ^


Thursday, June 16,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


FIVl 11911 Fl 4.10 CAM


1.







Thursday, June 16,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Important tips for homebuyers


FELTON, DE Home inspec-
tions are now considered so rou-
tine that an estimated 77 percent
of all homebuyers invest in one.
HGTV even devotes an entire
program to the service, called
"House Detectives." But televi-
sion does not always paint a true
portrait of the home inspection
process, suggests Cliff Grohe, Fel-
ton-area director of HouseMas-
ter(r).
"Watching 'House Detectives'
is a terrific way to educate home
buyers on the value of a home
inspection. But many of those
inspectors don't follow standard
industry protocol," says Grohe,
who notes that it is as important
to understand what a home
inspection is NOT, as well as
what a buyer should expect from
their inspection, in order to make
an informed home purchase
decision.
What a Home Inspection is
NOT: It is not a to-do list for the
seller. Over the past quarter-cen-
tury, two of the most common
questions asked of HouseMaster
inspectors are "Who should
make the repairs?" and "Should I
buy this house?"
The role of the home inspec-
tor is to provide the buyer with


their opinion of the home's con-
dition at the time of inspection.
Because each real estate sales
contract and transaction is differ-
ent, a buyer's real estate sales
professional or lawyer is better
qualified to answer these types of
questions.


A home inspection is not a
pass/fail test. "It is up to the
buyer to determine whether or
not the home passes his own
test," says Grohe. "A couple look-
ing to totally renovate a home
may realize that the need for lots
of repairs to the mechanical sys-
tems doesn't matter to them.
Conversely, a young couple
buying a 'starter home' in which
they plan to live only a few years
may find a home with many
problems is just not for them."
It does not make a home
, purchase risk-free. Most home
inspection companies follow
HouseMaster's lead and utilize
an inspection contract that out-
lines the specifics of the home
inspection, as well as its limita-
tions. But it's important to
remember that while a home
inspection is designed to reduce
the risk in buying a home, it can-
not eliminate that risk.
What to Look for in a Home


Inspection:
Choose wisely when it
comes to selecting a home
inspector. Even in areas where
there is mandatory licensing, cre-
dentials among inspectors can
vary dramatically. Price should
not be the reason to select a
home inspector. It is also impor-
tant to make sure that an inspec-
tor provides a written inspection
report that includes pertinent
details on the condition of major
elements of the home.
Look for a home inspector
that encourages you to go along
on the inspection. "The inspec-
tion is a terrific introduction to a
home. A professional inspector
can answer questions, demon-
strate how to operate various sys-
tems in the home, and provide
helpful maintenance sugges-
tions," says Grohe.
Heed the inspector's advice.
Deficiencies found on an inspec-
tion will continue to deteriorate
through usage and age. Plan on
addressing any outstanding con-
cerns as soon as possible.
A professional home inspec-
tion is the best investment a
homebuyer can make.


ALICO, INC. announces elections, meetings


LABELLE Alico, Inc.,
(NASDAQ:ALCO) one of the
South's best-known agribusi-
ness companies operating in
Central and Southwest Florida,
and with approximately 141,000
acres in real estate holdings,
announced that at its annual
stockholders meeting held Fri-
day June 10, John R. Alexander,
Robert E. Lee Caswell, Evelyn
D'An, Phillip S. Dingle, Gregory
T. Mutz, Charles Palmer, Baxter
G. Troutman, and Dr. Gordon
Walker were elected by the
stockholders to serve as direc-
tors of the Corporation. Addi-
tionally, the stockholders
approved the Alico, Inc. Director
Stock Compensation Plan.
At the annual meeting of the
Board of Directors following the
Stockholders meeting, the Board
re-elected Mr. Alexander as
Chairman and Mr. Gregory T.
Mutz as Lead Director. The
Board also elected the following
officers:
President & Chief Executive


Officer: John R. Alexander
Vice President Administrative
Division, Chief Financial Officer,
Treasurer and Assistant Secre-
tary: Patrick W. Murphy
Vice President, Ranch Divi-
sion: B. Wade Grigsby
Vice President, Heavy Equip-
ment and Facilities Maintenance
Division: Robert P. Miley
Vice President, Sugarcane
and Sod Division: Dwight Rock-
ers
Vice President, Citrus Divi-
sion: Steven M. Smith
Controller and Assistant Trea-
surer: Dennis J. Garbo,
Corporate Secretary: Denise
Plair
The Board also declared a
special dividend of $1 per share
payable to stockholders of
record as of June 30, 2005, with
payment expected on or about
July 15, 2005. Chairman Alexan-
der stated that the Company's
2004 fiscal year results were the
best in the Company's history
and the Board wanted the share-


holders to share in these results.
Chairman Alexander also
announced that the Board had
decided to begin paying regular
quarterly dividends beginning
with the end of the Company's
fourth quarter on August 31,
2005. The first such dividend in
the amount of $.25 will be paid
to shareholders of record as of
Sept. 30, 2005 with payment
expected on or about Oct. 15,
2005.
Chairman Alexander and Mr.
Greg Mutz, the company's lead
director, stated that they were
excited about working with the
new Board to continue the
process of enhancing the Com-
pany's business in the coming
year. They noted that "Alico is a
very different company than it
was two years ago. It has new
management and a new focus
and we are all dedicated to its
continuing success."


Your papa


not-ou


~Cw~tn y


We pledge to operate our newspaper as a public trust.

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Clewiston News

GLADES COUNTY


DEMOCRAT



TheSun
Community Service Through Journalism


W WIn service,calr 7a

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THE
OPTICAL CENTER
located in
FAMILY EYE CARE
100 N. Main St.
LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-0761


COUNTRY HOMES &
LAND REAL ESTATE
Kathy Hutchins
Lic. Real Estate Broker
Office: 863-612-0551
Fax: 863-612-0553
Visit Our Website at:
CentralFloridaLandSales.com



Rop's ilome Remiodeling
UC



haw I w


W INt 4~ I *..IUI'l' 4 111117I''fj

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ew;
Horizons
Real Estate Corp.
580 S. Main St. LaBelle, FL
863-675-1973
e-mail: newloiizons- te@earthlhik.net
If you are thinking of buying
fm'] or selling, give
[sis us a call!

P;I*1Vm1mj"um I


CLEISTON ANIMAL CLINIC





863-983-9145


South rn

Investments & Real Estate, Inc.
700 South Main Street
P.O Box 1680 LaBelle, Florida 33975
863-675-4500 Fax: 863-675-6575
www.soland,.com
TOLL FREE: 877-314-3048


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BUSINESS HERE

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AK
REALTY
INC.
233 N. BRIDGE ST
ON THE CORNER OF BRIDGE ST & WASHINGTON
VISIT US ON THE WEB AT
WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM
- I0- PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
** is1 \ RENTALS SALES




ma(yI&, /m&, !am



309 ';6. (.Yta / yj/jr


VICKERS
CHIROPRACTIC &
REHABILITATION CLINIC.
Caifor aon Appointment Today)f
DR. EDWARD VICKERS SR.,
Chiropractor
(863) 983-8391
905 W'. E 'R4, AE.
CL EWiSTO












NO ONE WILL
WORK HARD-
ER FOR YOU
THEN JAMIE
NAVARRO
GIVE HIM A
CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
REALTY
WQRLDU
WIl BROKER NETWORK
C. BAGANS FIRST
30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936



DISH
DEPOT


YOUR LOCAiL SATELLITE PROFESSIONALS

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HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS AT
HENDRY GENERAL
CALL TODAY FORAN APPOINTMF-I
530 W. Sagamore Avenue
Suite B
Clewiston, Florida 33440
(863) 983-2896
http: //wwwjointimplant.com


h Carolyn
homas
&ealty, Inc.

Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505




*Your Realtor
for the
Western Communitiei

Teresa Sullivan
561-795-8533

561-996-5623 c


82 W. IIICKINPOO'I U.E.-* ARELILE
(ACR~t,'SsFROM Bt'RGFR KING.)
CALL
(863) 67'5-TANU(8268)


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Pam' jPlumbintig ."rt/ BUSINESSI HERE
YO( CeP l&g Spca "The Sweetest
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CAmL863-983-9148

(863)983 7881 i'cim it)fi southaleas@newszap.com


F


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005







20 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


C aass if eds







1.877.353-2424 ...ABSOLUTEL
for any personal items for sale under $2,500


announcement Merchandlise


More Papers Mean More Readers!

Reach more readers when you run
your ad in several papers in
our newspaper network.


Agriculture Recreation


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Autoliob0iles





Public Notices I

III A


Services 1

LTI I I =I ji


.- Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!

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Announcements


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case of an inadvertent error,
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Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memoriam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage 'Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


IRS auction sale of prime Or-
lando area residence!! 3/3,
3600+ ft, pool on 1 acre.
1745 Markham Woods Rd,
Longwood, FL 6/30 at 10
AM. Visit www.ustre-
as.gov/auctions/irs or call
Gary at (850)942-8990 x
249 for info.
LAND AUCTION Calhoun
County, SC. June 23,
6:00PM, 960+/- acres of-
fered in 14 tracts. Located
near 1-26 between Columbia
and Charleston, near Lake
Marion. Timberland, Crop-
land, Hunting, Homesites.
Previews: June 18 & 22
from 11:00AM-2:OOPM. Call
(800)551-3588 for more in-
formation or visit
www.woltz.com. Woltz &
Associates, Inc., Brokers &
Auctioneers (SC#3663R).



Large Sale in LaBelle
Sat., June 25th @ 11am
Antiques, Tractors,
Trucks, Cars, Old Lures,
Loads of Hand Tools &
Power Tools.
See next weeks paper for:
Address & Complete List!!!f
On line: auctionzip.com
#1 Liquidators Auction
Jim Tate AU2266
Liquidators AB1855
239-878-0621

READING A
NEWSPAPER,.
i leads you
to the
best produds
and services.


- ---Em mI ur I CUSTODIAN
K l 0 IO Opening in Hendry County
Em-- o I | Commissioners. Must be
BURIAL PLOTS (2)- In old able to work evenings. Full
section of Evergreen Ceme- time with benefits. Applica-
tery. $1100 for both. tions and copy of job de-
(954)340-4475. scription may be obtained
E ployment from Human Resource in the
S FullTime 205 LaBelle Courthouse or sub-
Employment office in Clewiston. Deadline
M Mdical t 210 for submission is May 25,
mErp-21ment 2005. Vet Pref. EEO. Drug
Partime 215t Free. Applicants needing as-
Wa yment 220 distance in the application
READING A Job Information 225 process should contact HR.
NEWSPAPER .., saws 230 Driver- COVENANT TRANS-
,maikms Y"amom1.9ma, PORT. Excellent Pay &
a.ud itr,,fn ps, m. No Benefits for Experienced
wondw ern pe*sp f.od. m iw oyti Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams
a- mom swsi FTimf0 5 & Graduate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly. Equal
ii I I jSEII I Auto Transport, The Waggon- Opportunity Employer.
ers Trucking: Hiring Exp & (888)MORE PAY
BLACK LAB MIX- large, male, Non-Experienced drivers for (888-667-3729).
vicinity of Hwy 70 West" i Auto Transport in South East
(863)697-2513. Regions. Must have valid HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE
Class A CDL and verifiable 2 STUDENTS arriving August
CD CASE- black, with CD's, yrs OR 200K miles OTR. need Host Families. Has
found on Wolff Rd. Call Need stable work history own insurance and spending
(863)763-3134to claim. and clean MVR. High Earn- money. Promotes World
ing Potential, Great Benefits Peace! American Intercultu-
Young Female Cat Recently and matching 401K. CON- ral Student Exchange.
Spayed. Okeetantie Area. TACT Susan at (800)SIBLING
Call to identify. (866)413-3074 EOE. www.aise.com.
(863)697-2265 BRANCH MANAGER LAB TECHNICIAN:
GLADESAREA Will train.
American Red Cross- chapter Apply @ Casa Flora,
BILLFOLDS (2) lost out of seeks f/t professional to run 13140 Hartman PlantRd.,
purse, medical papers, pre- the Glades Area Branch. Palmdale, FL 33944.
scriptions, insurance cards, The position will provide (863)675-0170
driver license. Very impor- leadership in developing, im-
tant, vic of Labelle Antique plementing and managing all *MOVIE EXTRAS* Earn
Shop. (863)675-2384 or Amencan Red Cross service $150-$300/Day All
(863)675-3990. delivery to the communities Looks/Types Needed. No ex-
within the Branch's assigned perience Necessary TV, Mu-
LOST DOG Pit/Cur Mix geographical area. Ideal sic Videos, Commercials,
bik w/ wht Vic of Dark Ham- candidate will possess de- Film, Print. Call Toll Free 7
mock Rd, Burman Rd & 441 gree and/or experience in days! (800)260-3949 Ext
(772)260-6567 Reward not-for-profit management 3023.
and knowledge of the local
PIT/CUR MIX, 5yrs old, aprox communities. Excellent **SALES REPS** SALES
70lbs, missing on 6/4, vic of benefits package. Please MANAGERS $7,000 per
Old Fort Denaud, reward e-mail cover letter week is what our Top Sales
(863)675-2310 and resumeto People earn! Highly suc-
bootheL(@redcross-pbc.org cessful national co. expand-
vewa orfax (561)650-9147. ing. Will train. Call Jay
ADULT CATS 1 Blue Russian E 1E/DFWP (800)685-8004.
female w/ 7 toes, 1 blk Tom, Carpenter Wanted
must have tools & S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Driv-
good mouser, both free to transportation; steady ers. HOME WEEKENDS.
good home.(863)763-8892 work. 1-800-345-0060 Mileage Pay,Benefits, 401K.
Trainees Welcome/!Miami
BOBTAILKITTENS (2) CARPENTERS, CONCRETE area- exp. req. 21 min
Free to good homes. RESTORATION & age/Class-A CDL Cypress
(863)467-2139 LABORERS Truck Lines (800)545-1351.
CUR, 7 yrs. & Red Nosed Pit- Must have own tools .I .
bull, 4 yrs. Neutered males. & transportation.
Great w/kids. Housebroken, (561)637-2222 j!W ntd 22
updated shots. 863)447-0965
updated shots. 863)447-0965 CFI HIRING RECENT STU CARE GIVER/COMPANION-
DENT GRADS! Starting $.26, needs work, Will do light
German Shepherd/Sharpel increases to $.35 in 1 year. housekeeping and live in,
mix puppies, 1 male, 1 fe- Class A CDL Required. Local references (863)675-4239.
male, 6 weeks old, to good ORIENTATION! (800)CFI-
home. (863)675-4211 DRIVE (800-234-3748) or anca
HOT TUB- you must move, COURT RECORDS CONTRAC-
(863)357-2494. TOR: Nationwide company
r seeks experienced Indepen-
dent Contractors to collect ..-.-
and research public records
in Florida courts. Laptop pre- Business
fitetlifta i ferred. Pay based on pro- Opportunities 305
1.4% t 1 duction. Fax resume to Money Lenders 310
t, Kassie (866)322-8246 or Tax Preparation 315
Email: Kassie.Mill-
BELLE GLADE- Sat, er@choicepoint.com.
June 18th, 7:30am-?,BIiI
1505 NWAve G, DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR Op tig tis 3
MiscellaneousYardSale OWN. Flexible Hours!
$$$Great Pay!$$$ Personal
Computer required. #1 CASH COW! 90 Vending
',School/ (800)873-0345 ext #300. Machine units/You OK Loca-
:InuindItfaster. sooner tions Entire Business
Fid t sooner $10,670 Hurry!
EARN DEGREE online from n the classfileds (800)836-3464 #B02428.
home. *Business, *Parale- Empl et l mnt
gal, *Computers Job Place- ie B li
ment Assistance. Computer
& Financial aid if qualify.
(866)858-2121 www.tide- MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
watertechonline.com. MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
FREE LESSON. Saturday, Join our maintenance team! General maintenance
Diesel Semis, Heavy Equip- of a 120 bed nursing home & 40 unit
ment. Employers onsite, free apartment complex. Knowledge of electrical,
hotdogs, fun for all. National plumbing, carpentry and A/C. Must be "on call"
Truck & Heavy Equipment every third week. Prior experience in similar
Operator School.
(800)488-7364. position. HS diploma or GED required. Excellent
salary and benefits. Mileage paid to and from
work for out-of-town employees.
Glades Health Care Center
Is Stress Ruining Your Life? Pahokee, Florida
Read DIANETICS by Ron L. Call 561-924-5561, ext. 110
Hubbard Call orfax resume to 561-924-9466
(813)872-0722 or send
$7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N. EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Habana Ave., Tampa FL Equal Opportunity Employer
33607.


-mlymn


CARPENTERS

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Housing
Dept. is now hiring Carpenters for Big
Cypress & Brighton Reservations, 3-5
yrs. exp. in carpentry. HS Diploma/GED
req. Valid FL Driver's license req.

Resumes to galtmanc(5semtribe.com or
fax to 954-967-3477. Application online
@ www.seminoletribe.com. HR, 6300
Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024


CHILD DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE I
(Preschoolers, South Bay Head Start)
$11.04/hr.

Plans indoor and outdoor program activities for
preschoolers; observes work of assistants and
guides them in performance of their tasks. As-
soc. Degree in Early Childhood Ed./Child
Dev./other ECE Degree (or 60-sem./90-qtr. hrs.
related college); 1 yr. exp. working directly with
care and development of young children (ages
0-5--i.e., preschoolers-must specify on appl.);
equiv. Prefer 40 hrs. DCF Child Care Training.
Visit www.pbcgov.com for detailed position de-
scription & employment appl. Submit appl./re-
sume with any Vet. Pref. doc. for receipt by 5
p.m. 6/24/05 to Palm Beach County Human Re-
sources, 50 S. Military Trail #210, WPB, FL
33415 Fax 561-616-6893 EO/AA M/F/D/V
(DFWP)



p HEALTHCARE DISTRICT
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
HCAP Health Care Navigator
Grant Position
Glades Area
Position #163-2125
This position is to provide tailored care coordination services
to clients of Western Palm Beach County. Employee inter-
views clients in need of services and assists them in navi-
gating the eligibility process of medically and culturally
appropriate healthcare and social services. Employee must
provide high quality customer service with attention to spe-
cial needs of diverse client base. Employee participates in
outreach activities guiding clients to program services. As-
sociate's degree with course work emphasis in social work,
human services or related; supplemented by three (3) years
previous experience or training that provides excellent
knowledge of eligibility criteria for alternative government
supported health care programs and benefits including Flori-
da KidCare, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Disability
CHAMPUS, Veteran's Administration benefits, etc. and the
ability to perform interviews and advanced administrative
support functions; or an equivalent combination of educa-
tion, training, and experience. Position requires that the can-
didate possess moderate computer skills and possess and
maintain a current Florida Drivers License. Bi-lingual strongly
preferred. Pay Grade'7: $26,376. All applications & resumes
must be received by 5 PM 6/24/05. Resumes can be faxed
to (561)671-4670, send to: HCDPBC, 324 Datura Street,
Suite 401, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 or e-mail to:
Employment(hcdpbc.org.
The Health Care District is a Drug Free Work Place


JOIN A WINNING TEAM!
RNs & LPNs

12 Hr. Shifts 3 days on/4 off one week
4 on/3 off the next week
Days 7 am 7 pm
Nights 7 pm-7 am
RNs $24-$28/hour
LPNs $18-$22/hour
+ $2/hour night differential
RN SUPERVISORS
12 Hr. Shifts-3 days on/4 off one veek
4 on/3 off the next week
Nights 7pm-7am
$27-$31/hour
LTC & Management experience desirable
GLADES HEALTH CARE CENTER
Pahokee, Florida
Excellent Benefits
Mileage paid to and from work for
out-of-town employees
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Call: 561-924-5561 Fax: 561-924-9466
Equal Opportunity Employer


-Employmen
Full Tie 0205


Emlymn
Full Tie 0205


CITY OF SOUTH BAY
POSITION AVAILABLE
WITHIN
SOUTH BAY POLICE
DEPARTMENT
RECORDS CLERK
$9.50 Hourly
Full-Time Position
Benefits
The City of South Bay is accepting applications for the position
of Records Clerk. This position requires excellent adminis-
trative organizational and filing skills; ability to follow de-
tailed written and verbal instructions; great communication
and telephone skills; knowledge of modern office equipment;
practices and procedures. This position also requires an in-
dividual to maintain records that are confidential. Must be
able to type 45 wpm. Must have high school diploma or
G.E.D., an AA degree in Business Administration or 1-3
years progressively responsible secretarial experience or
equivalent. Applications will be accepted until June 24,
2005 at 5:00 pm. Sent to ATTN: Human Resources Direc-
tor, City of South Bay, 335 SW 2nd Avenue, South Bay, FL.
33493. Resumes may also be emailed to parchmen-
ta~southbavcitv.com Please Note: NO FAXES ACCEPTED.
EOE/AA/ADA/VET PREF


P/T Home Delivered Meal Driver Needed at La-
Belle agency serving seniors. If you have a
cheerful manner, valid FL license & clean driving
record, H.S. diploma or GED, we want to talk to
you. Great place to work, training provided-per-
fect for moms of school-aged kids or active old-
er adults. Stop by L.J. Nobles Senior Center,
475 E. Cowboy Way, 8-5, M-F to fill out an ap-
plication.
Home care workers needed to assist frail elderly
in their own homes in Hendry & Glades Co.
Must have CNA cert., H.S. diploma or GED,
clean FL driver license. Background chks done
on all new hires. We pay mileage, offer health
and other benefits. Great place to work helping
others. so come talk to us! F/T case aide posi-
tion with full benefits available in our Clewiston
office. On-call home delivered meal driver need-
ed in Buckhead Ridge. Call the office nearest
you for more info about job openings in your
area. LaBelle: 675-1446, Clewiston: 963-7088,
Moore Haven: 946-1821. We are an EOE.



( MANAGEMENT

Immediate restaurant management
openings in Lake Placid, Moore
Haven, LaBelle, Clewiston and
Okeechobee. We are a franchise with
27 restaurants throughout South
Florida and are hiring energetic,
honest, and responsible individuals.
We offer:
-Excellent Salaries
-Medical and Life Insurance
-Dental Insurance
-401K Savings Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Advancement Opportunities
-Training Program

For an interview please call:
863-983-4224
or mail your resume in confidence to:
Pauline Alvarez
Southern Management Corporation
1014 W. Sugarland Hwy.
Clewiston, FL 33440


AUTHENTIC $150k-$200k 1st
Yr. Potential 24/7 Msg
(888)783-7182 Or
www.freedomroad.biz "Only
Serious Inquires Only".
eBay OPPORTUNITY.
100,000 people are earning
a full-time income at home
with eBay. Are you ready? If
so contact Eric at
(866)932-2924.
Shop here first!
The classified ads


HELP WANTED Earn Extra in-
come assembling CD cases
from any location.
No Experience Necessary.
(800)405-7619 ext 90
www.easywork-great-
pay.com. (not valid in SD,
ND, WI or MD)
Professional Vending Route
and Equipment. Brand name
products, all sizes. Financing
available w/$7,500 Down.
(877) 843-8726
B02002-37).
Profitable online business for
sale. Home-based. Family
owned 6 years online. Com-
plete Internet marketing &
site training included. $48K
Call Richard after 2:
(407)322-4242.


$50,000 FREE CASH
,- GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)785-6360 Ext #75.
IMMEDIATE CASH!!! US Pen-
sion Funding pays cash now
for 8 years of your future
pension payments. Call
(800)586-1325 for a FREE,
no-obligation estimate.
www.uspensionfund-
ing.com.

Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Swvihes Offered 425
Insurance 430
Medical Services435

















SCREEN & PATIO
ENCLOSURES
Rescreening & repair.
lic. #2001-19849 &
insured. (5611784-5568
or (561)358-2456

Need a few more bucks
to purchase something
deer? Pick up some
extra bucks when you
sell your used items in
the classifeids.



DIVORCE$275-$350*COV-
ERS children, etc. Only one
signature required! *Ex-
cludes govt. fees! Call week-
days (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977.


NEW SELF STORAGE
46 units 7x15, 8x15, 10x15,
10x30, 12x30,15x25. Full
electric, secure on Commerelo
St. 350 ft. from Clewiston
Police Dept. 863-983-6663,
863-983-2808, after hrs.
863-983-8979

Earn some extra cash.
Sell your used items in
the classified


Thursday, June 16, 2005


LFIND IT FAST DIRECTORY!


12000


Employment
Full Time 02051


$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)856-9591 Ext #113.
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We
will not be undersold!


m








Thrdy ue1,20 evn h cmuiissuhooaeOecoe


Server
Maintenance
Housekeeping
Cashier
Players Club Rep.
(Customer Service)
Revenue Clerk


Empoyen
Ful Tie -020


$5.50 per hour plus grats
$9 to $12 per hour
$8 to $9 per hour
$9.50 to $13.00 per hour
$10.00 per hour

$11.00 per hour


Benefits available for all employees
www.theseminolecasino.com
Apply in person at 506 S. 1 Street
Immokalee, FL 1-800-218-0001
e-mail resume to mramos@semtribe.com


Looking for a career

with a company you

can grow with?

Are you self motivated?
Do you like meeting new people?
Are you computer literate?
If so,this could be the opportunity
you have been looking for.
Full and/or part time
positions available.

The Caloosa Belle and Immokalee
Bulletin are looking for bright, self-
starters with computer skills and
reliable transportation who are will-
ing to learn newspaper advertising
sales from the ground up.
If you have what it takes, you
could be the outside salesperson
in these fast growing markets.

Our company offers:
a unique work environment
potential for advancement
competitive pay and benefits
life and disability insurance
401,(K) plan
generous time o ifogram

Email your resume to:
jkasten@strato.net
An equal opportunity employer


Service Technician I
$8.37 p/hr.
(Valid CDL "C")
Administrative Assistant
$23,707 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam, type 45 cwpm)
Weed & Seed Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
(BS degree)
Closing: June 20, 2005
Accounting Specialist (P-T/Temp)
$10.40 p/hr.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
Police Lieutenant
$48,672 Ann.
9Must pass C.S. Exam)
Closing June 29, 2005
Police Sergeant
$40, 250 Ann.
(Must pass C.S. Exam)
losing: June 29, 2005
Police Officer
$14.68 p/hr.
Must pass C.S. Exam)
losing: June 29, 2005
Utility Systems Coordinator
$35,700 Ann.
Closing: June 29, 2005

Unless stated All positions open until filled.

Positions noted CS -
must pas exam to complete eligibility.

Complete Valid Employment Applications
must be submitted to:
City of Belle Glade
Human Resources Department
110 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., W.
Belle Glade, FL 33430-3900
Business Hours: 8:00 to 5:00
Posted: 06-06-05


HELP WANTED

DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Applications are being accepted by the Hendry
County BOCC. This is a highly responsible posi-
tion coordinating and directing the development
of programs that protect the public's health and
safety from large-scale natural and technological
hazards. Requirements are BS degree and four
years of responsible experience in public safety
ofemergency management or comparable
amount of experience. Applications can be ob-
tained at sub-office in Clewiston & at Court-
house in LaBelle. Deadline for submission is
June 16, 2005 at 5:00 P.M.

Vet pref, drug free, EEO, applicants with
disabilities needing assistance contact HR.


Merchandise I



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines5352
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China. Glassware. Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens 9 Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplies '
Services 7
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 740




AIR CONDITIONER -'05 York
3.5 ton package unit w/heat
$1375 (954)309-8659
AIR CONDITIONER
20K BTU Reverse Cycle,
window unit, $275 or best'
offer (863)674-0467.
AIR CONDITIONER
New, 21k BTU, electric $350
(863)357-8788
AIR CONDITIONERS (2) 5
Ton, For DW. Includes 6 yr.
warrantee. Like brand new.
$1200 (863)697-1894
AIR HANDLER, Trane, 2.5 ton,
220 volt, with heat, $150-.
(863)675-5929


CHINA CABINET- antique,
asking $30. (863)675-4912.


DRYER- apartment size,
works nice, $100.
(863)675-7694.
ELECTRIC STOVE- GE, 3 top
burners working, $15.
(863)467-0987.
MICROWAVE OVEN, excellent
condition, $20.
(863)675-2596
RANGE ( Roper) REFRIGERA-
TOR (Frigidaire 17 cu63 ft)
white, $300 for both.,
(863)467-3645.
REFRIGERATOR- 19 cu. ft.,
Frostfree, asking $75.
(863)675-0104.
REFRIGERATOR, Whirlpool,
Ig., beige, frost free, x-lg.
freezer, exc. cond., $150.
(863)675-2596
STOVE & HOOD FAN- Elec-
tric,Brand new. Never used.
$250. (863)763-7950
STOVE, Electric, Stainless
Steel. $50. (863)697-6464
STOVE, Gas, Frigidaire. White.
$400 or best offer.
(863)357-3639
WASHER & DRYER- Ken-
more, matching set, excel-
lent condition, $220 for both
(863)675-5089.
WASHER & DRYER- Ken-
more, white, both work well.
$100 (321)593-2739.
WASHING MACHINE
Kelvinator, old but works very
well. $25 (863)467-2557


Emlymn
FullTime 020


Emlymn
Ful Tie 005


SURVEY PARTY CHIEF

Experience needed in construction stake-out,
boundary and topo surveys. Pay is based on
experience. Apply in person at:

Johnson Engineering
251 W. Hickpochee (S.R. 80)
LaBelle,FL
or visit web site
www.johnsonengineering. corn
and download application.
recruiting(johnsoneng.com
DFWP


The GEO Group, Inc.

The GEO Group, Inc.
a worldwide leader in privatized corrections

OFFERS CHALLENGING AND EXCITING
OPPORTUNITIES. EXCELLENT BENEFITS

Current openings for:
CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS
DENTAL ASSISTANT
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
LIBRARY CONSULTANT (P/T 8 HRS, PER MO)

MOORE HAVEN
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East SR 78NW
Moore Haven FL 33471
Phone 868-946-2420
Fax 863-946-2487
EOE, M/F/V/H

The Paige Law Firm, PA.
Seeking experienced secretary, legal secretary experience
preferred but not necessary. Must be organized,
professional person willing to learn & work.
Salary is based upon experience. Fax resume to
(561)996-9337 or mail to 349 Northwest 16th St, Suite 108
Belle Glade, FL 33430 No Phone Calls Please.


Umplo.nt
MeicalBjg


H uTlont
Medical "I'l


-msclane I


Emplymen


COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR -
HEALTH (Medical & Health Services Manager L-1) (#64029893)
The Department of Health has an opening for a
County Health Department Director for Hendry and Glades Counties.
Annual Salary range is $120,000 $140,000.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
A physician licensed in Florida pursuant to Chapter 458 or Chapter 459
of the Florida Statutes who is trained in public health administration.
Five years progressively responsible experience in public health practice,
with management responsibilities in two or more areas of public health desired;
Five or more years of supervisory experience. Experence in grant writing,
public speaking, working with elected officials and the media.
Experience in quality improvement techniques, directing, planning, organizing,
developing, monitoring, budgeting, and human resource management.
Knowledge and experience in essential public health services.
Demonstrated knowledge of health policy issues. Proven professional writing skills
and experience in grant writing. Experience in Bioterrorism and Disaster Response.
Please apply 6n-line at https://jobs.myflorida.com.
Refer to requisition number 64029893.
Closing date: June 27, 2005. EOE/AA/VP Employer.


MAGAZINES- 1 box of assort-
ed titles. $50 for all.
(863)467-0987.



BUILDING SALE! "Rock Bot-
tom Prices!" 20x30 Now
$2900. 30x40 $5170.
40x50 $8380. 40x60
$10,700. 50x100 $15,244.
Others. Ends/accessories
optional. "Priced to Sell!"
Pioneer (800)668-5422.
Steel Arch Buildings! Genuine
SteelMaster Buildings,
factory direct at HUGE Sav-
ings! 20x24, 30x60, 35x50.
Perfect Garage/Work-
shop/Barn. Call
(800)341-7007. www.Steel-
MasterUSA.com.



FLOOR TILE includes tile
cutter, 50pcs, 12x12, light
grey $60 (863)467-2112
GARAGE DOOR- 16x8, good
condition, $250,
(863)467-1717.
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
'Buy Direct From Manufactur-
er 20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available
Toll Free (888)393-0335.
SLIDING PATIO DOORS (2)
4'x7', tinted glass, $100 for
both (239)246-3549
STEEL BUILDING- 30'x40'
Heritage Bought it, Now its
not needed $6000
763-4149/561-758-4337
VINYL SIDING- 1 full box,
covers 200 sq ft, color is
Sunny Maize, $100 or best
offer. (863)635-0433.



BABY ITEMS boys clothes,
toys, too many to mention
$100 for all or will separate
(863)357-2863
TEDDY BEAR- LARGE
Light brown w/ red heart says
"I love you" Perfect condition
$20 (863)763-8149



ROSENTHAL- 8pl setting,
Made in Germany, wheat de-
sign, gold trim, 50 yrs old,
never used $400
(863)357-2233.


A COLLECTORS FIND!!
Polished, like new Farberware
set w/ percolator (works!)
$45 (863)763-8149
ELVIS RECORD & SOUVENIR
COLLECTION: Approx. 44
yrs. old. Rare items. $2500
all. 863)824-3358


IHENDRY REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
Registered Nurses
Li r- r- -- .
". I ,J r ....*:- a 5 ." r, ..,
LPN I & II
l L. I f .: ,, '1 ,.. r .
S ,, F T, r ..: -
O.R. Staff Nurse
*-FL riA L,,: 4.-L- F. 4L .,.L
"..g R da'i:' in -i .-z i ri. t rr.i- i-'"
Respiratory Therapist
Per D.,A, C q r ,- T ,e7rre ._ -, .. ", ,-r-. r, ; "., e o

Per Diem Pharmacy Techncian
pc ,a f _1 1 I.. '. -, r.. -. I,, .- .. :k-
Full Tune Patient Account Representative

Full Timune Certified Dietary Manager
Fan- .. ..-,', .' d. .. ,- '..-* t'
Director of Quality Improvement
Res,.a *. .. i ,..s r .,' =-,-r. ,,-,.,, ",e-
Qate 1, .,, r,. 1...,: r i .' ,. '.. ..



Phone 863-902- 3079 or Fox resume to: 863-983 0805
Drug Free Workplace EOE


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Ifrai on 0225^


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N


LABOR $FIDERS

DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
All Types of Work Available
202 E. Sugarland Hwy. 4
r (Across from Clewiston Inn) tS
(863) 902-9494 ,


FOOTBALL, BASKETBALL &
BASEBALL CARD
COLLECTION: $1500 for all.
Call (863)763-8943
RUBY RED STEM WARE- as-
sorted sizes, asking $50.
(863)467-8050.



DELL COMPUTER- Windows
XR 256 MB Ram, Monitor,
Keyboard, Mouse & Lots of
games $150 863-843-0158.



COMMERCIAL KILN & Pour-
ing table. $550 for all, will
sep. (863)467-8177


ANTIQUE COUCH
circa late 1800's, needs some
work $150 (772)418-0018
BOXSPRING & MATTRESS
Very Good Condition $50
(863)675-0969
COFFEE TABLE, 2-End tables
& Sofa table, chrome &
brass w/glass tops.
$300./all. (863)674-0467.
DAYBED- Cherry Sleigh bed
style, $300 or best offer.
(863)634-4200.


7Th

V


TREADMILL: Pro-Form, Cross
over performance. Spd adj.
Walk Length 42". Pd. $510
Asking $250 (863)946-1896


ROOF CARRIER: For Luggage.
Hard. 15 cu. ft. Good condi-
tion. $75 (863)610-0732


HOSPITAL BED- Invacare,
electric, new matt, plus air
matt w/pump incld. $900
neg. (863)655-3436.

WHEEL CHAIR LIFT, dual mo-
tors for vans, like new, ask-
ing $1500. (863)357-8788


AFFORDABLE HEALTH BENE-
FITS From $89.95 A Month
Entire Family! Including Doc-
tor, Hospital, Vision, Rx.
Anyone Accepted! Call Now!
Toll Free! 24 Hours!
(866)697-3739.

HAND PUMP- $80, water w/o
electric, complete w/steel fit-
ting & brass valves to install.
(863)467-4389 mornings.


Emlymn I
Ful im I00


Join the most exciting attraction in SW Florida

JOB OPPORTUNITIES


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. If interested please call

561-993-1160


GENERATOR- Coleman, 5000
watt, 10 HP new in box ,
wheel kit included. $600.
(863)763-0944.
GENERATOR: Small. $500 or
best offer. (863)357-3388
PAINT SPRAYER, SPX Graco,
Hose & Gun. Used once.
Cleaned w/preservatives.
$700 (863)763-2692


MINI CHOPPER- Excellent
condition. 6 mo. old $500.
Firm.(863) 697-1702
863-467-4041
One man's trash is
another man's treas-
ure. Turn your trash
to treasure with an ad
in the classified.


WANTED: FL ART
A.E. Backus, H. Newton,
Highwaymen Art.
(772)562-5567

Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feod/Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants/.'
Flowers 865




TRACTOR, 3430 w/Bush Hog,
Mint Condition. $7500 or
best offer. (863)673-3790



CHICKEN COOPS (4) 10X10,
all pressure treated, $3500
value will sell $1200 you
move,. (863)467-5906


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



1, 2 & 3 BR HOUSES &
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
No pets.
Call (863)983-4436.


Port LaBelle, 2BR, 1.5BA,
single family house, w/gar-
age, $750 mo. plus sec.
dep. 863-634-2975.


ROOMMATES WANTED: Male
or Female, No children, Pets
neg. $450 mo. + util.
(863)228-3887 LaBelle


DESK, Wooden. Great for
computer. $40
(863)697-6464
DESKS (3), 1 Gray Computer,
1 Brown, 1 Childs Adjustable
Desk. $85 will sep. Local
delivery. (561)723-6753
DINING ROOM CHAIRS (4)
Light oak, good condition $75
(863)675-8760
DINING ROOM SET
Table w/ four matching chairs.
Good cond. $225
(863)467-6550
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
6' long, light oak color, $85
(863)357-2863
HIGH BACK Wicker Chairs, (3)
Good condition, $36 will sell
separately. (863)467-5477.
LR SUITE- used, fair condi-
tion, color pattern, $100.
(863)675-4912.
MATTRESS- California King
size, good condition,, paid
$800 asking $100
(863)675-0104
SOFA, Chair, Coffee Table &
glass top table, $250.
(863)635-4478
SOFA, SLEEPER SOFA, LOVE-
SEAT, blue, good condition,
all for $275.
(863)675-0998.
TABLE & 4 CHAIRS- antique
style, pecan, nice condition,
$100 (863)357-4532.
WATERBED- King Size, mo-
tion free, mattress, liner and
heater. $50.
(863)357-4463.



GOLF CART EZ GO, 2000
$1800 (863)763-7252
GOLF CART, Electric, 4 Seater
w/box bed. Work or Pleas-
ure. 36 V charger. $950.
(863)697-2033
Love the earth Recycle
your used items by
selling them in the
classified.

-mlymn


Gazebo Sandbox
Here's a great looking do-it-
yourself project that com-
bines a big hexagonal sand-
box with a classic gazebo. so
it's not only fun. but it makes
a handsome addition to any
yard. Thle sandbo\ measures
5 ft. wide by 7 ft. tall.
Gazeho Sanldhox plan
(No. 792) ... $9.95
Playhouses/Slruhiires Pack
4 plans incl. 792
(No. C104). $24.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds
of projects) ... $2.01)
Please add $3.00 s&hi
(except calalog-only ordels)
To order. circle itcie (,). clip
and send with check it:
U-lild. P.O. Box 2383,
Van Nuys. C,\ 91409.
Please he sinc to include
your name, address. andi the
name or this newspaper.
Allow 1-2 werks fr delivery.
Or call (800) 82-l-1111I1)
i-hiild.com
Money IBack Guiarantee


I 4i65,io-9o82 or I
(863)441-4722 I

KEY MACHINE
w/ blank keys, priced rea-
sonably at $400
(863)674-0296
Run your ad STATEWIDE!!!
For only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified ad
in over 150 newspapers
throughout the state reach-
ing over 5 MILLION readers.
Call this newspaper or Ad-
vertising Networks of Florida
at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classi-
fieds.com. Display ads also
available.



PIANO, Gul Bransen, real ivory
keys, perfect tuning, $600 or
best offer (863)467-6693 or
(863)634-1636


BABY CHINCHILLA- gray, 12
weeks old, $75.
(863)357-6825.
BULLDOG PUP- Male, no pa-
pers. $200. (863)634-7108
COCKATIEL'S- for sale, $50
(863)357-6825
DWARF RABBITS (6) $15 &
up (863)610-0843 after 5 p
EXOTIC FAINTING GOAT-
$150. Call evenings,
(863)675-4098.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS-
AKC reg. 5-males, Ready
June 9th $325. Cash only.
(863)357-3026
JACK RUSSELL (f) for breed-
ing, Rottweiler (f) asking
$250 for both will sell sep.
(863)357-2494.
PARROLET, 1 year old female,
Banded. $100.
(863)357-0476
SIBERIAN HUSKY, Solid
White (F), 1 yr. old & Black &
White (M) 3 yrs. old. $500
both, will sep. 863)610-9812



BATHTUB & SINK
From travel trailer $20 for both
(863)675-8760
PORT-A-POTTY
New in box never been used
pd $80 sell for $50
(863)675-4361 after 5pm



SPA, Portable, Jade, Seats 5.
$1800. (863)983-2234 after
6pm.



SEW MACH TABLE- portable,
1 drawer, legs can be re-
moved for transporting,
24x8 walnut $75
(863)467-7404.

T icets 720


Okeechobee Livestock
Market Sales every
Mon. 12pm & every
Tues. 11am. 763-3127



SADDLE- McCellan Repro-
duction, almost new cond.,
w/bridle & blanket, asking
$200. (863)675-4098.


REGISTERED HORSE SALE
Saturday, June 25th
Okeechobee Agri-Civic Center
11:00 am @ Tack
1:00 pm @ Horses.
Consianments Welcome
478-627-2727 or
850-532-9229
SLN#2120
SPOTTED WALKER FILLIE
2 V2 yrs old, green broke, very
sweet, $1500.
(863)843-2495.
THOROUGHBRED GELDING-
11 yr old, black w/ white
face, papers, $1800.
(863)467-9212,



BUSH ALL 5' Brand New
$400 (863)801-1666
FINISH MOWER, 6 ft., like
new, used one season,
$ 9 0 0
(863)675-1914/673-1846
FLY MOW LAWN MOWER,
Good condition. $75
(863)675-8168
LAWN TRACTOR/SWEEPER-
STX38 John Deere, needs
new belts & pulleys, $300.
(863)357-4532.
RIDING MOWER- John Deere
180 & Husky mower. $600.
ea. (863)763-4149 or
561-758-4337,
RIDING MOWER-MTD Garden
Tractor, 18h/p B&S engine,
46" cut, gd tires, needs trans
axle $160 (863)697-9704
ROTO TILLER Yard Man,
rear tine, like new, $500 or
best offer (863)697-9704
SCREEN ROOM- W/insulated
roof, 12x26, $500 you must
remove. (772)486-1914.


Real Estate |



Business Places
Sale 1,5
Commercial
Property Sale 1010
Condos.'
Townhouses Salel1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1Q40
Lots Sale 104E.
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspection 10'J60
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1081)





Tra C..o l ,'1, ?
I Lq .aj1. -1 ';I rL r C ,'rt
T 4-J.N[E 2.5- 1030 3 M
Evensville,TN


Tractors Trailers
I Heavy Equipment
Logging Equipment
Farm Implements
Complete Machine
Shop wl Tools & Equip,

701'ACRE FARM
b* (9oils wh'h roservo)
11 Tracts: 5 to 300 Ac.
S400 Ac. of Tillable Land
Former Commercial
Vdaahle Farm
BEaul.lni Views
real et .i te' ,,t,?;
1, 2,il; e P I. ,l u,.3-.
0rj 100 F

Is l I I- ', '.







Time to clean out the
attic, basement and/or
garage? Advertise
your yard sale in the
Ci3SSiiCLi, and make
your clean up a breeze!


HOME & LAND, Appraised @
$85,000. Selling for $86,000.
Keller Williams, World Class
Realtors. (239)839-9368
LABELLE- 3br, 2ba, Family
Room, on corner lot, large
oak trees, 1 acre of land, 2
garage carports, 2 sheds,
screened porch, 1046 No-
bles Rd. Ser. Inq. Only!
(863)675-1172. for appt.
LABELLE, Very Nice Area,
Beautiful 3BR w/hard fIrs. 1
BA w/surrounding tile firs.
Kit., D/R, Carport w/laundry
rm. Beautiful Old Oaks,
Palm, Citrus. About 1/2
acre. $179,900. By Owner.
(863)675-8038.

LAKEPORT- Canal front, 2
story, 2br, Iba, 24x24 gar-
age, 1st floor, 2br, 2ba on
2nd floor, 2300 sq ft total,
$260,000 (321)593-2739.
Nice, Large, CBS home, fine
neighbors, w/2 extra Ig. lots,
$95,000 neg.
(561)924-6022 for details.
REDUCED-Must Sell! 2/1, w/
new roof, plumbing, elec.,
kitchen cabinets, plus c/a,
$66,500. (561)602-8000



Sportsmans Paradise Yearly
Memberships. Hunting, fish-
ing, lodging and meals con-
veniently located in White
Springs, Florida. Sign up be-
fore rates increase For in-
formation call:
(800)655-6661.

Do-It-Yourself Ideas


' -


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16, 2005


Job
Information 0225








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16, 2005


I| e -ISale


40 Years Experience
a LICENED & INSURED PRE-SALES ISPECHION
S I Gw.-mi. ganfin Rod- m ,m.mgi^bi.ge-

CHEROKEE
HOME INSPECTIONS, INC.












4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, [ in Moore Haven
Many Upgrades $275,000 Reduced to $79,500
RESIDENTIAL- MOORE HAVEN
CLEWISTON 3BR, 2BA MH w/fenced yad
M Bank Foreclosures tai 500
Call for Details (


'3BR, 1BA Home in
Hooker's Point Area
$112,000
3BR, 2BA, MH on man-
made lake $70,000
New construction on
Bayberry Loop, 4 BR,
2BA, Many Upgrades
$275,000
S4BR, 2BA, MH, Sherwood
S/D New Upgrades
MONTURA
* Lots Available Call for Details


*River View Lots available on
Caloosahatchee River
Call for Details
LAKEPORT
* Listings Needed
ACREAGE LAND & LOTS
* Farm Land Available
Call for Details
COMMERCIAL
* Office & Retail Space available
in Shopping Center
Call for Details.


,, ,VN Dn'-ESS
IJC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
,- 420 F. SUGARLAND HWY.
S(863) 983-6663 (863) 983-9770
WEBSITE: DYESSREALESTATE.COM E-MAIL: ANN@DYESSREALESTATE.COM
Se Habla Espaiol
AFTER HOURS:
ANNDYESS FAYEKELTING LAURA SMITH TRAVISDYESS KATHYGARCIA
(863) 983-8979 (863) 677-0707 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863) 228-4798
RESIDENTIAL 3BIg4IgtlMIlP/4900 ACREAGE
2BR, 2BA New Condo MONTURA 9.9 acres Sears Rd. under
$184,900 LOTS AVAILABLE Citrus SOLD!! $94,900
5 New Homes CAilif.PEAW#IiisLNS$9S
Unde ContacCaIfor 4B1E tiViffAlW,0oo 5 a&L ENDI oo00
3 oSAE,K.PRDaWi900 COVIVIE-RCrAT Lot in Holiday Isle $27,000
3BR 2B /,! $340,000 MCOMERC 3 Montura 1.25 $42,000
4EBIJ.~IENDISN5 900 w/ Inly
Under Construction "I,000
A3BT jkAV fq. 9 Commercial Lots on US
ft. --$24000 27 with Building $400,000 List Your
Moore Haven Yacht Club Building 2476 sq. ft. on
LotSAIrsPENDIM)500 US 27 100'x100' H Hre!
3BSILSEBPENDJ13j000 8 Lots Zoned Rl-B Home Here!
.2 .80 $400,000
sacrE Tiifr'n|ails 10 Lots Zoned Commercial
acrs a or ils $500,000 Marketing To
2BR, 2BA 150'xlOO' $183,500 Harlem Bar Great
3BR, 2BtQjo,7rkshop Business Opportunity Every Potential
$340,000 Call for Details Buyer In The
MAOBIjSlBIOMES Indtl +
3BR, 2Ba, SlD!/ $67,500 10 World
3BR, 2BA Easy Life $87,000 Cabinet Shop 4800sq.ft.
3BR, 2BA Seminole Manor & Apt. $173,000 www3endry-gladesmmls.com
$87,500
SPECIAL. NEW ALISTINGTC3r
3 Bedroom. 2 Bath on Man Made Lake. Storage Shed.
Call For Details
Real Estate in Hendry and Glades Counties, Florida
http://www.hendry-gladesmmls.com


I/ OnW


Your Realtor for
Western Communities


C &d Teresa Sullivan



Call For Listings


.561-795-8533 or 561-996-5623,


Brian Sullivan

General Contractor

CUSTOM HOMES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Call us for all of your new construction needs,

your design or ours.

Visit our new web site

www.briansullivancontractor.com

and look at some of our new homes.


(863)441-4202


30






'Tit


(863)465-1371


License #CGC0061 855


cx- x


Croarrol
Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505


Ann Donohue 228-0221
., David Rister 634-2157,
Af ^J S ^Us, e 7fae _tiSnjSIrf


Ax


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLI-
NA. MUST SEE THE BEAUTI-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS
OF WESTERN NC MOUN-
TAINS. Homes, Cabins,
Acreage & Investments.
Cherokee Mountain Realty
GMAC Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainreal-
ty.com Call for Free Bro-
chure (800)841-5868.
East Alabama Mountain Prop-
erty For Sale One hour west
of Atlanta in Piedmont, AL
Great for enjoyment or in-
v e s t m e n t
15-acres-$54,250.00 512-a
cres-$1,485,000.00 More
information Call Gary
McCurdy (256)239-8001.
The classified are the
most successful sales-
person in town.


Grand Opening! Lakefront
Acreage from $69,900.
Spectacular new waterfront
community on one of the
largest & cleanest mountain
lakes in America! Large, es-
tate-size parcels, gentle
slope to water, gorgeous
woods, panoramic views.
Paved roads, county water,
utilities. Low-financing. Call
now (800)564-5092 x198.
LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Start-
ing at $89,900. Gorgeous
lakefront parcels. Gently
sloping, pristine shoreline,
spectacular views. Across
from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational
lake in East Tenn. Paved
roads, underground utilities,
central water, sewer, Excel-
lent financing. Call now
S800)704-3145 ext 617,
unset Bay, LLC.
Montana River Frontage, Log
Home, Guest House, Horse
Barn, +/- 4941 acres. Witt
& Associates Realty, Box
1273, Bozeman MT, Russell
Pederson, Agent.
(406)485-2399 www.Mon-
tanaLandAuctions.com.
NORTH CAROLINA MOUN-
TAINS! Spring is blooming
and is beautiful! A wonderful
time to look for real estate.
See Photos: www.North-
CarolinaMountainRealty.com
or call (800)293-1998. Free
Brochure.
Tennessee Lake Property
from $24,900! 6-1/2 Acre
lot $59,900. 27 Acre Lake
Estate $124,900. Lake Par-
cel and Cabin Package
Available $64,900.
(866)770-5263 ext 8 for de-
tails.
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS
North Carolina Where there
is: Cool Mountain Air,
Views & Stream, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage. CALL
FOR FREE BROCHURE OF
MOUNTAIN PROPERTY
SALES. (800)642-5333. Re-
alty Of Murphy 317 Peach-
tree St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.



NEED CASH??
I Buy Houses, Land, Campers,
Boats or anything, any con-
dition. (863)228-2761.




READING A
NEWSPAPER MAKES
YOU A MORE INFORMED
AND INTERESTING
PERSON.

wo nde Wewspopr
readers an mn m popiulol


-iUlenHmes -
Sale'I'll


..........


Moil Hme


CLEWISTON COUNTRY ACRES
Modular/Models. From $59,900 & up,
3/4/5BR, 2/3BA, acre & 1/4 available or use
your land as down payment. Financing
available. 863-673-6417 or 561-753-8355


I






F



E


.I


F
R


l0bile Homes



Mobile Home- Lots 2005
Mobile Home Parts 2010
Mobile Homes- Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2020



IBERGLASS STAIRS- New,
for mobile home, 5 risers,
$250. (863)467-0506.



2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile
Homes For Rent
Stanton Mobile Homes
863-983-8106



Financing Available:
Buy Here, Pay Here.
Stanton Mobile Homes
Marginal Credit O.K.
Call 1-800-330-8106
or 863-983-8106 \

New & Used
Mobile Homes:
Land Home Packages
as little as $1,800 down.
Stanton Homes
863-983-8106

IUSE AREA '02 DWMH
wide, 5br, 2ba, 2000 sq. ft.,
on .48 acres, nicely land-
sca ped, $140,000
(863)675-4912 Ive message
Owner Financing
ON MOBILE HOMES
& LAND
Call 863-228-1405
leading a newspaper
helps you understand
the world around you.
No wonder newspaper
readers are more suc-
cessful people!


OF CLEWISTON

1)Very Nice,
2/2 DW,
Applicances,
Screen Porch,
Extra DW
Carport, 2
Sheds
$74,900



2) Midstate
Loop Special,
3/2 DW,
Fence
Carport, Shed
72,00


3)New "
Land & Home
Packages in
Sunshine Lake
Estates
NowAvailable


4)Tropi 50


Ca AC&
nces
8,900
2160 W. Hwy. 27 Clewiston
1.4 Miles N.W. of WAL-MART
983-4663
*CHampion
HOME BUILDERS Co
I I


Recreation



Boats 3005
Camjt XeRVs 30,0
Jat i 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles/ATVs 3035



14'V HULL BOAT
Aluminum, w/trailer. $350
(863)675-6652
15' FIBERGLASS BOAT
W/trailer, vinyl top & 35 h/p
Evinrude motor. $1000
(863)675-6652
AIR BOAT 125 LYCOMING'05
Brand new prop but needs
starter. $2500
(863)634-8023 ask for John
AIR BOAT- Aluminum, 15ft,
small block Chevy, good
prop, runs good, trailer.
$2500 (863)763-4643.
AIR BOAT- small, 75HP Frank-
lin Aircraft engine, 5' prop,
needs tune-up, Must sell
$850 (863)675-0254.
BOAT, 14 Ft. Flat Bottom, Alu-
minum. $125
(863)228-2123
BOAT TRAILER, 14 Ft. Galva-
nized. Good shape. $200.
863-674-1105.
SEA KAYAK, '98 Perception
Eclipse, paddle, $700.
(863)697-3004.


CAMPER TRAILER, 32 Ft.
Good condition. $1000.or
best offer. (863)763-8261
COACHMAN 5TH WHEEL RV,
'93- 27', excellent cond,
$5000. (863)697-2180.
M/H CAR TOWING HITCH-
Honda, '2000 $100.
(863)675-8168
TERRY FLEETWOOD- '81, 30',
sleeps 6, Fair condition
$1800. 772-287-3602 or
772-486-1914



TROLLING MOTORS (2)ASK-
ING $75 for both.
(321)593-2739.


BOAT & TRAILER
Galvanized rocket boat trailer
w/ home made boat. $150
(863)763-3822
Harley Davidson 1200
Sportster, '97, new tires,
12k mi., never reg. in Fla.
Call Don bet. 5-8.
(561)992-9491


ATV 400 Polaris
Excellent shape $2500
(863)801-1666
BOMBADEER DS650 Baja,
'03, very few hrs., $4500.
(863)675-0939
YAMAHA 350, '86, blue, new
tires, good condition, $1100
or best offer (863)673-8741

Automobiles

II -
Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks4040
Parts Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



CADILLAC ELDOADO '79
Biarritz, 350 V8, only 78K mi,
$3,900 (863)612-0046
HONDA CIVIC, '04- low miles,
call for details,
(863)983-7415.
PONTIAC BONNEVILLE 92
Auto, Cold A/G, Good trans-
portation/gd tires $3000 863-
467-6577/357-1426.
SATURN WAGON 1993, 4
cyl., Auto., PW, A/C, Looks
& Runs great. $1500 or best
offer. (772)461-2629
TOYOTA TERCEL 1983,
4 cyl. Gas saver. Very clean
car. $900 or best offer.
(863)675-2598 Lv. msg


OLDSMOBILE TORONADO'85
Totally rebuilt, new tires, low
miles. Runs great! $6500 or
good offer. (863)824-0884



FORD EXPLORER SPORT '97,
4X4, Loaded, 2 Dr., Needs
motor work. $2500
(863)634-4104
JEEP Grand Wagoneer- '84,
Camo paint job runs & looks
good $2500.
(863)673-0920.


CLUB CAR GOLF CART-
w/charger, $600.
(863)467-1518.


GOLF CAR- 3 Wheel, recondi-
tioned, smooth riding, $750.
(863)612-1648.
Golf Carts,
Gas or Electric
Buy and Sell
Call (863)824-0878


Camper Shell, aluminum, for
short bed, full sz. pickup,
$350. (863)634-2975
FLATBED, 8 Ft., Comes w/2
tool boxes. Painted Diamond
Plate. $350. (863)228-2123
HITCH, Reese, 5th Wheel,
Easy Slide w/mounting rails.
$250. (772)285-8405
TIRE, Brand New Michelin &
Ford Wheel. $85
(863)674-1105
TRUCK CAP, Leer, High Top,
Fits full size Chevy. Pd.
$1300, Asking $300.
(302)264-1301
TURBO HYDROMATIC TRANS
Installation avail. $250 or best
offer (863)467-8856


CHEVY Z71- '94, 1/2 Ton, 4x4
Ext cab 350, auto, $2500.
(863)412-2504
DODGE 250 RAM 1981: 318
engine, 130K. Has electrical
short. $500 (863)763-5392
FORD 1986, 308, V8, 4x4,
manual shift. $1500
(863)763-5392
FORD F150 P/U 1989, Needs
motor. $1200
(863)634-4104
GMC S15 PU, '88- red, runs
good, $1500. neg.
(863)763-1751.
TOYOTA PU, '87- drk. blue, 5
spd, w/fibergalss canopy,
$1000, (863)697-3004.


CHEVY S-10 1992, Good con-
dition, needs repair. $2000
Call Jewel @
(863)751-1358
FORD BRONCO '86
Full size, 4x4 $600 ask for
Michael (863)967-6632
HUNTING PACKAGE $8500
Jeep '88, Cobra trlr,.tripod, 2
htrs, 2 tree stands, climber.
Call Natalia (954)304-4915
ISUZU TROOPER '91
V-6, A/C, good condition, runs
good $1000 or best offer
(239)657-4348


UTILITY TRAILER
w/ running boards & tires
$150 (863)675-0969


CHEVY VAN, '89- w/windows,
asking, beige w/ brown
stipe, runs good, $2500
neg.. (863)763-1751.


FORD AEROSTAR VAN, '92-
runs well, good shape,
$1500. (863)467-6423.
FORD HANOI CAPPED 1993,
Fully equipped. After 8pm
call (863)357-3534 $3800.
PLYM. VOYAGER 1988, Good
engine, no rust, good tires,
power steering leaks. $795
neg. (863)612-0111
PLYM VOYAGER, '87- V6,
AC/PS/CD, new tires, hitch,
runs great, low miles, $1500
(863)763-6205.
How do you find a job
in today's competitive
market? In the
employment section
of the classified


Public Notices



Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500



LEGAL NOTICE
The following vehicle will be sold at pub-
lic auction on June 28 at 8:00 a.m. at
2190 NW 16th St., Belle Glade, FL:
1986 Honda 4DR
VIN #1HGBA7429GA107886
62613 CGS 06/16/05

'Puli No


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
HENRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 2005-068-CP
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
JAMES MARTIN DOLES,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JAMES MARTIN COLES deceased,
File Number 2005-068-CP is pending
in the Circuit Court for elndtr County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 25 E. Hickpochee Ave.,
LaBelle, Ronda 33935.
The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All Creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this notice
is served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE OATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, In-
cluding unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must ile their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THIS
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of this Notice
is June 9,2005.
Personal Representative
Roma J.oVanse
16589 78th ODrive North
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Joseph ODeGance, Esquire
Attorney
Florida Bar No. 155360
3471 N. Federal Hwy. #300
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33306
954-566-1531
59576 CGS 6/9,16/05

:Pubi cNI


INVITATION TO BID
Notice is hereby given that the District School Board of Hendry County, Florida, will
receive bids until 3:00 p.m. on June21, 2005 at the Hendry County School
Board's Finance Office, at which time they will be opened and tabusated.
Project Title: Central Elementary School Restroom Renovation
Project-2005
Project Location: Central Elementary School
1000 South Deane Duff Avenue
Clewiston, FL 33440
Name of Owner: Hendry County School Board
25E.Hickpochee Ave.
LaBelle, FL 33935
Project Scope: Furnish all labor and materials required to complete
the renovations of the designated restrooms at
CentralElementary School
Site Examination: The site may be examined by contacting the
School Principal, Ms. Anna Jo Springfield at 863-
983-1550 and scheduling time of a site visit.
Place for Receipt of Bids: All bids shall be delivered to: Hendry County
School Board's Finance & Purchasing Office,
111 Curry Street, LaBelle, FL. or mailed to: Hendry
County School Board's Finance & Purchasing
Office, PO. Box 1980, LaBelle, FL 33975.
Obtaining Bid Documents: Bidders may obtain documents, including com-
plete drawing and specifications, by contacting
the office of Jay Ammon Architect, Inc., 3246
Lakeview Oaks Drive, Longwood, Florida, 32779
telephone number (407)333-1977. All requests
or pans and peciications must be accompan-
ied by a refundable deposit of $50.00 per set,
with checks payable to Jay Ammon Architect,
Inc.
All bids must be enclosed in a sealed envelope plainly marked on the outside "Cen-
tral Elementary School Restroom Renovation Project- 2005. Bid Date: 6/21/05,
3:00 p.m." The School Board of Hendry County reserves the right to reject any
and all bids received, and to waive any and all irregularities in regard thereto. No
bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt for bids for a
period of sixty (60) calendar days without consent of the Board.
Hendry County School Board
Richard Murphy, Chairman
62638 CGS/CB 06/16/05


rHouses


[Houses Sale


lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


lHouses Sale


Fouses Sale


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16, 2005


lHouses Sale


lHouses-Sale 10251









Thursday. June 16. 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


ISeli Notic


NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF LANDOWNERS OF
HENDRY-HILLIARD WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to call of the Board of Supervisors of Hendry-
Hillard Water Control District, and in accordance with Chapter 298, Florida Stat-
utes 1941, and law amendatory thereto, the Annual Meeting of Landowners of
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District, for the year 2005, will be held at the office
of Hilliard Brothers of Rorida, Ltd., 5500 FlagholeRoad, Clewiston, Florida on Fri-
day, June 17, 2005 at 1:00 PM., for the purpose of:
1. Electing one (1) supervisor for a term of three (3) years.
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine.
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
Additionally, this notice advises that, if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District Board of Supervisors, with re-
spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and that, for such purpose. He may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Board of Supervisors
Hendry-Hilliard Water Control District
By: Joe Marlin Hilliard
President
61026 CGS 6/9,16/05

PAHOKEE HOUSING AUTHORITY, INC.
NOTICE
INVITATION FOR BID
BID NO. LM0605
TO PROVIDE LAWN MAINTENANCE SERVICES
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the Pahokee Housing Au-
thority, until 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, June 22, 2005, local time, at which time
they will be publicly opened and read for furnishing of all labor, materials and
equipment, and performing all work necessary and incidental to Lawn Mainte-
nance Services for L.L. Stuckey Homes; McClure Village; Padgett Island Homes;
and Fremd Village, in accordance with the Pahokee Housing Authority's plans,.
specifications and contract documents.
The services for L.L Stuckey and McClure Village consist of removing litter; mow-
. ing, edging; spraying: and weed eating of dnveways and common areas.
The services for Padgett Island Homes and Fremd Village consist of removing litter,
mowing, spraying, weed eating, and edging of common areas and individual
yards; and edging of individual walkways and driveways, trimming of perimeters
of individual units.
Bids shall be delivered and addressed to the Pahokee Housing Authority, 465
Friend Terrace, Pahokee, FL 33476, and shall be labeled "Lawn Maintenance, Bid
No. LM06/05; 3:00 p.m.,; June 22, 2005." Any Bidder who wishes their bid to be
considered is responsible for making certain that their bid is received in the Pa-
hokee Housing Authority's office by the proper time. No oral, telegraphic, elec-
tronic, facsimile, or telephonic bids of modifications will be considered unless
specified. Bids must bear original signatures and figures. Specifications may be
examined and obtained at no charge by calling Julia Hale, Executive Director, at
(561) 924-5565.
Award will be made to the lowest responsible bidder whose bid meets the require-
ments of the invitation for bids. Pahokee Housing Authority reserves the right to
reject any or all bids and to waive any informality in bids, wherever it is in the
best interests of the Pahokee Housing Authority. Any late bids or bids received
after the scheduled deadline will be returned unopened. Pahokee Housing Au-
thority is an Equal Opportunity Employer and promotes a Drug-Free Workplace.
61335 CGS 6/16,23/05

SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF WORK PLAN
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to "The Water Rights Compact Among the
Seminole Tribe of Florida, The State of Florida, and The South Florida Water Man-
agement District', the 2nd Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan of the
Seminole Tribe of Florida has been submitted to the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District
The Seminole Tribe of Rorid, 6073 Stirling Road, Hollywood, FL 33024, has sub-
mitted, on June 6, 2005, the 2nd Amendment to the 17th Annual Work Plan to
include the following projects: Big Cypress Reservation: Big Cypress Rock
Quarry Building construct a proposed office building at the Big Cypress Rock
Quarry (SB/T48S/R35E). Brighton Reservation: Brighton Water Treatment Plant
construct a water treatment plant (S18-20/T39S/R33E). Immokalee Reserva-
tion: Immokalee Lake Drainage install a gravity control structure to help allevi-
ate flooding of the Immokalee Lake during the rainy season (S10/T47S/R29E).
Other: Coconut Creek Seminole Casino Expansion Phase 1 proposed expan-
sion of the existing casino building located on Trust lands. The proposed project
is located on Tract D0, owned by the Seminole Tribe but not Trust land, at the
Commerce Center of Coconut Creek. Proposed project consists of a building ad-
dition, valet parking driveway, and a modification to the existing lake with an ad-
dition of a 270' seawall (S18/T48S/R42E). The Work Plan describes existing and
proposed activities on Seminole land. The Brighton Reservation is located in
Glades County, Township 40 South, Range 32 East; Township 39 South, Range
32 East; Township 39 South, Range 33 East; Township 38 South, Range 33
East. The Immokalee Reservation is located in Collier County, Township 47
South, Range 29 East. The Big Cypress Reservation is located in Hendry
County. Township 47 South, Ranges 32-34 East. The Hollywood Reservation is
located in Broward County, Townships 50-51 South, Range 41 East.
Interested persons may comment upon the Work Plan or submit a written request
for a copy of the Staff Report containing proposed agency action regarding the
Work Plan by writing to: Environmental Resource Regulation, South Florida Wa-
ter Management District, PO Box 24680, West Palm Beach, FL 33416-4680;
such comments or requests must be received within 30 days from the date of
publication.
No further public notice will be provided regarding this Work Plan. A copy of the
Staff Report must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceed-
S ,;, ,,,; =i .if, .. .. ,.- ,i .1 to request an Adm inistrative
,. ,, :.r .._ J.ir, ii,- r ,,.,,.. -,] ,,.. ,, ,, ., submitting a written'request
ir- :i, jni W I.n in. Jr lin W I. i I


REQUEST FOR BIDS (RFB) CN051024
S-65A EROSION REPAIRS, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The South Florida Water Management District will receive sealed bids through the
Procurement Office, 2nd Floor, B-1 Bidg., 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm
Beach, Florida 33406, for S-65A Erosion Repairs, Osceola County, FL on
Wednesday, June 29, 2005 at 2:30 p.m. local time, at which timely submitted
bids will be opened and publicly read. Work consists of constructing channel
protection including fill material & riprap revetment; removal & replacement of
existing dolphin piles & floating safety barrier; removal & replacement of fender
system; install galvanized metal walkways along fender systems. An OPTIONAL
pre-bid conference will be held onsite on Monday, June 20, 2005 at 9:30 a.m. -
onsite. FL Tnpk. to Yeehaw Junction; go W SR60 approx 19 miles. Left (South)
at S-65 access Rd. Proceed approx 8 miles to S-65A structure. For directions
call (407) 846-5226. A site visit willimmediately follow.
All bids must conform to the instructions in the Request for Bidders (RFB). Inter-
ested respondents may obtain a copy of the complete RFB by downloading It for
Iree Irom our webslte www.sfwmd.co. by obtaining a set for $40.00 at the
above address, by calling (561) 682-6391, or by calling the 24-hour BID HOT-
LINE 800-472-5290. The public is invited to attend the bid opening. Information
on the status of this solicitation can be obtained at our web site -
www.slwmd.gov.
61670 CGS 6/16/05

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Hendry County Public Library Cooperative Governing Board will meet at 5:45
p.m., Monday, June 20,2005, in the City Hall Commission Chambers, 115 West
entura Avenue, Clewiston, Florida. The purpose of this public meeting is to:
* Review and consider the Hendry County Public Library Annual Plan of Service
for 2005, and
* Review and considerthe Hendry County Public Library Cooperative Annual
Budget for 2005.
All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend this public meeting. Any
person requiring a special accommodation to participate in the meeting because
of a disability or physical impairment, including speech or hearing impairments,
should contact the Hendry County Library Cooperative Board Coordinator at
(863) 983-1493 at least five calendar days prior to the scheduled meeting.
Christopher Kuechmann, Cooperative Coordinator
61889 CGS 6/16/05
mTearue aunIPPnrPinirAneau rrwnamn


AUCTION on Friday, July 1, 2005
at9:00 a.m. at1233N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property ofl Tamca McRae:
living room set chest of drawers, stereo
with speakers, misc. items
62653 CGS 6/16,23/05

NOTICE
AUCTION on Friday, June 17,2005
at 9:00 am. at 1233 N.W. Avenue L,
Belle Glade, Florida
Property of LaTonya Canty
Clothes, toys, basinet, baby tub and
misc. items.
60031 CGS 6/9,16/05

NOTICE OF BUDGET WORKSHOP/
SPECIAL MEETING
The Board of Supervisors for the Central
County Water Control District will hold
a budget workshop/special meeting
on Wednesday, June 22, 2005 at 5
p.m., the purpose of this workshop
will be to discuss the District's budget,
security needs and its right of way
policy.
All interested persons are invited to at-
tend and be heard with respect to the
proposed budget. Interested persons
may appear on their own behalf or by
agent or attorney. If anyone decides to
appeal a decision made by the Board
with respect to any matters c to insure
that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: IF YOU RE-
QUIRE SPECIAL AID OR SERVICES AS
ADDRESSED IN THE AMERICAN
DISABILITIES ACT, PLEASE CONTACT
THE DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE AT
1863) 983-5797, NO LESS THAN FIVE
5) DAYS PRIOR TO THE ABOVE
TATED HEARING DATE. ,
CENTRAL COUNTY WATER
CONTROL DISTRICT
59813 CGS 6/15/05
NOTICE TO PUBLIC
The Hendry County Hospital
Authority Financial Commit-
tee will conduct their month-
ly business meeting on
Thursday, June 30 at 10:00
a.m. in the Conference
Room at Hendry Regional
Medical Center, 500 West
Sugarland Highway, Clewis-
ton, Florida.
62398 CGS 6/16/05
Your next job could be in
today's classified. Did
you look for it?


NUii OFUREGULARMiEETiING
OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
OF THE CENTRAL COUNTY WATER
CONTROL DISTRICT
You are hereby notified that the Regular
Meeting of the Board oe Supervisors of
the Central County Water Control Dis-
trict will be held on Wednesday, June
22, 2005 at 7 p.m. at the Montura
Clubhouse, Montura Ranch Estates,
State Road 833, Clewiston, Florida.
The purpose of this meeting is to
transact any and all business which
may come before the Board. If a per-
son decides to appeal the decision of
the Board of Supervisors with respect
to any matter considered at the public
meeting or hearing herein referred he
or she may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the testi-
mony and evidence upon which the
appeal is based.
59805 CGS 6/15/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Lakeside Condo Association of Pahokee,
Florida is seeking bids for lawn main-
tenance. Bid should include weekly
mowing, weedeating, edging, spraying
as needed, biyearly front hedge trim-
ming and putting down mulch, and
some yearly trimming. For information
contact Mrs. Burroughs at
561-261-3992. Mail bids to Lakeside
Condo Association, #40 Lakeside Cir-
cle, Pahokee, FL 33476. Closing date:
6/30/05
61680 CGS 6/16/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given that Fergu-
son Towing will sell at public Auction,
free from all prior liens, the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Point, FL 33438 on June 20,
2005 at 9:00 A.M.
1991 Ford (van) Red
VIN# 1FMDAIUMZA27314
1992 Isuzu (4-door) Red
VIN# 452CG58Z2N4353451
1986 Bulck (2-door) Blu
VIN# 1G4GM47A7GP231421)
2002 Chevrolet (4-door) Whi
VIN# 2G1WF52E729376033
1991 Mercury (2-door Bro
VIN# 1MEPM6047MH623839
1999 Daewo(4-door) Grn
VIN# KLAJA52Z7XK237343
1983 Ford (Pickup) Grn
VIN# 1FTEF14G3DNA42155
60955 CGS 6/9,16/05


Grab a bargain from your
neighbor's garage, attic,
basement or closet in
today's classified.


Water, water everywhere for the rainy season


By MaryAnn Morris
Water is a big subject in South
Florida's rainy season. For newcom-
ers, the "rainy season", extends from
late spring through early fall, roughly
from May or June through October or
November, depending on the year.
Daily rainfall on the relatively flat land
of South Florida means that water can
be a problem.
Government water managers, such
as the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, local drainage districts,
such as the Coquina Water Control
District, cities and county govern-
ments and homeowners associations
have the responsibility to manage
rainfall runoff for their areas, canals,
ditches and lakes, as their codes and
charters require. Property owners,
ranchers, farmers and individuals are
also responsible for the runoff from


the land they own.
Dished medians in interstate high-
ways, roadside ditches and swales
along lot lines and residential roads all
work to drain water away from roads
we drive on and the buildings where
we work and live.
Sometimes water can be drained
off through public ditches, canals and
swales, or caught in ponds and partial-
ly contained in swales until it soaks in
or evaporates over time.
Nothing seems to cause more con-
tention than changing things on your
property that in some way changes
the water situation on your neighbor's
property. In short, you are expected to
keep your water and keep the ditches
flowing. This issue is known as "lot
drainage".
"Lot drainage in new subdivisions
is addressed as part of the review


Staff photos/MaryAnn Morris -.JI'E Ax]iBTV-,I.| f l
Tickseed, said to have been Pale Meadow Beauty is a little
used by the Seminoles for heat flower, sometimes blooming with
prostration is blooming almost Tickseed in open prairie. Its petals
everywhere a mower hasn't fall off easily, especially in the
touched. afternoon.


Tiny Shoe Buttons, also called Hat Pins looks like a tiny "pop" of
white fireworks on the slopes of ditches.


process," said Jennifer Busbin, plan-
ner for the Okeechobee County Plan-
ning and Development Department.
When roads and homes are built, the
areas covered with concrete, roofs or
paving no longer allow rainwater to
soak in. Plans must be made so that
no-one is hurt by the new construc-
tion.
"On existing properties," continued
Ms. Busbin, "neither may the drainage
flow be blocked nor may the lot be
changed in such a way to cause water
to flow onto or stand on neighboring
property."
So, what can you do?
Be you own best water manager.
Be sure that you understand the path
water takes as it leaves your property.
Don't block swales or ditches by plant-
ing in them or allow leaves, mulch
and other yard waste and sediment to


remain. Don't plant in swales and
ditches. Even tree trunks can interfere
with drainage. Older swales should
periodically be dug out to remove
accumulated sediment in the bottom
and sloped, if needed so that water
will flow to catch basins or soak into
the soil.

When changes on neighboring
property cause water problems on
your land, it can become a code
enforcement issue.

"If, for instance, you wish to build
higher than your neighbor, you can
where permitted, but you must keep
your water on your land with a swale.
You may not change drainage to
adversely impact your neighbor," said
Ms. Busbin, "Problems with existing
homes can be an issue for the Code
Compliance Department."


Spike Rush grows in ditches Yellow Colic-root's leaves form a
and marshes, often near or distinctive rosette at its base, mak-
among Pickerel Weed ing it easy to identify.


Okeechobee's Many


Wildflowers;

By MaiyAnn Morris
Here in Okeechobee County, devel-
opment has not pushed the farms and
open space back and back and back. In
other, more developed areas where
many wildflowers once grew, now only
the Periwinkle and some never-say-die
Lantana survive as traffic blasts by. Here
-we are lucky.
This time of year the roadsides and
ditches in Okeechobee County sparkle
with color. Wildflowers come popping
up year after year asking nothing, brush-
ing up, stretching up, and reaching for
US.
A riot of deep yellow Mohr's Susan
pops up with nodding heads behind the
bands of lighter yellow Tickseed.


we lucky few

Ditch bottoms bloom in a prolifera-
tion of wild abandon with cobalt blue
Pickerel Weed, white Spike Rush and
the interesting little white plant called
Hatpins, or Shoe Buttons up the side of
the ditch. It reminds of a tiny burst of
white fireworks exploding on the
ground. -
Roadside ditches often have a lacey
edge of yellow Tickseed to add to the
color palette. If you're out for a quiet
stroll or not driving too fast, you may
even see little Pale Meadow Beauty or
the delicate spikes of Yellow Colic-root.
Yes, here we are lucky.
Reference: Florida Wildflowers in
their Natural Communities by Walter
Kingsley Taylor


Researchers declare victory against invasive mole cricket


GAINESVILLE After a quarter-
century fight against three invasive
insects from South America, Universi-
ty of Florida researchers are declaring
victory against the pests that caused
$94 million in damage to turf and pas-
tures each year.
The successful battle against mole
crickets is a prime example of how
biological control agents can be used
to manage pests without conventional
pesticides, said Howard Frank, a pro-
fessor of entomology at UF's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
He said the release of three benefi-
cial organisms wasps, nematodes
and flies imported from South Ameri-
ca that attack mole crickets has
reduced mole cricket populations in
the Gainesville area by 95 percent, and
the control is spreading throughout
Florida.
"Reductions increased during the
past 12 years as populations of the
introduced natural enemies increased
and began to have a spectacular effect
on the mole cricket pests," said Frank,
who has coordinated the mole cricket
research program since 1985.
Frank said four species of mole
crickets are found in Florida: North-
ern, short-winged, southern and
tawny.
The northern mole cricket, which is
indigenous to the state, is not closely
related to the three South American
invaders, and it is not troublesome
because native wasp and nematode
species in Florida keep it under con-
trol. Unfortunately, the three invasive
mole cricket species are not affected
by native wasps and nematodes in
Florida, he said.
Accidentally introduced to the
southeastern United States more than
75 years ago, the pest mole crickets
first became a problem for Florida
vegetable growers and were poorly
controlled with arsenic baits. The


invasive pests became a nuisance
again in the 1970s when the Environ-
mental Protection Agency banned
chlordane and similar pesticides.
"When the three invasive mole
crickets left their natural enemies
behind, there was nothing to stop
their population boom here," Frank
said. "These pest mole crickets, which
tunnel into the ground and feed on
plant roots, are now found from North
Carolina to Texas, and they continue
to spread north and west."
Of the three, the tawny mole crick-
et is the most destructive, eating grass
roots in Florida pastures and turf as
well as the roots of tomatoes, cab-
bages, eggplants and bell pepper
seedlings, Frank said.
He said the pest crickets have a real
affinity for bahiagrass, Florida's most
common pasture grass, which covers
more than 2.5 million of the state's 35-
million acres. Like the pest crickets,
bahiagrass was imported from South
America, and it provides the insects
with an almost endless food source.
They also eat Bermudagrass on Flori-
da golf courses.
"Early research on the three inva-
sive pests showed how mole crickets,
like moles, burrow into soil around
plant roots and prevent them from
absorbing water," Frank said. "We
also realized that permanent control
of these pests could only be achieved
with a classical biological control pro-
gram, and we began looking for natu-
ral enemies in South America."
A BENEFICIAL WASP
In Brazil, researchers found a
native wasp (Larra bicolor) that
attacks the pest mole crickets. After
the Brazilian wasp stings the pest
mole cricket and lays an egg, the wasp
grub (larva) begins feeding on the
mole cricket and kills it within two
weeks.
In 1981-1983, the Brazilian wasp


was released at several South Florida
locations, but it did not thrive and
failed to provide effective control of
the pest mole crickets.
Undaunted, UF researchers found a
tougher strain of the same wasp in the
higher elevations of Bolivia, releasing
it in the Gainesville area during 1988
and 1989. It attacks all three pest mole
cricket species, but does not threaten
Florida's native northern mole cricket.
"By late 1993, it was evident that
the Bolivian strain of the wasp had
become established," Frank said.
"Four years later, the population had
spread at least 20 miles east and west
of Gainesville. By 2002, it seems to
have spread 135 miles northwest and
perhaps as far south. In time, it is likely
to occupy all of Florida."
A BENEFICIAL NEMATODE
Next stop in the battle against the
mole cricket invasion was Uruguay
where a parasitic nematode a tiny,
worm-like animal was found and
brought to Florida for mass-rearing
and release.
"While other mole cricket natural
enemies live above ground, nema-
todes dwell in the soil where mole
crickets do most of their damage -
that's the real advantage of this para-
site," said Grover Smart, a professor of
nematology who brought the nema-
tode to Florida in 1985. "The nema-
tode does not affect Florida's native
northern mole crickets, but it does
attack all three invasive mole cricket
pests."
Once the parasitic nematode
(Steinernema scapterisci) enters the
body of a mole cricket to mature and
reproduce, it kills the cricket within 48
hours, Smart said. Young nematodes
emerge from the dead cricket about a
week later to seek new hosts. Once
infected, mole crickets can spread the
nematode to new areas by flying,
crawling or burrowing.


Between 1989 and 1992, scientists
working on the mole cricket research
program released more than 16 billion
nematodes in 21 Florida counties.
"We just don't see a lot of mole crick-
ets anymore in areas where we have
released this parasite," Smart said.
UF holds three patents on the
organism, which is now available
commercially as a biopesticide mar-
keted' as Nematac-S by MicroBio, a
biotech firm owned by Becker Under-
wood Inc. in Ames, Iowa.
"If the nematode has not spread to
your land, it will eventually get there,"
Frank said. "If you want to speed up its
arrival, apply the biopesticide. It will
kill a large portion of your pest mole
crickets year after year."
A BENEFICIAL FLY
The third effective biocontrol is a
beneficial fly from Brazil (Ormia
depleta) that is attracted to two
species of the pest mole crickets by
the sounds they make.
"Like little guided missiles, the flies
home in on singing crickets and lay
their larvae on or near the singer,"
Frank said. "The larvae burrow into
the crickets and feed, killing the host
within a week."
He said the mole cricket research
program found and reared the Brazil-
ian fly, releasing a few hundred flies in
Gainesville and Bradenton in 1988.
Between 1989 and 1992, researchers
released more than 10,000 flies across
the state in cooperation with golf
courses and the Florida TurfGrass
Association. By 1994, the fly had
spread to 38 of Florida's 67 counties,
but the tropical insect does not seem
to survive permanently north of the
Orlando area.
"In counties where the fly is estab-
lished, surveys show significantly less
damage by pest mole crickets on golf
courses," Frank said.


Iubi Noice


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005





Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 16,2005


Maroone


.Chevrolet


N N N

A ~ ~ .CO


SELECTION, AND A MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE*...That's Marooneo.
IL!


S F_; or the first i in history, everyone in America gets the GM employee discount. You pay what we pay. Not a cent more.
urry this event ends spon! On all new 2005 models except Coryettes and medium duty trucks. See dealer for detail
L L'' _r Y ~ ~ ~I 1 L


\7PRICE,


Employee
Discount
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n I 4


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 16,2005


pAe.", azoe
7