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The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028421/00020
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: Sun (Belle Glade, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Independent Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade Fla
Creation Date: June 2, 2005
Publication Date: 1989-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Belle Glade (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Belle Glade
Coordinates: 26.685278 x -80.671389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 66, no. 44 (Dec. 7, 1989)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002051865
oclc - 33436726
notis - AKN9825
lccn - sn 95047260
System ID: UF00028421:00020
 Related Items
Preceded by: Belle Glade sun

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
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        page 4
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        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
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        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
    Classifieds
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
        page 24
Full Text




Bele.Gades on Dc0Svvy- Page 4


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Thursday, June 2,2005


Western Palm Beach County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1923


Vol. 78 No. 52


At a Glance

Roadrunner
Success Camp
Roadrunner Success Camp
at Lake Shore Middle School.
Are you ready for the chal-
lenge of Middle School? Lake
Shore Middle School will be
hosting an academic enrich-
ment camp July 5-21 from
8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Enroll-
ment is limited. Return regis-
tration forms by June 8.

Kick-off Party
Kick-off Party at the Belle
Glade Branch Library on
Thursday, June 9 at 10 a.m.
Bring the whole family for
entertainment provided by
Tale Twisters, and enjoy
games, craft and other activi-
ties. For more information call
the library at 996-3453. This
program is for all ages and will
last two hours.

Champagne
Celebration
The Mu Rho Omega Chap-
ier of Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc. announces their
annual Champagne celebra-
tion on Saturday, June 4 at the
Refugio & Celestino Ballroom.
Celebration begins at 9 p.m.
Tickets are $20 and $25 at the
door. For ticket information,
contact Ronelda Frederick at
(561) 993-2458 or Carla Lewis
at (561) 992-5519.

Workshop
meeting
The Belle Glade City Com-
mission will hold a Work-
shop Meeting on Wednesday,
oJnU t,4at.39, p.m. por a.s son
thereafter as possible, at the
Belle Glade City Hall, 110 Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
West, Belle Glade to address
the 2004-2005 Budget.

Family Fun Day
The Glades Community is
invited to attend The Prime
Time After -School Aged
Providers' Family Fun Day.
"It's a Family Affair" facilitat-
ed by Glades Community
Development Corporation on
Saturday, June 4, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Boys and Girls
Club 1101 SW Martin Luther
King, Jr. Blvd. In Belle Glade.

Registration
Glades Academy of Agri-
culture and Ecological Stud-
ies is located at 1200 E Main
Street, Pahokee, Florida
33476 and is a free Charter
Public School Grades Kg-5th.
Registration for the 2005-
2006 school year will run
Monday through Friday from
8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. beginning
May 16. For more detailed
information please call us at
(561) 924-9402.
See Glance-Page 4


Lake Level

13.8
S feet

level


Index


Classifieds
Opinion ..
School ..
Sports ...


. . .20-23

. . .. .1 1


See Page 4 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

newszap.com
newshlog.info
Online news & information



III 6 1 11111I
8 116510 00017 7


Police conduct sweep at park


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
PAHOKEE Despite public
concerns that a sweep could lead
to further disruption in the crowds
of people that gather at Martin
Luther King Park in Pahokee, the
police department, in partnership
with the sheriff's office, have
taken to the streets in a sweep
operation.
The sweep addresses a flood
of complaints that has been
lodged at city hall and the police


department against the swelling
crowds within the park.
They play their music loudly,
they drink, they fight, they swear
and they grow so large that mov-
ing across the street becomes an
increasingly harder thing to do,
residents say of the groups that
gather at the park late at night.
Members of a nearby church
spoke to commissioners at a
recent meeting and spurred the
city into action. The first step in
that project was organized quick-


ly after a group of approximately
3,500 to 4,000 took over the park
on a Sunday night.
In concert with the Palm
Beach County Sheriff's Office, the
Pahokee Police Department
developed a plan for action to
quell the disruption. They hope
that a series of sweeps targeting
the area will convince the crowds
that the park is not the place to
carry on at night.
Most often, the larger portion
of the crowd is made up of visitors


2005 Graduation: Glades Central seniors graduate


Staff photos/Jose Zaragoza
Dr. Effie Grear, a staple at Glades Central Community High School, spoke at this year's
graduation ceremonies. The crowd roared at her inspirational message, urging the new
graduates to do their best in life. Above everything, "Don't be ashamed to say you're
from the Glades," she said to an eruption in praise from parents and teachers.


to Pahokee, not residents. In a
town of approximately 6,000, offi-
cials say, it would be almost
impossible for the majority of the
city to be within a single park.
People from Riviera Beach, Boyn-
ton Beach, Clewiston and even
from neighboring Belle Glade
gather here, Chief Gonzalez said.
According to officials involved
in the operation, the first sweep
conducted May 22 produced
favorable results. Units on the
street approached the crowd of


hundreds at the park and used a
different approach in reaching the
crowds, said Interim Chief Calipto
Gonzalez.
The chief calls it his "walk and
talk" approach. Officers and
deputies first try to explain to the
crowds that the park, which offi-
cially closes at dusk to the public,
is off-limits to anyone later in the
night and ask them to move on.
See Police Page 12


City enforces



parking tickets


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
PAHOKEE Sixty-one-year-
old Edward Fountain walked
into the grocery store in Paho-
kee like he often does to cash his
check and, on leaving the store,
was met by a young officer who,
wrote him a $250 ticket for park-
ing his truck in the handicap
spot.
In the store no longer than
three minutes, he said, he dis-
agreed with the citation and tried
to reason with the officer. The
officer simply handed him his
ticket. "He should have more
consideration," Mr. Fountain
later said.
He is one of many citizens
upset over the recent enforce-
ment of parking violations.
Suddenly, citizens say, park-
ing routines that were normal
fare before are now frowned-
upon infractions, with some-


times serious penalties.
City officials, however, say it
is about time that the law is
upheld. For years, they say, citi-
zens have gone without follow-
ing the parking regulations, but
that is about to come to an
abrupt halt.
One hundred and thirteen
parking tickets were issued in
the month of April, according to
Interim Police Chief Calipto Gon-
zalez. Many of the tickets issued
cited residents for parking
against the flow of traffic or on
sidewalks. Nineteen of the 113
decided to appeal their case
before a special master last
month among them was Mr.
Fountain.
Mr. Fountain pleaded his case
at the hearing. For security rea-
sons, he-and the store manage-
ment had an understanding that
See Tickets Page 12


Organizers


finish up Relay,


look to next year


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
BELLE GLADE The
crowds are gone, the food is
eaten and Houston Tate is dry.
Yes, this year's Relay for Life
event is over and so are the
many festivities that enter-
tained participants during the
fun event.
The 18-hour overnight
event drew hundreds again
this year to the fundraising
effort, which helped to raise
thousands that will go toward
cancer research.


Beaming parents and friends filled the gymnasium at
the graduation ceremonies on Friday.


While most would savor
this time to relax after the
heavy planning and coordina-
tion necessary to pull off the
American Cancer Society Relay
for Life, organizers in the
Glades already look forward to
next year's event.
Reflecting on this year's
event, Barbara Bell-Spence,
one of the organizers and
employee of the city of Belle
Glade, said she was happy at
how well the event turned out.
See Relay-- Page 12


SFWMD seeks local


input in Acceler8


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
PAHOKEE Offering to pave
the way for local residents to take
advantage of upcoming employ-
ment opportunities in construc-
tion projects headed this way,
representatives of the South Flori-
da Water Management District
addressed the tri-cities.
The district has formed part-
nerships within the Glades com-
munities that cater to their unique
goal: To see the possible employ-
ment of approximately 1,000 resi-
dents in the Acceler8 projects that
will be undertaken soon.
Acceler8 is a program that
seeks to complete aspects of the
Comprehensive Everglades
Restoration Project a multi-bil-
lion dollar conservation project
that is scheduled to be completed
within a 20- to 30-year time frame
- in somewhat of a fast-track


mode. Acceler8 is the organiza-
tion of 8 projects deemed most
critical by the district for quick
implementation.
Two of the eight have greater
relevance to the Glades, and the
opportunities for local businesses
and residents to reap the benefits
of the scope of work planned
regionally.
The first of the projects is the
Everglades Agricultural Area
Reservoir, the first phase of which
will include an above ground
reservoir for water storage with a
capacity of 190,000-acre feet con-
structed on a 16,700 parcel of
land south of South Bay. The sec-
ond is the Everglades Agricultural
Area Storm-water Treatment
Area Expansion project, which
will reduce storm-water runoff
pollution levels flowing from the
See Acceler8 Page 12


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza

Enjoying a Sunday afternoon
On the eve of their summer vacation from school, Thomas, 16, and Gerardo, 16, played
a game of hoops at Pioneer Park near Belle Glade. Eight-year-old Esteban looked on.


/ -5


04







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 2, 2005


In the Military


Givens reports for duty
Navy Electrician's Mate Fire-
man Bryan L. Givens recently
reported aboard USS John F.
Kennedy (CV
67) after grad-
uating from
Apprentice-
ship Technical
Training, Great
Lakes, Ill. He is
the son of Dar-
ryl L. and
Melinda A.
Givens of
Clewiston and Bryan L.
a 2004 gradu- Givens
ate of Clewis-
ton High School. He is responsi-
ble for the operation and repair
of the ship's electrical power
plant and electrical equipment.
He looks forward to his first days
at sea and port visits aboard USS
Kennedy. USS Kennedy will pull
into New York City May 25 to par-
ticipate in the 18th Annual Fleet
Week New York. During the


weeklong celebration, the crew
of USS Kennedy will enjoy the
warm hospitality of New York
and surrounding tri-state area as
the community honors the men
and women of the Navy and
Marine Corps. Since 1984, Fleet
Week New York has been
known to highlight the pride,
professionalism and esprit-de-
corps of our nation's sea servic-
es. USS Kennedy, an 80,000 ton
conventional aircraft carrier,
home ported in Mayport, Fla.,
last participated in Fleet Week
New York in 2001.
Clinton E. Willis enlists
Clinton E. Willis, 17, son of
Pamela Demotte and Edward
Willis has enlisted in the U.S.
Army, and will be training for
satellite communications.
Moore boot camp
Pvt. Gary L. Moore, a 2002
graduate of Clewiston High
School, graduated boot camp


Engagement

Viejo and Arango


engagement
Wilda Enriquez, of Clewiston,
is proud to announce the
engagement of her daughter Ali-
cia 1. Viejo to Victor A. Arango
son of Surimelly and Jose
Arango of Lehigh Acres. The
bride is also the daughter of Jose
Viejo of Chesapeake, Va.
Wedding will take place July
30 at the West Palm Beach Elks
located at 6188 Belvedere Rd.
Bride-to-be is a 2004 Clewis-
ton High graduate and is current-
ly attending Florida Career Col-
lege to be a Medical Assistant.
The Groom is a 2004 Clewis-
ton High graduate and is current-
ly employed at T.G.I. Friday as a
waiter in West Palm Beach. After


Alicia I. Viejo and
Victor A. Arango
the wedding the couple will
reside in Clewiston.


with the Echo
Eagles, First
Platoon "Black
hawks", Sec-
ond Battalion
Tenth Infantry
Regiment
"Toma-
hawks", at Ft.
Leonardwood
MO., Friday, Gary L. Moore
May 20. Pvt.
Moore held the position of first
squad leader and received
badges for sharpshooter in rifle
and expert in grenade.
Pvt. Moore will continue with
his AIT at FT. Leonardwoood as
a chemical operation specialist
with the 82nd Chemical Battal-
ion Third Chemical Brigade for
the, next 11 weeks. Once this is
completed, PVT. Moore will train
with 82nd Airborne in Ft. Ben-
ning, GA.
You have made your family
proud Pvt. Gary L. Moore. God
Bless you and all who serve in
the United States Army.

Wedding


Baby and Happy wed
Congratulations to Cornelius
"Baby" and Tawanna "Happy"
Boldin from all your friends and
family.


Education

Five graduate with
Education degrees
On May 9, 2005, five employ-
ees of RCMA Graduated from
Palm Beach Community College
with an AS Degree in Early Child-
hood Development.
Representing Glades Early
Childhood Center, Jenneyfa
Rich, Center Coordinator, Aurora
Maldonado, Service Support
Specialist and Linda Stapleton,
Mentor-Teacher.
Representing Booker T.
Washington, Sherri Elrod, Men-
tor-Teacher and Pebra Pardo,
Family Support Specialist.
Jenneyfa Rich, representing
the Belle Glades Campus, was
one of the two student speakers,
for the Commencement.
Sherry Shupp, Early Child-
hood Specialist with Glades
Early Childhood Center will
graduate on June 5, 2005 with a
B.S. Degree in Interdisciplinary
Studies, from International Col-
lege.
Abrams graduates
from Alabama State
MONTGOMERY, ALA -
Jatavios Abrams was among 666
students who received a degree
from Alabama State University
during ASU's 271st Commence-
ment Exercise May 7, 2005 in the
Joe L. Reed Acadome.
Abrams, a resident of South
Bay, received a BS Degree in Ele-
mentary Education.
Tommy Ford, an actor who
plays the father on UPN's sitcom
"The Parkers" was the featured
speaker. Ford also appears in
FOX television's syndicated com-
edy "Marti" and "New York
Undercover."


Obituaries


Mary Kowal Gelb
Mary Kowal Gelb of Clewis-
ton, 95, died Saturday, May 14,
2005 at Hendry Regional Medical
Center in Clewiston.
Mary Kowal Gelb was born in
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She
lived in Clewiston for 28 years -
she was a loving Homemaker.
.. Survivors are, sons, Al Gelb of
Washington, Mich and Adolph
Gelb of Leesburg, Fla., daughter
Nancy Frankow of McKees Rock,
PA, 12 grandchildren and 24
great grandchildren.
Services were held at Akin-
Davis Funeral Homes, Inc., Bur-
ial Fort Myers Crematory Service.
Akin Davis Funeral Homes, Inc in
Clewiston were in charge of all
arrangements.


Jose C. Leyva
Jose C. Leyva, known as
"Pepe" and "El Viejo Leyva" with
the raspy voice of sense of
humor went peacefully in his
sleep into eternal life on Thurs-
day, May 26, 2005.
"Pepe" was born as Jose C.
Leyva, son of Aurelia Carames
and Antonio Leyva, on March 10
1902 in Cartajena, Las Villas,
Cuba.
IN 1950, "Pepe" came to the
United States from Cuba to do
seasonal work in the sugar
industry in Louisiana. In 1957 he
moved his family, wife and three
children from Cuba to Franklin,
Louisiana.
In 1959 he moved to
Fellsmere, Florida and then set-
tled in Clewiston in 1964. He
retired from the sugar industry in
1979. Through his entire life,
"Pepe" loved life, family and
friends. If there is one thing any-
one learned from him that he
would want you to take with
you, is to remember to Live,
Love and Laughter!
Predeceased by his wife,
Sofia P. Leyva, he is survived by


son, Jose R. Leyya, daughter-in-
law Dorothy J. Leyva, daughter
Alexia Alfonso, predeceased
son-in-law Ernesto Alfonso,
daughter Maria Luke, son-in-law,
Ralph Luke. Grandchildren,
Michelle Cameron, Monica
Alfonso-Nola, Lisa Frankow,
Michael R. Leyva, Julia Leyva
great-grandchildren Meredith
Cameron, Olivia Cameron, Luke
Frankow, and Joseph Leyva.
With many other family -and
friends that are too many to
mention, you know who you
are.
Visitation was on Friday, May
27, 2005, from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9
p.m. A Graveside Funeral Service
was on Saturday, May 28 at 10:30
a.m. and held at Our Lady Queen
of Peace Cemetery in West Palm
Beach.
All arrangements were made
by Akin-Davis Funeral Homes,
Inc., in Clewiston.


James C. "Jim"
Edwards
Mr. James C. "Jim" Edwards,
66, of Ethel, Miss., died May 24,
2005 at Mississippi Baptist Med-
ical Center in Jackson. Funeral
Services were on Thursday,
May 26, 2005 at 11 a.m. at
Ebenezer Baptist Church near
Zama where he was a member
and Deacon, Masonic Services
at Graveside. Rev Larry Ghar-'
vey, Minister of Ebenezer offici-
ated with the burial in the
Church Cemetery. Jordan
funeral home OF Kosciusko,
Miss was in charge of all
arrangements.
Mr. Edwards was born Octo-
ber 15, 1938 in Kosciukko, Miss.
to Geneis Conley and Myrtis
Mangrum Edwards.
Survivors include his wife, Jo
Helen Ponder Edwards of Ethel,
three daughters Jaime Sample
and Husband Sam of Ebenezer,
Ms. Kim Hester and husband


Robert of Marydell, Melissa
Fayard and husband Nathan of
Biloxi. Grandchildren: Samuel
Dickinson Sample, Jr. Justin
Edwards Sample, Matthew Allen
Sample, Patrick Neely Sample,
Kaylin Jo Hester, Kacy Beth Hes-
ter, Braden Nathaniel Fayard,
Annalyn Reese Fayard.
One sister Betty Ann Ferguson
of Walls, Miss. Two nieces and
two nephews.
Mr. Edwards was a retired
educator after 34 years, a 1967
graduate of University of South-
ern Mississippi B.S. in History ,
Masters Degree in Administra-
tion in Florida Atlantic Universi-
ty, West Palm Beach, and Mas-
ters Degree and Specialist
Degree in Administration, Missis-
sippi State University, Member of
Phi Delta Kappa.
He had also served as Super-
intendent of Education in the
Attala County School System,
Hendry County Florida School
System, and from 1992-2003 in
Drew Municipal School System
in Drew, Mississippi. A Shriner,
Ft. Myers Scottish Rite, Ft. Myers
Florida, 32 Degree Mason, mem-
ber of Lexington Lodge 24, for-
mer Grand Master of Sugarland
Masonic Lodge 281 ifin Clewiston,
Member of Mississippi State
Association of Superintendents
and Sons of Confederate Veter-
ans.
Active pallbearers: Sam Sam-
ple, Robert Hester, Nathan
Fayard, Samuel Sample, Jr,
Matthew Sample, Patrick Sam-
ple.
Honorary pallbearers: C.R.
"Deter Blanchard, Edward "Dob-
bin" Thrasher, Kempe Hodges,
Aaron Tolleson, Lewis Hardy, Ed
Oliver, Bill Dubard, James Ken-
neth Mangrum, Jerry Allen.
Memorials may be made to
The American Cancer Society or
Ebenezer Baptist Church Ceme-
tery Fund.


uxtons West ak1
I mr.-aI. M A I W INIaTO] M8;1


Sally Frances Scheffler

Scheffler graduation
ceremonies June 4
Scheffler Home School
announces Graduation Cere-
monies for Sally Frances Schef-
fler on Saturday, June 4 at 7 p.m.
at First Baptist Church Fellow-
ship Hall in Clewiston.


auk jgGlades Ford -Lincoln-Mercury
,I_ E dif. S i- .Ei Hli5 CuTl'.MEI' N FRIENDS
ph'''." HE H ',5 BEEEN 'SE P'.rI r,CL HEirE AT
C ".IE- F,.F.D. FOf) 29' -iE. _

F 800-726-8514
steve(i'gladesmotors.copm




















We" Pay Memorial Tribute
Remember a loved one
S who has departed with a special
Memorial Tribute in this newspaper.

Your tribute can be published following the memorial services, or to
commemorate an anniversary ofyour loved one's birth or passing. You
can add a photograph of your loved one, lines from a poem or
scripture, and special art or borders -- and we'll make sure it all comes
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Visit www2.newszap.com/memorals for sample ads
and an online order form, or call 1-866-379-6397 toll free.



AMERICAN HOME CARE
A Home Health Agency has immediate openings
for the following positions in Clewiston:

Director of Nursing Fulltime Starting Salary $50,000
With Full Benefits Must Be RN, with Current Florida
License, has home health experience.

PRN Field Nurse RN $30.00/visit $55.00 Admission
and $60.00 for weekend admission plus mileage.

Data Entry Fulltime with Benefits.

PRN PT/OT/ST/MSW/Home Health Aide
Please call at 1-866-766-0033 or
fax your resume at 863-983-5655 or
visit our website at www.americanhomecare.org
for more information.


i Health Fair
f!/ Please Join Us!

Hendry County Health Department -
V 1100 South Olympia
Tuesday, June 7th from 4pm to 7pm

Free Admission and Screenings

Blood Pressure, Hemoglobin, BMI,

PSA Screening for Men, Cholesterol,

Parkinson's, HIV, Body Fat Analysis

Plus computerized
stress screening


*Call
983-1408 Ext. 522 for
more information


Exhibits,

SDoor

Prizes

and

Snacks!


Serving The Lake Area Since 1980


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005








Thursday, June 2, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Facials and More



by Cameron


A new genre of luxury and
pampering is awaiting Clewiston
residents and it comes in the
form of Facials and More by
Clewiston's newest proprietor
and the doors to personal pam-
pering paradise are now open.
According to Ms. Edwards,
she is looking forward to offer-
ing their clients the best facials,
chemical peels, make-up, wax-
ing, and aromatherapy sessions
in town, which will include cus-
tom-designed fruit and vegetable
masks. The business will also
provide customers with free skin

Her future goals are to bring
in, and keep up to date with, the
latest technological advances for
skin care.
"So if you want to get rid of
S fine lines, wrinkles, acne scars
-- and age/dark spots, consider
chemical peel with Glycolic
Acid," says Ms. Edwards.
Courtesy Photo They also have special pack-
ages available for weddings and
Ms Anne Marie Mixon special occasions, and giftcer-
Mnarie M n Itificates for the hard-to-buy-for
The Tabernacle of Witness Deliverance Center with Pas- significant other are also avail-
tor Mother Bernice McMillan, Church Family presents able.
Ms. Anne Marie Mixon in concert Saturday, June 4, per- The business is located inside
formance at 7:30 p.m. at 901 Harlem Academy Avenue, of Pzazzrland Hairwy. and the hours willug-
in Clewiston. Come and experience the anointing of the be Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday
Holy Ghost as He uses this vessel to minister in songs and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4
and praises. "Make a Joyful Noise." For more informa- p.m. and Thursday from 10 a.m.
tion call (863) 983-9578 or (863) 677-1008. to 7 p.m. For more information,
or to make an appointment, call


Some hurricane survival tips


In a recent column, I encour-
aged readers to share tips they
learned during the 2004 hurri-
cane season. As we prepare for
(he 2005 hurricane season, we
4re armed with real life knowl-
edge of how to survive a major
storm. June 1-12, no sales tax
Will be charged on many hurri-
cane supply items, to encourage
Floridians to stock up on hurri-
cane supplies before we are
threatened by storms.
Some tips shared this week:
You can freeze milk and put
it in a cooler. Open the cap and
remove about one cup of milk
before freezing it, to allow room
for expansion. As it thaws, use
it.
Battery-operated fans help
beat the heat when the power is
off. You can find them in stores
that sell camping supplies.
If you have tropical fish,
invest in some battery-operated
aerators. These are sold at bait
and tackle shops and used by
fishermen to keep the fish alive
in the live wells on their boats.
Depending on the size of tank,
you may need several. Most run
bn standard "D" cell batteries. If
you are evacuating, turn the aer-
ators on before you leave, in
case the power goes off before
you return.


A
Healthier
Life X 0


with Katrina Elsken

If you go to a shelter, take
along a flashlight. During the
2004 hurricanes, many of the
shelters lost electricity. Many
people didn't think to bring
flashlights to the shelters.
After a hurricane, you
might not be able to eat the five
servings of fresh fruits and veg-
etables a day that is recom-
mended by the USDA. Keep
multivitamins on hand to sup-
plement your diet.
If a deputy comes to your
door and tells you that you
should evacuate, do it. During a
storm, emergency workers can-
not come and rescue you. Trees
and downed power lines may
be -blocking the roads. If your
home is flooded or destroyed by
high winds they will have to wait
until the winds die down before
they can start rescue efforts.
If you have horses, put


them in an open field. Make sure
the barn is locked so they can-
not go back into the barn. In the
open, the horses' survival
instincts will take over and they
will get out of the way of any fly-
ing debris. If they are in a barn,
they could be crushed or
trapped if it collapses.
If the electricity is off, go to
the breaker box and turn it off.
When the power comes back
on, you want-to be able to moni-
tor it. If there is damage to your
home, when the power comes
back on, it could start a fire.
Make sure your electrical break-
er box is marked so you can eas-
ily tell which switch controls
which area of your house. If
there is water damage in your
home, do not turn electricity
back on in that area until an
electrician has checked it to
make sure it is safe.
Stock up on supplies now.
When the area is under a hurri-
cane watch, it may be too late
and stores sell out of many
items.
Do you have a hurricane tip
or story to share? Post online at
our hurricanes blog at
http://newsblog.info/storms/ or
email me at
kelsken@newszap.com.


Clewiston Garden Club seeks members
P The Clewiston Garden Club Burlison, of Central Elementary, cussed, the raffle of prizes from
held its last meeting of the 2004- about his landscaping the Ace Hardware were awarded to
2005 season at the home of Vir- entrance of the school along the lucky winners. The meeting
ginia Polhill at 10 a.m. on Thurs- with his gardening class. The adjourned at 12:30 p.m.
(lay, May 19. Fifteen members club will donate money towards Meetings will resume the
were present and planned the their project. Members also were third Thursday in October. If you
upcoming 2005-2006 agenda off informed of the landscaping are interested in joining the club,
events. designs for the Clewiston Muse- please call Christine Howell at
President Christine Howell um scheduled for fall painting. (863) 983-7650, for further infor-
stated that she talked with Steve After all business was dis- mation.
I


Cameron Edwards performing
a facial session with a client.
Ms. Edwards has recently
opened Facials and More by
Cameron, in Clewiston.

(863) 983-2887 during regular
business hours or (863) 228-
2792 after hours.


.jiftgo p Gade Ford-Uncdn.Meiiy
COIb,,E. IN r i an.r-4
A G i lEAAT DEA.L.


New, Used & Leased Car Sales
800-726-8514
jon(' gladesmotors.com





People You ~nor2w, Carizng for
People You Love.....
Sub-Acute Care Respite/Short-Term Care
Long-Term Care 35 Bed Alzheimer's/Dementia Unit
S24-hour Skied Nursing Care provided by RN's, LPN's and Certified Nurses Aides

SOrthopedic and Surgical Rehabilitation' Recreational Therapy' Restorative Care' IV Therapy

Pain Management' Wound Care' Physical Occupational and Speech Therapies

Outpatient Therapy Program' Nutrition Counseling



mgoutAdmfrio Dp tet6MON w ytoedwaM .
301 South Gloria Street, Clewiston, FL 33440
(863) 983-5123


Do You HAVE ASTHMA?

Are you 25 64?
Have you ever been told by your healthcare provider that you have asthma?
Do you require daily long-term control medicine?
Do you have questions about how asthma affects your breathing, how asthma
medicines help to control your asthma, or what to do in an emergency?

The American Lung Association has a new program for you!


Breathe Well Live Well


1-1 1i


/ Learn how to be free of symptoms

/ Learn how to manage your asthma
and reduce your chances of letting
your asthma get out of control

/ Learn that you can do everything
that a person without asthma can
do!


Control your asthma; don't let your asthma control you!
The American Lung Association Breathe Well, Live Well program will be held at


g GLAPES GENERAL HOSPITAL

GLADES 1201 South Main Street
GENERAL
HOSPITAL

Orientation: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 from 5:15 pm 6:15 pm
Education Program: Saturday, June 25, 2005 from 8:00 am 12:30 pm
(Light breakfast available)
Space is limited, so register today by calling (561) 993-3632.

For participating and providing feedback on the new program, you will also
receive:
Orientation: Asthma Control Information Workbook
Education Program: Allergy Control Pillow Encasing
and Peak Flow Meter
Three-Month Follow-up: $25 Gift Certificate to Winn Dixie

AMERICAN
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ASSOCIATIONe
.,, :,<:m .


x c*j


rr~iMLS, H


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Walker


M 863-677-1010
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,W 13 Brand New Homes to be
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pL i 863-983-3508

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MLS# 205053592
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your Home Marketed
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Maribel


Ter
Rangel


pr 863-228-1142

Fun, Food, & a Good Time!!
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New istinri 29lJV2 MH on
2.28 ACRESJIlJji4r horses we
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New isn 3/2 MH1995 Great
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schools. Ni L ., .tl h move
in. $84.9K
New Listin Q$ fRES 100K
67f" IT It I_ _AN'
Ne ,! .Rgar
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1.25 SAMu PEffING9K
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New Listing! The most
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3bd/2ba on 1.25 Acres 0'
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Ready to Move in! 3bd/2'ba on
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Sam
Walker


863-677-1013

Fm Moving! Over 1/2 acre lake-
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FOR INFORMATION
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' : --: II i


[863-983-2933 1100 S. l3e!riacar frc3xxi walixiart)
Av-v. six crzairr4eialt-yr- c coxxx I


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005


-9 JM*Wff
A t k M z; N








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 2, 2005


Speak Out

Speak out is our free 24-hour opinion line. Call 996-6636 to
express your opinion or ask a question about public issues.
You are not required to give your name. While we want you to
speak freely, the newspaper reserves the right to edit calls for
clarity, brevity, relevance and fairness.



To the Community


(Editors Note: The following is
a poem submitted by Commis-
sioner Allie Biggs of Pahokee, on
behalf of the city commission.)

Promise Yourself

To be strong that nothing can
disturb your peace of mind;
To talk health, happiness and
prosperity to every person you
meet;
To make all your friends feel
that there is something in them;
To look at the sunny side of
everything and make your opti-
mism come true;
To think only of the best, to
work for only the best and to


expect only the best;
To be just as enthusiastic
about the success of others as you
are about your own;
To forget the mistakes of the
past and press on to the greater
achievement of the future;
To wear a cheerful counte-
nance at all times and to give
every living creature you meet a
smile;
To give so much time to the
improvement of yourself that you
have no time to criticize others;
To be too large for worry, too
noble for anger, too strong for
fear, and too happy to permit the
presence of trouble.

Author Unknown


When it's all right not to know


The Reverend Samuel S.
Thomas, Ph. D.+
Saint Martin's Church, Clewiston

We celebrated Trinity Sunday
this past week in our Church.
.Everyone knows that the Trinity is
a great mystery. More correctly, it's
a paradox something that is
true and yet a contradiction at the
same time. We haven't accepted
paradoxes very well in the West-
ern world and it causes problems
at times.
The oriental effort to under-
stand "the sound of clapping with
one hand" is outside of our way of
thinking. People like to know and
want explanations. They want to
be let in on secrets and want
answers right away.
I've visited people who worried
that ."the doctor isn't telling me
something" but could not consider
that maybe the doctor didn't know
either. There are people who are
suspect because they belong to
secret societies and great efforts
are expended to learn who


belongs and why they are secret.
There are groups that spend all
sorts of time and energy worrying
about the exact date of the end of
time, even when the scriptures tell
us that "no one knows about that
day or hour, not even the angels in
Heaven or the Son." (Mathews
24:36)
That shouldn't keep us from liv-
ing a good life and enjoying God's
world. It's a mystery and we aren't
supposed to know, and it's all
right!
Every now and again I get to
enjoy a sunset. It is pleasant to
watch the sun go down over the
horizon and be there at that instant
when the day becomes evening, to
watch the warmth of the day fade
and a slight chill of the evening
come over the world.
At that moment, I just enjoy the
experience. When I'm enjoying it,
there are so many things I don't
have to think about. I don't need to
remember that the sun is 93 mil-
lion miles away and actually much
larger than the earth and me see-
ing it set like a small globe is really


an optical illusion. I don't need to
remember that there are about
seven or eight minutes difference
between when the light energy
leaves the sun and when it strikes
the earth, and that I'm looking at
light that is already seven or eight
minutes old. I don't have to think
about the other kinds of energy
that I'm observing, that the sun is a
vast quantity of thermonuclear
explosions going on and they are
emitting other kind of radiation at
the same time I'm watching.
I don't have to think about the
reflection on the atmosphere that
may be causing the light of the sun
to linger just a bit even after it sinks
below the horizons and give a kind
of afterglow. I can forget about dis-
tance between the earth and the
sun at different times in the earth's
rotation cycle, and the angle of
declination of the axis of the earth
that affects the density of the sun's
rays hitting the earth.
There is so much I don't need
to know in order to enjoy the sun-
set. In fact, there is so much I don't
need to know to enjoy many


things in God's creation. I don't
have to know why someone can
care for me, and don't really know
all of the reasons I care for others. I
don't have to know why it really is.
that I live here and others live
where they live and are happy, or,
why others find their lives fulfilling
and challenging even if I don't see,
it myself. I don't have to know
everything there is to know about.
why some like chocolate and oth-"
ers like vanilla, or why electricity
flows through wires.
When it comes to God being a
mystery and His ways in the world'
being unknown, that's all right too.,-
That doesn't keep me from enjoy-
ing it as it is given to me, and that's'
enough.
Human relationships give us
fulfillment because we know they"
are there in our lives, not because
we know all of the details. God is'
like that too, He is there and we
can't expect to fathom all of His
being. God is there and God is one,
He will come when He chooses.
That works. I really know all that I
need to know after all.


Pet Corner


Question: Dear Doc Savvy! I
heard you mention that you can
microchip pets a few weeks ago
on The Savvy Vet Show. Can you
tell me more about how that is
done? Thanks Doc. Frank in Belle
Glade.
Answer: Dear Frank, There are
several companies which make
them, and I have had opportuni-
ties to use all of them. In my opin-
ion, Avid microchips are the best
choice. They are the most com-
monly used, easiest to administer,
and have universal detection serv-
ice, and devices. So, administra-
tion of the microchip is easy. It is a
simple injection, just like a vacci-
nation. It is placed between the
shoulder blades, and under the
skin. This way, in the event that
your pet is lost and picked up by
any Animal Care and Control Ser-
vice, Humane Society, or veteri-
nary hospital they can scan your
pet to identify information to con-
tact you. Once the identification is
made, it is as simple as a few
phone calls. My Chihuahuas Sami
and Luigi have microchips, and I
recommend it for dogs, cats,
horses, iguanas, guinea pigs, fer-
rets, snakes, rabbits, hamsters,
and gerbils. Thanks for that great
question Frank. Have a great one,
Doc Savvy.
Question: Dear Doc Savvy. It is
hard enough to make the deci-
sion of when to consider euthana-
sia for your pet, but what are a
pet's owner's options for your
pet's remains? Is it legal to bury


Glance

Continued From Page 1
Passion for

Fashion

Do you have style? Wear the
latest fashions? Would you like to
show off your personal style?
Young ladies and young men ages
12-18 this is the event for you.
Come and show off your style at
.the Clarence E. Anthony Library's
"Passion for Fashion" show. Each
participant will receive a trophy
and certificate of participation.
Refreshments will be served to all
participants. Deadline for entry is
June 17. For more information
contact Elizabeth or Deborah at
(561) 992-8393.


your pet in your backyard? Thank
you for your weekly column! It is
a wonderful forum for pet lovers!
Anonymous in Clewiston.
Answer: Dear Anonymous,
Thank you for your appreciation!
Yes, euthanasia is a very emotion-
al decision to make for your pet!
As far as what to do afterwards,
here are the options:
1.) Cremation Services: Either
a private service with the ashes
returned to you, or a service
where the ashes are disposed of
in accordance with the county
regulations.
2.) 2.) Burial Services: It is
against the law to bury a pet with-
in city limits! However, outside of
city limits is ok. There are various
pet cemetery locations for per-
sonal burials, and monuments.
3.) 3.) Memorials: Various
memorials in honor of your pet
can be made. Examples are The
Animal Rescue League's Memori-
al Wall, The Star Registry-naming
a star after your pet (both Sami
and Luigi have this already of
course!) and, having a tree plant-
ed in your pet's name.
I hope this answers your ques-
tion. Take care Anonymous! Doc
Savvy.
E-mail you pet questions to
DocSavvy@aol.comn and check
out your answers weekly in the
Pet Corner! Be sure to tune into
The Savvy Vet Show each and
every Thursday at 10:30 a.m. on
The Big Dawg 93.5FM!


PEPPI accepting

applications
PEPPI Head Start is now
accepting applications for three-
and four-year-olds for free/full
day childcare. PEPPI is located at
301 Southwest 8th St. in Belle
Glade. For more information,
please call 996-1718.


New Hope Charities
New Hope Charities is now
accepting applications for their
Summer Camp Program for youth
ages 10-17. Camp runs from June
6-Aug. 5. Registration cost is $1
per camper. Stop by to pick up
your application at 7450 State Rd.
15, Pahokee. For further informa-
tion, call (561) 924-7986.


The Sun


Our Purpose...
The Glades County Democrat is published by Independent Newspapers of
Flonda. Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspa-
per to pursue a rrmssionr of journalistic service to the citizens of the commu-
nity Since no dividends are paid, the company is able to thrive on profit
margins below industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in
Independent's mirussion of journalistic service, commitment to the ideals of
the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the comm-
munity's deLbertation of public issues.


We Pled ...
* To ..'pate this newspaper an a public trusi
* To lp ouAr communny btcoere a bener
pL-ce to Ire and -rkt. thnrm h *:ur dedi,
tren u,.x *.rscenn.:. ru? 'rinm
* To pri,-A the irfrmanan atuers reed t:'
Irke- them rowin itelreniasici.ms abur

* To relil the rewi th hcneist accuracey.
:'-tmIty. ft ea en and cWmi.aoi.
* To use j opmi page,' to bw that
ctminity detre. not to dommate it with

STo disJ- our ownm .-ruicts of inerrest or
ptinnI coAtllim s to readenr
' To conrei ouur err.n and toI. 'e .h ,, ,
rectio to the prominence it serves.
STo provide a right to reply to those we write
about.
* To treat people with courtesy, respect and
compassion.


Ne wi E.ir'r Mark Yeuri



Adwmfsna
AAtvkiinig Diictx Judy Kasten
Ntir,bxahArconmJy wPamt'r
Adwrrurr gS~rnisMelis~a Ape,
')vira M'N,
Lr-kiexed;rr,?4r.r wspat..r- in
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Pimd$ri u Ed'eht
Vkce P'ev--i-m ,*.f icynid lh Opeasara LmrByrd
Eircute EbwiFiry'Knu EAkk~n




Florida Press
Association


The Haves And The Have Nots


Pastor John Hicks
First United Methodist Church
I heard a minister say one time
that in his younger days, when his
children were small, he would
have family meetings. These meet-
ings were to discuss chores, and
family matters, trips, etc. Yet, he
admitted, when he would call
these meetings, the expression on
his children's faces would usually
be: "What have we done wrong,
now?" Finally, his wife pointed out
to him that the tone in his voice at
these meetings was the same tone
that was used when he disciplined
the children. Thus, they responded
with apprehension.
I wonder if that is not similar to
the response that many people
have when they have a meeting
with God. Despite all of the talk that
we do in the church about how
God loves us, I sometimes get the
impression that many feel that God
is the big disciplinarian. Maybe for
some people their feelings go back


to their experience of their own
father. With a stern earthly father, it
is difficult for them to envision a
heavenly father that would be any-
thing but strict.
The Israelites dealt with this
same problem. They believed that
God would not tolerate sin. They
even developed a system where
people were judged by the degree
of their sin. The worse the sin, the
worse off you were with God. This
not only left many with the feeling
that God totally despised them, but
some, like the tax collectors, the
butchers, and sometimes even the
shepherds were told they were too
unclean to even approach God.
Spiritually speaking, there were
the haves and the have-nots. The
haves perceived themselves as
having God's love, and the have-
nots believed that they were quite
beyond it. Because of this, many
had a hard time comprehending
why Jesus would spend so much
time with the "have nots" those
who dearly were rejected by God.


In response to criticism for receiv-
ing and eating with these sinners
and tax collectors, Jesus told the
parable of the prodigal son.
You remember the story. The
prodigal asks for his share of the
money and then goes off into the
,far country and squanders all of it.
He finally ends up doing the most
degrading thing that a Jew could
ever think of- he feeds pigs. Jesus
could have said nothing more hor-
rifying about him than that. The
son finally realizes the futility of his
lifestyle and decides to return
home. This boy's sinfulness was so
great that there was nothing left in
him that could motivate the father
to love him. And yet, the father
receives his son with open arms.
With this parable, Jesus was try-
ing to help us understand some-
thing about the father and his love.
If the father loves the son, then it is
only because that is the nature of
the father. The boy has done noth-
ing to merit it. And therein lies
Jesus' point. This is how our Heav-


enly Father loves each of us.
First, God's love for us has no
limits He loves us no matter,
what we have done. Second, God's
love is a patient love there is no
way we can stay away so long that
God's love is no longer offered.
God is not sitting on his throne'
with a litany of sins to read off to us.,
The truth is, God is more eager to
reestablish a relationship with us
after we have sinned than we are.
Just like the father in the parable,
he is eagerly waiting for us to,'
return. In His heart, we are all'
"haves".
What we have done and how,
long we have done it is no longer
the focus we are. As far as we
know, the father never even asked,,
the boy how he wasted all that,
money. That doesn't matter. What'
matters is that he is back home.I.
Jesus worded it very succinctly:,
"There is more joy in heaven over'
one sinner who repents than 99,
who simply think that they need
repentance."


Community Profile: Noelle L. Savedoff (a.k.a. Doc Savvy)


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza

Q: What is your name?
A: Noelle Savedoff. My mother's
French, she was born in Paris and I
think my parents wanted to give
me a French name because I was-
n't born anywhere around Christ-
mas. I love it. I think it's a great
name.

Q: Where were you born?
A: I was born in New York City,
in Manhattan. I didn't come straight
here. Left New York when I was
four, moved to London, grew up in
London, in Paris and Barcelona for
awhile. Back to Miami Beach, back
to England, kind of back and forth.
And, no, my parents weren't in the
military. When my parents were
divorced, my mom didn't know
what to do because she didn't have
a family here in the states. That's
why we were back and forth in
Europe. I've pretty much made
South Florida my home since high
school. I moved back permanently
at the age of 16.
I love Florida the most. The
United States is an amazing place.
People who don't get that are prob-
ably people who have not had the
opportunity to live in other coun-
tries. They just don't understand
this is the best place in the world to
live. We should really be grateful.

Q: What do you do?
A: I'm a veterinarian. It consists
of doing something that I think I
was really born to do. There is
nothing else for me, no other twist
whatsoever. It was just something
that 1 felt was just the way to go.
Work is not work work is play. I
get up every day and I love what I
do.

Q: Why?
A: I think they're kind of equal:
My staff and my clients. I love being
with my staff. They're a group of
girls that I've been with for, alto-
gether, the one who's been with
me the longest is'four years. It's like
a sense of family. It's reallyvery spe-
cial and unique because I've been
working with veterinarians as early
as they would let me, which is
probably around 14. One of their
biggest complaints is that there is
always a tremendous turnover in
staff. I'm very unusually blessed
that way, that I've got a staff that
sticks with me. We're very close.
About 95 percent of the time, we
get along really well. It's really
great.
And the clients the commu-
nity. They're just amazing. It's fabu-
lous to know the people so well
and know about their daughter get-
ting married or their mother cele-
brating their 50th anniversary, what
haveyou.
(Q: Can you see yourself doing
anything else?) Well I had a brief


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
Noelle Savedoff
moment where I wanted to be a
movie star when I was, some-
where around puberty I think
something happened that made
me decide to be a movie star. Very,
very quickly I changed my mind
because I can't sing, dance or act
and I know I'd go hungry and
broke for sure.
There is nothing else. The
thought of it is frightening. This is
the most important thing to me.

Q: Can you describe yourself?
A: I think I'm funny. (Q: Funny?)
I think so. Not shy, I'm very gregari-
ous. I'm outgoing. I'm possibly
even shocking at times. I think peo-
ple look at me and assume one
thing and talk to me and get the
complete opposite.

Q: What scares you?
A: Jumping out of a plane. It
would be not only dumb, but
frightening. I have a lot of clients
who are into jumping out of
planes. I had been invited on many
occasions. I have a couple of good
friends who are pilots too. Just the
thought of that.
I don't have a fear of a specific
animal, but say I was on safari in
Kenya and deciding to take pictures
and a warthog or something came,
well I'm not afraid of warthogs. If.
something were running after me I
think I'd get my adrenaline going.

Q: What is your favorite song?
A: There is one song, I can't say
it's my favorite song, but there's an
old Bob Dylan song that's called
"Just Like a Woman." I think that
that is just avery beautiful song.

Q: What irks you?
A: I do have a temper. Most peo-
ple think I'm very calm, cool, col-
lect and that I have this very easy-
going thing and I do. I try to do a lot
of things that help me with stress,
like Yoga. I paint and I like to work
with hands. There's a real big artis-
tic side to me.
What sets me off, I think the
most, are people who lie. There's
nothing worse than a liar or a thief,
I think. I can't stand liars.
I can't stand when an animal is
being mistreated. I lose it. I go
above and beyond to report, to get
the authorities involved as best as


possible. It's not once a month, but
probably somewhere between five
and eight times a year.
Q: What memory do you hold
dear?
A: I really think it was when I got
the letter from my national board. I
had just graduated from veterinary
college and finished up my intern-
ship at Oklahoma State. A letter
came. At the time I had a boyfriend
that I didn't, get married to. We
bought a home together, we were
going to get married and I wasn't
working yet and he's a vet too. He
came home and I wanted to wait
for him to come home. I carried my
national board exam results in my
back pocket for 12 hours because I
was so nervous about seeing
whether or not I passed. I hadn't
opened ityet.
It was on his birthday. It was on
his 30th birthday. I opened it and I
passed. I think that was probably
one of the happiest days of my life.
It felt like everything I worked hard
for ... I was in school until I was 30.
And that's consistently. That's a big
chunk of change of your young
years to invest. I knew that if I didn't
pass, I could take it again and pass,
but I just wanted to get on and get
working and start earning a living


and being a vet. It just felt like it was
the key that opened the door for

everything.
Another important memory,
there is a husky sled training in
Ketchikan, Alaska. I did a little train-
ing thing and it was very cool. I
became an official musher. That
was really cool. The guy who
taught me was a 17-year-old kid.
His dad is a vet who lives up by the
Arctic Circle and flies everywhere,
he's a pilot, flies everywhere to do
house calls. That was about two-
and-a-half years ago.
Getting a letter that I passed my
boards, that husky experience, and
I think also, just recently, flying with
a very good friend of mine who's a
pilot. He works for a company in Ft.
Lauderdale that he's a pilot for and
his boss wanted to test out the new
jet and take his wife and some
friends to dinner. He got to take
who ever he wanted and he called
me. I was working on a Saturday
and he said, "Can you get over here
in two hours because we're flying
to Key West for dinner." It was my
first time in Key West. That was
really, really gorgeous.
(Q: The thought of jumping out
the plane cross your mind?) Never.
Never. Not even once.


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005










Hendry County Arrest Log


Editor's note: The following
reports do not indicate guilt. Any-
one listed in the following reports
who are proven innocent or have
their charges dropped against
them, may contact the Clewiston
News to have that information
oriented.

Two juveniles nabbed
in suspected homicide
Hendry County Sheriff Ronnie
Lee announced the arrest of two
juveniles for attempted murder
The juveniles reported to be mem-
bers of the "Brown Boyz Gang"
who had crashed a birthday party
at a LaBelle address. When asked
to leave the party a fight erupted
and a 16-year-old victim was
stabbed. Several eyewitnesses
identified the assailants and the
ensuing investigation from the
HCSO was able to gather addition-
al information to complete the
arrests. Both were charged with
attempted murder and transferred
to the Division of Juvenile Justice.

HC SO recovers stolen
property in burglary
Hendry County Sheriff Ronnie
Lee reports that Jermaine Terrence
Feagin, age 30, has been arrested in


connection with a vehicle burglary
that occurred at a local motel. On
May 7, around mid-morning,
deputies were called to a local
motel in reference to a vehicle bur-
glary. A Time Warner Cable truck
had been burglarized. An inventory
of the truck revealed that between
$15,000 and $20,000 worth of tools
and equipment were missing.
From information gained at the
scene and other sources, the HCSO
Criminal Investigation Division was
able to locate and arrest the sus-
pect, as well as recover most of the
stolen items. Feagin was charged
with Criminal Mischief/ Property
Damage, Burglary of a Conveyance
and Grand Theft and booked into
the Hendry County Jail.

Video cameras help
snag hammer thief
Hendry County Sheriff Ronnie
Lee reports that video cameras at a
local convenience store helped
nab Christopher Kevin Critean, age
32, for stealing three hammers and
two walkie-talkies from a LaBelle
Hardware Store. Critean was
caught on the convenience store's
cameras with the hammers as he
shoplifted items from there. Also,
Critean pawned one of the ham-
mers at a local pawnshop, which
led to the discovery of the stolen


walkie-talkie, which he had previ-
ously pawned at the same shop.
Critean was arrested and charged
with Larceny, Dealing in Stolen
Property and Violation of Florida
Pawnbrokers Act. He was booked
into the Hendry County Jail.

Citizen's tip leads to
arrest and recovery
Sheriff Ronnie Lee reports that a
tip by an alert citizen allowed
Hendry County Sheriff Deputies to
locate and arrest Miguel A. Castillo,
age 18, Amado Pequeno, age 21,
and Juan Carlos Torres, age 20, for
steeling a tailgate off an unattended
truck. Deputy Fernando Herrera
received a tip that included a
description of the suspects and the
car they were driving and their
direction of travel. Deputy Herrera
spotted the car and made a traffic
stop on Beech wood Circle, at
which time the front seat passen-
ger (Pequeno) exited the car and
fled. Deputy Robert Archer,
responding to the traffic stop, pur-
sued Pequeno and apprehended
him hiding in the nearby woods.
An inventory of the vehicle was
conducted and a baggie containing
marijuana was discovered. Torres
was charged with grand theft,
Castillo was charged with grand
theft and resisting an officer with-


out violence. All three were
booked into the Hendry County
Jail.
Deputies responded to
suspected burglary
Hendry County Sheriff's
deputies responded to a call at 220
F Road regarding a suspected bur-
glary in progress. While respond-
ing to the scene, the deputies
observed a Dodge mini-van leaving
the area, which fit the description
of a vehicle that had been seen
near the residence. The mini-van,
occupied by three juveniles and
one adult, was stopped and
detained by Deputy George Elver
while Deputy Lois Morales
checked the residence.
After Deputy Morales deter-
mined the residence had been bur-
glarized, he returned to the mini-
van where he, Deputy Elver and
Sgt. James Wright recovered all
stolen items and arrested Joel
Perez, age 32, along with the three
juveniles. All were charged with
burglary and Perez was booked
into the Hendry County Jail while
the juveniles were turned over to
the Division of Juvenile Justice.
Sheriff Ronnie Lee credited the
quick action of the deputies for the
arrest and recovery of all stolen
items.


AG focuses on crime in black community


TALLAHASSEE Florida Attor-
ney General Charlie Crist and Geor-
gia Attorney General Thurbert E.
Baker will host the 20th annual
National Conference on Preventing
Crime in the Black Community
from June 1-4, in Tampa. .
The event is expected to attract
almost 2,000 attendees from 25
states and the District of Columbia,
and will feature a session with the
three Florida Attorneys General
who have presided over the history
of the conference.
The conference is a collabora-
tive effort to foster communication
and action in the community by
sharing innovative ideas and suc-
cessful prevention strategies. The
National Conference on Preventing
Crime in the Black Community
continues to be one of the few
events in the nation that focuses on
crime issues in the African-Ameri-
can community.
"By sharing innovative ideas


Need your help
On Oct. 6, 2004, a Clewis-
ton woman bore witness'to a
slip and fall accident in a
local grocery store. The vic-
tim of that accident is seeking
to contact the woman who
witnessed the incident.
You are asked to contact
the victim at P.O. Box 1515,
Clewiston FL, 33440.


and best practices across commu-
nities we hope to minimize vio-
lence in our neighborhoods," said
Crist. "Our children deserve a fight-
ing chance and'this conference will
provide positive alternatives to vio-
lence among our youth."
The three-day event features
three plenary sessions, four lunch-
eon speakers, and 28 workshops.
Members of law enforcement, vic-
tim services professionals, juvenile
justice and corrections profession-
als, local and state government
employees, school, church and
community leaders, and other
interested citizens from the general
public, along with approximately
500 teens, are expected to attend.
Attorney General Crist will deliv-
er the conference keynote address
Thursday, June 2, at 8:30 a.m. at
the Tampa Convention Center.
Joining Attorney General Crist
will be Juanita Evangeline Moore,
daughter of slain Florida civil rights


pioneer Harry T. Moore, whose
1955 murder investigation was
recently reopened by Crist.
Crime issues such as drugs,
gangs and violent crime continue
to disproportionately affect the
African-American community. To
address these problems, partici-
pants will hear from a panel of
African-American law enforce-
ment administrators, assembled
by the National Organization of
Black Law Enforcement Execu-
tives (NOBLE), including: NOBLE
President Clarence Edwards of Sil-
ver Spring, Maryland; Wenda
Phifer of the Fulton County Police
Department in Atlanta; Chief
Edwin Compass of the New
Orleans Police Department; and
Director Robert Parker of the
Miami-Dade Police Department.
- Each will provide a perspective
on those issues and discuss proac-
tive programs and strategies that
have been effective in their jurisdic-


tions. Former Florida Attorneys
General Jim Smith and Bob Butter-
worth will join Crist for a special
celebration of the conference's
20th anniversary on Thursday,
June 2, at 10:30 a.m. at the Tampa
Convention Center. After an
audiovisual presentation celebrat-
ing the history of the conference,
each attorney general will share
brief thoughts and recollections
about the conference.
The conference's General Ses-
sions will be in the Tampa Conven-
tion Center, 333 South Franklin
Street, Tampa, while the afternoon
workshops will be in the Tampa
Marriott Waterside Hotel, 700
South Florida Avenue (adjacent to
the convention center).
For more information on the
National Conference on Preventing
Crime in the Black Community,
please contact Ron Barkett at (850)
414-3353. To register, contact
Nancy Simmons at (850) 414-3367.


Missing girl in Palm Beach County


The Palm Beach County Sher-
iff's Office is seeking the public's
assistance in locating a missing
child by the name of Maria
Penaran of 59 Ferne Lane, Lake
Worth, FL. Maria is an I11-year-old
Hispanic female, with black hair
and brown eyes. She is 5'0" and
weighs 100 lbs. She has been
missing since Sunday, May 22,
2005 at 9:30 p.m.


Maria may be in the company
of Hispanic male Alfredo Hernan-
dez Pablo, DOB: Oct. 1, 1985, of
34 Ferne Lane, Lake Worth. Pablo
was last seen Friday night, May 20,
2005, driving a black Honda vehi-
cle with a spoiler on the trunk. He
packed up all of his belongings
and moved out of his address
telling the property owner he had
problems and had to leave.


It is unknown which direction
they could be traveling or what
their destination is.
If anyone has information
regarding the whereabouts of
Maria Penaran or Alfredo Hernan-
dez Pablo they are encouraged to
contact the Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office, Special Investiga-
tions Unit at 688-4140 or Crime
Stoppers at 1-800-458-TIPS.


Clewiston Police Department Arrest Report


Editor's note: The following arrests are
not an indication of guilt. Any suspect
identified on the following list who has
the charges listed dropped for any rea-
son may contact the Clewiston News
and their information will be printed.
May 20-'Jairon Fuentes, Battery
May 20- Javier Rodriguez, DUI
May 20- Christy Patrick, Battery
May 20- Rebecca Patrick, Battery
May 22- Jeffrey Mcgriff, Robbery
May 22- Harold Johnson, Robbery
May 23- Carlos Gonzalez, Revoked
DL
May 24- Astrid Filiponi, Warrant
May 24- Chuck Gilkes, Warrant, FRob-
bery


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May 24- Eric Galassini, Open Contain- juana May 25- Erika Ruiz, Disorderly Intoxi-
er May 25- David Mankamyer, Poss. of cate
May 24- Joseph Williams, Poss. of Marijuana May 27- Bonifacio Martinez Ramirez,
Marijuana May 25- Randy Salazar, Poss. of Mari- Poss. of Marijuana
May 24- Zachari Branch, Poss. of Mari- juana May 27- Juvenile, Poss. of Marijuana


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Letters home: Local families share soldier's letters


Editor's note: In honor of
Memorial Day, we asked read-
ers to share letters from service
men. The following letter was
written to Brenda Jaramillo, of
Clewiston, by her husband who
is serving in Iraq.

Hello my wife,
How is the love of my life
doing? Well we just got back
from a mission; we have been
going hard for about 17 days. I
think we are done tomorrow, if
we are, I'll be able to call you
and mail you this letter. To tell
you how much I miss you and
love you, and can't wait to come
home to hold you.
I am really sorry for not writ-
ing a lot, baby and I'm glad you
understand. It is my fault for not
writing and not explaining how
it is over here. We are working
our butts off baby. Sleeping on
the floor, no water no electric,
no heatlexcept for my sleeping
bag. Since my birthday I have
had two showers, I smell like
the locals now. We are doing
good though, by tomorrow we
should get some days off.
OMG, I am listening to Stan's
MP3 Player, to Vanilla Ice, he,
he. Earlier it was Kid Rock and
of course country, (Stan is from
Georgia).
I miss you, did I tell you that
already? I just wanted to remind
you. Tell Jackie I said Happy
Birthday. I hope she had fun
with Brandon in Orlando and
you getting to keep Kendall, I
bet that was fun.
I am the luckiest man alive.
Every time I think about you,
which is all the time, and like
when we get a bad feeling about
an area we are working in, I'm
like God, please let us get out of
here safe, I need to get back to
my wife.
Oh, by the way, Brian, Pocket
Brian and Stan are all married
now and have at least one kid
each. 'Cause when we talk to
the locals and work with the
Iraq Army, they ask if we have
"madam", that's what they refer
to as wife. It is their culture that
you're not a real man, unless
you're married with children. I
tell them I have a wife and four
kids and one granddaughter.
They say "Good, Mister, good!"
Baby I am going to go to
sleep now, I will try to call you in
a'few days, I miss you and love
you so mucX.
Love you! Miss you!
Your Baby Boy, husband
Julian

The following series of let-
ters from the Civil War. WW I,
WW II, Vietnam, Desert Storm
and Iraq were contributed by
Mrs. Louise Sullivan of Clewis-
ton.
They are from her Grandfa-
ther, William Charles Hawkins
(Civil War), her Father, John
Hawkins (World War I), Her
brother, Claude Ray Hawkins
and husband, James Sullivan
(World War II), her grandson,
Shane Sullivan (Gulf Storm),
her cousin, Charlie Carlson
(Iran and Iraq).

This is from a letter from the
Civil IWar. My grandfather,
William Charles Hawkins, was
charged with losing "One
Enfield Rifle and one set of
accouterments". He wrote an
explanation to the Board of
Examiners as follows:
"I brought all my things over
the top of a ridge and hid until
the Yankees surrounded me. I
then tried to escape but found I
could not run with my things. 1
was so weakened by coming up
the hill so I threw gun, cartridge
box, knapsack and things away
and then securely got away from
them.
Pvt. W.C. Hawkins, Co. K, 1st
Fla. Cavalry (Dismounted)"

He did not have to pay for
these items.
My grandfather served in all
the major battles from Chat-
tanooga to Greensboro where
he was paroled (surrendered).
The Yankees shot off his trigger
finger in the battle of Dallas, Ga.


September 8, 1918 Some-
where in France
Dear Mother.
Just a few lines to let you
hear from me. I am well and


dandy and am
the same. I
have not
heard from
you in over a
month. I got a
letter from
Mattie May last
week. She said
they were all
well. I have
never heard
from Albert
yet and I have


hoping you are









John E.
Hawkins


written them a half a dozen
times. Just mailed him a card.
We have not been getting mail
lately for some reason.
Mama, I have got my liberty
bond paid for and it may be sent
to you at Sanford and if you get
it, just save it for me. It might be
well for you to write to Sanford
and have all your mail sent to
you. I don't know for sure what
will go to you or myself and I
also have five thousand insur-
ance made out to you, but that is
on my service record. If any-
thing should happen, you will
get that anyway.
Well, I guess Laura is in Ga.
by this time teaching school.
Wish I was there and this
thing was all over for I am tired
and now it is not so much fun. I
would like to write more. I know
my letters are not interesting to
you at all but I can not write
much and I have to be careful
what I write for I want all of
them to go through the Base
Censor, but after all, if you don't
know just where I am at and
what I am doing, you can not
worry so much for I am not
always safe here but, Mother, I
am trying to do my part and the
best I can and I am having plen-
ty to eat and plenty of warm
clothes to wear so don't you
worry about that. I am getting
along fine and have a good time
when I can get off and they are
not so strict over here as they are
in the states. When we are off of
duty, we go where we please.
It will soon be time for my 14
days leave and I am going to try
and get it in England and Italy if I
can. Most likely part of it in Paris
and I may have to take mine
there.
I have got souvenirs, books
and postcards at all the places I
have been since I landed in
France. I am saving them to
bring home with me. Well, there
is no news I can write about so I
will close with lots of love by
John.
Pvt. J.E. Hawkins
Co.C. 15th U.S. Engrs.

American E.F. France May 17,
1944
Dearest Louise,
Well, I just came from Award
Presentation and I was present-
ed my Air Medal. It is a very pret-
ty and nice
medal. I will
send it to you f .
tomorrow or
the next day. It
should take a
couple of
weeks to
reach you. I
will insure it
and send you James
the insurance Sullivan
stub also. It
has a small lapel button that
YOU could wear. I intend to call
Claude when I get my pass and
see if I can't fly over or take the
train over and see him.
Didn't -yes I did! I started to
say I didn't get a letter today, but
I did. You be careful driving that
car as I sure don't want anything
to happen to you. You know
that.
As for sweating them out, I
am already doing that every mis-
sion and I have been on some
rough ones. Flak and German
fighters are getting awful accu-
rate and I've seen plenty of both.
May 8th was a very long haul,
way up around North Sea by
Norway and Denmark and
down into Poland. Made me


wonder if the Russians were
doing anything on their end of
the line.
I'll have someone take a
snapshot of me wearing the
medal and will send it to you at
the first opportunity. I have your
pictures laid out here and they
sure make me homesick for
you. Makes the end of my tour
seem like a million miles off, but
I'll stick in there pitching and it
will roll around sometime.
I was pleased to hear that
Father Wall thought of us. You
must tell me what the priest said
when he called. He was a very
nice fellow if I ever met one and
I wrote him a nice note before
leaving Dalhart.
Well, Little Sweetheart, I love
you, I love you, I do, I do, and
can't wait til we're together
again. Til tomorrow, g'nite and
all my love.
Your Little Husband,
Jimmie

Lt. C.R. Hawkins
360th Bomb. Gr. 367th Sq.
APO 557 C/O Postmaster New
York, NY
Sunday April 30, 1944
Dear Daddy,
Haven't forgotten tomorrow
is your birthday but it looks like
all I can do is write you. I haven't
been in town with a store open
yet, and besides, there is noth-
ing here at all.
Went on
my fourth mis-
sion today.
Was quite a
long haul.
That is four in ..
five days now
which isn't
bad. Won't be
long at that Claude
rate until I can Hawkins
return to the
States. Smith and myself helped
set a new record over the week,
which I think will stand awhile.
Three missions in two days.
That is really work.
On my missions I have flown
over several places I have heard
you tell of being in the last war.
Today a German fighter (FW-
190) passed so close to the nose
I could have hit him with a rock.
He was really in a hurry. He
passed in just a blur. Most of the
time our fighter support you
read about is really good. They
take the P51, P47 or P-38s any-
where now. They really look
good flying around when you
are deep in enemy territory.
Those boys are really good too.
They enjoy a scrap and will go
out of their way to find one.
Wish I could be with you on
your birthday tomorrow but
here I am. Maybe we can be
together on mine. Hope to be
back by then. At the rate I am
going now, it sure won't be
long.
Tell Mama I'll get the money
orders for the other $200.00
tomorrow if I have time. Your
money isn't much good to you
over here. I am sending $300.00
for the ring and $1,000.00 to the
bank this month. I didn't get
paid for March so had two
months. Hope I can get a nice
ring for the $300.00.
Hope you have a good birth-
day and wish I could be with
you.
Drop me a line.
Love,
Claude Ray

MAMS-17
1st MAM
FPO San Francisco, CA 96601
Oct. 6, 1966
Dear Mom and Dad,
Well, I got enough points for
my combat wings. We're start-
ing radio relay BOW where you
sit up all night for about 9 hours
using the plane as a ? for the
ground troops. My plane is
down today for a hole in the gas
tank.
It is sure hot down here and
dusty. We may go to China
Beach for a swim sometime
today.
I am sending $200 home in
money orders with this letter. 1I
don't know if you got the pic-
tures I sent or not. They were


taken at Danang. It is kind of
hard to wrap anything to send
because you can't get a hold of
anything to do it with.
I flew flares last night so I am
off today.
I was in Saigon yesterday and
came back yesterday night. I
went to the Philippines but did-
n't stay very long; to pick up
parts and return.
I may make corporal this
time but I won't know until the
9th. That's about all that is hap-
pening around here. Be sure to
write if you get the money
orders.
Love,
John
P.S. Send the pictures to
Grandma

Rolla, MO 31 Aug. 1982
Dear Aunt Louise,
I got your letter today. Thanks.
It feels super good to get mail. I
got a letter from Mom, also she
said Mary Ann and Steve might
move south. I think it would be a
very smart move. I think Steve
could get a steady job with
U.S.S.C. Good carpenters are
pretty hard to find down there.
Most work for themselves
(whenever they want to). It really
sounds like Uncle Jim is staying
busy. It's good for him. Keeps
him out of your way. Today was
payday. I've never worked so
hard for so little in my entire life.
I'm really tired. Today was tough.
They took us 7 miles around and
around, up and down, in and out
of the mountains until we were
totally lost. Then they gave us a
compass and told us to go for it.
Me and my buddy made it back
in 4 hours. Was it ever hot! I've
never had to walk in mountains
before. They told us the closest
way from point A to point B was
straight across. I never knew
straight across would be over
rocks, through river and straight
up cliffs. We made it. We were
the fourth ones to get back. Oh
well, I'd better get to bed. I've got
to do it all over again tomorrow.
Love, Joe

Gulf Storm
14 February 1991
Dear Grandma
Hi. Sorry I had no time to
write. I don't much like to write.
I should be leaving soon to go
back to Germany. The sooner
the better. lve been over Irere
for three months arid to mycon-
clusion, they can keep the Mid-
dle East. The people are all dirty;
they don't like us, even though
we won a war for them.
By the time you get this letter,
I should be back in Germany. I
got a letter from Mom's side of
the family and they wrote that
they were going to have' a 25th
surprise anniversary party for
Mom and Dad in May. I will try
to be home for it. Well, I have to
go to sleep now.
Love,
Shane


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005





Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


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Thursday, June 2, 2005










Glades-based NOAH awarded 35,500 from Knight Foundation


BELLE GLADE NOAH
(Neighbors Organized for Ade-
quate Housing) has received a
three-year, $235,500 grant award
from the John S. and James L.
Knight Foundation for its Prena-
tal Parenting Education Center.
The Center provides teenage
mothers with instruction on how
to properly care for themselves
during pregnancy and teaches
young parents how to care for
their infants.
The center was established in
1988, as part of NOAH s mis-
sion to assist Glades residents


with family development. It was
initially underwritten by the Chil-
dren's Services Council and also
briefly supported by the Palm
Beach County Department of
Housing and Community Devel-
opment. Funding from Knight
Foundation enables NOAH to
offer the center's services with-
out interruption.
"Part of NOAH's work has
always included family develop-
ment, and early on, we've
focused on teen parents and
ways to improve their parenting
skills and healthy birth out-
comes," said Gladys Givens-Bar-


ber, NOAH's Family Services
director. "We help these young
parents understand how to bond
and interact with their children
and care for them with proper
education, discipline and matu-
rity. This program sets the stage
for the child's development all
the way into the classroom."
Prenatal Parenting Education
addresses the need to change
individuals behaviors and
attitudes about maternal health,
family planning and child rear-
ing. Pregnancy rates among teen
mothers in Belle Glade and
Pahokee are two to three times


higher than the Palm Beach
County average, and the 17.5
percent infant mortality rate in
South Bay is twice as high as the
rest of the county.
"NOAH has had a consistent
track record in the community
and an experienced and dedicat-
ed staff that recognizes the
needs and challenges of resi-
dents living in the rural Glades
communities," said Suzette L.
Prude, Knight's community liai-
son program officer for Palm
Beach County. "This program
will help teen and young-adult
mothers acquire skills and infor-


mation that will increase the
chances for their children to suc-
ceed."
Established in 1983 to
address the need for adequate,
safe housing in the Glades,
NOAH provides residential,
social and family and child
development services for local
residents. NOAH's mission is to
improve housing in the Glades
area of Palm Beach County,
which includes Belle Glade,


Pahokee and South Bay; to
empower disadvantaged individ-
uals toward self-help and self-
sufficiency; and to build bridges
among the diverse racial, ethnic
and economic groups. Its main
offices are located at 601
Covenant Drive in Belle Glade.
The John S. and James L.
Knight Foundation promotes
journalism excellence world-
wide and invests in the vitality of
26 U.S. communities.


Family Eye Care

Randall T. Parrish, Jr., O.D.
L. Lamar Youmans, O.D.
Board Certified Primary Eyecare Physicians
Optical Services Available "Take Care of
Your Eycs-
100 N. Main St. LaBelle, FL 33935 The World Is
863-675-0761 Fullnof
e-mail: familyeyecare@earthlink.net Wonderful
Visit us on the Web4at: Things To
wwiv.familyeyecarelabelle.com Sec!"

I Law Offices of Robert L..Vaughn, P.A. |


112 W.C. Owen
Clewiston, FL 33440
(863) 902-9211


LaBelle, FL 33975
(863) 675-7719


ZUU Cowler tme.
Ft. Myers, FL 33901
(239) 936-9393


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
Scholarship recipients
The 2005 recipients of the R. Bruce Jones Memorial Scholarship, endowed by Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative of Flori-
da, are Raqueria Murvin from Pahokee Middle/Senior High School and Shalanda O'Neil from Glades Central High
School. Each student will receive $5,000 towards their college education. On-hand to congratulate the girls was Coop-
erative President George Wedgworth. Pictured, left to right: Doris O'Neil, Shalanda O'Neil, George Wedgworth, Raque-
ria Murvin and Linda Murvin.


School Happenings


1-800-579-0694



Glades Day School
The staff of Glades Day
School was on campus Tuesday
and Wednesday for post-plan-
ning and they are now officially
on summer break. The adminis-
tration will be working through-
out the summer except July 4-8
to assist in registering students
and preparing for the 2005-2006
school year. On Aug. 4, the new
teachers will begin pre-planning
and returning teachers will begin
on Aug. 8. Students will join the
mix for orientation on Wednes-
day, Aug. 10, and the first day of
school will be Thursday, Aug. 11,
Many grades are filling up, so call
soon for registration information
(561) 996-6769.

Elementary
The 2005-2006 Student Coun-
cil Junior Leadership class at
GDS has been selected. The stu-
dents who will be participating
for the next school year are third
graders Amanda Hernandez and
Jude Moss, fourth graders Lizzee
Lohmann and Joshua Hancock,
fifth graders Danielle Dixon and
Elliott White, and sixth graders
Ashley Chancey, D'Nara Davis,
Michelle Henson, Gabriella Her-
nandez, Kristen Holden, Jessee
Kirchman, Sara Lezcano, Brian-
na Lohmann, Brianne McMillan,
Dennis Pozo, Alicia Rodriguez,
Nicole Wax and Casey White.

High School
A group of helpful students
served at the annual Gator Gath-
ering, which was held at the Uni-
versity of Florida Research Cen-
ter on May 17. University of
Florida Head Football Coach
Urban Meyer was the guest of
honor, and Head Basketball
Coach Billy Donovan was also in
attendance. There was a huge


crowd of over 300 people and
the Glades Day students helped
to serve them all. Freshmen
Kevin Royal and Dane Kirchman
were excited to help at the event
and especially to get autographs
from the two coaches.
There were two trips planned
for the students who graduated
from Glades Day School this
year, though neither trip was
sponsored by the school. Several
of the students of the class of
2005 left last week for a five-day
trip to Cancun. Twelve graduated
seniors left yesterday, June 1 to
embark'%n a two-week adven-
ture throughout Italy and
Greece. The European travelers
will return June 14.

Special Thanks
On behalf of the students at
Gove Elementary, we thank the
faculty, staff, parents and com-
munity for designating our
school to receive a percentage of
their purchases when shopping
at Target. By using the Target
charge card, one percent of the
sale is donated to the school.
During the month of March, a
check in the amount of $587.27
was received from Target. The
money is used in the Family Cen-
ter to purchase supplies for par-
ent training, student incentives,
etc. Again, we thank you for
your continued support.

Reminder from the
Family Center
The Family Center is asking
for your support in helping to
collect ink cartridges, Box Tops,
Campbell's soup labels, and old
cell phones during the summer
months. This is a simple
fundraising initiative to help
raise funds for different events
sponsored by the Family Center.


.. .. ... ... . ...... ... ) ......... 1...l. _.s .1 lhsm n .

HIP & KNEE SURGEON
NOW SEEING PATIENTS
AT HENDRY REGIONAL

Dr. Ed Humbert is a fellowship
trained hip and knee surgeon
specializing in joint replacement
and arthroscopy of the hip and knee.

CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT


Dr. Ed Humbert
Next to Hendry Regional
in Suite B
530 W. Sagamore Avenue


IOINT
IMPLANT
SURGEONS


For more information pertaining
to this fundraiser, contact the
Sylvia Rodriguez at 993-1976.

Art news
We are pleased to announce
for the second year in a row, that
three Gove Elementary artists
won the SunFest/Real Yellow
Pages Design Contest. This
year's winners are Adriana
Rubio (first place), Cinthya Solis
(second place), and Michelle
Ramirez (third place). Their art
will be published in the Belle
Glade Real Yellow Pages in the
fall of the year. The.top 10 final-
ists include: Bernadette
Dominguez, Yannet Garcia,
Shernetta Hall, Luis Maldonado,
Tanya Rangel, Roxana Sanchez
and Angelica Zavalas. The Gove
Elementary Art Department
received a $200 cash award. We
are very proud of these students.

A culminating activity
As a culminating activity for
participating in our Dual Lan-
guage Program, 36 sixth grade
ambassadors had the opportuni-
ty to visit several places of inter-
est around the state of Florida.
The students, along with teach-


ers and parents, toured the city
of St. Augustine stopping at such
historic places as Ft. Matanzas,
the Spanish Village, Pioneer Vil-
lage and the Old Fort. The group
then traveled to Tallahassee
where they visited the Capitol,
the Governor's Mansion and the
Supreme Court. On their last leg
of their trip, they toured the city
of Tampa visiting such sites as
Ybor City and the Columbian
Restaurant. It was .a wonderful
opportunity for the students to
end their elementary school
experience with this memorable
trip.

Honors trip
An Honors Trip has been
scheduled for Wednesday, May
25 to reward those students in
grades third-sixth making high
marks on the FCAT. The stu-
dents, along with their chaper-
ones, will be traveling to Roxy's
in West Palm Beach via a limo
where they will be treated to a
delicious lunch compliments of
the administration. We congrat-
ulate all of the students for their
superior performance and wish
them continued success in years
to come.


Sago Palm Graduation
Sago Palm Academy graduated 15 students at their graduation
ceremony Friday, May 27, 2005. Included in the program was
recognition of the many Sago Palm students who scored fours
and fives on the FCAT. Mr. J.R. Thicklin, who was the speaker,
urged the students to take what they have learned at Sago Palm
and become "difference makers" in the world. Principal Alexan-
dra Deveroux spoke to the parents about the importance of cele-
brating their children and encouraging them to pursue further
education. After the graduation ceremony students and their par-
ents, who had come from all over the state, were treated to a
luncheon by the Sago Palm faculty and photographs were taken
of students and their parents.


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We Also Carry Used Appliances With Warranty

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Mastercard & Visa
Monday-Friday 9-6 Saturday 9-4


Coastal Financial Group
525 NW Avenue L Belle Glade, FL
www.gladesmotors.com


SKILLED CHIROPRACTIC CARE
33 YEARS OF SERVICE TO
CLEWISTON & MOORE HAVEN AREAS

Auto Injuries Headaches Work-Related
Injuries Neck Pain Sports Injuries Carpal
Tunnel/TMJ Sprains/Strains Back & Leg Pain
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( Call for an Appointment Today! )

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CHIROPRACTIC & REHABILITATION CLINIC

(863) 983-8391
905 W. Ventura Ave. Clewiston


Clewiston, FL 33440
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(863) 983-2896 OF FLODA


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MT11 THE RESPECT YOU DESERVE


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ff-


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005






Sevn.h omnte suho aeOecoeeTusaJn ,20


0

'M~ect/t&


'0


S&Jij


Greater Palm Beach Area Chapter
Proudly serving Glades, Hendry, Okeechobee and Palm Beach Counties


+American
Red Cross
Greater Palm Beach Area Chaprer

Volunteers Needed!
Get Trained Nowl Learn how to shelter and feed your
community in the event of a hurricane or other disaster.
These FREE sessions include: Introduction to
Disaster Services, Mass Care, Shelter Operations,
Shelter Simulation, First Aid and CPR/AED.
Call your local Red Cross to sign up today:
* Palm Beach County: 800-RED-CROSS
* Glades Area: 561-992-9703
* Okeechobee County: 863-763-2488
VOLUNTEER SHELTER TRAINING:
+ June 11, 2005 / 9am 6pm
June 12, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
Glades Area Branch, 195 US Highway 27 S., South Bay
4 June 18, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
June 19, 2005 / 9am 6pm
WPB Chapter, 825 Fern Street, West Palm Beach
+ July 9, 2005 / 9am 6pm
July 10, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
South County Branch, 5820 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton
4 July 16, 2005 / 9am 6pm
July 17, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
Okeechobee County Branch, 323 N. Parrott Ave., Okeechobee
+ July 30, 2005 / 9am 6pm
July 31, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
North County Branch, 9121 N. Military Trail, Suite 106,
Palm Beach Gardens
+ August 6,2005 / 9am 6pm
August 7, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
WPB Chapter, 825 Fern Street, West Palm Beach
4 August 13, 2005 / 9am 6pm
August 14, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
Okeechobee County Branch, 323 N. Parrott Ave., Okeechobee
4 August 27, 2005 / 9am 6pm
August 28, 2005 / 9am 4:30pm
Clewiston Service Cente, 475 Oceola Avenue, Clewiston
M This free training series is financially
supported in part by United Way
Umad Way of PalmBof Palm Beach County
United Wasy ow! Pabmd nsay

Together, we can save a life


x
S
U
* -
* U
* U
*

U.S.g.S..
U
U


Make a Plan


Remembering your lessons from last
year, have you planned for this year?
Now is the time to prepare your
personal evacuation plan with friends
and family. Identify where you will
go, how to get there and plan an
alternate route in case roads are
blocked, catalog important phone
numbers, designate an out-of-state
contact, make preparations for the
safety of your family and pets.


Get Trained


HELP save someone you Lovel
Emergency vehicles may not be able
to navigate roads clogged with debris
during and just after a storm. It may
be up to you to save a life. Learn
lifesaving skills such as CPR, First
Aid, and AED Essentials, even Pet
First Aid, through one of the many
courses offered by your American
Red Cross.
Tak a edCos Frt i


SA I




Bulld a Kt

Your hurricane supply kit
should include:
Canned food and manual can opener,
at least three gallons of water per
person, protective clothing, rainwear,
bedding, battery-powered radio,
flashlight and extra batteries, any
needed items for infants, elderly or
disabled family members, and
instructions on how to turn off
electricity, gas and water.


.Volunteer


You can help your community by
becoming an American Red Cross
volunteer.
Volunteer for shelters and/or help
provide mobile meals as well as bring
family services to people affected by
community-wide emergencies. You could
also become trained in life-saving skills
and then become certified to teach
these skills to others. Joining the
American Red Cross Speakers Bureau
and sharing the word about our work
in communities is another
way to help.
A"_:


PIsa M return to American Red Cross, Greater Palm Beach Area Chapter:
825 Fern Street, West Palm Beach 33401 Attn: Hurricane Preparedness

U Yes, I want to sign up for Shelter Training and help my community.
O June 11-12 a June 18-19
L0 I can't make the training but I would like to volunteer for the Red Cross.June
O July 9-10 a July 16-17 D July 30-31
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Alligagors can be dangerous, warns FWC experts


By Loma Jablonski
It is estimated that alligators and
people in Florida are 10 times more
likely to come into contact with
each other now than they were 35
years ago. This figure is based on
population estimates that indicate
both the number of alligators and
the number of humans, which
have more than tripled since 1970.
The staff at the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) states that these statistics
indicate a need for increased public
awareness about alligator safety
and behavior.
Statewide, in 2004, there were
18,048 alligator complaints
received by the FWC. Since 1948,
there have been 15 recorded fatal
attacks on humans, including two
last year in Lee County. Of the 15,
five took place late in the day or into
the evening; nine involved people
swimming, wading or snorkeling
and two involved children three-
years old or younger wandering
away from adult supervision. There
have been 327 non-fatal alligator
attacks documented by the FWC,
many as a result of people who
tried to capture or handle an alliga-
'tor.
The FWC has launched a toll-
free telephone number to report
nuisance alligators. The number is
.1-866-FWC-GATOR (1-866-392-


Staff photo/Lorna Jablonski
This alligator has lost its fear of humans as it surfaces in the
Rim Canal with its dinner in its mouth.


4286) and should be the primary
telephone number for alligator
complaints.
People should not report an alli-
gator that is simply sunning itself on
a bank or swimming in a lake, just
doing what alligators do. If there is
an immediate danger from an alli-
gator, the best thing to do is leave it
alone.
An important part of learning to
live with alligators is recognizing
that over time, these timid reptiles
can become a serious threat to
public safety with the wrong kind of
encouragement from its human
neighbors. Alligators are attracted
to splashing at the water's edge and
noises made by lawnmowers,
weed trimmers and airboat
engines.
Trained biologists and staff at
the FWC are experts at recognizing


the signs that indicate an alligator
has become a danger to humans,
and not just a victim of being in the
wrong place at the wrong time. Liv-
ing in close proximity to a creature
that is exhibiting signs of nuisance
behavior is not an option. The situa-
tion needs to be dealt with by pro-
fessionals from the FWC before
someone gets hurt. If you have any
questions as to whether an alliga-
tor's behavior indicates aggression,
call the experts at the FWC to have
them make a determination.
Alligators that are actively caus-
ing problems or threatening public
safety should be reported as nui-
sances immediately. Call the
FWC's alligator hotline at 1-866-
FWC-GATOR (1-866-392-4286)
and file a nuisance complaint.
Keep in mind that this telephone
number is for alligator complaints


FWC wants boaters to think safety


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) is keying in on three core
messages as its Division of Law
Enforcement gears up for a busy
summer boating season: Stay
alert, wear your life jacket and
don't drink and operate a boat.
The agency says keeping these
messages in mind can dramatical-
ly decrease your chances of get-
ting into an accident and increase
your chances of survival if you do.
"In 2003, Florida led the nation
in boating deaths with 64, and last
year we had 68. We hope to
reverse that trend by alerting
boaters to the biggest dangers,"
said Captain Richard Moore, Flori-
da's boating law administrator.
Moore said the agency honed


in on the three safety messages
after analyzing Florida's boat acci-
dent data.
Collisions with vessels or fixed
objects are the two leading types
of accidents. Last year, they
accounted for nearly half of the
mishaps on Florida's waterways.
Moore said this-reflects the impor-
tance of staying alert to everything
going on around you.
"One of the biggest miscon-
ceptions about boating accidents
is that they are caused by
extremely reckless behavior, but
when you look at the numbers
you see that it comes down to
people not paying attention or
making one careless move,"
Moore said. "We want people to
go out and have fun, but also to


understand the minute they lose
focus something could happen."
Moore said alcohol and not
wearing a life jacket are the two
major contributors to fatal acci-
dents. In 2004, alcohol use was
the primary cause of 21 percent of
boating deaths. Almost one-third
of the fatal accidents were classi-
fied as "falls overboard," and
drowning was the cause of death
in 65 percent of those fatalities.
"We don't know the exact
number of people who would
have survived these accidents had
they been wearing a life jacket,
but there is no doubt that most
might still be alive today if they
had worn a life jacket," Moore
said.
Beginning May 21, the FWC


will flood Lee County with the
three key messages to test out a
new boat safety campaign. The
$250,000 pilot program will target
boaters with television, print and
radio advertisements, billboards,
point-of-sale displays and hand-
outs from law enforcement offi-
cers, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxil-
iary and the U.S. Power
Squadrons. The agency is con-
ducting pre- and post-campaign
surveys to evaluate the cam-
paign's effectiveness. If the pilot
program is successful, the FWC
will roll out the campaign to other
target areas with high boating-
accident numbers.
Visit MyFWC.com/law/boat-
ing/ to get boating-accident statis-
tics.


water). Alligators favor this type of
habitat. Swim in designated areas
only.
Do not swim, walk dogs or
allow small children, at night or at
dusk, along the shoreline of waters
that are known to contain large alli-
gators. Large alligators feed most
actively during the evening hours. It
is illegal to water-ski after dark in
Florida.
Do not attempt to remove alliga-
tors from their natural habitat or try
to keep one as a pet. It is strictly
against the law to do so.
Do fence your waterfront prop-
erty. Appropriate fencing helps pro-
tect family and pets against incur-
sions by alligators.


only, not raccoons, armadillos or
possums.
Also keep in mind that if the alli-
gator is longer than four feet and
meets the FWC's criteria as a nui-
sance animal, it is harvested for its
meat and hide by a permitted FWC
trapper. Nuisance alligators larger
than six feet present the greatest
hazard to humans and pets. Small-
er gators four feet or less in
length pose little threat to peo-
ple, but they can deliver a nasty bite
that should be seen by a physician.
The bacteria in an alligator's mouth
cause bite wounds to become
infected easily.
Here are some basic guidelines
from FWC experts.
Do not feed or entice alligators.
Inform others that feeding alligators
is against state law. When alligators
lose their natural fear of people they
become dangerous.
Do not feed any wildlife in or
near the water. Dispose of fish
scraps or other potential alligator
foodstuffs properly.
Do no let pets swim or run along
the shoreline of waters known to
contain large alligators. Alligators
are attracted to dogs probably
because they are about the same
size as an alligator's natural prey.
Do not swim or allow pets to
swim in areas with emergent vege-
tation (plants growing up out of the


Alligators play a vital role in the
ecology of the state's wetlands and
are an important part of Florida's
heritage. They were, after all, here
first. It is against the law to feed,
harass, molest, and attempt to
move or kill them. Violators should
be reported by calling the FWC's
24-hour, Wildlife Alert Hotline at 1-
888-404-FWCC (3922). Callers may
remain anonymous and may be eli-
gible for a reward.
For information on Florida's alli-
gators, visit
www.wildflorida.org/gators/Defaul
t.htm, the alligator section of the
FWC Web site or call the Southwest
Region office at (863) 648-3203 dur-
ing normal working hours.


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Hunting permits now available online


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
will be accepting application June.
1-11 for 2005-06 regular and special
quota permits to hunt on wildlife
management areas (WMA).
Regular quota hunt applications
are for hunters who seek permits to
hunt during the first nine days of the
general gun-hunting season and
other general gun hunts on some


WMAs. Special quota hunt applica-
tions are for permits to take part in
.some archery or muzzleloader
hunts.
Applications are now available
online at MyFWC.com/hunting. In
addition, application forms will be
available from county tax collec-
tors' offices, license agents and
FWC regional offices as of May 23.
Applying for these permits is


now automated through FWC's
Total Licensing System (TLS). To
apply for these permits, visit any
license agent or tax collector s
office or submit an application
online at MyFWC.com after 10 a.m.
(EDT) June 1-11.
Applications for Recreational
Usepermits will be available online
and from FWC regional offices June
15. These permits are issued on a


first-come, first-served basis begin-
ning July 15. In addition, applica-
tions will be available July 1 for Air-
boat, Track Vehicle, Youth Hunt,
Blackwater WMA Quail Hunt,
Matanzas Family Hunt and Mobility-
Impaired Person Hunt permits.
Visit MyFWC.com/hunting for
more information on how to apply
for permits and application periods
and deadlines.


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Tiger Boosters hold 2005 Spring Fling Golf Tournament


CLEWISTON The Clewis-
ton Tiger Boosters held its
annual fundraising golf tourna-
ment Saturday, May 21, at the
Clewiston Golf Course. Teams
of three competed in the tour-
nament, with a total of over 150
participants. The event featured
one round of 18 holes, with sev-


eral in-game challenges such as
the Longest Drive, Straightest
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contests, each with a hand-
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Thursday, June 2, 2005








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, June 2, 2005


Relay
Continued From Page 1
"I thought it was a success,"
she said. "It turned out good."
According to Ms. Bell-Spence,
before the fun was over, 12 teams
from throughout the Glades had
participated in Relay, with hun-
dreds of residents dropping in
from time to time. Prior to mid-
night, folks dropped by to take in
the atmosphere and the quality
entertainment offered.
And there clearly was no
shortage in entertainment: The
Glory Singers, Gove Elementary
students and even a world-class
child-clogging duo took the stage
during the event.
An early tally puts the money
raised from the event at approxi-
mately $7,000, which will all go
toward cancer research.
Ms. Bell-Spence, who is com-
pelled to help to honor the mem-
ory of her mother, who lived with
the disease, has been an active
participant in the Relay for Life
event for the last few years, and
hopes to continue offering her
services in the future. Without
hesitating, she said she will take


Staff photo/Jose Zaragoza
The O'Farrill Family, a handful of the many people at this
year's Relay for Life, was in high spirits at the Relay for Life
event. Along. with all the other participants at the event, the
event was a success, according to organizers who look for-
ward to next year's event.


part in next year's Relay. A wrap-
up event is scheduled for a few
weeks from now, after which the
committee will begin work on
making the next event an even
bigger and better one than this
year's.
She thanks the community


members who make the event
possible and looks forward to
working with them again in the
future: This year, she recognizes
the efforts of several. Once again,
all three Glades cities made a
strong showing at the event, with
the city of Pahokee offering din-


ner and a movie to the partici-
pants who needed a little rest
from the walking, and other cities
contributed their own part. South
Bay offered savory food, barbe-
cued and ready for eating and the
city of Belle Glade added one of
the most entertaining aspects to
the affair: A city-manager-dunk-
ing booth. Belle Glade City Man-
ager Tate selflessly and bravely let
residents have a go at dunking
him. Needless to say, several did.
"The cities helped tremendous-
ly," said Ms. Bell-Spence.
Other contributors included
Glades General Hospital in Belle
Glade, Everglades Farm Equip-
ment, Gove Elementary and
Pahokee Middle/Senior High
School, for offering the use of the
football field for the event. Next
year's event will be held in Belle
Glade. Because it is a Glades
event, it rotates between Pahokee
Middle/Senior High and Glades
Central Community High School
in Belle Glade.
Many others also worked in
partnership with the committee
on the project, a fact Ms. Bell-
Spence hopes will continue.
"Without teams, nothing is possi-
ble," she said.


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Police
Continued From Page 1
So far, that plan has worked, offi-
cials say.
And it's the only way to go,
argues Chief Gonzalez. "We're
trying to do everything we can
without causing a disturbance,"
he said, adding that actual resi-
dents of the city are entitled to
peace. "The last thing we want is
to stop them from having fun."
A total of three, seven-member
teams took to the streets in that


Tickets
Continued From Page 1
he use the handicap space while
cashing his checks there each
month. The checks he cashes run
into the thousands of dollars.
When the space was occupied,
store employees walked him to his
vehicle. It is an arrangement that,
until he received the ticket earlier
this year, had gone on for months.
"I never had a problem there,"
he said.
The hearing officer felt different-
ly. "I don't know how the store can
make arrangements for you to vio-
late the law." He was denied his
appeal.
Of the 19 appeals, only three
were granted.

City Manager Lillie Latimore
explains that the need for the extra
attention on parking violations
comes as the city prepares for an
overhaul in its citywide infrastruc-
ture. Throughout the community,
infrastructure is a fundamental
issue. Sidewalks are cracked, roads


Acceler8
Continued From Page 1
EAA before entering the Ever-
glades. The EAA encompasses the
three Glades cities.
The projects are expected to
provide water quality benefits to
the environment. The combined
estimated cost of the two projects,
according to district representa-
tives, is $500 million.
Rhonda Haag, with South Flori-
da Water Management District's
Public Outreach Department, pre-
sented information on the collabo-
ration between her agency and
Palm Beach Community College in
Belle Glade. The two will partner in
the training of prospective workers.
The participants in the training pro-
gram will enroll in either a 150-
hour class or 400-hour class an
early estimate as to the two initial
training courses being considered
- to prepare them for the jobs that
will be sought by contractors for


fashion, working their way
through the crowd and eventually
pacifying and breaking up the
crowd. "It was very successful,
we had no disturbances," said the
chief. "Everyone got the message
and moved along."
With the night ahead of them,
the units moved on to Rardin Ave.,
where the sight of open contain-
ers and public drug use is a com-
mon occurrence. There, the units
made six arrests for drug posses-
sion, with two of the arrests carry-
ing charges of intent to sell.
The commission, which has
been accused by residents as try-


are deteriorated and sewer and
water lines must be replaced in
some places. As funding becomes
available for the work, a new set of
rules for parking will be used in
order that the repairs are main-
tained.
The relative volatility of the soft
muck soil in the Glades means that
infrastructure is a constant battle
for cities. "In Pahokee, the terrain
immediately starts to drop away,"
said Ms. Latimore. This means that
parking cars where they shouldn't
be parking and especially on side-
walks, irritates the infrastructure.
According to the city manager,
when cars park atop the sidewalks
that funnel water during rainy
events, the concrete "breaks like
glass because of the muck."
The roadways and streets that
run parallel to the homes in Citi-
zens Villas, in Pahokee, reinforce
that fact. Streets in that particular
residential area are cracked and
weathered and the gaps in the
pavement threaten the safety of
homeowners out on an evening
stroll.


the two projects. According to Ms.
Haag, two of the most needed
positions in those projects will be
heavy laborers and general labor-
ers.
With the certificate of comple-
tion in hand, those who have com-
pleted the courses will be ready for
the jobs. Training courses are slat-
ed to start in the fall. The two
organizations are looking at West
Tech, located between Belle Glade
and South Bay as the potential
training site.
A second tier to the concept of
raising awareness locally has to do
with helping to forge business part-
nerships between the contractors
that could potentially work on the
projects with local businesses and
vendors who might work along-
side them as sub-contractors. A
meeting between the two groups is
scheduled to take place June 23 in
a symposium.
"Five-hundred million doesn't
mean anything if the local people
and businesses don't get job and


ing to keep police from addressing
the problematic issue, has sup-
ported the sweep, though some
still express reservation.
Commissioner Keith Babb
asked if the procedure police used
in making the arrests during the
sweeps, whether the police target-
ed people at random. Chief Gon-
zalez explained that most of the
arrests that were made were the
result of officers targeting people
drinking alcohol in public. With
the right to search a person break-
ing the law, officers found more
than they initially bargained for.
No one was targeted at random,


But there other issues like safety
and upholding the law, Ms. Lati-
more said. "The people for so long
have done the wrong thing and
have been blessed with breaking
the law for 20 or 30 years," she
,said. "I believe in upholding the
law."
And so does the commission. In
2004, the commission approved an
ordinance and later a resolution
that clarified the power of officers
to issue citations for the violations.
She defends herself from the
criticism of residents furious at the
sight of their tickets. "Everything
we do affects this community. We
have to be concerned with safety,"
she said. "The commission some-
times has to make decisions that
are not popular."
Because she understood the
large order ahead of her in rehabili-
tating the mindset of residents, Ms.
Latimore directed the police
department to issue warnings prior
to issuing actual citations. February
of this year was the start of that
grace period, which ran until April.
Now, parking against the flow of


contract opportunities with it," said
Ms. Haag, who added that the dis-
trict when moving forward on the
projects and awarding them to the
contractors, will emphasize their
desire for contractors to hire local-
ly.
Glades representatives seemed
receptive to the news at their
monthly tri-cities meeting on May
23.
Pahokee Mayor J.P. Sasser was
enthusiastic at the opportunity
being afforded to his residents.
"I'm very excited. You're [South
Florida Water Management Dis-
trict] approaching this from our
point of view," he told district rep-
resentatives. "We have people
who just need an old-fashioned
job. They want to show up and get
a day's work and get paid for it." '
Representatives present prom-
ised to continue updating the com-
munity prior to the start of the train-
ing classes and said they will work
on attracting the attention of resi-
dents interested in the concept.


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he said.
The sweeps will continue for at
least the next few weeks, until the
crowds stop gathering from the
increased enforcement. In the
next few weeks, the sweeps,
which have been focused on Sun-
days, the day in which the crowds
tend to be larger, will be carried
through on other days as well.
The goal is to restore calm. "I
want parents who don't have to
worry that their sons or daughters
will get hurt," said Chief Gonzalez.
"We will be there until we get our
project and goal accomplished."


traffic and on sidewalks results in a
$25 fine while parking in a handi-
cap spot is a $250 fine. "We, really
didn't have to give warnings, but
we did it out of consideration," she
said. "When you get your drivers
license, that's your warning. These
are state laws we're enforcing.",
According to Ms. Latimore, resi-
dents should do their best in obey-
ing the parking rules. Doing so will
benefit everyone in the end, she
said. Officers will continue to
crackdown on the violations.
As for Mr. Fountain, he has
decided to adhere to the parking
rules, though under terms of his
own.
"I'm going to get a gun permit,"
he said moments after his appeal
was rejected. "If I walk into the
store with a twelve-gauge, we'll see
how many police will be there. I'm
not losing what's mine."


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Thursday, June 2, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


cane is relatively calm. The most
violent activity takes place in the
area immediately around the eye,
called the eyewall. At the top of
the eyewall (about 50,000 feet),
most of the air is propelled out-
ward, increasing the air's upward
motion. Some of the air, however,
moves inward and sinks into the
eye, creating a cloud-free area.
Tropical cyclones are classified
as follows:
Tropical Depression An
organized system of clouds and
thunderstorms with a defined cir-
culation and maximum sustained
winds of 38 mph (33 knots) or
less.
Tropical Storm An organ-
ized system of strong thunder-
storms with a defined circulation
and maximum sustained winds of
39 to 73 mph (34-63 knots).


Some hurricane names retired

If a hurricane causes severe damage, the name may be "retired" and taken off
the rotation for at least 13 years. The following hurricane names have been
retired.


Chronologically
1954 Carol
1954 Hazel
1955 Connie
1955- Diane
1955-lone
1955 Janet
1957 Audrey
1960-Donna
1961 Carla
1961 Hattie
1963- Flora
1964 Cleo
1964-Dora
1964- Hilda
1965-Betsy
1966 Inez
1967- Beulah
1968-Edna
1969- Camille
1970-Celia
1972 Agnes
1974 Carmen
1974 Fifi
1975 Eloise
1977 Anita
1979- David
1979- Frederic
1980-Allen
1983 Alicia
1985- Elena


1985- Gloria
1988 Gilbert
1988-Joan,
1989-Hugo
1990 Diana
1990 Klaus
1991 -Bob
1992 Andrew
1995- Luis
1995 Marilyn
1995 Opal
1995 Roxanne
1996- Cesar
1996-Fran
1996 Hortense
1998- Georges,
1998 Mitch
1999- Floyd
1999- Lenny
2000 Keith
2001 -Allison
2001 Iris
2001 Michelle
2002 Isidore
2002 Lili
2003 Fabian
2003 Isabel
2003 6 Juan


A hurricane is a tropical storm
with winds that have reached a
constant speed of 74 miles per
hour or more. Hurricane winds
blow in a large spiral around a rel-
ative calm center known as the
"eye". The "eye" is generally 20 to
30 miles wide, and the storm may
extend outward 400 miles.
As a hurricane approaches,
the skies will begin to darken and
winds will grow in strength. As a
hurricane nears land, it can bring
torrential rains, high winds, and
storm surges. A single hurricane
can last for more than two weeks
over open waters and can run a
path across the entire length of
the eastern seaboard. August and
September are peak months dur-
ing the hurricane season that lasts
from June 1 through Nov. 30.
The center, or eye, of a hurri-


Hurricane An intense tropi-
cal weather system with a well-
defined circulation and maxi-
mum sustained winds of 74 mph
(64 knots) or higher. Hurricanes
are called "typhoons" in the west-
ern Pacific, while similar storms
in the Indian Ocean are called
"cyclones".
Hurricanes form in the Atlantic
Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Indian
Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Pacific
Ocean. Hurricane winds in the
Northern Hemisphere circulate in
a counterclockwise motion
around the hurricane's center or
"eye", while hurricane winds in
the Southern Hemisphere circu-
late clockwise. Natural phenome-
na, which affect a storm, include
temperature of the water, the Gulf
Stream, and steering wind cur-
rents.
Powered by heat from the sea,
they are steered by the easterly
trade winds and the temperate
westerlies as well as by their own
ferocious energy. Around their
core, winds grow with great
velocity, generating violent seas.
Moving ashore, they sweep the
ocean inward while spawning
tornadoes and producing torren-
tial rains and floods.
In the eastern Pacific, hurri-
canes begin forming by mid-May,
while in the Atlantic, Caribbean,
and Gulf of Mexico, hurricane
development starts in June. For
the United States, the peak hurri-
cane threat exists from mid-
August to late October although
the official hurricane season
extends through November. Over
other parts of the world, such as


Hurricanes names in alphabetical order
Each year since 1953, the National Hurricane Center approves a list of names
for tropical storms and hurricanes. Before 1953, storms were labeled accord-
ing to where they made landfall, since as the Greater Miami Hurricane of 1926.
From 1953 to 1978, only female names were used. Since 1979, the list has
alternated between male and female names.
Hurricanes are named alphabetically in chronological order. The first tropical
storm or hurricane of the year has a name that begins with the letter A.a
The list contains names from A to W, but skips the letters Q and U.
Six lists of names are rotated. On occasion, a name will be retired, usually out
of respect for the families of those killed by a major hurricane. When a hurri-
cane name is retired, it will not be used again for a minimum of 13 years.


2005 hurricane names
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Dennis
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose


Staaff photo/Katrina Elsken


Instructor Jenny Johns helps kindergarten student Crys-
ten Smith-with her beaded bracelet. The culture program
includes instruction in native crafts.



Hairballs can be prevented


The technical term is trichobe-
zoars, but cat owners know them
by a more common name: Hair-
balls.
Most of the time, hairballs are
not a life-threatening problem,
but they can develop into a nag-
ging ailment and they may hide a
much more serious medical con-
dition, said Dr. John August, a
feline specialist at Texas A&M Uni-
versity's College of Veterinary
Medicine and Biomedical Sci-
ences.
Hairballs occur frequently in
cats because of the way the ani-
mals groom themselves, August
said. And with more than 60 mil-
lion cats out there, there is the
potential for a lot of hairballs.
Cats have been grooming
themselves for thousands of
years. But a cat that has a thick
coat, such as Persians and other
breeds may collect a lot of matted
hair on its tongue, and when that
hair is swallowed, it can clog up
the digestive tract.
That's when trouble can start.
"These balls of hair can irritate
the stomach lining and can inter-
fere with digestive functions, and
the most common response of
the animal is to vomit up the hair-
ball," Dr. August explains.
"If the condition continues, an
obstruction can form in the diges-
tive tract and the cat will either
show a significant weight loss or
at the least, a loss of appetite."
Dr. August said there are signs
to watch for if your cat suddenly
develops an unusual amount of
hairballs.
First, if the cat is grooming


itself excessively, it may because
of allergies or skin parasites. Also,
behavioral problems can cause a
cat to groom itself constantly,
August adds.
The best prevention? "A good
brushing at least once a day will
usually do the trick," Dr. August
believes. "You will see a lot of
excessive hair when you brush
the cat thoroughly, and that hair
on your brush is hair that the cat
probably, would have swal-
lowed."
Special diets usually ones
that contain extra fiber can be
obtained from a veterinarian or
from pet stores and these diets
will often greatly reduce the sever-
ity of hairballs, Dr. August said.
Laxatives can be prescribed,
but "most of us think there are
better ways to deal with hairballs
than laxatives," Dr. August said.
You should never give your cat a
laxative intended for human use,
he stresses.
The calendar can also play a
big role with hairballs.
During spring and summer,
cats tend to shed their hair more
often. In addition, fleas become a
problem and allergic reactions to
them can mean more excessive
grooming.
Bathing your cat frequently to
prevent hairballs is not recom-
mended.
"Only if the animal has a skin
condition is bathing recommend-
ed," Dr. August said. "Usually, a
good brushing daily will help-
reduce or eliminate hairballs.
Your cat will certainly appreciate
it."


Katrina
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rita
Stan
Tammy
Vince
Wilma


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the western Pacific, hurricanes
can occur year-round. Areas in
the United States vulnerable to
hurricanes include the Atlantic
and Gulf coasts from Texas to
Maine, the territories in the
Caribbean, and tropical areas of
the western Pacific, including
Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa,
and Saipan.

Hurricane
Categories
Hurricanes are rated from 1 to
5 according to what is known as
the Saffir-Simpson Scale.
Category 1: Hurricane has a
central barometric pressure of
28.94 inches or more and winds
of 74 to 95 mph. The storm is
accompanied by a 4- to 5-foot
storm surge and causes minimal
damage
Category 2: Pressure 28.5 inch-
es to 28.93 inches, winds from 96
mph to 110 mph, storm surge 6-
to 8-feet damage moderate.
Category 3: Pressure 27.91
inches to 28.49 inches, winds
from 111 mph to 130 mph, storm
surge 9- to 12-feet damage
extensive.
Category 4: Pressure 27.17
inches to 27.90 inches, winds
from 131 mph to 155 mph, storm
surge 13 feet to 18 feet damage
extreme.
Category 5: Pressure less than
27.17 inches, winds greater than
155 mph, storm surge higher than
18 feet. Damage Catastrophic.
(Information provided by
FEMA and the National Weather
Service)


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Florida has a long history with hurricanes


The 2004 Florida hurricane
season was one Floridians will
never forget. It produced 16
named storms, including six
major hurricanes. Four major hur-
ricanes Charley, Francis, Ivan
and Jeanne tore through the
state in less than two months,
leaving 116 Floridians dead and
thousands homeless. Property
damage was in the billions.
Hurricanes have been a part of
Florida history from the first
records kept by the state's pio-
neers. The following information
about some of the major hurri-
canes to hit South Florida was
provided by the National Hurri-
cane Center.


Great Miami
Hurricane 1926
The "Great Miami" Hurricane
was first spotted as a tropical
wave located 1,000 miles east of
the Lesser Antilles on Sept. 11.
The system moved quickly west-
ward and intensified to hurricane
strength as it moved to the north
of Puerto Rico on Sepi. 15. Winds
were reported to be nearly 150
mph as the hurricane passed over
the Turks Islands on the 16th and
through the Bahamas on Sept. 17.
Little in the way of meteorological
information on the approaching
hurricane was available to the
Weather Bureau in Miami. As a
result, hurricane warnings were
not issued until midnight on Sept.
18, which gave the booming pop-
ulation of South Florida little
notice of the impending disaster.
The Category 4 hurricane's eye
moved directly over Miami Beach
and downtown Miami during the
morning hours of Sept. 18. This
cyclone produced the highest sus-
tained winds ever recorded in the
United States at the time, and the
barometric pressure fell to 27.61
inches as the eye passed over
Miami. A storm surge of nearly 15
feet was reported in Coconut
Grove. Many casualties resulted
as people ventured outdoors dur-
ing the half-hour lull in the storm
as the eye passed overhead. Most
residents, having not experienced
a hurricane, believed that the
storm had passed during the lull.
They were suddenly trapped and
exposed to the eastern half of the
hurricane shortly thereafter. Every
building in the downtown district
of Miami was damaged or
destroyed.
The town of Moore Haven on
the south side of Lake Okee-
chobee was completely flooded
by lake surge from the hurricane.
Hundreds of people in Moore
Haven alone were killed by this
surge, which left behind floodwa-
ters in the town for weeks after-


ward.
The hurricane continued
northwestward across the Gulf of
Mexico and approached Pensaco-
la on Sept. 20. The storm nearly
stalled to the south of Pensacola
later that day and buffeted the
central Gulf Coast with 24 hours
of heavy rainfall, hurricane force
winds, and storm surge. The hur-
ricane weakened as it moved
inland over Louisiana later on the
21st. Nearly every pier, ware-
house, and vessel on Pensacola
Bay was destroyed.
The great hurricane of .1926
ended the economic boom in
South Florida and would be a $90
billion disaster had it occurred in
recent times. With a highly tran-
sient population across south-
eastern Florida during the 1920s,
the death toll is uncertain since
more than 800 people were miss-
ing in the aftermath of the
cyclone. A Red Cross report lists
373 deaths and 6,381 injuries as a
result of the hurricane.


San Felipe-
Okeechobee
Hurricane 1928
This classic Cape Verde hurri-
cane was first detected over the
tropical Atlantic on Sept. 10,
although it likely formed several
days earlier. It moved westward
through the Leeward Islands on
Sept. 12. It then turned west-
northwestward, scoring a direct
hit on Puerto Rico on the 13th
(the feast of San Felipe) as a Cate-
gory 4 hurricane. The hurricane
continued west-northwestward
through the Bahamas and made
landfall near Palm Beach, Florida
on Sept. 16. It turned north-north-
eastward over the Florida Penin-
sula on Sept. 17, a motion which
brought the remains of the storm
to' eastern North Carolina on the
19th. It then turned northward
and merged with a non-tropical
low over the eastern Great Lakes
on Sept. 20.
No reliable wind readings are
available from near the landfall
area in Florida. However, Palm
Beach reported a minimum pres-
sure of 27.43 in, making this the
fourth strongest hurricane of
record to hit the United States. In
Puerto Rico, San Juan reported
144 mph sustained winds, while
Guayama reported a pressure of
27.65 inches. Additionally, a ship
just south of St. Croix, United
States Virgin Islands (USVI)
reported a pressure of 27.50 inch-
es, while Guadeloupe in the Lee-
ward Islands reported a pressure
of 27.76 inches.
This hurricane caused heavy
casualties and extensive destruc-


tion along its path from the Lee-
ward Islands to Florida. The worst
tragedy occurred at inland Lake
Okeechobee in Florida, where the
hurricane caused a lake surge of 6
to 9 ft that inundated the sur-
rounding area. 1,836 people died
in Florida, mainly due to the lake
surge. An additional 312 people
died in Puerto Rico, and 18 more
were reported dead in the
Bahamas. Damage to property
was estimated at $50 million in
Puerto Rico and $25 million in
Florida.

"- ------- -





r-
',



.Donna 1960

Hurricane
Donna 1960
One of the all-time great hurri-
canes, Donna was first' detected
as a tropical wave moving off the
African coast on Aug. 29. It
became a tropical storm over the
tropical Atlantic the next day and
a hurricane on Sept. 1. Donna fol-
lowed a general west-northwest-
ward track for the following five
days, passing over the northern
Leeward Islands on the 4th and
5th as a Category 4 hurricane and
then to the north of Puerto Rico
later on the 5th. Donna turned
westward on Sept. 7 and passed
through, the southeastern
Bahamas. A northwestward turn
on the 9th brought the hurricane
to the middle Florida Keys the
next day at Category 4 intensity.
Donna then curved northeast-
ward, crossing the Florida Penin-
sula on Sept. 11, followed by east-
ern North Carolina (Category 3)
on Sept. 12, and the New England
states (Category 3 on Long Island
and Categories 1 to 2 elsewhere)
on Sept. 12 and 13. The storm
became extratropical over east-
ern Canada on Sept. 13.
Donna is the only hurricane of
record to produce hurricane-
force winds in Florida, the Mid-
Atlantic states, and New England.
Sombrero Key, Florida reported
128 mph sustained winds with
gusts to 150 mph. In the Mid-
Atlantic states, Elizabeth City,
North Carolina reported 83 mph
sustained winds, while Manteo,
North Carolina reported a 120
mph gust. In New England, Block
Island, Rhode Island reported 95
mph sustained winds with gusts
to 130 mph.
Donna caused storm surges of
up to 13 ft in the Florida Keys and
11-ft surges along the southwest
coast of Florida. Four- to eight-ft
surges were reported along por-
tions of the North Carolina coast,
with 5- to 10-ft surges along por-
tions of the New England coast.
Heavy rainfalls of 10 to 15 inches
occurred in Puerto Rico, 6 to 12
inches in Florida, and 4 to 8 inch-
es elsewhere along the path of the


hurricane.
The landfall pressure of 27.46
inches makes Donna the fifth
strongest hurricane of record to
hit the United States. It was
responsible for 50 deaths in the
United States. One hundred and
fourteen deaths were reported
from the Leeward Islands to the
Bahamas, including 107 in Puerto
Rico caused by flooding from the
heavy rains. The hurricane caused
$387 million in damage in the
United States and $13 million
elsewhere along its path.

T msdt--h f iv, .Ut
-" .... -. '





-IC. .


.... 1..- Andrew 1992

Hurricane
Andrew 1992
The most destructive United
States hurricane of record start-
ed modestly as a tropical wave
that emerged from the west
coast of Africa on Aug. 14. The
wave spawned a tropical depres-
sion on August 16, which
became Tropical Storm Andrew
the next day. Further develop-
ment was slow, as the west-
northwestward moving Andrew
encountered an unfavorable
upper-level trough. Indeed, the
storm almost dissipated on
August 20 due to vertical wind
shear. By Aug. 21, Andrew was
midway between Bermuda and
Puerto Rico and turning west-
ward into a more favorable envi-
ronment. Rapid strengthening
occurred, with Andrew reaching
hurricane strength on Aug. 22
and Category 4 status on Aug.
23. After briefly weakening over
the Bahamas, Andrew regained
Category 4 status as it blasted its
way across south Florida on
Aug. 24. The hurricane contin-
ued westward into the Gulf of
Mexico where it gradually turned
northward. This motion brought
Andrew to the central Louisiana
coast on Aug. 26 as a Category 3
hurricane. Andrew then turned
northeastward, eventually merg-
ing with a frontal system over the
Mid-Atlantic states on Aug. 28.
Reports from private barome-
,ters helped establish that
Andrew's central pressure at
landfall in Homestead, Florida
was 27.23 inches, which makes
it the third most intense hurri-
cane of 'record to hit the United
States. Andrew's peak winds in
south Florida were not directly
measured due to destruction of
the measuring instruments. An
automated station at Fowey
.Rocks reported 142 mph sus-.
tained winds with gusts to 169
mph (measured 144 ft above the
ground), and higher values may
have occurred after the station
was damaged and stopped
reporting. The National Hurri-
cane Center had a peak gust of


Hurricane and Emergency Management Acronyms


ARWO Aerial Reconnaissance
Weather
AFOS Automation of Field Opera-
tions and Services
ASOS Automated Surface Observ-
ing Systems
AWIPS -Advanced Weather Interac-
tive Processing System
AOC Army Operations Center,
Pentagon ,
ARC American Red Cross
ARES Amateur Radio Emergency
Services
ARRL American Radio Relay
League
CARCAH Chief, Aerial Reconnais-
sance Coordination, All Hurricanes
CONUS Continental United States
DAE Disaster Assistance Employ-
ee
DAC Disaster Application Center
DCO Defense Coordinating Officer
DFO Disaster Field Office
DOC Department of Commerce
EAS Emergency Alert System
EBS Emergency Broadcast Sys-
tem
EICC Emergency Information and
Coordination Center (FEMA)
EMS Emergency Medical Services
EMWIN Emergency Manager's
Weather Information Center
EOC Emergency Operations Cen-
ter
EOP Emergency Operations Plan
ERT Emergency Response Team
(FEMA)
ERT Advance Element of the
Emergency Response Team (FEMA)
ESF Emergency Support Function
EST Emergency Support Team
(FEMA)
FAST Field Assessment Team
FCO Federal Coordinating Officer
(FEMA)
FEMA Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency
FRP Federal Response Plan
GMT Greenwich Mean Time
GOES Geostationary Operational
Environmental Satellite
HES Hurricane Evacuation Study
HF High Frequency
ICS Incident Command System
IT Information Technology Direc-
torate (FEMA)
KM Kilometers
JIC- Joint Information Center
M- Statute Mile
MB Millibars
MEOW Maximum Envelope of


Water or Maximum Envelope of
Winds
MERS Mobile Emergency
Response Support (FEMA)
MPH Miles Per Hour
MOC MERS Operations Center
(FEMA)
M/S Meters Per Second
MT Mitigation Directorate (FEMA)
NASA National Aeronautics and
Space Administration
NAWAS National Warning System
NDMS National Disaster Medical
System
NECC National Emergency Coor-
dination Center (FEMA)
NEXRAD Next Generation of
Radar
NHC National Hurricane Center
NM Nautical Mile
NPSC National Process Serving
Center (FEMA)
NTC National Teleregistration Cen-
ter (FEMA)
NOAA National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
NVOAD National Voluntary Organi-
zations Active in Disaster
NWS National Weather Service
NWSFO National Weather Service
Forecasting Office
OSC On-Scene Coordinator
OS Operations Support Direc-
torate (FEMA)
PIO Public Information Officer
PT Preparedness, Training and
Exercises Directorate (FEMA)
PUP Principle User Processor
RACES Radio Amateur Civil Emer-
gency Service
RADAR- Radio Detection And Rang-
ing
RD Regional Director
REACT Radio Emergency Associ-
ated Communication Team
ROC Regional Operations Center
RR Response and Recovery Direc-
torate (FEMA)
SCO State Coordinating Officer
SITREP Situation Report
SLOSH Sea, Lake, and Overland
Surges for Hurricanes
SOP Standard Operating Proce-
dure
TD Tropical Depression
TS Tropical Storm
TPC Tropical Prediction Center
TAFB Tropical Analysis and Fore-
cast Branch (TPC)
TSB Technical Support Branch
(TPC)


USACE United States Army Corps
of Engineers
USAF United States Air Force
USCG United States Coast Guard
USGS United States Geological
Survey


USN United States Navy
US&R Urban Search & Rescue .
UTC Universal Time Coordinate
WFO Weather Forecast Office
Z -Zulu Time


164 mph (measured 130 ft above
the ground), while a 177 mph
gust was measured at a private
home. Additionally, Berwick, LA
reported 96 mph sustained
winds with gusts to 120 mph.
Andrew produced a 17-ft
storm surge near the landfall
point in Florida, while storm
tides of at least 8 ft inundated
portions of the Louisiana coast.
Andrew also produced a killer
tornado in southeastern
Louisiana.
Andrew is responsible for 23
deaths in the United States and
three more in the Bahamas. The
hurricane caused $26.5 billion in
damage in the United States, of
which $1 billion occurred in
Louisiana and the rest in south
Florida. The vast majority of the
damage in Florida was due to
the winds. Damage in the
Bahamas was estimated at $250
million.
More information on Andrew
is available at the National Hurri-
cane Center Web site.


< ... '


-vtch 1998

Hurricane
Mitch 1998
This powerful hurricane
began developing over the south-
western Caribbean Sea on Oct.
22. It drifted westward and
became a tropical storm later that


day, then turned northward and
became a hurricane by Oct. 24.
Mitch then turned westward
again and rapidly strengthened,
becoming a Category 5 hurricane
with a central pressure of 905 mb
on the 26th. After passing over
Swan Island on the 27th, a weak-
ening Mitch moved slowly south-
ward near the coastal Islands of
Honduras. It made landfall over
northern Honduras on Oct. 29 as
a Category 1 hurricane. Mitch
gradually turned westward after
landfall, and the surface center
dissipated near the Guatemala-
Honduras border on Nov. 1.
The remnant circulation aloft
reached the Bay of Campeche on
Nov. 2 and began developing
again. The re-born Mitch became
a tropical storm on Nov. 3, then
moved northeastward across the
Yucatan Peninsula on Nov. 4.
Mitch crossed south Florida as a
tropical storm on the 5th and
then became extratropical later
that day. The extratropical
cyclone remained strong as it
crossed' the Atlantic, eventually
affecting the British Isles and Ice-
land on Nov. 9 and 10.
Mitch ravaged the offshore
islands of Honduras with high
winds, seas, and storm surge.
However the greatest impact was
widespread heavy rains and
severe floods in Honduras,
Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El
Salvador. Mitch caused an esti-
mated 9,000 deaths in Central
America with another 9,000 miss-
ing. Thirty-one people died when
the schooner Fantome sank as it
encountered the high winds and
seas associated with the hurri-
cane. Two people died in the
Florida Keys when a fishing boat
capsized. Mitch caused tremen-
dous property, infrastructure, and
crop damage in Central America,
and an additional $40 million in
damage in Florida.


SGlades Ford Lincoln-Mercury
^ T I-I E RE S E NIv F E F
'BEEN larcFr Y'V rFm-ETTEF-I
17 3I I F:


Salesman New & Used Vehicles

800-726-8514




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www.carshelpi ngpeople.org

''Volunteers
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------ .......................... ..................... -----


wwwdflorida-classifieds~com


HYour LOCAL gateway

___ to the Internet


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005


,,-,-,or I

vi







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 2005


Place your Call A Pro

today for only

$10 per week!

Call Lauren or Melissa at

863-983-9148, 863-946-

0511 or 561-996-4404


NO ONE WILL WORK HARDER FOR YOU THEN
JAMIE NAVARRO GIVE HIM A CALL ON HIS
CELL AT (239) 822-9272
REALTY C. BAGANS FIRST
\ O LEY 30 Colorado Rd. Lehigh Acres, FL 33936


Get your ad in the Hendry Glades Real Estate Magazine

today! Call hauren or Melissa

at 863-983-9148, 863-946-0511 or'561-996-4404


2 ca his home features separate family and
living rooms. Tile floors and new roof 2,2,
Seperate screened lanai that leads to pool. MLS


COUNTRY HOMES & LAND REAL ESTATE
$0 DOWN
Se Habla Espafiol
Port LaBelle All New CBS Construction
ONLY 1 NEW SPEC HOMES 1.EF-'I'
BEAUTIFUL NEW CYPRESS MODEL
Granite Countertops, Sprinkler System
$198,400 Ready to Move In!!!
HOME PACKAGES STARTING AT $162,900!











.. .
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8 FLOOR PLANS TO CHOOSE FROM OR BRING YOUR OWN!
New Homes Resales Lots
Call for FREE Prequalification
LOTS 4 SALE IN PORT I. \HI..,I.1, S' \l' I \G AT $36K
***OW[f' FINA\('L**
Kathy Hutchins Lic. Real Mstae Brker
Office: 863-612-0651* Fax: 863-612-0553
Visit our website at www.CentralFloridaIandSalesconi
or www.(a t unitryAerdHoruneSites.com


il~ If you are thinking of buying or selling, give us a call! 1-


Fe ATURED HoivRIE





* \hi t a" detl. 1tR i 51i (CTS home in I n.Rlk
only minute< Iw. shopping Feature- included
newa cermm tltv, frc-h paint and lots more.
Oniy $147,900.,


* Nestlcd under the Oatks Custom bultt
SRSho LDP Li.
Vultad ,.' U B u lighting.
iprinkle- .. .. .... dcrac ed
I' ... Only $229,000.
* i I. ilR.2B holims i :
S, .i ,,- ,r ii.-. ;' .. r in, tkl.c nor-
i- mous' !ltl, ,i T[.. --c"bi
ltcvetd bxack y\ard & a'ov gIronnd piIl.
REDUCED $195900.,
S "-i .' 1 ... ;, ,,, :,
UNDER CONTRACT -,
$149,900.
* \What deal!! 3il"IR B CBS home in Lal if
only liinutc'itrom I 'i;'- Fatttiures include
new ceirmic til, Ire.' paint and lots more.
Only $147,900.
S(',mvy coinin' in l'hsl wonderihully
reno' \'aw chrimer. i IIoi B Florida
rac[cra home in t m.s \ w.': ,.. ,! Cre, ,Ind
{is in Prhini: i tiiOl n. Truk a muisr 'cc!
$144,00
* 2 I't.,aI in'me int their elmont SuSbiviMvsn
with 2 full b:ths &7 : I .-i 1, !,.
,a le.k.a M MIiIME CONTRACT. ..,
-recAf.ist i-. -i p;r.ite lii-ng ro ant d famlniy


h' i ; 1 I 1

SMIVlOamL HOMrmES
* Guil acces'i' by community do.cI Fi' hiang.
I-v) int -. \i ,itaer sports right out your doorE
nice -wallI intainiced 2N'R2R
mobile homn is io dcsirAlHe ... liay ony
Pine Iland. Community pool &spa. Don't
mis'- thr. ory tihirng getiaw.tvA 5149 900.
* .: .' ,- .1 1
d I i -
i-acre wA "r .* 'ntr.'v fei but only minutes'
fromll towi 'i ',-
* I kpt ldoubcwid home on 235S "
UNDERCONTRACTI horse
S ... i I n, i 'r 500.
"'- ;- OID ttt1


alls. ,Ui NDER C iNTBACT ,, i .
mll. cr I th .-ii loit r,i Ak' 4 125,.900.
* BuLy Ret, Sell. Retird Maiy hIave donC it. A
good placc to start is with this 3ri-B manuu
lactiurd home sihinzE otn specitacillar _ac Car'
n rlti.O i I 'I t'' i '
* 31BR. 2 2B 004 doublwidc imobik- hoe dose

$97,900.
* 4-BR 21! mnf''tured hioe v ith ov.cr 1,7.
, ',1 n t i I nt


a AC =armCSfAC5EE 1
* I a ', .: Milc don't ter thi,
., a pavedoad or only
|'J'. J' i


1* ,'.,I, '..artd
* ouLD
nufac
0* pnl'titlh wood:d 1.254-i ac, on Jasmine St.
in .Monturat. GrAat for invsstmifnt or homesitc,
Only $46,000.
* Wooded 1.25I: acre. hLor in Montura.
S42,500.
* ?i UNdBEBComIOVICT


* iri-Hu .S, a'* cre comer lot in downtown
i ,T j. ..i L i''t, ntiai. Currently zoned for
I. i wna pos-ibility of
* ,. ..r l. i r,. $129,000.
** '.. I .1 o nPearlSt,126,000.
* Hard ll fEONTRAef i'.,"**



$842,000.ch
* 2 heautifui uni 02 lots. In oaki hammock.
* ..i. I I i. .C r neighborhood.


* 2 1oss .'. .. ,: I or.n. i alUnit 02.
$47,500 each.
* ? I -t acre homeRsitcs on private rd,
S42,000 each ,
h o m e s o n l , : u' o r 1 i 1 r .

,. . .. -

a CaommencIAL.J
* S.181' acres roned C-i 'rnimercial just
South ot" L.aBc[lc city limits win: U5+/ !'at of
frontage on SR29 and front' on Luckey
Street. Asking $450,000.


*,. *r,1 ,'.I',5ix..o, rr, Build your dream house on this
S... 2.18/1- acre riverfront site.
S- .- .r, ,- a.--; O


East Fort Myers!
Extraordinary 3 Bedroom/2 Bath custom
intracoastal home located in a progres-
sive E Ft Myers riverfront Community
.. ': ., ... "'' ....."


F e6 uttfiitPaiverfnt 'r'-m ilh D O.'I LBellr. Rive front Homre'
t.Bed mm P a2 qialnr~m I, P 138 Area IE'8-1'we ja Bithrwm Oa,.i tmD= p 1.-W Aa


1115%.1LRI)IIIi IP111M111[M VR LA, L 'C1b Ie I LW IU tAC I e i'DfIPSI CiC *I e N cnu ri LIC *uj fl11 r L USC)
Vbi~ividiblp r.,1 1(11.- IriS" LoCaled 52689 RIWF BlSnOM LneLf Located 875 N Live Oak Si


ir~ls HO.. -Pt F-a~IiTPly LsiBell,- 0 512 Acre' Hnmesir' Led --a Acres [ ot!
12 soni i t Amst&Au Located 86669 ST 29 t.a~ted 14813 148 10Queen Aye


BRAND NEWII BEAU RIVAGE
So1.hoSIated CCharn In BeBtifulI
Downtown Forn Myere Two 'BR / 3BA
UnIts c0 Cnocse From Gel in on The
Ground Levl .for hi. lnvernlmen,
.r : 1 ?* d- '-. /'f


A'





C; 6~(IiI~ i1 ArcCmms-:ia: PPcnlsi~al
P.lm Beeh EId


*4' -
I i
~ iAD2~3 -J ~-9k)~-jJL)D


S' -'


Alva RIVER/CREEKFRONT HOME!
ONE-OF-A-KIND! 3Bedroom / 2.
5Bathrooms / 3Garage Home Offered on
5+/- acres with 425' of riverfront.


Ci.ewistoni 2 50' Acre Lot Clewirton 5 00 Acre Lot LaBelle 2 08 Acre Lot
Located 785 N I-acedna St Localel .850 Hendry liei Btvd Located 0 LIe Oak Lane
*i-* .. .,, ; ; -, ... ,',,-- X g -* 0 U C )


Sherri Denning
Licensed-Real Estate Broker since 1985
Associates
- Waync Ncquaig Lisn Herrero
- Lisa Clcghorn Paul Mecador
- Bonnie Denning. (PA Art Fry
- Tracey N illimnis Gre- Bone
- j.loe Gerstininn .esse Wallace
03 Fit]'
'gftKHS L'' "- .INNB


,IN STREE

-.1- ATr-


II


238 N. Bridge St. LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-8868
L isa Andrews Lic. RcAd Esitteu Broker
Associates: Dw~ight Hlatfield, Sandra
AlcNandcr, james Tanner, Roxana
.S.'allsve-rt ,014'M Cisneros & Linda Dekie Davis
Ro.lcu%1 rotir.binc. wx%N-svouthwcstfloridareatitygroup.om

HOMESt $55~0,000 k ytctk *'J 1r~wEi' 2 (vi ah;2r)

I i llI I Mr, *$300,000 -* Fim + f~i.~A


A ii Ii.. S15,000. :9iV nv' rir t'tt I4 rind m:,

*~~v 1, lf.*, 'i
* S119.900- 11"', 9D 21A I. i:'laaupcd ll~ i ll M'4 "ii A t 10:101
j d~isild>. Ilu






MI M E;______$46,900) : '0-lmtf!,.i: tl
Kid v In i n c im tAti Pir''J,d '
$99,0251.600 I 'I 'Sn .1w, l w ''" .' ~T,

*$94A0000 I e2, A.vW1.-u


VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM I PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RENTALS SALES
CNDY L. ALEXANDER
]K LIC.REAL ESTATE BROKER
ASOCIAESEC- 00ERt

11AI( 675-0500


R1EALTY
NEW LOCATION!
KU 233 N. BRIDGE ST
ON THE CORNER OF


('I I OWtNHOUSL 5430,AI 'RiV1 oI;At I'O A
IS 10 s 111 0 SilIlA I \L 'STIT fl Iiik 4kd2arJ~hit iu niauawa
3111EDROOM'"211AT 114 ICAR ( XRAC&I ti- ron fiolti-i It irh'apon ilI-n A 1 iiv j nudc- lii.
.i boulitlt it com'ia Io l fi as %ith 'oliiIrccs nil a~. rln alilrctkI i-i nod. 2 tnjiffol iasu k~d
b'' lockhti awnI ix' t h4 ti,- air L. I )w-, 'a an. tt'i mid, F k sn i., 11,; I mit i-a
c, q. f 11,), C ll w m* .all RpIll 1t~ittl
SMWI 1i 4~~' -\,kin- $129,900.0k vbl kihvi rp
IN PORT 1I1,1.1 1 Ir ii,tv dl C1t n-
C rI'tcI'i lo. III 1~ACILISn- v ith ti--fa nw F- i cs. i oA. vr I
*1I ,I ,020jtoo,
C iivif: loti-i-. (rain i- n I k(4515 iJ.\i
I -~-- R~duh .2 Ii-, o $0,06. a.014 t~



k ( 1 I 0 111 %11111F0A Xl)46( 1onI

oli i a- lii' tI OT IN I'I I'PENDING Com, '.A' 1 ut-
N 'Fr. 1 01) To 400,000 c,11 1,r in tppointt $31,00,


t


it ri utk. r
INUM-SAW^b* .
7yW-IMOIwTS





Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


'05 DODGE

STRATUS


STK~bjl&uA


'00 DODGE NEON
STK#53500A............................... ......................... ... 9 9 0
'98 HONDA ACCORD 4 DR. $
AUTO, A/C. STK#54365A 5,990
'01 DODGE INTREPID SE $
BLUE. STK#54022A........................ ................ 5 ,9 9 0
'02 FORD TAURUS $7 Q
RED, SUNROOF. STK#54261A......... $ ,9
'03 SATURN ION $9 990
BLACK. STK#50264A ......
'04 KIA SPECTRA $9990
STK#50697A............................ ,g
'01 TOYOTA CELICA GTS $10,990
BLACK. STK#54096A $ ,9
'02 DODGE STRATUS ES 4
SUNROOF, LEATHER, 20K MILES. STK#53895A I 11,990
'03 PONTIAC AZTEK $
BURGUNDY, LOW MILES. STK#50594A..........I 2,990
'02 VW JETTA GLS TURBO $13 990
RED, SUNROOF. STK#53467A
'02 VW BEETLE GLS *13 990
SUNROOF, WHITE. STK#52924A........................
'02 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONV $14A290
W HITE. STK#5-818A ........ ....................................
'05 DODGE STRATUS $4A
LIGHT GREEN, LIKE NEW. STK#5-3758A.............. I 4,490U
'00 LINCOLN TOWN CAR $14 990
GRAY. STK#P-4772A.............,
'05 TOYOTA SCION XB 15,990
BLACK. STK#53904A.. ......................... ....... ISO ,
'05 HONDA ACCORD EX $ 7,790
STK#5664A ......... : ..............................................,...
'05 DODGE MAGNUM 19 99Q
SILVER ......1..........................9,990
'04 MAZDA RX-8
SILVER, LOADED. STK#5906A................. 22990


S


"09 ISUZu

RODEO


LIKE NEW, 30K MILES.
STK#*31B2A


S '04 GMC

ANYON AWD


- ;z -. -%. -1II p -


:1114c ItI -


'96 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
AUTO, LOW MILES. STK#6042A ................................... 3 ,9 9
'00 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
STK#54406A .............................. 9 ,9 9 0
'03 CHEVROLET TRACKER 9990
24K MILES. STK#52558A 9,990
'02 DODGE CARAVAN $10790
BLUE. STK#5-2844A ...... 10,790
'02 CHEVROLET BLAZER $ ,990
STK#5926A................... 1 ,9 9 0
'02 DODGE RAM CARGO VAN 1990
STK#5-232A............... 1990
'03 FORD WINDSTAR $12990
SILVER. STK#5-3986A 12,990
'02 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
STK#5-3430A 12,990
'03 DODGE CARAVAN
STK#554419A ... ..................... 12 ,9 9 0
'00 FORD EXPEDITION XLT i 3990
3RD SEAT, REAR A/C. STK#54186A... 13,990
'02 FORD ESCAPE XLT 13990
LEATHER. STK#54015A
'02 JEEP LIBERTY RENEGADE
TAN, 17K MILES. STK#5-944A...................................... 3 ,9 9 0
'03 DODGE CARAVAN
LIGHT GREEN, 24K MILES. STK#5-3276A................
'03 DODGE DURANGO SLT -14 990
STK#53483A $14,990
'03 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE
SILVER. STK#5-3635A ...............................................
'04 JEEP LIBERTY
STK#53089A ............................................................. 7 ,9 9 0
'03 HUMMER H2
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Thursday, June 2, 2005










Daniel M. McCarthy: A true gentleman E U. o,


By MaiyAnn Morris
Daniel Marion McCarthy, born
and raised in Okeechobee and
long-time resident of Clewiston
died Feb. 24,2005 at the age of 82.
He was born in the house his
father, the pioneer merchant,
Daniel B. McCarthy built in Okee-
chobee on N.W. Second Street
with lumber cut from his grandfa-
ther's land. He was known as
'Marion" growing up, to avoid the
confusion of having two Daniels
in the family.
He played high school football
tor the Okeechobee Catfish, but
when he went away to college at
the University of Florida, he asked
to be called Daniel, like his father
and grandfather before. He gradu-
ated in 1943 with a degree in
Chemical Engineering.
"One time Dad was really
crazy about a girl who lived in
Canal Point. He decided to take
her out to a really special restau-
rant in West Palm Beach,"
remembers his daughter, Monica
Clark. "This was during the war
and gasoline, like so many things,
was rationed.'Well, on the way
back, they ran out of gas and had
to wait until the bread truck came
by in the morning and give them a
ride home. I guess Dad thought
he'd get shot for keeping the girl
out all night!",
He served in the armed forces
in World War II. While he was
overseas, his mother, who had
never been well, passed away. He
was 19 years old. After returning
from World War II, he met Ruth
Otten from St Louis, Missouri on a
blind date in New York City. He
married her in 1946 and came
back to Okeechobee to work in
his father's gas business in Okee-
chobee with Southeastern Natur-
al Gas Corporation. All through
school he had worked with his
father, who brought gas refrigera-


Recollections
A series about Florida's
pioneers and history





tion to Okeechobee in 1929 dur-
ing the Depression.
In 1947, he and Ruth moved to
Clewiston to establish the Glades
Gas Company, expanding to Belle
Glade and Okeechobee.
"The filling plant here means
that customers may obtain much
better service for an adequate
supply of gas is kept on hand here
at all times to keep the smaller
tanks filled and available for use
for stoves, water heaters, space
heaters, refrigerators and other
uses," said a Clewiston News arti-
cle from June 18, 1948.
"He was so proud of those
children," remembered Francis
Nail, longtime Clewiston resident
and former next-door neighbor of
the McCarthys in Clewiston. The
McCarthys had nine children.
"Mom and dad never missed a
school function," said their
daughter, Monica in a 1976 Flori-
da L.P.G.A. News article, "and one
year dad even took charge of the
band's flag program for Clewis-
ton."
His involvement with the
advancement of the city of
Clewiston is legendary.
In 1948, one year after moving
to Clewiston, he joined the cham-
ber of commerce and helped
draw up its Charter. He was a
director for over 12 years. He also
served on the city commission for
32 years and was mayor for two
years. Early on, he recognized the


uan ivMcarnny grauuaieu irom me university o ui
Gainesville with a degree in chemical -engineering.


Courtesy photos/Monica McCarthy Clark
Dan McCarthy played football for the Catfisha for Okee-
chobee High School in the 1930s.


need for self-regulation by the gas
industry. He was a founding and
lifetime member of Florida
Propane Gas Association.
There was no hospital nearby.
His background in engineering
served him well. He became
heavily involved in the construc-
tion of what was to be Hendry
General Hospital and served on
its Board of Directors for 25 years.


The accomplishments contin-
ue. A founding member of
American Legion Post in Clewis-
ton, Honorary Lifetime Member
Clewiston Lions Club, Lifetime
Member Clewiston Chamber of
Commerce, and a 25-gallon
donor to the Palm Beach County
Blood Bank and a Founding
Director of Clewiston National
Bank, now Big Lake National


Glades Gas, the company started by Dan McCarthy in 1946,
used this modern tank truck to deliver gas to homes in 1969.


Bank. All while being a devoted
husband to Ruth and father to
his nine children. Three of those
children, are involved with the
running of Glades Gas, the com-
pany he founded.
Dan McCarthy joined .the
Clewiston Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment in 1949 and remained an
active member. During Hurri-
cane Jeanne, he suffered a


stroke. The storm was so fierce,
emergency vehicles could not be
dispatched to his home to take
him to the hospital. But the vol-
unteer firemen heard the call
come over the radio, and came
in a fire truck to take him to the
hospital during the hurricane. It
was a fitting tribute to a great
man.
Dan McCarthy will be missed.


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Thursday, June 2, 2005








Thursday, June 2,2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Test could help third world farmers improve soil


GAINESVILLE A process
developed at the University of
Florida will help Third World
farmers keep nutrients in their soil
and could eventually allow them
to join the fight against global
warming.
The process provides a cost-
effective way to measure carbon
in large plots of land, said James
W. Jones, a distinguished profes-
sor of agricultural and biological
engineering with UF's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.
Crop soils in poor countries are
often carbon-depleted due to
farmers' reliance on primitive agri-
cultural practices that remove car-
bon a crucial nutrient that
helps soil resist erosion and pro-
motes plant growth but never
replace it, Jones said.
Carbon left in soil could one
day be used as part of an emis-


sions trading program under the
Kyoto Protocol to reduce carbon
dioxide and other greenhouse
gases. But first, researchers will
need to develop pilot projects to
demonstrate that the amount of
carbon stored in the soil can be
measured accurately through
time, said Sandra Brown, a senior
scientist at Winrock International,
a nonprofit agricultural research
organization in Little Rock, Ark.
And, she said, the global
warming treaty would need to be
amended as well to allow richer
countries to exceed their green-
house emissions limits in
exchange for investing in agricul-
ture projects.
Agricultural soils could absorb
more than 10 percent of man-
made carbon dioxide emissions
Worldwide, according to the Food
and Agriculture Organization of


the United Nations.
"It's going to be a long time
before anyone will pay to store car-
bop in farmlands in poor countries
in a significant way," Brown said.
"I agree with Dr. Brown that
this isn't going to happen
overnight," Jones said. "However,
research like ours is necessary to
advance the field such that soil car-
bon credits will become a reality."
Jones and other researchers
involved in a U.S. Agency for Inter-
national Development soil man-
agement program are already
working with farmers in develop-
ing nations to determine which
carbon-saving agricultural prac-
tices work best under specific cli-
mate and soil conditions. Jones
said methods under investigation
include no-till farming, in which
un-harvested plant material is
plowed back into the soil, and


ridge tilling, where farmers dis-
courage erosion by digging fur-
rows into crop fields.
"We're doing all we can to
bring the benefits of emissions
trading to farmers who need it,"
Jones said. "We believe our
approach has great potential, and
we will continue to move for-
ward."
Field tests in the African nations
of Ghana and Mali indicate the
new process, which combines
computer models and soil meas-
urements, out-performed existing
methods that rely exclusively on
one or the other, he said.
"The computer models can
account for a wide range of crops,
climates and land management
practices, and improve on the
accuracy of previous models. In
addition, our process requires
fewer costly soil measurements


than earlier methods based on soil
sampling," Jones said.
Jones' research can help farm-
ers in poor countries improve
their soils, increase crop yields
and extend the useful life of farm-
land, particularly if they adopt car-
bon-saving agricultural practices,
he said.
Foreign investments could pro-
vide much-needed funds to pay
for improvements, said John
Antle, a professor of economics
and agricultural economics at
Montana State University who is
working with Jones on the USAID-
sponsored program. Currently,
investors have few reasons to sup-
port Third World agriculture but
that might change eventually if the
Kyoto Protocol recognizes agricul-
tural land as a subject for its emis-
sions trading program, Antle said.
The Kyoto treaty, which took


effect in February, has already
spurred investments in forestry,
Antle said. In Europe, brokers help
industrial firms purchase the right
to emit specific amounts of car-
bon dioxide above their govern-
ment-mandated limits, in
exchange for making investments
in projects that plant or protect
trees. Like all green plants, trees
absorb carbon dioxide from the
atmosphere and store it in their
cells.
In mid-April, a company seek-
ing to exceed its allotment of car-
bon dioxide emissions paid about
$20 in forestry investment per ton
of emissions, according to Point
Carbon, a European emissions
broker in London. Analysts at the
firm expect $3.2 billion in world-
wide carbon dioxide emissions
trading this year, and predict more
than $40 billion per year by 2010.


Cicada Killer Wasp: A Wasp on Steroids?


Last week I walked into a wasp
nest both figuratively and literal-
ly. A local pest control business
brought in several dead wasps that
.were collected from the courtyard
of Raulerson Hospital. The report
was that these critters were big,
and they were flying around and
scaring the hospital staff, guests
and patients.
When I went on-site to investi-
gate, I arrived to a beehive of activi-
ty. The hospital staff was involved
in a mock-disaster drill, and yours
truly was declared "contaminat-
ed". While I was inadvertently vol-
unteering to be a victim, I had a
chance to get reacquainted with
Gina Ward, one of our local master
gardeners and member of the hos-
pital staff. After being officially
cleared, Gina directed me to one of
their courtyards.
I discovered what the buzz was
all about: I counted at least 30 hills
or wasp nests and more than that
many yellow and black wasps fly-
ing all around among the trees and
shrubs. These were big bugs -
more than an inch long, with bod-
ies as wide as a bumble bee. But it
was not scary at all I felt com-
fortable that I was not going to get
stung, as this was a colony of the
beneficial Cicada Killer Wasp -
the subject of this week's column.
While most wasps and bees
should be taken seriously, this is


one that may seem intimidating
because of its size. Experiences
with the Cicada Killer Wasp have
shown it to be generally harmless,
unless you happen to be a cicada.
These wasps make solitary nests in
the ground that look like oversized
anthills. The adult wasps then fly
out to find cicadas, which are para-
lyzed by a sting and then brought
back to the hole in the ground. In
the underground nest, the cicada
serves as food for the developing
wasps.
There have been two different
species of cicada killer wasps
found in Florida, and the most
common one is mostly black in
color. It has three pale yellow
bands that only go partially around
the fat abdomen. The legs and eyes
are a rust color, and there is a simi-
lar colored spot on the back
between the four, amber-colored
wings. Males are a bit smaller than
females, but are more commonly
seen flying around the colony.
While this insect may be some-
times called a Ground Hornet,
according to Purdue Extension
Educator Steve Mayer some people
refer to this large docile wasp with
a less fearful name of Cicada
Hawk.
Cicadas are fairly large insects in
their own right. They measure
about two inches long and a half-
inch in diameter. In the heat of


spring and summer days, you may
hear a slowly accelerating song of
repeated "che-che-che" noises
made by the male cicadas. The
adult cicadas emerge from the
ground after several years of feed-
ing on the roots of trees to mate,
and their size makes them a sub-
stantial meal for the cicada killer
larva.
Cicada killers over-winter as lar-
vae in the soil. Warmer spring tem-
peratures bring on the pupation of
the wasps in the ground, and
emergence of cicada as food.
Florida sees both wasps and
cicadas emerge earlier than in
other parts of the country.
In public places, this wasp can
be viewed as a nuisance. Those
people known to have severe reac-
tions to other kinds of bee and
wasp stings will not want them
around. However, the severity of
their sting is reported to be very
mild when compared to the sting
of other bees and wasps. And,
while the slightly smaller male
wasps are more likely to be flying
abound a person, they do not
sting. The female has the stinger,
and the reports are that they will
only use their stinger if trapped in
clothing or captured in a fist.
Cicada killer wasp colonies,
called lekss" by Professor Chuck
Holliday of Lafayette College, are
often found in disturbed areas (i.e.


near buildings and structures) that
are neglected (i.e. with minimal
landscape maintenance). Other
characteristics of.nests are that they
face south, have well drained soil,
and are nearby trees (which will
support the cicada populations).
Knowing what conditions cre-
ate a wasp colony will give some
clues to non-chemical manage-
ment of unwanted cicada killer
wasps: Provide regular irrigation
and maintenance to encourage
vegetation to cover the soil. Flood-
ing the wasps out with a hose or
with a drench of soapy water is
another idea this will discour-
'age wasp nesting. The suggestion
that mulching will discourage
nesting has been made, however,
the colony I observed was thinly
mulched, and offered little discour-
agement.
University of Florida entomolo-
gists have some chemical pesti-
cides recommendations for out-
door wasp control, but be sure
that you are using a properly
labeled product and are indeed
dealing with a cicada killer wasp.
Other more dangerous ground-
dwelling yellow jackets and hor-
nets can be much more danger-
ous for homeowners to attempt
control. Contact our office for spe-
cific pesticide recommendations
or assistance with identifying this
insect.


Attorney General


hails Freedom to


Worship Safely


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist com-
mended Governor Jeb Bush for
signing the Freedom to Wor-
ship Safely Act into law. The
bill, which was among. Crist's
legislative priorities this year, is
intended to protect individuals
from violent crimes in places of
worship by increasing the
penalties for such offenses.
"This new law will give
Floridians an extra measure of
security while they are engaged
in the deeply personal expres-
sion of their religious faith,"
said Crist. "Places of worship
must be sanctuaries from crim-
inal acts, and this measure will
help make sure houses of wor-
ship remain safe and secure."
The attorney general
worked with members of the
House and Senate to draft the
legislation in response to a
shocking crime last November
22, when two masked gunmen


burst into a sunrise Mass at St.
Anthony's Catholic Church in
Fort Lauderdale. The robbers
demanded wallets and purses
from the stunned parishioners,
shoving some of the elderly
faithful to the floor and threat-
ening one of the parishioners
by putting a gun to her head.
The Freedom to Worship
Safely Act, sponsored by Sena-
tors Rod Smith and Jeff Atwater
and Representatives Ryan and
Jack Seiler, increases the crimi-
nal penalties for an offense that
involves the threat or use of vio-
lence against any person, if the
crime is committed at a reli-
gious institution while the vic-
tim is on the property for the
purpose of participating in or
attending a religious activity. A
crime that might be a third-
degree felony, for example, will
now become a second-degree
felony if committed against a
worshiper on church grounds.


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561-996-5623

-Trn Your M





82 W. HICKPOOCHEE.l ABLIJE
(ACROSS FROM BURGER KING)
CALL
(863) 675-TANU(8268)
ic. .Habn rpa wl


Ila, Pro


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2,2005


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Sevn hecmuiie ot o aeOeehbeThrdy un ,20


Cl as if eds



T6llnFree



1-877-353-2424 ABSOLUVTEL
for any personal items for sale under $2,500


Annouincemenitils Merchliandise Mobile Homes
k [ IT IN ... ...... ...... .....


Employment


Financial Rentals Automobiles


Services

EllI I I jhMi


5IllAA


More Papers Mean More Readers!

Reach more readers when you run


0


your acU inl seve[di papers inI


our newspaper network.
4Our newspaper network

consists of eight papers one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!

Call Today For Details!
* Sources: Pulse Research Market Survey; Simmons Market Research; INI Market Research Center

Rules for placing FREE ads!
To qualify, your ad
Must be for a personal item. (No commercial items, pets or animals)
Must fit into 1 2 inch
(that's 4 lines, approximately 23 characters per line) i .
S Must include only one item and its price .
(remember it must be S2,500 or less)


/ 1-877-354-2424 toWFree)
I.







/ For Legal Ads:
legoods@newszap.com
/ For All Other ClossHied
Advertising:.
classad@newsznap.com


.1 Saturday
m. oor ,O


Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


Announcements

: er ial- j j
Please read your ad carefully
the first day it appears. In
case of an inadvertent error,
please notify us prior to the
deadline listed. We will not
be responsible for more than
1 incorrect insertion, or for
more than the extent of the
ad rendered valueless by
such errors. Advertiser
assumes responsibility for all
statements, names and con-
tent of an ad, and assumes
responsibility for any claims
against Independent
Newspapers. All advertising
is subject to publisher's
approval. The publisher
reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all copy, and
to insert above the copy the
word "advertisement". All
ads accepted are subject to
credit approval. All ads must
conform to Independent
Newspapers' style and are
restricted to their proper
classifications. Some classi-
fied categories require
advance payment. These
classifications are denoted
with an asterisk *.
Auctions 105
Car Pool 110
Share a ride 115
Card of Thanks 120
In Memorliam 125
Found 130
Lost 135
Give Away 140
Garage/Yard Sale 145
Personals 150
Special Notices 155
900 Numbers 160


LADIES JACKET- Must de-
scribe. Leave message
(863)610 3920.


CAT, male, smokey gray, neu-
tered, timid, vic. of Ft. De-
naud Bridge, south side,
named Tibs. (863)675-2491
GERMAN SHEPHERD-
Black/white, Missing since
May 14th, vic of Hwy 98 &
Civic Ctr. Family Pet, Please
call if found. REWARD
(863)634-7290.


PIT & LAB MIX- Male, Black,
little white on chest. Approx
25lbs. Vic. near SW O1tth St.
(863)763-7553 Reward.


BASSETT HOUND- (M),
housebroke, loves kids &
other animals, to good lov-
ing home only.
(863)612-0186.
CURR/BULL DOG MIX- Male,
lyr old. Free To Good Home
Only! (863)357-3994.
John Deere 212
Lawn Tractor, 12 hp, Kohler,
No deck, not running. FREE.
(863)763-6468


ACHIEVE A career in the Field
of Network Technology. Get
training in
Secure Networking & Wire-
less Technology! Pinnacle
Career Institute -
Online. Call (800)655-5554
Now!
www.pci-online.edu.



Is Stress Ruining Your Life?
Read DIANETICS by Ron L.
Hubbard Call
[813)872-0722 or send
7.99 to Dianetics, 3102 N.
Habana Ave., Tampa FL
33607.

Emp moment

Emploment -
FJI Trinn 205
M eata sal210



Employment 0.
P 0rt*TIme e 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job lnfrmatim 225
Job Training 227
Salso 230



DATA ENTRY Work ON YOUR
OWN. Flexible Hours!
$$$Great Pay!$$$ Personal
Computer required.
(800)873-0345 ext #300.


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Little Red Schoolhouse
This is one schoolhouse that children will look for-
ward to attending. It gives the kids a great place to
play and will keep them "in school" all year long.
Painted bright red with white trim and crowned with
its own little belfry, the schoolhouse measures about
four feet square by seven feet tall.
The plan includes step-by-step directions with
photos, full-size traceable patterns for the word
"school" and the plywood bell that hangs in the bel-
fry, an exploded diagram and more.
Little Red Schoolhouse plan (No. 619) .. $9.95
Playhouses & Structures Package (No. C104)
Four projects incl. 619 ... $24.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds of projects) ... $2.00
Please add $3.00 s&h (except catalog-only orders)
To order, circle item(s), Please be sure to
clip & send w/ check to: include your name,
U-Bild Features address and the name of
P.O. Box 2383 this newspaper. Allow
Van Nuys, CA 91409 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
o-nei u-bild.com
Money Back Guarantee


ADMINISTRATIVE
TECHNICIAN
In Emergency Management
Hendry Board of Commis-
sioners. Must have strong
computer skills. Applica-
tions can be obtained at
sub-office in Clewiston
and at Courthouse in La-
Belle. Deadline for sub-
mission is June 8, 2005 at
5:00 pm.
Vet Pref., drug free, EEO,
applicants with disabilities
needing assistance con-
tact HR.
ANIMAL KEEPER: Full Time,
Including Weekends.
Will train.
Call (863)675-0623
Carpenter Wanted
must have tools &
tfriinsportation, steady
work. 1-800-345-0060

COUNTY ENGINEER
County Engineer opening
with Hendry County Com-
missioners. Directs all
public work activities and
advanced engineering
work. BS in Engineering.
Florida Professional Engi-
neer required. This posi-
tion is open until filled.
Call HR at 863-675-5352
for job description and ap-
plication. Or fax resume to
863-675-5317.
Vet Pref. Drug free. EEO.
Applicants with disabilities
needing assistance in the
hiring process contact HR.
CUSTODIAN
Opening in Hendry County
Commissioners. Must be
able to work evenings. Full
time with benefits. Applica-
tions and copy of job de-
scription may be obtained
from Human Resource in the
LaBelle Courthouse or sub-
office in Clewiston. Deadline
for submission is May 25,
2005. Vet Pref. EEO. Drug
Free. Applicants needing as-
sistance in the application
process should contact HR.
Hrmfpfioyment i
w^SllTime 0205


Driver- COVENANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams
& Graduate Students. Bo-
nuses Paid Weekly. Equal
Opportunity Employer.
(888) MORE PAY
888-667-3729).
OWNER OPERATORS- Due to
strong growth in our in-state
market, immediate openings
available in our Florida Intra
Fleet. *Home Weekends
Most Evenings *Top Per-
centage Pay *Paid Permits
& Physicals *Weekly Pay -
Direct Deposit *100% Owner
Operator Make Sunco Car-
riers Your Home. Apply
Now! Call Cammy,
(800)237-8288.
S/E & 3-State Run: T/T Driv-
ers. HOME WEEKENDS.
Mileage Pay, Benefits, 401K.
Trainees Welcome/ Miami
area- exp. req. 21 win
age/Class-A CDL Cypress
Truck Lines (800)545-1351.
,EmplBy-ent
;FullTime 0205


is seeking applications for full
time teachers to work w/
toddlers and pre-schoolers.
CDA and experience req,
Ap naerson_




IelIclaWlil021l !
for Podiatry Office in
ewiston. Fax resume to
(239)481-8150

* 1i lli'iliL'llilft i|
Computer exp. necessary.
Exp. with medical records
a plus. Bilingual
English/Spanish preferred.
Competitive salary &
excellent benefits. Fax
resume to (863)983-9604
or apply at Florida
Community Health Center,
315 So. W.C. Owen St.
Clewiston, FL. EOE/DFWP


SCHOOL BUS RIDER

South Bay Head Start, 20 Hrs/Wk; 7 am 9 am
& 2:30 pm 4:30 pm, $9.81 hr. Must possess
valid Florida Driver's License and FL Class B
CDL Permit, Air Brakes and Passenger Endorse-
ments, .prior to appt. Will drive the school bus in
the absence of the passenger driver. Prevents
congestion on the bus and maintains discipline.
Requires 6 months exp. working with preschool-
ers and parents OR 1 yr. of related volunteer ex-
perience--must specify amt. of exp. working
with preschoolers. (Equivalency: HS/eq. and
20-40 hrs. of DCF chid care training and/or one
related college course (e.g., Elem. Ed., Psych.,
Sociology) AND 3 months of exp. with pre-
schoolers and parents or 6 months related vol-
unteer exp.). Visit www.pbcgov.com for detailed
position description and employment appl. Sub-
mit appl./resume and any Vet. Pref. doc. for re-
ceipt by 5 pm 6/10/05 to Palm Beach County
Human Resources, 50 S. Military Trail #210,
West Palm Beach, FL 33415; FAX:
(561)616-6893. (No e-mail appl./resumes ac-
cepted.) EO/AA M/F/D/V (DFWP)


Citrus Belle, A. Duda & Sons Has Immediately Position Openings
Day and Night shift Specialty Blenders:
Basic skills needed for this position:
* Basic math skills required with ability to read and measure
ingredients. *,
* Able to drive a forklift truck; will train.
- Perform general plant-sanitation in blending and plant envi-
ronments.
- Willing to work extended overtime hours.
- Must be willing to work day or night shift with some week-
ends or holidays required.
. Starting rate $8.00 per hour plus 1 1/2 times base pay after
40 consecutive hours of work per week.
Day and Night shift Forklift Operators:
Basic skills needed for this position.
- Add, subtract, multiply, divide.
- Perform general plant sanitation in Warehouse, Freezer, or
Plant enviromnents.
* Work in extreme temperatures from very hot to very cold.
* Able to drive a forklift truck a plus; will train.
- Starting rate $6.50 per hour plus 1 1A times base pay after
40 consecutive hours of work per week. There is a .50 per hour
increase after successfully completing a probationary period.
- Able to meet flexible work schedule to meet customer
demands.
Other duties as assigned.
Night shift General Labor Workers:
Basic skills needed for this position.
* Must be able to perform physical work with frequent lifting
of 30 to 40 pound.
* Able to tolerate prolonged standing, walking and bending.
* Must be willing to work extended overtime. During summer
months there is a six day work schedule.
* Must work safely and keep work area clean.
* Other duties as assigned.
All full time position include the following benefits: Company
matching 401K and pension plan, paid vacation time, 5 1/2
paid holidays, 5 paid sick days per year, discretionary end of
year bonus, wellness program, .15 per hour shift differential,
employee tuition assistance and cafeteria style health care
plans.
Apply in person at A. Duda & Soas, Inc. Citrus Belle Plant locat-
ed at 6007 Highway 29 south. The plant is located approxi-
mately 8 miles south of LaBelle. Bilingual in Spanish/English a
consideration plus. Phone calls will not be accepted. A. Duda &
Sons is an equal opportunity employer.


Empoyen


Employment
Ful Tim 'I l


FRITO-LAY INC.
Frito-Lay, Inc. has great opportunities for Route Sales Representative in the Clewiston area.
Qualified candidates should possess the following:
*Professional Appearance
*Good Communication Skills
*Solid work history & experience
Excellent driving record
We offer starting pay of approximately 31K per year and excellent benefits.
If you are interested please call
1-866-4-HIRING use zip code 33912
(1-866-444-7464) EOE, M/F/D/VN
I
PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Part Time 30 hours per week for a non-profit or-
ganization experienced in program development
and implementation in the areas of housing and
education located in eastern Hendry County. A
college degree or equivalent experience in com-
munity development or related field is preferred.
Must be organized, self-motivated and able to
work independently, with excellent written and
verbal communication skills. Grant writing expe-
rience is preferred. Send resume to the Empow-
erment Alliance, Executive Director at 750 South
Fifth Street, Immokalee, Florida 34142 or fax to
239-657-3084.




GeO
The GEO Group, Inc.

The GEO Group, Inc.
a worldwide leader in privatized corrections
OFFERS CHALLENGING AND EXCITING
OPPORTUNITIES. EXCELLENT BENEFITS
Current openings for:
CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS
DENTAL ASSISTANT
LIBRARY CONSULTANT (P/T 8 HRS. PER MO)
MOORE HAVEN
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East SR 78NW
Moore Haven FL 33471
Phone 868-946-2420
Fax 863-946-2487
EOE, M/F/V/H



Looking for a career

with a company you

can grow with?

Are you self motivated?
Do you like meeting new people?
Are you computer literate?
If so, this could be the opportunity
you have been looking for.
Full and/or part time
positions available.

The Caloosa Belle and Immokalee
Bulletin are looking for bright, self-
starters with computer skills and
reliable transportation who are will-
ing to learn newspaper advertising
sales from the ground up.
If you have what it takes, you
could be the outside salesperson
in these fast growing markets.

Our company offers:
a unique work environment
potential for advancement
competitive pay and benefits
life and disability insurance
401 (K) plan
generous time off program

Email your resume to:
jkasten@strato.net
An equal opportunity employer


Empoyen
Ful im I'l


-mlymn


MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT
Join our maintenance team! General maintenance
of-a 120 bed nursing home & 40 unit
apartment complex. Knowledge of electrical,
plumbing, carpentry and NC. Must be "on call"
every third week. Prior experience in similar
position $ HS diploma or GED required. Excellent
salary and benefits. Mileage paid to and from
work for out-of-town employees.
Glades Health Care Center
Pahokee, Florida
Call 561-924-5561, ext. 110
Or FAX resume to: 561-924-9466
EXCELLENT WORKING ENVIRONMENT
Equal Opportunity Employer




MANAGEMENT

Immediate restaurant management -
openings in Lake Placid, Moore
Haven, LaBelle, Clewiston and .
Okeechobee. We are a franchise with
27 restaurants throughout South
Florida and are hiring energetic,
honest, and responsible individuals.
We offer:
-Excellent Salaries
-Medical and Life Insurance
-Dental Insurance
-401K Savings Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Advancement Opportunities
-Training Program

For an interview please call:
863-983-4224
or mail your resume in confidence to:
Pauline Alvarez
Southern Management Corporation
1014 W. Sugarland Hwy.
Clewiston, FL 33440




SNOW HIRING!

Clewiston's and Glades Counties newest,
and most exciting store is opening soon
and we're looking for team oriented,
customer service focused, hard working
and fun people to join our team.
Store Manager (Salaried)
Asst Store Mgrs (40 hours)
Pricing/Stocking Supervisor (40 Hours)
Receiving Mgr (40 hours)
If you have 1 to 5 years experience in retail with
grocery, furniture, dollar stores, Big Box stores or
drug stores than WE want to talk to YOU!
We offer:
* Excellent Competitive Salaries/Hourly Pay
* Paid Vacations
* Training Program
* Advancement Opportunities
Price Cutter has stores in Ft. Myers (2)
and Arcadia and plans to expand
throughout SW Florida
If you are interested in joining our team please
Fax Resume to: 239 997 8284
Email Resume to: floridasalvaqers(cDyahoo.com
Send Resume to:
Price Cutter
ATTN: David G. Lincoln
Director of Stores/GMM
12180 Metro Parkway
Ft. Meyers FL 33912


P- -
o/ Mon-Fri
CL F 5PJTJ.


Mnt*~~u~dsi


800


Thursday, June 2, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee









ITI adri thcy,) 1r -, rm iho


Empoyen
Ful im I'l


FIELD MECHANICS

King Ranch, an agricultural operation
located in South Bay,
currently has two (2) Field Mechanic
positions open in the South Bay and
Indiantown area.

Must have experience repairing farm equipment
and implements. Must have your own tools and
valid Florida driver's license required.

Full benefit package available including
medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401 (k)
and retirement plan. Paid vacations, sick days
and holidays.

For an application, please call (561)996-7257.
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE.

TSS U


Duda is looking for an experienced welder
for our shop. Excellent benefit package, pay
commensurate with experience. Drug free
workplace. Apply in person at 1510 Hwy 29
N., Flelda, Florida. Contact Jim McVay at
(863) 673-0363. EOE/V/H/F/M


Se buscan soldadores para nuestro taller.
Se ofrece un paquete que incluye un
plan medico, seguro de vida, vacaciones,
plan de retiro, y otros beneficios. Sueldo
sequn la experiencia. Empleo libre de
drogas. Dirijase a.1510 Carretera 29
Norte, Felda, Florida. Hable con el
Senor Jim McVay a su telefono (863)
673-0363. Practicamos una political de
igualdad de oportunidades.
"or- -] 4


NURSE (RN OR LPN)


Needed at the Glades County Health Department
in Moore Haven. Must have valid Florida Driver's
License, reliable transportation; must be willing to
do some home visiting & work in busy clinic.
EEO/AA
Call Alina @ 863-946-0707 x 208
or Patti @ 863-674-4041 x 135
for further details.


FOAM INSULATION Company based out of Clewiston now
hiring installers, South Florida travel required. Company vehi-
cle provided; Monday through Friday. Piece work. Guaran-
teed minimum $550 a week during training period. Benefits,
bonus, and travel cost paid. Must be 21 years or older with
clean, class D drivers license. We are a drug free work-
place. Interviews will be conducted every Monday morning
from 8-1 Oa.m. at our Clewiston Facility. Call 800-683-3155
to line up an interview time. Directions to our facility will be
given to you at that time.





f HENRY REGIONAL
. MEDICAL CENTER
Registered Nurses
*.F .t Val 7,' ;i --,', F..-, ", ". FL F.'.
Ri. I r, S. ,-B -.. -
,JF<-r R.\ I' Ji/ 1- : FtL F LF'.:? .- .
LPN I & 1"
*FL LP.V L. a.- C-r. P-.-r. ,. -V T-., .
req F.l, P ar t r P ras ,,-r Pr- ,r ab,--
O.R. Staff Nurse
-FL PRV L .-ACL PALS ,-:''F.
C % C- R Jf ,,ad t-. -nI .- -:-
Respiratory Therapist
Pr ATr. C T :, F- 4 T p'- 1 ,
(2 3, rai -. ,-, r a n C -
BL -.a- ACi q .re ; rq f. HA
Per Diem Pharmacy Techru.an
ex, fn ,',' ,I i'n' .et P P ,'-'- r: T : -
g ;re .. 1 -.A *, a k -^ ..- -.1 r. '
Fuli Tune Pabennt Representative
T7,.e C. Fn r .r ed ; .

Full Time Certified Dietary Manager
Id-,a n .- -cr u Z .i t I
Director of Quality Improvement
Spatie.T :.i' '- .. : r, :,r :rtrr, '" 1 a
.m e .' ;,,,'-, r _M .- r .' ,. -,- m .

Competitive Salary Excellent Benefits *
Clinical Ladder Program Education Assistance
Phone: 863-902-3079 or Fox resume to: 863-983-0805
Drug Free Workplace EOE


SENIOR COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSE
Registered Nurses L-2
(#64068668)
Public health nursing position
handling all clinical health services in LaBelle.
Must be licensed professional nurse;
possess valid Florida Driver's License;
Pre-employment Drug Testing, Background
screening/fingerprinting required. EEO/AA
Apply on line: https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com
or Call Pat @ 863-674-4041 x118
for more details.


CLEWISTON COUNTRY ACRES

Modular/Models. From $59,900 & up,
3/4/5BR, 2/3BA, acre & 1/4 available or use
your land as down payment. Financing
available. 863-673-6417 or 561-753-8355



Need a few more bucks Time to clean out the
to purchase something attic, basement and/or
deer? Pick up some garage? Advertise
extra bucks when you your yard sale in the
sell your used items in classified and make
the classifeids. your clean up a breeze!


-lo
[noma^gtion


-bI
inomation^


LABOR FINDERS

DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
All Types of Work Available
S 202 E. Sugarland Hwy. $
(Across from Clewiston Inn)
(863) 902-9494 "


lems? Liens, Levies Foreclo-
sures, Repos, Medical Bills,
Judgements, Lawsuits & Di-
vorce A-A-A Attorney Refer-
ral Service (800)733-5342
24 hours 7 days a week.
DIVORCE$275-$350*
COVERS children, etc. Only
one signature required! *Ex-
cludes govt. fees! Call week-
days (800)462-2000,
ext.600. (8am-7pm) Divorce
Tech. Established 1977.


CENTRAL COUNTY
WATER CONTROL
DISTRICT
Has two lifeguard positions
open. Both are part time
starting at $10.00 an hour.
Apply in person at 255 N.
Hacienda, Montura Ranch
Clubhouse. Wednesday-
Sunday, 10am-5pm.
We are an equal opportunity
employer and
drug free workplace.-

Financial I



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315




#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending
Machine units/You OK Loca-
tions Entire Business
$10,670 Hurry!
(800)836-3464 #B02428.
$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)856-9591 Ext #105.
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do
you earn $800/day? 30 Ma-
chines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (800)814-6323
B02000033. CALL US: We
will not be undersold!
Professional Vending Route
and Equipment. Brand name
products, all sizes. Financing
Available w/$7,500 Down.
(877) 843-8726
B02002-37).
Start Your Own Business:
Choose your hours, income &
rewards. Choose Avon!
863-677-0025



$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005! Nev-
er Repay! For personal bills,
school, new business. $49
BILLION Left unclaimed from
2004. Live Operators!
(800)785-6360 Ext #75.
Loans by phone. Up to $1000
in 24hrs. No Credit Check!
Bank Account Req.
(888)350-3722 www.pay-
checktoday.com (No Fax-
ing).

Services



Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered415
Instruction 420
Services Offered'125
Insurance 430
Medical Services435











r132 -5 Wfl.- -%

1-----1



Electricians &
Foremen
Wanted:
Jimmy Pittman Electric,
Inc. a great employment
opportunity with competi-
tive pay and benefits
Headquartered in Clewiston
Is seeking experienced
Electricians, Foremen and
Apprentices.
Please call our office to
inquiry 863-983-5450 or
fax resumes to
863-983-9352







SCREEN & PATIO
ENCLOSURES
Rescreening & repair.
lic. #2001-19849 &
insured. (561)784-5568
or (561)358-2456




BANKRUPTCY DEBT PROB-
LEMS? Laws Changing
Soon File Now. Money Prob-


30x40,
move.


METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$
Buy Direct From Manufactur-
er. 20 colors in stock with all
Accessories. Quick turn
around! Delivery Available
Toll Free (888)393-0335
STEEL BUILDING- 30'x40'
Heritage Bought it, Now it's
not needed $6000
763-4149/561-758-4337
STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory
Deals Save $$$. 40 x 60'
to 100 x 200'. Example: 50 x
100 x 12' = $3.60/sq ft.,
(800)658-2885 www.rigid-
building.com http://www.ri-
gidbuilding.com



COOLER 6x8 walk in cooler
w/floor, good for drinks,
produce or hunters game
$2500 (239)657-3316
REACH IN COOLER
3 door, good for drinks or
produce $800 (239)657-3316



AQUARIUM PORTABLE IN-
FANT SWING- Great condi-
tion. $30. 863-763-2413


Lab Work --
Done In Office ^
CLEWISTON ANIMAL CLINIC
901 W Ventura Ave Clewlston, FL 33440
896.3- S-983- 9sI-


NEED A LAWYER ARRESTED?
INJURED? Criminal Defense
*State *Federal *Felonies
*Misdemeanors *DUI *Auto
Accident *Personal Injury
*Domestic Violence
*Wrongful Death "Protect
Your Rights" A-A-A Attorney
Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24 HOURS
7 DAYS A WEEK.


NEW SELF STORAGE
46 units 7x15, 8x1 5,10x1 5,
10x30, 12x30, 15x25. Full
electric, secure on Commereio
St. 350 ft. from Clewiston
Police Dept. 863-983-6663,
863-983-2808, after hrs.
863-983-8979


Merchandise



Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines535
Building Materials540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets-'Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc. 560
Clothing 565
Coins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes. Linens & Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605,
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment.,
Supplies 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps., Lights 640
Luggage 645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets Supplies/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbing Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Television/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
Toys & Games 730
VCRs 735
Wanted to Buy 710



BREAKFRONT/SECRETARY:
Antique, Mahogany. Circa late
1800. Beautiful condition.
$500 neg. (863)467-6805
COKE VENDING MACHINE-
20 yrs old, runs, makes
noise, $200 neg.
(863)763-8833 days,
(863)763-4169 eve.
SOFA, CHAIR, ROCKER- wal-
nut and cane, $350.
(863)763-4525.
Victorian Games Compendi-
um: Cards, Chess, Backgam-
mon, Horse Racing, etc. Rules
book. $1500 (863)532-9013


REFRIGERATOR- Frigidare,
Almond, 16 1/2 cu ft Clean,
Runs Good. $125.
(863)763-4920.
REFRIGERATOR: Kenmore,
Side by Side w/auto. ice
maker. Like new. $300
(863)763-2504


BIKE, Murray Whiplash, boys,
needs a good cleaning, $20.
(863)983-4915
SCHWINN, 1955- Original
condition, $900.
.(863)467-5756.


0Stop by for
HUGE Savings.
12180 Metro Parkway.
EARN DEGREE online from
home. *Business, *Parale-
gal, *Computers. Job Place-
ment Assistance. Computer
& Financial aid, if qualify.
(866)858-2121 www.tide-
watertechonline.com.


BABY CRIB Oak color, grows
w/ child into youth bed $75
(863)357-2863
BOY'S CLOTHING- 4 boxes,
Premature to 9 mo. $150.
Will separate. 863-763-2413
CRIB, beautiful, dark wood,
sleigh style w/ mattress. $80
(863)675-7306
STROLLER Limo, double
baby stroller $40
(863)675-7306


BASEBALL CARDS- Approx.
3000. Few NBA & Football.
95% is Major League. $250.
or best offer (863)634-6565
RARE STAMPS-Legends of
the West error & corrected
sheets, in original collectors
cover $199 (863)532-9013
RECORDS (150)
78's & 33's $100 for all or will
separate (863)763-6291



A NEW COMPUTER- BUT NO
CASH? You're APPROVED -
Guaranteed!* NO CREDIT
CHECK Bad Credit Bank-
ruptcy OK. (800)319-8860
8A-10P EST Mon-Fri Sat.
11A-6P *Checking Account
Req'd www.pcs4all.com.
COMPAQ- '2000, HP 825
printer, access. $200. Great
Deal! (863)467-1704.
SCANNER- Colorado Primax
600p, brand new with cable.
$25. (863)983-4915.



CERAMIC MOLDS (50)
Assorted styles in good
shape, $50 for all or will
separate. (863)763-6291


BAKERS RACK, Wrought Iron,
Antique Blue. $75
(863)467-2112
BED, King Size, Complete.
$50 (863)983-7996
BR SUITE- head/foot board,
dbl. dresser, armoire, 2 nite
stands, $750.
(863)634-0936.
CHINA CABINET, Beautiful,
Lighted. 57W x 78H x 17D.
$200 (863)675-4990
COMPUTER DESK- large,
gray, must see, will deliver
locally, $60. 983-0950 Cle-
wiston.
DINETTE SET, 4 chairs on
caster wheels. $50
(863)357-3439
DINING ROOM SET: 42x60
Black Lacquer Table w/4 grey
upholstered chairs. Good
cond. $250 (863)467-6550
DR TABLE W/4CHAIRS- leaf,
oak, asking $125 or best of-
fer. (863)357-3773.
DR SUITE- glasstop table, 6
chairs, lighted China cabinet,
Loveseat, 6mos old, $250
will sep. (863)357-0916.
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
6' long, light oak color, $75
(863)357-2863
QUEEN SIZE BED- mattress &
boxspring, frame & cream
colored wood headboard
$125. (239)728-9996.
RECLINER, Lazy Boy. Large.
$30 (863)357-3439
SLEEPER SOFA
$150 (863)674-0405 or
(863)673-5325
SLEEPER SOFA- Overstuffed
blue w/ floral print, Gently
used, Clean & comfortable,
$150(863)357-0060.
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Leather, light brown, fairly
new, great cond. $800
(863)697-6618
WATERBED- King size, ready
to set up. No headboard
$100. (863)763-6909.



CLUB CAR, '97- Exc. cond.,
good batt/charger, $1599.
(863)697-1350/763-2063.
EASY GO GOLF CART re-
stored, $2200.
(863)692-2229.
EASY GO Good cond. good
battery & charger. $799.
Neg. (863)697-1350 or
(863)763-2063.
GOLF CART- Lincoln Town-
car, Good cond. Lights & ra-
dio $1600. Or best offer.
763-4149 or 561-758-4337


SMITH & WESON 357- Model
66, Stainless, Like new in
original box. Asking $500.
(863)467-4328'


ELECTRIC SCOOTER- $1400.
Call after 5pm
(863)467-8094
WHEEL CHAIR LIFT, Bruno,
dual motors for up & in, fits
in vans, like new, asking
$1500. (863)357-8788


ARC WELDER & CABLES
30-225 Amps. $80
(863)824-0884
BAND SAW- Wilton, Good
condition. $200.
(863)357-2322..
TOOLBOX, very Ig. Maximizer,
top, bottom & side cabinet,
as is including tools, $5000.
(863)763-4028
READING A NEWSPAPER
HELPS YOU GET
INVOLVED IN THE
COMMUNITY


Doa wonder newspaper
readers have more funi



HOOVEROUND- Electric
Scooter, $500. Or best of-
fer. (863)610-1500.


AIR BOAT WANTED &
TRACTOR WITH FRONT
END LOADER
(863)699-2971
WANTED: FL ART
A.E, Backus, H. Newton,
Highwaymen Art.
(772)562-5567
Shop here first!
The classified ads


lPet Services I


Your Ad Could Be Here
Run your ad STATEWIDE!!!
For only $450 you can place
your 25 word classified ad
in over 150 newspapers
throughout the state reach-
ing over 5 MILLION readers.
Call this newspaper or Ad-
vertising Networks of Florida
at (866)742-1373. Visit us
online at www.florida-classi-
fieds.com. Display ads also
available.



AMERICAN BULL DOG- Ap-
prox 2 yr, Neutered Male,
Good children. House
broke. $250. 863-801-1724
BEAGLE PUPPIES- 2, 1-Male
1-Female CKC Reg. approx
16 wks. $150.
(863)634-1673
BIRD CAGE- large outdoor
hanging wire cage with
wood roof. 22x25x38 $25.
(863)357-8788.
BOAR- Poland China, pure
breed, 15 months old, about
400lbs. $350
(863)805-8789/677-0750.
CHIHUAHUA, Male, 5 months
old. All shots & wormed. CKC
papers. $250 (863)763-2749
(863)610-9812 Iv. message.
CUTE KITTENS- Some 7 toed,
Free To Good Home.
(863)763-8892.
DACHSHUND PUPS- AKC,
mini, (4 M), 2 choc/tan dap-
ple, 2 blk/tan, $350-$500
ready 6/18 (863)243-1413
DOBERMAN PUPS- Blue
males, Blue parents on site,
$500-$750. (863)763-7045
or (863)634-2502.
DOG HOUSES- for medium to
large dogs. 2 for $30.
(863)763-7497 Okeecho-
bee.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS-
AKC reg. 5-males, Ready
'June 9th $400. Cash only.
(863)357-3026
GUINEA PIG / RABBIT CAGE,
Like new wall accessories.
$30. (863)467-5756
SPICE FINCHES 2 PAIR
W/furnished breeding cage
$50 (863)675-3032



WADING POOL, Vinyl. 10 Ft. x
4 Ft., 18"D. $20
(863)467-2112



SEWING MACHINE
Table top, portable -
$30 (863)467-5477



TRAMPOLINE
you disassemble & remove,
$25 (863)763-6468



SPEAKER- 10" in a box, 300
amp. $150. Or best offer.
(863)634-4238
SPEAKER- Planet Audio, 10"
in a box. 2 Air horns. $100.
Or best offer.
(863)634-4238.



COLOR TV- 19", Good condi-
tion. $30. (863)532-8158

Tickets 072


ROOMMATES WANTED: Male
or Female, No children, Pets
neg. $450 mo. + util.
n(863)228-3887 LaBelle
Your new home could be
in today's paper. Have
you looked for it?

Real [state



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property Sale 1010
Condos/
Townhouses Sale 1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspection 1060
Real Estate Wanted 1065
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property 1080



LaBelle, 4 Bdrm., 1 Ba.
238 N. Riverview St., LaBelle.
For Sale By Owner. $199,900.
(863)612-0073 Mon-Fri.



5 minutes to Greenbrier Re-
sort MTN LAND BARGAINS
20 Acres & Up www.live-
inwv.com. (877)777-4837.


I Pet Services.


Employment
Full Time 0205


Do-It-Yourself Ideas


Grist Mill
Modeled on a grist mill built in 1797 in Tennessee,
this fun and easy do-it-yourself project can be used
to decorate even. the smallest garden or patio. Its fea-
tures include a working water wheel and authentic
touches like stairs, a door and windows.
Most of the mill's pieces are traced from full-size
patterns, so sizing them is a simple matter of trans-
ferring the patterns to wood. The completed project
measures 48 in. long by 25 in. wide by 35 in. tall.
Grist Mill plan (No. 456) ... $9.95
Water Wheels Package (No. C140)
Two projects incl. 456... $16.95
Catalog (pictures hundreds of projects). $2.00
Please add $3.00 s&h (except catalog-only orders)
To order, circle item(s), Please be sure to
clip & send w/ check to: include your name,
U-Bild Features address and the name of
P.O. Box 2383 this newspaper. Allow
Van Nuys, CA 91409 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Or call (800) 82-U-BILD
t, u-bild.com
al Money Back Guarantee y,


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. If interested please call

561-993-1160


I


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed,'Products 810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn & Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants,
Flowers 865


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday June 2 2005


COMMERCIAL MOWER
84" Toro Turfmaster Diesel w/
hyd mower lift and hydrostatic
drive.$4000 (863)675-2392
It's never too late to find
the perfect gift. Look
for it in the classifieds.


QUARTER MARE -9yrs old
Gentle, $900 (863)675-3032
REGISTERED APPALOOSA
HORSE, BROKE. $1200
(863)467-1421



FLAG POLE- 20', 4 sections
Beautiful condition. $60.
firm. (863)675-6556
RIDING LAWN MOWER
Craftsman, like new, $350
(863)763-4982
RIDING MOWER- Craftsman,
6 spd, 12.5HP, 38" deck,
PUSHMOWER- Quatro,
$450, (863)357-0916.
RIDING MOWER- John Deere
180 & Husky mower. $600.
ea. (863)763-4149 or
561-758-4337
RIMS (2) 12-20", Off of Front
of Massey Ferguson 253 4x4.
$300 for both. (863)674-5744
TRACTOR TIRES: 2 Titan R1
AG Tread, High traction, lug
size 14.9-28. $600 for the
pair (863)234-1230


LIVESTOCK TRAILER
20 feet long with a new top,
$3000
(863)634-8960 after 5pm
Okeechobee Livestock
Market Sales every
Mon. 12pm & every
Tues. 11am. 763-3127


Rentals



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land Rent 935
Resort Property -
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960



1,2 &3BR HOUSES &
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
No pets.
Call (863)983-4436.

Tficket 072


ASHEVILLE, NC MOUNTAINS
Gated Community. Spec-
tacular View & River Home-
sites. Clubhouse, Mountain
Spas, Paved Roads, View
Tower, Riverwalk. NEW
PHASE JUST STARTED!
www.bearriverlodge.net.
(866)411-5263.
ATTENTION INVESTORS: Wa-
terfront lots in the Foothills
of NC. Deep water lake with
90 miles of shoreline. 20%
redevelopment discounts
and 90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for 1 year. Call now
for best -selection.
www.nclakefrontproper-
ties.com (800)709-LAKE.
BEAUTIFUL NORTH CAROLI-
NA. MUST SEE THE BEAUTI-
FUL PEACEFUL MOUNTAINS
OF
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS.
Homes, Cabins, Acreage &
Investments. Cherokee
Mountain Realty GMAC Real
Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainreal-
ty.com Call for Free Bro-
chure
(800)841-5868.
LAKE LOT SALES. Fishing,
hunting, golfing, boating all
here! Recreational area hid-
den in the country of NE
Georgia. Visit today:
www.LakeRussellProper-
ties.com (706)213-6734 or
(706)201-5699.
LAKEFRONT BARGAINS Start-
ing at $89,900. Gorgeous
lakefront parcels. Gently
sloping, pristine shoreline,
spectacular views. Across
from national forest on
35,000 acre recreational
lake in East Tenn. Paved
roads, underground utilities,
central water, sewer, Excel-
lent financing. Call now
S800)704-3145 ext 617,
unset Bay, LLC.
NORTH CAROLINA MOUN-
TAINS! Spring is blooming
and is beautiful! A wonderful
time to look for real estate.
See Photos: www.North-
CarolinaMountainRealty.com
or call (800)293-1998. Free
Brochure.
Tennessee Lake Property
Sale! Parcels from $24,900.
6 1/2 Acre lot $59,900. 27
Acre Lake Estate $124,900.
Cabins Available. Call toll-
free (866)770-5263 ext 8 for
details.
WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS
North Carolina Where there
is: Cool Mountain Air, Views
& Stream, Homes, Cabins &
Acreage. CALL FOR FREE
BROCHURE OF MOUNTAIN
PROPERTY SALES.
(800)642-5333. Realty Of
Murphy 317 Peachtree St.
Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com.



NEED CASH??
I' Buy Houses, Land, Campers,
Boats or anything, any con-
dition. (863)228-2761.


Mobile Homes



MobHile Home Lots 2005
Mobile Home Parts 2010
Mobile Homes Rent 2015
Mobile Homes- Sale 2020



2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile
Homes For Rent
Stanton Mobile Homes
863-983-8106



Financing Available:
Buy Here, Pay Here.
Stanton Mobile Homes
Marginal Credit O.K.
Call 1-800-330-8106
or 863-983-8106

New & Used
Mobile Homes:
Land Home Packages
as little as $1,800 down.
Stanton Homes
863-983-8106


OF CLEWISTON

1)Very Nice,
2/2 DW,
Applicances,
Screen Porch,
Extra DW
Carport, 2
Sheds
$74,900


2) Midstate
Loop Special,
3/2 DW,
Fence
Carport, hed
572,100

3)New
Land & Home
Packages in
Sunshine Lake
Estates
NowAvailable


4)Tropi 50
/ 2N
Ca AC&
nces
8,900
2160W.Hwy. 27Clewiston
1.4 Miles N.W of WAL-MART
983-4663
D cHamPion
HOME BUILDERSCO.

Owner Financing
ON MOBILE HOMES
& LAND
Call 863-228-1405

Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers,RVs 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles ATVs 3035



AIR BOAT- 440 engine, Runs
good. $2495.
863-634-1636.
BASS BOAT- 18' Fiberglass,
with custom hauler trailer.
115 HP Mercury motor. New
seat, pumps, trolling motor.
$3500 Neg. Call
(863)983-4397
BASS BOAT- '2004,18' Triton,
30hrs, mercury 150hp. Ma-
rine Master trailer. Motor
guide trolling motor 71lbs
thrust. Digital. $17,000.
(863)983-4397
BOAT, 12 Ft. Aluminum, Sears
& Roebuck w/new. trolling
motor 30 lb. thrust. Never in
water. $200 (863)946-2542
BOAT TRAILER, 14 Ft. Galva-
nized. Good shape. $250.
863-674-1105.
FIBERGLASS BOAT- 17 Ft.
Includes trailer & canopy to
cover boat. No motor.
$800 (863)675-6738
GHEENOE 16.5 FT, '91- w/'91
40 HP Johnson, trolling mo-
tor, tdr, very fast, local boat,
$2500 (863)926-0296.
MON-ARK 17 Ft. Includes
trailer & canopy to cover
boat. 1st $800 takes it.
(863)675-6738


COACHMAN 5TH WHEEL RV,
'93- 27', excellent cond,
$5000. (863)697-2180.
Find t faster. Sell it sooner
in the classifieds


STEEL BUILDING -
$5000, you
(863)634-9583


Mobile Homes -
Sale "I,]


Mobile Homes -
Sale 11,01









Sevn h omnte ot fLk kehbeTusaJn ,20


,40 Years Experience
LICENSED & INSURED PRE-SALES INSPECTION



CHEROKEE
HOME INSPECTIONS, INC.
L- & -


* Bank Foreclosures -
Call for Details
*2BR, IBA W/Lrg Sc. Patio
on rental Lot $15,000
*3BR, IBA Home in
Hooker's Point Area
$112,000
" 3BR, 2BA, MH on man-
made lake $70,000
* New construction on
Bayberry Loop, 4 BR,
2BA, Many Upgrades
$275,000
* 4BR, 2BA, MH, Sherwood
S/D New Upgrades$
$84,000


I Homes Dy Brian fuvfnf
Available
MONTURA
* Listings Needed
MOORE HAVEN
* New Homes starting at
$145,000
3BR, 2BA MH w/fencedyard
$9do00
LAKEPORT
* Listings Needed
ACREAGE LAND & LOTS
* Farm Land Available
Call for Details
Montura Lots Call fr Details
COMMERCIAL
Office & Retail Space available
in Shopping Center
Call for Details.
TOWNHOMES
* 3BR 3BA in Greenacres
one & half hours east
of Clewiston. $155,000


AV AN .DYESS
I C. REAL ESTATE BROKER
420 E. SUGARLAND HWY
.. (863) 983-6663 (863) 983-9770
WEBSITE: DYESSREALESTATE.COM E-MAIL: ANN@DYESSREALESTATE.COM
Se Habla Espafiol
AFTER HOURS:
ANN DYESS FAYE KELTING LAURA SMITH TRAVIS DYESS KATHY GARCIA
(863) 983-8979 (863) 677-0707 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863) 228-4798
RESIDENTIAL MONTTURA ACREAGE
New Condo Call for Details LOTS AVAILABLE 1.25 acres.7J'/Utopia
5NewHomes CALL FOR DETAILS Montura ai $34,500
UnderContract Callfor Details 4BSAERBBJ BiAM,500 9.9 acres g .f under
3 or 4 BR, 2BA $194,900 COMM v ERCIAL Citrus, --S900
3BAO OOJ5 D000 COMMERCIAt -3 a
4BR, 2BA $139,900 w'lonly Lot in Holiday Isle
Under Construction I ,000
3BR, 2BA 2294 sq. 9 Commercial Lots on US
ft. $224,000 27 with Building $400,000 T
Moi lub 5 Lots Zo Family List Your
Lot w/Itrees $26,500 U2/P 250,000
3BL B3PENDsajo00 8 Lots Zoned Ri-B Home Here!
2BR, 2BA Polebarn 12.80 $400,000
10 Lots Zoned Commercial
acres Call for details $500,000 Marked To Ever
Harlem Bar GreatMarked To Every
MOBILE HOMES Business Opportunity Potential Buyer In
3B A W IQs500I1 Call for Details
3BR, 2BA Easy Life $87,000 M + The World
3BR, 2BA Seminole Manors
$87,600 Cabinet Shop 4800sq.ft.
3BS2B J )EItM 4,900 & Apt. $173,000 wwndy-esmnruaom


4 Bedroom, 4 Bath. 2 Car Grarage on 1.06 acre
Delmonte A.e. $345.Au00

Real Estate in Hendry and Glades Counties, Florida
httn:/vw...endrv-padeswi~mmls com


C(cwd!


Your Realtor for
Western Communities

Teresa Sullivan


Call For Listings


1561-795-8533 or 561-996-5623



Brian Sullivan


General Contractor

CUSTOM HOMES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

Call us for all of your new construction needs,

your design or ours.

Visit our new web site

www.briansullivancontractor.com

and look at some of our new homes.


(863)441-4202


:.





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< aS3l

8rofers:
Carolyn Thomas 946-2005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505

sa) AS sociatles
JAnn Donohue 228-0221
s 'i David Rister 634-2157


~.x{ Y~amjy24~b~












d
V -


The most important

20 minutes of your day

is the time spent reading

with your child from

birth to age nine.


2005 MODEL CLEARANCE
SALE- June 2nd-5th *Na-
tion's #1 Selling RV's *Low
Sale Prices- Florida Moto-
rhome- Towable Headquar-
ters. GIANT RECREATION
WORLD, (800)654-8475-
Winter Garden;
(800)893-2552- Daytona;
(800)700-1021- Melbourne.
www.grwrv.com
HUNTING CAMPER- 28' pull
behind. $1200. Or best offer
(863)634-4202



TRAILER For airboat 14'
ood condition, new tires
600 or best offer
(863)634-8960 after 5pm


HONDA BIG RED 200 1983,
$600 (863)675-3038
HONDA GOLD WING INTER-
STATE- mint condition,
5750 miles, $2500
firm.(863)612-0090.
HONDA SHADOW V4- 33K
miles, 500 CC, $1200 or
trade. (863)612-0090


Automobiles




Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks 4040
Parts Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070



1991 HONDA CIVIC
Ice cold a/c & tow hitch
$1800 (863)675-4540 or
(863)677-3091
BUICK LESABRE'87
Good condition, a/c,
runs good. $450.
(772)460-6488 after 6pm
CHEVY MALIBU, '98- 4cyl,
with AC, all power, great
condition & MPG, 155K,
$2000 (863)763-8969.
CLASSIC CHEVY CHEVETTE-
'79, 4 CYL, Runs good with
little gas. $500.
(863)675-2598 Lv msg
DODGE OMNI '90
Runs good, good gas mileage
$500 (863)675-6423
FORD TAURUS, '87 no air,
auto, new tires, low miles,
rebuilt mtr, new bait, $800
neg. (863)763-6396


IrunU ruiu ruU4, t4 ur.,
14.5K mls. $11,443. neg.
FORD FOCUS SE 2004, 4 Dr.
11 +K mls. $11,470. neg.
FORD FOCUS LX 2004, 4 Dr.
22+ K mls. $10,237. neg.
FORD FOCUS 2003,4 Dr.
10+ K mis. $10,725. neg.
Call Mark @ 863-675-1686
for more details.
JEEP CHEROKEE- '88, Needs
work, $500. or ,make an of-
f e r
(863)763-0783/634-9783
PONTIAC FIREBIRD- '95, Red,
Cold A/C, T-Tops, Runs
great! 110K, $3800.
(863)697-8947.
TOYOTA TERCEL '89, $200.
or best offer.
(863)675-1038.



CHEVY 1991 3/4 Ton Pickup,
4x4, 4 spd., $1500 or best
offer. (863)675-6214 after 6
pm.
FORD BRONCO, '87 runs,
needs some work, $2500 or
trade for boat or 4 wheeler.
(863)634-4338.


Golf Carts,
Gas or Electric
Buy and Sell
Call (863)824-0878


Chevy 6 lug 22 in. KMC Venon
rims, with Toyo 305/40R22
tires, $1800. 863-634-3304
ENGINE -350, Needs head
work, Edlebrock intake,
Chrome dress up kit, New
starter $400. 863-946-0868
ENGINE, KAWASAKI, brand
new, 10 hp, fits John Deere
or Kawasaki Mule. $900.
(863)692-2229.
FORD F150, '91- 302, auto,
good for parts, $300.
(928)202-0013 (cell)
HITCH RECEIVER- Class 3,
draw tite, for full size Ford.
$40. (863)697-6812.
RIM- Low Profile Custom, Off
Honda Civic. 4 lugs, $250.
(863)532-8158
RIMS- 22", Spinner wire
wheels. $2000. or best offer
(863)946-1007
TIRES, 2 New BFGoodwrench,
R1 AG Tread, Power Radial -
80. Size 11.2R-20. $400 for
both. (863)674-5744


CHEVY SHORT BED 1988,
Tagged. Racing motor.
Clean. Must see! $2500.
Firm. (302)335-3442
FORD F150- '91, 4X4, With
tool box. Good shape.
$2500. Neg. (863)697-1198


FORD F250 DIESEL, '97- 4x4,
ext. cab, lifted, $12,000.
(863)673-4065.
FORD RANGER '92- V6, cold
AC, solid body, replaced
motor, has 67K, $1750 neg.
(863)634-9620 Okeechobee


CHEVROLET BLAZER 1991,
$1000 (863)634-6596
FORD EXPLORER, '97- 4x4,
runs great, $4500.
(863)234-1522.


MOBILE WORKSHOP
14 x 52, zoned for workshop
in Glades Co. wired 220.
$2,000 neg. (352)754-8514.


DODGE CARAVAN- A/C, Pow-
er steering, AM/FM, 96K,
, Runs good. $2500.
(863)673-0065.
MERCURY VILLAGER GS-
Minvan '98, 7 pass. 68K,
A/C, Auto, All Power, Exc
cond. $6300 863-467-0031


Public Notices




Public Notice 5005
State Public -
Legal Notice 5500



CITY OF SOUTH BAY
NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPLY
The City of South Bay is applying for
funding from the US Department of
Agriculture, Rural Utilities Service, for
the purpose of participation in the
construction of the Lake Region Water
Treatment Plant to supply water to the
City of South Bay.
Written comments may be directed to
Bobby "Tony" Smith, City Manager,
City of South Bay, 335 S.W. 2nd Ave-
nue, South Bay, FL 33493.
59250 CGS 6/2,9/05
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
Pursuant to Ch 713.585(6) F.S. United
American Lien & Recovery as agent
with power of attorney will sell the fol-
lowing vehicles) to the highest bidder
sub ect to any liens; net proceeds de-
posted with the clerk of court; own-
er/lienholder has right to hearing and
pot bond; owner may redeem vehicle
for cash sum of lien; all auctions held
in reserve
Inspect 1 week prior @ lienor facility;
cash or cashier check; 15% buyer
prem; any person interested ph
(954) 563-1999
Sale date June 24, 2005 @ 10:00 am
3411 NW 9th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, FL
33309
14946 1998 Ford Escort SW Vin#:
3FAFP15P1WR164583 r/o Radiology
Regional Ctr, 3680 Broadway, Ft.
Myere, FL Cust: Juan Flores, PO Box
2727, LaBelle, FL Lienor: Quality 1
Auto Carew 19 Hardee St., LaBelle, FL
863-675-6106 lien amt $3268.15.
Licensed & bonded auctioneers Flab422
Rau 765 & 1911
59210 CGS 6/2/05


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR HENDRY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 2004-74 DR
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MELVIN DENNIS,
Petitioner/Husband
and
ROSAT. DENNIS,
Respondent/Wife
AMENDED NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: ROSA T. DENNIS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Pe-
tition for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are re-
uired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Thomas
Montgomery, Esquire, Attorne for Pe-
titioner, whose address is .O. Box
1510, Belle Glade, FL 33430, and file
the original with the Clerk of the
above-styled Court, in LaBelle, Hendry
County, Florida, on or before June 21,
2005, otherwise, a judgment against
you may be entered for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rulei of Procedure, requires
certain automatic disclosure of
documents and Information. Failure
to comply can result In sanctions, In-
cluding dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on May 9,2005.
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/Hammond
DEPUTY CLERK
54959 CGS 5/19,26;6/2,9/05
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO
HOME MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff
vs. Case No. 2005-173-ca .
ROMAN CABRERA, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROMAN BABRERA
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
2004 LIGHTHOUSE LANE
LABELLE, FL 33935-5317
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER, SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in HEND County, Florida:
LOT 13, BLOCK 6, PORT LABELLE
HOLIDAY PARK UNIT 1, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 3, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HENDRY COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are
requiredto serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30 days after the
first publication, if any, on Echevarria
& Associates, PA., Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the originsawith this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for two consecutive weeks in
the Clewiston News.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 18lth day of April, 2005.
Barbara S. Butler
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/Hammond
Deputy Clerk
59305 CGS 6/2,9/05


]


-uli


-I '


HIGHLAND GLADES WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE OF
2005 ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING &
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
the HIGHLAND GLADES WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable
laws, a meeting of the landowners of the HIGHLAND GLADES WATER CONTROL
DISTRICT will be held on Monday, June 20, 2005 at 2:00 p.m. ai ir, 'uc.i
Cane Growers Cooperative, 3rd Floor, West Sugar House Road, Btil. i,r
Florida, for the following purposes:
1. Electing Supervisor(s);
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may propedy come before the meeting.
The Board of Supervisors meeting will commence immediately thereafter and the
purpose of this meeting is to approve the budget and set the non-ad valorem asa
sessment rate for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and to transact any and all business
that may come before the Board.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of Supervisors
with respect to any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to en,
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person re,
quiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Districts Attorney, Chadese
Schech, at (561) 655-0620 at least least five(5) calendar days prior to the Meeting.
DATED this 27th day of May, 2005.
By: Charles F. Schoech, Esq.
59196 CGS 6/2,9/05

NOTICE OF ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING
OF DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries o)
DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable laws,
a Meeting of the Landowners of DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT.
will be held on onday, June 20, 2005 at 2:30 PM. at the office of Alice, Inc.,
640 South Main Street, LaBelle, Ronda, for the purpose of:
1. Electing Supervisors;
2. Receiving Annual Reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the
Landowners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
If a person decides to appeal the decision of the Board of Supervisors with respect
to any matter considered at the public meeting herein referred, he or she may
need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Amercian with Disabilities Act, any person requir-
ing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the
District at (863) 675-2966 at least five (5) days prior to the date of proceeding.
DATEDthis 16th dayofMay2005.
*BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF.
DEVIL'S GARDEN WATER CONTROL DISTRICT.
By: Robert P Milley, Secretary
57498 CGS 6/2,9/05


CITY OF CLEWISTON
REQUEST FOR QUAUFICATIONS
TO PROVIDE
PRELIMINARY ENGINEERING, DESIGN, AND CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
FOR A WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY EXPANSION
and COLLECTION SYSTEM EXTENSION
In compliance with the requirements of Florida Statute 287.055, the Consultants'
Competitive Negotiation Act, the City of Clewiston, Florida, is accepting State-
ments of Qualifications from qualified firms to provide Professional Engineering
Services. These services include preliminary engineering design and recommen-
dations, final design, permitting, and monitoring services during the construction
phases to expand an existing 1.5 MGD wastewater treatment (WWTP) to a 3.0'
MGD capacity. Requested services also include extension of the WWTP collec-
tion system to accommodate approximately 225 new service connections.
Statement of Oualifications should be submitted in the following format:
1. Firm Overview: Include firm's capabilities, depth of resources and management
approach.
2. Project Staff Qualifications: Describe related experience and qualifications for
project team members.
3. Past Performances: Consultant should clearly outline relevant experience in simi-
lar assignments including preliminary engineering and design of waste water
systems plus experience with funding agencies (including Water Management
District and USDA Rural Development) for sewer systems.
4. References: Include a minimum of five government client references for which
you have performed similar projects.
5. Understanding of Local Needs and Familiarity with Local Conditions: Include
firms understanding of the specific needs of the City of Clewiston as well as
knowledge of working with local regulatory agencies.
Original and 5 copies of your submittal should be sent to: City of Clewiston, Aftn-
Kevin McCarthy, 141 Central Av., Clewiston, FL 33440 by 4 PM on June 24.
2005. Late submittals will not be accepted. Questions should be directed to Mr.
Kevin McCarthy, Director of Utilities, at (863) 983-1454. Submittals must be
clearly marked "Waste Water Facility RFO." The City reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all Statements of Qualifications.
58342 CGS 6/2,9/05


(863)465-1371 /

-C0061855


[Houses Sale 1025


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Fouses Sale


MMM"


I Houses Sale


lHouses Sale


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, June 2, 20015








ishrsaJn2,05Srigtecm uiissuhoLaekec be


Iubi Noice


CITY OF CLEWISTON
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF AMENDMENT
TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN NOTICE
OF LAND USE CHANGE

The Clewiston City Commission proposes to
adopt the following Ordinance:

ORDINANCE NO. 2005-03

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF COMMISSION OF
THE CITY CLEWISTON, FLORIDA, AMENDING ITS
ADOPTED COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING
FOR PURPOSE; PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF
FACT; PROVIDING FOR CHANGE OF THE FUTURE
LAND USE DESIGNATION ON TWO CONTIGUOUS
PARCELS OF PROPERTY LOCATED AT 901 NORTH
FRANCISCO STREET, CONTAINING 3.08 ACRES OF
LAND, MORE OR LESS, FROM PUBLIC TO MULTI-
PLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL; PROVIDING FOR
AMENDMENT TO THE CITY'S FUTURE LAND USE
MAP; AND DECLARING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The Clewiston Planning and Zoning Board will
conduct a public meeting regarding this Ordinance
on Monday, June 13, 2005 at 5:30 p.m. The
Clewiston City Commission will conduct a PUBLIC
HEARING regarding the second and final reading of
this ordinance on Monday, June 20, 2005, at 6:00
p.m. Both meetings will be held in the City Hall
Commission Chambers, 115 Ventura Avenue,
Clewiston, Florida.
Adoption of this ordinance will constitute a "small
scale" amendment to the City's Comprehensive
Plan and change the future land use of the tw.o
parcels of property located at 901 North Francisco
Street and as shown in the map in this advertise-
ment from "Public" to "Multiple-Family Residential"
and will change the uses allowed on these proper-
ties.
All citizens and interested parties are encouraged
to attend the public hearing and to provide written
and/or verbal comments on the matter under con-
sideration. Any person requiring a special accom-
modation at this hearing because of a disability or
physical impairment, including speech or hearing
impairments, should contact the City Manager's at
least 3 calendar days prior to the hearing.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made
with respect to any matter considered at this meet-
ing, such person will need to record the proceedings
and, for such purpose, may need to insure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is based.

Wendell Johnson
City Manager


PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the Clewiston Planning and Zoning Board will meet at
.,5:30 p.m. on Monday, June 13, 2005 in the City Hall Commission Chambers,
115 West Ventura Avenue. Included in the agenda will be the following request
1)A request from Morris Ridgdill in accordance with City Code Section 110-438
titled "Required findings; Variance" for a variance from the rear setback re-
quirements to allow construction of a garage adjacent to his home located on
Lots 7 & 8, Block C, Ridgewood S/D Addition 1, A.K.A. 209 Cypress Ave, Cle-
wiston. The property is zoned R1-A and is required by City Code to maintain a
15' rear yard setback on accessory structures. The applicant is requesting a vari-
ance from these requirements in order to build an accessory building 7.5' off the
rear property line.
The City Commission will hold a PUBLIC HEARING to consider the recommenda-
tions of the Planning & Zoning Board and take final action on these requests on
June 20, 2005 at 6:00 p.m. in the City Hall Commission Chambers.
All citizens and interested parties are encouraged to attend the P&Z Board meeting
and the City Commission public hearing. Any inquiries regarding the hearing or
' any person requiring a special accommodation because of a disability or physi-
cal impairment, including speech or hearing impairments, should contact the
Building Official's office at least three days prior to the hearing.
CITY OF CLEWISTON
Mike Rearic
Building Official
59131 CGS 6/2/05


SHAWANO WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE OF
2005 ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING &
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
the SHAWANO WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable laws, a
meeting of the landowners of the SHAWANO WATER CONTROL DISTRICT is
scheduled for Wednesday, June 22, 2005 at 8:30 a.m. at the Sugar Farms Co-
op, Atlantic Sugar Mill Road, Belle Glade, Florida, for the following purposes:
1. Electing Supervisor(s);
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
, owners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting.
The Board of Supervisors meeting will commence immediately thereafter and the
purpose of this meeting is to approve the budget and set the non-ad valorem as-
sessment rate for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and to transact any and all business
that may come before the Board.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of Supervisors
with respect to any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings Is made, which record includes
Sthe testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person re-
Squiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting because of a
isability or physical impairment should contact the Districts Attorney, Charles F
SSchoech, at (561) 655-0620 at least five (5) calendar days prior to the Meeting.
DATED this 27t day of May, 2005.
By: Charles F. Schoech, Esq.
9206 CGS 6/2,9/05

GLADEVIEW WATER CONTROL DISTRICT
NOTICE OF
2005 ANNUAL LANDOWNERS MEETING &
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all owners of lands located within the boundaries of
the GLADEVIEW WATER CONTROL DISTRICT that, pursuant to applicable laws, a
meeting of the landowners of the GLADEVIEW WATER CONTROL DISTRICT will
be held on Thursday, June 23, 2005 at 8:30 a.m. at the Sugar Farms Co-op, At-
lantic Sugar Mill Road, Belle Glade, Florida, for the following purposes:
1. Eleclif Supervisor(s);
2. Receiving annual reports and taking such action with respect thereto as the land-
owners may determine; and
3. Transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting,
The Board of Supervisors meeting will commence immediately thereafter and the
purpose of this meeting is to approve the budget and set the non-ad valorem as-
sessment rate for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 and to transact any and all business
that may come before the Board.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board of Supervisors
with respect to any matter considered at these meetings, he/she will need a
record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person re-
quiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting because of a
disability or physical impairment should contact the Districts Attorney, Charles F
Schoech, at (561) 655-0620 at least five (5) calendar days prior to the Meeting.
DATED this 27th day of May, 2005.
By: CharlesF.Schoech, Esq.
59198CGS6/2,9/05

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Twin Lakes Estates will sell the mobile home described
below "AS IS" to the highest bidder.
1983 Model: PLYW Singlewide Mobile Home, ID#SHS2WGA05833150, 14' X 65'
bluish, 3 bed/2 bath with kitchen & living room.
For more details contact Eloy at Twin Lakes Estates 863-983-6293, The home was
previously owned by Cheryl Collett. The sale will be held on Wednesday, June 8,
005 at 630 p.m on Lot 15 at Twin Lakes Estates in Clewiston,
57473 CGS 5/26;6/2/05


. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Port LaBelle Community Develop-
ment District Board of Supervisors will
meet at 7:00 p.m., on Tuesday, June
21, 2005, at the District Office on
3293 Dellwood Terrace, Port LaBelle,
Florida. The purpose of this meeting is
to discuss and preliminary adopt next
fiscal years (10/1/05-9/30/06) pro-
posed operating budget and conduct
other routine business requiring action
by the Board. .
This meeting is open to the public.
The final budget and village rate will be
advertised, reviewed, and adopted
during public hearings in September,
2005.
Patrick Whidden
Chairman
59098 CB/CGS 6/2,9/05
NOTICE OF SALE
TO: Chuck RoseBlum
You are hereby notified that
the property stored by you
with Randy Coyle & Rena
Blissett, Unit #6 located at
1801 Red Road, Clewiston,
FL 33440. The items are be-
lieved to be household and
miscellaneous items and will
be sold to the highest bidder
for cash at the above ad-
dress on June 10, 2005, at
11:00 a.m, along with the
advertising costs in the
amount of $100.72 plus
$39.69. We reserve the right
to refuse any and all bids.
58585 CGS 6/2,9/05
NOTICE OF SALE
TO: Robbie Roland
You are hereby notified that
the property stored by you
with Randy Coyle & Rena
Blissett, Unit #8 located at
1801 Red Road, Clewiston,
FL 33440. The items are be-
lieved to be household and
miscellaneous items and will
be sold to the highest bidder
for cash at the above ad-
dress on June 3rd, 2005, at
11:00 a.m, along with the
advertising costs in the
amount of $288.90 plus
$39.69. We reserve the right
to refuse any and all bids.
57447 CGS 5/26/05
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public notice is hereby given that Fergu-
son Towing will sell at Public Auction
free from all prior liens, the following
vehicles that remaining unclaimed in
storage with charges unpaid, pursuant
to Florida Statutes 713.78, to the high-
est bidder at 12065 Lakeshore Drive,
Canal Pt., FL 33438 on April 25, 2005
at 9:00 AM,
2002 Chevrolet 4-door (whil)
2Gl1WF52E729376033
1995 Chevorlet 4-dnoor(red)
1G1L05543SY145556
1991 Mercury 2-door (bro)
1MEPM6047MH623839
1999 Daewoo 4-door (grn)
KLAJA52Z7XK237343
57705 CGS 5/26;6/2/05


READING A
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The Creek


alphabet.


Staff photo/Katrina Elsken
Brighton Seminole Reservation residents speak Creek, so that is the language taught at
the "pull out" program at Brighton. The Creek alphabet only has 19 letters. Some Semi-
noles on other reservations speak Miccosukee.


Staff photo/KatriraElsken
In the Pemayetv Cuko ("Our Way") educational program at Brighton Seminole Reserva-
tion grade school students learn about the Creek language as well as Seminole tradi-
tions. Standing in the corn in the program's garden are (left to right) Brydgett Koontz,
Jaryaca Baker, Kiylier Baker, Lanie Sedatol and Lahna Sedatol.


Check your


credit report
TALLAHASSEE Florida Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson
is urging consumers to take advan-
tage of a law that requires major
credit reporting services to provide
free credit reports.
The amendment to the Fair
Credit Reporting Act was designed
to provide consumers who cannot
or will not pay a fee for the reports
to access them for free once a year.
The law has been phased-in across
the United States, and Florida resi-
dents will be eligible for the docu-
ments on June 1.
"Reviewing your credit history
is one of the most important steps
people can take to avoid identity
theft," Bronson said. "If consumers
find out that someone is using their
identity or credit cards without
their knowledge, the credit reports
may be the first hint they have that
there is a problem."
A credit report contains infor-
mation about a consumer's credit
history, including a listing of all
credit cards, whether bills have
been paid on time, and whether
the consumer has been sued,
arrested or filed for bankruptcy.
National consumer reporting agen-
cies sell the information to credit
card companies and other credi-
tors, insurers, employers and other
businesses that use it to determine
whether to approve an application
for credit, insurance, loans, and
employment. A poor credit history
can result in rejection of credit or
higher interest rates on a loan.
"Consumers should regularly
review these reports for any mis-
takes," Bronson said. "Identity theft
is not the only concern. False infor-
mation that hurts someone's credit
rating can mean the difference of
whether they can buy a home or
not. It is important to ensure the
information is accurate and up' to
date, especially before making a
major purchase."
Consumers can challenge and
change incorrect information on
the reports. The three major credit
reporting agencies are Equifax,
Experian and TransUnion. To
obtain a free copy of reports from
these agencies, log onto
http://www.AnnualCreditReport.c
om. People should be wary of any
other sites, which claim to offer
free reports but steer consumers to
sites that offer services by subscrip-
tiotn for a fee.


Vulc Notice


Your time


is precious1



S --- --- ewston -hesUn
City looks at waste New cemetery Ii Y.approvespanIM







People have so much to do and so little time to do it.


To help you deal with your time constraints, we pack this little
newspaper with lots of relevant and useful information.


We want you to learn what you need to know quickly, so you can
experience and enjoy your community fully.


How are we doing?


Let us know by mailing feedback@newszap.com or calling your
editor.






Clewiston News


D LADES COUNTY



DEMrOCRAT



TheSun
C'nmmunitu Service Throuqh Journalism


P b ic Ntic


Quantum


Foundation


responds


to grant

PAHOKEE The Quantum
Foundation awarded
Alzheimer's Community Care a
$50,000.grant that will be used
to fund a recently completed
Comprehensive Alzheimer's
Care Center in Pahokee. This
grant was issued in response to
a challenge grant posed by the
Health Care District of Palm
Beach County.
Alzheimer's Community
Care's new Comprehensive
Alzheimer's Care Center will
open to the public on June 2.
The 2,500-square foot facility
was built on property formerly
occupied by the Women's Club
of Pahokee. In addition to offer-
ing dementia-specific day care,
the center will have an
Alzheimer's Community Care
Family Nurse Consultant on site.
The facility will also tend to the
needs of the general elderly pop-
ulation.
"The Quantum Foundation
continues to be a great patron of
our cause. This grant ensures
that Alzheimer's Community
Care will not bear as much of a
financial burden in operating
and providing these much need-
ed services to the Glades area,"
said Mary Barnes, Alzheimer's
Community Care president and
CEO. "Quantum has empow-
ered us and on behalf of the
hundreds of families that will
benefit from this facility, we are
sincerely grateful."
Alzheimer's Community Care
is still seeking funding for the
Pahokee Comprehensive
Alzheimer's Care Center. To
help fund this project or. for
more information, please call
Alzheimer's Community Care at
(561) 683-2700.
Alzheimer's Community Care
is a local not-for-profit organiza-
tion that works hands on in the
community to place a safety net
around Alzheimer's patients
and their caregivers. Their serv-
ices and resources include nine
dementia-specific day care cen-
ters, family consultant program,
Alzheimer's 24-hour crisis line,
prescription benefits program
for caregivers and patients, sup-
port groups, and education and
training.


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


.--hursday, June 2, 2005


2






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Thursday, June 2, 2006,


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


OFF MSRP
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