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The sun
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028421/00014
 Material Information
Title: The sun
Uniform Title: Sun (Belle Glade, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Independent Newspapers, Inc.
Place of Publication: Belle Glade Fla
Creation Date: April 7, 2005
Publication Date: 1989-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Belle Glade (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Belle Glade
Coordinates: 26.685278 x -80.671389 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 66, no. 44 (Dec. 7, 1989)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002051865
oclc - 33436726
notis - AKN9825
lccn - sn 95047260
System ID: UF00028421:00014
 Related Items
Preceded by: Belle Glade sun

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
    Classifieds
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
Full Text




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504


Thursday, April 7,2005


Western Palm Beach County's Hometown Newspaper Since 1923


Vol. 78 No. 44


At a glance

Black Gold
Jubilee Parade
This year is the 27th Annual
Black Gold Jubilee. Everyone
is invited to the parade April 9,
at 10 a.m. The parade stars on
the corner of NW Ave. L and
Main St. Parent entry forms are
available at the Belle Glade
Chamber of Commerce. Dead-
line is April 1.

Glades Central
Community High,
Class of 1996
There will be a meeting for
all class members of 1996. The
meeting will take place Sun-
day, April 10 at 3:30 p.m. The
meeting will be located in the
Goodwill Plaza on the Be the
One office. I f you have any
questions contact: Yvonne
Moreland at 561-261-5261 or
Robernetta Ford at (561) 516-
0120. Your attendance is great-
ly appreciated.

Young Women's
Initiative hosts
worship service
The Young Women's Initia-
tive of Mount Zion A.M.E.
Church will be hosting the
church's Family and Friends
Worship Service Sunday, April
10, at 4 p.m. The Service will
take place at the church, 249
SW 10th Street Belle Glade.
It is going to be a very spiritual
event. Dinner will be served
immediately following the
service.

Homebuyer's
workshop
A free homebuyer's work-
shop is planned for April 9,
from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the
Centro Campesino (South Bay
Villa Largo Villas sales office).
For more information, call
Angela or Alma at 996-3988.
Registration is required.

Field Day
University of Florida, Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural
Science, Everglades Research
and Education Center will host
a station field day on April 7.
The day will include tours of
the station and educational
presentations. The essential
research in Best Management
Practices, turf grass, plant-
breeding, sugarcane and veg-
etables, with the related envi-
ronmental factors will be
showcased by the EREC facul-
ty and staff. For more informa-
tion or to attend the 2005 Field
Day, please call Chay Burrus at
(561) 993-1500. The Ever-
glades REC is located in the
Everglades Agriculture Area at
3200 E. Palm Beach Rd, Belle
Glade.


Lake Level

S15.37


r above sea
level

Index


Schools ..
Classifieds


. 19-22


O pinion . . ..... 4


See Page 4 for information about
how to contact the newspaper.

newszap.com
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Online news & information



0 11 | I 1110
8 116510 0001 7 7


Duran: 'Resignation never happened'


By Mark Young
Former Pahokee Police Chief
Ralph Duran said his so-called
"resignation" never, really hap-
pened. Originally stating that he
was forced to resign under
duress, Mr. Duran is now outlining
the sequence of events that threw
Pahokee into a firestorm of con-
troversy.
The well-reported incident
between members of the Paho-
kee Police Department and
Robert Love, a convicted felon
and friend to Pahokee Mayor J.P.


"This is not the end. Not by a long shot."
Former Pahokee Police Chief Ralph Duran


Sasser, has been well document-
ed, but there are some discrepan-
cies to what has been reported,
according to Mr. Duran.
In question are the details sur-
rounding his resignation. Mr.
Duran said the following Tuesday,
eight days following the incident
with Mr. Love and city commis-
sion members, he was called to
the city manager's office and


asked to sign termination papers.
Mr. Duran refused to do so,
saying he would show the papers
to his attorney first, but said that if
the city was truly unhappy with
his services, he would resign with
30 days notice.
"I never said I was going to
resign, but said I would give them
30 days to find someone to
replace me if they were that


2005 Harvest Queen Pageant: The queen holds court


Staff photos/Jose Zaragoza
Pageant participants look on as Amy Hooker is crowned this year's Harvest Queen at
the 42nd Annual Harvest Queen Pageant held Saturday at the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. Ms. Hooker will be making an appearance at the Black Gold Jubilee Festival, the
queen of the festival.


unhappy with my services," he
said. "But I never gave that notice.
I'm not the kind of person to
resign."
Mr. Duran returned to his office
where he received a hand-deliv-
ered letter from City Manager Lilly
Latimore stating that his "verbal
resignation" had been accepted-
and in lieu of 30 days notice, he
would receive 30 days pay.
"I hadn't been in my office 10
minutes when the personnel
director walked in, hands me a
letter, and walked out and her
eyes were red because she was


upset. Two minutes after that,
Detective Gonzalez came in to
show me a letter written and
signed by (Ms. Latimore) that I
am no longer the chief and to turn
all my equipment over to the act-
ing chief, Detective Gonzalez."
Mr. Duran said that there had
been no previous tension
between himself and his police
department in regards to Mayor
Sasser or any of the other city
commissioners leading up to that
fateful night. In fact, the former

See Duran Page 12


Regional fire



department



idea progresses


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
SOUTH BAY Will the
Glades area fire departments
now operate under a single enti-
ty?
Glades leaders continued the
discussion on the regional fire
department concept at the tri-
cities meeting last week, agree-
ing to allow the local fire chiefs
to develop a comprehensive
implementation plan.
The move would allow the
Glades cities of South Bay, Belle
Glade and Pahokee to operate
under a single fire entity and
help local municipalities to
meet the minimum fire stan-
dards being proposed by the
county. According to Chief Steve
Rice with the Belle Glade Fire
Department, the next step is in


the hands of the three commu-
nities and what they envision
such a regional concept would
look like.
"I think the local cities need
to get together to decide what
it's going to take, how many
men we need, how many trucks
we need," Chief Rice said at the
tri-cities meeting. "We need to
decide how to structure it, not
the county."
Belle Glade City Manager
Houston Tate agreed. "The fire
chiefs need to sit down and dis-
cuss how do we work these
parts out, so we can agree to
agree what we will do."
'The discussion to make the
three departments into a region-
al station, is a discussion that
See Discussion- Page 12


Summer programs


to be available


Ms. Hooker was pleasantly surprised when the announcement was made crowning her
this year's queen. Finalists Amanda Rene Lewis and Afton Allen are pictured next to the
queen.


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
Spring is slowly giving way to
Summer, though not as quickly
as many kids would like, and the
sound of the shuffling feet of
recreation directors getting
ready for the coming months
fills the air.
The Glades is no different,
and this summer is already
shaping up to be another suc-
cessful vacation period for stu-
dents, with a few activities
aimed just for adults as well.
In Pahokee, Recreation
Director Herbert Crawford and
his staff prepare for the summer
by working through the final
details before school lets out.
With a number of events
planned, the staff at the depart-


ment anticipate no less than full
capacity in each of the pro-
grams. '
Quite possibly one of the
most popular programs in Paho-
kee is the summer camp. Head-
ed up by Mary Harper, the pro-
gram accommodates 200
children annually. Oftentimes,
the popularity of the program
leads to long waiting lists of
eager children ready to partici-
pate.
For the lucky kids who are
able to join the program
operates on a first-come first-
serve basis Ms. Harper plans
both fun and educational field
trips through the summer
See Summer Page 9


Literacy Coalition


holds Grand Opening


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza
BELLE GLADE On Friday,
the Literacy Coalition held a
grand opening for their new
building in Belle Glade, a facility
that will greatly help the organiza-
tion to continue offering its
resourceful literacy classes to
many more children and parents
in the area.
0 See more photos Page 9
Having been situated before in
a two-room center, the staff at the
program are quite happy to be
moving into tl ie new Glades Tri-
City Family Education Center a
building much larger in size.
Teachers say the new space
should accommodate'more peo-
ple in the program, which has a
history of helping parents arnd
children to learn in the same envi-
ronment and with the same
excellent results.


According to Executive Direc-
tor Darlene Kostrub, the program
has been in existence in the
Glades since 1993 and has oper-
ated out of two housing develop-
ments since its inception.
The program serves, primari-
ly, people who have difficulty
speaking English and also helps
them to achieve goals such as
obtaining their GED. The year-
round program caters to people
who speak Spanish and Creole.
The program is funded
through a number of different
sources, including the United
Way and the local school district.
With the program growing
rapidly in numbers, and having
achieved capacity in their old
facility, the Literacy Coalition
decided it was time to move into
a new building. The building is
located at 981 S.E. 1st Street, and

See Opening Page 12


Stan pnoto/Jose Zaragoza
With its smallest participants taking part in the ribbon-cutting ceremony for its new building,
the Literacy Coalition invited the community to visit the new site.


,"1" ; -" L-"*-"--.


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, April 7, 2005


Flipside at the

Sugar Festival
Sugar Festival attendees are going
to be treated to some big names in
country music at the upcoming April
16 concerts, but it wouldn't be a
local festival without local flavor.
Local band Flipside will be taking
the stage to entertain their home-
town crowd, as well. Members are,
from left to right, Snag, Trey, Dipp,
Terry, and Randy. Singing backup
for one show only will be Angela
Johnson and Eureka Whitehall.


Courtesy pnoto


Miss Rayl to marry
Mr. Snow on June 11.
Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Rayl of
Fitzgerald, announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Jodie Jean,
to James Matthew Snow, III, son of
Mr. and Mrs. James Matthew
Snow, Jr., of Belle Glade.
Miss Rayl is the granddaughter
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Bill Rayl and
the late Mr. and Mrs. Bedford
Moran. She is a 1998 honor gradu-
ate of Fitzgerald High School. She
graduated with highest honors in
2000 from Abraham Baldwin Agri-
cultural College with an Associates
in Business. While at ABAC, Jodie
was on the women's tennis team,
a member of Phi Theta Kappa
honor society, and a member of
Alpha Beta Gamma business soci-
ety. She then attended the Universi-
ty of Georgia and graduated Suma
Cum Laude with highest honors
with a Bachelors of Business in
Management Information Sys-
tems. At UGA, she was a member


of Alpha Kappa Psi business frater-
nity and enrolled in the honors pro-
gram. Miss Rayl is currently pursu-
ing a Juris Doctors from Stetson
University College of Law in St.
Petersburg, Fla, and plans to gradu-
ate in May 2007.
Matthew is the grandson of Mrs.
Mattie Snow and the late Mr. James
M. Snow, Sr., the late Mrs. Cary
Snow, and the late Mrs. Sue Vulg-
amore. Mr. Snow graduated in
1997 from Glades Day School in
Belle Glade. He then attended Val-
dosta Technical College where he
earned a diploma in Industrial
Electrical Technology. He contin-
ued his education at Valdosta State
University and received a Bache-
lors Degree of Applied Science in
Technical Studies. Mr. Snow is cur-
rently employed with Tampa
Armature Works as a service man-
ager in the Tampa office.
The wedding is to be held at
5:30 p.m. Saturday, June 11 at
Arbor Baptist Church in Fitzgerald,
GA. A reception will follow at
Fitzgerald Elks Lodge.


I


Obituaries


Laura Lockmiller
Laura Doub Lockmiller, 93, of
West Palm Beach (formerly of
Belle Glade), died at Sutton Place
Nursing Home March 7, 2005.
Laura was born in Pespire, Hon-
duras February 12, 1912. She was
the daughter of Fletcher Harris
Doub, originally from Greensboro,
NC and Susan Motino Doub. Her
first memories were from when
the family lived in Tegucigulpa,
Honduras. They lived in a house
about a block form the local cathe-
dral.
When she was bout five years
old, the family moved to San Sal-
vador. Her father who was very flu-
ent in Spanish got a job with the
U.S. State Department. He had
originally gone to Latin America
while serving in the Spanish Ameri-
can War. In 1921 the family sailed
from Central America to San Fran-
cisco. There Laura's father started a
hat factory. In 1925 he grew restless
and the family business was sold.
He bought a Ford automobile to
make a trip across the United
States. This was before there were
paved roads and motels.
The family drove and camped
out across the country. They settled
in a small community called
Whitehouse near Jacksonville, Fla.
Later they moved to LaBelle, Fla. in
anticipation of Hendry Ford build-
ing facilities in the area to help in
the manufacturing of rubber tires.
Laura graduated from high
school in 1931 as Salutatorian of
her class. She attended Florida Col-
lege For Women (now Florida
State University) in Tallahassee for
two years. Jobs were scarce when
she moved to Belle Glade to join
her sister Rosa who was teaching
at the high school. She got a job at
Darden's Drug Store. Later she met
her future husband Carl who
worked across the street at Betzn-
er's Hardware. They married in
1941. Carl and Laura started their
own business, Glades Hardware in
1946 and worked until their retire-
ment in 1977. For several years
Laura worked for Gove Elementary
in the ESE Department. She also
taught first grade catechism to
youngsters at St. Phillip Benizi
Catholic Church every Sunday for
over 30 years. Her husband, Carl
passed in 1993. In 1996 she moved


to West Palm Beach where she
lived on her own until 2003. '
She will be lovingly remem-
bered by her family, including her
daughter, Yvonne M. Lockmiller,
Wellington; son, Charles Lock-
miller, West Palm Beach; two
grandchildren, Alison and Michael;
two brothers, John Doub, LaBelle,
William Doub, Immokalee; three
sisters, Rosa Nash, Port St. Luci,
Julia Chappell, Jupiter, Carmella
Mayton, Alamogordo, NM; many
nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial was
celebrated March, 11, 2005 at the
St. Therese'De Lisieux Catholic
Church, Wellington. Burial fol-
lowed at Our Lady Queen of Peace
Catholic Cemetery, Royal Palm
Beach.
The family would like to thank
the Hospice Bronze Team and
Father Guerin and Father George of
St. Therese De Lisieux Catholic
Church for their care of Laura.
Duke Tucker
Duke Tucker, 25, of Jensen
Beach, died Sunday, April 3, 2005,
at his residence.
He was born in West Palm
Beach, and has been a resident of
Jensen Beach for 12 years coming
from Belle Glade.
He was employed by Jordan
Manufacturing in Jensen Beach.
He was a veteran serving in the
U.S. Navy.
He was a member of The
Church of The Holy Nativity in
Canal Point, Fla.
Survivors include his wife, Erica
Tucker of -Jensen beach; one
daughter, Ruby Tucker of Jensen
'Beach; his mother and father, Perla
and Bill Underwood of Jensen
Beach; and one brother, William
Underwood of Jensen beach.
Friends may call Thursday, April
7, from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A
prayer service will be held at 7 p.m.
on Thursday at the funeral home.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated at 1 p.m., Friday,
April 8, at St. Joseph Catholic
Church.
Interment will be in Port Maya-
ca Cemetery in Port Mayaca, Fla.
Those who wish may make contri-
butions to National Headache
Foundation, 820 N. Orleans, Suite
217, Chicago, IL 60610-3132.
Arrangements are under the


direction of Aycock funeral home,
Jensen beach.
Raymond Oscar
Reynolds
Raymond Oscar Reynolds of
Clewiston, 78, died Friday, April 1,
2005 at Palm Terrace in Clewiston.
Raymond Oscar Reynolds was
born in Sweetwater, Tennessee. He
lived here in Clewiston for 49 years.
He was employed with Okeelanta
Sugar Corporation, as an Instru-
ment Mechanic. His survivors are
nephews Johnny Reynolds of
Clewiston, Eddie Reynolds of Pana-
ma City nieces, Wanda Formonte
of Panama City, Faye Olson of
Sweetwater, Tenn., Emma Wheel-
er of Panama City and Vicky Robin-
son of Sweetwater, Tenn.
Calling hours are from 7-9 p.m.
April 5, 2005 at Akin-Davis Funeral
Homes. Services are at 11 a.m.
April 6, .2005 at graveside -
Ridgelawn Cemetery, burial will be
at Ridgelawn Cemetery. Officiating
Clergy Reverend Mark Harris.
Arrangements are in the direc-
tion of Akin-Dais Funeral Homes, in
Clewiston.

Edward Lee
"Buddie" Herring
Edward Lee "Buddie" Herring,
age 73, of Lake Placid, died March
31, 2005, at his home after a long
.battle with cancer. Mr. Herring was
born Sept. 18, 1931 in Moultrie,
Georgia, son of Theron and Velma
Herring. He was a retired Florida
Highway Patrolman. His last
assignment being at the Florida
Turnpike station in Orlando where
he served as sergeant. He was a
volunteer fireman for the city of
Clewiston for many years, and
enjoyed piloting airplanes, square-
dancing, collecting model trains,
tinkering with small engines and
traveling in his motor home. His
favorite organization was undoubt-
edly his many functions.
Mr. Herring is survived by his,
wife Loretta J. Herring; one daugh-
ter, Brenda (Herring) Lopez, one
brother, Cranford B. 'Jack" Herring;
one half- brother, Roscoe Gay; and
two grandchildren, Robin Lopez
and Oliver Lopez.
A memorial service was held at
11 a.m., on Monday, April 4,2005 at


the chapel of the Akin-Davis Funer-
al Home in Clewiston, with grave-
side services held at Ridgelawn
Cemetery also in Clewiston. For
those who prefer to make a dona-
tion in lieu of flowers, the family
requests that they be sent to Hos-
pice.
Eleanor Vansickle Wolf
Eleanor Vansickle Wolf went
home to the Lord, Sunday April 3,
2005. She was born May 25, 1920
in Indianapolis, Indiana. She grad-
uated from Purdue University with
a degree in Home Economics. In
1948, she moved to Belle Glade
with her husband Emil and two
small children where they lived for
44 years before they moved to
Venice, Fla. in 2002. For manyyears
she served the children of Commu-
nity United Methodist Church,
where she was a member. For 20
years she held active leadership
positions in the Palm Glades Girl
Scout Council. She substituted for
10 years in Belle Glade schools.
In her latter years, she volun-
teered at Gove Elementary and
with many other organizations that
helped people, including Red
Cross, Shriners, and Adult Literacy
Program.
Survivors include Emil, her lov-
ing husband of 63 years and her
daughters Barbara Port of Seffner,
Fla., Janet Hoffman of
Lawrenceville, Georgia, Nancy
Wolf of Temple Terrace, Fla., and
Jean Jankowski of Venice, Fla.,
seven grandsons, and two grand-
daughters.
The celebration of her life will
be at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 9,
2005, at Christ United Methodist
Church, 1475 Center Road, Venice,
Florida 34293, (941) 493-7504.
Memorial donations may be
made to the Florida United
Methodist Children's Home, 51
Main Street, Enterprise, Florida
32725, (386) 668-4774, or the
AJzheimer's Association, 1230
South Tuttle Avenue, Sarasota,
Florida34239, (941) 365-8883.


Clewiston, FL 33440 LaBelle, FL 33975 Ft. Myers, FL 33901
(863) 902-9211 (863) 675-7719 (239) 936-9393





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-ri Ivi rm -r < D iEj'x

Truck Sales & Leasing Consultant
800-726-8514
daxidc gladesmnotors.comi








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Call for more information 863-m6 -9462


| Law Offices of Robert L. Vaughn, P.A. I


Thursday, April 7,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee







Thursday, April 7, 2005 Serving the comirrunities south of Lake Okeechobee


Births






ka -A: ak


Are you eligible for any


of these tax credits


Kaylee Jade Blair
Lyndsey Yagovane anid Ronnie
Blair of Clewiston are proi(ud to
announce the birth of their
daughter, Kaylee Jade Blair. She
was born on February 24. 2005 at
Glades General I hospital in Belle
Glade. She weighed 7 pounds 13
ounces and was 20 inches long at
birth. Paternal grandmother is
Lisa Furderburk of Clewiston. The
Great-grandfather is Chester Blair.


Tijla na Briljnae
Williams
Congratulations to Libbv Cop-
per of Okeechobee and Bri(ce'
Williami from Clewvistoni on tihe
Birth of their daugh-ter Tijraiia
Brujnae ,ii .. Sle was born
on Mar ch 30. 2005 She weiglied 8
poun(ids, 2 ounces.


Congratulations


Cristina Isabel
Llorens graduates
May 6. 2005 is the graduation
day for Cristina Isabel Llorens
from The University of Central
Florida. Cristina a n-ember of
Glades Day School in Belle Glade,
class of 2000, has earned her
degree at UCF in Journalism witli
a minor in Political Science.
Cristina is the daughter of
Maria Isabel Torres of Belle Glade
and Fernando Z. Llorens of Stuart.
She is the granddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Alberto J. Torres and Mr.
and Mrs. Fernando N. Llorenos,
also of Belle Glade.


Identification helps


project food supply


Last week Florida Commis-
sioner of Agriculture Charles
Bronson was in Glades County
to promote "point of origin" tag-
ging for cattle. Under the pro-
gram, a button-like disc is iiscirl
ed into the animal's ear, much as
a human would wear a pierced
earring. The disc contains a 15
digit identification number and
responds to a scanner. Cattle can
be scanned quickly, running
them through a chute past a
portable scanner. This system,
coupled with computer records
kept by ranchers, buyers and
feedlots will be able to trace ain
'individual cow from birth to the
table.
This means that if a problem
'is found in a particular batch of
:,hamburger, health officials
,could determine exactly which
,cattle the meat came from, and
Trace those cattle back to their
'point of origin, within 48 hours.
American beef producers
-already have a good record for
,food safety. The tagging system
.improves food safety because it
,there is a problem, health offi-
,cials can quickly and efficiently
-determine which cattle may
;'have been exposed to a disease.
t. The ID system means any cat-
tle that might have been
-exposed can be quickly identi-
fied, quarantined and tested. It
:prevents the need to kill cattle
'that might not have had any con-
-tact with an infected animal. In
England, during the Mad Cow


A
Healthier
Life -


with Katrina Elsken


Disease scare, whole herds were
destroyed in areas where Mad
Cow was suspected, since at the
time they had no way to detei-
mline (xactiv whete each cowv
Ihad beei in its liiesparn.
The .,-,.: .; system is current-
ly voluntary. Consumers can
encourage it, and other food
identification, at the inaikel-
place.
With so many possible con-
taminants in today's food sup-
ply, consumers-need this kind of
information to help them
choose the safest food available.
Point of origin identification
also makes it possible for the
consumers to support American
farmers by insisting on knowing
where the beef came from and
buying American-bred beef.
Before making any change iii
your diet or exercise program,
consult your doctor. This is espe-
cially important if you are on any
diet or exercise program. Some
drugs interact badly with foods
that would otherwise be conisid-
ered "healthy."


Taxpayers should consider
claiming tax credits for which
they might be eligible when com-
pleting their federal income tax
retuLrns, advises the IRS. A tax
credit is a dollar-lor-dollar reduc-
tion of taxes owed. Some credits
are Iefundable taxes. which could
be reduced to the point that a tax-
paver would receive a refund

rather than owing any taxes.
Below are some of the ci edits tax-
payers could be eligible to claim:

Earned Income
Tax Credit
This is a refundable credit for
low-income working individuals
and families. Income and family
size determine the amount of the
EITC. When the EITC exceeds the
amount of taxes owed, it results
in a tax refund to those who claim
and qualify for the credit. For
more information, see IRS Publi-
cation 596, Earned Income Credit
(EIC).

Child Tax Credit
This credit is for people who
have a qualifying child. The rmaxi-
mum amount of the credit is
1,000 for each qualifying child.
This credit can be claimed in addi-
lion to the credit for child and
dependant care expenses. For
more information on the Child
Tax Credit, see Pub.972, Child Tax
Credit.

Child and Dependant
Care Credit
This is for expenses paid for
the care of children under age 13,
or for a disabled spouse or depen-
dant, to enable the taxpayer to
work. There is a limit to the
amount of qualifying expenses.
The credit is a percentage of those
qualifying expenses, For more
information, SEE Pub. 503, Child
and Dependant Care Expenses.

Adoption Credit
Adoptive parents can take a
tax credit of up to $10,390 for
qualifying expenses paid to adopt
an eligible child, A credit of up to
$10,390 may be allowed for the
adoption of a child with special
needs even if you do not have any
qualifying expenses. For more
information, see Pub. 968, Tax
Benefits for Adoption.


Credit for the
Elderly and Disabled
This credit is available to indi-
viduals who are either age 65 or
older or are under age 65 and
retired on permanent and total
disability, and who are U.S. citi-
zens or residents. There are
income limitations. For more
information, see Pub. 524, Credit
for Elderly or the Disabled.

Education Credits
There are two credits avail-
able, the Hope Credit and the Life-
time Learning Credit, for people
who pay higher education costs.
The Hope Credit is for the pay-
ment of the first two years of
tuition and related expenses for
an eligible student foe whom the
taxpayer claims an exemption on
the tax return. The Lifetime Learn-
ing Credit is available for all post-
secondary education for an
unlimited number of years. A tax-
payer cannot claim both reedits
for the same student in one year.
For more information, see Pub.
970, Tax Benefits for Education.

Retirement Savings
Contribution Credit
Eligible individuals may be
able to claim a credit for a per-
centage of their qualified retire-
ment savings contributions, such
as contributions to a traditional or
Roth IRA or salary reduction con-
tributions to a SEP or Simple plan.
To be eligible, you must be at least
age 18 at the end of the year and
not a student or an individual for
whom someone else claims a
personal exemption. Also, your
adjusted gross income (AGI)
must be below a certain amount.
For more information, see chap-
ter four in Publication 590, Indi-
vidual Retirement Arrangements
(IRAs).

There are other credits avail-
able to eligible taxpayers. Since
many qualifications and limita-
tions apply to the various tax cred-
its, visit a Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance (VITA) site near you.
The Clewiston and Harlem
libraries have IRS trained volun-
teers to assist you with tax prepa-
ration. Call the Clewiston Public
Library at 983-1493 or the Harlem
Public Library at 902-3322 to
schedule an appointment.


Big Lake Amateur Radio Club

to host station during Sugarfest


The Big Lake Amateur Radio
Club will have a short-wave radio
station on the air during the Sug-
arfest and just across from Wood
Works Park in Clewiston.
The club will make contacts
with the amateur radio commu-
nity and invite the public to visit
their station. This is chance to
speak with persons around the
country, and perhaps around the
world, telling them about our
"big event" here in Clewiston.
The station will be set up on
the corner of Osceola and W. C.
Owen Avenue and manned by

local amateur radio operators.
The radio club also invites
licensed radio amateur operators
to come and participate in this
event and welcomes anyone
who is interested in seeing the
station in operation or talking to
someone far beyond the limits of
the community.
This club event is also a
chance for everyone to see to
kind of "field day" operations
that make communication possi-
ble when all other means fail,


during natural and man-made
disasters, during hurricanes and
when there are power failures.
Members of the Big Lake
Amateur Radio Club come from
around Lake Okeechobee and
are found in Hendry, Palm Beach
and Glades Counties. They share
their operations skills and techni-
cal expertise in providing the
kind of communications that will
be 'shown while the Sugarfest is
in operation.
President of the club is Eric
Rhinehart, W4KPG and the local
Emergency Coordinator for
Hendry County is Jim Sparks,
AA4BN. The club is affiliated with
the American Radio Relay
League and a part of the Radio
Amateur. Civil Emergency Ser-
vice for Hendry and Glades
Counties. Persons interested in
the radio art are welcome to con-
tact the members for further
information, assistance in getting
"on the air", obtaining an ama-
teur radio license and in learning
more about amateur radio in this
area.


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4 OPINION Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, April 7, 2005


Speak Out

Speak out is our free 24-hour opinion line. Call 996-6636 to
express your opinion or ask a question about public issues.
You are not required to give your name. While we want you to
speak freely, the newspaper reserves the right to edit calls for
clarity, brevity, relevance and fairness.

Sunshine Law
I'm curious why the Sun newspaper hasn't reported anything
on the situation with Robert Love, the mayor, and city commission
breaking the Sunshine Law. Why hasn't the Sun been reporting
anything? Please let me know.
Editor's note: Thanks for calling. Apparently you missed the
Sun edition where it was noted in a Speak Out editorial comment
that we did, indeed, follow up on the Sunshine Law. After speak-
ing to counsel for the Florida Press Association, it was determined
that a strong argument could be made that the law was violated.
As noted in the previous comment, an official letter of complaint
was sent to the city of Pahokee and copied to the State Attorney
General's Office letting the city know that holding illegal meetings
will not be tolerated. As for the case itself, investigations are ongo-
ing.

Second request
This is to Ms. Delaney. Ms. Delaney, don't just quit politics alto-
gether. Stick around and come back in March. Take on the mayor
that we got. He's no good. We need a person like you.

Why, oh why
I have a question to pose to the city manager of Pahokee and
the mayor and even some of the commissioners. Why is it that the
city manager and the mayor are trying to discredit and disband the
newly formed Economic Development Board by flat out lying
about us in the city commission meetings? I'd like to get an answer
to that please.
Editor's note: Thanks for calling. Obviously these comments
are one-sided, but deserve an explanation, if they are true. If this
caller would like to contact the Sun, to set up an on-the-record
interview, it would be easier to approach those being accused
with a proper response.

Keep the money
I read in the paper where they were gonna give the city manag-
er of South Bay a $1,000 for each grant he gets. What they need to
do is to keep that money in fund to fix that road on First Street,
down by the water tower that you can hardly drive. This place is
giving their money away. Get something out of it.
Editor's note: Thanks for calling. Contracts such as the one
South Bay has with its city manager is not uncommon in small
towns, because small towns can rarely offer the salary range an
experienced city manager will consider. So, bonuses, such as this
one are a common tool to lure a good grant-writer to an area that
needs one. However, as you may have read, the city is attempting
to determine the exact nature of the original contract.

Truth will be told
I'd like your help. I'd like to get a message to our people in Paho-
kee that calls us all the time to ask us what's going to happen with
Robert Love and the mayor's lies he's been telling to the public. For
one thing, the mayor wasn't under the influence of Nyquil he
was drunk I know that for a fact. But the main thing I'd like to get
across is this: Our mayor, who demanded the resignation of our
Police Chief Duran, has tied Duran's hands from day one and I
want everyone to know that I've been in contact with Chief Duran
and the truth will be coming out this week. He's gonna do the right
thing. God bless you chief.

Questionable company
I'm a citizen of Pahokee. I'm calling in reference to the "Unfair
to Mayor Sasser." Mayor Sasser has not been nothing to Pahokee
but destroyed it. By putting palm trees in thexrffiddle Of (inaudible)
for our officers have to get around people in #n emergency call.
And another thing, Mr. Robert Love has a crimltlal background. Mr.
Larry Wright has every right speak his mind. Mr. Robert Love is put-
ting our youth in danger. Mr. Sasser, how are you going to explain
to young family with Mr. Robert Love hitting someone that night?
You couldn't explain that to nobody.

Dead man's curve
I would like to speak out about the dead man's curve road
being closed in Pahokee. I was coming back from Okeechobee
and dead man's curve was closed and there was a bad accident on
715 and we were in standstill traffic forever. We had to take the
back road where Hattie's Highway and then come back up. That is
ridiculous. They need to do something about the dead man's curve
being closed and Pahokee needs another way to get in and out.

Do something positive
I wonder who wrote the Speak Outs in the paper this week?
Could it be Larry Wright? God almighty, can we please do some-
thing positive for the city of Pahokee? Ya'll stop complaining about
everything and get out there and work hard like the rest of the peo-
ple in the community who are trying to turn it around.

Out of the spotlight
Why is there every week Ms. Mary 0. Evans is in the paper with
the employee of the month? Why don't she give the employee of
the month a chance to be recognized in the newspaper? I'm just
calling because she's in the paper every week, as if she has accom-
plished something, not the employee of the month.




..:--- -- _




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Community Profile: Alice Thompson


By Jose Jesus Zaragoza

Q: What is your name?
A: Alice Thompson.

Q: Where were you born?
A: I was born in Pahokee, I'm
not going to tell you when. I was
one of five children, we all went
to school here. I was married here
and lived here, my husband and I
have been married 40 years, so
I've been here except for those
few years. We moved back to
Pahokee because our sons were
in their early teens, in middle
school and we wanted to be in an
expanded family environment.
We wanted them to have what
we had growing up: A small com-
munity where people cared about
each other, you knew your neigh-
bors, you knew where they went
to school, who they played with.
Pahokee is a good place to grow
up.

Q: What do you do?
A: I put people together, I'm,
officially, the chamber executive
director so I serve a lot of purpos-
es. Every day is different. I serve
on the advisory board on Sago
Palm Academy as well. I'm on dif-
ferent committees. I'm on the
President's Partnership with Palm
Beach Community College. I


"I don't fear death. I don't try
to think about the things that
scare me, I focus on the posi-
tive things."
Alice Thompson


guess the biggest thing I do is
serve the community.

Q: Why do you do what you
do?
A: Because I want to promote
goodwill and promote the com-
munity and the good people in
the community-- to help people.

Q: Can you describe yourself?
A: Alice is sometimes too moti-
vated. Alice is too methodical.
Sometimes I think I need to be
defragged. My husband will tell
you that it's very tiresome to be
with me because I don't sit for
very long, I have to keep moving
and doing things. I think I'm just a
product of my mother and my
father. They were hard workers
and they grew up in an environ-


ment. My mother was an Indian
and her family had to struggle and
fight for everything they had. My
father was a hard worker too. I
just think it's inbred.

Q: What scares you?
A: You know, I'd have to really
think about that. I can't say there's
anything right now. I don't fear
death. I lost my mother this year
and I had to come to terms with
that. But that doesn't scare me.
I've lost a child. I don't fear death.
I don't try to think about the
things that scare me I focus on
the positive things. Those things
are going to happen anyway.
Some things you don't have con-
trol over. I try to focus on the good
things look for opportunities.


Letters to the Editor


Reliving History in
the Lower Lake Area
Dear editor:
The Year is 1975- Amara
Shrine set out its shingle and pre-
pared to be an active part of the
community with 1,559 mem-
bers. Less than a year later a
local entrepreneur, John D. Mac
Arthur, of Palm Beach Shores,
donated five acres of land,
Amara Shrines purchased an
adjoining five acres, and resi-
dence was established at 3650
Boulevard in Palm Beach Gar-
dens. Plans were made and
work proceeded on a new
Shrine Center building.
By 1977, -and still going
strong, Amara reached out into
the five counties comprising
their area of membership cog-
nizance and began chartering
Shrine Clubs to represent Amara
in the various local communi-
ties. Two very special clubs
made their debut that year, In
Belle Glade and Okeechobee
Cities.
Belle Glade Club.was to enjoy
a short existence of only two
years, but in that brief period it
made a lasting impression on
the old-timers of Belle Glade and
other towns in the lower lake
area.
Those who remember, talk of
the good old days of the club, the
fun times of parades and events,
times when the "Old Iron Train"
made its mark to the enjoyment
of all who turned out to share in
the festivities.
Twenty-six years have passed
since those memorable days,
and memories don't give up eas-
ily. Illustrious Sir Jimmy D.
McLaurin, potentate of Amara
Shrine, wants to take a trip back
in time and revive a bit of histori-
cal lore that was once a part of
the Belle Glade community, and
shared by the Shrines of then
and now.
The clarion call is going out to
citizens and Shrines alike to
reach back in time and recall
how it was during those years
from 1977 through 1979. A
moment in history when the
Belle Glade Shrine Club was up
and running. Let's gather togeth-
er in a neighborly manner, share
stories, spin yarns, and live a lit-
tle in memories from yesteryear
when Shrines and town-folks
gathered from Clewiston, Belle


Glade, Pahokee and other com-
munities around the lower lake
area.
Anyone who is interested,
please send a post card with
your name and address, and the
notation "I'm Interested" to: The
Historian, Amara Shrines Center,
P.O. Box 0335, Palm Beach Gar-
dens, Florida 33420.
If sufficient interest is shown,
a light luncheon will be planned
and everyone will be invited.
Price of admission participa-
tion in the program by artifact,
memorabilia, a short story, or
long. You just need to register to
qualify for your admission ticket.
So let's hunker down for a
good time of friendship, good
food, and getting acquainted, as
we wander down memory.lane,
together, but importantly, we
might make a little history
together, by adding to the histo-
ry, of The Lower Lake Area.


Questions need
answers
'Hello neighbors:
My name is Larry Wright and I
have a very simple question to
place before the mayor, city
manager, and Commissioners
Biggs and McEntire.
Why is it that all of you claim
to know what is best for the citi-
zens of Pahokee, and you make
"big deals" of anything any of
you or your "hired thug" Robert
Love do, and you all "claim" to
love Pahokee, yet you turn your
back on citizens who have
worked very hard and with a
passion over the years to help
bring a sense of pride back to
our community? Why?
There are many people who
work hard every day to erase the
"bad press" that you all produce.
Pahokee and her citizens
deserve better. My parents, along
with people like Mr. And Mrs.
Sasser, Mr. And Mrs Hendricks,
Mr. And Mrs. Parrish, Mr. And
Mrs. Lampi, Mr. And Mrs. Single-
tary, Mr. And Mrs. Babbs, Mr.
And Mrs. Boldin, and any num-
ber of married and single people
who have loved, nurtured and
prodded Pahokee to be a win-
ning community deserve better.
As a young boy coming to
Pahokee from "Yankee territory"
and Chief Duran coming from
the desperation that was Cuba in


Sound Off Extra

Why up so late?
I'm calling in regards to the letter supposedly written by Ral-
phael Duran and was put into the newspaper that Reverend
Denise Hudsberth read to the commission. I find it appalling. I
have to ask Duran why his son was up so late to be able to listen
to anything like that? Haven't we moved beyond the point of the
situation where we have to constantly write letters and (call
Speak Out). I really want to question the reverend, who is sup-
posedly wearing the cloth, why is she running around town gos-
siping. I don't think she is setting a very good example for a
church leader to be involved with politics. Also regarding the
Speak Out who said they didn't have freedom of speech, I don't
think this person has been denied any freedom because they
certainly are talking a lot.
Editor's note: Thanks for calling. Several calls this week had
to be edited for length. We encourage our readers' opinions,
however, if you have a lot to say, it is recommended that you
use the forum provided in the Letter to the Editor. As to Mr.
Duran's appointed bedtime for his child, we see no relation-
ship to that and the foul language used by city officials, elected
by their citizens, if indeed, that conversation took place.

Miss you chief
I'm calling in reference to the letter from the chief of Pahokee
and what I'd like to say is that we've lost a good man. This city of
Pahokee really needs to sit down and have a real rude awaken-
ing. And for the mayor and city manager, and the power bucks
that are in this town, they need to wake up and listen to the peo-
ple. We miss you chief, and wish you could come back, but if
you don't, we know the reasons why. We miss you.


the 60's, Rafael and I received
the same loving acceptance by
the citizens of Pahokee. We each
remember that love and accept-
ance and want to .give back to
Pahokee and her people for lov-
ing us. He is a man who was
doomed from the start of his
dream job. How DARE you Mr.
Sasser to use the "F" word over
and over as you demanded he
come to Pahokee to cover up for
your "hired thug". Do you not
know that we all KNOW? He is,
to his honor, an honest man. We
all know, and I from experience,
that an honest man has no lace
in City Hall. Shame on you.
Pahokee has been in the
clutches of "bad, sad, egotistic
manipulation" for too many
years. Many of us know that our
current city manager is con-
trolled (as is the mayor and his
two pocketed commissioners)
by forces that only use and
abuse the very people they have
made their fortunes on for 30
years. We all know who they are.
Too many of us are afraid to
admit it. And speaking of city
managers, when I was a key
member of your election team,
you promised all of us that you
would not fire Ken Schenck -
LIAR. You are simply a liar.
I am not afraid. My parents
taught all six of us to never judge
or see a man by his color or soci-
etal level. They loved us enough
to teach us that we were to leave
this world a better place. They
also taught us to respect every
man and woman for what they.
could contribute to God's world,
no matter how large or small.
I want the people of Pahokee
to know that you don't need to
be afraid any more of what a cer-
tain "rich man" can do to you if
you don't vote for him don't
let them bully you by telling you
how they "gave your Granddad-
dy a job" years ago. We all know
that years ago, anyone who
wanted a job in Pahokee had a
job.
The current administration is
one built on lies. Many of us
know that from personal experi-
ence. We are painted as "idiots"
with a "personal agenda" who


have no right "messing in city
business". I say bull to that Mr.
Sasser. You have quietly taken
away our right to free speech
(unless you are Robert Love) in
city commission meetings. You
answer that claim by saying "the
commission voted it into law" -
DUHHHHHHH J.P. we are not as
dumb as you think we are we
know you have "loaded" the
commission with two "back
pocket" commissioners thus
making an instant majority -
and neither one of them have the.
first name of Keith OR Henry.
Thank God for the two commis-
sioners who stand firm even
knowing they are outnumbered.
They are far better citizens of
Pahokee than the two who never
vote or speak their own minds,
but get their guidance before
every meeting from a man and.
his cronies who seek nothing
more than to "use" Pahokee for
their own good.
Shame Mr. Mayor shame I
must admit though that you do
work hard for Pahokee and I
believed in you enough to get
you elected. I now know how
much you lied. I am sorry that I
fell victim to your promises and
lies. Your "boss" lied the most
and when caught at it, he
laughed, puffed on a cigar and
said "hey, that's politics". Politics
of greed and shame.
As always, I am one proud cit-
izen who works every day to
make Pahokee better and YES I
am that "crazy" guy who swept
streets, pulled weeds, painted
buildings, planted beautiful
plants, guided Grassy Waters
Festival, yelled loud and prayed
hard. I am also that skinny kid
who worked for my parents in
the old Royal's Department store
- parents I am proud to say
gave their best to ALL members
of this community. As they say,
"the apple doesn't fall far from
the tree" and I am proud to say I
am my parents' son. I love Paho-
kee for what she gave me, unlike
our mayor and his cronies. They
only give a little so they can take
a lot.
Think about it, and speak
loud my fellow citizens.


TheSun


Our Purpose...
The Glades County Democrat is published by Independent New.papers of
Florida Independent is owned by a unique trust that enables this newspa-
per to pursue a mission of journalistic service to the citzens .or he commu-
nity. Since no dividends are paid. the company is able to thrive on profit
margin below industry standards. All after-tax surpluses are reinvested in
Independent's mission of jourmnlistic service. commitment to the ideals of
the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and support of the comm-


Mork -IrsSok'''r
Rp~jiresr. je Zrw a


AdwrsiangDu&-t w 14-Kamsr
NatinrW w moss) a) Pania
Aliwlisus Mampt: Bimeia jarers't.
Ad Serv omaCcdisutor Wands Orsirm
AdveetiioRrSermis teis KI Agw4
Lrsa Adam;,

tInd~dEpersieirtNspfenIn.:
Chasms, nJce Sn'vtt
~R~deni Ed DrdLk
5'ee Prr~em re ctF krdo i T,.i,m B)Te rd
Ezecutio i, Kamm Islesk

Mem ber o -W


Florida Press
AssoculAtin


rmunity's delibertation of public issues.


We Pledp...
* To ,'ewate inti newspaper ai a pilc trnust
* To help our cmanuruty become a better
ptace to live and waik., through ou dedica
som oncsmentimul umatumn.
.* pimode the information c.bems need to
mnake their own inteigent d-o siknm about
put'bc sues
* To repon the newm wmth honest. accuracey
biecmity fearlemess and Campudna.
* 1b use our opsLaOn pPesm o fathtte
miammuty debate, not to dominate it with
lur own opinions.
STo disclose our uwn roriffett of meretl or
pai.nlia cnfltcia to our eaden
STo corem our errors and to ipe reach cr
rectr n l the prominence it deserve
STlb provide a right to reply to those we wnte
about.
* Tb treat people with courtesy, respect and
compassion.


Q: What is your favorite song?
A: Amazing Grace. It Is Well
With My Soul. Those are songs
that really minister to me. This is
an especially good time of year for
me because it's a reminder of
who I am and who I belong to. I
wouldn't say I'm religious I'm
spiritual.

Q: What irks you?
A: Impatience. People who are
impatient to see things happen as
far as the community goes. They
say, "Nothing's happening." I say
yes things are happening, little by
little by little. Gosh, the time just
slips away from us, but we just
have to be patient.

Q: What memory do you hold
dear to you?
A: I have so many good mem-
ories. I witnessed my grandchil-
dren being born that to me is a
wonderful memory. I can't pin-
point one memory. I can right
now the. two of us walking the
aisle together and saying, "I do." I
can see the grin still on his face 40
years later. It was on Valentine's
Day and I can still remember all
the little things: The flowers, the
way we dressed, the wedding
party. After all this time, it's still
fresh. I remember our vows.


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7, 2005


OPINION











LEWISTON G Fd1Uo-fM
Sr'a f ditH Sawfeat 76.w- Py- 1. V-Vc>OK OX-y-


New, Used & Leased Car Sales
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Courtesy photos

Proud to serve
Tim Burtcher (left) and Robert Ellis Jr. (right), both former Clewiston residents, have recently become full time members
of Florida's Highway Patrol. After an intensive six months of academy training followed by additional on-the-road train-
ing, both troopers are now patrolling the state's highways. Ellis has been assigned to another district, but Burtcher is
still close to home, patrolling the roadways in and out of Clewiston.


FWC investigation nets habitual offender


Courtesy photo
A Florida Fish and Wildlife Officer loads up dozens of dead
rabbits, seized during a raid of a known poacher.


BELLE GLADE The Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) ended a
three-month investigation with
one man being charged with six
counts of illegal sale and posses-
sion of fish and wildlife. An


anonymous tip through the
Wildlife Alert number led investi-
gators to Ricky Robins (D.O.B. 5-
23-52) of 642 SW 7 Street in Belle
Glade who was reported to be
poaching and selling alligator and
rabbits from his home.


FWC's Special Operations
Group executed a Search War-
rant that uncovered three boxes
(approximately 110-140 carcass-
es) of cleaned rabbits and two 22-
caliber rifles, which were seized.
Investigators then charged Ricky
Robins with:
One count of sale of alligator
- 1st Degree misdemeanor,one
count of possession of alligator
- 2nd Degree misdemeanor,
two counts of sale of wildlife
(rabbit) 2nd Degree misde-
meanor.
One count of no retail fresh-
water fish dealers license 2nd
Degree misdemeanor, one count
of over possession limit of rabbits
- 2nd Degree misdemeanor.
Penalties for the 1st Degree
misdemeanor are up to one year
in prison and/or a $1,000 fine.
Penalties for each 2nd Degree
misdemeanor are up to six month
in prison and/or a $500 fine.
This isn't the first run-in Ricky
Robins has had with FWC offi-
cers. They have arrested him
seven times in the past for
charges including no hunting


license (two times); over the bag
limit for rabbit (two times); hunt-
ing during closed season; failure
to appear in court and for an out-
standing warrant.
To report fish or wildlife
resource or boating-under-the-
influence violations, please call
the Wildlife Alert number at (888)
404-3922. You can remain anony-
mous and if your information
results in an arrest, you may be
eligible for a reward of up to
$1,000 (depending on the severi-
ty of the case).


Belle Glade police probe shooting at Quick Service Gas


On Monday March 28, at
about 9:49 p.m., members of the
Belle Glade Police Department
responded to Quick Service Gas
Station, located at 300 Dr. Martin
Luther King Boulevard West,
Belle Glade to investigate a
report of an armed
robbery/shooting.
Upon arrival, officers discov-


March 21: Lashonda Kenndy,
18, Failure to Appear Warrant;
Domestic Battery
March 21:Willie M. James Jr.,
50, Domestic Battery, Child Abuse
March 22: Josequetta S. Rivers,
21, Warrant; Child Neglect
March 22: John Sosa, 33, Pos-
session of Marijuana over 20
grams
March 23: Juvrnile, 15, Simple
Battery
March 24: Dennis Devose, 28,
Burglary Structure, Fleeing and
Attempting to Elude Marked
Police Vehicle, Grand Theft.
March 24: Juvenile, 11,
Domestic Battery
March 24: Avencio Fuentes, 30,
Sexual Activity with a Child, Lewd
and Lascivious Battery
March 24: Rafael Lopez-Cis-
neros, 23, Domestic Battery
March 25: Yves Jupiter, 18, Bat-
tery


ered Carlos Roque lying near the
store counter bleeding from
multiple gun shot wounds. A
witness stated that an unknown
black male came inside the store
with a handgun, pushed one
employee to the ground and pro-
ceeded to the counter, where the
suspect shot Roque several
times and ran out of the store


March 25: Cassandra Hendrix
Daley, 31, Aggravated Battery
March 26: Randy Davidson, 40,
Tampering with a Witness, Hate
Crime Enhancement
March 26: Ricky Robins, 52,
Burglary Dwelling
March 27: Antowan Jaaber
Cain, 25,Warrant, Violation of
Probation
March 27: Gloria Glover, 34,
Failure to Appear Warrant, Unex-
cused Summons
March 27: Freddie Carter, 21,
Domestic Battery
March 27 Wilner Lauzandeiu,
23, Grand Theft
March 27: Rolex Costume, 19,
Grand Theft
March 27: Edner Hive, 24, Pos-
session of Marijuana under 20
grams, Failure to Appear Warrent,
Obstruction by Disguised Person
March 28, Juvenile, 14, Bur-
glary, Petit Theft


with the cash register. The Belle
Glade Police Department have
interviewed witnesses in this
incident. The Belle Glade Police
Department asks that anyone
having information about this
incident, to please contact
Detective Khan of the Belle
Glade Police Department at
(561) 996-7251.


March 29, Ezeil Latimore
28,Tresspas to Occupied Con-
veyance, criminal mischief
March 30, jACKIEpEAK, 39,
Failure to Appear Warrant
March 30, Jerome Rollins, 33,
Burglary Grand Theft
March 30, Wanda Louis Polter,
43, Failure to Appear Warrant
April 1, David Vineyard, 45,
DUI, Leaving the Scene of an Acci-
dent with injuries
April 1, Juvenile, 13, Battery,
Trespass to Occupied Structure
April 1, Juvenile, 14, Battery,
Trespass to Occupied Structure
April 1, Ruben Arroyo, 27, Vio-
lation of Probation Warrant
April 2, Dan Johnson, 35, Tres-
pass to a Structure
April 3, Rosalyn L. Gibson, 39,
Throwing Deadly Missile, Aggra-
vated Battery
April 3, Princess Hope Lowe,
21, Aggravated Battery


DR. DEVANESAN TREATS KIDS SO

ADULTS WILL BE HEALTHIER.


With every patient
he sees. Ramesh
Devanesan. MD. has one
eye on the future. In fact.
he chose Pediatrics as his
specialty for precisely
that reason he believes
the better we treat chil-
dren today, the better
world we'll have when
they're adults.
With a father, mother.
and sister who are physi-
cians, becoming a doctor
came naturally to
Ramesh. Following a
Bachelor's degree and
post-graduate studies at
the University of
Colorado, he graduated
from St. George's
University and School of"


Medicine in Grenada, with
clinical training at hospital
in Florida, New J.-rre..
Manhattan. arnd Lilondon,


England. He then served
as an intern and resident
physician at St. Joseph's
Children's Hospital, an
affiliate of Mt. Sinai
School of Medicine. He is
board certified in both
Pediatrics and Internal
Medicine.
An avid reader with
wide and varied interests,
Dr. Devanesan also
enjoys physical activity
including alpine skiing,
high-country hiking,
scuba diving, and boating.
But, most of all. he
eniovs children and the
adults they'll become.
l,. HENDRY REGIONAL
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Community homepages
newszap.com
Click anytime for the latest

LO(AL N[WS
LOCAL ADVERTISING
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n Obituaries
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& much more!


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newszap.com


Drs. Arrogante, Barhoush, Azan,
Glades General Hospital & You...
What a Team!


OBGYNs, Dr. Ahmed Barhoush, Dr. Carlito
Arrogante, and Pediatrician, Dr. Charles
Azan, rely exclusively on Glades General
Hospital for deliveries and surgeries.
From our newly renovated OB rooms
to our new state-of-the-art 3D Sonogram,
Glades General Hospital is growing to
meet the needs of the women, children
and families of our community.
We are pleased to welcome Dr. Arrogante
back to our team.of physicians.


Dr. Arrogante is currently
taking appointments.
If you are seeking an OBGYN,
please call 561-992-9477
for an appointment today.


Office Hours: Monid: Friday 9:00 am 5:00 pm
941 S E First Street, Belle Glade, FL 33430

tMedicare. tllediatd and mnorI iminii inlei' pl/in, dt't'eptt'd


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GENERAL
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Belle Glade arrest report


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7, 2005


IN: ova


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Thursday, April 7, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Staff photo/Katrina Elsken
Michael Bond (left), Extension Agent for the Seminole Tribe
of Florida and Moses Osceola (right), president of the Semi-
nole Tribe, show how ID 'buttons' are placed in a cow's ear.
Tagging the animals this way is similar to piercing a human
ear with an earring. The tags contain a 15 digit identification


By Katrina Elsken

The Seminole Tribe of Florida is
keeping close tabs on their cattle.
Thanks to a pilot program in
cooperation with the United Stated
Department of Agriculture and the
Florida Department of Agriculture,
all 25,000 Seminole cattle will
soon be fitted with computer chips
in their ears. These tags, which
respond to a radio signal, will
make it possible to track an animal
from birth to the dinner table.
The Tribe's participation in the
program has drawn interest from
other cattlemen and praise from
state officials.
Commissioner of Agriculture
Charles Bronson visited a Brighton
ranch on Thursday to promote the
program.
He said the Seminoles, a tradi-
tional people, are on the cutting
edge of new technology in the cat-
tle business.
"The Seminole Tribe is taking
the lead in this program," said Mr.
Bronson. "I hope the other beef
producers will get on board."
Mr. Bronson said the Tribe's
pilot program proves the tagging
system can be managed on a large
or small scale. He said point of ori-
gin identification will help keep
America's food supply safe
because it will be much easier to
track each step in an animal's life.
Should a diseased animal be dis-
covered, that animal could be
tracked back to its point of origin
within 48 hours.
"Other than the Spanish Con-
quistadors, the ones who have the
oldest experience with raising cat-
tle in Florida are the Seminoles,"
said Mr. Bronson.
"The talk around the country is
how big can you be to do this and
how efficient will it be?" he said.
"The Seminole Tribe is proving
that even large herds can be man-
aged this way."
The ID buttons currently cost
about $2.09 each. The equipment
to scan the stored information
costs about $1,500 and can hold
up to 50,000 ID scans before it
must be downloaded.
The USDA provided a $95,000
grant for the pilot program, admin-
istered through the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
Seminole Tribe Extension
Agent Michael Bond explained
that the National Animal Identifica-
tion System (NAIS) is a voluntary


Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture Charles Bronson
visited Brighton Seminole
Reservation on March 31 to
discuss the pilot program for
tracking cattle to point of ori-
gin with the help of special
ear tags and computers.
program to individually mark all
agricultural animals and track
then as they come into contact
with or are inter-mixed with ani-
mals other than herd mates from
their point of origin.
He said the ID button in the
cow's ear is similar to the SunPass
devices. used by drivers at toll
booths. As the cow passes by a
scanner, the cow's identification
number is recorded.
Mr. Bond said the device is "ani-
mal friendly" and that the comput-
er system needed to use it is "cow-
boy friendly."
He said all of the data about the
cattle is ini the Tribe's computers.
The "button" in the cow's ear only
contains a 15-digit identification
code.
"The Tribe has volunteered to
go through the ups and downs of
learning the process," he said,
adding that Tribal representatives
will be available to help other
ranchers who want to tag their cat-
tle too.
"This is a brand new program
and I am glad to be part Of it," said
Moses Osceola, President of the
Seminole Tribe.
He said they hope providing
buyers will point of origin informa-
tion will increase the marketability
of their cattle, as well as protect the
consumers by making it possible
to track diseases back to the point
of origin.


Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Charles Bronson shows
the tags used in the pilot program for point of origin tracking.
a button-like "earring" is installed in the cow's left ear. A tra-
dition plastic tag with the same ID number is placed in the


Cows at Brighton Seminole
Reservation now sport "but-
ton" earrings in their left
ears and plastic tags in their
right ears. The buttons can
be scanned by a computer
to keep track of an animal
throughout its lifespan. The
plastic tags carry the same
ID number and can be
checked visually.
Mr. Bond said point of origin
tracking is important for exports.
"Recently Japan has been talk-
ing about opening up their mar-
kets to U.S. beef again," he
explained. "Point of source moni-
toring is one of the issues."
Before Japan closed their mar-
kets to American beef, exports to
Japan made up about 10 percent
of the American beef exports.
Mr. Bronson said this will be a
big issue in dealing with all foreign
trade partners in the future.
He said that in addition to pro-
tecting the consumer, the tagging
system will also help the rancher.
"One thing most feedlots want
to know is where the cattle came
from and which ones had the
highest percentage of lean meat,"
he explained. If afeed lot operator
finds that cattle from a certain
ranch produce a high percentage
of lean meat, he will want to buy
more cattle from that particular
ranch.
Mike Milicevic of the Florida
Cattlemen's Association said Lykes
Brothers is currently tagging calves
that will be sold this year. He said
an incentive is that some buyers
will now pay $10 per head more
for cattle with point of source tags.
The McDonald's restaurant chain
is responsible for the premium
price, he said, because for public
safety they want to purchase beef
that can be traced to point of ori-


Ranchers who want more
information about the tagging pro-
gram may contact Michael Bond at
(863) 763-5020, ext. 120; or email
michaelbond@semtribe.com.
Don Robertson, Natural
Resources Director for the Semi-
nole Tribe, said the tribe has cattle
in five locations includingBrighton
Seminole Reservation, Big Cypress
Seminole Reservation and three
leased pastures. The cattle opera-
tion. is a cow-calf operation, with
"feeder" calves raised to be
shipped to the feed lots in the Mid-
west.
The United States Department
of Agriculture stepped up its efforts
to create a national animal identifi-
cation program when a cow in
Washington state tested positive in
December, 2003 for Bovine
spongiform encephalopathy
(BSE), widely referred to as "mad
cow disease". The cow was traced
back to Canada and no additional
cattle have tested positive for BSE
in the United States since then.
However, a lack of a national ani-
mal ID system made it more diffi-
cult to quickly determine exactly
where the infected cow had been
to find out if other cows in herds
where the animal had been locat-
ed were also infected. The United
States Department of Agriculture
has been working with various
states on pilot animal ID projects
which will be used to assist in
developing a national system.
"I appreciate the willingness of
members of Seminole Tribe of
Florida to work with us on this very
important project," Mr. Bronson
said. "We are hopeful that this
pilot program will enable us to
work through any potential prob-
lems or shortcomings in the ID sys-
tem so that it becomes a premier
example of a program that
achieves its goal while not being
burdensome on cattle ranchers."


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Eastern Equine Encephalitis has
been reported in Union County
and he is urging horse owners to
have their animals vaccinated
against mosquito-borne illnesses.
The three-year-old horse was
seen by a local veterinarian who
suspected Eastern Equine
Encephalomyelitis (EEE). On
March 22, lab testing confirmed
the diagnosis of EEE. The testing
also revealed an exposure to the
West Nile Virus (WNV), which
may have complicated the horse's
condition.
"Horse owners have done a
good job in getting their animals


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few years and we have seen a sig-
nificant drop in the number of
equine WNV cases," Mr. Bronson
said. "But it is critical that we
don't become complacent. Mos-
quito season is upon us and the
chances of contracting these dis-
eases have, of course, increased.
Horse owners are reminded that
their animals' vaccinations must
be up to date, including the nec-
essary booster shots."
In 2004, there were 48 report-
ed cases of EEE in horses and six
confirmed equine WNV cases.
That compares with nearly 500
reported WNV cases in 2002. A
vaccination against WNV became
available in the summer of 2001
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Thursday, April 7, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Community preps for Black Gold


By Mark Young

BELLE GLADE The 27th
annual Black Gold Jubilee is a com-
munity celebration revolving
around the rich tradition of the end
of harvest season.
The Black Gold title is appropri-
ately named after the area's dark,
rich soil, which grows an abun-
dance of corn, rice, sugar, and
other marketable crops so neces-
sary to the country's internal
wealth.
Belle Glade's motto is, "Our for-
tune is in our soil," and this small,
yet versatile community is very


Summer
Continued From Page 1
months, with trips to West Palm
Beach and Miami in the works.
Even the department's senior citi-
zen program will get in on the fun,
with its members joining in the
field trip fun.
The program starts June 6, with
registration open the week before,
from May 30 to June 3. Ending on
August 26, the program provides
children with daylong activities as
well, and each child is given a
breakfast and lunch for a nominal,
one-time $25 fee.
On the sports side of things,
Jonathan Johnson prepares for the
baseball program. Working hand-
in-hand with a varsity baseball
coach in the area, Mr. Johnson is
hoping to resurrect interest in the
sport locally and looks forward to
working with the high-school aged
kids who will participate. The pro-
gram starts in May. As far as how
many can participate? "We'll take
300 if we can get them," said Mr.
Johnson.
Running in tandem with base-
ball will be track. Kids ages 7-16


much aware of its agricultural roots
and history. The Black Gold Jubilee
pays ample tribute to that acknowl-
edgment, but in the end, it's just a
great excuse for the community to
gather as friends, in community
celebration.
Some of the events are ongoing
and yet others are pending. The
Harvest Queen Pageant and Little
Miss and Mr. Black Gold titles have
already been awarded. But upcom-
ing events include the 5K walk/run
down Main Street at 10 a.m., April
9.
A stage stands ready at the Belle
Glade Marina where big name
entertainers will take the stage.


can take part in running and throw-
ing and other events that will kick
off in April.
For the adults, the department
has a basketball league starting in
April that continually gets off to
much success, with adults from
Clewiston, West Palm Beach and
other surrounding communities
coming out to participate at the
gym next-door to the recreation
department. Last year, the program
counted with a total of eight teams
vying for the top spot in the league.
In Belle Glade, the swimming
program will be making a come-
back. A partnership between the
city of Belle Glade, who owns the
Lake Shore Pool used for the swim-
ming lessons, and the American
Red Cross, the program last year
served over a thousand people,
according to Belle Glade Recre-
ation Coordinator J.D. Patrick.
Children from the ages of four
and up, including adults, are given
personal lessons on safe swim-
ming procedures by swimming
instructors. Lessons will be offered
from 8 a.m.-noon and from 4-6
p.m. The general public is invited
to make use of the pool each day
from 1-4 p.m.
According to Mr. Patrick, the


Vendor booths will be plentiful,
sporting tons of food, crafts, and
information. Free children's rides
will be available, with games being
played throughout the day before a
fireworks display lights up the dusk
sky. County Commissioner Tony
Masilotti is sponsoring the display.
Much of the festival will take
place at the marina and the festival
will run from 10 a.m. through 10
p.m.
One of the more popular side
events of the festival is the third
annual Chihuahua Races, spon-
sored by Dr. Noelle Savedoff, a vet-
erinarian located in Belle Glade.
Dr. Savedoff said as many as 30


program is offered to everyone in
the Glades, with Pahokee and
South Bay making use of the swim-
ming lessons for their residents and
children also.
The pool will be open on
Memorial Day right up to the end of
summer.
In June, adults will get a chance
to join the men's softball league.
Mr. Patrick, much like Mr. Johnson,
agrees that participation in base-
ball has dwindled, but hopes that
the numbers will continue to
increase and more people will join.
"It's a lot of fun for those who
play," he said. "I would like to see it
flourish again."
Organizations especially are
encouraged to form teams and
battle it out against other competi-
tors. Teams play at Pioneer Park
and the program continues until
August.
In South Bay, the city prepares
to cultivate the talents of some
future Olympic competitors, with
the introduction of two programs
to children: The wrestling and table
tennis events.
Partnering with the Palm Beach
County Sports Commission, the
unique opportunity exposes chil-
dren to the actual training and


contestants have entered this year's
relay race, which features dogs less
than 25 pounds competing with
their handlers. Check in for this
popular event is at 1 p.m., April 9,
with a 2 p.m. race time set.
It's recommended that festival-
goers bring lawn chairs and sun-
screen for a full day of fun in the
sun.
For more information regarding
the festival, the entertainment, the
many sports activities, and more,
contact Brenda Bunting, festival
chairman for the Belle Glade
Chamber of Commerce, at (561)
996-2745.
practicing regimen of Olympic ath-
letes. Local recreation staff had a
chance to interact with Olympic
coaches who showed them the
proper way to foster the talent in
children.
Children ages 10-14 are being
sought for the wrestling program,
with children 6-12 for the table ten-
nis program.
According to South Bay Recre-
ation Director Charles Inman, the
city will also offer a summer camp
for children. For $25 a week, chil-
dren in the program. will participate
in field trips and other activities
throughout the summer months.
The camp will serve approximately
50 children and will also work on a
first-come, first-serve basis, accord-
ing to Mr. Inman.
South Bay will also have an
adult basketball program as well as
an adult flag football program to
ensure that grown-ups get their
share of fun this year.
If you are interested in learning
more about any of the programs
being offered in the Glades, please
call the recreation departments at
the cities for more information:
Belle Glade, 996-0100; South Bay
996-1155; Pahokee 924-2976.


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SWishing you and your li'l Angels a great day

2005 Black Gold Jubilee





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27th Black Gold Jubilee
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Welcome to the 27th Annual Black Gold Jubilee

Richard Gagnon & Staff will have a booth for product sam-
ples and to answer any questions or concerns you may have
about your skin. Remember to wear your sunscreen.
We will see you there!!!


Royal Beauties
Left, a total of 12 participants took part in this year's Harvest Queen Beauty Pageant, held Saturday night in Belle Glade.
The pageant was presented by the Belle Glade Lions Club and Palm Beach Community College. At right, the Master of
Ceremonies for the event was Karen DeCastro, herself a hometown pageant queen.


School Happenings


Gove Elementary Wellness Team
to participate in Public Health Week
Belle Glade- The Spring Glades Wellness Program has scheduled a
kick -off Tuesday, April 5 at 5 p.m., in the media center of Gove Elemen-
tary School as part of National Public Health Week.
During Public Health Week, April 4-10 all are encouraged to live
stronger and longer through exercise, good nutrition and practicing
healthy habits. The spring program will take place over a six-week period
and participants will be encouraged to use the new heart trail surround-
ing Mace Park. In addition, persons will receive instruction on starting a
wellness program and tips for maintaining it for the long term.
The kick -off on Tuesday will also feature a wellness fair where all will
be able to experience fun fitness equipment, check their heart rate and
blood pressure, meet the wellness team and get started on the way to liv-
ing stronger and longer.
The wellness initiative surrounding Gove Elementary is being funded
through grants from the Department of Education, The Chronic Disease
Program of the Department of Health., The Pew Foundation, Palm Beach
County Health Department and Coordinated School Health Department.
Head Custodian -Belle Glade Elementary- School
Related Employee of the Year
Samuel King, the head custodian at Belle Glade Elementary School,
was named Palm Beach County School-Related Employee of the Year
today.


Superintendent Dr. Art Johnson presented the award to Mr. King in a
surprise visit to the school this morning. Mr. King has been with the
School District for 26 years. He received $200.00 from the Florida Depart-
ment of Education and will now advance to the regional competition.
Belle Glade Elementary also presented Mr. King with a plaque and gift
certificate.
Glades Day School
The entire school has been testing over the past few weeks. The high
school students got the big exams out of the way before spring break by
finishing up on March 18. Last week the elementary students were busy
with the standardized tests each morning for several hours before resum-
ing to a regular schedule after lunch. The results of each child's test will
go out in their final report card of the year.
Elementary
The Elementary Student Council sponsored the St. Jude's Children's
Hospital Math-a-thon again this year. Many students participated by
working out math problems and the young volunteers raised over $3000
for the hospital. This was the largest amount collected in several years.
The student who raised the most money for the project was Karina Stein.
She was rewarded with a CD player for her efforts. Students in the ele-
mentary enjoyed Easter parties and field day on Friday, March 18. The
pre-k classes enjoyed special lunches and Easter Egg hunts, while the
older kids participated in a fun-filled day of sports and activities. The
classes were split into Green or Gold teams and the Gold team ended up
being the victors for the day.


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reality of war -- the hardships soliders face, the horrors they see, the friendship and
courage that sustain them.
Do you have any letters written by military service members? They can be from the
Revolutionary War, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf
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Share these letters with our readers for a special Memorial Day salute to the military,
Photos of the service men and women who wrote the letters are also welcome.
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office at 626 W. Sugarland Highway in Clewiston or mail themto: Letters Home,
c/o Independent Newspapers Florida, P.O Box 1236, Clewiston, Florida 33440.








.56 .Scwoo' cS__./F,,'
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27th Black Gold Jubilee




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Thursday, April 7, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee SPORTS 11


Lady Tigers take fifth at Bishop


Josh Ingram Juanita Perez

Clewiston High


athletes of month


Clewiston High School has
named Josh Ingram and Juanita
Perez as their March athletes of
the month.
Ingram is a freshman at CHS,
but is making a name for himself
on the tennis squad as the num-
ber one singles competitor and
is also on the number one dou-
bles squad. Ingram has shown a
competitive nature that can be
sometimes rare for a freshman
up and comer and is gaining


valuable experience as a varsity
netter.
Perez, a junior at CHS, is on
the varsity tennis team as well,
but thrives a three-sport athlete.
Perez keeps herself busy all year
while playing on the soccer
team, as well as the volleyball
team in the fall.
A fierce competitor and valu-
able team leader and player,
Perez has earned the spotlight
this month.


By Mark Young
Clewiston High School's Lady
Tiger track squad finished mid
way through a 10-team pack
while partaking in the Bishop
Verot Invitational. The fifth place
effort was a solid performance
and the event was not without
Lady Tiger highlights.
Clewiston took home a pair of
first place performances, one in a
track event and one in a field
event. Tequilla Weston dashed to
the 100-meter finish line in a time
of 12.67 to take first place in avery
competitive field. The top five
runners were all within a second
of one another and Clewiston's
Evelyn Thompson's time of 12.86
was evident of the competition, as
she finished the event in fifth
place.


Nicole Pope was the other
Lady Tiger top performer after
winning the shot put event with a
toss of 33'11".
Thompson would collect valu-
able team points in two other
events, after finishing sixth in the
long jump and fifth in the 200.
Weston also continued her stellar
effort by taking third in the 200.
Mary Hegley ran the 400 in
63.70 and it was good enough to
take second place out of a solid
field of competitors. Hegley also
joined up with teammates Ivana
Cruz, Araceli Sierra, and Alisa
Abru to finish the 4x400-relay race
in fourth place.
Final results of the meet saw
Charlotte winning, Barron Collier
was second, Lely was third, Bish-
op Verot finished fourth, Clewis-
ton took fifth, Gulf Coast was


sixth, Immokalee was seventh,
North Port was eighth, North Ft.
Myers finished ninth, and Palmet-
to Ridge rounded out the 10-team
field.
The Lady Tigers turned right
around to compete at the LaBelle
Invitational in their most recent
meet and claimed fourth place
overall with some of the same
usual suspects, which included
Bishop Verot's squad who took
first place with 161 points.
Sebring came in second with
106 points, Canterbury was third
with 89 points, Clewiston finished
fourth with 53 points, LaBelle fin-
ished fifth with 46 points, Moore
Haven was sixth with 39 points,
and Lake Placid rounded out the
field with seven points.
The Lady Tigers only had one
first place performance and it


went to Pope who won her sec-
ond straight shot put event, with
this one being launched for a dis-
tance of 32'1". Clewiston per-
formed well.in the field events,
with Teadra Jackson taking third
in the discus and Curtissa Franklin
finished third in the triple jump.
Clewiston's relay squads
brought home a pair of top four
finishes. Kimberly Holley, Cruz,
Alma Vasquez, and Abreu took
fourth in the 4x800, while Cruz
and Abreu teamed up with Heg-
ley and Araceli Sierra finished
third in the 4x400 relay.
Sada James raced to third in
the 100 hurdles and captured
points with a sixth place perform-
ance in the 300 hurdles. Hegley
placed second in the 400 and Sier-
rawas third in the 100.


Sugar Festival rodeo rain or shine


By Mark Young
Cast a leery eye to the sky
April 16, but only to determine
what to wear, because the annu-
al Sugar Festival Rodeo will go
on rain or shine.
Whether cowboys and cow-
girls will taste the dust of a dry
arena floor or wallow the mud of
a wet one, crowds will surely
delighted at the hard-charging
action within the Clewiston
Rodeo Arena.
Events will include the ever-
popular Mutton Busting, with
wide-eyed six-year-olds and
under trying to hang onto the


wooly grip of a frightened sheep.
Sometimes it's hard to tell
whose more frightened, but
eventually that future cowboy or
cowgirl is revealed to an excited
crowd.
The 12 and under crowd will
partake in the Wild Pony event
while the Barrel Racing division
will be broken down into three
categories pee wee, juniors,
and seniors.
Bull Riding will also be bro-
ken down into junior and senior
divisions, but no matter what the
division, it's always a crowd
favorite as the world's last true


man vs. beast action.
Team events will include Wild
Cow Milking, a spectacle not to
be missed, Ribbon Roping in
both male and female divisions,
team tying, the wildly popular
Wild Horse Race, Team Roping
and Branding, and the relay race.
Gate admission will run $10
for adults, with six to 10-year-
olds paying $5, and children
under five will get in for free.
There will be a 60-percent
payback for all events and all-
around male and female buckles
will be awarded. Contestants
must sign in by 7 p.m. on the day


of the rodeo and the action is
scheduled to kick up dust at 8
p.m.
The Hendry County Rodeo
Association is also holding the
annual youth rodeo April 15 at 8
p.m. Six and under will get in for
free with gate admission running
a mere $5.
Catch all the standard events
including barrels, steer un-deco-
rating, breakaway roping, team
roping and branding, poles,
buddy pickup, junior steer riding,
junior goat tying, senior bull rid-
ing, mutton busting, and wild
pony riding.


Sports


courtesy pnoto
The victorious Lady Gators after the Slam Fest Tournament
held on' March 18, are from left to right, top Jessica Paez,
Lora Jo Henson, Gennie Anderson, coach Yates, Ciara Walk-
er, Stephanie Mattes, Megan Flannery, coach Paez, Vanessa
Yates. Bottom Heather Daglian, Amber Martyn, Phlyscia
Powell, and Emily Byers.


Lady Gators are at


the top of their game
The GDS softball team is hav- from a Heather Daglian sacrifice
ing a banner year again this year. bunt and a Megan Flannery single.
Their current record is 14-3 and The Lady Gators went on t(
they recently traveled south for claim an 8-3 victory against
the Slam Fest Tournament held LaBelle High School, sending the
March 18. The team played four Lady Gators into the champi
games starting with 6A-school onship game.
Miami Sunset. The Lady Gators Glades Day took the tourna
defeated the Miami team 7-0 with ment by defeating 5A Naples Higt
Jessica Paez going 4-for-4 at the School 7-3. Vanessa Yates anc
plate. I Paez were offensive starid-outs


Emily Byers pitched a shutout
against St. Thomas Aquainas with
* Paez going 2-for-3 and scoring the
only run of the game with help


both hitting home-runs in this
championship game, and pitcher
Emily Byers was named the MVP
of the tournament.


Tiger tennis squad nets


4-3 win over Immokalee


By Mark Young

The Clewiston High School ten-
nis squad picked up their third vic-
tory of the season with a closely
contested 4-3 victory over the Fight-
ing Indians of Immokalee High
School.
Josh Ingram put the Tigers up
early, with a relatively easy 6-1, 6-0
victory at the number one singles
spot and Clewiston continued to
track a winning pace when Andres
Fuente snatched duplicate 6-1 vic-
tories at the number two seed.
Immokalee put themselves
back in the hunt with wins in the
number three and four seed
matches, but a number five-seed
victory from Raymond Guerra (7-5,
6-0) put the Tigers up by one
match needing to win only one
of the doubles matches to secure


the team victory.
It came at the number one dou-
bles match up when Ingram and
Fuente paired up take an 8-2 victo-
ry, giving Clewiston the four need-
ed wins to secure the overall victo-
ry. Immokalee managed to pull the
number two doubles win, but it
was too little too late for the Fight-
ing Indians who succumbed to the
Tigers by a 4-3 team score.
The Tigers only have three
more regular season matches
before the district tournament
kicks off April 18 in North Port.
Clewiston has realistic expecta-
tions for the district tournament,
given their relative young squad,
but should some of their seeds get
a good first round draw, can be rel-
atively competitive while gaining
the experience head coach Steve
Gwyn was looking for this year.


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Tiger Slam Tennis
Tournament
Have fun and exercise at
the same time by participating
in the 2005 Tiger Slam Tennis
Tournament. The tournament
will consist of men's doubles,
women's doubles, men's sin-
gles and women's singles.
Play will begin Sunday, April
10, with those advancing to
the finals taking the court Sat-
urday, April 16. Entry fee is $10
per event and players will fur-
nish their own tennis balls.
Registration deadline is Satur-
day,. April 9. To register, con-
tact Steve Gwyn, at 983-3294
or Sean Moore, at 228-6280.
The tournament is being
sponsored by Berner Oil and
MCM Paint and Flooring.

Coaches needed in
Clewiston
The Clewiston Cougars are
seeking football and cheer-
leader coaches for the 2005
season. Anyone interested in
volunteering please contact
April White or Charlene Forde.
The league has also formed a
new board. The new mem-
bers are: President Ben Cut-
shaw, Vice President Charles
Felton, Treasurer Charlene
Forde (228-3986), Secretary
April White (228-7887), Athlet-
ic Director Rick Benjamin,
Jose Casas, Melvin Brooks, Al
Gary, and Ray Tolbert.

Travel baseball
has new teams
Clewiston welcomes AAU
travel baseball with two new
travel teams for ages 12 and


under and for those 14 and
under. Home games are
played at the Sugarland Park
Sports Complex. Admission is
free. Concessions are avail-
able. All games are double-
headers. Follow the league
and standings online at
www.AAUGOLDCOST.org; for
more information, contact
John Davis at (239) 253-8576.

More coaching
help needed
The Clewiston Youth Base-
ball League is still in need of
sponsors and umpires for the
upcoming youth baseball sea-
son. If you would like to get
involved in sponsoring a team
or purchasing a banner,
please contact Abby Mass at
228-0475. Umpires are also
needed this year a certifica-
tion is required. For more
information in how to get
involved with your communi-
ty's youth through America's
pastime, contact Kevin
Durance at 228-0636.

Belle Glade Black
Gold Tennis
Join in for a morning of fun
and competition at the Belle
Glade Black Gold Tennis Tour-
nament! Every player or team
will play at least three pro-set
matches using a compass for-
mat where competitors
advance towards players of
comparable ability. Beginners
to advanced, in shape or out of
shape, everyone is welcome.
No entry fee. Singles are Satur-
day, April 2. Doubles are Satur-
day, April 9. Call Ken
Buchanan at (561) 996-6107
for details and to participate.


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SPORTS 11


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7,2005


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, April 7, 2005


Opening
Continued From Page 1
was built from the ground up with'
the desires of the staff in mind and
"exactly like we wanted it," said
Ms. Kostrub.
The facility now has a dedicated
adult room for adult lessons, a
computer room where students
can get a better familiarization with
technology and a kitchen area. The
largest room is the children's
room, with a screened-in patio
adjacent to it and a fenced-in area
directly behind the building.
Administrators hope to make use
of that area for a playground, and


Duran
Continued From Page 1
chief had been recognized for his
commitment to service during the
hurricanes of last summer by the
commission and has several
awards relating to his two years of
service to the city of Pahokee.
So, while the chief and the city
seemed to have an agreeable rela-
tionship, the same cannot be said
for Ms. Latimore and her alleged
hostility towards the Pahokee
Police Department.
"There was no tension
between me and the city commis-
sion," said Mr. Duran. "It was just
between her and I. She has been
trying to get me fired for a long
time. The bottom line is that I do
not micromanage. I'm a firm
believer that we are all adults and
you have a job to do and you need
to do it. The guys are doing their
jobs."
Ms. Latimore's final reasoning
in asking for Mr. Duran's resigna-
tion was partly due to an increase
in crimewithin the city. The former
chief initially said that would be
expected given his limited
resources, but has added that the
numbers are now being distorted.
It was only a year ago when Mr.
Duran received a letter from Mayor
Sasser congratulating him on
decreasing crime within the city.
Mr. Duran admits there was a
slight increase this year, but the
reasoning is not warranted.
"There was only a three per-
cent increase in crime," he said.
"But what's not being told is that
actual arrests have gone up two-
fold since I've been here. The guys
are out there making actual arrests
and the majority of those arrests
are drug charges and gun charges.
We've made more arrests in the
last two years than this agency has
done in several previous years."
Another source of tension
between the former chief and the
city manager was that Ms. Lati-
more kept insisting that more offi-
cers be fired over complaints that
have been made against those offi-
cers.
"I will not fire you unless I have
a paper trail," said Mr. Duran. "I
will not violate the law and put


Discussion
Continued From Page 1.
has been broached in the past,
with the fire chiefs of the three
communities having spoken
about the possibility of doing so.
The conversations became much
more detailed when, in light of the
county's decision to impose a min-
imum level of fire service, the three
cities found themselves unable to
comply with the new standards.
Under the county's plan, each
municipality is charged with pro-
viding a minimum number of fire
personnel to respond to any given
emergency. Rather than have the
handful of fire rescue personnel
that, individually, each of the cities
now depends on, the idea was
proposed to combine the staff and
service of the three cities into one
regional department that would be
able to comply with the new stan-
dards.
Involved in the discussions
were representatives with the


are actively seeking funds to
achieve their goals. Though they
raised $10,000 toward that goal -
and to purchase a new van to
transport program participants -
and another $6,000 was donated at
the grand opening, the center still
has away to go before the children
will see their new playground.
According to Program Coordi-
nator Sally Langley, the program
sees the participation of approxi-
mately one dozen children and 38
adults. She expects to see that
number grow as word gets out on
the program, which has been open
only two months at the new site.
Many of the children's parents
actually participate in the program
while their kids are at the facility,


myself in a situation where it
comes back to bite me later on."
Mr. Duran said many of those
complaints were going directly to
Ms. Latimore and the ones that did
come to him were followed up
and when warranted, letters of
reprimand were placed into an
officer's file. But those instances
have been rare.
"We average about a 1,000
calls a month," he said. "Which is
about 12,000 calls a year. Out of
that, we averaged about 35 com-
plaints a year, which isn't a bad
ratio. Those complainants are
asked to come to the office to file a
formal complaint so it can be doc-
umented. Half the time they don't
follow up on the complaint or if
they would write the complaint,
they would never come back."
Mr. Duran said they give com-
plainants 30 days to follow up on
the written complaints and that the
police department makes a con-
centrated effort in investigating
those complaints.
"It's all documented on how
many times the police department
calls these people back," he said.
"People just wouldn't return. Less
than 10 percent of the 35 com-
plaints a year are followed through
on and when they are followed
-through, we have taken appropri-
ate action against the officer
through verbal counseling or a let-
ter in their file or something of that
nature. We do follow through, but
I can't reprimand an officer on
hearsay. I don't work on hearsay."
Mr. Duran is claiming that Ms.
Latimore's prejudice against law
enforcement officers is of a per-
sonal nature after stating that she
used to be married to a cop and
didn't really like cops.
"When that statement was
made, our ears perked up and we
said, 'Oh, my gosh.' That's a dead
giveaway."
According to the police report
regarding the arrest of Mr. Love on
the night of the incident, Mr. Love
was stopped around 10 p.m. for
driving through town without the
use of his headlights. Much has
been made on the treatment of Mr.
Love by the Pahokee Police
Department, but the initial officer
to the scene was a rookie officer
who did not know Mr. Love.


county's fire department, who
have pledged to offer their help in
the formation of such a regional
department. Early in the discus-
sions, the representatives have
offered to help in the implementa-
tion of the regional concept, con-
tinuing to offer monetary support
to the regional fire department.
At the tri-cities meeting, it
seemed that the three cities were
in agreement that the only way to
accomplish the minimum level of
service is through the regional
concept.
"One of the reasons we're get-
ting into a regional discussion is
that most of the cities can't afford
to meet the level of standards,"
said South Bay Mayor Clarence
Anthony.
Discussion also shifted to the
creation of the board that will over-'
see the regional fire department.
Though the tri-cities representa-
tives discussed a five-member
board, the argument was made,
and agreed on, that a seven-mem-
ber board comprised of represen-
tatives from each of the three


The trouble ensued when the
backup officer arrived to the scene
and the report states that Mr. Love
became belligerent and uncooper-
ative. Mr. Duran said the entire
arrest is on audiotape and the
tapes confirm that the officers
treated Mr. Love with professional-
ism and respect, even through his
ultimate arrest, which turned
somewhat violent.
"You can hear the officers on
the tape saying, 'Please don't
resist, Mr. Love. Please cooperate."
Mr. Love was taken to the hos-
pital for facial injuries following his
arrest, but Mr. Duran said Mr. Love
hit the ground after struggling with
the officers who used a leg take-
down maneuver to bring Mr. Love
to the ground. .Mr. Duran said it
was at that time Mr. Love received
his injuries.
Mr. Love is relating his story dif-
ferently and had said that the offi-
cer tried to take his eye out with a
baton.
"It only takes five pounds of
pressure to take an eye out," said
Mr. Duran. "I could use my thumb
to take an eye out. I wouldn't need
a police baton."
Ultimately, Mr. Love was taken
into custody after police found 58
grams of "freshly cut" marijuana in
his vehicle, which he was driving
under a suspended license, for the
"umpteenth" time.
Mr. Duran said that an individ-
ual could be taken to jail for driving
under a suspended license on a
first offense and that if the police
department was really harassing
him, as he claims, he would have
been jailed several times over for
his driving violations.
The arrest brought the mayor
and members of the city commis-
sion to the scene, although it is
unclear as to how they learned of
the arrest and why they felt the
need to penetrate what had
become a drug-trafficking crime
scene. Ms. Latimore complained
that officers told her to leave the
scene and return to her car and
acted surprised that she was not
allowed entry into the area.
The only surprising aspect of
Ms. Latimore's decision to con-
duct herself in this manner is that
she was not arrested for obstruc-
tion of justice and interfering with


cities, a county representative, a
representative from the surround-
ing unincorporated area and pos-
sibly a representative of the Palm
Beach Health Care District, would
be an ideal make-up of that future
board.
Belle Glade would have two
representatives for its larger popu-
lation and the representative of the
unincorporated area could possi-
bly serve to also represent the
community of Canal Point just
south of Pahokee. Though a
motion was made to that effect, it
was later withdrawn with the three
cities agreeing to re-visit the issue
after the fire chiefs discuss and
provide a strategy at a future tri-
cities meeting.
"The county now is ready to
talk, when we avoided discussion
because we didn't know what we
wanted to do," said Mr. Tate.
At least one person in the dis-
cussion expressed some concern
with the move to a regional fire
service. "What's frightening is
we're moving to a regional water
plant, and a regional fire depart-


an officer in the course of his
duties, said Mr. Duran. Palm
Beach County Sheriff's Office
Deputy Sgt. Jeffery Smith told Mr.
Duran, that the Pahokee Police
Department were well within their
rights to arrest everyone who
refused to leave the crime scene.
Ms. Latimore also claims that a
gun was pointed at them during
the incident. While it would have
been within the officer's rights as
an officer to forcibly remove
them, Mr. Duran vehemently
insists that no guns were drawn.
"No gun was ever pulled," said
Mr. Duran. "That is a false state-
ment that was made by Sasser
and the city manager. The only
weapon that was displayed was
one of those beanbag guns, which
was slung around one of the sher-
iff's deputies. And that was never
pointed at anyone."
Mr. Duran said this wasn't the
first time Ms. Latimore has
crossed the line of her authority,
citing an incident where she
entered the police station on
behalf of a juvenile that was
arrested.
"She demanded to come into
our office and basically was going
to take this kid out of our office,"
he explained. "She said, 'No
you're not going to arrest him. I'll
take him with me and I'll do the
sentencing for him.' She almost
got arrested and again, at that time
Sgt. Smith called me to tell me and
I said, 'Arrest her. End of story.
Arrest her.' But thinking they were
helping me, they didn't."
Mr. Love was released the very
next day after his arrest on a
$3,000 bond.
"I don't how that could have
happened," said Mr. Duran.
Unanswered questions in this
case appear to be the norm and it
has caught the attention of outside
agencies, according to Mr. Duran.
When asked directly if Mr. Duran
had any knowledge of criminal
activity associated with members
of city hall, he hesitated.
"I can't comment on that right
now," he said. "But I will say this.
There are governmental agencies
who are getting involved. This is
not the end, not by a long shot."


ment," said South Bay Commis-
sioner Shirley Walker-Turner.
"What's next? A regional police
department?"
The cities are working with a
looming implementation date of
2007 for the minimum level of
service.


learning themselves as well. Ms.
Langley says the program can best
be described as a family literacy
program.
Participants in the program go
from knowing very little or no Eng-
lish to being able to effectively
communicate in the language.
,Staff stresses the importance of
teaching basic living skills to the
adult participants. In fact, one per-
son who sought the aid of the pro-
gram later went on to become part
of the instructional staff, according
to Ms. Kostrub.
As they move into their build-
ing, the staff at the program hope
to continue offering that service to
more and more residents. They
invite all interested in the program


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,. Sa someone eLe, 4ouc am an aunt, gcnandmteiote Oa

fIamd hiend wa 4 the 'methe' int ftou ife, we inwite
you to write akdut that pewan.


mail teme iand photo to mm @unewuzap.com ( 9St ing 6ubmidniom
to the newspape office at 626 W. Sugatand Noigfwa*, eewiuton.
('We can copy photo wuhi you wait.) (ot .Mai ekttesi and photo to
We wnememt 6 other c Jdependent Newapapmes iYida 92 SO(o 1236
eewijtoa, t&.,ida 33440.

(f yau want a pheto a 'etwtned, please include a sef-addiessed enelo&pe.)


to contact them to learn more.
In the meantime, participants in
the program continue to express
their own successes with the fami-
ly education center.
During the grand opening cere-
mony, a few of them stood up to
tell the others of their individual
experiences at the program. One, a
woman, said she was working
toward obtaining her GED, and
looks forward to a better life. She
owes it, she said, to the help that
the program has offered.
Of learning to speak a new lan-
guage, she insisted, "It's hard, but
not impossible."
If you would like to learn more,
you can contact the family literacy
center at 992-8068.


ATTENTION
' Landowners, Developers
Ranchers and Farmers
We Buy'

Cabbage Palms
and Pine Timber

Statewide Palms, Inc.

863-675-4844

..... ;, .: ..,. .. .


3Glades Ford* Lincoln-Mercury
S A, 'm LI HI-' E EN -EF, -IC FI~ AT
c. r,- ,, 2, b a-%F-"


_ I 800-726-8514
sx ste\vei(gladesmotors.com


Thursday, April 7,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


a -


FOR SALE

B Y OW
y OWNER







Thursday, April 7, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Women of accomplishment named


Courtesy photo
Easter egg hunt is play time

At Woodland Park on Tuesday, March 22, 31 parents
and 41 children enrolled in the Healthy Families' Pro-
gram and had fun hunting for Easter eggs. From left
are Destiney McLendon, Pamela Jackson, and Kyle
Morton. Playing with your child and teaching your
child to share are just a few of the positive parenting
skills. Family Support Worker Pamela Jackson, shows
Kyle and Destiney how to be Easter Bunnies. For more
information on the Healthy Families Program call 902-
3311, ext. 525 or 674-4041, ext. 149.


By Barbara Oehlbeck
Palm Beach Community Col-
lege at Belle Glade, the Glades
Campus, honored 12 Glades
women Monday, March 21, as
Women of Accomplishment
2005, at the Dolly Hand Cultural
Arts Center in Belle Glade.
The Mistress of Ceremonies
was Elizabeth Hernandez-
Cayson, who was herself a
Woman of Accomplishment in
2000, in the category of Health
Care.
Dr. Dennis P. Gallon, Palm
Beach Community College pres-
ident, welcomed the winners for
2005 and attending guests. The
history of Women's History
Month was presented by Bobbie
Marsh, who is in the PBCC/Eco-
nomic and Workforce Develop-
ment Department.
The awards this year were
made in the categories of Arts,
Banking, Community Service,
Education, Entrepreneur, Gov-
ernment, Health, Medical, Nurs-
ing, Pioneer and Religion.
This year's winners include:
Sarah Bennett in the category of
Performing Arts, Angela
Pope/Banking, Janice Forbes
and Karen McCarthy both in
Community Service, Florence S.
Maitland/Education, Gwendolyn


1 rV.'


Courtesy photo
The Women of Accomplishment awards were held at the Dolly
Hand Cultural Arts Center, in Belle Glade. The center plays
host to several functions within the Glades communities.


Davis, business owner in the cat-
egory of Entrepreneur, Cather-
ine Peeples, Glades County
School Board in the category of
Government, Geraldine Bailey,
registered nurse in Health cate-
gory, Susan McMillan, nurse
practioner/Medical, Miriam Her-
nandez Hollon/Nursing, Ann
O'Connell Rust in the Pioneer
category and Geneva McKenzie
Boyd, Pastor at Moore Haven in
the category of Religion.
Glades County was well rep-


resented with winners Cathy
Peeples, Glades County School
Board member, District Two,
and Geneva McKenzie Boyd,
Doctor of Divinity and pastor of
the Miracle Deliverance Center,
Moore Haven.
Each recipient made brief
remarks before being presented
with a gold medallion engraved
with name and accomplishment
and a Certificate of Accomplish-
ment by Dr. Helen B. Franke,
provost of PBCC.


"These 12 Floridians have
made their respective marks in
their communities, as have the
other winners in the past five
years," Dr. Franke said. "We
here at PBCC are proud of all of
you and know that your dedica-
tion and work in your communi-
ties will continue to be an inspi-
ration to others."
Following the ceremony, a
reception was held in the Grand
Hall.
The Women of Accomplish-
ment program is an annual pres-
entation of Palm Beach Commu-
nity College.
Recent Glades County
"Women of Accomplishment
recipients include Diana
Winiecke/Community Ser-
vice 2003 and Anne Friedman in
the category of the Arts 2004.
Jeff Barwick, executive direc-
tor of the Clewiston Chamber of
Commerce was the director of
this year's awards event.
The Women of Accom-
plishmnt program is an annual
presentation of Palm Beach
Community College, held each
year in March at the Dolly Hand
Cultural Arts Center in Belle
Glade in celebration of National
Women's History Month.


Arrests cap two-year 'Operation Road Runner'


MIAMI Florida Attorney
General Charlie Crist joined with
federal and local law enforce-
ment to announce the arrests of
six individuals who helped direct
a major nationwide car theft ring.
This ring was responsible for
stealing hundreds of vehicles
from South Florida worth some
$8 million and using an illicit
pipeline -.maintained in part
-from inside a federal prison to
ship the vehicles as far as Massa-
chusetts and California. *
Charged today were Miami-
based enterprise leaders Carlos
*Ponce (known as "The King of
the Cars"), Jorge Valdez and Fran-
cisco Sabina. Also charged were
two inmates held in federal cor-
rectional institutions: Richard
'Wershe, a former Detroit drug
dealer, and Lorenzo Nichols Sr.',
.formerly a New York city drug
kingpin, as well as their Virginia
Beach, Virginia, contact Lorenzo
Nichols Jr.
The interstate auto theft ring
stole luxury cars in South Florida,
renumbered them using the Vehi-


cle Identification Number identi-
ties of other identical "clone"
vehicles, and then shipped the
vehicles to out-of-state buyers
with fraudulent Florida titles. The
arrests focused on the racketeer-
ing enterprise's criminal conduct
between the main Miami organ-
izers, middlemen operating from
the federal prison, and their con-
tact in Virginia Beach, VA. Earlier
in the two-year investigation,
dubbed "Operation Road Run-
ner,", authorities arrested more
than 20 suspects in seven differ-
ent states and recovered more
than 100 vehicles.
"This investigation is an
exceptional example of nation-
wide cooperation among federal,
state and local agencies to com-
bat crime," said Crist. "This crimi-
nal enterprise had its tentacles
everywhere, and it is only
through the hard work of authori-
ties at all levels that we have been
able to shut it down for good."
The investigation identified
more than 250 vehicles, valued at
approximately $8 million, which


were stolen and sold with altered
vehicle numbers and paperwork.
A total of 119 of those vehicles,
valued at approximately $3.5 mil-
lion, have been .recovered. The
federal inmates charged in the
operation used "attorney-client"
telephone lines within the federal
prison which by law cannot be
monitored by prison authorities
- as a point of transfer for three-
way calls to further their criminal
enterprise.
In addition to auto theft, the
investigation revealed that mem-
bers of the criminal enterprise
also engaged in identity theft,
narcotics trafficking, wire fraud
and other criminal activity.
In addition to the Attorney
General's Office, Florida law
enforcement agencies involved
in the case are the Miami-Dade
Police Department, Florida High-
way Patrol, state Division of
Motor Vehicles, Miami-Dade
State Attorney's Office and
Miami-Dade Department of Cor-
rections. Federal agencies were
the FBI, U.S. Department of Jus-


tice Bureau of Prisons, Depart-
ment of Homeland Security
Immigration and Customs
Enforcement, and U.S. Postal
Inspection Service.
Others involved included law
enforcement agencies from
Michigan, New York, Virginia,
Nevada, Kentucky, Arizona, Geor-
gia and.California, as well as the
private National Insurance Crime
Bureau, the Federal Express
Security Division and T-Mobile's
law enforcement relations unit.
Crist said the case highlights
the value of the National Motor
Vehicle Title Information System,
established by Congress in 1992
to integrate vehicle registration
records from all 50 states so that
vehicles cannot be cloned or
"washed" of information such as
damage claims.
The criminal charges will be
prosecuted by the Attorney Gen-
eral's Office of Statewide Prose-
cution. If convicted of all
charges, the six men arrested
today face up to 60 years in a
Florida prison.


S Glades Ford Lincoln.Mercury
NE L' *Or- Us CEk rrEC,
US rF Fo'r- Tr ,.' r.:. & SU\'i
. '.1 F,EI'I M \L CFELU u I 0 K .'.L..LAME

Sales & Leasing
800-726-8514
robertu-rgladesmotors.com


U DENTURES
BEST PRICES SAME DAY


DR. MERCER'S DENTURE CLINIC
US 41 SOUTH FT. MYERS
IV ANESTHESIA AVAILABLE


FLEP enrollment open

to Florida land owners


TALLAHASEE The Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, Division of
Forestry announces that it will
hold a sign-up for enrollment in
the Forestry Land Enhancement
Program (FLEP) from April 4
through June 13.
This program, authorized
under the 2002 Farm Bill, is
available to non-industrial pri-
vate forest landowners on a 75-
25-cost-share basis. Eligible
practices include, but are not'
limited to site preparation, tree
planting, and prescribed burn-
ing activities.
Landowners who own at
least 10 acres, but no more that
10,000 acres of land who have a
multiple-resource practice plan
will be eligible to receive fund-
ing assistance under FLEP. A
maximum of $10,000 will be
available for each qualifying
landowner over the life of the
program, as reimbursement for
incurred expenses for approved
practices.
Almost half of the state's 14-
million acres of forestland are
owned by private non-industrial
forest landowners. According to
national, regional and statewide
landowner surveys, most forest
landowners don't have a man-


Landowners who own
at least 10 acres, but
no more that 10,000
acres of land who
have a multiple-
resource practice
plan will be eligible to
receive funding assis-
tance under FLEP.
agement plan for their property.
The state's allocation under the
program will be used for imple-
menting of forest practices pre-
scribed in existing or newly
developed management plans.
Landowners can obtain
application forms from their
local Division of Forestry office
and from other cooperating
agencies. The Division of
Forestry foresters will provide
technical assistance to
landowners and will be the
local contact person for partici-
pating landowners. For more
information, contact Ruthie
Cole, Program Manger, in Talla-
hassee at (850) 414-9913, your
local county forester, or visit
www.fl-dof.com


Primary Care Laboratory Service.
Social/Psychological Services

Sp loyment Screening.


Place a classified ad in over 160 Florida newspapers and reach
over 5 Million readers for just $450.
Place a display 2x2 or 2x4 in 113 Florida newspapers and reach
-Oe over 4 Million readers.


V


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m
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mel -1 Million Realers I)v calljj),L this ilospallcl. or
F lori(k] I'l-css Scr icc (866)742-1373


ABSOLUTE AUCTIONI'C'


100t Homesites in
Highlands County, FL
This is YO R chance to own property in
Highkiand Cownty! Homesites range
from 1/1 to 1/1 acre.inelnding
Idlefront Agolfs enurse properties.
Over 10 homesites will he sold
ABSOLTE to the last and
highest bidder, regardlessof price!
This i1 perfect opportunity to purchase
property for investments, primary residence.
vacation home or retirement home sites,.


Call FroeFurther 'A C~E
Information,
800-257-4161 www'* lg~g'e lb~fo wh 'amclomm


Seiving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7, 2005









Servingadin teHen communities souEthoL aketeehoeeahursayAprid7,200


ICall Brenda, hauren or Meliss

at 83-93-918, 63-96-011 o 56-996440


Countdown to Home Ownership


Purchasing a home involves a
roller coaster of emotions, a pile
of paperwork and nerves of steel.
Beginning the process without a
cursory course in home buying is
not a wise venture. Here are
steps along the way to expect on
the way to your final destination
- home ownership.
Step 1: Affordability: Before you
visit a real estate agent, decide on
a price range. The best way to do
so is to sit down with a financial
consultant or mortgage broker.
who will weigh your current debt
against your income and savings.
Step 2: Finding a home:
Finding your prospective home
can be a time-consuming
process. Consult with a real
estate broker, who will have cur-
rent listings and up-to-date infor-
mation, or set out on your own
search by visiting open houses.
Step 3: Making an offer: In
most states, you'll be required to
make a formal offer on the house
in the form of a written contract.


It will state your intended offer
price as well as information on a
down payment and proposed
closing date.
Step 4: Securing a mortgage:
Now that you know your pur-
chase price, find a lender who
will agree to lend you the money.
Shop around for the best offer
from several financial institu-
tions, keeping in mind the cur-
rent interest rate.
Step 5: Contact an attorney:
You'll likely want to contact an
attorney who will guide you
through the legalities that will
ensue. (The seller probably has
an attorney working for him.) A
lawyer can review the contract
and advocate for items in your
favor like improvements that
need to be made, or appliances
you'd like to keep. Your attorney
will also facilitate contact
between the seller, so you won't
need to be involved so thorough-
ly in the process.
Step 6: Home inspection: A


COUNTRY HOMES & LAND REAL ESTATE
$0o DOWN
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Port LaBelle All New CBS Construction
ONLY 1 NEW SPEC HOMES LEFT
BEAUTIFUL NEW CYPRESS MODEL
Granite Countertops, Sprinkler System
$198,400 Ready to Move In!!!
HOME PACKAGES STARTING AT $163,000!
....I


8 FLOOR PLANS TO CHOOSE FROM OR BRING YOUR OWN!
New Homes Resales Lots
Call for FREE Prequalification
LOTS 4 SALE IN PORT LABELLE STARTING AT $36K
***OWNER FINAM('I NG***
Kathy Hutchins Lic. Real Estate Broker
Office: 863-612-0551 Fax: 863-612-0553
Visit our website at www.CentrialFloridaandSalest,.com
or www.CoattryAereHomeSites.eom


licensed professional can best
assess if the home is structurally
sound and built according to
code. Should anything be illegal,
or just not up to par, the inspec-
tor will include it in his report.
Step 7: Walk-through: In most
cases, you'll be able to walk
through the prospective home
right before the closing to make
sure the house is in the agreed
upon condition.
Step 8: The closing:You'll be
required to sign paperwork and
present fees, called closing costs.
Examples of closing costs
include: down payment, proper-
ty taxes, attorney's fee, points,
title insurance, clerical/process-
ing costs, proof of homeowner's
insurance
After you've signed what seems
like a million documents, and ini-
tialed a million more, you will
receive the keys to your new
home. Congratulations on being
a homeowner!

Place your
Call A Pro
today for only
$10 per week
Call Brenda, Lauren or
Melissa at 863
863-946-0511 or


tf If you are thinking of buying or selling,


t~AruqoHoa~m


* Well kept douhebklidie home on 2.oi8-.' atacs.
Features a large stocked pond. horse pastures.
fruit trees and nice oaks. $132.500.


* This stunting 20-.'' acri' e states I 'ly one of
a kind! The main hotiuse eaittlls inchludI (.RS
coMnsrucion. vauled ceilings, MIal wood cahli
ncis with d'6 t cld lkitchl'cnI
lops and i. 1- hoM5s.
T'hre is also a LO3-0+- square foot ratmutiac
turwd home located iowirds the Ironi of tdw
,. .'." r with separate entrance and itnciRng
that would be peelect as a guest house ,Ir f'.r a
: . I I| '*' t4u* n
* '., ,. ,,,, .ks Custom butlt
,1 i .T,,
sprinkle': "" i :
S.. I $229,000.
* .1 ,I,, 1 1 .' 11 R hole in l.aBI'ele.
Ii i I'.. plan, ceramic tile, eoior-
mous laundry nao .and lots of kitchen cabinets.
Outside is a spacious sicreeed porch, fiened
back .yard & ,iwe ...." pot, REIUCED
$195,900.
* Hands down ian.r.. Compeion xtM s

.......4.. u..* mii "


3-983-9148,
561-996-4404


VISIT US ON THE WEB AT WWW.OAKREALTYINC.COM PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 4-RENTALS SALES
]K CINDY L ALEXANDER
LIC, REAL ESTATE BROKER
ASSOCIATES: EDITH MILLER
JILL DILLMAN AND TIM SPENCER
675-0500



SU NEW LOCATION
233 N. BRIDGE ST
I n ON THE CORNER OF
BRIDGE ST &
SMI* WASHINGTON
jFt o" i >i l i, \ 11 i it i \ ,-Br .. Or .r,' i
OIHCfS Il t F \ A 411 .11i I .ill ..1 1 i. t l. A MUST SEr I I.i ,.I 1'. imanuhictiured
3/2/1 $775/NM NO PETS. home with carport on *c/ acres. ncluicds fireplace,
I-ARGE 3-/2/1 $850)/( NO PETS bic.kfast nook. rcretreat off ma cr hedromc hlint
nSH mit R ranR anid back -acld. P'ro.ety a.lio hi 2a1100 sq. ft barn
2BED/2BATH DOI)BLEWIDE IN MOORE Call today for an appoiintment Asking $529.900.
HAVEN YACHT CLUIL Home has 46 ft covered Aiso available widi this property is an additional 6
. r-,.] ,nJ, n, i irs. i,.ni \.l ing$101,000 a...r. % i,,g.li m
ilk i 2B,\1 ll t.fr 4 r.5 1. I't. hn, ii, '.A .l I I'lt- '-. ,. .'iod k i',me cracker housw'
t'i'l],li,.i ,r-. % k J.r, .I:,, Ii.-.,n ,i-n, h ,'1 ,-,. Being sold As Is" Asking $2,0201,)0 .
I'tir.,. ." ;rg$67%liO IN PIONEER! 41i.l28lath mobile home on 2.5
\E \ I1.1ITI I\ I I IU 2 .il! am -I Il ,it tlAOi .",Il 9. it ,i i .,
ilkJ., ah ti l n,,,I In NI,,.,l..I l i I t FI 2, \V I iL i ... ...i'i, ...
-ling .il ll. ll /. .,ink ig$2'.(lll'
St K O'N I HE MARKETI lBed-a2ath house in
Port laBelle on cbhool Circle. Icing sold "As is". BACK ON THE M '. i- P! Commercial lot
Call for details 3xB232- with wid famine housc sellingg ".Xs Is"
T\ r',11 I >i lit .. I .L 4 0 1ti
Bte 2 \ li, ,.. u I,...T, ...l,..h-lI ,l ...n BU SINESS LOT r .. .i .
custom oak cabinets, below givund poml. screen building sold ",s Is" Asking $S40,000.
lanid. lighted water lall sp., s-paratc 2.5 garage| IOT ON DOLLY AVE.- ,i % i i 'in Olle('
I .... .... -.. ..1 '" ,i ",i. R r" I 0T4T i I' 1' 'IT T l ir I O r i
0 ,%-1 'lpl. lil,,, I l w , I, t v i L \ ,, n
t),III1. A hiR IK I-",U]'1110 [ 1 I",q i lk I.I [ F / 2ill


, !, I I ,- 21,, I, ,,1 .l. I 4, Q 0 0
I, .1. l ". I ,.I
ir home in Ortonai sts on .77+; acres and is in
Pristine condition ,U'l.t' a must see' $144,900
*Oty. I r i- .1 shopping and
schools' ill.: 'l ,,i, i i ti.,t [hoin on I 4t.-
AcrCs wI .. ntre bed t only minmtci
from town, 1l i""i
*2 1 room homic in the Blnomnt Sublivision
S*l. 'I 1 hal' batihs. This hoime also
ea,, Oxil
1ar.,.

MUILM HOMO
* \Wl[ kept doubkwv'ide home on'3 I8.' wces.
FI eat s a large stocked pond, horse pastures.
fritu tlrees and nice iiks. $132,500,
* Looking for country living? Here it is! This
UNDER CONTlRACT sits on
I II .' I ._ .. 1. -, 1 l m in te
* ?iR/1?B ma.n.uflaturtd home om 12.4+ acres
features valued .. i k- textured sheet rock
il, lots of uilt. in eQabmets. dual sinks in
tni itsr baih a-d lot s mor '.t I 1 th)
* C(ounmry Livirg- l its i.. 1I,
h.aili.u' dccoratcd 3 IR/2n' home. sis on
nicel I cbO t i,.
kitch I
'ew 1". 1 "2 ., 1. I 1
to s9 ..I .
* SBwi1 anaa turd hor on 2.+i- acvs
*hre v 1 ris ualsd

[or horse bwrs's 1 t, .. iii'


* iir l l l.1 l i i ; l. .' ,, 1,700
r,, ....." ii i l r- 1 ..
lot
iastcr suite and feinced yard Only $52500.


* wM

lor two homes. $125,000.
* 2 2.5+/' acre aidjoitng pa-c.cs iin ioneerc
Improved pasture &Z suitabe for manufactured
or sikt built homes. $59,900 each
*1.2 cre in Monnu $34.9(W.


* IkaUifol 25+- acre corner lot in downtown
lalicllk v'.':gratL ptcntial. (Currntly zoncd for
dua '.1 .. .., r .! possibdi t'of rezon
ing to Businesst -:"7 il
* i I+1- acre homesitesjust souLh al town on
private road $59,900 each,
* .-5+.- acre in Init 4 w:.oak $39.900.
* OvIrsi::ed cornc lot in I'ni 102 on S.
Hilton. $7,000.
* Ovacsiaed lot I mit 102 w.'oaks $37.000.
*25: acre in Unit li.S,S,000.


6. _r MI_ ERIAL_
*6.'- .c.s oe I.*0 ( l ,,
f t399Ille cft liits with ITS..- fet ol frontage
$S99,900.


238 N. Bridge St. LaBelle, FL 33935
863-675-8868
Lisa Andrexws Lic. Real Estate Broker
Associates: Dwight Hatfield, Sandra
Alexander, James Tanner, Roxana
u t7,hffvCjtt F ribt- Cisneros & Linda Dekle Davis
fRl$1".t Cw'oSip. h. -. www.southwestfloridarealtygroup.com
SE HAuLA ESP.OL


* $210,000 This 3'1.5/I Ft. Msyern hoime is a $225,000 Highway 29 S Frontagc. 2.25+/'-
newly ruimodeled mnu.st .ee! acres zonod RG3M.
W.Q01UfithmHIi $159,000 -iBeautiful ,43+/- acr, w.oded lot
* $229,000 Reduced, Motivated Seller with creek on Ft. Denauid Rd.
1.1- :I,, Former exotic animal home. Ca(age, $. tE"" r .i lo '.AC.,x. h
galore! 1, 2 & 3 stores oni & off the ground. $31,500 1l04- IEflmesit, no more
ightin, water & electric throughout. lond, ci ity I,_sCO .T' ,iACT
island aid t muh ilroo acres. il +- TC. .
* $144,900 2BD/2BA Secluded, arming $35,000-107+ -acrelocatcd onpavedroad
mobile hnume. Has vaumted cilingh and lots of out1 away ,lnn ithusdie and bhitle of ciy living,
.cvr-as. ,I' lnl mis ,oit onithits one. ''. ... ..l 7+/- acr wotxied lot avatilabhk.
* $139,900 .*.iW i"Pil,. home on 2.41 $35,000- 25-ti '. i
acresin lit. DIG)i. GgulCT you're .I .EtiST* iCT t 'i1 let ihis
* Reduced! l I A W I'll -'m .,1,1..' .i.' onegoby.
, .1, I.. It. A r" ill $30,000. -FN WA ,ki.i, ,' Monuam,
* $91,000 Netl 3BI/211A mobile hine 'on 1, ..... i ',G1iR ',CT
,6+/-a(re. jWiOlrsIIT%'r-
* $89.900 3130i21)A mobile ho m otin 1+/- *. H 'aT, .,~ I low n. Chitex to
aci wi th new carltclm aiiand paint, ri. ve$ ''
* $89,900 New 3B112.BA mobile home on "iva -! ,,Z ,
.65'-' at C $40,000. Nice .25+/'- ArTC i' dose to town,
7 ;' $9900 e ala $5,000. Ni li;t available in Port lallwlle
AC$',E 3* $0',000- .32+- tacri lot hitt-ad in itVy with
* $1,500,000 10i- a-ors of)l.astire in Muse. !b'autifurs including oaks.
* $1,025.600 5I+/.- sea ludcd. lots of '**-' t "; l( i .
ifEa. fronts on wo, rt asd. winner will divide. OMMER(IAL
* $300,000 19,! 3+/'-- 1trs with num+,t-P ; $450,000 Divc-d li siorc on corner lit
poslsiitiit:s. Adjoining t 9.2-i+,'. itres alst avail with l:i9' .i" i. i i ) S,


LaBelle 0 25 Acre Homesite Clewiston 0 50 Acre Homesite LaBelle 0 25 Acre Homesite
Located 5025 Gunn Circle Located 410 N Romero SI Located 8003 Piper Lane

ads, -, Ai=Wj .;


LaBelle Riverfront Homel
3B 128A I Goal oc 1 1 36 Aae
$0a5,000
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Thursday, April 7, 2005









Thursday, April 7, 2005 Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Remembering life in the 1940s


Courtesy photo

Habitat for Humanity
Mary Mosely and her two children are the new owners
of the Habitat for Humanity home and she expressed
her appreciation to the club for their efforts in land-
scaping. The dedication has been held and several
club members attended the affair.





Museum ms draw



record crowds



for new exhibits


FORT MYERS Southwest
Florida is hosting two new
exhibits drawing record atten-
dance to the showcase muse-
ums of Fort Myers. The Imagi-
narium Hands-On Museum
and the Southwest Florida
Museum of History are just
one mile apart and a visit to
both museums makes for a
wonderful day trip to the area.
The exhibit "Robo Bugs:
The Giant World of Insects"
features common insects of
giant proportions giving a new
perspective as guests explore
these amazing creatures
shown 40 to 120 times life size
allowing smaller details to be
magnified and explored. Get
ready for an exciting., entomo-
logical adventure that will
bring you face-to-face with a
20-foot-long praying mantis, a
pair of battling beetles, and a
lone locust, just. to name a
few.
The exhibit features three
areas including a Robotic
Area, an Educational Area and
a Portrait Gallery. Learn about
insects and other amazing
arthropods as you walk
amongst the giant robotic
replicas and explore the live
insect zoo.
Highlights of the Educa-
tional Area are an interactive
wall showing insect move-
ment and eating habits. The
Portrait Gallery features water-
colors showing the biology of
various insects and an arts and
crafts area where children can
create rubbings of their
favorite arthropods.
"Robo Bugs" runs now
through May 22.
Tickets are $8 for adults, $7
for seniors (55+), $5 for'chil-
dren-3-12, and $3 for school
groups. Group rates are avail-
able for groups of 10 or more.
Tickets can be purchased by
calling (239) 337-3332.
The Imaginarium is open
Monday through Saturdays
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. It
is closed for major holidays.
The Roswell Exhibit debuts
for the first time ever at the
Southwest Florida Museum of
History allowing visitors to
view the artifacts, video and
audio clips, documents and
dioramas and draw their own
conclusions.
The 1947 crash of some-
thing in the desert 30 miles
north of Roswell, New Mexico
was an historic event that gave
rise to a campaign of disinfor"


"The Roswell Exhibit"
explores the timeline
and events of the
Roswell Incident, trac-
ing the people mili-
tary and civilian alike
- who were involved
at Roswell, their evi-
dence and based on.
their stories and
sworn affidavits,
pieces together the
Roswell scenario.
mation and cover-up as
alleged by eye-witnesses to
the crash and former military
personnel and their family
directly involved in handling
the Roswell "Incident".
To this day, almost 60 years
later, what exactly crashed
remains a mystery and an
entire sub-culture has grown
up around Roswell sparking
conspiracy theories, accusa-
tions of military and govern-
ment cover-ups, inspiring
dozens of movies, TV shows,
documentaries and seminars
all in an attempt to determine
what happened at Roswell
back in 1947.
"The Roswell Exhibit"
explores the timeline and
events of the Roswell Incident,
tracing the people military
and civilian alike who were
involved at Roswell, their evi-
dence and based on their sto-
ries and sworn affidavits,
pieces together the Roswell
scenario.
Don't miss your opportuni-
ty to view "The Roswell Exhib-
it" and decide for yourself
about one of the biggest mys-
teries of the 20th century. The
Roswell Exhibit will be on dis-
play through June of this year.
The foremost investigator
and author on Roswell and
.UFOs, Stanton Friedman will
conduct a seminar on those
subjects Saturday, April 9, for
the museum. Call (239) 332-
5955 for more details.
The museum is open Tues-
days through Saturdays from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday
from noon to 4 p.m. Admis-
sion is $9.50 for adults, $8.50
for seniors, $4 for students and
group rates are available for
groups of 10 or more. Call
(239) 332-5955.


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By MaryAnn Morris

OKEECHOBEE In the
1940s, some people in South
Florida lived out on the ranches
and others lived in town. Some
people will remember the old
gravity gas pumps and packages
from the store tied with string by
the store clerk. People saved
string.during the Depression -
people saved everything they
could and prayed they'd get
through. Doc Anderson lived
then and remembers.
"We lived alongside Taylor
Creek in East Okeechobee when
I was growing up," he said. "Tay-
lor Creek wasn't straight like it is
now. The Corps of Engineers
came in and did that. Back then it
twisted all around. The railroad
ran just about 40-50 feet along
the south side of Highway 70 and
crossed Taylor Creek on a wood-
en bridge, then it went over
behind city hall and over by
what's now the school board
building and the freshman cam-
pus, then it came over by where
Morgan's furniture is and crossed
back over 70 again. Part of that
old track is still there.
"I was raised by my Aunt," Mr.
Anderson continued. "I don't
know how she did it back in
those days. She gave us some
values. We went to school we
came home and did our chores,
ate supper and got ready for the
next day.
"She wasn't an educated
woman, but I don't think anyone
ever put one past her. One time
when I was in high school, I
thought I'd like to try out for the
football team. So I went home
and asked her, 'Can I go but for
the football team?' She said
'Come home, do your chores,
then you can go.' I said, 'But if I
do my chores first, it will all be
over!' She said, 'Come home and
do your chores first!' So I never
played football, but I learned to
do my chores.
"No one in town wore shoes
"to school in those days. I think by
the time I was in junior high we
did," he said.
I "Once in awhile my aunt
would give me money for a
movie. The Gilbert Theater cost
25 cents for the movie, five cents
for popcorn and five cents for a
drink. The theater was on South


Park Street near Elliot's Book-
store, it was moved across the
street later. The Gilbert Theater
had a free Christmas show for all
. us kids. Santa Claus would be
there with a bag of goodies for
each of us. It was a real treat,"
said Mr. Anderson.
"When I was 13 years old, I
went to work at a .filling
station/grocery store on the
other side of S.R. 70 for $10 a
week. That was really good
money during the Depression.
The store was owned by a man
called Ira Swindler. We weighed
out grits, and flour and beans
from the big burlap sacks into lit-
tle brown paper bags, tied them
with string and put them up on
shelves for people to buy. When
someone would come for gas, if
they could afford gas, and some
people couldn't because gas was
12 to 15 cents a gallon!
"Gas was pumped with a
hand pump that would pump the
gas into a clear glass container
marked to show one gallon, two
gallons and so forth. When it got
to the amount someone wanted,
the gas flowed down into their
car by gravity. For fun, if you had
a spare nickel or dime you could
buy what was called a 'Punch
card' at the store. You'd punch
out the little marks and opened
the little folded paper to see what
you won! I worked for three gen-
erations of that family," he said.
"They talk about the fights at
the Saturday night dances at the
American Legion. It was right
across 70 from our house, where
-the Mexican place is now. It used
to have a second floor where the
American Legion was. It was
called the Riverside Hotel back
then and Williams owned the
hotel. Upstairs, was where they
danced and there were fights.
The stairs going up were really
very steep stairs. It's a wonder no
one was killed on those stairs,
because just about any time
there were fights.
"My friend Billie and I used to
roller skate around the building
during the day. There was a roller
skating rink out 441 North just
before the railroad tracks, too.
"S.E. 10th Ave used to be Han-
cock Street, (named for Henry
Hancock, who owned and devel-
oped that general area). My aunt
and uncle owned along the


...~
~


-I.


south side of S.R. 70 from Taylor
Creek to S.E. 13th Avenue. Our
house was on 16th Avenue -
three bedrooms and a bath. I
could watch the cattle drives
coming in 70 to town right from
the house. There was a wooden
bridge over Taylor Creek and
some of the cowboys' horses
would refuse to cross it. Maybe
they didn't like the look of it. But
some cowboys would have to
blindfold their horses and lead
them across that bridge," Mr.
Anderson said.
. "In September of. 1943, I
joined the Navy and was sta-
tioned on the battleship New Jer-
sey. Now, -in the Korean War in
1954, my friend Cossie Conrad
enlisted and got stationed on that
same ship. I was on a different


ship in the Korean War.
"People say 'we're united
now and put stickers all over
their cars, but back then, every-
one worked toward the war
effort. School kids collected for
paper drives and scrap metal
drives. You turned in so much,
you got stamps to fill a book and
then When the book was filled,
you bought a war bond. No new
cars were made during World
War II until I think 1946. Every-
thing was rationed: Food, gas,
everything. Everyone had a gar-
den patch. If you had a car, and
could afford to drive it, you had a
ration sticker on your car to say
how much gas you were allowed
to buy each week. No one grum-
bled about it. Everyone worked
together."


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Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7, 2005


..


..T '








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee Thursday, April 7, 2005


Growing and Green


SARASOTA Green Trends
2005, the second annual Florida
Green Building Conference and
Trade Show, is taking place at the
Chelsea Center in Sarasota, Fla.
May 25-27. GreenTrends is a Flori-
da-focused conference and trade
show for those interested in learn-
ing about the benefits of green
building and sustainable develop-
ment here in Florida.
The conference, organized by
the non-profit Florida Green
Building Coalition, Inc., is a forum


for businesses, organizations,
government agencies, and indi-
viduals interested or involved in
providing Florida with a better-
built environment in which to live
and work.
The Theme for this year's con-
ference is, "Building a Green Flori-
da Together" and will explore
how we can all work together to
better promote green building in
our state and help resolve some
of the confusion over all of the
green building standards, guide-


- Florida's future is a choice


lines, and incentive programs that
are now available.
Participants will have the
opportunity to learn about the eco-
nomic and environmental benefits
of building green from a variety of
experts in the field. The confer-
ence, which includes a trade show
that is open to the public, will pro-
vide all the latest information on
green building materials specifical-
ly designed for Florida's climate.
Bill Gregory, director of Sustain-
able Strategies for the Floor Cover-


ing Division of Milliken & Compa-
ny, will be the opening keynote
speaker for the event. The title for
his presentation is "Transitioning
to a Green Future."
Drawing from first-hand experi-
ences, hq addresses the challenges
of achieving consensus in setting
sustainable standards and imple-
menting green practices. Allan F.
Bedwell, deputy secretary Regula-
tory Programs and Energy for the
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection, will be the


awards banquet keynote speaker.
John Moran, Florida nature pho-
tographer, will also present his
award winning presentation "Jour-
nal of Light: The Visual Diary of a
Florida Nature Photographer."
A number of related events are
being held in conjunction with
GreenTrends 2005. On Wednes-
day, May 25, there will be a free
Rebuild America Workshop on
"Greening Affordable Housing."
Also, tours of local green proj-
ects in the Sarasota area will take


place May 27, immediately follow-.
ing the conference. The Sarasota
Efest and the First Annual Florida
Green Building Open Golf Tourna-
ment are taking place May 28-29,
providing participants with an
informational and fun-filled week-
end. Details on all these events are
available on the GreenTrends 2005
Web site.
For more information on
GreenTrends 2005 or to register to
have GreenTrends held in your city
visit www.GreenTrends.org.


Your exercising needs change when you get older


Courtesy photo

Galloping fun
The Hendry County Fair Horse Show was judged by Ms.
Linda Wooten. Exhibitors had the opportunity to partici-
pate in seven classes; Grooming and Conditioning,
Showmanship, Walk/Trot Western Pleasure, Walk/Trot
Western Horsemanship, Western Pleasure, Trail, Key-
hole, and Pole Bending. Golden Bits 4-H Club member T.
J. McClure captured the most points to receive High
Point with Alexia Eighner winning Reserve High Point.
Alexia is also a member of the Golden Bits 4-H Club.
Karen Jackman and Tim McClure provide leadership for
the Golden Bits 4-H Club and Sam and Lynn Briefman
are the club leaders for the Silver Saddles 4-H Club.


BUY, SELL or TRADE
Classifieds Pages 19-22


No matter how well you take
care of yourself, it's not realistic to
thinkyour body can do at 65 what it
did at 45 or even 55. That doesn't
mean you should reduce physical
activities. It does mean you'll need
to modify your expectations.
How your body changes: As
you age, the maximum pumping
capacity of your heart declines,
resulting in less oxygen to exercis-
ing muscles and a decrease in your
cardiovascular fitness. Your mus-
cles lose some strength and mass
and become less flexible, "as.do
your tendons and joints. It takes
longer to recover from a muscle
strain, sprain, trauma or injury.
The March issue of Mayo Clinic
Women's HealthSource says that
by staying physically active, you can
help minimize nearly all of these
effects of aging. But the physical
activities you choose, as you age,
will likely change.
This isn't to say you should
reduce your physical activity. It
means modifying your activities to
accommodate change. For exam-
ple, if you've been a jogger most of
your life, you may need to switch to
walking to protect your joints. Or if
you were a high-intensity aerobics
buff, you may need to try low-
.intensity aerobics, yoga, tai chi or
Pilates. The important goal is to


remain fit.
Fit at any age: If you've had to
slow down the treadmill a bit or
make other activity changes, how
do you know if you're fit? Make an
honest assessment of your own
physical abilities. Can you perform
daily tasks without fatigue? Can you
perform moderately intense activi-
ties and talk at the same time?
These are both signs of being fit.
And no matter what your age or
where you are, on the fitness scale,
you can always improve your per-
sonal fitness level.
Avoid falls at home
When it comes to household
safety, it pays to be proactive. In the
United States, about 30,000 people
die each year as a result of injuries
at home. Falls are responsible for
about one-third of home injury
fatalities. Older adults are often
more susceptible to falling because
of a decline in mobility and bal-
ance.
The March issue of Mayo Clinic
Women's HealthSource offers tips
to minimize chances of falling at
home.
Light your way. Keep all areas,
especially hallways and stairways,
well lit. Use nightlights and have a
flashlight handy in case of power
outages.


Keep pathways clear. Arrange
furniture to allow for easy move-
ment. Remove boxes, newspapers,
cords, baskets and general clutter
from high-traffic areas. Keep out-
door steps and walkways in good
repair.
Secure rugs and flooring.
Secure loose rugs and carpets with
tacks or a slip-resistant backing.
Remove small throw rugs. Repair
frayed carpet and loose floor-
boards.
Safeguard stairways. Make sure
all stairways have sturdy railings
and that steps have a nonskid sur-
face.
Enhance bathroom safety.
Install grab bars in your shower or
tub and near your toilet. Use non-
skid mats in the shower or tub.
Keep necessities handy. Store
clothing, dishes, food and other
everyday items within easy reach.
Genetic testing -
is it right for you
Cancer seems all too common
in your family, but should you have
a genetic test to learn more about
your risk?
Genetic tests offer a glimpse of
what the future may hold for your
health. But the look has limitations.
Genetic tests can't tell you with cer-


tainty whether you'll develop a dis-
ease or how severe it might be if
you do develop it. They can only tell
you if you have a mutation that is
shown to be associated with a risk
of the disease.
Deciding to have genetic testing
is complicated. That's why it's
often recommended you consult
with a genetic counselor.
The March issue of Mayo Clinic
Women's HealthSource offers
ways a genetic counselor can help:
Research your family history
and medical records to assess your
risk of a genetic disorder or the like-
lihood that you carry a genetic
mutation.
Provide information on the ben-
efits, risks and limitations of a spe-
cific genetic test.
Explain the implications of a
positive, negative or indeterminate
test result, for both you and your
family.
Consider possible treatment
options or preventive measures if a
gene mutation is found.
Costs for genetic tests can range
from less than $100 to several thou-
sand dollars. These tests may not
be covered by insurance. Fortu-
nately, many states have enacted
laws that prohibit using genetic test
information to determine eligibility
for health insurance.


__


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LaBelle, FL
863-675-2132

:.i d.1 )[ I ['mu *I


ADVERTISE YOUR Brian ullivan
BUSINESS HERE Sullivan
BUSINEss HERE cass Iemalcontrablr-(GoRn ,


I N 0 P 4 1-11 MAN


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7,2005


P19,Wf"Jqllimw







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee 17


Senior Connections

Faith in Action in Clewiston Thursday, April 7
Public is invited to celebrate the expansion of Senior Connec-
tions of SW FL Faith in Action program in Clewiston at the Senior
Center next to John Boy Auditorium, 1200 South W.C. Owen Ave.
The purpose of Faith in Action is to match volunteers with those
who are chronically ill, to help them with different activities of daily
living. Faith in Action volunteers, "care partners," can provide a vari-
ety of helpful services, including making friendly phone calls, shop-
ping for groceries or just being a compassionate listener. Please join
us for a short program, with refreshments, to kick off Clewiston's
participation in this nationwide program. RSVP TO Liz Taylor (863)
983-7088.


Thursday, April 7,2005


Get ready for hurricane season


ORLANDO With the 2005
hurricane season nearly upon
us, the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security's Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) has announced
publication of an updated, in-
depth guide to citizen disaster
preparedness titled, "Are You
Ready?"
The publication is available
to individuals, .families and
community preparedness
groups who are looking for a
comprehensive information
source of what to do before,
during and after a disaster
strikes.
The guide provides a step-
by-step approach to disaster
preparedness by walking the
reader through Information on
how to get informed about local
emergency plans, identifying
hazards that affect their area,
instructing them on how to
develop and maintain an emer-
gency communications plan,
and building a disaster supplies
kit.
Other guide topics include
evacuation, emergency public
shelters, animals in disaster and
information specific to people
with disabilities. The piepared-
ness facts are based on the
most reliable hazard awareness
and emergency education infor-
mation including advances in
scientific knowledge, the most
accurate technical language
and the latest physical research
on what happens in disasters.
"Being prepared for disasters
is everyone's personal responsi-
bility, and the 'Are You Ready?'
guide can be a key tool to
enable families to protect them-


selves against all hazards," said
Bill Carwile, the FEMA federal
coordinating officer. "We are
making these publications
available to the public at all of
our 21 Disaster Recovery Cen-
ters."
To broaden the usage of the
publication, a facilitator guide is
available for those interested in
delivering the disaster prepared-
ness content in a classroom or
small group setting. The facilita-
tor guide includes training mod-
ules for adults and school chil-
dren. It also contains a CD ROM
tool-kit with resources such as
customizable slides and hazard-
specific fact sheets.
The guide also can, be used
as a study manual with credit
awarded for successful comple-
tion with a 75 percent score on
a final exam. Questions about
the exam should be directed to
www.training.fema.gov/emi-
web/is or by calling (800) 238-
3358. College credit for the
course is also being offered
.through Frederick Community
College, Frederick, Md.
"We encourage everyone to
take the time to pick up a copy
and study this publication," said
Craig Fugate, state-coordinating
officer with Florida's State
Emergency Response Team
(SERT). "Having just experi-
enced the devastation by four
major hurricanes and their
aftermath, we all should under-
stand the necessity of being bet-
ter prepared for future events."
The 200-plus-page "Are You
Ready?" guide is FEMA's pre-
mier, preparedness resource
catalog and is also available
from the FEMA Web site. Log on


to http://www.fema.gov/arey-
ouready/ for your free copy. Or,
receive your copy by mail from
FEMA's Publications Warehouse
at (800) 480-2520.
Four preparedness booklets
supplement the guide's infor-
mation. They cover the follow-
ing citizen preparedness top-
ics: 1) Preparing for Disaster;
2) Food and Water in an Emer-
gency; 3) Preparing for Disaster
for People with Disabilities and
other Special Needs; and 4)
Helping Children Cope with
Disaster. Organizations are
urged to use the Web site's
instructions for printing large
quantities of the guide, even
customizing the covers with
organization seals or logos.
The State Emergency
Response Team (SERT) is a col-
laboration of Florida's state
agencies led by the state coor-
dinating officer. SERT's mission
is to ensure that Florida is pre-
pared to respond to emergen-
cies, recover from them, and
mitigate their impacts. Visit
www.floridadisaster.org for the
latest information on the hurri-
cane relief efforts.
FEMA prepares the nation
for all hazards and manages
federal response and recovery
efforts following any national
incident. FEMA also initiates
mitigation activities, trains first
responders, works with state
and local emergency man-
agers, and manages the
National Flood Insurance Pro-
gram and the U.S. Fire Admin-
istration. FEMA became part of
the U.S. Department of Home-
land Security on March 1, 2003..


Florida Medicaid defrauded of millions


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist announced
.the arrest of nine individuals in
Miami and Savannah, Georgia, on
charges stemming from the inves-
tigation of Martin J. Bradley III and
his father, Martin J. Bradley Jr.,
owners of Bio-Med Plus, a Miami-
based pharmaceutical wholesaler.
Bio-Med Plus was primarily
engaged in the buying and selling
of prescription drugs used to treat
conditions such as AIDS and
hemophilia.
The arrests follow a 288-count
indictment returned by a federal
grand jury sitting in Savannah.
The Bradleys, who reside in
both Savannah and Miami, are
accused of. conspiring to defraud
the Florida Medicaid Program out
of millions of dollars involving
* these medications. The investiga-
tion revealed that these individuals
facilitated the diversion of these
drugs through various companies
and pharmacies either owned or
influenced by them. The business-
es were located in Florida, Georgia
and Puerto Rico.
Investigators with the Miami
office of the Attorney General's
Medicaid Fraud Control Unit,
together with federal agents of the
Savannah offices for the Internal
Revenue Service, the Food and
Drug Administration and the
Bureau of Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement, investigated
the Bradleys and their businesses.
"There is significant evidence of
widespread racketeering that must
be prosecuted," said Crist. "These
unlawful activities cost Medicaid
millions of dollars, which must be
returned to the taxpayers."
It is alleged that pharmaceuti-
cal treatments were ordered by
associated Miami-area physicians
who in turn did not administer the
drugs as prescribed. Through the


"There is significant evidence .of widespread
racketeering that must be prosecuted. These
unlawful activities cost Medicaid millions of dol-
lars, which must be returned, to the taxpayers."
Charlie Crist, Attorney General


use of certain pharmacies con-
trolled by the RICO enterprise, the
Florida Medicaid Program was
then billed and subsequently paid
for these drugs, often as much as
$4,000 to $6,000 per treatment.
The pharmacies would deliver
mass quantities of medications to
the physician offices for the sup-
posed purpose of administering
the drugs to patients. The drugs
would later be collected by co-
conspirators and returned to either
area pharmacies or Bio-Med Plus.
The prescription drugs billed to
the Florida Medicaid Program, but
not administered to Medicaid
recipients, were either fraudulently
re-billed to Medicaid through sev-
eral pharmacies, or unlawfully
transferred, distributed and divert-
ed to other pharmacies or whole-
salers, including Bio-Med Plus, for
sale on the open market. It is esti-
mated that the payments for the
fraudulently obtained drugs cost
the Florida Medicaid Program and
Florida Medicaid recipients well in
excess of $5 million.
In addition, the Bradleys
instructed others involved in the
scheme to destroy documentation
related to the transfer, distribution
and diversion of prescription drugs
sold on the open market by Bio-
Med Plus, which had already been
reimbursed by the Florida Medic-
aid Program.
The Bradleys, along with sever-
al of their business partners,
opened offshore bank accounts in


the Caribbean allegedly in order to
hide the illegal gains of their crimi-
nal enterprises. The indictment
also charges the Bradleys with
defrauding the Medicaid program
in the state of California.
.Along with Martin J. Bradley III,
39, of Coral Gables, and his father,
Martin J. Bradley Jr., 66, of Savan-
nah, Georgia, seven other co-con-
spirators were indicted and arrest-
ed as a result of this joint
investigation: Jose A. Trespalacios,
36, of Coconut Grove; Alberto L.
Tellechea, 38, of Coconut Grove;
Edwin RiveraJr., 34, of Miami; Mar-
lene Caseras Marrero, 33: Stephen
B. Getz, 46, of Pinecrest; and Sara
E. Griffin, 44, and John D. Strick-
land, 36, both of Savannah, Geor-
gia. Each of the defendants was
charged with Racketeer Influenced
Criminal Organization (RICO).
Several defendants where also
charged with money laundering
and wire fraud, as well as other
lesser charges. The RICO charge
alone carries a potential sentence
of 30 years to life in a federal
prison. Each defendant who is
convicted in this case is subject to
forfeiture of any and all property
constituting or derived from pro-
ceeds obtained directly and indi-
rectly from racketeering activity
up to a sum of money equal to at
least $45 million.
The case is being prosecuted
by United States Attorney Lisa
Wood of the U.S. District Court for
the Southern District of Georgia.


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Uc. Real Estate Broker
Office: 863-612-0551
Fax: 863-612-0553
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Lilia D. Joslyn Associate






lanrn
Investments & Real Estate, Inc,
700 South Main Stroet
P.O. Box 1680 i a3elle, Rorida33975
863-675-4500 Fax: 63-675-6575
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Teresa Sullivan
561-7953-853

561-99W5623



Sunburst Tours
Pick Up Available In
Clewiston
Belle Glade
Moore Haven
Call for more information
1-888-738-9130


THE
OPTICAL CENTER
located in
FAMILY EYE CARE
100 N. Main St.
LaBelle, FL 3393.5
863-675-0761


Free Services to help elders
Insurance counseling with a trained SHINE (Seniors Helping with
Insurance Needs of Elders) counselor is available every Wednesday
morning free of charge at Nobles Center and in Moore Haven at Senior
Connections offices. Legal help from Florida Rural Legal Services is
available at the Nobles Senior Center in LaBelle on April 13 from 9:30-
11:30 a.m. (Must call 675-1446 to make appointment) "Save the Date"
Memory Mobile and the next Trash to Treasures Indoor Flea Market at
Nobles Center are both on Friday morning, April 15. "NEW" Medica-
tion assistance through LEAPS is available April 20 from 1-5 p.m. at
Senior Connections office in Moore Haven.
Post Disaster Help for Older Adults
Disaster funds are still available to help older adults living in Hendry
and Glades Counties who continue to need assistance with such
issues as roof repair, debris removal, insurance deductibles, appliance


repair or replacement, chore work, etc. Elders in need of help due to
the hurricanes of last summer can speak with a specially trained out-
reach worker in Clewiston on Mondays and Tuesdays, 983-7088, and
LaBelle Wednesday through Friday (675-1446).
Upcoming Meetings and Events
Family Caregiver Support Group free meetings in April will feature
discussions with a Parkinson's disease specialist from Lee Parkinson's
Care in Ft. Myers. All meetings take place from 4-5 p.m. at local Senior
Connections offices. Next meetings are April 13 in LaBelle, April 20 in
Clewiston, and April 27 in Moore Haven. Call 675-1446 in LaBelle, 983-
7088 in Clewiston and 946-1821 in Moore Haven.
Nobles Senior Center exercise classes meet M-W-F at 9:00 a.m.
Come and join this lively group for better health. "NEW" Gamers
come every Monday to the L.J. Nobles Senior Center starting at 1 p.m.
for card playing, Scrabble and what-have-you. All are welcome.


14 V.


uIM, m











Robo-turkey helps catch hunting violations


Aler robo-turkey (left) and female hen robo-turkey


Courtesy photos/FWC
Col. Julie Jones (right), FWC s law enforcement director,
thanks NWTF Florida Chapter President Bill Marvin (left) for
donating five robo-turkeys to her division.


Some high-tech recruits are
joining the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion's (FWC) law enforcement


team. The Florida State Chapter
of the National Wild Turkey Fed-
eration (NWTF) gave the FWC
five robotic turkeys. These so


called robo-turkeys are lifelike
figures that rotate their bodies,
move their tails and even gob-
ble.
"Our officers use the robo-
turkeys to snare poachers as
they attempt to shoot the
decoys," said Col. Julie Jones,
FWC's law enforcement direc-


tor. "Having five more of these in
the field will greatly increase our
ability to catch unethical hunters
and conserve one of Florida's
prized game birds."
Robo-turkeys are not cheap,
costing around $700 a piece, and
since they are not bulletproof,
they often have a short lifespan.


FWC Officer Dwain Mobley uses remote control to demon-
strate a robo-turkey's mobility and sound-making capabil-
ities.


That is why NWTF has stepped
in to offer assistance.
"Our group made a commit-
ment to provide the mechanical
birds to all five FWC regional
offices," NWTF Florida Chapter
President Bill Marvin said. "We
appreciate the agency's commit-
ment to enforcing wildlife laws
and want to help officers with


their efforts."
NWTF has donated a total of
15 birds to the agency during the
last three years. The five new
robo-turkeys include four gob-
blers and one hen.
This latest donation couldn't
have come at a better time. Flori-
da's spring turkey season began
this last month.


Farmland values on the increase


By Chuck Woods
GAINESVILLE The value of
agricultural land continued to
increase in all areas of the state
last year, buoyed by a population
boom and strong nonagricultur-
al demand for land, according to
a new University of Florida sur-
vey.
"Following recent trends, the
market for agricultural land was
very active this past year, and the
rate of increase in land values
was particularly high in the
southern regions of the state,"
said John Reynolds, a professor
emeritus with UF's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.
"In most land-value categories,
we recorded double-digit
increases."
He said the most prominent
changes occurred in South Flori-
da where the value of cropland
increased by 58 percent and pas-
tureland values jumped by 76
percent. The largest increases
were in the Indian River area,
Okeechobee County and the
Gulf Coast counties.
Cropland and pastureland in
other regions also experienced
substantial increases: 19 to 25
percent in the central region of
the state, 10 to 19 percent in the
northwest region and nine to 15
percent in the northeast region.
Although citrus groves did not
increase in value as much as
cropland and pasture, the value
of orange groves in the south
region increased by 10 percent
and 12 percent in the central
region. The value of grapefruit
groves increased 34 percent in
the south region and 15 percent
in the central region. The value
of land with five- to seven-year-
old citrus plantings increased
about nine percent in the south
and central regions.
The average value of orange
groves in the south region was
$6,540 per acre, about $130 per
acre higher than in the central
region. The estimated value of
grapefruit groves increased to
$5,264 per acre in the south
region, about $746 per acre
higher than in the central region.
The average value of land with 5-
to 7-year-old citrus groves was
$5,920 per acre in the south
region, about $580 per acre
higher than in the central region.
Reynolds' 2004 land value
survey, which measures changes
over the past year, divides the
state into five regions: south,
southeast, central, northeast and
northwest. Because of the
impact urbanization has on agri-


"Following recent trends, the market for agri-
cultural land was very active this past year,
and the rate of increase in land values was
particularly high in the southern regions of the
state," "In most land-value categories, we
recorded double-digit increases."

John Reynolds, professor emeritus,
UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


cultural land values, Reynolds
collects data for the southeast
region, including Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach coun-
ties.
He also measures the value of
transition land acreage being
converted or likely to be convert-
ed to nonagricultural sites for
homes, subdivisions and com-
mercial uses. Counties were
divided into metropolitan and
non-metropolitan counties, and
transition land values were esti-
mated for each region.
The value of transition land
within five miles of a major town
in metropolitan counties
increased by seven to 13 percent
in northern regions of the state
and by six to 52 percent in south-
ern regions. In dollar amounts,
the value of transition land in
metro counties ranged from
$14,082 to $24,983 per acre,
except in the southeast region of
the state where transition land
values were $62,500 per acre.
The value of transition land
more than five miles from a
major town in metro counties
ranged from $7,950 to $14,352
per acre, except in the southeast
where the value was $36,250 per
acre.
In non-metro counties, the
value of transition land within
five miles of a major town
ranged from $4,793 to $6,778 per
acre. Transition land more than
five miles from a.major town
ranged from $3,921 to $5,446 per
acre.
For the 2004 study, six coun-
ties were reclassified. Reynolds
said the changes in the north-
west include moving Jefferson
and Wakulla counties into the
Tallahassee metropolitan statisti-
cal area (MSA), which is a feder-
al designation for urban or
urbanizing areas. In the north-
east region, Gilchrist County was
moved into the Gainesville MSA,
and Flagler County was removed
from adjacent MSA counties. In
the southern region, Indian River


County was designated as the
Vero Beach MSA.
"It is important to emphasize
that the value of a specific tract
of land may vary substantially
from the survey estimates
because of the physical charac-
teristics of the tract, its location
and the economic or institution-
al factors that restrict its use,"
Reynolds said.
"The survey measured land
values up to May 2004, and it
does not include any changes in
land values that may have
occurred after last year's hurri-
cane season."
The 2004 Florida Agricultural
Land Value Survey also shows:
Last year, the value of crop-
land and pastureland in the
south region increased from
$1,100 to $1,400 per acre. The
value of improved pasture was
higher in the central region than
in other regions. The lowest agri-
cultural land values were report-
ed in the northwest region, rang-.
ing from $1,450 per acre for
unimproved pasture to $2,193
per acre for irrigated cropland.
The value of irrigated crop-
land was $3,901 per acre in the
south region, $3,709 in the cen-
tral region, and $3,428 in the
northeast region. The value of
non-irrigated cropland was
$3,237 in the central region,
$2,657 in the northeast region


and $1,983 in the northwest
region.
The value of improved pas-
ture ranged from $3,608 per acre
in the central region to $1,783
per acre in the northwest region.
The value of unimproved pas-
ture ranged from $2,605 per acre
in the south region to $1,451 in
the northwest region.
The value of farm woods
increased by 18 percent in the
northwest region of the state and
by 16 percent in the northeast
region.
Survey respondents were
asked if they expect agricultural
land values to be higher, lower
or remain unchanged during the
next 12 months. Eighty-five per-
cent of the respondents in north-
ern areas and 67 percent of the
respondents, in south region
expect land values to increase
during the next year. Only 2.per-
cent expect lower land values
during the next 12 months.
Respondents in the southeast
region said that they expect land
values to increase by 30 percent,
primarily because of strong
urban demands.
The annual food and
resource economics department
survey, which Reynolds started
in 1985, was compiled from
information provided by 190
respondents from around the
state. Respondents included
property appraisers, farm
lenders, real estate brokers, farm
managers, land investors, feder-
al farm-assistance and conserva-
tion staff, UF/IFAS extension
agents, and others who develop
and maintain information about
rural land values.
More details on the survey,
"Nonagricultural Demand Caus-
es Agricultural Land Values to
Increase" (FE'545), are available
on the UF/IFAS Electronic Data
Information Source (EDIS) Web
site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/


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4-4


Okeechobee
28'i1 Rucks Dairy Road
863-467-94s44


Z,:fmi 119


Thursday, April 7,2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee








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LOST WALLET Outside of
the Dollar General store
441. Brownish red. Please
call 863-697-6129.

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RESTED? Criminal De-
fense *State *Federal
*Felonies *Misdemeanors
*DUI *License Suspen-
sion *Parole *Probation
*Domestic Violence
*Drugs "Protect Your
Rights" A-A-A Attorney
Referral Service
(800)733-5342 24
HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK.


Place your ad online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or mailto:
classad@newszap.com

Employment


Employment -
Full-Time 205
Employment -
Medical 210
Employment -
Part-Time 215
Employment
Wanted 220
Job Information 225
Job Training, 227
Sales 230



ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Must .have computer skills
and knowledge of general
office work. Bi lingual a
plus, Fax resume to
(561)924-9670.


Gar.g


150 AA


Garage
Yard Sale


YARD]
SALE




Place Your

YARD SALE

ad today!

Get FREE

signs and

inventory sheets!


Call Classifieds

877-353-2424


MANAGEMENTT

Immediate restaurant management
openings in Lake Placid, Moore
Haven, LaBelle, Clewiston and
Okeechobee. We are a franchise with
27 restaurants throughout South
Florida and are hiring energetic,
honest, and responsible individuals.
We offer:
-Excellent Salaries
-Medical and Life Insurance
-Dental Insurance
-401K Savings Plan
-Paid Vacations
-Advancement Opportunities
-Training Program

For an interview please call:
863-983-4224
or mail your resume in confidence to:
Pauline Alvarez
Southern Management Corporation
1014 W. Sugarland Hwy.
Clewiston, FL 33440


Geo@
The GEO Group, Inc.
The GEO Group, Inc. a worldwide leader in
privatized corrections others challenging
and exciting opportunities. Excellent bene-
fits (F/T positions) Current openings for:
RN
Library Consultant (P/T 8 hrs per mo)
Certified Correctional Officers
Dental Asst.
LPN
MOORE HAVEN CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
1990 East SR 78 NW
Moore Haven, FL 33471
Phone 868-946-2420
Fax 863-946-3437
e EOE M/F/V/H


Your new home could be In Get a quick response to
today's paper. Have you .any Item you may be sell-
looked for It? Ing with a classified ad.


RI 1. AIf 0 W W
r of an personal items for sale under 52 500


pO Ol y I I1lIIU I ll D C

More Papers Mean More Readers!

S" Reach more readers when you run
.. .. I .. I .


your ar u in several papers in
our newspaper network.
Our newspaper network
consists of eight papers one
daily and seven weeklies. An ad run in all these newspapers will
reach more than 164,000 readers*!

Call Today For Details!
SScOujrce? Puie Recr -, rh.larkei Surv.'ey Srrirrim on 1.1rlk'.-I R -.'earch irJI 1J,3rke[ R se, r,'h Ce,,irr

Rules for placing FREE ads!
STo qualify. your ad
SMust be for a personal item. (No commercial items, pets or animals)


Must fit .nto 1 2 inch
. (that's 4 lines. approximately 23 characters per line)
Must include only one item and its price
(remember it must be $2.500 or less)
Call us!
No Fee, No Catch, No Problem!


/ For Legal Ads:
legalads@newszap.com
/ For All Other Classified
Advertising:
classad@newszap.com


/ Mon-Fri
Ca, i3m 5p


EXION'alff'llI
V Saturday


/ Monday

; 0 n 4


Emlymn


NOW HIRING

Glades Ford is looking for the following:
*Experienced Salespeople
*Certified Technicians
*Certified Transmission Mechanic
*Part-time Retiree's as Drivers
Office Manager Trainee (knowledgeable in
accounting and automotive experience helpful)
Excellent pay plan advancement
available, great benefits.
Many opportunities.

Apply in Person

525 N.W Avenue L Belle Glade, FL 33430.

Call 561-992-4000


kL Friday 9 a.m. -


POSITION: Director of Curriculum
LOCATION: Glades County School District
DATE REQUIRED: May 1, 2005
QUALIFICATIONS:
*Administrative/Management Experience
eAppropriate Educational Background
& Certification.
DUTIES:
*Administer the operation & management
of district wide programs.
*Any duties as assigned
by Superintendent.
SALARY:
*Per Glades County School Board
Salary Schedule.
APPLICATION DEADLINE:-April 12, 2005
Direct Application and Resume To:
Wayne Aldrich, Superintendent
400 10th Street SW
Moore Haven, Florida 33471
(863)946-2083
Equal Opportunity Employer and Service Provider.
Reasonable Accommodations and Modifications
made for the Disabled.
Posted: 3/29/05


POSITION: Assistant Principal
LOCATION: Glades County School District
MooreHavenJr.-Sr. High
School
DATE REQUIRED: July 18, 2005


QUALIFICATIONS:
*Certified in School Principal or
Eligible for Certification
DUTIES:
*As assigned by Principal
*216 day contract
SALARY:
ePer Glades County School Board
Salary Schedule.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 12, 2005
Direct Application and Resume To:
Wayne Aldrich, Superintendent
400 10th Street SW
Moore Haven, Florida 33471
(863)946-2083


Equal Opportunity Employer and Service Provider.
Reasonable Accommodations and Modifications
made for the Disabled.
Pnstpd 3/2q/N5

BOOKKEEPER,
Full time position for busy ag. office,
must be experienced in computerized P/R,
A/P & Excel. Strong accounting background
& attn. for detail. Fax resume w/salary req.
to 863-983-5116. r


5 p.m.


Busy Home
Health Agency
Looking for the following:
Full time RN w/ benefits,
PRN $35 per visit $55 per
admit,MSW, HHA
1-941-505-4663 or fax
resume to:941-575-4445
Driver- COVENANT TRANS-
PORT. Excellent Pay &
Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos,
Teams & Graduate Stu-
dents. Bonuses Paid
Weekly. Equal Opportunity
Employer. (888)MORE
PAY (888-667-3729).
Driver- OWNER/
OPERATORS
*Competitive Rates *Paid
Fuel Taxes & Tolls *Air
Freight Runs *Lots of
Miles. Call Phil, M-F, 8-4
@ (800)899-3059;
(765)315- 118.

Drivers/OTR-Tanker look-
ing for Professional driv-
ers! NEW 2005 Equip-
ment, Top Pay, BONUSES,
Prepass & EZ Pass, Rider
Program & Much more!
North American Tank
Lines (866)748-6285.

Everglades Federal
Credit Union Looking
for Teller. Apply in per-
son, Mail resume to
1099 W. Ventura Ava.
Clewiston FL 33440 or
email efcu@earthlink.
net or fax
R'R-qN9- 1?9
Everglades Federal Credit
Union Receptionist need-
ed, Previous Phone Expe-
rience Preferred, Proficient
Word and Excel, Bilingual
a +. May apply in person,
mail resume to
1099 W. Ventura Ave,
email to:
efcu@earthlink.net
or fax 866-302-521,2.
Exceptional Online Retail
Business for Sale. Gross
$90K. Expandable. Up-
market Home/Garden dec-
orative accessories. $25K.
(407)322-4242 after
onm
HELP WANTED Earn Extra
income assembling CD
cases from any location.
No experience necessary.
Start immediately!
(800)405-7619 ext 28
www.easywork-
greatpay.com.

KNIGHTS MARINE Now Hir-
ing All Shipyard Crafts-
men. East, West And Gulf
Coast Projects. Excellent
Pay And Benefits. TOLL
FREE (877)603-7635.


0 RN/STAFF DEVELOPMENT
Palm Terrace of Clewiston
(Formerly Grace Healthcare)
Has Exciting Full-Time Opportunities
For Registered Nurses:
Registered Nurse Educator/Manager with longer
term care experience. Must have excellent
organizational skills for implementing staff and
patient education programs.
Staff RN's to plan/deliver nursing care to
patients/Residents requiring long term or
rehabilitative care.
Please apply in person:
Palm Terrace of Clewiston
301 S. Gloria Street
Clewiston, FL 33440
or Fax Resume to: DON 863-983-6698
or Email: adrqin.clewiston@chemfl.com




HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MECHANIC
Tropical Shipping is searching for
a Heavy Equipment Mechanic to
join our West Palm Beach, FL
facility. Qualified candidates will
have 3 yrs. exp. in heavy
equipment repair, maintenance
and operation. HS diploma and
valid driver's license.
Excellent comp/benefits package,
incl. relocation and 401(k).
Send resume to:
careers(tropical.com
fax (561)840-2956 or
apply on-line at:
www.tropical.com.
^ \EOE/DFWP /


.d OLDE CYPRESS COMMUNITY BANK'5
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Apply in person at main branch on
205 So. W.C. Owen Ave.
Clewiston 9:00-4:00. EOE
SALES ASSOCIATE
Creative self-motivated retail oriented
individual to service and cultivate new
customer relationships at our full service
Wal-Mart Branch open Mon-Sat. Banking
experience not required. Training,
competitive salary, incentive program
and full benefits.
POST CLOSING CLERK
Review loan files, data entry, balance
journals, and prepare correspondence.
Good typing, computer, telephone and
customer service skills required.
Salary and full benefits. (


WORKSITE AIDE
NEEDED TO WORK WITH ADULTS
WITH METAL RETARDATION OTHER
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES.
DUTIES INCLUDE: Supervise Lawn Crew.
Operate Lawn, Maintenance Equipment &
Forklift. Drive a 15 Passenger Van..
(CDL Required).
Excellent Benefits.
Drug Free Workplace, Equal Opportunity Employer,
Background Screening Required & DOT Physical.
APPLY @ 4250 N.W. 15th Street,
Belle Glade or Call Paul Maccarone @
863-996-9583 to schedule interview.
Closing Date: 04/13/05


NOW ACCEPTING APPLI-
CATIONS PT/FT No Exp
Necessary $50 Cash Hir-
ing Bonus (888)287-6011
ext 107
www.USMailingGroup.co-
m


Place your help wanted ad
online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or
mailto: classad@newszap.com


UP TO $4,000 WEEKLY!!
Exciting Weekly Paycheck!
Written Guarantee! 11 Year
Nationwide Company Now
Hiring! Easy Work, Send-
ing Out Our Simple One
Page Brochure! Free Post-
age, Supplies! Awesome
Bonuses!! FREE INFOR-
MATION, CALL NOW!!
8800)242-0363 Ext.
800.



Place your help wanted ad
online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or
mailto: classad@newszap.com



BABYSITTING
needed on site at the
Clewiston Airport
Easy Cash
For details contact
Dave @ AirAdventures
(863)983-6151
561 )414-5493

Place your help wanted ad
online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or
mailto: classad@newszap.com



I WIL-Caregive/Light
housekeeping, Mon-Fri. I
will also do just house-
keeping. (863)946-6697

Place your help wanted ad
online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or
mailto: classad@newszap.com


Financial



Business
Opportunities 305
Money Lenders 310
Tax Preparation 315


#1 CASH COW! 90 Vending
Machine Hd. You approve
Loc's-$10,670 (800)836-
3464 #B02428.


WORK FROM HOME
Part Time / Full Time
VISIT
.www.getvideogetpaid.com


$50,000 FREE CASH
GRANTS*****- 2005!
Never Repay! For personal
bills, school, new busi-
ness. $49 BILLION Left
unclaimed from 2004.
Live Operators! (800)606-
6081 Ext #75.


LEARN MORE ABOUT
IRS's and Investing.
First Bank of Clewiston
863-963-8191.

Loans by phone. Up to
$1000 in 24hrs. No Credit
Check! Bank Account Req.
(888)350-3722
www.paychecktoday.co-
m.
When you want something
sold, advertise in the
classitieds.


--;F


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


hT d A il 7 2005


Employment
Full Time


Employment
Full Time 205


Employment
Full Time "I I


Employment
Full Time "I I


Employment
Full Time 201


Employment
Full Time







Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7, 2005


VISION ACE HARDWARE
of Clewiston
is looking for two good people for the
following positions:
FLOOR MANAGER &
RADIO SHACK MANAGER.
Both positions are full time with
competitive salaries and good benefit
packages. Applicants should be self
starters with an energetic and
outgoing personality. Previous retail
and management experience is a must.
Please apply in person during store
hours @ 310 E. Sugarland Hwy.


S ATTENTION
HEALTHCARE
PROFESSIONALS!

RN's, LPN's, HHA's, PT,
OT, ST, MSW &
Community Educator.
Contact Sunrise Home Health
877-285-1722 or
S fax 941-235-1524 o


SOUTHERN GARDENS GROVES
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR ;
Must be experienced in working with:
Excavators, Graders,
Front End Loaders & Pan Machines.
Requires good driving record
with Class D or CDL license.
GOOD PAY, BONUS 401 K, & BENEFITS.
Contact HR Dept. @ 863-902-4133,
fax 863-902-4315, or
dmelton@southerngardens.com.


AutoCAD Draftsman
Successful candidate will be thoroughly
knowledgeable in AutoCAD 2004. 5+ years exp.
Land surveying and LDD experience preferred
but not required. Competitive pay
and excellent benefit package..
Mail resume to
Morris-Depew Associates, Inc.,
2216 Altamount Ave.,
Ft. Myers, FL 33901
Attn: Human Resources. Fax 239-337-3994.
Email: resume@m-da.com



CITY OF CLEWISTON
Immediate Opening
Police Dispatcher
High School Diploma or GED required.
Position requires working shift work,
weekends, & holidays. This is a full time
position with benefits package. Job
description and applications are available
at City Hall, Marilyn McCorvey,
Human Resources, 115 W. Ventura Ave.
Position is open till filled. EOE/DFWP.



^ LICENSED
PRACTICAL NURSE
LPN position working in LaBelle & Clewiston
Ryan White Title III program; assisting in
clinics; must be willing to learn & use tele-
medicine software & technology. Bilingual
Spanish/English a plus; must have valid
Florida driver's license; background screen-
ing & fingerprinting required. EEO/AA
Call Renee @ 863-674-4041 x 148 for
more details.


5 RN/LPN
Palm Terrace of Clewiston
(Formerly Grace Healthcare)
Has Immediate Openings
For RN/LPN's
*RN/LPN's, Full Time/Part Time, 7am-7pm
*NIGHT SUPERVISOR, 11 pm to 7 am
EXCELLENT WAGES & BENEFITS.
Please fax resume to 863-983-6698
or call DON for an appointment @
863-983-5123. EOE/DFWP


SEMINOLE TRIBE OF FLORIDA
Has immediate openings in our Big Cypress Reserva-
tion at our Gas Station/Convenience Store. FT/ & P/T
positions available for:
FOOD SERVICE ASSOC/COOK & SALES ASSOC.
Previous exp. pref. Excellent Communication skills
Good manual skills, cash handling exp., & positive cus-
tomer service attitude. HS diploma/ GED req. Flexible
working hours. $8 + starting based on experience. Ex-
cellent benefits (medical, dental, 401K) + fuel & food
allowance & incentives.
Fax resumes :954-967-3477. Applications available @
www.seminoletribe.com.



DISTRIBUTOR ROUTE SALES
License & credit checked
Flowers Baking Co. LLC
Call (561)252-5968
For Appointment
EOE DFWP


LABOR < ) FINDERS>

DAILY WORK DAILY PAY
All Types of Work Available
t 202 E. Sugarland Hwy. $ J
\$ (Across from Clewlston Inn) V
(863) 902-9494 )


Need a few more bucks to
purchase something
deer? Pick up some extra
bucks when you sell your
used items in the classi-
fieds.


Time to clean out the attic,
basement and/or gar-
age? Advertise your yard
sale In the classifleds
and make your clean up a
breeze


HENDRY REGIONAL
MEDICAL CENTER
Pesgism~ed Nunse
-Ful ii Me .Sg ay-im ,7 -,n RN
I a., 1 y rieprence pr.-feraid will tiaa n ww i,ia
*So,'rnr' RN (, d ,.a".'FL r?-'.L ,..
LPBj.a 1 h""I I 1.,r, r ,..a a

I.pN I & nI
-Fl. L-PNL.. VI.t P,, a~l* .-l ,,
F,Fd) FP. 7,, 7,a.-& ~,,.n T .L
*rd I .Regq.,a- '~, .
Pt r r, ,au'A ll.- ..( ,


0.. Staff Nurse
*FL RA' .. ACL- F.4L.S .,-e,,(
C' OR i... e br c *'d u .a I
Respiratory Therapist
(n ) ,TD *r rl : ac ., Rr rn.rl .,i .., .. .., e
SD S M r. -C L. a t. rr A er ,ld i H
* Full Time Hou.ekeeping SuperviSor
Two .t rn. i. -', ., ai.a Qfl. ., ..- .. ,' r

Full Time- l uranceBifler-l-FCC
:.7 .'-k in t,,l'l 'af. I- .e,. a w irr ... HF (L r. .. li. r
W ." a" '.1 b ,l- a... t .an ,, ,, a".'.. C C. ,-
da. _raJdil a. cadij. ,amfns Ra.'a: r-."111
Competitive Salary Excellent Benefits *
Clinical Ladder Program Education ASistance
Phone: 863-902-3079 or Fox resume to: 863-983,0805
Drug Free Workplace EOE



AIR CONDS- (1)- 3 ton, (1)-
5 ton, used 6 months,
$750 for both will sell sep-
arate. (239)243-6083.


Babysitting 405
Child Care Needed 410
Child Care Offered 415
Instruction 420
Services Offered 425
Insurance 430
Medical Services 435







PLa: (561)9964524
J(56l)996-9066
13- .S. W-- i.



Is Stress Ruining Your
Life? Read DIANETICS by
Ron L. Hubbard Call
(813)872-0722 or send
7.991 to Dianetics, 3102
N. Habana Ave., Tampa FL
q'qRn7






SCREEN & PATIO
ENCLOSURES,
Rescreening & repair.
lic.# 2001-19849 &
insured. (561)784-5568
or 61-358-2456.


Anyone
who has a
problem wall around
roofing & construction,
John or Phyillis Daniels
@ 863-983-7546


NEW SELF STORAGE
46 units 7x15, 8x15, 10x15,
10x30, 12x30, 15x25. Full
electric, secure on Com-
mereio St. 350 ft. from
Clewiston Police Dept.
863-983-6663, 983-2808
after hrs 983-8979


Air Conditioners 505
Antiques 510
Appliances 515
Appliance Parts 520
Beauty Supplies 525
Bicycles 530
Books & Magazines 535
Building Materials 540
Business Equipment 545
Carpets/Rugs 550
Children's Items 555
China, Glassware, Etc.560
Clothing 565
Ceins/Stamps 570
Collectibles 575
Computer/Video 580
Crafts/Supplies 585
Cruises 590
Drapes, Linens Fabrics 595
Fireplace Fixture 600
Firewood 605
Furniture 610
Furs 615
Health & Reducing
Equipment 620
Heating Equipment/
Suppoes 625
Household Items 630
Jewelry 635
Lamps/Lights 640
Luggg645
Medical Items 650
Miscellaneous 655
Musical Instruments 660
Office Supplies/
Equipment 665
Pets/Supplles/
Services 670
Photography 675
Plumbi.g Supplies 680
Pools & Supplies 685
Restaurant
Equipment 690
Satellite 695
Sewing Machines 700
Sporting Goods 705
Stereo Equipment 710
Televiaion/Radio 715
Tickets 720
Tools 725
1o I& Games 730
VRs a 735
Wanted to Buy 740



AIR CONDITIONER: 2005 3
Ton Package Unit w/Heat.
Never installed. $1150.
(954)309-8659
Find it faster. Sell It sooner
In the classified. -


INDIAN LANCE Rare, From
the Plains Indian. Museum
quality. $2500. (863)763-
0072.


DRYER, Gas, Like new.
$100. (863)635-3439


ELECTRIC RANGE- Ken-
more, good shape, $75.
(863)467-8160.

REFRIGERATOR, 2002
Whirlpool, 19 cu. ft. $300
or best offer. (863)635-
3439
REFRIGERATOR, Frigidaire,
Side By Side w/3rd door.
Works really good. $125
neg. (863)675-2440
Refrigerator, Commercial,
8x79x32, 3 dr, see thru,
$500 neg. You Haul. 863-
763-6257/763-0818.
STOVE, GE, Electric, All
works well. $100 or best
offer. (863)675-2440


Sunrise Appliances
New, Used, Scratch & Dent
Full Factory Warranty
Lowest Prices Guaranteed
401 US Hwy. 27
Moore Haven, Fl
(863)946-2666
UPRIGHT FREEZER- 18 cu
ft, freezers very good,
body in good condition,
$75. (863)983-4694.



PAPERBACK BOOKS- 2
shopping bags full, $20 for
all will separate.
(863)467-0924.


Steel Building Sale 20X30,
25X30, 30X40, 40X60,
50X100 Brand New Free
Delivery if ordered by 04-
09-05 Call Charlie
(800)896-1082.
STEEL BUILDINGS. Factory
Deals Save $$$. 40 x 60'
to 100 x 200'. Example: 50
x 100 x 12' = $3.60/sq ft.
(800)658-2885
www.rigidbuiiding.com.



BREAKER BOX- Siemens,
125 amp, with breakers,
$65. (863)467-8160.

METAL ROOFING SAVE
$$$ Buy Direct From Man-
ufacturer. 20 colors in
stock with all Accessories.
Quick turn around! Deliv-
ery Available Toll Free
(888)393-0335.

PIPE- used HDPE, 8-12",
various lengths, make of-
fer. (561)992-2482.

RIDGE CAP- new, brown,
steel, 60 feet, 26 gauge,
$120. (863)357-5754.



INDOOR/OUTDOOR CAR-
PET-Sears, new, 8.5x12,
teal blue, UV protected,
$50. (863)674-1695.



GRECO CRIB SET Converts
to Day bed & then to a
double bed. $125. Or best
offer. (863)357-3575.


SHOES, Dress, Sz. 9, Name
brand, never worn. Pd
$65, Now $20. Taylor
Creek. 863-763-0867



COMPUTER SYSTEM-
complete, loads of soft-
ware/programs, all for
$100. (863)612-0900.


BEDROOM SUITE girls
5pcs. Antique white stain
w/pink floral design $400
(863)983-7775
BED SKIRTS, (2) Twin, light
green, $6. (863)467-
8681


Umpomn
Part Time^^


Um


Emlymn


~f LARGE OR SMIALi
SSi& W See Them A"!'
CLEWISTON ANIMAL CLINIC
901 Ventu Ave Qewlston, FL 33440
G3 -9S3-91.4-S 2S


BUNK BEDS Twin, Solid
wood w/bunky boards.
Rarely used. $225 863-
634-5943.

CHEST, Dark wood. Great
for blankets. Good condi-
tion. $45. 863-763-0634

COFFEE TABLE w/Formica
Top and COMPUTER
CHAIR, $50 for both, will
sep. (863)763-1059

Coffee Table, 2 end tables
& sofa table, chrome &
brass w/glass tops. $300/
all. (863)674-0467.

DINNING ROOM TABLE,
Oak w/4 velvet red & wood
chairs & leaf. Good condi-
tion. $75 (863)902-7077

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER,
black, fits 27" TV, good
condition, $50. (561)252-
1371 (cell)

GLIDER CHAIR- 2 seat,
needs cushions, $10.
(863)763-1997.

LIVING ROOM SET, 3 pc.
set. Sofa, Recliner & Love-
seat. Tan. $300. 863-612-
9879'

RECLINER, LANE, w/rocker
& swivel, cream with light
green stripes, $250.
(863)467-8681

WROUGHT IRON BED
queen size have photo for
email on request $200
(863)983-7775



EASY GO GOLF CART
restored
$2200
(863)692-2229

GOLF CLUBS- 30 Misc,
clubs, incid sets, $6.00
Each, 2 bags $7 each.
(863)946-3123.

GOLF CLUBS, Wilson &
Spalding, 2 Sets w/metal
woods. $190 for both, will
sep. 863-946-3123



WEIGHT SET, Welder Pros-
tack. $300 863-673-2671





Place your ad online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or mailto:
classad@newszap.com


WEDDING BANDS, Trio Set,
white gold, diamonds,
$600. (863)467-0108



WALKER: VACARE w/Front
whis. Will hold person up
to 300 Ibs. & Bath tub
stool. $75 863)763-1059


ALASKAN DIAMOND WIL-
LOW (2)- beautiful pattern,
$200 neg. (863)763-7584
after 5.

BRAND NEW COMPUTER
Bad Credit? No Problem!
You're approved. Guaran-
teed. No Credit Check
Checking account re-
quired. (800)507-4855
Blue Hippo Funding Call
now for free bonus.

FREE 4-ROOM DIRECT
SYSTEM includes stan-
dard installation. 2
MONTHS FREE 50+ Pre-
mium Channels. Access to
over 225 channels! Limit-
ed time offer. S&H. Re-
strictions Apply.
(866)500-4056.


ONE CALL STANDS BE-
TWEEN YOUR BUSINESS
and millions of potential
customers. Place your ad-
vertisement in the FL Clas-
sified Advertising Network.
For $450 your ad will be
placed in over 150 papers.
Check out our 2x2 and 2x4
display network too! Call
this paper, or Heather
Mola, FL Statewide Net-
work Director at
(866)742-1373, or e-mail
hmola@flpress.com for
more information. (Out of
State placement is also
Availablee) Visit us online
at www.florida-
classifieds.com.
Place your ad online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or mailto:
classad@newszap.com
SPA! Overstocked! New 7
person spa-Loaded! In-
cludes cover, delivery &
warranty. $2999, was
$5999. (888)397-3529.






ORGAN- Hammond, Model
Elegante, 2 manual, full
pedal, Best offer, Free to
church or non' profit.
(863)675-0215.



AMERICAN PIT BULL TER-
RIERS- ABA Reg, all col-
ors, 8 wks old, (863)697-
2750.
APPALOOSA MARE- 6yr
old, some training, $600.
or best offer. (863)763-
7608.
BEAGLE PUPPIES, Small,
Tnri-Color, 3 Female, 3
Male. Parents on premis-
es. Vet checked, 1st
shots, Ready 3/30 $250
(863)382-3370
BLK. LABS AKC 2-M Par-
ents hold Jr Test Title
Ready to go 4/1/05 $600
(772)528-8564
EASTER BUNNIES
(10), $100. Will
separate. 863-673-1364
or 863-673-0476.
MINIATURE DACHSHUND
4 (M) Puppies & Mother.
CKC reg. Colors vary.
$425 Neg. 863-357-2250
Peach & White Doves, (2),
old enough to eat on their
own, $20 each. (863)675-
6214 aft 6 pm.
PET BUNNIES- (5) to good
homes only, $50 will sell
separately. (863)983-
5633.
PIT BULL PUPPIES
.Ready to go, $100.
(863)697-1725.

YORKIE PUPPIES 9 weeks
old, AKC reg., 1 female, 1
male, $695. Call (561)
791-4567.


SINGER,
Old, 401
good.
3389.


Slantimatic, Sews
$20. (863)675-


BASKET BALL POLE & Net.
Good condition. $45
(863)902-7077/599-1770

FISHING ROD RACK-
round, hold 6 rods, asking
$15. (863)763-1997.



SAW, Table Style, Crafts-
man, 10". 27x40" Table.
$150. (863)763-7584

TABLE SAW (2) Beachtop
w/stands. $200 for both,
will sep. (863)697-9704


PORTABLE OXYGEN
MACHINE- that will run off
12 volt or 110. (863)357-
1715.

STEEL GUITAR Double
Neck Pedal in good condi-
tion. Please call (863)763-
6230.


Agriculture



Christmas Trees 745
Farm Equipment 805
Farm Feed/Products810
Farm Miscellaneous 815
Farm Produce 820
Farm Services
Offered 825
Farm Supplies/
Services Wanted 830
Fertilizer 835
Horses 840
Landscaping
Supplies 845
Lawn t Garden 850
Livestock 855
Poultry/Supplies 860
Seeds/Plants,'
Flowers 865


QUARTER HORSE, MARE,
Registered, Leo-3 Bars,
Rides, Barrels, Child safe.
$2500 (863)675-4981

REGISTERED PASO FIND
GELDING- 11 yrs, buck-
sskin color, smooth gait,
$2500 (863)447-2395.



Ben Byrd's
Outdoor Power Equipment
Sales & Service
To Your Door
Factory Authorized
Available 7 Days
Servicing Hendry & Glades
863-677-0210.


LAWN TRACTOR- '02,
16HP, Cub Cadet, Power
Plus, 42" cut, 37HRs,
$1950. (863)467-5933.

MATCHES SMALL.
ENGINES Weed eaters,
Blowers & Mowers. $50 &
up 863-946-6636.

RIDING MOWER Snapper,
28" cut, 10 hp Briggs &
Stratton. Exc. cond:, $600
best offer. 863-983-4397

WALKING TRACTOR, Sim-
plicity, rotary, sickle bar,
plow, $850. 863-674-
0790


Okeechobee Livestock
Market Sales every
Mon. 12pm & every
Tues. 11am. 763-3127'


Rentals T



Apartments 905
Business Places 910
Commercial
Property 915
Condos/
Townhouses Rent 920
Farm Property -
Rent 925
House Rent 930
Land. Rent 935
Resort Property.
Rent 945
Roommate 950
Rooms to Rent 955
Storage Space -
Rent 960


1, 2 & 3 BR HOUSES &
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
No pets.
Call (863)983-4436.

EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
Available.
Call 863-227-6155 or
863-946-0004.



Fisheating Creek: under
new management, address
7555 US Hwy. 27 North
Palmdale. 863-675-5999


VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For Dolly Hand Cultural Arts
Center. If interested please call

561-993-1160


READING A
NEWSPAPER
HELPS YOU
UNDERSTAND
THE WORLD
AROUND YOU.




//


Employment
Full Time 205


Employment
Medical


Employment
Medical


[Tickets 7201


m


I Tickets


Employment
Full Time 10,


FULL-TIME REPORTER WANTED

Full-time reporter wanted for coverage in Hendry and Glades Counties.


The successful applicant must be a selfmotivated idvidual with strong

organizational skis, Previous news experience is preferred and knowledge of

digital photography is helpful, Duties will include the coverage of government

meetings in both counties, fulfilling assignments on time, creating communi

t contacts, and creating enterprising features,


To apply: Faxresumes to (83)983-7537.



Resumes can be mailed or dropped off at the Clewiston News oce at


626 West Sugarland Highway,Clewiston L, 334



Resumes should be addressed to: Mark Young, News Editor,


Real Estate



Business Places -
Sale 1005
Commercial
Property -Sale 1010
Condos;'
Townhouses Sale 1015
Farms Sale 1020
Houses Sale 1025
Hunting Property 1030
Investment
Property Sale 1035
Land Sale 1040
Lots Sale 1045
Open House 1050
Out of State -
Property Sale 1055
Property Inspection 1060
Real Estate Wanted 106-5
Resort Property -
Sale 1070
Warehouse Space 1075
Waterfront Property1080


HOUSE w/land
4BR/2BA DR, LR, landry,
porch, $25,000
(863)599-0626

MOORE HAVEN AREA,
Historic Frame House
on 9 acres w/pond, paved
road & city water. Oaks &
Citrus Tree's on property.
$300,000. 863-946-0189



HUNT ELK, Red Stag,
Whitetail, Buffalo Our
season starts September
1, 2005. GUARANTEED
HUNTING LICENSE,
$5.00. We' have NO Game,
NO Pay Policy. Call days:
(314)209-9800, Even-
inqs: (314)894-3776.


*LAND FOR SALE*
41.4 Acres
in Hendry County.
Call 239-657-5654

LABELLE V1 ACRE, with
beautiful river view. Re-
duced for quick sale.
$175,000 or best offer.
Build your dream home on
this prime location in La-
Belle, with a gorgeous
view of the Caloosahatchie
River & Waterfront Park.
.Corner 4 lots on CR 78 &
Avalon Ave. reaching to
Magnolia Ave. Total ap-
prox. size 200' deep x
113.5' wide. $175,0000.
863-517-0977.



ATTENTION INVESTORS:
Waterfront lots in the Foot-
hills of NC. Deep water
lake with 90 miles of
shoreline. 20% predevel-
opment discounts and
90% financing. NO PAY-
MENTS for 1 year. Call
now for best selection.
www.nclakefrontproperti-
es.com (800)709-LAKE.


BEAUTIFUL NORTH CARO-
LINA. WINTER SEASON IS
HERE! MUST SEE THE
BEAUTIFUL PEACEFUL
MOUNTAINS OF WEST-
ERN NC MOUNTAINS.
Homes, Cabins, Acreage
& Investments. Cherokee
Mountain Realty GMAC
Real Estate, Murphy
www.cherokeemountainr-
ealty.com Call for Free
Brochure (800)841-5868.


FORECLOSED GOV'T
HOMES $0 or Low down!
Tax repos and bankrupt-
cies! No Credit O.K. $0 to
low down. For listings
(800)501-1777 ext.
2?qq

Guadalupe Riverfront!
Spectacular wide river-
fronts on "Prime" Texas
Hill, Country location. 10-
32 acres w/ lots of water
frontage, huge trees, pan-
oramic views. From
$300's to $400's. Limited
number available, call now
before they're gone.
(800)609-7042 x 110.

LAKE VIEW BARGAIN
$29,900. Free boat slip!
High elevation, beautifully
wooded parcel. Across
from national 'forest on
35,000 acre recreational
lake in TN. Paved roads, u/
g utils, central water, sew-
er, more. Excellent financ-
ing. Call now (800)704-
3154, ext. 608. Sunset
Bay, LLC.


SERENE MOUNTAIN GOLF
HOMESITE $230/MO. Up-
scale Golf Community set
amid Dye designed 18
hole course in Carolina
Mountains. Breathtaking
views. Near Asheville NC.
A sanctioned Golf Digest
Teaching Facility! Call toll-
free (866)334-3253- ext
832
www.cherokeevalleysc.c-
om Price: $59,900, 10%
down, balance financed
12 months at 4.49% fixed,
one year balloon, OAC.


WESTERN NC MOUNTAINS
North Carolina Where
there is: Cool Mountain
Air, Views & Stream,
Homes, Cabins &
Acreage. CALL FOR FREE
BROCHURE OF MOUN-
TAIN PROPERTY SALES:
(800)642-5333. Realty Of
Murphy 317 Peachtree St:
Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.co-
m.



MOBILE WORKSHOP
14x52, zoned for workshop
in Glades Co. wired 220.
$2,000 neg 352-754-8514


Mobile Homes



Mobile Home Lots 2005
Mobile Home -Parts 2010
Mobile Homes Rent 2015
Mobile Homes Sale 2020



AWNING
4' wide 54" high
$65.
(863)467-4191



2 or 3 Bedroom Mobile
Homes For Rent
Stanton Mobile Homes
863-983-8106
Pioneer, 2/2, sgl., $700
mo., retirees welcome,
non-smoking environ-
ment. (863)983-6313



Financing Available::
Buy Here, Pay Here.
Stanton Mobile Homes
Marginal Credit O.K.
Call 1-800-330-8106
or 863-983-8106

CENTRAL HoMEs
OF CLEWISTON

1) Easy Life
Special 312 DW,
Appliances,
Screen Room
& Shed
$69,900


2) Super Buy
Tropical #228
DW, 3/2, Lg.
Screen Room,
10x14 Shed
$38,900,

3)New
Land & Home
Packages in
Sunshine Lake
Estates
NowAvailable

4)734 M tte
Loop 3





"2, 900
2160W. Hwy. 27 Clewiston
1.4 Miles N.W. of WALoMART
983-4663
CI champion
k tr OME 8UILOFRSCO


Job
Information


Job
Information







Thursday, April 7, 2005


Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


I Houes-al


6 13rPrim] Ne%% Illw.siajI~kS1 t.



Sky %~alle y ofClesvislon
12 DInlles 11151 olitsile 01'
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Somixilndvmir 3 2. %1~lim up'r,id-'
DeadJ Feil fliurouglIasf5 Chance DFmil
NrSAU EN

Reduced 4 [h Ls'wift OaEpporlunulV

I~AL'E PEll Hl. K 4E ru

NeW Isia '.(nJu :i~bd -2ba
Utt,, : I



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New t4LduE 140 -Acie. Siugu
Lanfe Call to Inqldne.
Alconirupaa Us 1.25 to2.3 .-lires.
Chit hemn while 15)1camL1C all to
ouilqire


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hhurl -IIII I ,ti- \ fluali

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R.11ii I FsI.tVNi C. IIfIH I l u I i~iI If 'it
11toullitoi I.irI t/h il 1 33. dk


klinlura Ranch F.Mtsla 19%INlCowiirv HlIing! Ilcamitul lhdi. m Nwliini I.OtS 12. -1dXTrs ( "d]Ifor
l1Id 'l, '14 L I I,11 '-":t '.j hic. I19i1lidit I i, I w%0%n, I ifll .ad T%% I IItrnr Itrnim I, Iflofliktmf.
hIA I -,o' Iii ',t'd $,1 S76ri'.W147
MIH)C i bd -21w. tillss tinmhiili .i 34k ook No I uriher %Nc hai~ ,
nop 'itt r l'l .( Ne%% ILslrg I '1 II III % L 1K k. ix .irl ionr rpropterI i n M ni
Ii, t Ti~ i l e I hri ~k i.Ni % -('I '' ked Hai rrin nn the (,iu~t~le

C A~I" J 'T7~N
'ISA~i~pLv1yb ii''I ~ ~A'
'rhlt'~,s.U'I Flls ROw M mug l4'.Tf14ll
'~%% Liming!aa, l l'.BdliUIV '2Cfl' lilitd i il) us ing! ihd~ Ib~i 584.9k
'i i f0%dererm J ssr-ii tn Duaipv, Ipin ,srd Fr hadbnk GET'IN TOWN!I
Call willflhBest Offer 1.s', bajr. ',Ikd. vised paittitpim
huiiliiai'.d.hvk -40 Flaghole "2 MI I UI ar(!.
rlat el road. Beaiutiful Oaks
'~ ~ ~~hs -I eoae 1hd rel'entil remnidt'lecd. WiLLGO
iii lilt a. drpt u a~ Jerry FASP! C-_.1.
111- I-0 v -ij- n.i-,%%iiir fill I GREA Sm~ith Wtanting to Buy or Sell
DE 11i i 25K CadllUs
1% '1SALEPHIDNDr 561-261-3444 We ;i ant Your Listings!!

PII. ISAUPITEMDM MG' CAM~LFOR The only REAL NILS in
t-,.i%,Pn' h r~ixt., I o Ciewislon. Ask Us
VACANTCAT LAND Today!


* Bank Foreclosures -
Call for Details
* 3BR, 2BA, MH, Many
Extras Reduced to $85,000
* 3BR, 2BA, Mi ,,T ,
maade lake S ;l ,
* New construction on
Bayberry Loop, 4 BR,
2BA, Many Upgrades
$265.000
* 4BR, 2BA, MR, Sherwood
S/D New Upgrades
* 4BR, 3BA. CBS Home. w1
Lrg. Pool $225,000


MOORE HAVEN
New Homes tarting at
S139.900
LAKEPORT
* Listings Needed
ACREAGE, LAND & LOTS
* Farm Land Available
Call for Details
* Montura Los Call for Details
COMMERCIAL
* Office & Retail Space available
in Shopping Center
Call for Details,
TOWNHOMES'
* 3BR,3BA in Greenacres
one & half Iours east
of Clewiston. $210,000


ANN DJV 'SS
LIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
420 E. SUGARLAND HWY.
(863) 983-6663 (863) 983-9770
WEBSITE: DYESSREAL-ESTATE.COM EMAIX: ANX@DYBSSREALSTAT'.COM
Se fIlablia E.pa tol
AJF7ER jROURS:
ANNDYESS FAVE ILT7NG AURASMTH TRAVISDYESS KATHYGARCIA
(863) 983-8979 (863) 677-0707 (863)599-1209 (863)228-2215 (863) 2284798
SJBSXDBNT jJi CO1tIMERCIAL Ifi
NsOW1UCT"C tI v Gi'r 2a ACREAGE
3^ff--ENDINf^,900 ^o tyo o' jiTNCWSO,
4BR, 3BA $345,000
$2150 Mobile Home Park 6 lots- 3 Re cl
BIi^TIlf:MlBR, w/.mbile home, 3 lots only 0'*j" YN 90c
1? $106,000 rchB aiaoi
.0 on9 Commercial Lc U 0Sn0
the--'- ,O 27 7 uh B lhhni $4,'11, 0h S

c in 8Lot- edR B
well B% pump. S250.00)
10 Lots Zoned Commercial
M(,re. Hhven Yacht Club $300,000
Lot w,' irces $26,500
3BR,2Ba,Ridglill $67,500 W ComonI -eB sing
Corner fl.V wen8 8-
MONTT.URA Marg i 9 sq. ft.
s aArdnAsarWidwrn $129.000


4BR 2BA 3 X4 w- $169,000
10~ rilJc


Harlem Bar Great
Business Opportunity
Call for Details


Visi ourwebite or therlisings at
w av.RAk RALESATECO


40 Years Experience \
LicEN.5ED & ltWRED- PRE SAIES lNPECloos

td-Whakfe akno-Ib- ta akltu -d hiSpas
CHEROKEE
HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. /
1-888-556-4637


P-TmvvYzaI-rIrqu
3 Bedroom, I Bath Northside


http,,l/www,hendrv-gladeanml~s.corn


-J

Above
CAovd


Your Realtor for
Western Communities

Teresa Sullivan


hom a



Carolyn Thomas 946-4005
MaryLee van Wijck 946-0505


r\ Ann Donohue 228-0221
'^ ,' David Rister 634-2157
. j4 | CfiULW~e&wf


Call For Listings


561-795-8533 or 561-996-5623,



Brian Sullivan

General Contractor

CUSTOM Homs CO ER BUILDINGS

Call us for all of your new construction needs,

your design or ours.

Visit our new web site

www.briansullivancontractor.com

and look at some of our new homes.


(863)441-4202


(863)465-1371


t .. m. -sms I License #CGC0061855


EobleHme


EobleHme


-'


CLEWISTON COUNTRY ACRES
Modular/Models. From $59,900 & up, 3/4/
5BR, 2/3BA, acre & 1/4 available or use
your land as down payment. Financing
available. 863-673-6417 or 561-753-8355

Your new car could be In Looking for a place to hang
today's paper. Have you your hat? Look no further
looked for it? than the classified.


New & Used
Mobile Homes:
Land Home Packages
as little as $1,800 down.
Stanton Homes
863-983-8106


Owner Financing
ON MOBILE HOMES
& LAND
Call 863-228-1405

Time to clean out the attic,
basement and/or gar-
age? Advertise your yard
sale in the classitfeds
and make your clean up a
breeze


Recreation



Boats 3005
Campers/RVe 3010
Jet Skiis 3015
Marine Accessories 3020
Marine Miscellaneous 3025
Motorcycles 3030
Sport Vehicles'ATVs 3035


BOAT, MOTOR, TRAILER,
17FT- take $1200 or trade
for economy car.
(239)243-6083.
Shop here first!
The classified ads.


Place your ad online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or mailto:
classad@newszap.com
PROLINE 153- 15'3", runs
good, 70HP Johnson, trlr,
lots of gear, $500 neg.
(305)304-5723.
Your new car could be in
today's paper. Have you
looked for it?
One man's trash is another
man's treasure. Turn
your trash to treasure
with an ad in the classi-
fieds.
Reading a newspaper
helps you understand the
world around you. No
wonder newspaper read-
ers are more successful
people!


BIG DISCOUNTS!!!!
Brechenridge
Park Models. ALSO...
Woodland Park,
Park Models.
New 40' Brechenridge:
Front kitchen.
List is $33,500
Special $29,900 Only 1!
Over 20 to choose from
& many used from
$2995.00
HOLIDAY RV
239-590-0066
Rt. 41 in Fort Meyers.
Betwn Alico/Corkscrew Rd.
How fast can your car go?
It can go even faster
when you sell It in the
classified.


Franklin Royal Executive
Park model '83, 12'x 35',
Very reasonable park
$7000. 239-612-0332.
GIANT RV BUYERS BLITZ.
April 8th, 9th, 10th. Giant
Recreation World. Flori-
da's Motorhome- Towable
Headquarters-
*Melboume- (800)700-
1021. *Ormond Beach-
(800)893-2552. *Winter
arden- (800)654-8475.
www.grwrv.com.

Reading a newspaper
helps you understand the
world around you. No
wonder newspaper read-
ers are more successful
people


RIVERFRONT- Price Re-
duced, 35', Park trlr,
10x30 room addition in
Meadow Lark Camp-
g round, $7000 or best of-
fer. (863)675-3474 .
TRAVEL TRAILER, '92 Yel-
low Stone, 30'. Exc. cond.
New awning. $6000/best
offer. 863-675-7145



OUTBOARD MOTOR- Mer-
cury 125HP, 2002, Merc.
Warranty until 8/08,
$4000, (954)553-5140.
Your new home could be In
today's paper. Have you
looked for it?


OUTBOARD MOTOR- Mer-
cury 9.8, runs good, ask-
ing $400 or best of-
fer,(863)673-1574.
STAINLESS STEEL PRO-
PELLER, for 40 50 hp.
Mercury motor, 10/4 x 12.
$125. (863)763-7609.


KAWASAKI '77 750 Black &
Wine, AM/Fm Cassette &
leather Saddle bag $1500
neg (863)452-6561
Time to clean out the attic
basement and/or garage?
Advertise your yard sale In
the classified and make
your clean up a breeze


ho. 1~r- it~a


A uliaj o~~rio neccti~tj -ppt ic fFlrd


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale


I Houses-Sale








Serving the communities south of Lake Okeechobee


Thursday, April 7, 2005


1-^-- ----1
Lot s-S]le 104!




AUCTION
100i Homesites in Highlands County, FL
This in FO'R chenc. to ou.n property) in Iliilalgh ds
County! Homesites range from 1/4 o 1/2 acre,
including lakefront & golf course properties. *

Over 100 homesites will be sold ABSOLfl'E to theo
last and highest bidder, regardless of price!

Tkis is a perfect opportunity to purchase
property for investments, primary residence,
I a atlioio hiom or retirement home sale.






Plusl 2 Large Tracts In Levy County to be sold
In parcels Call for details.. .

I GGEG OIAM Ai ..l|I= rahr eI.rl.r.,.n.
800-257-4161
[i &I li IC nLalJ Id lia www hiqner.bothmnl com


FLEETWOOD '99, 21', Hy-
brid, A/C, Bunkbeds,
sleeps 7, Good Cond Ask-
ing $8500 863-467-2773


Automobiles



Automobiles 4005
Autos Wanted 4010
Classic Cars 4015
Commercial Trucks 4020t
Construction
Equipment 4025
Foreign Cars 4030
Four Wheel Drive 4035
Heavy Duty Trucks 4040
Parts Repairs 4045
Pickup Trucks 4050
Sport Utility 4055
Tractor Trailers 4060
Utility Trailers 4065
Vans 4070


BUICK LESABRE, '96-
needs minor work, $550.
(863)763-7023.


Dodge Dart Swinger, '73,
blue, raised rear, orig.
slant 6, $1500. (863)635-
4357 aft 5.

HONDA CIVIC '89 Needs
fixing or good for parts
Good Motor $200
(863)902-0213

NOVA, '72- 6cyl, auto, 79K
'miles, Daily driver 863-
634-0526.


Place.your ad online at
http://www2.newszap.com/
classfl.html or mailto:
classad@newszap.com
PONTIAC GRAND AM, '92,
runs, needs some work,
body in good shape, $600.
(239)462-7342


NOVA, '72- 6cyl, auto, 79K
miles, Daily driver 863-
634-0526.




CLASSIC' JEEP CHEROKEE
'85 runs & in good shape
$1250 or best offer
(863)763-0072.
JEEP WRANGLER, '92-
4x4, $1800 neg. Call for
more information.
(863)697-3656.


GOLF CART, Club Car, late
model, reconditioned, gas
&' electric, $1495,
(863)675-1472
Golf Carts,
Gas or Electric
Buy and Sell
Call (863)824-0878


ENGINE, KAWASAKI, brand
new, 10 hp, fits John
Deere or Kawasaki Mule.
$900. (863)692-2229.
FORD BRONCO, '79 parts
only, $300. ISUZU PUP
'85- parts only, $150.
(863)763-5147.


I Pb ic.No


MOTOR & TRANS- 4.3,
manual trans, 5 spd over-
drive, $600 neg.
(863)234-1798.
OLDS TORNADO '88, Blue,
Needs work. Nice body.
Doesn't run. $200 best of-
fer. (863)467-0987
TAILGATE for Ford F250
Pickup, navy blue, New
$424 Now $350. or best
offer. 863-677-1407


CAMPER SHELL For Full sz
short bed pickups w/
wedge design & ladder
bars. $400 863-634-2975
Chevy C10 Stepside, '67,
solid body, 350 eng., runs,
needs some work, $1000.
863-635-4357


JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO 1996, Good con-
dition. All power. $3000
(863)946-0189



MATTRESS- new, for Trac-
tor Trailer sleeper, 36x78,
plus sleeper pad mattress,
$60. (863)674-1695.


GOOSENECK '95 Stock/
Horse Trlr., 12 Ft. long w/
tandem axles. Exc. cond.
$1995 863-983-7734


GMC High Top Conversion
Van, '93, good motor &
trans, 5 new tires, will
trade for 3/4 ton Chevy or
GMC Pickup of equal val-
ue. (863)763-6083


READING A
NEWSPAPER
HELPS YOU
GET INVOLVED IN
THE COMMUNITY


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR HENDRY COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC
F/K/A CONSECO FINANCE SERVICING CORP.,
Plaintiff,
v. CASE NO. 2005-08-CA
JAMES R. GAMBLE, JR.; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES R. GAM-
BLE, JR.; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DE-
FENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, Ll-
ENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgement of
Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of
HENDRY County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in HENDRY
County, Florida, described as:
A PARCEL OF LAND IN SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 43 SOUTH, RANGE
32 EAST, HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 19,
RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 09'37" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 2510.16
FEET ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 19,
THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 08'42" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 851
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THIS DESCRIPTION; THENCE
CONTINUING SOUTH 88 DEGREES 08'42" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 267
FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 09'37" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
796.93 FEET; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 09'10" EAST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 267 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 09'37" EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 796.88 FEET TO THE SAID POINT OF BEGINNING OF
THIS DESCRIPTION.
To include a:
1996 WEXFORD MOBILE HOME; VIN 10L24879 and TITLE
#72061440
A/K/A
14159 CANOPY LANE
CLEWISTON, FL 33440
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front office
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the Hendry County Courthouse (being
the second floor hallway of the Hendry County Courts Building), LaBelle,
FL 33935 at 11:00 AM, on the 27th day of April, 2005.
DATED THIS 29th day of March, 2005.
CLERK. OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /S/ Hammond
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing a special accommodation to participate In this proceed-
ing should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days
priot to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-
8771 (TOO) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service.
564628 CGS 4/7,14/05


NOTICE SEMINOLE TRIBAL REGULAR ELECTION MAY 9 2005
For Tribal Council Representatives and Board of Directors Representa-
tives in accordance with the Amended Constitution and Bylaws of the
Seminole Tribe of Florida, and the Amended Corporate Charter of The
Seminole Tribe of Florida, Inc., a Regular Election is called for the follow-
ing offices on Monday, May 9, 2005.
SEMINOLE TRIBE OF FLORIDA SEMIOLE TRIBE OF FLORIDA, INC.
TRIBAL COUNCIL: BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
BIG CYPRESS RESERVATION BIG CYPRESS RESERVATION
REPRESENTATIVE (1) REPRESENTATIVE (1)
BRIGHTON RESERVATION BRIGHTON RESERVATION
REPRESENTATIVE (1) REPRESENTATIVE (1)
HOLLYWOOD RESERVATION HOLLYWOOD RESERVATION
REPRESENTATIVE (1) REPRESENTATIVE (1)
Enrolled members of the Seminole Tribe of Florida who have reached
their 18th birthday on or before April 9, 2005, and who have lived on any
combination of the reservations ten (10) month out of each year for the
past four years, are eligible to vote for the positions mentioned above.
The representatives for Tribal Council and Board of Directors are voted
for by residents of their respective reservations.
Eligible members who wish to become candidates may obtain a petition
form from one of the Tribal Offices at Brighton, Big Cypress, and Holly-
wood reservations, beginning April 8, 2005 or can obtain Information
form the Secretary of the Tribal Councl['and Board of Directors. The com-
pleted petitions from candidates must be in the hands of the Secretary no
later than 5:00 p.m. on or before April 18, 2005 so that the announce-
ment of candidates can be announced April 20, 2005.
ALL ELIGIBLE TRIBAL MEMBERS ARE URGED TO VOTE
PRISCILLA D. SAYEN
SECRETARY
563749 CGS 4/7/05

Love the earth Recycle Grab a bargain from your
your used items by sell- neighbor's garage, attic,
ing them in the classi- basement or closet In to-
fieds. day's classlfieds.


I Puli Noic


I Puli No


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HENRY COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case File No. 2005-206-CA
Division: Civil
BERTHA MURATI,
Plaintiff(s)
v.
EVELINA 0. RASPALL, WILLIAMS R. RASCO,
JOSE A. DECASTRO and DALIA DECASTRO,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: EVELINA 0. RASPALL, WILLIAM R. RASCO, JOSE A. DECASTRO,
and DALIA DECASTRO, if alive, or if dead, their unknown spouses, wid-
ows, widowers, heirs, devisees, creditors, grantees, and allparties hav-
ing .. ..i q,, -"i r i" 'h,..jh uJ-:i' -r inrt thvm nd3n 3 i nd I pl r
s o n ; I iT r n o", h i r ni,- l, .i .- n :r i l n r I n ,- i ..1 i ,: iT.1 ,r ,
against the Defendant in regards to the following described property in
Hendry County, Florida:
PARCEL 1 THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 14, TOWNSHIP 44 SOUTH, RANGE 32 EAST, HENRY COUNTY
FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR AN ACCESS ROAD OF THE
WEST 30 FEET THEREOF. SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR A DRAIN-
AGE CANAL OF THE NORTH 30 FEET THEREOF. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT
NO. 3549 IN MONTURA RANCH ESTATES
PARCEL ID# 1-14-44-32-A00-0061-0100
PARCEL 2 THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 SECTION
14, TOWNSHIP 44 SOUTH, RANGE 32 EAST, HENDRY COUNTY FLORI-
DA. SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR AN ACCESS ROAD OF THE EAST
30 FEET THEREOF. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT NO. 3559 IN MONTURA
RANCH ESTATES
PARCEL ID# 1-14-44-32-AOO-0064-0000
PARCEL 3 THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 14, TOWNSHIP 44 SOUTH, RANGE 32 EAST, HENDRY COUNTY
FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR AN ACCESS ROAD OF THE
EAST 30 FEET THEREOF. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT NO. 3560 IN MONTURA
RANCH ESTATES
PARCEL ID# 1-14-44-32-AOO-0064-0100
Notice is hereby given to each of you that an action to quiet title to the
above described property has been filed against you and you are required
to serve your written defenses on Plaintiffs attorney, BILL MCFARLAND
P.A., P.O. BOX 101507, CAPE CORAL, FL 33910, and f;li ir... ,:,..1;,,i
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Hendry County, P.O. i.:.. "r..
Belle, FL 33975 on or before April 25, 2005 or otherwise a default judge-
ment will be entered against you for the relief sought in the Complaint.
THIS NOTICE will be published once each week for four consecutive
weeks in a newspaper ,o general circulation published in Hendry County,
Florida.
Dated this 18th day of March, 2005.
BARBARA S. BUTLER, Clerk of the Court
By A. Holsbeke, Deputy Clerk
Bill McFarland
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 101507
Cape Coral, FL 33910
Fla. Bar No. 195103
562572 CGS 3/24,31;4/7,14

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER
ADOPTION OF COUNTY ORDINANCE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of
Glad,: ..u,,r, Fi .:,;.jj -.i11 hold a public hearing at the regular meeting
on -ur.,in 4p, i 1"."1:, at 9:00 a.m. in the County Commissioners
Meeting Room in the Glades County Courthouse, Moore Haven, Florida,
to consider the adoption of the followingordinance:
ORDINANCE NO. 2005
GLADES COUNTY, FLORIDA
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2001-9 RELATED TO
THE GLADES COUNTY ENTERPRISE ZONE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY;
APPOINTING A BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF THE AGENCY; PRO-
VIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION; PRO-
VIDING FOR CONFLICTS; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
A copy of the proposed Ordinance is on file at the Glades County Clerk of
Court's Office, 500 Avenue J, Moore Haven, Florida 33471.
IF A PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WITH RESPECT TO ANY MAT-
TER CONSIDERED AT THE HEARING, THAT PERSON WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND HE/SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, WHICH
RECORD INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.
ALL Interested parties are invited to attend and be heard.
r"A17- CPCtIrr, teiIr


Need a few more bucks to
purchase something deer?
ick up some extra bucks
when you sell your used
Items in the classified.
Your new home could be in
today's paper. Have you
looked for Ft?
How do you find a job in to-
day's competitive mar-
ket? In the employment
section of the classi-
fieds.


I Public Notice


Public Notices



Public Notice 5005
State Public
Legal Notice 5500


IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR GLADES COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 05 CC 17
NORMAN WALDRON
Plaintiff
-vs-
PEDRO H. JIMENEZ, it alive, or if
dead, the unknown Personal Rep-
resentative of his estate; his un-
known spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors and all other
parties claiming by, through and
against these Defendants; and All
Unknown Tenants,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PEDRO JIMENEZ
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a Mortgage has been
filed against you, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Mela-
nie A. McGahee, Esq., whose ad-
dress is 417 West Sugarland High-
way, Clewiston, FL 33440, on or
before 4/22/05 (not less than 28
days) and to file the original with
Clerk of this Court either before
Service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
DATED on March 15, 2005.
JOE FLINT
As Clerk of Court of Glades County
By: Bonny Rhymes
As Deputy Clerk
562136 CGS 3/24 31-4/7 14



LEGAL NOTICE
The following vehicle will be sold at
public auction on April 21 at 8:00
a.m.at 2190 NW 16th St.
1986 Ford Van
VIN #1FTJE3416GHA20937
565843 CGS 04/07/05

Need a few more bucks to
purchase something
deer? Pick up some extra
bucks when you sell your
used items in the classi-
fieds.


Reading a newspaper helps
you understand the world
around you. No wonder
newspaper readers are
more successful people
It's never too late to find
the perfect gift. Look for
it in the classified.
One man's trash is another
man's treasure. Turn
your trash to treasure
with an ad in the classi-
fieds.


byfilling inthe space above!
by filling in-the space above!


Sell your personal valuables if
they're $2,500 or less
for absolutely free!
No fee, no catch, no problems!


* 4 lines for 2 weeks

* Price must be
included in ad

* Private parties
only


* 2 items per house-
hold per issue


ACiewiston News


* 1 used htem1 or
grouping per ad
priced at $2,500
or less

* Independent
Newspapers

reserves the right to
disqualify any ad.


DS COUNTY
.4 DEMOCRAT


The Sun


Toll Free 877-353-2424

E-Mail: classad@newszap.com


Your paper,






not ours.



tia- Clewiston Wi- TheSun



.. .. ''* ".








We pledge to operate our newspaper as a public trust.


We believe journalists are nothing more than guardians of every citizen's
right to a free press. We have no authority to compromise, bargain away
or dishonor the principles underlying the First Amendment.


We don't play loose with the facts. We give notice to your opinions, not
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GrLADES COUNTY



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The Sun

Community Service Through Journalism


READING A NEWSPAPER,.,


THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HENDRY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 04-716-CA DIVISION
CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHEN J. HINTON, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu-
ant to a Final Judgement of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 28,
005 and entered in Case No. 04-
716-CA of the Circuit Court of the
TWENTIETH Judicial Circuit in and
forHENDRY County, Florida where-
in CHASE MANHATTAN MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION, Is the Plain-
tiff and STEPHEN J. HINTON;
WANDA W. HINTON; JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK AS INDENTURE
TRUSTEE C/O RESIDENTIAL
FUNDING CORPORATION; are the
defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash IN FRONT
OF THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF
THE COURT, BEING THE SECOND
FLOOR HALLWAY OF THE HEND-
RY COUNTY ADMINISTRATION
,iiLJi. CORNER OF HIGHWAY
.l 1iHa 29TH SOUTH, LABELLE,
FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 27th
day of April, 2005, the following
described property as set forth in
said Rnal Judgment:
LOT 13, BLOCK A, RIDGEVIEWM
ESTATES ADDITION NO. 2,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGE 122, AS RECORDED IN
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HENDRY COUNTY, FLORIDA;
SAID LAND SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN HENDRY
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 812 Sawgrass Street,
Clewiston, FL 33440
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on the March 29,
2005.
Barbara S. Butler, Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ S. Hammond
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons
needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the Deputy
Court Administrator whose office
is located at Lee County Justice
Center, Room 3112,17010 Monroe
Street, Fort Myers, Florida 33901,
telephone number (813)335-
2299; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770 (v), via Florida
Relay Service, not later than sev-
en (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
565698 CGS 04/07/05


i -