Sumter County times

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Sumter County times
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D.C. Hull ( Sumterville Sumter County Fla )
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HAPPY THANKS IING!
50 Cents


I SUMTER COUNTY





IMES


Established in 1881


Thursday, November 28,2013
Volume 127 Number 48



For more news, videos, photos
Visit us: sumtercountytimes.com


E-mail us:
news@sctnews


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LARRY BUGG
Times Correspondent

When the players,
coaches, fans and fami-
lies of the South Sumter
High football team sit
down to Thanksgiving
dinner today, they can be
very grateful for Friday's
game.
South Sumter, now 12-
0, beat North Marion 42-


On to regionals Friday
8 in a Class 5A-Region 2 to beat a team like North Our kids are just s(
semifinal in Sparr. That Marion (9-3) by that lop- selfish. We are able
means the Raiders play sided score, a lot of good things
St Petersburg Lakewood "I thought we would can't do what we d(
on Friday in Bushnell for win," he said. "I thought be selfish. Consequ.
the regional title, our kids would concen- this team thing is
South Sumter head trate enough to win. I ing great for us."
coach Inman Sherman think everybody under-
said he wasn't expecting stands it's a team thing. ,.,,o


o un-
to do
.You
) and
ently,
work-


South


Sumter


hosts


event

BRENDA LOCKLEAR
Staff Writer

South Sumter's NJROTC
served as host this year for
the annual orienteering
competition between Cen-
tral Florida schools.
South Sumter's team
ended the competition with
four awards this year, in-
cluding three in the female
category and one in the
team category Jesseca Cur-
rie took a first place in the
female yellow category and
sixth overall, Marie Rod-
man took a second place in
the female orange category
and the South Sumter
green team of Shane Cohn,
Tyler Smith and Clifford
Thompson taking third.
NJROTC Commander
Charlie Jacobs said after
past competitions, they
opted to host the event, uti-
lizing Bushnell's Dade Bat-
tlefield Historic Site.
This year's event drew
more than 80 contestants
from five high schools in-
cluding South Sumter, Cen-
tral, Gulf, Gaither and
Tampa's Robinson High
School.
The event was held on
Saturday, Nov 15 at the
park and lasted until early
afternoon.


BRENDA LOCKLEAR/
Sumter County Times
The first orienteer-
ing event, hosted
by the South
Sumter High
School NJROTC
and Dade Park
drew more than 80
contestants. Five
schools from Cen-
tral Florida, pic-
tured above,
participated, as
well as two teams
from the general
public. For more
photos see Page
12.


The South Sumter
High School orien-
teering team is
shown at left with
NJROTC Com-
mander Charles
Jacobs. The team
took part in the
competition and
hosted the event.


y FOR THE HOLIDAYS


6 845781 2029 7


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DEC. 6
Lighted-boat Night Parade
If you're a boating enthusiast and love the
holidays, or just love to Christmas carol, you
may want to join the crowd on Friday Dec. 6
for the Lighted-Boat Night Parade in Lake
Panasoffkee.
Boat floats are asked to meet at 6 p.m. at
Angler's Haven boat basin, where they'll
begin line-up.
The flotilla will move along and arrive at
Harbor Lights at 7 p.m. and then on to the
WerdaHeckamiat? pier by 7:15 for caroling.
The public is invited to meet at the pier
and join in, or meet at the boat basin to par-
ticipate in the parade.
For more information, call Bob Clark at
352-568-5757.
Dec.7
Panasoflkee Christmas Parade
Ho, ho, ho, what fun!
The annual Panasoffkee
Christmas Parade is
slated for the first Satur- -
day of the month. Line- -
up is set for 9 a.m. at the -
IGA Economizer on C.R.
470.
Spectators can line up An-


east of the store, along C.R. 470.The parade
starts at 10 a.m.
There will be a first and second place and
honorable mention.
Children's Christmnas Party
The annual Children's
Christmas Party is slated
from 11 a.m. to 1p.m. and
sponsored by the Lake
Panasoffkee Moose
Lodge 1179 and Women
of the Moose Chapter
1590.
The clubs are hosting a
visit with Santa and a
chance to take home
some goodies.
Bring a camera to take
photos of your child/children with Santa.
The event will be held at the Church of the
Fishermen in Lake Panasoffkee.
Wildwood Christmas Parade plans in the
works
The Wildwood Historical Society will host
the 2013 Wildwood Christmas Parade. Set to
begin at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7, the pa-
rade is open to the public not only as spec-
tators, but as participants as well.
All entries must be pre-registered. For
pre-registration and entry information, con-


tact Gidget Gibson at 352-461-1140 or by
emailat: gidneyb@aol.com
Parade line up begins at 2 p.m. at the Wild-
wood Middle High School
Christmas on the Florida Frontier
Christmas on the
Florida Frontier at Dade
Battlefield Historic Park is k.6
a night out for the commu-
nity admission is only $5 '
per car load (up to eight
people) or park pass.
Step back in time to a
simpler time of celebrat-
ing Christmas on the
Florida Frontier.
Make and play with
homemade toys, create
corn husk dolls, do soap
carving, learn the art of
punch tin crafts, dip can-
dles, listen to old-time music, square dance,
sing carols, decorate a Christmas tree, make
Christmas crafts and visit a far from home
soldier's encampment.
The cost of creating items is included in
admission, but guests will also have the op-
portunity to purchase refreshments from
local vendors.

Please sAeOLIDAY, Page 2


Piecdase tsVWUUCLnbf JPdyc





PAGE A2 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013


ESTABLISHED 1881
F'7j7 SUMTER COUNTY


(USPS #535-880)
GIVE US A CALL
News Department............. 352-793-2161
Circulation .................. 1-888-852-2340
Retail Advertising .............. 352-793-2161
Classified Advertising . Toll Free 1-877-676-1403
Fax .......................... 352-793-1486
The Sumter County Times is published Thursdays,
52 times a year, for a subscription price of
$25.00 per year in Sumter County by:
SUMTER COUNTY TIMES
204 E. McCollum Ave.
Bushnell, Florida 33513
Deadlines:
Display advertising
Proof .................... Friday at 3:00 p.m.
Final .................... Monday at 3:00 p.m.
Classified Advertising......... Tuesday at noon

Periodical Postage paid at Bushnell, Florida, and
at additional mailing offices.
POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO
SUMTER COUNTY TIMES.


HOLIDAY

continued from Page 1
The date is set for Saturday, Dec. 7 from 3 p.m. to 8
p.m. and the park is located at 7200 at 7200 C.R. 603
For more information, call 352-793-4781.
DEC.7 and 8
Christmas with the Alpacas
Date of Event: 12/07/2013 Time of Event: 11:00 am
Location: 751 NW 111th Lane, Oxford.
TMMA Farms will be open to the public for the first
weekend in December, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The public is invited to come out and see the al-
pacas up close and personal, enjoy hot cocoa and
sweets and shop for the holidays. Unique gifts and
products all made from alpaca fleece, see our local
spinners spin yarn and so much more. The cost is a $3
donations per person, or a canned good for the local
families in need. The farm is at 751 NW lllth Lane in
Oxford. For more information: wwwtmmafarms.com
or call 352-484-7856.
DEC. 14
Webster Christmas Parade
The City of Webster will host the 2013 Webster
Christmas Parade "A Country Christmas." Set to
begin at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14, the parade will be
in the city limits and all entries must pre-register. Pa-
rade line up will begin at 5 p.m. at the Webster Farm-
ers Market.
For more information, or to enter the parade, con-
tact Webster City Hall at (352) 793-2073 or by email


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Country Christmas Craft A
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The second annual'Coun-
try Christmas Craft Show' is
slated for Saturday, Dec. 14
in Lake Panasoffkee.
Set from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., l
the show will include a vari- -
ety of handmade and home- .
made items, just in time for "
holiday shopping.
There'll be jams and jellies, boondoggles, aprons,
table runners, jewelry, whirly gigs and more.
The show will be on the property across from Paths
of Grace Church, at 101 C..R. 527 in Lake Panasoffkee
- across from Spirit and just east of Interstate 75.
Still accepting vendors and spaces are $25 each.
For more information and an application, call Louis
@ (352)643-0005.
Baker House Tour and Historical Exhibit
Baker House in Wildwood will be open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. on Saturday Dec. 14 and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Sunday Dec.15 for tours.
The house will be decorated for Christmas, with
some of the rooms decorated by local businesses, or-
ganizations or individuals. Ticket donation is $10 per
person.
There will also be a living history exhibit presented
by the Sons of the Confederacy, on the grounds behind
the house
Tickets are available at the door. Guided tours will
be given through the house. All proceeds benefit the
Baker House Project.


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A3


Pastor Marguerite Matthews (left) and Carol Dizon (far right), presented a
check to Lake Panasoffkee Elementary School Principal Bridget Veal, re-
cently. The check was donated as a "tithe" from the church, for the money
they raised at their pumpkin patch.The funds from the patch also benefited
the Navajo Native Americans (who raised the patch) and the church itself.
The patch served as a community effort, between the church as the host
site and the community support in purchasing from the patch.

Police report


Tuesday, Nov. 19
Rachel Vanllita
Nethercot, 56, Bushnell,
arrested for violation of
probation.
Edward Keith
Mitchell, 39, Bushnell,
arrested for trespassing.
John Allan Pace, 51,
Bushnell, arrested for in-
decent exposure.
Wednesday, Nov. 20
Shakima Diamonique
Brown, 21, Wildwood, ar-
rested for larceny.
Monique Danielle
Smith, 19, Wildwood, ar-
rested for probation vio-
lation.
Cheyenne Dakota-
Dean Updyke, 21, Bush-
nell, arrested on
out-of-county warrant
Thursday, Nov. 21
Robin Marie Griffith,
38, Webster, arrested for
dealing in stolen prop-
erty
Billy A. Sizemore, 48,
Webster, arrested for
possession of drug
equipment and vehicle


theft.
Saturday, Nov. 23
Jaquard Kyree Cuyler,
22, Wildwood, arrested
for probation violation.


Sunday, Nov. 24
Bobby Joe Smith, 27,
Lake Panasoffkee, ar-
rested for probation vio-
lation.


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PAGE A4 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013



OSumter County Times




pinion


Don't let holiday hazards


ruin your celebration

he holiday season, with excited children, rushing
parents, holiday decorations, and holiday parties,
can unfortunately create potential for accidental
poisonings.
The health professionals at the Florida/USVI Poison
Information Center Jacksonville would like to remind
everyone of the potential poisoning hazards that could
threaten your holiday cheer. Bacterial food poisoning
from mishandled food at parties can result in diarrhea,
stomach pain and vomiting. These symptoms usually go
away in 12 to 24 hours; however, severe and persistent
symptoms, especially when accompanied by fever, can
signal that medical attention is needed.
Holiday decorations at this time of year often find
their way into a young
child's or pet's mouth.
Likewise, alcoholic bev-
.., _i- erages left unattended at
,- .- = .^( family parties have been
r~j known to change holiday
i' cheer into a significant
S cause for concern. The
SPoison Center can be
e m reached at 1-800-222-
y1222, 24 hours a day, to
IL)immediately help with
any of these concerns or
to answer questions
about these holiday haz-
= 5,..ards.
The following tips can
help you to ensure a safer
holiday season. Don't for-
get to remind your sleepover holiday guests to keep
their medications up, out of reach and out of sight of
young children!
FOOD
Do not thaw food at room temperature; this allows for
bacterial growth. Thaw frozen food unwrapped in the
refrigerator.
Wash work areas, utensils and hands after contact
with uncooked meat.
Cook food carefully as to prevent salmonella. Salmo-
nella is a common and widespread cause of food poi-
soning and is typically found in raw meats, poultry,
eggs, milk, fish and their byproducts. Salmonella can
only be destroyed by cooking food thoroughly to tem-
peratures above 140 degrees.
Refrigerate leftovers separately after the meal; room
temperature is not sufficient Use leftover turkey, stuff-
ing and gravy within three days of cooking.
DECORATIONS
Although they are not fatal (as folklore depicts), poin-
settias if consumed, can cause some stomach pain and
even vomiting. Keep small children and pets away from
poinsettias to keep the plant pretty and the kids and
pets comfortable.
Antique ornaments might have hidden hazards. Be
aware that some older ornaments may be decorated
with harmful lead paints or contain poisonous liquids.
Bubble lights may contain methylene chloride which is
toxic if the liquid is swallowed.
The use of artificial snow can cause respiratory prob-
lems if not used in a well-ventilated area.
Angel hair, made of spun glass, is irritating to the eyes
and skin. Be mindful of icicles or tinsel; both can be a
choking hazard if put in the mouth.
Lamp oils can be toxic if contents are swallowed and
coughed/vomited into the lungs.
Artificial tree scents often contain alcohol and other
irritants, and can be dangerous if swallowed or sprayed
into the eyes. Tree preservatives, which may have dan-
gerous levels of electrolytes and chemicals, should be
kept away from children and pets.
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Clean up immediately following all holiday parties so
that alcohol, cigarette butts, and other potentially
harmful items are not within reach of children who
may imitate adult behavior.
A small amount of alcohol can cause a child's blood
seizures and breathing difficulties can occur when a
child swallows alcohol.
Store all alcoholic beverages in a locked cabinet or
up and out of reach and sight of children.
Don't drink and drive.
In a poisoning emergency, don't waste time searching
the Internet. Call your Poison Center first at 1-800-222-
1222 and a Specialist in Poison Information, who is a
health care professional, will assist you. The Poison
Center Help line is toll free and Specialists are avail-
able 24 hours a day in a poisoning emergency, or to an-
swer your poisoning-related questions.



The Voice of Sumter County since 1881
The editorial opinion expressed in the Sumter County Times
is the opinion of the news staff of this newspaper.
Publisher- Gerry Mulligan
Regional Manager John Provost
Editor Bob Reichman


BEYOND SUMMER


Letter to the editor


Losing our heritage
Our trees! Our beautiful, life giving, hundred-
year-old trees are being slaughtered by the
thousands in the name of progress.
Do their silent screams go unheard? Can no
one stop this? Where are our conservationists?
Are they off buying plots of rain forests in South
America?
Why say we want to save our planet when our


majestic trees are being bulldozed to the
ground and buried in a hole. Machines are up-
rooting our heritage.
Let us find some funds to buy some of our
land to save our trees. All too soon Wildwood
will be the "treeless city"
Elberta Ritchie and members of
the Wildwood Woman's Club


A Purple Heart Wall was created by local American Legion post.



Special veterans honor


On Nov 11, Veterans Day, A Purple Heart
Wall was dedicated to thank our Soldiers who
gave their all and those Soldiers wounded in
service to this great nation. American Legion
Memorial Garner-Grant Post 101 of Bushnell,
Florida welcomed the community to celebrate
with them the unveiling of their Purple Heart
Wall and the celebration of their 75th anniver-
sary of being chartered by our national organi-
zation in 1938.
Commander Dennis Angelo, a veteran of the
United States Air Force, after community
recitation of the Pledge ofAllegiance, asked the
SGT at Arms Dan Lanning, a veteran of the
United States Army, to place the POW/MIA
cover on the empty chair that was centered be-
tween the Flag of the United States of America
and the flags representing all entities of the
American Legion. After the presentation 2nd
Vice Commander, John Rolfingsmeyer, a vet-
eran of the United States Army, recited the
meaning of the POW/MIA draped chair, and the
POW/MIA table.
Commander Angelo taking the podium again
welcomed all veterans and their guests. He ex-
plained the Purple Heart Wall is in honor of the
Post members and South Sumter Servicemen
and Women who gave all and those who gave
more than some.
Before he unveiled the wall he described it
to everyone in this way:
"It is red for the bloodshed, the pain and
heartache of families, mothers and fathers,
brothers and sisters of those who made the
supreme sacrifice."
It is framed in gold to represent honor and
courage. A replica of the Purple Heart Medal is

OPINIONS
* The opinions expressed in Sumter County
Times editorials are the opinions of the editorial
board of the newspaper.
* Viewpoints depicted in political cartoons,
columns or letters do not necessarily represent
the opinion of the editorial board.
* Groups or individuals are invited to express
their opinions in a letter to the editor.
* All letters must be signed and include a phone


in the center A plaque to the right of the Purple
Heart replica has the following inscription:
My color is red for the blood they shed.
The medal I bear is from my Country to show
it cares.
IfI could be seen by all mankind,
Maybe there would be peace in my lifetime.
To the left of the Purple Heart Medal is a
plaque with the inscription:
ROLL OF HONOR
MICHAEL MAHR -KILLED INACTION-
AFGHANISTAN
CHESTER SKIPPER VIETNAM
JOSEPHFLYNN- VIETNAM
BILL GREEN- VIETNAM
CARLOS MARXUACH- VIETNAM
BILL SIMMONS VIETNAM
FRED FUDGE- VIETNAM
LOUIS COLLANDRIA VIETNAM
RAYMOND BENNETT- VIETNAM
Each name was read. The family of Michael
Mahr and the Wounded in Action Veterans took
their place in front, accompanied by 2nd Vice
Commander John Rolfingsmeyer. Then sponta-
neous applause erupted as the community rose
to their feet to honor our Purple Heart recipi-
ents. After everyone was seated Commander
Angelo gave the order for the SGT at Arms Dan
Lanning to come forward and remove the cover
from the POW/MIA chair The second order
from the Commander to the SGT at Arms was
to remove the cover from the Purple Heart
Wall.
The rest of the evening was a celebration.
The American Legion Post served a steak din-
ner. The Veterans meals were free to thank
them for their service.

INVITED
number and hometown, including letters sent via
e-mail. Phone numbers will not be printed or
given out.
* We reserve the right to edit letters for length,
libel, fairness and good taste.
* Letters must be no longer than 450 words, and
writers will be limited to two letters per month.
* SEND LETTERS TO: The Editor, The Sumter
County Times, 204 E. McCollum Ave., Bush-
nell, Fla., 33513, or e-mail news@setnews.com.


204 E. McCollum Ave.
Bushnell, Fl. 33513
Member Florida Press Assocation





SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A5


RELAY FOR LIFE


Sumter Sheriff Bill Farmer to



serve as Relay chairman


The American Cancer
Society has selected
Sumter Sheriff William
0. "Bill" Farmer, Jr. to
serve as honorary chair
for th e next Relay For
Life of Sumter County.
Farmer was chosen to
represent our Relay For
Life of Sumter County
for all his outstanding
support of the event.
The Sheriff's Depart-
ment has a very success-
ful Relay team thanks to
his support.
The world's largest
grassroots fundraising
movement, Relay For
Life mobilizes commu-
nities throughout the
country to celebrate
people who have battled
cancer, remember loved
ones lost, and provide
participants with an op-
portunity to fight back
against the disease.
Relay For Life events
are held overnight as in-
dividuals and teams
camp out at an athletic
track, park or other
gathering area, with the
goal of keeping at least
one team member on
the track or pathway at
all times throughout the
evening. Teams do most
of their fundraising
prior to the event, but
some teams also hold
creative fundraisers at


their camp sites during
Relay. Relay brings to-
gether friends, families,
businesses, hospitals,
schools, faith-based
groups.., people from
all walks of life all
aimed at furthering the
American Cancer Soci-
ety's efforts to save lives
by helping people stay
well, by helping them
get well, by finding
cures and by fighting
back.
"Here in Sumter
County, funds raised by
our Relay For Life event
are making an impact
on so many lives, said
Shari Bare, Event Chair
"From making possible
the vital American Can-
cer Society programs
and services that sup-
port those in our com-
munity facing a
diagnosis, to life-chang-
ing cancer research and
medical discovery, to
advocacy for access to
quality health care for
everyone affected by
cancer, the money
raised through Relay
For Life of Sumter
County is helping fur-
ther the vision of a
world with less cancer
and more birthdays."
Others serving on the
Relay For Life commit-
tee include: Katrina


Sumter Sheriff Bill
Farmer


Webb, Missi Kelsey, Con-
nie Webb, Erin Munz,
Amy Barco, Lynn Cle-
land, Crissy Thibodeau,
Lisa Perryman, Tiffani
Hampton, Susan
Hardee, Theresa Ham-
mer, Theresa Fissell,
Judy Scott, Courtney
Pinion, Chrissy Ham-
mer, Gail Burry, Fawn
Pinion, Becky Mullins &
Maxine Cox.
The Relay For Life of
Sumter County takes
place at Lake Sumter
State College, Sumter-
ville Campus on May 2,


2014. To participate, call
your American Cancer
Society at (352) 326-9599
or Shari Bare at (352)
303-9094.
For more information
about how Relay For
Life benefits the local
community, contact the
American Cancer Soci-
ety at 1-800-227-2345, or
visit RelayForLife.org.
The American Cancer
Society combines an un-
yielding passion with
nearly a century of ex-
perience to save lives
and end suffering from
cancer As a global
grassroots force of more
than three million vol-
unteers, we fight for
every birthday threat-
ened by every cancer in
every community. We
save lives by helping
people stay well bypre-
venting cancer or de-
tecting it early; by
helping people get well
by being there for them
during and after a can-
cer diagnosis; by finding
cures through invest-
ment in groundbreaking
discovery; and by fight-
ing back by rallying la w-
makers to pass laws to
defeat cancer and by
rallying communities

See BILL, Page 6


Why I Relay


Lynn Cleland got in-
volved with Relay for
Life for "several rea-
sons," she said.
"I relay for our event
chair, Shari Bare, who is
a long time, very dear
friend of mine and great
mentor for the American
Cancer Society. I also
relay for my brother who
has leukemia, my
cousins who are breast
cancer survivors, for all
other survivors and for
the ones we've lost to
this terrible disease."
I relay with "Team
#31 Friends for Hope,"
and she relies on her
family to help her raise
money and give her sup-
port through the year.
Cleland said she en-
joys the relay event from
open to closing.
"However at the end,
during closing cere-
monies, when our event
chair tells us not only
did we meet our goal but
we succeeded, the goose
bumps set in and you
know all your hard work
and dedication is worth
every dime raised!"
While she is thrilled
with their success, she
finds the most touching


Lynn Cleland


moment of the event,
"walking the survivor
lap with my brother who
has leukemia!"
And then there are the
laughs.
Cleland said the fun-
niest moments for her
were during the "Mr
Relay" contest.
"Nothing better than
watching men dress in
drag and beg for
money!"

See RELAY, Page 6


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PAGE A6 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013


Helping

out...

Youngsters and staff at
Playtime Childcare and
Learning Center in
Bushnell stand by the
holiday food basket
they prepared for two
needy families in the
county's Healthy Start
program. Besides a va-
riety of food goods, the
Thanksgiving basket
also included a $25
Walmart gift card and a
$25 Winn Dixie gift
card. The center is also
planning a toy drive for
Christmas.


B I governmental investor in who have had cancer and
B ILL cancer research, contribut- countless more who have
ing about $3.4 billion, we avoided it will be celebrat-
continued from Page 5 turn what we know about ing birthdays this year
cancer into what we do. To learn more call 1-800-
worldwide to join the fight. As a result, more than 11 227-2345 or visit
As the nation's largest non- million people in America cancerorg


RELAY
continued from Page
Her second year in the
event, she said it's some-
thing she plans to partici-
pate in for years to come.
And Cleland has some in-
formation she believes is
important to get out to the
public.
Cancer facts:
About 1,660,290 new
cancer cases are expected
to be diagnosed in 2013.
About 580,350 Ameri-
cans are expected to die of
cancer in 2013. Approxi-
mately 42,370 will be from
Florida alone.
Cancer is the second
most common cause of


death in the U.S.!
An estimated 232,340
new cases of invasive
breast cancer are expected
5to be diagnosed in the US


for 2013.
An estimated 40,030
breast cancer deaths (410 of
them will be men) are ex-
pected in 2013.


|_ I_ ^ 36^


9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 14
Jams, jellies, boondoggles,
whirly-gigs, homemade
items and much more!
The show will be held on the property -
V next to Paths of Grace Church
in Lake Panasoffkee
(101 C.R. 527 the road across from Spirit
Struck shop)
S Food available for purchase
643-0005 or revlouis@yahoo.comn -r
Still accepting vendors! ,
40- Mq m -_ --


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Our new implants can address both and you
may eliminate your need for glasses.

The new FDA approved TRULIGNTM Toric intraocular lens is the
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Schedule an appointment with Dr. Kaufman to
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Clip, complete and mail to:
T SUMTER COUNTY


TIMES
www.sumtercountytimes.com
204 E. McCollum Ave., Bushnell, FL 33513
Call 352-793-2161 or blocklear@sctnews.com





SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A7


RAIDERS

continued from Page 1

The Raiders had 352 yards total offense while
holding North Marion to just 119 yards.
Raider backAnderson Faulk scored on a one-yard
run with 5:29 left in the first quarter. It was Faulk's
21st touchdown of the season and he has over 1200
yards rushing. North Marion made 23 yards in
penalties to ease the Raiders path to the end zone.
Quarterback Levi Sapp hit Ladovick Gibson for a
six-yard TD pass at 11:30.
Sapp hit J.T. Taylor on a screen for a 41-yard TD
pass. Taylor took a screen and ran through the de-
fense. Moir booted the extra point
Sapp now has 14 touchdowns for the season. He
hit 11 of 16 passes for 166 yards.
PJ. Brown scored on a two-yard run with 41 sec-
onds left. Xavier Story picked off his fifth intercep-
tion of the season to stop a North Marion drive.
South Sumter took a 28-0 lead on 21 second period
points.
At the half, the South Sumter defense held North
Marion to 38 yards on 11 attempts.


SATURDAY, NOV. 30
Community sale
Red Oaks RV Resort,
5551 S.W 18th Terr, in
Bushnell, will have a
community-wide yard
sale starting at 8 a.m.

MONDAY, DEC. 2
Low Vision Workshop
Do you have Macular
Degeneration? Glau-
coma? Cataracts? Does
your vision loss make it
difficult to do daily tasks?
New Vision for Inde-
pendence and the State
of Florida Division of
Blind Services will host a
workshop about local low
vision services and re-
sources. To learn more
about services that em-
power those with low vi-
sion or blindness to live
more independently, join
us for one of the following
sessions:
The Villages Library at
Pinellas Plaza, 7375 Pow-
ell Road, Wildwood at 9
a.m.
Lake Panasoffkee Com-
munity Library, 1500
County Road 459, Lake
Panasoffkee at 1 p.m.
Online registration is
available from the li-
brary's Calendar of
Events You may also reg-
ister by calling 352-689-
4588.

THURSDAY, DEC. 5
Webster Advisory
meeting
The second School Ad-
visory Council meeting at
Webster Elementary
School will be held at 5:15
p.m. in the conference
room.

FRIDAY, DEC. 6
Council for the Deaf&
Hard of Hearing
A representative from
the Florida Coordinating
Council for the Deaf and
Hard of Hearing will be
visit-ing the Sumter
County Library System.
To learn about the local,
regional, and national as-
sistance available to you-
join us for one of the fol-
lowing sessions:
The Villages Public Li-
brary at Pinellas Plaza,
7375 Powell Road, Wild-
wood at 9:30 a.m.
Lake Panasoffkee Com-
munity Library, 1500 C. R.
459, Lake Panasoffkee at
2 p.m.
Online registration is
available from the li-
brary's Calendar of
Events. You may also reg-
ister by calling 352-689-
4588.

SATURDAY, DEC. 7
Langley holiday event
Youngsters are wel-
come to join Langley
Health Services for the
annual Laura Vickers
Christmas Party from
noon to 3 p.m. The event
provides plenty of enter-
tain-ment and fun for
youngsters and it's free.
Langley is at 1389 U.S. 301
in Sumterville.
Civil War history
Come and learn about
Florida's Civil War his-
tory with author and re-
enactor Keith Kohl. The
presentation will include
archival illustrations,
maps, photographs, as
well as uniforms,
weapons, field gear and
other items from the Civil
War era. The program
will be held at the E. C.
Rowell Public Library at
10 a.m. The program is
part of our VIVA 500 cele-
bration that commemo-
rates 500 years of
Florida's history and cul-
tural diversity


Program is free of
charge but registration is
required. Online registra-
tion is available from the
library's Calendar of
Events. You may also reg-
ister by calling 352-569-
1533.
Craft show
Red Oaks RV Resort,
5551 S.W 18th Terr, in
Bushnell, will have a
craft show from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. Table are $5 each.
Call 793-2152 for informa-
tion. Both breakfast and
lunch will be available.

THURSDAY, DEC. 12
Shriners golf tourney
The Villages Shrine
Club golf tournament in
support of Shriners Hos-
pitals for Children. All
proceeds sup-port
Shriners Hospital in
Tampa. The tournament
with be a 8:30 a.m. shot-
gun start. The format is
Scramble. Men and ladies
are invited to enter indi-
vidually, or as a team. The
entry fee is $95, which in-
cludes 18 holes of golf,
golf cart, luncheon and


North Marion's top running back, James Allen,
didn't enter the game until the second quarter as he
was penalized for missing a practice.
North Marion hasn't allowed more than 10 points
in the past few games.
Ladovick Gibson bulled his way eight yards for a
score with 2:10 left in the third quarter
With a 35-0 lead, the Raiders turned the game into
a running clock game.
North Marion's quarterback Caleb Seller hit Fred-
die Swain for a 40-yard touchdown pass with 11:31.
Seller hit Zack Collins for a two-point conversion.
Raider quarterback Malik Bell ran two yards for
the TD with 1:44 left in the game.


SOUTHSUMTER
NORTHMARION


7 21 7 7- 42
0 0 08- 8


TEAM STATISTICS:


SOUTH SUMMER

First Downs
Rushing
Passing
Total yards
Interceptions
Sacks
Fumbles/lost
Penalties/yards
Punts


S-Faulk 1 run (Moir kick)
S-Gibson 6 pass from Sapp (Moir kick)
S-Taylor 41 pass from Sapp (Moir kick)
S-Brown 2 run (Moir kick)
S-Gibson 8 run (Moir kick)
NM-Swain 40 pass from Seller (Collins pass from
Seller)
S-Bell 2 run (Moir kick)


various awards. There
will be high quality
awards and prizes, plus a
live auction and 50/50 raf-
fle. To obtain an entry
form, contact Omar Need
259-7247 (e-mail:
ouneed@comcast.net) or
Ken Johnson at 259-4334
(e-mail: kljins@embarq-
mail.com).


VS@feScript PHARMACY
dispensing care.......
*. Durable Medical Equipment Supply
*. Compounding $2.99 Generic Drugs
*. Diabetic Supplies
*. Ostomy & Wound Care Supplies


*. Easy Prescription Transfer


NORTH MARION


31-186
11-16-166
352
1
0-(-0)
0-0
5-50
2-36


18-72
6-19-47
119
0
0-(-0)
0-0
7-43
6-28.5


-This is Miss Kitty, she is
a 9-year-old declawed
= Tiger sweetie. She has
been spayed, is current
Ron her vaccines and
micro-chipped. If you
are interested in her or
any of the Humane So-
ciety's other pets come
by Monday through Sat-
urday 9:30 a.m. to noon
or1:30 to 3 p.m.You can
also see all adoptable
pets on our website
- www.hsspca.org. For
information call the of-
fice Monday through
Friday 793-9117.


Loctios ToServ
InSutr out


i


880 N. Main St., Bushnell


*o Most Major Insurance Accepted v" Call: 793-8000
r --- ----- ~ ~- --- -- - ---------------- (IN SOUTH SUMTER PLAZA)
gae Certain 342 Shopping Center Dr., Wildwood
Restrictions Apply,
~ ,lO a Call Pharmacys for Call: 748-9900
.. .Details 0-- 7eais 7
---- --- ---- --- --- ---- --- ---(IN SHOPPING CENTER PLAZA)
A ~ LO


RI


GGOINGC OL


RESTAURANTS
ACTIVITIES
EVENTS
TRAVEL
MOVIES


9Pizza, Subs, Salads,
To Je S and Wings

prese

Serving Sumter County for over 26 years!

Mon. -Sat. 11 am. -9 p~m. Sunday Closed for Church
352-793-8877
1W"IA-,", 412 W. Hwy 48, Bushnell


-eer&Wine-

WOODY'S


Sun.-Thurs. 11 AM-9 PM Fri.-Sat. 11 AM-10 PM
1220 S. Main Street in Wildwood 352-748-1109


2for20
One appetizer to share and two entrees* with
the purchase of 2 beverages.
Choose one from: Onion Rings, Fried Squash,
Fried Okra or Corn Nuggets.
Choose two from: BBQ Pork, Beef or Turkey,
Pulled Pork, BBQ Chicken, Spare Ribs, 1/2 rack
Baby Backs, any salad or any sandwich.
ADD A HALF RACK of Baby Backs
to any 2 for $20 offer for only $4 more.
Cannot be used with any other offer or coupon. Entrees are lunch portions.
Valid at the Wildwood location. Not valid on Early Birds. Limited time only.
20% OFF entire ticket from 3-6 PM
regularly priced menu items only


wLIVKT
A:A^^


LOut and about


P,
op
h6


J7 dr

;Mdg:=eZ440


Ti


'40dr





PAGE A8 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013


Sumter obituaries


Joseph Thomas Waters, 74
Joseph Thomas Waters, 74,
of Bushnell, Fla., died _.1
Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013, at
Leesburg. He was born
March 1, 1939 in Central
Falls, R.I. He is survived by
his brother, John (Laurie)
Waters of Bushnell. A visita-
tion was at the Purcell Funeral Home Chapel, Bush-
nell, Wednesday, Nov 27, 2013. Graveside Services
will be at Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, 2:30
p.m. Friday, Nov 29, 2013, with Military Honors ren-
dered by the Sumter County Honor Guard. Online
condolences may be left at wwwpurcellfuneral-
home.com. Arrangements entrusted to Purcell Fu-
neral Home, Bushnell.


Burnett Marvin Wamre, 69
Burnett Marvin Wamre, 69, of Webster, Fla., died
Wednesday, Nov 20, 2013, at Webster. He was born
May 18, 1944. He is survived by his sons, Jeff (Amy)
Wamre of Reno, Nev, and Jerrod (Shelia) Wamre of
Minnesota. Online condolences may be left at
www.purcellfuneralhome.com. Arrangements en-
trusted to Purcell Funeral Home, Bushnell.

Lois Elizabeth Mills, 106
Lois Elizabeth Mills, 106, Oxford, Fla., died Nov 23,
2013, under the loving care of her family and staff of
The Villages Hospice House in The Villages. Mrs.
Mills was born April 24, 1907, in Eastman, Ga. She is
survived by her loving children Ronnie (Cecelia)
Strickland and Marlene Yates both of Oxford. Funeral
services were 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov 27, 2013, at


Banks, Page-Theus Funeral Home, Wildwood, with
burial at Greenwood Cemetery in Wildwood. On-line
condolences may be shared by visiting
wwwbankspagetheus.com. Arrangements are en-
trusted to Banks/Page-Theus Funerals and Crema-
tions, Wildwood.

Karen Jean Peckham, 62
Karen Jean Peckham, 62, of Webster, Fla., died
Thursday Nov. 21, 2013, at Dade City She was born
Oct. 9, 1951, in Beloit, Wis. She is survived by her fi-
ance, Arthur Gene Elwell of Webster; sons, Garon
Keith (Shawna) Suggs of Webster, and Theron Andrew
(Jamie) Suggs of Lake Panasoffkee; daughter, Donna
Annette Suggs of Jacksonville. Online condolences
may be left at wwwpurcellfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements entrusted to Purcell Funeral Home,
Bushnell.


Church calendar


Church of the
Fisherman
Please join The Church
of the Fishermen and
Werda-Hecamiat for the
second annual Boat Pa-
rade and Caroling Event
on Dec. 6 at 7:15 p/m.
There will be a boat pa-
rade fol-lowed by carol-
ing and light
refreshments. The event
will be held at Werda-
Hecamiat, 965 County
Road 439, Lake Panasoff-
kee. Werda-Hecamiat is
also proud to announce
that the restaurant will be
re-opening soon as the
Werda-Hecamiat Restau-
rant and Grill. Please call
352-793-3438 with any
questions about the
event.
Wildwood UMC
Cantata
Join us in worship at
the Church of the Fisher-
men as we host the Wild-
wood United Methodist
Church choir presenta-
tion of the cantata "The


First Noel- Born is the
King" on Dec.11 at 6 p.m.
The musical presentation
will be followed by a time
of fellowship and light re-
freshments There is no
cost for the event. Please
call 352-793-3438 with any
ques-tions.
Spaghetti Dinner
Want to satisfy your
inner Italian yearnings?
Good news. The Church
of the Fisher-men is host-
ing a spaghetti dinner on
Dec. 13 from 4 7 p.m. The
cost of the dinner will be
$7 and it will include
spaghetti, salad, bread,
coffee, iced tea and a
dessert. Please call 352-
793-3438 with any ques-
tions.
Wildwood Country
Fair
Wildwood Country Fair
with guest Christian
artist-Norman Lee Schaf-
fer will be at Wildwood
United Meth-odist
Church,300 Mason St.,
Wildwood, on Saturday,


Nov 30, from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. For more informa-
tion call 748-1275.
USDA food giveaway
On Wednesday, Dec. 4,
and every first Wednes-
day of the month from 9
a.m. noon there will be a
USDA food giveaway at
The Church of the Fish-
ermen. There will be an
exception in January,
when the USDA giveaway
will be on Jan. 8, due to
the New Year's Day holi-
day A limited number
packages are available on
a first come first served
basis. All are welcome.
The Church of the Fish-
ermen is located at 589 N.
C.R. 470 in Lake Panasof-
fkee. Please call 793-3438
for more information.
Catholics Returning
Home
St. Vincent de Paul
Catholic Church will con-
duct an ongoing series
called Catholics Return-
ing Home on six consecu-
tive Sunday evenings


from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
The church address is
5323 East CR 462, Wild-
wood. This next series
started on Sunday, Nov 3.
Sessions are for non-
practicing Catholics who
are seeking answers to
ques-tions about return-
ing to the Catholic Faith.
No matter how long you
have been away, and no
matter the reason, please
consider renewing your
relationship with God
and the Catholic Church.
There will be informal
sharing and an update of
the Catholic faith.
If you would like more
details, or if you would
like to sign up please e-
mail the coordinator Dea-
con Dan Pallo at
behappy60@embarq-
mail.com or call him at
391-9338. You can also
call the Director of Faith
Formation at St. Vincent
de Paul Catholic Church,
Frank Webber at 330-
0220.


Tracy and April Taylor are proud to an-
nounce the upcoming wedding of their
son, T.J. Taylor, to Lacy J. Furlong, daugh-
ter of Zeke and Becky Shaw. Taylor and
Furlong are both 2012 graduates of
South Sumter High School and members
of Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist Church. The
wedding will take place at 4 p.m. on Sun-
day, Nov. 30, at the Bushnell Assembly of
God.


Wildwood church sets holiday events


The First Baptist
Church of Wildwood will
be hosting a variety of
Christmas events and
everyone in Wildwood is
welcomed!
Each event will cele-
brate the true meaning of
Christmas.
The second annual
"Gift to Wildwood" will be
presented on Friday, Dec.
13 at 7 p.m. and again on
Saturday, Dec. 14 at 5:30
p.m. in the church Fel-
lowship Hall.
You won't want to miss
the Youth Drama Team
performance and the va-
riety of music from our
Adult, Children's and
Handbell Choirs, the FBC
Praise and Worship Band
and the Fab 5 Ensemble.
Each evening also in-
cludes a delicious Christ-
mas meal and a $100 gift
card giveaway! This is a
completely free event, but
please make a canned


food donation for the Car-
ing Hands Food & Cloth-
ing Ministry
Get your free tickets
soon since seating is lim-
ited! For ticket informa-
tion call the church office
at 748-1822 or come by the
church office at 402 Ox-
ford St. in Wildwood (two
blocks behind Wildwood
City Hall).
At 6 p.m. on Saturday,
Dec. 21 and Sunday, Dec.
22, First Baptist will host
the Children's Musical
and Drama, "The Secret


of Snowflake County -
Hope in a Humble Sta-
ble." Held in the church
sanctuary, everyone is in-
vited.
Finally a Candlelight
Service will be at FBC
Wildwood on Christmas
Eve, Tuesday Dec. 24.
The service will be held
in the First Baptist sanc-
tuary at 6 p.m. and offers
everyone a time of music,
fellowship and worship
celebrating the real rea-
son for the season.


Ban m/P* -Theu





FunralHoe an

Crematio Service


685-1128-SCT


PUBLIC NOTICE


NOTICE OF CANVASSING BOARD MEETING
FOR THE CITY OF COLEMAN
MUNICIPAL GENERAL ELECTION
TO BE HELD ON DECEMBER 3, 2013
SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA

NOTICE is hereby given that the Canvassing Board for the City of Coleman
will convene on December 3, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. to tabulate ballots and
canvass absentee ballots. Section 101.048 a person casting a provisional
ballot shall have the right to present written evidence supporting his or her
eligibility to vote to the supervisor of elections by not later than 5 p.m. on
the second day following the election. If a Provisional ballot is cast, the
Canvassing Board will convene again on December 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. to
tabulate ballots, absentee ballots, and provisional ballots.

The Canvassing of Ballots on December 3, 2013, and if any provisional
ballots again on December 6 2013, will be held at Coleman Community
Building, 1204 N. Church Street, Coleman, Florida at 7:00 p.m.

In accordance with the Sunshine Law of Florida, these meetings will be
open to the public.

This is in accordance with 101.5612(2), Florida Statutes. Persons with
disabilities requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this
proceeding/event should call 352-748-1017, fax 352-748-2291.

NOTE: Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, states that if a person decides
to appeal any decision made by the board, agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such a purpose, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.

Ruth Busby
Public Service Director
City of Coleman, Florida
352-748-1017


I don't want a cheap funeral, but I can save a lot

of money by planning now.. .so why not?

iI'm a person who plans ahead and I'm also


l pretty careful ith the money I make.
ON Since someday my family and I will need a
reliable Funeral home, why not make my arrangements
S now and lock in a low price that I can control?
The old saying is true: you can't Lake your
S money with you. But, if I make my plans now I can
^ make the decisions on all the details that matter to
me, including the cost, and that's like leasing more
money behind For my wife and kids.

r LET'S TURN YOUR PRIORITIES INTO A PLAN.
Fill oum ,i, reum, tI ,oupo, to ,j,. ,r1, i ail. Pur,,ell C apel 'p/ t ioi, rpr," ..i*.
iting doite ot and for all Or, call tw at 352- 793-4531. i h ease Ieth 111Oh t,n i a7r'
, f,,,o Plan WithI Purcell Chapel @ 114 W. Noble AMe. BushneU, FL 33513
Name


Address
Cin' 'Ste Zip
Phone

Best Time To Call: PURCELL CHAPEL
(Circle One) A.M. P.M. BEERS FUNERALHOMEandCREMATORY
www.PurcellFuneralHome.com ...FBFP









^ | Worship This Week at the Church of Your Choice
J___________


LAKE PANASOFFKEE
First Baptist Church
of Lake Panasoffkee
Hwy 470, Lake Panasoffkee 793-5510
Sunday Services 8'30 & 10'50 a m
Sunday School 9'45 a m
I P.M
i ,-,,-- 4 ,, i r , -, ,,- ,-, O p m 1
After School Care 2'30-6'00 p m
l Pastor Randy AlonsoeI

( BUSHNELL
First United Methodist Church
i- 221 W. Noble Ave., 793-3221
L I Jeffery Thomas, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 A.M.
WORSHIP 11 A.M.
BOY SCOUTS MON. 6:30 P.M. CUB SCOUTS TUES. 6:30 P.M.
CADET GIRL SCOUTS WED. 6:30 P.M. OOOFBGN

S WAHOO
'Wahaoo Bapatt ChurchA
(Discover the Difference) PAULALONSOi
43 Miles West of 1-75 on Hwy 48 PASTOR
Classic Service Sunday: 800 A M
~~y~,~ 1 AM
r' - , h A M
.Wednesday Evening: PM
.' . . . PM
.~PM
wahoochurch org 352 793-6015

SUMTERVILLE
Sumterville
United Methodist Church
"OVER 150 YEARS OF PRAYER
S2565 CR 522.-1 BLOCK EAST OF HWY 301
Invites you to attend Sunday worship serve 9:30a.m.
Pastor CharlesTomberlin
l All children are invited. 000FBGV

SWEBSTER
Webster United Methodist Church
Invites You To Attend
Worship Service 11:15 a.m.
Church School 9:45 a.m.
173 S E 3rd St, Webster, FL 33597
P0 Box 87, Webster, FL
S)793-3734


BUSHNELL

125W.AndersonAve. 793-4612
"Sharing the Good News of Life Through Faith in Christ"
SSunday School. .8:15, 9:30 & 1 :00A.,M
SWorship....................... 9:30 & 11:00A.M.
* Sunday W orship....................... 6:00P M.
* Wednesday Bible Study..........6:30p.M.

LAKE PANASOFFKEE"
The Church of The Fishermen
A United Methodist Congregation
\ 589 CR 470,1mileWof1.75
I Sunday Worship: 9:30 AM
S Wed. Night Bible Study 6:15 PM
S for the Whole Family
Swwchurchofthefishermen.org

SBUSHNELL
St. Francis Episcopal Church
313 N. Grace Street (At US 301)
P.O. Box 566, (352) 793-3187
Holy Eucharist 10 a.m. Sunday
Sunday School 10 a.m.
AA meets Thursdays at 8 p.m.

KWILDWOOD"
ST. VINCENT DE PAUL
CATHOLIC CHURCH

MASS TIMES & DIRECTIONS: 330 0028
Office: 330-0220 5323 E CR 462
| www.sumtercatholic.org 1


CALL

793-2161
To Adverl isc iill lhc
SCJ' (i'htclh ])tirccorv


S BUSHNELL
THE BUSHNELL PRESBYTERIA
CHURCH USA
323 N. BROAD (Comner of W. Dade & N. Broa
Church School: 9:15 A.M.
Public Worship: 10:30 A.M.
WEDNESDAY: Bible Study 10:00 A.
352-793-4202 ...F.GA

aBUSHNELL
First Church of God
S ... Anderson,JIN |
793-3455
105 E Central Ave.- P.O. Box 1128, Busmhnell, FL 33513
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Worshlip 10:45 a.m.
Evenmng WorshTip 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Evening 7:00 p.m.
Randall Belcher, Pastor 793-3534

WEBSTER
First Baptist Church
of Webster
1/4 mile east of 471 on SE 1stAve.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
evening Service 6:00 PM
Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 PM

SBUSHNELL
All Are Welcome At
BUSHNELL ASSEMBLY
OF GOD
Christian Education 9:00 A.M. Worship 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Evening- please call for date and time
Wed. Discipleship Night 7:00 P.M.
1451 West C.R. 476, Bushnell 793-2240

SBUSHNELL
tlidt c iiA t t Bpt Churchi
Pajtor Irwaiftveit
7819 C, 633, Suu d 4W 76 be 768 & 575
Sunday School ........................9:45 am
Morning Worship ..................11:00 am
Evening Worship ....................6:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Service....7:00 pm
l __ Youth Group OOOFBGe


I19





SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A9



Royal community featured in documentary


The Community of
Royal was featured re-
cently on Part 1 of the
Florida Crossroads Docu-
mentary Florida's Black
Heritage Trail: The Cen-
tral Florida Region.
Highlights of Royal's
history were filmed to
help make Royal's part of
the documentary includ-
ing: filming of an Inter-
generational meeting
between the RHEAP
Summer '13 program par-
ticipants and Royal's Eld-
ers, an African dance
performed by the RHEAP
Summer '13 participants,
an interview with Royal's


historian, Catherine La-
timer, 87, and an inter-
view of Royal's lifetime
resident, Mr. Nathaniel
Williams, Sr.
The documentary also
was archived on Florida
Channel's website by
Sunday, Nov 24. To view
Florida's Black Heritage
Trail: The Central
Florida Region visit
http://thefloridachan-
nel. org/programs-cover-
age/florida-crossroads.
Part II was feed the week
of Nov 25 and includes
New Smyrna Beach and
Sanford. Part I includes
Royal, Bartow and St. Pe-


tersburg.
This was a coordinated
effort of Young Perform-
ing Artists (YPAs), Inc.
and its Royal Historical
Enrichment & Art Pro-
gram (RHEAP) during
their Summer '13 Feed-
ing & Activities program.
The next RHEAP pro-
gram entitled 'Holiday '13
Feeding & Activities' will
be Monday- Tuesday, Dec.
29- 30, and Thursday-
Friday, Jan. 2 -3, 2014, 11
a.m. -3 p.m.
RHEAP is held at the
Alonzo A. Young, Sr. En-
richment & Historical
Center, 9569 County Road


235, Wildwood (Royal). To
register your child, call
352-748-0260, email: roy-
alproject@cfl.rr.com or
download an application
at wwwcommunity-
ofroyal.org or
www.youngperformin-
gartists.org.
Also, if you are inter-
ested in taking GED
classes at the Young Cen-
ter of Royal, starting Jan-
uary 2014, scholarships
may be available, call the
center at 352-748-0260.
For more information
regarding Community Of
Royal visit: wwwCommu-
nityOfRoyal.org.


The Community of Royal was featured recently on
Part 1 of the Florida Crossroads Documentary
Florida's Black Heritage Trail :The Central Florida


Florida Cheer Sensation's All-Star Cheerleading squad, The FCS Diamonds, (located in Sumterville) recently competed at the Florida Cheer and Dance Associ-
ation competition in Winter Haven at Polk State College. This outstanding squad of 20 cheerleaders has been practicing their two-minute and 30-second routine
of stunting, dancing and tumbling since July. They went out on to the floor and rocked their routine to earn a respectable second place finish.The coaches, Shelby
and Lisa Shiflet, expressed their gratitude to both the Diamond parents and the community, noting the importance of their support.The FCS Diamonds compete
again on January 25th in Tampa at the Florida State Fair Grounds.Team Members include: Thalia Resinos, Sydnee Parrish, Emily Shiflet, Alyssa Proctor, Casey
Ryan, Cristian Cardoso, Carson Gregory, Shelsey Flowers, Jasmine Grover, Brandi Locklair, Paityn Maggert, Brooklyn Minton, Alana Moffitt, Julia Proctor, Bre-
ann Stephens, Kortnie Oliver, Samantha Matteson,Vannette Hooten, Ashley Herren and Ashton Durham. For information on the program or to become sponsor
please contact Shelby Shiflet at 321-331-1637.


Grant a Wish
Every year the City of
Bushnell participates in
the "Grant A Christmas
Wish" program. The Chil-
dren's Home Society, who
works with the Florida
Department of Children
and Families, provided
the names of 60 Sumter
County children in need.
The children's names
and wishes are available
at City Hall now
The due date for re-
turning the new, un-
wrapped gifts is
December 6th. The due
date is so early because
the gifts will still need to
be wrapped and distrib-
uted to the children in
time for Christmas.
For information visit
Bushnell City Hall or call
352-793-2591.


Families

invited to

holiday

lunch
South Sumter Middle
School will hold their an-
nual Holiday Luncheon
on Thursday, Dec. 12.
Families are invited to
enjoy a holiday lunch
with their child.
Times are: eighth
grade- 11:26 a.m. to 11:52
a.m.; sixth grade from
12:13 p.m. to 12:39 p.m.
and seventh grade from 1
p.m. to 1:26 p.m.
The menu will include
turkey and gravy, mashed
potatoes, stuffing, green
bean casserole, cranberry
sauce, a roll and pumpkin
tart or a slice of cake.
The cost is $3.25 for
each adult meal and $2.10
and for each child's meal.
If you plan to attend,
please send the student's
name and grade, as well
as the number of adults
and children who will be
attending.
The school telephone
number is 352-793-2232.


Erectile Dysfunction
Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health
FREE book by doctor reveals what the
drug companies don't want you to know!
Dr. Kevin Hornsby, MD will mail the pay the postage and handling. If
first 37 men that respond to this ad the popular pills don't work for you
a free copy of his new thirty dollar regardless of your age or medical
book "A Doctor's Guide to Erectile history (including diabetes and
Dysfunction." He's so sure this book prostate cancer) you owe it to your-
will change your life he will even self and your lady to read this book.
...... Call Toll Free (800) 960-4255



411W

Waterfront Property in Suwannee, FL
5 1/2 acres-Offered in 7 parcels Auction conducted
Minutes from the Gulf of Mexico on-site Dec. 4th, 11am

For bidders packet: www.BenCampen.com
Ben Campen, Lic. Real Estate Broker & Certified Auctioneer
352-262-5348 or Ben@BenCampenAuctoneers.com
OOGQJ3


Erectile Dysfunction
Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your Health
FREE book by doctor reveals what the
drug companies don't want you to know!
Dr. Kevin Hornsby, MD will mail the pay the postage and handling. If
first 37 men that respond to this ad he popular pills don't work for you,
a free copy of his new thirty dollar regardless of your age or medical
book "A Doctor's Guide to Erectile history (including diabetes and
Dysfunction.' He's so sure this book prostate cancer) you owe it to your-
will change your life he will even self and your lady to read this book.
...... Call Toll Free (800) 960-4255

Buy IGet I REI!,

Send Double
Florida
Sunshine

7Item #BNGN
Orderone
gift tray of Navels .bs.ofNavels
and receive another FREE! in each tray!
Feel good about sending a healthy gift this holiday season.
Sweet, seedless Florida Navel Oranges are tree-ripened and
picked at the peak of perfection. Shipped fresh and ready
to enjoy. Satisfaction guaranteed. Both trays will be
shipped in one carton to one address. *PlmusstaMdadshiping.
ORANGE BLOSSOM o". I
Indian River Citrus "od Z'o;...
Gifts of Florida's Finest Fruit "'D .o T,9A s,
www.orange-blossom.com/B I G 1 1-800-624-8835


Sumter County Public Works
Household Electronics & Hazardous Waste


At

The Villages Sumter County

Service Center
(Parking Lot)
7375 Powell Road, Wildwood, FL 34785


* AuLumou c liuids
e ,S tilPYlni') Ii hil'cric
r lcUic;
.I" FrnIia>
* rluorsment limps uid
Mercury i: maiinanp deiti
e 'tt.d (ircs tainc<
u icidoe
SWod rmnalim

S iHoNoW eionico
ITV%- VCR. omfuim,. et i
* Iic\ aoiIbazxcdpw b
PUni rPimK
* Paini L)iane
soblthncnij
, PiClaidn
*Po~ chaiisals
*Sotcuht
SPrnpiaic wnk (.251bhi


I, ,
* Biological'Infectious waste
* Explosives
* Radioactive waste


Smoke deleciors
*Empy paintcans




(1) DoNOTmi% chemicalitogeiher.
(2) Keep products in ogmail bcled colainers if possible.
(3} Place contAmmcn in cardnibrd boes I0 prevenl
bruku'r.
(4) Place leak conuaincr in clear pl~aik bag and trivpon
in box with newspaper,
(5) P bowe In tt o in backdf chiCle nay from
pls'aigcrs.


V For more information on this and other
hue. mobile collections, contact Sumter County
Public Works at 352-569-6700


o^"Llay
d6 --.;


0





PAGE A10 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013





SS CHAMBER CONNECTIONS




Chamber's Annual Meeting/ Installation Dinner set


A night of dining, entertainment and awards


The Sumter County Chamber of Commerce's 91st Annual Meeting and Installa-
] tion Dinner will be Friday, Jan. 24, at the Savannah Center in The Villages. For


Sumter County's own
Emily Graham, a 15-
year-old singer and Vil-
lages High School
student, will perform at
the Sumter County
Chamber of Com-
merce's 91st Annual
Meeting and Installation
Dinner.


The Sumter County
Chamber of Commerce's
91st Annual Meeting and
Installation Dinner will
be held Friday, January
24 at the Savannah Cen-
ter in The Villages. A fab-
ulous evening of dining
and entertainment is
planned, featuring live
performances by Sumter
County's own Emily Rose
and Emily Graham. In ad-
dition to the installation
of the chamber's 2104
Board of Directors, wor-
thy businesses and indi-
viduals making an impact
in Sumter County will be
celebrated during the an-
nual Business and Indus-
try Awards.


Emily Graham is not
your typical 15-year-old.
When she's not volun-
teering in her community
or participating in one of
many after school activi-
ties, she is belting out
country and gospel tunes
for sold out shows and
standing ovations. Per-
forming songs from artists
like Trisha Yearwood,
Leanne Rhimes and Alli-
son Kraus, Emily finds
the perfect mix of tender
ballads and toe tapping
crowd pleasers.
An up-and-coming
country music star, Emily
Rose is a local girl step-
ping into the spotlight.
She has performed


around Sumter County
for years, as a solo act or
with her band, The Buds.
She is gaining a regional
following as she enter-
tains throughout central
Florida performing songs
by Taylor Swift and Lady
Antebellum, among oth-
ers.
Tickets to the Annual
Meeting and Installation
Dinner are $40 per per-
son.
A silent auction will be
held at the event. By do-
nating an item, gift cer-
tificate, gift basket, or
service valued at $50 or
more you can directly
support the chamber's
mission to educate, sup-


port, and promote busi-
nesses in Sumter County
The Sumter County
Chamber of Commerce is
the primary business or-
ganization comprised of
business members work-
ing together to create eco-
nomic prosperity
Donors will be listed on
the Chamber's website, in
the event program, on the
auction tables, and in a
special feature in our
newsletter. $500+ donors
will be recognized on the
PowerPoint prior to the
live program.
For more information
and tickets for the Annual
Meeting and Installation
Dinner, to nominate


Emily Rose, an up-and-
coming singer gaining a
regional following, will per-
form at the Sumter County
Chamber of Commerce's
91st Annual Meeting and
Installation. Photo by
Stacy Gunn Photography.
someone tbfor the Business
and Industry Awards, or
to donate a Silent Auction
prize, call the chamber at
(352) 254-0105, or visit
www sumterchamber.org.


Nominate a Future Leader for Leadership Sumter County


Do you know someone
who has the right stuff to
become a leader in
Sumter County? Nomi-
nate them for Leadership
Sumter County Leader-
ship Sumter County
builds and strengthens
the Sumter community
through training its lead-
ers for the challenges of
tomorrow. The program
focuses on developing in-
formed leaders and chan-
neling their ideas and
experiences toward com-
munity resources, includ-
ing issues and concerns,
so that they might help di-
rect the future of Sumter
County
Leadership Sumter
County participants learn
specific leadership skills,
gain a broad based expo-
sure to the community,
and meet peers in other
fields. The friendships
and networks formed
during the program bene-
fit professional and vol-
unteer activities. In
addition, the community
gains a group of trained
leaders who have devel-
oped a heightened sense
of civic concern and re-
sponsibility
The curriculum in-
cludes a retreat in Janu-
ary, one full day session
per month from February
through October and a
commencement dinner


The Leadership Sumter County Class of 2013 celebrates at its commencement dinner in October. The Sumter County Cham-
ber of Commerce is now accepting nominations for the Class of 2014, which begins in January. For more information call the
chamber at (352) 254-0105, or visit www.sumterchamber.org.


Each program session
concentrates on a specific
area of the community
using panel discussions,
speakers, special presen-
tations and participatory
experiences. A home-
work assignment is to be
completed prior to each
session which requires
approximately two hours


of work.
Topics covered include
local government, the ju-
dicial system, local eco-
nomics, quality of life, the
education system, med-
ical services, state gov-
ernment, cultural
diversity, volunteerism
and leadership skills.
The benefits for Lead-


ership Sumter County
participants include
learning specific leader-
ship skills, gaining a
broad base exposure to
the community, meeting
peers in other fields and
forming friendships and
networks to benefit pro-
fessional and volunteer
activities. In addition, the


community gains a group
of trained leaders who
have developed a height-
ened sense of civic con-
cern and responsibility
The cost for Leader-
ship Sumter County is
$500 per student, which
includes all retreat ex-
penses, meals at the
monthly programs, mate-


rials needed throughout
the year, transportation
for the state government
session and graduation
fees.
Scholarships may be
available on a limited
basis. For more informa-
tion, contact the Sumter
County Chamber of Com-
merce at 352-793-3099.


Bushnell update at Dec, luncheon
The latest developments in the City of mart) in Bushnell. The cost to attend is
Bushnell will be the topic of the Cham- $12 for members and $18 for non mem-
ber Lunch Exchange on Wednesday, bers, includes lunch.
Dec. 11, 11:30 a.m., at Blueberry Hill RV Please call the Chamber office at 793-
Resort in Bushnell. 3099 or email sumter-coc@sumter-
New City Manager Bruce Hickle, who chamber. org to let us know in advance
was selected by the City Council upon that you are planning to attend.
the retirement of longtimeManager Would you like to reserve a spot in the
Vince Ruano this summer, will outline Member Midway and receive premium
some of the city's ongoing projects and exposure at this event?
future plans. Call the Chamber to make your reser-
The Blueberry Hill RV Resort is at vation at 352-793-3099 or email mem-
6233 Lowery Street (adjacent to Wal- bership@sumterchamberorg.


Tracy Smith, center of T.Weston's Smokehouse inWildwood was the day's
big winner, taking the prizes for Best Ribs and Best Brisket. Chamber Ex-
ecutive Director Andy Cripps presented the cash prize, joined by Aileen


Beef&Boogie Cook-off winners


Congratulations to the
winners of the third an-
nual Beef and Boogie
Cook-offs. Brandell
Campbell, a winner at
Beef and Boogie two
years ago, won for
Sumter's Best Burger
against strong competi-
tion.
Tracy Smith of T.We-
ston's Smokehouse in


Wildwood was the day's
big winner, taking the
prizes for Best Ribs and
Best Brisket.
The awards were the
result of blind judging, as
the judges did not know
the origin of any entries.
Thanks to Beth Kenny
of Rubbin' Bones Barbe-
cue for chairing the com-
petition, and to our


judges.
They are Lt. Bobby
Caruthers of the Sumter
County Sheriff's Office,
Roger Kane, County Tax
Collector Randy Mask
and his wife Christy,
Martha Maddox of the
UF/IFAS Extension Of-
fice, and Nathan Over-
street of Langley Health
Services.


"-qqmI

Gourmet Today ...
Gourmet Today is a relatively new member to the chamber, but is already
making quite an impact. Jessy Flynn and her husband Kevin are the dy-
namic duo that makes up Gourmet Today. A full-service catering company
specializing in private and corporate catering, Gourmet Today served sam-
ples of their signature dishes at "A Taste of Simply Sumter," and catered a
recent chamber luncheon, receiving rave reviews from attendees. Jessy has
referred several new members to the chamber, and her enthusiasm and en-
ergy about the chamber is infectious. The Chamber Ambassadors proudly
recognize Jessy and Kevin Flynn of Gourmet Today as November's Member
of the Month. Pictured: Chamber Ambassador Ryon Meyers, left, of SECO
Energy presents the Member of the Month award to Jessy and Kevin Flynn
of Gourmet Today.


..............................





SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE All


GRO


UP


Question:
What is the large shrub that has big
red flower hanging down that is bloom-
ing in November?
Answer:
That is Turk's Cap Malvaviscus pen-
duliflorus. It blooms from late summer
thru December It is drought resistant,
any soil works and it likes sun with a lit-
tle shade. The shrub is usually around
5' but can get taller in ideal conditions.
And it has few problems with pests or
diseases. The blooms look like a hibis-
cus blossom that never opens; it is
closely related to the hibiscus. In the
picture above you can see how large the
blossom is and right around Christmas
they are really bright red. This is a
plant you could find in a native plant
nursery and it is a low maintenance
plant that blooms in the fall and winter
What more could you want!
Question:
My citrus trees are dropping fruit;
what is wrong?
Answer:
That's a hard question to answer as
there can be more than one reason. Hot


rainy weather, low potassium levels,
poor pollination, excessive amounts of
fruit on the tree, etc. And it is common
in certain citrus like navel oranges. It is
extremely important to properly fertil-
ize and maintain your citrus trees. For
problems like fruit drop, we suggest you
take pictures, leaf samples and a piece
of fruit to your local extension office
Plant Clinic so we can discuss the care
of the tree with you. For more informa-
tion on citrus problems in the home
landscape see this publication
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hsl41
Question:
My Valencia oranges are dry and not
juicy Can you help me with this?
Answer:
Granulation can happen with sev-
eral types of citrus; we see it frequently
in Valencias, mandarins, navel oranges
& grapefruit. This drying is usually as-
sociated with over-maturity, a lack of
water, excessive tree vigor, or even ex-
tended warm and/or dry fall weather
Some of these causes are environmen-
tal and you can't do much about it. Pick
the fruit when it is ripe. This publica-
tion https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs132 has a


Turks Cap


table that gives harvest times for vari-
ous citrus. Granulation is also associ-
ated with immature trees; this
condition is alleviated when the tree
matures. Again, be sure you fertilize


ASK THE MASTER GARDENER
F]


Holiday food safety tips for a healthy meal


Martha B. Maddox, CEA III
Family and Consumer Science
UF/IFAS Extension,
Sumter County
Holiday time is upon us and we are
planning dinners, parties and get
to gathers with family and
friends. During this time we are very
busy and we want to make sure the food
we serve is delicious and safe. During
the holiday time I receive several calls
about food safety I want to share some
of them with you because they could be
helpful.
If I thawed steaks for dinner tonight
will they need to be discarded if the
guests do not come?
Raw meat (or poultry) can be safely re-
frozen, but only if it was thawed in the re-
frigerator If the meat or poultry was
previously frozen, there may be a de-
crease in quality when frozen a second
time, but it would be safe because bacte-
ria do not grow in the freezer Alterna-
tively, if your guests will be able to come
at a later time, poultry and ground meats
can be refrigerated for two days; red
meats like roasts and steaks, up to five
days. Kept longer at refrigeration tem-
peratures, meat or poultry will likely
spoil.
If everything is ready for your meal
but your guests have been delayed at
least an hour, what should you do to hold
the food?
Just remember the basic food safety
rules: Keep hot foods hot, and cold foods
cold, Don't let any cooked food, meat or
poultry remain in the danger zone be-
tween 40 F and 140 F for more than
2 hours, One suggestion to keep in mind
is if you have hot foods in the oven, you
may be able to hold them safely until
your guests arrive. Put a food thermome-
ter in the thickest part of your roast or
poultry, or center of your casserole. Ad-
just the oven temperature so that the
food stays at an internal temperature of
140 F or above and to prevent dryness,
cover the dishes or wrap with aluminum
foil.
In an emergency situation, your guests
will be here, but they will be three to four
hours late can the food stay in the oven?
Food will probably dry out if kept warm
that long. For extended delays, it is safer
to refrigerate the food and reheat it when
your guests arrive. Store the food in shal-
low containers so it will cool rapidly to a
safe temperature in the refrigerator Do
not worry about putting hot foods di-
rectly into the refrigerator because the
thermostat will keep the unit running to
maintain a safe temperature (40 F or
below). When your guests arrive, reheat
food in a 325 F oven to an internal tem-
perature of 165 F, or until hot and
steaming. Cold foods should be kept re-
frigerated until mealtime.
Do I leave the stuffing in my turkey to
serve?
No you do not. Remove the turkey
from the oven and allow it to stand for 20
minutes, remove the stuffing, and place
it in another container If you will not eat
all the stuffing you have prepared put
what you will eat into one container and
place the remaining stuffing into a shal-
low container, cover and refrigerate. Re-
move the legs, thighs, and wings. Carve
the breast meat, and legs and thighs, if
desired. (remember turkey should not be
left out over 2 hours from the time it is
removed from the oven)
This is one of the top questions I get:I
frequently order take-out foods when I
am entertaining, what should I do with
the food after I bring it home?
How you handle the food will depend
on its temperature when you pick it up.
First, take the food home immediately
Do not leave take-out foods at room tem-
perature longer than two hours. At room
temperatures over 90 F, discard after
one hour Foods cold when picked up
should be refrigerated until serving time.
If the food is hot, and you will not be eat-
ing within two hours, keep it in an oven
set at a high enough temperature to keep
the turkey at 140 E Measure the tem-


perature of the turkey by inserting a food
thermometer in the thickest part of the
thigh. If you are picking up the foods far
in advance, refrigerate them and reheat
later for serving.
'This morning, I discovered the pork
roast was left out all night I took it out of
the freezer to thaw for a while last night
and forgot to put it back in the fridge be-
fore I went to bed. The roast is com-
pletely thawed and warm to the touch. If
I cook it, will it be safe?"
No, unfortunately, this roast should not
be eaten. It has been out of refrigeration
too long. Refrigerate perishables, pre-
pared foods, and leftovers within 2 hours
(1 hour if the temperature is above 90 E)
At room temperature, bacteria that may
be present in raw meat and poultry mul-
tiply very rapidly and some types of bac-
teria will produce toxins which are not
destroyed by cooking and can possibly
cause illness. Never thaw frozen meat or
poultry on the kitchen counter Refriger-
ator thawing is much safer You may also
thaw foods in cold water or in the mi-
crowave. These foods must be cooked im-
mediately to a safe minimum internal
temperature before refrigerating.
"I purchased a fresh stuffed turkey
from my local grocery store in the deli
department. One of my houseguests said
it's not safe to cook and eat it. Is she
right?" Your houseguest must be well-in-
formed on food safety She's right: Do not
use it! We recommend discarding or re-
turning the product to the store where
purchased.
USDA recommends only buying frozen
pre-stuffed turkeys that display the
USDA or State mark of inspection on the
packaging. These turkeys are safe be-
cause they have been processed under
controlled conditions. Do not thaw be-
fore cooking. Cook from the frozen state.
Follow package directions for safe han-
dling and cooking.
"What should I do? I put a 20 lb. turkey
in a 200 F oven before I went to bed last
night, and the pop-up timer says its al-
ready done at 7:30 this morning. We wont
be eating until 3 p.m."
You have two problems here. First,
overnight cooking of meat at a low tem-
perature isn't a safe method so we don't
recommend eating this turkey It's not
safe to cook any meat or poultry in an
oven set lower than 325 F At 200 F,
meat remains in the "Danger Zone" too
long (between 40 and 140 F) where bac-
teria multiply rapidly and can form tox-
ins. Secondly, holding a safely cooked
turkey at a safe internal temperature of
140 F or above for this amount of time
can dry it out and affect the quality. If a
safely cooked turkey must be held from
7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., for optimal safety and
quality it should be carved and refriger-
ated in covered shallow containers and
served cold or reheated to an internal
temperature of 165 F Use a food ther-
mometer to check the internal tempera-
ture.
"I baked some pumpkin pies over the
weekend to serve tomorrow. They've just
been sitting on the counter. Should I have
refrigerated them?"
Yes. Foods made with eggs and milk
such as pumpkin pie, custard pie and
cheesecake, must first be safely baked to
a safe minimum internal temperature of
160 'F Then, they must be refrigerated
after baking. Eggs and milk have high
protein and moisture content and when
these baked products are left at room
temperature, conditions are ripe for bac-
teria to multiply It's not necessary to re-
frigerate most other cakes, cookies or
breads unless they have a perishable fill-
ing or frosting.
Hopefully these holiday questions/tips
have been helpful and will help you and
your families prevent foodborne illness.
For more information on Food Safety
contact your local UF/IFAS Extension
Office or email mmadddox@ufl.edu
Martha B. Maddox, County Extension
Agent III, UF/IFAS Extension in Sumter
County May each ofyou have a safe and
happy holiday season with friends and
family.


0


'N


N~ A'"


/V -t
s,9 &

I I


I|.

't


Vendors needed for Master Gardeners'
plant and garden festival in March

The UF/IFAS munity center. Six-foot
Sumter County Mas- tables are available for
ter Gardeners are $20 each for crafters of
seeking vendors for a garden art, outdoor
the organization's an- decor and gifts for gar-
nual Plant & Garden deners or anyone who
Festival, to be held on -3 likes flowers and butter-
Saturday, March 15, flies. Tables are ex-
2014 at the Wildwood tremely limited. Indoor
Community Center at S,, set-up will be available
6500 Powell Road. V Friday evening and early
Previous spring Saturday morning.
events have attracted v' Master Gardeners will
more than 2,500 eager N; 4* also staff an "Ask The Ex-
shoppers. We are perts" table at the cornm-
seeking vendors of a unity center
landscape and indoor A Chinese auction will
plants, outdoor fur- b be heldin the Master
nishings, vertical and Gardeners' tent at the
hydroponic gardens, Festival entrance. Ven-
raised garden beds, dors are invited to ex-
fountains and water pand their marketing by
features and other donating items to the
vendors who offer auction.
garden related items. ho 14 Admission for the fes-
Outdoor spaces of rival is $1 for adults and
20-feet by 20-feet are available for $60. free for children under 12 years. For
The festival will be held from 8 a.m. to information and reservations, email
1 p.m. Outdoor set-up will be available Andrea Nelson, festival chairman, at
all day Friday andyaleff@comcast.net or call (352)
New this year, is the Gardener's 217-9965.
Boutique inside a portion of the com-


UF/IFAS
EXTENSION SUMTER
COUNTY
PLANT CLINIC
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC


Bushnell Location: 7620 SR 471.
352-793, -2728. Ext 229. ,pen
\\edne'sdi.. tri'' 9 until 3 I' n
Villages Location: Su iiter C,. i.nt.
G-T-\ element Anne-0. i313, E CR-466.
Corner ,' Mr-e B(I d & 4661. 35.2-
689-4673. )pen l':'nd.I\ & TInur-s-
(l.i\ t'riii 9 tiuntil 3 wit th the
exCe-)pt iIn :'t the 2nd ThAirIsd.i :it
ecli-h month \hen thle cnnenx Pltnt
C( inc 1 : 1 ,:,.Ied ti:r the (1,\

with the proper fertilizers, at the right
time with the right amount. Call our ex-
tension office and request our Citrus
Fertilizer Fact Sheet.
To submit questions to 'Ask the Mas-
ter Gardener"please call 352-793-2728,
Ext 229 or email us at plant-
clinic@aol.com Photos courtesy of
Sumter County Master Gardeners.





PAGE A12 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013


ON THE ARTSY SIDE..


Orienteering...


South Sumter High School drawing class portfolio winners were Brent Helms first place, Jakiera
Jackson second place, Julio Arredondo third place. The students are in Cindy Spell's art class.


JIM RODMAN/Courtesy to the Sumter County Times
Autin Perron coming in at the finish line.


South Sumter High School painting class portfolio winners were: Morgan Shepherd first place,
Katelyn Williams second place and Erica Dellinger third. The students are in Cindy Spell's art
class.




All about Art reviewed


More than 100 art
work pieces encom-
passed the Sumterville
Community Building
'All About Art" exhibit
earlier this month (No-
vember 2, 2013). 'All
About Art," a celebra-
tion of the Sumter
County Arts Guild's
tenth anniversary
With seven participat-
ing artist available on
Nov 2 to provide details
for the pieces on display
visitors were encour-
aged to indulge their
creative curiosity at All
About Art, a celebration
of the Sumter County
Arts Guild's 10th an-
niversary
Among the art pieces,
visitors found an in-
triguing variety of artist
media, including
stained glass, Zentangle
cards, oil, acrylic and
watercolor paintings,
graphite drawings and
portraits, several of
which can be seen at
both the Langley Med-
ical Center Hall gallery
as well as the second
floor gallery at the


Bushnell City Hall. The
galleries are open to the
public.
One such collection
was Darlien Crosby's
animals in coffee.
Moving on through
the exhibit, even
novices, appreciated
the playful structured
Zentangle images cre-
ated by Gail Scot.
Perhaps the most en-
gaging work was Carol
Applegate's wide vari-
ety of media. Onlookers
couldn't help but linger
with her.
The large number of
works, in the pleasantly
brief exhibit, truly al-
lowed the steady flow of
visitors to fully study
and contemplate indi-
vidual pieces, or simply
appreciate dynamic
creations on a purely
aesthetic level.
The Sumter County
Arts Guild meets each
Wednesday from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Sumter-
ville Community Build-
ing U.S. 301 at C.R.
522. Meetings are open
to all artisans.


Visitors discuss the guild with Carol Ap-
plegate, president and showing artist.


Deanna Johnson shows her art.


Eric Royce displays his artwork. Gail Scot and "Bo" Perdue display their
artwork.




Adding some creative art to the mixture


Dillan Woodard finishes up the round of
orienteering at Dade Park.


* :
.". '...^^ + ..

: -- / --,. :
p.'


.. ... ,, ',


'- .* 'f^ ^EI4 -~


Jesseca Currie runs for the finish of the
orienteering course at the Sumter hosted
event.


"The Harmony in Di-
versity" will be the theme
for the Tri-County Inter-
faith Alliance of The Vil-
lages on Tuesday, Dec. 3
from 7- 9 p.m.
The program will in-
clude a workshop that in-
vites people to create
their own religious sym-
bols to examine the simi-
larities in design.
We will also offer the
opportunity to participate


in a 'bottle band.' Partic-
ipants are encouraged to
bring an empty bottle and
a CD representative of
music from their faith tra-
dition.
This event will take
place at the Villages
United Church of Christ,
12514 SR 101; Oxford, FL
34484.
The Tri-County Inter-
faith Alliance (TCIA) is a
chapter of the national


organization seeking to
"protect faith and free-
dom."
We welcome all people
of goodwill who are inter-
ested in combining edu-
cation and service -
minds and hands -- to
benefit lives in our small
corner of the world.
For more information,
contact Rev Janet Onnie
at 941-323-8513.


Shane Cohn, Tyler Smith and Clifford
Thompson accept their third place trophy
from Commander Jacobs.






SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A13


Fun andGAMES


THATiS WHATOI'M \
S TYNG TSAY WITH
T'*- MY PA1NT1NO0...A


^ ^-' \ ~ ___ .i _S -_ I
A : ^-:
A" 2Nr '1


Out on a Limb



TgoULE AT
{THE TIP MALL...


I'VE EXTKACTEP THE --
OBVIOUS 50 THAT THE VIEWER ) : '
CAN EXPERIENCE WHA-T THE I-
i TREE EXPERIENCE B
!, I "


Ii' i it
^kfi ----. n .


,WHAT POESS
'MY PAINTING
SAY TO YOU .


(ITSE 6E,' URE
A GQOP-.OQKIN'
7WFF IN7A A B/6
SeVWN 8LOB''f





1 7


CL.... I

(PHILISTINE!r


w0


ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Deci-
sions involving your finances might
seem to be foolproof. But they could
have underlying risks you should
know about. Don't act on anything
until all the facts are in.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
You're attracted to a situation that
appeals to your Bovine intellect. And
that's good. But don't neglect your
passionate side when romance comes
calling later in the week.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A
recent development enhances that spe-
cial relationship. Spending more time
together also helps make the bonding
process stronger. Expect news about a
possible career change.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A sus-
picious situation should be dealt with
before it leads to serious problems.
Get all the facts needed to resolve it.
Then refocus your energies on those
tasks that need your attention.
LEO (July 23 toAugust 22) Try to be
more open-minded in working toward
a resolution of that standoff between
yourself and a colleague or family
member. A little flexibility now could
work to your advantage later.
VIRGO (August 23 to September
22) You might feel a bit threatened by a
proposed workplace change. The best
way to deal with it is to ask questions.
You'll find that those involved will be
happy to provide you with the facts.
LIBRA (September 23 to October


1. Thor: The Dark World .(PG-13)
Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman
2. Jackass Presents:
Bad Grandpa .............................(R)
Johnny Knoxville, Jackson Nicoll
3. Free Birds ........................... (PG)
animated
4. Last Vegas ......................(PG-13)
Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas
5. Ender's Game ................(PG-13)
Harrison Ford, Asa Butterfield
6. Gravity ........................ (PG-13)
Sandra Bullock, George Clooney
7. 12 Years a Slave ...................(R)
Chiwetel Ejiofor,
Michael K. Williams
8. Captain Phillips .............(PG-13)
Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi
9. About Time ..........................(R)
Domhnall Gleeson,
Rachel McAdams
10. Cloudy With a Chance
of Meatballs 2 ......................... (PG)
animated
2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


22) Feeling alone in a crowd during the
early part of the week is an unsettling
emotion. But your spirits soon perk
up, putting you into the right mood to
start making holiday plans.
SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem-
ber 21) A pesky problem should be
dealt with immediately so you can put
your time and effort into something
more important. Someone from your
past could have significant news for
you.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) High-energy aspects
dominate, both on the job and at home.
Use this time to put some long-range
plans into operation. Things level off
later in the week.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) Even the usually gregari-
ous Goat might feel overwhelmed by a
flurry of activities. Be patient. Things
soon return to your normal social rou-
tine.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru-
ary 18) Career choices that seem too
confusing to deal with at this point
probably are. More information would
help uncomplicate them. On the per-
sonal side, a friend might need your
advice.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
Your Piscean imagination is stimu-
lated by possibilities you see in a new
opportunity. But keep those ideas to
yourself until you feel ready to trans-
late them into a workable format.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have
an ingratiating way of helping people
deal with their fears. Have you consid-
ered a career in social work or with the
clergy?
C' 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


SCRAMBLERS
Unscrable the letters within each re tangle totor torordinaryord s. Theegg
rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!
Bliss
RF5 1 JI ?h


nI Ic r" u l 'i ftn -

ENFUSCO
Blent
TRICED
Cavort
PROM


"Must be for you it's addressed to
Jr."


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m [o ITODAY'SWRo]iD





PAGE A14 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013


"Firey Sky" by Andrew Collins took first place in the 7-10 year-old age division.


"Bumblebee on a
Flower" by Sonia Maya
took third place in the
15-17 year-old age divi-
sion.


"Preening Pair" by Myrna Erler-Bradshaw took first place in the 18 and up
age division.



Winning photos


winners from the Frank
Thomas Florida Folk
Heritage and Music
Festival contests are shown
here.
The contests included the
Frank Thomas photo contest


and the Ann Thomas Youth
Writing Contest.
Pictured are the winning
photographs from the first-
time event which was held on
Saturday, Nov. 9, at Dade Bat-
tlefield Historic Park in Bush-
nell.


"Twin Butterflies" by Gary Lyons took second place in the 18 and up age
division.


rIA PIMpat" I ( falw 9% P wI IJlk N V I
"Look at Me Mom" by Pamela Dale took second place.in the 18 and up age
division.



"-= .--'-r ?---- '-. '' -.
-- =
.- ..-


"Sunset" by Laramy Strickland took first place in the 15-17 year-old age di-
"Lilly Pads" by Harli Post took first place in the 11-14 year-old age division, vision.






SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A15




Wildwood Country Fair set for Saturday


More than 26 organiza-
tions are coming together
to participate in the first
Wildwood Country Fair
on Saturday Nov 30.
Churches, aid groups,
help agencies, and min-
istries are gathering to-
gether that day from
11a.m. to 3 p.m. to partic-


ipate in the event at Wild-
wood United Methodist
Church, 300 Mason St., in
Wildwood.
The organizations will
have booths to share in-
formation and build rela-
tionships. Free lunch will
be provided and there
will be plenty of activities


including: bounce house,
face painting and games,
along with a children's
staging area complete
with clown alley, and
puppet/magic show It is
set up for families and
children of all ages.
Wildwood United
Methodist Church is host-


ing this year's event, ex-
pected to become an an-
nual undertaking.
Wildwood UMC is impor-
tant to more than just its
church members; it is
home to the Wildwood
Food Pantry (a partner-
ship of many
churches/ministries


throughout the commu-
nity), which feeds hun-
dreds of families each
month by providing
enough groceries to last
for a two-week period.
Throughout the day, a
unique cultural blend of
talents and musical
groups will take the stage,


including Christian
music performing artist
Norman Lee Schaffer.
The public is encour-
aged to bring blankets or
lawn chairs for seating to
enjoy the festivities.
For information, con-
tact Michael Beck at 203-
7258.


Critter chatter




Ready to adopt?


ou have been
thinking about it
for awhile. You
have given a lot of
thought to a long term
commitment And you
want to do the right
thing and save the life of
a homeless animal.
Good for you! Three
cheers to your decision!
And what great news for
a homeless animal wait-
ing to be adopted into a
loving family
Have you decided
what species is right for
you? Many of us think of
a dog or a cat, but there
are many rescue organi-
zations that have home-
less birds, rabbits,
hamsters, and guinea
pigs.
If you have limited
space, or allergies, you
may have decided on
fish or turtles.
What ever pet you
have decided to give a
home to, it is best to first
ask your self a few ques-
tions. Examine your
lifestyle. How much
quality time can you
spend with your new
pet? Do you want a
young energetic animal
that will require a lot of
exercise, or do you want
an adult or older pet
that is more settled?
Would you like to go hik-
ing or jogging with your
pet, or do you prefer a


stay at home kind of
buddy Can you provide
a healthy and safe envi-
ronment for the pet of
your choice? If you pre-
fer aquatic or exotic
pets that can be low
maintenance, do your
homework first on the
specific environments
they will need to stay
healthy and safe.
Another consideration
is your financial obliga-
tions to the needs of
your new pet.
The larger the pet, the
more food you will be
buying. Your pet will re-
quire toys or other items
that will enrich his or
her life. Crates, cages,
or tanks and related
items must be consid-
ered. Remember to in-
clude veterinarian care,
which may include un-
expected expenses for
illness or injuries.
Yes, there is much to
consider before adopt-
ing a pet, but once the
decision is made, and
you bring your new
friend home, you will
know that you made a
wise decision.
After all, our animals
bring us joy and give
purpose to our lives.
First and foremost,
check out the adorable
animals at our local Hu-
mane Society/SPCA.
Check out the county's
animal control facility
Or go on-line to
www.petfinder.com and
search a wider area for
your perfect match. Re-
member, your new
friend is waiting to be
adopted in a shelter
near you. You just need
to start looking.


686-1128-SCT


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT


COLEMAN MUNICIPAL ELECTION


DECEMBER 3, 2013


To vote for one of the candidates, mark a cross (X) in the blank space next to ONE of the
candidates for each seat listed.


COUNCIL SEAT 3
RICHARD K LIMA
CYNTHIA D. MARTIN


PROPOSED CHARTER REFERENDUM
THE PURPOSE OF THIS REFERENDUM IS TO: CHANGE THE CITY CHARTER
SO THAT THE ELECTION DATE COINCIDES WITH THE STATE'S GENERAL ELECTION
AND TIE VOTES AND HIGHEST VOTES ARE DETERMINED BYAPPLYING STATE LAW;
TERMS OF OFFICE FOR THE MAYORAND COUNCIL MEMBERS ARE CHANGED
FROM TWO YEARS TO FOUR YEARS; CITY COUNCIL MAKES APPOINTMENTS TO FILL
VACANCIES; AND THE COUNTY PROVIDES POLL WORKERS
AND THE CANVASSING BOARD FOR ELECTIONS.

TO VOTE ON THE REFERENDUM, MARKA CROSS (X) IN EITHER THE YES OR
NO COLUMN. YES IS FOR THE REFERENDUM; NO IS AGAINST THE REFERENDUM

REFERENDUM NUMBER 1___

SHOULD THE CHARTER BE AMENDED TO CHANGE THE DATE YES NO
OF THE ELECTION FROM THE 1ST TUESDAY IN DECEMBER TO
THE 1ST TUESDAY IN NOVEMBER TO COINCIDE WITH THE
STATE GENERAL ELECTION; FOLLOW FLORIDA LAW IN
REGARD TO DETERMINING HIGHEST NUMBER OF VOTES AND
TIE VOTES; ALLOW THE CITY COUNCIL TO MAKE
APPOINTMENTS TO FILL VACANCIES; AND CHANGE THE
TERM OF OFFICE OF THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL
MEMBERS FROM 2 YEARS TO 4 YEARS?

REFERENDUM NUMBER 2

SHOULD THE CHARTER BE AMENDED TO CHANGE POLL YES NO
WORKERS AND CANVASSING BOARD FROM THE CITY TO THE
COUNTY?


NOTICE TO VOTERS: Coleman Municipal Election December 3, 2013.
is prepared in Accordance with FS 101.20.


This Sample ballot


This certifies that the above is a true and correct copy of the official ballot for the City of
Coleman December 3, 2013 Municipal Election.

Ruth Busby, Public Service Director


OXFORD
Huge Multi-Family
Yard Sale
Friday 11/29 & Sat
11/30. 8:30 am to
whenever.Go-Carts,
tools,clothes, &
Toys-Toys-Toys! Come
here before store
Sales-Tons of
everything Cheap!
Corner of Hwy. 301 &
110th Rd.





Adult Mentor
Interested in a very
rewarding part-time
position? Sumter
County Adult
Education Center is
seeking applicants
for a Success
Mentor who will
work with adult
students to develop
and support career
pathways. The
Success Mentor will
assist with intake of
new adult students,
provide support to
students through
career pathways,
and engage with
local employers to
help place com-
pleters in gainful
employment. Pay is
$25 per hour at
10-12 hours per
week. Hours will
vary between day
and evening and
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PAGE A16 SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013


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612-1128 SCT
Cundall, Joanne Guy 2013CP471 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 2013CP471 Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOANNE GUY CUNDALL
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Joanne Guy Cundall, deceased whose date
of death was February 13, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Sumter County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 215 E. McCollum Avenue, Bushnell,
Florida 33513. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 21, 2013.
Personal Representative:
Thomas Charles Cundall, Jr.
1086 Indian Cave Road, New Market, Tennessee 37820
Attorney for Personal Representative:
DUSS, KENNEY, SAFER, HAMPTON & JOOS, P.A.
By: Eliot J. Safer Florida Bar No. 0194511
4348 Southpoint Blvd., Suite 101, Jacksonville, FL 32216
Telephone: (904) 543-4300 Fax: (904) 543-4301
Primary Email: esaterdjaxfirm.com Secondary Email: Pleadingsdjaxfirm.com
November 21 & 28, 2013.


618-1128 SCT
Sairls, Gloria Eileen 2013CP000448 Notice of Administration
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013CP000448 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF GLORIA EILEEN SAIRLS
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of Gloria Eileen Sairls, deceased, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Sumter County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 215
E. McCollum Avenue, Bushnell, FL. 33513, file number 2013CP000448. The estate is
testate and the dates of the decedent's will and any codicils are Last Will and Testa-
ment dated April 17,2012. The names and addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary
lawyer-client privilege in Section 90.5021 applies with respect to the personal repre-
sentative and any attorney employed by the personal representative.
Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of administration is served
who challenges the validity of the will or codicils, qualification of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is required to file any objection with
the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME RE-
QUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of
service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on that person, or those objections
are forever barred.
A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on
behalf of any person entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE
TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 months
after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on such person or
the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving
the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other
matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to ex-
empt property is deemed waived.
An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviv-
ing spouse entitled to an elective share under Sections 732.201 732.2155 WITHIN THE
TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months
after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on the surviving
spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse,
or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedent's death. The time for filing
an election to take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florida
Probate Rules.
Personal Representative:
Eileen Gloria Clark
9099 S. Great Oaks Dr., Floral City, Florida 34436
James E. Wade, III, Attorney for Eileen Gloria Clark Florida Bar Number: 0374083
WadeLaw, P.A. 116 Bushnell Plaza, Bushnell, FL 33513 Telephone: (352) 568-2500
Fax: (352) 568-2501 E-Mail: jameswade&wadelaw.us
Secondary E-Mail: pleadings@wadelaw.us
November 21 & 28, 2013.


619-1128 SCT
Sairls, Gloria Eileen 2013CP000448 Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2013CP000448 Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF GLORIA EILEEN SAIRLS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Gloria Eileen Sairls, deceased, whose date of
death was April 28, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Sumter County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is 215 E. McCollum Avenue, Bushnell, Fl. 33513.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 21, 2013.
Personal Representative:
Eileen Gloria Clark
9099 S. Great Oaks Dr., Floral City, Florida 34436
James E. Wade, III, Attorney for Eileen Gloria Clark Florida Bar Number: 0374083
WadeLaw, P.A. 116 Bushnell Plaza, Bushnell, FL 33513 Telephone: (352) 568-2500
Fax: (352) 568-2501 E-Mail: jameswade&wadelaw.us
Secondary E-Mail: pleadings@wadelaw.us
November 21 & 28, 2013.


F S


F Sae


608-1128 SCT
Vs. Allen, Ronald B. 2013 CA 000366 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 2013 CA 000366
HOMEWARD RESIDENTIAL, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RONALD B. ALLEN A/K/A RONALD ALLEN AND LINDA JEAN ALLEN, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Nov.
7, 2013, and entered in 2013 CA 000366 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Sumter County, Florida, wherein HOMEWARD RESIDENTIAL, INC., is the
Plaintiff and RONALD B. ALLEN A/K/A RONALD ALLEN; LINDA JEAN ALLEN;
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR-IN-INTEREST TO
WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, N.A. F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA are the
Defendantss, Gloria Hayward as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the Courthouse 215 E. McCollum Ave. Room 333, Bushnell,
FL 33513, at 10:00 AM on December 12,2013, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

BEGIN 40 FEET WEST OF THE SE CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4, RUN NORTH 210
FEET, EAST 195 FEET, SOUTH 210 FEET, WEST 195 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LY-
ING AND BEING IN SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 19 SOUTH, RANGE 23 EAST, SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 12th day of November, 2013.


(SEAL)


Gloria Hayward, As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ Kallyn Wells, As Deputy Clerk


IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to partic-
ipate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain as-
sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator for the Courts at least 7 days before
your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days at, Sumter County,
Lorna Barker: (352) 569-6088

November 21 & 28, 2013 13-01764


609-1128 SCT
vs. Tafoya, Charles 60-2012-CA-000017 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR
SUMTER COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 60-2012-CA-000017 Division
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES TAFOYA, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS AS NOMINEE FOR
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,


Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on October 28, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Sumter County,
Florida, I will sell the property situated in Sumter County, Florida described as:
LOTS 20, 21, 22, 23 AND 24, BLOCK 5, BUSHNELL PARK, PLAT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 61 1/2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA.

and commonly known as: 208 SOUTH YORK STREET, BUSHNELL, FL 33513; including the
building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, 215 E. McCollum Avenue Bushnell, FL 33513, Room 333, on
December 12, 2013 at 10 ;00 a.m.

Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 31st day of October, 2013.


(SEAL)


Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gloria R. Hayward
By:/s/Kallyn Wells, Deputy Clerk


Lindsay Moczynski, (813) 229-0900 x1551
Kass Shuler, P.A., P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800
November 21 & 28, 2013. 327628/1123729/idh


610-1128 SCT
Vs. Demeree, Kenneth A. 2012-CA-000842 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2012-CA 000842

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, a North Carolina banking corporation, as
successor in interest to Colonial Bank fka Colonial Bank, N.A., a national banking cor-
poration, by asset acquisition from the FDIC in its capacity as receiver for Colonial
Bank, as in interest to First Federal Savings Bank of Lake County,
Plaintiff,
v.
KENNETH A. DEMEREE and ROSEMARY DIANE DEMEREE, his wife; JOHN DOE n/k/a
ERIC WILSON and MARY DOE n/k/a JASMINE EDWARDS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Notice is given that pursuant to a Final Judgement of Foreclosure dated October
28, 2013, entered in Case No. 2012-CA-000842, pending in the the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit Court in and for Sumter County, Florida, in which the BRANCH BANKING AND
TRUST COMPANY, is the Plantiff and KENNETH A. DEMEREE and ROSEMARY DIANE
DEMEREE, his wife; JOHN DOE n/k/a ERIC WILSON and MARY DOE n/k/a JASMINE
EDWARDS, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder in the Sumter
County Judicial Building, 215 East McCollum Avenue, Room 333, at 10:00am on the
12th of December, 2013, the following-described property as set forth in the Final
Judgment, to wit:
The West 260.61 feet of the North 210.0 feet of the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4,
Section 30, Township 21 South, Range 23 East, Sumter County, Florida, LESS road right
of way. AND 1985 Twin Mobile Home, ID # T25217728A & T25217728B.
Address: 3035 County Road 714, Webster, FL 33597
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated this 30th dayof October, 2013.


{COURT SEAL}


Honorable Gloria R. Hayward
Sumter County Clerk of Court

By: /s/ Kallyn Wells, Deputy Clerk


David S. Hendrix, Esq.; Bridget E. McNamee, Esq.
GrayRobinson, P.A., 401 E. Jackson Street, Suite 2700,
P.O. Box 3324 (33601) Tampa, FL 33602 (813)273-5000 (813)273-5145
Attorneys for Plaintiff

November 21 & 28, 2013.


611-1128 SCT
vs. Kranyik, M. Regina 60-2013-CA-000746 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 60-2013-CA-000746 DIVISION:
CITIZENS FIRST WHOLESALE MORTGAGE COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
M. REGINA KRANYIK A/K/A REGINA KRANYIK A/K/A REGINA M. KRANYIK, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated November 06,2013 and entered in Case No. 60-2013-CA-000746 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for SUMTER County, Florida wherein CITIZENS
FIRST WHOLESALE MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and M. REGINA KRANYIK
A/K/A REGINA KRANYIK A/K/A REGINA M. KRANYIK; WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCI-
ATION; THE HOCKING VALLEY BANK; CENTRAL FLORIDA WATER PROCESSING;
SUNTRUST BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at Judicial Courthouse, 215 EAST MCCOLLUM AVE. BUSH-
NELL, FL 33513, Room 333, at 10:00 AM, on the 12th day of December, 2013, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 26, ROLLING HILLS MANOR, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN
1753.44 FEET SOUTH AND 1938.28 FEET EAST OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 28,
TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 23 EAST, SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH
58 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST, 150.00 FEET THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 30
MINUTES WEST, 140.80 FEET TO THE WATERS OF A CANAL, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID WATERS TO A POINT THAT IS NORTH 8 DEGREES WEST, 185.22 FEET FROM
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE SOUTH 8 DEGREES EAST, 185.22 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 5380 COUNTY ROAD 122, WILDWOOD, FL 34785
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 12, 2013.
Gloria R. Hayward, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Kallyn Wells, Deputy Clerk
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities reuqest-
ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact,
Cheryl Creel (352) 568-6628 or (TDD) 800-955-8771.
November 21 & 28, 2013 F13005705


613-1128 SCT
vs. Ross Jr. J. B. 60-2013-CA-000258 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 60-2030-CA-000258 DIVISION:
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
J. B. ROSS, JR., et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated June 05, 2013 and entered in Case No. 60-2013-CA-000258 of the Circuit
Court of the FIFTH Judicial Circuit in and for SUMTER County, Florida wherein NA-
TIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC. is the Plaintiff and J. B. ROSS; JACQUELINE D. ROSS A/K/A
JACKIE ROSS A/K/A JACQUELINE ROSS; TENANT #1 N/K/A JOSEPH ROSS are the De-
fendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Ju-
dicial Courthouse, 215 EAST MCCOLLUM AVE. BUSHNELL, FL 33513 at 10:00AM, on
the 12 day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:

THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 23, TOWN-
SHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 22 EAST, SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 23, THENCE RUN NORTH
(REFERENCE BEARING) ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 23, A DISTANCE OF
668.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH A DISTANCE OF
616.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 50,
THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 50, A DISTANCE OF 495.00 FEET, THENCE
DEPARTING SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, RUN SOUTH, PARALLEL WITH THE EAST LINE
OF SAID SECTION 23, A DISTANCE OF 616.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 26
MINUTES 31 SECONDS E, PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 50, A DISTANCE OF 495.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 1931 STATE ROAD 50, WEBSTER, FL 33597

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 10, 2013.
Gloria R. Hayward, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Winona Mitchell, Deputy Clerk
Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
In accordance with the Americans Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities reuqest-
ing reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact,
Cheryl Creel (352) 568-6628 or (TDD) 800-955-8771.

November 21 & 28, 2013 F113000410


614-1128 SCT
vs. Coleman, Alice G. 60-2011-CA-000688 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 60-2011-CA-000688
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALICE G. COLEMAN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 7,
2013, and entered in Case No. 60-2011 -CA-000688 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for Sumter County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., suc-
cessor by merger to Wachovia Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Alice G. ColemanWes
Holding Corporation, as successor in interest to Wachovia Equity Servicing, LLC, as
successor in interest to Homeq Servicing Corporation, as successor by merger to TMS
Mortgage, Inc., d/b/a The Money Store, Tenant #1 n/k/a Frederick Coleman, Tenant
#2 n/k/a Linette Coleman, are defendants, the Sumter County Clerk of the Circuit
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on West Door, Sumter
County Courthouse, 215 E. McCollum Avenue, Bushnell, Florida 33513, Sumter
County, Florida at 10:00 a.m. on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

TRACT 58, FOREST HILLS DEVELOPMENT, UNIT NO. 2, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION,
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4, OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE
22 EAST, TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND:
THE WEST 25 FEET OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE WEST 1/2 AND THE EAST 25
FEET OF THE WEST 1/2 OFTHE EAST 1/2 OF THEWEST 1/2 OF SECTION 23, LESS THE NORTH


281.90 FEET THEREOF AND THAT PART OF THE WEST 25 FEET OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE EAST
1/2 OF THE WEST 1/2 AND THE EAST 25 FEET OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE
WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 20 SOUTH, RANGE 22 EAST, LYING NORTH OF U.S.
HIGHWAY 301, ALL LYING AND BEING IN SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA.

TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO, DESCRIBED AS: A 1992 GENERAL DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDEN-
TIFICATION NUMBERS GMHGA241915587A AND GMHGA241915587B AND TITLE NUM-
BERS 0063754518 AND 0063754519.

A/K/A 1766 CR543B, SUMTERVILLE, FL 33585-5112
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated in Sumter County, Florida this 10th day of June, 2013
Gloria R. Hayward, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Sumter County, Florida
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kallyn Wells, Deputy Clerk.
Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743, eService: servealaw albertellilaw.com

If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a
program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordi-
nator, (352) 569-6949, within two (2) working days of receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, please call 1-800-955-8771. To file response please con-
tact Sumter County Clerk of Court, 215 E. McCollum Ave., Bushnell, FL 33513.

November 21 & 28, 2013. 11-76895


615-1128 SCT
vs. Cicero, Christine 60-2010-CA-001551 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 60-2010-CA-001551 DIVISION:
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SASCO MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-RFI1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHRISTINE CICERO, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 15,
2013, and entered in Case No. 10-01551 of the Circuit Court of the Fifth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Sumter County, Florida in which US Bank National Association, as Trus-
tee for SASCO Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-RF1, is the Plaintiff and Christine
CiceroOakland Hills Homeowners Association, Inc.,, The Unknown Spouse of Chris-
tine Cicero n/k/a Jeff Caldwell, are defendants, the Sumter County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on West Door, Sumter
County Courthouse, 215 E. McCollum Avenue, Bushnell, Florida 33513, Sumter
County, Florida at 10:00 a.m. on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 258, OAKLAND HILLS SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 75, 75A
THROUGH 75G, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA.TOGETHER WITH
A MOBILE HOME AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED
AS: A 1997 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS
GMHGA4109716510A AND GMHGA4109716510B AND TITLE NUMBERS 0073511615 AND
0073511614.

A/K/A 7754 COUNTY ROAD 109G, LADY LAKE, FL 32159-8853
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated in Sumter County, Florida this 20th day of May, 2013
Gloria R. Hayward, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Sumter County, Florida
(SEAL)
By: /s/ Kallyn Wells, Deputy Clerk.
Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743, eService: servealaw albertellilaw.com

If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a
program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordi-
nator, (352) 569-6949, within two (2) working days of receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, please call 1-800-955-8771. To file response please con-
tact Sumter County Clerk of Court, 215 E. McCollum Ave., Bushnell, FL 33513.
November 21 & 28, 2013. 10-59720


621-1205 SCT
Est. Jouvenas, Sandra A. Case No. 2013 CA 001258 NOA
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 2013 CA 001258
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA,
A POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
v.
THE ESTATE OF SANDRA ANGEL JOUVENAS A/K/A
SANDY ANGEL JOUVENAS F/K/A SANDRA L. CASTOR,
DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND
ASSIGNS OF THE ESTATE OF SANDRA ANGEL JOUVENAS
A/K/A SANDY ANGEL JOUVENAS F/KA SANDRA L. CASTOR;
UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE
OF SANDRA ANGEL JOUVENAS A/K/A SANDY ANGEL
JOUVENAS F/KA SANDRA L. CASTOR; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS
AND/OR DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF MERLE I. BICKNELL,
DECEASED; TENANT or TENANTS IN POSSESSION; ALL OTHER
PARTIES OCCUPYING OR IN POSSESSION; if the above Defendants
are alive and if one or more of said Defendants are dead, their unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, assignees, grantees, creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or against said defendants, and all unknown
parties claiming interests by, through, under or against a named defendant
to this action, or having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the
property herein described, sued herein as JOHN DOE.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE ESTATE OF SANDRA ANGEL JOUVENAS A/K/A SANDY ANGEL JOUVENAS
F/K/A SANDRA L. CASTOR, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND ASSIGNS
OF THE ESTATE OF SANDRA ANGEL JOUVENAS A/K/A SANDY ANGEL JOUVENAS F/KA
SANDRA L. CASTOR; UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF SAN-
DRA ANGEL JOUVENAS A/K/A SANDY ANGEL JOUVENAS F/KA SANDRA L. CASTOR;
TENANT or TENANTS IN POSSESSION; ALL OTHER PARTIES OCCUPYING OR IN POSSES-
SION; if the above Defendants are alive and if one or more of said Defendants are
dead, their unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, assignees, grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, under or against said defendants, and all unknown par-
ties claiming interests by, through, under or against a named defendant to this ac-
tion, or having or claiming to have any right, title, or interest in the property herein
described, sued herein as JOHN DOE.

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 130 N.E. Rowland Blvd., Trenton, Florida 32693-3700

CURRENT ADDRESS: Unknown
UNKNOWN TENANT or TENANTS IN POSSESSION; if the above Defendants are alive
and if one or more of said Defendants are dead, their unknown spouses, heirs, devi-
sees, assignees, grantees, creditors, or other parties claiming by, through, under or
against said defendants, and all unknown parties claiming interests by, through, un-
der or against a named defendant to this action, or having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the property herein described, sued herein as JOHN DOE.

CURRENT ADDRESS: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a code enforcement lien on
the following property in Sumter County, Florida:
Lot 34, Block 28, Pana-Coo-Chee Retreats Unit Four A/K/A Panacoochee Retreats,
Unit 4, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 17, of the Public
Records of Sumter County, Florida; also known as Parcel # F31D195, 2229 CR 426,
Lake Panasoffkee, Florida 33538.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses to it, if any, on James K. Fisher, Esquire, The Hogan Law Firm, attorneys for
Plaintiff, Board of County Commisoners of Sumter County, Florida, whose mnling
address is 20 S. Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34601, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above-styled court within thirty (30) days after the first date of publica-
tion of this notice; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
THIS NOTICE SHALL BE PUBLISHED once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks in the
Sumter County Times newspaper.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court at Bushnell, Florida on this 1 day of Novem-
ber, 2013.
(SEAL)
GLORIA R. HAYWARD, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Kallyn Wells, Deputy Clerk
November 28 & December 5, 2013


620-1128 SCT
Final Agency Action
PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCYACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the application for a
Water Use Permit to serve Industrial/Commercial activities The total authorized withdrawal
is 496,000 GPD, Peak Month is 552,000 GPD, and Maximum is N/A GPD The project is lo-
cated in Sumter County,Section(s) 34, Township 18 South, Range 22 East The permit ap-
plicant is William Farkus, Trustee whose address is PO Box 567, Wildwood, FL 34785
The Permit No is 20013111 001
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8'00 a m to 5'00 p m, at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District 7601 Highway 301 North, Tampa, FL 33637-6759
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this
matter may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120 569 and
12057, Florida Statutes (FS), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (FAC),
of the Uniform Rules of Procedure A request for hearing must (1) explain how the substan-
tial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's action, or
proposed action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person requesting the hearing
or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106,
F A C A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk of the Dis-
trict at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899
within 21 days of publication of this notice Failure to file a request for hearing within this
time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing
under Sections120 569 and 12057, FS

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the
filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the position
taken by it in this notice of agency action Persons whose substantial interests will be af-
fected by any such final decision of the District in this matter have the right to petition to be-
come a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above

Mediation pursuant to Section 120 573, F S, to settle an administrative dispute regarding
the District's action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a request for hearing
Published in the SUMTER COUNTY TIMES, November 28, 2013


616-1128 SCT
12/4 BrdOfDir.
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Early Learning Coali-
tion of the Nature Coast,
a United Way supported
organization, will be fa-
cilitating the Board of


Director's bi- monthly
meeting on Wednesday,
December 4, 2013 at 9:00
a.m. The meeting will be
held at the Early Learning
Coalition of the Nature
Coast's main office at
1560 N. Meadowcrest


Blvd, Crystal River, FL.
34429. Please contact
Coalition Staff at
352-563-9939, ext. 263 if
you have any questions.
Public participation is
welcome.
Nov. 28, 2013.


Foreclosure Salle.
s
Action Notice I


FoelsreSl,


Foreclosure Sale/
s
Action Notice I


AcinNtcoelsr m e


FoelsreSl,


FoelsreSlm e


Foelsr ae,


I Misc. No


I Misc. Not


I Misc. No




SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013, PAGE A17


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY






G2 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


DISCOVER SUMMER


Welcome to Discover a place where you'll find a
variety of faces and stories about some of Sumter
County's interesting surroundings.
You'll meet community representative Beverly
Steele on the north end of the county, who is shar-
ing some historical information about the commu-
nity of Royal. You'll meet Kelly Williams, the
mayor of Webster, on the south end of the county,
sharing some highlights about her city along with
information about its history and thoughts about
its future.
And in between, you'll discover more interesting


their communities.
Discover only scratches the surface of the places
that make Sumter County a unique place to visit
and to live.
From the ever-expanding growth in The Villages
to the quiet bucolic surroundings of farmlands in
central and southern portions of the county,
Sumter County offers a wide variety of environ-
ments and Discover Sumter provides a glimpse of
those places.
The stories are compiled from thoughts and infor-
mation shared by community representatives and


people providing you with tantalizing facts about leaders.


Bushnell is home to the historic County Courthouse.


BUSHNELL

continued from Page 4
Bushnell has been active
with some public projects.
Over the past few years,
various grants and loans
have made it possible for
Bushnell to extend its
sewage system and, in
some areas, the water sys-
tem, Maddox said.
The projects included
extending public water
and sewer services to
much of the commercial
and public facilities in the
Sumterville community
Currently, Sumter County
has a project underway
that will extend Bushnell's
municipal water lines
westward along County
Road 470 to the Lake
Panasoffkee Interstate-75
interchange and the in-
dustrial properties along
that route, Maddox said.
More recently, Bushnell
late last year completed
construction of its "Multi-
Modal" transportation
project. It involved the
construction of miles of
new sidewalk/bike paths
through-out the city and
major changes to the tra-


ditional down-town area.
There are enough paths
that a pedestrian or bicy-
cle rider can go all the way
to the Dade Battlefield
Historic Site, Maddox said.
To the west of the his-
toric Sumter County
Courthouse, along Bush-
nell Plaza, the city has
built a park that provides
expanded vehicle parking
for visitors to the down-
town shops and offices and
provided visitors with an
attractive fountain and
gazebo. Bushnell's re-
cently new city hall faces
the park on the east side.
This summer also
brought another major
change to city hall. Vince
Ruano, Bushnell' first and
only city manager until
July, retired. Bruce Hickle,
formerly Bushnell's utili-
ties director, has been ap-
pointed to that position.
Hickle was already re-
sponsible for running the
Bushnell's water, sewer
and electric departments
which is a major part of
managing the city, Maddox
said.
Last year was also
marked by changes in the
city organization. After


some problems developed
in the city police depart-
ment, the council decided
to close the department
and contract with the
Sumter County Sheriff's
Department for law-en-
forcement services.
The specifically-as-
signed group of officers
are solving more crimes
and he hasn't heard any
complaints from the com-
munity, Maddox said. "I
think they are doing al-
right."
While Maddox acknowl-
edges he likes the small-
town feel of Bushnell, he
said that the city does
need some growth.
"We're trying to get the
best rates possible for our
utility customers," he said.
"We're trying to keep costs
down. Our customers
shouldn't have to pay more
money for us to provide
the service. I would like
for us to expand and be
able to provide services
competitively"
While city officials deal
with the complexities of
keeping a small town in
operation, they are still
keeping one Bushnell's
more modern traditions -
the Annual Fall Festival.


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G19


Services






G18 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


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fish natural to Florida. While not typically open for pub-
lic events, this image is of an organized day for chil-
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interested in preserving the heritage of life in the out-
doors. They host the fishing derby to give youths of all
ages a chance to experience what the outdoors has to
offer.


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The recently constructed park in front of Bushnell City Hall is aglow at night. (Photo by Brenda Locklear)




DISCOVER BUSHNELL


Wildwood City Hall is the center of city government located off Main Street in Wildwood.


WILDWOOD

continued from Page 6


said, noting that there
are now four industrial
parks in Wildwood.
The city's own Willard
Peebles Industrial Park
has "too many" vacan-
cies, Wolf said. But, he
cites the Alliance Motor
Coach facility on the east
side of town for continu-
ing success and more
than a hundred employ-
ees.
Wolf anticipates more
commercial building
along the State Road 44
corridor.
There has been recent
talk of new hotels and a
bowling alley in that
area, he said.
The city is prepared
for growth, with zoning
and municipal services
such as sewage and
water in place, Wolf said.


Mayor Ed Wolf anticipates more
commercial building along the
State Road 44 corridor


Wildwood officials
have also been preparing
for growth with more
"significant" building
and development regula-
tions, according to Wolf
"These might not set
well with some folks, but
it helps with what we can
attract," Wolf said.
"We are in an enviable
situation we can design
the city the way we want
"We want to make a
good first impression,"
he said. We don't want
people to drive out of the
Villages and go, Oh gosh,
we're in Wildwood. But,
we can still maintain a
small town atmosphere,
and maintain our iden-
tity"
With the recent growth
in the city and the neigh-
boring Villages, Wild-


wood residences now
have many more choices
in dining and entertain-
ment, Wolf said. With the
growth, there will be
more opportunities for
residents.
"We have opportuni-
ties to enjoy amenities of
the Villages and not be
tied to it," he said. "We'll
build family first."
As the city grew in size,
economic slow downs
still hampered many
businesses. That appears
to be changing. "I'm glad
to see our "mom and
pop" business operators
finally making a living,
Wolf said.
"I miss the quaintness
we once had, but it's
coming back in a differ-
ent form."


i








Bushnell City Council Member Warren Maddox is shown in
the city's new downtown park with the also relatively-new
city hall in the background. (Photo by Martin Steele)


MARTIN STEELE
Times Correspondent
hen Bushnell
City Council
Member Warren
Maddox talks about his
home town, he expresses
a fondness for the city he
helps to govern.
"It's just a small town,
but it's kind of unique,"
Maddox said in a recent
Times interview. 'A good


portion of my graduating
class still lives around
here. You end up knowing
a lot of people."
Maddox who's been
on the council for 12 years
- acknowledged that's
changing somewhat.
"Last time I campaigned
for re-election, I was sur-
prised at how many peo-
ple were here that I didn't
know"
College and a stint in


the Air Force took Mad-
dox away from Bushnell
for several years, but he
returned to live here in
1972. After more than
seven years of working in
Marion County, he came
back to Sumter County to
work and soon became
the Environmental
Health Supervisor for the
Sumter County Health
Department until retire-
ment.
Like most of the incor-
porated communities in
the county, Bushnell was
historically a farming and
ranching town, providing
for the needs of many
small farms in the area. It
is also the county seat
since the early 1900s.
Maddox also acknowl-
edges he liked the way it
used to be when he was a
high school graduate in
1965. There wasn't a lot of
major changes in the city
until about the mid 1960s,
he said.
But, according to Mad-
dox, while he was away in
college, a couple oftrans-


Like most of the incorporated communities in

the county, Bushnell was historically a farm-

ing and ranching town, providing for the

needs of many smallfarms in the area. It is

also the county seat since the early 1900s.


portation changes had
major impacts on Bush-
nell.
Main Street- U.S. High-
way 301 was a two-lane
main road in town.
"There were stores and
businesses on both sides
of the street," Maddox
said. "The town was com-
pact. There were grocery
stores, pharmacies, dry
good stores, hardware
stores, restaurants and
others, all within a small
area. There were people
who worked in town that
didn't even have vehicles
- they walked to work."
But then came the "ru-
ination" of the town as
Maddox somewhat jok-


ingly described it the
four-laning of Main Street
by the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation.
That took out most of the
businesses along the east
side of Main Street.
The highway "improve-
ments" were followed by
a series of fires that
wiped out a number of
the old buildings, Maddox
said. Others succumbed
to the economic changes
of the times and gradually
closed out.
"It was typical of what
was happening all over
the county and the south-
east," he said.
While "downtown" was
facing something of a de-


dcline, construction of In-
terstate 75 was underway
just west of Bushnell.
When it was completed
about 1969, it took traffic
away from Bushnell busi-
nesses.
But, Maddox contends
that it was better to have
the interstate close to the
city "Counties without it
are generally much worse
off," he said. "1-75 bene-
fits the county as a whole
from the fuel taxes."
While much of the com-
mercial development that
came after the interstate
construction tended to go

See BUSHNELL, Page 4


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G3


C--.i-A






G4 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMMER COUNTY


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For information, contact City of Bushnell 352-793-2591.










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BUSHNELL

continued from Page 3

up outside of Bushnell,
the city has seen some
business growth in recent
years with new pharma-
cies, restaurants, auto-
parts stores, an expanded
Wal-Mart and others.
Maddox noted that the
population has been rela-
tively stable. Records
show that the city was at
2,050 residents in 2000.
Recent population esti-
mates by the University of
Florida place the current
population at 2,445.
He commented that
residential growth is
probably somewhat in-
hibited by the lack of
available home building
lots in the city On a recent
drive around town, Mad-
dox said he found only a
couple of lots.
That could change. He


noted that several years
ago, city officials invited
neighboring land owners
to annex into the city A
number of those land
owners apparently found
that to be a good move
and brought their prop-
erty into the city
That generally began in
2007. Since then with
some relatively recent
large acreage annexa-
tions north of the city-
have almost doubled the
land area of the city City
personnel calculated that
Bushnell had annexed
roughly 4,200 acres since
2007. County records
show the city covers ap-
proximately 7.362 acres
(11.5 square-miles).
Sumter County's offi-
cial geographical infor-
mation systems (GIS)
website depicts Bushnell
as a very irregularly-
shaped land area that is
about eight-miles long
and three-miles wide.
While Bushnell has


much more space, most of
the larger tracts are in
agricultural use, with no
pending project propos-
als for housing subdivi-
sions or other
construction.
The city has recently
seen the addition of a few
new duplex apartments,
he said, noting that the
city currently has a good
offer for those doing new
residential or small-scale
commercial projects.
The city recently ex-
tended and expanded its
temporary waiver of
"reservation capacity
charges," a utilities fee
associate with new con-
nections, he said. Typi-
cally, the waiver could
result in a savings of
$8,000- $9,000 for a project
such as a small store.
While private construc-
tion has been very slow,

See BUSHNELL, Page 19


I ISCOVE OXSRDI


OXFORD

continued from Page 7

mulberry tree which he had
planted there. His name
was Kyle.
From 1853 to 1859 there
were no public schools
here. A few teachers from
private schools were here.
The first school house was
north of Oxford, Chancy
was its name.
In 1856 there was Indian
trouble. People thought In-
dians were back of every
stump or tree.
There was always horror
among the settlers.
Again breathed easily
....more southern part of
Florida attracted the set-
tlers in northern Florida.
When traveling south
they found Oxford. Many
stayed here because of fer-
tile land and the trees.
Among these were two men
named Brown and White
who came in 1877. They
were good farmers and they
helped clear the land.
Next came a man who
lived here permanently and


his descendants live here
also. This was Hiram Cren-
shaw and his son James.
On Saturday, March 5,
1854, Aunty Betty Dias fa-
ther and his family came
here. Aunt Betty was 14
then and the following Mon-
day her first washing was
put out at the old spring
called the "Perry Spring."
His descendants have
marked their cattle "54" in
remembrance of the time
they came here.
Rubin Gordon was the
first child born in Oxford.
He was born in 1854. We
have no record of his de-
scendants.
The Baptist Church north
of the Pine Level Cemetery
was the first church here
and was built in 1876.
In 1875, the settlers of Ox-
ford started having picnics
on lake "Sarah Jane,"
which is now Miona. They
always had their picnics in
May
These lasted until 1920.
They had vast crowds at
the last ones, people from
every settlement near Ox-
ford. An important event
taking place at one of these
picnics was the changing of


the name of the lake from
"Sarah Jane" to "Miona."
There was a standing vote
and it was almost unani-
mous.
Among the pines north of
Oxford became the burying
place of the people. They
built a cemetery there and
named it Pine Level. The
first person buried there
was little Carrie Christie, in
February 1876. The first
Methodist Episcopal
Church was built between
Colliers and the railroad.
Sandspur now had a post
office. All the settlers of Ox-
ford went there for their
mail. Joshua Perry was the
postmaster. It was about 4
of a mile from here.
In 1880, the railroad was
built through here and the
first train came after its
completion in 1882. People
flocked to see it but when it
passed by, some screamed
and ran, while others fled,
with their horses wild and
foaming at the mouth, to
their homes, too afraid to
talk. The railroad came
from Fernandina to Wild-
wood, which was then much
smaller than Oxford.
Cotton was raised more


than anything else, and for
that reason was called the
king crop. Tomatoes, pota-
toes, cane and corn were
the chief crops.
There was no way to ship
them until 1886. The post
office of Oxford was put up
by the railroad for conven-
ience.
The first hotel was put up
here about this time. It was
in the eastern part of town
so that it might be near
Pomeroy Browns mill.
The son of old uncle
Johnny Perry had a large
plantation here, which
stretched from the mill
quarters to Bogue's. He had
named Oxford, so he had it
cut in sections and the
streets were named.
O.S. Bogue was Oxford's
first postmaster. He held
the place a long time and
later C.A. Hooks took his
place. Hooks was suc-
ceeded by O.D. Bogue who
still is postmaster
No cars were here and
transportation was a drudg-
ery. It was a week's journey
to Clearwater.
The first car owned here
was Uncle Jimmy
LaVeignes's and was bought











What a way to travel. Pic-
tured is the Main Street in
Oxford in the 1870s.


by him from Doctor Van
Hoode of Ocala. It was a lit-
tle red skeeterr" and was as
much of a mystery as the
"iron horse" had been.
Sometimes it would run
and sometimes it wouldn't.
In this period, Neil Fudge
was the first to own a store.
O'Berry was Oxford's sec-
ond merchant, Bogue third,
Wright fourth and Frazier
fifth.
Another era of store
building came later when
the population increased.
Grimes, Sparkman, Stapp
and Gardener
In 1910 the depot burned
and it was replaced by the
one now standing.
Between 1921 and '23 a
crate mill was built by Led-
better It was prosperous for
over four years. In the end
it failed.
Other early car owners
were Eugene Parham,
Charlie Hooke and Mr
O'dell.
In 1906, Collier and
Warnock's store was estab-
lished. In 1911, it burned
and was replaced by the
building which now stands.
In 1915 the old school
house was built. Much time,


money and work was used
to building another in 1926.
(School built in 1926 is now
Oxford Assembly of God.)
The boom had much af-
fect on Oxford. Many people
went into the real estate
business. Afterwards came
a time of dragging condi-
tions, which still exists.
Depot was between Ox-
ford fire department and
the railroad.
State Road number 23,
which is a branch of the
Dixie Highway was put
here in 1922. The road run-
ning east and west was put
here about 1924.
Oxford was once in great
peril when the influenza
epidemic came. There was
a funeral every day for
three months. The war did-
n't cause much upstir be-
cause only one was killed
from Oxford from this
time until now, no more epi-
demics or wars have
crossed the path of the in-
habitants.
Oxford has had her ups
and downs like every town
but she has held up well
under the existing condi-
tions and is the second old-
est town in Sumter County.


Ca
gese'


SShirley 'n' Kim's Antiques
"on the Korner"
224 N. Main St.
(U.S. Hwy 301) Downtown Bushnell
only minutes from
Webster or Wildwood
p 2.7 miles East of 1-75
6 miles West of Webster
10 miles North of Hwy 50
1-407-383-3619 cell
[__, .' '4 ^ 1-352-793-1709 shop
- 4,000 sq. ft. of
1800's to Present Day Collectibles & Gifts
Art Glass, Painted China, Tea Cups, Cookie Jars,
Owls, Wicker, Nautical, China Cabinets, Desks,
Lamps, Depression Glass, Country Store Collectibles,
Vintage Jewelry, Hats, Clothing, Iron Door Stops
Open Mon., Fri. & Sat. 11-4(5) (Some Sundays 1-4)
Please call to verify Hours
Visit our store at www.acpeddler.com
;. .


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G17






G16 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


Providence at Wildwood, a new independent living facility near the intersection of County Road 466-A and Powell Road, is part of the surge of growth that Wildwood has experienced
during the past few years. (Photo by Martin Steele)


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Dade Park is open through
the year and offers a vari-
ety of events for visitors to
choose from. The year
starts with the reenact-
ment of an 1838 battle be-
tween the U.S. military and
the Seminoles, works
through WWII Commemo-
rative Day and Frontier
Christmas. There are pio-
neer and nature camps in
the summer followed by a
Native American Pow
Wow. They even offer
haunted hayrides in Octo-
ber. These families came
out for the Frontier Christ-
mas where they took part
in several old Florida holi-
day traditions, including
making wreaths with items
from the woods.


One of the events at
Dade Park is a Native
American Pow Wow, that
draws participants from
around the nation. The
event includes a sam-
pling of foods, goods
and entertainment.


DISCOVER


Ed Wolf, Mayor of Wildwood for the past 27 years, is shown
recently in front of Wildwood City Hall. (Photo by Martin
Steele)


MARTIN STEELE
Times Correspondent

he City of Wildwood
is a "diamond in the
rough" to its long-
time Mayor Ed Wolf
"We have so much po-
tential the possibilities
are almost endless," Wolf
said recently about his


"small town" that is
Sumter County's largest
incorporated community
Wolf became a city com-
missioner in 1976 and has
been mayor for 27 years.
He has been about as
close as possible to the
ups and downs of small
town life and government
during that time.
Like so many rural


small towns, Wildwo
seemed to remain mos
static for decades, B
the city has seen a sur
in growth during the pe
decade, greatly in la
area but also in popu
tion.
"We stayed at abc
2,000 residents for ma
years, but jumped up
about 4,700 in the past fE
years," Wolf said.
The city is apparent
in another surge
growth. Recent popul
tion estimates from t
University of Flori
place Wildwood's popu
tion at slightly more th
7,000.
Wolf is enthusiasm
about the city's future, b
some decades ago, the
was a lot of concern.
Newly married a:
fresh out of college, W
moved to Wildwood
1968.
"It was a perfect smi
town, everyone knE
each other," Wolf sa


WILDWOOD

od Like so many rural small towns, Wildwood seemed
tly
ute to remain mostly static for decades, But, the city
rge
ast has seen a surge in growth during the past decade,
nd
la- greatly in land area but also in population.


)ut
my
to
ew

tly
of
la-
he
da
la-
an

tic
)ut
*re

nd
olf
in

all
ew
id.


"The railroad was thriv-
ing and football was still
king."
The city was home to a
major railroad service
and operations center for
many years which was a
major economic source
for the community But,
back in the 1970s came
rail company mergers
and severe reductions in
the Wildwood operations.
At times things looked
rather bleak for the city
"I can remember com-
ing over the overpass at
the north end of town on a
Sunday morning and not
seeing a single car on
Main Street," Wolf said.
'And, there would be
nothing in the rail yard."
"We were scratching


our heads trying to keep
the city surviving," he
said.
During those lean
years, with benefactor as-
sistance, the city built and
operated a nursing home
and built an industrial
park.
But, tides of economics
and growth has changed
for Wildwood in about the
past five years.
With the rapid develop-
ment of the Villages of
Lake and Sumter ap-
proaching Wildwood's
eastern boundaries, city
officials realized that they
could be enveloped by the
Villages.
"We had to make a deci-
sion grow now or not
grow at all," Wolf said. It


led to Wildwood's annex-
ing about 20,000 acres
into the city about five
years ago.
"I think a lot of people
saw dollar signs and took
advantage of it," Wolf
said. "We grew exponen-
tially in land mass. It was
a good move on their
(landowners) part and a
good move on our part."
Sumter County's online
geographical information
systems (GIS) maps show
the rather irregularly-
shaped city to be about 18
miles in length, running
north to south. At the
widest part, Wildwood is
about six miles across.

See WILDWOOD, Page 6


,.. .. 11- -, ...7 I '.t --- -. -' I - L I L i I - -Z.a . .- p -1


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G5






G6 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMMER COUNTY


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continued from Page 5

But so much of that
land area is not homes
$ and businesses. There are
Relatively vast areas of
undeveloped land within
the city boundaries.
Wildwood is gradually
seeing that change.
,-- Much recent activity is
3 occurring on Wildwood's
east side along the edge of
and within the Villages
development.
Earlier this year the
Villages opened it's
newest town center -
Brownwood a Florida
frontier themed enter-
tainment and retail com-
* plex on State Road 44.
Through agreements be-
tween the city and the Vil-
lages, the new complex is
inside the city limits.
Along County Road 466-


A ( or Cleveland Avenue),
the Villages is completing
construction on a new
shopping center just east
of the Sumter County gov-
ernment complex on
Powell Road.
Back to the west
slightly, a new independ-
ent living facility, Provi-
dence at Wildwood, is
recently completed and
in operation with addi-
tional assisted living fa-
cilities in the plans for
that site, Wolf said.
In addition to the town
center, the Villages is ne-
gotiating with city offi-
cials on the 200-acre
Oxford Oaks residential
development that will not
be age-restricted, he said.
Dwellings are proposed
ranging from townhouses
to up-scale single family
homes.
A number of large resi-
dential projects are still
in wait for the start of con-
struction, two of the


largest being Wildwood
Springs and Loadstone.
The development of re-
gional impact for both
projects has been ap-
proved by the state and
city
Neither project has
broken ground yet, Wolf
said, noting that he antic-
ipates that the developers
likely will wait until the
build-out of the Villages
of Lake and Sumter antic-
ipated for next year
Wildwood Springs lo-
cated along the south side
of County Road 468 east of
Coleman will include
about 2,600 homes. And,
the project will include
commercial construction
along US 301 near its in-
tersection with CR 468,
Wolf said.
City officials still try to
push for industry with
higher-paying jobs, he

See WILDWOOD, Page 18


I O P ES R


WEBSTER

continued from Page 8

Williams acknowledges
that there's often resist-
ance to change in the city
And, while she wants to
"maintain our unique-
ness," some contends that
some growth is needed.
"If we don't grow, we die,"
she said. "But, we can
control how we grow."
She would like to see
the community benefit
from revitalization and
bringing in more tourism
money Typically, Web-
ster's biggest days of com-
merce are Mondays with
the flea market opera-
tions. But, the city is not
capitalizing on that trade
as much as possible, she
said.
There have been some
inquiries and talk of pos-
sible annexations for de-
velopment projects,
Williams said. One cur-
rent residential develop-
ment by Homes in
Partnership has been
somewhat stymied by the
municipal sewer hook-up
fees.
The commission is
weighing the possibility of
putting a moratorium on
those fees to help get
some house construction
stimulated. That could
save a potential home-
builder up to about
$7,000, Williams said,
adding that the fees have
been counterproductive.
While, development
has been at somewhat of a
standstill, the town got a
new Dollar General store
last year and Sumter
County is completing con-
struction on a new fire
station and new library at
the south edge of town.
And, the commission is
expected to have a final
hearing in November to
rezone land for a new
Family Dollar store in the
city, Williams said.


I O E IL O01O


The city commission is
also anticipating comple-
tion of a contract to lease
antenna space on its
water tower to Air Max, a
relatively new company
providing wireless Inter-
net service in south
Sumter County
"I would like for us to
have a more business-
friendly town," Williams
said.
Webster is sort of a hub
for a number of small, un-
incorporated communi-
ties that still have many
active cattle ranches, hay
producers, ornamental
plant nurseries, tree
farms, and blueberry
farms. The city serves an
extended area of about
10,000 people, Williams
said.
She got involved in the
city government through
involvement with a group
of about a dozen or more
volunteers who wanted to
improve the city's appear-
ance. They started "Web-
ster in Bloom" and began
projects to help clean up
some areas, plant flowers
and maintain a commu-
nity vegetable garden.
They're continuing with
the work and recently had
prepared the community
garden for winter vegeta-
bles. Williams said more
volunteers and partici-
pants are welcome.
She noted that there is
lot of volunteer effort
both from within the city
and the adjacent areas.
There are mobile home
parks and recreational
vehicle parks just outside
the city limits. She
praised the efforts of
those communities for the
volunteer projects they
had helped with or spon-
sored in Webster.
The town has seen it's
share of changes. Web-
ster's original "down-
town" area has generally
faded away over the years
as businesses closed or
moved. A number of
buildings were destroyed


by fire decades ago.
Where the former At-
lantic Coastline Railroad
tracks used to split the
town, there is a now an
oak-tree shaded mediun
between one-way streets
in the old commercial
area.
From time-to-time,
there's some effort to re-
store and utilize the exist-
ing historic buildings,
housing a few small
shops. Williams said that
she wants the town to
keep its character
"I want to preserve a
sense of place, keep the
character of the town,"
she said, noting that the
Lake-Sumter Metropoli-
tan Planning Organiza-
tion is considering a route
through Webster as one of
the top three possible for
a bicycle/pedestrian con-
nector trail. A number of
connectors are proposed
to link existing trails in a
coast-to coast system.
She cited Winter Gar-
den with an old down-
town transected by the
West Orange Trail as an
example of how that kind
of project can help revi-
talize a community "It
would be an economic
boon to Webster,"
Williams said.
Antonia Flores, of Plant City,
is one of the many vendors
at the Webster Flea Market.


www.husqvarna.com
t 2013 Husqmrna AB (publ). All righ reserved.


The new Fire Station was designed to replace the existing facility in Webster. It will provide 24-hour occupancy for round-
the-clock emergency services to the area.


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G15


ou5e.


, lk


itzl






G14 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


DISCOVER


OXFORD


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This letter was submit-
ted by Oxford resident
Reggie Caruthers, who
has an interest in collect-
ing history While
Caruthers isn't sure of the
writer or the date, it's be-
lieved to have been writ-
ten in the 1930s.
While some minor edit-
inghas been done, the let-
ter is mostly in its original
form and structure.


History of

Oxford
Back before the Civil
War, in about 1840, Oxford
was nothing but a pine
forest. For miles and
miles either way, there


were no horses, log cabins
or even clearings in the
woods. There were no
oaks at all.
In 1850 there was only
one town in Sumter
County, Florida. That was
Adamsville, which later
became the county seat.
Going north a traveler
once found a fertile spot
about ten miles from
Adamsville. There he set-
tled down as a hermit. It
is estimated that he
stayed here about twenty
years. He built a log cabin
and cleared a little land
near it. So he lived in soli-
tude. When the next set-
tler came, all that was left
of his crude cabin was a
board or two and the old


See OXFORD, Page 17


An event that draws
thousands each year, is
Bushnell's Fall Festival.
The crowds come from
around the state to
browse the arts and
crafts, watch the parade
and enjoy the entertain-
ment. Vendors set up
downtown, with a chil-
dren's "Kiddyland" and a
food court at one end of
the street. Entertainment
includes everything from
live music to pageants,
an evening street dance
and fireworks. Mid-after-
noon is the featured
greased pig contest. En-
trants step into a wa-
tered down mud hole
and try to capture the
greased pig. The day of-
fers the crowd a chance
to get out, have some
fun and spend some
time with neighbors,
friends, family and even
lilh ~strangers. The festival
!w* C takes place on the third
A :5.8 Saturday of each
S(l October.


Oxford's renovated O'dell home.


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G7






G8 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


The new E.G. Rowell Public Library was designed to replace the existing facility in Webster. The new facility is 4,400 square feet in area and will provide increased services.


DISCOVER


Webster Mayor Kelly Williams took office in January. (Photo
by Martin Steele)


MARTIN STEELE
Times Correspondent

outside Webster City
Hall, there's a Par-
son Brown orange
tree, standing as a sort of
a living monument to the
south Sumter County
town's agricultural legacy
The tree, with an ac-
companying historical


plaque, represents part of
Webster's agricultural
heritage. But, there's
been considerable
changes to the commu-
nity's agricultural base
since that young citrus
tree's namesake estab-
lished the fruit variety in
the late 1800s.
The commercial citrus
groves that were found in
and around Webster in


that era are now historic
footnotes. And, in about
the past three decades,
the many vegetable farms
that were the economic
base of the Webster area
for so many years have al-
most disappeared.
These days, Webster is
largely known for having
one of the largest flea
markets in the country,
operated by the Sumter
County Farmers Market,
with neighboring inde-
pendent operations. But,
the flea market itself is a
product of the agricul-
tural past, evolved from
both vegetable and live-
stock auctions started in
the early 1900s.
A look around the com-
munity shows that Web-
ster has not entirely lost
its agricultural roots. One
of the largest full-time re-
tail businesses in town is
the farm supply/hardware
store. And, according to
Webster Mayor Kelly
Williams, the on-going
weekly livestock auction
is the third largest in the
state.


WEBSTER


The commercial citrus groves that were found in and around

Webster in that era are now historic footnotes. And, in about

the past three decades, the many vegetable farms that were

the economic base of the Webster area for so many years

have almost disappeared.


Williams, won election
against an the incumbent
mayor in December and
was seated as mayor in
January It's her first ex-
perience at holding a gov-
ernmental office.
A resident of Webster
for two years, she came to
the post with a back-
ground in radio, public
relations, banking and
law With no city manager
on staff, she's had consid-
erable "hands-on" experi-
ence with the city
operations in the past sev-
eral months.
Since she took office,
the city commission has
hired a financial consult-
ant to help with a number
of bookkeeping and audit
issues and has managed


to cut a number of ex-
penses, getting the city in
an improved financial
status. The commission
has also had to correct
some old re-zoning issues
so the property owners
wanting to sell or develop
projects on their land
would not be hindered by
an incorrect zoning.
There's much more to
be done, according to
Williams. The potable
water system needs to be
updated in a number of
areas in the city and there
needs to be changes to the
city's relatively new
sewage system. She cites
poor design of the sewer
system as one of the
major problems. Improv-
ing the water quality is


another issue and a long-
term project.
"It's a great city, but we
can do so much more for
our citizens," she said.
For a number of years,
the city has not had much
growth. It remains rather
constant in population
with Sumter County gov-
ernment estimates for
2013 at 780 for Webster.
That's down from the 2000
U.S. Census number of
805.
The city has been
rather constant in physi-
cal area, with a current
land area of about 900
acres, based on the
county's geographical in-
formation website.

See WEBSTER, Page 15


DI !S V ER ROY' AL


ROYAL

continued from Page 12

Royalty (thus the name
Royal).
In 1865, the first settlers
came to this community
from the Old Green Plan-
tation, located down by
the Withlacoochee River
where they were freed
from slavery Some of the
original homesteaders
were Hamp Anderson,
William Harley, Sandy
Robinson, Dave Brooks,
Pete Anderson and the
Pickets family
The first industries
started in this community
were farming, logging and
turpentine dipping. The
men cleared the land to
farm on to have food for
their families.
The first AME Church
was established and built
by Rev Alfred Brown.
This church was named
Ebenezer.
The first Baptist
Church was built by Rev
Euman Ellison. This
church was named Beth-
lehem Missionary Baptist
Church.
In 1891, as this commu-
nity became more popu-
lated the citizens were
given a Post Office. The
first postmaster was Mr.
Eli Johnson. The first
postmistress was Mrs. Sa-
vannah Johnson. Mr. Tom
James was the first mail
carrier Mr. W D. Williams
was appointed as the next
postmaster Following
him was Mr John Greene.
After Mr Greene gave up
the position the Post Of-
fice was moved back to
Wildwood.
There is no known date
when the first school was
built in this community
but it was built by Rev Al-
fred Brown. The first
principal was Mr. Spate
and the last principal was


The first industries started in this

community were farming, logging

and turpentine dipping.


Mr. Alonzo A Young Sr.
who served 22 years until
it was phased into the
Wildwood schools.
The first block home
was built in 1946 and was
owned by Mr. & Mrs. Cole-
man James. It was built by
Mr. Letaf Brooks. The first
electric service was in-
stalled in 1938 by Sumter
Electric Cooperative Co-
operation. Some of the
first citizens to sign up
and receive electrical
services were Mr. McAu-
thur Woods, Mr. Sal Rich,
Mr. M. D. Steele, and Mr.
Zettie Williams.
Mr. & Mrs. Primas
Massey were the first
family to have a tele-
phone installed in their
home.
Mr. Ellis Walker Ander-
son was the founder and
coordinator of our first
Annual Homecoming Day
The first service was held
at Ebenezer A. M. E.
Church- Royal with Rev
Jerome Andrews, Host
Pastor and Rev J. L. Hill,
Pastor of Second Bethel
Baptist Church- Royal
was the speaker.
In 1980 two men from
the Community of Royal
were the first African
Americans in Sumter
County to run for a Public
Office as a County Offi-
cial: Robert 'Tom' Dixon
and George G. Wideman.
Both were defeated.
In October 2, 1984,
Robert 'Tom' Dixon was
elected as County Com-
missioner of District 1,
Sumter County making
him as the first African
American to hold an
elected office in Sumter
County
Joseph Graham was our


first Fire Chief and
Lorenzo Brooks was our
first Assistant Fire Chief.
In 1987, after graduat-
ing from Wildwood High
School, James G. Wide-
man joined the U.S. Army
In 1990, he was the first
person from Sumter
County to be selected to
go to the United States
Military Academy at West
Point in New York. In
1994, he graduated from
West Point as 2nd Lieu-
tenant.
On April 24, 1995, Ellis
Johnson was the first per-
son from the Community
of Royal to be picked to
play in the NFL. He was
drafted in the 15th pick in
the first round. He played
ten years with the Indi-
anapolis Colts. After he
retired, he was inducted
into the Hall of Fame at
the University of Florida,
in Gainesville, FL on
April 13,2007.
In October 2007, the
renovation project of one
Royal's oldest and his-
toric buildings was
deemed by Gov Charlie
Crist, then governor of
Florida, as a Point of
Light Project.
In August 12, 2010, the
unveiling of a state issued
Community of Royal's his-
toric marker making it
one of only two markers
in Sumter County
We give thanks to God
and to everyone that
worked so hard to help
keep the heritage and the
Community of Royal
alive.
For more information,
352-748-0260, royalpro-
ject@cfl.rr.com,
www. Community-
OfRoyal.org


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G13






G12 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


DISCOVER ROYAL


Why the

name- Royal?
ost of us are
aware of the Com-
munity of Royal's
history For example, how
it once was called Pick-
etsville then called Royal.
We all know how it was
given the name Pick-
etsville because of the
picket fences that sur-
rounded each family's
property but, Why the
name Royal?
Before now, no one
knew how the beloved
community was given its
name -Royal. Even, the
noted historian, Sister
Catherine Latimer, didn't
know how the community
was given the name
Royal. Many of the most
recent ancestors just did-
n't know when the change
occurred or how the com-
munity was given the
name Royal.


According to Mr. Hulon
H. Nichols in his book en-
titled 'Long Hammock
Memories', before there
were any towns in Sumter
County and even before it
was Sumter, there was, as
is still the case, the Long
Hammock. It was so
named by the first survey-
ors, and is on their first
maps (today, as the Cren-
shaw and Nichols area at
County Road 475 and
County Road 466).
Before 1835 there was
an "old Negro Town" with
free blacks (African
slaves) living there. They
were not bothered by the
Seminoles and were even
considered as allies with
them. Some were killed
by the United States Gov-
ernment during Andrew
Jackson's term in office or
shipped west to Arkansas
and Oklahoma. A few that
hid and remained were
befriended by the first
whites not believing in


This historic marker shows the site of the Royal School.


slavery These first four
families of whites and the
small group of blacks
started milling operations
and cloth weaving a
decade before the War
Between the States. The
small group of Blacks'
community, today, is


known as Royal.
It was handed down
that upon arriving in 1848,
the Scotts and later the
Crenshaws found Free
Blacks living near the
head of Gum Slough,
called Gum Springs, and
also called "Gator". As


more Whites came and
settled near Gum Springs,
because of the abundance
of clear water at the
springhead, they pushed
and the Blacks slowly
moved away By the be-
ginning of the War Be-
tween the States, the
'clean blooded' Blacks
were living in Long Ham-
mock where they felt safe.
Clean blooded meant to
this small group: that they
were Black Africans
whose parents were tribal
leaders (Kings & Queens)
that were killed by rival
warring tribes and their
families were marched
hundreds of miles and
sold into slavery, and they
were to keep to them-
selves. They or their par-
ents had escaped in
Spanish Florida. They
did not mix blood with
Native Americans or any
race, and as soon as they
could they or their chil-
dren intended to someday


return home to Africa and
retake their family prop-
erties.
Before the War Be-
tween the States, the
Long Hammock settle-
ment of Blacks that had
first been quietly known
as "Royalville" had be-
come known as "Pick-
etsville."
"Picketsville was so
named because each
cabin had sand yards with
picket type fences around
them to keep cattle and
hogs away from the
house. The yards had no
grass so the rattlesnakes
could be seen. After the
war, residents quietly
changed its name back to
"Royal", and documented
it by 1880. It was done so
future generations of all
races would always know
some of the first Blacks at
least, were of African


See ROYAL, Page 13


Community leader Beverly Steele provided the information for Dis-
cover Royal.
Here's some insight into Ms. Steele: One of the most rewarding
things I've ever accomplished in my life is founding Young Perform-
ing Artists (YPAs), Inc., a 501 c) 3), not-for-profit, state recognized,
and statewide focused corporation. I can't begin to explain how ful-
filling it is to serve and be of service, especially to children and
their families. If I had to choose between my work experiences of
founding this organization and when I was a NYC corporate man-
ager who handled million dollar departments, hands down it would
be founding this organization that brought me the greatest joy. I
think back on my journey and realize that 'to whom much is given
much is required.'
I did not start this organization for financial gain but truly to share
my experiences and compassion with many. My Board and I ask
support simply because it is our strong desire to sustain this or-
ganization, preserve its history of providing enrichment, cultural &
artistic services and continuing to promote the many benefits of the
Arts. I want my tombstone to read: 'The Lady of Steele: she lived,
she learned, she loved'. Visit: www.youngperformingartists.org


Beverly Steele with some of the Royal Historical Enrichment &Art Program (RHEAP) Sum-
mer 13 participants.


DISCOVER LAKE PANASOFFKEE


Jim Veal Jr. is well versed on
the history of Lake Panasoff-
kee. His family has operated
Pana Vista Lodge for
decades.

BRENDA LOCKLEAR
Staff Writer


Jn the late 1800s the
bustling little town of
Panasoffkee was well
known for its citrus in-
dustry At that time, the
town was located along
the railroad at Panasoff-
kee Creek. The railroad


was expanding south-
ward, so Panasoffkee was
a nice "stopping off"
place- especially for the
many wealthy northern-
ers moving south to a
tropical paradise, where
the climate cured all ail-
ments, says Jim Veal Jr
His family has deep roots
in the community and has
operated Pana Vista
Lodge since the 1940s.
Some New York devel-
opers had Panasoffkee
drawn and platted as the
largest city in Florida.
Then the "Great Freeze"
of 1894-95 changed the
whole future of our area.
Not only did the freeze
wipe out all the citrus, it
also sent the developers
packing.
Shortly after the freeze
Lake Panasoffkee started
building its reputation as
a great freshwater fishing
lake moving forward,
ever since.
Not only is Lake Pana-


soffkee the largest and
most sought out lake in
Sumter County, it is also
one of the finest fishing
lakes in Central Florida
or even the entire state of
Florida. Its 4,400-acre
footprint is also unique
because it is an open win-
dow to the aquifer
The folks of Panasoff-
kee are not only proud of
its reputation as one of
the best shellcracker
lakes in the south, they
take pride in the fact that
it is also a great large-
mouth bass lake. Ask any
of the fisheries biologists
that have worked the lake
area and they'll tell you
that the water quality and
fish habitat are the best of
any around. Its shallow
stature, shell bottom and
heavily vegetated areas
help it maintain its qual-
ity The recent $26 million
lake restoration project,
along with the fact that
state owns more than half


Some New York developers had Panasoffkee

drawn and platted as the largest city in Florida.

Then the "Great Freeze" of 1894-95 changed

the whole future of our area.


of the lake shoreline, in-
sure us that it will be very
productive for many
years to come.
In recent months and
currently, Sumter County
is in the process of spon-
soring a very popular
tagged fishing contest.
In an effort to promote
the area, 150 fish were
tagged and released into
the lake. Those tagged
fish can earn the angler
anything from an
overnight stay in one of
the fishing lodges to
$10,000 cash.
The contest is ongoing
until either all the
tagged fish are caught, or


mid-2014, whichever
comes first.
While the county is
sponsoring some of the
big money, the local com-
munity is also kicking in -
donating overnight stays
and even the big celebra-
tion lunch that took place
the day of the kick-off
The $10,000 fish is
"General Sumter" grand
prize.
The western shoreline
of Panasoffkee is dotted
with a hand full of "old"
Florida style fish camps -
bait shops, marinas, boat
ramps and campgrounds.
Anything you may need
for your fishing trip can


usually be purchased lo-
cally There is no room for
the big box stores or chain
restaurants here!
There is only one high-
way running through the
small town of Panasoffkee
and it is part of the
Sumter Scenic Highway
County Road 470 was re-
cently chosen by the state
as the newest scenic high-
way
Jim Veal Sr. said his
parents bought Pana
Vista Lodge back in the
1940s and needed help
running the business.
That's when he and his

See. LAKE, Page 10


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G9






G10O Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


Shellcrackers galore from the lake.


The new Fire Station in Lake Panasoffkee.


LAKE

continued from Page 9

wife Eloise moved to the
community.
Panasoffkee inspires
loyal visitors at
Idlewild, owner Steve
Martini said they have
families and groups who
come back year after
year- some for family re-
unions, some for local
events and some to host
their youth group events.
Martini said, often the
groups rent the entire
lodge for their events.
Often, generations of
families returned to the
lake, handing down the
tradition to children and
grandchildren.


"That's the really re-
warding part of this busi-
ness," said Veal, Sr.
"Fishing is a cycle re-
ally, with highs and
lows," he said, adding
that the best to happen at
the lake was the restora-
tion, which returned the
lake to what it was years
ago.
"This past year was an
outstanding bass sea-
son."
It's the shellcrackers
that made the lake fa-
mous, he said.
Along with overnight
accommodations in fish-
ing camps, visitors will
find a collection of local
businesses from Pana-
soffkee Hardware to
Stardust Wine and Gen-


eral Store a local wine
shop with a unique twist.
The shop owners actu-
ally have their own win-
ery in the Tampa Bay
area and have created
several new flavors, just
for their brand. On Sun-
day afternoons, they
offer wine tasting and
live music.
Looking for a bargain
or a unique dining expe-
rience? There's a collec-
tion of thrift shops and
several restaurants.
Among the eateries are
Catfish Johnnies where
you guessed it, catfish is
a feature.
Harbor Lights and At
the Pier sit along the
lake's edge and give din-
ers a wonderful view of


the water and wildlife.
Live music is never a
surprise at some of the
other restaurants either,
as they come in the form
of music jams and
karaoke.
Other food choices in-
clude fast food, grocery
store specialties, subs
and more at The Big
Cheese.
It's a community for
the family, from the Lake
Panasoffkee Recreation
Park and library to the
Marsh Bend Park on the
outlet- fishing, picnick-
ing and playing. There's
also a wildlife manage-
ment area.
Love a bargain? You'll
find thrift stores and a
curiosity shop for brows-
ing and buying.


-Tffhe Red




A
.


Rose Formal Boutique
"From Babies To Bridal And
Everything In Between"
415 N. West St.
Bushnell, FL 33513
(Corner of SR. 48 and West St.)
352-461-8409
Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 10am-3pm


DISCOVER


SUMTER EVENTS


MONTHLY
Wildwood Food Truck
Chamber of Commerce Meets

JANUARY
Dade Battle Reenactment
Reenactment
Agritunity Sumter Extension
Office
Annual Chamber Dinner
Bushnell Chili cook-off
Dixie Youth League sign-ups
begin

MARCH
Sumter County Fair
Miss Sumter Pageant
WW Commemorative Day
Ides of March 5K Wildwood

APRIL and MAY
Relay for Life American
Cancer Society
75 Chrome Shop Truck Show
Run for the Son Christian
motorcycle fundraiser
Art in the Park Dade Park
Earth Day at SEEK
Bushnell Men's Club Picnic at
Lincoln Park
Law Enforcement Torch Run
Wildwood Tree City
Bushnell Tree City
High school prom nights
Graduation

JUNE and JULY
Linden Cemetery Picnic
VBS programs
Summer Day Camps Bushnell,
Wildwood and Dade Park
Dade offers both a pioneer and na-
ture camp for youth
Patriotic Family Fun Day-
Dade Park
Back-to-School Luau-
Lake Panasoffkee
Pop Warner sign-ups
Wildwood Athletic golf
tournament
Kids N Cops Days day camp
and youth center
Dixe Youth Tournaments


AUGUST
Football Season
Women and Men's sports leagues
at Kenny Dixon
Pop Warner begins play
Wildwood Sumter youth soccer

SEPTEMBER
A Road Back in Time -
Dade Park
Langley's Cracker Ball
Taste of Sumter
Native American Celebration -
Dade Park

OCTOBER
Sumter County Farm Bureau
Annual Banquet
Mr. South Sumter South Sumter
High School
Bushnell Fall Festival
Oxford Fall Festival
Dade Park Haunted Hayrides
Thousand Oaks Haunted
Forest Walk
Panasoffkee Halloween in
the Park
Family Fun Fest Sumter
County Fairgrounds
Hinton Haunted House -
Webster
Webster Cemetery Picnic -
Sumter County Farmer's Market
Webster High School Reunion -
Sumter County Farmer's Market

NOVEMBER
Beef and Boogie
Florida Folk Festival

DECEMBER
Wildwood Women's Club
Christmas House Tour
Lighted Night Parade Webster
LP Christmas parade -
Lake Panasoffkee
Wildwood Christmas Parade
Celebrating Far From Home -
Dade Park
Grace Tabernacle the Gift
Frontier Christmas Dade Park


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I-ik s n:AEeBOWU


DISCOVER LAKE PANASOFFKEE I


I I


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 Gl1


)OGNBJ






G10 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


Shellcrackers galore from the lake.


The new Fire Station in Lake Panasoffkee.


LAKE

continued from Page 9

wife Eloise moved to the
community.
Panasoffkee inspires
loyal visitors at
Idlewild, owner Steve
Martini said they have
families and groups who
come back year after
year- some for family re-
unions, some for local
events and some to host
their youth group events.
Martini said, often the
groups rent the entire
lodge for their events.
Often, generations of
families returned to the
lake, handing down the
tradition to children and
grandchildren.


"That's the really re-
warding part of this busi-
ness," said Veal, Sr.
"Fishing is a cycle re-
ally, with highs and
lows," he said, adding
that the best to happen at
the lake was the restora-
tion, which returned the
lake to what it was years
ago.
"This past year was an
outstanding bass sea-
son."
It's the shellcrackers
that made the lake fa-
mous, he said.
Along with overnight
accommodations in fish-
ing camps, visitors will
find a collection of local
businesses from Pana-
soffkee Hardware to
Stardust Wine and Gen-


eral Store a local wine
shop with a unique twist.
The shop owners actu-
ally have their own win-
ery in the Tampa Bay
area and have created
several new flavors, just
for their brand. On Sun-
day afternoons, they
offer wine tasting and
live music.
Looking for a bargain
or a unique dining expe-
rience? There's a collec-
tion of thrift shops and
several restaurants.
Among the eateries are
Catfish Johnnies where
you guessed it, catfish is
a feature.
Harbor Lights and At
the Pier sit along the
lake's edge and give din-
ers a wonderful view of


the water and wildlife.
Live music is never a
surprise at some of the
other restaurants either,
as they come in the form
of music jams and
karaoke.
Other food choices in-
clude fast food, grocery
store specialties, subs
and more at The Big
Cheese.
It's a community for
the family, from the Lake
Panasoffkee Recreation
Park and library to the
Marsh Bend Park on the
outlet- fishing, picnick-
ing and playing. There's
also a wildlife manage-
ment area.
Love a bargain? You'll
find thrift stores and a
curiosity shop for brows-
ing and buying.


-Tffhe Red




A
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DISCOVER


SUMTER EVENTS


MONTHLY
Wildwood Food Truck
Chamber of Commerce Meets

JANUARY
Dade Battle Reenactment
Reenactment
Agritunity Sumter Extension
Office
Annual Chamber Dinner
Bushnell Chili cook-off
Dixie Youth League sign-ups
begin

MARCH
Sumter County Fair
Miss Sumter Pageant
WW Commemorative Day
Ides of March 5K Wildwood

APRIL and MAY
Relay for Life American
Cancer Society
75 Chrome Shop Truck Show
Run for the Son Christian
motorcycle fundraiser
Art in the Park Dade Park
Earth Day at SEEK
Bushnell Men's Club Picnic at
Lincoln Park
Law Enforcement Torch Run
Wildwood Tree City
Bushnell Tree City
High school prom nights
Graduation

JUNE and JULY
Linden Cemetery Picnic
VBS programs
Summer Day Camps Bushnell,
Wildwood and Dade Park
Dade offers both a pioneer and na-
ture camp for youth
Patriotic Family Fun Day-
Dade Park
Back-to-School Luau-
Lake Panasoffkee
Pop Warner sign-ups
Wildwood Athletic golf
tournament
Kids N Cops Days day camp
and youth center
Dixe Youth Tournaments


AUGUST
Football Season
Women and Men's sports leagues
at Kenny Dixon
Pop Warner begins play
Wildwood Sumter youth soccer

SEPTEMBER
A Road Back in Time -
Dade Park
Langley's Cracker Ball
Taste of Sumter
Native American Celebration -
Dade Park

OCTOBER
Sumter County Farm Bureau
Annual Banquet
Mr. South Sumter South Sumter
High School
Bushnell Fall Festival
Oxford Fall Festival
Dade Park Haunted Hayrides
Thousand Oaks Haunted
Forest Walk
Panasoffkee Halloween in
the Park
Family Fun Fest Sumter
County Fairgrounds
Hinton Haunted House -
Webster
Webster Cemetery Picnic -
Sumter County Farmer's Market
Webster High School Reunion -
Sumter County Farmer's Market

NOVEMBER
Beef and Boogie
Florida Folk Festival

DECEMBER
Wildwood Women's Club
Christmas House Tour
Lighted Night Parade Webster
LP Christmas parade -
Lake Panasoffkee
Wildwood Christmas Parade
Celebrating Far From Home -
Dade Park
Grace Tabernacle the Gift
Frontier Christmas Dade Park


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DISCOVER LAKE PANASOFFKEE I


I I


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 Gl1


)OGNBJ






G12 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


DISCOVER ROYAL


Why the

name- Royal?
ost of us are
aware of the Com-
munity of Royal's
history For example, how
it once was called Pick-
etsville then called Royal.
We all know how it was
given the name Pick-
etsville because of the
picket fences that sur-
rounded each family's
property but, Why the
name Royal?
Before now, no one
knew how the beloved
community was given its
name -Royal. Even, the
noted historian, Sister
Catherine Latimer, didn't
know how the community
was given the name
Royal. Many of the most
recent ancestors just did-
n't know when the change
occurred or how the com-
munity was given the
name Royal.


According to Mr. Hulon
H. Nichols in his book en-
titled 'Long Hammock
Memories', before there
were any towns in Sumter
County and even before it
was Sumter, there was, as
is still the case, the Long
Hammock. It was so
named by the first survey-
ors, and is on their first
maps (today, as the Cren-
shaw and Nichols area at
County Road 475 and
County Road 466).
Before 1835 there was
an "old Negro Town" with
free blacks (African
slaves) living there. They
were not bothered by the
Seminoles and were even
considered as allies with
them. Some were killed
by the United States Gov-
ernment during Andrew
Jackson's term in office or
shipped west to Arkansas
and Oklahoma. A few that
hid and remained were
befriended by the first
whites not believing in


This historic marker shows the site of the Royal School.


slavery These first four
families of whites and the
small group of blacks
started milling operations
and cloth weaving a
decade before the War
Between the States. The
small group of Blacks'
community, today, is


known as Royal.
It was handed down
that upon arriving in 1848,
the Scotts and later the
Crenshaws found Free
Blacks living near the
head of Gum Slough,
called Gum Springs, and
also called "Gator". As


more Whites came and
settled near Gum Springs,
because of the abundance
of clear water at the
springhead, they pushed
and the Blacks slowly
moved away By the be-
ginning of the War Be-
tween the States, the
'clean blooded' Blacks
were living in Long Ham-
mock where they felt safe.
Clean blooded meant to
this small group: that they
were Black Africans
whose parents were tribal
leaders (Kings & Queens)
that were killed by rival
warring tribes and their
families were marched
hundreds of miles and
sold into slavery, and they
were to keep to them-
selves. They or their par-
ents had escaped in
Spanish Florida. They
did not mix blood with
Native Americans or any
race, and as soon as they
could they or their chil-
dren intended to someday


return home to Africa and
retake their family prop-
erties.
Before the War Be-
tween the States, the
Long Hammock settle-
ment of Blacks that had
first been quietly known
as "Royalville" had be-
come known as "Pick-
etsville."
"Picketsville was so
named because each
cabin had sand yards with
picket type fences around
them to keep cattle and
hogs away from the
house. The yards had no
grass so the rattlesnakes
could be seen. After the
war, residents quietly
changed its name back to
"Royal", and documented
it by 1880. It was done so
future generations of all
races would always know
some of the first Blacks at
least, were of African


See ROYAL, Page 13


Community leader Beverly Steele provided the information for Dis-
cover Royal.
Here's some insight into Ms. Steele: One of the most rewarding
things I've ever accomplished in my life is founding Young Perform-
ing Artists (YPAs), Inc., a 501 c) 3), not-for-profit, state recognized,
and statewide focused corporation. I can't begin to explain how ful-
filling it is to serve and be of service, especially to children and
their families. If I had to choose between my work experiences of
founding this organization and when I was a NYC corporate man-
ager who handled million dollar departments, hands down it would
be founding this organization that brought me the greatest joy. I
think back on my journey and realize that 'to whom much is given
much is required.'
I did not start this organization for financial gain but truly to share
my experiences and compassion with many. My Board and I ask
support simply because it is our strong desire to sustain this or-
ganization, preserve its history of providing enrichment, cultural &
artistic services and continuing to promote the many benefits of the
Arts. I want my tombstone to read: 'The Lady of Steele: she lived,
she learned, she loved'. Visit: www.youngperformingartists.org


Beverly Steele with some of the Royal Historical Enrichment &Art Program (RHEAP) Sum-
mer 13 participants.


DISCOVER LAKE PANASOFFKEE


Jim Veal Jr. is well versed on
the history of Lake Panasoff-
kee. His family has operated
Pana Vista Lodge for
decades.

BRENDA LOCKLEAR
Staff Writer


Jn the late 1800s the
bustling little town of
Panasoffkee was well
known for its citrus in-
dustry At that time, the
town was located along
the railroad at Panasoff-
kee Creek. The railroad


was expanding south-
ward, so Panasoffkee was
a nice "stopping off"
place- especially for the
many wealthy northern-
ers moving south to a
tropical paradise, where
the climate cured all ail-
ments, says Jim Veal Jr
His family has deep roots
in the community and has
operated Pana Vista
Lodge since the 1940s.
Some New York devel-
opers had Panasoffkee
drawn and platted as the
largest city in Florida.
Then the "Great Freeze"
of 1894-95 changed the
whole future of our area.
Not only did the freeze
wipe out all the citrus, it
also sent the developers
packing.
Shortly after the freeze
Lake Panasoffkee started
building its reputation as
a great freshwater fishing
lake moving forward,
ever since.
Not only is Lake Pana-


soffkee the largest and
most sought out lake in
Sumter County, it is also
one of the finest fishing
lakes in Central Florida
or even the entire state of
Florida. Its 4,400-acre
footprint is also unique
because it is an open win-
dow to the aquifer
The folks of Panasoff-
kee are not only proud of
its reputation as one of
the best shellcracker
lakes in the south, they
take pride in the fact that
it is also a great large-
mouth bass lake. Ask any
of the fisheries biologists
that have worked the lake
area and they'll tell you
that the water quality and
fish habitat are the best of
any around. Its shallow
stature, shell bottom and
heavily vegetated areas
help it maintain its qual-
ity The recent $26 million
lake restoration project,
along with the fact that
state owns more than half


Some New York developers had Panasoffkee

drawn and platted as the largest city in Florida.

Then the "Great Freeze" of 1894-95 changed

the whole future of our area.


of the lake shoreline, in-
sure us that it will be very
productive for many
years to come.
In recent months and
currently, Sumter County
is in the process of spon-
soring a very popular
tagged fishing contest.
In an effort to promote
the area, 150 fish were
tagged and released into
the lake. Those tagged
fish can earn the angler
anything from an
overnight stay in one of
the fishing lodges to
$10,000 cash.
The contest is ongoing
until either all the
tagged fish are caught, or


mid-2014, whichever
comes first.
While the county is
sponsoring some of the
big money, the local com-
munity is also kicking in -
donating overnight stays
and even the big celebra-
tion lunch that took place
the day of the kick-off
The $10,000 fish is
"General Sumter" grand
prize.
The western shoreline
of Panasoffkee is dotted
with a hand full of "old"
Florida style fish camps -
bait shops, marinas, boat
ramps and campgrounds.
Anything you may need
for your fishing trip can


usually be purchased lo-
cally There is no room for
the big box stores or chain
restaurants here!
There is only one high-
way running through the
small town of Panasoffkee
and it is part of the
Sumter Scenic Highway
County Road 470 was re-
cently chosen by the state
as the newest scenic high-
way
Jim Veal Sr. said his
parents bought Pana
Vista Lodge back in the
1940s and needed help
running the business.
That's when he and his

See. LAKE, Page 10


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G9






G8 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMMER COUNTY


The new E.G. Rowell Public Library was designed to replace the existing facility in Webster. The new facility is 4,400 square feet in area and will provide increased services.


DISCOVER


Webster Mayor Kelly Williams took office in January. (Photo
by Martin Steele)


MARTIN STEELE
Times Correspondent

outside Webster City
Hall, there's a Par-
son Brown orange
tree, standing as a sort of
a living monument to the
south Sumter County
town's agricultural legacy
The tree, with an ac-
companying historical


plaque, represents part of
Webster's agricultural
heritage. But, there's
been considerable
changes to the commu-
nity's agricultural base
since that young citrus
tree's namesake estab-
lished the fruit variety in
the late 1800s.
The commercial citrus
groves that were found in
and around Webster in


that era are now historic
footnotes. And, in about
the past three decades,
the many vegetable farms
that were the economic
base of the Webster area
for so many years have al-
most disappeared.
These days, Webster is
largely known for having
one of the largest flea
markets in the country,
operated by the Sumter
County Farmers Market,
with neighboring inde-
pendent operations. But,
the flea market itself is a
product of the agricul-
tural past, evolved from
both vegetable and live-
stock auctions started in
the early 1900s.
A look around the com-
munity shows that Web-
ster has not entirely lost
its agricultural roots. One
of the largest full-time re-
tail businesses in town is
the farm supply/hardware
store. And, according to
Webster Mayor Kelly
Williams, the on-going
weekly livestock auction
is the third largest in the
state.


WEBSTER


The commercial citrus groves that were found in and around

Webster in that era are now historic footnotes. And, in about

the past three decades, the many vegetable farms that were

the economic base of the Webster area for so many years

have almost disappeared.


Williams, won election
against an the incumbent
mayor in December and
was seated as mayor in
January It's her first ex-
perience at holding a gov-
ernmental office.
A resident of Webster
for two years, she came to
the post with a back-
ground in radio, public
relations, banking and
law With no city manager
on staff, she's had consid-
erable "hands-on" experi-
ence with the city
operations in the past sev-
eral months.
Since she took office,
the city commission has
hired a financial consult-
ant to help with a number
of bookkeeping and audit
issues and has managed


to cut a number of ex-
penses, getting the city in
an improved financial
status. The commission
has also had to correct
some old re-zoning issues
so the property owners
wanting to sell or develop
projects on their land
would not be hindered by
an incorrect zoning.
There's much more to
be done, according to
Williams. The potable
water system needs to be
updated in a number of
areas in the city and there
needs to be changes to the
city's relatively new
sewage system. She cites
poor design of the sewer
system as one of the
major problems. Improv-
ing the water quality is


another issue and a long-
term project.
"It's a great city, but we
can do so much more for
our citizens," she said.
For a number of years,
the city has not had much
growth. It remains rather
constant in population
with Sumter County gov-
ernment estimates for
2013 at 780 for Webster.
That's down from the 2000
U.S. Census number of
805.
The city has been
rather constant in physi-
cal area, with a current
land area of about 900
acres, based on the
county's geographical in-
formation website.

See WEBSTER, Page 15


DI !S V ER ROY' AL


ROYAL

continued from Page 12

Royalty (thus the name
Royal).
In 1865, the first settlers
came to this community
from the Old Green Plan-
tation, located down by
the Withlacoochee River
where they were freed
from slavery Some of the
original homesteaders
were Hamp Anderson,
William Harley, Sandy
Robinson, Dave Brooks,
Pete Anderson and the
Pickets family
The first industries
started in this community
were farming, logging and
turpentine dipping. The
men cleared the land to
farm on to have food for
their families.
The first AME Church
was established and built
by Rev Alfred Brown.
This church was named
Ebenezer.
The first Baptist
Church was built by Rev
Euman Ellison. This
church was named Beth-
lehem Missionary Baptist
Church.
In 1891, as this commu-
nity became more popu-
lated the citizens were
given a Post Office. The
first postmaster was Mr.
Eli Johnson. The first
postmistress was Mrs. Sa-
vannah Johnson. Mr. Tom
James was the first mail
carrier Mr. W D. Williams
was appointed as the next
postmaster Following
him was Mr John Greene.
After Mr Greene gave up
the position the Post Of-
fice was moved back to
Wildwood.
There is no known date
when the first school was
built in this community
but it was built by Rev Al-
fred Brown. The first
principal was Mr. Spate
and the last principal was


The first industries started in this

community were farming, logging

and turpentine dipping.


Mr. Alonzo A Young Sr.
who served 22 years until
it was phased into the
Wildwood schools.
The first block home
was built in 1946 and was
owned by Mr. & Mrs. Cole-
man James. It was built by
Mr. Letaf Brooks. The first
electric service was in-
stalled in 1938 by Sumter
Electric Cooperative Co-
operation. Some of the
first citizens to sign up
and receive electrical
services were Mr. McAu-
thur Woods, Mr. Sal Rich,
Mr. M. D. Steele, and Mr.
Zettie Williams.
Mr. & Mrs. Primas
Massey were the first
family to have a tele-
phone installed in their
home.
Mr. Ellis Walker Ander-
son was the founder and
coordinator of our first
Annual Homecoming Day
The first service was held
at Ebenezer A. M. E.
Church- Royal with Rev
Jerome Andrews, Host
Pastor and Rev J. L. Hill,
Pastor of Second Bethel
Baptist Church- Royal
was the speaker.
In 1980 two men from
the Community of Royal
were the first African
Americans in Sumter
County to run for a Public
Office as a County Offi-
cial: Robert 'Tom' Dixon
and George G. Wideman.
Both were defeated.
In October 2, 1984,
Robert 'Tom' Dixon was
elected as County Com-
missioner of District 1,
Sumter County making
him as the first African
American to hold an
elected office in Sumter
County
Joseph Graham was our


first Fire Chief and
Lorenzo Brooks was our
first Assistant Fire Chief.
In 1987, after graduat-
ing from Wildwood High
School, James G. Wide-
man joined the U.S. Army
In 1990, he was the first
person from Sumter
County to be selected to
go to the United States
Military Academy at West
Point in New York. In
1994, he graduated from
West Point as 2nd Lieu-
tenant.
On April 24, 1995, Ellis
Johnson was the first per-
son from the Community
of Royal to be picked to
play in the NFL. He was
drafted in the 15th pick in
the first round. He played
ten years with the Indi-
anapolis Colts. After he
retired, he was inducted
into the Hall of Fame at
the University of Florida,
in Gainesville, FL on
April 13,2007.
In October 2007, the
renovation project of one
Royal's oldest and his-
toric buildings was
deemed by Gov Charlie
Crist, then governor of
Florida, as a Point of
Light Project.
In August 12, 2010, the
unveiling of a state issued
Community of Royal's his-
toric marker making it
one of only two markers
in Sumter County
We give thanks to God
and to everyone that
worked so hard to help
keep the heritage and the
Community of Royal
alive.
For more information,
352-748-0260, royalpro-
ject@cfl.rr.com,
www. Community-
OfRoyal.org


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G13






G14 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


DISCOVER


OXFORD


inline-H-4-, c

performance-1
Inc" Tod Garrett Scott Bruce

Complete Mopar Repair
& Maintenance
" Alignments Tire Sales
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[ CR 48 Southeast of Bushnell


Mental health isn't about losing control- 3
It's about MAINTAINING IT.
Most of the time, we can deal with the serious problems
life puts us through. Divorce. The death of a loved one. j
An economic setback or other personal loss. f
But every once in a while, some of us are faced with I
events which, combined with other pressures, seem
unmanageable. We feel anxious, sad, can't eat or can't
stop eating. We sleep too much. Or not at all. Some
days. we don't know if we can even get out of bed.
At LlfeStream, we really care about what you're going
through, and know how to help. Better still,
we can help you feel In control, again. A


This letter was submit-
ted by Oxford resident
Reggie Caruthers, who
has an interest in collect-
ing history While
Caruthers isn't sure of the
writer or the date, it's be-
lieved to have been writ-
ten in the 1930s.
While some minor edit-
inghas been done, the let-
ter is mostly in its original
form and structure.


History of

Oxford
Back before the Civil
War, in about 1840, Oxford
was nothing but a pine
forest. For miles and
miles either way, there


were no horses, log cabins
or even clearings in the
woods. There were no
oaks at all.
In 1850 there was only
one town in Sumter
County, Florida. That was
Adamsville, which later
became the county seat.
Going north a traveler
once found a fertile spot
about ten miles from
Adamsville. There he set-
tled down as a hermit. It
is estimated that he
stayed here about twenty
years. He built a log cabin
and cleared a little land
near it. So he lived in soli-
tude. When the next set-
tler came, all that was left
of his crude cabin was a
board or two and the old


See OXFORD, Page 17


An event that draws
thousands each year, is
Bushnell's Fall Festival.
The crowds come from
around the state to
browse the arts and
crafts, watch the parade
and enjoy the entertain-
ment. Vendors set up
downtown, with a chil-
dren's "Kiddyland" and a
food court at one end of
the street. Entertainment
includes everything from
live music to pageants,
an evening street dance
and fireworks. Mid-after-
noon is the featured
greased pig contest. En-
trants step into a wa-
tered down mud hole
and try to capture the
greased pig. The day of-
fers the crowd a chance
to get out, have some
fun and spend some
time with neighbors,
friends, family and even
lilh ~strangers. The festival
!w* C takes place on the third
A :5.8 Saturday of each
S(l October.


Oxford's renovated O'dell home.


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G7






G6 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


a
Husqvarnad


on.

An

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106 E Gulf to Atlantic Hwy
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That's Badcock's way
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continued from Page 5

But so much of that
land area is not homes
$ and businesses. There are
Relatively vast areas of
undeveloped land within
the city boundaries.
Wildwood is gradually
seeing that change.
,-- Much recent activity is
3 occurring on Wildwood's
east side along the edge of
and within the Villages
development.
Earlier this year the
Villages opened it's
newest town center -
Brownwood a Florida
frontier themed enter-
tainment and retail com-
* plex on State Road 44.
Through agreements be-
tween the city and the Vil-
lages, the new complex is
inside the city limits.
Along County Road 466-


A ( or Cleveland Avenue),
the Villages is completing
construction on a new
shopping center just east
of the Sumter County gov-
ernment complex on
Powell Road.
Back to the west
slightly, a new independ-
ent living facility, Provi-
dence at Wildwood, is
recently completed and
in operation with addi-
tional assisted living fa-
cilities in the plans for
that site, Wolf said.
In addition to the town
center, the Villages is ne-
gotiating with city offi-
cials on the 200-acre
Oxford Oaks residential
development that will not
be age-restricted, he said.
Dwellings are proposed
ranging from townhouses
to up-scale single family
homes.
A number of large resi-
dential projects are still
in wait for the start of con-
struction, two of the


largest being Wildwood
Springs and Loadstone.
The development of re-
gional impact for both
projects has been ap-
proved by the state and
city
Neither project has
broken ground yet, Wolf
said, noting that he antic-
ipates that the developers
likely will wait until the
build-out of the Villages
of Lake and Sumter antic-
ipated for next year
Wildwood Springs lo-
cated along the south side
of County Road 468 east of
Coleman will include
about 2,600 homes. And,
the project will include
commercial construction
along US 301 near its in-
tersection with CR 468,
Wolf said.
City officials still try to
push for industry with
higher-paying jobs, he

See WILDWOOD, Page 18


I O P ES R


WEBSTER

continued from Page 8

Williams acknowledges
that there's often resist-
ance to change in the city
And, while she wants to
"maintain our unique-
ness," some contends that
some growth is needed.
"If we don't grow, we die,"
she said. "But, we can
control how we grow."
She would like to see
the community benefit
from revitalization and
bringing in more tourism
money Typically, Web-
ster's biggest days of com-
merce are Mondays with
the flea market opera-
tions. But, the city is not
capitalizing on that trade
as much as possible, she
said.
There have been some
inquiries and talk of pos-
sible annexations for de-
velopment projects,
Williams said. One cur-
rent residential develop-
ment by Homes in
Partnership has been
somewhat stymied by the
municipal sewer hook-up
fees.
The commission is
weighing the possibility of
putting a moratorium on
those fees to help get
some house construction
stimulated. That could
save a potential home-
builder up to about
$7,000, Williams said,
adding that the fees have
been counterproductive.
While, development
has been at somewhat of a
standstill, the town got a
new Dollar General store
last year and Sumter
County is completing con-
struction on a new fire
station and new library at
the south edge of town.
And, the commission is
expected to have a final
hearing in November to
rezone land for a new
Family Dollar store in the
city, Williams said.


I O E IL O01O


The city commission is
also anticipating comple-
tion of a contract to lease
antenna space on its
water tower to Air Max, a
relatively new company
providing wireless Inter-
net service in south
Sumter County
"I would like for us to
have a more business-
friendly town," Williams
said.
Webster is sort of a hub
for a number of small, un-
incorporated communi-
ties that still have many
active cattle ranches, hay
producers, ornamental
plant nurseries, tree
farms, and blueberry
farms. The city serves an
extended area of about
10,000 people, Williams
said.
She got involved in the
city government through
involvement with a group
of about a dozen or more
volunteers who wanted to
improve the city's appear-
ance. They started "Web-
ster in Bloom" and began
projects to help clean up
some areas, plant flowers
and maintain a commu-
nity vegetable garden.
They're continuing with
the work and recently had
prepared the community
garden for winter vegeta-
bles. Williams said more
volunteers and partici-
pants are welcome.
She noted that there is
lot of volunteer effort
both from within the city
and the adjacent areas.
There are mobile home
parks and recreational
vehicle parks just outside
the city limits. She
praised the efforts of
those communities for the
volunteer projects they
had helped with or spon-
sored in Webster.
The town has seen it's
share of changes. Web-
ster's original "down-
town" area has generally
faded away over the years
as businesses closed or
moved. A number of
buildings were destroyed


by fire decades ago.
Where the former At-
lantic Coastline Railroad
tracks used to split the
town, there is a now an
oak-tree shaded mediun
between one-way streets
in the old commercial
area.
From time-to-time,
there's some effort to re-
store and utilize the exist-
ing historic buildings,
housing a few small
shops. Williams said that
she wants the town to
keep its character
"I want to preserve a
sense of place, keep the
character of the town,"
she said, noting that the
Lake-Sumter Metropoli-
tan Planning Organiza-
tion is considering a route
through Webster as one of
the top three possible for
a bicycle/pedestrian con-
nector trail. A number of
connectors are proposed
to link existing trails in a
coast-to coast system.
She cited Winter Gar-
den with an old down-
town transected by the
West Orange Trail as an
example of how that kind
of project can help revi-
talize a community "It
would be an economic
boon to Webster,"
Williams said.
Antonia Flores, of Plant City,
is one of the many vendors
at the Webster Flea Market.


www.husqvarna.com
t 2013 Husqmrna AB (publ). All righ reserved.


The new Fire Station was designed to replace the existing facility in Webster. It will provide 24-hour occupancy for round-
the-clock emergency services to the area.


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G15


ou5e.


, lk


itzl






G16 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


Providence at Wildwood, a new independent living facility near the intersection of County Road 466-A and Powell Road, is part of the surge of growth that Wildwood has experienced
during the past few years. (Photo by Martin Steele)


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CARPET DEPOT & MORE

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Dade Park is open through
the year and offers a vari-
ety of events for visitors to
choose from. The year
starts with the reenact-
ment of an 1838 battle be-
tween the U.S. military and
the Seminoles, works
through WWII Commemo-
rative Day and Frontier
Christmas. There are pio-
neer and nature camps in
the summer followed by a
Native American Pow
Wow. They even offer
haunted hayrides in Octo-
ber. These families came
out for the Frontier Christ-
mas where they took part
in several old Florida holi-
day traditions, including
making wreaths with items
from the woods.


One of the events at
Dade Park is a Native
American Pow Wow, that
draws participants from
around the nation. The
event includes a sam-
pling of foods, goods
and entertainment.


DISCOVER


Ed Wolf, Mayor of Wildwood for the past 27 years, is shown
recently in front of Wildwood City Hall. (Photo by Martin
Steele)


MARTIN STEELE
Times Correspondent

he City of Wildwood
is a "diamond in the
rough" to its long-
time Mayor Ed Wolf
"We have so much po-
tential the possibilities
are almost endless," Wolf
said recently about his


"small town" that is
Sumter County's largest
incorporated community
Wolf became a city com-
missioner in 1976 and has
been mayor for 27 years.
He has been about as
close as possible to the
ups and downs of small
town life and government
during that time.
Like so many rural


small towns, Wildwo
seemed to remain mos
static for decades, B
the city has seen a sur
in growth during the pe
decade, greatly in la
area but also in popu
tion.
"We stayed at abc
2,000 residents for ma
years, but jumped up
about 4,700 in the past fE
years," Wolf said.
The city is apparent
in another surge
growth. Recent popul
tion estimates from t
University of Flori
place Wildwood's popu
tion at slightly more th
7,000.
Wolf is enthusiasm
about the city's future, b
some decades ago, the
was a lot of concern.
Newly married a:
fresh out of college, W
moved to Wildwood
1968.
"It was a perfect smi
town, everyone knE
each other," Wolf sa


WILDWOOD

od Like so many rural small towns, Wildwood seemed
tly
ute to remain mostly static for decades, But, the city
rge
ast has seen a surge in growth during the past decade,
nd
la- greatly in land area but also in population.


)ut
my
to
ew

tly
of
la-
he
da
la-
an

tic
)ut
*re

nd
olf
in

all
ew
id.


"The railroad was thriv-
ing and football was still
king."
The city was home to a
major railroad service
and operations center for
many years which was a
major economic source
for the community But,
back in the 1970s came
rail company mergers
and severe reductions in
the Wildwood operations.
At times things looked
rather bleak for the city
"I can remember com-
ing over the overpass at
the north end of town on a
Sunday morning and not
seeing a single car on
Main Street," Wolf said.
'And, there would be
nothing in the rail yard."
"We were scratching


our heads trying to keep
the city surviving," he
said.
During those lean
years, with benefactor as-
sistance, the city built and
operated a nursing home
and built an industrial
park.
But, tides of economics
and growth has changed
for Wildwood in about the
past five years.
With the rapid develop-
ment of the Villages of
Lake and Sumter ap-
proaching Wildwood's
eastern boundaries, city
officials realized that they
could be enveloped by the
Villages.
"We had to make a deci-
sion grow now or not
grow at all," Wolf said. It


led to Wildwood's annex-
ing about 20,000 acres
into the city about five
years ago.
"I think a lot of people
saw dollar signs and took
advantage of it," Wolf
said. "We grew exponen-
tially in land mass. It was
a good move on their
(landowners) part and a
good move on our part."
Sumter County's online
geographical information
systems (GIS) maps show
the rather irregularly-
shaped city to be about 18
miles in length, running
north to south. At the
widest part, Wildwood is
about six miles across.

See WILDWOOD, Page 6


,.. .. 11- -, ...7 I '.t --- -. -' I - L I L i I - -Z.a . .- p -1


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G5






G4 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMMER COUNTY


The Downtown Park, Kenny Dixon Sports Complex, Bushnell Community Center
and Lincoln Park are available and open to the public for special events.
For information, contact City of Bushnell 352-793-2591.










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I US L


The park pavillion near Bushnell City Hall provides the perfect setting for an evening con-
cert.


BUSHNELL

continued from Page 3

up outside of Bushnell,
the city has seen some
business growth in recent
years with new pharma-
cies, restaurants, auto-
parts stores, an expanded
Wal-Mart and others.
Maddox noted that the
population has been rela-
tively stable. Records
show that the city was at
2,050 residents in 2000.
Recent population esti-
mates by the University of
Florida place the current
population at 2,445.
He commented that
residential growth is
probably somewhat in-
hibited by the lack of
available home building
lots in the city On a recent
drive around town, Mad-
dox said he found only a
couple of lots.
That could change. He


noted that several years
ago, city officials invited
neighboring land owners
to annex into the city A
number of those land
owners apparently found
that to be a good move
and brought their prop-
erty into the city
That generally began in
2007. Since then with
some relatively recent
large acreage annexa-
tions north of the city-
have almost doubled the
land area of the city City
personnel calculated that
Bushnell had annexed
roughly 4,200 acres since
2007. County records
show the city covers ap-
proximately 7.362 acres
(11.5 square-miles).
Sumter County's offi-
cial geographical infor-
mation systems (GIS)
website depicts Bushnell
as a very irregularly-
shaped land area that is
about eight-miles long
and three-miles wide.
While Bushnell has


much more space, most of
the larger tracts are in
agricultural use, with no
pending project propos-
als for housing subdivi-
sions or other
construction.
The city has recently
seen the addition of a few
new duplex apartments,
he said, noting that the
city currently has a good
offer for those doing new
residential or small-scale
commercial projects.
The city recently ex-
tended and expanded its
temporary waiver of
"reservation capacity
charges," a utilities fee
associate with new con-
nections, he said. Typi-
cally, the waiver could
result in a savings of
$8,000- $9,000 for a project
such as a small store.
While private construc-
tion has been very slow,

See BUSHNELL, Page 19


I ISCOVE OXSRDI


OXFORD

continued from Page 7

mulberry tree which he had
planted there. His name
was Kyle.
From 1853 to 1859 there
were no public schools
here. A few teachers from
private schools were here.
The first school house was
north of Oxford, Chancy
was its name.
In 1856 there was Indian
trouble. People thought In-
dians were back of every
stump or tree.
There was always horror
among the settlers.
Again breathed easily
....more southern part of
Florida attracted the set-
tlers in northern Florida.
When traveling south
they found Oxford. Many
stayed here because of fer-
tile land and the trees.
Among these were two men
named Brown and White
who came in 1877. They
were good farmers and they
helped clear the land.
Next came a man who
lived here permanently and


his descendants live here
also. This was Hiram Cren-
shaw and his son James.
On Saturday, March 5,
1854, Aunty Betty Dias fa-
ther and his family came
here. Aunt Betty was 14
then and the following Mon-
day her first washing was
put out at the old spring
called the "Perry Spring."
His descendants have
marked their cattle "54" in
remembrance of the time
they came here.
Rubin Gordon was the
first child born in Oxford.
He was born in 1854. We
have no record of his de-
scendants.
The Baptist Church north
of the Pine Level Cemetery
was the first church here
and was built in 1876.
In 1875, the settlers of Ox-
ford started having picnics
on lake "Sarah Jane,"
which is now Miona. They
always had their picnics in
May
These lasted until 1920.
They had vast crowds at
the last ones, people from
every settlement near Ox-
ford. An important event
taking place at one of these
picnics was the changing of


the name of the lake from
"Sarah Jane" to "Miona."
There was a standing vote
and it was almost unani-
mous.
Among the pines north of
Oxford became the burying
place of the people. They
built a cemetery there and
named it Pine Level. The
first person buried there
was little Carrie Christie, in
February 1876. The first
Methodist Episcopal
Church was built between
Colliers and the railroad.
Sandspur now had a post
office. All the settlers of Ox-
ford went there for their
mail. Joshua Perry was the
postmaster. It was about 4
of a mile from here.
In 1880, the railroad was
built through here and the
first train came after its
completion in 1882. People
flocked to see it but when it
passed by, some screamed
and ran, while others fled,
with their horses wild and
foaming at the mouth, to
their homes, too afraid to
talk. The railroad came
from Fernandina to Wild-
wood, which was then much
smaller than Oxford.
Cotton was raised more


than anything else, and for
that reason was called the
king crop. Tomatoes, pota-
toes, cane and corn were
the chief crops.
There was no way to ship
them until 1886. The post
office of Oxford was put up
by the railroad for conven-
ience.
The first hotel was put up
here about this time. It was
in the eastern part of town
so that it might be near
Pomeroy Browns mill.
The son of old uncle
Johnny Perry had a large
plantation here, which
stretched from the mill
quarters to Bogue's. He had
named Oxford, so he had it
cut in sections and the
streets were named.
O.S. Bogue was Oxford's
first postmaster. He held
the place a long time and
later C.A. Hooks took his
place. Hooks was suc-
ceeded by O.D. Bogue who
still is postmaster
No cars were here and
transportation was a drudg-
ery. It was a week's journey
to Clearwater.
The first car owned here
was Uncle Jimmy
LaVeignes's and was bought











What a way to travel. Pic-
tured is the Main Street in
Oxford in the 1870s.


by him from Doctor Van
Hoode of Ocala. It was a lit-
tle red skeeterr" and was as
much of a mystery as the
"iron horse" had been.
Sometimes it would run
and sometimes it wouldn't.
In this period, Neil Fudge
was the first to own a store.
O'Berry was Oxford's sec-
ond merchant, Bogue third,
Wright fourth and Frazier
fifth.
Another era of store
building came later when
the population increased.
Grimes, Sparkman, Stapp
and Gardener
In 1910 the depot burned
and it was replaced by the
one now standing.
Between 1921 and '23 a
crate mill was built by Led-
better It was prosperous for
over four years. In the end
it failed.
Other early car owners
were Eugene Parham,
Charlie Hooke and Mr
O'dell.
In 1906, Collier and
Warnock's store was estab-
lished. In 1911, it burned
and was replaced by the
building which now stands.
In 1915 the old school
house was built. Much time,


money and work was used
to building another in 1926.
(School built in 1926 is now
Oxford Assembly of God.)
The boom had much af-
fect on Oxford. Many people
went into the real estate
business. Afterwards came
a time of dragging condi-
tions, which still exists.
Depot was between Ox-
ford fire department and
the railroad.
State Road number 23,
which is a branch of the
Dixie Highway was put
here in 1922. The road run-
ning east and west was put
here about 1924.
Oxford was once in great
peril when the influenza
epidemic came. There was
a funeral every day for
three months. The war did-
n't cause much upstir be-
cause only one was killed
from Oxford from this
time until now, no more epi-
demics or wars have
crossed the path of the in-
habitants.
Oxford has had her ups
and downs like every town
but she has held up well
under the existing condi-
tions and is the second old-
est town in Sumter County.


Ca
gese'


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"on the Korner"
224 N. Main St.
(U.S. Hwy 301) Downtown Bushnell
only minutes from
Webster or Wildwood
p 2.7 miles East of 1-75
6 miles West of Webster
10 miles North of Hwy 50
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Vintage Jewelry, Hats, Clothing, Iron Door Stops
Open Mon., Fri. & Sat. 11-4(5) (Some Sundays 1-4)
Please call to verify Hours
Visit our store at www.acpeddler.com
;. .


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G17






G18 Thursday, November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY


* -S,. ---. . .


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Richloam Fish Hatchery is a state facility for breeding
fish natural to Florida. While not typically open for pub-
lic events, this image is of an organized day for chil-
dren. The event coordinators are local residents
interested in preserving the heritage of life in the out-
doors. They host the fishing derby to give youths of all
ages a chance to experience what the outdoors has to
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The recently constructed park in front of Bushnell City Hall is aglow at night. (Photo by Brenda Locklear)




DISCOVER BUSHNELL


Wildwood City Hall is the center of city government located off Main Street in Wildwood.


WILDWOOD

continued from Page 6


said, noting that there
are now four industrial
parks in Wildwood.
The city's own Willard
Peebles Industrial Park
has "too many" vacan-
cies, Wolf said. But, he
cites the Alliance Motor
Coach facility on the east
side of town for continu-
ing success and more
than a hundred employ-
ees.
Wolf anticipates more
commercial building
along the State Road 44
corridor.
There has been recent
talk of new hotels and a
bowling alley in that
area, he said.
The city is prepared
for growth, with zoning
and municipal services
such as sewage and
water in place, Wolf said.


Mayor Ed Wolf anticipates more
commercial building along the
State Road 44 corridor


Wildwood officials
have also been preparing
for growth with more
"significant" building
and development regula-
tions, according to Wolf
"These might not set
well with some folks, but
it helps with what we can
attract," Wolf said.
"We are in an enviable
situation we can design
the city the way we want
"We want to make a
good first impression,"
he said. We don't want
people to drive out of the
Villages and go, Oh gosh,
we're in Wildwood. But,
we can still maintain a
small town atmosphere,
and maintain our iden-
tity"
With the recent growth
in the city and the neigh-
boring Villages, Wild-


wood residences now
have many more choices
in dining and entertain-
ment, Wolf said. With the
growth, there will be
more opportunities for
residents.
"We have opportuni-
ties to enjoy amenities of
the Villages and not be
tied to it," he said. "We'll
build family first."
As the city grew in size,
economic slow downs
still hampered many
businesses. That appears
to be changing. "I'm glad
to see our "mom and
pop" business operators
finally making a living,
Wolf said.
"I miss the quaintness
we once had, but it's
coming back in a differ-
ent form."


i








Bushnell City Council Member Warren Maddox is shown in
the city's new downtown park with the also relatively-new
city hall in the background. (Photo by Martin Steele)


MARTIN STEELE
Times Correspondent
hen Bushnell
City Council
Member Warren
Maddox talks about his
home town, he expresses
a fondness for the city he
helps to govern.
"It's just a small town,
but it's kind of unique,"
Maddox said in a recent
Times interview. 'A good


portion of my graduating
class still lives around
here. You end up knowing
a lot of people."
Maddox who's been
on the council for 12 years
- acknowledged that's
changing somewhat.
"Last time I campaigned
for re-election, I was sur-
prised at how many peo-
ple were here that I didn't
know"
College and a stint in


the Air Force took Mad-
dox away from Bushnell
for several years, but he
returned to live here in
1972. After more than
seven years of working in
Marion County, he came
back to Sumter County to
work and soon became
the Environmental
Health Supervisor for the
Sumter County Health
Department until retire-
ment.
Like most of the incor-
porated communities in
the county, Bushnell was
historically a farming and
ranching town, providing
for the needs of many
small farms in the area. It
is also the county seat
since the early 1900s.
Maddox also acknowl-
edges he liked the way it
used to be when he was a
high school graduate in
1965. There wasn't a lot of
major changes in the city
until about the mid 1960s,
he said.
But, according to Mad-
dox, while he was away in
college, a couple oftrans-


Like most of the incorporated communities in

the county, Bushnell was historically a farm-

ing and ranching town, providing for the

needs of many smallfarms in the area. It is

also the county seat since the early 1900s.


portation changes had
major impacts on Bush-
nell.
Main Street- U.S. High-
way 301 was a two-lane
main road in town.
"There were stores and
businesses on both sides
of the street," Maddox
said. "The town was com-
pact. There were grocery
stores, pharmacies, dry
good stores, hardware
stores, restaurants and
others, all within a small
area. There were people
who worked in town that
didn't even have vehicles
- they walked to work."
But then came the "ru-
ination" of the town as
Maddox somewhat jok-


ingly described it the
four-laning of Main Street
by the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation.
That took out most of the
businesses along the east
side of Main Street.
The highway "improve-
ments" were followed by
a series of fires that
wiped out a number of
the old buildings, Maddox
said. Others succumbed
to the economic changes
of the times and gradually
closed out.
"It was typical of what
was happening all over
the county and the south-
east," he said.
While "downtown" was
facing something of a de-


dcline, construction of In-
terstate 75 was underway
just west of Bushnell.
When it was completed
about 1969, it took traffic
away from Bushnell busi-
nesses.
But, Maddox contends
that it was better to have
the interstate close to the
city "Counties without it
are generally much worse
off," he said. "1-75 bene-
fits the county as a whole
from the fuel taxes."
While much of the com-
mercial development that
came after the interstate
construction tended to go

See BUSHNELL, Page 4


SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G3


C--.i-A






G2 Thursday November 28, 2013 DISCOVER SUMMER COUNTY


DISCOVER SUMMER


Welcome to Discover a place where you'll find a
variety of faces and stories about some of Sumter
County's interesting surroundings.
You'll meet community representative Beverly
Steele on the north end of the county, who is shar-
ing some historical information about the commu-
nity of Royal. You'll meet Kelly Williams, the
mayor of Webster, on the south end of the county,
sharing some highlights about her city along with
information about its history and thoughts about
its future.
And in between, you'll discover more interesting


their communities.
Discover only scratches the surface of the places
that make Sumter County a unique place to visit
and to live.
From the ever-expanding growth in The Villages
to the quiet bucolic surroundings of farmlands in
central and southern portions of the county,
Sumter County offers a wide variety of environ-
ments and Discover Sumter provides a glimpse of
those places.
The stories are compiled from thoughts and infor-
mation shared by community representatives and


people providing you with tantalizing facts about leaders.


Bushnell is home to the historic County Courthouse.


BUSHNELL

continued from Page 4
Bushnell has been active
with some public projects.
Over the past few years,
various grants and loans
have made it possible for
Bushnell to extend its
sewage system and, in
some areas, the water sys-
tem, Maddox said.
The projects included
extending public water
and sewer services to
much of the commercial
and public facilities in the
Sumterville community
Currently, Sumter County
has a project underway
that will extend Bushnell's
municipal water lines
westward along County
Road 470 to the Lake
Panasoffkee Interstate-75
interchange and the in-
dustrial properties along
that route, Maddox said.
More recently, Bushnell
late last year completed
construction of its "Multi-
Modal" transportation
project. It involved the
construction of miles of
new sidewalk/bike paths
through-out the city and
major changes to the tra-


ditional down-town area.
There are enough paths
that a pedestrian or bicy-
cle rider can go all the way
to the Dade Battlefield
Historic Site, Maddox said.
To the west of the his-
toric Sumter County
Courthouse, along Bush-
nell Plaza, the city has
built a park that provides
expanded vehicle parking
for visitors to the down-
town shops and offices and
provided visitors with an
attractive fountain and
gazebo. Bushnell's re-
cently new city hall faces
the park on the east side.
This summer also
brought another major
change to city hall. Vince
Ruano, Bushnell' first and
only city manager until
July, retired. Bruce Hickle,
formerly Bushnell's utili-
ties director, has been ap-
pointed to that position.
Hickle was already re-
sponsible for running the
Bushnell's water, sewer
and electric departments
which is a major part of
managing the city, Maddox
said.
Last year was also
marked by changes in the
city organization. After


some problems developed
in the city police depart-
ment, the council decided
to close the department
and contract with the
Sumter County Sheriff's
Department for law-en-
forcement services.
The specifically-as-
signed group of officers
are solving more crimes
and he hasn't heard any
complaints from the com-
munity, Maddox said. "I
think they are doing al-
right."
While Maddox acknowl-
edges he likes the small-
town feel of Bushnell, he
said that the city does
need some growth.
"We're trying to get the
best rates possible for our
utility customers," he said.
"We're trying to keep costs
down. Our customers
shouldn't have to pay more
money for us to provide
the service. I would like
for us to expand and be
able to provide services
competitively"
While city officials deal
with the complexities of
keeping a small town in
operation, they are still
keeping one Bushnell's
more modern traditions -
the Annual Fall Festival.


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY Thursday, November 28, 2013 G19


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G20 Thursday, November 28, 2013


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880 N. Main St., Bushnell
Call: 793-8000
(III SOUTH SUMITER PLAZA
342 Shopping Center Dr., Wildwood
Call: 748-9900
iII SHOPPIInIG CEInITER PLAZA


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SUMTER COUNTY (FL) TIMES


DISCOVER SUMTER COUNTY