Citation
The star

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group,Tim Thompson - Publisher
Creation Date:
December 30, 2004
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Star, W.S. Smith, Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000358020 ( ALEPH )
33602057 ( OCLC )
ABZ6320 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047323 ( LCCN )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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** Volume 80 Number 37 Subscribe to The Star Phone: 800-345-8688 Opinion ....................A4 Letters ......................A5 Outdoors ..................A14 Sports.......................A15 Society News ...............B2 School News ...............B3 Obituaries ..................B4 Classifieds ............B7-B8 A10Park concerns B3Master Board Thursday, June 28, 2018YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 @PSJ_Star facebook.com/psjstar50 ¢ For breaking news, visit star” .com LIGHTHOUSE LADIES | B1 By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comThe 2018 county election ballot underwent some tweaks in the final two days, but has been finalized with the end of candidate qualifying at noon ET last Friday.Over the final two days candidates joined the fray and others decided maybe not this year.And Brooke Wooten, drawing no opposition for his District 2 seat on the Gulf County School Board, was automatically re-elected.It is very humbling, I am humbled,Ž Wooten said. I hope I can take that to mean that I did a good job the past four years for my district and the county. I look forward to working hard the next four years.ŽTwo dates provide the cru-cibles for the coming county campaign, as they also do for contentious state and federal races, including for gover-nor, U.S. Senate and the U.S. House.And, of course, there are also a mind-numbing 13 pro-posals for amendments to the Florida Constitution.County ballot set after changesBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comWith the crafting of the coming fiscal year budget at full speed, county commissioners on Tuesday wondered whether one place to add would be the building department.More specifically, code enforcement.The proliferation of RVs and pole barns in areas such as Oak Grove, Highland View and St. Joe Beach arose again during the regular monthly meeting of the Board of County Commissioners.Chris Wahl, who submitted a lengthy, detailed letter to the editor on the issue in last weeks edition of The Star, spoke to commissioners urging them to action on what has happened in his community of Oak Grove. Actions and lack of action has had a negative impact on my community,Ž Wahl said in reference to the countys RV ordinance, amended several times.We have to do something about code enforcementCounty commissioners urge budget actionBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comThe call arrived about 10 p.m. ET Sunday.Fire units desperately needed in Eastpoint, where a fire a woods fire had been raging for more than five hours.At the volunteer departments in Port St. Joe, Highland View and the Beaches, units mustered to bring three Class A pumper trucks and 13 volunteers to assist under a mutual aid agreement among the fire departments in the area.Units throughout the region showed up to assist.Port St. Joe Fire Chief John Ford said there was little hesitation.They were chomping at the bit,Ž Ford said of the Port St. Joe volunteers. We had more at the station than we could carry.ŽThe Gulf County units would remain on the front lines for nearly four hours, until roughly 2:30 a.m. ET, Ford said.They were just glad to see us,Ž he added, referring to the firefighters first on the scene. They had been fighting that fire for five hours.Ž And to say fighting would be an apt description.Community reaches toward Eastpoint after reThis is just one days worth of donations by local residents to assist folks in Eastpoint. [COURTESY PHOTO/GULF COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT] By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comAlignment can be a trans-formative process. Lets start here in Port St. Joe and discussions over the past month or so between youth leaders at Oak Grove Church and First United Methodist Church.Each church had summer youth programs; they hoped to broaden the reach and were planning for some kind of outreach effort in July.They were characterizing it as a local mission outreach partnershipŽ and titled it, One,Ž a love thy neighborŽ outreach.Meanwhile, in Midway, NC, roughly 13 hours by car from Port St. Joe, plans for Midway Methodists summer youth mission, something of a bedrock at the church, had fallen through.However, Amanda Thomas, Midway Method-ists Youth Director, had a fallback position.She had attended seminary with Geoffrey Lentz, pastor at First United Meth-odist of Port St. Joe.A phone call became a reach-out. And, so it came that three weeks ago, Eli Duarte, out-reach leader at Oak Grove, phoned Allie Osborne, a youth leader at Oak Grove, and Julie Hodges, youth director at First United Methodist of Port St. Joe, to inform them the pieces of the partner mission were falling into place.And there was one more partner.Just a tiny glitch: the orig-inal schedule was July; that timeline was moved up a few weeks and, just for good measure, both Hodges and Osborne were out of town on vacation when Duarte called.Nonetheless, the hurdles fell away and Monday a group of more than two dozen teens and adults from North Carolina went to work on several projects, including repair work for, yep, another partner, the Christian Community Development Fund.The seed that was planted is happening,Ž Hodges said as van keys and assignments were sorted Monday morning. There are just too many things that lined up, it was Gods timing.ŽOver the next four days, the teenagers installed three handicapped ramps, reconstructed several sets of home stairs and steps, repaired flooring in one home and performed some general yard work.All for families of need served by the CCDF, a local non-profit which provides a host of programs for the needy and elderly in the county.Supplies, water, food, etc., were donated by the Piggly Wiggly.In addition, a number of the teens and adults assisted with the summer youth program operated by CareerSource Gulf Coast at the Washington Gym in the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe.My youth group, they are amazing,Ž Thomas said. Our kids have giving hearts and they love serving the Lord and giving back.Ž In fact, the next four days were simply a reflection of the fabric at Midway Meth-odist, located in a town akin to Port St. Joe in that it only has two stoplights.A summer mission for One loveTeens from North Carolina t raveled to Port St. Joe for an outreach mission this week.[PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | THE STAR] Adults from North Carolina and Port St. Joe, from three churches and the Christian Community Development Fund, are assisting in a host of projects with the teenagers. Churches partner for local missionSee BALLOT, A6 See MISSION, A6 See COUNTY, A11 See FIRE, A12

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** A2 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The StarBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comThe Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Library in Port St. Joe is wrapping up its summer reading program by taking wing.FlightŽ, a presentation of the Atlantic Coast The-atre, will be held 11 a.m. ET at the library.The show is aimed at children 5-14 and is free and open to all. The cost for this show would normally be out of our range,Ž said Nancy Brockman, Coordinator of the Gulf County Librar-ies. But thanks to a grant from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs for underserved counties, we are able to bring this to the community.ŽFlightŽ explores mans fascination with the skies including the Wright Brothers, Amelia Earhart, the Space Race between the U.S. and Soviet Union and the history and accom-plishments of NASA.The show combines creative staging, original music and audience par-ticipation and encourages audiences to think about the future of flight and be inspired to become pioneers reaching for the stars themselves,Ž according to ACT website.The show is tailored to fold in history, music, character education, audience participation and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics).The Atlantic Coast The-atre was founded in 1999 and aims to marry enter-tainment and education through quality theater performances.There group has several professional touring companies; others include The Snow QueenŽ and Florida Treasures.ŽEach company includes trained professional actors dedicated to arts education, according to the company. Each performance lasts 40-50 minutes and is followed by a questionand-answer period and meet-and-greet with the actors, time permitting.Taking Flight: Reading program ends in blast Saturday [PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Star Staff ReportTurtles and Trash exhibit opens Friday. The Joe Center for the Arts welcomes you to its newest exhibit 6 p.m. ET Friday, June 29. The Center for the Arts is located at 201 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe. Come support this fledgling orga-nization as it gathers steam to be a cultural arts destina-tion for our area. The new exhibit is a blend of art and science, as the center opens the door to a conversation about taking care of our planet and coastal community. Come visit with scientists, learn about art from artists and make some yourself. Fall under the spell of Guest Artist Beth Apple-tons work as you look at her lush microscopic view of the world and delight in the whimsy of Joan Mateys Fishy Fashions.This exhibition runs all summer with a grand closing event with The Recollections on Aug. 17. Every Thursday is Turtle Thursday, with a lecture, art workshop or a special treat, free and open to the public. Check out our schedule online at: thejoe-center.com or on Facebook.The exhibit is made possible by supporting artists from the local community and the bigger community who love nature. Many thanks to all supporters who have posted a poster, made a donation or volunteered. Special thanks to F & B Builders who gave a signifi-cant sponsorship donation to make this exhibit possible and to our partners, the Florida Coastal Conservancy and the Port St. Joe Library.Third annual Sea Turtle Festival Sunday. Floridas Forgotten Coast plays host to an abundance and variety of visitors, includ-ing adult and juvenile sea turtles. To celebrate these remarkable creatures and raise awareness of their importance, the Florida Coastal Conservancy and Forgotten Coast Sea Turtle Center invite you to join us for the 3rd Annual Forgotten Coast Sea Turtle Festival 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET on Sunday at Village Drive and George Core Park in Port St. Joe.The Festival will include live music by Rick Wilson, Country Outlaw (11 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET) and K.T. Up Close & In Person (1-4 p.m. ET), hot dogs and ice cream, a sidewalk chalk art contest for all ages, educational displays, local art vendors, activities for kids, and giveaways. The Festival is free to attend-ees and will take place rain or shine. Come join the fun and learn about our amazing sea turtles and the places they call home!Climb the Cape San Blas Lighthouse during holiday hours. Venture to George Core Park in Port St. Joe and climb to the top of the lighthouse, nearly 100 feet high. The lighthouse will be open 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET Thursday through Saturday and 1-5 p.m. ET Sunday. The lighthouse will be open 11 a.m. until6 p.m. ET Monday through Saturday during the holi-day week. For adults 13 and over, the cost to climb is $5 and for children under 12, but at least 44-inches tall, the cost for the climb is $3. Please, no flip-flops … climbers need sturdy shoes. In addition, the lighthouse is open, by appointment, for groups of 5 or more. The minimum charge is $25. Contact 229-8261 to book an appointment for a group.Still time to register for 50th birthday celebration on St. Vincent. The Friends of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge will host a birthday bash July 6 on the island. From 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. ET, the island and its Friends will host a summer picnic (lunch on the grill) includ-ing a half-mile loop walking tour through forest to sugary beaches (and serious shell search-ing) and, after a wander over some dunes, to the normally off-limits Point to view nesting and rest-ing shore and water birds. There will also be a host of exhibits and activities along the way.It is just a short jaunt by boat to the island and the Friends will have a barge leaving every half hour from the Indian Pass boat ramp. Space on each barge load is limited to 40 pas-sengers. The Friends of St. Vincent kindly ask all who wish to be part of the celebration to register at www.stvincentfriends.com. The celebration and the transportation are free, just sign up in advance.Exhibit, festival highlight things to doThe third annual Forgotten Coast Sea Turtle Festival is Sunday. [FILE PHOTO] This work by Janice Wright is part of the new exhibit opening Friday at The Joe Center for the Arts[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] The lightouse will be open each day during the Fourth of July week. [COURTESY PHOTO/JOHN SELLERS] The 50th birthday celebration on St. Vincent Island is July 6. [FILE PHOTO]

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A3

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** A4 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star OPINION Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Tim Thompson Editor: Tim Croft Circulation: 850-522-5197 SUBSCRIPTIONS In county Out of county 1 Year: $24.15 $34.65 6 Months: $15.75 $21 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. My wife has devised a summer vacation plan that will have grandmothers all over America sitting up and taking notice. You will need a calculator and a calendar for todays story. And some paper to keep score on. We are blessed with six grandchildren. And dont turn me off here, this chronicle is not about them. They are what we call in the editorial business innocent bystanders.Ž They range in age from twelve down to four. But that, too, is immaterial. Cathy has determined in her heart that they can not pass the summer of 2018 without a visit to NonniesŽ house. She has already arranged for Joshs three to come down the first week. That would include Luke and the twins, Hayden and Hannah. Jesss children, Addison, Avery Lee and Max, are coming the following week. It made sense to me. We wouldnt even have to pick up the Lincoln logs, stable the plastic horses, take the unraveled toilet paper out from under the kitchen cabinet or roll up the Slip N Slide. I knew it would mean no golf, no Longmire, not one baseball game on TVƒ..Disney Channel and the Cartoon Network would be the order of the day. Every dayƒ..all day long! But listen, they are my grandchildren, too. And its only two weeks. OK, have you got your scorecards out? Nonnie put her grandmother thinking cap on. And almost immediately was overcome by this vision of how much fun it would be if, after everyone had been down, we recalledŽ the two oldest cousins to come back by themselves for a week. You know, they hardly ever get to see each other.Ž She said it like there wasnt nothing else we could do! Well, a day didnt pass before she allowed that if we had the oldest cousins down, we must invite the twins and Avery down together. We cant leave anyone out. And wouldnt it be wonderful to have the younger girl cousins down together.Ž Well, dummy me pointed out that plan would leave Max out. Nonnie almost broke into tears. The solution, as she saw it, was abundantly clear. After they come as families, and then by age, we will have each one down individually for a week. Think of the time we can share with each one of them. How we can hold them, give them individual attention.Ž I dont have the power to countermand any plan involving grandchildren but I did quietly mention that there are only a certain amount of weeks in the summer. She rejoined so quickly that I knew the arrangement was complete, definite and most workable in her mind. They dont have to stay a whole week. We can pick them up on Monday and take them homeSaturday.Ž Pick them upŽ was a 470 mile one way trip to Joshs. And 403 miles to Jesses. Nonnie was near bout swooning with anticipation. She bought Little BitesŽ breakfast muffins by the truckload. She had a case of sunscreen shipped to the house. And an equal amount of bug spray. She washed and sterilized every sand bucket, plastic shovel, swimming mask, beach chair and water pistol lingering in the back of the shed. She bought a giant multi colored beach tent. Dont worryŽ she gave me her best you-cando-it smile, the clerk said a moron could set this up in five minutes.Ž Cathy called Gulf World, Shipwreck Island, Coconut Creek, Just Jump, Wonderworks and three movie theaters checking on dates, times and purchasing tickets. She rented a ski boat. She reminded me that Avery EXPECTED (Since you let her do it last time.Ž) to sleep with me in the crawl space above the garage. I was also in charge of bed time storiesƒ..but I could not tell the one about me and Sasquatch scaring the little kids when we traveled with the carnival or the bloody one where I was the only survivor at Custers Last Stand or the one where me and Uncle David hijacked the uranium truck in Amarilloƒƒ. Nothing deterred her. When she found out the twins dance group was performing in the national finals in Orlando she moved them from week four to week six. Max was scheduled for week six so he had to be moved up a couple of slots. Luke had a church camp. He and Addison had to be dropped back to week five. Wait! Addison had a softball tournament that week. WeŽ moved them up to week two and dropped Jesss childrens allotted time into the vacated hole. You know what would be really greatŽ Nonnie was going for grandmother of the year, if we had ALL SIX to come back down for the very last week together.Ž This summer is going to last into Novemberƒƒ Respectfully, KesHUNKER DOWNWhos on rst? Kesley ColbertBy Lee H. HamiltonThere arent many people who would argue that Congress is working well these days. Its been 24 years since it passed a comprehensive budget without resorting to omnibus bills. It cant pass health-care legislation. Its members talk about the desperate need for a new infrastructure bill, but cant even get one drafted. Its unable to produce immigration reform. Its facing a host of issues on the environment, education, trade, the concentration of wealth and economic power, war powers and our entanglements abroad „ and it cant find common ground or develop a consensus around solutions to any of them. This goes a long way toward explaining why Congress is held in such low public esteem: it cant make progress on issues of importance to ordinary citizens. How did we get here? How did the House and the Senate „ which these days can only be called the worlds greatest deliberative bodyŽ with ironic air-quotes „become so frustratingly unproductive? Theres no single answer, of course. Partisanship and polarization among politicians and the American people as a whole have made honest negotiation and compromise politically fraught. A lot of members simply dont believe in government, and oppose government action. Many are content to defer to the president. We have a presidential administration beset by internal problems, vacancies, and cabinet appointees struggling to perform effectively. This at the same time that very few voices in Congress speak up for sustaining its role as a co-equal branch of government „ let alone for congressional dynamism and policy leadership. Of course, its hard to be effective when you dont work very hard at legislating. You cant explore the complexities of the issues that need addressing, build consensus, or hammer out legislation when youre so concerned with raising money and pursuing re-election that you put in only a three-day legislative work week. At its current law-making pace, one pundit noted recently, Congress has a real chance at being the least productive legislature since the 32nd, from 1851 to 1853.Ž This is a far cry from the government envisioned by our Founders, who believed that Congress should drive federal action. In the end, its hard to avoid faulting the congressional leadership. To be sure, there are a lot of members who no longer really identify with the body in which they serve. They rhetorically separate themselves from the institution. They identify with their party, or with special interest groups they support, but not with Congress itself. And so they dont seem to carry any sense of responsibility for its functioning. But its leaderships task to turn that around. Congress has never been easy to corral, but strong leaders (and I have seen many of them) have always understood that they had to work in the environment they were given. They were able to make Congress work. Theres a list of procedural and structural reforms that might help „ stopping the three-day work week, strengthening committees, following the traditional order, Hey leadership! Let Congress do its workConstruction helmets were scattered around my front yard (wearing side down). Some were white, some were orange, but there was no doubt that there were was something going on. My neighbors were walking by and of course had to ask. They thought that we were perhaps playing some sort of game and using the helmets for bases or markers. I know that I have written about it or themŽ before. However, enough is enough. I cut my grass on Friday or Saturday. I like to cut my grass … I really do. I like for it look nice. But the little underground vole critters seem to be having a reunion or celebration in my front yard. They have trenches and hallways just underground all over my front yard. Im over it. First, it was the squirrels eating all of birds food, then it was the rabbits eating all of the flowers. Squirrels and rabbits are easier to deal with because they are above ground. Im pretty sure the voles had a wedding or something planned in my yard for June. They probably sent out invitations early enough to get friends and family from all over the neighborhood and the woods in the back. They noted on the invitation that my front yard was beautiful and ripe to be torn apart emphasizing that the bachelor and bachelorette parties would both be held there, in addition to the rehearsal dinner, wedding and honeymoon. The festivities would go on for a month at least. Do you know what voles can do in a month? I was reading where gestation last for three weeks and the young voles reach their maturity in a month. This is incredible in terms of how fast moles can reproduce. So vole populations can grow very large in a very short amount of time. How large? Litters average five to ten and when a couple of voles decide to get married, they can birth more than a hundred voles per year. A lot of folks dont know what voles areƒ they are like little molishŽ devils that look a lot like a blind mouse with a long snout and paddles for hands (so they can tear up your yard). They eat bugs and grubs and the roots of your grass and plants and leave underground visible trails throughout your yard. They also say that voles like peanut butter. I sure hope they do, because under every one of those construction helmets in my front yard, there is a mouse trap with peanut butter on it. The traps and helmets are strategically placed over vole holes in my front yard. The voles who are leaving the parties and festivities underground might want a quick bite of peanut butter on their way out. Why the helmets? They keep my dogs and birds from getting into the traps. Mean? Noƒ I have a catch and release program for the voles. In other words, I reuse the traps. Still some folks will say that is cruel, I disagree. Lets say you clean your floor every day and you enjoy clean floors. Then, every day a group of folks roll around the mud and trounce through your house over your clean floor without hesitation and never apologizing. That is what the little voles do to my front yard. And the construction helmets? They expire after a few years and are no longer effective in doing their job protecting heads. So, I figured I would use them a little while longer and then recycle them. On the bright side, I guess I could have a lot bigger problems to worry about. But, I have a very good opponent. And to beat it all, they didnt invite me to any of the parties or any of the festivities and used my property for it all. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com.CRANKS MY TRACTORJune weddings and helmets in the yard BN Heard See HAMILTON, A5At its current law-making pace, one pundit noted recently, Congress has a real chance at being the least productive legislature since the 32nd, from 1851 to 1853.Ž This is a far cry from the government envisioned by our Founders, who believed that Congress should drive federal action.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A5 LETTERSBy Shelly CainSpecial to The StarSummer is in full swing! We are rich in volunteers and people who want to give to their elders and our community. Last week we were blessed by the Ukulele Orchestra of the Forgotten Coast. It was the second time in two months they have come to play for us. Our residents and staff enjoy it so much. Thank you Brooks, Pallas, Bill, John, Bette, Mattison, Barbara, Alex, Faye, Wendy, and Sharon! Tommy Ts hosted an Ice Cream Social for all our elders and employees. It was so good! The strawberry ice cream, especially, was heaven in a cup! Three scoops each! Thank you Minnie, Steve, Brian and Amber for hosting such a wonderful party! I want to take this opportunity to thank the First United Methodist Church in Port St. Joe for the generous cash donation for our Activity Department. We plan to use it to start our Music Therapy program. Remember to treat everyone with importance and always be kind.CROSS SHORES CORNERCommunity shows it cares[FILE PHOTO] Our houseƒis a very, very, very ne houseƒŽOur HouseŽ as recorded by Crosby, Stills and NashWhile in high school I worked at my parents lunch restaurant in Lake Zurich, Illinois, then a sleepy little town that has since become a booming suburb of Chicago. Even though restaurants are oftentimes bad investments, my parents opened one anyway. My Mom said, and I remember it well: People have to eat.Ž Mom built a solid business which she later sold when she and my Dad traded frigid Illinois winters for sunny Florida. I was thinking about my Moms people have to eatŽ rationale recently while researching the large, publicly traded homebuilders. The shares of these companies have fallen since the start of the year, presumably because interest rates have risen slightly and because the pace of sales has slowed a bit. I believe that the countrys largest homebuilders have a multi-year growth runway ahead of them, so naturally the falling share prices further piqued my interest. Rising rates or not, people have to live somewhere, as well as eat. In the past, homebuilding was a relatively low margin, capital intensive, boom-and-bust industry dominated by thousands of local builders. Small homebuilders still put up the majority of new houses in America, but thats changing quickly. The ten largest homebuilders have been growing their market share and now construct almost a third of all new homes. Industry consolidation is often a sign that the remaining players will become more profitable since they face less aggressive competition. Less competition isnt their only advantage, though. Homebuilding costs are rising, which should also benefit the larger players because they can borrow money cheaper than smaller builders; buy materials in bulk and save money; and spread their design and labor costs over more projects. All this means more profit per home than subscale competitors. Additionally, the largest homebuilders are moving to an asset lightŽ business model which has substantially improved their returns on capital. Instead of having their money tied up in land that may or may not be developed in the near future, some homebuilders are increasingly using purchase options to reserve land they may buy rather than buying the land outright. This sometimes means they end up paying a few percent more for a parcel of land. But by securing construction sites this way, companies can build more homes where the demand (and prices) are currently highest and forego projects that may not be as profitable. In the old days when a project got scrapped, the homebuilders had to find a buyer for their land, which isnt always an easy task. Now, when a project doesnt work out, they walk away from the land and forfeit the small option payment. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor Outlook,Ž is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850.608.6121 … www. arborwealth.net), a fiduciary, fee-onlyŽ registered investment advisory firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor.ARBOR OUTLOOKRestaurants, Houses and Growth RunwaysGolf cart usage Dear Editor, Ive just got to say something to clear my mind of the I should have said somethingŽ syndrome. Ive seen a grandparent with a one year old on her lap and another child on the seat, driving a golf cart. If she took a turn too hard or a car was to hit her that baby would hit the pavement, possibly the other child would, too. Come on, what are you thinking? Ive also seen a golf cart full of folks on Highway 98, where the speed limit is 45 mph. Is that legal? Im waiting for a vacationer thats not familiar with the road to just run right over the golf cart. What a tragedy. And last, but not least, Ive seen kids not old enough to have driving licenses driving golf carts on Garrison Avenue. Im not sure if any of this is illegal, Im just sure its not safe. Good luck Law Enforcement!Dennis Maulding, Port St. JoeLETTERS TO THE EDITOR By Cora FoxCenter for Rural AffairsEach year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) makes billions of dollars in payments to farmers across the country. Farmers rely on this money as part of a safety net, which helps them mitigate risks involved with working in agriculture. Congress put in place common sense limits on farm program payments, but left damaging loopholes. Currently, farmers are required to be actively engaged in farming to receive these payments. Actively engagedŽ farmers should be on the farm or in the tractor, as well as investing in land, equipment, or providing capital for the farming operation. Each corporation, LLC, or individual farmer meeting actively engagedŽ eligibility criteria can receive payments. In 2015, USDA paid $3.7 million to one farming operation comprised of two individuals and 32 corporations. The operation reported that 25 members (plus 10 spouses) contributed active personal management, but no personal labor in the field. Support for these large farming operations works against other USDA programs, like beginning farmer loans, rural development programs, and more. The positive impact from those programs is diminished when corporate agriculture is strengthened by excessive and unnecessary farm program payments. Taxpayer dollars shouldnt be misguided to further drive farm consolidation, increase barriers for beginning farmers, and decrease the number of true family farms in our agricultural system. Instead, sound, effective payment limitations should be implemented and enforced to ensure taxpayer dollars arent funding the squandering of rural America.Abuse of farm safety net harms rural AmericaSentencing law reform Dear Editor, Did you know the Florida Legislature has cut $28 million from the Florida State budget for badly needed substance abuse and mental health programs, and has eliminated prisoner reentry and work-release services that prepare inmates for life outside of prison? Ive been working on the District-level of United Methodist Women, and we are very concerned that our country has the highest rate of incarcerations in the world! Our prison population has increased from 300,000 prisoners in the early 1900s to 2.3 million today. On our District Board, several women have had family members in prison. One of our members received a call from a family friend whose son is in prison. The friend was worried about the re-entry and work-release programs not being funded for her son when he is released. We need reform in our sentencing laws. Mary Ellen Klas of The Tampa Bay Times wrote a very informative article on May 6 entitled Florida Prisons Cut Programs to Cover $28 million Deficit.Ž Mary Ellen writes: Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg), chairman of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee that writes the prison budget, is convinced the state neither has the will nor the capacity to afford its prison population of 96,000 and has been on a mission to reform sentencing laws that aim to reduce the number of offenders in the system and provide more treatment and diversion alternatives to non-violent offenders.Ž The proposals passed the Senate but were stopped in the House. Brandes said the solution will take courage. We need to have courage„whatever your political party, faith or race. Call your legislators: Senator Bill Montford (850487-5003), Assistants: Melissa Durham, Varna Mitchell and Taylor Peck, or Representative Halsey Beshears (850-717-5007). We must enter the arena if we truly care what happens to our fellow man„sons, daughters, fathers, mothers and children.Ann Tison, Member, Gulf County Democratic Partycampaign finance reform, and nonpartisan redistricting that would lead to more competitive congressional seats. But really what needs to happen is that the leadership must let the House and Senate „ the full House and Senate „ work their wills on the major political issues of the day. These days, leaders usually do their utmost to avoid this. Putting power back in the hands of ordinary members may seem counter-intuitive when just above I suggested that Congress needs strong leaders. It does „ just not leaders who manipulate the process to get the results that they themselves, or some faction of their caucuses, want to see. Rather, we need leaders who enable members of the Congress to vote on the major issues of the day. This means leadership that recognizes that Congress is filled with diverse and often conflicting opinions, and that to represent and serve the American people as intelligently and effectively as possible, members should vote on the clear-cut and specific issues of most concern to Americans. Instead, too often today the leadership blocks the full House and Senate from working their respective wills on major legislation. This should end. Lee Hamilton is a Senior Advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative Government; a Distinguished Scholar, IU School of Global and International Studies; and a Professor of Practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. HAMILTONFrom Page A4 Margaret McDowell Less competition isnt their only advantage, though. Homebuilding costs are rising, which should also bene t the larger players because they can borrow money cheaper than smaller builders; buy materials in bulk and save money; and spread their design and labor costs over more projects. All this means more pro t per home than subscale competitors.

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** A6 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The StarLocally, here is how the key dates break down: August 28The primary will also be election day in two school board races.In addition, the day will see the first round of tallies for the Board of County Com-missioners District 4 seat.Brian Cox, who had filed initial paperwork to challenge for the School Board District 1 seat, decided not to run, leav-ing Bernadette Hackett and Dennis McGlon vying for the seat.And for the District 5 seat on the School Board, Ruby Knox and Barbara Radcliff are the candidates.School Board races are non-partisan and therefore whoever achieves 50 percent-plus one in the primary is elected; with two candidates in each race, someone is going to secure a majority.As for the District 4 BOCC seat, Democrats Commissioner Sandy Quinn, Jr. and challenger Tan Smiley will reprise their race of four years ago.The winner will advance to face two candidates who filed with no party affiliation, meaning an automatic advance to the general ballot.Ronald Pickett (not Boyd as reported last week) and Amy Rogers filed in the last two days of qualifying and will await the Quinn-Smiley winner. Nov. 6General election day, beyond the state and federal races, will be all about the Board of County Commissioners with three seats, a majority, up for grabs.District 1: Incumbent Commissioner David Rich, a Republican, faces chal-lenges from John Nagy, who qualified as a Democrat, and William Lawson, running with no party affiliation.District 2: Incumbent Ward McDaniel, a Democrat, also faces two challengers, Tom Semmes, who qualified as a Republican, and Josh Taunton, who will run with no party affiliation.District 4: Whoever the winner of Quinn versus Smiley in the primary will be up against Pickett and Rogers. Voter registration books close 29 days prior to any election. All new registration and party change requests must be received by the Supervisor of Elections or postmarked on or before that day to be eligible to vote. BALLOTFrom Page A1Candidate qualifying ended at noon last Friday. [TIM CROFT | THE STAR] the youth is, well, part of the calendar, what one did each summer.Just ask a teen, simply, if they could not have found something better to do on a blistering summer day.This what we look for-ward to every summer,Ž said 15-year-old Grace Smith. Its a tradition.ŽAnd one that has a long reach.The churchs youth have missioned in various communities in North Carolina and South Carolina and trav-eled as far as New Orleans.Youth have grown and returned to assist as adults. It is a circle.They get our adults ener-gized,Ž Thomas said. This is just part of our ongoing missionary work.ŽIn turn, the Port St. Joe churches have bandied about ideas and programs to glorify their faith within the community, as partners, as one body, an event that would be transforming to all ƒ to bring life and light to the homes and families of our community with no strings attached.Ž All youth and young adults were welcomed to join the work and fun, with the Midway Methodist kids bol-stering the effort.But it was not all work this week.A beach bonfire in Salinas Park was scheduled for Monday evening and a cook-out in Frank Pate Park was on tap for Wednesday dinner; dinner was served at Oak Grove the other nights.A movie night, indoor volleyball, ice cream compe-titions and other activities, along with guest speakers and worship were planned throughout the week. This is kind of a God thing that we are all here together,Ž Thomas said. The kids are excited.Ž MISSIONFrom Page A1The teens and adults from Midway United Methodist in North Carolina. [TIM CROFT | THE STAR] The churchs youth have missioned in various communities in North Carolina and South Carolina and traveled as far as New Orleans.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A7 Special to The StarANDALUSIA, Ala. … Edward Jones of Wewahitchka has been elected to represent Gulf Coast EC on PowerSouth Energy Cooperatives Board of Trustees. Jones appointment was approved at PowerSouths June Board meeting.Jones is a retired railroad engineer and retired volunteer fireman. He also was a charter member of his local Lions Club chapter.He has served on the Gulf Coast EC Board of Trustees since 1995. He and his wife, Sue, have two daughters, Kelli (Jason) Creamer and Kristin (Chris) Hamlet, and four grandchildren.PowerSouth, headquartered in Andalusia, Ala., serves the wholesale energy needs of 16 electric cooperatives and four municipal electric systems in Alabama and northwest Florida. Collectively, these distribution members provide electric service to homes, businesses and indus-tries in 39 Alabama and 10 Florida counties.Jones to represent Gulf Coast EC on PowerSouth board Jones By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comThe downward fall of the countys unemployment rate continued in May, according to statistics from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.The countys unemployment rate in May was 3.1 percent, down from 3.2 in April and the 3.7 posted in May 2017.The unemployment rate has fallen nearly a full percentage point since the 4.0 percent posted in February; the rate was 4.4 percent in January.The unemployment rate in Florida was 3.8 percent in May; in the U.S. it was 3.6 percent.The region, which also includes Bay and Franklin counties, saw unemployment remain at 3.2 percent overall in May, down from 3.9 in March and well below the 3.9 percent of May 2017.The state unemployment rate for May was 3.8 percent, down 0.4 percent from 2017.There were 398,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 10.2 million.Out of a regional labor force of 102,964, which was up 2.9 percent, or 2,400 from last year, there were 3,271 unemployed.We continue to have good job growth in several sectors,Ž said Kim Bodine, Executive Director for CareerSource Gulf Coast.Our job growth rate outpaced most of the state, due in part to our tourism season, but also likely due to the real estate market leading to an increase in professional and business services.ŽGulf County reported 15 permits for residential con-struction during the month of May, up from 11 in April and the 11 in May 2017.In Bay County and Franklin County, residential construc-tion permits were down from the same period in 2017.Another economic factor in Gulf County was the 16.5 percent drop in bed tax col-lections in April compared to the same month in 2017.Bay and Franklin counties each reported bed taxes were up in April compared to 2017.In May, non-agricultural employment within Panama City MSA, which also includes Gulf County, was 87,900, up 2,900 jobs, or 3.4 percent, over the year. The Panama City MSA had the second-fastest annual job growth in Florida in the following sectors in May: professional and business services (up 8.5 percent); leisure and hospitality (5.8 percent); financial activi-ties (4.4 percent); and trade, transportation and utilities (up 3.6 percent).That sector, along with the mining, logging and construction (7.8 percent), leisure and hospitality (6.8 percent), and trade, transportation, and utilities (2.5 percent) sectors also grew as fast as or faster than in the Panama City MSA than state-wide year over year.The sectors of education and health services (up 2.7 percent) and government (.07 percent) grew as fast or faster over the past year than any other metro area in the state.Industries gaining jobs over the past year included professional and business services (up 900 jobs); edu-cation and health services (up 300 jobs); leisure and hospi-tality (up 900 jobs); trades, transportation and utilities (up 600 jobs); government (up 100 jobs); mining, log-ging and construction (up 200 jobs); and financial activities (up 200 jobs).According to the DEO, the manufacturing (down 200 jobs), and information indus-tries (down 100 jobs) lost jobs over the past year.The other business sectors were unchanged.The unemployment rate does not reflect those unem-ployed who are no longer receiving unemployment benefits nor does it include those who have stopped seek-ing employment.CareerSource Gulf Coast operates offices in all three counties. Visit www.career-sourcegc.com to learn more about professional workforce development and job place-ment services, all offered free of charge.May unemployment remains below state, US

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** A8 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A9On June 4, Deputy P. Young was dispatched to the 500 block of S. State 71 in Wewahitchka in ref-erence to a trespassing. Deputy Young identified the trespasser as Michael Deane Ward (50). While speaking with Ward he learned that there was a warrant for his arrest for Trespassing, which stemmed from an incident reported to the Sheriffs Office June 1 on Johnson Lane. Deputy Young placed Ward under arrest for the warrant and transported him to the Gulf County Detention Facility.On June 4, Deputy G. Desrosier travelled to the Wakulla County Jail to pick up Marci Ellen Griffin (38) on a transport order to Gulf County to attended court proceedings. After the proceedings she was transported back to Wakulla County by Deputy M. Layfield.On June 4, Deputy G. Desrosier travelled to the Bay County Jail to pick up Tatiana Nicole Davis (22) and Dillon Clyde McDan-iel (20) on transport orders and transported them to Gulf County to attend court proceedings.On June 4, Deputy D. House arrested Kenneth Dean Church (57) on Mockingbird Drive in Wewahitchka. Church had an active warrant for his arrest out of Bay County for failing to appear in court.On June 5, Deputy P. Young responded to a report of a traffic accident on CR 386 near the intersection of Harmony Street. It was a single vehicle accident and the vehicle was driven by Gerald Clifton Shearer (54). Shearer was not injured as a result of the accident however it was determined that Shearer was under the influence of alcohol. Shearer performed some field sobriety assessments and as a result, Deputy Young had probable cause to believe that Shearers blood alcohol content was above the legal limit. Shearer was placed under arrest and charged with Driving Under the Influence of alcohol. Shearer submitted to a breath test to determine his blood alcohol content and he tested a .152, which above the legal limit of .08.On June 7, Investigators S. Ferrell and P. Williams executed an arrest warrant on Bay Avenue in Wewahitchka by arresting Michael Stephen Stripling (27) for Domestic Battery. The warrant stemmed from a domestic distur-bance that occurred at the Family Dollar in Wewahi-tchka on June 2.On June 8, Deputy C. Harvey responded to the Indian Pass Raw Bar in reference to a verbal dis-turbance. It was reported that a man visiting the Raw Bar had got upset with an employee for checking his kids identification and had threatened that employee. An argument ensued between the man and his family and the other employees. The man and his family left the Raw Bar and, in the process, swerved the vehicle they were in toward the edge of the roadway nearly hitting people standing outside the Raw Bar. Deputy Harvey was able to identify the suspects and criminal charges may be pending.On June 9, Sgt. J. Wil-liams conducted a traffic stop on Long Avenue near Allen Memorial Way. The vehicle was occupied by Xavier Floyd Bateman (19) and Nicholas Dwight Lewis (22). Both were asked to exit the vehicle while Sgt. Williams deployed his K-9 around the vehicle. When Bateman exited he dropped a metal pipe with marijuana residue in it. Bateman was placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Para-phernalia. Lewis admitted to having a pipe in the car with methamphetamine residue in it. Lewis was placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.On June 9, Deputy A. White conducted a traffic stop on State 71 near Doc Whitfield Road. Deputy White had gath-ered information that the vehicle was being driven by Kyle Edward Jones (27) and that Jones was wanted out of Bay County, Florida, for Larceny. Deputy White encountered Jones inside the vehicle and placed him under arrest.On June 9, Sgt. J. Wil-liams conducted a traffic stop on State 22 near West River Road. The driver was identified as Daniel Kenton Sineath (31). During the course of the traffic stop Sineath was found to have heroin, syringes and an Oxycodone pill in his pocket. During a search of the car, other medication was found that Sineath did not have a prescription for. Sineath was placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Heroin, Possession of a Controlled Substance, Possession of New Legend Drugs without a prescription, Possession of Drug Para-phernalia and Violation of Probation. Sineath was on probation for Possession of Methamphetamine. On June 10, Sgt. J. Wil-liams arrested Darien Nathen Hutcheson (40) in Pine Ridge Apartments on a warrant for Failure to Appear in court.On June 10, Deputy A. White responded to report of a verbal distur-bance in the 300 block of Waterview Avenue. While investigating the disturbance, Deputy White saw marijuana and paraphernalia used to ingest marijuana in plain view inside the home. Deputy White identified the owner of the contraband as Thomas Brian Laurimore (50). Laurimore was placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.On June 12, Investigators S. Ferrell and P. Williams conducted a traffic stop on 2nd Street and East River Road. They identified the driver as Michael David Carter (46) and determined that his drivers license was not valid. Carter was placed under arrest and charged with Driving While License Suspended or Revoked.On June 13, Deputy P. Young was responded to a report of a verbal distur-bance on Thomas Circle in Wewahitchka. Deputy Young learned that during the disturbance, William Lee Nunery, Jr. (45) picked up a shovel handle and threatened to beat another person with it. A warrant was obtained for Nunerys arrest for Aggravated Assault and he was taken in to custody by deputies on June 15. Nunery resisted arrest when he was taken into custody and was additionally charged with Resisting Law Enforce-ment without Violence.On June 15, Investigators S. Ferrell and P. Williams conducted a traffic stop on CR 386 near the intersection of S. Long Street. They identified the driver of the vehicle as James Bernard Clayton (47) and determined that Clayton had a suspended drivers license and was classified as a habitual traffic offender. Clayton was placed under arrest for driving with a suspended drivers license. During an inventory of his vehicle investigators found a personal amount of methamphetamine, marijuana and rolling papers. Clayton was charged with DWLSR (Habitual), Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia.On June 16, Deputy M. Manley conducted a traffic stop on State 71 near the intersection of Charles Avenue. During a drivers license check on the driver, who was identified as Valentino Jarrod Bolden (33), Deputy Manley revealed that Boldens license was sus-pended for failing to pay traffic fines. Valentino was placed under arrest and charged with Driving While License Suspended or Revoked.On June 17, Deputy M. Peek, was dispatched to Parkside Circle in Barrier Dunes in reference to a theft. It was reported that during the night someone had stolen a Yeti cooler from the back of a pickup truck. The cooler was described as a Yeti Tundra 75quart, tan in color. It was secured in the back of the truck with a lock and cable but the thief cut the cable. The cooler was not recovered and no suspects have been developed.On June 18, Brittnay Cheyanne Strickland (22) turned herself into the Gulf County Detention Facility to be arrested and booked on warrants for Burglary of a Dwell-ing and Grand Theft, and a Writ of Bodily attachment for failing to pay child support.On June 18, Deputy M. Layfield was dispatched to N. Deer Avenue in Howard Creek in reference to a report of credit card fraud. The suspect in this case was authorized to make a single purchase with another persons card. The suspect made multiple charges that were not authorized. Charges against the sus-pect are pending.On June 19, Deputy C. Harvey travelled to the Leon County Jail to pick up Katelyn Lorraine Kaeppel (27) and transport her to Gulf County to attend criminal court proceedings. After her appearance in court, she was transported back to the Leon County Jail. Deputy Harvey then transported another subject from the Leon County Jail to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Toney Jacob Becton (35) was wanted for Vio-lation of Probation on the original charge of Felony Battery. Becton was also wanted on a Writ of Bodily attachment for failing to pay child support.On June 19, Sgt. D. Sanders travelled to the Bay County Jail and arrested Timothy James Cooper (40) on a viola-tion of probation warrant for driving with a suspended license. Cooper was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility and booked on the warrant.On June 19, Deputy P. Young responded to a report of a theft on Court Street in St. Joe Beach. Someone had entered into a home that was under construction and stole a new furnace heat exchanger valued at approximately $5,000. The furnace was removed from its box, dragged across the street and loaded into a vehicle. The theft remains under investigation.On June 19, Deputy C. Harvey responded a report of a physical disturbance on Woodmere Drive in Wewahitchka. The altercation had taken place between two broth-ers who were already separated when deputies arrived. During the inves-tigation it was shown that Brandon Lee Burkett (32) was the aggressor in the altercation. Burkett was located and placed under arrest for Domestic Battery.On June 19, Deputy D. House attempted to conduct a traffic stop on Avenue A in Port St. Joe. The vehicle failed to stop and attempted evade Deputy House. During the pursuit Deputy House observed an item being thrown from the passenger side window. The vehicle finally stopped at a residence on N. Bay. The driver exited the vehicle and fled on foot. Deputy House chased the suspect on foot to Harbor Street where the suspect surrendered and put his hands up. Deputy House placed the subject under arrest and identified him as Johnny Arnez Williams, Jr. (37). Williams had an active Writ of Bodily Attachment for failing to pay child support. During a search of the vehicle Williams was driving, a baggie of crack cocaine was found in the passenger side door weighing approximately 4.5 grams. Williams was charged with Possession of Crack Cocaine, Failing to Obey a Lawful Order and Resist-ing Law Enforcement without Violence.On June 20, Brandon Lee Burkett (32) was arrested and charged with Failure to Appear in Court on the charges of Grand Theft and Trespass. Burkett was already in custody at the Gulf County Deten-tion Facility on unrelated charges.On June 21, Deputy G. Desrosier arrested Jessika Louise Turner (26) in the 1100 block of Long Avenue on a violation of probation warrant. Turner was on probation for Possession of Methamphetamine.On June 21, Deputy G. Desrosier travelled to the Bay County Jail to arrest Billy Joe Nichols on a Gulf County warrant and transport him to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Nichols was wanted for failing to appear in court on the charges of Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Paraphernalia.On June 22, Deputy M. Layfield was assigned to investigate a theft from the Scallop Cove General Store on Cape San Blas. It was discovered that an employee had been steal-ing merchandise from the store. The employee has since been terminated and criminal charges are forthcoming.Gulf County Sheri s O ce law enforcement summaryJune 4-24

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** A10 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star Special to The StarJust named one of the Top 12 Independence Events in Florida, Apalachicolas Inde-pendence EveŽ event attracts people from all over the Forgot-ten Coast and beyond. It is held each year 5-10 p.m. ET July 3 at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola.This family-friendly celebra-tion features live music, food trucks, a parade, kids activities, a free ice cream social, a veter-ans tribute, and the singing of the National Anthem-all culminating in a spectacular fireworks show reflected in the waters of the Apalachicola River.The featured entertainment is the popular Bo Spring Band. They blend their crowd-pleasing Americana sound from Rock, Soul, Country, Funk and Bluegrass music. The band released their debut album in 2017 and has a large following in the area.Food trucks will be offering a tasty array of American and international favorites. In addition, the City of Apalachicola is organizing vendors to raise money for the victims of the recent catastrophic fire in Eastpoint that left more than 200 people displaced. The Center for History, Cul-ture, and Art will be offering free kids art activities in its facility across the street from Riverfront Park. Director Merrill Livingston is putting together a fun collection of col-lage materials, canvasses, and red, white, and blue paint for kids of all ages. Independence Day themed art by local artists will also be for sale.Independence Eve in ApalachicolaBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comNo matter how much they try to distance themselves, county commissioners keep being dragged into the details concerning a proposed renova-tion of Port St. Joes 10th Street Park.During last weeks meeting of a county-appointed parks committee, committee chair Commissioner Sandy Quinn, Jr., stated the committee meets for one hour only to discuss updates on the overall project.There was not sufficient time for all views to be heard and debated, he said, which angered several residents who had attended the publicly-noticed meeting. In addition, county attorney Jeremy Novak emphasized last week that the details of the park plan are not the Board of County Commissioners to debate; such decisions were up to the city.The only question for the BOCC would be whether to approve the spending of bed tax dollars for the project.Tuesday, during the BOCCs regular monthly meeting, several residents living adja-cent to the park came to speak to commissioners about the details.In at least one case, that didnt provide much satisfac-tion as Robert Branch barely got through his designated three minutes before, in an unusual action, not receiving any motion from commission-ers to extend his time.While not a scientific count, the number of such requests for additional time not being approved in the past year could easily be counted on one hand and fingers would remain.In any case, Branch and Christy McElroy, who also lives adjacent to the park asked com-missioners to be conscious of the concerns of park neighbors.As Branch said, most of the folks who live along that area of Marvin and McClelland understand the historic and recreational significance of the ball fields at 10th Street.Weve always said from the get-go we all know why the park is there,Ž Branch said.They are not opposed to the park, but urge that any renova-tions remain within the current footprint of the park and be completed in a cost-efficient manner.We still want the same thing for the neighborhood,Ž Branch said. We want whats best for (those who use the fields).Just keep it cost-efficient and in the same footprint.ŽMcElroy noted that TDC funding to the city since 2015 totaled just under $40,000 and much of that was spent on fire-works, Fourth of July and New Years Eve.This, she added, while the city boasts a number of parks as well as lodging partners, restaurants and other businesses serving tourists in the cityMcElroy said the renova-tion should not be commercial in nature, such as Frank Brown Park in Panama City Beach, aimed at attracting visitors as a primary mission.That changes things,Ž McElroy said. The main thing ƒ is be consistent with the footprint of the park, to not have so much of a commercial venture and stay within the (regulations) of the (Tourist Development Council)Ž which oversees the bed tax spending.She said the neighbors are concerned about cost factors, footprint and balance of the renovation within the existing neighborhood.As Quinn noted last week, he was the one that brought to the BOCC the idea of focusing on 10th Street Park rather than a sports complex opposite the Gulf/Franklin Center.That was last summer, more than two years after the county began collecting a fifth penny in bed tax for parks and recreation, with the vision of a sports complex off Field of Dreams Ave.The process has bogged down since a conceptual plan, ostensibly crafted to begin the process of a budget and master plan for the project, was released in January.That plan was approved unanimously by county and city.However, over the past sev-eral months residents living adjacent to the park have criticized the scope of the plan, which is now on its sixth version and city commission-ers only voted to approve that plan with the understanding it would change.They have argued about the degradation of the natural beauty surrounding the park, flooding and safety issues and impacts to their homes and property. Stone Mill Creek re stationCommissioners approved a final deal with Cathey Construction to build a new fire station in Stone Mill Creek, the construction not to exceed $400,000.The land for the station was donated by the Pitts Family and the county secured a legislative appropriation earlier this year for $400,000.During initial bidding two contractors submitted bids, both exceeding the $400,000.The low bidder, Cathey Con-struction, agreed to work with the county to bring the price within budget.Ground work has already begun. Veterans Memorial ParkCommissioners approved spending $50,000 in TDC parks funds to purchase the flag poles that will be part of the new Honor Walk to be built at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill.Commissioner Jimmy Rogers said the dollars could represent the boards contribution to the project, for which a fundraising campaign is underway.Citizens take park concerns to county

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A11 Special to The StarIn collaboration with the Gulf County Emergency Management (GCEM) and Gulf County Emergency Medical Ser-vices (GCEMS), Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf (SHHG) developed a comprehensive hurricane evacuation plan to protect the safety of patients and provide emergency care before, during and following severe weather.Sacred Hearts hurricane plan is designed to prepare for the potential impact of a hurricane landfall within its ser-vice area. One part of the plan is to ensure that physicians and associates essential to staff the hos-pital are available before, during and after a hurri-cane. When hurricanes threaten our area, the hospital evaluates staff-ing, orders extra supplies of food, water and medi-cations and tests backup generators to be ready for the worst-case scenario.To further ensure readiness, the hospitals incident command center team which is led by senior leadership, physicians and other key personnel, participate in tabletop exercises designed to practice scenarios of real-world events that calls for emergency response actions including a hurricane threat."Our tabletop exercises are performed in part-nership with Gulf County Emergency Management and Gulf County Emer-gency Medical Services,Ž said Scott McCormick, Facilities and Emergency Preparedness Manager for Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Combining their expertise and know-how with ours provides the best possi-ble result of a successful outcome in an emergency event whether it be a hurricane, active shooter or mass casualty event.ŽOur number one concern is always that our patients and associ-ates are kept safe," said Roger Hall, President of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. For a hur-ricane or any real-world emergency our incident command team is ready to initiate safety measures to ensure the best possible outcome,Ž Hall said.In certain hurricane threat conditions, the hospital will evacuate patients to more secure healthcare facilities away from the storms path. Those conditions include:€ When Gulf County Emergency Management has issued a mandatory evacuation for one or more evacuation zones in Gulf County, or an evacuation is deemed necessary for the safety of our patients and asso-ciates by the Hospitals President/CEO.€ The hurricane must be at a category 2 or stronger and/or a projected storm surge of at least 6 … 8 feet. A category 2 hurricane has winds from 96 to 110 mph.If hospital patients were to be evacuated, the plan calls for the hospitals Emergency Department to remain open if it is logistically possible. The Emergency Department Incident Command staff will work directly with Gulf County Emergency Management during the storm and will re-open to the public as soon as possible after the storm passes.SHHG remains in close contact with GCEM on the status of damaging storm threats and any evacuation measures. Please note that SHHG does not serve as a public shelter during an emer-gency or disaster, such as a hurricane. Please visit the Gulf County Emergency Management web site at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov/EmergencyManage-ment.cfm or Facebook page at www.facebook.com/GulfCountyEmer-gencyManagement for information as well as a list of public shelters that will be activated.How SHH on the Gulf prepares for major hurricanesWahl said the blame could be shared, maybe some attributable to the lack of action from the com-munity and a good portion due to actions taken by the BOCC in its RV ordinance.He noted, however, he is not alone in his concerns.More than 40 property owners in Oak Grove have signed a petition pleading with the county to jump in and address an ongoing, and steadily growing, problem.(Now there are) RVs in residential areas, pole barns as primary structures,Ž Wahl said. You have put forth ordinances ƒ and many of those have brought issues.ŽWahl has contended some areas of St. Joe Beach are becoming RV parks and RVs are being advertised for sale. The motive is money, plain and simple, Wahl said, and those individuals who wish had every right to make money.But not at the cost of a neighborhood and dozens of property owners who have called an area such as Oak Grove home for decades.The RV ordinance does not address pole barns. Pole barns, under county rule, can not go up on a lot without a primary structure.As for RVs, by county rule outside the countys Coastal Construction Cor-ridor (CCCL) the limit is one per lot.But that provision of the ordinance, as we shall see, does not apply to Oak Grove.There has been a lot of stuff going on in the neigh-borhood,Ž said Lorinda Gingell, another Oak Grove resident.She questioned whether some structures going up were even permitted and implored commissioners to increase funding and manpower for code enforcement.The problems being experienced in Oak Grove, she added, were occurring in varying degrees in High-land View and St. Joe Beach.The commissioners whose districts are most impacted, Commissioners Phil McCroan and Sandy Quinn, Jr., said the board must do something and soon. McCroan asked staff to consider funding options before the board sees the tentative budget next month.We have real issues,Ž McCroan said. These problems are not going away.Weve got to deal with this. Get ready.ŽAddressing the issue could come in the form of re-opening the RV ordinance; commissioners asked county attorney Jeremy Novak in April to examine the ordinance and come back to the board with recommendations.The ordinance, which has been amended three times after initial adoption, has traveled a long, tortuous road. That path began in 2010 at the urging of coastal property owners in 2010.The first two attempts at completing the process of adopting an ordinance, including public hearings and advertisement, failed when a majority of the BOCC at the time refused to move forward.Five years after starting down the path, an ordinance was approved after the county, using state guidelines, established a CCCL extending one-mile inland from coastal open waters. RVs, other than short-term, county-permitted stays, are prohibited within that boundary.Commissioners subsequently returned to the ordinance and took out Oak Grove, Jones Homestead and Highland View from its provisions, determining they were areas not considered adjacent to open watersŽ but St. Joseph Bay.County administrator Michael Hammond, who has characterized the ordi-nance as a major headacheŽ for staff and a nightmareŽ to enforce, said that carve out fueled what has hap-pened in Oak Grove. (The problem in Oak Grove) is a direct response to the RV ordinance,Ž Hammond said in April.RVs banned from the beaches had nowhere else to go but Oak Grove and Highland View.The RV ordinance ƒ its almost impossible to enforce as it is,Ž Hammond added.At the very least, Gingell said, the county should figure out an alert system to ensure that the RVs arriv-ing in Oak Grove will depart immediately under threat of a major storm.But, McCroan and Quinn, said the county must do more to assist property owners.McCroan has noted the negative impact to prop-erty values, and in turn the countys tax base, due to the increase of pole barns and RVs in the neighborhood.It is an issue the city of Port St. Joe is also attempt-ing to wade into as city officials also see an increase in pole barns and what some commissioners consider out-sized accessory buildings.Weve got to try to help the people, whatever it takes,Ž Quinn said. McCroan added, Weve got to do something sooner than later.Ž COUNTYFrom Page A1

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** A12 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The StarFord had never seen anything like it and said it was not an easy scene to absorb.The fire, whipped by blustery winds, ravaged a community, consuming, in total or in portion, 40 homes, countless cars and boats, and leaving nearly 140 homeless, complete devastation.ŽThe fire consumed about 820 acres in mere hours Sunday evening.Eddie Fields, who works with the Christian Community Development Fund, is a resident of Eastpoint and said the fire could have easily spread to his subdivision; according to the Florida Forest Service a mitigation road provided a fire-break.In all, 136 were directly impacted and possibly left homeless and roughly 250 people had registered with the American Red Cross as of Monday night.Many of the homeless only escaped, literally, with the clothes on their back.The property damage is estimated to exceed $800,000.Veterinarian Hobson Fulmer was intaking ani-mals affected by the fire into Tuesday.The cause of the fire is under investigation.It was more like a movie, a war zone,Ž Ford said. Some of those people got out of there with just the clothes are their back.It was very hard to take. We just tried to help those people the best we could.ŽThe larger commu-nity was doing that come daybreak.Coordinated byGulf County Emergency Man-agementand the Port St. Joe Ministerial Association, lists of immediate needs, from water to dia-pers, was out by late morning.Marshall Nelson, county director of emer-gency management, said one trailer full of goods was taken over Monday, including emergency meals.We have had an amaz-ing response,Ž Nelson said.Collections continued at the EOC through thismorning and the transport of another trailer.Meanwhile, other truck loads were being taken to Franklin County upon arrival.Businesses and civic organizations also joined the effort by Monday afternoon and there were a host of local initiatives to aid the drive to assist."We appreciate the people of Gulf County for their generosity," said Ben Guthrie of Gulf County Emergency Management.Relief e ortsThere are immense shortand long-term challenges for the East-point community.The primary outlet is a GoFundMe page established by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office.That link is: https://www.gofundme.com/ eastpoint-fire-victimrelief-fund.In addition, Frank-lins Promise Coalition, a long-term recovery orga-nization, is coordinating the relief effort.That link is: http://www.franklinspromisecoalition.org/ FIREFrom Page A1Gulf County units fought the Eastpoint “ re for four hours[COURTESY PHOTOS/GULF COUNTY FIRE AND EMERGENCY] Nearly 140 were left homeless. Gulf County units were on the front lines until 2:30 a.m.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A13

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** A14 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star OUTDOORSCONTACT USEmail outdoor news to tcroft@starfl.comBy Melissa CrouchSpecial to The StarSummer fishing season is heating up and youre invited to Catch a Florida Memory with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) by participating in any of three fun and exciting Saltwater Angler Recognition Programs. See if you can catch all 71 species in the Saltwater Fish Life List. Caught a big fish that warrants bragging rights? Submit it to the Saltwater Reel Big Fish program. And be sure to check out the nine categories of Saltwater Grand Slams that challenge anglers to catch three specific fish in a 24-hour period. Anglers of all ages and skill levels can earn various prizes such as certificates, shirts, hats, rods and reels, dehooking tools, rubber-coated nets and more. Successful anglers receive recognition in Florida Saltwater Recreational Fishing Regulations booklets and on the Club Members page of CatchaFloridaMemory.com, plus the chance to win monthly raffle prizes courtesy of generous program partners. Catch a Florida Memory programs are not only fun and rewarding, but they also promote fisheries conservation. Anglers are encouraged to target a diversity of species to help decrease fishing pressure on the most sought-after fishes. Catch-and-release fishing and responsible fish handling practices are emphasized, and anglers do not have to harvest their catches to qualify. Photos of the angler with each catch are required and could even be featured in FWC publications or on social media. Saltwater Fish Life List Can you catch them all? Similar to a birding life list, this program allows anglers to track their progress at catching 71 different species of saltwater fish. Anglers who catch at least 10 different Life List species can join the Saltwater Fish Life List 10-Fish Club and receive a prize pack including a certificate of accomplishment and a colorful shirt, plus be eligible for additional prizes as they catch 30, 50 and all 71 fish on the list. Anglers who complete their Life List by submitting all 71 fish will be awarded a grand prize! Get started today and print your Saltwater Fish Life List or request to receive one by mail at CatchaFloridaMemory. com. Saltwater Reel Big Fish Dont let that whopper of a fish turn into just a whopper of a story. Memorialize your Saltwater Reel Big Fish by submitting a photo of you with your catch and a photo of the fish over a measuring device. This program includes 30 different species in both adult and youth (15 and younger) categories. Successful participants receive a prize pack including a certificate of accomplishment and a colorful shirt, and are eligible for additional prizes as they catch five, 10, 15 or all 30 different Saltwater Reel Big Fish species. Plus, anglers who submit all 30 species will get a grand prize! Saltwater Grand Slams Can you meet the challenge? FWC has nine different Saltwater Grand Slams that award anglers for catching three specified fish within a 24-hour period, and the categories may surprise and challenge you. From the Inshore Grand Slam consisting of red drum, spotted seatrout and flounder to the Florida Grand Slam of permit, tarpon and bonefish, these challenges will make you work to increase your fishing skills. The program even includes a Small Fry Grand Slam for anglers 15 and under who catch a pinfish, catfish and grunt. Successful anglers receive a prize pack with a certificate of accomplishment and a colorful shirt showing the fish from their Grand Slam, and can win additional prizes when they catch three, six, or all eligible Grand Slams. Plus, a grand prize will be given to anglers who complete all eligible slams! For more information Learn more about Catch a Florida Memory programs and submit catches today at CatchaFloridaMemory.com. Keep track of whos catching what on the Catch a Florida Memory Facebook page, Facebook. com/CatchaFLMemory. Want to learn more about saltwater fishing? View how-to videos at MyFWC.com/SaltwaterFishing. And brush up on your saltwater fish identification skills at MyFWC. com/FishingLines. Have questions? Are you a business or organization that would like to partner with Catch a Florida Memory? EmailAnglerRecognition@MyFWC. com or call 850-487-0554.GONE COASTALCatch a Florida Memory while saltwater shing[COURTESY OF GAVIN HART] [COURTESY OF ALLISONSTATTNER] Special to The StarGAINESVILLEIn response to recent sight-ings of the endangered snail kite at Paynes Prai-rie Preserve State Park, the Florida Department of Environmental Pro-tection surveyed the park and discovered a nest containing three chicks.Declining snail kite populations led to protection of the species under federal and state law in 1967. In 2016, Ala-chua County residents spotted a snail kite for the first time in nearly 20 years. Since then, estimates have put the snail kite population in the Paynes Prairie basin in the single digits.Last year, Hurricane Irma destroyed dozens of snail kite nests around Lake Okeechobee, the more common nesting area for the imperiled species.The Paynes Prairie sightings sparked the interest of the Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Florida. Wildlife biologist Brian Jeffery led the survey expedition along with Florida State Park Environmental Special-ist Keith Morin.The habitat of this bird has improved a lot with our recent efforts to reduce wetland trees, which crowd the areas where these birds hunt,Ž Morin said. Water qual-ity also has improved over the past decade as the park has improved treat-ment marshes. Those factors, coupled with weather conditions that have helped drive up the apple snail population, the snail kites primary food source, have ben-efited the bird greatly.ŽThe state park also partners with the Alachua County Audubon chapter. They provide us valu-able location information on a number of species, including snail kites, through their monitoring and surveys,Ž Morin said. Audubon volunteers often alert us when they see a new species present in the area. We can then investigate and survey the area as needed.Ž"We are absolutely thrilled to see the number of snail kites increase at Paynes Prairie," said Debbie Segal, President of the Alachua Audubon Society. "Not only is this great news for the spe-cies, but it is also good for Gainesville's ecotourism industry. Bird watchers from around Florida, Georgia and other south-eastern states are visiting Gainesville, specifically to see this iconic bird species."DEP also partners with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Fletcher Lab at the UF Wildlife Ecology and Conservation school to help monitor sensitive wildlife in the Paynes Prairie basin.Endangered Snail Kite nesting at Paynes PrairieDEP discovered a nest with three snail kite chicks in Paynes Prairie.[PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEXIS CARDAS, FWC] Sighting of rare species sparks interest among scientists, birdwatchers FISHING REPORTWe have had some really hot temps. the last week on the Forgotten Coast but it has not cooled off the “ shing. Red“ sh and Trout has been pretty productive in St. Joe Bay and live shrimp and soft baits have done a good job. We think one key is hitting it early or hitting it late in the evening with these hot temps. Fish are going to go deeper and look for shelter right now. Offshore Snapper season has been really good so far with plenty of boat limits (two per person) and some exceptional sized “ sh this year. If your worried about your boat not being able to get out to the Snapper there has been plenty of good reports of Snapper in shallower water only 10 or 12 miles out. Until next week, Happy Fishing

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 A15 SPORTSStar Staff ReportKayla Cody, who led the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team in kills and blocks the last two years recently signed a full scholarship to play volleyball for the Lady Commodores of Gulf Coast State College. As a senior, Cody had 221 kills during the regular season, adding 16 during the district tournament. As junior, she was just shy of 200 kills. As a senior she also had 72 solo blocks, 84 total blocks. As a junior Cody had 79 total blocks.WHSs Cody signs with Gulf Coast[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comNine Port St. Joe athletes competed at the AAU Region 9 track and field qualifier over the past weekend in Tallahassee.All nine finished in the top six in their event and age group to qualify to compete in the national AAU Junior Olympic Track and Field Champ ionships to be held next month in Des Moines, IA.Of those nine, eight earned at least one top-3 finish, earning a medal during what is effectively the state AAU qualifier, this year held at Florida State University.This is a state qualifier with teams from Miami to Pensac-ola all at this one meet,Ž said Keion McNair, who coaches the Port St. Joe track athletes during the summer season. They have all worked hard and did well.ŽOn the track, in fact, both of McNairs charges earned medals. Jade Cothran, who steadily improved in the 100 meter hurdles during the school season, finished third in the event in Tallahassee.And Autumn Kotelman fin-ished second in the 1,500 and 800 meter runs.Cothran and Kotelman both competed in the 15-16 age group.On the field side of the events, lets take a pause and consider the javelin.The javelin is not an event a local athlete has taken up in formal competition and Keith Chiles, who coaches the Port St. Joe field athletes, said he had only taught the discipline to a couple of athletes for a few days prior to the meet.Nonetheless, Celeste Chiles (the coachs daughter) won the javelin in the 17-18 age group with a throw of 89 feet and Isaac Wockenfuss finished third in the 15-16 age group with a throw of 102 feet.Pretty impressive consid-ering they had never thrown it in competition before,Ž Coach Chiles said. All our kids qualified for nationals in their event, which is pretty neat.ŽLily Wockenfuss (15-16 age group) won the pole vault, was second in the high jump, fifth in the long jump and sixth in the high jump.In addition to winning the javelin, Celeste Chiles won the shot put and was second in the pole vault and discus.Isaac Wockenfuss added to his third in the javelin with a win in the high jump, fourth in the discus and fifth in the shot put.London White (14 age group) was third in the pole vault, fifth in the high jump and sixth in the long jump.Bladen Levins (14 age group) won the pole vault and Kristen Bouington (15-16 age group) was third in the same event.Sumner Dickey (10 age group) was fourth in the shot put and sixth in the long jump, just missing a medal.The Port St. Joe athletes will next compete in the Ernie Sims Invitational in Tallahas-see in two weeks.Coach Chiles and McNair said the athletes, despite qualifying, will not undertake the 1,100-mile trip to Des Moines.Chiles noted that next years national meet is in Virginia. Well qualify them all again and go up there next year,Ž Chiles said.PSJ track athletes stand out in TallahasseeFrom left, Sumner Dickey, Lily Wockenfuss, Celeste Chiles, Isaac Wockenfuss, Kristen Bouington, London White and Bladen Levins[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Celeste Chiles won the javelin in her “ rst try at the event in formal competition. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] From left, Jade Cothran, Coach Keion McNair, and Autumn Kotelman. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarFaster access to data. Improved fisheries estimates. More informed decision making. We want to thank you for making the Gulf Reef Fish Survey a success. Your participation has led the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), for the first time ever, to be able to manage the harvest of recreational red snapper in both state and federal waters in the Gulf. Participants in the survey are helping improve fisheries management in Florida.Since April 2015, recre-ational anglers who fish from private boats on the Gulf coast of Florida have been asked to sign up for the Gulf Reef Fish Survey. Signing up is required to legally harvest red and vermilion snappers; gag, black and red groupers; gray triggerfish; and amber-jack species.The purpose of the Gulf Reef Fish Survey is to provide timely and precise data to state and federal agencies that are responsible for man-aging reef fish and making decisions that impact recreational anglers in Florida. By signing up for the survey, anglers are eligible to receive a questionnaire in the mail about recent fishing activity. Each month, angler responses from the mail survey are used to estimate the numbers of recreational trips taken on the west coast of Florida to fish for Gulf reef fish species.By working collaboratively with NOAA Fisheries, the Gulf Reef Fish Survey produces data that are com-plementary with the existing Marine Recreational Information Program. When information collected from the two surveys is used together, estimates of landings are more precise, and this allows fishery managers to have greater confidence in our data. Later this year, the FWC will request NOAA Fisheries certify the Gulf Reef Fish Survey for use in regional stock assessments and fisher-ies management.The Gulf Reef Fish Survey is the primary data collection method for private recreational anglers to help improve recreational data collection for use in fisheries stock assessments and fisheries regulations. For red snapper, anglers can also use a smartphone/tablet app called iAngler Gulf Red Snapper to voluntarily log red snapper fishing trip data. Anglers who report through the app are still asked to participate in the Gulf Reef Fish Survey if they receive a questionnaire in the mail or are interviewed by an FWC biologist at the dock. Participation in the survey, MRIP and the iAngler app is important for fisheries management.If you receive one of the Gulf Reef Fish surveys in the mail, we ask that you fill out the questionnaire and return it to the marked address. Return the questionnaire even if you did not fish during the month of the survey. If an FWC biologist greets you at a boat ramp or marina, the interview takes just a few minutes of your time. By participating in an interview for the Gulf Reef Fish Survey, you are making an im portant contribution to help conserve Floridas recreational fisheries.Want to know more about the Gulf Reef Fish Survey? Visit MyFWC.com/Research, click on Saltwater,Ž then Commercial and Recreational FisheriesŽ and Gulf Reef Fish Survey.Ž You can also learn more at MyFWC.com/Snap-pers by clicking on Gulf Reef Fish Survey.ŽParticipation in Gulf Reef Fish Survey improving managementGag grouper. [FWC PHOTO] Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School baseball program and Coach Ashley Summerlin will host a baseball camp July 19-20 at Centennial Field.Camp sessions will be held 5-7 p.m. ET each day; the camp is for boys and girls ages 6-12.Campers will need a glove, bat and cleats and will receive a t-shirt for their participation. Please register by July 10 to ensure a t-shirt.Registration begins June 26 and forms are available in the school office. Payment may be made at time of reg-istration or the first day of camp.Cost will be $50 per camper.Make checks payable to Port St. Joe Baseball Dugout Club.Any questions call Sum-merlin at 706-957-2210.Port St. Joe baseball camp

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** A16 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star SCENE AROUNDSend us your photos that spotlight the best that Gulf Coast has to offer. This page is for photos submitted to The Star by read ers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star” .com A dolphin seeking a free meal. [COURTESY OF JIM SPENCE] St. Joseph Bay at low tide. [COURTESY OF RON RUDOLPH] The Cape San Blas Lighthouse and George Core Park on a cloudy day as seen from a boat on St. Joseph Bay. [COURTESY OF JODY JONES] Rainbow off St. Joe Beach. [COURTESY OF BILL GERSPACHER] The Dead Lakes [COURTESY OF EDWINA BACK-YAKKEY] Sunset over the Gulf of Mexico. [COURTESY OF KENNY MOORE] A heron takes a walk on the beach near WindMark. [COURTESY OF GINA BRAMBLE]

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 B1 COMMUNITY Wilson CaseyTRIVIA FUN Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or sug-gestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. What dog breed bites people the most in the U.S., according to Canine Journal?Pekingese, Labrador retriever, Chihuahua, Bull terrier2. What state is second to Vir-ginia as to having the most Civil War battlefields?South Carolina, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Tennessee3. What is the only state entirely bordered by rivers to the east and west?Wisconsin, Missouri, Indi-ana, Iowa4. Of these, which is not a type of fabric print or pattern?Hopsacking, Paisley, Hounds tooth, Herringbone5. The StortingŽ is whose leg-islative body?Germany, Norway, Vatican, Greece6. What is taxonomy the sci-ence of?Bill collecting, Reproduction, Classifying things, Hunger ANSWERS: 1. Chihuahua, 2. Tennessee, 3. Iowa, 4. Hopsacking, 5. Norway, 6. Classifying thingsSpecial to The StarI think I can, I think I can.Ž That was the motto of The Little E ngine That Could.Gulf County Tax Collectors offices recently took a leaf out of the classic childrens book that teaches the value of optimism and hard work. With an organ donor sign-up rate averaging 67 percent in April, they finished third in the Florida Panhandle … an outcome usually attained by larger, m ore urban areas. The average donor designation rate among Florida tax collector offices is 52 percent.Gulf County Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins and staff were treated to an office pizza party for their achievement.Im proud to see my staff recognized for the wonder-ful life-changing work they do every day,Ž said Jenkins, who oversees a workforce of 10.Nine employees, including Jenkins, are assigned to the main office located inside the Gulf County Courthouse in Port Saint Joe. Two employees work from a small satellite office in Wewahitchka. Gulf is one of a small number of counties to be under two time zones, Central and Eastern.Gulf Countys triumph is particularly impressive given the size and scope of the competition. The small coastal community outpaced tax col-lectors in 33 counties with just a handful of employees. Percent-age-wise, they finished neck and neck behind behemoths like Walton County (68.2 percent), population 36,500, and St. Johns County (67.1 percent), population 227,000, respectively. Gulf County has 15,800 full-time residents.Like The Little Engine That Could, Gulf Countys formula for success is simple and self-less. Eleven professionals in two offices asked one question amid their daily routine, Do you want to be an organ donor?ŽWe take the time to talk with our customers and explain to them,Ž said Danette Medley, a tag and title clerk in the Wewahitchka office.Donate Life Florida celebrates National Donate Life Month in April. Local, regional and national activities are designed to honor and recognize those who have saved lives through donation and encourage others to register as organ, eye and tissue donors.Small Tax Collector O ce with big resultsEmployees at the Wewahitchka of“ ce. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarLighthouse LadiesŽ Beverly Mount Douds and Mary Alice Cullifer were remembered at a reception hosted by the St. Joseph Historical Society on June 16 at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse Complex. Many family members and friends were welcomed to the reception by St. Joseph Historical Society President Charlotte Pierce. The invocation was given by Society member, Mazie Stone.Paula Boone, Society Parliamentarian and longtime friend of Beverly Mount Douds, remembered Beverlys love of the lighthouse and how she had worked tirelessly to pro-mote and share the history of lighthouses. Boone also noted Beverlys passion for geneal-ogy and her ability to locate ancestors with amazing speed and accuracy. A plaque, rec-ognizing Douds contributions to the lighthouse while serving as the first gift shop employee and history curator, has been placed in the lighthouse. Copies of the plaque were given to her children.Dawn Radford, an area writer and mentor to Douds, read a tribute recognizing Beverlys uncanny ability to gather information and write a book in record time. Copies of the poem were provided to Ms. Douds family.Linda Wood, Society Secre-tary and Operations Director of the lighthouse complex, shared about Mary Alice Cullifers love of lighthouses through paintings. Cullifer was a resident of Lynn Haven and a well-known artist in the area. Tribute to Lighthouse Ladies kicks o fundraisingLinda Wood, Toni Collins, Charlotte Pierce, and Mel Magidson, Jr. (L to R). [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comCarolyn Husband said she and her family never heard of Be the MatchŽ before April of this year.Sure, they had always checked the box on the driv-ers license applications to be organ donors, but Be the MatchŽ might as well have referred to a soccer match or a fire prevention campaign. Today, she is a disciple.A conversation with Hus-band can quickly and easily become a message on the life saving to be found by the mantra Be the Match.ŽBe the MatchŽ is the national bone marrow registry, a crucial data base in the fight against a host of diseases, but most especially a variety of cancers.And, Husband added, she and her family never needed to know much about Be the MatchŽ until life tossed a curve.In April, her 24-year-old son, Taylor, began com-plaining of fatigue.It last a few days, then he became dizzy, passed out and ended up in a hospital emergency room.A battery of tests and six hours later and the doctor delivered the stomach-punch diagnosis: leukemia, as it would turn out Acute Myleoid Leukemia.Taylor was transferred to Shands Cancer Hospital in Gainesville the following day.He told me, Mom, I am going to win this battle,Ž Husband said. Ever since then we have learned far more than I would ever want to know about leukemia and treatments.We are hoping and pray-ing for a miracle and his complete healing.Ž One of the first questions asked as doctors began crafting a treatment plan was whether Taylor had a brother or sister.Enter sister, Laura Suber.The question, and sub-sequent information about Be the MatchŽ was aimed at identifying a potential bone marrow donor; a bone marrow transplant has a high rate of success.Meanwhile, the physicians also began referencing the nationwide registry while Laura under-went testing.Two weeks ago, the news; Laura Suber was not just a match, she hit all the num-bers, 10 out of 10.Early next month the brother and sister will undergo a bone marrow transplant.Being the matchLaila Suber before... [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Laila Suber after...[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Cancer ght a family a airSee TRIBUTE, B6 See LOCKS, B6 See TAX, B6

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** B2 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star SOCIETYSpecial to The StarGFWC Wewahitchka Woman's Club hosted free live music at Lake Alice Park in Wewahitchka last Friday. Performances from Lawson Horne and Morgan Mayhann accompanied by Taylor Smith on guitar was most entertaining!Several families and locals came out and enjoyed the music, ate hotdog meals and boiled peanuts. We are looking forward to the next one. Thank you to all who came out and helped. Proceeds from food sales and donations goes to our Coats for Kids program.If you would like to learn more about all the exciting programs and projects we do in support of our community, visit our Facebook page, GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club or send us an email for more information. wewawom-ansclubgfwc@yahoo.comTupelo Summer Music in The ParkThe Wewahitchka Womans Club music night bene“ tted Coats for Kids. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Lawson Horne, Morgan Mayhann and Taylor Smith provided the music[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarJill Bebee, a Gulf County Master Gardener and a member of the Port St. Joe Garden Club, had an idea for a community project. Wanting to help add a little beauty and inter-est to our Seniors Center in Port St. Joe located behind the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Public Library, Jill in con-junction with members of the Garden Club planted a succulent garden on the lawn of the Center this past week. With the many helping hands the garden was completed in one morning thankfully before the full heat of the day. Although most of the plants are small now they will grow to fill the area over time. Succulents require little care and are very hardy providing enjoyment for many years to come.Port St. Joe Garden Club newsSue Meyer (President of the Garden Club); Robert Farmer (Center Support at the Senior Center); and Jill Bebee. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarIf you are looking for a place to come relax, enjoy some fun activities and a lunch, we are the place. Our center is located at 120 Library Drive in Port Saint Joe. We also have a center located in Wewahitchka at 314 N 3rd St. The purpose of our buildings are to give seniors 60-plus a place to come and enjoy fellow-ship and community. We have different activities each day. We also have field trips to go shop, eat lunch and enjoy a day on the town. Our purpose is to keep our seniors active and enjoying fun with other seniors in the area.We are also asking for any items that you do not need when you are doing your spring/summer cleaning to be donated and used for p rizes with some of our activities. Items such as trinkets, figurines, throw pillows, candles, etc. Our prizes are getting extremely low.Below is a calendar of our activities for the month of July. We are adding new activities each month, so drop by the centers and pick up a calendar every month to see what we are doing.Please continue to donate and help the seniors of Gulf County. You can make a donation by calling the center at 229-8466.Open doors at Gulf County Senior Citizens CenterSpecial to The StarGuardian ad Litem volunteers advocate for abused and neglected children from Gulf County who are currently g oing through court proceedings. We do this through the use of specially trained volunteers. We are seek-ing strong, stable adults who can be the voice for these children. Your input to the court is valuable and you are the eyes and earsŽ for the judge. An application, fin-gerprints/background check and training is required. Training is scheduled to begin in July. Please visit our website at www.guardi-anadlitem14.com or call the Bay County office at 747-5180.Guardian ad Litem volunteers soughtSpecial to The StarHow to pick up the pieces and go on with life after a crisis will be explored 7 p.m. CT Monday, July 2 at Life-tree Caf.The program, titled After the Attack: Pick-ing Up the Pieces and Moving On,Ž features a filmed conversation between a woman who was assaulted in her home„and the man who attacked her.Id thought about her for days,Ž said the attacker, who was sentenced to six years for the crime. I had that drive„and a knife.ŽDuring the program participants will discover how both the victim and attacker were able to move on with their lives and eventu-ally reconcile.Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel.Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual cof-feehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or livingwater@living-wateratthebeach.com.Lifetree Caf: Woman shares story of assaultSpecial to The Star€ Mondays: Gospel Sing-ing at 10:45 a.m.€ Tuesdays: Tai Chi at 9 a.m.; Bingo at 10:45 a.m.€ Wednesdays: DJ Gina dancing (first Wednesday each month) at 10:30 a.m.; Arts & Crafts at 11:15 a.m.; t Trip to Walmart (once a month).€ Thursdays: Sewing and Quilting at 9 a.m.; Bingo at 10:45 a.m.€ Fridays: Tai Chi at 9 a.m.; Gulf Coast hearing checks at 9 a.m. (first Friday each month); Field trip once a month.We will be adding new activities beginning Aug. 1, such as movie day, puzzle day, exercise, bean toss, etc.Activities at the Senior Citizens Center

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 B3 SCHOOL NEWSStar Staff ReportThe local chapter of the DAR honored the winners of its annual essay contest. Here is one of the winners.This week, Kristen Bou-ington, an eighth-grader at Faith Christian School, and her essay: World War I: Remembering the war to end all wars By Kristen BouingtonThe Christmas of 1918 was the best I can remember. The Great World War was finally over! My fat her, Harold, and my brother, Kenneth, returned from the fighting. The eighteen months they spent overseas were definitely the longest I had ever experienced.It had been hard not having them around. Since both Father and Kenneth were gone my mother and sister-in-law, Helen, started to work. With no revenue coming in they had no other choice. My mother went to work conducting trolleys, and Helen worked at a factory.During the war, the Spanish flu rampaged the city, killing many. Public areas had been closed, even school. Everyone had to wear masks. It was a ter-rible nuisance, but it was better to be safe than sorry especially when the con-sequences could be fatal.I missed having my brother to talk to. We had been very close, and even though I wrote to him it wasnt the same. The let-ters he wrote me seemed to have parts left out.I suppose that after seeing all that death and despair, they would rather talk about the ups instead of the downs.I can still remember November 21 clearly. It was on the same day that our masks came off and my family was reunited. Father looked like a man who wasnt scared of anything because he knew nothing could be worse than what he has already been through.Kenneth looked skinnier than I remember him being. I know Mother thought so as well. I could hear her mumbling about how she was going to get some real food into him.After so long, our house once again felt like a home. No longer would we go through our day wondering if we would ever see them again. A great weight had been lifted off our shoulders.Mother decided to stop working, but Helen went back to work, as did Father and Kenneth. It seemed no one was having trouble finding a job. Kenneth said it was because of the demands of the war.Factories had needed to make supplies, so they hired women and even African Americans to fill in for the men who had left to fight. Although the war was over, industry was still booming.Four days after they arrived, I had to go back to school. Every child did, because it had just been made a law.After school, I would work on our garden. Almost everyone had started one during the war to help with the food shortages. If we ate our own home-grown food, then there would be more for the soldiers.I suppose it wouldn't have mattered because the war was over, but I found the work soothing. Helen and I used to tend it together while we told each other about our day.She had had trouble when she first started working. Some people didnt think a women could work as well as a man, but she never let the beratement get her down.She kept working and accepted the changes that came along with her job even when it involved cutting her hair, shortening her skirts, and not wearing corsets. After dinner, I would beg my father for stories. My favorites were those of the inventions he saw.Instead of having to wash the cloths you used for cleaning and disinfecting, you could throw them away afterwards and grab a new one when you needed it.The military started making giant ships made to sail underwater. There were also many advancements in medicine and surgeries. If only these advancements could have been made without the massive loss of lives that accompanied them.The changes the war brought with it were immense. Not only the inventions, but the soldiers.They were not as carefree as they were when they left. There was a sadness in their eyes. One that only time could fix if it could be fixed at all.I know my brother must have met lots of people during his time overseas, but he never talked about the people much. I think it reminded him about those who didnt make it.There was a difference in the air as well. Instead of being full of dread, it was filled with hope. Everyone might not have felt it, but I did. When you are used to living in a big city, you come to realize that many people wont even notice you walking right beside them.After the war, everyone was happy and more than willing to give a warm smile and a cheerful greet-ing. People knew that with the end of the war came a era of peace.With peace, came booms in industry. Booms in industry prov ided jobs. Jobs provided wages. The wages provided the lifestyle many people fell in love with. My father was very insistent on remind-ing us not to get caught up in the newfound opulence. He knew that if we did, we would forget all the tragic repercussions of the war. It was God who brought us out of the dismal past and into the bright future. Without His peace, we couldnt have gotten through the war. We saw what a war could do when its influence reaches people from many regions, and we are not likely to forget about it anytime soon.A war like that can divide, but it can also unite. War is not something I would wish upon anyone. Thank fully, now that we know the ramifi-cations of a war like this, we are not likely to let it happen again.The war brought both tragedy and opportunity with it. Many lives were lost, and distrust among different nationalities grew exponentially, but the war also gave women the chance we needed to prove that we could do more than just sit around at home all day.It showed us Americans how indomitable our nation was, is, and will be if we continue to love it, support it, and ensure that it stays one nation under God.DAR Essay winnersSpecial to The StarThe distinction of Master BoardŽ was awarded to the Gulf County school district leadership team by the Florida School Boards Association last month. The Gulf County school district is one of only 28 school districts in Florida to currently hold this prestigious award.The Master Board program is a voluntary program which provides opportunities for the leadership team (defined as the superintendent and the school board) to engage in training that enhances its capacity to provide visionary leader-ship for the school district. The Master Board pro-gram concentrates on the leadership teams gover-nance roles for enhancing student achievement, fostering connections and empowering collaboration between schools and the community, and in creating a learning organization to advance excellence in public edu-cation. The leadership team completed twenty (20) hours of learning activities to earn this distinction.Members of the leader-ship team who completed the program are: Cindy Belin, Danny Little, Billy Quinn, Jr., Brooke Wooten, and Jim Norton, Superintendent.The Master Board pro-gram is one of several professional develop-ment programs offered by the Florida School Boards Association to ensure board members obtain well-rounded and thorough understanding of his or her policy-making job responsibilities. More information about all FSBA professional devel-opment offerings and recipients can be found at http://fsba.org/pro-fessional-development.School Board members recognized2018 DAR Essay Winners and their families. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

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** B4 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star FAITHElzie Williams, age 82, of Highland View went to be with his Lord and savior on Wednesday, June 20, 2018 at Bay Medical Covenant Care. Elzie was a catcher for a minor league baseball team the Graceville Oilers which was an affiliation of the Cincinnati Reds. He worked at the St. Joe Box Plant for 43 years as a Press Operator and Shipping Clerk. He was a member of the Highland View Assembly of God for 50 years. Elzie enjoyed fishing and his favorite hobby of all was deer hunting. He enjoyed spending time with his family, to whom he was their Big Papa.Ž Elzie was preceded in death by his parents J.B. and Ester Williams, brothers Earl Williams, Bee Williams and sisters Mattie Bray and Barbara Creel After the death of his mother at 6 monthsold he lived with and was raised by his Aunt and Uncle who became his parents, Monroe and Bessie Beck. Elzie is survived by his wife of 61 years, Shirley Williams and his children, Randy Williams, Elizabeth (Michael) Nixon, Diana NannerŽ (Kenneth) Dykes and Larry (Britt) Williams; six grandchildren, Lee Barfield, Christa Gray, Kari Williams, Allen Dykes, Aaron Williams, Karley Williams; and 10 greatgrandchildren, Devin, Trey, Willa, Noah, Jenna, Kensley, Raegan, Carson, Ryne, Kathryn and Adilyn. Graveside Services were held on Sunday, June 24, 2018 at 2 p.m. in Holly Hill Cemetery. Funeral services provided by Comforter Funeral Home.ELZIE WILLIAMSJames G. (Jimmy) McDaniel was born June 8, 1930, in Wewahitchka, FL, to parents Jim B. and Phoebe McDaniel. He was baptized at the age of 12 in Lake Alice, Wewahitchka. Jimmy graduated from Wewahitchka High School in 1948 and entered the Air Force in 1950. He served a tour of duty at Manston, AFB in England where he met and married his wife, Joyce Littleboy in 1953. He was employed at St. Joe Paper Mill for approximately 33 years and was a Bleach Plant Operator until his retirement in 1995. He served a term as City Commissioner and then ran for Gulf County Commissioner where he served for 8 years. Preceding him in death are his parents, Jim B. and Phoebe McDaniel. He is survived by Joyce, his wife of 64- years. His children are Paul McDaniel, Bill McDaniel, Lori Attaway (Andy) and Clyde McDaniel (Heather). He had eight grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Services under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home.JAMES G. MCDANIELAndrew Lamar Davis of Wewahitchka, Florida, went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ at 10 a.m. CST on Wednesday, June 20, 2018. He was born in Bascom, Florida, on April 7, 1924. Lamar served in the United States Army 563rd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion during WWII. He saw action in numerous significant battles including the Battle of the Bulge. He was awarded the following medals: WWII Victory Medal, American Campaign Medal, EuropeanAfrican-Middle Eastern Company Medal with three Bronze Stars, Honorable Service Lapel Button WWII, Expert Badge with Carbine Bar, Sharpshooter Badge with Submachine Gun Bar, Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar, and Good Conduct Medal. After WWII Lamar worked with Greyhound Bus Lines out of New Orleans, Louisiana, and arrived in Wewahitchka in 1950 selling Gulf Life Insurance. He was later hired at Port St. Joe Paper Company, working there 37 years where co-workers became life-time friends. Mr. Davis was a gentleman, and a true farmer to the bone. He refused to stop and give in to the aches and pains, and truly touched many lives through his daily example of Christ, as well as in the sharing of the fruit of his gardening. Lamar was preceded in death by his loving wife of nearly 58 years, Ada Claire (Nichols) Davis; his father, Andrew Neal Davis; his mother, Mellie Lenora (Ray) Davis, and his siblings, William Harold Davis, Imogene Davis Jones, Kenneth Ray Davis, and Jerrell Edwin Davis, Sr. He is survived by his three children William Lamar Davis (Linda), Ross Nichols Davis (Janet), and Lewana Davis Patterson (Pat). He is also survived by six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren who will miss him terribly. The visitation and funeral took place at Westside Baptist Church on Saturday, June 23, with the interment at the Methodist Church Cemetery family plot in Dellwood, Florida. Memorial donations can be made to Westside Baptist Church, Covenant Care, or Gulf County Senior Citizens.ANDREW LAMAR DAVIS A willing servant I would be, My life a light for all to see. A light dear Lord that when they see, Theyll know it only comes from Thee. Since Lord, were only here awhile, Let my service show, that Im your child. Help me be like a refreshing rain in summer Or a gentle breeze in spring. Help me show the gift of kindness, That only Godly love can bring. Then when my light begins to dim, My life on earth is done. I long to hear my Father say welcome home, Well done my faithful son. Billy JohnsonA WILLING SERVANT SEE MORE ONLINE AT STARFL.COM FirstBaptistChurch102THIRDSTREET€PORTST.JOE BuddyCaswell,MinisterofMusic&EducationBobbyAlexander,MinistertoStudentsNewServiceScheduleforFirstBaptistChurch NewServiceScheduleforFirstBaptistChurch Dr.BoydEvansPastor4525064 SundayMorningScheduleBlendedWorshipwithChoir/PraiseTeamƒ8:30AM GreatCommissionSundaySchoolƒƒƒƒ...9:45AM ContemporaryWorshipw/Bandƒƒƒƒƒ..10:45AM WednesdayDinnerƒƒƒ..................ƒƒ.5:00-6:00pm AWANAƒƒƒƒƒ..............ƒ.6:00-7:30pm SurrenderStudentMinistryƒ.6:15-7:30pm Prayer/BibleStudyƒƒƒƒƒ.6:15-7:30pm Nurseryƒƒƒƒƒƒƒ....ƒƒ..6:00-7:30pmwww.fbcpsj.org

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** The Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 B5By Ray BodreyGulf County Extension Director UF/IFAS Special to The StarBlueberry season will begin to wrap up next month, as late rabbiteye cultivars will be at mature fruiting stage. This is generally the time of year when we receive seemly, daily afternoon thunderstorms. These rains can compromise blueberry plants long term, if management measures are not in place. Rabbiteye cultivars are more popular in the Panhandle than southern highbush. Our environment is more hospitable to rabitteye, plus theyre a favorite of backyard growers as they tend to be more drought tolerant and less susceptible to disease. The harvest season for rabbiteye blueberries extends from May to July, depending on the cultivar. Phytophthora root rot is a potential problem this time of year, due to increased rain events and poor draining soils. This is caused by the fungus, Phytophthora cinnamomic. This can lead to plant death, if not managed. Its a condition that is easier to detect than most diseases. A clear sign is if your plant is experiencing symptoms of fall color development with foliage of yellow, orange and red, such as with the hardwood trees. This is followed by leaf drop. A fungicide can be used to treat this condition, but cultural methods as transplanting in well drained soils and using at least 3Ž of pine bark as mulch, will greatly reduce the risk of susceptibility. Remember, blueberries, like azaleas and camellias are acidic soil loving plants too. Soil pH range of 4.0-5.5 is necessary for overall plant health and high fruit yields. Pine bark mulch will help assist in maintaining an acidic pH. Botrytis flower blight or gray mold, caused by Botryospheria spp., can be an issue in late spring/early summer, due to lingering moisture. Avoid any overhead watering during the budding and flowering stage in the future. Stem blight can occur this time of year. Symptoms are of dying branches, which can be simply be removed with sharp shears. There is no chemical control for stem blight. The best defense against stem blight is good cultural practices that will in turn reduce plant stress. With summer temperatures and rainfall, often follows an increase in insect populations. Most insecticides that are safe for ornamental landscape plants and fruit crops should be safe for blueberries, just be sure to check the label for application rates, directions and precautions. Also, pay close attention to the label for the HI or harvest interval. This is the number of hours or days that need to pass before you can safely harvest fruit once an application of insecticide is made. For more information on growing blueberries, please contact Gulf County Extension at 639-3200. Supporting information for this article can be found in the UF/IFAS EDIS publication, 2017 Florida Blueberry Integrated Pest ManagementŽ, by Jeffrey G. Williamson, Phillip F. Harmon, Oscar E. Liburd & Peter Dittmar: http:// edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/HS/HS38000.pdf & Blueberry Gardeners GuideŽ, by J. G. Williamson, P. M. Lyrene, and J. W. Olmstead: http:// edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/MG/MG35900.pdf UF/IFAS Extension is an Equal Opportunity Institution.Summer rains can create obstacles for blueberries"Comfort food is the food that makes us feel good … satis ed, calm, cared for and carefree. Its food that lls us up emotionally and physically. ƒ Finding comfort in food is a basic human experience." Ellie KruegerMeatl oaf is a simple, comforting, yet polarizing food; people seem either to love it or hate it. I love it. Im not sure why people would have antimeatloaf feelings. Is it because it sounds strange...it has the word loafŽ in it, which is admittedly not the most elegant-sounding way to serve meat. It isnt the most sophisticated, modern dish one can make, honestly. It conjures images of an apron-wearing 1930s housewife, doesnt it? Old-fashioned, outdated, pass. It is a food borne of the depression era, when housewives needed ways to stretch a pound of ground beef to feed their hungry families. Meatloaf was, and is, simple, hearty, and slightly different from kitchen to kitchen. For me, pass or not, meatloaf is a favorite comfort food, and my mothers was the best. I dont think that she had a recipe, to be honest; she made it by eye, the way some musicians play lovely songs by ear. I remember watching her make it: chopping the onion, making the breadcrumbs, cracking the eggs, digging her hands into the fresh ground beef. Then shed use ketchup to make a sauce to pour over the top of it after she had formed it into a loaf in a baking dish. Shed bake that simple entree, and make mashed potatoes and green beans to accompany it while it was in the oven. It was homestyle perfection. My granddaddy made a fancier meatloaf than mom made, if meatloaf can be fancy. He would use both ground beef and ground pork, and I believe he used more breadcrumbs than mama did, because his meatloaf held together better than hers. She would get so mad when her meatloaf slices would fall apart. It makes me smile to think about it; she would fuss, but I would always tell her, honestly so, that I preferred her more tender meatloaf that sometimes fell apart to granddaddys firm, more dry meatloaf. She was always glad to hear that, but she was still mad it didnt stay together like she wanted it to. As much as I enjoyed moms meatloaf for dinner with potatoes and green beans, my favorite concoction was the second-day meatloaf sandwich. Again, its not at all fancy: White bread. Dukes mayonnaise. Heinz ketchup. Leftover meatloaf slice. Done! When you took a bite of the gloriously simple sandwich, a chunk of meatloaf could be expected to fall onto your lap, but it was so good, you just didnt care. Ive been reading Rick Braggs latest book, The Best Cook in the World, about the simple, wonderful cooking of the women in his family. One chapter tells how the family recipe came about, during the birth of his aunt, when a woman, married to a cousin somewhere along the line, came to the house to cook for the family while the new mama recuperated. Her name was Maudie, but like we do in the South, she had been given a nickname: Sis. Sis was a large woman who stomped around the small house, but little 8-year-old Edna remembers watching her as she entered the kitchen and began to cook, Bragg says. She became as graceful as a dancer when she entered the kitchen, effortlessly sliding pans into the oven and pots across the stovetop. She made food that would fortify the new young mother, as well as her hungry family. She made buttery green peas, creamy scalloped potatoes, and the star of the simple, wholesome show: meatloaf. My sister and I thought wed make the womans meatloaf Sunday, to see how it stacked up to mamas and granddaddys meatloaves. The recipe is unique in that she didnt use eggs or milk to create it, which left me skeptical. I have to say, though, it was quite wonderful. We were surprised that it wasnt dry, and it had a great flavor. I did alter it a bit, as I only had a pound of ground beef, while she used a pound and a half, and I skipped the green bell pepper, as I didnt have any and Im not a huge fan of it in this dish, anyway. Heres how I made it: Maudie's Meatloaf€ 5 or 6 slices of white bread, torn into four or “ ve pieces each € 1 pound of ground chuck € 2 tablespoons of tomato paste € large white onion, minced € pinch of chili powder (I used ancho) € teaspoon each salt and pepper € teaspoon minced garlic or garlic powder Method: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour about a tablespoon olive or vegetable oil in a cast iron skillet. In a mixing bowl mix together the meat and bread pieces. Knead the bread into the meat until you can no longer see the white pieces of bread in the meat. It should all look like meat when youre “ nished. Next, add the garlic, onion, salt, pepper, tomato paste and chili powder. Knead well to incorporate all the additions uniformly into the meat. Form the meat into a loaf shape, and spread another tablespoon of tomato paste over the top of it. Place it into the oiled skillet. Bake 40-45 minutes. Then remove the skillet from the oven, and allow the meatloaf to set for about ten minutes. Slice into one-inch slices, and, if youre like me, use a bit of ketchup for dipping bites of it into. Enjoy! In case youd like to make scalloped potatoes to accompany this meatloaf, heres a recipe I enjoy which is so much better than the boxed kind, in my opinion. Creamy Scalloped Potatoes€ 1 clove garlic, smashed € 2 tablespoons unsalted butter € 2 pounds red or other waxy-style potato € 2 cups half-and-half € 2 teaspoons salt € Freshly ground black pepper, to taste € Pinch nutmeg Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Rub the garlic around the inside of an 8Žx8" casserole dish or an 8Ž iron skillet, and let it dry. Reserve the remaining garlic. Rub the butter around the inside of the dish. Reserve the remaining butter. Boil potatoes whole in a large pot until done, about 25 minutes. Dont overcook. If the potatoes are small, you will likely need to shorten this cooking time. In a medium saucepan, combine the garlic, butter, half-and-half, salt, pepper to taste, and nutmeg. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to medium, and cook, stirring continually, about “ ve minutes. Put about cup cold milk in a bowl; add about cup of plain ” our. Whisk until no longer lumpy. Add to the hot half-and-half mixture in the pot, continually whisking to keep the mixture smooth. When it is the consistency of a good gravy, remove from heat immediately. Peel the boiled potatoes, being careful not to burn yourself. Slice them into 1/3 inch thick slices and begin layering in a two-quart casserole dish: a bit of sauce on the bottom of dish, then a layer of potatoes, then a layer of sauce, then potatoes, then “ nish with sauce on top. Bake the potatoes, basting occasionally, until lightly browned and bubbly, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool for 10 minutes before serving. Enjoy! I highly recommend any of Braggs books as quality reading material as you wait for dinner to bake, or for reading later as you let your dinner go down while you sit in a comfortable chair. You will likely recognize many of the characters as being similar to people youve known growing up in the small-town South! I enjoy them very much, and I hope you will, too. Stephanie Hill-Frazier is a writer, food blogger and regional television chef, whose on-air nickname is Mama StephŽ. She grew up in Gulf County, on St. Joe Beach, a place she will forever call home. She is married and has three sons who are significantly taller than she is. You can find more of her recipes at WhatSouthernFolksEat. com, and shed love to hear about your own favorite recipes via email at Steph@ whatsouthernfolkseat.com.WHAT SOUTHERN FOLKS EAT The comforting food of our peopleMeat loaf before baking. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Meat loaf fresh from the oven. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Stephanie Hill-Fraizer

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** B6 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The StarHer love of lighthouses and the history and charm they brought to lighthouse enthusiasts led her to paint the Florida Lighthouse Collection.Ž The Cullifer Family has lent this collection to the St. Joseph Historical Society and it is on display in the gift shop for guests to enjoy. A cer-tificate of appreciation was presented to the Cullifer Family for their generosity.Mel Magidson, Jr., Historical Society member, announced the kickoff of the Reassemble the LensŽ Campaign. The St. Joseph Historical Society is undertaking an ambitious project to raise $75,000. This will provide for the reassembling of the lens, establishment of a Mari-time Museum with displays for the lens, relics from the lighthouse and keepers quarters, and items from the Cape San Blas U.S. Coast Guard Station. The museum will also include an interactive exhibit fea-turing the maritime history of our area.A designated fund has been established at Capi-tal City Bank in Port St. Joe for this project. Because the St. Joseph Historical Society is a 501 (c) 3 orga-nization, contributions are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.Magidson extended an invitation to participate by contributing to the St. Joseph Historical Society, P. O. Box 231, Port St. Joe, FL 32457, or stopping by the gift shop any Thursday through Saturday between the hours of 11 A.M. and 6 P.M at 200 Miss Zolas Drive.Toni Collins, US Lighthouse Society Passport Ambassador, attended the reception and presented the Society with her personal contribution, which was the first contribution to the project. TRIBUTEFrom Page B1Members of the Cullifer Family. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Seth Douds, Jennifer Douds, Mason Parker, Frank Perry, and Paula Boone. (L to R). [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Linda Wood, Charlotte Pierce, and Mel Magidson, Jr., (L to R)[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] We just want to get the word out to everyone to please consider registering with agencies such as Be the Match,Ž Husband said. Organizations such as this one provide lifesaving trans-plant donors for those battling cancer.We also thought this would be a great way to help spread the word about the importance of considering all the families and friends who have someone battling cancer, or who has battled cancer in the past or lost someone to this dreaded disease.ŽAnd sister Laura is not the only member of the family diving into the fray.Lauras daughter, Laila, being an observant 9-yearold, took notice of her Uncle Taylor and other patients as she has traveled at times between Wewahitchka and Gainesville.Here she was with long flowing blonde locks while many of those patients had no or thinning hair.She also knew there were organizations, such as Locks of Love, that turn donated hair into wigs for sick children and adults. So, Laila sacrificed.Over 12 inches of hair sac-rificed, which was mailed out Friday to be destined for the head of someone who needs it.She had let her hair grow very long and only just trimmed it since she was a toddler,Ž Husband said. I call her my Barbie.The gift (of hair) brought such joy to Lailas face and price to her family; we realized it was a gift from the heart.ŽNot that hair ends it, as Laila is also selling lemonade as the temperatures spike with any proceeds destined for Shands Childrens Hospital.There is also benefit account established at Centennial Bank to assist Taylor with expenses and costs of travel on the long roadŽ to recovery. LOCKSFrom Page B1Gulf County Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins, center right, and her Port St. Joe employees. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Ninety-five percent of Floridas donors register through the tax collector offices and Florida Department of Highway Safety & Motor Vehicles when completing driver license applications. About 114,000 people are on the national organ transplant waiting list. One donor can potentially save up to eight lives.Floridas donor registry is the third largest in the nation due in large part to the generous work tax collector employees do behind the scenes every day. TAXFrom Page B1More than 12 inches of hair destined to be a wig for a sick child or adult. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

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CLASSIFIEDSThe Star | Thursday, June 28, 2018 B B 7 7 20647S FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner vs. ETHAN R. WOODARD, Case #40521 Respondent NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ETHAN R. WOODARD, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before July 23, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: May 23, 2018 Dean Register, Professionalism Director FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By: -s-Ashley Black, Division Representative Pub June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018 20731S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 5T Wealth Partners, LP, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are as follows: Application #2018-06 R.E. No 00624-050R Tax Sale No. 00624-050R Certificate #2011-101 Date of Issuance : May 25, 2011 Name in which assessed:R.E Tracy D Ritter a/k/a Tracy Denise Ritter Description of Property : Lot 22, Block “L” RED BULL ISLAND UNIT NO. 2, an Unrecorded Subdivision, in Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and thence go South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds East (Bearing Base) along the West boundary line of said Section 30, for a distance of 422. 7 feet to the Southerly right of way boundary line of Canning Drive (formerly River Road; having a 66 foot wide right of way), thence go South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 00 Seconds East along the Southerly right of way boundary line of Canning Drive for a distance of 195.00 feet to a point of intersection with the Easterly right of way boundary line of Sesame Street (having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence go South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds East along the Easterly right of way boundary line of Sesame Street for a distance of 704.60 feet to a point of intersection with the Northerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue (having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence go South 88 Degrees 32 Minutes 00 Seconds East along the Southerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue for a distance of 945.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, departing the Northerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue, go North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds West, for a distance of 135.00 feet; thence go South 88 Degrees 32 Minutes 00 Seconds East for a distance of 90.00 feet; thence go South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds East for a distance of 135.00 feet to the Northerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue; thence go North 88 Degrees 32 Minutes 00 Seconds West along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 90.00 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel having an area of 0.28 acres, more or less. All of said property being in Gulf County, State Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 11th day of July, 2018. DATED: June 4, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018 20649S FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner vs. RYAN M. HATHCOX Case #41277 Respondent NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RYAN M. HATHCOX, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before July 23, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: May 23, 2018 Dean Register, Professionalism Director FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By: -s-Stacey Price, Division Representative Pub: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018 20807S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 16-62DR TIMOTHY MARTIN SOUTHERLAND Petitioner/Former Husband, and MADELAINE KRISTIEN BRYANT, f/k/a MADELAINE KRISTEN SOUTHERLAND, Respondent/Former Wife NOTICE OF ACTION TO: TIMOTHY MARTIN SOUTHERLAND ADDRESS UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Modification of Custody and to Establish Child Support has been filed by Madelaine Kristen Bryant and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, on H. Matthew Fuqua, Esq., Former Wife’s Attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 1508, Marianna, Florida 32447, on or before 30 days from the first date of this publication of this notice. You must file the original of your written defenses with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, either before service on petitioner’s attorney or immediately after service. Otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Dated this 12th day of June, 2018. REBECCA L. NORRIS, Clerk Gulf County, Florida By:Lynn M. Barnes Deputy Clerk Pub: June 21, 28,July 5, 12, 2018 20814S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are Application #2018-07 Tax Sale Certificate # 366 Name in which assessed: Charles Orndorf R.E. No. 01656-010R Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 Description of Property: Begin at the Old Cemetery Corner in Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and run North for 664 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run North for 75 feet, thence run West for 100 feet, thence run South for 75 feet, thence run East for 100 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Section 13, Township 4 South, Range to West, Gulf County, Florida. All of said property being in Gulf County, State Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 18th day of July, 2018. DATED: June 11, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub June 14, 21,28, July 5, 2018 20816S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2017-CA-000080 CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. RUSTY E. WARD and MEREDITH M. WARD, jointly and severally; MELVIN WARD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3 and UNKNOWN TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Summary Judgment dated May 30th, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017 CA 000080 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Capital City Bank is the Plaintiff, and Rusty E. Ward and Meredith M. Ward, jointly and severally and Melvin Ward are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 12th day of July, 2018, except the Clerk shall not conduct the sale unless a representative of Plaintiff is present, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: P arcel 1: The North half (N1/2) of the following described property: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence North 105 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 105 feet; thence East 105 feet to the Point of Beginning, being ln the NW of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 2: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 157 1/2 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to the point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 3: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 105 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 5th, 2018. REBECCA L. NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of Court By: /s/ B.A. Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, as no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at Post Office Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at 850-747 5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20853S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 18-031 PR Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF LEE ROY STRICKLAND Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Lee Roy Strickland, deceased, whose date of death was February 22, 2018,

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B B 8 8 Thursday, June 28, 2018 | The Star CLASSIFIEDS NF-4529538 NEWLY RENOVATED! (2) Lanark Village Apartments 2 bed, 1 bath Units $1200/ month, $1200 SD All Utilities Included NO PETS AVAILABLE JULY 1st Lanark Village Apartment 3 bed, 1 bath $775/month, $1000 SD Pets Considered w/ $300 non-refundable pet fee Adult/Child Care Manager needed to provide case management services in our Apalachicola and Bristol Florida Offices. Requirements: *Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services field and 1 year of mental health experience with adults and children required. Bachelor’s Degree in non-related field acceptable with 3 years of mental health experience with adults and children. *Official transcripts required. *Valid Driver’s License with no more than 6 points over 3 years. $15.40 per hour (includes location differential) Please apply at www.apalacheecenter.org or call Stephanie Luckie at 850-523-3212 or email at stephaniel@apalacheecenter .org for details. is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 21st, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representatives: s/Glenda F Swear ingen Glenda F. Swearingen Attorney Florida Bar Number: 306339 PO Box 1009 Marianna, FL 32446 Phone: (850) 526-4465 Fax: (850) 526-2316 E-Mail: glenda@aginggra ciously .com Personal Representatives: s/ Debbie J George Debbie J. George 502 Nathan Drive Anchorage, AK 99518 s/ Derek Roy Strickland Derek Roy Strickland 13550 Windward Court Anchorage, AK 99218 Pub: June 21, 28, 2018 20862S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2017-CA-000080 CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. RUSTY E. WARD and MEREDITH M. WARD, jointly and severally; MELVIN WARD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3 and UNKNOWN TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Summary Judgment dated May 30, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017-CA-000080 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Capital City Bank is the Plaintiff, and Rusty E. Ward and Meredith M. Ward, jointly and severally and Melvin Ward are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 12th day of July, 2018, except the Clerk shall not conduct the sale unless a representative of Plaintiff is present, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: P arcel 1: The North half (N112) of the following described property: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence North 105 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 105 feet; thence East 105 feet to the Point of Beginning, being in the NW V4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 2: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 157 1/2 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to the point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 3: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 105 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 5, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of Court By: Barbara Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, as no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at Post Office Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at 850. 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduleld appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20922S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 16000054CAAXMX DIVISION WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, DURWARD L. OWENS A/K/A DURWARD LENTON OWENS, JR. A/KJA DURWARD LENTON OWENS, DECEASED, et al, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Ne_ June 6th, and entered in Case No. 16000054CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust, is the Plaintiff and The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, or other Claimants claiming by, through, under, or against, Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Anna Elizabeth Owens aik/a Anna E. Owens, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; CitiBank, N.A., successor in interest to Citibank, Federal Savings Bank; Dana Michelle Owens f/k/a Dana Michelle Christley f/k/a Dana M. Christley, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Dana Owens Hardman a/k/a Dana 0. Hardman a/k/a D. 0. Hardman, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Donna Owens Hubbard a/k/a Donna 0. Hubbard, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Janet Bankston; John Bankston; Sarah Owens Hammock a/k/a Sarah 0. Hammock, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Unknown Party #1 n/k/a Russell Hardman; and Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 12th day of July, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 7 IN BLOCK C, LAKE COMO, AN UNRECORDED ADDITION TO TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1 IN BLOCK 15, CORRECTIVE REPLAT OF TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION, UNIT ONE, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LAKE VIEW DRIVE, AS PER TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION UNIT TWO RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 44, 99.62 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 40 DEGREES 38 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 105.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 42 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 106.82 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 109.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 52 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 109.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 110 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST, 159.92 FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 18.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, 41.86 FEET (THE CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 33.36 FEET) TO THE P.O.C. ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A COUNTY ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 15 SECONDS ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 167.39 FEET; THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 120 FEET; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGRESS 54 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST, 148.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 225 LAND DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 7th day of June, 2018 Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: Barbara Baxter Rebecca L. Norris Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@albertellila w .com If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20937T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 17-37-PR IN RE: The Estate of CAROL VLAHOS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of Carol Vlahos, deceased, File Number 17-37-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P.O. Drawer 510, Marianna, FL 32447. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 28, 2018 Personal Representative: Lexine F. Pranschke, 1059 Perdue Avenue St. Louis, MO 63130 Attorney for Personal Representative: Twyla Sketchley, Attorney FL Bar No.: 478822 THE SKETCHLEY LAW FIRM, P. A. The Professional Center at SouthWood 3689 Coolidge Court, Suite 8 Tallahassee, Florida 32311 Phone: (850) 894-0152 Fax (850) 894-0634 Primary Service E-Mail: service@sketchleylaw .c om Pub: June 28, July 5, 2018 20972S CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2018-13 Re-Bid of Waste Water Treatment Plant Repower Sealed bids for the City of Port St. Joe for the WWTP Repower will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Friday, July 20, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday, July 20, 2018, at 3:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Conference Room. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and “RFP 2018-13, Re-Bid of Waste Water Treatment Plant Repower.” DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Location-455 CR 382, Port St Joe, Florida. Install (1) 150 amp feeder from MDP panel board to existing 400amp panel GP (appx 525 ft.) Install (1) 100 amp feeder from panel GP to panel HA (appx 300 ft.) Install (1) 100amp feeder from panel GP to panel in the old office (appx 400 ft.) Install (1) 100 amp feeder from panel GP to panel DP (appx 25 ft.) Provide and install (1) 150 amp breaker and (3) 100 amp breakers. All feeders are 3 phase 480 vac. Bids are to include electrical engineers stamped drawings of work. When work is completed, it will be inspected and signed by the electrical engineer as approved. For questions concerning this Bid, please contact Waste Water Treatment Plant Manager Kevin Pettis at 850-229-6395. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer. Pub June 28, July 5, 2018 20942S NEPA/S106 PUBLIC NOTICE American Towers LLC is proposing to construct a 163’ tall monopole telecommunications tower off of Cape San Blas Road, Cape San Blas, Gulf County, FL, 32456, Tax Parcel ID 06268-721R. The new tower structure will not be lit and the tower facility will include a 50’ x 50’ lease area and associated easements, along with a 30ft buffer surrounding the lease area. American Towers LLC seeks comments from all interested persons on any potential significant impact the proposed action could have on the quality of the human environment pursuant to 47 C.F.R. Section 1.1307, including potential impacts to historic or cultural resources that are listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Interested persons may comment or raise concerns about the proposed action by submitting an e-mail to enviro.services@american tower .com Paper comments can be sent to: American Towers LLC, Attn: Environmental Compliance, 10 Presidential W ay W oburn, MA 01801 Requests or comments should be limited to environmental and historic/cultural resource impact concerns, and must be received on or before July 21, 2018. This invitation to comment is separate from any local planning/zoning process that may apply to this project. Re: 21806018 Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20976S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 18CP-36 IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of RONALD J. BORDELON, deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of RONALD J. BORDELON, deceased, whose date of death was May 21, 2018, File Number 18CP-36, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and that personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS OR DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 28, 2018. Thomas S. Gibson Rish & Gibson, P.A. 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-8211 Attorney for Personal Representatives FL Bar No. 0350583 CYNTHIA LYNN FERNANDEZ 144 Finch Lane Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Personal Representative JONATHAN PHILLIP SULLIVAN 7502 SW 166th Terrace Palmetto Bay, FL 33157-3868 Personal Representative Pub June 28, July 5, 2018 Port Saint Joe 1405 Constitution Drive HWY 98 June 30th -July 1st 9am -4pm Eastern3 Garages Full SaleSleeeper sofa & love seat, couch, dressers, beds, chairs, tables, lots of plates, china, collectibles, and antiques. Cheap prices. RAIN OR SHINE! Port saint Joe310 4th Street Sat. June 30th 8am -tillJohnnie’s Trim Shop Moving Sale Furniture,Remnant Fabrics, Old Retro Tables, Some Tools, Old Fans, Old Bicycles, & Parts (Some New) & misc. YARD SALESaturday, June 30th 8am-1pm 2001 Marvin Ave Port St Joe, FL Generator Tools Antique Wedgewood China Misc Household Items GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLJune 30th & July 1st 9:00 am -5:00 pmGeneral Admission $6Concealed Weapons Classes 1pm Daily, $50Reservation Suggested850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407Please Support Your Local Small Gun Shows Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2200 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $577/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 College Student Offering Accelerated Introductory Piano Lessons. Ages 7-11, twice a week, Ages 12+, three times a week $25 per lesson Teaching in Port St. Joe. References available upon request. (239)431-1848 FREE TV Old Sanyo 32 in TV Still Works Call 227-7670 Golf Course Maintenance Employees NeededFull Time or Part time Applications available at the Club House 700 Country Club Rd Drug Free Establishment Equal Opportunity Employer Veterinary Assistant/Technician Wanted Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic Full Time, Competitive Salary & Benefits, Animal/Medical Experience Preferred. Minimum Qualifications: High School Graduate, Stable Work History, Strong Community Ties, History of Proper Veterinary Care of Personal Pets, No Criminal History, Seeking Long Term Employment, Ability to Lift and Restrain Large Dogs, Available For Weekend Duty, Good Grammar/Writing/Math/Com munication Skills, Team Player, Personable, Good References from Previous Employers, Ability to Work With Public. Send Resume to: drhffulmer@yahoo.com No phone calls or walk ins. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Used Single Wides Zone Three, 2016 and 2017 Models. Call: 229-246-1218