Citation
The star

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group,Tim Thompson - Publisher
Creation Date:
December 30, 2004
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Star, W.S. Smith, Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000358020 ( ALEPH )
33602057 ( OCLC )
ABZ6320 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047323 ( LCCN )

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Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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** Volume 80 Number 36 Subscribe to The Star Phone: 800-345-8688 Opinion ....................A4 Letters .......................A5 Outdoors ..................A10 Sports.......................A11 Society News ...............B2 School News ...............B3 Faith .........................B4 Classifieds ............B7-B8 A6County ballotB3Drones Thursday, June 21, 2018YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 @PSJ_Star facebook.com/psjstar50 ¢ For breaking news, visit star” .com T.H. STONE B1 By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comAn initial focus was established a year ago.A county-appointed committee has conducted 11 meetings. Hours of regular meeting time has been consumed by Port St. Joe commissioners over the past three months.A joint county-city work-shop was held in April.But, after all that, to characterize the 10th Street Park plans as having made little forward progress would actually be giving the pro-cess credit.That was underscored Wednesday morning as the county committee adjourned with the city pledging a workshop on the project, something a number of residents have said should have been done months ago.The Board of County Commissioners, as attorney Jeremy Novak explained Return to square one on park plansThe current version of plans for the 10th Street Park[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comCandidate qualifying period for the 2018 fall general election ballot will end noon Friday, with few changes likely in the last two days.And county offices are slowly beginning to fill.County Judge Tim McFarland was re-elected early last month when the qualifying period for judicial candidates ended and McFarland drew no opposition.Current chair of the Gulf County School Board, Brooke Wooten, also figures to be automatically re-elected come the close of all candidate qualifying Friday.As of press time for this edition, Wooten was facing no opposition for his Dis-trict 2 seat.The other county races are shaping up, with just one to be determined during the Aug. 28 primary election.Incumbent County Com-missioner Sandy Quinn, Jr. will face off against Tan Smiley, both Democrats, in a rematch of the 2014 elec-tion for the District 4 seat on the Board of County Commissioners.Boyd Pickett has filed his initial paperwork to challenge for the District 4, also as a Democrat, but as of press time had not completed all his paperwork.The other BOCC races will be determined in November.Incumbent Commissioner David Rich, a Republican, has drawn two challengers for the BOCC District 1 seat.William Lawson is running without party affiliation and John Nagy is a Democrat.There will be no primary in the race.Candidate qualifying ends FridayWooten appears bound for re-electionBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comThere was plenty on which the district could hang its hat on in last weeks release of Florida Standard Assess-ment scores. There was also plenty to be concerned about. The Florida Department of Education released the latest scores from the states stan-dardized testing regimen, including language arts, math and science as well as end of course exams in biology, algebra, civics and history.The scores are the major component in the formula for school grades, which will be released in the coming weeks for elementary schools.High school grades come later in the year after factors such as graduation and drop-out rates are rolled into the final grade.We made gains, but there were a couple of areas where we went down,Ž said Super-intendent of Schools Jim Norton. There are areas of concern, but overall there is more positive than negative.ŽThe area of English Language Arts scores highlights the highs and lows.On the positive, Wewahitchka fourth-graders scoring at Level 3 or above (considered at or above grade proficiency) grew by eight percentage points and Port St. Joe fifth-graders scoring Level 3 or above increased by nine percentage points.However, at both grade levels the district lagged behind the state; 49 percent of district fourth-graders scored Level 3 or above while statewide the number was 56 percent.Among fifth-graders, the margin was 48 percent to 55 percent.The district was at or above the state average of students scoring Level 3 or better in sixth, eighth and 10th grades, but trailed the state in third through fifth and ninth grades.Wewahitchka High School saw a decrease in seventhgraders scoring Level 3 or above, but gained in eighth (by a whopping 15 percentage points), ninth and 10th grades.Port St. Joe scores fell for every high school grade save 10th-grade, where the gain was 13 percentage points.Both high schools were above the state average for Level 3 and above.Wide swings were also found in math scores. At Port St. Joe Elementary, math scores in grades 3-6 fell, from a drop of 21 points among fourth-graders to a fall of two percentage points among sixth-graders.State tests reveal gains, challenges for districtBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comJudy Miick and Sandi Christy knew each other 10 years ago, but they were not best friends by any means, Miick.Christy, though, had come to respect the way Miick worked with dogs, her abil-ity, patience, discipline, in training the dogs that came through the shelter at the St. Joseph Humane Society.So, one day, Christy broached a subject.She said I just have this little idea,Ž Miick said. She said she liked the way I trained the dogs and won-dered if I would be interested in working with dogs at the prison.ŽJust a little ideaBlonde lab Lacey is heading to Alabama and a home with “ ve children. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Maggie and her one blue eye is going to Panama City and a family with two children. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] DAWGS celebrates 9 years, 591 dogsSee TESTS, A6 See PLANS, A7 See CANDIDATE, A7 See DAWGS, A7

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** A2 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Star Star Staff ReportThe temperatures heat up, so too the calendar. A few suggestions for your recreational entertainment.The Rick Ott Band at the Port Theatre. Thursdays at the TheatreŽ continues tonight with local favorite the Rick Ott Band taking the stage of the historic Port Theatre. The concert series is aimed at expanding arts options in the county while training a spotlight on the historic theater as a outstanding venue. The Rick Ott Band specializes in Southern rock, including all the favorites from the 60s and 70s along with original compositions. Ott, who plays electric and acoustic guitar, is also known for his From the Heart radio broadcasts. Dean Neuman will make a guest appearance. General admission tickets are $10, the doors open at 6:45 p.m. ET. VIP tickets are $25 and include admittance into a meet-and-greet with the band 6-6:45 p.m. Tickets are available at The Port Inn and Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, located at 314 Reid Ave. Or go online at www. HistoricPortTheatre. com. Learn tips on growing, preserving blueberries. Want to learn more about how to grow and care for blueberries? Want to learn about preserving the harvest? Please join the Gulf County Extension Office for a presentatioin about what varieties will grow best in the Panhandle, learn the requirements needed for a plentiful harvest and best practices in preserving the fruit. The event is presented by Gulf County Extension Agents, Ray Bodrey and Melanie Taylor. The presentation will be 11 a.m. until 12 noon CT Friday at the Wewahitchka Library, 314 N. 2nd St., 639-2419. This is a free event. For more information, please see the UF/IFAS EDIS publication, Blueberry Gardeners GuideŽ by J. G. Williamson, P. M. Lyrene, and J. W. Olmstead: http://edis.ifas. ufl.edu/pdffiles/MG/ MG35900.pdf UF/IFAS Extension is an Equal Opportunity Institution. Register to be part of the 50th birthday celebration on St. Vincent. The Friends of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge will be hosting a birthday bash July 6 on the island. From 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. ET that Friday, the island and its Friends will host a summer picnic (lunch on the grill) including a halfmile loop walking tour through forest to sugary beaches (and serious shell searching) and, after a wander over some dunes, to the normally off-limits Point to view nesting and resting shore and water birds. There will also be a host of exhibits and activities along the way. It is just a short jaunt by boat to the island and the Friends will have a barge leaving every half hour from the Indian Pass boat ramp. Space on each barge load is limited to 40 passengers, though, so the Friends of St. Vincent are kindly asking all birthday attendees to register in advance at the citizen support organizations website: www.stvincentfriends.com. The celebration and the transportation are free, just sign up in advance. St. Vincent Island is a 12,490-acre barrier island, just over a quarter of a mile into the Gulf of Mexico that is about as Old Florida as one can get in this region. Expanded summer hours to climb the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Summer hours begin today at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Venture to George Core Park in Port St. Joe and climb to the top, nearly 100 feet high. The lighthouse is open 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET Thursday through Saturday. For adults 13 and over, the cost to climb is $5 and for children under 12, but at least 44-inches tall, the cost for the climb is $3. Please, no flip-flops … climbers need sturdy shoes. In addition, the lighthouse is open, by appointment, for groups of 5 or more. The minimum charge is $25. Contact 229-8261 to book an appointment for a group.Thursdays at the Theatre highlights things to doThe Rick Ott Band plays tonight in the latest installment of Thursdays at the Theatre.Ž [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Learn how to grow and preserve blueberries Friday. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Register now to be part of the golden birthday celebration at St. Vincent Island on July 6. [FILE PHOTO] Summer hours expand options to climb the lighthouse. [FILE PHOTO]

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 A3By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comDuring a workshop last week Port St. Joe commis-sioners took the first steps toward consideration of a proposal to rezone Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.The rezoning is seen as the catalyst for redevelop-ment of the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe outlined in a master plan originally formalized in 2006 and updated last year.The amended plan, sponsored by the North Port St. Joe Project Area Coalition (NPSJ-PAC), was approved earlier this year by the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and forwarded to the Commission.With the citys new planning consultant, Ray Grier, on hand, commis-sioners mapped out a plan forward.We are trying to figure out our role,Ž said Com-missioner David Ashbrook, who chaired the meeting with Mayor Bo Patterson absent.Weve pledged our support (of the plan) ƒ and we intend to see it through to the end.ŽAmong the first steps, notifying property owners along and adjacent to the MLK corridor, which Grier said came with a bit of urgency to moving the process.In addition, an assessment of infrastructure deficits that could arise if density limits were increased from 15 units per acre to 25, as proposed for some areas of the corridor.While infrastructure improvements will certainly be needed, the extent is an unknown and significant component of the equation.The other major change in the communitys dynamics, as proposed in the amended master plan and zoning proposal, would be increases in height limits from 35 feet to 60.The height and the units per acre, those are going to be your big changes,Ž Grier said. It is a pretty substantial increase in height.In short strokes, the proposed rezoning would involve maintaining the current underlying mixed-use category under which most of the corridor is zoned.On top of that would be overlayŽ areas, three sectors or zones which would have specific land use regulations dictating the residential/commer-cial mix.A central goal would be preserving the historic and current mix on MLK; predominantly commercial between Avenues A and D and predominantly residential from Avenue D north.We didnt want a one-size-fits-all zoning so we could preserve what is there, we want to preserve the sense of neighborhood,Ž said John Hendry, consultant for the NPSJ-PAC.The increase in height limits would accommodate buildings which have a first floor of retail or commercial with two to three floors of residential, Hendry said.Such construction would also bring the necessity of an increase in density limits.Hendry said the plan provide the elements to create workforce or afford-able housing within the neighborhood, which he noted could be revitaliz-ing at the same time as the neighboring Port of Port St. Joe.But even without the port growing, Hendry said, the plan puts forth a frame-work to expand lodging and dining options within the neighborhood, providing both visitors and residents more places to shop and eat.And, Hendry emphasized, the rezoning plan, the master plan, are pieces in a puzzle to address the very evident issue of blight in North Port St. Joe and along MLK, conditions in stark contrast to the revival that has taken place along Reid Ave.It is essential the neigh-borhood, the city and the county come up with the best way of eliminating this blight,Ž Hendry said. There will have to be a coherent and integrated plan for this.This needs the support of everybody. We want everybody to come together in a positive way to determine how to fix this.ŽThe overarching goal, Hendry added, create a neighborhood, community dynamic that attracts investors, that speaks to investors and compels investment to be part of something positive.And there will need to be outside investors.The NPSJ-PAC is pursuing a grant from Tri-umph Gulf Coast, though an initial pre-application was deemed ineligible.Hendry said that sufficient documentation was not available at the time the pre-application was submitted and was hope-ful a full application would be considered eligible.As proponents have stated, it fits the Triumph Gulf Coast goal of trans-formational projects.ŽCity commissioners will take the next steps once an assessment of infrastruc-ture is taken and impacted property owners notified. Commissioners expressed a desire for a workshop involving property owners to gauge support for the rezoning and future steps.PSJ moves ahead on master plan amendmentSpecial to The StarFloridas Forgotten Coast plays host to an abundance and variety of visitors, including adult and juvenile sea turtles. To celebrate these remarkable crea-tures and raise awareness of their importance, the Florida Coastal Conservancy and Forgotten Coast Sea Turtle Center invite you to join us for the 3rd Annual Forgotten Coast Sea Turtle Festival 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET on Sunday, July 1 at Village Drive and George Core Park in Port St. Joe.The Festival will include live music by Rick Wilson, Country Outlaw (11 a.m.until 1 p.m. ET) and K.T. Up Close & In Person (1-4 p.m. ET), hot dogs and ice cream, a sidewalk chalk art contest for all ages, edu-cational displays, local art vendors, activities for kids, and giveaways. The Festival is free to attend-ees and will take place rain or shine. Come join the fun and learn about our amazing sea turtles and the places they call home!Sea Turtle Festival July 1[SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

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** In the movie Forrest Gump, his friend, Bubba,Ž talks to Forrest about the versatility of shrimp and how hes going to go back to Alabama when the war is over and get himself a shrimping boat. As most folks know, Bubba died in the war, leaving Forrest to go back to Alabama and ultimately make it big in the shrimping business. He, of course, did not forget about Bubbas family, giving them Bubbas half after he sold the business. As you may remember, Bubba had a wonderful quote in the movie regarding the versatility of shrimp. Bubba said to Forrest, Anyway, like I was sayin', shrimp is the fruit of the sea. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, saut it. There's uh, shrimp-kabobs, shrimp creole, shrimp gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There's pineapple shrimp, lemon shrimp, coconut shrimp, pepper shrimp, shrimp soup, shrimp stew, shrimp salad, shrimp and potatoes, shrimp burger, shrimp sandwich. Thatthat's about it." Well, now that I have my little 20 x 50 feet community garden plot at work, I feel like I am the Forrest Gump of squash, specifically zucchini. It seems that six plants put out a lot more squash than you (or actually I) would expect. I planted six yellow and six zucchini squash and it seems like that every morning I stop in to check on how my garden did during the night, these great big zucchinis show up by the droves. Im taking them home in a laundry basket I got at the dollar store. Well, after two or three days of canning, freezing and pickling zucchini squash, Im started to feel a little like I need Forrest Gumps best good friend, Bubba, to help me out with some recipes or creative ways to prepare my daily haul. Yes, I do give some away, but the joy of eating out of my little garden is more than I could have imagined. Where is Bubba on this one? Well, I dont have the way with words that Bubba did, but heres my take on it. There is zucchini noodles, zucchini hummus, zucchini salsa and zucchini carpaccio. How about stuffed zucchini, stir-fried zucchini, or in your meatloaf or coleslaw. Maybe zucchini bread or baked in chocolate or cream cheese cake? On the Zucchini Carpaccio,Ž I didnt know what carpaccio was, but I checked and it looks pretty good. Throw in a little sugar and vinegar and you can pickle zucchini real easyƒ You can pickle just about anything for that matter. If you grew up in the South, you know that … we pickle everything, even ourselves from time to time. Zucchini is great for grilling, broiling, steaming, sauting, oven roasting, and microwaving. Heck, I even saw a recipe for smoked squash. And dont forget just plain fryingƒ Maybe Ive said that already. We fry everything in the South also, but then we get our cholesterol report and we have to start using air-fryers or other similar contraptions sold on the basis of getting rid of the oil. Do you know what you have when you are frying without oil? I dont know, but I know you arent really frying anything. Zucchini marries up with many interesting flavors including garlic, cheeses, various nuts, yogurt, tomatoes, lemon, soy, ginger and all kinds of herbs and spices. And just for our best good friend Bubba, theres Zucchini Shrimp Scampi, Garlicky Shrimp Zucchini Pasta, Pan Roasted Garlic Shrimp with Zucchini, and Shrimp with Zucchini and Tomatoes. Enough is enoughƒ I was sitting on my front steps and reading an article in the newspaper the other day about how good gardening is for your health and well-being. I think that it must be true. My younger neighbor walked by and asked from the street, They still make those?Ž referring to my newspaper. I said, Yes and I sure am thankful they do.Ž My spaghetti squash are now about to explode. Time to see what I can do with those. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. A4 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Star OPINION Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Tim Thompson Editor: Tim Croft Circulation: 850-522-5197 SUBSCRIPTIONS In county Out of county 1 Year: $24.15 $34.65 6 Months: $15.75 $21 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. A childhood friend who accidentally read a couple of my little blurbs asked if I actually remembered everything I was writing about. I didnt say this was a smart friend. But it is a tad difficult to write about something that you DONT remember! It did get me to thinking if there were memories out there that had faded over to the forgotten side. And Im not counting here the ones that I choose not to remember. Like knocking down that whole row of brand new bicycles at Robert Halls Western Auto or sophomore Latin or getting run over by Leroy Segraves in a high school football game or ripping my pants wide open doing the Watusi on Channel 7s Top Ten Dance Partyƒ.. Old Gold cigarettes came to mind. I have no idea why, except maybe Im no smarter than my friend. I never smoked one. Im not sure Ive ever seen a pack other than on a store shelf or in an advertisement. And I dont know if they even make them anymore. But it is an item I just barely recall. One of those things that is certainly close to being gone forever in my memory bank. I wouldnt remember them at all if it werent for the dancing feet covered with white high top boots. The early television ads back in the day showed a pack of Old Golds with a ladys legs protruding from the bottom. The pack, and sometimes two, would dance lightly across the stage as some guy hidden behind the curtain extolled the virtues of Old Golds tobacco blend. Even as a ten year old I thought it was a ridiculous way to sell cigarettes. Of course, it may not have been quite as preposterous as I thought; here I am, writing about the brand half a century„and then someƒ.after the commercials ran. Buddy Wiggleton and I used to wonder why they didnt call them New Golds, Modern Gold or Better Than Gold. It seemed to us they wanted you to try something that was worn out! I reckon it made more sense than smoking a Camel. The blame for me not picking up the cigarette habit lies at the feet of my high school coaches. My only goal in life back in those days was to make the varsity team. I showed up for football and before we got our practice gear Coach Scott lectured us, Dont smoke young men, ever. It will cut your wind.Ž First day of tryouts for basketball, it was the exact same admonition. I got the message early. Loudly. And often. Heres another one that almost escapes my memory. In the early 1950s, they would take up a collection to help fight polio at the Park movie theatre. Mr. Clericuzio, the manager, had the official cans with pictures of young boys and girls stricken with polio. The top had a small slot where you could drop in your change. It seems like it was done in conjunction with the March of Dimes program instituted by Franklin D. Roosevelt. Faultless Starch just barely lives in my mind; mostly because Mom didnt use it. She bought that harder than concrete, stiffer than Bessemer steel, more solid than the Rock of Gibraltar Niagara Corn Starch! And by the amount she poured into mySunday-goto-meeting collar, it must have been cheaper than a Continental paper bill back when Washington was huddled up at Valley Forge. Folks at church were always so complementary on how attentive me, Leon and David Mark were to Brother Hatchers sermon each and every Sunday morning. The truth is we couldnt turn our heads in any other direction! S.S.S. Tonic barely rings a bell with me anymore. But I remember Mom giving it to us if we had a fever or the chills or a headache or a bellyache. Shed pour it on a knife wound or a rash. If you had a sore throat, she made you gargle with it. Shed put a few drops in your ear if it was aching. And if a bad tooth was bothering you, shed have you swish it around in your mouth. No wonder my mind is trying to blot out that concoction! And I cant for the life of me remember how it tastesƒ.. could be there is something to this selective memoryŽ theory. Nobody talks about fender skirts or moon hubcaps anymore. Penny gum machines and roller skate keys have gone the way of the dodo. S&H Green Stamps wont buy a thing these days. Theres a fading list chasing the Old Gold cigarettes as items Ive almost forgot ten. And maybe thats not a bad thing. Who knows, we get too much of that old stuff cluttering up our mindsƒ..it might cut our windŽ completely out. Respectfully, KesHUNKER DOWNNear bout Gone With The WindŽBy Dr. Neal Dunn (FL-02)Special to The StarThe opioid epidemic claims the lives of roughly 174 Americans every day. Opioids have resulted in the deaths of more Americans than the Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam wars over the same time period. Unfortunately, the news is worse for our veterans. Former Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald stated, Veterans are 10 times more likely to abuse opioids than the average American,Ž and this abuse is the leading cause of homelessness among veterans. In 2016, the VA treated 66,000 veterans for opioid addiction. It is clear we are failing our nations heroes. That is unacceptable. According to the Centers for Disease Control, one of the common risk factors for opioid addiction is obtaining overlapping prescriptions from multiple providers. As a doctor, Im familiar with the tools already available to help combat the opioid epidemic, such as state-based Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs. PDMPs ensure prescribing physicians have a clear picture of what controlled medications their patients are taking. Thats why almost every state has established some sort of database to monitor prescribing. Since 2013, the Veterans Health Administration has cut its rate of prescribing these medications by about 41 percent. While this is welcome progress, a recent Government Accountability Office report found that VA providers dont always check state databases. I recently became chairman of the House Veterans Affairs Health Subcommittee, but this is an issue Ive been working tirelessly to address since I was sworn in. Too many veterans are suffering from addiction and opioid abuse. As a doctor and a veteran, I have met heroes who need help, but arent finding it at the VA. We can change that. Since the VA is the largest health care provider in the country, it is in a unique position to lead the initiative to prevent prescription opioid abuse, particularly among veterans. Thats why I introduced the Veterans Opioid Abuse Prevention Act … to ensure no veteran slips through the cracks. My bill increases opioid prescribing transparency at the VA and allows VA doctors to do what private sector physicians are already doing … access data from states nationwide to identify patterns of high opioid use that put patients at risk for addiction. The act recently passed the House with bipartisan support and was also included as a provision in the VA MISSION Act, which was signed by President Trump. Sharing this information is just one step we can take to ensure the nine million veterans who receive their care through the VA benefit from the same safeguards as private sector patients. I take my responsibility to serve those who fought for our freedoms seriously. We must do more to protect our veterans and I believe my Veterans Opioid Abuse Prevention Act is a vital part of our efforts to fix health care at the VA. Our work to honor and to care for our veterans will never end, because our debt of gratitude can never be repaid.No veteran should slip through the cracks Kesley Colbert BN HeardCRANKS MY TRACTORThe Forrest Gump of zucchiniHeres another one that almost escapes my memory. In the early 1950s, they would take up a collection to help ght polio at the Park movie theatre. Mr. Clericuzio, the manager, had the o cial cans with pictures of young boys and girls stricken with polio. The top had a small slot where you could drop in your change. It seems like it was done in conjunction with the March of Dimes program instituted by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 A5 LETTERSDear Editor, In reference to the posted April 26, 2018 article County could reopen RV ordinance.Ž As discussed in the article, Commissioner Phil Mcroan presented a petition requesting the current RV ordinance be amended to include all areas within 3 miles of the coastline of St. Joseph Bay as well as place a moratorium on construction of pole barns as primary structures. Since this commission meeting it seems little to no progress has been made. Currently a new development within the community of Oak Grove is not only allowing, but advertising, the ability to build pole barns and mixed-use, touting light restrictions. Although I was not living here when the current ordinance was put in place, as someone who was born, raised, and spent 37 of my 47 years of life in the area, I must say it sickens me to see what has happened an been allowed within my hometown. Per the article and county commission meeting, the county administrator stated that due to the ordinance RVs banned from the beach had no where to go.Ž Well that is absolutely inaccurate. There are places for RVs to go, they are called RV parks and campgrounds. It is overwhelmingly apparent the previous commission was influenced by opportunistic desires of certain persons or groups that had previously invested in the areas in question such as Oak Grove during the real estate boom.Ž During this time of inflated prices, real estate investors purchased properties in Oak Grove and other under developed areas of gulf county believing these areas would see great return on investment if properly developed. Once the market fell, these investors were stuck with properties they were almost certain of realizing a loss on. During this time values for everyones homes and land declined due to the fall of the economy. This situation was also compounded by fact many investors walked away from homes and investment properties bringing the onslaught of short sales and/or foreclosures compounding the decline of real estate value. But there were still some investors left holding on to property that had seen major depreciation on value. Simultaneously, as the market began to take an upward shift, the RV and Tiny house market was beginning to boom. RVs and Tiny homes have allowed many people to to enjoy vacationing at a lower cost, especially for families. Many people around the country are investing RVs and tiny homes as a residence or vacation option. Due to this boom RV parks have been able to charge much higher prices in excess of a mortgage for monthly rentals, causing some RV owners to begin looking for somewhere to purchase to become their vacation destination Recognizing this, the good ole boy network has seen opportunity and is capitalizing on it. By carving the areas of Oak Grove, Highland View and Jones Homestead, the investors have now been able to recoup some or all of their initial investment and the real estate agents are profiting from the increased value of open land in these areas. That is great for the real estate investors, agents, and nonresidents seeking to have a vacation spot near the water to put an RV. However, this is not good for the full-time, voting, tax-paying residents of these communities nor the county as a whole. Since this has been allowed, Highland View, Oak Grove, as well as some areas along CR 30A are essentially becoming campgrounds. Along with the RVs, many owners are constructing pole barns with little to know regulation that have essentially apartments in them which may or may not be up to code. Compounding this issue, is the fact many of these owners are renting these parcels out as RV lot in a commercial manner which is not allowed. You can also find individuals living in storage units in certain areas of the county. The county has stated they have no way of proving this and does not have the man power to enforce this properly. On any given weekend there is pole barn and RV in Oak Grove which 8-10 people utilizing the pole barn and RV as a living area which supposedly is not allowed. Upon contacting the county, it is repeatedly stated we just do not have the manpower to check this.Ž If the county cannot enforce ordinances, then the ordinances are null and void. Due to this there should be a moratorium on construction of pole barns in the areas in question until the issue is resolved in the best interest for the residents and there are proper ordinances and restrictions that can also be properly enforced. For those of you that may be thinking this is a Oak Grove or Highland view issue, it is not. If you evaluate the average taxes collected on the properties in these areas on single family homes compared to RV lots on average is significantly higher. Compound that with the fact that if properly developed, newly constructed single family homes would bring in even higher tax revenue for the county as a whole. In an evaluation of the taxes paid in Oak Grove comparing 10 RV lots and 10 single family homes, on average the revenue from single family homes is approximately $700.00/ parcel more compared to lots being used for RVs. (It should be noted the number quoted does not evaluate all homes and/or lots in the community only 10 lots known for RV use and 10 single family homes). Secondly, some of these RV lots are being rented in a commercial manner and not collecting bed taxes for short term rentals which another loss for the county. I can only assume, since I was not living here when the ordinance was first established, that many of the residents of these communities were not completely aware of the ordinance, the implications of the ordinance, and what was to come. What I am certain of now is, the majority of the full time residents of these communities are not happy with what has happened. I am also certain that elected officials should be acting in the best interest of residents of the community they represent as a whole, not the special interest of certain individuals within the county. Although this issue has not been as highly visible as the recent Port St. Joe city commission debacle attempting to remove the city manager with no just cause, some of the same influences are at play within this situation. I urge everyone who has not driven in these areas and taken notice of what is happening to drive though Oak Grove, Highland View, St. Joe Beach, as well as CR 30A and take notice as to what has happened and is continuing to happen in our paradise. Please contact your county commissioners and/or attend the county commission meetings (I know this is difficult for those of us that work normal 9-5 hours) In my opinion, any county commissioner that would vote against taking action on this is not acting in the best interest of the residents they represent and come election time should be replaced. If not, what will happen next to benefit special interest of certain individuals and what effect will it have on you?Chris Wahl Port St. JoeRV ordinance Shopping for a pair of shoes, shopping for a hat; Were buyin some of this, and were buyin some of thatƒŽDown in the MallŽ as performed by Warren ZevonSince the first shopping mall was built more than 60 years ago in Edina, Minnesota, malls have represented the apex of American retail and social culture. If we needed anything, from a prom dress to a lawn mower, we headed to the mall, left our car in a vast parking lot, and attempted to navigate an endless variety of stores. We negotiated long, well-lighted corridors amidst throngs of fellow customers in a shoptil-you-drop mania. I bought almost all my Christmas presents at a mall for several years; it was more convenient than driving from store to store. Everything was under one climate-controlled roof. Often our family would journey to the mall, separate and shop, and convene later at an onsite restaurant with our packages at our feet. Wed then compare purchases and talk about which stores were the most appealing. The mall was, simply put, part of our familys weekly experience and part of the larger American culture. Like everyone else, we stopped shopping on Main Street and headed to the mall instead. I remember the first time I read about the Mall of America shortly after it opened in Bloomington, Minnesota in 1992. One of the first mega-malls, the MOA was the largest in the U.S. in total floor area and the third largest in North America in leasable space. But like railroad travel, which gave way to planes and cars, malls are now being replaced by online retail and the new outdoor walking retailŽ concept. Mall anchor tenants, some of them household names, are closing in droves. Many municipalities are attempting to revive their downtown and inner city regions with new, walker friendly retail developments, often placed adjacent to apartments and lofts. The irony is obvious, as the trend comes full circle. The advent of suburban malls hastened the decline of our inner city shopping districts. Now, the return to walking retail in downtown areas is rendering the suburban mall obsolete. So what are we doing with our mall space? In California, one mall now houses a prominent tech firm. In Tennessee, another has been converted to a skating rink, a recreation center, a community college and a library. One of the nations oldest indoor retail spaces, located in Providence, RI, has been converted to small, one-bedroom apartments. Restaurants and other walk-in retail outlets now occupy abandoned malls. Dozens of new schools and churches have utilized store space in malls. Once we worried that our kids were wasting too much time hanging out at the mall. Well, they're still there, only now they're attending class. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor Outlook,Ž is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850.608.6121 … www.arborwealth.net), a fiduciary, fee-onlyŽ registered investment advisory firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor.ARBOR OUTLOOKMalls, Anchor Tenants and Downtown Revivals So what are we doing with our mall space? In California, one mall now houses a prominent tech rm. In Tennessee, another has been converted to a skating rink, a recreation center, a community college and a library. One of the nations oldest indoor retail spaces, located in Providence, RI, has been converted to small, onebedroom apartments. Restaurants and other walk-in retail outlets now occupy abandoned malls. Margaret McDowell

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** A6 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The StarOnly among sixthand eighth-graders did district students scoring Level 3 or aboe exceed the state aver-age: among fifth-graders the district lagged 14 percentage points behind the state.On the other side of the scale, however, 78 percent, up five percentage points, of sixth-graders at Wewahitchka Elementary scored at least Level 3 or above, 12 percentage points beyond the state average.Fifth-graders at WES met the state average and improved by an impressive 14 percentage points.There is a challenge in maintaining that momentum as students enter the middle school grades,Ž said Lori Price, Assistant Superinten-dent for Instru ction.And 81 percent of Port St. Joe students taking the end of course exam in geometry scored at Level 3 or above.Science scores maintained the trend of uneven scores.Port St. Joe fifth-graders improve 20 percentage points for students scoring Level 3 or above, which was also three points above the state average.In addition, the percentage of students scoring Level 3 or above in end of course biology exams at Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School improved 22 points.However, overall, the district lagged behind the state in fifthand eighth-grade science scores and Port St. Joe eighth-graders lost ground, as did Wewahitchka biology scores.The district is above the state in biology and even with the state inU.S. History.Price mapped out challenges highlighted by the scores.Teacher turnover has proved to be a significant problem,Ž she said, noting Wewahitchka Elementary will be filling at least seven teaching positions for the second consecutive school year.A top priority will continue to be 10th-graders pass-ingthe English Language Arts FSA test, seeking to add to the growth realized this past school year.The district will continue to offer after-school tutoring and weekend ACT prep classes, Price said.Test scores also indicate a need to increase emphasis on science instruction in the primary grades,Ž Price said. Science is not formally tested until fifth grade and not retested until eighth.It is necessary to improve progress monitoring in this area and provide interven-tions earlier.ŽNew science textbooks have been adopted for the upcom-ing s chool year with a hope to foster growth.Price said in light of test scores and new legislation, each elementary school will be putting in place additional teaching strategies, including an emphasis on a multi-sen-sory approach to reading.At all grade levels, sched-ules will be amended to allow those students with disabili-ties an increased amount of time in less restrictive mainstream classes, Price added.As with every year, there remains both a need and desire to improve, but (we) feel confident that school grades will reflect the dedi-cation of the teachers and the hard work of the students,Ž Price said.Factors such as graduation rate, industry certification and middle school accelera-tion are a part of school grades making predictions based on test scores alone precarious.Ž TESTSFrom Page A1 By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comTransition time for the Port St. Joe Commission arrived Tuesday as commissioners were joined by a full meeting room in bidding adieu to Commissioner Rex Buzzett.The longest-serving com-missioner, Buzzett leaves after a decade, deciding not to stand for re-election.Buzzett noted some of the successes during his tenure.That included the expansion of sewer, the building of a new city water plant constructed for the future and saving the Cape San Blas Lighthouse, a beacon to the future.ŽDuring his tenure the city had not raised the millage rate, Buzzett noted, and he believed he was leaving with the city in an improved finan-cial state.Buzzett, his voice shak-ing a bit, thanked his family, noting wife Nancy had been a commissioner for 10 years but without a vote.He also thanked staff for the solid working relationship and effort during his tenure.The board presented Buzzett with a plaque.In addition, newcomer Commissioner Scott Hoffman, who is succeeding Buzzett in the Group 4 seat, and Commissioners Brett Lowry and Eric Langston were sworn in for new terms.In other business:*A workshop on golf carts and their usage in city limits is scheduled for 6 p.m. ET Tuesday in the Ward Ridge meeting room. *Commissioners approved adding four-way stop signs at 10th Street and Woodward and 10th Street and Marvin in an attempt to cut down people speeding on the roads and ignoring existing signage.*Commissioners discussed a workshop on Triumph Gulf Coast funding and the poten-tial for securing funding for the proposed rezoning of MLK and revitalization of North Port St. Joe.Hoffman noted the city did not need county permission to pursue grant funding. The North Port St. Joe Project Area Coalition is in the midst of crafting an application to Tri-umph for some $5 million for in infrastructure improvements.€ Commissioners canceled their next regular meeting, scheduled for July 3. The next regular meeting will be July 17.City bids Buzzett farewell; swears-in 3County Judge Tim McFarland swears-in new Commissioner Scott Hoffman. [PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | THE STAR] Commissioner Eric Langston is sworn in for a one-year term. The city presented outgoing Commissioner Rex Buzzett a plaque of appreciation for 10 years of service. Commissioner Brett Lowry was sworn in for a new two-year term.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 A7during the committees meeting Wednesday morning, needs to receive a formal resolution from the city.That resolution should provide the detail for what the city proposes for the park project, a budget, scope of work and timeline.Only then, Novak continued, could the BOCC consider approving using tourist development bed tax dollars, roughly $850,000, on the project.The city picks the amenities, this is city prop-erty,Ž Novak said. The BOCC is the final arbiter of funding this TDC project, but everything outside of that is the city.ŽNovak also noted the BOCC will soon have to decide on continuing the bed taxs fifth penny for parks and recreation which sunsets in 18 months. The park committee has recommended the BOCC continue the fifth penny beyond that point, in part to renovate the 10th Street Park.The obstacle to any res-olution from the city is the fair distance remaining to anything resembling consensus.I was hoping to get a plan that everybody would support, but we are still a long ways from that,Ž said newly-installed City Commissioner Scott Hoffman. We are far away from where we need to be.ŽHoffman stepped into the minefield during Tues-days regular meeting of the City Commission, his first action to put forward a revision of a prior plan, ver-sion six, and urged support from commissioners prior to Wednesdays county committee meeting.Though Mayor Bo Patterson expressed a desire to wait until after the committee meeting to take action, ultimately the board voted 5-0 to support a plan that mirrors version six.That includes six total ball fields, three on either side of 10th Street, with pickle ball courts and park-ing primarily along Eighth Street.There are also batting cages, conce ssion stands and restrooms.The boards decision, which approved the plan while allowing for possible tweaks to softball fields on the south side of 10th, was not met warmly. To start, for the second meeting in a row residents were being asked to con-sider not the conceptual plan provided the public in advance of the m eeting, but another revised drawing.This fed a sentiment from many residents living adjacent to the park, though the number has expanded beyond those boundaries, who believe they have been left out of the process from the get-go.Opposition cleaves along several lines.Several residents see expansion of the ball parks as an encroachment on their property rights, which they assert are already tenuous during ball season. Trash and rude behavior from children and, especially, adults, are ongoing problems.For them, the Field of Dreams opposite the Gulf/Franklin campus is the place for the kind of sports complexŽ the city wishes, one that will attract tournaments, which dovetails with the TDC mission regarding the fifth penny.This issue is this is a residential area and you want to build a sports com-plex, not ball fields,Ž said resident Arthur Rodgers. This is a slap on the face for residents.ŽThere are concerns about further construc-tion and potentially piping a stormwater canal as just adding to existing problems with flooding during heavy rains.In addition, there is skepticism as to whether this initial renovation leads to additional phases to meet an initial conceptual plan that had construction all the way to 16th Street. We do not oppose have the existing neighborhood ball fields improved,Ž said resident Jill Bebee. Its a park and needs to stay a park. Those are neighbor-hood ball fields and they should stay neighborhood ball fields.Youre building in a swamp ƒ this is not an appropriate place for anything but a rebuilt neighborhood park.ŽOn a completely separate spot are coaches, parents and players of youth baseball and softball who contend the existing park footprint constraining for the 225 or so children who play on the existing, historic fields. As the debate has raged over the past several months, another alternate location has gained some support.A sports complex on 60 acres donated to the city along Field of Dreams Ave. was abandoned long ago by the city and county due to funding constraints in the wake of last decades Great Recession.Neither city or county has broached a return to that con cept.Recently, resident Robert Farmer has urged commissioners to con-sider the old railroad yard land behind CVS and bor-dered by Avenue A and First Street.There would be plenty of space, Farmer said, for anything desired in the complex and would be in the middle of town, a showcase for people entering the city.The drawback for that proposal is the land is owned by The St. Joe Company, which adds an entirely new dynamic to the puzzle.As of Wednesday morn-ing, the city was to hold a town hallŽ meeting, as the recommendation of County Commissioner Sandy Quinn, Jr., in order to provide sufficient public input in order for the city to find a path forward. PLANSFrom Page A1There will also be no primary for the BOCC District 2 seat.Commissioner Ward McDaniel, the Demo-crat incumbent, is facing Republican Tom Semmes.Josh Taunton had filed initial, but not all, paper-work this week to run for the District 2 seat. He would run with no party affiliation meaning the November ballot would decide the race.School Board races are non-partisan.The District 1 seat, being vacated by Danny Little, has three candidates vying, Brian Cox, Bernadette Hackett and Dennis McGlon.If none of the three earns 50 percent-plus one of the vote in the August prim ary, the top two vote-getters will advance to November.Ruby Knox and Barbara Radcliff have filed for the School Board District 5 seat being vacated by John Wright. That race will be decided on the August primary ballot.From the beginning of the qualifying period Monday, it was likely there would be few actual changes since the deadline for candidate qualifying via the petition method expired last month.To qualify all candidates had to secure was signatures from just 10 percent of eligible voters in their race.This week, to enter any race candidates had to pay the qualifying fee; $1,732-$1,155 for county commission depe nding on whether or not there is a party affiliation, $1,061 for school board. CANDIDATEFrom Page A1 Miick was about to have a void in her everyday rou-tine anyway as she was about to retire her dog from the two trips a week to the local nursing home.I thought about (the prison program) and fig-ured, How hard can it be?Ž Miick said.Nine years later, the Developing Adoptable dogs with Good Sociability (DAWGS) in Prison graduated its 59th class last week, bringing to 591 dogs that have graduated the program.Pause (or paws) here, and let that number sink in.I am excited and over-whelmed with the number of dogs we have been able to graduate and get adopted,Ž Miick said. More often than not, those are dogs that would have ultimately been euthanized without that program.ŽJust one more fun fact, even though it is younger than nearly all other programs in the state prison systems, DAWGS is a pack leader. We have graduated more than any other canine prison program in Florida,Ž Miick said.Last year, Sandi and I (co-directors of DAWGS) were at a conference and according to the literature on the canine programs they handed out, we had graduated more dogs.ŽThose 591 dogs over the past nine years have ended up becoming part of 578 families; there are several homes with two dogs adopted from DAWGS and one New York City resi-dence is home to four such graduates.Those 578 families are spread across 28 states and three countries; last weeks graduates were heading to Alabama, Florida, New York, Connecticut, Massa-chusetts and Pennsylvania.And lest one believes that the work ends with graduation, Miick will quickly disabuse one of that notion.Since last Wednesdays graduation, she has exchanged phone calls with two of the four adopt-ers who traveled to the ceremony. Part of each graduation is a rundown of commands as well as a letter from the dogŽ detailing the personality, likes and dislikes of each dog.But, Miick noted, there is a lot of information to cover and transition, for dog and adopters, can take a few days.And is hardly unusual for adopters to call in the days following graduation, at least one time, Miick noted, at 3 a.m.Usually for dogs it takes about a week,Ž Miick said of the transition from prison to a home. And usually, it only takes a few minutes to understand what is going on and pro-vide some suggestions.Our program is very structured and at this point I knew it very well. Usually, it is just simple things.ŽBut, there have been occasionsƒ. Sandi and I, we have both gone to peo-ples homes to help,Ž Miick said, saying the decision is based on proximity and nature of the issue.One thing that can be said of DAWGS, however, there has been just one return.Out of 591, and that dog was quickly placed in another forever home.ŽThere is, of course, another side to DAWGS, a partnership between the humane society, Board of County Commissioners, Department of Correc-tions and the Gulf Forestry Camp.In addition to the number of dogs, the total of inmates who have worked in the program is over 500; 536 to be exact who have served as caretakers, handlers, trainers and lead trainers.And, many of whom have gone on to apply skills learned in dogs, including discipline, accountability, responsibility with a mix of humble, to a successful life outside the prison.Its very rewarding,Ž Miick said of DAWGS. I like to do it. I love working with animals. I have learned how to teach those inmates how to train the animals. I respect them and they give me a great deal of respect.I had no idea (the program would flourish for nine years). It is something Sandi and I never dreamed. Were both very proud of our program.Ž DAWGSFrom Page A1Lilly, a brindle Plott hound, is going to Panama City.[SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

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** A8 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The StarBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comIn last weeks (June 14) edition, we reported on Nancy Jones and her local effort to eliminate plastic straws.Jones and her partner had become the regional distributor for a brand of paper straws manufactured by an Indiana company, the local product sporting the shapes of green sea turtles.A portion of the proceeds from sales of the straws will be donated to the For-gotten Coast Sea Turtle Center.Jones already lined up several prominent establishments including the Haughty Heron, Blue Parrot and The Owl, the latter two in Franklin County.The initiative generated plenty of positive comments on social media, as well as a couple of links on similar initiatives around the globe.One reader noted they had just dined at the Blue Parrot which served them paper straws.Id like to see our Gulf and Franklin County restaurants support this initiative,Ž wrote Keka Spoonemore.Lennon Thiel added, This is fantastic.ŽOf course, straws are only part of a problem that scientists have estimated will leave as much pound-age in plastic as fish in the worlds oceans by 2050.Several readers urged the end of plastic grocery bags.Plastic grocery bags must go,Ž wrote Paula Ramsey Pickett. Most places we visit offer paper or you bring your own.If you request plastic they charge you a fee.ŽThe discussion also brought a couple of links worthy of attention.One, shared by Jack Kerigan, was a report from Money magazine that McDonalds would eliminate plastic straws in the United Kingdom and Ireland by the end of 2019.McDonalds uses some 1.8 million plastic straws per day in the UK and Ire-land alone.According to Litterati, an app that identifies and maps trash, plastic straws are the sixth-most common type of litter globally.Only 1 percent are recycled, largely because they are made of a mix-ture of polypropylene and polystyrene.One million birds and more than 100,000 sea mammals die every year from eating or getting entangled in plastic waste, according to the UK government.Another link, shared by a public relations con-sultant for FinalStraw, concerned the companys focus on the consumer instead of business with a stainless steel, collaps-ible straw.The straw comes with a carrying case, small enough to attach to a keychain, and cards the customer can leave behind for the business, encouraging them to eliminate plastic straws.The company is partnering with companies such as www.lonelywhale,org, a global movement for a strawless ocean.ŽEliminating the plastic, part IIA follow-up to last weeks Turtle Straws story According to Litterati, an app that identi es and maps trash, plastic straws are the sixth-most common type of litter globally. Only 1 percent are recycled, largely because they are made of a mixture of polypropylene and polystyrene. SEE MORE ONLINE AT STARFL.COM

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 A9

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** A10 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Star OUTDOORSCONTACT USEmail outdoor news to tcroft@starfl.comBy Frank SargeantSpecical to The StarFor those with a desire for red snapper fillets„pretty much all of us without a fish allergy„the opening of the season in June is cause for celebration. And thanks to extended negotiations between the Gulf states and federal fishery managers, this years season is the most promising in years because its likely to provide an extended opportunity to harvest these tasty fish, more in line with their apparent numbers. The 2018 recreational season opened June 11 and is expected to close July 21, depending on the reported harvest. The season for charter and party boats is June 1 through July 21. While thats not a lot of time, it beats the heck out of the four-day seasons in federal waters in the recent past. The great thing about red snappers at present is that it does not take a trip over the horizon to get at least a few keepersize fish; they have again become abundant on some inshore structures in as little as 60 feet of water, well within sight of the beaches. This makes it possible for those of us who own single-outboard center consoles to get at them in relative safety. (However, venturing offshore in iffy conditions is always questionable and all the usual safety gear should be aboard anytime a boat gets outside the inlet, including a DSC-enabled VHF radio that will tell the Coast Guard where you are at the touch of a button if you get into serious trouble.) How to get em Red snapper are generally pretty cooperative, which is one of the reasons they are so easily fished down to levels lower than biologists like to see. However, theres definitely an established regimen for finding and catching them. Here are a few tips, most given to me by Captain Tommy Butler, longtime commercial hook-and-liner and charter captain out of Madeira Beach: 1. Snapper are not bottom fishŽ like grouper„theyre usually found above the structure rather than directly down on it. 2. Look for the Christmas treeŽ image on sonar, small and the top, large at the bottom above structure, to indicate a school of red snapper. The top of this tree may be as much as 40 feet off bottom in a big school. 3. Motor-fish where possible: Its difficult for most less expert anglers to drop the anchor in 200-foot depths and get the boat positioned right in wind and current on the first try, and repeat drops can spook the fish. 4. Have a chum bag ready: Snapper frequently come up to take advantage of a chum stream, and when theyre in the chum, theyre usually easy to catch, though you may have to switch to unweighted hooks on spinning tackle for these fish. 5. Avoid catch-andrelease fishing„as soon as everybody on board has their 2-fish limit, pull off the spot. That way theres less chance of other anglers discovering you and moving in to clean it out. Its also a good idea to restŽ a school for several days before hitting it again, though given the pressure thats likely on nearshore reefs, this may not be a good plan this summer. 6. In calm, clear water, it pays to lighten up on gear„opt for 40-pound-test tackle rather than 60, giving the fish less visible leader and smaller hooks to fool them. 7. Dont fish below the fish. Snapper will come up to get a bait, but they wont go down as a rule„note where the fish are on sonar and stop your drop above bottom to put it in their face. 8. While there may be keepers over the 16-inch minimum on inshore reefs, if you want fish over 10 pounds, it means a trip out to 150 to 280 feet of water. The inshore fish get caught before they become lunkers. The right baits and rigs Cut cigar minnows are a favorite of many experienced snapper-chasers„a piece about 3 inches long on a ‡ to ‡ circle hook is the ticket for inshore chickenŽ snapper, while the big mommas offshore require ‡ to ‡ hooks and larger baits. Note that by law, only circle hooks without an offset are permitted for reef species. The idea is that the circular hooks tend to slide out of the throat but the point catches on the lip of the snapper, thus its less likely to mortally wound fish that are to be released. Red snapper eat a wide assortment of other baits, with squid and cut menhaden also effective. Some expert skippers like Captain Mike Parker of Silver King Charters in Destin carry along several dozen select live shrimp when they go snappering„the shrimp are all but irresistible to the fish, apparently. Anglers fishing farther south, where scaled sardines are abundant, have done well by using these silvery live baits to lure the snapper, as well. Snapper that have not been hard-fished can be caught on artificial lures, with the shrimp-scented DOA Shrimp in 4-inch size and the Berkley GULP crab among the more successful offerings„theyre fished below heavy weights, just like live bait. For adult fish far offshore, giant jigs from 4 to 8 ounces with 8-inch plastic tails, sometimes dressed with a mullet or bonito belly, lure fish off reefs over 200 feet down. The usual rig for fishing cut or live bait is an egg sinker between 3 and 8 ounces above a swivel of suitable strength, then a 5-foot length (or more in clear water) of mono or fluorocarbon in 50 to 60 pound test, then the hook. Finding snapper spots The Panhandle has hundreds and perhaps thousands of privateŽ reefs, that is junk that skippers have dropped on otherwise barren sand bottom to attract snapper„old washing machines, steel drums, all sorts of bulky trash. Its not legal any more, but there are still many of these reefs around, and smart skippers have dozens of them in their GPS machines„all very carefully protected from other skippers who might want to pirate theirŽ fish. There are also numerous legally-placed artificial reefs, including tugboats, barges and ships as well as demolition rubble, that attract lots of fish; these can be found on any good offshore chart, or visit www.myfwc.com and type artificial re efsŽ in the search box. Party boats and charter boats You dont have to have your own boat to go red snapper fishing; the Panhandle area between Panama City and Pensacola has one of the largest and most active reef fishing fleets in the nation, and any angler interested in a trip can readily find just the right boat for his buddies or his family. Prices range from around $350 for a half-day to $800 for a full day, and that fee can be split by up to six anglers on most boats. Party boats or head boatsŽ are also numerous in Panhandle ports, and these big boats can handle up to 45 anglers, at prices typically around $60 each for four hours, $90 each for eight hours. The longer trips go out farther and catch the bigger snapper. Kids under 5 are not accepted on some offshore boats„check in advance. Most partyboats have snackbars and air-conditioned lounges where you can cool off between spots. Note that during the snapper season, it can be hard to get a spot„its best to reserve by phone or on-line in advance because everybody wants to bring home a few snappers while theres an opportunity. Take your Dramamine in advance„they wont come back if you get seasick. (ReliefBand is a watch-like strap-on device that sends tiny electrical shocks into your wrist to prevent sea-sickness„it sounds like snakeoil, but it absolutely works; Ive seen it cure some folks who absolutely could not get offshore otherwise „ www.reliefband.com.) Releasing red snapper Fish caught from deep water frequently have issues with the rapid pressure change as they are brought aboard„they blow up like a balloon, and are unable to swim when put back over the side. Since the limit on red snapper is just two fish daily, its common for anglers to release much of their catch these days, and improving survival of these fish makes good conservation sense„as well as being required by state and federal law. Improving survival depends on several steps: 1. Use circle hooks so that the hook is unlikely to be swallowed. (This is required by law for all reef species anyway.) 2. Get the hooks out promptly with an efficient hook-removing tool or long-nose pliers. (These are also required when fishing for reef species.) 3. If you want a photo, make it quickly. 4. Use a deep-release descenderŽ device like the Seaqualizer (www. seaqualizer.com) to help the fish get back down to bottom safely. Descender devices include large weights to which the fish is hooked and lowered back to a comfortable depth, then released. 5. Let the fish go promptly„time out of water are the biggest enemy to survival.Time to snap up a few snappers FISHING REPORTFishing continues to be hot along with the weather on the Forgotten Coast. Flounder has been excellent and Bull Minnows and Natural or White grub colors are taking “ sh. We even had a customer in the store with about a 8 to 10 pounder that blew everyones mind including the old timers. Red“ sh is still good as well as Trout in the Bay and Popping rigs and paddle shad worked along the bottom is producing “ sh. Snapper “ shing is now a week in and the “ shing has been awesome, some very large Snapper have been taken along with a good mix of Grouper and Vermillion. We had great luck on the Bluewater boat last week and boated some nice Chicken Dolphin on the outing. Make sure on your run back you troll for some King Mackerel to “ nish up the day. Until next week Happy Fishing !! Red snapper are usually easy to catch, making them good targets for young anglers. [PHOTOS BY FRANK SARGEANT]Cut cigar minnows are among the favorite snapper baits, but they also take squid, shrimp and other cut “ sh.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 A11 SPORTSStar Staff ReportTo the winner belong the spoils, the old adage goes, and the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team cleaned up on all-state selections last week.The Class 1A state cham-pion nearly swept the major awards in the Class 1A balloting, with Brianna Bailey taking both Player of the Year and Pitcher of the Year awards and Gracie Price winning the Defen-sive Player of the Year.First-year Coach Tony Price was named the Coach of the Year.The only major award the Lady Gators did not win was Offensive Player of the Year, which went to a member of the squad from state runner-up Trenton.Bailey simply domi-nated all year for the Lady Gators, who finished 26-4 and won a state champion-ship that had eluded them the prior two years.Bailey was 25-1 with a 0.31 ERA and 282 strike-outs, against just 30 walks, in the circle.At the plate, Bailey, who signed a scholarship with Florida Gulf Coast, hit .279 with 29 RBIs, second on the team, six doubles, a triple and home run.Price, a first-baseman, made no errors while handling more than 300 put-outs and adding 16 assists.She also hit .419 with a .515 on-based percentage, .782 slugging percentage and 1.298 OPS, combined slugging and on-base, all team-highs.Price also led the team in hits (45), doubles (11) and triples (five) and tied with Bailey for the team lead in home runs with two.She also scored runs 27 runs.In addition to Bailey and Price, Lady Gators named to the first team included Cyrina Madrid, Angela Long and Aleah Wooten.Madrid batted .312, scored a team-high 36 runs and led the team with 27 stolen bases without being caught.She had 25 hits and drove in 12.Wooten, who hit .279, was second on the team with 32 runs and stole 20 bases, third on the team, without being caught.Wootens .959 fielding percentage was fourth on the team.Long hit .253, driving in 17 runs while scoring 13, stealing 13 bases and registering a .963 fielding percentage, third on the team.Two other Lady Gators were named to all-state teams.Katie Shealy earned a second-team nod after hitting .288, driving in seven runs and scoring 11.Anna Setterich was an honorable mention selection; she scored 12 runs, drove in 10 and her .978 fielding percentage was second on the team.Bailey, Long and Setterich were graduating seniors, along with Naomi Parker, who did not play this year due to a knee injury suffered during the volleyball season. However, Madrid, Price and Wooten were all soph-omores this past season and Shealy was just an eighth-grader.Lady Gators dominate all-state teamWewahitchkas Brianna Bailey was the state Class 1A Player of the Year and Pitcher of the Year. The state champion Lady Gators placed “ ve players on the Class 1A all-State “ rst team; seven total on allstate teams. [FILE PHOTOS]

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** A12 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The StarThe end of another day in paradise. [COURTESY OF KENNY MOORE] All sorts of wildlife can be found at T.H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. [COURTESY OF CAROL BUIKEMA] The eerie beauty of the Dead Lakes. [COURTESY OF LINDA SEXTON] Kayaking St. Joseph Bay. [COURTESY OF HEATHER BLOOD AND STEVE WOMACK] St. Joseph Bay at peace. [COURTESY OF KAREN GEORGE] Fishing on Indian Pass Beach. [COURTESY OF JOHN SELLERS] A Scarlet Tanager during a stop on its migratory ” ight. [COURTESY OF CAROL AND PHIL DOHMEN] SCENE AROUNDSend us your photos that spotlight the best that Gulf Coast has to offer. This page is for photos submitted to The Star by readers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@ star” .com .

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 B1Trivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. It would be the biggest state in the union if it were ironed out flatŽ is said about what state?Tennessee, North Carolina, Idaho, Montana2. Whose quotes included, Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood.Ž?Twain, Emerson, Thoreau, Frost3. By perpetual legend, Adolf Hitler at one time owned thousands of acres in which U.S. state?Texas, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Georgia4. Which Florida city is the Kitty-Litter Capital of the WorldŽ?Foley, Ocala, Tice, Quincy5. Where is the Palliser Triangle?Pacific ocean, Canada, Indian ocean, Moon6. Papiamento is a type of ...?Language, Seasoning, Ship, Pizza ANSWERS: 1. Idaho, 2. Emerson (Ralph Waldo), 3. Colorado, 4. Quincy, 5. Canada, 6. LanguageTRIVIA FUN COMMUNITY Wilson Casey By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comSmithsonian. Gulf County sports. Sounds like a winning mix. And it figures to be this fall when the Smithsonian Institute will bring its Museum on Main StreetŽ to the Port St. Joe Library, and as the local library seeks to add a dash of community flavor to the exhibit. With photos of the many great athletes, and teams, that have called Gulf County home through the years. The traveling exhibit, Hometown TeamsŽ, examines the many roles that sports play in American society,Ž according to the Smithsonian website. Hometown sports are more than just games … they shape our lives and unite us and celebrate who we are as Americans.Ž The exhibit will arrive in November but preparations have been taking place for some time. Funding for the exhibit was secured through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council, said Nancy Brockman, director of the Gulf County Libraries. They have been marvelous in their support,Ž Brockman said of the humanities council. They are a wonderful way for us to expand our offerings for the community.Ž With Museums on Main StreetŽ the Smithsonian extends its reach into smaller, rural areas, communities with an average population of 8,000; the range is 1,000 to 20,000. Its really to get Smithsonian quality exhibits out in rural areas,Ž Brockman said, noting there are six different exhibits traveling the country as part of the Museums on Main StreetŽ program. Hometown TeamsŽ is merely one of the exhibits which have visited more than 1,400 communities across the country since 1994. The idea came out of a survey of 13 humanities councils and 300 small cultural institutions in the country which underscored that rural areas tend to be isolated from things such as the arts and museums and that libraries and small museums, while lacking in financial assets, were perfect platforms for programs as they serve as community centers. The exhibit, which will fill the Florida History room in the library during its stay, brings Smithsonian quality and space for a local look at Hometown teamsSmithsonian to bring exhibit to PSJ libraryThe Port St. Joe Library is seeking photos pertaining to Gulf County athletics. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] The peninsula state park was a wish of Stones and the park is named in his honor. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Compiled and written by H. Higdon SwattsGrandson of T.H. Stone, written May 20, 2018 Special to The StarTerrell Higdon Stone, also known as T. H. Stone, was born September 19, 1868. He was the son of James Bennett and Jincy Ann Yon Stone and was born at Shiloh Community in Calhoun County, Florida. The Shiloh Community was located near what is now called Scotts Ferry. Mr. Stone, was the greatgrandson of Colonel Henry Dessex Stone, of a well known Stone family of Marianna, and Jackson County Florida. Colonel Stone had a total of four wives and according to Stone family records, he fathered twenty seven (27) sons. The Colonel served with Andrew Jackson during the Civil War between the North and the South. At one time, he had been President of the Territorial Council of Florida. One of the Colonels grandsons, James Bennett Stone, resided in old St. Joseph during the last couple of years before the city was destroyed by yellow fever and a hurricane. Later James Bennett became a member of the Florida Legislature and served from 1868 to 1877. He later located on a creek about four miles north of Wewahitchka. There, he erected a saw REMEMBERING Terrell Higdon StonePioneer of Port St. JoeBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comNearly four months ago Teresa Sosebee received a medical diagnosis to make any child shudder. Her father, just in his late 50s, had 24-48 hours to live as he battled vascular dementia and repeated strokes, a physician told her. In the hours following that diagnosis, she made her dad a pledge. He told me that he wanted to see me do what he had done someday,Ž Sosebee said. He did so much for our family and gave back to his community. I promised him after that diagnosis that I was going to make that happen.Ž Beginning Friday the journey arrives. Sosebee will open Clementinez at 3320 State 386 which she described as a produce market/general store. Not just your average general store,Ž she said.A market callingTeresa Sosebees grandfather established the family produce business in Georgia in 1937. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Local woman honors father with market T. H. Stone See EXHIBIT, B5 See MARKET, B5He told me that he wanted to see me do what he had done someday. He did so much for our family and gave back to his community. I promised him after that diagnosis that I was going to make that happen.ŽTeresa Sosebee, Clementinez ownerSee STONE, B6

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** B2 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Star SOCIETYSpecial to The StarDuring last months fundraiser for the Gulf County and Mexico Beach Domestic Violence Task Force, the Bay Countys Sheriffs Office was among the donors, pledging $1,500 for the cause. Pictured is Pam Martin from the Task Force (left) and Chevina Jackson, a victim advocate with the BCSOs Criminal Investi-gations Division.Donating to stop domestic violence[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarGuardian ad Litem volunteers advocate for abused and neglected children from Gulf County who are currently going through court proceedings. We do this through the use of specially trained volunteers. We are seek-ing strong, stable adults who can be the voice for these children. Your input to the court is valuable and you are the eyes and earsŽ for the judge. An application, finger-prints/background check and training is required. Training is scheduled to begin in July. Please visit our website at www.guardianadlitem14.com or call the Bay County office at 747-5180.Guardian ad Litem volunteers soughtSpecial to The StarThe impact of money on peoples lives will be explored 7 p.m. CT Monday, June 25 at Life-tree Caf.The program, titled Money, Money, Money: Stories from a Lottery Winner,Ž features a filmed interview with Harry Werkema, a man who won $26 million in the Michigan lottery with his police partner. Winning the lottery will change your life,Ž said Werkema. It can have a profound effect for the good, the bad and otherwise.ŽDuring the program, Lifetree participants will have the opportunity to discuss ways their lives would change if they won the lottery. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel.Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or livingwater@livingwa-teratthebeach.com.The good, bad of money discussed at Lifetree CafMr. and Mrs. Phil McCroan of Port Saint Joe, Florida along with Mr. and Mrs. Steven Charles of Marianna, Florida are pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of their children, Haley McCroan to Trent Charles.Haley McCroan is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Barnes of Port Saint Joe, Florida and the late Mrs. Elaine Barnes of Port Saint Joe and the late Mr. and Mrs. Barney McCroan of Port Saint Joe.Trent Charles is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. John Sims and Ms. Maggie Charles and the late Lavon Charles all of Marianna.Haley is a 2015 graduate of Port Saint Joe High School and graduated with her RN degree from Chipola College and is presently continuing her education through Chipola to receive her BSN degree. She is currently employed at Jackson Hos-pital in the Special Care Unit. Trent is a 2015 graduate of Marianna High School and is employed at Philco as an HVAC/R technician and installer.The ceremony will be held at Centennial Park in Port Saint Joe on July 7, 2018, at 6 p.m. ET, with a reception immediately following in the Centen-nial Building.Haley McCroan, Trent Charles to marry Special to The StarWith June 15 being National Elder Abuse Awareness Day, the Domestic Violence committee from GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club was prompted to hold a special day event at the Wewahitchka Senior Center.A sing-a-long was pro-vided by David Ford, Mary Jo and Marjorie Ford, Rick and Carol Bragg and Dudley Balmer. Club member Nancy Balmer accompanied on the keyboard. All are from Taunton's "Chapel in The Woods" church.Following music, the 10 GFWC club members assisted in the Bingo games, with prizes for all of the 13 senior players. Pastor Dudley Balmer, GFWC Booster member, called out the numbers.After lunch the ladies served watermelon as a treat to all. The watermel-ons were donated by David Rich from Rich's IGA. Excess watermelon was delivered to local neighbor-hood elder adults.Workers from Woman's Club included: Nancy Balmer, Carol Childress, Donna Stitz, Catherine Adams, Marlyn Grawey, Rosemary Lewis, Pat Stripling, Carolyn Watson, Rhonda Alderman and Booster member Dudley BalmerWewahitchka Womans Club newsHosting Bingo. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Womans Club members and the Bingo prizes. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] National Elder Abuse Awareness Day Bingo With June 15 being National Elder Abuse Awareness Day, the Domestic Violence committee from GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club was prompted to hold a special day event at the Wewahitchka Senior Center.

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 B3 SCHOOL NEWSMakayan Jones, a “ fth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary School earned her place in the 100 Point Club in Accelerated Reader. Congratulations. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR]Accelerated reading at PSJES Special to The StarTALLAHASSEE-More than 1,000 students were named to the Spring 2018 Deans List at Tallahassee Community College. To qualify, students must earn a semester grade point average of 3.5 or higher.Local students named to the list include: Rachel Douglas and Janeesa Lewis of Port St. Joe.Tallahassee Commu-nity College is consistently ranked as one of the top community colleges in the nation. Every semes-ter, thousands of students choose TCC as the next step in their education journey. With our Associate in Arts degree for transfer to a state university in multiple tracks, as well as over 70 different degree and certificate programs that encompass a variety of fields, TCC has a wide range of educational pathways for students from all walks of life.Local students named to TCC Deans ListSpecial to The StarMONTGOMERY, AL„ The Huntingdon College Office of the Registrar has issued the lists of full-time day students whose aca-demic performance during the spring semester 2018 qualified for recognition on the Colleges Deans List of Honors or Deans List of High Honors. The Deans List of High Honors recog-nizes those who achieved semester grade point aver-ages of 3.8 to 4.00. The Deans List of Honors rec-ognizes those who achieved semester averages of 3.6 to 3.79. To be eligible for inclusion on either list, a student must have received letter grade evaluations on at least 12 hours during the term and must have completed all coursework for the term. An incom-pleteŽ grade on a students grade report precludes the students inclusion on the Deans List.The Deans List of High Honors, Winter 2017 and Spring 2018, included Ker-igan Addie Pickett of Port St. Joe. She is seeking a degree in Communication Studies.Huntingdon announces Spring 2018 Deans ListsSpecial to The StarGulf Coast State College in Panama City was the focus of much excitement during the first week of June as fac-ulty members from Gulf Coast State College and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and PAEC personnel provided an Unmanned Systems STEM Summer Challenge to middle and high school students from Gulf and Franklin counties.Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University provided this high-tech learning opportunity at no cost to participating students through a partnership with the Pan-handle Area Educational Consortium. Gulf Coast State College, another project partner provided space, faculty and tech-nical support.During the Challenge activities, student teams designed, constructed, and flew their hovercraft and coded terrestrial and aerial vehicles to navigate through obstacle courses to conduct autonomous missions.Ž On the final day of the challenge, stu-dents tested their skills by maneuvering the sys-tems during a series of competitions.Students were accompanied by Gulf district teachers, Lana Harrison and Kim McFarland and Franklin district teacher Lucinda Mathews.This is an important opportunity for area students, because unmanned or autonomous systems are gaining in sophistication, use is expanding and the demand for new systems and operators is growing. Annually, the potential financial impact totals in the billions of dollars across military, commercial, personal, and technology sectors. Increased demand is a result of the benefit of using these systems in places where people cannot reach or are unable to perform in a timely and efficient manner.By using cameras, sensors, and computing capabilities, these systems can sense and navigate challenging terrain and provide infor-mation, so that human operators may understand the environment and take action to achieve a variety of missions.Some of the uses include examining agricultural crops, capturing more innovative shots for movies, getting closer to action for accurate news stories, highlighting real estate properties and mapping areas. Unmanned sys-tems are also making their way onto roadways and in use to deliver packages, inspect bridges and oil platforms, for search and rescue missions, to moni-tor drug trafficking across borders, to conduct weather and environmen-tal research, in disaster relief, firefighting, and by the military. Their use captured an international audience during the 2018 Winter Olympics when 1218 Shooting Star drones took to the skies to present an inspir-ing light show, as well as set a Guinness World Records title for the most unmanned aerial vehicles airborne simultaneously.STEM Summer for challenge at Gulf Coast State CollegeParticipants in last weeks STEM camp. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarThe 2018 Sunshine State Scholars program was held last month in Orlando. Each of Floridas school districts select their top 11th grade students in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering or Math-ematics (STEM). Each of the scholars, along with their parents, traveled to Orlando for an extraordinary two-day program. This years program brought 100 high school STEM scholars together to conduct a think tankŽ on tough Florida challenges.The two-day program culminated with the Commissioner of Education honoring each scholar for their significant academic accomplishments and celebrated for the poten-tial they represent for our communities and state. In addition to bringing together the scholars to be honored by the Com-missioner of Education, representatives from Floridas colleges and universities met with the students and discuss higher education oppor-tunities available to them in Florida.Bailey Lake is Gulf Countys Sunshine State ScholarBailey Lake, second from right, was honored last month in Orlando. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] The two-day program culminated with the Commissioner of Education honoring each scholar for their signi cant academic accomplishments and celebrated for the potential they represent for our communities and state.

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** B4 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Star FAITHMens fellowship breakfast at New LifeNew Life Christian Center will host a Mens Fellowship Breakfast 9-11 a.m. Saturday, June 23 at the Center, 5-4 Sixth Strett in Port St. Joe. The speaker will be Brother John Crosby from the Church of God in Christ. Come out and fellowship. Contact the church at 229-7782. VBS at FUMCFirst United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe will host Vacation Bible School June 25-29. The program, Rolling River Rampage: Experience the Ride of a Life-time with GodŽ will be held 9 a.m. until 12 p.m.; each day. This is for children grades K4 through sixth. Register at www.cokesburyvbs.com/portstjoeumc.For more information con-tact Krystal Terry at 227-1724 or krystal@psjumc.org. Over 55 Bunch Eco-Dolphin TourThe Over 55 BunchŽ at Beach Baptist Chapel will host a Captain Andersons Eco Dolphin Tour 12:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. ET Saturday, June. 23. Cost is $18.75 per person and payment is due in cash day of trip. We will car pool from Beach Baptist Chapel. All community Seniors are welcome.Contact Jackie King 850-731-1197 Davis to be honoredThe members of Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will be honoring its Pastor, the Elder Chester Davis and Leading Lady Freddie Davis with appre-ciation services on Sunday, July 1. The Davis's have served Philadelphia and the community untiringly for the past 3 years. Lady Freddie Davis will be honored during the 11 a.m. ET worship hour with CoPastor Shirley Jenkins of New Life Christian Church as the guest speaker. Elder Davis will be honored during the 3 p.m. services with guest minister, the Rev. Paxton Rogers and St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church of Tallahassee leading the ser-vices. Rev. Rogers is a native of Port St. Joe.A cordial invitation is extended to each one to come and be blessed along with the Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church family as it "gives honor where honor is due", to Elder Chester and Lady Freddie Davis. The church is located at 261 Avenue D. Over 55 Bunch at Beach BaptistThe Over 55 BunchŽ at Beach Baptist Chapel invites all to join them in a game of Hand-and-Foot. The Bunch meets 10 a.m. ET every Tues-day and Thursday. Bring your lunch and enjoy getting to know new people. If you enjoy a little friendly competition stop by and try a hand. Dont know how to play? These ladies will be happy to teach you.FAITH BRIEFSMinnie Glen Floyd Fennell age 75, of Fort Worth, Florida, formerly of Campbellton, Florida went home to be with the Lord on Friday, June 15, 2018 in Boynton, Florida. She was born on August 8, 1942, in Campbellton, Florida, to the late Gentle Floyd and the late Era Mae Floyd (Robinson). Her early education was received in the Jackson County School System. Later she moved to Port St. Joe, Florida where she graduated from Washington Senior High School. Minnie and her family moved to Okeechobee, Florida in 1965. While in Okeechobee, she worked as a Cottage Parent for the Florida School for Boys and then the Okeechobee County School District as a Teachers Aide. Minnie retired from the Okeechobee County School District in 2002. God gave her the gift of giving and she never hesitated to give to anyone that was in need. She was also a great cook. She touched many lives with her food and her cooking brought people from many different backgrounds together. Minnie gave her life to Christ at an early age. While in Okeechobee, she attended Bethel Missionary Baptist Church and New St. Stephens African Methodist Episcopal Church. When she moved to Lake Worth, Florida, she worshiped at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church. She is loved and missed by her family, many relatives and friends! She met and married Zebedee Fennell. From this union four children were born: Era Dionne, Candace Lashawn, Derrick Tramane and Raymond Gregory, affectionately known as Tony; she is also survived numerous nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. The family will receive friends from 10 a.m. (EST) until funeral time of 11 a.m., Saturday, June 23, 2018 at the New Bethel AME Church, 146 Avenue A in Port St. Joe, Florida. She will be laid to rest in the Forest Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe under the directions of Christian Memorial Chapel of Graceville, Florida.MINNIE GLEN FLOYD FENNELLGod would have us to respect all people, And earn their respect too. I dont know about you, But its hard for me to do.But when I think about Jesus,How He suffered on the cross for me.He did it for all who belive folks, That we might be set free. We have a choice to make, Whatt is going to be?Jesus said if youre mine take up your cross And follow after me.Will you start today respecting people And try to be respected?What ever you do in the name of Jesus, I know it will be accepted. Billy JohnsonRespected or rejected SEE MORE ONLINE AT STARFL.COM FirstBaptistChurch102THIRDSTREET€PORTST.JOE BuddyCaswell,MinisterofMusic&EducationBobbyAlexander,MinistertoStudentsNewServiceScheduleforFirstBaptistChurch NewServiceScheduleforFirstBaptistChurch Dr.BoydEvansPastor4525064 SundayMorningScheduleBlendedWorshipwithChoir/PraiseTeamƒ8:30AM GreatCommissionSundaySchoolƒƒƒƒ...9:45AM ContemporaryWorshipw/Bandƒƒƒƒƒ..10:45AM WednesdayDinnerƒƒƒ..................ƒƒ.5:00-6:00pm AWANAƒƒƒƒƒ..............ƒ.6:00-7:30pm SurrenderStudentMinistryƒ.6:15-7:30pm Prayer/BibleStudyƒƒƒƒƒ.6:15-7:30pm Nurseryƒƒƒƒƒƒƒ....ƒƒ..6:00-7:30pmwww.fbcpsj.org

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** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 B5By Ray BodreyGulf County Extension Director UF/IFAS Special to The StarThe Coastal Shoreline Restoration module is a 4-day course filled with knowledge of marine ecology and restoration principles regarding our Panhandle shores. Some of the topics that will be discussed are living shorelines, coastal processes & sea level rise, mangroves and their impact on our bays and oyster restoration efforts. The class dates for the course are July 12 in Bay County, August 9 and 10 in Gulf County and September 20 in Franklin County. Classroom presentations will be accompanied by field trips. For tentative course agenda, see registration link below. The Florida Master Naturalist Program (FMNP) is an adult education program developed by the University of Florida and provided by many UF/IFAS Extension Agents and participating organizations throughout the State of Florida. This course focuses on living shoreline restoration and is intended to improve participants understanding of the science and application of living shorelines. It includes foundational training on the ecology, benefits, methods, and monitoring techniques for restoring oyster reefs, mangroves, and salt marsh. Graduates of this course will be better prepared to promote and assist with restoration projects. You will receive 24 hours of in-person classroom learning, field trips, and hands-on experience. The registration fee is $155 $175 (depending on materials) and includes a detailed course manual, FMNP certificate, and entry into the online FMNP Database for verification as required for obtaining CEUs or in-service credits. We welcome anyone interested in shoreline restoration (homeowners, contractors, concerned citizens, politi cians, managers, or naturalists). To see the tentative course agenda and register, navigate to http:// www.masternaturalist.ifas.ufl.edu/. Then select the current course offeringsŽ tab and view current courses under coastal shoreline restoration. € Registration closes at 10 a.m. July 6, 2018. Special Instructions: € Field trip locations & times may change due to unforeseen circumstances. It is the students responsibility to verify field information. € Course time schedule does not include travel time, except between a.m. and p.m. € Transportation and lunches are not included. € Students need to bring lunch and water bottle to all classes. € Field activities can take up to 2 to 4 hours and may involve wading, walking, or paddling.Upcoming Florida Master Naturalist ProgramSpecial to The StarTALLAHASSEE… This week, the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO) announced the launch of a new website, FloridaDisaster.biz, to help Florida businesses prepare for and recover from hurricanes and other disasters. By providing critical information before, during and after a disaster, the website will help businesses recover and get Floridians back to work following emergencies. Features of the new website include: € A disaster planning toolkit to help businesses prepare for hurricanes and other disasters; € Critical disaster updates from the State Emergency Operations Center to keep businesses informed during emergencies; and € A Business Damage Assessment Survey to help businesses get back up and running after an emergency. Governor Scott said, Floridians understand the importance of being prepared for disasters, especially during hurricane season. This new website will help businesses make safe and informed decisions for themselves, their employees and their customers. Every Florida business can visit FloridaDisaster.biz, make a disaster plan and stay updated as we move further into hurricane season.Ž Cissy Proctor, DEO Executive Director, said, The new FloridaDisaster.biz provides key resources and information to help Floridas job creators in the face of a disaster. We know that businesses, like individuals and families, must be prepared with a plan, and FloridaDisaster.biz will guide businesses step-bystep to help them prepare and recover quickly from an emergency.Ž Wes Maul, Director of the Florida Division of Emergency Management, said, Effectively preparing for, responding to and recovering from disasters takes input from the whole community. This valuable tool will boost Floridas private sector engagement during emergencies and help raise awareness of available resources. Ensuring our businesses can reopen quickly is critical to the speedy recovery of our impacted communities.Ž FloridaDisaster.biz is a partnership between DEO and the Florida Division of Emergency Management. Other partners include the U.S. Department of Commerce, Florida State Universitys Center for Disaster Risk Policy, the Florida Chamber of Commerce, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, the Florida Retail Federation, VISIT FLORIDA, the Florida Small Business Development Center Network and others. DEO is the lead agency for the support of business, industry and economic stabilization during a statewide disaster.New website helps businesses prepare for natural disasters[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Register now for Coastal Shoreline Restoration Hometown TeamsŽ celebrates the role of athletics in small communities. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] sports. Its really, really neat,Ž Brockman said. We can bring a local flavor to it.Ž The connection between the community and its athletics seemed a perfect fit, Brockman added. Brockman and staff are currently soliciting and combing through historic photos pertaining to sports donated to the library for use during the exhibit. The plan is for at least one slideshow pertaining to local sports to be part of the exhibit and a high school yearbook will also be included. Brockman and volunteer Mimi Minnick have also undergone training required to assemble, disassemble, understand and explain the exhibit. The exhibit includes a series of panels pertaining to American hometown sports and there is a seat of bleachers from which folks can lift a seat cushion and learn about local or national sports. It all has to do with how sports are part of small towns,Ž Brockman said. The library, as noted, is soliciting photos from the community and Brockman is placing a particular focus on expanding the images beyond the troika of football, basketball and baseball. Soccer is big around here and so is track and field and youth sports,Ž Brockman said. I want to expand as much as we can.Ž EXHIBITFrom Page B1To begin, the store will be open 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET every day but Tuesday at the outset, though Sosebee said the hours will also depend on the season, The produce side of the store is something that Sosebee carries in the genes. Founded by her grandfather in 1937, Sosebees Produce was a supplier from North Georgia to western North Carolina for decades. Her father took over the business upon his fathers death and continued the business until his illness just over four years ago. After 12 years in the medical field and her dad very sick, Sosebee decided the time was right for a move. Her dad wanted to be near the ocean and they had relatives that spoke glowingly of the area. She said they had been welcomed and nurtured by the community the past four years. And when she says her store will feature fresh produce, given her familys connections in the business, Sosebee means fresh. When I think of it I say farm to table,Ž she said. In addition to a regional network, Sosebee said she would be tapping into local resources, receiving fresh eggs from Wewahitchka and fresh Tupelo honey products from keepers based in Overstreet. The general store side of the endeavor, she added, will also take advantage of an array of locally produced items, from toiletries to sundries. And once a month, Sosebee will hold a kind of mini-farmers market, what she called a bazaarŽ, outside her store. She will invite four or five vendors, of the variety one might encounter at Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach farmers markets, to showcase their wares for a day. I want to bring local art to the store,Ž Sosebee said. Its really important to me.Ž She will focus on what she called cost-effectiveŽ merchandise: the vendor makes a living but nothing beyond the means of a traveler along the road. It wouldnt make sense to have $200 items,Ž Sosebee said. I want to make it cost-effective for everyone.Ž And while she will not require, she will encourage each of those vendors to set aside a percentage of their sales that day to be used as a contribution to a local charity. My soft spot is the elderly,Ž Sosebee said, noting the work of Cross Shores Care Center. Speaking of which, it would be appropriate here to mention that four months after that horrific diagnosis, Sosebees father celebrated a birthday Tuesday and was recently discharged from hospice care. This is all about him,Ž Sosebee said of her store. Vendors interested in being part of Sosebees monthly bazaars can call her at 630-7743. MARKETFrom Page B1 This is all about him.Ž Teresa Sosebee, Clementinez ownerSoccer is big around here and so is track and eld and youth sports. I want to expand as much as we can.ŽNancy Brockman, director of the Gulf County Libraries.

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** B6 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Starmill and a grist mill on the property. The creek to this day is known as Stone Mill Creek. T. H. Stone labored with his father, James Bennett Stone and four brothers in the saw mill, falling and hauling logs. T. H. attended the meager schools of the community but mostly his education was secured in his home via tutoring by his parents. Seeking to further his education, he attended a business college in Columbus, Georgia and after several months of diligent study, was awarded a diploma in accounting and bookkeeping. In 1891, T. H. Stone went into business for himself, opening a general mercantile store at Magnolia Landing on the Chipola River about four miles northeast of Wewahitchka. In addition, he was employed by the Federal Government as a mail carrier. The steamboats delivered the mail to his store and he carried it to Wewahitchka by horseback. Stone operated his store at Magnolia Landing for thirteen (13) years. On May 2, 1904 Stone married Miss Annie Virginia Wynn, who was a native of Dublin, Georgia. Miss Wynn had been spending time with her aunt and uncle, who at the time operated the Iola Hotel, located on the Chipola River near Magnolia Landing. Stones father had left him a vast tract of land which was centered around the site of old St. Joseph. This tract extended from what is now Beacon Hill all the way to Cape San Blas. In 1903, he moved to what is now Port St. Joe and established a navel stores business (turpentine). In 1904 he moved his young bride to the wilderness to begin a new life and raise a family. Building the first home, he and his wife became the first permanent residents of a new town, which later would be established as the City of Port St. Joe, Florida. The first child, a little girl named Etta, was born in 1905 and died at the young age of six months. In 1907, a son named Nobie Higdon Stone was born and in 1909, a second daughter was born. Her name was Maybel Stone. A third daughter named Ola was born in 1913. In 1914, another son named Silas R. Stone was born and in 1921 a third son named Jesse V. Stone was born. In 1909, the town of Port St. Joe was founded. It was also this year when the first post office was established. On March 10, 1910, by act of the Florida State Legislature, the town was officially named Port St. Joe. T. H. Stone was named the citys first postmaster and was considered the founder of the new town. On May 7, 1910, the first excursion and passenger train over the new Apalachicola & Northern Railroads tracks left Apalachicola at 8 a.m. and arrived in Port St. Joe 50 minutes later. Several hundred Passengers were greeted with a picnic lunch at the beach provided by the ladies of the M.E Church of Apalachicola as a fund raising event. The round trip fare was fifty cents. The railroad had wanted the city to be named Port St. Joe because of their interest in the citys deep water port. This was the reason they built their line to St. Joe in the first place. Later the railroad would move its headquarters to Port St. Joe. The City of Port St. Joe was incorporated on July 1, 1913. Thomas J. Howard served as the citys first mayor, but resigned before the end of that year. T. H. Stone then became mayor and served for several terms. He promoted the city at every opportunity. Many new homes were being built and the first public school at Port St. Joe opened. The railroad docks were expanded and the population grew to close to 1800 according to census records. In 1922, a state monument was erected to commemorate the assembling of the First Constitutional Convention of the State of Florida at the site of the former city of St. Joseph. On January 11, 1923, it was dedicated and a huge celebration was held hosted by the cities of Port St. Joe, Apalachicola and the State of Florida. The Monument was unveiled by Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Stones oldest daughter, Maybel Stone and her friend Elizabeth Jones. Miss Jones was the daughter of other early Port St. Joe pioneers, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Jones. This monument still stands today in Port St. Joe at the site of the Florida State Museum. Port St. Joe as well as Wewahitchka and all surrounding areas were all a part of Calhoun County. T. H. Stone as Port St. Joes Mayor and also a Calhoun County Commissioner was the outstanding spokesman for the division of Calhoun County. After seven years of opposition by the residents of the City of Blountstown and surrounding areas, Mr. Stone with help of several state legislators, was finally able to split the county and Floridas 66th county was born on June 6, 1925. Elections were held and a new slate of county commissioners was elected. When the new county held its first organization meeting, the first order of business was to select a name for the new county. One of the commissioners made a motion to name the county, Satsuma County. Mr. Stone stood to his feet and asked for permission to address the new commission. He then stated It is true, that the new county has an abundance of Satsuma trees but with one hard freeze, they could all be wiped out. Why dont we name the county Gulf County? That gulf will never run dryŽ. The next moment, there was a motion and a second made and a vote of 5-0 to name the county Gulf. Stone served Gulf County as County Commissioner for several years and later as a State Legislator during the 1933-35 Session. In 1930, Port St. Joe began to experience a downturn in the local economy. The lumber mills failed and closed down after many years of cutting and re-cutting of the timberlands. The countrys banks were failing and with national panic and depression sweeping the country, people began to move out of Port St. Joe in order to find enough work to feed their families. The population dwindled to 853 people. Fearing that the city would soon become little but a memory, Stone and others began to promote the city in several ways. The deep water port had always attracted the shipping industry and fishing was definitely an asset but with little or no tourism left, the economy had dwindled to almost nothing. In 1933, Alfred I du Pont, a member of the famous manufacturing family of du Ponts became interested in industrial developments, especially those based on chemical research. When the possibility of making paper from southern pine wood became apparent, he and his bother-in-law, Edward Ball, surveyed the Northwest Florida Region. Encouraged by the results of the survey, Mr. du Pont purchased 60,000 acres of Northwest Florida timberland. Mr. du Pont knew that, for a southern paper industry to become a reality, a vast amount of timberland would be required. Soon after the first land purchase, Mr. Ball concluded a transaction with a bond-holding company in St. Louis, Missouri, that gave Mr. du Pont ownership of five Port St. Joe companies and an additional 240,000 acres of timberland. The companies acquired were: Apalachicola Northern Railroad Company, St. Joseph Telephone & Telegraph Company, St. Joseph Land Development Company, St. Joe Dock Company and Port St. Joe Company. A very large tract of Port St. Joe area timberland was also purchased from T. H. Stone. The St. Joe Paper Company was founded in 1936, a year after Mr. du Ponts death. The mill went into operation in 1938. Because many new families were moving into Port St. Joe, a substantial need for housing developed. T. H. Stone, being the largest land owner in Port St. Joe Proper, began to sell lots for houses to be built by the new citizens. It has been said that he gave many lots to needy families with the only stipulation, that they build their family a home. Stone also built several boarding houses as well a few rental homes to help alleviate the housing shortage. He also built several store buildings downtown, to be rented to newfound business adventures. During WW II, the Federal Government built a new Air Force Base in Bay County. The original mission of the base was to train pilots to fly Missions supporting the allied STONEFrom Page B1The 1923 dedication of the Constitution Convention Monument. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] See STONE, B7

PAGE 19

** The Star | Thursday, June 21, 2018 B7 B7 20807 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 16-62DR TIMOTHY MARTIN SOUTHERLAND Petitioner/Former Husband, and MADELAINE KRISTIEN BRYANT, f/k/a MADELAINE KRISTEN SOUTHERLAND, Respondent/Former Wife NOTICE OF ACTION TO: TIMOTHY MARTIN SOUTHERLAND ADDRESS UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition for Modification of Custody and to Establish Child Support has been filed by Madelaine Kristen Bryant and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any, on H. Matthew Fuqua, Esq., Former Wifes Attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 1508, Marianna, Florida 32447, on or before 30 days from the first date of this publication of this notice. You must file the original of your written defenses with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, either before service on petitioners attorney or immediately after service. Otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Dated this 12th day of June, 2018. REBECCA L. NORRIS, Clerk Gulf County, Florida By:Lynn M. Barnes Deputy Clerk Pub: June 21, 28,July 5, 12, 2018 20647S FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner vs. ETHAN R. WOODARD, Case #40521 Respondent NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ETHAN R. WOODARD, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before July 23, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: May 23, 2018 Dean Register, Professionalism Director FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By: -s-Ashley Black, Division Representative Pub June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018 20649S FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner vs. RYAN M. HATHCOX Case #41277 Respondent NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RYAN M. HATHCOX, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before July 23, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: May 23, 2018 Dean Register, Professionalism Director FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By: -s-Stacey Price, Division Representative Pub: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018 20731S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 5T Wealth Partners, LP, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are as follows: Application #2018-06 R.E. No 00624-050R Tax Sale No. 00624-050R Certificate #2011-101 Date of Issuance : May 25, 2011 Name in which assessed:R.E Tracy D Ritter a/k/a Tracy Denise Ritter Description of Property : Lot 22, Block LŽ RED BULL ISLAND UNIT NO. 2, an Unrecorded Subdivision, in Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of Section 30, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and thence go South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds East (Bearing Base) along the West boundary line of said Section 30, for a distance of 422. 7 feet to the Southerly right of way boundary line of Canning Drive (formerly River Road; having a 66 foot wide right of way), thence go South 89 Degrees 12 Minutes 00 Seconds East along the Southerly right of way boundary line of Canning Drive for a distance of 195.00 feet to a point of intersection with the Easterly right of way boundary line of Sesame Street (having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence go South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds East along the Easterly right of way boundary line of Sesame Street for a distance of 704.60 feet to a point of intersection with the Northerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue (having a 60 foot wide right of way); thence go South 88 Degrees 32 Minutes 00 Seconds East along the Southerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue for a distance of 945.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, departing the Northerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue, go North 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds West, for a distance of 135.00 feet; thence go South 88 Degrees 32 Minutes 00 Seconds East for a distance of 90.00 feet; thence go South 00 Degrees 00 Minutes 00 Seconds East for a distance of 135.00 feet to the Northerly right of way boundary line of Tupelo Avenue; thence go North 88 Degrees 32 Minutes 00 Seconds West along said Northerly right of way boundary line for a distance of 90.00 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel having an area of 0.28 acres, more or less. All of said property being in Gulf County, State Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 11th day of July, 2018. DATED: June 4, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub: June 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018 20796S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 18CP-32 IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of JOSEPH KYLE RICH, deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS The arrival of the railroad brought vast changes to early Port St. Joe, and Stone was front and center. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] force war efforts around the world. Around 1944, the Government found a need for property to be used for target practice and soon condemned Cape San Blas, using Eminent Domain laws to obtain ownership of the Cape. T. H. Stone, being the owner of the Cape, had sold large tracts of land to others but had remained the largest landowner with several thousand acres of timberland, with bay front and gulf front beaches. The Government was required to give justŽ compensation to the property owners. T. H. Stone, with the largest tract, was paid just $10,000 and others much less. Many years after WW II was over, the Government declared Cape San Blas property to be surplus land but retained ownership until the early 1960s. Prior to T. H. Stones death in 1958, efforts to regain ownership had been fruitless. It was his desire to regain ownership, so that one day a state park might be built on this pristine land. Stones son, Attorney Silas R. MickeyŽ Stone, made numerous trips to Washington D. C., representing the previous land owners, hoping to have the land returned to no avail. In 1963, through the efforts of the St. Joseph Historical Society and under the direction of its president, Jesse V. Stone, who was T. H Stones youngest son, began a campaign to have portions of the Cape property deeded from the Federal Government, to the State of Florida for the purpose of building a new state park. This campaign consisted of some 1100 letters being mailed to public officials as well as obtaining 63 resolutions from local government, social and educational groups. Most of these letters were directed to congressmen and Senators to support the request to deed the requested property to the state. In that same year, some 900 letters were written to the Florida State Governor, State Representatives and Senators, requesting that appropriation of funds be made to begin construction and development of the park. In December of that year, The Federal Government released 671 acres. By 1966, another 1700 acres was released. In August of 1967, the first phase of the Park was completed and the formal dedication was set for September 6, 1967. By act of Legislature in 1967, the name of the state park, previously named as St. Joseph Peninsula State Park was officially renamed T. H Stone Memorial State Park. This bill, Number 1162, was filed by State Representative of the Ninth District, Ben C. Williams and became law upon the official signing by Governor Claude R. Kirk. On September 6, 1967, T.H. Stone Memorial State Park was officially dedicated with Mrs. Annie V. Stone and other Stone family members being honored during the ceremony. T.H. Stone Memorial State Park is today one of the largest, certainly one of the finest and one of the most beautiful state parks in the State of Florida. The white sand beaches have been selected as the finest beaches in the world several times during the past few years. T. H. Stone, most certainly, would be mighty proud. This information was compiled from family and historical records and written by H. Higdon Swatts, grandson of T.H. Stone. STONEFrom Page B6

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B B 8 8 Thursday, June 21, 2018 | The Star CLASSIFIEDS NF-4529446 NEWLY RENOVATED! (2) Lanark Village Apartments 2 bed, 1 bath Units $1200/ month, $1200 SD All Utilities Included NO PETS AVAILABLE JULY 1st Sands of Carrabelle 3 bed, 2 bath Condo $1200/month, $1200 SD NO PETS AVAILABLE JULY 1st Lanark Village 3 bed, 1 bath $775/month, $1000 SD Pets Considered Adult/Child Care Manager needed to provide case management services in our Apalachicola and Bristol Florida Offices. Requirements: *Bachelor’s Degree in Human Services field and 1 year of mental health experience with adults and children required. Bachelor’s Degree in non-related field acceptable with 3 years of mental health experience with adults and children. *Official transcripts required. *Valid Driver’s License with no more than 6 points over 3 years. $15.40 per hour (includes location differential) Please apply at www.apalacheecenter.org or call Stephanie Luckie at 850-523-3212 or email at stephaniel@apalacheecenter .org for details. Housekeeping Property InspectorsPart-time seasonal positions available. Weekend work required. Personal vehicle, valid driver’s license, and automobile insurance needed. Competitive wages. Come by Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. located at 60 East Gulf Beach Drive to apply in person or email Quentin Allen to request an application be emailed to you. quentin@collinsvacationrentals.com Maintenance Technician WantedFull time position with competitive wage and benefits. Weekend work required. Must have maintenance experience. Need to be detailed oriented and have basic computer skills. Valid driver’s license required. Come by Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. located at 60 East Gulf Beach Drive to apply in person or email Quentin Allen to request an application be emailed to you. quentin@collinsvacationrentals.com HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JOSEPH KYLE RICH, deceased, whose date of death was March 3, 2018, File Number 18CP-32, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and that personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS OR DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2018. Thomas S. Gibson Rish & Gibson, P.A 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-8211 Attorney for Petitioner FL Bar No. 0350583 Danielle E. Rich 352 Parker Farm Road Wewahitchka, Florida 3246 Personal Representative Pub June 14, 21, 2018 20816S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2017-CA-000080 CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. RUSTY E. WARD and MEREDITH M. WARD, jointly and severally; MELVIN WARD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3 and UNKNOWN TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Summary Judgment dated May 30th, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017 CA 000080 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Capital City Bank is the Plaintiff, and Rusty E. Ward and Meredith M. Ward, jointly and severally and Melvin Ward are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 12th day of July, 2018, except the Clerk shall not conduct the sale unless a representative of Plaintiff is present, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: P arcel 1: The North half (N1/2) of the following described property: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence North 105 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 105 feet; thence East 105 feet to the Point of Beginning, being ln the NW of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 2: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 157 1/2 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to the point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 3: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 105 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 5th, 2018. REBECCA L. NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of Court By: /s/ B.A. Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, as no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at Post Office Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at 850-747 5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20814S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are Application #2018-07 Tax Sale Certificate # 366 Name in which assessed: Charles Orndorf R.E. No. 01656-010R Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 Description of Property: Begin at the Old Cemetery Corner in Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and run North for 664 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run North for 75 feet, thence run West for 100 feet, thence run South for 75 feet, thence run East for 100 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Section 13, Township 4 South, Range to West, Gulf County, Florida. All of said property being in Gulf County, State Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 18th day of July, 2018. DATED: June 11, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub June 14, 21,28, July 5, 2018 20853S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 18-031 PR Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF LEE ROY STRICKLAND Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Lee Roy Strickland, deceased, whose date of death was February 22, 2018, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s Estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against Decedent’s Estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 21st, 2018. Personal Representatives: s/ Debbie J George Debbie J. George 502 Nathan Drive Anchorage, AK 99518 s/ Derek Roy Strickland Derek Roy Strickland 13550 Windward Court Anchorage, AK 99218 Attorney for Personal Representatives: s/Glenda F Swear ingen Glenda F. Swearingen Attorney Florida Bar Number: 306339 PO Box 1009 Marianna, FL 32446 Phone: (850) 526-4465 Fax: (850) 526-2316 E-Mail: glenda@aginggra ciously .com Pub: June 21, 28, 2018 20862S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2017-CA-000080 CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. RUSTY E. WARD and MEREDITH M. WARD, jointly and severally; MELVIN WARD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3 and UNKNOWN TENANT #4, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Summary Judgment dated May 30, 2018, entered in Case No. 2017-CA-000080 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Capital City Bank is the Plaintiff, and Rusty E. Ward and Meredith M. Ward, jointly and severally and Melvin Ward are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 12th day of July, 2018, except the Clerk shall not conduct the sale unless a representative of Plaintiff is present, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: P arcel 1: The North half (N112) of the following described property: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence North 105 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 105 feet; thence East 105 feet to the Point of Beginning, being in the NW V4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 2: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 157 1/2 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to the point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. And, P arcel 3: Begin at the Southeast corner of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West; thence run North 660 feet; thence West 525 feet; thence North 105 feet for point of beginning; thence North 52 1/2 feet; thence West 105 feet; thence South 52 1/2 feet; thence East 105 feet to point of beginning; being in the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 8 West. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 5, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of Court By: Barbara Baxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, as no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at Post Office Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at 850. 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduleld appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20922S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 16000054CAAXMX DIVISION WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, DURWARD L. OWENS A/K/A DURWARD LENTON OWENS, JR. A/KJA DURWARD LENTON OWENS, DECEASED, et al, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Ne_ June 6th, and entered in Case No. 16000054CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust, is the Plaintiff and The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, or other Claimants claiming by, through, under, or against, Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Anna Elizabeth Owens aik/a Anna E. Owens, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; CitiBank, N.A., successor in interest to Citibank, Federal Savings Bank; Dana Michelle Owens f/k/a Dana Michelle Christley f/k/a Dana M. Christley, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Dana Owens Hardman a/k/a Dana 0. Hardman a/k/a D. 0. Hardman, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Donna Owens Hubbard a/k/a Donna 0. Hubbard, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Janet Bankston; John Bankston; Sarah Owens Hammock a/k/a Sarah 0. Hammock, as an Heir of the Estate of Durward L. Owens a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, Jr. a/k/a Durward Lenton Owens, deceased; Unknown Party #1 n/k/a Russell Hardman; and Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 12th day of July, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 7 IN BLOCK C, LAKE COMO, AN UNRECORDED ADDITION TO TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1 IN BLOCK 15, CORRECTIVE REPLAT OF TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION, UNIT ONE, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LAKE VIEW DRIVE, AS PER TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION UNIT TWO RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 44, 99.62 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 40 DEGREES 38 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 105.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 42 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 106.82 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 109.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 52 MINUTES EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 109.09 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 110 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 77 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST, 159.92 FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 18.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, 41.86 FEET (THE CHORD BEING SOUTH 11 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 33.36 FEET) TO THE P.O.C. ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A COUNTY ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 15 SECONDS ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 167.39 FEET; THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 120 FEET; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGRESS 54 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST, 148.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 225 LAND DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 7th day of June, 2018 Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: Barbara Baxter Rebecca L. Norris Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@albertellila w .com If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Pub June 21, 28, 2018 20942S NEPA/S106 PUBLIC NOTICE American Towers LLC is proposing to construct a 163’ tall monopole telecommunications tower off of Cape San Blas Road, Cape San Blas, Gulf County, FL, 32456, Tax Parcel ID 06268-721R. The new tower structure will not be lit and the tower facility will include a 50’ x 50’ lease area and associated easements, along with a 30ft buffer surrounding the lease area. American Towers LLC seeks comments from all interested persons on any potential significant impact the proposed action could have on the quality of the human environment pursuant to 47 C.F.R. Section 1.1307, including potential impacts to historic or cultural resources that are listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Interested persons may comment or raise concerns about the proposed action by submitting an e-mail to enviro.services@american tower .com Paper comments can be sent to: American Towers LLC, Attn: Environmental Compliance, 10 Presidential W ay W oburn, MA 01801 Requests or comments should be limited to environmental and historic/cultural resource impact concerns, and must be received on or before July 21, 2018. This invitation to comment is separate from any local planning/zoning process that may apply to this project. Re: 21806018 Pub June 21, 28, 2018 Port Saint Joe 2017 Marvin June 22nd & 23rd 8am -3pmYard SaleAntique Beds, Bikes, Toddler Clothes, Golf Equipment, and Lots of Other Stuff! Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2200 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $577/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLJune 30th & July 1st 9:00 am -5:00 pmGeneral Admission $6Concealed Weapons Classes 1pm Daily, $50Reservation Suggested850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407Please Support Your Local Small Gun Shows College Student Offering Accelerated Introductory Piano Lessons. Ages 7-11, twice a week, Ages 12+, three times a week $25 per lesson Teaching in Port St. Joe. References available upon request. (239)431-1848 FREE TV Old Sanyo 32 in TV Still Works Call 227-7670 Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 855-259-0557 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill! Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www .Norwood Sawmills.com or call (800)578-1363 Ext. 300N Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Used Single Wides Zone Three, 2016 and 2017 Models. Call: 229-246-1218 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 The Star 850-747-5020or visit us online at emeraldcoastmarketplace.comFor all your buying and selling needs. Spot Advertising works!