Citation

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group,Tim Thompson - Publisher
Creation Date:
December 30, 2004
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Star, W.S. Smith, Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000358020 ( ALEPH )
33602057 ( OCLC )
ABZ6320 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047323 ( LCCN )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Full Text

PAGE 1

** Volume 80 Number 24 Subscribe to The Star Phone: 800-345-8688 Opinion .................... A4 Letters ...................... A5 Outdoors ................. A10 Sports...................... A11 School News .............. B3 Faith .........................B4 Obituaries ................. B4 Classifieds ........... B7-B8 A2Lots to doA7Library program Thursday, March 29, 2018 PIONEERS OF THE PAST, A5 BEAR TIMES, B1 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 @PSJ_Star facebook.com/psjstar50 ¢ For breaking news, visit star” .com By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comDuring the summer of 2017, the membership of two local veterans organizations unanimously supported resolutions to permanently honor their namesakes on U.S. Highway 98.On Tuesday, the Board of County Commissioners pro-vided unanimous support to the effort, forwarding to the countys state legislative delegation resolutions to rename sections of U.S. 98.State lawmakers must provide final approval.Under one resolution, a section of U.S. 98 from the Tapper Bridge to WindMark would be named in honor of John C. Gainous.Gainous, who grew up in Port St. Joe and Highland View, was killed in action in Vietnam.The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10069 in High-land View, which celebrated 50 years of service to veter-ans last year, was renamed in his memory.I am proud we are getting this done today,Ž said Com-missioner Phil McCroan.The second resolution County urges renaming of U.S. 98 sectionsAim to honor John Gainous, Willis Rowan Butlers nal meetingCounty administrator Don Butler attended his “ nal commission meeting Tuesday, his retirement effective at the end of the week. Butler has served more than 28 years, longer than any other current administrator in Florida. He is the only administrator in Florida to hold the title of chief administrator. This has been a great ride,Ž Butler said. Thanks to the County Commission for giving me a job. Thank you to everybody who helped me along. Its been good. Im not changing my phone number. Call me anytime and Ill be honored to help.Ž Michael Hammond, the deputy administrator, will succeed Butler effective Monday. We appreciate your commitment to Gulf County,Ž Commissioner Sandy Quinn, Jr., told Butler. (Butler) is a great mane and we appreciate everything youve done.ŽBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comFor two incumbents, the re-election campaign began and ended Wednesday.For four political newcomers, Wednesday dropped a green flag on what figures to likely be just round one.Candidate qualifying for the May Port St. Joe municipal elections ended at 12 p.m. ET Wednesday, with six candidates and just one remaining race.Incumbent Commissioners Eric Langston and Brett Lowry drew no oppo-sition, meaning both are automatically re-elected.For Lowry, that means a second two-year term in the Group 3 seat.Langston, appointed to the Group 1 seat late last year after the seat-forfei-ture of William Thursbay, earned a one-year term.The seat will be back on the ballot in 2019.The other seat in play this was year was that of Group 4, currently occu-pied by Commissioner Rex Buzzett.In the weeks leading up to candidate qualifying, Buzzett was non-commital on a sixth term.In the end, he stepped away from the Commission. Seeking to take his place are, in alphabetical order, Scott Hoffman, Rosemary Brown Lewis, Aaron Little and James Sickels.Given that the race is non-partisan, the presence of more than two PSJ ballot setThe department is seeking training for any possible scenario. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comThe city of Port St. Joe will turn to the State Revolving Fund for dollars to assist in the replacement of sewer lines beneath Long Ave.The loan/grant request is a significant portion of the citys efforts to overhaul Long Ave., including replacing aging infrastruc-ture below and the road above.Long has, pardon the pun, long been a thorn for city officials, one of the key motor vehicle arteries in the city but with a badly beaten road surface and issues beneath the road. The city has $1 million in road bond money from last years bond renewal by the Board of County Commis-sioners, money earmarked specifically for Long Ave.However, Long also sits atop water and sewer PSJ to seek SRF funding for LongBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comThis number urges atten-tion: on any given day, there can be as many as 100 military aircraft in the skies over Gulf County.Fighter aircraft, drones, unmanned and manned, dot the sky as Tyndall Air Force Base is home to several aircraft squadrons, the Gulf of Mexico as fine a training site as there is in the country.Many of those aircraft can be carrying live munitions.What if the worst scenario plays out, an aircraft comes down in Gulf County, along the beaches or coastal areas?That was question posed that was answered last week as members of the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department traveled to learn and train for a day with the Tyndall AFB Fire/Rescue Training for the worst Tyndall AFB/SGCVFD partner for training The hope for SGCVFD is to partner with Tyndall Fire/Rescue for monthly training. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR]See TRAINING, A8See LONG, A8 See RENAME, A8 See BALLOT, A7

PAGE 2

** A2 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star Star Staff ReportAhead is one of those weeks, and weekends, when there just dont seem to be enough hours in the day for all the calendar offers. Here are a few, just a few, suggestions for entertainment or recreation. Enjoy savory food for a good cause. The Willis V. Rowan American Legion Post 116 will host its annual Fish Fry/ Chicken BBQ Friday, Good Friday, from 11 a.m. ET till the food runs out. Meals are available for $8 a plate. The event will be held at the redesigned Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. Dine at the park or take it home. All proceeds will benefit the Veteran Charities in the community.Easter Egg Hunt Saturday. The Junior Service League of Port St. Joe hosts the annual Easter Egg Hunt 10 a.m. ET Saturday at George Core Park, located off U.S. 98 in Port St. Joe by the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. All kids ages 11 and under are welcome to attend. The event is free and a great time with prizes in every egg. There will be two candyfilled piatas, Peter Rabbit storytime, photo opportunity with the Easter Bunny (the first 150 kids receive a present), as well as face painting, so bring your camera. Don't forget to bring your Easter basket! Please arrive early/on time to ensure your child gets to join in the fun! The eggs go pretty quickly once the hunt begins!. Learn local history during Archaeology Weekend. Hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network and the University of West Florida, the weekend, from today through Saturday, will offer a series of events, all free and open to the public, to train a spotlight on local history. Local events begin 11 a.m. ET today with a presentation on Shipwrecks of Northwest FloridaŽ at the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Public Library. Friday, the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center hosts a presentation at 6 p.m. ET which is titled: Going Ballistic: Archaeology of Floridas Natural Bridge Battlefield.Ž The weekend wraps up with two events on Saturday. From 10 a.m. until 12 p.m. ET in the T.H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, the Archaeology Network will have a local history and archaeology information booth set up to allow folks to chat with an archaeologist, discover local history and bring artifacts for identification. At 2 p.m. ET Saturday at the Constitution Convention Museum State Park in Port St. Joe, the Dash through the PastŽ history and archaeology scavenger hunt will be held. The hunt, appropriate for all ages, is a journey through historic Port St. Joe. Catch the Blue Moon from atop the lighthouse. The next full moon climb at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse will be Saturday with the arrival of the Blue Moon.Ž The hours of the climb will be 7:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. ET and the cost is $5 per climber. The lighthouse is located in Port St. Joes George Core Park. There are actually two popularly-used definitions of a Blue Moon, according to Space.com. The older of the two defines a Blue Moon as the third full moon in a season that has four full moons. Called a seasonal Blue Moon, this occurs about every 2.5 years, according to NASA. There are roughly 29.5 days between full moons, making it unusual for two full moons to fit into a 30or 31-daylong month. The other definition is that a Blue Moon is the second full moon within a single calendar month. Celebrate the opening of St. Joe Arts Member Show. The first annual Member Show at The Joe Center for the Arts will be formally opened 6 p.m. ET Saturday at the Center, located at 201 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe. The exhibit will feature the work, photography, painting, fiber arts, sculpture, glasswork and multi-media, by 30local artists from Apalachicola, St. George Island, Indian Pass, Cape San Blas, Port St. Joe, Mexico Beach, Panama City Beach and Santa Rosa Beach. The opening party and exhibit are free and open to the public. Those attending the opening party will be asked to vote on their favorite work and a Peoples ChoiceŽ award will be given during th evening. If you can't make the opening night, the exhibit will be open Thursdays (10 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET), Fridays (10 a.m. until 6 p.m.) and Saturdays (10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET) from April 1 through April 20.THINGS TO DO THIS WEEKENDThe annual JSL Easter Egg Hunt is Saturday. [FILE PHOTO] Archaeology Weekend includes several events on local history [FILE PHOTO] The Blue MoonŽ full moon will be on display atop the lighthouse Saturday. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] The American Legion will host a Fish Fry/Chicken BBQ fundraiser Friday to bene“ t Warrior Weekend. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] The First Annual Member Show opens Saturday. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

PAGE 3

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 A3 Special to The StarMATTHEWS, NC … Family Dollar Stores, Inc., a leading small format and convenience retailer, unveils its renovated store in Wewahitchka this weekend.The store opens to the public today followed by a grand opening celebration for the community Saturday. The grand opening will include giveaways and prizes, including a Coby Bluetooth Speaker, gift baskets and a gift card raffle.The store is located 821 S. State 71.Family Dollar is proud to be a part of the Wewa-hitchka community and were excited to welcome existing and new customers to our newly renovated store,Ž said Heather Briganti, Family Dollar spokesperson. In addition to providing everyday low prices and a broad assortment of merchandise, we have expanded our selection of food, beauty and essentials, household products, and seasonal items. Our renovated store should provide even greater value and convenience to our shoppers.ŽFamily Dollar stores are open seven days a week and offer everyday items for the entire family in an easy-toshop neighborhood location.Family Dollar opens renovated store today in WewahitchkaSpecial to The StarOn the Nov. 6 ballot, voters will be asked to decide if they want to amend the State Constitution to increase the homestead exemption by exempting the assessed valuation of home-steaded property greater than $100,000 and up to $125,000 for all levies other than school district levies.I would like the people of Gulf County who are homesteaded to see for themselves how the proposal would affect them,Ž said Gulf County Property Appraiser Mitch Burke. When our taxpayers/voters go to the polls in November, theyll be doing more than elect-ing candidates for public office. Theyll be deciding whether to increase the amount of the homestead exemption for property owners.ŽIn an effort to provide voters the information they need about the Third Homestead ExemptionŽ before going to the polls, Burke has put an estimator of tax savings on the official website at www.gulfpa.com under the tab STAY INFORMED.ŽOur office, along with the Property Appraisers Association of Florida, has created educational materials and a what-if calcula-tor, to solve the question whether you will benefit if the amendment passes,Ž Burke said.If it passes, the amend-ment would take effect Jan.1, 2019. For information or help, call the Gulf County Property Appraisers Office at 2296115.Property Appraisers o ers bene t insight of proposed amendment Please recycle this newspaper!

PAGE 4

** A4 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star OPINION Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Tim Thompson Editor: Tim Croft Circulation: 850-522-5197 SUBSCRIPTIONS In county Out of county 1 Year: $24.15 $34.65 6 Months: $15.75 $21 Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Tim Cro Im so old I remember March Madness before it dribbled onto a basketball court. The Martian landing out at the clay pits took place in March. Now, that got some madness rebounding! Somehow every party line in town received the same late-afternoon call about the flying saucer coming to earth.Ž I dont have the space or inclination to explain party lineŽ to you, but suffice it to say„it was faster than facebook, twitter, texting or yelling out your backdoor to the neighbors combined! Most folks, after the dust settled, thought someone at the telephone office had to be in on it. I never did get the skinnyŽ on the howcomes or wherefores of the evening, but I had my suspicions. And they were all but confirmed when I finally caught a ride to the landing spotŽ to see the little green men for myself. Leon and Nicky Joe Stafford were out on the Shiloh Road near the turn off to the clay pits counting cars and laughing their heads off! The case of the frightened bovine loose in the high school auditoriumŽ also unfolded in March. Leon never confessed to this one. But can you think of anyone else in town crazy enough, and clever enough, to run a cow undetected into the school house? It was udder madness! The melee out at the Skyway Grill also took place in March. Pam Collins told the police after order had been restored it was just a combination of a full moon, a table of Atwood boys and the wrong month. I was innocently munching on a world famous Skyway Grill cheeseburger when Jim Hays came flying across my table. I didnt see exactly how he got airborne. Chaos broke out on every side. Folks were shouting and pushing and kicking. The place went dark. Somebody turned the jukebox over. Ketchup bottles were being used as hand grenades. People were scrambling for the front door. It was like Channel 7 wrestling had come to the Skyway Grill. Leon allowed all March Madness stemmed from February and elementary school, February is the worst month of the year. Its cold as blue blazes. The New Year excitement is long gone. By this point in school youve had it with spelling bees and reading classes. They force you to pass out heart shaped cards to people you may not even like. And then, they give you a pair of dull scissors and grade you on how well you can clip around a silhouette of Abraham Lincolns knotty head!Ž Its enough,Ž Leon felt it left a lasting mark, to drive the Pope batty!Ž He believed the only solution was to balance the equationŽ by striking back in March. The zanier, the better! You could see the end of the school year by the middle of March. Hope was on the rise. We needed to celebrate by giving a little something extraŽ to commemorate the moment. Commemorating a moment was probably what he called removing the light off our only police car and wiring it into the jukebox out at the Dairy Bar. Im sure if you looked it up, it happened in March. As did the blue soap suds in the town square fish pond. I figured Id outgrown this March craziness when I moved off to college. I survived (barely) the first semester. But the sunless, snow filled days of February brought me to my knees. Elementary school spelling bees and reading classes had been replaced with Latin and three hour biology labs! On the seventeenth of March my freshman year the Green Ribbon Society taped David Paschall to a large bass drum borrowedŽ from the marching band. We must have used ten rolls of athletic tape to secure Paschall to the drumƒ.or vice versa. A little after midnight we attacked Gailor Hall. The object was to wake up the entire dorm by constantly beating on the drum as we fought to get David all the way up to the third floor. The object of every student rooming in Gailor Hall was to keep David from reaching the top by ripping his drum off and throwing him and any accompanying members of the Green Ribbon Society out on the sidewalkƒƒthrough any window on any floor as the opportunity arose! I realized about half way up the second floor we were in for a long night. We had seven more dormitories to go! It was March Madness personified. But, I swear, as we licked our wounds and tended to the bleeding over by the ATO house, for the first time in my young college career, I could see a little light at the end of the tunnel. Respectfully, KesHUNKER DOWNTalk about some foulŽ shots! Kesley ColbertLooking across Charleston Harbor, I saw Fort Sumter. The wind was blowing and it was just a beautiful day. In the middle of my visit to Charleston, I had already seen many wonderful historic homes and sites. But Fort Sumter holds a special place for some of us, some of us who hold to the past and love the smell of peanuts and popcorn. No, I havent gotten my stories mixed up. I understand the importance of Fort Sumter as it relates to the War Between the States. However, I looked out to Fort Sumter and heard the crack of the bat, the roar of the crowd and smell of beer, peanuts, popcorn and leather all mixed together. Why? Fort Sumter is where the fellow who didnt invent baseball surrendered. Its late March, almost time for baseball season to begin, I couldnt help but think about Abner Doubleday when I looked out at Fort Sumter. Doubleday was the fellow who supposedly fired the first shot in defense of Fort Sumter, in the opening battle of the War Between the States. He is said to have aimedŽ the cannon that fired the first return shot in answer to the Confederate bombardment on April 12, 1861. He would eventually refer to himself as the Hero of Sumter,Ž due to aiming that first cannon shot. I think he forgot about actually losing that battle and surrendering. He did eventually come back in 1865 and raise the flag toward the end of the war. That war is over and we are happy that it is. Doubleday is even more famous for his inventing the game of baseball … actually for not inventing it. Its interesting about how history changes through the years, whether it be in terms of military victories, politics or sports. This mistake is actually the reason that Cooperstown, New York has the Baseball Hall of Fame. Someone along the way started the story of Abner Doubleday inventing the game of baseball in Elihu Phinneys cow pasture in Cooperstown, New York in 1839. Folks believed this for a long time, some folks will still tell you Doubleday invented the game. Folks have been through Doubledays papers and diaries and records; none of which mention the game of baseball. It seems pretty obvious to me that a Yankee who claimed to be the Hero of Sumter for aiming a cannon, would have taken credit for being the inventor of baseball if he knew anything about the game or anybody who ever played the game. Of course, Im exaggerating a little bit. Doubleday was a famous and capable military leader, who evidently mightŽ have passed out balls and bats for his soldiers to either play the game or use against the enemy. The truth is baseball probably came from the Egyptians, Indians or from an English game like cricket. For the record, the first professional baseball club was the Cincinnati Red Stockings in 1869. The salary for the entire Cincinnati ball club was $11,000. That may sound like a lot, but considering inflation, it would still only be about $200,000 today. Im not sure, but I bet there are professional athletes who make that much in a few days. The Red Stockings from Cincinnati won 130 straight games from 1869 to 1870. That is some kind of winning streakƒ However, all good things must come to an end, the Red Stockings were expelled from the league in 1880 for selling beer at the teams games. It took about ten years for them to get back into the league. Of course, now, they are known as the Cincinnati Reds. Arthur Conan Doyle, the British writer who gave us Sherlock Holmes,Ž once said, What you do in this world is a matter of no consequence. The question is what can you make people believe you have done.Ž There will always be those who wave their own flags and claim to have done things that the little fellow actually did. And there will be those who write stories giving credit to the wrong folks. Its just life. I will tell you this, they have good food in Charleston and some American Indian tribe probably invented baseball. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com.CRANKS MY TRACTORLooking at Fort Sumter across the harbor BN Heard These are not easy words to write, or more specifically, I suppose, key onto the monitor in my face. Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend scheduled for May has been cancelled. And the circumstances under which this years event was ditched, the inability of organizers to secure adequate and appropriate lodging, which must serve as cocoon for 20 or so veterans, spouses and caregivers, makes it difficult to believe it will return. Hopefully, that sentiment will be proved wrong, but this morning is a frustratingly sad day. For the event, for the county that embraced it, for the lives that will not be impacted so profoundly, as has been witnessed here for more than a decade. Certainly, as with any onion, there are layers to this, but no amount of playing the blame game or pointing fingers will take away the dent that bruised the fruit. And this was an award-winning variety, this Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend. This tribute to veterans, to warriors, to heroes, pick one or all, arrived each May as a shiny bauble on the annual Gulf County calendar. For more than a decade the community turned out, to feast at the honor banquet, to wave and fly a flag during a parade, to participate in the Warrior Weekend Offshore Fishing Classic. To, welcome the warriors, so many recovering from horrific wounds, the way this community, it is unique way, can toss out the mat, or in the case of the Warrior Weekend honor banquet, red carpet. George Duren of the events organizing committee spoke last year with wonder about the demand from charter captains, from as far away as Georgia, to participate and donate time, fuel and resources to the weekend and those warriors. The event was always about the community within community, the dozens of veterans, caregivers, family, loved one, who have made the five-day trek to Gulf County each May. That number is now pushing 200 veterans and caregivers and loved ones. Let that number wash over. Those special visitors were provided, by the community beyond, the chance to hit pause, to just be relieved of the everyday trials, pains and challenges of life since returning from war zones. Rarely in one piece, physically or mentally. But that weekend offered respite, a palliative, compounded by the shared expierences of those warriors. The bonds forged here in Gulf County, as one witness to much of that emotional blacksmithing, was astounding; no, life-altering. A kind of renewal year after year after year. In a world of win-wins, Warrior Weekend seemed the epitome. Gulf County, during warm, beautiful spring months, could show off its best assets, the waters, the beaches, the laid-back vibe and, in the overwhelming number of cases, its people. A dozen or two veterans were able to heal for a few days, to build friendships and camaraderie that bridged miles and personal tribulations, and report back home on what transformation, if only for a weekend, really looks like. Some who arrived here as warriors would become counselors, returning again and again, the draw powerful. That, folks, seems like a tourist development dream. For crying out loud, last years event included a wedding between veteran and caregiver; by the time of the ceremony a host of local individuals and merchants were personally involved. But that adage about all good things coming to an end is a dogged rascal. Though it is not that much of a surprise that KEYBOARD KLATTERINGSBidding Warrior Weekend goodbyeSee CROFT, A5

PAGE 5

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 A5 LETTERSBy Lyd and Jerry StokoeSpecial to The StarIn picture is the first ship to load at Port St. Joe, from Carrabelle, on Feb. 26, 1910. On the far right is Max Kilbourn. The ship is likely a schooner. Max (1873-1956) and his wife, Eda Pickett Kilbourn (1876-1960) moved from Carrabelle to Port St. Joe in 1010 to establish a fish and ice business, later to become known as the St. Joe Ice, Co. Many pioneer families will remember the bygone era of ice being made and deliverd to old ice boxes. Notable are two pioneer families that helped the Kilbourn family in this business: Louis Peters, Sr. (lovingly called Uncle Pete) and the Elton Wood family that arrived in the 1920s. Their offspring still reside in Port St. Joe. The Kilbourn family, the T.H. Stone family (founder of Port St. Joe) and the Ashbury Morgan Jones, Sr. family (founder of the Methodist Church in 1912) were all neighbors and friends living on Eighth Street, a friendship that lasted decades. They were old friends with many pioneer families living in Port St. Joe; Costin, Maddox, Tapper, Raffield, McNeil and Wood, especially the Peters family that they had known in Carrabelle since the 1890s. Two of Max and Edas children were: Jimmie Kilbourn (1907-1977) and Ida Ethel Kilbourn Brown (1909-1998). These two children left descendants living in Port St. Joe, some listed are: grandchildren, Eda Ruther Kilbourn Taylor, Elizabeth (Lyd) Brown Stokoe and George Kilbourn; great-grands, Jay Taylor, Tyler Smith and Mark and Michael Kilbourn; great-greatgrands, Chad Allen, Katie Kilbourn, Lee Goff Barfield; and great-greatgreat-grands, Dennis, Dale III, Noah, Jenna and Ryan Barfield, children of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Barfield. The Max Kilbourn family has four generations that are graduates of Port St. Joe High School from the beginning in 1927. Six generations have made their home in Port St. Joe. An ancestor of Eda Pickett Kilbourn, Peter Alexander Yent (1810-1876) settled in Florida before it was a state in the 1830s. Other descendants of Yent, living in Port St. Joe, are: Tony Maige, Mary Graham, Ranza Whittington and Jimmy and Eugene Cox. Eight generatons stemming from him have made their home in the Florida Panhandle.Pioneers of the past By Rodney HerringSpecial to The StarEds Note: The following was written by Rodney Herring to introduce readers of Sandra Bass Joines, a former Port St. Joe High School classmate, and successful novelist. Her latest book, dedicated to the late Jim JimmyŽ Cox, Jr., A True Warrior,Ž is set in large measure in Apalachicola. Herring was asked by Joines to provide an overview, titled, About the Setting.Ž The following is the result: Just as Adam reaches to touch the hand of God, a finger of land stretches from the eastern bank of the Apalachicola River delta to is western shore. Conveniently, the tiny fishing village on the east bank is known as Eastpoint. The town on the opposite shore, which was once named West Point, has long since been known as Apalachicola in honor of the great river that spills between its namesake and Eastpoint. My mother recalled a childhood memory of sitting aboard her grandfathers wagon, waiting for the ferry to carry them across the wide expanse. Today, a long bridge and causeway connect the outstretched fingers. The Apalachicola River begins on the Florida and Georgia state line at the confluence of the Flint River and the river made known by an Alan Jackson song called the Chattahoochee. From there is flows southerly into the Apalachicola Bay between Eastpoint and Apalachicola and empties into the Gulf of Mexico. At a time when the majority of Floridas immigrant population had settled in Pensacola, St. Augustine, and spots in between, the port of Apalachicola became a thriving commercial connection to the Gulf of Mexico and beyond. Thanks to King Cotton, seafood, and timber, Apalachicola boomed. Flat-bottomed paddle wheelers moved bales of cotton from Alabama and Georgia plantations down the river to grand, brickfronted warehouses that lined the bustling Apalachicola wharf. From there, shallow-draft schooners carried the cotton to ships which transported the cargo on to New England and Europe. Worldwide demand for timber caused numerous sawmills to pop up along the rivers floodplains. Tens of thousands of submerged cypress trees … known as deadhead … were bound together and floated to lumber mills on the coast. As a result, millions of board feet of cypress and pine were processed through the port of Apalachicola. The seafood industry thrived as the river system fed nutrients to one of the most productive oysterbedding operations in the entire world. To this day, many culinary experts declare the Apalachicola oysters as the best in the world. For a time, Apalachicola was the economic hub for a one-hundred-mile stretch along the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. But other communities cropped up and began ventures to rival those of the ruling city. Since they lacked a similar river, their successes were short-lived. In fact, the entire stretch along the Gulf of Mexico fell into a deep and long depression following the years of the Civil War. Harvesting seafood, sawing timbers, and extracting turpentine for naval stories continued. But those were not viable enough to sustain prosperity. By the time Flagler and other magnates began laying tracks into South Florida, much of the shoreline along either side of the Apalachicola River seemed forgotten. Although visitors took advantage of the excellent hunting and fishing opportunities, the struggling town offered little to entice them to establish residence. As the new railroads carried millions of settlers down along the Atlantic Coast and into the Florida Keys, the once-thriving town of Apalachicola continued to decline. To those who remained, the area seemed forgotten. Cities farther south outgrew and outpaced them and easily gained political dominance over the State of Florida. Retirees from failing factories up North began to notice that all the beaches of the Florida Panhandle has something to offer, after all. Investors, publicists, and local chambers of commerce took notice. Why not, they began to ask themselves, capitalize on our less frenzied highways, our more laid-back lifestyles, and our more affordable real estate? The sugar-sand beaches began their siren call. Gradually, folks began to discover the place that time had forgotten. Off the coastline, enriched on the inside by the waters of the river and outside by the Gulf of Mexico, lie several offshore islands, along with two beautiful peninsulas … Alligator Point and Cape San Blas. To Apalachicolas west is St. Vincent Island. To its east are St. George Island and Dog Island. Of the three, only St. George is connected by a bridge, one especially engineered to protect the delicate oyster beds of Apalachicola Bay. Despite occasional storms, building has skyrocketed in these areas and has enhanced local tax rolls. The same has been true of coastal beaches. Nonetheless, this onceforgotten coastline still retains elements of its enchanting, mysterious past. Protected by a national forest, the unclaimed inland area known by locals as Tates Hell Swamp is replete with legends. Tales about Native Americans, Civil War deserters, pirates and escaped convicts (most of whom are rumored to have been consumed by the spirits of Tates Hell, lost and never seen again) have been shared from generation to generation. My great-great-grandfather who operated a small farm on the edge of the swamp near Whiskey George Creek passed down numerous stories about the legendary inhospitable Tates Hell. He eventually abandoned the place from which livestock cattle and domesticated boars vanished without a trace and moved to a land less mysterious and more civilized. As a retired schoolteacher who was born in these parts and has lived his entire life here, I was inspired to write an introduction to this unique world by such a talented author. From having read her previous books, I know that she will entice her readers with a backdrop filled with mystery and intrigue. For those who visit here, they cannot leave without wonderment over how a place so lovely, and so rich in history (and one that has been overlooked and forgotten for so many years) can yet exist. While we are turning the pages in anticipation, let us be reminded that we are never far beyond Tates Hell. With a single twist of fate, the once-Forgotten Coast could be returned to nature, where the only sounds would the bellowing of alligators, the inquisitive questioning of owls, and the tumbling of florescent waves along its white sands.On Apalachicola, the river, the bay, the town at some point an endeavor that required a ton of private sector participation would run into a scenario where other agendas, no matter the form, trumped, well, however you would describe the Warrior Weekend. Uplift, outreach, paying back to those who served, the proper word sometimes eludes, but this was no ordinary event. It was no secret that over the life of the Warrior Weekend a segment of individuals, businesses and organizations that otherwise are consistent donors to local events did not support the Weekend. Whether it was the personalities or political leanings of some involved, philosophical differences, last names, recognition, whatever the factor, is beside the point, Warrior Weekend was not on their radar. That the event continued to grow and prosper, after an early one-year reboot, is a testament to the many good people who were involved, from donors to servers to charter boat captains and on and on. And to the veterans, who, lest we forget, were the point from the outset. That is what makes the cancellation particularly unnerving, this was truly an event that the overwhelming percentage of people in the community looked forward to, participated in, marked the calendar for. Whatever the reasons that last year, the prior year and the year before that could be accommodated and this years Warrior Weekend could not, cancellation is is disappointing. Every May it was Gulf County in her finest attire, most patriotic pose, best foot forward. Today, it feels like a community that prides itself, rightly, on its bond with the military and country, with the veterans who serve and sacrifice, has misplaced some clothes. CROFTFrom Page A4 A paddlewheeler[SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

PAGE 6

** A6 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star

PAGE 7

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 A7 Special to The StarAward-winning author Kristy Woodson Harvey will be visiting Port St. Joe for a Books and BitesŽ lun-cheon at the public libraryThe author event and book signing will be 11 a.m. ET Tuesday, April 10 in the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Public Library. A light lunch will be provided. The program is sponsored by the Friends of the Gulf County Public Libraries. Register to attend the free Books and BitesŽ lun-cheon by calling 229-8879 or visiting the library.Kristy Woodson Harvey is the author of Dear Carolina (2015), Lies and Other Acts of Love (2016), and Slightly South of Simple (2017). Dear Carolina was longlisted for the Pat Conroy Southern Book Prize. Her newest release, The Secret to Southern Charm (April 3) is part of the beloved Peachtree Bluff Series exploring the powerful bonds between sisters, mothers and daughters. She blogs daily at Design Chic about how creating a beautiful home can be the catalyst for creating a beautiful life. Discover more about the talented Southern author by visit-ing kristywoodsonharvey.com.The Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Public Library is located at 110 Library Drive. Call 229-8879 or visit www.nwrls.com for more information.Books and Bites: Kristy Woodson HarveyKristy Woodson Harvey [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] candidates increases the odds of a run-off should no candidate receive 50 percent-plus one of the vote May 8.The deadline for voters to register for the election is 5 p.m. ET at the Supervisor of Elections office on Long Ave.Early voting begins April 28 and spans through May 5, save for the Sunday that falls during that period.Early voting will take place 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. ET each day at the Super-visor of Elections Office.Voting on Election Day will take place 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET at the Port St. Joe Fire Station. BALLOTFrom Page A1

PAGE 8

** A8 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Starapproved Tuesday would rename the section of U.S. 98 between the Gulf/Bay county line and WindMark in honor of Willis V. Rowan.Rowan was shot down and killed over Germany during World War II and the American Legion Post 116 is named in his memory.This is well-deserved,Ž said Commissioner Sandy Quinn, Jr. They paid a lot for us all.ŽIn other business during Tuesdays regular monthly meeting: *Commission-ers approved the final deed and documents to convey to North Florida Child Development the historic Wewahitchka Courthouse.The deed contains several reverter clauses returning ownership to the county, the clauses tied to maintaining current NFCD employment in the facility, allowing access for historic purposes and creating a link to a local non-profit in the pursuit of historic preser-vation grants.NFCD, the lone tenant in the building, has long desired to reach a position of restoring the courthouse, with its historic second-floor courtroom.*Contracts for design and engineering oversight of the floating dry dock proposed for the Port of Port St. Joe are out and ready to be finalized, said county attorney Jeremy Novak.The contract with Hager Dry Dock on the design is in the companys hands; once signed the company will undertake the design of the dry dock under a 108-day window.The engineering oversight contract will be drafted and forwarded to Dewberry after Technol-ogy Associates, Inc. out of New Orleans abandoned its protest of the bid award.*The county will try to negotiate a short-term lease on the former bank building at 418 Cecil G. Costin Blvd. in Port St. Joe.The county aims to convert the building into a facility housing Sheriffs Office communications, 9-1-1 dispatch and other county offices.A targeted June closing on the purchase of the building is delayed to the public comment period required for final-ization of the countys implementation plan for spending direct allocation RESTORE Act funds.The short-term lease will bridge the time until the federal funds become available, Novak said. RENAMEFrom Page A1team.We are looking at training for any of the possible incidents we could be faced with,Ž said SGCVFD Captain Mike Barrett. I didnt realize until we did the training how many aircraft can be flying over Gulf County.The more we train ƒ it is the lifeblood of staying alive.ŽAs example, Barrett referenced the now famous incident of nearly a decade ago when a commercial airliner was landed in the New Yorks Hudson River after suffer-ing engine failure.A scenario, on the surface, that could only be conjured in a flight simulator.The pilot (Chesley Sullenberger) said they trained on that 1,000 times,Ž Barrett said. It was second nature to (the crew).Last weeks training at Tyndall involved classroom instruction, power point lectures, pre-fire planning and hands-on actual live fire training with the shells of planes.As the photos illustrate, the fire was very, very real.We were immediately welcomed by the crews at Tyndall Fire/Rescue,Ž said Vince Bishop, Assistant Fire Chief for the SGCVFD. Its a genuine brother/ sisterhood.We were informed and educated on the role of South Gulf Fire/Rescue in an actual downed aircraft operation.ŽBarrett noted that in the event of a aircraft coming down in Gulf County, air force base crews would be close to an hour, if not more given traffic during warm weather, reaching the scene. One of the things we learned is what is our responsibility prior to their arrival,Ž Barrett said. We learned the dos and donts.ŽThe primary role for local first responders, Barrett said, would be to establish a perimeter 3,000 to 5,000 feet away to keep people out.In addition to jet fuel and hydraulic fluid, both combusti-ble, some of the remote controlled aircraft carry munitions with batteries with a lifetime of 39 hours.The underlying goal of the train-ing is part and parcel to SGCVFDs mission.Were trying to keep people alive,Ž Barrett said. This is to help save the people we protect. Anything we can learn is going to help us with that mission.ŽThe training is also not a one-off.The members of Tyndall Fire/ Rescue has invited SGCVFD to participate in their monthly train-ing, addressing a host of scenarios that only fire and rescue personnel fully understand.We have nurtured a positive relationship with Tyndall Fire/Rescue and are looking forward to training with them in the future,Ž Barrett said.That air force base has a wealth of knowledge and opportunities for us to train and learn.Ž TRAININGFrom Page A1lines in need of replace-ment and city officials have sought funding to make the entire package a reality, rather than resurfacing the road only to tear it up again for infrastructure work. We are trying to come up with the additional funding to do all the work,Ž said City Manager Jim Anderson. It makes the best sense.If we are going to do it, we want to do it right.ŽThe water and sewer lines are situated beneath the middle of the street, and, in the case of the sewer lines, deep, requir-ing the city to contract out that portion of the work.The majority of the water line replacement will be undertaken in-house by the crew that has been put in place for that purpose within Public Works.The city has set aside $400,000 in its budget for the water line replace-ment: Anderson said the city likely needed another $100,000 for that portion of the work but has another budget cycle coming up later this year to set aside additional funds.We want to just keep rolling (the funding) over until we have all the funding we will need,Ž Anderson said.The city is initially seeking $100,000 from the State Revolving Fund for design work on sewer line replacement.The city should know this spring in the next couple of months whether that funding will arrive, allowing engineers to design the scope of work, establishing a template for costs.The city will apply for an additional $2.7 million from the SRF to replace the sewer lines below Long Ave. from First Street to 19th Street and for the replacement of a chronically tempermen-tal and aging lift station on First Street.The hope is that the city would qualify for 70 per-cent of that $2.7 million to come as a forgiveness grant with $800,000 in the form of a loan, which under the terms of the SRF typically carries interest of 2-3 percent.The State Revolving Fund, from separate funds for water and sewer proj-ects, has provided several million dollars over recent years to the city to facili-tate water and sewer line replacement, so the SRF has an existing relation-ship with the city.The hope would be that the SRF application would be processed and the funding released in February or March 2019, Anderson said, adding that the city would be ready to proceed with the overhaul of Long Ave., including water line replacement and paving by that juncture.Anderson said city offi-cials must before the year is out approach the BOCC to update the board on the progress on Long Ave. and ask for an extension beyond the end of the year to commit the road bond funds currently sitting with the Clerk of Courts. Jones Homestead sewerAfter approval from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the city is moving ahead on bring-ing sewer to Jones Homestead.A $250,000 grant came with a caveat of a minimum of 65 customers; the city has 55 commitments and con-tinues to reach out to the community.The FDEP approved the city moving ahead with the work while campaigning to secure additional customers.The city is offering to those who hook-up now a cost-break, amounting to several thousand dollars, for connecting to the sewer lines now com-pared to the costs should a septic system fail. In the event of a septic system failure, a prop-erty owner is prohibited by law from replacing the septic system if sewer lines are accessible.The FDEP grant continues an effort by local and state stakeholders to remove as many homes as possible from septic in the areas surrounding St. Joseph Bay. LONGFrom Page A1 The South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department partnered with Tyndall Fire/Rescue for training last week. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR]

PAGE 9

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 A9

PAGE 10

** A10 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star OUTDOORSCONTACT USEmail outdoor news to tcroft@starfl.comBy Nancy and Jack BlakeContributing WritersLying only 45 miles to the east of Port St. Joe is the small but enchanting town of Carrabelle. It is typically one in which an eastbound traveler would ignore and quickly motor through on their way to a larger and more active destination. However, when one does set aside a bit of time to see what makes Carrabelle tick, several interesting things remain to be discovered. First, some geography and demographics. While Carrabelle lies those 45 miles from Port St Joe, its only about 20 miles east of Apalachicola. Going in the other direction, its situated 55 miles west of Floridas capital, Tallahassee. Theres approximately 2,750 full time residents here, making it about three-quarters of the size of PSJ. Theres no question that the main activity, the predominant economic driver and the center of the Carrabelle world is boating, be it pleasure, sport or commercial. The Carrabelle River as it loops immediately south of the village is as active a thoroughfare as is US Highway 98 which passes landward through the town. The port provides both shelter from, and access to, the Gulf of Mexico via St. George Sound immediately south of the village. Carrabelle's waterfront combines the authenticity of a working waterfront with the fun of recreational fishing and boating. Charter fishing is readily available. One of Carrabelles unique items of interest is what the city fathers boast as the worlds smallest police stations. A photo is included here. Its really nothing more than a phone booth, but said booth has an unusual and interesting history dating back over 50 years. Its too lengthy to include here, but just visit Carrabelle and ask one of the locals about it. You could very well be mesmerized. If youve time, you can hop a scheduled ferry to the remote and lonely Dog Island, about 3.5 miles from Carrabelle. The barrier island, about six miles in length, is best known for its pristine beaches, good shelling, birding, crabbing and shore fishing. Theres no vehicular traffic here but the island does have about 40 full-time residents plus several more holiday homes. Talk about getting away from it all. One final itemƒ. just three miles west of Carrabelle stands the Crooked River Lighthouse which was built in 1895 and eventually replaced three lights situated on Dog Island. Its open to the public. When one combines the elements of our recently published Day Trips to ApalachicolaŽ with a further extension down those 20 miles to Carrabelle, you would certainly have the makings of an extraordinary day exploring the Panhandleƒ.. and all within 50 miles of Port St. Joe. Happy travels.Day trip travelogue „ Port St. Joe to Carrabelle Carrabelle Carrabelle River Marina Carrabelle River Dolphin Park Worlds smallest police station Crooked River Lighthouse [PHOTOS COURTESY OF JACK AND NANCY BLAKE] FISHING REPORTReports of Spanish Mackerel are still strong and the Mexico Beach pier and out along the St. Joe sea wall is still producing. Clarkspoon is still a good choice for bait and the Coho Killer lure is still making waves in these parts. There is a limited number of these lures available in our area so if you have a chance to purchase make sure and pick up a couple. Sheepshead bite continues to be pretty good around structure areas and live shrimp continues to pull them in. Looks like the Trout bite is slowly coming back in the St. Bay around the head of the bay. Soft baits jigged or behind popping corks are your best bet. We are counting down to the Bluewater Outriggers annual tent sale April 6th and 7th, so please plan to join us. There will be fun for the entire family and smoking deals on Fishing gear, Apparel, Shoes and other miscellaneous items so mark your calendar and come see us. Until next week, Happy Fishing

PAGE 11

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 A11Pat McCannGatehouse MediaWith the 14th edition of the annual All-Star Basketball Classic less than two weeks away, the final boys and girls for the East All-Stars have been selected.The event matches the top seniors from The News Her-alds eight-county readership area comprising the East boys and girls teams against the best seniors from The Daily News in Fort Walton Beachs Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton county area. The East teams are chosen by The News Herald with assistance of the East All-Star coaches … Bozeman coach Michael Memmen for the boys, and Bozeman coach Desmond Brown for the girls. The first four boys … Ruth-erfords Lorenzo Ferrell, Blountstowns KK Godwin, Mosleys Stacy Burse, and Bethlehems Kobe Hendrix … and first four girls … Mosleys JaTayvia Holley, Port St. Joes Teiyahna Hutchin-son, Holmes Countys Laura Jones, and North Bay Havens Josselin Geer … were revealed last week.Rounding out the East boys roster is Eddie Dubose of Rutherford, Antonio Bellamy of Mosley, Matthew Isenhoff of Vernon, Werlean Pollock of Marianna, Jacobi Jones of Wewahitchka, Amari Banks of Cottondale, Noah Gustason of Bozeman, and Jamal Howard of Blountstown. For the girls, the final eight selections go to Brooklynn Quinn and ShaMario Cole of Port St. Joe, Shelby Suggs and Carly Hanson of Bozeman, Devyn Butorac and Taylor West of Ponce de Leon, Kori Jones of Marianna, and Robin Tate of Poplar Springs.Dubose, a 6-foot-5 forward, averaged 10 points and 7.5 rebounds per game for the Rams this season, while the 6-1 Bellamy was the second-leading scorer for the Dolphins at 13.8 points per game and led them with 6.3 rebounds per contest. He also shot 52 percent from the field and 70 percent from the free throw line. Isenhoff, a 6-foot guard, was the top scorer for Vernon at 21.8 points per game while adding 4.6 rebounds, 2.3 assists, and 2.6 steals per game.A super-athletic 6-2 guard, Pollock averaged 12 points, six rebounds, and 3.5 assists per game for the Bulldogs this season. A 5-9 guard, Banks was the top performer for the Hornets at 19 points per game to go with four assists, five rebounds, and a steal per game. Gustason, a 6-3 for-ward, led Bozeman with 11.6 points and 8.5 rebounds per contest to go with an assist and 1.7 steals per game. A 6-2, 200-pound forward, Howard brought interior toughness to an undersized Blountstown team and finished his senior season averaging eight points, 6.2 rebounds, and 1.5 steals per game. Stats for Jacobi Jones were not made available.Kori Jones, a 5-7 guard, averaged 12 points, seven rebounds, and two steals per game for the Bulldogs this season, while the 5-9 Tate averaged 13.2 points per game for the Atomics. Quinn, a ver-satile 5-11 guard-forward, finished the season with averages of 9.2 points, 6.4 rebounds, 4.7 assists, and 3.6 steals, while the 5-5 Cole put in 7.4 points, two rebounds, and 2.7 steals per contest.Suggs, a 5-7 guard, led the Bucks in scoring with 16.8 points per game and added 5.9 rebounds per game as well, while the 5-10 forward Hanson averaged a doubledouble this season at 14.2 points and 10.4 rebounds per contest. Butorac, a 5-6 guard, averaged 11.2 points, 4.5 rebounds, an assist, and 2.1 steals per game for the Pirates, while 5-4 teammate West put in 10.4 points, 3.7 assists, and 3.1 steals per game this season.Rutherford senior guard Kara Spani, who averaged 16 points per game for the Rams, was originally slated to be on the East girls team before suf-fering a knee injury in her last game of the season.The All-Star Basketball Classic will take place April 7 at the Billy Harrison Field House at Gulf Coast State College. The girls game will tip off at 11 a.m. CT, followed by the boys game at 1 p.m. CT. Admission to the games will be $6 for adults, $2 for children, and kids 4 and under will get in free. Passes will be accepted for high school and college coaches.Bozeman coaches Michael Memmen and Desmond Brown have been chosen to helm the All-Star East teams, with Rutherford coach Rhondie Ross helping Memmen coach the boys, and North Bay Haven coach Ty Steele assist-ing Brown with the girls.Quinn, Cole, Jones join Hutchinson on Classic rosters SPORTSStar Staff ReportPort St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School senior Teiyahna Hutchinson had one more high school basketball game remaining and she made the most of it last Saturday.Hutchinson scored a game-high 22 points to lead the North team in the Florida Athletic Coaches Assocation 2018 Girls Basketball Classic in Lakeland.Hutchinson, who led the Lady Tiger Sharks to the Class 1A title game, drained a free throw to give the North its final lead, 72-71, entering the final minute of the game.The South, however, took the lead back immediately and held on for a 76-75 win.Hutchinson is signed to play next year with Gulf Coast State College, which just finished fourth in the national JUCO tournament after winning the previous two national titles.Hutchinson top scorer in Classic[FILE PHOTO]

PAGE 12

** A12 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star SCENE AROUNDSend us your photos that spotlight the best that Gulf Coast has to offer. This page is for photos submitted to The Star by readers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star” .com Soaring over T. H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. [COURTESY OF CAROL BUIKEMA] A beautiful Cape sunrise. [COURTESY OF CAROL AND PHIL DOHMEN] A pelican hanging out at the Mexico Beach pier. [COURTESY OF MELISSA ISVORSKI OF WHITELAND, IN}] The peace and tranquility of a St. Joseph Bay sunset. [COURTESY OF SANDIE KENNEDY] Sunset in Money Bayou. [COURTESY OF NATALIE DOLAN] A beautiful day on the Intracoastal Waterway near the Overstreet Bridge. [COURTESY OF DOUG T.] Days end at the Port St. Joe Marina. [COURTESY OF RON RUDOLPH]

PAGE 13

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 B1COMMUNITY Wilson CaseyTRIVIA FUN By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comOnly minutes expired before the discussion during last weekends annual meeting of the Gulf Pines Property Owners Associa-tion turned to bears.One property owner noted that she had a black bear all but living under-neath her home.Another discussed the black bear of over 400 pounds that was rendering his trash cans immaterial.And it is spring time and bears join shorebirds, flowers and a host of other species picking up the activity as the weather warms.The cubs were born last month, breeding season is just around the corner, and the population of bears, in Florida and in this part of Northwest Florida, is on the rebound.Springtime can also be bear timeBear activity increases with warmer temperatures. [FILE PHOTO] By Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comThe county unemployment rate fell by nearly half a percentage point in February, part of a region-wide improvement on the jobs front.The February unemployment rate in Gulf County was 4.0 percent, down from 4.4 percent in January and 4.3 percent in February 2017.The region, which also includes Bay and Franklin counties, saw unemployment fall to 4.0 percent overall, a slight improvement over January and down nearly 1 percent from February 2017.Out of a labor force of 99,263, which was up 2.8 per-cent, or 2,717 from last year, there were 3,934 unemployed residents in the region.The region netted 2,200 jobs compared to the prior February.Statewide, the unemploy-ment rate in February was 3.9 percent, unchanged from January and down more than half a percentage point from February 2017.There were 398,000 unem-ployed Floridians out of a labor force of 10.2 million.The nations unemploy-ment rate in February was 4.1 percent.As unemployment drops and the labor market tightens, we are encouraging all employers to take full advantage of our free employment services by registering in our job matching system, EmployFlorida.com,Ž said Kim Bodine, Executive Director of CareerSource Gulf Coast. Through this website employers can post job open-ings, search for candidates and even access valuable labor market trends, all at no cost.We have local staff to assist job seekers and employers.ŽIn Gulf County, the economic news also included a rise of 1.6 percent in January bed tax collections.Mexico Beach realized a 2 percent increase in bed taxes in January.For the CareerGulf Coast region, the following sectors grew faster than statewide during the following year: pro-fessional and business services (up 7.4 percent); mining, log-ging and construction (up 8 percent); financial activities (up 7.1 percent); education and health services (up 4.4 percent); leisure and hospi-tality (up 4 percent); and trade, transportation and utilities (up 1.9 percent).Industries gaining jobs over the past year included profes-sional and business services (up 800 jobs); education and health services (up 500 jobs); leisure and hospitality (up 500 jobs); mining, logging and construction (up 400 jobs), trade, transportation and utilities (up 300 jobs); and financial activities (up 300 jobs).February unemployment fallsBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star 850-227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.comWith 10 days to go, cam-paigns to bolster a Sheriffs Office drive for kids and swell the local food bank were lagging.A late b oost in donations, both monetary and food items, pushed both campaigns over the goal line in time for the holiday.We just thank every-body in the community who contributed,Ž said Dr. Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Asso-ciation of Gulf County, which spearheaded both campaigns.We appreciate all the many generous donations, both items and cash, that m ade these drives so successful. Folks in this community are simply wonderful.ŽFor the youngters, the Easter Basket drive snared sufficient funding, and new baskets, to provide 250 chil-dren in need with baskets full of goodies for the coming Easter celebration.The basket drive is sponsored by the Gulf County Sheriffs Office, with children of need identified by public school guidance counselors.The goal of $3,370, or $15 per basket, was reached early last week.That includes funding from the recent Liars Chal-lenge, the Port St. Joe Lions Club, Gulf 2 Bay Construc-tion and donations collected at St. Joseph Bay Golf Club.The campaign to assist the food bank, which serves more than 600 people per month, began with a goal of $3,500.Two weeks ago, collections were at $2,500, but in the final 10 days that amount doubled and last week a crew from South Gulf County was shopping for groceries at Durens Piggly Wiggly.The stores owner, George Duren, had secured discounts from a variety of vendors and the store had helped establish a donation system by which folks could purchase a $5 or $10 bag of already-bagged food items for donation. And on shopping day, the final contribution total was $5,000 and a van, trailer and several other truck loads were transported from the Piggly Wiggly to the food bank on Peters Street.We try to support the food back as much as we can,Ž Hardman said. It changes lives.ŽA little bit can go a long way.ŽEaster Basket/Food Bank drives hit the markThe drive to “ ll the food bank garnered more than $5,000 in food and monetary donations[TIM CROFT | THE STAR] The shopping was done at Durens Piggly Wiggly last week; Durens secured a host of discounts from vendors for the campaign. [TIM CROFT | THE STAR] This trailer was bulging by the time it left for the food bank. We appreciate all the many generous donations, both items and cash, that made these drives so successful. Folks in this community are simply wonderful.ŽDr. Pat HardmanTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or sug-gestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. What city, famous for its hog industry, was nicknamed PorkopolisŽ during the 1830s?Seattle, San Francisco, Cincinnati, Miami2. Whats the only New England state with no coastline along the Atlantic Ocean?New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Maine3. And away we goŽ was whose famous parting line?George Burns, Jackie Gleason, Bob Hope, Johnny Carson4. What does XXXŽ at the end of a letter mean?Hug, Important, Rain, Kiss5. Which weaponŽ did Dennis the Menace most often carry?BB gun, Slingshot, Mud pie, Rubber knife6. What organization once was known as the Haloid Company?Xerox, Pet, Wilson, Chevrolet ANSWERS: 1. Cincinnati, 2. Vermont, 3. Jackie Gleason, 4. Kiss, 5. Slingshot, 6. XeroxSee BEAR, B6 See FALLS, B6

PAGE 14

** B2 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star SOCIETYBy Ray BodreyGulf County Extension Director & Ethan Carter, UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Regional Specialized Row Crop Agent UF/IFASContinuing Education Unit system is used by Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) for recertifying pesticide applicators that are issued licenses by the Bureau of Licensing and Enforcement (Chapter 487 F.S., Chapter 482 F.S., and Chapter 388 F.S.).Applicators must become recertified in order to renew their pesticide applicator licenses. To become recertified, individuals have the option of either retaking the certification exams or earning CEUs. These credits are earned by attending profes-sional meetings, seminars or completing online or corre-spondence courses that have been approved in advance by FDACS to award CEUs. If an individual has more than one license, the same CEUs can be used to renew both licenses, provided the CEUs were earned during the license period for each license (from the day the license was issued until it expires) or within one year after expiration.Area applicators have the opportunity to earn all the necessary core CEUs to renew their license at one training session. Gulf County Extension will host a core applicator pesticide applica-tor training on April 11 from 1 … 5:30 p.m. CT. Training will be held at the Gulf County Extension main office at 232 E. Lake Ave. in Wewahitchka. Restricted use applicators (487Ag licenses) can earn 4 core credits, while limited applicators (482) can earn 2 core credits. Those Individ-uals without a restricted use license (487), but wishing to obtain one, will be able to use the training as a refresher course, and take the exam afterwards. CEUs and exams will be issued/administered at 4:30 p.m. CT. There is a $10 registration fee, and you must call 639-3200 to pre-register as space is limited.Supporting information for this article can be found in the following the UF/IFAS EDIS publication, The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) Continuing Education Unit (CEU) System for Certified Pesticide ApplicatorsŽ by Frederick M. Fishel: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/PI/PI07700.pdfUF/IFAS Extension is an Equal Opportunity Institution.Pesticide applicator training for CEUsA tractor spraying pesticides on rows of experimental tomatoes. [TYLER JONES, UF/IFAS COMMUNICATIONS] Special to The StarThe Florida state Daughters of the American Revolution Conference was held in Orlando March 15-18 at the Florida Hotel and Conference Center. The St. Joseph Bay Chap-ter DAR from Port St. Joe was represented by three chapter officersRegent Sherrill Russ, Vice-Regent Carolyn Forehand and Treasurer Fran Walters. The state conference is held annually in Orlando, this year there were over 800 Florida DAR members present. Every member of DAR is a direct descendant of a Patriot of the American Revolution.St. Joseph Bay DAR chapter attends state DAR ConferencePictured at the conference, from left: Sherrill Russ, Carolyn Forehand, Fran Walters. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarHow to heal and forgive after being wronged will be discussed 7 p.m. CT Monday, April 2 at Lifetree Caf.The program, titled The Struggle to Forgive: Finding a Way Forward,Ž features the filmed story of Alicia Brady, who was the victim of a gang-related drive-by shooting.A dancer, Brady sustained injuries that caused her to lose the ability to perform competitively.Dancing was my life,Ž said Brady. Everything I had worked for was taken from me. I had lost that life, and I wasnt going to get it back.ŽThis Lifetree program will offer guidance for those who find it difficult to forgive those who have wronged them.Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and bev-erages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel.Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or livingwa-ter@livingwateratthebeach. comFinding a way to forgive explored at Lifetree CafSpecial to The StarThere is an urgent need for two very good used or new vans for the Senior Citizens Centers in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka. Both of our vans (2003 Kia, 2004 Kia) are on their way out. We have to repair every month to keep the vans on the roads, which is how we deliver meals on wheelsŽ to shut-ins and take seniors to places we need to go. They have become unsafe and are not dependable. If anyone has a van in good condition or they would like to make a donation for the vans to the center, it would be appreciated. We hope our community will rally around our seniors and help us to care of the seniors. Remember, any donations to the senior center are tax deductible. Additional support neededWe are also still asking for donations to make repairs on our building for our seniors. We are doing a little refur-bishing in our center and need donations to purchase some paint for the walls which has had some bumps and bruises this past year. We are also looking at replacing some ceiling tiles that are damaged and ceiling fans that are in disrepair. Please help us with a donation to the center so we can refurbish the place. Please contact us at the center at 229-8466. Your monetary contribution will help us keep the center in good shape for our seniors and they would deeply appreciate the contribution.As of this week, we have not received any donation to help us with the center which is sad for our seniors. Please take the time to help us take care of our most precious family. It only takes a few minutes to call or stop by with a donation of help.We are open Monday-Fri-day from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. EST. In Port St. Joe, the center is located at 120 Library Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 next to the library and the Court House.Vans dying at Senior Center

PAGE 15

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 B3 SCHOOL NEWSSpecial to The StarRecently, Wewahi-tchka Jr./Sr. High School received two American flags which previously flew over the Ronald Reagan Library and Museum located in Simi Valley, CA. Navy veterans Patrick (retired Master Chief, 31 years of service) and Mary Dronkers (retired Chief Petty Offi-cer, 20 years of service), the parents-in-law of WHS science and agricul-ture teacher Eric Bidwell, presented the flags a few weeks ago when visiting the school.Ms. Karen Turner, Wewahitchka High Schools guidance counselor, joined Principal Jay Bidwell as they pre-sented one of the flags to Ms. Peral Hunters U.S. Government class. The first period Government students have faithfully raised and lowered the flag for the whole year and they were very excited to receive this special gift.We are very proud to receive these flags,Ž said Principal Bidwell. They are in mint condition, because they are only flown one day each at the Reagan Library before being donated to fortu-nate recipients. Each one came with an ornate wooden display case and a certificate of authenticity, so they are quite special.One of the flags will be flown at Wewahitchka High and the other will be displayed in the trophy case, so that many future classes can enjoy it. On behalf of the students and staff of Wewahitchka High, I would like to thank the Dronkers for their thoughtfulness and gen-erosity to our school.ŽWewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School receives giftsMr. Bidwell and Ms. Turner present Reagan Library ” ag to Ms. Hunters class. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Rayanna Pennix and Jonas Shockley display Reagan ” ag.[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarAfter approximately 10 years conducting the annual Military Ball at Tyndall AFB, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC returned to Port St. Joe March 16. Its an annual affair that has male cadets wearing uniforms, female cadets have an option of uniform or semito formal-attire. Non-NJROTC guests wear semi-formal attire. This year, the Ball was conducted at the Senior Citizens Center on Library Drive. Sand Dollar Caf catered the dinner for us and Panache and A Design by Dorann each donated place settings, table settings and other items to help us be sure it was a first-class affair. The evening featured a formal receiving line fol-lowed by the introduction of seniors and presentation of our Nations Colors.The events DJ was Night Al Productions from Panama City Beach.The Military Ball or dining-out is an age-old tradition. The Ball is an occasion for which military personnel dress in their finest uniforms. It is an opportunity for cadets to interact in a social, albeit formal, setting. Aside from the formal receiving line and posting of the colors (flags), there is a formal dinner, formal toasts and of course, a dance. Senior cadets are assigned to coordinate the Ball under the supervision of NJROTC instructors. Team building, commu-nication and planning are skills honed by the senior cadets.NJROTC Military Ball comes home[SPECIAL TO THE STAR] [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Special to The StarLocal Business Leaders and Professionals met with the staff of High School High Tech (HSHT) to give suggestions and plan for the Annual Shadowing Day this Spring. HSHT is par-tially funded by The ABLE Trust and Vocational Rehabilitation and run in Gulf County by Dyslexia Research Institute at the PSJ High School. The pro-gram is designed to give high functioning students with disabilities opportu-nities to learn appropriate job skills and explore career options through Career Shadowing and Summer Internships. There are 18 students in the program with many different interest in terms of careers. This is the 12th year for the program in PSJ.The Career Shadowing Day is set for April 3.Students are paired with business leaders or mentors to shadow (follow them around and find out exactly what is required for that job). They are dropped off with their mentor at the time their job starts for the day, and then the mentor and student come to Sunset Coastal Grill to share their experiences. This shadowing sets the stage for the type job the student might like to be involved in for the Summer Intern-ship Program.We need the communitys help. In fact, this program cant work at all with community involve-ment. With 18 students with a wide range of career interests, we need more folks for our students to shadow. Please call Dr. Pat at 229-7799 or the Program Director Heather Gainous at 381-5853 to volunteer. Again, the day for the Shadowing is April 3.Our Guest was Corey Williams, a past HSHT member, and Debbie Hooper, his mentor for his first Shadowing Day. They shared their story and friendship that grew out of that day. Allision Chase was present from The ABLE Trust and shared information with the group.In attendance to offer the counsel and advice were: Jessica Swindall (Sea Turtle Conservatory), Debbie Hooper (Professional Photography), Susan Machemer (FairPoint), Larry Dickey (Gulf County Sheriffs Office), Stacey Price and Kristi Dorman (Capital City Bank), Caisey Rodgers (Humane Society), and Sheryl Bradley (Beach Realty). Patricia Hard-man and Heather Gainous represented Dyslexia Research Institute and the HSHT program.High School High Tech students meet advisory councilDebbie Hooper and Corey Williams. [SPECIAL TO THE STAR] STARFL.COM

PAGE 16

** B4 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star FAITHOn March 21, 2018, John William Daniels, Jr., was called home unexpectedly. The viewing was held at Westside Baptist Church on Monday March 26, 2018, from 6-8 p.m. CT for all family and friends.. Funeral services will be held at Westside Baptist Church on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, at 3:00 p.m. The burial followed at Roberts Cemetery. John was born in Wewahitchka, to John William Daniels Sr., and Naomi Griffin Daniels. He married Wanda Hysmith on July 29, 1982. He was an active member of Westside Baptist Church and worked as a Correctional Officer Sergeant for 25 and a half years. He was preceded in death by his father John William Daniels, Sr., brother Roger Allen Daniels and daughter Tabitha Amanda Daniels. He is survived by his mother Naomi Daniels, wife Wanda Daniels, two daughters Rebecca Daniels and Kelly Angelino and grandchildren Daren and Taylor Angelino. Services are under the direction of Comfort Funeral home.JOHN WILLIAM DANIELS, JR.Ida Belle Lindsey, loving wife, mother, and grandmother, went to be with the Lord on March 24, 2018 at the age of 87. She was born in Gulf County, FL to George and Lula Kemp and moved to Kinard, FL at a young age. At the age of 16, she made Port St. Joe, FL her home. She retired from St. Joe Telecommunications after 19 years where she worked as a chief operator. She enjoyed fishing, cooking, and working in her yard, but most of all being Granny.Ž She was the beloved wife of Melvin (Crook) Lindsey; caring sister to Bernice Fortner and Ouida Cross; loving mother to Donald (Donna) Capps, Freddie (Faye) Capps, Robert (Regina) Capps, Pelo (Mary Jane) Lindsey, Charles (Debbie) Lindsey, and Wayne (Brenda) Lindsey; cherished granny to Bryan, Brad, Joey, Tammy, Kristi, James, Caroline, Jenna, Callie, Louis, Reba, Sheila, Sabrina, Jason, Casi, Ranae, Michelle, Robert, and numerous great-grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her first husband Fletcher Capps, sister Helen Clements, and brother George (Bud) Kemp. The family welcomed friends on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at 10 a.m. E.D.T. at Highland View Baptist Church. The celebration of her life began at 11 a.m. E.D.T. followed by interment at Holly Hill Cemetery. Always and forever is a grandmothers love. Until we meet again...Ž Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home.IDA BELLE LINDSEYHeaven celebrated on March 26, 2018, as Mary Janowski went to meet her heavenly father and joyfully reunite with her loving and devoted husband of 63 years, Maryon Janowski. She had just celebrat ed her 90th Birthday with her family, friends and nurses at Cross Shores Nursing home in Port Saint Joe. Mary is survived by her son Henry Janowski (Margie), her daughter India Miller (Mike), her daughter Neva Garrett (James) and 16 Grandchildren and 27 Great-Grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her Husband, Maryon and her son Boley Janowski III. The family wishes to express their sincere appreciation to the staff and nurses at Cross Shores Nursing home, Bay Medical ICU nurses and Covenant Hospice for the loving care you gave our mother. The celebration of her life will be at the Beach Baptist Chapel located at 311 Columbus Street St. JoeBeach, on Thursday March 29, 2018. The viewing will be at 10 a.m. EST followed by the service at 11 a.m. EST. Services under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Psalms: 23MARY JEANNETTE JANOWSKIMarch 9, 1928 … March 26, 2018SONrise Resurrection Service on the beachCome experience the Resurrection.Ž First Baptist Church of Mexico Beach will host a SONrise ResurrectionŽ Service 6:30 a.m. CT Sunday, April 1 at the Sea Street Ramp on Mexico Beach. All are invited. Bring a lawn chair and a blanket and join the church after for coffee and donuts. Good Friday services will be 12 p.m. CT Friday at the church, located at 823 N. 15th Street in Mexico Beach. For more information call 648-5776 or 340-0921. Beach Baptist Chapel Senior FestivalBeach Baptist Chapels  Over 55 BunchŽ will travel to a Senior Festival at Lake Yale Baptist Convention Center April 16-18. Gospel music, senior activitoies, Christian humor and guest speakers. Cost is $175 per person and includes room and six meals. A $50 per person deposit is required when you make your reservation. For more information contact Jackie King at 850-731-1197.FAITH BRIEFS The family of Leroy (Charles) Strickland would like to say a heartfelt thank you to the Masons Tupelo Lodge 289 in Wewahitchka. You did a wonderful memorial service to honor him and you were there to help the family in many ways. The ladies of Eastern Star were there also to help, they made a delicious buffet for the family that came from near and far. Your support made this sad time in our life less stressful and will always be remembered. Thank you also to the people of Wewahitchka, for your love and support...as always in this community ...you were there.. Thank you and God bless.Linda PriceSTRICKLAND FAMILY CARD OF THANKS FirstBaptistChurch102THIRDSTREET€PORTST.JOE BuddyCaswell,MinisterofMusic&EducationBobbyAlexander,MinistertoStudentsNewServiceScheduleforFirstBaptistChurch NewServiceScheduleforFirstBaptistChurch Dr.BoydEvansPastor4525064 SundayMorningScheduleBlendedWorshipwithChoir/PraiseTeamƒ8:30AM GreatCommissionSundaySchoolƒƒƒƒ...9:45AM ContemporaryWorshipw/Bandƒƒƒƒƒ..10:45AM WednesdayDinnerƒƒƒ..................ƒƒ.5:00-6:00pm AWANAƒƒƒƒƒ..............ƒ.6:00-7:30pm SurrenderStudentMinistryƒ.6:15-7:30pm Prayer/BibleStudyƒƒƒƒƒ.6:15-7:30pm Nurseryƒƒƒƒƒƒƒ....ƒƒ..6:00-7:30pmwww.fbcpsj.org

PAGE 17

** The Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 B5On March 19, Deputy P. Young went to the 300 block of Gary Rowell Road and arrested Tyler Anderson Bowles (29) on a warrant for Viola tion of a Domestic Vio-lence Injunction. The warrant came after it was reported that Bowles was contacting some-one, via social media, that he was prohibited to contact.On March 19, Deputy L. Greenwood responded to a report of a physical alterca-tion in the 1800 block of South State 71 in Wewahitchka. During the investigation, Deputy Greenwood learned that Michael Ewart Lawrence (53) used a metal pipe to choke another person, following a verbal conflict. Lawrence, being found as the primary aggressor, was placed under arrest and charged with Aggravated Battery.On March 19, Deputy M. Manley was assigned to inves-tigate a report of a Domestic Violence Injunction violation. The respondent on the injunc-tion, Deborah Lynne Burant (57), violated No ContactŽ conditions of the injunction by sending emails to the petitioner. A warrant for was obtained for Burants arrest for Violation of a Domestic Violence Injunction. Burant was arrested on the warrant by the Parker Police Depart-ment days later.On March 20, Sgt. L. Dickey obtained information on the whereabouts of some stolen property located in a wooded area in the 8000 block of U.S. 98 in St. Joe Beach. Sgt. Dickey and Investigator P. Baxley investigated the tip and found some items suspiciously located in a wooded area. They found a 6000-watt generator, a microwave (still in the box), two bed comforters (new) and a cooler with miscellaneous tools inside. Investigators were able to track the property back to the owner, who advised they were burglarized recently but declined an investigation into the matter. The p roperty was returned to the owner.On March 21, Sgt. J. Williams took a report of a burglary that had occurred on N. Kim Street in Howard Creek. The victims that state that someone had entered their home, while they were away, and removed a box of Drumstick ice cream from the freezer. The home was under video surveillance and two white males were captured on the security cameras may be responsible for the burglary. Sgt. Williams developed names of the subjects and attempts are being made to locate the subjects for questioning.On March 21, Deputy A. White was dispatched to the 500 block of S. 4th Street in Wewahitchka, in reference to a vehicle burglary. It was reported that during the night, someone had entered an unlocked vehicle and stole a wallet from the center console of the car. No suspects have been developed at this time.On March 21, Deputy C. Harvey conducted a traffic stop in the area of Canning Drive and Sesame Street. The driver was identified as Colton Lee Mullinax (22). During a drivers license check, it was revealed that Mullinax had a suspended license for being a habitual traffic violator. Mul-linax was placed under arrest and charged with Felony Driv-ing While License Suspended or Revoked. On March 23, Sgt. C. Dixon travelled to the Bay County Jail to arrest Deborah Lynne Burant (57) and transported her to Gulf County to be charged with violating a domestic violence injunction.On March 23, Deputy M. Peek and Deputy G. Desrosier responded to a report of a physical altercation on S. Squirrel Avenue in Howard Creek. When deputies arrived, they found a man and woman on scene and the woman was bleeding from her nose. The man, who was identified as Joseph Tavel Stephenson (38), had struck the woman in the face with his fist. Stephen-son was arrested and charged with Domestic Battery.On March 24, Deputy C. Harvey observed a wanted person driving a ve hicle in the area of State 71 and State 22 in Wewahitchka. The wanted person, Rana Marie Parker (28), was wanted out of Bay County for Possession of Methamphetamine, Posses-sion of Drug Paraphernalia and Failure to Register as a Convicted Felon. Deputy Harvey stopped Parkers vehicle on State 71 near Lake Grove Road and attempted to arrest Parker. As Deputy Harvey attempted to get Parker out of the vehicle, Parker started the vehicle, put it in gear and sped away. Deputy Harvey attempted to stop Parker again but she crashed her vehicle into a power pole on State 71 near Old Transfer Road. Parker fled from the crash site before Deputy Harvey arrived. Parker was never apprehended and is now wanted by the Gulf County Sheriffs Office for Fleeing and Eluding Law Enforcement and Resisting Law Enforcement without Violence.On March 24, K-9 Deputy M. Peek conducted a traffic stop on State 71, near the intersection of CR 381A. The driver was identified as Haley Elizabeth Kent (23). During the course of the traffic stop, Deputy Peek found that Kent was in possession of a glass pipe with residual amount of methamphetamine inside it. Kent was placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of Methamphet-amine. Kent was on probation for drug related charges so she was also charged with violation of probation.On March 25, Deputy M. Manley encountered a disabled vehicle on Indian Pass Road with two subjects stand-ing outside it. Deputy Manley contacted the subjects and identified one of them as Christina Lynn Smith (35). A wanted person query revealed that Smith was wanted for criminal charges in Franklin County. Smiths car contained a personal amount of marijuana and a digital scale with methamphetamine resi-due on it. Smith was charged with Possession of Meth-amphetamine, Possession of Paraphernalia and Possession of Marijuana.On March 25, Sgt. C. Dixon was dispatched to the 200 block of West Creekview Drive in reference disturbance involving an intoxicated person. The intoxicated person, Blake Edward Harrel-son (21), was at this property engaged in a child custody dispute. Harrelson refused to leave the property and became belligerent when asked to leave by the owner of the property. After refusing several requests to leave the property, Sgt. Dixon arrested Harrelson and charged him with Trespassing.If you have any information regarding the aforementioned cases, please contact the Gulf County Sheriffs Office at 227-1115, 639-5717, or remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 785-TIPS.Gulf County Sheri s O ce law enforcement summaryMarch 19-26 I had a friend in college who moved away from Florida after she married her husband. He was a military pilot, so they moved frequently, which they seemed to enjoy, since they were in their twenties and quite adventurous. One such move took them to the island of Sicily. When they moved to that lovely Mediterranean island, which is off the southern tip of the Italian peninsula, they found a small house off-base to live in. She told me about it later, and I have to say, its been quite a long time ago, probably 20 years, so I dont remember much about it except that she told me that their back yard was full of beautiful fruit trees. Most of them were lemon trees, filled with tart, juicy fruits, ready to be picked. I can only imagine that my friend made many pans of lemon bars, gallons of tart lemonade, and skillets full of lemon chicken with all that wonderful fruit, warm from the Sicilian sun. Doesnt that sound lovely? When you think about it, lemons are quite a versatile fruit. You can use them in your iced tea to enhance the flavor, which is my favorite way to sip tea. You can make fresh lemonade, which is much better than a powdered version, of course. You can make dense, tart lemon bars, which are a classic Southern dessert that most everyone enjoys. Ive used lemons for dinner, to make lemon chicken on a sheet pan in the oven, which was delicious and easy to make. Fans of the show Everybody Loves Raymond will remember that Debra made a lot of lemon chicken, too. Ive even used lemons for practical purposes. When I sing, I make a cup of warm tea with honey and lemon to sip before the performance, to soothe my throat. I do this when I'm sick, as well. I also make a natural air freshener with them. I simply drop some lemon slices in a pot of water on the stove with a cinnamon stick, and let it gently simmer, checking on it frequently as I work in the kitchen so the water didnt boil away. I love that scent wafting through my house. As far as desserts go, lemon desserts are a perfect choice for springtime. The aforementioned lemon squares, as well as lemon pound cake and even lemon cookies, are refreshing treats for warm weather. Theres one dessert that stands out in my mind, though, as possibly even more delicious than any of those sweets: lemon-raspberry blondies. I began making these about seven years ago when I first began appearing on television cooking segments. They are beautiful, with their lovely contrasting colors, and they're simple to demonstrate on tv, which means they're simple to make in your own kitchen, too. They also happen to be moist and delicious. I hope you'll try these this week, keeping in mind that if you're not a fan of raspberries, blueberries would be a delicious substitute for them in this recipe. Lemon-raspberry blondies€ 1 cup all-purpose ” our € 1 cup sugar € 1 teaspoon salt € 1 cup (2 sticks) butter; room temperature € 4 eggs € Juice from lemon € Zest from 1 lemon € 1 cup fresh raspberries Glaze: € 1 cup powdered sugar € 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice € Additional lemon zest for garnish Preheat oven to 350F. Grease a 9Žx9Ž baking pan. In a mixing bowl, stir together ” our, sugar and salt; add soft butter, cutting in with two forks or pastry blender. In a separate bowl, mix together eggs, juice from lemon and zest from 1 lemon; stir into ” our mixture. Fold in 1 cup of fresh raspberries, then pour into prepared pan. Bake for 30 minutes or until set; use a toothpick to check for doneness. Remove from oven and cool on a rack. When brownies are cool prepare glaze by stirring together powdered sugar and 2 tablespoons lemon juice; drizzle over brownies and sprinkle with additional lemon zest and raspberries, if desired. For more lemon recipes, visit WhatSouthernFolksEat.com and search for "lemon" to see everything I have posted there. Enjoy! Stephanie Hill-Frazier is a writer, food blogger and regional television chef, whose on-air nickname is Mama StephŽ. She grew up in Gulf County, on St. Joe Beach, a place she will forever call home. She is married and has three sons who are considerably taller than she is. You can find more of her recipes at WhatSouthernFolksEat. com, and shed love to hear about your own favorite recipes via email at Steph@ whatsouthernfolkseat.com.What Southern Folks Eat „ When life gives you lemons...Citrus fruit at the market. [PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR] Lemon raspberry bars Berries in a bowl Stephanie Hill-Fraizer When you think about it, lemons are quite a versatile fruit. You can use them in your iced tea to enhance the avor, which is my favorite way to sip tea. You can make fresh lemonade, which is much better than a powdered version, of course. You can make dense, tart lemon bars, which are a classic Southern dessert that most everyone enjoys.

PAGE 18

** B6 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The StarIn Florida, the population of black bears has grown 53 percent to just over 4,000, according to the Florida Fish and W ildlife Conservation Commission.In the 1970s, there were fewer than 300.In the Eastern Panhandle, which includes Gulf and sur-rounding counti es, the bear population has exploded by nearly 90 percent; more than 1 in 4 of Floridas black bears now lives in the Eastern Panhandle.An area that has seen signifi-cant impacts, via development, to bear habitat which has only increased in recent years as changes in land ownership has meant a transition in land-uses.In other words, fewer trees and the associated vegetation and space that bears, which have wide home ranges, enjoy: the typical home range is 15 square miles for females and 62 for males, according to the FWC.The number one factor in bear/human interaction is food, the sweeter, the easier access, the better.Bears have a better sense of smell than any land mammal, according to the FWC, seven times more acute to smell than a bloodhound.And 80 percent of their diet comes from fruits, nuts and berries, natures sweeteners.Take away the source of easy food, and the scent of sweet food, and they will move on down the road,Ž said Dr. Pat Hardman of the Coastal Com-munity Association of Gulf County.Indeed, the FWC notes that bears will not linger in any particular place where they do not find food.The county, as discussed last weekend among Gulf Pines owners, has received FWC grant funding to purchase and distribute garbage can clasps, in St. Joe Beach and along St. Joseph Peninsula.Some clasp sets remain; con-tact county offices if interested.Hardman said in addition to some kind of protection from bears on the trash cans, uni-formity within a subdivision or development was essential. This is particularly true in an area where homeowners live adjacent to rental units.Education of short-term renters is essential, but also ensuring that all property owners, whether renting or living in their home, adhere to the same actions. One rental unit with the food disposed of in an unsecured trash can will still attract the bears in the direction of all the cans.The only way to solve it is to have the whole group do it,Ž Hardman said.The FWC, in its BearWise program, emphasizes a community-wide approach in addressing bear/human con-tact issues.Gulf Pines property owners are also pushing Waste Pro to honor the terms of its waste hauling contract with the county and provide bear-proof cans to any resident who seeks one.Some residents have been told the request is wait-listedŽ but the property owners associ-ation noted that Waste Pro is in the third year of its original five-year contract with the county.There are two options for two-year renewals, and the availability of bear-resistant containers (for $10 additional each month) is part of the contract. Time to hold feet to fire. BEARFrom Page B1 According to the DEO, the manufacturing, education and health services (minus 300 jobs), government (down 200 jobs); and information industries (down 100 jobs) all lost jobs over the past year.The other services industry was uchanged.The unemployment rate does not reflect those unemployed who are no longer receiving unemployment benefits nor does it include those who have stopped seeking employment.CareerSource Gulf Coast operates offices in all three counties. Visit www. careersourcegc.com to learn more about professional work-force development and job placement services, all offered free of charge.*The 14th Annual Career Expo, designed for resume-ready job seekers, will be 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. CT Wednesday, April 4 in the Holley Center at FSU Panama City.The Expo is hosted by CareerSource Gulf Coast, the Bay County Chamber of Com-merce and the Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce. FALLSFrom Page B1You can wheel and deal the best of themƒ And steal it from the rest of themƒ You know the scoreƒtheir ethics are a bore.ŽŽMr. BusinessmanŽ as performed by Ray StevensA recent 5th Circuit Court ruling has overturned a 2016 Department of Labor rule requiring use of the fiduciary standard by financial advisors in managing investors retirement accounts. Based on this ruling, the U.S. Department of Labor will immediately cease enforcing the fiduciary rule passed two years ago. Thus, an investor's retirement account can now be managed by an advisor who is required to adhere only to the less stringent suitability standard and not the fiduciary standard. In other words, an investment can be recommended for a client as long as it is deemed suitable. Imagine our local water company is providing a product that is less than pure, but meets minimum suitabilityŽ standards as prescribed by local environmental regulators. Would we be satisfied? What consumer would not balk at such an arrangement? We all want the purest water available and, naturally, given a choice, we all would choose to work with an advisor who is required to serve our best interests and not his own. We believe that all accounts, not just ERISA governed retirement accounts, should be managed according to the fiduciary standard. But the forces fighting against its uniform implementation have now gained the upper hand. Several things could happen. The decision could be appealed. The SEC might offer its own fiduciary standard. A groundswell of public opinion could persuade the investment industry to voluntarily adopt the fiduciary standard. Or none of that might occur, and many investors might continue to work with advisors who are not required to adhere to the highest standard of client care in a caveat emptorŽ scenario. With the 5th Circuit ruling, an advisor can sell or recommend products which are in his own best interests (and pay him a commission from a parent company) and not necessarily that of the client. That the investment vehicle may not be the best or most costefficient for the client is the price we pay for not operating under a fiduciary standard. I remember overhearing an advisor at a con ference years ago explaining why he could never consider leaving his parent company and serving as a fiduciary to his clients. "They sent my wife and me to Italy last year because of my annuity sales and for how many clients I pl aced in their mutual funds," he said. "Next year we're going to Alaska. I'd like to serve as a fiduciary, but we can't afford to give up free trips like these." That advisor is compensated by his parent company, and works for them, not for his clients. Its hard to do both. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, author of the syndicated economic column Arbor Outlook,Ž is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850.608.6121 … www.arborwealth.net), a fiduciary, fee-onlyŽ registered investment advisory firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor.ARBOR OUTLOOKFiduciary Rule, Clean Water and Ray Stevens Margaret McDowellBears do not linger in neighborhoods if they do not “ nd food. Properly storing or securing garbage and other attractants is a proven method of preventing bear con” icts around homes, neighborhoods and businesses. However, it takes a community-wide effort to keep bears wild and away from people. These items will attract bears: € Unsecured trash and unwashed recycling containers € Bird and squirrel feeders with items like seed, suet and peanuts € Wildlife feeders € Pet food and bowls € Barbeque grills and smokers € Small animals such as chickens, goats, pigs and rabbits € Animal feed like corn, grain and pet food € Composting unsuitable materials € Beehives Fruit and nutbearing trees and shrubs € Unsecured outdoor freezers, refrigerators or coolers These items will attract bears:

PAGE 19

CLASSIFIEDSThe Star | Thursday, March 29, 2018 B B 7 7 POWERFUL. DIGITAL. MARKETING.There are more ways than ever to market your business, and News Herald is here to help! Weve added the power of ThriveHive „ everything you need to market your business online. Theres a great big world of opportunity out there waiting for you. And its closer than you think. Contact Kathleen Smith to get started today. (850) 747-5004 | www.newsherald.com + Guess who can set you up with digital marketing?(Heres a hint, its us). 17348S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 17-000031 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF BILLY HOWARD HUGHES Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Billy Howard Hughes, deceased, whose date of death was May 20, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr Blvd., Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 29, 2018. Personal Representative: Lois Hughes 1345 Brahma Drive Valrico, FL 33594 Attorney for Personal Representative: Eric J. Olson Attorney FL Bar No: 426857 PO Box 2249 LAKELAND, FL 33806 Phone: (863) 688-3606 Fax: (863) 582-9440 E-Mail: eolson@ejopa .com Secondary E-Mail: emmya@ejopa.com March 29, April 5, 2018 17380S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 17-000031 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF BILLY HOWARD HUGHES Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of Billy Howard Hughes, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr Blvd., Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, file number 17-000031. The estate is testate and the dates of the decedent’s will and any codicils are Last Will and Testament dated September 23, 2008. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary lawyer-client privilege in Florida Statutes Section 90.5021 applies with respect to the personal representative and any attorney employed by the personal representative. Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of administration is served who challenges the validity of the will or codicils, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is required to file any objection with the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on that person, or those objections are forever barred. The 3-month time period may only be extended for estoppel based upon a misstatement by the personal representative regarding the time period within which an objection must be filed. The time period may not be extended for any other reason, including affirmative representation, failure to disclose information, or misconduct by the personal representative or any other person. Unless sooner barred by Section 733.212(3), all objections to the validity of a will, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court must be filed no later than the earlier of the entry of an order of final discharge of the personal representative or 1 year after service of the notice of administration. A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on behalf of any person entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on such person or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to exempt property is deemed waived. An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviving spouse entitled to an elective share under Sections 732.201 -732.2155 WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedent’s death. The time for filing an election to take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florida Probate Rules. Personal Representative: Lois Hughes 1345 Brahma Drive Valrico, FL 33594 Attorney for Personal Representative: Eric J. Olson Attorney FL Bar No: 426857 PO Box 2249 LAKELAND, FL 33806 Phone: (863) 688-3606 Fax: (863) 582-9440 E-Mail: eolson@ejopa. com ; Secondary E-Mail: emmya@ejopa. com March 29, April 5, 2018 19544S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that David Pete Windham, DMD 401K PSP, and Caroline Windham, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are as follows: Application #2017-25 Tax Sale Certificate #2015-900 Name in which assessed: CQ Developments LLC AGENT: James A. Cox, Jr. R.E. No. 05015-002R Date of Issuance: May 29, 2015 Description of Property: Lot 13, Block 45, of Re-Subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Joseph’s Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 11th day of April, 2018 Dated: March 5, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018 19546S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that David Pete Windham, DMD 401K PSP and Caroline Windham, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are as follows: Application #2017-26 Tax Sale Certificate #2015-899 Name in which assessed: CQ Developments LLC AGENT: James A. Cox, Jr. R.E. No. 05015-001R Date of Issuance: May 29, 2015 Description of Property: Lot 12, Block 45, of Re-Subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Joseph’s Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 11th day of April, 2018 Dated: March 5, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub: March 8, 15, 22, 29, 2018 19650S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION, FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2016-DP-009-ABC IN THE INTEREST OF: Z. H. DOB: 04/18/2008 Z. K. DOB: 03/12/2010 W. K. DOB: 02/12/2011 MINOR CHILDREN NOTICE OF ACTION (SEC. 39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to KAYLA HESTER, mother of the child, Z.H., whose last known residence and address is Unknown. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court concerning Termination of Parental Rights in the case of Z.H., child, for placement with licensed child placing agency or the Department for the purposes of subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable James J. Goodman, Jr., Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32457, on 26th day of April 2018, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., E.T. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THE CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. Dated: March 7, 2018 REBECCA NORRIS, Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Pub: March 15, 22, 29, April 5, 2018 19676S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Capital One Cltrl Assignee of FIG 2241, LLC, the Certificate Holder of the following Tax Sale Certificate, has filed said Certificate for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The Tax Deed Application number, Real Estate number, Certificate number, Date of Issuance and Name(s) in which it was assessed are as follows: Application #2017-27 Tax Sale Certificate #2015-1071 Name in which assessed: Marion O. Laney R.E. No. 06290-285R Date of Issuance: May 29, 2015 Description of Property: Lot 19, Block 3, Surfside Estates, per plat Book 2, Page 18, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 am E.T., Wednesday, 18th day of April, 2018 Dated: March 12, 2018 REBECCA L. NORRIS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Elaine Bland, Deputy Clerk Pub: March 15, 22, 29, April 5, 2018 19708S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2017-CA-000047 DIVISION: CIT BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, ROBERT HEATH, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s).

PAGE 20

B B 8 8 Thursday, March 29, 2018 | The Star CLASSIFIEDS Please call 850-697-5300to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!!NF-452893821-3 Collins Avenue Located in Lanark 1 bedroom Furnished $550 per month $1,000 Security Deposit No Pets OPS FISH & WILDLIFE TECHNICIANFL FIsh & Wildlife Conservation Com. BOX-R WIldlife Mgt. Area 300 Tilton Road, Apalachicola, FL 32320 $13.21/Hourly, plus benefits. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation control, road & facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts, and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at https://jobs.myflorida.com. For additional info contact:Kay Haskins kay .haskins@myfwc.com 850-265-3676Job closes 04/02/2018 EEO/AA/ADA and VP Employer RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES of SGI, Inc.is now accepting applications for: Part-Time Seasonal Housekeeping Inspectors Work 1-3 days per week. $12/hour plus fuel reimbursement Weekend work required. Must have reliable transportation. Apply in person at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island. RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES of SGI, Inc.is now accepting applications for: Full-Time Maintenance Technician. Some maintenance experience required. Must have clean driving record. Weekend work required. Great benefits package Apply in person at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island. NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, ROBERT HEATH, DECEASED Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: THE LOT, PIECE, OR PARCEL OF GROUND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF GULF, AND STATE OF FLORIDA KNOWN AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, AND EXTEND A LINE SOUTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 FOR 338.37 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM THIS POINT OF BEGINNING TURN 92 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 45 SECONDS LEFT FROM THE LINE LAST DESCRIBED ABOVE FOR 309.55 FEET AND AN IRON STAKE ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 71; THEN TURN LEFT ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR 270.93 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THEN TURN LEFT AND EXTEND A LINE WEST THAT IS PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 FOR 249.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THEN TURN 90 DEGREES 05 MINUTES LEFT FOR 278.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS A 1975 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING TITLE NUMBERS 10694622 AND 10694621 AND VIN NUMBERS 1282A AND 1282B. A/K/A 5455 NORTH HIGHWAY 71, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before April 16, 2018, service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 5th day of March, 2018. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 File No.: 17-007937 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. March 22, 29, 2018 19786S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 17000004CAAXMX DITECH FINANCIAL LLC F/K/A GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN C. HALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN C. HALL; PNC BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 22, 2018, and entered in 17000004CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein DITECH FINANCIAL LLC F/K/A GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC is the Plaintiff and JOHN C. HALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN C. HALL; PNC BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK are the Defendant(s). Rebecca L. Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM, ET, on July 26, 2018 the following described property as set forth in sai dFinal Judgment, to wit: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH 0 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST 182.20 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 130.76 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 0 DEGREES 22 MINUTES WEST 181.86 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 130.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 0.55 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Property Address: 186 QUAILS DEN DR WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a calim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 23rd day of February, 2018. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. or email AD ARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Ste 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 File No.: 16-219085 March 22, 29, 2018 19766S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PROBATE DIVISION File Number 18-10-PR RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT B. JACOBS Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of ROBERT B. JACOBS, deceased, whose date of death was December 21, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 which is the Gulf County Courthouse. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSON ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdictionof this court are required to file their objections with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 22, 2018. Personal Representative: Robert Wesley Jacobs 209 Underwood Court Lexington, SC 29072 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 Post Office Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Phone: (850) 227-1159 email: ccostin@costin law .com March 22, 29, 2018 19788S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232015CA000046CAAXMX MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P., Plaintiff, v. KATHY D. EAVES, ET AL., Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment dated March 5, 2018 entered in Civil Case No. 232015CA000046CAAXMX in Circuit Court of the l4th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P., Plaintiff and KATHY D. EAVES are Defendant(s), Clerk of Court, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash beginning at 11:00AM ET in the courthouse lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on June 7, 2018 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCING AT THE SW CORNER OF LOT 2, IN BLOCK 3, MID-WAY PARK SUBDIVISION, AS PER OFFICIAL PLAT RECORDED IN THE OFFICE THE CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND RUN NORTH FOR 18 FEET TO THE POB; THENCE RUN EAST 156 FEET ALONG THE NORTH SIDE OF THE PRESENT COUNTY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 282 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 156 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 282 FEET TO THE POB. SAME BEING THE SW CORNER OF SAID LOT 2 IN BLOCK 3, MID-WAY PARK SUBDIVISION, IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 417 Midway Park Rd., Wewahitchkia, FL 32465 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. PERSONS WITH A DISABILITY NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO ACCESS COURT FACILITIES OR PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING AT ANY COURTHOUSE OR COURT PROGRAM, SHOULD WITHIN TWO (2) DAYS OF RECEIPT OF NOTICE, CONTACT COURT ADMINISTRATION TO REQUEST SUCH AN ACCOMMODATION. PLEASE CONTACT THE FOLLOWING: COURT ADMINISTRATION, P.O. BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447; PHONE: 850-718-0026; HEARING & VOICE IMPAIRED: 1-800-9558771; EMAIL: AD A REQUEST@JUD14.FL COURTS.ORG Dated: March 13, 2018 Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: Reena Patel Sanders Kelley Kronenberg 8201 Peters Road Fort Lauderdale, FL 33324 Service Email: ftlrealprop@kelleykro nenberg.com March 22, 29, 2019 19904S CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2018-05 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for the Jones Homestead Sewer Project -Bores will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Thursday April 26, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Thursday April 26, 2018, at 3:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Conference Room. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “RFP 2018-05 Jones Homestead Sewer Project -Bores.” DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The City of Port St. Joe is accepting bids for underground bore work as part of our Jones Homestead Sewer Project. The work shall consist of various bores as described in the base bid sheet that are required to complete the installation of new low-pressure forcemains throughout the Jones Homestead Community. A complete bid package is available at www .city ofportstjoe.com For questions concerning this project, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer March 29, April 5, 2018 19810S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID: The Gulf County School Board is taking bids on the repair to the structural supports on the dome at Port St. Joe High School. There will be a mandatory pre-bid meeting at Port St. Joe High School on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 at 12:00 p.m. est. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids may be e-mailed by contacting Woody Borders at wborders@ gulf .k12.fl.us or faxed by calling 850-2298369. March 22, 29, 2018 19874S NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that Best American Storage Manager LLC dba America’s Mini Storage located at 141 Commerce Blvd Port St Joe, FL 32456, intends to offer for sale the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed under the Self Storage Facility Act Statutes 83.801-83.809. Unit C00035, 10x20 unit, household goods, Rachel Jones 6428 W Highway 98 Port St Joe, FL 32456 The auction will take place at 11am EST April 6, 2018 The auction will be held online on www .storagetrea sures.com March 29, April 5, 2018 19916S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 15000007CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CARRINGTON MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007RFC1, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, PLAINTIFF, VS. CLETUS F. HEAPS, III, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 9, 2018, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Gulf County, Florida, on April 19, 2018 at 11:00 AM, ET, at Courthouse steps/ lobby 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 for the following described property: THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: LOT 17A, PONDEROSA PINES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 1979.80 FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST, 267.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 100.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST, 267.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 100.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. Prepared by: Tromberg Law Group, P.A. 1515 South Federal Highway, Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33432 File No.: 13-001300-F If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at AD ARequest @jud14.flcourts.org P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 29, April 5, 2018 19906S CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2018-04 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for the Jones Homestead Sewer Project Materials Purchase will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Thursday April 26, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Thursday April 26, 2018, at 3:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Conference Room, Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “RFP 2018-04 Jones Homestead Sewer Project Materials Purchase.” DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Direct Purchase of materials as listed in the Base Bid sheet that are required to complete the installation of new low-pressure forcemains throughout the Jones Homestead Community. A complete bid package is available at www .cityofportstjoe.co m For questions concerning this project, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer March 29, April 5, 2018 19920S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 17000053CAAXMX Wells Fargo Financial System Florida, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Viola Kemp a/k/a Viola L. Kemp; Unknown Spouse of Viola Kemp a/k/a Viola L. Kemp; Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger to Wells Fargo Financial Bank Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: Phoebe Oreda Butler a/k/a Phoebe O. Butler Last Known Address: 4016 Holiday Dr. Panama City Beach, Fl. 32408 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE NW CORNER OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 12, T4S, R11W, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE GO N 8928’07” E 558.48 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST R/W LINE OF KEMP CEMETERY ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 0505’09” WEST FOR 205 FEET TO THE POB; FROM SAID POB THENCE NORTH 8928’07” EAST FOR 326 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 0505’09” WEST FOR 161.95 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 8928’07” WEST FOR 326 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST R/W LINE OF KEMP CEMETERY ROAD; THENCE NORTH 0505’09” EAST FOR 161.95 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POB. LESS AND EXCEPT ANY PORTION THAT LIES WITHIN LEGAL DESCRIPTION RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 199, PAGE 900. TOGETHER WITH MOBILE HOME VIN NO. ALCA0396270S30264 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Julie Anthousis, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL. 33309, within thirty (30) days of the first date of publication on or before April 30, 2018, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on March 22, 2018. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Brock & Scott, PLLC 1501 NW 49th St. Suite 200 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)618-6955 File # 17-F02620 March 29, April 5, 2018 19918S IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2017-111CC SAN DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff, vs. STERLING TRUST COMPANY, n/k/a EQUITY INSTITUTIONAL, a Division of EQUITY TRUST COMPANY, CUSTODIAN, FOB: CHARLES E. YOST, ACCT. 068812, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the County Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the following property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: Lot 14, SAN DUNES SUBDIVISION, according to the plat recorded in the public records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 5, page 6. At the public sale to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at: Gulf County Courthouse, Main Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. ET on April 12, 2018 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 22nd day of March, 2018. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the County Court BY; BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Anderson & Givens, P.A. Justin J. Givens, Esq. JGivens@AndersonGiv ens.com P. O. Box 12613 1689 Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahassee, Florida 32317-2613 (850) 692-8900 FL Bar No. 0052130 Counsel for Plaintiff March 29, April 5, 2018 We Buy Anything OldItems we buy include: Signs (Gas and Oil, Soda, Tobacco, etc.) Images (Time Types, Ambrotypes, CDVs, etc) Antique Weaponry, Primitives, Antique Furniture, Clocks, Country Store Items, Jewelry. Taxisdermy, Oddities, Pottery, Architectural Items, Militaria, Folk Art, Lamps and a whole lot more! We pay cash! Contact Kris Clark 706 474 3443 We Buy GoldJewelry & Diamonds Watches & Silver We pay cash for estates 7 Days AWeek Pawn Loans Low Rates! 700 Beal Pkwy US GOLD PAWN Call TOM Now!! 850-974-2462www .usgold p awn.com SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill! Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www .Norwood Sawmills.com or call (800)578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTEDExperienced residential Plumbers and helpers needed. Port St Joe Area Top pay Good benefeits Call (850)227 1101 or (850)528 0907 Local Church needs Pianist call Glen 850-545-5791 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Motorhome, 2006 Fleetwood Flair. 32’, 2 slides, 55,500 miles, AC, Generator, Gas/Ele Fridge, Very good condition. $30,000. Motoerhome located in Carrabelle. Call 989-657-1025. Small Price for Big Results! The Star 850-747-5020or visit us online at emeraldcoastmarketplace.comFor all your buying and selling needs. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.