The star

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Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03961


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, SEPTEMBER 25, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 50 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The beaches are sparkling. Last Saturday, 82 volunteers took to both St. Joe Beach and Mexico Beach for a series of community cleanup events. Volunteers spent the early morning hours walking the beaches and cleaning up trash from the shore, through the dunes and all the way to U.S. Highway 98. The cleanup was in conjunction with the 29th annual Ocean Conservancys International Coastal Cleanup, during which volunteers clean up the shores of beaches, lakes and rivers across the world. In 2013, an estimated 648,015 volunteers picked up more than 12.3 million pounds of trash along 12,914 miles of shoreline. In St. Joe Beach, the inaugural cleanup was led by resident Melina Elum. Her crew consisted of 30 volunteers, 16 of whom were NJROTC students from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School joined by leader Marty Jarosz. The remaining volunteers were concerned residents and visitors to the area. Elums crew collected about 315 pounds of trash, lling 21 bags. I was really pleased, Elum said. It was a big success. Elum has owned property in St. Joe Beach since 1990 and visited a half dozen times each year before settling permanently in Gulf County. She said the beaches are what bring both residents and visitors to the area, and its important to keep them beautiful. Im ready to see something happen with a Leave no Trace ordinance, Elum said. Something with teeth that will solve the problem. Its about the beach aesthetic. The only thing you should leave on the beach is your footprints. Elum broke her volunteers into groups of two across 10 zones, each responsible for two city blocks worth of beach. One person picked up refuse while the other identied the trash and tallied it on a card. The information is collected and sent to the Ocean Conservancy of ces, where it can be further analyzed. Among the trash collected were 894 cigarette butts, car parts and even a wooden door to a ship, found rotting in the dunes. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com One audience member gave the motion an Amen. The Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday morning took the rst step toward the implementation by next spring of a Leave No Trace ordinance for the countys beaches. Commissioner Warren Yeager, as part of comments about appointments to the Tourist Development Council advisory board, said county and tourism of cials have watched problems with debris on the beach grow exponentially as tourist volume has also increased. Though the success the TDC has had in marketing Gulf County has been a boon for tourism, it has also meant problems with trash on the beaches. The evidence seemed particularly abundant this year, despite an ambassador program aimed at providing education and hospitality outreach on the beaches. A beach maintenance team has taken tens of thousands of pounds of trash off the beach this summer. Reporting of debris, including tents, pylons, tables and chairs, as well as incidences of camp re residue left behind and huge holes dug in the sand and left un lled have been on the rise. The problems have not only been visited upon many partand full-time residents of South Gulf County, but also their neighbors, nesting sea turtles. This newspaper has seen a sharp rise, including again this week, of Letters to the BOCC adopts budget, tax increase By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners took a little from all to balance its budget. Commissioners closed the nal gap in the 2014-2015 budget by implementing an across-theboard 1 percent cut for departments and constitutional of cers and adopted a nal budget Monday night. By the end of the second public hearing Monday, commissioners nished the work of cutting to reach the tentative millage rate of 6.9936, up more than fourtenths of a mill from last year, and to nalize a spending plan for the next year that includes a nearly 8 percent increase in taxes, translating to just over $800,000. A mill is equal to $1 per $1,000 of taxable property value. Commissioners entered Septembers public hearings needing to slice roughly $115,000 from the budget after a proposal to institute a 5-cent increase in the local option gas tax was voted down by commissioners last month. That revenue was counted in the tentative budget on which the tentative millage rate was set. Once set, commissioners were locked into that tentative rate as a ceiling. During the rst budget meeting, commissioners chopped $40,000 that was earmarked for work toward countywide voting and debated proposals from Commissioner Joanna Bryan that looked more closely at individual line items and departments. Commissioners tabled action and recommended the budget review committee look at areas of a budget document County Administrator Don Butler said was in need of maintenance and that commissioners questioned repeatedly concerning accuracy of the numbers. They borrowed money from a restricted fund for the general fund and pledged answers by Mondays second public hearing. And stemming from that rst meeting was a recommendation from Commissioner Carmen McLemore that took hold to cut all budgets by 1 percent in order to completely close the gap. That gap, with motions to rescind cuts to several outside agencies, including the Gulf County Library, folded in, amounted to roughly $100,000, Butler said Monday. Some budgets carried restricBOCC moves toward Leave No Trace The TDC has done a great job of bringing people to Gulf County, but they leave a lot of things behind. It has become a real problem for the turtles and for people who live on the beach. Warren Yeager, county commissioner Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ...................... B9-B11 See BUDGET A2 Sunset sailing RON RUDOLPH | Special to The Star A great blue heron glides across a fading sky as the sun sets over St. Joseph Bay. Thanks to Ron Rudolph for the photo. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MELINA ELUM | Special to The Star ABOVE: Volunteers keep an eye out for trash on St. Joe Beach during a cleanup Saturday. RIGHT: Almost 900 cigarette butts were pulled from the shore, dunes and shoulder of St. Joe Beach. Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach get a good scrubbing See CLEANUP A2 See LEAVE NO TRACE A2 Appreciate the state park Saturday B1

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 POR T ST JOE I PA NAMA CITY To schedule an appointment or set up a skin cancer scr eening, please call 850-233-DERM (3376). Caring fo r the der mat ology need s of the Port St. Joe com munity is all about he lping our patients mai ntain their he alt hiest skin at eve ry ag e It s abou t tak ing the ti me to ad d re ss your concer ns an d m ak in g sur e we alway s ans wer yo ur que stions. It s our commitme nt to th e co mm unity and it s Gulf Coast Der matolo gy s commitmen t to ev e ry pa tie nt we ca re for . Tr icia Berry ARNP A Co ntin ue d Com mitme nt To Pr ov id ing Th e Hi ghe st Le vel Of Der mat ol ogy Car e A C ontin ue d Com mitme nt To Pr ov id ing T he Hi ghe st Le vel Caring f or t he d ermat ology need s of the Port St Joe community is all abou t he lping our patients mai ntain their he alt hiest skin a t eve ry a ge It s abou t tak ing the t ime t o addr ess your concer ns a nd makin g sur e we alway s ans wer yo ur que stions. I t s our commitme nt t o the com munity and it s Gulf Coast Der matolo gy s co mmitmen t to e very pat ient we car e for . Tr icia Berry ARNP Of De rmato log y C ar e Port St Joe community is all abou t he lping our patients mai ntain their he alt hiest skin To Pr ov id ing T he Hi ghe st Le vel Of De rmato log y C ar e OUR NEW LOCA TION: gulfcoastderm.com 98 30 Piggly Wiggly McDonald s Av e A Av e B Marina Drive First St re et Drive Editor from residents be moaning the impact debris has had on the beaches. We have watched it for the past couple of years, and weve had beach am bassadors out there this year, and we have an is sue, Yeager said. The TDC has done a great job of bringing people to Gulf County, but they leave a lot of things behind. It has become a real problem for the turtles and for people who live on the beach. Yeager said there were a variety of models out there for a Leave No Trace Ordi nance several counties to the west have such or dinances in various forms but said commissioners need to take the step to ward putting an ordinance in place by the arrival of the busier summer season in 2015. The motion was ap proved unanimously. The last couple of years, there is becoming more and more junk left on the beach, Commissioner Joanna Bryan said. TDC appointments A proposal for a Leave No Trace ordinance emerged from a contentious debate over appointments to the TDC advisory board. The debate became heat ed enough for Commission Chairman Ward McDaniel to gavel for a 5-minute re cess before Bryan could respond to Commissioner Carmen McLemore regard ing McLemores question ing of her job performance. As of Oct. 1, the TDC ad visory board has four mem bers rotating off, though one reapplied and was ac cepted because the indi vidual was not term-limited under BOCC policy. Three members, how ever, are term-limited, and during its prior meeting, the BOCC rejected a re quest from the TDC to con sider waiving board policy limiting members of volun teer boards to two consecu tive terms. County administrator Don Butler presented the recommendations of ex ecutive director Jennifer Jenkins on lling the three seats with candidates iden tied after vetting of all applications. Butler recommended accepting Jenkins rec ommendation, but Bryan objected to being asked to consider the list when it had just been presented during the meeting and she had been told by Jenkins that a nal vote would come the rst meeting of October. She cited it as another example of the BOCC making decisions without ability to fully review the required information and recommendations. I can not review this, but Im supposed to re view it and vote on it dur ing a meeting? Bryan said. This is ridiculous. Mr. Chairman, is this appropriate? Before McDaniel could respond, Yeager, the BOCC representative on the TDC, said hed seen the list, they were all good names and he had no problem proceeding. Though agreeing with the quality of the pool of candidates, Bryan repeat ed that the information should have been provided in a more timely manner. I disagree with the pro cedure we have followed, Bryan said. Butler said he present ed the information when it was provided, and he was operating under the rules commissioners had established. He also noted the terms would expire be fore the BOCC met again. At that point, McLemore said Bryan needed to be more involved, and she preferred to reach out and cut somebody down when it is half your fault. Bryan was not allowed to respond as McDaniel gaveled the meeting. When commissioners came back in session, Julia Cunningham approached the board and asked that they consider putting a person who actually lives on Cape San Blas on the TDC board. That, she said, would bring more balance to the TDC board and an agency that affects not just tour ists, but the residents of Cape San Blas. I hope you pick a can didate who has their toes in the sand, Cunningham said. She noted that three Cape residents had applied to the TDC board, and all brought excellent qualica tions. She said any of the candidates from the Cape would fulll requirements of being a bed-tax collector and heavily involved with issues relating to tourism. And she noted that of the candidates recommended by Jenkins, one was not technically a bed-tax col lector and another did not submit the application by the advertised deadline. The motion to accept the nominations was ta bled and the three mem bers whose terms end Oct. 1 had their terms extended for one month. LEAVE NO TRACE from page A1 BUDGET from page A1 tions, Butler noted, that would not allow for cuts. There were already commitments on the books that were factored, but cutting departments and constitutional ofcers 1 percent would bring an additional $125,512 to the revenue side, he said. McLemore motioned and com missioners agreed to funnel the roughly $25,000 over what was need ed into the budget of the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce. Bryan opposed the cuts, arguing that in sweeping all departments and ofcers up in the same dictate, commissioners were penalizing department heads producing from the start a clean budget. What I dont like is we are cut ting across-the-board instead of looking at individual line items, said Bryan, who reiterated the stance she has held from the outset that there was room to cut in the budget. Bryan and Commissioner Ward McDaniel voted against the budget; the two also voted against the mill age rate. Other notes from the second pub lic budget hearing: Several factors are at work for at least a portion of the increase in spending, and Clerk of Courts Becky Norris noted several Monday. One was a $200,000 reduction in projected revenues from EMS, and another was increases to the Florida Retirement System. Additionally, commissioners are increasing their commitment to eco nomic development, now a county department, by more than $100,000. Butler recommended during Tues days regular BOCC meeting that commissioners reject the sole bid received on proposals for a private company to take over EMS. Butler said changes in the opera tions of EMS most notably making director Houston Whiteld a salaried employee and an ongoing effort to reduce overtime would help man age the EMS budget, which already took a $200,000 hit with the estimated reduction in revenue. The decision to eliminate funding for outside contractors to assist in redistricting and, ultimately, a deci sion on countywide voting continued to roil the podium during Tuesdays meeting. Wewahitchka resident and com mission candidate Tom Semmes asked about the specics of the needed services, specically GIS mapping and any legal leg work, and how the county would save. Specically, while Semmes agreed with McLemore that the inhouse GIS director could perform the required GIS work, he wondered if the legal work would be outside the scope of county attorney Jeremy No vaks contract with the county. Novak said he would adhere to di rections from the board as the BOCC prepares to undertake redistricting next year as prescribed by law. He said much of that work would likely fall outside the scope of his basic con tract, but he was open to negotiate. The discussion expanded when Port St. Joe resident Tom Graney took the podium to argue that the case to overturn the federal decree under which county government op erates was a slam dunk, according to statements made a decade ago by the countys Tallahassee attorney on the issue. He said the priority should be overturning the federal decree to al low the county to operate as 64 others in Florida do and decide what form of government to operate under sin gle-member, countywide or charter. Redistricting should not be such a big deal, Graney said. The issue of counting prison ers in districting, which the county does not do contrary to state law and was therefore recommended by the outside attorney, should be a no-brainer. They dont move, Graney said. Count the prisoners, and draw the lines. But while bogging down in such thickets, commissioners, he argued, were hiding behind the federal judge and the decree instead of addressing what voters long ago expressed a de sire for, to the extent that a private citizen offered to fund the countys legal bills to go to federal court. The debate had been muddied over the past 10 years by commission ers, and other issues were peripher al to the central goal of overturning a federal decree that has been in place since the 1980s and meant a federal court believed the county racist and crazy, Graney said. Novak said the issue is complex, and the county is following the direc tions from the same attorney Graney cited to provide the county the best possible case when entering federal court. CLEANUP from page A1 Theyll be back next year, and there will be more of them, Elum said. Their awareness has been raised as to whats out there and the damage it can cause. The Mexico Beach clean up, led by Jane Mathis, wel comed 52 volunteers, a new record for the cleanup that has happened annually for the past 10 years. Mathis volunteers, who worked four to a zone across 15 zones cleaning the 3-mile stretch of beach, brought in about 1,185 pounds of trash, lling 79 bags. They worked so hard, and Im so grateful to all of those volunteers for show ing up, Mathis said. It was the perfect morning for a beach cleanup. In addition to the regu lars who attend each year, Mathis said she saw a lot of new faces and said one woman drove from Atlanta specically for the event. Like St. Joe Beach, Mex ico Beach also had its share of common litter. Mathis said the volunteers picked up thousands of cigarette butts. Other common of fenders included plastic water bottle labels and re work debris. Its so gratifying. Im so proud of our community, Mathis said. It was amaz ing looking at those faces ready to launch out and clean up. It was a record year, and I hope we do this well in the future. Star Staff Report State Sen. Bill Montford and Rep. Halsey Beashers will hold a public hearing of the Gulf County Legislative Delegation at 5 p.m. ET Monday, Sept. 29, at the Board of County Com missioners meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Building courthouse annex. All residents and elected ofcials are invited to attend. This hearing is intended to al low citizens the opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and of fer comments for the upcoming 2015 Legislative Session. The Robert Moore Building is at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. SETTING IT STRAIGHT Star Staff Report Last week The Star reported that in the vote on the sale of the Highland View Elementary School property, Gulf County School Board members George Cox and Danny Little voted not to sell the property for $650,000. During the 3-2 vote, Danny Little and Billy Quinn Jr. dissented while Cox was in support of the sale. County legislative delegation meeting set for Monday

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, September 25, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Coming soon to the Gulf/ Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College is the law enforcement training academy, poised to roll out in January 2015. To provide more infor mation to the community an open house will be 5:307 p.m. Oct. 9 at the Gulf/ Franklin campus. The purpose of the pro gram, which will be eight months in length, is to pre pare students for employ ment as a municipal, county, or state law enforcement of cer. The program includes courses mandated for law enforcement certication with the state of Florida. The program is being overseen by Douglas Boortz, corrections coordinator for GCSC Gulf/Franklin cam pus, a position hes held for the past two years. Boortz said that when people start ed asking about a law en forcement program several months ago, he knew it was something to consider. We tried in the past, but there was never enough in terest, Boortz said. Now, we have more and more in terest and that encouraged us to give it a shot. Boortz is bringing 25 years of law enforcement expertise to the program and teachers for the classes will be certied instructors from the Gulf County Sher iffs Ofce and the Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach Po lice Departments. With the economic is sues that are surrounding the shing and oyster in dustries, people are looking for other career options, Boortz said. People love (TV shows like) C.S.I and they nd it intriguing. Were holding this open house so people who are interested can get a feel for what life as a law enforcer is like. To help Boortz in giving attendees a peek behind the curtain, several of cers from each local law enforcement branch will be on hand at the open house to show off their equipment, including the latest gadgets and technologies, and give those who attend a real idea of what life on the force is like. Classes in the program will include the legal pro cess of law enforcement, human issues, communi cations, vehicle operation, rst-aid for criminal justice ofcers, rearms, defensive tactics, patrol, crime scene investigation and more. Once students conclude the program, credits can be used toward additional de grees at the school, and stu dents will be eligible to take their state certication test through the Florida Depart ment of Law Enforcement to work at police agencies or sheriffs departments from Pensacola to the Flor ida Keys. Its a huge opportunity, Boortz said. Were trying to do our best to give out more opportunities in the public safety divisions. We want people to come out, poke around and ask questions. Well be showing them rst-hand the subjects that will be introduced and the instructors who will show them how the courses are presented and what to expect. GCSCs corrections of cer program has run for 12 years, and Boortz said the law enforcement program is a natural extension, and its possible for students to become dual certied. Job placement rates for pro gram graduates average 96 percent for the past two years, a feat Boortz hopes to duplicate with the law en forcement program. We really want to en courage people in the com munity to come out and learn more about the ca reer options, said Loretta Costin, director of the Gulf/ Franklin Campus. Well also be celebrating local law enforcement ofcers and the important role they play in the community. Those who attend the open house and are inter ested in enrolling in the pro gram will have the opportu nity to learn more about the admissions requirements and pricing and sit down with a nancial aid adviser. Hotdogs and drinks will be provided at the open house. CD 10 73 WOW 9/ 14 Be ca us e yo ur fu tu re doe sn t ret ire 4. 15 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lu es of $1 0, 000 -$ 24 ,9 99 4. 40 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lu es of $2 5, 000 -$ 99 ,9 99 4. 60 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lue s of $1 00 ,0 00 -$ 49 9, 999 In st ea d of Ce rt i ca tes of De po si t, a sk ab ou t a Si ng le Pr em ium Def er re d An nu it y wi th a Fi rs tYe ar In te r es t Bo nu s fr om Wo od me n of th e Wo rl d. Se pt em be r in it ia l gu ar a nt ee d in te re st s ra te s ar e: Se co nd ar y gu ar an te ed in te re st ra te th ro ug h sur re nd er ch arge pe ri od is 1. 00 % Mi ni mum gu ar an te ed in te re st ra te is 1. 00 % Wo od man of th e Wo rl d Li fe In su ra nc e So cie ty Ho me Of c e, Om ah a, Ne br as ka | wo od men .o rg EX PE RI EN CE D DE DI CA TE D FA IR Ts emm es @n et sca pe s. com 850 -2 27 -5 60 1 "I pr o mi se to wo rk ha rd an d al wa ys do wh at is bes t fo r al l the pe op le of Gu lf Co un ty ." To m has th e wo rk an d li fe ex pe ri en ce s th at we ne ed to he lp so lv e th e ma ny pr ob le ms fa ci ng Gu lf Co un ty To m ha s pr ov en hi ms elf in man y to ug h job as si gn me nt s th ro ug h th e ye ar s wh ic h hav e pr ov id ed hi m wi th ex te ns iv e ex per ie nc e in th e ar ea s of bu dg et o ve rs ig ht an d man ag em en t sk ill s: Ret ir ed wi th ov er 20 ye ar s of s er vi ce as a Ch ie f Wa rr an t Of ce r in th e Si gn al Co rp s. Pr es id en ti al Co mm un ic at io ns Of ce r, su pp or ti ng Pr es id en ts Ro na ld Re ag an an d Ge or ge Bu sh Gr ou p Ma na ger su pe rv isi ng Pro je ct Ma na ger s on na ti on al an d in te rn ati on al te le co mm un ic ati on s pr oj ec ts El ec te d Ad vi so ry Bo ar d Me mb er re pr ese nti ng Gu lf Co un ty To ms Co mm un it y In vo lv em en t: Vi ce Co mm an de r, We wa hi tc hk a Pos t 82 85 Me mb er an d su pp or te r. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m It was a hometown welcome. During an open house held last Tuesday at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Suite 203 was packed with members of the community who made the trek to welcome family medicine physician, Dr. Rachel Bixler, MD back home. Bixler was born and raised in Port St. Joe, graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 2004, and set out with a goal to learn medicine and then come back home to ply her trade. Its a dream come true, Bixler said. This was the plan from day one. Bixler received her medical degree from Florida State Uni versity College of Medicine in Tallahassee and subsequently completed her residency train ing in family medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. In her nal year of the pro gram, Bixler claimed the title of chief resident from 2013 to 2014, a position designed to honor the hard work and achievements of the top performing residents. Bixler said she nished her residency June 30 of this year and by July 1 she had all of her belongings packed in her car and was on the road home to Port St. Joe. I am excited about return ing home as a family medicine physician with Sacred Heart Medical Group, Bixler said. I love this community and can not wait to serve as one of their doctors. Volunteers, members of the community and her fellow medical practitioners gave Bix ler a warm welcome and were treated to refreshments and conversation. Bixler said she has a special medical interest in womens health along with dermatology and child health from infancy through adolescence. She will work from the medical center on the Sacred Heart Campus where she will accept sameday appointments and new pa tients. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call her ofce at 229-5661. Bixler said she hoped that her experiences would inspire other graduates of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School to pursue their dreams. If its your dream and youre passionate about it, dont let anyone tell you no, Bixler said. Sacred Hearts Bixler receives hometown welcome WES LOCHER | The Star An open house to welcome Dr. Rachel Bixler, MD, back to Port St. Joe was held at the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf medical center last week. GCSC to hold law enforcement open house in OctoberS PECIA L TO T HE S TAR GCSC has held corrections ofcer programs for the past 12 years. Students will be able to become dual certied.

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OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, September 25, 2014 A Section The other morning, I was on the shore of a large creek. The creek was large enough for big pleasure boats and the manmade beach I was standing on had sand on it. The temperature was perfect the morning was beautiful, so I took a few pictures of the water. After getting home, I studied the pictures I had made with my cellphone and found one that I really liked. It was a picture of the water, the boats, the clouds and a perfect re ection of the clouds into the water. While taking the pictures, I didnt notice the beauty of the scene. It happens that way a lot with folks taking pictures. Havent you ever seen parents at a sporting event or dance recital taking so many pictures that they cant even enjoy whats going on? I had my picture and I guess you could say the re ection of the clouds in the water of the creek caused me to re ect. Albeit a day later, I still had reason to ponder my lack of appreciating the scenery at the time. Looking back on our slipups and what we miss is very easy. Someone once said, Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards. It makes a lot of sense, but I think we often are in such a hurry that we fail to appreciate the scene we are in. There is a sign on the road close to where I work that notes, Slow Down Its not a Race, Its a Life. Yes, I know they are talking about speeding and cars and such, but the same applies to life in general. It is a life and its the only one we have here. The technology bugs, the hurry bugs and the Kuwtj bugs are always biting at us and ying into our eyes such that we cant enjoy the beauty of where we are right now. What is a Kuwtj bug? It is a word I invented and is pronounced coot-age. It is the Keeping Up With The Jones bug and it will sting you, blind you and send you running places you dont need to go. A recent sermon at our church had to do with the importance of rest, speci cally sleep. It was a sermon I needed to hear, because I am always trying to cheat the hours in a day and it cant be done on a regular basis. Im pretty sure my son listened to the sermon closely because he continues to take two-hour naps in the afternoon and insists on staying in the bed until the last possible minute to make it to school on time. Perhaps, it is just the regimen of a teenaged boy. On my drive back from the water, I noticed a van pulling a trailer. On the trailer, it noted that it was a Cub Scout troop or pack. The van was going slow and the fellow driving honestly, looked a little scary. The driver had on a leather hat that looked like something you would wear in the Australian outback with some sort of pins or buttons stuck in it everywhere you could stick them. He had a big bushy mustache that seemed to be hiding the lower part of his face. It just didnt t his seemingly boney looking stature. I was making this observation while driving in the car and passing the van full of Cub Scouts. As I passed on by and got on down the road, I thought about how unfair it was to think the fellow driving was scary looking. He was going slowly, surely on a camping trip with a van-load of little boys. As for his looks, would you want your leader to look boring? No You would want to see roasted marshmallows dripping off of that Teddy Roosevelt mustache and those little boys probably know about the adventure that every one of those pins or buttons on the Australian outback hat represent. Now that I think about it, perhaps my re ection is not too bad. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. I once sent Leon $348.00. He was attending Sothern College of Optometry in Memphis. I had just started a teaching career in Port St. Joe. This was back in 1970..or 71. He had never, in his whole life, asked me for anything. He musta been pretty hard up. Leon was married, with two beautiful daughters by the time he decided to go back to college to become an eye doctor. I was not married at the time; didnt even have a girl friend or any extra bad vises to waste my money on. And I was holding down a pretty steady job. The cash was easy to send. Leon said it was for a spectrometer or spectroscope or something like that. I dont remember for sure, but it sounded like a tool he might need to peer into someones eyes. Let me tell you what I got back in return for those 348 bucks. Over the next forty years Leon has given me, my immediate family, my wifes family, friends I sent to him or folks I found on the street that looked like they needed a little eye care approximately one hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars worth of exams, glasses, contacts, etc! And Im telling you with my hand up, thats a conservative estimate! He never took one dime from me. You couldnt pay him. Even in the early days. Hed mail my contact lenses to me, three or four sets at a time. If I squinted up at the sun, hed have me a pair of prescription sunglasses before you could say Roy Orbison. The day after the new soft contacts came out, he was calling me to come try on a pair. Id go visit on the week-ends. Hed say, Lets run down to the office, its been a while since we checked your eyes. I pointed out to Leon along about 1985 that hed outfitted me, Cathy, Josh and Jesse for years with whatever eye products we needed, wanted or could think of.. and that I ought to pay him something! He looked at me like I had insulted him, then he gave me that million dollar smile that hed been lighting up the world with all of his life..and he moved the conversation on to something else. He discovered the cataracts in my eyes early. KC, were going to have to do something about them. He knew the best cataract man in Nashville. He scheduled the hospital. He scheduled the best doctor. He and Paula took the day off and accompanied me to the surgery. They were standing by the operating door when I went in and they were standing over me when I woke up. I spent the recovery days at their house. When I got ready to pay, I didnt owe nobody nothing. Let me tell you something, you get into a giving contest with my older brother and you are going to lose every time! When we were growing up he gave me the shirt off his back. Literally! He got the new stuff, me and David Mark got the handme-downs. He modeled near bout everything I wore for years. I can still remember telling him to take good care of the Roy Rodgers shirt with the western yoke and the tie strings on the front. And to this day, I think I looked better in those black loafers with the white lightening streak down the sides than he did! He was giving when we didnt have any money. He spent hours getting me to hold the baseball across the seams. Get your elbow up, I can hear him like it was yesterday, nobody in this family is going to throw like a girl! For a long time, me and David could only go to the Saturday afternoon picture show if Leon walked with us. We could only go swimming if Leon took us. We couldnt go down to the big ditch unless he went to look after us. Shoot, he was out-giving me.before I was even old enough to realize it! Both of my sons attended Belmont University in Nashville. Thats ve hundred miles from the house. It was across the city for Leon. I feared for their lives. Leon went to every baseball game Joshs freshman year. I dont think he ever played but Leon was there. Hed take him to eat after the game and encourage him. When Jesse got there, it was the same thing. As a matter of fact, Jess moved in with Leon there for a while. This went way beyond giving. Lon, I actually set him down, so hed know I was serious, I cant live long enough to repay you and Paula for what yall have done for my boys. He looked at me kinda befuddled like, then gave me the smile and said, Are we keeping score? Just this past April, during my regular check-up, he pointed out the gyroscope or spectrometer or whatever he called that thing I bought him those many years ago. It was on a small table in his examination room. You know, I still use it on occasion. He was thanking me! I dont need to buy a lottery ticket, I hit the jackpot the moment I fell into Dr. Holmes hands. Love you, KC HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert If The World Had His Heart CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Kuwtj Bugs and Re ections Page 4 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 As we head into autumn, people with Medicare once again need to consider their options for next year. Even if you like the coverage you have now, you should spend at least a few minutes making sure it will still meet your needs next year. Here are some key questions that people with Medicare should ask. When is the enrollment period? Medicares open enrollment period runs, as usual, from October 15 to December 7. During this time, you can make changes in your Part D prescription drug plan or Medicare Advantage plan, or, if you dont have one, you can select one for the rst time. How is this different from the open enrollment period for the health insurance marketplaces? If you have Medicare, the health insurance marketplace is not for you. Medicare coverage and its open enrollment period are completely different from those of the health insurance marketplaces (which are also known as exchanges). The health insurance marketplace offers coverage and nancial assistance for people who do not qualify for Medicare usually, people under age 65 who do not have permanent disabilities. The marketplace open enrollment period starts and ends later than Medicares. But if you have friends or loved ones who need coverage and do not qualify for Medicare, encourage them to check out www. healthcare.go v What are my options? During Medicare open enrollment, if you have a Part D prescription drug plan or Medicare Advantage plan, you can change it. You can also join a Part D or Medicare Advantage plan for the rst time. If you currently have original Medicare and a supplemental plan (either a private Medigap plan or a plan with a former employer), be very careful before dropping your supplemental plan. You may not be able to get that plan back later. How should I prepare for open enrollment? If you have a Part D or Medicare Advantage plan, nd out how your plan will be changing for 2015. Your current plan should mail you an Annual Notice of Change (ANOC) http://www. medicareinteractive.org/page2. php?topic=counselor&page =glossary#ANOC and/or an Evidence of Coverage (EOC) notice in September. These notices will highlight any changes in the plans costs, bene ts, and rules for the upcoming year. Use these resources to nd out whether your plan will cover the same services, drugs, doctors, hospitals, and pharmacies. Are premiums changing? What about copayments? Once you know what your current plan will cover next year, you can start making comparisons. To compare your current plan to other plans, visit www.medicare. gov/ nd-a-plan. If I like my current plan, do I need to do anything? Even if you like your current Part D or Medicare Advantage plan, it could still be changing next year. You should always check to see what your plan will be covering next year and make sure it still ts your needs. What if someone tells me I must buy a particular plan? You should never believe any high-pressure sales pitch for a Medicare plan. Private plans do sometimes decide to drop out of Medicare or change their coverage signi cantly. If this happens to your plan, take your time to learn about your options and make an informed choice. You will never be left without coverageyou will always have the option of taking original Medicare. How can I get more information? You can get a lot of information about your options on the Medicare website, www.medicare.go v or by calling 1-800-MEDICARE. But the best way to get personalized help is to get individual counseling from your local State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Every state has a program, and they offer free, unbiased advice. You can call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral, or go to www.Medicare. go v and click on Find someone to talk to. You can also visit https:// shipnpr.shiptalk.org/shippro le. aspx to nd your local SHIP. SHIP of ces get very busy during open enrollment, so try to call early to make an appointment. What if I need nancial help? If you have limited income and resources, additional nancial help is available. For more information, go to the Social Security website www.ssa.gov/prescriptionhel p or call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local SHIP. Making smart Medicare choices in 2015 RON POLLACK Director, Families USA

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, September 25, 2014 A Section Page 5 Roosevelt, Guthrie and The Color of Money From the redwood forest to the Gulf Stream waters This land was made for you and me. This Land is Your Land written by Woody Guthrie Have you watched any of the PBS documentary series by Ken Burns on the Roosevelt family? The historic, grainy lm of Theodore Roosevelt traversing the countryside on horseback, inspecting a steam shovel in the Panama Canal and gesturing emphatically in political speeches is remarkable. Yosemites towering redwoods and giant sequoias and the vistas of the Grand Canyon are accessible today because of Roosevelts desire that future generations be allowed to enjoy such natural grandeur. Inserting the federal government into the role of arbiter in the 1902 coal strike, however, was a much more controversial use of executive power. Anthracite coal miners had not enjoyed a pay raise in some 20 years, and mine owners steadfastly refused to negotiate with the miners union. With the country facing the prospect of a long winter without adequate coal supplies to heat businesses and homes, Roosevelt intervened, rst by threatening to nationalize the mining companies. Eventually a 10% pay increase (the miners had lobbied for 20%) and a nine-hour day (the miners had lobbied for an eight-hour, six-day work week) was negotiated. Roosevelts use of executive authority was historic and his actions established a precedent whose shock waves are still being felt today. How so? Six years ago markets were oundering in the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. The government actively entered the crisis, saving some corporations but not others; creating a bondbuying program that in uenced markets; and holding interest rates at a sustained, low level in an attempt to rein ate the stock market and to encourage mortgage lending. Today its not just the executive branch, but other governmental bodies whose actions cause markets to react. Whether we agree or disagree with particular uses of executive authority or actions by, say, the Federal Reserve vis-a-vis the economy, is immaterial. Indeed, government may indeed be too much with us. But to ignore the far reaching implications of government actions designed to in uence the economy is to do so at ones own economic peril, regardless of ones politics. Its not blue states or red, as in votes. Its green, as in the color of money. When Federal Reserve Chair Yellen attempts to establish a consensus on how best to wean ourselves from Quantitative Easing, markets are impacted. Analyzing these actions intelligently and applying this knowledge to investment accounts is what matters. Astute portfolio managers see Shinzo Abe in the early stages of the Japanese version of Quantitative Easing and consider the possibility that the Japanese Fed will drive markets in the same fashion that they have been in uenced here. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-6086121~www.arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Dear Editor, Quite obviously the medical marijuana drive has little to do with medical use and more to do with recreational use. The medical use is the ability of using THC, which is in marijuana, to help relieve pain and stimulate appetites. This pill has been available in the synthetic form for over 15 years. This is not about helping the sick; this is a smoke screen to legalize the drug. If you have 20 percent of Floridians hooked on marijuana at the present time, maybe three million, and you legalize it and you double that amount, you have six million marijuana users in the state. Who is going to support all these people who have dif culty functioning in society? So lets make the November vote easy. If you have a member of your family or a friend who is a user of marijuana and/or alcoholic, and their whole life is wasted, then vote no. You have seen what this drug does to people. Constant use causes brain damage. How could you vote yes? Most of us have seen the results of individuals who, due to the continued use of marijuana and alcohol, live off relatives or the government. They cant work because they dont have the focus to hold a job, they steal to buy drugs and you cant trust them period. So the bottom line is if you have never seen anyones life destroyed by marijuana and alcohol, vote yes with a clear conscience. Be honest with yourself. This is your state and your country. If you want to argue about alcohol versus marijuana, go ahead and waste everyones time, and while you are trying to confuse the issue some more kids will get hooked on drugs and alcohol and their lives will be gone. Does it really matter which drug it is? Bart Cassidy Madison, Florida Marijuana referendum Dear Editor, I read, with interest the letter from Jim Clements of Carrabelle, in the September 11, 2014, issue of The Star. Mr. Clements calls out Rep. Steve Southerland for stating that he support of the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. As Mr. Clements stated, he voted for the earlier watered-down version of the act but voted against the nal bill. I have no interest in calling Mr. Clements to task for his statements because I dont know what changes/ riders were attached to the nal bill that were not in the rst version. Many times, hundreds of additions which have nothing to do with the subject at hand are included in the subsequent versions of any bill. In addition, I dont believe that Mr. Clements would be my go to guy for information on any Violence Against Women initiatives as I am certain that being a commercial sherman in Carrabelle does not qualify as expertise in the area. I rather suspect that Mr. Clements has some other issue with Rep. Southerland in the area of shing regulation rather than his stated concern for VIOW issues. On the subject of Rep. Southerlands challenger (Gwen Graham), I have questions about her effectiveness for those of us in Gulf County and Northwest Florida. Since she broadly boasts that she is the daughter of former Gov. and U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, I think that she must bear his record. I was born, raised and educated in Florida. Because of the limited employment opportunities in Florida, I was forced to leave to provide for my family. I worked and lived in eight states, before I could nally return to Florida. We chose Cape San Blas as our nal destination, in retirement. The place we purchased was 15 feet above sea level and did not require ood insurance, and it had not ooded in the 25 years since it was built. Well, FEMA changed the designation for my home requiring $6,000/year (non federal) ood insurance. Federal ood insurance would have cost 90 percent less. I, and others, fought the re-designation for 2 years, but in the end, I on xed income, we had to sell. During that time, I contacted Sen. Graham asking for help, support, or just suggestions. I thought that he would be a wealth of information and help since he had a home on St. George Island (whichhad been exempted from the COBRA designation). Bob Graham wouldnt even write a letter for us in Gulf County and others in North Florida. He wouldnt return phone calls and nothing even from staffers. On the other hand, Rep. Allen Boyd (also a Democrat) made visits to the area; held meetings with of cials in Washington; answered every letter. Sen. Grahams position seemed to be an indifferent let them eat cake! In another, but related, issue, we solicited Sen. Grahams help to get some of the sand being removed from the Apalachicola river basin to help replenish the erosion in Indian Pass and Cape San Blas. Sen. Graham added his support to the transporting of that local sand to the southern Florida beaches, from where he received most of his political support. Do we need more of the Graham indifference to North Florida? James McKenzie St. Joe Beach A master of spin indeed! As I think about growing up, I am proud to say that I had parents who taught me to be honest in every way. My dad died when I was very young, I was just getting old enough to read, but I still remember relatives who told me that my dad made sure that everything that was promised to any of the family came to be what happened. When I started growing up, I followed my parents example and I rest assured that I am setting the right example for my family as they are growing up. As I am getting older, I can realize more about how much it pays to set a good example for others on how to live an honest, caring life because I can see how the results of this are very good and it proves the saying in the Bible that we will reap what we sow. Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe An honest, caring life Dear Editor, Weve been coming to the Cape for over two decades and have observed the damage caused by the hurricanes along with the loss and replenishment of the beachfront. Nothing prepared us for the wholesale ruin caused by the staggering misuse of the beach we experienced. Our dream two-week beachfront rental quickly turned sour when we found ourselves staring at an encampment of stuff piled directly in front of the house, none of which was moved until the owners departed at the end of week one. Our beachfront view included half a dozen beach chairs, a large blowup bright pink beach shelter and a large blue kiddy pool, assorted toys, buckets, shing gear, nets, a variety of unknown canvas items lying here and there, beer cans, and other debris. The beach looked like an end of summer sidewalk sale at a big box store. Rather than setting up in front of the vacant lot next door, this mountainous mess required a longer trek from their off-beach rental. Despite a visit from the Turtle Patrol and the fact that many days no one visited the beach at all, nothing budged until the day that group departed. Thats when our beachfront rental turned into a parking lot front accommodation. Every day, there was a new vehicle, pickup truck, or SUV parked in front of the house. Even walking across the sand became dif cult with row after row of tire tracks to be negotiated. One day, a middle-aged couple brought blankets and pillows and proceeded to camp out in front of the house all night. They left in the next morning, leaving the beach littered with dead sh and cigarette butts. My wife called the Sheriff and was told there are no rules on camping on the beach. On a moonless night near the end of August, there was a crawl from a nearby turtle nest. The next morning, I followed the turtle tracks up the beach a good distance following a deep rut from truck tire; until one by one, they disappeared. None went into the Gulf, and I presume the hatchlings had been picked off by predators. There is no way the beaches on St. Joe Peninsula can withstand this constant ow of vehicles. You cant drive on the beach without damaging it and the life it supports. Security is also compromised, and property values will certainly drop as a result. Why rent a beachfront accommodation when one can bring all the gear imaginable, leave it on the beach, and then drive back and forth as needed? The worst blow of all came when my wife told me that for her, the magic had been drained from the Cape. Sincerely, Louis Prosterman Chattanooga, Tennessee To anyone who still cares, By Brian Depew Center for Rural Affairs Special to The Star Buy local. Its a well known strategy for small towns. Keeping your grocery money close to home keeps the grocery store close to home. Economists tell us that every dollar spent at a locally owned business generates two to four times the economic bene t. But what if we take it to the next level? What if we invest local too? The concept is an extension of buy local campaigns that urge us to capture the multiplier effect of commerce by keeping our spending money close to home. You already see it all around you in small towns. Often it takes local citizens to see opportunity where an outsider would overlook it. In our hometown of Lyons, Nebraska, a new hardware and feed store went up on Main Street this summer. The owner and his family have run independent businesses in Lyons for two generations. Its not a Menards, or a Bomgaars. Those companies would never build here. My hometown of Laurens, Iowa, took it upon themselves to build a broadband network that delivers high-speed internet to every house and business in town. They didnt wait for Comcast or Verizon to build a network. If they had, they might still be waiting. Local residents, rooted in place, are often willing to take a nancial risk to make their small town a better place. Imagine if more of us joined them, investing locally. Creating a vibrant future for your small town really is in your hands. Established in 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs is a private, non-pro t organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. Beyond Buy Local, Invest Local

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Thursday, September 25, 2014 OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Se pt 25 85 71 20 % Fr i, Se pt 26 84 73 20 % Sa t, Se pt 27 84 74 60 % Sun, Se pt 28 83 74 60 % Mo n, Se pt .29 83 74 60 % Tu es Se pt 30 84 73 80 % We d, Oc t. 01 85 73 20 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Autumn Days are Here! Sh op wi th us fo r al l yo ur hu nt in g su ppl ie s www .shopb wo .c om SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Inshore shing is almost at a peak this week. With better weather conditions, we should see an improvement for the rest of the month. Top-water trout catches are almost the norm with good red sh in the mix. St. Joe Bay is recovering very well after a long, hot summer lled with scallop hunters. Many of our shallow water spots or ats are producing great sh such as trout, red sh and ounder. Bridge and pier shing is producing good red sh and some smaller Spanish mackerel in the early hours of the day. Page 6 Star Staff Reports Florida Cat sh Classic The 16th annual Florida cat sh classic tournament will begin Friday at Gaskin Park Landing in Wewahitchka. The tournament will bene t Wewahitchka Search and Rescue. Registration for the event is $55 per boat. For children ages 14 and under, registration for freshwater cat sh is $20 and $55 for athead. The tournament begins at 4 p.m. CT Friday, Sept. 26, and ends at noon Saturday. The award ceremony will take place at city hall immediately after. Participants may launch their boats from Gaskin Park Landing, Bristol Landing, Estiffanulga Landing or Owl Creek-Hickory. Door prizes will be given away during the award ceremony, and cash prizes will be awarded for the largest catch, including $2,500 for rst place, $1,500 for second, $1,000 for third, $750 for fourth and $500 for fth. The individual with the most poundage of atheads will receive $250. All cat sh submitted in the tournament must be at least 14 inches long and alive. An additional $800 cash prize will be awarded to the sherman with the most combined individual athead poundage from the following 2014 tournaments: The Liberty County Senior Citizens Cat sh Tournament, The Florida Cat sh Classic, Gator Classic Cat sh Tournament, and Choctawhatchee Cat sh roundup. To be eligible, shermen must have participated in three of four tournaments. Participants must register at the tournament site between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m. CT Friday. Registration forms are available at Wewahitchka city annex or online at www. FloridaCat shClassic.com. For questions, call tournament organizers Angie Minchew at 814-1346 or Tracy Minchew at 630-9049. GCSO bass tournament The annual Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce bass shing tournament is set to begin Saturday at the White City Landing. Fishing for the tournament will begin at daylight Saturday, Sept. 27, and end at 3 p.m. CT Sunday, Sept. 28. Registration will be open the morning of the event for $175 per boat, and the tournament will be limited to 200 boats. Teams may only have one of two people per boat. First place will take home $10,000, based on 100 entries. One team member must check in the morning of the tournament, and a pre-meeting will take place one hour before the of cial sunrise. Largemouth, spotted or shoal bass will be scored with a vesh limit. Any frozen or iced sh presented for weighin will result in immediate disquali cation. Winners are subject to a polygraph test. Boy Scout Troop 347 of Port St. Joe will serve breakfast and lunch both days of the tournament to raise funds. For of cial rules and registration forms, visit www. gcsotournament.com. Scallop season closed Star Staff Report The 2014 recreational season for bay scallops will close today, Sept. 25. The nal day of harvesting was Wednesday. FWC scallop researchers will conduct underwater surveys after the season closes to reassess the scallop population. While the season is open, scallop harvesters can assist researchers by completing an online survey at http:// svy.mk/bayscallops, indicating where they harvest scallops, how many they collect and how long it takes to harvest them. Participants can email BayScallops@MyFWC.com to ask questions or send additional information. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Bay Scallops to learn more. 2 shing tourneys offer big fun, prizes THE PORT ST. JOE STAR BOAR-ING INTO A YARD PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR Donna Bradley and her husband, who live off County Road 30 in Indian Pass, woke up over the weekend to nd this sight in their backyard, caused by what has been determined to be wild boar. According to law enforcement dispatchers, a bit of time has elapsed since the last reported incident of boars. All the Bradleys know for sure is their backyard took a beating, or boaring, as it were. A FINE FLOUNDER COURTESY OF JOHN FAIRCLOTH | Special to The Star Jacob Lynn caught a 26-inch ounder at the Indian Pass Lagoon that weighed in at 8 pounds, 10 ounces.

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Running for the Bay Marathon Su nda y Oc to ber 26, 2014 In beautiful Ap alachic ola, FL Fu ll Ma ra thon, Half Ma ra thon, 10K 5K & Ul tr a50K Registration Now Open! Re gi st er online at running fo rt heba y. co m fr iends@running fo rt heba y. co m Run or Wa lk PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, September 25, 2014 A Page 7 Section 38, 41: and more sports new math Last Friday night was certainly a rst, and I can only hope a last. I covered the Port St. Joe High School football game against Jefferson County and returned to The Star of ce to write my story to appear in the next days Panama City News Herald. I enjoy this kind of coverage for two reasons: a larger platform for local teams and I get a huge jump on the next print edition of The Star. I captured the action and rounded up the night as best I could, which is typically well short of Pulitzer material, gave it several more reads and then passed it to Panama City, my work done. Until, say, about 3:15 a.m. About that time, tfully seeking Sandman for the better part of an hour, I started replaying the game in my brain. Or what I thought was my brain because I was to discover, certain synapses must not have been working last Friday. No matter how hard my brain tried, it could not t ve touchdowns, ve extra points and as eld goal, 38 points, into a 41-point hole which I had written. The 41 points was a perfect for the lead I had concocted in my mind as the game played out to the end and somehow, I suppose, my mind decided not to let the facts come between me and a good introductory paragraph. But, of course, arriving at that conclusion at 3:15 a.m. does not help at all. The presses had long since stopped rolling and outside of driving door-to-door to nd and change all delivered and machine-bought, copies of the paper, I was left to gure out how I managed to turn 38 into 41. I have always been poor at math Calculus is the language of Calcutta is it not? but this was worthy of Dumb and Dumber: The Sequel. Needless to say, Sandman departed and the sports editor at the News Herald was greeted the next morning with a phone message from Tim, berating Tim, and alerting him to the incorrect score and that it was high time to not only get out of sports but maybe this writing thing altogether. I have made some doozies. But the score? Of a football game? With a new scoreboard, ve times the size of its predecessor, highlighting the score into the night air? That, friends, is the journalistic equivalent of a goal-line fumble. But the more I seethed and marinated in my juices, I came up with an alternative theory to my faux pas which, I now told myself was no faux pas. What I had done, inadvertently, was create a new scoring system and given the state of football, off the eld and on these days, maybe a new wrinkle was just the tonic. Actually, considering the state of football I was glad this was a high school game over which I made the blooper of all bloopers. If it was college or the NFL, think of the gamblers giving 39 and Port St. Joe who would be t to be tied the next morning. In any case, this new system, I decided, should take a page from ice skating and award style points. That, in part, is what I yelled at my editor I was awarding six points to Cole Cryderman after his booming 28-yard eld goal to nish the scoring last Friday. The kick that would have cleared from 40 yards and was, therefore, equal to basketballs 3-point shot. Follow my thinking here. Upon further re ection (which would have come in handy writing down the right score in the rst place) I could tweak that scoring system to give Cryderman 1 extra point. The Tiger Shark offensive line, which has been punching holes in defenses this season give them an extra point for style. And since Port St. Joe pitched a shutout and held Jefferson County to fewer than 50 yards while the action still mattered hand them a point on me. Before you know it, a lopsided Port St. Joe 38-point win is even more impressive with three additional style points and a total of 41. The system could be applied to any football game and apply to all phases of the game, even the cheerleaders pyramid-building ability. So I have transitioned from applying a mental whip to my back to considering a more thorough vetting and codifying of my new scoring system. And make sure to read next weeks Port St. Joe coverage as I provide all statistics in meters rather than those humdrum yards. TIM CROFT Go the Distance COURTESY OF WAYNE TAYLOR Jarkeice Davis (1) had 86 rushing yards and scored three touchdowns for Port St. Joe. Lady Tiger Sharks win 2 Special to The Star The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team won its notched its rst regular season win of the season last week and before the week was out the Lady Tiger Sharks added win No. 2. The Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Wewahitchka last Monday and came away with a win in three straight sets, 25-15, 26-24, 25-12. The team was led by Addison Rice who had eight kills, four service aces, a solo block and 10 digs. The following day Franklin County visited Port St. Joe and the Lady Tiger Sharks overpowered the Lady Seahawks, winning in four sets by scores of 25-17, 25-19, 15-25 and 25-17. Haley Wood had ve aces on 20 serves and was 100 percent from the serving line. Callie Fleshren led the team in kills with 10. The sixth annual Pink Out will be played Oct. 14 against Wewahitchka. As always, proceeds go to the Side-Out Foundation for Breast Cancer Research. Email Coach Taylor at wtaylor@gulf.k12. .us to get your T-shirt and lets Pink Out the Dome. Port St. Joe romps past Jefferson Co. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks are making themselves right at home in the 40-point neighborhood. The host Tiger Sharks (3-1) just missed scoring 40 points for the third time in four games, all wins, and tossed in a throttling of Jefferson Countys offense while rolling to a 380 victory Friday night. And as they crafted their latest dominating performance, the Tiger Sharks showed a couple of new ingredients to their winning recipe. While senior fullback Jarkeice Davis, who had rushed for more than 200 yards twice this season, had a solid game with 86 yards and three touchdowns rushing, senior wingback Aaron Paul provided the big plays with 121 total yards, 102 rushing on just ve carries. Senior quarterback T. J. Williams completed just three passes in ve attempts, but those completions went for more than 18 yards a shot. We are not a feature offense, we dont feature any one player, Port St. Joe coach John Palmer said. We have a team concept and an important part of that is the offensive line and they played very well. On defense, Port St. Joe was commanding, holding the Tigers (1-2) to fewer than 50 total yards through the rst three quarters before Jefferson County nearly doubled its output on the nal drive with the clock running and Port St. Joe liberally substituting. Jefferson County has improved this year and they had some guys out injured, but we really challenged the kids this week and I thought they responded, Palmer said. I thought we executed very well early. I liked our focus. And I thought we played extremely hard. The Tiger Sharks set the tone of the game with a methodical 15-play, 59yard drive on their rst possession of the game. Nothing fancy, just mixing runs inside and out before Davis bulled over from the 5. Cole Cryderman made it 7-0. Cryderman, who rushed for 21 yards in the second half, was perfect on extra points for the night and closed the scoring with a 28-yard eld goal early in the fourth quarter. Port St Joe forced a Tiger punt on the following possession and took over at the Tiger Shark 18. On rst down Paul took a jet sweep left and easily out anked the Jefferson County defense, which was keying on a Davis inside dive that was faked. Paul was nally dragged down at the Tiger 16 and three plays later, with the second quarter just underway, he scored on a sweep left from the 12 and Port St. Joe went up 14-0. Davis pooch on the ensuing kickoff was juggled and fumbled by Jefferson County, Deontae George recovering for Port St. Joe at the Tiger 28. Williams hit tight end Marquez Johnson, open on a route down the left seam, for the touchdown on a perfectly executed ea icker and it was 21-0. The rest of the half was a mixed bag as Port St. Joe put the ball on the ground three times, losing one, while sti ing any attempt at offensive momentum from Jefferson County, which nished the half with just 32 total yards. We got a little sloppy there, we kind of lost our focus, and we have to improve on that, Palmer said. The defensive play tonight was just outstanding. Port St. Joe reasserted itself from the opening kickoff of the second half. The Tiger Sharks moved 70 yards in just six plays, the big one an out route between defenders from Williams to Paul. Davis nished off the drive when he slipped outside left on a sweep from the 22, picked up a block from Paul and snaked past a tackler before nding the pylon. After forcing a threeand-out, the Tiger Sharks got a short eld and sprinted 45 yards to score, Paul setting up a 4-yard touchdown run by Davis with a 20-yard run to the 6. At that point, just more than three minutes left in the third quarter the clock began to continuously run and Cryderman added his eld goal just after the nal period began. Gators drop district tilt to Graceville By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com An early hole proved a tad steep to climb out of last Friday for the Wewahitchka High football team. The Gators fell behind early, fought back into the game three times but nally succumbed to visiting Graceville 27-14 in a District 2-1A contest. Wewahitchka drops to 13 overall, 1-1 in league play. Graceville is 2-2, 1-0. Overall we played well, said Wewahitchka coach Loren Tillman. We did a lot of good things. They just made one or two more plays. It was a very good high school football game, a very back-and-forth football game. Graceville put 15 points on the board before Wewahitchka could nd the end zone to close to within 15-7 at the half. After Graceville scored to go up 21-7 the Gators answered with the second of Rashard Ranies two touchdown runs. But a eld goal attempt was undermined by snap issues and turnovers, including a fumble and two interceptions on the night, helped seal the Gators fate. Ranie nished with 90 yards and two touchdowns rushing, but needed 29 carries to do it. He passed for another 59 yards. Kaleb Shiver was the maxpreps.com offensive player of the game for the Gators with 57 yards rushing on 11 carries, two pass receptions for 13 yards and four kick returns totaling 87 yards. We moved the ball well, Tillman said. We made some good plays. They just had more. The loss was the rst in district play for Wewahitchka and makes an upcoming tilt against Sneads in the next district game crucial to maintain playoff hopes. We talked a lot last week that Graceville wasnt a die game, but it was a do game, Tillman said. If we lost to Graceville we were still alive, but if we beat them it would really set up our season. We just need to win the next district game and see where it goes from there. This week, the Gators have a bye before preparing to travel to North Bay Haven in Panama City Oct. 3.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star .co m COURTESY OF BILL FAUTH An aerial of the old Butlers property and adjacent WindMark Beach in Port St. Joe COURTESY OF GRETCHEN MAYES Sea oats frame a beautiful sunset over St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF MR. AND MRS. TONY SMITH A pair of wild boars spotted along the beach near the Stump Hole on St. Joseph Peninsula COURTESY OF HERMAN JONES A Florida black bear helps himself to a bag of Pam Jones bird seed on Gulf Street in St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF LAURA AT DRAGONFLY PHOTOGRAPHY A crab hides in its shell in the surf at St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF SAMANTHA LAYFIELD A gorgeous sunset over the gazebo at Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe COURTESY OF TERRY LIND A shorebird scours for food along St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF MELINA ELUM A crab on St. Joe Beach. COURTESY OF RON RUDOLPH Clouds dot the sky over the Dead Lakes in Wewahitchka

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, September 25, 2014 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) What happened to Mt. Vernon, Washingtons home, during the U.S. Civil War? Confederate hospital, Left alone, Union stockade, Southern storage depot 2) What was the rst animal successfully cloned? Rabbit, Mouse, Sheep, Guinea pig 3) The late Minnie Pearls hat had a hanging tag with what dollar amount? $.02, $.98, $1.98, $1.99 4) What was the original name for TV Guide? TV Time, Television Night, TV Digest, Channel Select 5) Which famed persons middle name was Sydenstricker? Ulysses Grant, Pearl Buck, Harry Truman, Malcolm Forbes 6) Where in Germany is the Mercedes-Benz museum? Hamburg, Munich, Stuttgart, Potsdam 7) Which Porsche model became its rst with a water-cooled engine? 911, 924, 944, 959 8) What famed writer lled her pockets with rocks and drowned herself? George Eliot, Ayn Rand, Virginia Woolf, Mary Wollstonecraft 9) From the comics whose dog foe is named Tackhammer? Woody Woodpecker, Popeye, Judge Parker, Gar eld 10) What country provided the main setting for the classic movie Casablanca? France, Egypt, Morocco, Italy 11) A Teenagers Romance and Im Walkin were whose earliest records? Ricky Nelson, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Perry Como 12) What does the British English word buffer mean in American English? Bumper, Skater, Thinker, Student 13) On older TVs Bonanza what were Buck, Cochise, Chub, and Sport? Beers, Horses, Bartenders, 6-guns 14) Experts on ants claim the insects hate what the most? Salt, Vinegar, Mayonnaise, Baking soda ANSWERS 1) Left alone. 2) Sheep. 3) $1.98. 4) TV Digest. 5) Pearl Buck. 6) Stuttgart. 7) 924. 8) Virginia Woolf. 9) Woody Woodpecker. 10) Morocco. 11) Ricky Nelson. 12) Bumper. 13) Horses. 14) Vinegar. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Like an old reliable pickup truck from a country song, the annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival will return to the Forgotten Coast on Oct. 16. Back for its sixth year, the event will feature three days of free concerts at area venues from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. Even if you dont know the faces of the songwriters, chances are youve heard the music. The 30 visiting artists make their living in the songwriting business and have had at least one hit (if not many, many more) on country radio stations. Participating writers have penned tunes for the likes of superstars Faith Hill, Jason Aldean and Garth Brooks and countless others. In order to bring a little piece of Nashville to town the concerts are presented in a writers round format, a performance method invented and perfected in the country music capital of the world. Four songwriters will appear at each concert during the festival and will trade off playing the songs that became number one hits. The other songwriters may choose to join in with harmony, rhythm, additional guitar riffs or they may just sit back and enjoy the performance. While listeners may recognize the hits, they may be surprised to hear them played in their original forms by multiple talents, potentially on different instruments. The combination of rawness and spontaneity leads to a truly unique and one of a kind experience for listeners. For event organizer Jason Bogan, this years event has proved a unique challenge. Shortly after last years festival Bogan moved from Port St. Joe to Santa Cruz, C.A. but still wanted to play By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m This was no barking matter. Last Wednesday the Developing Adoptable dogs With Good Sociability (DAWGS) program graduated class 35 during a ceremony held at its headquarters at the Gulf Forestry Camp in White City. The program is a partnership between the Florida Department of Corrections, the Board of County Commissioners and the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. It provides inmates of the camp an opportunity to work as trainers for the rescued dogs, teaching the animals basic obedience skills and transforming them into adoptable animals. In the ve years since the programs inception, 367 dogs have graduated the program and 411 inmates have learned the skills of compassion, patience, tolerance and teamwork. DAWGS not only helps save the lives of animals in need of a good home, but it focuses on providing inmates with vital skills that will them secure employment upon release. In the last ve years at DAWGS, we have witnessed many miracles made from mistakes, said program co-director Sandi Christy. None of us are perfect and we all have made many mistakes in our lives. Here at DAWGS, we learn that a negative past does not disqualify us from a positive future. We dont look for perfect people or dogs in our programwe look for a good heart and a focus on the future. Throughout the eight-week program, pro les of the pups are posted online and those looking for a new best friend can apply to meet and potentially adopt the canines. Each application is thoroughly screened by Christy whose ve years of experience taught her that the dogs and adopters must be compatible with one another. Some dogs may not do well with children, others may be nervous around cats and these details, which may appear small on paper, directly affect the type of training the dog will get during the program. Graduates from class 35 headed to New York, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and one even stayed locally in Port St. Joe. Adopters often make the trek to the forestry camp to see their pets graduate after which they receive an overview of basic commands from the trainers before heading home to start their new lives. Our dogs are obviously the victims of mistakes, but look at them now, Christy said. Theyre happy, well trained, healthy companions, who look forward to a better life with our adopters. Photographic memories By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Dave Maddox of Port St. Joe and Calvin Clingan of West Virginia met on an island in the South Paci c. They spent nine months working side-by-side at a U.S. Navy station before they each went their separate ways in the summer of 1945. Maddox was in charge of 300 men tasked with loading and unloading ships at one of the Navys major shipping stations during the War in the Paci c. The vast majority if not all of the men had been convicted in a general court martial of largely minor offenses State Park Appreciation day on Saturday By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will host the annual Park Appreciation Event this Saturday, Sept. 27 at Eagle Harbor. The event will coincide with National Public Lands Day and will begin at 10 a.m. ET with a shore cleanup that will last until noon. Free sack lunches and beverages will be available to those who participate. Live music from the Bo Spring Band will begin at 2 p.m. and registration will begin for the sand castle contest. Judging for the competition will begin at 4 p.m. with prizes awarded. Eagle Harbor will be lled with area organizations handing out information and the Friends of St. Joseph Songwriters fest returns in October BLAST ON THE BAY FILE PHOTO The annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival returns in October with Nashville talent who have written for country music stars George Strait, Faith Hill and Garth Brooks. See BLAST B8 COURTESY OF CHARLOTTE PIERCE Dave Maddox and Calvin Clingan hold Maddoxs copy of a photo the two had taken with a third friend while serving in the Paci c during World War II. See MEMORIES B8 See PARK B8 DAWGS in Prison graduates class 35 SPECIAL TO THE STAR Joey, a male foxhound, was chosen as Top Dog program and was adopted by a family in New York. TOP: The DAWGS in Prison program graduated class 35 last week during a ceremony at the Gulf Forestry Camp. See DAWGS B8

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B2 | The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 Ap ri l is a1 yr 32 lb Ca ta hou la /H oun d mix. Sh e wa lks we ll on a le as h an d wi ll si t fo r a tre at Th is swe et gi rl wa s sur re nd er wi th he r pu ppi es whe n he r ow ne r pa ss ed aw ay Ap ri l lo ve s ki ds an d ad ul ts al ik e an d wo ul d mak e a gr ea t fa mi ly pe t. If yo u ar e unabl e to adop t at thi s ti me pe rh aps yo u co uld fo st er or mak e a Do nat ion Al l pe ts ado pt ed fr om SJ BH S wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc ina ti on s an d spa ye d/ ne ut er ed Pl eas e do n ot he sit at e to em ai l tow nse nd .h sd ire ct or @g ma il .c om or ado ptb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 711 03 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or De bbie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e av ai la ble at www .s jb hu man es oc iet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t ho u rs : Th ur sda ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g To ad ve rt is e he re CA LL Ma rc ia at 22 778 47 LIVE ON TH E POOP DECK KO NKRETE SOUL SA TURD AY 9P M FRID AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M RAND Y ST AR K RA ND Y & ART ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES UPCOMING EVENTS ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S KARAOKE & DJ THURSD AY -FRID AY -SA TURD AY -9PM AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CI TY LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 Lily is 3! Heather Henderson and Dakota Massey have their hands full with a beautiful, smart three year old! On Sept. 6 Lily celebrated with her friends and family at a Dora the Explorer party at the park. Lily is the granddaughter of Donna and Donnie Harcus of White City, Michael Henderson of Apalachicola, and Nita and Rod Massey of Carrabelle. She is the great granddaughter of Edna and the late Bill Henderson of Eastpoint. We love our Lily bug so much! Thank you for making our lives and hearts so full of joy! Birthday Cecelia Ivester, Mattew Keigens to marry Dennis and Connie Ivester would like to announce the engagement of their daughter, Cecelia Ivester to Mattew Keigans of Port St. Joe. Mattew is the son of Bill and Pam Keigans and mother Bonnie Keigans also of Port St. Joe. The couple is planning a December 2015 wedding. Engagment Special to The Star Your libraries are busy with Storytimes and other events. Tuesday Tales is held for children birth to three years old each Tuesday morning at 10:30 a.m. ET at the Corrine Costin Gibson Memorial Public Library in Port St. Joe. The Charles Whitehead Library in Wewahitchka holds its Wee Read Storytime each Monday at 11 a.m. CT. These inquisitive groups enjoy sharing songs, poems and stories each week. Come join us! Adults, come meet New York Times bestselling author Tim Dorsey at the Port St. Joe branch at 4:30 p.m. ET on Monday, Sept. 30. A prize package of goodies including a copy of Dorseys Tiger Shrimp Tango will be given away to one lucky attendee, so be sure to be part of this opportunity. The Red Cross will be at the Port St. Joe branch on Saturday, Oct. 4 to present two readiness classes: Chest compression CPR and Disaster Preparation. The CPR session starts at 9 a.m. with the Disaster Prep class following at 9:45 a.m. ET. Information about how to volunteer with the Red Cross will also be available. In celebration of Banned Books Week, we invite you to come have your mug shot made with your favorite banned book. We will be posting these in a library display, unless you are interested in posting on our Facebook page as well! Music performance by local artists, Crosstie Special to The Star Please join us with you support and donations, Saturday Oct. 4, starting at 6:30 p.m.CT at the ElGovernor Motel in Mexico Beach. We are asking for a $10 donation to attend. Barbecue and sh with all the trimmings will be served starting at 6:30 p.m. and the music will begin about 8 p.m. All proceeds raised are to assist Randall for medical expenses as he battles cancer. Anyone not able to attend or for those who would like to donate more may do so, checks are to be made payable to Randall Cowart. Drop off at the Mexico Beach Marina, 3904 U.S. 98 Mexico Beach or mail to: Mexico Beach Marina, P.O. Box 13117 Mexico Beach, FL 32410 Anyone that would like to volunteer to help make this event a huge success can call the Marina at 648-8900. Living on the Not So Forgotten Coast is such a blessing, knowing that we all pull together in a time of need for a friend. Randall has blessed us all with his music and his great personality. All donations, whatever the amount, are greatly appreciated and needed! Happy birthday! Its here at last, for you its took so long For me, I just do not know where 10 years have gone!! Happy Double Digits Skylar Clayton! We love you! Dad, Mom, Christina and Callie Walk with ease class offered at senior center Gulf County Senior Citizens and the Arthritis Foundation are offering a Walk with Ease Class at the Port St. Joe Senior Center beginning Oct. 7. This program was developed to help people with or without arthritis form walking groups whose goals are safety and success. If you can be on your feet for 10 minutes without increased pain, you can probably participate successfully, and the program can be modied to t your needs. Groups meet for six weeks, three times per week. Sessions will be on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday beginning at 9 a.m. ET. Each session lasts about one hour. Enrollment is limited to 12 people and is free. For more information, or to enroll, call Mary Clayton or Debbie Sumner at Port St. Joe Senior Center at 229-8466. Thanks from the Senior Citizens Center On behalf of the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association, we would like to thank Durens Piggly Wiggly, members of the Republican Party and all who donated food, time and money. Your commitment to helping the local seniors in our community is sincerely appreciated. Each year the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association continues to advance its mission of administering a wide range of programs that provide seniors with the assistance they need to remain in their own homes as long as possible. Thank you again for your generous support. Any donations can be mail or dropped off to the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association at 120 Library Drive Port St. Joe 32456. Society BRIEFS Rocking for Randall Benet Gulf County Library News Birthday Society Special to The Star Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Jorge L. Londono graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Londono is the son of Betty Jean Baker of Port St. Joe. He is a 2006 graduate of Pensacola State High School. Londono graduates from basic JORGE L. LONDONO

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The Star| B3 Thursday, September 25, 2014 To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL SPECIAL TO T HE STAR The Blue Dazzlers for the week of Sept. 15 Special to The Star What is Apologetics? Simply dened, Apologetics is the defense of the Christian faith. The word apologetics derives from the Greek word apologia which was originally used as a speech of defense or an answer given in reply. In ancient Athens it referred to a defense made in the courtroom as part of the normal judicial process. In short, Apologetics give us a defense of our faith and actions with reason and logic. But sanctify Christ as Lord in your hearts, always being ready to make a defense to everyone who asks you to give an account for the hope that is in you 1 Peter 3:15 Faith Christian School is thrilled to introduce this year an Apologetics science curriculum from Apologia Educational Ministries for our upper elementary students. We have selected Apologias Young Explorer series. In this curriculum, our students experience conversationally-written instruction, hands on activities, and interactive notebooking with an inquisitiveness into Gods Creation. From the tiniest microbe to greatest galaxy, all of creation declares His glory (Psalm 19:1), and if we study Gods creation with intent to glorify Him, then we will soon learn to be in awe of Him and the works of His hand. This truly is an incredible science curriculum and we are so blessed to introduce it to our students this year. If you are looking for a place to give your young explorer a great biblical and academic foundation, FCS is the place for you. A place where Jesus is the center and love is the theme. Call our ofce today at 229-6707 for more information on this wonderful program. Special to The Star E ggs are hatching: Scott Lambersons science classes enjoyed the chicken egg hatching process last week as they had 15 eggs hatch on Tuesday and Wednesday. Its an amazing process and most of these students havent lived on a farm so its something they wouldnt have the opportunity to see if we didnt provide it, Lamberson said. Fertile eggs were given to Lamberson and were incubated for three weeks prior to the hatch. The chicks will spend another week on display to all students (they can see them in B pod, room 205) and then they will be given to a local individual who wants to increase his chicken ock. Wouldnt it be wonderful if a few of our students got a passion for the poultry/livestock business from these classroom efforts Lamberson said. Key C lub proudly announces the addition of thirty-one new members for the 2014-2015 school year. Yearbooks for 2014-15 school year are now on sale for $40. As always, books must be ordered and paid for in advance. No extras are orders. The $40 price is only available until Sept. 30. You can order from the school or online at www. jostens.com/apps/store/ productBrowse/1039206//2015-Yearbook /2014082804160881072/ CATALOG_SHOP/ Dig P ink fundraiser underway. T-shirt sales are ongoing, see Coach Taylor. A Facebook challenge has been issued. See our Facebook page for more details www.facebook. com/TigerSharkVolleyball H omecoming P arade: Port St. Joe Junior-Senior High School will be holding its annual Homecoming Parade through downtown Port St Joe. on Friday, Oct. 17. Step-off time is 3:30 p.m. ET. Any organizations, businesses, groups or individuals interested in participating in this years event, please contact LCDR Marty Jarosz at 296177 or e-mail mjarosz@ gulf.k12..us. All entries are due no later than Tuesday, Oct. 14. Thanks for supporting Gulf County Schools. Special to The Star Through the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project, talented and gifted high school students from small and rural districts across Florida participated in the 2014 STEM Immersion experience. This opportunity was made possible through a partnership with the University of Floridas Center for Precollegiate Education and Training. In the PAEC-served area, 29 STEM Scholars and ve teachers participated in a variety of experiences at the University of Florida and STEM Scholars were exposed to a variety of STEM career preparatory programs available at the university. For a realistic college experience, University ofcials assigned students to dorm rooms as well as their work groups for the week. One of the STEM Scholars rst experiences included a STEM Health Science Professions forum. This took place in the Health Science Center where STEM Scholars interacted with university faculty and students from the Colleges of Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Pharmacy, and the Biology Department. The students then visited various Biomedical Research Laboratories housed in the center. The Chemistry Department shared information about career options in their specic eld and provided students hands-on activities working with nanotechnology. The students also visited the Computer Science Department where they constructed a Virtual Patient and practiced with diagnosing that patients illness. The STEM Scholars experiences included extracting DNA from plants, running a PCR and completing gel electrophoresis in the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research. Data was used to construct morphological and molecular phylogenies. STEM Scholars also completed a scientic research activity at the Entomology and Nematology Department by collecting data on fruit ies (Drosophila) that were in a cold-induced coma. Students took advantage of this departments outside classroom as they waded through the Stormwater Ecological Enhancement Project Wetlands teaching laboratory and worked with university faculty and graduate students to explore this Florida ecosystem. Students nished their week of activities by exploring a cave at the Harvey Sharron Bat Cave Field Laboratory to get an authentic picture of the Floridan Aquifer and visiting Blue Springs to see one point where the water emerges from the aquifer. The week was packed full of fun experiences and the students went home with new friends and an expanded outlook on their future careers. School News BLUE DAZZLERS The Lions Tale Maura Mahan (Port St. Joe High School) shared the sample she collected at the Stormwater Ecological Enhancement Project Wetlands teaching laboratory. STEM Scholars Explore STEM Careers through UF Immersion Experience P HOTO S SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Hunter Chason (Altha School) and Lindsay Furr (Port St. Joe High School) patiently record the time as anesthetized fruit ies wake from their slumber. Haley Anderson (Port St. Joe High School) learns about Floridas geology and hydrology as she explores a bat cave at the Harvey Sharron Bat Cave Field Laboratory.

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FAITH Thursday, September 25, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net 9:15 a.m .................................................................................................. Pr ay er ser vic e 9:45 a.m ................................................................................................ Sunda y school 10:30 a.m .................................................................................. Fe llo ws hip br eakfast 11 a.m .................................................................................................. Wo rship ser vic e www .f ait hb ib le ps j. ne t 80 1 20 th St re et Po rt St Joe, Fl (8 50 ) 22 967 07 SOUTHERLAND FA MIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 10 0 E 19 th St re et Pa na ma Ci ty Fl or id a SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Benjamin Franklin Causey, 77, of Wewahitchka, passed away in his home from a lengthy illness on Sept. 18, 2014. He is survived by his sister Carah Sweet of Tallahassee; his brother Billy McDaniel of Edison, Ga.; his children, David Causey and wife Marilyn, Stevie Causey, Buddy Causey, Alice Herrell and husband Scotty, Debra Brown and husband Bill, all from Wewahitchka, and Marie Piland and husband Mike from Winter Park; his grandchildren, Amanda Simpson and husband Brandon of Houston, Hunter Causey and wife Tamber of Blountstown, Stetson Causey, Harley, Kristen and Kory Brown and Peyton Herrell, all of Wewahitchka, Sarah and Catie Holton of Winter Park, Anna and Grace Causey of Chipley; many nephews, nieces and cousins. Ben was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and retired from the Gulf County School System in 2002 after 30 years of serving in the maintenance department. Services will be held graveside at Holy Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. Please contact Brocks Funeral Home in Panama City for details. Benjamin Franklin Causey BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CAUSEY 7TH ANNUAL ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH SPAGHETTI DINNER A Fabulous Spaghetti Dinner, entertainment, sing-along fun, door prizes, and a cash bar featuring Italian beer and wine await you at the 7th Annual SJCC Mens Club Spaghetti Dinner. The dinner will be held on 5-7 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 4 at the church hall. The hall is just east of the church (20th Street and Monument Avenue) on 20th Street in Port St. Joe. In addition to the Spaghetti Dinner, you will get a salad, garlic bread and delicious desserts. You will enjoy Italian Accordionist Tony Minichello and vocalist and sign-along leader Marty Jarosz. You can win one of the many door prizes as well. The ticket prices are $8 for adults and $4 for children ages 5-12. Fouryear-olds and younger are free. Tickets will be $10 and $5 if purchased the date of the event at the door. Get your tickets from any Mens Club Member, by stopping by the church hall ofce (227-1417), at Hannon Insurance, the No Name Caf Books & More, or by calling Mens Club President Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Get your tickets early only 200 will be sold. You can also get spaghetti dinners to go, if you wish. HOLY LAND JOURNEY First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach is inviting those interested to join a pilgrimage to the Holy Land spiritually directed by Pastor Jerry Arhelger. The journey, In the Footsteps of the Bible, will be May 11-21, 2015 and will be led by Catherine Klein of Journeys Travel. For more information and an itinerary, call Catherine at 387-4221. Special to The Star A couples journey with their sons announced homosexuality will be examined at 7 p.m. CT Monday, Sept. 29 at Lifetree Caf. This Lifetree event features exclusive lmed interviews with a couple who faced various challenges from family, friends, and church after their college-aged son announced his gay lifestyle. According to Lifetree Caf representative Craig Cable, This is one familys story of a situation with all sorts of questions and consequences. Well have a chance to talk about family, faith, values, and love. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Jeanine Dykes Peterson, 55, of Apalachicola, passed away Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, in Panama City. A native and lifelong resident of Apalachicola, she worked in the seafood industry. She was a loving wife and mother, and was a member of Living Waters Assembly of God Church where she sang on the Worship Team. She was preceded in death by her dad, Willie Dykes, and her siblings, G. W. Dykes, Marvin Dykes and Glenn Dykes. She is survived by her husband, Lawrence Peterson of Apalachicola; her son, Stephen W. Peterson of Apalachicola; two sisters, Willie Lee Collie of Georgia, and Dora Coulter (Arthur) of Apalachicola; her mother, Johnnie M. Dykes of Apalachicola; sister-in-law Ruby Dykes; and many nieces and nephews Funeral services were held 1 p.m. EDT Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014, at Living Waters Assembly of God Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. The visitation was at Living Waters Assembly of God Church 6-8 p.m. EDT on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Jeanine Dykes Peterson William Terrace, 85, of St. Joe Beach passed away Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. William lived in St. Joe Beach since 1970 after retiring from the United States Military. He was a life member of the Marine Corps League, the American Legion and life member of John C. Gainous Post 10069 VFW. He enjoyed music and playing guitar. He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Barbara Terrace of St. Joe Beach; his daughter and sonin-law, Sheri Martin and Kevin of St. Joe Beach; four step-children (spouses), Jimmy Taylor of Niagara Falls, NY, Terry Taylor (Pam) of Panama City, FL., Sharon Wilkens (Bill) of Charlotte, NC, and David Taylor (Carlene) of Niagara Falls, NY. William had numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at Beach Baptist Chapel, 311 Columbus Street St. Joe Beach, at 11 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery. Flowers are accepted or contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice. Funeral services were under the directions of Comforter Funeral Home William T errace My Son Is Gay lm shown at Lifetree Obituaries Faith BRIEFS

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, September 25, 2014 NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 10/15/2014 CODE: SJ00 The blooming of Chrysanthemums is a sure sign of fall. These attractive and versatile owers are showing up in nurseries, garden and orist shops, supermarkets, around home, and of course at the football games. We thought you might like to grow some of these hardy plants for your own enjoyment. Commonly call mums chrysanthemums are available in a wide range of ower colors, shapes, and sizes. There are two types of chrysanthemums garden mums, and orist or pot mums. Those in the latter group are sold primarily as corsages and cut owers, or as gift plants for indoor growth. They are not suited to garden culture. For outdoor plantings, you should purchase garden mum varieties from a nursery or garden center. If you want to start a fall bed of chrysanthemums, buy full grown garden mums to plant now. These will probably already be in bloom. With proper care and a little luck you may enjoy their owers from now through December and for years to come, because chrysanthemums are grown as perennials here in Florida, providing a new burst of color each fall. Next spring, you could add to your chrysanthemum plantings with cuttings, which you could root yourself from present stock. If they are available, you could purchase some young plants that are already started. Chrysanthemums will grow in almost any well-drained soil, as long as it contains plenty of organic materials. If your landscape is low in organic matter, thoroughly work in a three or four inch layer of peat prior to planting. Apply an 8-8-8 fertilizer, a t the rate of one pound per 100 square feet of garden bed, three times a year in spring, early summer and late summer be careful to keep the fertilizer off the foliage, make sure the soil is moist before you fertilize, to avoid root burn, the water thoroughly after fertilizing, to distribute the material throughout the root zone. Your chrysanthemums should be pinched periodically during spring and summer, to develop compact plants with many owers. When chrysanthemums reach six to eight inches in height, remove about half the stem, leaving three sets of leaves. This will cause lateral branches to form. When these reach six to eight inches in length, pinch again. Continue pinching back until about the rst week in August, when ower buds begin to form. Any later p running will limit the number of blooms Several diseases and pests can damage chrysanthemums. Fungus ailments, such as septoria leaf spot, mildew, botrytis, and ray blight, discolor leaves and blooms. Certain nematodes are a threat to both leaves and roots. Aphids, spider mites, thrips, and some caterpillars may also feast on chrysanthemum foliage and owers. At the rst sign of trouble, check with your garden center operator, or your County Extension Agent for control. As I said at the beginning, Chrysanthemums are hardy plants that produce a variety of beautiful fall and winter blooms. Try some, in your garden. For more information on daylilies contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf.ifas.u. edu oredis.ifas.u.edu and see FPS 171. Special to The Star Last week, County Com missioner Ward McDaniel welcomed Dr. Renee B. Parrish, DMD to the Flori da Department of Health in Gulf County Dental team. Dr. Parrish is a Doctor of Medical Dentistry grad uate of the Georgia Health University and a Bachelor of Science undergraduate of Valdosta State College. She brings experience working in community health centers to provide oral health care services to underserved populations. Dr. Parrish looks forward to developing a strong part nership with Gulf County families, and strives to de liver a pleasant and posi tive dental experience. Call today to schedule your appointment. For the Wewahitchka loca tion at 807 W. State 22, call 639-4414 For the Port St. Joe location at 2475 Garrison Avenue, call 227-1276, x160. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County accepts Prestige and Stay well Medicaid, Medicare and most other third party insurances. The Department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Special to The Star This year is a big year for local author Michael Lister. Its his 20th anniversary as a writer and will see the publication of three new novels-one from each of his three main series char acters: John Jordan, Jimmy Soldier Riley, and Mer rick McKnight. The last, A Certain Retribution, fea turing ex-reporter, Merrick McKnight, is the rst in his twenty-year career to be set in Gulf County where he lives. Im so excited to nally have a book set in the com munity and county where I live, Lister said. It was so much fun to write, using real places and even honor ing a few close friends along the way by putting ctitious versions of them in the book. Listers new novel, A Certain Retribution, is a sequel to 2010s Thunder Beach. For his twentieth anni versary as a novelist, Mi chael Lister is doing some thing hes never done be foresetting a novel in his hometown. And not just any novel. A Merrick McKnight novel that introduces Reggie Summers. A mystery. A thriller. A love story Merrick McKnight and Michael Lister share many things chief among them the same small North Flor ida town of Wewahitchka. Wewa to locals. Wewahitchka, which means water eyes, be cause of the two nearly perfectly round lakes in the center of town, is a wild, un tamed region backwoods, dirt roads, untouched, un spoiled, in some ways un welcoming. This brutally beautiful place is home to the legendary Dead Lakes, world famous Tupelo hon ey, and now A Certain Retribution. In keeping with the nov els twenty-year theme, it opens with these words: I see her for the rst time in over twenty years the night before shell be arrested. Reggie meets Merrick and a thrilling adventure begins. Mystery. Romance. Suspense. All in a small town. Welcome to Wewa. This anniversary year follows a year in which List er won his second Florida Book Award. The Florida Book Review says, Listers ability to masterfully combine dark, vivid settings with tough yet fallible characters ri vals that of Michael Koryta and Dennis Lehane, while Florida Weekly writes, Mi chael Lister is a giant tal ent with a unique vision. His landmark John Jordan Mystery series is a treasure of contemporary literature suspenseful, provocative and unsettling. For more about Michael Lister and his books, visit his website: www.Michael Lister.com. PHOTOS SP ECIAL TO T HE S TAR The staff of the Health Departments dental clinic. County commissioner welcomes new dentist in Wewahitchka County Commissioner Ward McDaniel and new dentist Dr. Renee B. Parrish A special signing for A Certain Retribution will take place at the No Name Cafe, (which is mentioned in the book), from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. EDT this Saturday, Sept. 27. Everyone is invited. New Lister novel set in Gulf County ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Chrysanthemums

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 El egan th ome loc ate di nt he peac eful ,c oastal co mmunit yo fW ate r sE dge with deeded beach ac ce ss .W ate r sE dge is beautifully ca nva ssed with ma tur ep ine and oak tr ees and ye t just st eps away fr om the beach. Th is home is of superior qualit ya nd loc ate do nal ar ge FEM A eligible lot .O pen oor plan, wheelchair ac ce ssible ,c at hedr al ce ilings in living ar ea, gr anit e co un te rt ops ,a nd plen ty of windo ws letting tha tF lo ri da su ns hine in. Ame nities include newly re sur fac ed te nnis co ur ta nd pool .C on ve nien tly loc ate d1 0m iles fr om Po rt .S t. Joe Wa te r sE dge is ag re at plac et oc al lh ome ,a o rd able living just st eps fr om the beach!! Ga br ie ll e Pi er gi ov an ni 850-227-6671 Under co nstruc tion beach home no wb eing sold as-is 4BD/4BA, 2,100 sqf tw ith deeded ac ce ss to Gulf .X -o od zo ne in N. Ca pe Sa nB las .T his is au nique loca tion fr om which yo uc an wa lk to the St at eP ark an dr estaur an t. On sew er with possible ro om fo rap ri vate pool GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE LAW ENFORCEMENT SUMMARY Special to The Star The R.A. Driesbach, Sr. Lodge 77, Knights of Pythias, a 501 (c)(3) organization, organized July 18, 1929, continues to function as a catalyst for the community through a wide range of social and service activities. Please join us in our effort to provide bicycles for the boys and girls of Gulf County this Christmas. We are expanding our bike program countywide to provide 100plus bicycles this year. Members of the Knights of Pythias are purchasing new and collecting old and used bikes for restoration and distribution. The program will provide bikes for boys and girls ages 6-12 who would not normally receive a bike at Christmas. Working in conjunction with Jerry Stokoe and Billy Dixson in Port St. Joe and Bob Sutton in Wewahitchka Christmas initiative; Gulf County Sheriffs Department; Gulf County Fire Departments; Salvage Santa in Panama City; and the Gulf County School System. Lodge 77 relies heavily upon the generosity of our friends and neighbors to support the mission of our Order each year. Your philanthropic support for our Bikes for Boys and Girls Program will be greatly appreciated. Please make checks payable to R.A. Driesbach, Sr. Lodge #77. For additional information, visit www. knightsofpythias .com or call Clarence Monette, Chancellor Commander, at 899-1479 or any member of the Knights of Pythias. Sept. 15-21 On Monday, Sept. 15, Deputy J. Oquendo took the report of a theft from a complainant in the 500 block of Dolphin Street in Highland View. A red 150psi air hose, with brass ttings, was stolen out of the back of a vehicle parked at the residence. The theft occurred during the late evening of September 13th. On Tuesday, Sept. 16, the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce (GCSO) executed an order to transport by traveling to the Bay County Jail to transport Nicholas A. Pierce (36) back to Gulf County. Pierce was due to appear in circuit court. He was returned to Bay County the same day. On Sept. 16, four warrants for Contempt of County Court were served to Carrie Kathleen Strain (28) at the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF). Strain was already in custody. On Sept. 16, the GCSO received two complaints regarding a possible impaired driver in the area of State Road (SR) 71 and SR 22 in Wewahitchka. Sgt. J. Williams was able to locate the vehicle. After observing the vehicle on the roadway, Sgt. Williams conducted a traf c stop to investigate. At the conclusion of the investigation the driver, Alfred W. Liesinger, III (58) was arrested for Driving Under the In uence and transported to the GCDF. Liesinger was rst appeared the following day and released on a $1,000 bond. On Wednesday, Sept. 17, Deputy P. Williams responded to the Wewahitchka Substation to take the report of a burglary. The complainant reported the theft of two rearms from his residence in the 100 block of Armstrong Road in Wewahitchka. It was reported the guns were noticed missing two to three weeks prior to notifying law enforcement. One gun is described as a black double action .22 caliber pistol and the other as a Remington .22 caliber ri e. On Sept. 17, Anthony L. Turner (30) was arrested in the 200 block of Woodbrook Drive in Wewahitchka by Sgt. M. Herring and Deputy J. Hanson. Turner had an active warrant for his arrest out of Calhoun County for Contempt of Court. Turner was taken into custody and transported to the GCDF. He was later released. On Sept. 17, Deputy M. Lay eld served Arthur T. Addison, III (38) with a warrant for Violation of Probation on his original charge of Possession of Cocaine. Addison turned himself in. He was booked into the GCDF and released on a $5,000 bond. On Thursday, Sept. 18, Jodie J. Hopper (37) turned herself in at the GCDF. Hopper was wanted by the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce for Public Assistance Fraud. On Sept. 18, the GCSO traveled to the Bay County Jail to transport Ernest L. Mace (41) back to the GCDF. Mace returned to Gulf County after completing is court proceedings in Bay County. He currently is charged with Burglary and Dealing in Stolen Property. He remains in custody. On Sept. 18, Deputy B. Smith was dispatched to the Family Dollar in Wewahitchka. The manager reported the theft of merchandise valued at $80. A suspect was developed in the case and criminal charges are forthcoming. On Friday, Sept. 19, Sgt. S. Strickland arrested Tyler D. Flora (19) at Port St. Joe Jr. Sr. High School for Disorderly Conduct and Resisting a Law Enforcement Of cer without Violence. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on his own recognizance. On Sept. 19, Deputy J. Oquendo conducted a traf c stop on U.S. Highway 98 east of Port St. Joe near Depot Creek. Deputy Oquendo clocked the vehicle, using radar, traveling 94 mph in a posted 60 mph zone. Contact was made with the driver, Lataska V. Harris (33), who operated the vehicle on a suspended license. Harris was placed under arrest for Driving While License Suspended/Revoked (DWLS/R) and transported to the GCDF. A citation for speed was also issued, which required a mandatory court appearance. He was released on a $500 bond. On Sept. 19, Deputy J. Brock responded to the 1700 block of Grouper Avenue in Highland View to an unknown disturbance. The caller reported a female could be heard screaming. The call resulted in the arrest of Karen A. Mancham (47) for Disorderly Intoxication, Resisting a Law Enforcement Of cer without Violence and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. She was transported to the GCDF where she was later rst appeared and released on her own recognizance. On Sunday, Sept. 21, Deputy J. Oquendo conducted a traf c stop on U.S. Highway 98 near Depot Creek. The vehicle was stopped for speed, 79 mph in a posted 60 mph zone. The driver, Melissa W. Thomas (42), had an active warrant for Failure to Appear in Court out of Liberty County. She was taken into custody and transported to the GCDF, where she later posted a $2,500 bond. A citation for speed was issued. On Sept. 21, the GCSO received a 911 call from the 1300 block of Stonemill Creek Road regarding domestic disturbance. The caller requested an ambulance and a deputy. Sgt. J. Murnan responded to the call and conducted an investigation. The case resulted in the arrest of Arthur E. Lanier (21) for Domestic Battery. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and conditionally released. From Sept. 15-21 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 31 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 35 calls for EMS, 23 calls for other departments/ agencies and 14 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From September 15th through September 21st the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/ Zone Checks, 271; Traf c Stop, 29; Field Contacts, 26; Civil Paper Service, 20; Suspicious Person, 7; Traf c Accident, 7; Special Detail, 6; Domestic Disturbance, 5; Information, 5; Suspicious Vehicle, 5; Welfare Check, 5; Prisoner Transport, 4; Request for Security Check, 4; Warrant Arrest, 4; Unknown Disturbance, 3; Verbal Disturbance, 3; Abandoned Vehicle, 2; Alarm, 2; Battery, 2; Physical Disturbance, 2; Harassing Phone Calls, 2; Theft/Shoplifting, 2; Animal Call, 1; Burglary, 1; DUI, 1; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 1; Noise Disturbance, 1; Funeral Escort, 1; Fire, 1; Fraud, 1; Identity Theft, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Trespass, 1; Reckless Driver, 1; and Stolen Tag, 1. GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Pythians deliver bikes to Salvage Santa PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR Knights of Pythias members David Lewis, Raymond Rogers, Bonnie Bell and Clarence Monette prepare bikes for delivery to Salvage Santa.

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Thursday, September 25, 2014 NO TI CE OF BU DG ET HE AR IN G Th e Ci ty of Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a ha s te nt at iv el y ad op te d a bu dg et fo r 20 14 -2 01 5. A pu bl ic he ar in g to mak e a FI NA L DE CI SI ON on th e bu dg et AN D TA XE S wi ll be he ld on : Se pt em be r 30 20 14 6: 00 P. M. ES T At Ci ty Ha ll lo ca te d at 30 5 Ce ci l Co st in Sr Bl vd The Star| B7 Local Special to The Star Start celebrating Bay Day early. From 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. ET on the evening of Fri day Oct. 3, Dr. Cliff Harris of Gulf Coast State College in Panama City will take visitors of the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve on a free astronomy stroll through the planets of the solar system. This is an easy and en tertaining walk that is es pecially suited for families with children. Children should be able to walk two mile round-trip. No advance registra tion is required for the event and signup is avail able on site. Attendees should meet at the Buffer Preserve visitors center at 3915 State Road 30-A in Port St. Joe. Be amazed at the mas sive size of our solar sys tem as you walk it out to scale. Learn fascinating facts, scientic principles and explore the mysteries of the universe. Learn about the con stellations, hear intrigu ing stories and search for distant planets. Guests are encouraged to bring a ashlight and bug spray. Guests will have an op portunity to use the tele scope located in the Buffer Preserve tower and are encouraged to bring their own. Telescopes will also be provided on site. The road guests will walk is unpaved and sandy so athletic or tennis shoes are recommended. For more information on the Astronomy Walk, call the preserve at 2291787, ext. 1. Special to The Star The Gulf County Senior Citizens Asso ciation will hold the rst annual Trick or Trot at 8 a.m. ET on Nov. 1. The 5K and 10K run/walk will start and nish on the beautiful Port City Trail lo cated on U.S. 71 between Emerald Coast Credit Union and the U.S. Post Ofce. The rst 50 runners are guaranteed a Trick or Trot shirt. This race is designed to grow awareness for the seniors in our community. The Gulf County Senior Citizens As sociation, Inc. is a non-prot organization that administers a wide range of pro grams, ranging from congregate Meals and nutrition, disaster preparedness, elder abuse prevention programs, emer gency home energy assistance, senior companion programs and transportation. Preregistration is $25 for the 5k and $35 for the 10k through Oct. 3. Those in terested in registering can do so online at www.active.com/port-st-joe-/races/trickor-trot-2014?int=72-2-A6 or contact Mary Clayton at 229-8466 or at scalgulf@aaan eads.org. Astronomy Night at the Buffer Preserve Senior Citizens Association presents Trick or Trot

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 Peninsula State Park will host a membership drive. Individuals can sign up for an annual fee of $15 or $25 per year for fami lies. Perks of the membership include 12 free entrees to the park. Businesses can become a friend for $100 annually and receive a free pavilion rental each year. A low country boil begins at 3 p.m. with plates and drinks available for a $5 donation. Scallop Cove will provide free ice cream for children. Funds raised during the event allow the Friends orga nization to nancially support the park with needed purchas es and maintenance projects. Members get to be part of what happens at park and many volunteer to help at events, said park manager Mark Knapke. Lots of people enjoy the park and its their opportu nity to be directly involved. For more information on the Park Appreciation event con tact the park ofce at 227-1327.SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Dudley received the award for most improved dog and was adopted by a local family in Port St. Joe. Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 a role in an event he believes in. I thought it would be easy, Bogan said. Im still adapting to the 10-hour California work day and the one hour commutes. Bogan said that with a little bit of delegation, planning has been smooth and relatively stress-free. Despite the festivals growth pat tern in the past, Bogan said he wanted to hold the line when it came to the amount of invited writers to keep a feeling of exclusivity. The structure will be very same to last year, Bogan said. We had pretty solid growth in the amount of songwriters and added a bunch of new venues. We didnt want to go too crazy this year. The rst event in 2008 brought just ve artists to town and it has steadily built from there. Last years festival featured 27 writers but as tradition keeps bringing it back, more and more songwriters in Nashville have heard about the big music party in the little coastal town and want in. Even with the amount of songwrit ers booked to take part in the festival Bogan and fellow talent scout, song writer Will Rambeaux, made room for a half dozen new artists to share with them the Blast on the Bay experience. The songwriters festival is de signed as a listening event rather than a rock concert. The artists have traveled from Nashville to Gulf Coun ty to not only play their music, but to share the stories behind them and give listeners a peek into the songwrit ing process and organizers ask that attendees respect the songwriter and the craft. Once the concert is com plete, writers stick around for meet and greets with the audience. I want to get people out there to have a good time, Bogan said. I want these writers to feel like they came to Port St. Joe for a reason, and I want to show them a certain civility. Proceeds from the event will ben et the Coastal Songwriters Educa tion Coalition Inc. The Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival runs from Oct. 16-19. For more information and schedules visit www.blastonthebay. com. BLAST from page B1 and were working to keep their noses clean to have the blot on their record expunged. They were generally good men, but there were some rough characters, Maddox said. Mostly they just had done something like going out and get ting drunk and getting in trouble. They werent bad fellows. Clingan was the mailman for the outt, in charge of handling and deliv ering letters to the men. As such he and Maddox worked in close proximity. One day they had a photo snapped with buddy Earl Red Taylor, the three young men jauntily standing alongside a Jeep outside the tent that passed as their ofce. Each man received a copy of the photo and each inscribed his name and hometown on the back of each copy. Maddoxs copy hangs in a room of his Port St. Joe home devoted to his maritime memories and photographs. I see it almost every day and I think of (Calvin) often, Maddox said. But I hadnt heard from him since the Pacic. We just sort of went our own way. The two never spoke or had contact over the ensuing 70 years. So, when Clingan, out of the blue, rang up Maddox recently it was a jolt from the past. Clingan had asked a daughter to use her computer skills to see if she couldnt nd a trace of Maddox and Taylor, those smiling faces of long ago in his copy of the photograph. Taylor, it turned out, passed away years ago but the daughter found a trove of information about Maddox, who turned 93 Sept. 12. She found a bunch of junk that had to do with me, Maddox said. And Clingan decided to give Mad dox a phone call. Clingan told Maddox he was coming this way from his Ohio home en route to South Florida and would love to get to gether with Maddox for an afternoon. He suggested meeting at a local restaurant. I said how about the living room of my house, the ever-succinct Maddox countered. Clingan came in Sept. 9 and the two spent the afternoon talking and rewind ing memories of 70 years ago when both served in the U.S. Navy. Mostly we talked about things that happened in the Pacic because we didnt really know each other beyond that, Maddox said. It was real nice. MEMORIES from page B1SPECIAL TO T HE STAR St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will host its annual Park Appreciation Event this Saturday, Sept. 27 at Eagle Harbor. PARK from page B1 So dogs and men who lost their way come to gether here to rescue each other. Every day across the U.S. 10,000 dogs are eutha nized due to lack of homes and limited shelter space and resources. Christy re minded Gulf County resi dents of the free spay and neuter programs offered by the humane society and asked pet owners not to let their animals roam. Its an amazing privi lege for us to part of these miracles, Christy said. And now our adopters get to take home and cherish the result of this partnership. DA WGS from page B1

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 25, 2014 The Star | B9 33611S IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA PANAMA CITY DIVISION CASE NO.: 5:13-cv-00162 CADENCE BANK, N.A., as successor-in-interest by merger to Superior Bank, N.A., as successor-in-interest to Superior Bank, FSB, by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Superior Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. APEX DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a limited liability company, GEORGE STEPHENS NEWMAN, JR., an individual, JOSEPH PATRICK FERRELL, an individual, JOHN Z. FERRELL, an individual CARRAWAY BAY PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, a Florida non-profit corporation, OCEAN PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, HIDE-A-WAY AT LAKE POWELL HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., A Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHAL’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Amended Final Default and Summary Judgment directed to me by the U.S. District Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned United States Marshal or any of his duly authorized deputies, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Section 2001, et seq., will sell the property having the legal description of: EXHIBIT “A” Newman F errell Property: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 18. Township 9 South, Range 11 West. Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South Range 11 West. Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot right of way of State Road No. 30-B; thence Southeasterly along said right of way boundary the following six courses and distances: thence South 23 degrees 25 minutes 11 seconds East, 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left: thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 degrees 08 minutes 33 seconds, an arc length of 427.29 feet; thence South 25 degrees 33 minutes 44 seconds Eastl 171.69 feet to a point of curve to the right: thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11415.15 feet: a central angle of 05 degrees 18 minutes 49 seconds an arc length of 1058.64 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East 3017.88 feet to the Point of Beginning: thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East. 102.00 feet: thence leaving said Southwest right of way boundary, South 69 degrees 45 seconds 05 minutes West, 264.15 feet: thence North 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds West. 101.83 feet: thence North 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds East, 264.15 feet to the Point of Beginning, said lands containing 0.62 acres, more or less. Together with a 5 Pedestrian Access Easement a 5.00 foot wide parcel of land lying and being in Section 18, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying 2.50 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida: thence North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot right of way of State Road No. 30-E thence Southeasterly along said right of way boundary the following six courses and distances: thence South 23 degrees 25 minuets 11 seconds East, 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left; thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11426.79 feet: a central angle of 02 degrees 08 minutes 33 seconds an arc length of 427.29 feet: thence South 25 degrees 33 minutes 44 seconds East 1711.69 feet to a point of curve to the right: thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11415.15 feet: a central angle of 05 degrees 18 minuets 49 second, an arc length of 1058.64 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East, 3017.88 feet; thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East, 102.00 feet: thence leaving said Southwest right of way boundary; South 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds West, 548.30 feet: thence North 20 degrees 14 minuets 55 seconds West, 5083 feet to the Point of Beginning of this centerline; thence South 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds West 315.14 feet more or less to a point on the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico. Said point being the Point of Termination of this centerline. Together with an ingress/egress/Utility Easement: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 18. Township 9 South. Range 11 West. Gulf County. Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South. Range 11 West, 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot right of way of State Road No. 30-E; thence Southeasterly along said right of way boundary the following six courses and distances: thence South 23 degrees 25 minutes 11 seconds East, 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left; thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 degrees 08 minutes 33 seconds for an arc length of 427.29 feet; thence South 25 degrees 33 minutes 44 seconds East. 1711.69 feet to a point of curve to the right; thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11415.15 feet, a central angle of 05 degrees 18 minutes 49 seconds for an arc length of 1058.64 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East 3017.88 feet: thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East, 82.00 feet to the Point of Beginning: thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minuets 55 seconds East, 20.00 feet: thence leaving said right of way boundary, South 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds West 548.30 feet; thence North 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds West. 60.81 feet; thence North 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds East. 15.00 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minuets 55 seconds East, 40.84 feet: thence North 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds East, 533.30 feet to the Point of Beginning. together with all appurtenances thereto and all improvements thereon, at public auction at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, on the 15th day of October, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. EST. The terms of the sale shall be certified funds, with ten percent (10%) of the successful bid to be deposited with the undersigned by the successful bidder upon the property being struck off to him; the balance of the successful bid shall be due and payable in the office of the undersigned at 111 N. Adams Street, Suite 277, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within fortyeight (48) hours following conclusion of the sale. The plaintiff reserves the right to bid on the above property and apply the indebtedness of the defendant to any bid so made. Any questions should be directed to Allison C. Doucette, Esquire at (813) 273-5616. Ed Spooner United States Marshal September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33743S PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for one (1) Honda Odyssey. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance/Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids may also be faxed/e-mailed by calling 850-229-8369 or 850-227-1204. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33615S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-62-CA DIRECT PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER LOGAN JOHNSON, ANA DAVIS JOHNSON, RBC BANK F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK, SURFSIDE ESTATES OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO CHRISTOPHER LOGAN JOHNSON and ANA DAVIS JOHNSON: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action seeking to quiet title in the property located in Gulf County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 23: Commence at the Intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. (hereafter “the Property”). has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within 30 days of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: August 22, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33861S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 232014CA 000013CAAXMX REGIONS BANK SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH AMSOUTH BANK, Plaintiff, -vsCHARLES L. BOND and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES L. BOND Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Gulf County, Florida, described as: SEE EXHIBIT “A” ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF EXHIBIT “A” Legal Description PARCEL 1 OF THE LASSITER MINOR REPLAT : Commence at the Northwest corner of Camp Palms Subdivision on Indian Peninsula as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 53-A, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, and thence run Southerly along the Western boundary line of said Camp Palms Subdivision for 505.97 feet to a concrete monument on the Southern right of way line of County Road S-30-B, thence Northwesterly along said right of way line to a point that is 2375.745 feet, measured perpendicularly from said Western boundary line of Camp Palms Subdivision for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 02 degrees 37 minutes 38 seconds West, 117.98 feet, thence North 88 degrees 06 minutes 43 seconds West 112.87 feet, thence North 01 degree 16 minutes 00 seconds East 136.94 feet to a point on said Southerly right of way line, thence along said Southerly right of way line, South 78 degrees 49 minutes 54 seconds East, 117.58 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The above described parcel of land is located on Indian Peninsula in Fractional Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. SUBJECT TO Ingress, Egress, Utility Easement, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Camp Palms Subdivision on Indian Peninsula as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 53-A, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, and thence run Southerly along the Western boundary line of said Camp Palms Subdivision for 505.97 feet to a concrete monument on the Southern right of way line of County Road 5-30-B, thence Northwesterly along said right of way line to a point that is 2375.745 feet, measured perpendicularly from said Western boundary line of Camp Palms Subdivision for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 02 degrees 37 minutes 38 seconds West 264.11 feet, thence North 88 degrees 06 minutes 43 seconds West 54.75 feet, thence North 01 degree 53 minutes 17 seconds East 15.00 feet, thence South 88 degrees 06 minutes 43 seconds East 34.95 feet, thence North 02 degrees 37 minutes 38 seconds East, 252.37 feet to a point on said Southerly right of way line, thence along said Southerly right of way line, South 78 degrees 49 minutes 54 seconds East, 20.23 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The above described parcel of land is located on Indian Peninsula in Fractional Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the courthouse lobby, in Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.in Port Saint Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on November 13, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FUNDS FROM THIS SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 45.031(1)(a), FLORIDA STATUTES. DATED this 12th day of September, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. NOTE: THIS COMMUNICATION, FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR, IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33745S PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for two (2) Chevrolet 1500 Silverado. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance/Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids may also be faxed/e-mailed by calling 850-229-8369 or 850-227-1204. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33847S PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: On 16 housing units, a total of approximately 25,000 square feet, located on 11th and 12th Street in Apalachicola, FL, install (color silver) 24 gauge galvalume metal roofing with 6 inch eave drip edge to match roof color, installation of one layer of #30 lb felt underlayment on existing roof surface, replace all existing gutters and add or replace vent pipes as necessary. Metal roofing will go over existing shingle roofs. All grounds to be cleaned up on a daily basis as homes are occupied by tenants. All bushes, shrubs and flowers to be protected. Bids will be received until October 14, 2014. Please send bids to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 For questions, please email apalhousing@ gmail.com or call 850-653-9304 Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33943S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 14-58-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN LACIVITA, LORI LACIVITA, LAWRENCE LACIVITA, HERON WALK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage dated September 12, 2014, in Case No. 14-58-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and KEVIN LACIVITA, LORI LACIVITA, LAWRENCE LACIVITA, and HERON WALK HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on October 9, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage and more particularly described as follows: LOT 8, HERON WALK SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 31, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: September 18, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court BY: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 33956S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 836 Application No. 2014-40 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03371-000R Description of Property: Begin at the Southwest corner of Section 26, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, for Point of Beginning; thence North along the West line of Section 26 for a distance of 420 feet to a point; thence East parallel to the South section line a distance of 525 feet to a point; thence South parallel to the West section line 420 feet to the South section line; thence West along the South section line a distance of 525 feet to Point of Beginning. Name in which assessed: William Coleman Smith All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 29th day of October, 2014. Dated this 22nd day of September, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk September 25, October 2, 9, 16, 2014 33945S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 14-51PR IN RE: ESTATE OF HAZEL MARIE BARTON Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of Hazel Marie Barton, deceased, File Number 14-51PR, by the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456; that the decedent’s date of death was August 11, 2014; that the total value of the estate is $99,000.00 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Carol B. Rich 411 N. Orange Ave Eufaula, AL 36027 Phyllis S. Rudisill 9547 Bay Vista West Indianapolis, IN 46250 David L. Barton 1545 Allshire Ct. Tallahassee, FL 32311 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 25, 2014. Person Giving Notice: /s/ Carol Rich Carol B. Rich 411 N. Orange Ave. Eufaula, AL 36027 Attorney for Person Giving Notice /s/ Mel Magidson Jr. Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney FL Bar No.: 261629 528 6th Street P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tele: (850) 227-7800 Fax: (850) 227-7878 E-Mail: mmagidson@ fairpoint.net Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 33981S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2014-63-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TAUNTON TRUSS, INC.; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; MIDCOUNTRY EQUIPMENT FINANCE, INC. a/k/a MIDCOUNTRY BANK a/k/a OFC CAPITAL CORPORATION a/k/a OFC SERVICING, LLC a/k/a OFC HOLDING, LLC; MIDCOUNTRY EQUIPMENT FINANCE, INC. a/k/a MIDCOUNTRY BANK a/k/a OFC HOLDING, LLC; WOODFORD PLYWOOD, INC.; LAKESIDE LUMBER CO., L.L.C. a/k/a LAKESIDE LUMBER COMPANY, L.L.C.; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; and TAUNTON’S, LLC, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment dated September 12, 2014 and entered in Case No. 2014-63-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and TAUNTON TRUSS, INC.; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; MIDCOUNTRY EQUIPMENT FINANCE, INC. a/k/a MIDCOUNTRY BANK a/k/a OFC CAPITAL CORPORATION a/k/a OFC SERVICING, LLC a/k/a OFC HOLDING, LLC; MIDCOUNTRY EQUIPMENT FINANCE, INC. a/k/a MIDCOUNTRY BANK a/k/a OFC HOLDING, LLC; WOODFORD PLYWOOD, INC.; LAKESIDE LUMBER CO., L.L.C. a/k/a LAKESIDE LUMBER COMPANY, L.L.C.; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; and TAUNTON, LLC, are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on October 9th 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the Courthouse Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 3 and 5 of that certain unrecorded plat of the Gulf County Industrial Park, and being and lying in a portion of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the 4” concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of said Section 18; thence North 85 degrees 25 minutes 26 seconds East 1429.01 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 24 degrees 15 minutes 37 seconds East 51.26 feet to a point of intersection of the Northeasterly right of way line of State Road 71 with the Northerly right of way line of State Road 381; thence along the Northeasterly right of way of State Road 71, North 18 degrees 20 minutes 53 seconds West 268.20 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line North 18 degrees 20 minutes 53 seconds West 413.04 feet; thence leaving said right of way line, North 86 degrees 08 minutes 06 seconds East 324.60 feet; thence South 17 degrees 55 minutes 26 seconds East 412.32 feet; thence South 86 degrees 08 minutes 13 seconds West 321.44 feet to the Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on September 17, 2014 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@jud14.fl courts.org. Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 33957S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 267 Application No. 2014-39 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 01369-115R Description of Property: Commence at the SE Corner of Section 35, T3S, R10W, and thence run 86 degrees 39 minutes 48 seconds East for a distance of 227.93 feet to the Eastern R/W line of SR 71; thence run North 145.5 feet, m/l, to the Southern R/W of a paved driveway; thence Easterly along the South side of said paved driveway 227.93 feet, m/l, to the boundary line between Section 35 & 36, T3S, R10W; thence South along said Section Line to the POB, containing 3/4 acre, m/l. Name in which assessed: Ladora L Nunnery f/k/a Ladora Nickell, f/k/a Ladora Mombi All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 29th day of October, 2014. Dated this 22nd day of September, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk September 25, October 2, 9, 16, 2014 95750S PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2014 NOTICE OF ELECTION I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in Florida, on November 4, 2014, for the ratification or rejection of a proposed revision to the constitution of the State of Florida. No. 1 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 28 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Water and Land Conservation -Dedicates funds to acquire and restore Florida conservation and recreation lands Ballot Summary: Funds the Land Acquisition Trust Fund to acquire, restore, improve, and manage conservation lands including wetlands and forests; fish and wildlife habitat; lands protecting water resources and drinking water sources, including the Everglades, and the water quality of rivers, lakes, and streams; beaches and shores; outdoor recreational lands; working farms and ranches; and historic or geologic sites, by dedicating 33 percent of net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents for 20 years. Financial Impact Statement: This amendment does not increase or decrease state revenues. The state revenue restricted to the purposes specified in the amendment is estimated to be $648 million in Fiscal Year 2015-16 and grows to $1.268 billion by the twentieth year. Whether this results in any additional state expenditures depends upon future legislative actions and cannot be determined. Similarly, the impact on local government revenues, if any, cannot be determined. No additional local government costs are expected. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 28. Land Ac quisition T rust F und. a) Effective on July 1 of the year following pas sage of this amend ment by the voters, and for a period of 20 years after that effective date, the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall re ceive no less than 33 percent of net revenues derived from the exist ing excise tax on docu ments, as defined in the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, as amended from time to time, or any successor or replacement tax, af ter the Department of Revenue first deducts a service charge to pay the costs of the collec tion and enforcement of the excise tax on documents. b) F unds in the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall be expended only for the following pur poses: 1) As provided by law to finance or refinance: the acquisition and im provement of land, water areas, and re lated property interests, including conservation easements, and re sources for conserva tion lands including wetlands, forests, and fish and wildlife habitat; wildlife management areas; lands that pro tect water resources and drinking water sources, including lands protecting the water quality and quan tity of rivers, lakes, streams, springsheds, and lands providing re charge for groundwater and aquifer systems; lands in the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protec tion Area, as defined in Article II, Section 7(b); beaches and shores; outdoor recreation lands, including recrea tional trails, parks, and urban open space; ru ral landscapes; work ing farms and ranches; historic or geologic sites; together with management, restora tion of natural systems, and the enhancement of public access or rec reational enjoyment of conservation lands. 2) T o pay the debt service on bonds is sued pursuant to Arti cle VII, Section 11(e). c) The moneys depos ited into the Land Ac quisition T rust F und, as defined by the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, shall not be or become commingled

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B10| The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS with the General Reve nue F und of the state. No. 2 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 29 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Use of Marijuana for Certain Medical Conditions Ballot Summary: Allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. Allows caregivers to assist patients’ medical use of marijuana. The Department of Health shall register and regulate centers that produce and distribute marijuana for medical purposes and shall issue identification cards to patients and caregivers. Applies only to Florida law. Does not authorize violations of federal law or any non-medical use, possession or production of marijuana. Financial Impact Statement: Increased costs from this amendment to state and local governments cannot be determined. There will be additional regulatory and enforcement activities associated with the production and sale of medical marijuana. Fees will offset at least a portion of the regulatory costs. While sales tax may apply to purchases, changes in revenue cannot reasonably be determined since the extent to which medical marijuana will be exempt from taxation is unclear without legislative or state administrative action. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 29. Medical marijuana production, possession and use. (a) PUBLIC POLICY (1) The medical use of marijuana by a qualify ing patient or personal caregiver is not subject to criminal or civil liabil ity or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (2) A physician li censed in Florida shall not be subject to crimi nal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law for issuing a physi cian certification to a person diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition in a manner consistent with this section. (3) Actions and con duct by a medical mari juana treatment center registered with the De partment, or its em ployees, as permitted by this section and in compliance with De partment regulations, shall not be subject to criminal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (b) DEFINITIONS. F or purposes of this sec tion, the following words and terms shall have the following meanings: (1) “Debilitating Medical Condition” means can cer glaucoma, positive status for human im munodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired im mune deficiency syn drome (AIDS), hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, P arkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis or other conditions for which a physician be lieves that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the po tential health risks for a patient. (2) “Department” means the Department of Health or its succes sor agency (3) “Identification card” means a document is sued by the Depart ment that identifies a person who has a phy sician certification or a personal caregiver who is at least twenty one (21) years old and has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana. (4) “Marijuana” has the meaning given canna bis in Section 893.02(3), Florida Stat utes (2013). (5) “Medical Marijuana T reatment Center” means an entity that acquires, cultivates, possesses, processes (including development of related products such as food, tinctures, aerosols, oils, or oint ments), transfers, trans ports, sells, distributes, dispenses, or adminis ters marijuana, prod ucts containing mari juana, related supplies, or educational materi als to qualifying pa tients or their personal caregivers and is regis tered by the Depart ment. (6) “Medical use” means the acquisition, possession, use, deliv ery transfer or admin istration of marijuana or related supplies by a qualifying patient or personal caregiver for use by a qualifying pa tient for the treatment of a debilitating medi cal condition. (7) “P ersonal caregiver” means a person who is at least twenty one (21) years old who has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana and has a caregiver identification card issued by the De partment. A personal caregiver may assist no more than five (5) quali fying patients at one time. An employee of a hospice provider nurs ing, or medical facility may serve as a per sonal caregiver to more than five (5) qualifying patients as permitted by the Department. P ersonal caregivers are prohibited from con suming marijuana ob tained for the personal, medical use by the qualifying patient. (8) “Physician” means a physician who is li censed in Florida. (9) “Physician certifica tion” means a written document signed by a physician, stating that in the physician’s pro fessional opinion, the patient suffers from a debilitating medical condition, that the po tential benefits of the medical use of mari juana would likely out weigh the health risks for the patient, and for how long the physician recommends the medi cal use of marijuana for the patient. A physician certification may only be provided after the physician has con ducted a physical ex amination of the patient and a full assessment of the patient’s medical history (10) “Qualifying patient” means a person who has been diagnosed to have a debilitating medical condition, who has a physician certifi cation and a valid qual ifying patient identifica tion card. If the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards within nine (9) months after the effec tive date of this section, then a valid physician certification will serve as a patient identifica tion card in order to al low a person to be come a “qualifying pa tient” until the Depart ment begins issuing identification cards. (c) LIMIT A TIONS. (1) Nothing in this sec tion shall affect laws re lating to non medical use, possession, pro duction or sale of mari juana. (2) Nothing in this sec tion authorizes the use of medical marijuana by anyone other than a qualifying patient. (3) Nothing in this sec tion allows the opera tion of a motor vehicle, boat, or aircraft while under the influence of marijuana. (4) Nothing in this law section requires the vi olation of federal law or purports to give immu nity under federal law (5) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any accommodation of any on site medical use of marijuana in any place of education or em ployment, or of smok ing medical marijuana in any public place. (6) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any health insurance pro vider or any govern ment agency or author ity to reimburse any person for expenses re lated to the medical use of marijuana. (d) DUTIES OF THE DEP ARTMENT The Department shall issue reasonable regulations necessary for the im plementation and en forcement of this sec tion. The purpose of the regulations is to en sure the availability and safe use of medical marijuana by qualifying patients. It is the duty of the Department to promulgate regulations in a timely fashion. (1) Implementing Regu lations. In order to al low the Department sufficient time after passage of this section, the following regula tions shall be promul gated no later than six (6) months after the ef fective date of this sec tion: a. Procedures for the issuance of qualifying patient identification cards to people with physician certifications, and standards for the renewal of such identifi cation cards. b. Procedures for the issuance of personal caregiver identification cards to persons quali fied to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana, and standards for the renewal of such identification cards. c. Procedures for the registration of Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers that include procedures for the issu ance, renewal, suspen sion, and revocation of registration, and stand ards to ensure security record keeping, testing, labeling, inspection, and safety d. A regulation that de fines the amount of ma rijuana that could rea sonably be presumed to be an adequate sup ply for qualifying pa tients’ medical use, based on the best available evidence. This presumption as to quantity may be over come with evidence of a particular qualifying patient’s appropriate medical use. (2) Issuance of identifi cation cards and regis trations. The Depart ment shall begin issu ing qualifying patient and personal caregiver identification cards, as well as begin register ing Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers no later than nine months (9) after the effective date of this section. (3) If the Department does not issue regula tions, or if the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards and registering Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers within the time limits set in this section, any Florida citizen shall have standing to seek judicial relief to compel compliance with the Department’s constitu tional duties. (4) The Department shall protect the confi dentiality of all qualify ing patients. All records containing the identity of qualifying patients shall be confidential and kept from public disclosure other than for valid medical or law enforcement purposes. (e) LEGISLA TION. Nothing in this section shall limit the legisla ture from enacting laws consistent with this pro vision. (f) SEVERABILITY The provisions of this sec tion are severable and if any clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this measure, or an ap plication thereof is ad judged invalid by any court of competent ju risdiction other provi sions shall continue to be in effect to the fullest extent possible. No. 3 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 10, 11 (Legislature) Ballot Title: Prospective Appointment of Certain Judicial Vacancies Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution requiring the Governor to prospectively fill vacancies in a judicial office to which election for retention applies resulting from the justice’s or judge’s reaching the mandatory retirement age or failure to qualify for a retention election; and allowing prospective appointments if a justice or judge is not retained at an election. Currently, the Governor may not fill an expected vacancy until the current justice’s or judge’s term expires. Full Text: ARTICLE V JUDICIARY SECTION 10. Retention; election and terms.(a) Any justice or judge may qualify for retention by a vote of the electors in the general election next preceding the expiration of the justice’s or judge’s term in the manner prescribed by law. When If a justice or judge is ineligible for retention or fails to qualify for retention, a prospective va cancy is deemed to oc cur at the conclusion of the qualifying period for retention for the pur pose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. When a justice or judge so qualifies, the ballot shall read substantially as follows: “Shall Justice (or Judge) ...(name of justice or judge)... of the ...(name of the court)... be retained in office?” If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to retain, the justice or judge shall be retained for a term of six years. The term of the justice or judge retained shall commence on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January following the general election. If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to not retain, a prospective vacancy is deemed to occur im mediately following the general election for the purpose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. (b)(1) The election of circuit judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that circuit approves a local option to select circuit judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of circuit judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (2) The election of county court judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that county approves a local option to select county judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of county court judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (3)a. A vote to exercise a local option to select circuit court judges and county court judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election shall be held in each circuit and county at the general election in the year 2000. If a vote to exercise this local option fails in a vote of the electors, such option shall not again be put to a vote of the electors of that jurisdiction until the expiration of at least two years. b. After the year 2000, a circuit may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of circuit judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the custodian of state records a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the circuit in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. c. After the year 2000, a county may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of county court judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the supervisor of elections a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the county in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. The terms of circuit judges and judges of county courts shall be for six years. SECTION 11. Vacancies.(a)(1) Whenever a vacancy occurs in a judicial office to which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the vacancy by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. (2) Whenever a pro spective vacancy occurs in a judicial of fice for which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the prospective va cancy by appointing a justice or judge from among at least three persons but not more than six persons nomi nated by the appropri ate judicial nominating commission. The term of the appointment commences upon the expiration of the term of the office being va cated and ends on the first T uesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general elec tion. (b) The governor shall fill each vacancy on a circuit court or on a county court, wherein the judges are elected by a majority vote of the electors, by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next primary and general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. An election shall be held to fill that judicial office for the term of the office beginning at the end of the appointed term. (c) The nominations shall be made within thirty days from the occurrence of a vacancy or prospective vacancy unless the period is extended by the governor for a time not to exceed thirty days. The governor shall make the appointment within sixty days after the nominations have been certified to the governor. (d) There shall be a separate judicial nominating commission as provided by general law for the supreme court, each district court of appeal, and each judicial circuit for all trial courts within the circuit. Uniform rules of procedure shall be established by the judicial nominating commissions at each level of the court system. Such rules, or any part thereof, may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the legislature, or by the supreme court, five justices concurring. Except for deliberations of the judicial nominating commissions, the proceedings of the commissions and their records shall be open to the public. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 95756S ENMIENDAS CONSTITUCIONALES PROPUESTAS SOBRE LAS QUE SE VOTAR EL 4 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2014 AVISO DE ELECCI"N Yo, Ken Detzner, Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida, por el presente notifico que se llevarn a cabo elecciones en cada condado de la Florida, el 4 de noviembre del 2014, para la aprobacin o el rechazo de una propuesta de modificacin de la constitucin del Estado de la Florida. No. 1 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 28 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Conservacin de aguas y tierras: dedicar fondos para adquirir y restaurar tierras objeto de conservacin y recreacin en el Estado de Florida Resumen de la boleta: Provee fondos para el Fondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de Tierras con el fin de adquirir, restaurar, mejorar y administrar tierras objeto de conservacin, entre ellas pantanos y bosques; el hbitat de peces y vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, incluidos los Everglades, y la calidad del agua en ros, lagos y arroyos; playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre; establecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en actividad, y emplazamientos histricos o geolgicos. Para ello se dedicar el 33% de los ingresos netos obtenidos del impuesto especial existente sobre documentos durante 20 aos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: Esta enmienda no incrementa ni reduce los ingresos estatales. El ingreso estatal limitado para los propsitos especificados en la enmienda se estima en $648 millones para el ao fiscal 2015-16 y aumenta a $1.268 mil millones hacia el vigsimo ao. Si eso traer como consecuencia gastos estatales adicionales depende de futuras acciones legislativas y no puede determinarse. De la misma manera, tampoco puede determinarse el impacto sobre los ingresos de gobiernos locales, si los hubiera. No se prevn costos de gobiernos locales. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 28. F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras. a) Con vigencia el 1 de julio del ao poste rior a la aprobacin de esta enmienda por par te de los votantes y du rante un perodo de 20 aos a partir de esa fecha de entrada en vigor el F ondo Fiduci ario de Adquisicin de T ierras recibir no me nos del 33% de los in gresos netos derivados del impuesto especial existente sobre docu mentos, tal como se define en los estatutos vigentes al 1 de enero de 2012, enmendados de tanto en tanto, o de cualquier impuesto su cesor o de reemplazo, despus de que el De partamento de Haci enda deduzca primero un cargo de servicio con el fin de pagar los costos de recopilacin y aplicacin del im puesto especial sobre documentos. b) El dinero del F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras se emp lear nicamente con los siguientes props itos: 1) Como lo establece la ley para financiar o refinanciar: la adquisi cin o mejora de tier ras, reas de agua y derechos inmobiliarios relacionados, entre el los las servidumbres de conservacin y los re cursos para tierras ob jeto de conservacin, como, por ejemplo, pa ntanos, bosques y h bitat de peces y vida silvestre; reas de ad ministracin de vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, entre ellos las tierras que protegen la calidad y cantidad del agua en ros, lagos, arroyos, manantiales, y tierras que brindan recarga de agua subterrnea y sistemas acuferos; tier ras en el rea agrcola de los Everglades y el rea de proteccin de los Everglades, como estn definidas en el Artculo II, Seccin 7(b); playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre, incluidos senderos recreativos, parques y espacios abiertos urbanos; pai sajes rurales; estab lecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en activ idad, emplazamientos histricos o geolgi cos; junto con la ad ministracin, restaura cin de sistemas natu rales y mejoramiento del acceso pblico o disfrute recreativo de las tierras objeto de conservacin. 2) P ara el pago del servicio de la deuda sobre los bonos emiti dos conforme al Art culo VII, Seccin 11(e). c) El dinero depositado en el F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de T ier ras, tal como se define en los estatutos vigen tes al 1 de enero de 2012, no estar mez clado ni se mezclar con el F ondo de In gresos Generales del Estado. No. 2 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 29 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Uso de marihuana para algunas enfermedades Resumen de la boleta: Permite el uso mdico de la marihuana a las personas con enfermedades debilitantes, segn lo determine un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Florida. Permite a los cuidadores asistir a los pacientes en el uso mdico de marihuana. El Departamento de Salud deber inscribir y regular los centros que producen y distribuyen marihuana con fines mdicos y debern extender tarjetas de identificacin a pacientes y cuidadores. Se aplica nicamente a las leyes del Estado de Florida. No autoriza infracciones de la ley federal ni ningn uso, posesin o produccin de marihuana con fines que no sean mdicos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: El aumento de costos generado por esta enmienda para el gobierno estatal y los gobiernos locales no puede determinarse. Habr actividades adicionales de regulacin y aplicacin asociadas a la produccin y venta de marihuana con fines mdicos. Las tarifas compensarn al menos en parte los costos de regulacin. Si bien el impuesto sobre la venta se aplica a las compras, los cambios fiscales no pueden determinarse de manera razonable, dado que, si no existe una accin legislativa o administrativa estatal, no est claro en qu medida la marihuana con fines mdicos estar exenta de impuestos. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 29. Pro duccin, posesin y uso de marihuana con fines mdicos. (a) POLTICA PBLICA (1) El uso mdico de marihuana por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal no est sujeto a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (2) Un mdico autori zado por el Estado de Florida no estar sujeto a responsabilidad pe nal o civil ni a san ciones, conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, por extender un certificado mdico a una persona diagnosti cada con una enferme dad debilitante de con formidad con esta sec cin. (3) Las acciones y el comportamiento de un centro de tratamiento de marihuana con fines mdicos inscrito ante el Departamento, o sus empleados, segn se contempla en esta sec cin y en cumplimiento de las reglamentacio nes del Departamento, no estarn sujetos a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (b) DEFINICIONES. A los fines de esta sec cin, las siguientes pa labras y trminos ten drn los siguientes sig nificados: (1) “Enfermedad debili tante” significa cncer glaucoma, estado posi tivo del virus de inmu nodeficiencia humana (VIH), sndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SID A), hepa titis C, esclerosis lateral amiotrfica (ELA), en fermedad de Crohn, enfermedad de P arkin son, esclerosis mltiple u otras enfermedades para las cuales, a crite rio del mdico, los ben eficios del uso mdico de la marihuana proba blemente seran superi ores a los riesgos po tenciales para la salud de un paciente. (2) “Departamento” sig nifica el Departamento de Salud o su agencia sucesora. (3) “T arjeta de identifi cacin” significa un documento emitido por el Departamento que identifica a una per sona que tiene un cer tificado mdico o a un cuidador personal de por lo menos veintin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de marihuana. (4) “Marihuana” tiene el significado otorgado al cannabis en la Seccin 893.02(3) de los Esta tutos de Florida (2013). (5) “Centro de trata miento de marihuana con fines mdicos” sig nifica una entidad que adquiere, cultiva, po see, procesa (incluido el desarrollo de prod uctos relacionados ta les como alimentos, tinturas, aerosoles, aceites o ungentos), transfiere, transporta, vende, distribuye, de spacha o administra marihuana, productos que contienen mari huana, suministros re lacionados o material educativo a pacientes calificados o a sus cui dadores personales y que est inscrito ante el Departamento. (6) “Uso mdico” signif ica la adquisicin, po sesin, uso, entrega, transferencia o admin istracin de marihuana o suministros relac ionados por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal para ser usados por un paciente calificado para el tratamiento de una enfermedad debili tante. (7) “Cuidador personal” significa una persona de por lo menos vein tin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente califi cado en el uso mdico de marihuana y tiene una tarjeta de identifi cacin de cuidador emitida por el Depar tamento. Un cuidador personal no puede asistir a ms de cinco (5) pacientes por vez. Un empleado de un proveedor de cuidados paliativos o de un cen tro mdico o de un ho gar de ancianos puede actuar como cuidador personal para ms de cinco (5) pacientes ca lificados, segn lo per mite el Departamento. Est prohibido para los cuidadores personales consumir marihuana obtenida para el uso personal y mdico del paciente calificado. (8) “Mdico” significa un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Flor ida. (9) “Certificado mdico” significa un documento por escrito firmado por un mdico, en el que se indica que, en la opinin profesional del mdico, el paciente su fre de una enfermedad debilitante, que los be neficios potenciales del uso mdico de la mari huana probablemente sean superiores a los riesgos para la salud del paciente, y se in dica durante cunto tiempo el mdico reco mienda el uso mdico de marihuana para el paciente. Un certificado mdico slo puede ex tenderse despus de que el mdico haya re alizado un examen fsico del paciente y una evaluacin com pleta del historial m dico del paciente. (10) “P aciente cali ficado” significa una persona a la que se le ha diagnosticado una enfermedad debilitante, que tiene un certificado mdico y una tarjeta de identificacin vlida de paciente calificado. Si el Departamento no comienza a emitir tar jetas de identificacin dentro de los nueve (9) meses posteriores a la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin, un certificado mdico vlido servir como tarjeta de identificacin de paciente para per mitir que una persona se convierta en “paci ente calificado” hasta tanto el Departamento comience a emitir tar jetas de identificacin. (c) LIMIT ACIONES. (1) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin afectar a las leyes referidas al uso no m dico, posesin, pro duccin o venta de ma rihuana. (2) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin autoriza el uso de mari huana con fines mdi cos a cualquier per sona que no sea un paciente calificado. (3) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin permite la operacin de un vehculo de mo tor embarcacin o aer onave mientras se est bajo la influencia de la marihuana. (4) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requiere que se in frinjan las leyes feder ales o pretende otorgar inmunidad conforme a las leyes federales. (5) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir adaptacin alguna para el uso mdico de marihuana en ningn lugar de educacin o trabajo, ni para fumar marihuana con fines mdicos en ningn sitio pblico. (6) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir que ningn proveedor de seguros de salud u organismo o autoridad del gobier no reembolse a ningu na persona por los gastos relacionados con el uso mdico de marihuana. (d) OBLIGACIONES DEL DEP ART AMENTO El Departamento debe r emitir reglamenta ciones razonables y necesarias para la im plementacin y apli cacin de esta seccin. El propsito de las reglamentaciones es garantizar la disponi bilidad y el uso seguro de marihuana con fines mdicos por parte de los pacientes califi cados. Es obligacin del Departamento promulgar reglamenta ciones de manera oportuna. (1) Implementacin de reglamentaciones. Con el objeto de otorgarle al Departamento tiem po suficiente despus de la aprobacin de esta seccin, las siguientes reglamen taciones debern pro mulgarse a ms tardar seis (6) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta sec cin: a. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de paciente calificado a las personas porta doras de certificados mdicos, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. b. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de cuidador personal a personas calificadas para asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de mari huana, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. c. Procedimientos para la inscripcin de Cen tros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos, que incluyan procedimientos para la emisin, renovacin, suspensin y revoca cin de inscripciones, y estndares para garan tizar la seguridad in formtica, el manteni miento de registros, anlisis, etiquetado, in speccin y seguridad. d. Una reglamentacin que defina la cantidad de marihuana que po dra considerarse un suministro adecuado y razonable para el uso mdico de los pa cientes calificados, so bre la base de las me jores pruebas disponi bles. Esta presuncin referida a la cantidad puede contrarrestarse con pruebas del uso mdico apropiado por parte de un paciente calificado en particular (2) Emisin de tarjetas de identificacin e in scripciones. El Depar tamento comenzar a emitir tarjetas de identi ficacin de paciente calificado y cuidador personal, y tambin ini ciar la inscripcin de Centros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos a ms tardar nueve (9) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin. (3) Si el Departamento no emite las reglamen taciones, o si el De partamento no comien za a emitir tarjetas de identificacin y a inscri bir a Centros de T rata miento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos dentro de los plazos establecidos en esta seccin, cualquier ciu dadano del Estado de Florida tendr derecho a valerse de recursos judiciales para obligar al cumplimiento de las obligaciones constituci onales del Departa mento. (4) El Departamento deber proteger la con fidencialidad de todos los pacientes califi cados. T odos los regis tros que contengan la identidad de los pacie ntes calificados debe rn ser confidenciales y estar exentos de divul gacin pblica excepto con fines mdicos o referidos al cumpli miento de la ley vli dos. (e) LEGISLACI"N. Nada de lo contenido en esta seccin limitar a la legislacin para promulgar leyes coher entes con esta dispos icin. (f) DIVISIBILID AD Las disposiciones conteni das en esta seccin son divisibles, y si cual quier tribunal compe tente declara la inval idez de cualquier clusula, oracin, pr rafo o seccin de esta medida, o su aplica cin, las dems dis posiciones continuarn vigentes en la mayor medida posible. No. 3 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO V, SECCIONES 10, 11 (Asamblea Legislativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Nombramiento Eventual para Ciertos Cargos Judiciales Vacantes Resumen de la boleta: Proponer una enmienda a la Constitucin del Estado en la que se establezca que el Gobernador debe cubrir las vacantes eventuales en los cargos judiciales que estn sujetos a elecciones de retencin cuando los jueces o magistrados se encuentren por cumplir la edad legal para jubilarse o en el supuesto de que no califiquen para la eleccin de retencin; y permitir los nombramientos eventuales si un juez o magistrado no se retiene en su cargo en una eleccin de retencin. En la actualidad, el Gobernador no puede cubrir una vacante prevista hasta que termine el mandato del juez o magistrado actual. Texto completo: ARTCULO V PODER JUDICIAL SECCI"N 10. Retencin; eleccin y mandatos.(a) Cualquier juez o magistrado puede calificar para la retencin, la cual se produce mediante el voto de los electores en la prxima eleccin general que sea anterior a la conclusin del mandato del juez o magistrado por las causas establecidas por ley. Cuando Si un juez o magistrado no est habilitado para ser retenido o no cumple con los requisitos para la retencin, se producir una vacante eventual al finalizar el periodo de calificacin de retencin a fin de nombrar un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. Cuando un juez o magistrado califique como tal para la retencin, en la boleta se deber leer claramente lo siguiente: “Deber el Magistrado (o Juez) ...(nombre del juez o magistrado)... de la...(nombre de la corte)... ser retenido en el cargo judicial?” Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen retenerlo, entonces, el juez o magistrado continuar ejerciendo sus funciones durante un periodo de seis aos. Este mandato del juez o magistrado que ha sido retenido comenzar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero siguiente a la eleccin general. Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen no retenerlo, una vacante eventual se producir inmediatamente luego de la eleccin general con la finalidad de nombrar a un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. (b)(1) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de jueces de circuito sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho circuito aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces de circuito mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces de circuito deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (2) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de los jueces de la corte del condado, sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho condado aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces del condado mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces del Condado deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (3)a. En la eleccin general del ao 2000 se deber votar en cada jurisdiccin territorial de circuito y de condado para decidir si el modo de elegir a los jueces de circuito y a los jueces del condado ser mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. Si los electores votan por no ejercer esta opcin local, esta opcin no podr someterse a votacin de los electores en esa jurisdiccin hasta que hayan transcurrido al menos dos aos. b. A partir del ao 2000, cada circuito puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o de la eleccin de jueces de circuito, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el encargado de los registros estatales. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en la jurisdiccin de ese circuito en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. c. A partir del ao 2000, cada condado puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o la eleccin de los jueces del condado, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el supervisor de las elecciones. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en el condado en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. Los mandatos de los jueces de circuito y los jueces de condado sern de seis aos. SECCI"N 11. Vacantes.(a)(1) Siempre que se produzca una vacante en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir la vacante mediante el nombramiento de una persona entre al menos tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que finalizar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a las prximas elecciones generales que se efecten al menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. (2) Siempre que se produzca una vacante eventual en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir esa vacante eventual mediante el nombramiento de un juez o un magistrado de entre al menos tres personas y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos corresponiente. El plazo del nombramiento comienza cuando finaliza el plazo del cargo que qued vacante y concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a la prxima eleccin general. (b) El gobernador deber cubrir cada vacante de una corte de circuito o de una corte de condado, en donde los jueces sean elegidos por mayora de votos de los electores, al nombrar a una persona entre no menos de tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao que sigue a eleccin primaria y general que se efecte por lo menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. Se deber realizar una eleccin para cubrir ese cargo judicial por el periodo del cargo que comienza al finalizar el periodo del cargo por nombra miento. (c) Los nombramientos se debern realizar dentro de los treinta das desde que se ha producido la vacante o vacante eventual, excepto que el gobernador extienda el perodo por un lapso que no podr exceder los treinta das. El gobernador deber realizar el nombramiento den-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 25, 2014 The Star | B11 4519197 4 5 1 0 1 6 1 1129711 1129712 6 52 0 8 6 7Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6 52 0 8 66 6 52 0 8 6 5I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 6 52 0 8 6 4$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6 52 0 8 6 3Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 5. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 6. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets. 7. Mariner's View #9 3 bedroom 3 bath fully furnished, $850mo. No utilities. Pet friendly 8. 46-4 Carlton Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished apartment, $375mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 9. 33-2 Holland Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished, $525mo. No utilities. 10. 51-4 Pine Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath, unfurnished. $525mo. No Utilities.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 45192 6 7 ROOM FOR RENTQuiet neighborhood in Port St Joe. 3 Bedroom 2 bath furnished house. Couple $800.00 Single $500.00 % of utilities/ First, last plus deposit. Call 850-227-2496 4519287 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254518515 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com € Cooks € Servers4519279 The City of Mexico Beach is currently accepting applications for a full time position as an administrative assistant in the POLICE DEPARTMENT. The primary responsibilities include specialized work in dispatching police, and at times re and ESU units to emergencies, assisting the public with questions and complaints, disseminating information to ofcers through State-wide computer systems, performing clerical and secretarial support work for the Police Department; as part of the hiring process, applicants will be required to pass both background and drug tests prior to employment. Applications will be accepted at Mexico Beach Police Department, 118 North 14th Street or by mail at PO Box 13425. Applications will stop being accepted on October 3rd, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. Salary range starts at $11.32DOE/DOQ. For more information please call Chief Norris at 850-648-4790. The City of Mexico Beach is a Drug-Free work place and is an EEOC provider.4519285 Case Management position Bachelor's Degree in Social Services (social work, sociology, psychology, or related eld) or an LPN/RN license and 2+ years of professional case management experience REQUIRED. No one without these minimum qualications will be considered. Excellent written communication skills and basic computer skills also required. Please send resume to Mary Clayton, Gulf County Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 or email to psjseniorscfo@fairpoint.net.4519284 AdministrativeFacilities SpecialistLooking for a self-motivated multi-tasker to report to the Facilities Manager for the St. George Plantation Owners’ Association. You will need extensive software skills, as well as computer research and graphic abilities. Responsibilities include controlling the incoming and outgoing documentation process for multiple functions plus maintaining computer files; creating spreadsheets and meeting presentations; tracking project progress and results; filing and copying. Strong communications, interpersonal and organizational skills required. You will be expected to maintain solid customer relations with all internal groups interfacing with this position, especially in fielding and resolving questions and concerns with speed and efficiency. Full-time position with full benefits plus a starting salary in the low to mid $30,000 range based on experience and qualifications. References required. Please submit your resume or inquiry to Karen Rudder, General Manager, St. George Plantation Owners’ Association, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328; Fax 850-937-3039; email gmanager@sgpoa.com EEO Employer Web ID#: 34301145 SalesWashington County News/Holmes County Times Advertiser Advertising Sales ExecutiveHalifax Media Group is looking for an experienced sales executive to provide online and print advertising solutions to advertisers in Washington/Holmes Counties in beautiful northwest Florida, to maximize the benefits of advertising for our customers while maximizing revenues for our company. This position will focus on soliciting print and online advertising on behalf of the businesses and brands of Halifax Media Group, Northwest Florida. Prior sales experience a must. Washington and Holmes counties are just a short drive to the World’s Most Beautiful Beaches and have plenty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Halifax Media Group offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Hire is made pending a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background check. No phone calls, please Web ID#: 34300963 tro de los sesenta das desde que los nombramientos hayan sido certificados ante el gobernador. (d) Tal como lo establece la legislacin general, debern existir diferentes comisiones judiciales de nombramientos para el Tribunal Supremo, para cada tribunal de apelacin de distrito, y para cada circuito judicial en todos los juzgados de primera instancia del circuito. Las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos debern establecer reglamentos de procedimiento uniformes en cada nivel del sistema judicial. Tales reglamentos, o cualquier parte de ellos, podrn ser derogados por las leyes generales promulgadas con la mayora de votos de cada cmara de la Asamblea Legislativa, o por el Tribunal Supremo de Justicia con el voto concurrente de cinco magistrados. A excepcin de las deliberaciones realizadas por las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos, los procedimientos de las comisiones y sus registros debern estar abiertos al pblico. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 96274S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No.: 2013-CA-000023 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 20072, Plaintiff, vs. CHERYL A. COMBS, ET AL., Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 4, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA000023of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-2, is Plaintiff and CHERYL A. COMBS, ET AL., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 at 10:00 a.m., Central Time (11:00 Eastern Time). on the 23rd day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 19 OF AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS SUNSHINE ACRES AND BEING LOCATED IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIPS SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY THEREOF, SAID PARCEL BEING FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 8924’40” EAST FOR 1250.00 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 8924’ 48” WEST FOR 250.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0131’37” WEST FOR 408.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY THEREOF. Located: 590 BORDERS ROAD, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465-6445 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida, this 17th day of September, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of said Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone, & Pincus, P.L. Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Ave. Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561)713-1400 Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 96124S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AMERICA’S MINI STORAGE AND OFFICE, INC., INTENDS TO DISPOSE OF OR OFFER FOR SALE THE PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT STATUTES SECTION 83.801-83.89. AMERICA’S MINI STORAGE AND OFFICE, INC., WILL DISPOSE OF SAID PROPERTY NO LATER THAN THE DATE OF FRIDAY, OCTOBER 03, 2014. PROPERTY IS LOCATED AT 141 COMMERCE DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL. GULF COUNTY. SALE DATE: October 3, 2014 Pamela L. Goetsch Allan Goetsch 4920 Fleetwood Dr. Knoxville, TN 37931 #B-19, 10x15 unit Household, furniture, misc. Bid on Unit -HIGHEST BID TAKES ALL. Sale Time Starts @ 9:30 am to register. Sept 18, 25, 2014 96254S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 #44 Dawn Armstrong #64 Collen Faircloth #41 Rena Baker #46 Ann Collins #74 Darleen Chism #51 Tim Chastin #73 Tonya Ellis#CC-N Charleen BrownTo be opened for sale October 7, 2014, 9:00 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. September 25, 2014 October 2, 2014 96276S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2012CA000095 Division No. Section. RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2013-TT2 Plaintiff(s), vs. MARK L. LALUZERNE, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2012CA 000095 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and or GULF County, Florida, wherein RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2013-TT2 is the Plaintiff and GLAE LALUZERNE AKA GLAE REA LALUZEERNE; MARK LOUIS LALUZERNE AND GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Main Lobby of Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 9th day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9 AND 11, IN BLOCK 12, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF PORT SAINT JOE BEACH, UNIT ONE, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, CITY OF PORTSAINT JOE BEACH, STATE OF FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 230 GULF STREET, PORT SAINT JOE BEACH, FL 32456 IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at GULF County, Florida, this 16th day of September, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS, Clerk GULF County, Florida By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq./FL Bar# 549452 Laura L. Walker, Esq./FL Bar# 509434 Jennifer Lima Smith/ Florida Bar # 984183 GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, FL 33607 (813)443-5087 201604.5002/tavias “In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, GULF County, 1000 CECIL COSTIN BLVD, PORT ST. JOE FL 32456-, County Phone: 850229-6112 EXT. 1107 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service”. Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 96284S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2014 CA 000047 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DAN DANIELS AKA DAN T. DANIELS AKA DAN THOMAS DANIELS, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION of 427 S 4th Street, Wewahitchka, FL 34265, EVA MARIE DANIELS, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2014, was entered in CASE NO. 2014 CA 000047 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Dan Daniels a/k/a Dan T. Daniels a/k/a Dan Thomas Daniels, Eva Marie Daniels are the Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 11:00am ET in person 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 on 9th day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THE NORTH HALF OF LOTS 142 AND 143, OF MACK’S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF WEWAHITCHKA, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE EAST FIVE FEET OF LOT 142 AS CONVEYED IN QUITCLAIM DEED RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 24, PAGE 109 TOGETHER WITH THAT MANUFACTURED HOME 2007 CMH BLUE RIDGE 76 X 16 VIN CLM087713TN. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This the 18th day of September, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2014 ADOPTION: Jewelry Designer & TV Journalist yearn for 1st baby to LOVEMeryl & David 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Found Small DogMace Martin Rd & County Rd 381. Call 850-572-6711 or 850-722-0384 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com Package Deal!! $3,200 Furniture for sale.. 2 Queen size mattresses/ with new pad never used.. Beautiful lane iron headboard with dresser.. Brown leather headboard w/ matching dresser, small kitchen table & chairs.. New Whirlpool washer & dryer never used. Selling as package, all for $3,200!! In climated controlled unit @ 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 PSJ 7326 W. Hwy 98 Sept 27th, 8am-until?Large Yard SaleSporting goods, Tools, Fishing equip., Large Variety of Misc. Text FL01309 to 56654 GUN SHOW FORTWALTON FAIRGROUNDSSeptember 6th and 7th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL98949 to 56654 GUN SHOWSeptember 27th &28th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 txt FL00161 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 11th & 12th9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Conceal weapon classes offered daily. Refrigerator, dryer, rabbit cage, sugar glider cage. Make an offer. 850-340-1620 Amanda Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternFront Desk MaintenanceWeekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34301150 Install/Maint/RepairFT Maint/ Grounds In Port St JoeAC Experience. On Call Background Chck. Fax resume -850-265-5797 Web ID 34298978 Install/Maint/RepairJOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position:Service Worker -Public Works DepartmentPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on October 10, 2014. The entry level salary for a Utility Service Worker will be $12.08 per hr. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34301271 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate Available For Lease 4 Offices w/ Kitchen Located at 149B Commerce Blvd, PSJ $850/mo+ $850/dep 1-3 Year Lease Call 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-247-8470 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 42 acres -farm land, partially subdivided. $500,000 OBO. 850-340-1620 Amanda Text FL99631 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Phils Phix ItFishing rod repair, restoration & custom build. Reel cleaning and repair. Call 850-227-6508 7326 W. Hwy 98 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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Local B12 | The Star Thursday, September 25, 2014 XNS P112049 Parkway Motors Parkway Motors CHEVROLET AVA LANCHE $ 315 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 4x4 HOND AA CCORD $ 235 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn EX-6, Leather ,R oof ,L ow Miles! MINICOOPER $ 235 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 26K Miles DODGE RAM $ 315 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn 2t oc hoose fr om! CHEVROLET SUB URB AN $ 374 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn 271, 4x4, Th ir dR ow ,N AV CHEVROLET SIL VERADO $ 359 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn GENESIS COUPE $ 316 /mon th WA C, $1000 Do wn R-Spec SU ZUKI ZL7 $ 9,991 S X4 $ 9,991 HOND AO DY SSEY EX-L $ 9,991 CHEVROLET MALIB U $ 9,991 HO ND AC R-V $ 9,991 PT CRUISER $ 4,995 BU ICK CENTUR YS ED AN $ 4,991 VW E0S $ 234 /mo nth WA C, $1000 Do wn Con ve rt ible Good Cr edit, Bad Cr edit NO PROBLEM! One ye ar on the job Yo u re Appr ove d!! 75 CA RS &T RUCKS TO CHOOSE FR OM!! Ref er aF ri end or Fa mily Member Receiv e $ 200 if the yb uy! We We lcome First Time Buy ers! HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HOND A OD YS SEY EX-L HO ND A CR-V Under $ 10,000 850-481-0148 4136 E. 15th St. |P an ama City www .pkwymot ors.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Winners were announced on Monday in Mexico Beachs annual photography contest which welcomes residents and visitors to submit their best shots from around the city. More than 200 entries were submitted in this years contest, hosted by the Mexico Beach Community Development Council. For the duration of the contest, which started in April, beach-based paparazzi had four months to capture their subjects and submit their photos across six different categories. Around Mexico Beach: 1st place, Gloria Sanchez of Mexico Beach; 2nd place, Katrin Seidel of Mexico Beach; 3rd place, Carol Senecal of Madison, T.N. Sunrise & Sunset: 1st place, Marty Moore of Belpre, O.H.; 2nd place, Sean Donofro of Marianna; and 3rd place, Saralyn Fulbright of Mexico Beach. The Beaches: 1st place, Bill Fauth of Mexico Beach; 2nd place, Regan Kerns of Garner, N.C.; 3rd place, Whit Perry of Lagrange, G.A. Fishing & Boating: 1st place, Dragony Photography of Stone Mountain, G.A.; 2nd place, Lisa Gaines of Richmond Hill, G.A.; 3rd place, Rosie Gammell of Inverness, F.L. Flora & Fauna: 1st place, Bill Fauth of Mexico Beach; 2nd place, Saralyn Fulbright of Mexico Beach; 3rd place, Peggy Hanson of Osage, I.A. People: 1st place, Sean Donofro of Marianna; 2nd place, Joyce Schehl of Cincinnati, O.H.; 3rd place, Priscilla Hightower of Brandon, M.S. All winning photos may be viewed at www.MexicoBeach.com, along with the archive of winners from years past. Additionally, all winning photographs will also be on display in the Mexico Beach Welcome Center throughout 2015. Thank you to all of the photographers who entered this year, said Mexico Beach CDC executive director Kimberly Shoaf. We hope you will continue to capture Mexico Beach through the lenses and enter again next time. Mexico Beach photography contest winners announced S P ECI A L T O THE S TA R Gloria Sanchez of Mexico Beach won rst place in the Around Mexico Beach category. In the Sunrise & Sunset category, rst place went to Marty Moore of Belpre, O.H. First place in The Beaches category went to Bill Fauth of Mexico Beach. Dragony Photography in Stone Mountain, G.A. took rst place in the Fishing & Boating category. Bill Fauth picked up another win in the Flora & Fauna category. Sean Donofro of Marianna claimed rst place in the People category.

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20 14 FRANKLIN, GULF & MEXICO BEA CH Ph ot o co ur te sy of Mi che ll e Ke ndri ck

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Page 2 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 25, 2014 20 14 To p 3 Winners In Each Cat eg or y Category First Place Second Place Thir d Place Ac countant Ralph Roberson Fr iedman Mic hael McK enzie Air Conditioning / Heating Miller Air Conditioning Gunn McCr oan Heating and Air Antiques The Tin Shed Antiques On Reid Ba y Br eez e Antiques Ar t / Decor ating Jo seph s Cot tag e The Fu nky Fiddler Bo we ry Ar t Gallery Asian Golden Dr ag on, We wa hitc hk a Hong Ko ng Bistr o Thai Chef At to rn ey Gor don Shuler Je re my No va k Char les Costin Au to Services 5 Star BJ s Au to To m s Au to Repair St Jo e Beac h Bank / Cr edit Union Cent ennial Bank Ty ndall FCU Emer ald Coast FCU Bar Haughty Her on Look out Loung e Indian Pa ss Ra w Bar Barbecue Pa ul Gant Hog Wild Mason Dix on Beac h Supplies Bluew at er Outr igg ers Dollar Gener al Island Ad ve nt ur es Bed & Br eakf ast Po rt Inn Coombs House Tu rt le Beac h Inn Best Place to Shop Bluew at er Outr igg ers Dollar Gener al Jo seph s Cot tag e Best Place to Wo rk Res or t Va cation Pr oper ties The Gulf of Mexico Sunset Coastal Gr ill Boat Repair We ng s Mar ine Ke vin s Mobile Mar ine Lee Jo nes Books No Name Caf e Do wnt ow n Books Fo rg ot te n Coast Used Books Br eakf ast Shar on s Caf e El Ja lisco Sist er s Restaur ant Builder / Contr act or Big Fish Constr uction F&B Constr uction Gallo way Car pet Cleaner Xtr eme Clean Dr i-Br it e Cat er ing Pa ul Gant Mason Dix on Sunset Coastal Gr ill Char te r Captain Da nn y Ta nk ersle y Gadson Segr ee Andr ew Sapp Chir opr act or Zoe Segr ee Gulf Coast Der ek Tr acy / Gulf County Chir opr actic Chur ch Relat ed First Unit ed Methodist Living Wa te rs Assembly Of God Long Av enue Baptist Clothing / Thr if t Shop Goodwill Boutique By The Ba y Jo seph s Cot tag e Da y Spa / Massag e Spa Pur The Mane A Da y Aw ay Deli / Sandwic h Mason Dix on BJ s Pizza And Subs Beac hcombers Dentist Dusty Ma y Da vid List er Rex Whit eman Der mat olog y Gulf Coast Der mat olog y Spa Pur Der mat olog y Associat es Electr ician Cur re nt Solutions Ke nn y Str ang e Cat e s Electr ic Electr onics Radio Shac k Fe stiv al / Ev ent Flor ida Seaf ood Fe stiv al Scallop Fe stiv al Plein Air Fine Dining Owl Caf e Sunset Coastal Gr ill Pr ov isions Fishing Guide Da nn y Ta nk ersly Br et t Mar tina Ta ft Ta unt on Fishing To ur nament Kids Win Fisher man s Choice Yo uth To ur nament Big Bend Floor ing Car pet Country Seller s Tile Flor ist Ba yside Flor ist Design By Dor ann Blinging Up Da isies (cont. on pag e 4)

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Thursday, September 25, 2014 | Forgotten Coast | Page 3 It is our pl eas ur e to se rv e su ch a be au ti fu l ar ea I ho pe to wo rk wi th yo u ag ai n in the fut ur e. 85 057 301 30 ki ms to nep ho to gr ap hy @y aho o. co m Ki m St on e Ph ot og ra ph y on Fa ce bo ok We ha ve th e Be st Cu st om er s on th e Fo rg ot ten Co ast Th an ks fo r al lo wi ng us to se rv ic e yo ur in su ra nc e ne ed s. Roy An dy La ur a, Ka re n, Ci nd y & Ty le r 22 1 Re id Ave Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 (8 50 ) 22 711 33 Th an k Yo u fo r Vo ti ng Us as On e of th e Be st In Si x Ca te go ri es Lu nch 11 am 3p m ED T, Di nn er 5p m 10 pm ED T Re se rv at io ns Su gg es te d 85 022 779 00 Se e Yo u at th e Su ns et 60 2 Hi gh wa y 98 Po rt St Jo e, FL

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Page 4 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 25, 2014 20 14 To p 3 Winners In Each Cat eg or y Category First Place Second Place Thir d Place Fr ied Chic ke n Dur re n s Piggly Wiggly AJ s IGA Deli Apalac hicola Fu rn it ur e Badcoc k Jo seph s Cot tag e Tif n Int er iors Gener al / Fa mily Medicine Sacr ed Hear t Elizabeth Cur ry/Shor eline Medical Da na Whale y Gif ts / Je we lry / Souv enirs Riv er lily Blue Wa te r Outr igg ers Pe rsnic ke ty Golf Course St. Jo seph Ba y St. Ja mes Ba y Gr ocery Piggly Wiggly Apalac hicola Dur re n s Piggly Wiggly Publix Hambur ge r Ba yside Bur ge rs Beac hcombers Sunset Coastal Gr ill Har dw ar e / Supply Ac e Har dw ar e Apalac h Ac e Har dw ar e PSJ Cathe y s Ac e Har dw ar e Health Club / Fitness Cent er One Wa y Fitness (Ramse y s) Fo rg ot te n Coast Fitness Cent er Fit As A Fiddle Hot Dog Tin Shanty Beac hcombers III No Name Caf e Ice Cr eam Old Time Soda Fo untain Shoobies Au nt Ebb y s Insur ance Hannon Insur ance Mar ks Insur ance Cook Insur ance Age ncy Italian Jo e Mamas Pr ov isions Ta mar a s Kar aok e Look out Loung e Indian Pa ss Ra w Bar Har ry As Landscaping / Ya rd Maint enance Coastal Design & Landscape GCPS Tr oy Segr ee Local Band / Musician The Cur rys Bo Spr ing Band Ko nkr et e Soul Lodging Po rt Inn Resor t Va cation Pr oper ties Gibson Inn Mar ina Po rt St. Jo e Mar ina Scipio Cr eek Bat te ry Pa rk Mexican Pe ppers El Ja lisco Most In uential Ralph Rish Ly nn Mar tina Mar cia Jo hnson New Cars Bill Cr amer GMC Pa nama City To yo ta Outdoor / Spor ting Goods Bluew at er Outr igg ers Surviv ors St Jo e Ve lo Oyst ers Indian Pa ss Ra w Bar Ly nn s Quality Oyst ers Pa pa Jo es Phar macy CVS Buy Rit e Car ra belle Medical Phot ogr apher Dr ag on y Phot ogr aph y Kim St one Phot ogr aph y Debbie Hooper Pizza Jo e Mama s BJ s Pizza Hungry Ho wies Plumbing Williams Plumbing King s Plumbing Miz e Plumbing Po ols St. Jo e Po ols Pr istine Po ols GCPS Realt or Ry an Har mon 98 Realty Je ff Gallo way /Zac h Childs (tie) Salad Sunset Coastal Gr ill Jo e Mama s Mason Dix on Salon / Stylist / Mak e-Up Salon Lux Spa Pur The Mane Seaf ood Killer Seaf ood Pa pa Jo e s In dian Pa ss Ra w Bar Seaf ood Mar ke t 13 Mile Br and Seaf ood Ly nn s Seaf ood Mar ke t St Jo e Shr imp Skin Car e Spa Pur Dr Wa rd St eak / Pr ime Rib Ronnie B s Sunset Coastal Gr ill Owl Caf e Used Cars Bill Cr amer GMC The Tr uc k Link We dding Planner Design By Dor ann Ev ents By Chellse y Am y Pr ice Wine / Liquor Haughty Her on Hone y Hole Po rt Fine Wine Wings Mang o Mar le ys Red Pir at e AJ s

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Thursday, September 25, 2014 | Forgotten Coast | Page 5 The staff at Miller Heating and Air Conditioning would like to ex press our appreciation for your votes in The Best of the Forgotten Coast. It means so much to us! Thank Yo u for voting us as one of the best golf courses for the 2014 edition of The Best of the For gotten Coast. Gr eat Golf away fr om the cr owds In the Heart of the For gotten Coast St. Joseph s Bay Golf Club 700 Country Club Road Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Pr o Shop/Pool: (850) 227-1751 Snack Bar/Of ce (850) 227-1751 info@stjoebaygolf.com www .stjoebaygolf.com Gr ou pe r ~ Sh ri mp ~ Oy st er s Wh ol e Fl ou nde r ~ St ea ks an d Mo re NE W FA LL HO UR S: Su nd ay 11 am 2p m Mo n & Tu es CL OS ED We d & Th ur s 4p m 9p m Fr i & Sa t 4p m 10 pm 11 4 Sail or s Co ve Por t St Jo e, Fl or id a 85 022 713 86 (B es id e th e Li gh th ou se ) Th an k Yo u fo r Vo tin g us on e of th e Be st pl ac es to ea t a St ea k or Pri me Ri b on th e Fo rg ot te n Co as t. Du re n s Th an k yo u fo r vo ti ng fo r us in th e B es t of th e Fo rgo tt en Co as t fo r Be ac h Su pp li es Be st Pl ac e to Sh op Gi ft s/ Je we lry an d Ou td oo r/ Sp or ti ng Go od s! Th an k yo u fo r vo ti ng fo r us in th e B es t of th e Fo rgo tt en Co as t fo r Fr ie d Ch ic ke n an d Gr oc er y!

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Page 6 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 25, 2014 Th ank yo u fo r vo ting us as one of the B est of the Fo rg ott en Co ast He alth Cl ubs/F itness Ce nt ers Apalachicola: 850-653-2161 | Ta llahassee: 850-668-6162 See us fo r your insurance needs at 61 Av e. E, Ap alachicola, FL 32320 Thank you for voting us as one of the Be st of the Forgotten Coast Insurance Agencies! 117 Sa ilors Co ve, Port St Joe, FL 850-229-FINE (3463 ) Th an k Yo u fo r vo ti ng fo r us BE ST Ba r & BE ST Wi ne/ Li qu or 850-229-AUTO (2886) Th ank yo u fo r recogn izi ng us as one of the Best of the Fo rg otten Coast recipients!

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Thursday, September 25, 2014 | Forgotten Coast | Page 7 Po rt St Jo e We wa hi tc hk a Ea st po in t 50 2 Wo od wa rd Av e 10 1 Ea st Ri ve r Road 24 8 US H igh way 98 (8 50 ) 22 7. 11 56 (8 50 ) 63 9. 50 24 (8 50) 67 0. 11 99 Th an k yo u fo r vo ti ng us in th e "B es t of th e Fo rg ot te n Co as t" fo r Ba nk /C re di t Un io n Em ai l: em er ald co as t@ fa ir po in t. ne t www .e mer ald co as tf cu. co m 34 0 Ma rin a Dr ., Po rt St Joe FL 32 45 6 (8 50 ) 22 79393 / (8 50 ) 22 7939 4 (F ax ) www .P SJ MAR IN A. co m TH AN K YO U fo r vo ti ng fo r us in th e B es t of th e Fo rg ot te n Co as t fo r Ma ri na Th an k Yo u fo r vo ti ng fo r us BE ST OY ST ER S Al so fo r be in g one of th e be st pl ac es fo r Ka ra ok e, Sea fo od & Ba r 83 91 Co un ty Ro ad 30 A, Po rt St Joe FL 32 45 6 (8 50 ) 22 716 70 in di an pa ss ra wb ar .c om

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Page 8 | Forgotten Coast | Thursday, September 25, 2014