The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03960


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................. A10 Sports ................................... A11 School News ........................... B3 Faith ................................. B4-B5 Obituaries ............................... B5 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 76, NUMBER 49 See what’s being SCENE AROUND A12 They came, they saw, they SCALLOPED Annual scallop celebration lures thousands to Port St. Joe By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com They rocked George Core Park this weekend with plenty of familyfriendly activities and an assortment of live music. The two-day event celebrated the bay scallop with food and fun. Live music from Dredd Clampitt, Tabacco Road, Thirty Three and headliner Joe Dif e offered something for all tastes. According to event organizer and Gulf County Chamber of Commerce President Paula Pickett attendance at the event was up 40 percent from last year. “That’s huge for us,” Pickett said. “Straight up, it was a great event. We had beautiful weather and an amazing turnout.” In addition to more than 70 vendors, a Kid’z zone and the opening of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse, bulk scallops were sold and a trolley was on hand to transport attendees to and from the downtown business district for additional shopping and meal options. The event was sponsored by GAC Contractors, which brought the lighthouse from its previous home on the Cape to its new home in Port St. Joe. “GAC was very proud to participate,” Pickett said. “It’s amazing to have a sponsor say they did the right thing. “The lighthouse was a huge attraction and made a beautiful backdrop for the festival.” Santa Rosa’s Dredd Clampitt entertained the crowd on Friday night, and Tallahassee’s Tobacco Road played Saturday evening, but it was a performance by headliner Joe Dif e, who has released 13 albums with 20 Top 10 singles, that elicited screams from the crowd as he played his hits that included “Pickup Man,” “Third Rock from the Sun,” “John Deere Green,” and his latest, “Girl Ridin’ Shotgun.” Midway through his set Dife took a few moments to welcome surprise guest Jerry Salley to the stage to duet on several songs. Salley is a famed Nashville singersongwriter who, in addition to penning songs for stars Reba McIntire, Toby Keith, Patty Loveless, Brad Paisley and more, is a regular staple of the Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival each year in Port St. Joe. Pickett said that Dif e spoke highly of his experience at the festival and that two of his band members had already planned to return to Port St. Joe to vacation with their families. “We made a great impression,” Pickett said. “We were thrilled to be able to get Joe for the festival. “There aren’t many places where you can see a great $5 concert like this.” For those who missed out on the mollusks, 5-pound bags of frozen scallops still are available at the Chamber of Commerce for $40 each. Event T-shirts have been discounted to $10. Grab your scallops and your gear by calling the Chamber at 227-1223. PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Festival goers enjoyed live music from Dredd Clampitt, Tobacco Road, Thirty Three, Ashton Shepherd and Joe Dif e. See more photos, Page A8 The Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild raised funds and welcomed new members with the annual Duck Derby raf e. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM Cape San Blas Lighthouse hosts soft open By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com During a ceremony last Friday, the St. Joseph Historical Society celebrated a “soft open” of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse in George Core Park. City of cials including Mayor Mel Magidson and Commissioners Bo Patterson and Phil McCroan gathered with a small crowd to celebrate the occasion. “It’s been a long time coming, a year and a half long journey,” said Magidson. “These things don’t happen overnight. “I’m happy to have the lighthouse here. It’s great for the city.” Magidson, his wife, Helen, and McCroan then headed for the top of the structure to take in the view of the city. St. Joseph Historical WES LOCHER | The Star Commissioner Phil McCroan enjoyed the view from the top of the lighthouse. See SOFT OPEN A8 County taxes heading up By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners took a bookkeeping step last week to set up a nal public budget hearing Monday and a likely increase in property taxes. As it heads to nal approval at 5:01 p.m. Monday the budget re ects a .4328 increase in the millage rate, to 6.9936 in the general fund carrying an increase in funding of more than $800,000. The millage is 7.79 percent above the rollback rate, that millage at which the BOCC would garner the same revenue as the current year. Commissioners also will take into the next year $1.34 million less in cash being carried forward after using the cash to ll budget holes the past several years. And facing a rst public hearing during which commissioners had to cut $115,000 after the late defeat of a proposed hike to the local option gas tax, commissioners only managed to leave the hearing with a balanced budget after moving money from one fund to the general fund in lieu of more action next week. The main takeaways from last week’s public hearing: z The document that commissioners had in front of them, and which the public was reviewing, was not accurate. Budget to get final approval next week PSJ commissioners continue demolition talks on Gulf Pines site By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners continued discussions on the Gulf Pines Hospital site during their meeting Tuesday, seeking another redraw of potential housing lots. The hospital, closed more than a decade ago, has been in a steady state of decay and commissioners have explored the idea of demolishing the building and selling the land for single-family homes. To accommodate those plans commissioners changed the zoning of the property to residential, single family, in keeping with the neighborhood. During previous meetings commissioners examined plans presented by PrebleRish Engineers, the city’s engineers of record, which broke the property into six lots, but tabled discussion in order to give them a thorough look. These lots, located at the corner of 20th Street and Dupont Drive are oddly shaped and Commissioner Rex Buzzett asked city engineer Clay Smallwood for an additional redraw of the plat where the properties faced St. Joseph Bay rather than a street. “We only have one chance to get it right,” Buzzett said. “We should tweak it a bit more to get the most money for each piece of property. There are still a few wrinkles we need to try to iron out.” Commissioner William Thursbay called for updated numbers on demolition costs to see if they’ve risen or fallen since the last appraisal in 2011. Buzzett said that before demolition on the building could begin, an asbestos abatement would need to be conducted on See GULF PINES A9 See TAXES A9

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 " # "! % $% !" + " !!!" !" #" %" # $ # "' " # # % 1 # 0 /0 ,( )* # "' # #! & " .* "0 CD 10 73 WOW 9/ 14 Be ca us e yo ur fu tu re doe sn ’t ret ire 4. 15 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lu es of $1 0, 000 -$ 24 ,9 99 4. 40 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lu es of $2 5, 000 -$ 99 ,9 99 4. 60 % Pa ya bl e on a ce rt ic at e wi th ann ui ty va lue s of $1 00 ,0 00 -$ 49 9, 999 In st ea d of Ce rt i ca tes of De po si t, a sk ab ou t a Si ng le Pr em ium Def er re d An nu it y wi th a Fi rs tYe ar In te r es t Bo nu s fr om Wo od me n of th e Wo rl d. 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That might be in signi cant measure a product of a budget and millage rate that will remain largely as it has been save for an in crease in utility rates. Commissioners kept with a six-year trend and adopted a millage rate of 3.5914 although for the rst time during that span the revenue number will increase slightly, by about $2,500, because of a slight increase in property values. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of assessed property value. Commissioners noted they pretty much tacked conservatively, with no em ployee pay raises and no large capital outlay despite needs. “We held the line,” Com missioner Phil McCroan said. “We had to make some hard decisions.” Although revenue has been shrinking during the past six years, commission ers have resisted increas ing property taxes as utility rates went up, particularly in the past four years. Once again during bud get workshops commis sioners voiced resistance to any proposal to raise the millage rate as once again residents and water users are facing an increase next month. Utility costs will increase 3.5 percent, the fourth in a ve-year process of raising rates to meet thresholds identied in a rate study has needed to support the city’s long-term debt, which is linked at signi cant levels to a new water plant and distribution line replacement. The rst year the in crease was more than 20 percent, and each year the amount of increase has de clined. Next year, the sched uled increase is 3 percent. And with this year’s increase commissioners again charged staff with belt-tightening. Some of those efforts have included city Public Works crews performing much of the second phase of water line replacement saving the city several hundred thousand dol lars; in the coming budget Public Works will absorb recreation ending a service provided by an outside con tractor at a higher cost. “Staff did a great job of holding the line,” Commis sioner Rex Buzzett said. The city has contracted out recreation costs — pri marily upkeep of city parks and ball elds — the past ve years but the contract had grown to a projected $45,000 for the coming year. That, Public Works su pervisor John Grantland said, is enough to capture salary and benets for a full-time employee, at a savings to the city, and staff had recommended bring ing the work back in-house. Grantland said pro grams the city wished to establish could be put in place. The hope, commission ers voiced last week, is that some breathing room will arrive soon and this year’s slight increase in property values will be followed by additional and more sub stantial increases in com ing years. “There are some indica tors things are picking up,” Mayor Mel Magidson said. “I think the future is bright er than the past.” The city will host its nal budget hearing next week. Port permit application in nal stretch By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The saga to secure a permit to dredge the federally authorized shipping channel at the Port of Port St. Joe is in the nal chapter. Tommy Pitts, project manager for Hatch Mott MacDonald, told Port Authority mem bers last week the engineering rm is within weeks — maybe as soon as next week — away from submitting the portion of the application pertaining to disposal of dredge spoil. The dredge application has two primary components: the application to contract for and perform the dredging and the applica tion to contract and construct the sites for disposal. Hatch Mott is handling the disposal work while the U.S Army Corps of Engineers un dertakes the dredge application under a $40 million contributed funds agreement with the Port Authority. Pitts said the eld work had been com pleted and disposal areas dened. Wetlands impacts, he said, had been avoided wherever possible to avoid mitigation costs. All of the land to be used for disposal — be yond a federally-designated site north of High land View — is owned by either The St. Joe Company or the city of Port St. Joe, Pitts said. Hatch Mott currently is seeking a letter from the city regarding formal permission un der set conditions for the use of 10 acres that is part of the city’s spray eld capacity. The city wants another 10 acres immedi ately, rather than when needed as proposed by Hatch Mott. Negotiations are ongoing. Pitts said permitting for the disposal sites could be in hand by mid-December and con struction of the disposal sites is likely to com mence before the dredging. “We are very much there,” Pitts said. “Our efforts are parallel with the Corps’ efforts and I anticipate we will submit (our applications) at the same time.” Pitts said the window for submitting the applications was within “the next couple of weeks.” The permits, said Port Authority chair Leonard Costin, are one of the two primary benchmarks ahead for the Port of Port St. Joe. The second is signed agreements with two energy rms who have entered into Letters of Intent with The St. Joe Co. to ship through the Port of Port St. Joe. Those agreements remain where they have for almost two months. One, with Green Circle, has been approved by the Florida Department of Transportation, which urged the formalization of the Letters of Intent as a foundational brick for state fund ing for dredging and rail improvements. The company and St. Joe are nalizing the paperwork and it is anticipated that contract, to which the Port Authority is a party, will be signed shortly. The second contract, with Enova Energy, is proving more problematic, although it still is expected to be ratied, just not as quickly as hoped, Costin indicated. In other news: z Bill Johnson, a former ofcial with the Port of Miami, has been hired as a consultant by The St. Joe Company, Port Authority chair Leonard Costin said. Costin said Johnson was “dynamic” and “charismatic” and said the hiring was a posi tive for the development of the overall port planning area. z The Port Authority board elected new ofcers. Eugene Rafeld succeeds Costin as chair with Jason Shoaf moving to vice chairman. Jessica Rish continues as treasurer and Johanna White takes over for Shoaf as secretary. The new appointments take effect next month. County legislative delegation meeting Star Staff Report State Sen. Bill Montford and Rep. Halsey Beshears will host a public hearing of the Gulf County Legis lative Delegation at 5 p.m. EST Monday, Sept. 29, at the Board of County Com missioners meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Building courthouse annex. All residents and elected ofcials are invited to at tend. This hearing is in tended to allow residents the opportunity to meet their legislators, discuss concerns, ask questions and offer comments for the upcoming 2015 legislative session. The Robert Moore Build ing is at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, September 18, 2014 JOWF gd ZW J@ DGBZZRa Friends of St. Jo seph Bay Pr eser ves Proud ly Sponsor ed by www.camGulfCoast.com @e de K QZdG^ N B@ n de @e G BgJJ Gb ^bGdGb iG d x „ b–x‚ • @ ^– š  d K Q– „" J– š‰‚x Ÿ eZ gb eNG ^b Gd Gb iGda •a• •x‘ a •x‘ Gde Ÿa•• —‘a •—‘ Gde Ÿa•• —‘ a•— ‘ Gd e G”‹– x †¢‰‚„‚  –¢š  ‡ š–¢†‡  ‡„ }x  ––‚œ  š x‰œ –…  ‡„ B¢……„š ^š„œ„š§ „ x”‚ „xš” x}–¢  }‰š ‚œ x”‚ ‰ …„ x–”†  ‡„ }x K SZ l DZ gWeb n dNbOU^ BZOS a• •x‘ Ÿa• •— ‘ Gd e '• ‚– ”x ‰– ” @e ^ bG d Gb iG d a JOWF gd ZW J@ DGBZZRa StJ osephBayStateB ufferPr eser ves Find mor e inf o at: deQZdG^NB @n ^bGdGb iGdKZbL > ,• ŸŸ, of St. Jo seph Ba y Preser ve s, Inc. FR IE ND S OF ST JO SE PH BA Y PR ES ER VE S Pr es en ts SA TU RD AY OC TO BE R 4, 20 14 RA IN DA TE : SA TU RD AY OC TO BE R 11 20 14 LI VE MU SI C Deal: School board makes decision on Highland View building By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com During a special meeting Tues day, the Gulf County School Board accepted an offer on the old High land View Elementary School. Last summer, school board members formally declared the land surplus with an eye toward selling the property, which is zoned for mixed-use residential/commercial. The buyer, represented at the meeting by real estate bro ker Brent Faison of Nai Talcor of Port St. Joe, made a cash offer of $650,000 for the property. Previously the board had re ceived three appraisals on the site with a low end of $500,000 and a high of $750,000. The board received two other offers on the property but they were for less than $500,000 each. Due diligence on the sale will take place within 45 days and the school board has required that the buyer demolish the existing build ings on the land within 18 months of sale. Closing on the structure would take place after the rst of the year. Before the vote, Superinten dent of Schools Jim Norton en couraged members of the board to take the sale into consideration, saying an extra $650,000 would help the district immensely. Norton focused on the upkeep of the property and shared that plans to fence off the property and perform asbestos abatement would total more than $100,000, an amount the board would have to nd in next year’s budget. “This is the leanest budget in my lifetime and all of your board service,” Norton said. “The bud get we now have implemented we need to cushion. “I make a strong recommen dation to the board that we agree to these terms.” Attorney Charles Costin rec ommended the board recognize that the market is not what it was 10 years ago and that the offer was on the “exceptional upper level” of its appraised value. “I feel you had competent, good appraisers,” Costin said. “This is something you need to consider. I feel you can enter into the con tract without any reservations.” Norton said that if accepted, only $25,000-$50,000 of the funds would be spent in the 2014-15 scal year on non-recurring projects. The rest, he said, would act as a cushion for the operating fund balance. Norton said the district had already reduced its unrestricted fund balance to 3 percent, the minimum allowed by law, and any unfunded mandates could easily put the schools in jeopardy of be ing taken over by the state. “This (property) is one of the saving graces we have,” Norton said. “There is no way we’ll oper ate a school there.” Norton asked Faison if the buyer might consider paying the 3 percent real estate commission, but Faison said that such a coun teroffer likely would cause the buyer to pull out. When asked what the buyer planned to do with the property Faison said the buyer runs an en gineering rm based out of Talla hassee and planned to build 20-25 residential units on the land. Board member John Wright made a motion to accept the offer, seconded by George Cox. Before a vote could be taken, Cox, who will retire from the board this year, told his fellow board members he would hate his vote to cause the system to go into default and asked Norton to promise to look at every penny he spent. Norton promised to watch every dime. The motion passed 3-2 with Cox and board member Danny Little dissenting. Daughters of the American Revolution promote Constitution Week awareness Special to The Star Our Constitution stands as a testament to the tenaci ty of Americans. Throughout history, they have struggled to maintain their liberties and freedom to insure those inalienable rights to ev ery American. Wednesday, Sept. 17, begins the national celebration of Constitution Week. The week commemo rates America’s most impor tant document and is one of our country’s least known ofcial observances. The tradition of celebrat ing the Constitution was started many years ago by the Daughters of the Ameri can Revolution (DAR). In 1955, the Daughter’s pe titioned Congress to set aside Sept. 17-23, annually to be dedicated for the ob servance of Constitution Week. The resolution was later adopted by the U. S. Congress and signed into Public Law No. 915 on Aug. 2, 1956, by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The aims of the celebration are to (1) emphasize citizen’s respon sibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution, preserving it for posterity; (2) to inform the people that the Constitution is the basis for America’s great heritage and the foundation for our way of life; (3) to encour age the study of the histori cal events which led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787. The United States of America functions as a Re public under the Constitu tion, which is the oldest document still in active use that outlines the self-govern ment of a people. This land mark idea, that men had the inalienable right as in dividuals to be free and live their lives under their own governance, was the impe tus of the American Revolu tion. Today, the Constitution stands as an icon of freedom for people around the world. The DAR has served America for 116 years as its foremost cheerleader. In 1928, the Daughter’s began work on a building as a me morial to the Constitution. John Russell Pope, architect of the Jefferson Memorial, was commissioned to design the performing arts center, known as DAR Constitution Hall. Today, DAR Constitu tion Hall is the only struc ture erected in tribute to the Constitution of the United States of America. Known as the largest women’s patriotic organiza tion in the world, DAR has over 168,000 members with approximately 3,000 Chap ters in all 50 states and 11 foreign countries. The DAR has long promoted patrio tism through commemora tive celebrations, memorials, scholarships, and activities for children, as well as pro grams for new immigrants. ‘A LIVING DOCUMENT’ The Fathers of the Con stitution were not just a group of casual people who started a casual thing in a casual way. They had studied the ancient civilizations and the methods of government employed therein. They also studied the medieval sys tems and the various gov ernments of their day. They were well acquainted with the great classical writings on the subject; therefore, they came to their tasks very thoroughly equipped. They knew the results of the experiments in gov ernment through the ages. Above all, they knew that men here on earth must become self-reliant, selfexpressive and self-deter mined in order to glorify their creator. With an eye to the fu ture, the Founding Fathers constructed only a broad framework of government, which could be changed and enlarged to keep pace with the times. Through the passage of laws, judicial in terpretation and the growth of custom, the Constitution has become a “Living Docu ment.” This has enabled the federal government to perform many functions un dreamed of by its creators. In fact, the government had hardly been launched before the rst 10 amendments the “Bill of Rights.” They provided for free dom of speech, press and worship; for the right of states to establish militias; for the security of people in their homes against unrea sonable search and seizure; and for trial by jury. Since 1787, there have been 27 amendments added to our Constitution. This is evidence the Constitution is a “Living Document.”W e E S L oc OC H e E R | The Star The Gulf County School Board accepted a $650,000 offer on the old Highland View Elementary School during a special meeting on Tuesday.

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O PINIo O N www.starfl.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 A Section I can tell you the trouble with touch football. After the second argument over whether you were “down” or not, the ght breaks out. Ricky would dive at my feet and stretch out both hands, “I got’ya!” I kept rushing toward the goal line because I’m not sure he tagged me with his left hand. “You’re down right here!” Rick was adamant. “You didn’t get me with both hands!” We were running wide open. The tag went by in a ash. I’m not dead certain positive that he didn’t get me……but I’m trying to win this game! “I promise I got you.” “No you didn’t!” “Rick, I believe you missed him.” Larry was on my team. It didn’t matter if he actually saw the play or not, he automatically took “our” side. The bickering would continue through the next kick-off. We played “two hand touch, below the waist”. I don’t know who invented the game. It was supposed to be safer than tackle football. In the early days we played over in Billy Gwaltney’s big side yard or in the vacant lot between Ricky Hale’s house and the Mabry’s. As we grew we moved the game up to the high school football eld. We, of course, had no helmets, pads or any safety apparel. We’d just choose up sides and go to playing football. We didn’t bother with coaches, referees, halftime breaks, rules or grown-ups. If a cheerleader happened to show up, we’d run her off. This was real football! On our next possession, I caught a swing pass from Bobby Jackson and just as I turned up eld Ricky hit me so hard it jarred two molars and my esophagus loose. He knocked me at of my back! As I was trying to get my windpipe open and suck in enough air to get some feeling back in my limbs he matterof-factly said, “I got you that time”. Folks, the game was on! We ran full force into each other until dark……or somebody broke a bone. I’ve gone home with my tee shirt completely torn off, scratches across my chest and face so deep it looked like I’d lost a ght with a bobcat, blood caked to my skin, grass stains so deep in my jeans Cheer detergent with the “new blue magic whitening power” couldn’t wash it out! When we went out for the junior high team they gave us helmets, shoulder pads, girdle pads, knee pads, mouth pieces……and I don’t know what all else to protect us from hurting each other. The equipment weighed more than we did! It slowed us down. And there were rules against choking, kicking, biting, hitting in the back and piling on. We learned to do it “their way” with the coaches around. But even after we graduated to the high school team we didn’t forsake our pick-up games. We’d play our hearts out for the Rebels on Friday night and Saturday morning would nd us back at the eld, choosing up sides. It was football just for the sake of the game. I could still hear Ricky, Larry and the rest hollering at me last week as I “got set” for the kick-off of another college football season. I read the team by team reviews. I watched all the ESPN build up shows. I noted the Heisman watch has already begun. I grabbed the TV schedule and remote….. But something didn’t feel just right. Maybe I had been overexposed before the rst kickoff. You can analyze near ’bout anything to death. And listen, how much hype does a real football game need? Something about the whole atmosphere has changed since Bobby Gwaltney’s side yard. Teams now have helmets with holograms on them. I saw one outt dressed in uniforms that looked like neon highlight markers. Curley cues and stripes run in conicting directions across the shoulders. The manufacture’s logo is more prominent on the jersey than the number. College football has hit the big time. TV has added night games on Thursdays and Fridays…… Money has become a bigger motivator than the old leather lunged line coach. Nick Saban is the highest paid public ofcial in Alabama. You think about that for a minute. I full well understand the business side. But hasn’t the game given up something in return? Nothing will ever take the place of a Saturday afternoon kick-off in the fall. The leaves are turning, the breeze out of the south end zone has a hint of coolness, the smell of sweat and pigskin permeate the air, thousands rise to cheer and Ricky blindsides you out of nowhere……. I can’t tell if the players are having fun today or using the game as a springboard to professional football. The “sport” seems to have become more of a production than a game. I haven’t seen a bloody nose in years. The “end around” has gone the way of the dinosaur. And no one catches a pass and has to dodge an oak tree or a re hydrant these days. The “Gipper” is turning over in his grave.   Respectfully, Kes I live in Denver, where marijuana dispensaries outnumber pharmacies, liquor stores, McDonalds and Starbucks. When I walk and drive the streets of this beautiful Rocky Mountain city, I often encounter the smell of marijuana smoke. Marijuana users are not allowed to smoke openly and publicly, but a bench in the front yard is considered private property, allowing the smell to pollute the clean mountain air. The problems in Colorado began 14 years ago with the passage of Amendment 20 legalizing medical marijuana. Abuse and fraud ourished under its provisions because medical marijuana became easily available for recreational use. In November, Florida voters will be faced with the choice to legalize marijuana for “medical use.” Voters should instead ask themselves whether they want marijuana legalized in Florida for recreational use. That’s essentially what Amendment 2 will do. The amendment is so awed that if it passes,  medical marijuana will be readily available for  anyone who wants to obtain it. Like Colorado, Florida’s Amendment 2 allows “Medical Marijuana Treatment Centers” to develop edibles. These food products have been developed intentionally to allow discreet consumption of marijuana in public places, at schools and in the workplace, and to introduce the product to a larger – younger – consumer base. Brownies are pass. In Colorado, marijuana is sold in soda, salty snacks like nuts, granola bars, breakfast cereals, cookies, rice cereal treats, cooking oil and even salad dressing. Some companies buy commercially available children’s candies like Swedish sh, sour patch kids, lollipops or lemon drops, and infuse them with marijuana; others make chocolate bars, tootsie rolls and trufes. So now in Colorado, parents who once taught their children not to take candy from a stranger must tell their children not to take candy from a friend because it could very well contain marijuana. Our emergency rooms report a striking increase in children who have unintentionally ingested marijuana edibles and require medical treatment. Florida’s Amendment 2 allows for ANY medical condition, not just terminal, chronic or debilitating conditions,to qualify for marijuana treatment, as long as “a physician believes that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the potential health risks for a patient.” This exception will result in patients who use marijuana to get high, despite the stated intention of the amendment to prohibit such conduct. Colorado’s marijuana patient registry statistics show that only 1 percent of patients list HIV/AIDS; 2 percent list seizures; and 3 percent list cancer. A whopping 94 percent of those using “medical marijuana” claim to have “severe pain,” a subjective and unveriable condition. Sixty-six percent of users are male with an average age of 41, despite severe pain being a condition more closely associated with older, female patients. In Denver, it is common to see young, 20-something able-bodied men ocking to medical marijuana centers on Friday and Saturday nights to get their “medicine.” Since outright legalization in 2012 for all persons 21 or older, Colorado has seen an explosion of medical marijuana patients between 18-20 years old. Moreover, the long-term health implications from youth marijuana use are troubling. A longitudinal study found an association between weekly marijuana use by persons under the age of 18 and permanent decline in IQ. You might think that Florida won’t go as far as Colorado and Washington, but it will be one step closer. Every state that passes medical marijuana laws believes that they will be able to correct the errors of those who have paved the way. This has yet to be accomplished. The Colorado experiment is failing our children, and so will Florida’s. Coloradans may not be able to go back in time, but you can stop yours before it starts. Rachel O’Bryan is a Colorado resident and an attorney who spent 18 months serving at the request of Governor John Hickenlooper and the Colorado Department of Revenue to aid in the development of recreational marijuana legislation and regulation. She is a founding member of SMART Colorado, a citizen-led non-prot that protects Colorado kids from the unintended negative consequences of legalizing marijuana for recreational use. HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert We Didn’t Stop For Commercials Colorado is going to pot, don’t let Florida Make them scream and beg for more… Honestly, I try to keep my mathematics education away from my writing, much in the same way I have always tried to not bring work home with me or talk about it. As a result, I have children who do not necessarily want to be scientists or mathematicians. This is ne with me. However, working as a mathematician, being able to teach college classes and enjoying writing about my thoughts sometimes get all tangled together. They get tangled together in a good way that makes me happy and throws me into joy like a dog getting to stick his or her head out of a car window. I was in my college classroom, waiting for my students to nish their rst exam of the term. In an effort to give them immediate feedback, I was grading the exams as fast as I could and asking the students to wait for the results. It’s pretty easy until I get close to the end of class and have a group of students who want to push the time limit. These are generally two types of students who wait until time has expired; the students who would spend all the time available on simple exams because they are thorough and those who could not gure out something if you gave them a day and a half rather than an hour and a half. Fortunately, I don’t see many of the latter type. Quite a few students had nished their exams; I graded them and sent the students on their way. Having caught up with my grading, an airman nished her exam and slowly moved toward my desk at the back of the room. She is a student that hadn’t said much the rst few weeks of class, to be honest – she always seems a little timid and scared. College math classes can do this to some students. Having a majority of military students, I have been spoiled with students who say, “Yes Sir,” “Thank You Sir” and who genuinely want to learn in the classroom. This young lady handed me her exam and simply said, “Yes Sir,” when I asked her to sit back down and wait for me to grade her exam. She slowly took her seat in the back of the room. Having graded a number of students’ tests already, I had gotten in my groove and was able to go through her answers rather quickly. I called the young lady to come back to my desk. She hung her head and approached me, saying, “I’ve never been good at math.” This bothers me. It bothers me a little more when I hear it from a girl or from a woman. Therefore, I will admit to thinking about uttering one of my Daddy’s “sailor words” or a word of a bovine barnyard nature. Perhaps I did, but I will not admit to it. I told the young airman, “You did not miss any and don’t you ever let that statement come out of your mouth again, your daughter or another child might hear it and repeat it.” Having seen my own children’s eyes light up when being surprised with a gift or good news, I know what “Joy” looks like in a person’s eyes. This young airman’s eyes came close to popping out of her head, a smile revealed a mouth full of braces that I’m sure the Air Force paid for (and I’m happy about that!) A tear ran down her cheek – then she started laughing and seemed to be hyperventilating at the same time. She was holding her chest and I was a little afraid she might pass out. She sat back down. Having told her it was okay to leave, I was not sure she knew what she was doing or if she knew where she was. I got up and simply told her again, “I’m proud of you and you can leave now.” She gathered her books, still laughing, coughing and having a little trouble breathing. She slowly moved out of the classroom and into the hall, where I could hear loud breathing and laughing and these gulping sounds like she was choking on something. Letting a few seconds pass, I snuck to the door and stuck my head out to watch her walk down the hall. She was walking, still holding her chest and literally holding on to the wall every few steps to keep from falling out with joy or surprise or exhaustion or whatever. She stopped and started calling someone on her cellphone – I hope it was her parents. I’ve always dreamt of making a person this happy. I am not taking credit for this (maybe a little), but I am a witness to it and it made me joyful. We are always searching for “Joy” and sometimes she sneaks up on us slowly, almost timid and then explodes in a way that causes us to need to hold on to walls and tell other folks. I’m telling you. Also, I’m telling you that sometimes the best thing you can do is to keep your mouth shut. Never say “I wasn’t good at math” or “Girls aren’t good at math” or “What good is math?” On this day, math brought me joy and happiness and closer to satisfaction than I have been in a long time. Our next class, the young airman was back in her seat with a little more condence and a look in her eyes that seemed to be begging for more. How many men in their 50’s can say they made a 20 something year-old woman scream and beg for more? Please do not answer that question. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Page 4 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y o O U r R OPINIONs S L ETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 A Section ‡+ OO G G BG ‹ ‡+ OO G OQ ‰„‹u „ zS” —u’ |… w‰ ’ „” ‰—~S” —u’ |… w‰ Page A5 Groundhogs, Katydids and Leading Indicators “Oh the days dwindle down…to a precious few…September…November…” — “September Song” as recorded by Willie Nelson Pennsylvania has Punxsutawney Phil; Florida has singing katydids. Last week a wonderfully entertaining article in the Sebring News (central Florida) described a variety of signs that we are facing an early, cold and wet winter. A primary source is the Farmer’s Almanac. Mainly, though, folks around Sebring are observing nature’s pre-winter activities. One Sebring native says that katydids are singing, and this traditionally means that winter’s rst frost is only six weeks away. “Thick tails and bright bands” on raccoons and thick hair on the nape of cows’ necks represent more signs that cold weather is coming. Crickets populating the replace hearth earlier than usual is another harbinger. Some Sebring natives say that considerably cooler weather is imminent when spiders spin webs that are larger than normal and nd their way inside peoples’ homes. Finally, squirrels are already burying acorns for the winter. Pretty unscientic, huh? But I’ll be shocked if our central Florida friends are incorrect. Animals, insects and birds can “sense” the earth’s changing seasons. Anyone who has witnessed the movements of nature’s creatures just before a hurricane arrives has likely marveled at their prescient qualities. By the way, January is likely to be our coldest month this winter. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if certain events tipped us off to similar coming market changes? As my father used to say, “Would that it were.” Lagging and coincident indicators only provide backward and sideward glances. For instance, a look at current corporate prots (a lagging indicator) tells us nothing about the future, because these numbers represent past performance. Leading economic indicators may provide some front windshield views, but economists differ on how these factors should be interpreted. Many items are considered leading economic indicators by the Conference Board, including 10 that comprise the Composite Index: average weekly hours (manufacturing); average weekly jobless claims for unemployment insurance; manufacturer’s new orders for consumer goods; vendor performance; manufacturer’s new orders for non-defense capital goods; building permits for new private housing units; the S&P stock index; money supply; the interest rate spread and the index of consumer expectations. Synthesizing and applying this information, once it’s assembled, is a neat trick, especially when individual leading economic indicators provide conicting data. What’s an investor or advisor to discern, for instance, when manufacturer’s new orders for consumer goods and capital goods are up, but when consumer expectations and vendor performance are down? Various aspects of the economy may be performing at different levels. Which is why all the securities and sectors of a well-designed portfolio do not rise or fall in concert simultaneously. In other words, “the Bronx is up, but the Battery’s down.” Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-6086121~www.arborwealth.net), a “Fee-Only” and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. Dear Editor, In the last County Commission meeting Administrator Don Butler recommended to the board to absorb cost for removing ll sand on a thirty acre site that was sold to the Gulf County Gun Cub. This was termed as a “Grave” situation as the Corp of Engineers discovered this illegal lling of wetlands by the county prior to selling the property to the Gun Club. The County Engineer Preble Rish  who’s responsibility is to protect the county in these matters failed to apply for and get a federally required dredge and ll permit. The Corp of Engineers can levy huge nes and penalties against the County should they decide to do so. It is not the fault of the Gun Club as they bought what we refer to in the South as a Pig in the Poke. This is the same property that Commissioner McLemore who was Chairman at that time insisted that a new public works building be built closer to his home in Howard Creek and allowed the ll in and even attempt to construct a building which failed. Citizens bore the cost of having county equipment and personnel try to erect the building, illegally move sand to ll in the wetlands and nally have to move the building to Port St. Joe.  Commissioner Yeager in last week’s meeting made claims that they did nothing wrong which give credence to the mentality of old Board Members and why they need to be replaced as well as the County Administrator Butler who lied and said it was a “Duck Pond” and should have known better. Last time I checked, I was told this asco cost the citizens over $60,000 plus without removing the sand and without nes and penalties. This could cost citizens well over $100,000.00 but I suppose the Commissioners do not have to worry because after all, it not their money, it’s yours. Vote Responsibly, Jim Garth Chairman Dear Editor, We’ve always known it is very important for us to take at least thirty minutes of exercise every day by riding a bicycle, walking or doing exercise on a mat, but we need to realize that it’s also important for us to exercise our minds. I’ve started exercising my mind by starting at the beginning of the alphabet and spelling every word that comes to my mind. If I’m not sure that I’ve spelled it correctly, I check the dictionary to make sure that I’ve spelled it correctly. We need to take care of our body and mind so that we’ll be able to work both of them together, as needed. Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe By James Forstall Executive Director, FTRI Special to The Star Five million seniors live in Florida. As a state famous for gray hair retirees, that number likely comes as no surprise. What may surprise you, however, is that one of every three seniors you meet has some degree of hearing loss—among the most common yet overlooked health challenges in the US. September is Grandparent’s Month and the perfect time to reect on our loved ones. While Florida has among the highest percentage of citizens who are hard of hearing in the US—a large portion of which are seniors—we also have tremendous resources in place to meet their needs. Unfortunately, many Floridians don’t realize these resources exist. For example, in 1991, Florida legislation established a nonprot organization called Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. (FTRI – www.ftri.org/fre e ) to provide amplied telephones to qualied Florida residents for free. FTRI makes it possible for those who are hard of hearing, speech challenged, deaf or deaf/blind to have the same access to basic telephone services as everyone else. While hearing aids may be the rst thing that comes to mind when you think of hearing loss, amplied telephones are equally helpful. Not only do these phones boost incoming sound, but the audio can be customized through tone control and other features for different degrees of hearing loss. To date, FTRI has served more than 502,670 residents and distributed over 1,000,000 pieces of equipment like amplied telephones. Why is this critical?  For starters, having difculty hearing on the telephone is one of the rst signs of hearing loss. For people with children and grandchildren spread out across the US, phone conversations are vital to staying in touch with loved ones and engaged with the world. A ve minute phone call may seem insignicant to a grandchild but it could be uplifting, joyous and day-changing to a grandparent. Complicating things further, when grandparents or seniors have difcultly hearing on the telephone they may withdraw and become isolated, which may increase additional health risks. It’s not simply a social benet, phone conversations are an essential lifeline to caregivers, doctors and family members. Hearing loss amongst grandparents or seniors is increasing more and more every day. The good news is technology to help is also advancing, and qualifying for a free amplied telephone with FTRI is simple. Permanent Florida residents who are certied as having hearing loss or speech disabilities can obtain amplied telephones and other telecommunications equipment at no cost at one of the 26 regional distribution centers throughout the state. Furthermore, some of the centers offer free hearing tests. If your grandparents, parents or friends are one of the more than three million Floridians with hearing loss, let them know about resources like FTRI. Even if theyre not, pick up the phone and give them call. Either way, you can make their day and help us all Keep Florida Connected.  To learn more about this free amplied telephone program, call FTRI at 800222-3448 or visit our website www.ftri. org/fre e To parents with a freshman entering college this fall: You’re probably expecting to shell out major bucks for tuition, room and board and a million other necessities over the next few years. But before you send your kid off, make sure you share one gift likely to steer him or her along the road to nancial security – a sound understanding of how credit works. You probably learned the hard way yourself that young adults encounter many unfamiliar expenses – and temptations – upon entering college or the workforce. So it’s important to help your kids avoid early nancial missteps that could damage their credit for years to come. The rst step in managing personal nances is mastering the basic checking account and debit card. A few tips you can pass along: • Look for a bank or credit union that charges no monthly usage fee, requires no minimum balance and has conveniently located ATMs so you don't rack up foreign ATM charges. • Enter all transactions in a check register or in a budgeting tool like Mint.com and review your account online at least weekly to verify when deposits, checks, purchases and automatic payments have cleared. • Avoid writing checks or making debit card transactions unless your current balance will cover them – such transactions often clear instantly. A good way to build sound credit is to demonstrate responsible credit card use. But people under age 21 must have a parent or other responsible adult cosign credit card accounts unless they can prove sufcient income to repay the debt. So how can parents help their kids begin building a credit history if they can’t open their own account? A couple of alternatives: • Make them an authorized user on one of your accounts. They'll get their own card and you can usually restrict the amount they're able to charge. Authorized users are not legally responsible to pay balances owed – that's your responsibility, so tread carefully. • You can add them as a joint account holder to a new or existing account – preferably, one with a small credit limit. Joint account holders are equally liable to pay off the account. • Just remember, any account activity, good or bad, goes on both your credit reports, so careful account monitoring is critical. If your kids haven’t yet demonstrated nancial maturity they may not be ready for an unsecured credit card or loan. Other alternatives include: • A secured credit card, where users can charge up to the amount deposited to open the account. Purchases are charged against the account's revolving credit limit. As they pay off the balance the available credit rises, just like a regular credit card. After a period of on-time payments, ask the lender to convert it to an unsecured card, or to at least add an unsecured amount to the account. • A prepaid debit card, where you load the card with money in advance and they use the card for purchases or ATM withdrawals. You monitor account activity online or by phone. • With each, fees and restrictions may apply so shop for the best terms. If you need help educating your kids about personal nancial management, a good resource is What’s My Score ( www.whatsmyscore.or g ), a nancial literacy program for young adults run by Visa Inc. It features a comprehensive workbook called Money 101: A Crash Course in Better Money Management, which can be downloaded for free. Bottom line: Getting your kids off on the right foot, credit-wise, can make all the difference to their future nancial health. Jason Alderman directs Visa’s nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMone y MA rR GA retRET R. M c D oO W ellELL AA rbor OO utlook Commission passes mistake off to citizens Body and Mind Grandparent’s Month: help seniors with hearing loss Here’s Credit 101 for your college freshman JA soSO N AldermALDERM AN

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 Just like clockwork – they’re back. Every May and September, we can rely on those pesky black bugs to once again splat against our windshields. What are they? Plecia nearetica, otherwise known as lovebugs. Lovebugs are small ies with red thoraxes. Males are one-fourth of an inch, and females are one-third of an inch in length. These ies are members of the family Bibionidae and are known as March ies. Several species of March ies are native to Florida, however, Lovebugs, Plecia Nearctica Hardy are recent invaders from the west. Two generations of lovebugs each year. The adult populations take ight during May and September and are present for approximately four weeks. Mating takes place almost immediately after emergence of the female, since adult females live only a few days. That is why lovebugs are attached when ying. During the mating process, the male lovebug attaches to the female and only separates during the daytime while resting on vegetation. They never separate during ight or at night. Successful mating takes a long as 12 hours, and the female dies within 86 hours of laying eggs. You have probably noticed that lovebugs like to hang around gas stations. Automobile exhaust fumes, heat from the engines and the vibrations of the vehicles actually attract lovebugs, which often splatter against the front of your car. Lovebugs on or in the car is not a pretty sight. A buildup on the radiator may cause cars to overheat, their bodies on the windshield can reduce driver visibility, and uid from their bodies can damage paint. Several things can lessen the problem. By traveling at night, motorists can avoid the insects; lovebugs reach peak activity at 10 a.m. and stop ying at dusk. Traveling slower will reduce the number of bugs spattered. A mesh screen in front of the grill will keep the radiator ns from clogging and protect the nish on the front the car. If a large screen is not used in front of the grill, at least place a small screen behind the grill in front of the radiator. Washing lovebugs carcasses from vehicles within one day will help to reduce paint damage. Lovebugs are more easily removed, and the chance of damaging the nish is lessened if the cars have been waxed recently. Soaking for several minutes with water aids in removal. When lovebugs are numerous, some motorists spread a light lm of baby oil over the front of the hood, above the windshield and on the grill and bumper. This practice will make removal a simpler task. Adult lovebugs are harmless and do not sting or bite. They feed on the nectar of various plants, especially sweet clover and goldenrod. Lovebugs are also benecial to our environment, but that is true only during their immature life state. Larvae feed on thatch in the lawn. Thatch is a layer of decaying organic material between the grass roots and leaf blades. If it builds up in the lawn, it can cause problems for the grass. Immature lovebugs live in the thatch and consume it. Through this process they redistribute essential nutrients back into the soil, beneting plants. A number of insecticides have been evaluated for effectiveness in controlling lovebug larvae and adults. Most kill lovebugs but are impractical because high populations of the insects occur over vast areas of the state. A vacuum cleaner can remove adults from conned area, such as in buildings and vehicles. 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To m has th e wo rk an d li fe ex pe ri en ce s th at we ne ed to he lp so lv e th e ma ny pr ob le ms fa ci ng Gu lf Co un ty To m ha s pr ov en hi ms elf in man y to ug h job as si gn me nt s th ro ug h th e ye ar s wh ic h hav e pr ov id ed hi m wi th ex te ns iv e ex per ie nc e in th e ar ea s of bu dg et o ve rs ig ht an d man ag em en t sk ill s: $ Ret ir ed wi th ov er 20 ye ar s of s er vi ce as a Ch ie f Wa rr an t Of ce r in th e Si gn al Co rp s. # # % ( # $ Pr es id en ti al Co mm un ic at io ns Of ce r, su pp or ti ng Pr es id en ts Ro na ld Re ag an an d Ge or ge Bu sh ) # # $ Gr ou p Ma na ger su pe rv isi ng Pro je ct Ma na ger s on na ti on al an d in te rn ati on al te le co mm un ic ati on s pr oj ec ts '# # & ( #" # # ( # $ El ec te d Ad vi so ry Bo ar d Me mb er re pr ese nti ng Gu lf Co un ty To ms Co mm un it y In vo lv em en t: # # & # ( $ Vi ce Co mm an de r, We wa hi tc hk a Pos t 82 85 # # & # # %* # $ Me mb er an d su pp or te r. Sa ve the Ca pe (B each Re storation Me eting) Ho st ed by the Co astal As so cia tion of So uth Gu lf Co un ty Wh o : St ev e So uther land (U .S. Re pr esen ta tiv e) Wa rr en Ye ager (G ulf Co un ty Co mmissioner) Mi chael Do mbr osk i (MRD Eng ineer ing) Wh at : CBR A & FEM A issues; Gulf Co un ty e or ts; U. S. FWL lack of pr og re ss; and the MA JOR impac t (ec onomic and en vir onmen tal) Be ach Re st or at ion has on all Gulf Co un ty Wh en : 6 Oc to ber 2014 @ 5:00pm EST Wh er e : St Joseph Ba y Go lf Club Wh y : Th is co uld be the most impor tan t meeting in Gulf Co un ty this ye ar Th is inf or ma tion impac ts ev er y re siden t and lando wner in So uth Gulf Co un ty businesses re alto rs re nt al agencies and the en vir onmen t. Ev er yo ne is We lc ome to At te nd! Special to The Star The next Bay Day will be held on Saturday, Oct. 4. It will be an adventurous day with the rst birding trip beginning at 8 a.m. ET and last tram tour at 2 p.m. ET. There will be trips, tours and excursions in-between for a fantastic day at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve. One of the highlights of the day will be the low country boil with tasty shrimp and all the xings. Begin the day at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Visitor Center at 3915 State Road 30A, just ve miles from Port St. Joe. Events planned include tours through the heart of the Buffer on a Tram, trips for Birders, shoreline and kayak excursions, nature walks and of course the best ever low country boil. On Friday night there will be an astronomy walk in the Buffer and Saturday night a sunset cruise is planned to enhance the experience. The buffer preserve invites everyone out to pick up T-shirts, enjoy the educational displays and share food and fellowship with the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves, a citizen support organization. “This event just keeps on getting better and better,” said Preserve Manager, Dylan Shoemaker. “We try to grow it a little each year giving more opportunities for those attending to enjoy the event.” The St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve was purchased in 1995 with the recognition of the importance of the protection of surrounding uplands to the preservation of the outstanding water quality and natural resources of the Bay. To learn more visit www. stjosephbaypreserves. org, or call 229-1787, Ext. 1. Special to The Star The Gulf County Coop erative Extension Service will sponsor an interac tive video rst responders meeting. The meeting will be held at the Gulf County Extension Ofce located at 232 East Lake Ave, at 6 p.m. CT on Thursday, Sept. 18. All Gulf County beekeepers and anyone that is considered to be a rst responder in emer gencies or disaster cas es are cordially invited. Dr. Bill Kern, UF/IFAS Entomologist and State Specialist Beekeeper will be the speaker. For more information contact the Gulf County Ex tension Service at 639-3200. ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Celebrate Bay Day at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve FILE PHOTO LOVEBUGS ARE BACK! Washing lovebugs carcasses from vehicles within one day will help to reduce paint damage. Lovebugs are more easily removed, and the chance of damaging the nish is lessened if the cars have been waxed recently. Soaking for several minutes with water aids in removal. When lovebugs are numerous, some motorists spread a light lm of baby oil over the front of the hood, above the windshield and on the grill and bumper. AA fricanized bee rst responders meeting

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The Star| A7 Thursday, September 18, 2014 Sept. 8-14 On Monday, Sept. 8, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce (GCSO) received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 1100 block of County Road (CR) 381 in Dalkeith. Deputy B. Smith responded to the call. The investigation resulted in the arrest of a female juvenile, who was arrested and charged with Aggravated Battery. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) and turned over to the Department of Juvenile Justice. On Tuesday, Sept. 9, multiple investigations conducted by the GCSO Narcotics Unit culminated into the arrests of twelve individuals. Investigators and deputies served warrants on Darren B. Evers (38) for two counts of Sale of Marijuana; Christopher B. Pugh (33) for two counts of Sale of Marijuana; Scott W. Burkett (49) for Sale of Meth within 1,000 feet of a Church; Christopher E. Linton (38) for Sale of Meth; Warren L. Grifn (42) for Sale of Meth within 1,000 feet of a Park, Sale of Meth within 1,000 feet of a Church, and two counts of Unlawful Use of a Two-Way Communications Device; Brandi E. Brogdon (35) for Principle to Sale of Meth; Travis I. Whiteld (28) for Sale of Meth and Unlawful Use of a TwoWay Communications Device; Brenda G. Gortman (59) for eight counts of Possession of Controlled Substance; Marcus L. Cain, Jr. (46) for Principle to Sale of Meth; Mary K. McFarlane (53) for Sale of Meth within 1,000 feet of a Park and Unlawful Use of a TwoWay Communications Device; Christan R. Moses (30) for Sale of Meth within 1,000, feet of a Park and Unlawful Use of a Two-Way Communications Device; and Darrell L. Vann (40) for Principle to Sale of Meth. All subjects were transported to the GCDF and later rst appeared. On Wednesday, Sept. 10, the GCSO received a complaint regarding the theft of farming equipment in the 3500 block of CR 381 in Dalkeith. Sgt. J. Murnan made contact with the complainant who reported his PTO drive shaft from a hay machine was stolen. The theft took place at some point over the past two weeks. The shaft was valued at approximately $450. On Sept. 10, Deputy G. Desrosier arrested Dewayne D. Veasey, Jr. (24). Veasey was taken into custody at the GCSO Substation in Wewahitchka on a warrant out of Bay County for Violation of Probation. He was transported to the GCDF. On Thursday, Sept. 11, Deputy J. Oquendo responded to a theft complaint in the 200 block of West River Road in Wewahitchka. The complainant reported the theft of over $2,000 in funds. Investigator L. Greenwood continues to investigate the case. On Sept. 11, the GCSO received a complaint regarding a residential burglary in the 1300 block of Indian Pass Road. Sgt. J. Murnan responded to investigate the case and made contact with the complainant. The door to the residence was breached and entry was made. It was determined that a piece of linen was taken from the residence. On Sept. 11, Sgt. J. Williams conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle east of Port St. Joe near the area of Twine Road and U.S. Highway 98. The operator of the vehicle violated Florida’s “Move Over” Law as it passed an emergency vehicle on the road side, thus prompting the stop. Contact was made with the driver, Daniel P. Beale (22). During the contact, Sgt. Williams developed reason to believe illegal narcotics were in the vehicle. K-9 Marco was deployed to sniff around the exterior of the vehicle and alerted to the presence of narcotics. Beale was determined to be in possession of marijuana. He was arrested and transported to the GCDF. Beale was charged with Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. He was rst appeared and conditionally released. On Sept. 11, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 200 block of Bay Avenue in Wewahitchka. Deputy J. Oquendo responded to the call to investigate. At the conclusion of the investigation, Logan P. Johnson (22) was placed under arrest for Domestic Felony Battery and Resisting a Law Enforcement Ofcer without Violence. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and conditionally released. On Friday, Sept. 12, Deputy P. Williams responded to the 300 block of East Chipola Avenue in Wewahitchka in reference to forgery and theft. Contact was made with the complainant in the case, who discovered the forgery of several checks and unauthorized use of a credit card. Inv. L. Dickey continues to investigate the case. On Saturday, Sept. 13, while on patrol Deputy P. Williams observed a motorcycle traveling at a high rate of speed. He stopped the vehicle for reckless driving in the area of State Road (SR) 71 and Harden Circle in Wewahitchka. Contact was made with the driver, James T. Small (31), who was subsequently arrested for Operating a Motorcycle without an Endorsement. Small was taken into custody and transported to the GCDF, where he was later rst appeared and conditionally released. On Sept. 13, Deputy M. Layeld served Douglas E. Pratt (22) with a warrant for Failure to Appear at the GCDF. Pratt was originally arrested by the Chickasaw Police Department in Alabama on September 2nd. He was extradited back to Gulf County from the Mobile County Jail. Pratt failed to appear on his original charge of Dealing in Stolen Property. He remains in custody. On Sunday, Sept. 14, Deputy B. Smith responded to a domestic dispute in the 300 block of Fire House Road in Overstreet. Contact was made with the parties involved and the case was investigated. Christopher L. Coyle (38) was placed under arrest and charged with Domestic Assault and Domestic Battery. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and conditionally released. NO TI CE OF PR OP OS ED TA X IN CR EA SE Th e Ci ty of Me xic o Be ac h ha s te nt at iv el y ad op te d a me as ur e to in cr ea se it s pr op er ty ta x le vy La st ye ar ’s pr op er ty ta x le vy : A. Ini ti al ly pr op ose d ta x le vy ……………………… ……… ... .. $1 ,6 99 ,9 11 B. Le ss ta x re du ct io ns du e to Va lu e Ad ju st me nt Bo ar d An d oth er as se ss me nt ch an ge s… …………………… .. ... $1 ,2 67 C. Ac tu al pr op er ty ta x le vy …………………………………… $1 ,6 88 ,6 44 Th is ye ar ’s pr opo sed ta x le vy …………………… ... ... .… ... $1 ,7 12 ,8 35 Al l co nc ern ed cit iz en s ar e in vi te d to at te nd a publ ic he ar in g on th e ta x in cr ea se to be he ld on : M o nda y, Se pt em be r 22 20 14 at 5: 01 P. M. at th e Me xic o Be ac h Civi c Ce nt er 10 5 N. 31 st St re et M ex ic o Be ac h, Fl or ida 32 45 6 A FI NAL DE CI SI ON on th e pr op ose d ta x in cr ea se an d th e bu dg et wi ll be ma de at th is he ari ng BU DG ET SU MM AR Y CIT Y OF ME XI CO BE AC H FI SC AL YE AR 20 14 2 01 5 *T HE PR OP OS ED OP ER AT IN G BU DG ET EX PE ND ITU RE S OF TH E CI TY OF ME XI CO BE AC H AR E 12 .8 9% LE SS THA N LA ST YE AR S TO TA L OP ER AT ING EX PE ND AT UR ES Mi ll age Pe r $1 ,0 00 5. 02 9 Es ti ma te d Re ve nu es Ta xe s Mi ll ag e Pe r $1 ,0 00 Ad Va lo re m Ta xe s 5. 02 9 Sa le s an d Us e Ta x Ch arg es fo r Se rv ic e In te rg ove rn me nt al Fi ne s an d Fo rf eit ur es Mi sc el lan eo us Re ve nu e Li ce ns e an d Pe rm it s In te rn al Se rv ic e Ch arg e To ta l Re ve nu es Tr ans fe rs & Ba la nc es Ex pe nd it ur es Ge ne ra l Go ve rn me nt Pu bl ic Sa fe ty Ph ys ic al En vi ro nm en t Tr an sp or ta ti on Cu lt ur e/R ec re at ion De bt Se rv ic e To ta l Ex pen dit ur es Tr an sf er s Ou t Fu nd Ba la nc e/R es er ve s/ Ne w As set s To ta l Ap pr opr ia te d Ex pen di tu res Tr ans fe rs & Ba la nc es Ge ne ra l Fu nd 1, 62 7, 63 5 36 3, 34 4 41 ,72 5 15 7, 28 4 2, 000 10 0, 000 21 ,0 00 35 ,0 00 2, 34 7, 98 8 46 3, 11 5 70 7, 70 4 11 3, 61 7 57 7, 46 8 16 4, 12 5 11 0, 53 1 2, 13 6, 56 0 21 1, 42 8 2, 34 7, 98 8 En te rpr is e Fu nd s 2, 85 0, 31 3 2, 85 0, 31 3 2, 85 0, 31 3 2, 85 0, 31 3 2, 85 0, 31 3 To ta l 1, 62 7, 63 5 36 3, 34 4 2, 89 2, 03 8 15 7, 28 4 2, 000 10 0, 000 21 ,0 00 35 ,0 00 5, 19 8, 30 1 46 3, 11 5 707 ,7 04 2, 96 3, 93 0 57 7, 46 8 16 4, 12 5 11 0, 53 1 4, 98 6, 873 21 1, 42 8 5, 19 8, 30 1 TH E TE NT AT IV E, AD OP TE D, AN D/ PR FI NAL BU DG ET S AR E ON FI LE IN TH E OF FI CE OF TH E AB OV E ME NTI ON ED TA X AU TH ORI TY AS A PU BL IC RE CO RD Special to The Star A Gulf County jury needed just 18 minutes of deliberations last Thursday night before convict ing a Wewahitchka man of selling methamphetamine. Assistant State Attorney Gary Pack took Shannon Dwayne Cau sey, 33, to trial and showed jurors a well-orchestrated controlled buy from two condential sourc es working with the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce. Deputies sent the two to Causey’s home at 215 Bur gess Creek Road the night of April 24, 2013, with $100 with which they bought a quantity of meth. Both informants were searched prior to and after the buy and were equipped with a recording device which captured video and audio of the sale. Causey’s criminal record has arrests dating back to 1999 and convictions for assault in 2001 and possession of a controlled sub stance with intent to sell in 2007. Causey was found guilty as charged of sale of methamphet amine, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Circuit Judge John Fishel II scheduled sentencing for Oct. 21. Wewa man convicted on meth charges Law Enforcement GULF COUNTY SHERIFF’ sS OFFI cC E LL A w W EE NFOR cC EMENT SUMMARY Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 e ne w College of Ap plied St udies at FSU Pa nama City was appr ov ed by th e FSU Boar d of Tr ustees in Ju ne 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily re spond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. We invite yo u to suppor t e Campaign for Ou r Community ’s Un iv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr ow ’s jobs. Ou r goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of Ap plied St udies by 2017, which will allo w FSU Pa nama City to establish student scholarsh ips, impleme nt ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr ov ide ne w equipment and tech nology To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our community ’s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mb lo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR CO MMUN IT Y’ S UNIV ER SIT Y En do wmen t for To morr ow ’s Jo bs $ $ % $ %' % # ' # & # ($ $ % % $ '' ($ $ $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL NO TI CE OF PR OP OS ED TA X IN CR EA SE Th e Gu lf Co un ty Bo ar d of Co un ty Co mm is si on er s ha s te nt at iv el y ado p te d a me asu re to in cr ea se it s pr op er ty tax le vy La st ye ar 's pr op er ty tax le vy : A. In it ia ll y pr op os ed ta x le vy .. ..... ...... ...... ...... ..... $ 9, 26 0, 14 6 B. Les s ta x re du ct io ns du e to Va lu e Ad ju st me nt Bo ar d an d ot he r as ses sm en t ch an ge s. ....... ........ ...... $ 19 ,0 82 C. Ac tu al pr op er ty ta x le vy ......... ........ ........ ........ $ 9, 24 1, 06 4 Th is ye ar 's pr op os ed tax le vy ............................ ... $ 10 ,0 82 ,7 67 Al l co nc er ne d ci ti ze ns ar e in vi te d to at te nd a pu bl ic he ar in g on th e ta x in cr ea se to be he ld on : Mo nd ay Se pte mb er 22 nd 20 14 At 5: 01 P. M. E. T. In th e me et in g ro om at th e Ro be rt M. Mo or e Ad m. Bu il di ng Co ur tho us e Co mp le x 10 00 Ce ci l G. Co st in Sr Bo ul ev ar d Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a 32 456 A FI NA L DE CI SI ON on th e pr op os ed tax in cr ea se an d th e bu dg et wil l be ma de at th is he ar in g. Society President Charlotte Pierce said the lighthouse had reopened 23 months to the day that it closed on Cape San Blas and that it made all the hard work and fundraising worthwhile. “We are delighted,” Pierce said. “I’m elated to see it come to fruition.” Historical Society vicepresident Lynda Bordelon and recording secretary Linda Wood were on hand to sell tickets and sell lighthouse related merchandise. They also welcomed the lighthouse’s first official customer, Anne Whittle of Port St. Joe, who purchased a T-shirt to commemorate the occasion. “It’s a relief to be this far in the process,” Wood said. “It’s an awesome experience, and I’m glad to be part of it,” Bordelon said. “I think it will be wonderful for the community.” The lighthouse welcomed visitors all day Friday and Saturday during the 18th annual Florida Scallop and Music Festival. WES LOCHER | The Star Magidson and wife, Helen, headed to the top of the structure to take in the view of the city. SOFT OPEN from page A1 CC OURTESY OF DEBBIE HH OOPER AT JOEBAY.COM The rst to climb the lighthouse at its new location in George Core Park had a new perspective on Port St. Joe. 18th annual Scallop, Music Festival SS PECIAl L TO TT HE SS TAR During his performance on Saturday night Scallop and Music fest headliner Joe Dife surprised the crowd by bringing famed Nashville songwriter Jerry Salley to the stage to duet on several songs. PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Above left a dedicated Kid’z zone provided kids with plenty of opportunities to burn off energy during the day. Above right Santa Rosa band Dredd Clampitt entertained on Friday night at the George Core Park stage. CC OURTESY OF DEBBIE HH OOPER AT JOEBAY.COM The Lion’s Club rafed off a Plein Air painting by James Hempel to raise funds for the organization. A dedicated Kid’z zone provided kids with plenty of opportunities to burn off energy during the day.CC OURTESY OF DEBBIE H H OOPER AT JOEBAY.COM Some people admired the Cape San Blas Lighthouse from the safety of the ground.

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Local The Star| A9 Thursday, September 18, 2014 / # : <<4: -.4 7: .: 7 0< 8 8 8 8 0<7 :.:7 4./ % !$" # + .+++ 8 8 8 8 044<7 -6. .67< 44 / & # + 9 +++ 8 8 8 8 :.74 9 : .74 9 / # $% # % # + 9+++ 8 8 8 8 61, 79 1 6 1, 79 1 / ( # # # + 9+++ 8 8 8 8 169 76 1 69 76 $7 $ 7 & ) $ ,++ 79 -. 1<. 7. ,1 71 69. 744 8 8 47 +467 <9+ & % $ #' ) .:. 7, +, 8 8 8 8 .:. 7, +, $$ # % $ + +1 7+ 91 8 8 8 8 ++1 7+ 91 % # !'# % & 41+ 71 ,1 71 +.9 7, +9 ,,4 7: 4< 8 8 47 :.<7 -6. #$ # # $ ++, 7< +1 7, .6, 7, : 8 8 8 ,7 16+7 16. & % $ $ +99 7. 8 8 8 8 +99 7. $ !&$ & +-9 7. +4 +94 74 -,9 ,. 8 < 96 7+4 ::1 74 ,1 7. : 99 7+ -6 71 4-9 79 61 7, ,. .4:7 .,< ,-7 6+97 -4# $ # $ 9,+ 7+ 14 8 8 8 8 9,+ 7+ 14 $$ 95 ;. <1 7, +6 2 ; ,+< 7< ,, 2 ; <66 74 :2 ;, 2 ; ,17, 12 ;: <6 7: +< 2 $ $ # !&% #( # : 7: 4.7 16. .7 -6.7 41< 17 .+<7 ,.. 1:7 +61 -1.7 ,,< ,.7 6:67 <4% 1+7 .::7 1:, 0 67 94.7 <-. 0 47 :1+7 <.0 1:7 +-9 0 ,7 14-7 6,6 0 417 --:7 <<9 0 # '# % #' $ 97 :6,7 +44 0 +7 94< 8 0 0 8 8 0 9 76 9,7 961 0 & %* +<79 :1 7: :.+7 ,:, 8 8 1947 6:6 67 ,9<7 -,*$ #! % .,9 71 .: ,7 1-17 +,. 8 9 -+ 7: 1 8 ,7 <9+7 :,4 # $"!# % % :-6 7+ 9,-47 +<. 8 8 8 7+ 447 --+ ! #! % +:, 79 64 17 1667 ,,1 8 8 8 1 7: 917 161 & # $ 1,6 7: .,7 :-<7 69, 8 8 8 1 79 4:7 .:4 & % &# # % 6< 71 -1 16+7 69+ 8 8 8 16 74 99 &#% 8 % .,, 7. ,, ,.7 +4, 8 8 8 9 ., 71, % & % 4<7. +4 <91 7. <. 8 8 -917 4<+ ,7 :9,7 9.1 % #' 8 8 < +< 7< -< 8 9 14 71 7+ ,-7 14. :6+ 7. 94 79 , ,6 7, 4< 7: <+< 7< -< 9-+ 7: 1 7, 4.7 .-1 1.7 .4:7 1:4 # $ # $ & % 8 +179 61 8 8 9<, 7. 9 ,+ 7+ 14 $#'$ 9-, 71 ,, 79 49. 76 14 <4+ 7, 4: 71 8 + .+ 7+ : 7, 4+7 6,6 % % 1+7 .::7 1:, 0 67 94.7 <-. 0 47 :1+7 <.0 1:7 +-9 0 ,7 14-7 6,6 0 417 --:7 <<9 0 % % # & #' 4 5 % $ 4. 5% County administrator Don Butler said he would not “bet the grocery money” on the accuracy of the print-out and said “maintenance” needed to be performed to the budget before next week. Commissioners Tan Smiley and Ward McDaniel questioned the veracity of the numbers several times and asked the county budget committee to review some areas and address questions raised during the hearing. “I’m not comfortable with some of these numbers,” McDaniel said near the end of the hearing. The majority of the questions came from Commissioner Joanna Bryan who brought a list of areas and line items she believed could be shaved. Bryan had been challenged to do so by Commissioner Carmen McLemore after Bryan made the motion to dispel with the gas tax, a proposal McLemore moved to kill last year before joining the majority in voting it down this year. McLemore, in two meetings, put the onus on Bryan to nd the cuts in the budget to offset the gas tax revenue counted in the tentative budget. Bryan said her list included budget lines from which less than 50 percent of budgeted funds had been expended. Further, they primarily focused on areas such as “outside contractual services” as well as items such as basic ofce supplies. “These are things we need to look at,” Bryan said. “It all adds up. People we represent are cutting back. But we are not even going to look at them?” “It seems I’m the only one wanting to look at all these areas.” Bryan also mentioned travel and said the county should be represented at various important conferences, but “do we really need to send ve or seven people?” But as Bryan went down her list, Butler and assistant administrator Lynn Lanier countered with rationale for some expenditures and Butler said Bryan was highlighting line items that may or may not be accurately detailed in the current printout. And Bryan found little agreement from her fellow commissioners, though her questions raised questions. “I am wondering why we don’t send the budget committee to look at some of these things,” Smiley said. “If there is money there that needs to be cut we should cut it.” z The county economic development department will be funded at more than double the funds the BOCC provided an earlier quasi-public agency led by an economic development professional, Bryan noted. In salaries alone, she said, the budget was $110,000 with nearly $80,000 more in operational expenses. Bryan opposed the move to a county-operated department and said she questioned the direction the BOCC was taking in all phases of operations. And, she said, there seemed to be no apparent rationale for boosting the budget — in its last commitment to an Economic Development Alliance the BOCC was providing $60,000 annually — to three times that previously provided to economic development. “The operating expenditures are far too much,” Bryan said. “You can’t train somebody to do economic development by sending them to seminars. “The public should not pay to learn a new job. To train for new skills for advancement, yes, but not a new job. And (director Towan Kopinsky) has retirement on the horizon.” McLemore said he would not consider touching the funding and Commissioner Warren Yeager said he would abide by his stated stance against any budget cuts unless commissioners approved alternative sources of revenue, such as the just-defeated gas tax. “I feel strongly now we have people in place who will promote Gulf County and bring jobs to the county,” McLemore said. Bryan said her list of proposed cuts had been “an exercise in futility” due to the “lack of cooperation” from commissioners. z Redistricting took another twist as McDaniel reversed a previous vote and joined McLemore and Smiley in cutting $40,000 from the budget earmarked for work toward redistricting. “I do know where we can get $40,000,” McLemore said about the decit commissioners faced. McLemore and Smiley, with stated opposition to the ultimate goal, countywide voting, have opposed the $40,000 expenditure and after saying he was not impressed with Bryan’s list of cuts McLemore moved to the cut the funding. The money would be used to hire an outside GIS expert to map the county’s districts based on demographics and, most importantly, total population, which means counting state prisoners, which the BOCC does not in contrast to state requirements. A consulting attorney on countywide voting and the Voting Rights Act and a federal decree recommended the outside consultant to bring the county into compliance with state rules before addressing the federal decree and single-member districts. McDaniel said he agreed with McLemore’s assertion that the work could be done in-house, with the county GIS department and county attorney. “It don’t take a rocket scientist to gure out this map,” McLemore said. Yeager again argued against the cut and said some circumstances called for outside contracting and independence and redistricting was such a case. “We need professional help with some things,” Yeager said. “We need professional outside help to redraw those lines.” The $40,000 was the only cut made as commissioners move $75,000 from another fund to the general fund as a stopgap before the nal hearing. z The county continues to look at the privatizing of EMS. Butler said some nal numbers and a proposal should be forthcoming from Lifeguard in the coming two weeks and that could signicantly color the nal budget document. TAXES from page A1 GULF PINES from page A1 the property to see what refuse could be taken to area landlls and what would need to be handled by specialized contractors. He passed a motion for a request for proposal on asbestos abate ment on the property. The nal question on the topic was whether to sell the lots while the hospital was still standing or wait until they building had been brought down. Commissioners considered trying to pre-sell the properties with a 10 percent deposit while demolition took place. City attorney Tom Gibson said he spoke with several real estate brokers in the area and the consensus was that the lots would not be worth as much with the abandoned hospital building still standing. Commissioners agreed to revisit the discussion after Smallwood had nished redrawing the lot plans. COMPUTER UPGRADES Commissioners voted to lease 26 new computer systems from Dell for various city departments at a cost of $37,543 for the 2014-15 scal year. Many city employees are currently working on outdated systems and the last update to the computers was in September of 2008. IT manager Banyon Pelham told commissioners much of the hardware in use was so outdated that software utilized by the city was no longer supported. If issues arose, support would be extremely lim ited, potentially leaving city operations in the lurch. Earlier in the year a server went ofine at city hall shutting down many operations for a week. The city paid $19,000 for repairs. Pelham said the update would include more stable servers to ensure the city wouldn’t face similar situations in the future. The lease would provide up-to-date equipment for city hall, public works, the waste water plant, police department and water plants. After the lease is up the city will own the equipment. SS OLID WASTE c C ONTRAc C TS Another meeting saw discussion on solid waste contracts being tabled once more. After calling for new contracts from Waste Management and Waste Pro city manager Jim Anderson told commissioners that he was “real close” to having rough drafts for review. “There’s a lot of moving pieces,” Anderson said. “We want to en sure it’s what everyone is looking for before bringing it to vote.”CAPE S S AN BLAS L L IGHTHOUSE After two years of discussion and hard work, commissioners saw the fruits of their labor last week. The Cape San Blas Lighthouse opened at its new location in George Core Park in time for the 18th annual Florida Scallop and Mu sic Festival last weekend. The lighthouse opened to the public on Friday morning and ac cording to St. Joseph Historical Society president Charlotte Pierce 187 adults and 51 children younger than age 12 ascended the iron gi ant during the two-day festival. The property was open to visitors for nine hours each day. “We had a good number of people there,” Pierce said. “The visitors said they thought it was a beautiful, awesome view.” The lighthouse will continue to be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST every Friday and Saturday. Mayor Mel Magidson asked Pierce how long it would take for the lighthouse to receive that number of visitors in its previous location on the cape. While Pierce didn’t have exact gures in front of her, she assured Magidson that it would take “a while.” Commissioner Phil McCroan, who made the climb on Friday, en couraged members of the community to visit the lighthouse and enjoy the view from the top.

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By TOM BAIRD Special to The Star Recently, we hosted visitors from southern California, and naturally went kayaking, paddleboarding, and snorkeling in the bay. It’s common to nd sea urchins on the bottom around the grass ats, but some people didn’t want to touch them for fear they had poisonous spines. This would be a natural reaction of someone from California because the Indo-Pacic region has some truly nasty urchins. Indeed, many people think all urchins have sharp spines and venom. However, the most common urchin in St. Joseph Bay is the little Short-spined sea urchin (Lytechinus variegatus), and it is harmless and easily handled. In fact, it is fascinating to hold and observe the myriad waving spines and moving mouth parts. Short-spined urchins resemble a pin cushion with their one-inch spines and are about the size of a small tomato. Generally, they are pinkish-brown in color, and very often camouage themselves with bits of shell or plant matter held over the body using their tube feet. They play a major role in the balance of life in the bay and can both help or harm sea grass beds depending on their numbers. Urchins are Echinoderms and related to sea stars, sand dollars, sea cucumbers and brittle stars. Sand dollars are just attened urchins. Like most Echinoderms, they possess radial symmetry and a vepart body plan. Like their relatives, they are strictly marine and there are no freshwater urchins. Their senses are limited to touch, the ability to sense light and dark, and chemicals in the water. However, urchins appear to be able to avoid predators and to seek hiding places. How do they do this without eyes? Recently some ingenious researchers at Duke University set up some experiments with urchins to answer that question. The results of their experiments suggest that urchins may in fact use their entire body as an eye, much like the compound eye of a crab or insect. The experiments suggest that urchins can see just as well as a horseshoe crab. So while you are looking at that little sea hedgehog, it might be forming a vague image of you. Turn the little urchin over in your hand and note the mouth parts on the underside. Urchins primarily feed on algae; however, they will also consume invertebrates, such as worms and are attracted to a dead sh or other decaying matter in the water. They will also feed on sea grasses. In experiments conducted here in St. Joseph Bay, researchers found that under moderate grazing pressure, urchins actually helped the sea grasses. They found increases in shoot density and productivity of the turtle grass when moderately grazed. However, too many urchins in an area can denude the sea bottom. For instance, sea otters love urchins. When sea otters were hunted almost to extinction on the Pacic coast, vast areas of bare sea bottom appeared. These are called urchin barrens from the overgrazing of huge numbers of urchins. When sea otters were reintroduced, they brought the urchin population back in check and underwater habitats ourished again. So what keeps the urchin population in check here? Many sh take urchins, as well as birds, crabs, eels, and octopus. Those spines aren’t a total deterrent to predators. In many parts of the world, there is another predator – humans. Urchins are packed with roe. A female may have millions of eggs. In St. Joseph Bay, the urchins are fertile from May to September, and will release huge volumes of eggs. It is those eggs that are a delicacy around the world. In the Mediterranean, urchin eggs are often added to sauces, or eaten raw with lemon. Native American populations from Alaska to the West Indies consumed urchin gonads, and many still do. It is in the Orient however, that you most see urchin roe consumed. It is incorporated in a variety of dishes or served raw in sushi or as sashimi. The demand is so great that Japan imports large quantities from South Korea and the U.S., leading to fears of overshing. While urchin eggs are a rare delicacy to most Americans, nevertheless some are collected for personal consumption on U.S. Atlantic and Pacic coasts. Like oysters, urchins raise the age-old question of who was brave enough or hungry enough to look at a sea urchin and say, “I could eat that.” The hard exoskeleton of urchins is called a test, and it often persists after the urchin dies. Many a beachcomber or shell collector has a sea urchin test or two sitting in their collection or on a shelf. The Short-spined urchins are a critical component of the ecology of St. Joseph Bay. Their presence can stimulate the growth of sea grasses, however a delicate balance must be maintained between intensive grazing, loss of habitat, and sh predation on the urchins. If there are too few sh of a size to consume the urchins, then the urchin population increases and overgrazes the grass ats leading to bare areas and loss of productivity. Good sheries management practices not only sustain sh populations, but the overall long-term productivity of the bay. Who would guess that little sea-going pin cushion you hold in your hand plays such a key role in the health of the bay. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Se pt 18 89 75 0 % Fr i, Se pt 19 86 73 40 % Sa t, Se pt 20 85 74 20 % Sun, Se pt 21 86 74 10 % Mo n, Se pt .22 85 74 10 % Tu es Se pt 23 85 74 80 % We d, Se pt 24 84 74 20 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Autumn Days are Here! Sh op wi th us fo r al l yo ur hu nt in g su ppl ie s www .shopb wo .c om SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR The short-spined sea urchin is the most common sea urchin in St. Joseph Bay Short-spined sea urchins common in St. Joe Bay By WES L OO CHE RR 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com BlueWater Outriggers not only serves as a landmark in Port St. Joe, it now does so below the surface of the Gulf of Mexico as well. Bob Cox, President of the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association, announced that the organization dedicated reef number MB-158 as BWO 6 in honor of George Duren and BlueWater Outriggers their continuous support of the annual Kingsh Tournament held last weekend. The Kingsh Tournament serves as the biggest fundraiser for the organization, which plans to deploy even more reefs in 2015. The BWO 6 reef is one of the super reefs deployed by the organization in April of this year. The six super reefs are 17-25 feet tall and weigh 16-18 tons each. Each reef is constructed from one cubic yard of concrete and covered in Florida limestone. The coarse, porous surface is made of shell fragments and makes it easy for marine animals to attach. At the top of each reef, 10 feet of exposed rebar are meant to attract sh that hunt in higher parts of the water, leading to a more active ecosystem. “I really appreciate all the support George has given the MBARA, making it possible for us to continue building reefs,” Cox said. Learn more about the BWO 6 reef and its location by visiting www.mbara.org/reefdetail. cfm?id=158. PHOTOs S SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR A super reef deployed by the MBARA in April was dedicated to BlueWater Outriggers owner George Duren for his support of the annual Kingsh Tournament. MBARA dedicates reef to Duren Page 10 Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 O UTDoo OO RS www.starfl.com Section A SPON sS ORED BY PP ier/Surf II nshore/Bay OO ffshore/Bottom Flounder are starting to show up in fair numbers on the flats and in shallow water. Live bull minnows are plentiful and a must for any serious flounder anglers! Red fish are running in good numbers along the beaches in our waters and as far as Apalachicola right now. Live bait is a good choice for the bigger ones, however, grubs and jigs are producing good slot sized fish also. Our waters are coming alive again this week as the cooling water and air temperatures are falling a little. Good trout catches are being reported in St. Joe bay, Crooked Island and East Bay. Most anglers are seeing large numbers of fish and catching them as well. Smaller trout seem to be the norm with a limit no to hard to fill. Most trout are aggressively eating live shrimp and even soft plastic baits are producing nice fish.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 A Section Co nv enien tly loc ate da tt he be ach ye tw ith ease ac ce ss to Po rt St .J oe and Pa nama Ci ty .A co mmunit yp ool ,t ennis co ur ts ,p riv ate beach ac ce ss ar ej ust as hor tw alk fr om this home Th em ain oor' sl iving ro om opens to aw ell ma in ta in ed an am pl ed eck and ac ce ss to thr ee be dr oo ms an dg ro und lev el suit e. Th em ast er bedr oom opens to the sc re ened por ch just o the main deck .T he gr ound oor fe at ur es a" self -c on tained ar ea "w ith ac ce ss to the pr iv ate pool and gar age .P len ty of na tur al ligh ti nfuses this home; impec cab ly main tained home and la wn. Co nt ac tE li Du ar te El iD ua rt e 850-227-5152 Be achfr on t3 BD/2BA co ndo with gor geous ,p anor amic view so ft he gulf aw aiting yo u. Lar ge open ki tc hen, living and dining ar ea with gr ea tv iew s. Fu rn ished and re ady fo ry ou .R en tal re ady and is set to do about $20k in re nt al inc ome in 2014. Po ssible ow ner nancing Aline ’s Be aut y Sa lo n & Merl e Nor man Stu dio Limit 1 per customer Offer Expires 9/30/14  •• VDD It†• {› u• •• VDD =…Œ†{t‹ \• †{ 9|‰}|y h||c _yŽ R‰ eƒc_Ž V[ + + 1 0 *)0' 2 ,10 1 +'+ )'11 && 2102+' 1'0 '( + '1/+ $ )2+ '* / '+.0+ + (+ 0+* 0 + 0/ # 2 + 0 +'(1+ '+ $ " ‡+ OO GG B G ‹  ‡+ OO G OQ ‰„‹u„ zS” —u ’| …w‰ ’ „” ‰—~S” —u’ |… w‰ Lady Tiger Sharks drop three matches Star Staff Report The past week, Coach Wayne Taylor said, has been a tough one for the Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School volleyball team. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost three matches last week, going the distance before losing to Bay High and taking Liberty County and South Walton to four sets before falling. Last Monday, Bay came calling to Port St. Joe, and the Lady Tiger Sharks fell 15-25, 2520, 16-25, 25-20 and 4-15. The following night, Port St. Joe traveled to Liberty County. The nal score, with the Tiger Sharks falling, was 21-25, 25-21, 15-25 and 13-25. Thursday the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted South Walton. “South Walton is very good, and this was a very close, tough match,” Taylor said. “It was one of the best fundamental matches of the season for Port St Joe even though we came out on the losing end.” The nal scores were 23-25, 16-25, 25-18 and 23-25. “Overall, the team is showing improvement and starting to function well together as a team,” Taylor said. Top stats leaders for the week were Callie Fleshren with 20 kills and 21 assists and Haley Wood with 15 kills and 4 solo blocks. The Lady Tigers Sharks travel to Wewahitchka and host Franklin County. The team has begun the annual Dig Pink fundraiser for Breast Cancer Awareness and Research. T-shirt sales have begun and a Facebook challenge called 10 for 10 in 30 has been set up to help the team reach its goal. Check it all out at the team’s Facebook page www.facebook.com/TigerSharkVolleyball. In the past ve years, the Lady Tiger Sharks have contributed $5,000 to cancer research thanks to community support and generosity. Page 11 Star Staff Reports GATORS HOST GRACEVILLE IN DISTRICT CONTEST Wewahitchka coach Loren Tillman has emphasized the District 21A schedule as the Gators have opened the football season. Another big district tilt arrives 7 p.m. CT Friday when Graceville visits Gator Field. Coming off a 63-0 loss last week to Liberty County, one of the best teams in the region, the Gators (12 overall) face a scenario similar to the rst two weeks. In the season opener, Wewahitchka lost a onesided game to Port St. Joe but followed that up by scoring 13 unanswered points in the fourth quarter to beat Cottondale in the district opener the following Friday. Now, after losing to Liberty County in a nondistrict tilt, the Gators can snatch a lion’s grip on a playoff spot by beating Graceville to remain unbeaten in the district. SOCCER GOALKEEPER CAMP A four-session Goalkeeper Camp will run Thursday to Saturday, Oct. 2-4. Coaches Gary Hindley of Port St. Joe High School and Don Maples of Knoxville, Tenn., will instruct beginner and more advance players. Only 30 keepers will be registered. The sessions will be at the Callaway Sports Complex, off State 22 in Callaway. Thursday and Friday sessions will run from 5:30-7:30 p.m. CT, and the double session on Saturday will be from 2-4 p.m. and 5:30-7:30 p.m. For further questions or to register, contact Hindley at 850-276-6353 or gjhallpro@aol.com. 850 ATHLETICS – DREAMS INTO REALITY 850 Athletics offers a free after-school program for children ages 7-18 providing direct instruction covering homework and remediation. The schedule is 3:30-5:30 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday. Transportation from Port St. Joe Elementary School is provided. 850 Athletics is at New Bethel Baptist Church, 208 N. Park Ave. in Port St. Joe. To register, email 850Athletics@gmail. com or call Raye Bailey at 307-7197, Jennifer Bailey at 227-6931 or Keion McNair at 890-6967. By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com SAND HILLS — Port St. Joe is back on key. Bozeman is stuck on the same tune. The Tiger Sharks ended a one-game skid with a 46-0 blowout of the homestanding Bucks. PSJ improved to 2-1. Bozeman, which pumped up school pride with a “Red Out“ game, fell to 0-3. Jarkeice Davis led all rushers with 206 yards for PSJ, all coming in the rst half. He raced to touchdowns of 85 and 72 yards in the opening 24 minutes to key the rout. The long gains capped the rst and second quarters, while Bozeman again struggled to score. To their credit, the Bucks saw marked improvement on offense despite having little on the scoreboard to show for their efforts. A quarterback shuf e between David Elmore and Logan Foster netted early results, but Bozeman hurt itself each time. The Bucks opened the game with four completed passes that chewed up 49 yards to the PSJ 36. Three straight incomplete attempts and a delay-of-game penalty killed the drive. A high snap on the ensuing punt delivered a 31-yard loss. PSJ needed six plays to move 28 yards with the game‘s opening score coming on a 1-yard plunge by Cole Cryderman. Bozeman responded with a 22-yard pass and catch from Foster to Elmore, but the march stalled again. Davis went 85 yards on the rst play after a punt for a 14-0 lead. Elmore used his legs to move the chains on Bozeman‘s third possession with 36 yards on four carries. He was corralled for a 4-yard loss and Foster was stopped on another run to end the drive. Aaron Paul scored on a 33yard pass from T.J. Williams seven plays after Bozeman’s third punt. Williams tossed another TD and Davis raced for 72 yards on his eighth carry of the half to continue the celebration. Bozeman was shut out for the rst time this season after having produced one touchdown in each of its rst two games. The Bucks sniffed the end zone late in the second quarter with rst-and-goal from the 10 following pass interference. Their scoring hopes were dashed by a lost fumble. Elmore led Bozeman with 45 yards rushing. He added 62 yards on eight completions. Williams nished with three TD passes, including two to Paul, while also adding a 2-point conversion run in the rst quarter. Bozeman seeks its rst win at Holmes County next week in a District 3-1A game. PSJ blows by Bozeman 46-0 Sports SHORTS

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Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star.com Local A12 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 COURTESY OF RR ON RR UDOLPH An egret sails over St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF LL AURA AT DD RAGONF F LY PP HOTOGRAPHY With the Cape San Blas Lighthouse in the background a sailboat sets off from the boat ramp at Frank Pate Park COURTESY OF MARGY JONES A Cape San Blas sunset COURTESY OF GG INA BRAmb MB LE AT BRAmb MB LIN’ PP HOTOGRAPHY A scallop harvest from St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF TT ROY HH OLTON A double rainbow highlights this sunset over St. Joseph Bay has seen from a residence along CR 30A COURTESY OF TT ERRY LL IND A puffer sh COURTESY OF BILL FF AUTH A cormorant glides above the water off St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF JOANN LL O c C ASc C IO The moon – last week’s so-called “supermoon” – sets last Tuesday morning over St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF TT HOm M AS JETT A heron prepares to take off from the Mexico Beach Pier

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, September 18, 2014 B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) This trivia column (begun in Spartanburg, SC H-J and now nationally widespread) is celebrating what number anniverary this week? 6, 8, 10, 14 2) What’s considered the most dif cult of all woodwind instruments to play correctly? Clarinet, Oboe, Flute, Saxophone 3) Of these which has remained virtually unchanged since 1890? Vicks VapoRub, Vaseline, Band-Aids, Dixie Cups 4) What did Charles Stilwell invent in 1883 that is around today? Grocery bag, Shopping cart, Cash register, Ear muffs 5) How many years did Noah Webster spend writing his famed dictionary? 26, 36, 46, 56 6) During which century was Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick” rst published? 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th 7) Where did cattle branding in the U.S. originate? Connecticut, South Carolina, Texas, Ohio 8) When was the rst-ever Social Security check #00000-001 issued by the U.S. Government? 1920, 1930, 1940, 1950 9) General Manuel Noriega was at one time military leader of what country? Mexico, Cuba, Nicaragua, Panama 10) What’s the number of steps leading to the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa? 296, 412, 602, 856 11) When was Mexico’s current constitution adopted? 1617, 1717, 1817, 1917 12) What was patented by Frank Baldwin in 1850? Hand saw, Adding machine, Fish hook, Paint brush 13) Karachi and Rawalpindi have both been capitals of what country? Pakistan, Nepal, Saudi Arabia, Egypt 14) When a recipe calls fo r a dash of something, that’s about how much of a teaspoonful? 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2 ANSWERS 1) 14. 2) Oboe. 3) Vicks VapoRub. 4) Grocery bag. 5) 36. 6) 19th. 7) Connecticut. 8) 1940. 9) Panama. 10) 296. 11) 1917. 12) Adding machine. 13) Pakistan. 14) 1/16. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com SPECIAL TO THE STAR The next Salt Air Farmer’s Market will be held on Saturday, Sept. 20 at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmer’s Market promotes a sustainable food system on Florida’s Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. SALT AIR FARMER’S MARKET By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m There’s a reason so many visitors ock to area beaches each year and several local groups are doing their part to keep them pristine. On Saturday, Sept. 20 beach cleanups will be held in Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach. The rst in Mexico Beach will run 8:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. CT and volunteers will meet at Sunset Park at U.S. Highway 98 and 19th Street. For 10 of the 12 years she’s lived in Mexico Beach, coordinator Jane Mathis has struck out to ensure the area from shore to U.S. 98 is practically sparkling. According to Mathis the cleanup is held in conjunction with 29th annual Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup, during which volunteers clean up the shores of beaches, lakes and rivers across the world. In 2013 an estimated 648,015 volunteers picked up over 12.3 million pounds of trash along 12,914 miles of shoreline and Mathis hopes to see Mexico Beach visitors and residents add to the tally. “What we’re doing is also being done simultaneously by hundreds of thousands of people all over the world,” Mathis said. “We’re doing a great thing together.” To keep track of their contributions, each volunteer is given gloves, trash bags, snacks and documents that allow them to record what they pick up. Mathis said that a cleanup on this scale can have worldwide implications. She said that in the 1970s many soda cans were manufactured with “pop-tops” that came completely off when opened. These tops quickly became litter and could be found covering beaches and other gathering areas. When volunteer cleanup crews presentFlipKey names Port St. Joe as a top Gulf Coast beach By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m In an August online article Port St. Joe was chosen as one of the top Gulf Coast beaches to visit by the website FlipKey, a branch of the popular travel review site TripAdvisor. com. FlipKey, a vacation rental search engine, based out of Boston, M.A. puts together weekly lists to get seasoned travelers, along with those just lled with wanderlust, out and exploring. Port St. Joe is now an of cial FlipKey recommendation. TripAdvisor is one of the Internet’s largest travel sites built around the goal of enabling travelers to research, plan and embark on the perfect trip. The site offers advice from real travelers and a variety of planning features for booking rooms or airfare. The site boasts 280 million unique monthly visitors with more than 170 million reviews in its database. On the site Port St. Joe has received more than 4,000 reviews covering everything from lodging to vacation rentals to attractions and restaurants. Tara Gardner, manager of online business development for the site, said that the destinations were chosen based on beaches in the Gulf region that have been most favorably reviewed by travelers and narrowed down by a panel of travel experts. “The experts look at factors including quality and beauty of the beaches and the variety of attractions and things to do in the area,” Gardner said. “The Gulf Coast is one of FlipKey’s most popular travel destinations in the country for tourists booking vacation rentals so we wanted to shed more light on some of the By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Party in the park next weekend. National Public Lands Day will be celebrated Saturday, Sept. 27 and to celebrate, the Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will host the annual Park Appreciation Event. The event will kick off at 10 a.m. ET with a shore cleanup until noon to keep the sugar white sands looking beautiful for the events to come. Free sack lunches and beverages will be available to those who participate. At 2 p.m. ET live music will ll Eagle Harbor courtesy of the Bo Spring Band and signup will begin for the sand castle contest. Competitors will sculpt their masterpieces on the beach with judging to begin at 4 p.m. and prizes to be awarded soon after. A low country boil will run from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. ET with plates available for $5 donations and free ice cream for the kids courtesy of Scallop Cove. Food will be offered at no charge for current members. Park Manager Mark Knapke said that plans for the event began as soon as last year’s event concluded as staff members focused on how they could improve the 2014 installment. Knapke said that in the end, the event was all about the people and it was something he wanted to get back to. “This is our third year and we wanted to focus on the initial intent of the event,” Knapke said. “It’s the end of the season and we want to recognize staff members, volunteers and the various entities who support us throughout the year. “It’s a day of appreciation.” The Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park will host a membership drive throughout the event. Individuals can sign up for an annual fee of $15 or $25 per year for families. Perks of the membership include 12 free entries to the park. Businesses can become a friend for $100 annually and receive a free pavilion rental each year. “Members get to be part of what happens at park and many volunteer to help at events,” Knapke said. “Lots of people enjoy the park and it’s their opportunity to be directly involved.” Knapke said that the funds brought in during the event allow the Friends organization to support the park by making needed purchases and helping to pay for large maintenance and improvement projects. Knapke said he hopes to raise enough money from the event to be able to extend the Cape San Blas bike trail inside the park. Displays from area organizations including the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce, Florida Fish and Beach cleanups this weekend FILE PHOTO Vacation rental search service FlipKey.com named Port St. Joe as a top Gulf Coast beach. See FLIPKEY B6 SPECIAL TO THE STAR Judges check out the creative sand castles from the 2013 Appreciation Day competition. Attendees to the Appreciation Day event will enjoy good company, good food and good music. See BEACH B6 Celebrate St. Joseph Peninsula State Park See CELEBRATE B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 Mo rg an is a yo ung fe mal e DSH ca t. Sh e is ve ry fr ie nd ly an d soc ia ble Mo rg an lo ve s to be he ld an d re al ly lik es to be pe tt ed Sh e ke ep s he r ke nne l cle an an d ti dy an d pr om ise s to do so at he r ne w hom e. If yo u ar e unabl e to adop t at thi s ti me pe rh aps yo u co uld fo st er or mak e a Do nat io n. Al l pe ts ado pt ed fr om SJ BH S wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc inat io ns an d sp ay ed /n eu te re d. Pl eas e do no t he sit at e to em ai l tow nse nd hsd ire ct or @g mai l. co m or ado ptb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 711 03 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at ww w. sj bh um a ne soc iet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t ho u rs : Th ur sd aySa tu rda y fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e OF THE WEEK PET If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty St. Joseph Ba y Humane Society www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g To ad ve rt is e he re CA LL Ma rc ia at 22 778 47 LIVE ON TH E POOP DECK RICK OT T BAND SA TURD AY 9P M FRID AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M RAND Y ST AR K BO SPRING ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES UPCOMING EVENTS ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S KARAOKE & DJ THURSD AY -FRID AY -SA TURD AY -9PM AT THE T OP OF THE CRO W’S NEST 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CI TY LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 Serving all of Gulf and Fr anklin Counties Pr ev entati ve Maintenance Email us at inf o@portstjoeac.com www .portstjoeac.com W¦ ™ £¦ ‘ƒ ££ ¦Š ƒ– ™ ¦Š ‹–  I I I D™ –¦ z ¦ £ ¦™ z ‡+ OO GG B G Œ‡Žw’‡ }]—š w• ˆ yŒ Y’ ‡+ OO G OQ ‡—Œ„š ] —š w• ˆ yŒ Society Gayla Williamson, Travis Burge to marry Croska and Arvelia Williamson of Wewahitchka would like to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter Gayla Joy Williamson to Travis Chambers Burge, son of Travis and Lynn Burge of Port St. Joe. The wedding will take place 6 p.m. EST Saturday, Sept. 27 at the Constitution Museum State Park in Port St. Joe with the reception immediately following in the Centennial Building. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Wedding AMERICa A N LEg G ION POSt T 116 M M EEt T INg G There will be a general session American Legion Post 116 meeting at 4 p.m. ET, Thursday, Sept. 18. The meeting will be held at the VFW Post 10069 on Trout Avenue in Highland View. Members are urged to attend. Eligibility for membership and benets can be found on the American Legion website at www. legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. For God and Country. CC OMMISSIONER THURSba BA Y FUNDRa A ISER Port St. Joe city commissioner William Thursbay is in need of our nancial support as he battles verrucous carcinoma of the bladder. To raise funds, food will be sold at the Centennial Building from noon until 6 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 20. Complete chicken or pork dinners will be available with baked beans, cole slaw, roll, drink and a dessert for $10. Advance tickets are recommended and will be sold throughout the community at City Hall, Pristine Pools, Haughty Heron, Mexico Beach CDC, Fish House Restaurant, Mexico Beach Post Ofce, Beachwalk, Shoreline Salon and Spa, Graba Java and El Governor Motel. To donate, call Paula at 227-6128 or Carol at 227-6831. Laura SS eay, Gene Adams wed By LAURA SEAY Special to The Star When we pulled into the quaint Bed & Breakfast in the small coastal town at the base of northern Irish territory, I was already a bit frantic. We were running behind, had gotten a little lost, and I had driven the hour and a half for the rst time on the opposite side of the car and road. Nervous was an understatement. As we unloaded our luggage from the trunk, we saw him drive into view. Our photographer had arrived. I had been hoping to have an hour or so to myself before we met up with him. After all, it was my wedding day, and a girl needs time to x her hair and put on a touch of make-up. Even simple, low-maintenance girls like me. We apologized, stating that we might have to get started a little later than we had planned. I, bare-faced, explained how we’d gotten lost and how the car rental company had not initially found our reservation in their system, setting us back another half hour. He was so relaxed and assured us that we had all the time in the world. I calmed some, but still didn’t want to keep him waiting. I am never late for anything. I went upstairs, Gene not far behind, inging open my suitcase, feverishly searching for my makeup bag. We had so strategically packed and repacked our belongings in our minimal luggage, that this was a feat in and of itself. Which bag is it in?! I nally retrieved it and began the familiar motions of putting on my face. I tried to give my hair a tad more oomph, but quickly changed my mind, as I knew it wouldn’t make much difference. The air was so misty that day. And there he was, buttoning his shirt so calmly, grinning from ear to ear. Why couldn’t I be more like him, even if just for this one day? Gene went downstairs to check in with our photographer, telling him I needed a few more minutes, before returning upstairs to gently hurry me along. As unprepared and thrown-together as I felt, I told him I was ready for him to come up to get some shots of the nal “getting ready” touches. When they both entered the crisp, white room overlooking Carlingford Lough, Tim walked up to me and softly spoke, “Listen. You have nothing to be nervous about. This is going to be a great day. No pressure. No rush. Let’s just relax and enjoy it together.” He also commented on how great I looked in my lacy dress I had so hastily thrown over my head while Gene went to fetch him. A peace suddenly came over me. What was I so worked up over? Everything so far had played out even better than we’d ever imagined possible. Why should I fear that this day would be any different? Becoming aware of my nonsensical behavior, I decided to let it go. He was right. It was going to be a great day. I began to actually enjoy myself. Tim snapped shots of Gene putting on his tie— the tie we’d just bought the night before we boarded the plane—and me putting on my casual jewelry. We didn’t worry about how fancy we would be dressed. We didn’t worry about traditions or things old, new, borrowed, or blue. We were just ourselves. True and simple. Then she entered the room; a young girl with a pacier in her mouth, not even waist-high. In her hand was one of the most gorgeous hand-picked bouquets I’d ever seen— another element I didn’t bother to arrange that day. She was the granddaughter of the B&B owner, and wanted to pick owers for “the princess” on her wedding day. This was the sweetest of moments, in a way that could never be planned or manipulated. It was perfect in all its spontaneity. We made our way downstairs and rode in the backseat of Tim’s car up to the woodsy car park at the base of the mountain. Our mountain. Reuben, our minister, was not far behind. Introductions were made, laughs were had, and up we went. The hike took about twenty minutes and was more difcult than expected. We were all breathing heavily by the time we reached the top, and nothing could prepare us for the view we were about to experience. All we could do was stand there in silence, in awe of the beauty on all sides and as far as our eyes could see. Worth it. This moment, this marvel, made everything—all the planning, stress, nerves, questions—feel worth it. We just stood in complete wonder for about half an hour before any vows were exchanged. Just being here with the person I loved so much, experiencing it all together, felt like our vow in and of itself. We both knew that to say those solemn words in this miraculous place would just be the cherry on top. We turned to face one another, embracing in our joy and gratitude. This time was a gift, a gift that neither of us would ever take for granted. We thanked God with every ber of our being, for each other, for this trip, for this life. Then, in that voice that always steadies and comforts my soul, he spoke into my ear. “We did it.” Laura Seay and Gene Adams were wed on June 13, 2014 in County Down, Northern Ireland. Seay grew up in Port St. Joe and Adams in Thomasville, Ga. The couple currently lives in Dothan, Ala. Wedding CC OURt T ESY OF THIS MM ODERN LOVE | Special to The Star Special to The Star Betsy Ross accepts the Proclamation from Mayor Mel Magidson declaring that the week of September 17 -23, 2014 is Constitution Week, honoring the signing of the U.S. Constitution. Miss Betsy Ross (portrayed by Miss Sadie Burkett), is the Granddaughter of Mrs. Sherrill Russ, Regent of St.Joseph Bay Chapter DAR. Master Cade Costin gave a Colonial ag to the Mayor as a momento of the occasion. Children of the American Revolution are Sadie Burkett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Brian Burkett, and Master Cade Costin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Costin. The children are direct descendants of American Revolutionary War patriots. The monthly meeting of St. Joseph Bay Chapter DAR will be on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at the Sunset Coastal Grill at noon. The speaker this month will be Pastor James Wiley, Oak Grove Church. Pastor Wiley will be giving a program on the U. S. Constitution. Anyone interested in becoming a member of the DAR and would like to attend a meeting, please contact: the Chapter Regent, Sherrill Russ, at 229-8574. Reservations required for the meetings. Society bB RIEFS WES LOCHER | The Star Celebrating Constitution Week

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The Star| B3 Thursday, September 18, 2014 Special to The Star The Woodmen of the World of Port St. Joe presented a U.S. ag to Wewahitchka Elementary School last Wednesday. Woodmen of the World is one of the nation’s leading fraternal benet societies and serves a dual mission—to help ensure nancial security for members and their families through insurance and investment products and to carry out community service projects that enrich lives and benet individuals, families and communities. Woodmen of the World is also a patriotic organization, and member regularly present ags and agpoles to schools, parks, churches and other non-prot organizations. In the past 60 years, Woodmen of the World members have presented more than 1.7 million U.S. ags. For information about Woodmen of the World, contact Carol Dixon at 625-5530. Woodmen of the World was founded in 1890 as a fraternal benet organization. Today, Woodmen of the World offers insurance, annuities, mutual funds and 529 college savings plans. Nearly 785,000 Woodmen of the World members across the country share a commitment to family, community and country. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Pictured are the students named Students of the Month at Wewahitchka Elementary School. The instructional person of the month is second-grade teacher Becky Weston; the non-instructional person of the month is maintenance supervisor Tony Strange. STUDENT sS OF THE MONTH AT WEwW AHITCHKA EE LE mM ENTARY SCHOOL BLUE DD AZZLER sS AT PP ORT ST. JOE EE LE mM ENTARY SCHOOL FF REE TUTORING bB Y NPNP SJ YY OUTH II NITIATIVE Free tutoring services are being offered to at the Washington Recreation Center by the NPSJ Youth Initiative for children in grades 1-7. Help with homework, reading and math skills are available from 3-5 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday. Parents / Guardians will need to pick up and complete an enrollment form. You may contact Mrs. Likely or Mrs. Patten at 229-7808 for more information. Special to The Star FF all P P ictures: Fall pictures will be taken for all students in grades 7-11 tomorrow, Friday, Sept. 19. PP rogress R R eports will be issued Today. Bridges is beginning their fall container garden. We have planted fall tomatoes, so far. Later we will plant cabbage, lettuce, broccoli, turnip greens, kale and other fall vegetables. Seniors will need to pay $80 on Sept. 23 which includes payment for their cap and gown, senior dues, and senior T-shirt. They will be called from Mr. Jardina’s classes for the money to be collected. Please make all checks payable to Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. YY earbooks for 2014-15 school year are now on sale for $40. As always, books must be ordered and paid for in advance. No extras are orders. The $40 price is only available until Sept. 30. You can order from the school or online at www.jostens.com/ apps/store/productBrowse/1039206//2015-Yearbook/2014082804160881072/ CATALOG_SHOP/ GG irls Basketball will have a bake sale on Sept. 20 at the Piggly Wiggly from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. DD ig P P ink fundraiser underway. T-shirt sales are ongoing, see Coach Taylor. A Facebook challenge has been issued. See our Facebook page for more details – www.facebook.com/TigerSharkVolleyball. 4IBSL 5BML Special to The Star The K-4 program at FCS is an incredible transition class from K-3 into Kindergarten. One of the academic highlights of our K-4 class is our reading program. Our K-4 students spend much of the year developing their understanding and execution of phonetic sounds and blends. By the end of K-4, our students are reading stories aloud from their readers. Our K-4 teacher, Mrs. Debbie Burch, has led this class for the past 18 years through the love of Jesus, making incredible impacts on countless numbers of students. In our K-4 class, students learn the phonetic sounds of the alphabet and how to form phonetic blends, they learn to recognize and count numbers 1 through 100, learn twenty-six Bible scriptures from memory, grow their dexterity in letter formation for manuscript penmanship and art, learn and recite classic nursery rhymes and poems, develop an understanding of classroom and behavioral etiquette, and much more. “Watching these young students develop a love for God, school, and reading is a great joy of mine.” Mrs. Debbie said. “Nothing makes me more proud than seeing a student I taught 15 years ago who is now equipping themselves for a call into ministry and knowing Faith Christian School played a part in that.” If you are looking for a place to give your four year old a great biblical and academic foundation, FCS is the place for you. A place where Jesus is the center and love is the theme. Call our ofce today at 229-6707 for more information on this wonderful program. Special to The Star Florida law mandates each school district to report to the public annually the following: Changes to the Student Progression Plan and the Code of Conduct, the number of students promoted in good cause in grade 3, and FCAT assessment results. Legislature mandated the primary change to the Student Progression Plan. Students who entered the ninth grade prior to 20142015 and who have been properly classied with an intellectual disability such as ASD, E/BD, hearing impaired, specic learning disabled, physically impaired or language impaired, may be eligible for a special diploma. However, beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year there will be no special diploma option. The Student Progress Plans reads: Beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year: 1. For students with disabilities for whom the IEP team has determined that the Florida Alternate Assessment is the most appropriate measure of the student’s skills: a. A combination of course substitutions, assessments, industry certications, other accelerated options, or occupational completion points appropriate to the student’s unique skills and abilities that meet the criteria established by the State Board of Education rule. b. A portfolio of quantiable evidence that documents a student’s mastery of academic standards through rigorous metrics established by State Board of Education rule. A portfolio may include, but not be limited to, documentation of work experience, internships, community service, and postsecondary credit. 2. For a student with a disability for whom the IEP team has determined that mastery of academic and employment competencies is the most appropriate way for a student to demonstrate his/her skills: a. Documented completion of the minimum high school graduation requirements, including the number of course credits prescribed by rules of the State Board of Education. b. Documented achievement of all annual goals and short-term objectives for academic and employment competencies, industry certications, and occupational completion points specied in the student’s transition plan. The documentation must be veried by the IEP team. c. Documented successful employment for the number of hours per week specied in the student’s transition plan, for the equivalent of 1 semester, and payment of a minimum wage in compliance with the requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. d. Documented mastery of the academic and employment competencies, industry certications, and occupational competition points specied in the student’s transition plan. The documentation must be veried by the IEP team, the employer, and the teacher. The transition plan must be developed and signed by the student, parent, teacher, and employer before placement in employment and must identify the following: 1) The expected academic and employment competencies, industry certications, and occupational competition points; 2) The criteria for determining and certifying mastery of the competencies; 3) The work schedule and the minimum number of hours to be worked per week; and 4) A description of the supervision to be provided by the school district. The following change was made to both the Student Progression Plan and the Code of Conduct: The student is expected to make up all work and all tests missed during any absence(s) according to the following conditions: 1. The student must contact the teachers on the rst day back in each class in order to make arrangements to make up the work. 2. It is the student’s responsibility to make up work within the given time frame unless other arrangements are made due to extenuating circumstances. The time frame for make-up work is the number of days absent plus one (1) day commencing immediately upon return from the absence. i.e., 1 day absent plus 1 equals 2 days to make up work.) Previously, work missed during an unexcused absence could be made up however; students were unable to score higher than 59 on such assignments. FCAT reading data for grades 3-10 are reported county-wide by percent: GG RADE 3 • Level 1: 18 percent • Level 2: 31 percent • Level 3: 28 percent • Level 4: 18 percent • Level 5: 5 percent GG RADE 4 • Level 1: 15 percent • Level 2: 22 percent • Level 3: 29 percent • Level 4: 26 percent • Level 5: 7 percent GG RADE 5 • Level 1: 17 percent • Level 2: 18 percent • Level 3: 26 percent • Level 4: 24 percent • Level 5: 5 percent GG RADE 6 • Level 1: 12 percent • Level 2: 29 percent • Level 3: 23 percent • Level 4: 22 percent • Level 5: 11 percent GG RADE 7 • Level 1: 9 percent • Level 2: 28 percent • Level 3: 34 percent • Level 4: 18 percent • Level 5: 11 percent GG RADE 8 • Level 1: 18 percent • Level 2: 29 percent • Level 3: 23 percent • Level 4: 22 percent • Level 5: 8 percent GG RADE 9 • Level 1: 12 percent • Level 2: 29 percent • Level 3: 24 percent • Level 4: 23 percent • Level 5: 13 percent GG RADE 10 • Level 1: 10 percent • Level 2: 29 percent • Level 3: 27 percent • Level 4: 24 percent • Level 5: 9 percent Third grade good cause promotion gures: Good Cause #4: 3 students, Good Cause #5: 7 students, Good Cause #6: 1 student. For more information about your child’s school, you may access the Florida Department of Education at www.doe.org (School Grade) or the district’s webpage via www.gulf. k12..us. Look under documents for the Student Progression Plan, Code of Conduct, the Title I Parent Involvement Plan, School Improvement Plans, and other documents of interest. The School Public Accountability Report is available on the district’s webpage as well as at each school upon request SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR This week’s Blue Dazzlers from Port St. Joe Elementary School. Woodmen of the World lodge presents ag to WES School district news The Lion’s Tale School bB RIEF School News

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F AITH Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Sponsored by the church Men’s Club Special to The Star A fabulous spaghetti dinner, entertainment, sing-along fun, door prizes and a cash bar featuring Italian beer and wine await you at the seventh annual SJCC Men’s Club Spaghetti Dinner. The dinner will be held on 5-7 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 4, at the church hall. The hall is just east of the church (20th Street and Monument Avenue) on 20th Street in Port St. Joe. In addition to the spaghetti dinner, you will get a salad, garlic bread and delicious desserts. You will enjoy Italian Accordionist Tony Minichello and vocalist and sign-along leader Marty Jarosz. You can win one of the many door prizes as well. The ticket prices are $8 for adults and $4 for children ages 5-12. Fouryear-olds and younger will be admitted free of charge. Tickets will be $10 and $5 if purchased the date of the event at the door. Get your tickets from any Men’s Club Member, by stopping by the church hall ofce (227-1417), at Hannon Insurance, the No Name Caf Books & More or by calling Men’s Club President Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Get your tickets early; only 200 will be sold. You can also get spaghetti dinners to go if you wish. Nz’ ’ ¡ 9’ ~z …}z ’ T & % # % % % % % $ qY l ¦ ¨ S’ ¦Š’ OSS (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) !!! !!! !!! !!! !!! ! !! COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME e X ]†q~ 8†‚v†‹t‹ L>9 (850) 227-1818 Y• <}• u} usˆ tx ›Š• }Š†x B ’ <}• u} Šz ’}x Vsœs xˆx & % "" "# & (850) 229-9596 '" '" % "# '" '" $ '" Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. Fi rs t Un it ed Me tho di st Ch ur ch Is se ek in g a pa rt ti me nu rs er y ass is ta nt to ca re fo r ch il d re n age s 05 du ri ng Su nd ay Sc ho ol Su nd ay wo rs hi p se rv ic es Su nd ay ni gh ts We dn es da y ni g ht s, Fr id ay mo rn in gs an d ot her ch ur ch ev en ts as re qu ir ed Pl ea se su bm it a re su me co nt ac t in fo rm at io n fo r at le as t 3 re fe re nc es an d a co ve r le t te r to fu mc ps j@ gt co m. ne t At te nt io n: Nu rs er y Po si ti on or P. O. Bo x 26 6 Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 7 At te nt io n: Bo bb i La ss it er 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net +++&$%&!%& 9:15 a.m .................................................................................................. Pr ay er ser vic e 9:45 a.m ................................................................................................ Sunda y school 10:30 a.m .................................................................................. Fe llo ws hip br eakfast 11 a.m .................................................................................................. Wo rship ser vic e www .f ait hb ib le ps j. ne t 80 1 20 th St re et Po rt St Joe, Fl (8 50 ) 22 967 07 SOUTHERLAND FA MIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 10 0 E 19 th St re et Pa na ma Ci ty Fl or id a "#!" !& # $#!! '$ # &!" &# $"0 $' 3073 $' # !'! 4 "' 1 &&& 5'$!5# 727 % 6 &#& !# #5 6 ).3,22+,./77 # & !$ "! $" # #! "$ ('*( $ )'*( SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children’ s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE B ’ :sŒ ’ ’ <}• u } $ && & 6 ’ rr 8oŒ –t F O {„{Œt‹ †v O’Œ{q {‹Œ 6oˆ {Œ 8y’‹qy ^’ „r o ^ qy† † e† ‹Œy {ˆ ^ t‹• {qt C' o ‚ ^ ’„ ro ^q y †† e† ‹Œy {ˆ ^ t‹• {qt 'S o‚ ^’ „r o < •t„ {„x 4r ’ 6 {pt ^ ’r ˆ‚ e tr „t Œr o R{ xy  ^’ˆˆt ‹ m'S ˆ ‚ ! #% ! # S ˆ‚ ! #% "% ! 'S ˆ ‚ ! #% % 'S ˆ ‚ www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g `›‹xu ¡ `›‹xu ¡ `w ~… Q* u‰ g ’” ~ `z’ wz *f u‰ ?~’ '* ‰ Rt– ^t‹•{ qt ^qytr’ t v†‹ >{‹Œ 6oˆ {Œ 8y’‹qy gz x‹z” xu ¡ @‹‹z’ ‡* '* ‰ 9g 9W 9 '* G* f ‰ `›’’ z‹ xz’ `— ›xz‹— T‹” —’ ¡ '* ‡ G* f ‰ [’ u¡ z’;v…z `— ›x¡ '*f G* f ‰ W›’ ”z’ ¡ '* G* f ‰ Bruce Hodge, Pa stor *+ ˆ Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter “under the sails” on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children’ s time. Special to The Star What your handwriting reveals about you will be discussed 7 p.m. CT Monday, Sept. 22, at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled “Sign Here: What Handwriting Reveals About You—and Others,” features a lmed interview with master graphologist Kathi McKnight. “There are about 5,000 things a person’s handwriting reveals about the writer, and just a few things it can’t tell you,” says McKnight, who will reveal some of her secrets for analyzing handwriting. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. King Belshazzar saw the handwriting on the wall. Daniel explained what it meant, but it didn’t slow the party at all. Daniel told him he was about to lose his throne. He had drank so much wine, it didn’t hit home. That very night the message came true. He lost his throne and his life too. If you’re a Christian and still drink too, You can be a stumbling block, if the lost see you. Even a weaker Christian, you can lead astray. When they see you drink your little social drink each day. Read the 14th chapter of Romans, then you make the call. If God’s word doesn’t convict you, you missed the handwriting on the wall. Nearly 40 years ago, I had to make that call. Thank God I saw, the handwriting on the wall. Billy Johnson ANNU aA L FRUIT H aA RVEST WORS hH IP aA T ZION F a A IR The City Wide Missionary Society of Port St. Joe will conduct its annual Fruit Harvest Worship Services at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church at 7 p.m. ET on Thursday, Sept. 18. All citizens, churches, and organizations in the community are asked to support this program through your donations and attendance. Proceeds from this service are used for the Mission’s Thanksgiving holiday Outreach Ministry. WOMEN’S D aA Y aA T PhPH IL adAD ELP hH I aA PP RIMITIVE Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will observe its annual Women’s Day on Sunday, Sept. 21. Guest messenger of the observance will be Sister Glenda Alexander, Pastor of Spirit of Pentecost Church Panama City. The focal message for the 11 a.m. ET worship service is “What God Has For Me” and is promised to bring encouragement and spiritual growth to all in attendance. The church is on Avenue D. ‘HE aA RTS fF OR C aA RTa A GEN aA ’ PaPAN caCA KE BRE aA K faFAST Enjoy a pancake breakfast for a good cause 8-11 a.m. ET Saturday, Sept. 20, at Sister’s Restaurant. For a $6 donation you get a plate of pancakes and either patty or link sausage along with beverage. Proceeds support Oak Grove Church’s mission to Cartagena, Colombia. Faith BRIE fF S Handwriting secrets revealed Sept. 22 at Lifetree Caf The handwriting on the wall St. Joseph Catholic Church Spaghetti dinner

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The Star| B5 Thursday, September 18, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 +" '"+% $ !$ $ '$ *$ '$ ( $( *$ $$ & $ '$ $ '$( #' # # ) +$ ($ $ + Faith Mary Alice Follendore, 86, of Wewahitchka died Sept. 13 at Willson Hospice House in Albany, G.A. Graveside funeral services were held on Wednesday at Roberts Cemetery in Wewahitchka, ofciated by Chief Scott Rigsby. Mrs. Follendore was born to John and Ruby Jackson on Sept. 13 in Columbus, Ga. She grew up and attended school in Columbus and moved to Wewahitchka from Southport, Fla., 10 years ago as a homemaker. Survivors include a son and his wife, Robert and Linda Taylor of Albany; ve grandchildren, Katrina Copeland and her husband, Wes of McDonough, Ga., Tammy Taylor of Valdosta, Ga., Kerrie McBride and her husband, Eddie of Albany, Angel Sewell and her husband, Joe and Monty Odom all of Wewahitchka; eight great-grandchildren and six great-greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her daughter, Charlotte Odom. The family will be at the residence of Robert and Linda Taylor at 1906 Weymouth Drive, Albany, G.A 31721. Those desiring may make contributions to Willson Hospice House, 320 Foundation Lane, Albany, G.A. 31707. To sign the online registry or send condolences to the family, visit the Mathews Funeral Home website at www. mathewsfuneralhome.com. Mary Alice Follendore Mrs. Belinda L. Parham, 71 of Newnan, G.A., passed away Tuesday, Sept. 9, at Hospice LaGrange. Born February 4, 1943 in LaGrange, Ga., Mrs. Parham was the daughter of the late Johnny and Alice Feagin. She retired from Ampex in Opelika, Ala., after 27 years of service and had lived in Port St. Joe from 1992 until earlier this year. Mrs. Parham attended Beach Baptist Chapel and was an avid Auburn fan. Survivors include her daughter and son in-law, Toni and Shawn Bidinger of Newnan; sons and daughters in-law, Tommy and Vonda Worley and Terry and Heather Worley, all of Opelika, Ala.; step-daughter and son in-law, Jennifer and Matt Ward of Fort Walton Beach; step-son and daughter in-law, Jamey and Stephanie Parham of Pace, Fla.; sister, Carolyn Wilson of Warm Springs, Ga.; brother and sister in-law, Danny and Sue Feagin of Acworth, Ga.; 10 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband James David Parham. The funeral service was conducted at 6:00 p.m., Thursday, September 11, in the Chapel of Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home in Hogansville, G.A. with Mr. Tim Wilson and the Reverend Josh Rhye ofciating. Interment was at 3:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 12, in Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe, with Pastor David Nichols ofciating. Condolences may be expressed at www. mckibbenfuneralhome. com Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home of Hogansville were in charge of arrangements. Belinda L. Parham Hillard “Bill” Morris Hammock, Jr., 90 was born in Lake Wales, Florida on May 6, 1924 to parents Jesse Mae Hammock and H. M. Hammock. Bill passed away on September 12, 2014. He is predeceased by his wife of 67 years, Beverly Ann Yuill Hammock. Bill leaves behind one son, Alan Hammock of Bradenton, Fla., and two daughters, Jan Smith (Dean), Atlantic Beach, Fla., and Suzanne White (Gary) Port St. Joe. His grandchildren include Laura Hammock, Mckenna Hammock, Andy White (Kristen) and Erin White; one greatgrandson Eli Colt “CW” White. Bill grew up in Port St. Joe and joined the US Marine Corps at age 19. A soldier in the 1st Marine Division, he was wounded on April 13, 1945, in the battle of Okinawa. He was awarded the Purple Heart. During recovery he then met his wife of 67 years, a Navy nurse in the Philadelphia naval hospital. After returning to Port St. Joe, he worked for the St. Joe Paper Company for 45 years. The family would like to express their love and appreciation to the wonderful caregivers that have taken care of him just like family. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to the charity of your choice. A graveside service was held at the Holly Hill Cemetery 3 p.m. ET on Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Hillard ‘Bill’ Morris Hammock, Jr. In loving mM E mM ORY Gillie McNair Boy! It’s been a year already mama. Time does y. What makes my heart sing is, you saw Jesus, and then he pointed to your mother whom you saw for the very rst time. I can just imagine the smile on your face. We miss you but I know you are safe with God. Tell everybody hello and we’ll see you in the morning. Love you still, Lorene “Red” McNair Tunstalle & Family Harold Stetson Kirkland, 68, of White City, Florida, passed away on Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Harold was born on October 30, 1945 in Port St. Joe, Florida to the late Harold and Janell Kirkland. In 1966 he entered the United States Army and served as paratrooper in the 101st Air Borne Screaming Eagles Division where he was awarded a bronze star for his exemplary service. Harold was an avid sherman and hunter but also enjoyed spending time with his son building cars. He was also a great witness of Jesus and could be found proclaiming his testimony. Harold is survived by his loving wife of 38 years Martha Kirkland, four children, Christine Jones, Kelli McCarter and husband (Christian), Kristi Gordon and husband Michael, and Hal (Bruv) Kirkland. He also leaves to cherish his memory six grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. A Celebration of life will be held on Saturday, October 4, 2014 at White City Baptist Church where Harold was a dedicated member. The service will be held at 1 p.m. ET. Funeral arrangement were by Brock’s Home Town Funeral Home in Callaway, Harold Stetson Kirkland 1945 to 2014 Obituaries sS U bmBM I ssSS IO nsNS Send obituaries to tcroft@star.com Star Staff Report On Monday, Sept. 8 Scout Troop 347 held its rst court of honor. A court of honor is where scouts are recognized in front of family and friends for merit badges, awards and rank advancement they have earned during each quarter of the year. The following scouts were honored that evening: Star Scout Christian Quaranta, First Class Scout Sean Farnsley, Scout Canaan Goddin and Scout Noah Perea all earned their environmental science merit badge. Scouts Tyler Guthrie and Corey Phelps had advanced to Tenderfoot. Both had earned the following merit badges: leather working, weather, nger printing and environmental science. Star Scout Hunter Van Der Tulip had advanced to the rank of Life Scout. Hunters next rank he is actively working on is his Eagle Scout, the highest rank in scouting any boy can achieve. Hunter has also earned the following merit badges and awards: BSA stand up paddle boarding award, personal management, communications, lifesaving, radio, wood carving, mammal study, wilderness survival, game design, rowing, pioneering and metal working merit badges. On behalf of all of your leaders and the troop committee we would like to say congratulations and keep up the great work. And if anyone would like to have their son get involved in our program we meet every Monday at 6 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Port St. Joe. Come by check us out and ask questions or call Scoutmaster Bill at 247-9091. Court of Honor for United Methodist Church Scout Troop 347

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 region’s best for those who are interested in learning more about them.” Gardner said that with the fall shoulder season of September through November fast approaching FlipKey has seen an in ux of travelers searching the site for warmer areas to visit that are less crowded and still affordable. “The Gulf region is one of the best parts of the country during the fall for this very reason and we wanted to pull together some of the very best places as travel inspiration for this time of year.” Gardner said. Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, said the article supports the county’s marketing efforts, especially when goals for the next scal year include a plan to grow visitation in the offseason by 20 percent. “We saw the article last week and are thrilled,” Jenkins said. “We will not keep our eye off summer, rather we want to sustain our record season but really impact the other three.” Gardner said that the site’s travel experts come from a variety of backgrounds but what they all have in common is experience in keeping a pulse on the latest travel trends and conducting research into traveler’s top picks and favorite destinations through TripAdvisor. Perhaps the Forgotten Coast isn’t so forgotten after all. Other Florida beaches on the list include Perdido Key, Pensacola Beach, Panama City Beach and Marco Island. The article can be viewed online at www. ipkey.com/blog/2014/08/18/ top-gulf-coast-beaches-tovisit. FLIPKEY from page B1 ed the legislature with their ndings, showing that a large majority of the litter came from these “pop-tops,” laws were passed to remove them from soda cans and they were replaced with the tabs we see today. “Our work can result in education and law changes to improve how we package things,” Mathis said. Last year, the Mexico Beach cleanup brought out 39 volunteers who picked up more than 600 pounds of trash. Mathis said she hoped to see those numbers rise this year. To help in the endeavor, Melina Elum will host the rst annual St. Joe Beach cleanup. Volunteers will meet at the corner of U.S. Highway 98 and Coronado Street in St. Joe Beach at 8:30 a.m. ET and continue their cleanup through 10:30 a.m. ET. “I honestly believe that if we don’t do this right now, it will be a totally uncontrollable situation in the near future and there will be con ict,” Elum said. “It breaks my heart when I walk the beach in the morning and see what looks like an abandoned campground or tent city.” Mathis said she’s mentored Elum and hopes to see her host many more cleanups in the future. “It’s obvious to me that over the 10 years of organizing the Mexico Beach cleanup, (Jane) has worked hard to establish a following of concerned citizens who, like her, demonstrate a high degree of respect for our beautiful beaches and the state of their health,” Elum said. “Jane has been very supportive and deserves a lot of credit for giving her time and knowledge to this endeavor.” Elum will have the assistance of 15 NJROTC cadets from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, but welcomes residents and visitors of St. Joe Beach to join in on the fun. Additionally, Elum has plans to form a group for citizens who want to remove clutter from St. Joe Beach on a regular basis, especially after a busy summer where trash was ever-present. “We’re expanding and I’m very happy,” Mathis said. “The beach cleanup has become something the community values. “It’s nice to give the beach a good scrubbing once a year and I feel like the cleanup is something positive and tangible for the community.” BEACH from page B1 B6 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 33583S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1071 Application No. 2014-37 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 04154-000R Description of Property: Lots Two (2) and Four (4), Block Thirty-Two (32), Port St. Joe Beach Unit No. Two (2), as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 6 in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, same being located in Fractional Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West. Name in which assessed: Kenneth James Todd Gould, ET AL All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 1st day of October, 2014. Dated this 25th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33585S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 710 Application No. 2014-35 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03130-005R Description of Property: Lot 9, Block “D”, Money Bayou Subdivision, a subdivision as per plat or map thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 49, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Kevin Strickland All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 1st day of October, 2014. Dated this 25th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33587S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 266 Application No. 2014-36 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 01369-110R Description of Property: BEGINNING at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the SE Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 86 Degrees 39 Minutes 48 Seconds West, along the South boundary line of said Section 35, for 228.13 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Road No. 71; then turn right along said R/W line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 4384.04 feet and a central angle of 05 Degrees 10 Minutes 23 Seconds, for an arc length of 395.82 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run North 85 Degrees 55 Minutes 02 Seconds East for 634.98 feet; thence South 03 Degrees 21 Minutes 05 Seconds East for 390.04 feet; thence South 85 Degrees 55 Minutes 02 Seconds West for 484.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Sections 35 and 36, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and having an area of 261,338.22 square feet or 6.00 acres, more or less. LESS AND EXCEPT that Deeded to Ladora L. Mombi, as per Deed recorded in O.R. Book 237, Page 267, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Donna K. Nickell All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 1st day of October, 2014. Dated this 25th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33611S IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA PANAMA CITY DIVISION CASE NO.: 5:13-cv-00162 CADENCE BANK, N.A., as successor-in-interest by merger to Superior Bank, N.A., as successor-in-interest to Superior Bank, FSB, by asset acquisition from the FDIC as receiver for Superior Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. APEX DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a limited liability company, GEORGE STEPHENS NEWMAN, JR., an individual, JOSEPH PATRICK FERRELL, an individual, JOHN Z. FERRELL, an individual CARRAWAY BAY PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, a Florida non-profit corporation, OCEAN PLANTATION HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, HIDE-A-WAY AT LAKE POWELL HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., A Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF U.S. MARSHAL’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Amended Final Default and Summary Judgment directed to me by the U.S. District Court in the above styled cause, the undersigned United States Marshal or any of his duly authorized deputies, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. Section 2001, et seq., will sell the property having the legal description of: EXHIBIT “A” Newman F errell Property: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 18. Township 9 South, Range 11 West. Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South Range 11 West. Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot right of way of State Road No. 30-B; thence Southeasterly along said right of way boundary the following six courses and distances: thence South 23 degrees 25 minutes 11 seconds East, 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left: thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 degrees 08 minutes 33 seconds, an arc length of 427.29 feet; thence South 25 degrees 33 minutes 44 seconds Eastl 171.69 feet to a point of curve to the right: thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11415.15 feet: a central angle of 05 degrees 18 minutes 49 seconds an arc length of 1058.64 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East 3017.88 feet to the Point of Beginning: thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East. 102.00 feet: thence leaving said Southwest right of way boundary, South 69 degrees 45 seconds 05 minutes West, 264.15 feet: thence North 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds West. 101.83 feet: thence North 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds East, 264.15 feet to the Point of Beginning, said lands containing 0.62 acres, more or less. Together with a 5 Pedestrian Access Easement a 5.00 foot wide parcel of land lying and being in Section 18, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying 2.50 feet on each side of the following described centerline: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida: thence North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot right of way of State Road No. 30-E thence Southeasterly along said right of way boundary the following six courses and distances: thence South 23 degrees 25 minuets 11 seconds East, 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left; thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11426.79 feet: a central angle of 02 degrees 08 minutes 33 seconds an arc length of 427.29 feet: thence South 25 degrees 33 minutes 44 seconds East 1711.69 feet to a point of curve to the right: thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11415.15 feet: a central angle of 05 degrees 18 minuets 49 second, an arc length of 1058.64 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East, 3017.88 feet; thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East, 102.00 feet: thence leaving said Southwest right of way boundary; South 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds West, 548.30 feet: thence North 20 degrees 14 minuets 55 seconds West, 5083 feet to the Point of Beginning of this centerline; thence South 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds West 315.14 feet more or less to a point on the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico. Said point being the Point of Termination of this centerline. Together with an ingress/egress/Utility Easement: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 18. Township 9 South. Range 11 West. Gulf County. Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary of Section 6, Township 9 South. Range 11 West, 1341.09 feet to the Southwesterly boundary of the 100 foot right of way of State Road No. 30-E; thence Southeasterly along said right of way boundary the following six courses and distances: thence South 23 degrees 25 minutes 11 seconds East, 1642.44 feet to a point of curve to the left; thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 degrees 08 minutes 33 seconds for an arc length of 427.29 feet; thence South 25 degrees 33 minutes 44 seconds East. 1711.69 feet to a point of curve to the right; thence Southeasterly along the arc of said curve having a radius of 11415.15 feet, a central angle of 05 degrees 18 minutes 49 seconds for an arc length of 1058.64 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East 3017.88 feet: thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East, 82.00 feet to the Point of Beginning: thence continue South 20 degrees 14 minuets 55 seconds East, 20.00 feet: thence leaving said right of way boundary, South 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds West 548.30 feet; thence North 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds West. 60.81 feet; thence North 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds East. 15.00 feet: thence South 20 degrees 14 minuets 55 seconds East, 40.84 feet: thence North 69 degrees 45 minutes 05 seconds East, 533.30 feet to the Point of Beginning. together with all appurtenances thereto and all improvements thereon, at public auction at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, on the 15th day of October, 2014, at 12:00 p.m. EST. The terms of the sale shall be certified funds, with ten percent (10%) of the successful bid to be deposited with the undersigned by the successful bidder upon the property being struck off to him; the balance of the successful bid shall be due and payable in the office of the undersigned at 111 N. Adams Street, Suite 277, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within fortyeight (48) hours following conclusion of the sale. The plaintiff reserves the right to bid on the above property and apply the indebtedness of the defendant to any bid so made. Any questions should be directed to Allison C. Doucette, Esquire at (813) 273-5616. Ed Spooner United States Marshal September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33615S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-62-CA DIRECT PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER LOGAN JOHNSON, ANA DAVIS JOHNSON, RBC BANK F/K/A RBC CENTURA BANK, SURFSIDE ESTATES OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO CHRISTOPHER LOGAN JOHNSON and ANA DAVIS JOHNSON: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action seeking to quiet title in the property located in Gulf County, Florida, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 23: Commence at the Intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. St. joseph State Park Appreciation Day Featuring Music By Food & Drinks Family Fun September 27, 2014 (National public lands day) St. Joseph Peninsula State Park (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands day) (National public lands 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State Park St. joseph State Park St. joseph State Park St. joseph State Park St. joseph State Park St. joseph State Park St. joseph State Park Invites You to join us for Voted #1 State Park in America by americasbestonline.com Come have fun and learn about the park Music and Entertainment will be located at Eagle Harbor and can be enjoyed by boat or from the beaches of Eagle Harbor sandcastle Contest Judging Will Be at 4:00pm Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Come have fun and learn about the park Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm open to public for $5 Donation free for Current Members, Volunteers & Staff Free Ice Cream for THE kids Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Music and Entertainment Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Low Country shrimp Boil 3:00 6:00 pm Become a Park “Friend”! Join On Appreciation Day! Featuring Music By Featuring Music By St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park .PSOJOH4IPSFMJOF$MFBOVQt'SFF4BDL-VODI"OE#FWFSBHF'PS5IPTF1BSUJDJQBUJOH*O4IPSF-JOF$MFBO6Q Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Invites You to join us for Photo By Debbie Hooper Family Fun Family Fun Food & Drinks Food & Drinks ZZZ)ULHQGV2I6W-RVHSK3HQLQVXOD6WDWH3DUNRUJ #P4QSJOH#BOE #P4QSJOH#BOE St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park St. Joseph Peninsula State Park Environmental and Community Educational Displays! Activities: Sand Castle Contest Programs: Marine Life Kayaking, Fishing, Cast Netting Wildlife Conservation Commission, turtle patrol and St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve will also be set up at the celebration to provide information to educate attendees on how to protect or enhance the park’s natural resources. “It’s one of our best days of the year for folks helping to manage the park and its resources,” Knapke said. “It’s also a chance for visitors to meet everyone involved in the operation.” Throughout the event park administrators, staff and volunteers will be recognized for their contributions. For more information on the Park Appreciation event contact the park of ce at 227-1327. CELEBRATE from page B1 SPECIAL TO THE STAR Two events held on Saturday morning will clean the beaches in Saint Joe Beach and Mexico beach from the shore to the highway. Last year the annual Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup disposed of 12.3 million pounds of trash along 12,914 miles of shoreline worldwide.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 18, 2014 The Star | B7 right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. (hereafter “the Property”). has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within 30 days of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: August 22, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 33679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 14-45-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT CHRISTOPHER HILL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT CHRISTOPHER HILL, JOSEPH L. JONES A/K/A JOSEPH JONES, MARTHA A. JONES A/K/A MARTHA JONES, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Re-Establishment of Promissory Note dated August 21, 2014, in Case No. 14-45-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and ROBERT CHRISTOPHER HILL, JOSEPH L. JONES A/K/A JOSEPH JONES, and MARTHA A. JONES A/K/A MARTHA JONES are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on September 25, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Re-Establishment of Promissory Note and more particularly described as follows: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 6, Township 7 South, Range 8 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northwest Corner of the Southwest Quarter of said Section 6; thence South 00 degrees 08 minutes 41 seconds West along the West boundary line of said Section 6, 64.57 feet to the Northerly right of way boundary line of County Road No. 387 (AKA Doc Whitfield Road -having a 100 foot right of way); thence South 74 degrees 39 minutes 12 seconds East along said right of way boundary line, 2728.36 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning departing said right of way boundary line, North 15 degrees 20 minutes 48 seconds East, 218.00 feet; thence South 74 degrees 39 minutes 12 seconds East, 100.00 feet; thence South 15 degrees 20 minutes 48 seconds West, 218.00 feet to the aforesaid Northerly right of way boundary line of County Road No. 387 (AKA Doc Whitfield Road); thence North 74 degrees 39 minutes 12 seconds West, 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO KNOWN AS: Lot 26, of Block “J”, Howard Creek Properties Unrecorded. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: September 2, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court BY: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33681S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2012 CA 000164 Division: BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN WHITE; et. al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated August 21, 2014, entered in Civil Case No.: 2012 CA 000164, of the Circuit Court of the of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is Plaintiff, and STEVEN WHITE; BRANDY A. WHITE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. REBECCCA L. (BECKY) NORRIS, the Clerk of the Court shall sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL. 32456 on the 25th day of September, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK D, STONE MILL CREEK ESTATES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN S 89 55’ 18” E ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 3 FOR 1293.98 FEET; THENCE S 00 25’ 04” W FOR 342.98 FEET; THENCE N 89 24’ 46” E FOR 395.83 FEET; THENCE N 89 57’ 41” E FOR 33.00 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 66.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 89 57’ 41” E FOR 33.00 FEET; THENCE N 89 24’ 46” E FOR 140.00 FEET; THENCE N 04 05’ 38” E FOR 327.24 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 66.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY; THENCE N 87 55’ 41” W ALONG SAID CENTERLINE FOR 199.92 FEET; THENCE S 00 35’ 14” E ALONG SAID CENTERLINE FOR 335.12 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 33.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY AND WESTERLY BOUNDARIES. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2007 MANUFACTURED HOME SERIAL NUMBER WHC016484GAA AND WHC016484GAB. This property is located at the Street address of: 230 W. CREEKVIEW DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 1, 2014. REBECCA L. (BECKY) NORRIS CLERK OF COURT By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Elizabeth R. Wellborn, Esq. Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd., Suite 100 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Tele: (954) 354-3544 Fax: (954) 354-3545 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, FL, 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File #8377ST-38139 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33691S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 14-73-CA JEAN F. ARNOLD 18069 Main Street N. Blountstown, FL 32424 Plaintiff -vsSHERRY R. POTTS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS 7849 McClean Road Tallahassee, FL 32312 Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 21, 2014, and entered in Civil Case No. 14-73-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein JEAN F. ARNOLD is the Plaintiff and SHERRY R. POTTS is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., E.T., on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: A portion of Lots 2 and 3, Block 3, Beacon Hill Subdivision, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2,Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being in Section 30, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 3, Beacon Hill Subdivision, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being on the Southwest right of way line of U. S. Highway 98; thence along said Southwest right of way line, North 43`13’07” West, 95.15 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said Southwest right of way line, North 43`13’07” West, 18.00 feet; thence leaving said Southwest right of way line, South 46`44’53” West, 224.35 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence along said mean high water line, South 41`53’01” East, 18.01 feet, more or less, to a point on a line that bears South 46`44’53” West of the Point of Beginning; thence leaving said mean high water line, North 46`44’53” East, 224.77 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said lands containing 0.09 acre, more or less. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or Telephone (850)229-6113 prior to such proceedings. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 3rd day of September, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Costin & Costin Charles A. Costin Clerk of Circuit Court 413 Williams Ave. P.O. Box 98 Port St. Joe, Fl. 32457 850-227-1159 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33689S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No. 14-73-CA JEAN F. ARNOLD 18069 Main Street N. Blountstown, FL 32424 Plaintiff -vsSHERRY R. POTTS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS 7849 McClean Road Tallahassee, Fl. 32312 Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 21, 2014, and entered in Civil Case No. 14-73-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein JEAN F. ARNOLD is the Plaintiff and SHERRY R. POTTS is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., E.T., on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: Parcel 2: A portion of Lot 2, Block 3, Beacon Hill Subdivision, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being in Section 30, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 3, Beacon Hill Subdivision, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being on the Southwest right of way line of U.S. Highway 98; thence along said Southwest right of way line, North 43’13’07” West, 76.55 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line, North 43’13’07” West, 18.60 feet; thence leaving said Southwest right of way line, South 46’44’53” West, 224.77 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence along said mean high water line, South 41’53’01” East, 18.60 feet, more or less, to a point on a line that bears South 46’44’53” West of the Point of Beginning; thence leaving said mean high waterline, North 46’44’53” East, 225.21 feet more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said lands containing 0.10 acre, more or less. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or Telephone (850)229-6113 prior to such proceedings. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 2nd day of September, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Costin & Costin Charles A. Costin 413 Williams Ave. P.O. Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-227-115 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33717S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2007-000443-CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. PAULA E. PARSONS A/K/A PAULA PARSONS; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on in Civil Case No. 2007-000443-CA, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff, and PAULA E. PARSONS A/K/A PAULA PARSONS; KAY W. EUBANKS are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Rebecca L. Norris will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 a.m., on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: THE WEST ONE-HALF (1/2) OF LOT NINE (9) AND ALL OF LOTS THIRTEEN (13), FOURTEEN (14), AND FIFTEEN (15), BLOCK “C”, C.P. GAULDING ADDITION TO HIGHLAND VIEW SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION OF THE SW OF GOVERNMENT LOT FOURTEEN (14) IN SECTION 26, T7S, R11W, AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on September 3, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Aldridge / Connors, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 S Congress Ave. Suite 200 Delray Beach, FL 33445 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 IMPORTANT IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P. O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850) 747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711 OR EMAIL ADA REQUEST@JUD14.FLCO URTS.ORG. File# 1113-2997 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 33851S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at a Special Meeting on the 30th day of September, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 508 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA LEVYING THE AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE RATE FOR MUNICIPAL PURPOSES ON ALL TAXABLE PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2014 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2015, STATING THE PERCENTAGE BY WHICH THE MILLAGE LEVIED IS -.78% LESS THAN THE ROLLED-BACK RATE; AND, PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Charlotte Pierce, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. September 18, 2014 33743S PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for one (1) Honda Odyssey. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance/Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids may also be faxed/e-mailed by calling 850-229-8369 or 850-227-1204. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33745S PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for two (2) Chevrolet 1500 Silverado. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance/Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids may also be faxed/e-mailed by calling 850-229-8369 or 850-227-1204. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33847S PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID The Housing Authority of Apalachicola is requesting Sealed Bids for the following work to be conducted: On 16 housing units, a total of approximately 25,000 square feet, located on 11th and 12th Street in Apalachicola, FL, install (color silver) 24 gauge galvalume metal roofing with 6 inch eave drip edge to match roof color, installation of one layer of #30 lb felt underlayment on existing roof surface, replace all existing gutters and add or replace vent pipes as necessary. Metal roofing will go over existing shingle roofs. All grounds to be cleaned up on a daily basis as homes are occupied by tenants. All bushes, shrubs and flowers to be protected. Bids will be received until October 14, 2014. Please send bids to: 141 15th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 For questions, please email apalhousing@ gmail.com or call 850-653-9304 Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33861S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 232014CA 000013CAAXMX REGIONS BANK SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH AMSOUTH BANK, Plaintiff, -vsCHARLES L. BOND and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES L. BOND Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Gulf County, Florida, described as: SEE EXHIBIT “A” ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF EXHIBIT “A” Legal Description PARCEL 1 OF THE LASSITER MINOR REPLAT : Commence at the Northwest corner of Camp Palms Subdivision on Indian Peninsula as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 53-A, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, and thence run Southerly along the Western boundary line of said Camp Palms Subdivision for 505.97 feet to a concrete monument on the Southern right of way line of County Road S-30-B, thence Northwesterly along said right of way line to a point that is 2375.745 feet, measured perpendicularly from said Western boundary line of Camp Palms Subdivision for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 02 degrees 37 minutes 38 seconds West, 117.98 feet, thence North 88 degrees 06 minutes 43 seconds West 112.87 feet, thence North 01 degree 16 minutes 00 seconds East 136.94 feet to a point on said Southerly right of way line, thence along said Southerly right of way line, South 78 degrees 49 minutes 54 seconds East, 117.58 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The above described parcel of land is located on Indian Peninsula in Fractional Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. SUBJECT TO Ingress, Egress, Utility Easement, described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Camp Palms Subdivision on Indian Peninsula as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 53-A, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, and thence run Southerly along the Western boundary line of said Camp Palms Subdivision for 505.97 feet to a concrete monument on the Southern right of way line of County Road 5-30-B, thence Northwesterly along said right of way line to a point that is 2375.745 feet, measured perpendicularly from said Western boundary line of Camp Palms Subdivision for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence South 02 degrees 37 minutes 38 seconds West 264.11 feet, thence North 88 degrees 06 minutes 43 seconds West 54.75 feet, thence North 01 degree 53 minutes 17 seconds East 15.00 feet, thence South 88 degrees 06 minutes 43 seconds East 34.95 feet, thence North 02 degrees 37 minutes 38 seconds East, 252.37 feet to a point on said Southerly right of way line, thence along said Southerly right of way line, South 78 degrees 49 minutes 54 seconds East, 20.23 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The above described parcel of land is located on Indian Peninsula in Fractional Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the courthouse lobby, in Gulf County Courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.in Port Saint Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on November 13, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FUNDS FROM THIS SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 45.031(1)(a), FLORIDA STATUTES. DATED this 12th day of September, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. NOTE: THIS COMMUNICATION, FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR, IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Sept. 18, 25, 2014 33853S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at a Special Meeting on the 30th day of September, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. ORDINANCE NO. 509 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ADOPTING THE TENTATIVE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/ 2015 AS THE FINAL BUDGET OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/2015 AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Transactions of the public meeting will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the meeting will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact Charlotte Pierce, City Clerk, City of Port St. Joe, at City Hall, telephone number (850)229-8261 Ext 113. September 18, 2014 96116S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 13000105CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENOR, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF JACKSON D. JAMISON A/K/A JACKSON DONALD JAMISON, DECEASED, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 13000105CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, and, Jamison, Patricia L., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the Highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 am, on the 25th day of September, 2014, the following described property: LOT 6, BLOCK 65, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP #12 OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES 20-22, SAID MAP SHOWING SAID LOT TO BE LYING IN AND A PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest int he surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner a sof the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of September, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-491-1120 (33585.0025/LPerlis) IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assitance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850-747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you ar ehearing or voice impaired, call 711. Sept. 11, 18, 2014 96100S NOTICE TO SELL Notice is hereby given that Bayou Storage, pursuant to FS83.806, will dispose of or offer for sale after September 24, 2014, the miscellaneous items belonging to the following tenant: Denise Strickland, SunCatcher Services, LLC. Unit #317. Storage unit contents may be redeemed by owner prior to September 24, 2014, for cash only. Pub: Sept. 11, 18, 2014 96118S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000141 ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Plaintiff, vs. JACQUELINE D DANFORD; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN TENANT; B.T. TAYLOR AS TRUSTEE OF THE B.T. TAYLOR TRUST. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 2, 2014, and entered in 2013-CA000141 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB N/K/A ONEWEST BANK N.A., is the Plaintiff and JACQUELINE D DANFORD; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN TENANT are the Defendant(s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Lobby 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM on October 2, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgement, to wit: LOTS 11 AND 12, AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 13, IN BLOCK 7, GULF COUNTY LAND COMPANYS SUBDIVISION TO THE TOWN OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 2nd day of September, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850)747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADA Request@jud14.flcourts. org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-23504 Sept. 11, 18, 2014 96122S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO:2014-115-CA IN RE: FORFEITURE OF One 2002 Nissan Silver Four Door Sedan VIN# 1N4BL11D32C289826 NOTICE OF FORFEITURE 96120S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO:2014-119-CA IN RE: FORFEITURE OF 1996 Toyota, Burgundy, Two Door Sedan, VIN# JT2AC52L6T0116204 NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS TO: Joann Parker Wilder, and any other persons who claim an interest in the following property: a 1996 Toyota, Burgundy, Two Door Sedan, VIN# JT2AC52L6T0116204. Sheriff Mike Harrison, Gulf County Sheriff’s Office, seized the above-described property on July 25, 2014, in Gulf County Florida. Mike Harrison, as Sheriff of Gulf County, Florida, filed a PETITION for Forfeiture on August 22, 2014, with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The PETITION may be reviewed at the Clerk’s Office during regular business hours, Monday through Friday. Any claimant desiring to contest the forfeiture of the above-described property must, within 20 days after receipt of the forfeiture PETITION, file and serve responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses to the PETITION on D. Robert Bradshaw, Esquire, Attorney for the Gulf County Sheriff’s Office, whose address is, 2107 SE Third Ave., Ocala, Florida 34471, rbradshaw2 @gmail.com, and must file the original responsive pleadings and defenses with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, either before service on petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter. Failure to file and serve such pleadings within said time period shall result in the entry of a default pursuant to Florida Rule of Civil Procedure 1.500(a), and a final order of forfeiture awarding the above-described property to the Sheriff of Gulf County, Florida. MIKE HARRISON, SHERIFF OF GULF COUNTY D. Robert Bradshaw FL Bar No.: 0561428 2107 SE 3rd Avenue Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 629-7110 rbradshaw2@gmail.com Attorney for Petitioner Sheriff Harrison Sept. 11, 18, 2014

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B8 | The Star Thursday, September 18, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519197 4 5 1 0 1 6 1 Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans. The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout September We seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 4518883 Help WantedFull Time Receptionist Needed For Busy Veterinary Clinic in Eastpoint. Must be skilled with customer service, be a team player, have good telephone skills, be able to handle a busy workload, have good computer skills, be able to deal with difcult situations, love pets and their people, and be a quick learner. Only candidates seeking long term employment need apply. Competitive salary and benets.Please send resume to: P.O. Box 685, Eastpoint,FL 32328 or email to: drhffulmer@yahoo.com 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED: €Hostesses €Bartenders €Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4518836 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 5. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 6. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets. 7. Mariner's View #9 3 bedroom 3 bath fully furnished, $850mo. No utilities. Pet friendly 8. 46-4 Carlton Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished apartment, $375mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 9. 33-2 Holland Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished, $525mo. No utilities. 10. 51-4 Pine Lanark Village 2 bedroom 1 bath, unfurnished. $525mo. No Utilities.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518856 1129711 1129712 6520863Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6520864$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6520865I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6520866 6520867Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254518515 PROCEEDINGS TO: Susan Lee Hughen, and any other persons who claim an interest in the following property: a 2002 Nissan Silver Four Door Sedan, VIN# 1N4BL11D32C289826. Sheriff Mike Harrison, Gulf County Sheriff’s Office, seized the above-described property on the 3rd day of July, 2014, in Gulf County Florida. Mike Harrison, as Sheriff of Gulf County, Florida, filed a PETITION For Forfeiture on August 11, 2014 and an Amended PETITION for Forfeiture on August 18, 2014, with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The PETITION may be reviewed at the Clerk’s Office during regular business hours, Monday through Friday. Any claimant desiring to contest the forfeiture of the above-described property must, within 20 days after receipt of the forfeiture PETITION, file and serve responsive pleadings and affirmative defenses to the PETITION on D. Robert Bradshaw, Esquire, Attorney for the Gulf County Sheriff’s Office, whose address is, 2107 SE Third Ave., Ocala, Florida 34471, rbradshaw2 @gmail.com, and must file the original responsive pleadings and defenses with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, either before service on petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter. Failure to file and serve such pleadings within said time period shall result in the entry of a default pursuant to Florida Rule of Civil Procedure 1.500(a), and a final order of forfeiture awarding the above-described property to the Sheriff of Gulf County, Florida. MIKE HARRISON, SHERIFF OF GULF COUNTY D. Robert Bradshaw FL Bar No.: 0561428 2107 SE 3rd Avenue Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 629-7110 rbradshaw2@gmail.com Attorney for Petitioner Sheriff Harrison Sept. 11, 18, 2014 96136S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 2013-CA-000001 DIVISION: CIVIL CP-SRMOF II 2012-A Trust, by U.S. Bank Trust National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as Trustee, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH ALDERMAN A/K/A KENNETH W. ALDERMAN; et al. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on August 21, 2014 in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on September 25, 2014 at 11:00 a.m Eastern Standard Time (EST) at Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148. Port St. Joe, FL 32456. COMMENCE AT THE SW CORNER OF THE NE OF THE NW OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SE CORNER OF THE NW OF THE NW OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN N 0026’17” E, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE NE OF THE NW OF SAID SECTION 10, 220.00 FEET; THENCE S 8938’19” E, 200.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S 8938’ 19” E, 194.61 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF MICHAEL STREET: THENCE S 0030’54” W, ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 220.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NE OF THE NW OF SECTION 10; THENCE N 8938’19” W, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OF THE NE OF THE NW , 198.10 FEET: THENCE N 0031’58” E, 220.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 2007 SCOTBILT HOME MOBILE HOME; MODEL NUMBER: 286673-SPP; SERIAL NUMBER: SBHGA1110702442 A/B. Property Address: 291 Michael Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: September 5, 2014 REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK GULF COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT By:B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@jud14. flcourts.org Sept. 11, 18, 2014 96124S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AMERICA’S MINI STORAGE AND OFFICE, INC., INTENDS TO DISPOSE OF OR OFFER FOR SALE THE PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT STATUTES SECTION 83.801-83.89. AMERICA’S MINI STORAGE AND OFFICE, INC., WILL DISPOSE OF SAID PROPERTY NO LATER THAN THE DATE OF FRIDAY, OCTOBER 03, 2014. PROPERTY IS LOCATED AT 141 COMMERCE DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL. GULF COUNTY. SALE DATE: October 3, 2014 Pamela L. Goetsch Allan Goetsch 4920 Fleetwood Dr. Knoxville, TN 37931 #B-19, 10x15 unit Household, furniture, misc. Bid on Unit -HIGHEST BID TAKES ALL. Sale Time Starts @ 9:30 am to register. Sept 18, 25, 2014 96140S NOTICE OF INTENT TO VACATE SUBDIVISION PLAT AND EASEMENT FOR ROAD RIGHT OF WAY Notice is hereby given that Capital City Bank intends to petition the City of Port St. Joe, Florida to vacate the following property consisting of a portion of a subdivision plat and a portion of an easement for road right of way as described below: A PORTION OF MCCLELLAN & DICKENS SUB-DIVISION THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS. Begin at the Northwest corner of Government Lot 6, Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida., said point also marking the Southwest corner of McClellan & Dickens Subdivision thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 24 of the Public Records of Gulf County Florida., said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING run along the South boundary line of said McClellan & Dickson subdivision, South 89 degrees 39 minutes 32 seconds East 330.00 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Southerly boundary line with the centerline of Jefferson Street as shown on the Plat of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division; thence leaving said Southerly boundary line run along said Centerline, North 00 degrees 14 minutes 42 seconds East 330.00 feet to a point marking the intersection of said centerline of Jefferson Street with the centerline of Alma Avenue as shown on the Plat of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division, thence leaving said centerline of Jefferson street run along said centerline of Alma Avenue, South 89 degrees 38 minutes 51 seconds East 330.00 feet to a point marking the intersection of said centerline of Alma Avenue with the East boundary line of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division; thence leaving said centerline run along said Easterly boundary line North 00 degrees 15 minutes 45 seconds East 330.07 feet to a point marking the Northeast corner of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division; thence run along the North boundary line of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division, North 89 degrees 39 minutes 32 seconds West 660.00 feet to a point marking the Northwest corner of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division; thence run along the Westerly boundary line of said McClellan & Dickens Sub-division, South 00 degrees 15 minutes 13 seconds West 660.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 7.50 acres more or less. And, ALL OF THAT PORTION OF THAT CERTAIN RIGHT OF WAY EASEMENT DATED JUNE 17, 1953 BETWEEN ST. JOSEPH LAND & DEVELOPMENT COMPANY AND THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 23, PAGE 295 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, LYING NORTH OF THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD #382. Any person(s) having an interest in or an objection to said property being vacated should contact: Kyle D. Phelps, CFA Senior Vice President Capital City Bank Trust Building 304 E. Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850) 402-7760 Pub: Sept. 11, 18, 2014 96186S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 7th day of October, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 507 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE 348; PROVIDING FOR DRIVERS WITH LEARNER’S PERMITS; REQUIRING LICENSED DRIVER SUPERVISION; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 229-8261, Ext. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: Charlotte M. Pierce City Clerk Pub: Sept. 18, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com Package Deal!! $3,200 Furniture for sale.. 2 Queen size mattresses/ with new pad never used.. Beautiful lane iron headboard with dresser.. Brown leather headboard w/ matching dresser, small kitchen table & chairs.. New Whirlpool washer & dryer never used. Selling as package, all for $3,200!! In climated controlled unit @ 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 PSJ: 691 Duval St. (Right behind Oak Grove Church) Sat, 9/20 8am -?Huge Estate Sale Furniture, clothing, crystal, antiques, carnival glass and so much more! Text FL00793 to 56654 GUN SHOW September 27th &28th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 txt FL00161 to 56654 Refrigerator, dryer, rabbit cage, sugar glider cage. Make an offer. 850-340-1620 Amanda Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternFront Desk Maintenance Weekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34298690 Install/Maint/Repair FT Maint/ Grounds In Port St JoeAC Experience. On Call Background Chck. Fax resume -850-265-5797 Web ID 34298978 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate Available For Lease 4 Offices w/ Kitchen Located at 149B Commerce Blvd, PSJ $850/mo+ $850/dep 1-3 Year Lease Call 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 Available For Lease Office, Bath, Storage w/ Large Warehouse Space Location 151-E Commerce Blvd PSJ, $600/mo + $600/dep 1 Year Lease Call 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue, PSJ. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-247-8470 For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Publisher’s Notice All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. In Wewa RV for Rent $140/week. + $140/ dep. Great for 1-2 people. Includes water, sewage, electric & WIFI 850-639-5721 Text FL99969 to 56654 42 acres -farm land, partially subdivided. $500,000 OBO. 850-340-1620 Amanda Text FL99631 to 56654 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.