The star

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Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03957


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com An Apalachicola man was killed early last Thursday when his SUV rolled over on the Cape San Blas beaches near Money Bayou. Both occupants were ejected, but Chris Burke, 28, became pinned under the vehicle and died as a result of his injuries or drowning, according to a report from the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department. Burke was a former member of the SGCVFD, completing First Responder classes in 2008, and occasionally worked at the Scallop Cove Market on Cape San Blas. Members of the SGCVFD were alerted to an auto accident with injury at 5 a.m. ET and found the SUV, which had rolled Thursday, AUGUST 28, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 46 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................. A10 Sports ................................... A11 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ................... B10-B12 Matching pets to owners a critical step By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Long before there is a graduation, there is matchmaking. While the graduation ceremonies provide the DAWGS in Prison program all the appropriate pomp and circumstance, the meeting of prospective owner and dog, the rst encounter, is the critical step. Whenever possible, we like to meet with adoptive families, their children and dogs they own to make sure it is a good match, said Sandi Christy, co-director of the Developing Adoptable dogs With Good Sociability (DAWGS) in Prison program operating out of the Gulf Forestry Camp. This is especially important when a family member is disabled or has an impairment. A dog never lies, and his reaction to this adoptive family is a critical component of a successful adoption. That critical component came last Saturday morning for two dogs and their possible forever families. The owner Brad Sollberger said he was just Googling. The Iraq War veteran, retired from the U.S. Army as 100 percent disabled from the effects of a serious brain injury and resulting posttraumatic stress disorder, had gone online with a purpose. His doctors at the VA had suggested he seek a four-legged companion to join his family, which also includes his wife and four children aged 12 and under. Doctors believed Sollberger, like many who suffer from PSTD, might bene t from the soothing vibes of a canine sidekick. We hadnt really thought about a dog because we were renting, Sollberger said. We just moved into a new house, and it has a fenced-in yard. So it seemed right. And so one night, Sollberger began his Googling, and in time, he came upon the DAWGS in Prison program. Perusing photos of the dogs that comprise the class due to graduate from the eight-week training program in mid-September, Sollberger spied Flinn, a black Labrador. The dog For starters, the name could not have been more appropriate. Flynn, oh so coincidentally, is his wifes maiden name and the middle name of the couples 10-year-old son. Further, the 2-year-old touted for his calm demeanor seemed a good t. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday held the rst of two public hearings on a pair of tax hike proposals. While a motion was put forward to stop the progress of a proposal to add 5 cents to the local gas tax, the motion died for a lack of a second after county attorney Jeremy Novak recommended commissioners conduct a second hearing Sept. 9 as scheduled before a nal vote. A proposal to add one penny to the bed tax collected for tourist development, which garnered far less comment, will also be the subject of a second public hearing Sept. 9. A supermajority, four of the ve commissioners, must support the proposals to be approved for implementation Jan. 1. And for a time during Tuesdays hearing, there was a question about whether the gas tax proposal had that support. Commissioner Joanna Bryan, after public comment, quickly moved to halt the proposal, arguing there was money in the budget that could be carved out to mitigate the $116,000 a year the 5-cent gas tax would provide for operations at Public Works. I dont think we are operating on austerity, Bryan said. I think there is a lot of room for cuts in this budget. She got a second from Commissioner Carmen McLemore, who has opposed a proposed hike in the gas tax the past two years. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Political newcomer Sandy Quinn Jr. secured the District 4 seat on the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday while the District 2 seat on the Gulf County School Board remains in play. Quinn beat incumbent Commissioner Tan Smiley, seeking a second term, in the BOCC District 4 race, opening a small lead in early voting that he maintained throughout the night. Tuesdays primary in District 4 was universal, meaning both candidates were from the same party, Democratic, and all voters could cast ballots as the primary decided the seat. Quinn received 353 votes, or 58 percent, while Tan Smiley received 258 votes and 42 percent. Im excited, and I feel blessed and thankful, Quinn said. People came out and supported, and they rallied behind me. They wanted to see a change. A big thank you to Tan Smiley for running a clean race. Thank you to the citizens of Gulf County. SANDY QUINN JAMES TAUNTON BROOKE WOOTEN Quinn elected to BOCC; recount in school board race See ELECTION A8 SPECIAL TO THE STAR A local man was killed Thursday of last week when an SUV rolled over on the beaches of Money Bayou. The surviving passenger is being treated at Bay Medical Center. DAWGS IN PRISON MEET AND GREET PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The Star Brad Sollberger and his family drove from Land O Lakes to make the acquaintance of Flinn as part of the adoption process under the DAWGS in Prison program. Initially, June wasnt entirely sure about Timothy Mosteferis from Niceville, but a few treats and soothing words had them fast friends an hour later. See MEET AND GREET A9 BOCC hears tax hike proposals Apalachicola man killed in accident at Money Bayou See ACCIDENT A8 See TAX HIKE A8 Have a safe holiday LABOR DAY

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Hi gh wa y 98 for a di st an ce of 15 0 fe et mo re or le ss to th e po in t of be gin ni ng. Sa id pa rc el be in g th e sa me as th at co nv ey ed in De ed Bo ok 26 Pa ge 42 1 of th e Pu bl ic Re co rd s of Gu lf Co un ty Fl ori da The dea d li ne fo r su bm is si o n of se ale d bi ds sh al l be 4: 00 pm ED T, Se pt em be r 2, 20 14 If th e su bm it te d bi ds m eet or ex ce ed th e Fa ir Ma rk et Va lu e se t by th e Bo ar d, th e boa rd w ill ac ce pt th e highe st an d bes t bi d. If th e su bm it te d bi ds ar e be lo w th e Fa ir Ma rk et Va lu e se t by th e Boa rd th e Boa rd rese rv es th e ri gh t to ne g ot ia te wi th bi dd ers fo r a pr ic e wi th in a st at ed ra ng e. The Boa rd rese rv es th e ri gh t to re je ct al l bi ds In te rest ed pa rt ie s ca n co nt ac t Bi ll Carr at bca rr @gul f. k1 2. us or Siss y Wo rl ey at sw or l ey @gul f. k1 2. us Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Boa rd 15 0 Mi dd le Sch ool Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6. Ph one : (8 50 ) 229 -8 25 6 Fa x: (8 50 ) 229 -6 08 9 Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 WES LOCHER | The Star Students at Port St. Joe schools received free backpacks and school supplies courtesy of Calvin Pryor, who was drafted by the New York Jets football team in May. Pryor surprises students with supplies By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Calvin Pryor is giving back. Students at Port St. Joe schools received a surprise on Tuesday morning when they took a trek out to Shark Field where they received free book bags, school sup plies and snacks courtesy of hometown hero Calvin Pryor, who graduated from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School three years ago and was drafted 18th as a safety by the New York Jets in the National Football League draft in May. Pryors godmother, Si mona Beard said that Pryor got in touch three weeks ago wanting to do something for the school and students and asked around as to what would be benecial for stu dents. Pryors family decided that school supplies for the new term would go a long way. Calvin wanted to do something to motivate the students, Beard said. He wanted to give something back to the kids of Port St. Joe. Each of the 1,100 back packs was emblazoned with the former Tiger Sharks logo and handed out to smiling students by district employ ees and Pryors family. Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton welcomed the students as they collected their gear and made sure the younger generations understood what Pryor had achieved since graduation. Calvin is another exam ple of someone who has come out of the local school system and gone on to do very well for themselves, Norton said. At the same time, hes not forgetting where he came from. Norton said that he found it inspiring that the Tiger Sharks just played their rst game of the season and just three years ago, some stu dents were Pryors team mates on the eld. Calvin expects a lot from himself and in the process, has shown the fabric of who he is, Norton said. Beard thanked the teachers and district staff for their help in spreading Pryors message to students of his alma mater. Calvin wanted to show the students that if you start here and make big plays in school, you can go anywhere. SETTING IT STRAIGHT A story concerning the Port St. Joe City Commission last week in correctly stated gures for projects undertaken by the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency. The commission approved the landscape maintenance fee of $14,356 to Coastal Design for main tenance of all downtown landscaped areas. That expenditure was at tributed in the article to new gateway signs along U.S. Highway 98 at Third and Fourth Streets. Commissioners approved spending $3,800 for design and probable construction costs of the gateway signs. The Star regrets the error. Lighthouse to open in coming weeks By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com A hoped-for soft opening might not happen this weekend, but by the time the Scallop and Music Festival rolls around in a couple of weeks the Cape San Blas Lighthouse should be ready for any intrepid climber. Port St. Joe city manager Jim Anderson said Tuesday efforts to open the lighthouse tower for climbers this weekend likely will fall shy of the target. Members of the St. Joseph Historical Society and city ofcials had been working to try for a soft opening this weekend in preparation for full readiness for the Sept. 12 Scallop and Music Festival. However, securing a nal sign-off from a structural engineer based out of Jacksonville has proved problematic due to distance and schedules. The city has liability insurance in place and only an okay from the engineer is standing in the way of opening the tower. We are not sure we are going to get there (by Friday), Anderson said. But it is close. The tower survived the move from Cape San Blas to George Core Park with no issues and the citys re department has performed a kind of pressure clean of the tower, Anderson said. The stairs have also been examined and appear sound, though the structural engineer must perform a nal inspection before climbers are allowed. We are going to open it up when it is safe, Anderson said. Regardless, the plan is to have the tower open for the upcoming festival, which is centered at George Core Park. The two keepers quarters and oil house are in surprisingly good shape, Anderson said. The buildings had been unused and somewhat open to the elements for more than a year. However, Anderson said there appear to be few structural issues and the primary work left is cosmetic fresh paint and cleaning in particular. The potential is there for a really nice facility, Anderson said. Mayor Mel Magidson said a next step would be coordinating with the Historical Society on a fundraising campaign to rehab the buildings to use. The lighthouse gift shop, now at the nearby Maddox House, was situated in one of the keepers quarters. Charlotte Pierce said the Historical Society had the expertise for raising funds and performing the work. In the prior decade, the organization undertook the effort to secure state historical preservation grants and contract out the work to renovate one keepers quarter and the tower. We know what needs to be done, Pierce said, and we know how to go about it. S PECIA L TO THE S TAR The Cape San Blas Lighthouse tower should be open for climbs in the next two weeks.

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Of fe r va lid thr ough September 15, 2014 at par ticipating stor es only LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 20% OFF 20% OFF discount is of f of re gular re tail only 5 pc DINING ROOMS LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 5 pc DINING LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 5 pc DINING ALL 5 pc dinettes include ta ble & fo ur chair s LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 20% OFF 20% OFF discount is of f of re gular re tail only ENTER TA INMENT CENTERS LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE ENTER TA INMENT ALL LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 75% OFF 75% OFF LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 75% 75% 75% 75% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 75% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 75% 75% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 75% 75% 75% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 75% 75% 75% 75% 75% 75% 75% up to up to discount is of f of re gular re tail only FLOORING LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE FLOORING LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE FLOORING LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE FLOORING ALL LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 25% OFF 25% OFF APPLIANCES LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE APPLIANCES LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE APPLIANCES ALL discount is of f of re gular re tail only LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 25% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 25% 25% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 25% 25% 25% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% 25% up to up to LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% OFF 40% OFF discount is of f of re gular re tail only LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% 40% up to up to ELECTRONICS LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE ELECTRONICS LABOR D AY SALE L ABOR D AY SALE ELECTRONICS ALL 515 Cecil G Cos tin Sr Blvd POR T SAINT JOE 850-229-61 95 Pr ices and off er s effectiv e Au g. 26 Sep t. 15, 2014

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OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, August 28, 2014 A Section When does that Affordable Health Care thing kick in? I know its coming. Ive seen the heralding and posturing. If I understand it right, you just go down and sign up and all your health insurance needs are taken care ofat a fraction of the price Blue Cross has been charging. Some are even saying its not going to cost anything. This could be the greatest thing since sliced bread! I just need to know when its going to reach down to my house. I dont know how much longer Cathy and I can hang on. Our monthly health insurance premiums are higher than a cats back! Ive bought automobiles for less. One agent suggested that we set up a direct withdrawal from a bank account so you will hardly notice the payment. What kind of bank account do these people think we have? Our yearly payout is more than some third world countries GNP. Im not sure we can get sick enough to get our money back! I heard a CNN guy say you couldnt be turned down under this new health deal even if you had preexisting problems. And I think it has to cover everything. Thats going to be a blessing for us. It seems, under our current policy, every high cost medicine or special procedure or the doctor we need is not covered under the plan we have chosen. Apparently, they write you the high dollar coverage and then start right in immediately on the list of what it does not cover. I called the convenient 800 hotline number listed in our brochure to get some clari cation. The automated voice suggested I read the ne print. Boy howdy, the Affordable Health Care Law is getting here just in the nick of time. I actually thought congress had already voted on this. But apparently not; or they are taking their own sweet time about sharing the good news with our insurance people. I hope to goodness they havent sent this thing to a committee or placed it under judicial review. Maybe its one of those trickle down policies If thats the case, someone in Washington needs to turn the spigot on. Im so happy its coming Im not even questioning how theyre going to pay for it. But I am a little befuddled. Its the furniture store syndrome that has me scratching my head. You know what Im talking about. Furniture stores have historically existed on two advertising schemes. One is, of course, the going out of business sale. Ive personally known stores in Paris, Tennessee, that went out of business six or seven times a year. The other tactic is the factory direct sale. The owner comes on TV declaring he is able to slash prices because he has cut out the middleman. Basically, this Affordable Health Care thing is telling us they have cut prices by ADDING a middleman (government). Im telling you, this could only happen in the land of the free and the home of the brave. One other thing concerns me just a little here. And this goes back to my childhood. I remember Mr. Roy Manley, when we went out to pick his strawberries, was always allowing how the politicians in Memphis could get into your cotton money quicker than the boll weevils. I dont remember being ill as a child. We were too busy running to town, swimming down at Mr. Moores pond, chasing cows, picking cotton, throwing rocks at a Pet Milk can, ghting over a close call at second base and racing each other to the mailbox and back. We couldnt t sick in. Our health insurance back then was a Rhode Island Red or an old Leghorn chicken in the back yard. Dr. Holmes would sew up your foot in a jiffy for a good layer and a bushel of butter beans. He delivered many a baby for some canned tomatoes, pickled peaches and a jar of blackberry jam. You sometimes couldnt nd a seat in his waiting room for the hamper of peas and the baskets of sweet corns stacked form wall to wall. I heard tell he would even take cash on occasion. Dr. Holmes would give you a shot of penicillin or pull the nail out of your foot before you lled out the paperwork! When Mom got real sick once, Dr. Holmes came out to the house to take care of her. I dont think the Affordable Health Care Act is going to go that far! And it doesnt have to. Just get my premiums down! Pay for the expensive pills that my current policy doesnt cover. Get me in immediately if I have a real emergency. Let Dr. Holmes be my primary physician if I want him. And dont raise my gas tax, income tax, sales tax or syntax to pay for this coverage. Robbing Peter to pay Paul has never been the answer. But mostly, lets get this thing moving. At the current rate Im paying for health insurance, if they dont get the new plan down to me in a hurry, I wont be able to afford it at any price! Respectfully, Kes Sitting in my beach chair on the beautiful white sands of the Florida Panhandles Gulf Coast, I was studying the ne art of women carrying babies on their hip. You know, That thing they do when they put a hip out and carry a baby or toddler around. It is actually quite amazing. There is an art to it that no man could ever successfully emulate. I will admit that many of these mamas were wearing two-piece bathing suits which did nothing but add to the beauty of the task. However, a bikini is by no means a requirement to successfully and artfully do this mama hip thing. Ladies in one-piece bathing suits did it well, women with pretty tattoos and even more importantly grandmothers. Its just a move that comes with being a mother I suppose. It is beautiful. You see mamas in the mall doing it, but to fully appreciate all of the physics involved in this makeshift saddle mamas have on their hip you need to be at the beach. Its kind of like riding horses for pleasure versus being part of a rodeo. There are just more challenges involved. Think about it These babies are covered with every sunblock known including lotions, face stick and spray on junk. If you have ever been to a county fair where they had a contest to catch a greased pig this is about the same. Now, not only are these children covered in greasy sun-blocking slippery stuff; they have also been rolling around in the sand, making sandcastles, digging holes and throwing it all over each other. So again, these mamas (many in bikinis) are able to swoop up these greased kids covered in sand and pop them on their hip they do it with con dence and beauty. If the grease and sand werent enough, the diapers and swimsuits are loaded with sea water and I would think other things. These mamas just keep going Grandmamas do too They are perhaps the best. Yes, I enjoy watching the bikini scenery, but to see a grandmother in action is more beautiful than words can describe... However, I will try. I watched a grandmother come for the save in baseball terms. This little fellow had sand in all of his wrinkles and crevices and he was yelling, screaming and crying. The mama was panicking and pulling this little fellows clothes off. The grandmother promptly grabbed him, took him to the water and dipped the buck naked little boy into the ocean she then gently placed him on her hip. People get excited about football season coming up and being able to see their team make fantastic plays and possibly win the championship. Sheese Watching a grandmother come in, grab a buck naked baby, dip him in the ocean, turning tears into laughter that is winning and worth watching time and time again. I did not have to pay money to watch this but I would have. The mama in the bikini was pretty, the grandmother with the know-how She cranks my tractor! We continue to struggle with the worlds big problems. Honestly, this is something we have to do. Understand why we do it watching a grandmother do her thing goes a long way in helping us understand what we stand for as a country and a world for that matter. We continue to strive for what is good and worth having. Grandmother Watching is a pleasure we should not overlook. Oh goodness gracious there is a bikini-clad mama with one baby on each hip How in the world does she pull that off? Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard I May Have To Start Raising Chickens That thing they do Honoring our grandparents wisdom across the generations Sunday, Sept. 7 is Grandparents Day. For most of us, no one provided a more vital link to our heritage and family history than our grandparents. Whether by birth or through adoption, grandparents are treasures deserving of honor and respect. Like all of us, none were perfect, but most were there for us when we needed them most. I distinctly remember so many ways my elders, especially my dear Grandma Minnie, influenced me by example. Here are a bakers dozen life lessons I learned at Minnies kitchen table.... An open door is an open heart. Minnies kitchen table was where others came to eat and be fed spiritually. If a neighbor had a problem, she was there for them. If I needed them, Id hope for the same treatment. The golden rule does not tarnish. Love knows no boundary. Keeping close to the people you love. Loving them without having to love everything they do, is the key to family strength. You dont have to be perfect to be loved. Waste not; want not. Finishing our meals and saving leftovers for another time was common practice for our elders. Many remembered the pangs of deprivation, so they valued the food on their plates. Charity begins at home. As little as they had, our grandparents always seemed to find a way to help others in need. Minnie had a tin can in which she would drop coins...a little something for those with less than us. Cleanliness is next to godliness. A clean home is a symbol of how we should conduct our lives in the sight of others. Minnie swept the sidewalk in front of her house almost every day. When our guests come to our door, they should have a clear and welcoming path. Progress comes in little steps. Expecting too much too soon is unreasonable. A drop plus a drop fills up the pot was among Minnies favorite phrases. Every day is another opportunity to take positive steps...for family and for community. Laughter is the closest distance between two people. Its a pleasure to enjoy the company of others and to hear a good joke, tell a witty story, and listen to the folk tales of the old country. These are among lifes great gifts. Frowns make more wrinkles than smiles, Minnie would say with glee. Honest compliments are among our most valued possessions. Giving credit when credit is due, and honoring the actions of those whose energy and enthusiasm helps others is important. People shouldnt assume you know about their good works. Tell them they are appreciated. If theres a problem, try to fix it. Minnie knew that youll sit a long time with your mouth wide open before a roasted chicken will fly in. Ignoring a problem is neither smart nor sensible. Dont leave politics up to someone else. As an immigrant girl, Minnie felt the sting of discrimination and injustice. She was a suffragist as a young woman, and upon becoming a naturalized citizen, she voted for the rst time in 1920. Minnie never missed an election in her life. Power is not given, its won with courage and hard work, she said. Words without deeds are empty. Someone who makes a promise and doesnt keep his word is an emotional thief. Its better to keep quiet than make a meaningless offer. Our children learn from us not so much by what we say, but by what we do. Patience pays dividends. Whether it was baking her famous cinnamon buns or preparing a full holiday dinner for 16, Minnie knew that the process required patience and persistence.. I like to cook because when I see the faces of satisfied eaters, Im happy. Resting is a reward for working hard. Minnie earned her rest, and made the time to relax, listen to music, observe nature, or read for pleasure. Too much of anything isnt good...including work. When the Sabbath came, Minnie knew that rest gave her the emotional and physical renewal she needed. Im not alone in receiving the gift from my elders life treasury. Family history is a living legacy. Its not only the story of who our elders were, but it defines in many ways defines who we are. While Im not yet a grandparent, my appreciation of family history is translated to our sons, and Im confident that someday, they will in turn have the opportunity to pass along the generational gift. Please consider recording your family history, share the stories with your children and grandchildren, and make sure that treasured family photos are duplicated and records are kept safe and out of harms way. Jack Levine, a family policy advocate, is founder of 4Generations Institute. He may be reached at jack@4gen.or g Page 4 JACK LEVINE Special to The Star Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 These mamas (many in bikinis) are able to swoop up these greased kids covered in sand and pop them on their hip they do it with con dence and beauty.

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LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, August 28, 2014 A Section Page 5 By Capt. Tom Adams Mexico Beach Charters Special to The Star Six years later we are back again at the same crossroads. Shorter red snapper seasons and the EDF backing a select few commercial and charter shermen advocating for Sector Separation. Most of you might say, I thought Catch Shares had been tabled. Well, it has, so the EDF and their small percentage of commercial and Charter shermen came up with another way to get the same idea back on the table Sector separation. This is the new term now, a revised plan to take more Red Snapper away from recreational shermen and give it to the charter boats. If not for the efforts of our Rep. Steve Southerland, his team (locally Melissa Thompson) and others in Washington this scheme to take more Snapper and shing days away from would have already passed. We are in a battle right now to keep the publics access to our gulf sh open to the public. EDF has been pumping over a million dollars into small organizations like Share the Gulf and Gulf Fishermans Association. They may still lose this war if we all get active now! Although most local commercial shermen do not agree with what is happening, it is being pushed through the Gulf council, National Marine Fisheries Service and NOAA, at record pace with the seemingly unlimited funds of the EDF, Oceans Conservancy and Pew. They want to take your sh away, shorten your shing seasons and limit the future opportunities for anglers to participate in our rich shing heritage. A nal hearing took place Wednesday, Aug. 27 at 5:30 8:30 p.m. CT in Biloxi, MS and was open for public comment. For all anglers that didnt even get a chance to sh for red snapper this year, now is the time to be heard. Write your Gov. Rick Scott. Write our seemingly uninterested Senators, Marco Rubio, and Bill Nelson. Tell them we want our red snapper and we dont want Sector separation. Ask them--Where have they been? Rep. Steve Southerland has been tirelessly ghting this ght to keep our Gulf open, for us all to sh in, not just the commercial shermen, who for some reason, get to sh year round, while we get a 9 day season. We all need to go to Biloxi (free ride available) and either say your piece or be there to show support in keeping the Gulf a public access shery. They may postpone the eventual vote on this needless sector separation until October in Mobile, so we need to contact our elected representatives now. Steve Southerland and the House of Representatives in Washington need our Senators and Governor to step up to the plate now and start getting as mad as we all have been the last ve or six years as our shing seasons have dwindled. The sad thing is, we are losing access to our Gulf and the sh we like to catch and eat to an environmental group and a few greedy commercial and charter shermen. If you want to be able to sh for snapper and grouper around here like we are used to. Get up, write some letters or make some phone calls and dont forget to vote for our friend Steve Southerland. Her love for music came at a very young age, around 5 years old. Her dad was also a great music lover and showed much pride for his young daughter with her ability to sing and called on her to come out on the front porch and sing when he had company, so without hesitation she went out and sang with great joy. Her dad played the harmonica and tried to teach her to play it, but she nally had to teach herself to play and with much joy she played the harmonica as she walked her special little dog, Trampur, down the street. Then, when she grew older, she was asked to sing in the church choir, which gave her much joy. She was then asked to sing a special song and she did without hesitation and she was complimented on her singing at the end of the services. A young man told her he could tell she enjoyed singing because of the smile on her face. Then, she had a bad fall on her face which the doctors could not x, so she herself decided to stop singing in the choir. But her love for music continued and her sons gave her a musical instrument that had different music involved in it, so she learned to play it by ear in her senior years. Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe Dear Editor, If our politicians can agree on one thing, its that they should control the election process. Elections are rigged to limit the election of public of cials to a small pool of candidates picked by party leaders, and not the people. We need election reform here in Florida. On Aug. 26, Florida will hold a closed Primary. This election will disenfranchise nearly 27 percent of Floridas voters. Why is this you ask? Well, in closed primary states such as Florida, if you are not registered into the Democratic or Republican Party, you are not allowed to vote in the election, even though you pay for the primaries as a taxpayer. Thats 2.7 million Floridian voters who will be excluded from voting in the primaries. Primaries are crucial, because in most cases, the victor in the primary also wins the general election. I recently moved to Orlando and became involved with Florida Independent Voters. We believe a Top Two nonpartisan election system would better serve Floridians. Under Top Two all registered voters can vote for any candidate for each of ce regardless of party af liation, and the top two vote getters go onto the general election. This would force candidates to run campaigns that extend to the broader population, not just the polarized constituents that incumbents rely on to win time and time again. Voters in California and Washington passed this reform and elections have become more competitive. Voters in Oregon will have an opportunity to vote on a Top Two nonpartisan initiative in November, and we hope to put it on the ballot in Florida in the near future as well. If you have any further questions, please email me at jcorley86@gmail. co m or phone me at 708.670.0095 for more information. Also visit http:// oridaindependentvotingorg.blogspot.co m to learn more about Top Two here in Florida, and visit IndependentVoting. org to learn more about the independent movement nationally. Jarell Corely Orlando Wrigley Field, Saban and Big and Rich Time to get on down to Floridafor the game! Comin to Your City as performed by Big and Rich As a fair-weather Cubs fan who attended games at Wrigley Field quite sparingly, the extent of my sports allegiance is shallow and casual. So when I moved South 33 years ago, I was completely unprepared for the passion which accompanies college football in yall country. I never watch an entire game, though I will admit to an af nity for the song Were Comin to Your City, played at top volume on televisions throughout my neighborhood each Saturday morning. Something about a College Game Day Show? All I know is that the noise drowns out the Cooking Channel. But a recent article in The Economist piqued my interest about college athletics. The magazine estimates NCAA annual revenues at $10 billion. The argument that coffers will be depleted if studentathletes are given a living wage in addition to a scholarship seems laughable in this context. In 41 of 50 American states, a college coach is the highest paid public employee. Urban Meyers net worth is said to be approaching $18 million. Nick Sabans net worth is estimated at $15 million; his annual salary is $5.6 million. My son, a Florida grad, says this demonstrates Meyers superior nancial acumen. At $3.7 million annually, Gator hoops coach Billy Donovan is Floridas highest paid public employee. Saban is Alabamas highest paid public employee. Bulldogs Head Coach Mark Richt is the highest paid Georgia public employee, at $3.2 million. The economic impact of college football on local communities is not insigni cant. For the players, though, it would be fascinating to analyze their participation in return on investment terms. What is the actual risk and reward for them? It certainly appears to be a one-sided affair, like buying a penny stock and hoping the company will take off. The odds that a college player will advance to the professional level, simultaneously gaining employable skill while avoiding serious injury, are stacked heavily against him. And as The Economist observes, he gets nothing nancially for his considerable efforts. Except his scholarship. Most student-athletes technically live in poverty, notes the magazine, because their scholarships do not cover the cost of living beyond room and board and the NCAA bars them from signing independent endorsement or licensing dealsFor decades, college sports fans cheered for their alma maters without worrying that the best coaches earn millionswhile the best players live hand to mouth. One wonders about the long term nancial prospects for collegians who dont turn pro. Some actually pursue serious academic careers, but a large number fail to graduate with marketable skills. And many major in pigskin, while the mentors around them major in money. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC (608-6121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. Im sorry to report that child identity fraud is alive and well in 2014. If anything, the problem may be worsening as identity thieves devise new methods to steal and use childrens personal information. Most commonly, theyll harvest kids dormant Social Security numbers (SSNs) and use them to illegally obtain jobs or open fraudulent bank and credit accounts, mortgages or car loans. Many victims dont realize theres a problem until they later apply for a student loan, bank account, job or apartment and are turned down because of the poor credit history someone else racked up. Some families are even hounded by collection agencies or arrested because the debts or criminal activities were so extreme. There are no completely foolproof methods to protect your childrens identities, but here are some precautions you can take: While its tempting to simply not register your kids for SSNs until they turn 18, thats not practical in todays world. For one thing, theyll need one to be claimed as dependents on your taxes. You may also need SSNs for your kids to obtain medical coverage or government services or to open bank accounts in their names. Because each persons SSN is unique, its not uncommon for schools, health care providers, insurance companies, banks and others to require them as ID. However, dont be afraid to ask: Why do they need to use an SSN is there a legal requirement? Will they accept alternative identi cation? What will happen if you don't disclose it? What security precautions do they take with personal information? Will they agree not to use the SSN as your child's personal identi cation number on correspondence, account statements or ID cards? Watch for these clues your childs personal data may have been compromised: They receive preapproved credit account offers. They receive calls or billing statements from collection agencies, creditors or government agencies. You're unable to open a bank account in their name because one already exists with the same SSN. They're denied credit, employment, a driver's license or college enrollment for unknown or credit-related reasons. Remember, there could be legitimate reasons why your child is receiving credit offers. For example, it could be a marketing outreach from an af liate of your bank or because you opened a college fund in their name. If you strongly suspect or have evidence that identity theft has been committed, you can: File a police report and keep a copy as proof of the crime. Contact the fraud units at the three major credit bureaus for instructions: Equifax (800525-6285), Experian (888397-3742) and TransUnion (800-680-7289). Notify the Federal Trade Commission (877438-4338), whose Identity Theft site contains information on fraud alerts, credit freezes, how to work with police and much more ( www.ftc.go v ). Ask Social Security (800-772-1213) whether anyone has reported income using your child's SSN. Search "Identity Theft" at www.ssa.go v for information. Contact the IRS' Identity Protection Unit (800-980-4490). The FTC recommends contacting the three credit bureaus around your childs 16th birthday to see whether they have credit reports on le. (There usually wouldnt be unless theyre an authorized user on one of your accounts.) If there is a report and it has errors due to fraud or misuse youll have time to correct it before you kid needs to use credit. Warn your kids about the dangers of revealing personal information by phone, email, or social networking. Dont hesitate to monitor their accounts and install parental blocking software. And remember, if they share your computer, a downloaded virus could infect your accounts as well. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMone y MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Controlling the process A love of music Steve Southerland, red snapper and catch shares Identity thieves target kids as well as adults JASON ALDERMAN

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 By Dave Maddox Special to The Star With Labor Day approaching my thoughts return to something happened here one Labor Day years ago. Our friends, Jack and Mary Archer, were visiting from Pensacola. Just after Ive gone to bed the phone rang and it was Mrs. Erlma Boyles. She was frantic saying that her daughter, Glenna, and Marsha Cargill and three boys from Alabama had gone riding in Marshas Jeepster and had not returned. This was prior to our area having rescue teams. Neighbors helped each other and if the search involved the water, somehow I came to mind. Mrs. Boyles had people searching the roads in Gulf, Franklin and Calhoun counties, shining lights in the ditches to see if they had wrecked. She asked me to take the pilot boat and go to the peninsula and look for them over there. I tried to explain to her that my boat was too big and required too much water to get near the beach. She then asked if I would take the peninsula as my search project. I could understand her fear because the previous Christmas a couple had left Mac Millers store at Simmons Bayou returning home to Franklin County. The couple was never heard from. Several months later a Department of Transportation maintenance crew working on a bridge just south of Gautier Hammock on C30 found them and their submerged car in the ditch by the bridge. I told Mrs. Boyles that I would go look for them. Jack heard the phone conversation and wanted to go. I explained to him that this was going to be a long night and that he should go back to bed, but he insisted on going. And it was a long night. We went to Bill Cargills home to see if he could tell me anything about where they might have gone. When I arrived, a doctor was treating Mrs. Cargill for being so upset about the missing girls. She was also suffering with terminal cancer. Bill said that he knew something was terribly wrong because Marsha would have crawled on her hands and knees if she needed to so that they would know that she was safe. There were no cell phones or CB radios in those days. Mrs. Boyles husband was also sick and her daughter, Barbara was in a hospital. Here were two families in crisis who needed help. Jack and I drove to the Coast Guard station at the Cape San Blas lighthouse. At that time you had to log in and out there to drive across the Coast Guard station to reach the beach. Remember that there we no paved roads on the peninsula at this time. We found the man on duty and he showed us where the kids had logged in to drive on the beach, but had not logged out. We then that they were on the peninsula somewhere. We asked the man on duty for permission to use their Jeep. We then explained the situation to the chief who agreed to help by letting two of his men take us on the Coast Guard Jeep to look for the young people. After getting several containers of water, we set out on the Gulf Beach. It was now about midnight. Although the tide had risen we could see an occasional tire track. We continued up the beach and rounded St. Joe Point at Shark Hole. We nally saw some tail lights ashing ahead where they had bogged down. We drove as far as we could and then started walking toward them. We then heard what sounded like a herd of horses running toward us. When we met, one of the boys as us what had taken so long to nd them. I was quite unhappy with that remark after what they had put so many people through on that night. In fairness to them, I am sure that the dog ies and mosquitoes had been biting them badly because those boys were only wearing swimming trunks. Glenna was crying because we knew her mother was frantic about her. While walking back to the Jeep I suddenly realized that there were nine adults to ride that Jeep 16 miles back down the beach to the Coast Guard station. However, much to my relief, we were all able to get on and started back. With the high tide we couldnt drive on the hard part of the beach and had to drive in the soft sand. The driver was using four wheel drive and double low gear with that heavy load. When the engine would overheat, we would stop and let it cool. Twice the Jeep bogged down and we all pushed it out. We nally reached the Coast Guard station and thank the two young men for their help. Seven of us got in my car and started back to St. Joe. Jack and I delivered the girls to their homes between daylight and sunup. I dont remember what happened to the boys. Jack had an exciting night, but it was old hat to me. The following day, George Wimberly and some men retrieved Marshas Jeepster from the peninsula. We ems Memorial Rehab Car e of fers in-patient re habilitative services, designed to impr ove function and maximize potential for re tur ning to home, school, work, and the community Our team customizes each patient s car e to meet both patient and family needs. We ar e committed to re tur ning those individuals who have been impair ed by accident or disease to their highest level of independence. Re hab Re stor e, Re turn to Home Call To day (850 ) 653-8853 135 Av enue G, Apalac hicola We ems Memorial Re hab Car e Yo ur Jour ney Back Home A Labor Day Remembered THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, August 28, 2014 By Brad Buck University of Florida/IFAS Special to The Star GAINESVILLE A Univer sity of Florida-developed web tool can bring grow ers $1.7 million more in net prots over 10 years than a calendar-based fungicide system because it guides growers to spray their crop at optimal times, a new UF study shows. The Strawberry Advi sory System, devised by an Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences re searcher, takes data such as temperature and leaf wetness and tells growers when to spray fungicide to ward off diseases. Growers can use the system by log ging onto www.agroclimate. or g /tools/strawberry or use the website to sign up for email or text alerts. Before the system was developed, strawberry farmers traditionally sprayed weekly during the November-to-March grow ing season. Spraying more often than is needed wastes money and can lead to fungicide resistance, said Natalia Peres, associate professor in plant pathol ogy, who led the systems development. Not all strawberry grow ers use the system, but this research might persuade them to do so, said Tatia na Borisova, an assistant professor in UF/IFAS food and resource economics department. The study will help ad ditional producers to real ize the benets, Borisova said. Increased adop tion of this system can in crease the protability of the strawberry industry in Florida, and it will help pro ducers to stay competitive in the market. Ekaterina Vorotnikova, a doctoral student in food and resource economics, worked on the study to identify how much the web tool could increase prof its and yield by reducing spraying for anthracnose and botrytis, two of the crops deadliest diseases. Using a 26-acre farm as her average, Vorotnikova took data collected at UFs Gulf Coast Research and Education Center from 2006-2012 and put it into a 10-year model. She found that using the web tool in creased net prot for straw berries with anthracnose by $1.7 million and $890,000 for those with botrytis. The increased prot stemmed mostly from decreased spraying, Borisova said. Florida is the nations second-leading strawberry producer, behind Califor nia. Floridas crop brings in $366 million annually, according to the state De partment of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Given that world strawberry production was worth about $4.3 billion in 2013, the development and adoption of expert systems for small fruit production operations can benet millions of farmers world wide, Vorotnikova said. In 2012 and 2013, a UF/ IFAS survey found 96 per cent of Floridas strawber ry producers said botrytis attacks their crop. Half said they get anthracnose every three to four years, while 40 percent said they get it ev ery year. Fifty-ve percent of respondents said they subscribe to text or e-mail alerts about anthracnose and botrytis risk levels from the system, Borisova said. Traditionally, strawberry growers sprayed their crop with fungicide weekly. But this was not optimal, said John VanSickle, a UF/IFAS food and resource econom ics professor and a study co-author. For example, if condi tions do not induce diseas es, growers sprayed unnec essarily, wasting chemicals and labor and increasing production costs. Second, if weather worsens unex pectedly, farmers might not be able spray. Third, too much fungicide helps build chemical resistance for the disease, VanSickle said. The study, written by Vorotnikova, Borisova and VanSickle, was pub lished online last month in the journal Agricultural Systems. Ex pe ri en ce Co un ts Co mm it me nt to Ex ce lle nc e Bo ar d Ce rt i ed In te rn al Me di ci ne & Cos me ti c Sp ec ia li st Vi nc en t Iv er s, MD 22 770 70 | WWW .IVE RS MD .C OM 30 1 M ON DA Y T UE SD AY T HUR SD AY & F RI DA Y 9 AM 6 PM W ED NE SD AY & S AT UR DA Y 9 AM 2 PM Co ng rat ul at io ns to Dr Vi nc en t Iv er s, fo r Ov er 23 Ye ar s o f De di ca t ed Co mp ass io na te Se rv ic e. Dr Iv er s, Hi s St af f, an d Fa mil y Th an k Yo u an d Loo k Fo rw ar d to Ma ny Mo re Ye ar s Wi th Al l of Yo u. Dr Iv er s an d his fa mi ly re lo ca ted fr om th e Co co a Bea ch ar ea wh er e he wo rk ed as a pr im ar y ca re ph ys ici an to jo in th e St Jo e co mmu ni ty in 19 95. He th en beg an pr act ici ng in te rna l me di ci ne fa mi ly me di ci ne in -p at ie nt ca re an d ca rd io va sc ul ar me di ci ne a t Gu lf Pi ne s Me di ca l. Dr Iv er s Gr ad u at ed Cu m La ud e in his me di ca l cl as s. Wh en he joi ne d Gu lf Pi ne s Me di ca l, he wa s a mem be r of th e Am er ic an Co ll eg e of Ch es t Ph ys i ci an s, Amer ic an Me di ca l As so ci at io n an d th e Amer ic an Co ll eg e of Ph ys i ci an s. Dr Iv er s ha s re ce iv ed ma ny aw ar ds th ro ug h th e ye ar s, bu t mo st re wa rd in g of al l is th e hono r of ea rn in g th e tr us t an d lo ya lt y of hi s so ma ny wo nd er fu l pa ti en ts M AN AG IN G AL L YO UR FA MI LY NEED S : Strawberry monitoring system could add $1.7 million to farms UF/IFAS STUDIESCO U RT ES Y UF/IFAS FILE PHOTO Natalia Peres, UF/IFAS associate professor of plant pathology, shows a container of strawberries. A new UF/IFAS study shows growers can use the Strawberry Advisory System, a web-based tool that Peres helped design, to save up to $1.7 million over 10 years in fungicide use. Instead of spraying weekly, growers can use the system to tell them more optimal time to spray their strawberries. By Brad Buck University of Florida/IFAS Special to The Star Many parents presume their children will shun whole grains because they think they dont like them, a University of Florida re searcher says, but a new UF study may start to de bunk that idea. If whole grains are of fered, kids eat them, ac cording to a new study by researchers at UFs Insti tute of Food and Agricul tural Sciences. Specically, former graduate student Allyson Radford and two faculty members found children ate wholeand re ned-grain foods in equal amounts. We tried to choose foods we thought kids would en joy, such as cereal bars, macaroni and cheese and SunChips and found that they ate the ready-to-eat snack foods the most, said Radford, one of the studys authors. We were interested to see if they would eat the whole-grain foods as much as the rened-grain foods, and so we were pleasantly surprised that they would eat the same amount whether the food was whole or rened. Radford co-wrote the pa per with assistant professor Wendy Dahl and professor Bobbi Langkamp-Henken, all of whom are in the food science and human nutri tion department. The study was published online last week by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Eating whole grains, combined with a healthy diet, may reduce the risk of heart disease and help with weight management, ac cording to the U.S. Depart ment of Agriculture. Examples of wholegrain foods include pop corn, oats, whole wheat bread and brown rice. Re ned grains, enriched and fortied with nutrients, in clude foods such as white rice and white bread. The 2010 Dietary Guide lines for Americans call for at least half the grain consumers eat to be whole grains, and they urge ado lescents to consume 5 to 7 ounces of grains daily with at least half being whole grains. National surveys sug gest adolescents consume far less: about 1 ounce, or Offer kids whole grains; theyll eat them the grain contained in one slice of bread. Federal dietary guide lines for the 2012-13 school year increased the whole grain required in school lunches. Start ing this fall, schools must offer only whole-grain rich products. The new rules requir ing more whole grains in school lunches should re sult in adolescents eating more of them, Dahl said, but many parents believe their kids wont eat whole grains. General Mills funded a broad study on the impact of whole grains on immu nity. As part of the study, Radford wanted to know if children could meet the 2010 dietary guidelines for whole grains. For the study, 83 students in a Florida middle school were randomly assigned to receive either wholeor rened-grain foods over a six-week period in 2010. Of those, 42 stu dents were in the rened grain group, while 41 were in the whole-grain group. Participants and their families were given re ned-grain or wholegrain pasta, rice, bread and other foods to eat at home. And they were given wholeand renedgrain snack foods to eat at school. Researchers inter viewed students weekly to see what fruits, veg etables and grains they ate in the previous 24 hours. Before the study, participants were eating about one ounce of whole grain per day. During the study, students in both groups reported eating more than 6 ounces of grains each day, and those given whole grains reported more than half their grain intake came from whole grains, meeting the 2010 dietary guidelines. Snacks served at school were the most popular grain foods the kids ate. Encouraging con sumption of whole-grain foods that require little to no preparation may be the most effective means of increasing whole grain intake at home, said Radford, now a UF re search study coordinator in food science and hu man nutrition.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL A T THE MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S SA TUR DA Y 9P M FRID AY 9P M SUN DA Y 7P M LA BOR DA Y 7P M SA TUR DA Y 9P M FL ABBERGASTED SUND AY 7P M KO NKRETE SOUL LA BO R D AY 7P M RAND Y ST ARK RAND Y ST ARK ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T S ELEC TION O F A LL Y OUR F AV ORITE B EER W INE & SPIRIT S UPCOMING EVENTS KARAOKE/DJ THURSD AY -FRID AY -SA TURD AY AND SUND AY !!! AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST FRID AY 9P M LIVE ON THE POOP DECK Celebrate Labor Day All Weekend Long 45 18 65 4 TAX HIKE from page A1 However, McLemore cautioned that killing the proposal would mean commissioners would have to nd the money elsewhere in the budget as the tentative millage rate, which can not be raised, has already been approved. That is my only issue at this point; it would have been easier to not go this route from the outset, McLemore said. I have opposed this from day one. Public comment there were three speakers was divided. Tom Semmes of Wewahitchka said the gas tax would create additional hardship for those on xed or low incomes and said the result could be a ight of customers to Bay County to purchase fuel for their vehicles. He added that commissioners had not always managed funds appropriately, citing recent examples such as a $20,000 increase in the administrators salary while most employees were not getting raises, bloated and over-budget travel expenses and lack of spending on the leaking Wewahitchka Courthouse. This is a bad ordinance, Semmes said. With commissioners also looking at an increase in the millage rate, Barbara Radcliff of Port St. Joe said an increase in the gas tax was in effect double-dipping and echoed Semmes comments about low income residents. It is a kind of regressive tax, Radcliff said. But Pat Hardman of Port St. Joe said it was appropriate to shift some of the burden for funding county operations off property taxpayers she said already foot too much of the bill. There has got to be some relief for the property taxpayer, Hardman said. We are taking it on the chin for the tourists and those who dont pay property taxes. Commissioner Warren Yeager, who has championed the gas tax hike the past two years, said commissioners had to nd alternative sources of revenue. He took exception to Semmes comments on managing money, arguing the budget has been steadily carved the past six years. His fundamental opposition to the property tax system fed his belief that offsetting a chunk of the budget through the gas tax was the right thing to do. Its a fair tax, and its fair way to do it, Yeager said. And, he added, Bay County had the same level of gas taxes, and the prices in Bay County were lower because of proximity to the gas, not taxes. The discussion took a turn to countywide voting as Commissioner Tan Smiley said commissioners had added to the budget and in turn the millage rate to pay an attorney for continued work on countywide voting and had provided $80,000 a year for a director of economic development without results. And now, Bryan was proposing to push another $120,000 into property taxes. I am just doing simple math, Smiley said. Smiley argued, the people in my district dont want countywide voting, and McLemore agreed, saying a voter referendum on the issue is now a decade old and might not pass today. Bryan said three commissioners had run for of ce in support of countywide voting and that the legal work was actually to bring the county into compliance on districting. Commissioner Ward McDaniel roped the discussion back to the gas tax and made his case that the additional dollars would bene t not only the county but the two municipalities that would share in the proceeds from the tax. Rigid restrictions were placed on the spending of revenue from the gas tax, he said. He said the cost to a driver, $50 for every 1,000 gallons of gas, was not too heavy a burden. I dont like any new tax, but a sales tax is a fair tax, McDaniel said. RESTORE Yeager reported that with rules from the U.S. Treasury almost nalized, the county would soon begin seeing some money from nes deriving from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Gulf County is in line to receive some $2.2 million from the settlement with Transocean. The BP trial picks up again in January and is expected to result in the county potentially seeing 10 times that amount. Yeager and Novak said once Treasury rules are nalized, as soon as October after a public comment period, the county would be position to apply for funds to help crafting a plan for spending future revenue. The county was out ahead of the curse with a RESTORE Committee charged with assessing and prioritizing local projects funded through the RESTORE Act. Im proud we got this far, and its a great opportunity for Gulf County, Yeager said. ELECTION from page A1 The race to succeed George Cox in the District 2 school board race will be subject to a recount. Cox announced his retirement this year after more than 50 years serving the public schools. James Taunton charged to a lead in early voting, but Brooke Wooten closed the gap before the night was over, with each candidate taking 50 percent of the vote. The two were separated by just two votes with Wooten receiving 276 to Tauntons 274. According to Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon, Wooten and Taunton face an automatic recount because of having less than a 5 percent difference. The recount would take place in 3-5 days from the election. In the Republican primary for the District 2 BOCC seat, Tom Semmes received 70 percent of the vote while Vicki Adkison Armstrong received 30 percent. Semmes will now face incumbent Commissioner Ward McDaniel, the Democrat, and former commissioner Billy Traylor, running with no party afliation in the November general election. In a regional race, Circuit Judge Jim Fenson was re-elected to the 14th Judicial Circuit bench; in Gulf County, he received 61 percent of the vote to Shalene Grovers 27 percent and Gerard M. Virga Jr.s 12 percent. In statewide race decided Tuesday, Gov. Rick Scott received 88 percent of the county vote in the GOP primary with Yinka Abosede Adeshinas taking 2 percent and Elizabeth Cuevas-Neunder 10 percent. Former Gov. Charlie Crist received 54 percent of the county Democratic vote for governor while Nan H. Rich took 46 percent. George Sheldon brought in 66 percent of the local votes for the Attorney General in the Democratic primary while Perry E. Thurston received 34 percent. ACCIDENT from page A1 over several times, coming to rest on its roof in the shallows of the water. The other occupant, Keith Kelly, 28, of Panama City, suffered critical injuries and was transported to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf where he was Life Flighted to Bay Medical Center in Panama City and was treated for hypothermia. According to Vince Bishop, captain of the SGCVFD, its unknown what caused the SUV to roll, and the accident could have occurred hours before it was discovered by vacationers. Bishop said several factors likely contributed to the event, including excessive speed over soft sand full of bumps, holes and logs. In addition, neither Burke nor Kelly appeared to have been wearing a seat belt, and it was not clear which of the men had been driving. The case is under investigation by the Florida Highway Patrol. It would have been easier to not go this route from the outset. I have opposed this from day one. Carmen McLemore county commissioner 2014 WWW.STARFL.COM THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on

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Local The Star| A9 Thursday, August 28, 2014 The ability to secure a fully trained dog clinched the case. The VA recommended I get a dog, but working through them and another agency this just kind of came up and it just seemed easier, Sollberger said. Last Friday, the Soll berger clan jumped in their vehicle in Land O Lakes in Central Florida where he works in law enforcement and made the drive to Tallahassee for a nights stay before heading to the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society the following morning for a rst look at Flinn. Sollberger has submit ted an application to Chris ty, answering a series of questions about the dogs future home and family. Flinn, having been screened at the shelter, is living at the Forestry Camp while undergoing training to become an adoptable dog. The training was even tweaked with a specic owner in mind Sollberg ers family includes a cat so Flinn is being trained at the Forestry Camp with a cat around. We didnt want to get rid of the cat, so we wanted a dog who was good with cats and kids, Sollberger said. The DAWGS program obliged. But, whether all that effort has a payoff de pends largely on that rst meeting. A signicant part of Christys job is matching owner and dog. For instance, having placed a previous dog with a veteran dealing with PSTD, Christy was careful to match Sollberger with a dog of just the proper temperament. He is doing very well with his training, Christy said of Flinn. And we do extra training when there are kids in the house. A match made Sollberger and his fam ily, particularly an autistic son aged 9, seemed taken. The younger children in particular This is a surprise. They thought we were going to the beach, which we are after this, Sollberger said bounced around Flinn as if he was sitting under a tree on Christmas Day. Hes so soft, Sollberg ers youngest son said with a grin creasing his face. Flinn, in fact, was al most Zen-like meeting Sollberger, his wife and children, with other dogs barking in the background and the house cat coming and going. The dog held a regal pose and uttered not a sound, while reacting, at his pace, yes, to com mands. And, as Christy noted, he still has three weeks of training. Christy noted that Flinn will likely become attuned to Sollberger, recognize the ebbs and ows of his daily rituals and learn to come to his master when needed. He is very calm and very perceptive, Christy said. You can see what a comfort he is. He is a very calm inuence. After learning a few basic commands, playing some outside and taking a brief walk, the Sollberg ers were sold. They will return Sept. 19 for gradu ation and to take Flinn to his new forever home. The VA thinks this will help with my moods, and hopefully this will be a way to reduce the medications, too, Sollberger said. I have two VA appointments this week, and the doctors will be pleased that I got out of the house to come to do this. June Flinn was not the only member of the Sept. 19 class to have a successful meet and greet with their new owner. June, a hound mix, will be adopted by Timothy Mosteferis from Niceville. Mosteferis sustained a catastrophic injury almost 20 years ago and is a quad riplegic. He lost his dog of 16 years earlier this year and was seeking another companion. June, again as part of the effort to match dog and owner, has been training with a wheelchair at the Forestry Camp, though the dog needed a few mo ments to get accustomed to Mosteferis electric model. After some initial re luctance, June and Moste feris, who operates a mu sic store, were good buds particularly once June understood that good deeds mean good treats, just as they taught her at the Forestry Camp. Shes beautiful, Mo steferis said. Wa rm and coz yt wo bedr oom tw ob at hb each co ttage in an "X" ood zo ne .N ea ta nd ve ry we ll car ed fo r, ex ce llen t gulf view s, dune wa lk ov er within 200 ft .E xt re mely we ll appoin te da nd though to ut .N ew er stack wa sher and dr ye r, re fr iger at or and st ov e. Fu rn itur ei sn egotiable Th is wo uld make an ex ce llen ts hor tt er mr en tal NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 9/15/2014 CODE: SJ00 Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR MEET AND GREET from page A1 PHOTOS BY T IM CROFT | The Star LEFT: Sandi Christy teaches a few basic commands to the Sollberger clan, the rst the proper way in and out of a door. RIGHT: Flinn not only seemed to have a calming effect on Brad Sollberger, but also his 9-year-old autistic son.

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Special to The Star Despite a brutal rain storm Friday afternoon at the Captains Party that destroyed five tents, loyal anglers came to the event and registered for the 18th Annual Mexico Beach Artificial Reef Association Kingfish Tournament. The Captains Party and registration brought in 141 boats for the big tournament Saturday. We were all hunkering down when the storm came through on Friday afternoon, and it was scary for a while, said Ron Childs, tournament director. After it quit raining and blowing, volunteers moved the torn up tents, wiped off the chairs and tables, and we kept on going. The food was great and we got everybody registered for the tournament. A big 31.92 pound king mackerel was the winner in the recreational division on the boat Bluewater Predator with Michael Lodge acting as the Captain. The winning fish in the professional division was caught by Jud Alexander on the boat Congo. The fish weighed 38.85 pounds. The second-place fish in the recreational division was caught by Bill Connally on the boat Reel Natural. The fish weighed in at 31.87 pounds. Third place went to Stephen Price on the Cape Horn at 30.03 pounds. The winning Wahoo was caught by Finley Cook on the boat Garfin and it weighed 25.07 pounds. The winning Spanish mackerel was caught by Bill May on the boat Contender Bay. It weighed 4.12 pounds. Bob Cox, president of the MBARA, said, This is our biggest fund raiser and we really appreciate all of our anglers, sponsors, and Corporate Friends that helped make all of this happen. Since 1997, the MBARA has built about 1.4 million dollars worth of artificial reefs and has plans to keep working hard to build marine habitats off of Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, and Panama City. All reef coordinates are listed at www.mbara.org along with underwater videos of reefs and research reports on each reef. Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer is almost gone! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Au g. 28 88 78 20 % Fr i, Au g. 29 87 79 80 % Sa t, Au g. 30 88 79 50 % Sun, Au g. 31 88 79 40 % Mo n, Se pt 1 89 79 40 % Tu es Se pt 2 89 78 20 % We d, Se pt 3 89 78 20 % Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 10 Thursday, August 28, 2014 OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Offshore/Bottom Inshore/Bay SPONSORED BY Amberjack is now closed as of 8/25, however gag grouper still is open and some anglers are reporting great catches over live or hard bottom due south of Cape San Blas. King sh still are very thick in our regions waters with no sign of stopping soon. Slow trolling or drift shing live baits should get you in on the action fast shing many of the buoys and channel markers close to shore. Inshore shing is slowing down still due to school activities and the hot weather. Good reports from Crooked Island and East Bay this week of nice schools of red sh in great numbers. Most inshore species are moving and feeding in our waters and looking for cooler waters. Deeper is going to be better for inshore sh right now and rst light is the best time depending on tides. MBARA King sh Tournament scores big PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR First place Pro King sh Congo: Capt. Jud Alexander (caught sh), Miss King sh, Corey Norland, Earl Middleton, Davis Durham, Tanner Alexander. Below left third place King sh Capehorn: Grayson Price, Algy Wade (caught sh), Capt. Stephen Price with Miss King sh. Below right rst place King sh Bluewater Predator: Creighton Rollins, Miss King sh Morgan Guilford, Jack Hittinger (caught sh), Capt. Michael Lodge, Phillip Cochran, Mike Chavez Jr. Above rst place Wahoo Gar n: Ron Martin, Capt. Finley Cook, Winston Berrottla, Miss King sh, Drew Cook (caught sh) and Taylor Whiddon. At right rst place Spanish Contender Bay: Capt. Bill May, Miss King sh (Ashley May, not in photo, caught the sh). Gator Classic Flathead Cat sh Tournament this weekend Star Staff Report The 4th annual Gator Classic Flathead Cat sh Tournament will be this weekend, Aug. 29-30, at Gaskin Park Landing in Wewahitchka. Registration for the event will be from 9 to 10 a.m. CST Friday, Aug. 29. The fee to participate is $55 on the day of the tournament. Fishing begins at 4 p.m. CST Friday and ends at noon Saturday, Aug. 30. A rules meeting will be 30 minutes before the tournament begins. The $700 prize for largest cat sh will be awarded at a ceremony beginning immediately following the tournament. Second place will receive $300, third $250, fourth $150 and fth $100. An additional cash prize of $800 will be awarded to the sherman with the most, combined individual athead poundage from the following 2014 tournaments at the Florida Cat sh Classic: The Liberty County Senior Citizens Flathead Tournament, The Florida Cat sh Classic, The Choctawhatchee Cat sh Roundup and The Gator Classic Cat sh Tournament. Fisherman must have participated in three out of four tournaments to be eligible. Children of any age wishing to sh for athead must pay the adult rate and will sh against adults. Cat sh must be at least 14 inches long and alive. All boats must check in and be inspected at Gaskin Park before shing in the tournament. Launches for the tournament will take place from Gaskin Park, Bristol Landing, Estiffanulga Landing or Owl Creek-Hickory Landing. Proceeds from the event will bene t the 2014 and 2016 Project Graduation Classes at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. Call tournament director Dennis Peak with questions at 340-1029. The winning sh in the professional division was caught by Jud Alexander on the boat Congo. The sh weighed 38.85 pounds.

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By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka junior/senior high school football teams start the 2014 regular football season on similar footing. Both are coming off kickoff classic wins, which in their respective ways were impressive, and they will begin the new season facing each other, as they have in recent years. The Tiger Sharks host the Gators 7:30 p.m. EST Friday at Shark Field in a renewal of the county rivalry. Wewahitchka comes in off a 31-0 drubbing of visiting Franklin County in a Kickoff Classic last Friday as Rashard Ranie averaged over 12 yards a carry on 10 carries to pace a balanced Gator attack. We played pretty well, said rst-year Gator coach Loren Tillman. We got a lot of kids in to play. From where we were in the spring we are pleased. Although Ranie led the team, Tillman noted that several other skill players in particular Brett Setterich and Caleb Shiver stood out. We had a lot of kids get in there and if we can establish enough other than Rashard to keep teams honest that will bene t us, Tillman said. We are still a young team, but we are playing at game speed and that is good. The kids have come to understand the team concept we are teaching, that what is best is what gives the team the best opportunity. I am pleased with our progress. Friday was step in that direction. A step preceded by a fruitful summer. Physically we just looked different from the spring, Tillman said. Leaner, thicker, faster, I think that comes from the kids learning the system, buying into what we are trying to do and working hard running and lifting during the summer. The Tiger Sharks had a tougher time in their 20-19 victory, but the score was less important than the opponent visiting Blountstown, which reached the Class 1A title game last year. Also how the Tiger Sharks won was a boost. With the varsity exclusively on the eld in the rst half, the Tiger Sharks carved out a 20-2 lead and a goal-line stand in the nal minutes sealed the win. It was great to get a win. I thought the kids played hard. And it should be a boost in con dence that it was the state runner-up, said Port St. Joe coach John Palmer, returning to the Tiger Shark sideline after spending six years in Hernando. But we have got a lot of room to improve. Our technique was not really good in spots and we had some turnover issues. We also had some early penalties we have to clean up. We have a lot of work to do and things we need to focus on correcting. Port St. Joe enters the game fairly healthy. Chad Quinn, who had suffered heat-related issues that kept him off the practice eld for several weeks will be back and the Tiger Sharks escaped Blountstown without injury. The Tiger Sharks have good numbers out for football this season and return 11 starters from last year. Hopefully we will be ready Friday night, Palmer said. The Gator team Port St. Joe faces, he said, was far different than the one the Tiger Sharks dominated at the end of spring practice. Of particular concern, Palmer said, was a distinct size advantage in the trenches. They are very big on the lines, Palmer said. A great test for us will be to be able to stop them on offense. Offensively, they come up with ways to move the ball behind that big line. They are playing really good on defense right now. It will be a challenge for us to be able to move the ball. For the Gators, Tillman said, the key will be playing intelligently and keeping the Tiger Shark offense in front of them, cutting off long plays. The Gators are nursing a few bumps and bruises, Tillman said, and he must be cognizant with those players that next week brings crucial district game. Both coaches agreed the turnover battle would also be crucial. Weve got to play good smart football, Tillman said. We need to get rst downs and dont turn the ball over. As long as we are picking up rst downs it will end in the end zone. We also have to limit big plays. We have to keep their offense in front of us. Port St. Joe Yo uth Soccer registration for the fall soccer season will be held on Friday August 22nd and 29th from 5:00 pm until 7:00 pm, Saturday August 23rd and 30th from 9:00am until 12:00 noon at the ST AC House The ST AC House is located on 8th street in Port St. Joe. Boys and Girls ages 4 to 13 are invited to play soccer Players must be at least 4 years old before September 1st in order to play Bring a copy of your child s birth certi cate to the registration. No experience is necessary Registration fee is $60 per player A limited number of scholarships available. Coaches, referees and sponsors are needed. Please sign up at the time of registration! PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, August 28, 2014 A Page 11 Section Tiger Sharks, Gators ready for county clash MORE INFO Centennial Bank will sponsor a Clash of the County tailgate party before Fridays game. The event is free and all fans are invited. The party will be 5-6:30 p.m. EST adjacent to Shark Stadium in Port St. Joe. Hot dogs, chips and drinks will be provided. COURTESY OF MALLORY PEAK Rashard Ranie had 130 yards rushing on just 10 carries as Wewahitchka drubbed Franklin County 31-0 in a Kickoff Classic last week. Port St. Joe beat Blountstown 20-19. PORT ST. JOE TIGER SHARKS 2013: 8-4 (3-0 District 4-1A) Head coach: John Palmer, rst year Starters returning: 6/5 SCHEDULE Aug. 29 Wewahitchka 6:30 p.m. Sept. 5 at Bay 7 p.m. Sept. 12 at Bozeman 7 p.m. Sept. 19 Jefferson Co. 6:30 p.m. Sept. 26 Chipley 6:30 p.m. Oct. 3 at Franklin Co. 6:30 p.m. Oct. 17 Florida A&M 6:30 p.m. Oct. 24 at W. Gadsden 6:30 p.m. Oct. 31 at Liberty Co. 6:30 p.m. Nov. 7 Arnold 6:30 p.m. RESULTS at Wewahitchka 45-20 Bay 0-19 Bozeman 35-0 at Jefferson County 38-6 at Chipley 16-28 Franklin County 49-6 at Florida A&M 21-12 West Gadsden 17-3 Liberty County 24-7 at Arnold 0-38 South Walton 45-21 at Blountstown 0-34 WEWAHITCHKA GATORS Last season: 2-8 (0-4 District 2-1A) Head coach: Loren Tillman, rst year Returning starters: 5/5 SCHEDULE Aug. 22 Franklin County W 31-0 Aug. 29 at Port St. Joe 6:30 p.m. Sept. 5 Cottondale 7 p.m. Sept. 12 Liberty County 7 p.m. Sept. 19 Graceville 7 p.m. Oct. 3 at N. Bay Haven 7 p.m. Oct. 10 Maclay 7 p.m. Oct. 17 at Sneads 7 p.m. Oct. 24 at Vernon 7 p.m. Oct. 31 at Franklin Co. 6:30 p.m. Nov. 7 West Gadsden 7 p.m. RESULTS Port St. Joe L 45-20 at Cottondale L 22-14 at Liberty County L 46-8 at Graceville L 48-0 Franklin County W 40-14 North Bay Haven W 34-13 at Maclay L 40-12 Sneads L 53-14 Vernon L 55-0 at West Gadsden L 49-34 Soccer goalkeeper camp set for October Special to The Star ALL-Pro Soccer, in conjunction with Callaway Youth Soccer, will be hosting a middle school\high school, preseason goalkeeper camp for all those interested. The four-session camp will run from Thursday, Oct. 2, through Saturday, Oct. 4. There will be two levels of instruction, one for keepers preparing for area schoollevel soccer, who have had little or no previous training at that position, and a second group of those players with previous positional training. Coaches Gary Hindley of Port St. Joe High School and Coach Don Maples of Knoxville, Tenn., will be the instructors. Only 30 Keepers will be registered. The sessions will be at the Callaway Sports Comples, off State 22 in Callaway. The Thursday and Friday sessions will run from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (CST) and the double session on Saturday will be from 2 to 4 p.m. and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. To register, call 850-276-6353 or email gjhallpro@aol.com.

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Local A12 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 Scene Scene around STAR STAFF REPORT This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Submit your photos to tcroft@star .com. COURTESY OF GRETCHEN MAYES A St. Joe Beach sunset. COURTESY OF SAMANTHA LAYFIELD A sunset over WindMark Beach. COURTESY OF MELINA ELUM A heron on St. Joe Beach. COURTESY OF MICHELLE KENDRICK Of lily pads and lighthouses. COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI A sea gull glides over Indian Pass. COURTESY OF TERRY LIND A view across St. Joseph Bay. COURTESY OF DOROTHY ROGERS Eagle eye. COURTESY OF RON RUDOLPH A dolphin comes close off Cape San Blas. COURTESY OF STEVE AT KAYAK DOG ADVENTURES Floating down the Brothers River.

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, August 28, 2014 B Page 1 Section Undersea archaeology brings tourism beyond the beaches By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com In a ceremony earlier this month, Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner hosted a press conference in Pensacola to mark the launch of an initiative to support tourism beyond the beaches with the Florida Panhandle Shipwreck Trail. The trail was developed in 2012 by August marks 158th anniversary of her demise By H ER MAN J O N ES Special to The Star No one knows where the Great Storm of 1856 was spawned. Chances are it sprang to life over the Baha mas around Aug. 25-26. On the Aug. 27, it entered the Straits of Florida and both Fort Dallas on Biscayne Bay and Key West reported strong winds and gales. For the next four days it would churn its way through the Gulf before making landfall on Crooked Island, west of Mexico Beach. First it beat the devil out of Cape San Blas and destroyed the second lighthouse, which now lies about two-thirds of a mile offshore. Just ve years before, another Great Storm had knocked down the rst Cape San Blas lighthouse along with the ones on Cape St. George and Dog Island. To the north, on the pen insula, the S.S. FLORIDA would become the second victim of the storms fury. FLORIDA departed the Pensacola Navy Yard on Thursday morning, Aug. 28. As the steamer crossed the Pensacola Bar at 10 a.m. and entered the open Gulf, Im sure the seasoned Master of FLORIDA felt a knot in his stomach. The long ground swells that crashed beneath FLORI DAS bow meant only one thing--somewhere in the Gulf there was a hurricane. Hopefully, they could reach Apalachicola, their next scheduled stop the next day, and nd safety in its protected bay. Friday morning, as they drew near Cape San Blas, an ominous warning greet ed them. The great shoal of the Cape was a seething, boiling cauldron of crash ing breakers; it would be impossible to round the Cape and reach Apalachic ola. The captain decided to put about and try to nd a protected anchorage westward. There was no one to no tice the sleek side-wheeler as it rounded St. Josephs Point and entered the pro tection of St. Josephs Bay. There was an unusually By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Hassle-free education. That is what Gulf Coast State College at its Gulf/ Franklin Center will be offering next month as Edu cation Encore returns for another year. Education Encore offers non-credit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics. We have a saying, you are never too old to learn, said Jim Barr, coordinator of Education En core. There are no tests, no grades, no stress, just fun. Registration for Education Encore will be held at 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, Sept. 17. Registration is rst-come, rst-served. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednes days, beginning Sept. 24 through Oct. 29. Classes are being offered in three morning time periods, from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon, making it pos sible for a student to take three classes during this years Encore. In fact, the fee is based on each student having access to all three classes each Wednesday. The goal of Education Encore, Barr said, is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom in which adults explore new ideas. If you have been to college, Barr said, this is an opportunity to re-live the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live the college experience. Just as exercising the body keeps one physi cally texercising the mind keeps one mentally t, he added. The courses offered at the Gulf/Franklin Cen ter include basic computer skills, drawing, writing, chair yoga, jewelry making, gardening, photogra phy and acrylic painting. Kesley Colbert will teach the history of Gulf County and writing in iambic pentameter. Judge Fred Witten will instruct students on the Bill of Rights. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit the website at www.gulfcoast.edu/EducationEn core or for more information call 872-3823 or trans mit an email to Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. As Barr said, Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime in terest. You are never too old to learn. Education Encore returns next month to Gulf/ Franklin Center Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Statistically you are 17 percent more likely to get divorced if you regularly spend money on what? Lottery tickets, Lattes, Cigarettes, Booze 2) On which day do more alcohol-related driving accidents get reported? Super Bowl Sunday, New Years Eve, St. Patricks Day, Halloween 3) A gallon of used motor oil can ruin approximately how many gallons of fresh water? 1,000; 100,000; 500,000; 1 million 4) Whats the term for an animal that lives mostly in trees? Arboreal, Nocturnal, Herbivore, Bonobo 5) The 2-toed sloth has more of what than any other creature? Teeth, Ribs, Toes, Hearts 6) Where did James Naismith invent the game of basketball? Canada, Massachusetts, Ireland, Ohio 7) Of these who didnt drop out of high school? Frank Sinatra, Cher, Orville Wright, Billy Graham 8) What date (MDCLXVI) uses all the Roman numerals from the largest to smallest? 1491, 1666, 1851, 2006 9) From 1969 to 1976 what was against the rules in basketball? Zone defenses, Full court presses, Jump balls, Dunking 10) Which poet wrote the book, Good Morning, America? Frost, Sandburg, Dickinson, Longfellow 11) What was the rst animal to be successfully parachuted out of an airplane? Dog, Cat, Monkey, Goat 12) In Monopoly (board game) how much money does one collect for passing GO? $100, $150, $200, $250 13) Of these presidents which was not assassinated? Gareld, McKinley, Harding, JFK 14) Women are statistically what percent more likely than men to steal money from their kids? 5 percent, 44 percent, 63 percent, 72 percent ANSWERS 1) Cigarettes, 2) St. Patricks Day, 3) Million, 4) Arboreal, 5) Ribs, 6) Massachusetts, 7) Billy Graham, 8)1666, 9) Dunking, 10) Sandburg, 11) Dog, 12) $200, 13) Harding, 14) 72 percent Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com COUR T ESY O F R OSS BOWMAN The Vamar shipwreck is perfect for divers of all skill levels due to its depth and abundance of sea life which includes grouper, stingrays and nurse sharks. S PE C IAL T O THE ST AR At left the S.S. Florida would have looked much like Dictator, another Jacksonville side-wheeler. (Jones collection) At right the remains of the S.S. Florida, one mile south of St. Josephs point. Only the rusting reboxes and bottom of the boiler remain above the sand. The wreck of the S.S. Florida UNDER THE SEA S PE C IAL T O THE ST AR The wreckage of the Vamar located off Mexico Beach is part of the Florida Panhandle Shipwreck Trail. See S.S. FLORIDA B9 See SEA B8

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B2 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 Sa uc y is a me diu m en er gy 40 lb 1y r+ Pl ot t Hou nd /M ix. Sh e is ve ry fr ie nd ly an d soc ia bl e wi th ki ds an d adu lts al ik e. Sa uc y wa lks we ll on he r le as h an d wi ll sit fo r a tre at Sh e ha s sta rt ed cr at e tr ai nin g an d is doi ng ex cep ti onal Sa uc y wi ll mak e a gr ea t add it ion to yo ur fa mi ly an d a wo nde rf ul co mp an ion Th is pr et ty gir l is spa ye d, up -t o-d at e on va cc in at ion s an d he ar t wo rm ne gat iv e. If yo u ar e unab le to ado pt at thi s ti me pe rh aps yo u co ul d fo st er or ma ke a Do nat ion Al l pe ts adop te d fr om SJ BHS wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc in at ion s an d sp ay ed /n eu te re d. Pl ease do no t he sit at e to em ai l tow nse nd .h sd ire ct or @ gm ai l. co m or ad o pt ba ys tj oe@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Huma ne So ci et y at 85 022 7-1 10 3 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at ww w. sjb hu mane soc iet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur sd ay -S at urd ay fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e. OF THE WEEK PET If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty St. Joseph Ba y Humane Society www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! Ke ep your business moving with our 4x4 Equipment Loan : New or Used Equipment Financing Av ailable $25,000 Minimum Loan Fo ur -Y ear Te rm with Fixed Rates as low as 4% APR ^ Quick Approval Process Call your Capital City Banker to apply today 504 Monume nt Av e. | 229.8282 www .ccbg .com FINAN CING FO R NEW & US ED LOGG ING EQUIP MENT 2014 annual Noma community reunion The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building Saturday, Aug. 30. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon CT. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a welllled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. Anyone desiring additional information may contact Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. Wewahitchka Medical Center hosts free quit smoking classes next week Wewahitchka Medical Center is hosting a tobacco quit program called Tools to Quit from 5:30-7:30 p.m. CST on Tuesday, Sept 2. The class is offered by Big Bend AHEC and will offer a trained facilitator to guide participants as they identify triggers, explain withdrawal symptoms, and brainstorm ways to cope with them. The Tools to Quit Program is a 2hour seminar where participants learn how to develop a successful quit plan. This program offers free nicotine replacement therapy (while supplies last and if medically appropriate), educational materials, goodies for their quit day, and follow-up support. The classes are open to anyone. If interested in attending, please contact Wewahitchka Medical Center at 639-5825 to RSVP. Senior Citizens meals programs Gulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe and 314 E. Third Street in Wewahitchka provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to meal sites. The senior center in Port St. Joe is in need of donation of bingo prizes for seniors that love to play bingo several times a week. Small inexpensive prizes or individual packages of cookies, crackers, chips, juice, etc. would be appreciated. The center is also looking for volunteers that might play piano, or who would like to call bingo or that might have other games in mind that seniors would enjoy. Please call Debbie at 229-8466 for more information. Star Staff Report During the rst weekend of August, James Rish of Wewahitchka participated in the 150th anniversary of the (Damn the Torpedoes) Battle of Mobile Bay. He is the great-great grandson of John Rish who came to what is now Gulf County from Georgia after the War Between the States. John Rish was part of the Georgia 59th infantry regiment and fought at such places as Gettysburg, Chickamauga, the Wilderness, Spotsyivania and Cold Harbor. John Rish survived the war and lived until 1925 with a mini ball lodged in his body. James Rish is part of the First Florida regiment company E (re en-actors) and survived a hot weekend in a wool uniform and a lot of bureaucratic foul ups for the event. However, the re en-actors did respectfully put the US ag back on the ag pole after having removed it for the event and raised the Confederate Stars and Bars in its stead. James Rish served as a replacement for one of the artillery members after having spent the day before shooting at Yankees with a .58 caliber Spring eld ri ed musket. He is wearing a pin re pistol that the rebels imported from France. In history the Federal forces were not able to take the fort by land assault. So, instead they used new and improved ri ed naval guns that basically made Swiss cheese out of the fort. After a 13-day bombardment, the Confederates decided that maybe it was not such a good place to be and surrendered the fort. Star Staff Report Fundraisers to assist Port St. Joe Commissioner William Thursbay in his ght against cancer will be held this weekend. There is also an account, the William Thursbay Cancer Fund, set up at Centennial Bank to assist Thursbay with medical costs. Thursbay is self-employed and will not be able to work during treatments for a rare form of bladder cancer which begin Sept. 8. A sh fry will be held 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET Friday in Frank Pate Park. Plates with sh, baked beans and coleslaw will be available. Delivery is available for orders of 10 or more plates. Contact John Reeves at 625-6727 to order. Simultaneous to the sh fry will be a yard sale, also at Frank Pate Park. The yard sale will run most of the day. Call Reeves to donate any items for the yard sale. On Saturday, from 12 noon to 6 p.m. ET, at the Centennial Bank building in Port St. Joe, complete chicken or pork dinners will be for sale. Plates come with baked beans, coleslaw, roll and drink for $10. Whole pork butts are available for $30 and whole chickens for $10. Advance tickets are recommended and will be sold throughout the community. If you would like to help or donate, call Paula at 227-6128 or Carol at 227-6831. Henry Quarles Werner Henry Quarles is here! July 6, 2014. 7 pounds, 13 ounces, 20 inches. Birth Society BRIEFS Society Fundraisers to be held for Commissioner Thursbay SPECIAL TO THE STAR James Rish, far right, served as a replacement for an artillery battery. Rish participates in Mobile Bay re-enactment James Rish, left, res a cannon. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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The Star| B3 Thursday, August 28, 2014SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Ms. Millers classes enjoyed an educational Google Glass computer presentation by Matthew Miller. Students were thrilled with the hands-on experience of operating the computer glasses. Google Glasses are innovative wearable technology activated with your voice and a tap of a touchpad, Google Glass opens the possibility of whats in front of you without the distraction of looking down at a device. Using Wi and Bluetooth, it allows you to pull up a map, take a picture or make a video using the high-res display. Special to The Star Yearbooks are in! The 2013-2014 yearbooks have arrived. If you ordered one, please stop by Mr. Taylors class and pick it up. We are also beginning pre-orders for the 2014-15 yearbook. Volleyball Match: Tonights scheduled home opener against West Gadsden has been rescheduled. The teams will now play a doubleheader at 5 p.m. ET Tuesday, Sept. 23. C lash of the C ounty! Projection graduation will have Clash of the County T-shirts for sale at the Port St. Joe vs. Wewahitchka football game Friday night. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR This years Student Government Executive Board hosted PSJHSs Annual First Day activities. This board along with the additional members of the SGA will lead students this year in numerous projects and activities from Homecoming festivities to the Relay for Life event. Pictured left to right: Kennedy Thacker; Gracie Cryderman; Hannah Fulk; Janel Kerigan, treasurer; Carter Thacker; Caitlin Godwin, president; Morgan Butts, secretary; Jimmy Cummings; Elisha Vereen; Billy Quaranta, representative; Deliliah Harrison, vice president; Alex Nunez; Sophie Harrison. Not pictured is Burke Godwin. Special to The Star Breanna Clemmons, McKenna Waters and Jessie West recently traveled to Washington, D.C. for the Rural Electric Youth Tour. McKenna and Breanna are seniors at Wewahitchka High School, and Jessie is a senior at Blountstown High School. McKenna and Jessie were eligible to go on the trip as winners of Gulf Coast Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour Contest. Each year, the Cooperative sponsors the contest for eleventhgraders whose parents or guardians are members of GCEC. Contestants are interviewed by a panel of three judges from the electric cooperative industry, and two winners are chosen to travel on an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. in June. Breanna won the statewide essay contest for children and grandchildren of cooperative employees and trustees. While in Washington, the students toured museums; Arlington National Cemetery; the Iwo Jima Monument; the U. S. Capitol area; the mall area; the Korean, Lincoln, Vietnam, FDR, Jefferson, Martin Luther King Jr. and World War II Memorials; Mt. Vernon; and the National Cathedral. They also saw the U. S. Marine Corps Sunset Parade; attended a boat cruise and dance on the Potomac River; and ended their trip with a visit to the Kennedy Center to see a performance of The Lion King. A highlight of the trip was the National Youth Day rally, where they joined more than 1,600 students representing electric cooperatives from 43 states a record number. We were proud to have McKenna and Jessie representing Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative in Washington and proud of Breanna for winning the essay contest. Over and over again, the Youth Tour trip has been referred to as the trip of a lifetime, and we hope that it truly was for these exceptional students, GCEC Manager of Marketing and Communication Kristin Evans said. The Washington, D.C., Youth Tour Program has been in existence since 1957 when co-ops sent students to Washington, D.C. to work during the summer. By 1964, the program was catching on, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association began to coordinate the efforts of the co-ops. Since then, thousands of young people have experienced this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to visit our nations capital and learn about our government. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of the Touchstone Energy national alliance of local, consumer-owned electric cooperatives providing high standards of service to members large and small. GCEC employees serve about 20,000 meters and 2,600 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, White City, Fountain and Southport. Special to The Star The rst days of the new school year have come and gone. What an incredible group of students we have this year! Their excitement, laughter, hugs, and love for the Lord are a huge blessing to the staff of FCS. One of the things we are very excited about this year is our new curriculum. We began last year exploring new and better curriculum options for our students. After much research and attending a Classical Christian School conference in Orlando during the summer, the administration and school board have made some exciting changes in the History, Science and foreign language courses. In the coming articles, we will explore and give detail on our new curriculum and how it is already making great impacts on our students. The yearbooks from the 2013-2014 school year have arrived and they look awesome! If you have yet to receive your copy, simply stop by the front ofce to pick it up. Thank you to our yearbook editor, Mrs. Janice Evans, for another great book of beautiful memories. If youre interested in giving your child the gift of a Christian education, it isnt too late to enroll. Vacancies are very limited in most grades, but we will be glad to talk with you about how an education from FCS is not only something that can make a positive impression on your students mind but also his or her heart. Please call the school ofce at 229-6707 for more information. The Lions Tale SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Breanna Clemmons, Jessie West and McKenna Waters at Arlington National Cemetery Local students travel to Washington, D.C. SGA BOARD GETS THINGS GOING AT PSJHS Special to The Star Jessica Cross of Wewahitchka graduated this summer from Troy Universitys Global Campus division. Cross received a Master of Business Administration degree. More than 350 students graduated this summer from TROYs Global Campus. The Global Campus consists of students taking classes online through eTROY, or at teaching sites located around the U.S. and the world. Jessica Cross graduates from Troy University GOOGLE GLASSES AT WES If youre interested in giving your child the gift of a Christian education, it isnt too late to enroll. Vacancies are very limited in most grades, but we will be glad to talk with you about how an education from FCS is not only something that can make a positive impression on your students mind but also his or her heart. School News

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FAITH Thursday, August 28, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. SOUTHERLAND FA MIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 10 0 E 19 th St re et Pa na ma Ci ty Fl or id a Fi rs t Un it ed Me tho di st Ch ur ch Is se ek in g a pa rt ti me nu rs er y ass is ta nt to ca re fo r ch il d re n age s 05 du ri ng Su nd ay Sc ho ol Su nd ay wo rs hi p se rv ic es Su nd ay ni gh ts We dn es da y ni g ht s, Fr id ay mo rn in gs an d ot her ch ur ch ev en ts as re qu ir ed Pl ea se su bm it a re su me co nt ac t in fo rm at io n fo r at le as t 3 re fe re nc es an d a co ve r le t te r to fu mc ps j@ gt co m. ne t At te nt io n: Nu rs er y Po si ti on or P. O. Bo x 26 6 Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 7 At te nt io n: Bo bb i La ss it er 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. Maurice L. Dawson, beloved husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather, of St. Louis, Michigan, died Friday, Aug. 22, 2014, at Schnepp Health Care Center at the age of 89. Funeral Services will be held at Smith Family Funeral Homes, St. Louis, Mich., on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, at 2 p.m. with Mr. Keith Wise of ciating. Burial will take place at North Star Cemetery, North Star, Mich. Visitation was held on Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014, from 2-8 p.m. with family present from 2-4 p.m. & 6-8 p.m. and Monday, August 25, 2014 from 1 p.m. until the time of service at Smith Family Funeral Homes St. Louis Chapel. Maurice was born in Marion, Michigan on June 27, 1925, the son of Alva L. and Mary Irene (Bruce) Dawson. He graduated from Ithaca High School with the class of 1947. On April 25, 1947 he married Virginia Baker in Ithaca, Mich. He grew up in Gladwin, and moved to Ithaca where he met and married the love of his life, Virginia. He resided most of his life in St. Louis, Mich., and also lived in Port St. Joe from 1959-1967. Maurice served his country in the U.S. Navy on a wooden mine sweeper and in Alaska during WWII. He had worked for Michigan Chemical Co. in St. Louis and in Port St. Joe; then he went to Dow Chemical Company in Midland, retiring in 1985. His priorities in life were his faith in God and love of family. He was a member of St. Louis Church of Christ from the early 1950s, and an Elder at the church for many years. He was very involved with his church and also was a strong supporter of Rock Lake Christian Assembly. Throughout his life he treasured the time he spent with his family. He is survived by his wife, Virginia Dawson, of St. Louis, Mich.; three daughters: Dianne Dawson-Ryan of Lansing, Mich.; LaDonna and Gordon Johnson of Grand Ledge, Mich.; Deanna and Lyle Essex of St. Louis, Mich.; a son: Dennis and Marilynn Dawson of Brighton, Mich.; four granddaughters: Emily and Aaron Matthews, LeAnna Slates, Pamela Johnson, Shawna and John Bellamy; two grandsons: Brett and Lindsay Dawson, Luke and Amy Essex; 6 greatgrandchildren: Ethan, Colden, Blake, Grace, twins, Tate and Everett; a sister: Nola McVay, and a sister-inlaw: Joyce Dawson. He was predeceased by his parents, two sisters, Margaret Maltby and Ruth VanHorn, and two brothers, Robert and Wayne Dawson. Memorials can be made to St. Louis Church of Christ or Rock Lake Christian Assembly, Vestaburg, Mich. Online condolences can be sent to www. smithfamilyfuneralhomes. com. The family is being served by Smith Family Funeral Homes St. Louis, Mich. Maurice L. Dawson MAURICE L. DAWSON Howard Lee Watts, of Wewahitchka, passed away at the family home on Sunday, Aug. 24. He was born in Jacksonville and raised in Yulee, Fla. As a child, Howard spent many summers in this area while visiting family. His love for the area, the river and desire to be near family, brought him to this area to call home 23 years ago. Howard had a true love for family and friends. His pride and joy was his children and grandchildren, all of whom lived nearby. He was a very kind soul and was loved by all who knew him. The family wishes to remember the wonderful times shared with Howard, and know that he is with his Heavenly Father. We are fairly certain he and his earthly father, Lee Ralph Watts Jr., have a shing trip planned already in the beautiful river of Heaven. He is survived by his mother, Dorothy Epperson Watts; his children Tony Watts and Carie Watts; his two siblings Jimmy Watts and Teresa Watts Mansell; ve grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and other extended family members; he was preceded in death by his father Lee Ralph Watts, Jr. A private family service will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, at 11 a.m. CT, at the family home on the Chipola River. His nal resting place will be in the family plot at Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. The family would like to extend their appreciation to Emerald Coast Hospice for their care and support during his last days. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to Emerald Coast Hospice at 2925 Martin Luther King Blvd., Panama City, FL 32405. Howard Lee Watts HOWARD LEE WATTS OBITUARIES Special to The Star Hollywood director Tom Shadyac, best known for Ace Ventura, The Nutty Professor, Patch Adams, Bruce Almighty, and I Am, will discuss how he simpli ed his life in a lmed interview 7 p.m. CT Monday, Sept. 1 at Lifetree Caf. Shadyac sold his Hollywood mansion and moved into a trailer park, says Lifetree representative Craig Cable. Hell share his journey and offer practical help in taking the next step toward living a saner, happier, less cluttered life. The Lifetree event, titled Simplify Your Life, offers participants practical help to reduce clutter, complication, and chaos in everyday life, according to Cable. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. Beach Baptist homecoming celebration The Beach Baptist Chapel will host a homecoming celebration beginning at 10:45 a.m. ET on Sunday, Aug. 31. A dinner in the social hall will follow the musical service. Beach Baptist sh fry The Beach Baptist Chapel will hold a sh fry fundraiser from 10 a.m. FAITH BRIEFS until 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 6. Proceeds help purchase of new playground equipment for the church grounds. Tickets are on sale for $6, meals will include fried sh, baked beans, coleslaw and a cake. How to simplify your life explored at Lifetree Caf

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Special to The Star The Florida Small Busi ness Development Center at Gulf Coast State College is proud to announce the opening of its ofce at the Gulf/Franklin campus. With 40 ofces through out Florida, the FSBDC facility offers high-end, pro fessional business develop ment consulting, educa tion and research services serving the needs of microbusinesses, small-medium enterprises and even new ventures. Services are at nocost and condential. Highlytrained, educated and statecertied consultants are available to provide growing businesses with ac counting assistance, strate gic planning assistance, cash ow management, nancial and capital assistance and marketing strategies. Certied business con sultant Quen Lamb is the local contact, and he can be reached at 227-9670, ext. 5519 or qlamb@ gulfcoast.edu. Open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday, the Gulf/Franklin Campus is at 3800 Garrison Ave. To make an appoint ment for consultation, visit northoridabiz.com and click for consultation. The Florida SBDC Regional ofce is at the northeast corner entrance of the Advanced Technol ogy Center at Gulf Coast State College, Suite 107 and has served the local business community since 1993. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Step inside St. Joe Mu sic and youre bound to see a new face. That new face belongs to David Farrell, who pur chased St. Joe Music on Williams Avenue in Port St. Joe from former owner Tom McEniry last month and has big plans for both the store and attached re cording studio. A classically-trained pianist, Farrell grew up in Trinidad and came to the U.S. 18 years ago to pur sue a career in the music industry. He spent time as a mu sic minister in Washington state and Michigan before transitioning to building home recording studios and theaters in California and Texas where he han dled every aspect from de sign, acoustic treatments and construction. Ultimately, he achieved his goal of becoming a tour ing musician, playing key board and piano for artists like Gloria Estefan, Tom Jones and Grover Wash ington on tours across the U.S., Australia, Europe and Asia. With a degree in eco nomics from Temple Uni versity in Philadelphia, Farrell said he always has had a passion for business and after settling down in Tennessee with his wife and two daughters, ages 18 and 19, he got into the mergers and acquisitions business. Thats when he received the phone call that once again would change his path. In April, Farrell spoke with a broker in Orlando who told him about a small music store and recording studio for sale situated in the Florida Panhandle. Always interested in music-related opportuni ties, Farrell said he con sidered the purchase but initially passed. In July, Farrell noticed that facility was still for sale and decided to do some re search. Farrell said that once he realized it was the only recording studio with in a 75-mile radius, he saw opportunity. After a visit to tour the facility he signed the pa perwork and moved his family to town less than a month ago from Cleveland, Tenn., excited to begin his latest adventure. Cleveland is small town USA, Farrell said. But this small town has a beach, and that is good. Farrell said his main goal is to bring more and better music equipment to the store so area musicians can get what they need without having to spend gas driving all the way to Panama City. My goal is to give peo ple a big city music store in a small community, Far rell said. If we revamp the store well, the community will rally around it. In addition to giving the store a facelift with new paint and a new look, Far rell plans to redesign the online store, add rooms for private music lessons, construct a live-in suite for traveling artists and modernize the recording studio, which has been re named to Port St. Joe Re cording Studio. The process of modern izing the studio includes new sound treatment for the walls and installing the same gear that major label recording artists use for their own albums. I dont want people to feel like they have to go all the way to Atlanta to have a quality recording, Far rell said. If we give artists a good, quality product, theyll want to come back. Farrell will act as pro ducer for recording ses sions but welcomes artists to bring in their own teams if they desire. He also has a solid network of studio mu sicians and photographers and has the experience to put together any size proj ect to meet any budget. I can give artists real industry advice, Farrell said. Im going to bring in my expertise where I can, but Im not a know-it-all. In addition to recording and producing local artists, Farrell plans to help pro mote them as well. Later in the year hell travel to an artist sym posium in Los Angeles where businesses gather to nd music and jingles for television and radio commercials. He hopes to present those in attendance with a selection of music from Port St. Joe that could be licensed for commercial use. Port St. Joe is a music town and my goal is to ex pose the music to outside areas, Farrell said. I want to show that St. Joe music can inltrate the music scene positively. Farrell said that resi dents have already come into the store to welcome him to the community and been very encouraging. He plans for the St. Joe Music to be selling a lot of gear by the time the Christ mas season rolls around. Everything in the store currently is being sold off to accommodate the new stock. More than just provid ing many different types of instruments Farrell said he wants to foster an environ ment where a child inter ested in music can spend time in the store plunking around on guitars or bang ing on some drums to help nd the right instrument for them. (Former owners) Tom and his father did a good job in what they wanted to accomplish with this store, Farrell said. Hope fully, we can take it to the next level. Local The Star| B5 Thursday, August 28, 2014 WES LOCHER | The Star David Farrell relocated to Port St. Joe to revamp St. Joe Music and the attached recording studio. A big city music store in a small community David Farrell is the new face of St. Joe Music Small Business Center opens ofce at GCSC Gulf/Franklin QUEN LAMB Gulf/Franklin campus to host business roundtable forum Special to The Star Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Campus will host a business roundtable forum for the local business community. The goal of the forum is to provide a viable means to drive conversation to identify local economic topics of real concern. Ac cording to Loretta Costin, Gulf/Franklin vampus direc tor, Safeguarding the eco nomic well-being of our local communities is a core focus of Gulf Coast State College. This breakfast is designed as a tool to learn, share, and engage in meaningful dialogue. The forum is spon sored by the Florida Small Business Development Center at Gulf Coast State College in partnership with the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce and the Apala chicola Bay Chamber of Commerce. It will be from 7:45 to 9:30 a.m. EST Monday, Sept. 22, at the Gulf/Franklin Campus, at 3800 Garrison Ave. in Port St. Joe. The forum is open to the business community at no cost, and a breakfast buffet will be provided. RSVP no later than Sept. 15. For event details and to RSVP visit www.gulfcoast. edu/smallbusinessforum or email mdarko@gulfcoast. edu. All inquiries should be directed to the Gulf/Franklin Campus at 227-9670 ext 5503.

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$4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL e ne w College of Ap plied St udies at FSU Pa nama City was appr ov ed by the FSU Boar d of Tr ustees in Ju ne 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily re spond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. We invite yo u to suppor t e Campaign for Ou r Community s Un iv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr ow s jo bs. Ou r goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of Ap plied St udies by 201 7, which will allo w FSU Pa nama City to establish student scholarsh ips, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr ov ide ne w equipment and tec h nology To learn ho w yo u can supp or t our community s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@ pc.fsu.edu. TH E CAM PA IG N FOR OUR COMM UNI TY S UNI VER SIT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs SUPPOR T OUR CO MMUNIT Y S UNIVERSIT Y PU BL IC NO TI CE NO TI CE IS HE RE BY GI VE N th at th e Ci ty Co mm is si on of th e Ci ty of Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a, at it s me et in g on th e 2nd da y of Se pt em be r, 20 14 at 6: 00 P. M. ES T, in th e re gu la r Co mm is si on me et in g ro om at th e Mu ni ci pa l Bu il di ng Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a, wi ll ha ve th e 2nd re ad in g an d co ns id er fo r n al ad op ti on an Or di na nc e wi th th e fo ll ow in g ti tl e: OR DI NA NC E 50 0 AN OR DI NA NC E OF TH E CI TY OF PO RT ST JO E, FLO RI DA AM EN DI NG TH E CO MP RE HE NS IVE PL AN AN D FU TU RE LA ND US E MA P OF TH E CI TY OF PO RT ST JO E, BY AN D TH RO UG H TH E PR OC ED UR ES RE QU IR ED FO R LA RG E SC AL E MA P AM EN DM EN TS PU RS UA NT TO AU TH OR IT Y PR OV ID ED BY FL OR ID A ST AT UT ES SP EC IF IC AL LY CH AN GI NG AL L OR PA RT OF TH E PA RC EL S DE SC RI BE D IN EX HI BI T A ; PR OV ID IN G FOR RE PE AL OF AN Y CO NF LI CTI NG OR DI NA NC E; PR OV ID IN G FO R SE VE RA BI LI TY ; AN D PR OV ID IN G FO R AN EF FE CTI VE DA TE. Co pie s of th e Or di na nc e ar e av ai la bl e fo r pu bl ic in sp ec ti on at Ci ty of Po rt St Jo e Ci ty Ha ll lo ca te d at 30 5 Ce ci l G. Co st in Sr ., Bl vd ., Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a. In te re st ed pe rs on s ma y at te nd an d be he ar d at th e pu bl ic he ar in g or pr ov id e co mm en ts in wr it in g to th e Ci ty Co mm is si on er s, Ci ty of Po rt St Jo e Ci ty Ha ll 30 5 Ce ci l G. Co st in Sr ., Bl vd ., Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a. Tr an sa ct io ns of th e pu bl ic he ar in g wi ll no t be re co rd ed Pe rs on s wi sh in g to ap pe al an y de ci si on ma de du ri ng th e he ar in g wi ll ne ed a re co rd of th e pr oc ee di ng an d sh ou ld ens ur e a ve rb at im re co rd is ma de in cl ud in g th e te st im on y on wh ic h th e ap pe al is ba sed An y pe rs on wh o wi sh es to at te nd an d re qu ir es ass is ta nc e ma y ca ll th e Ci ty Cl er k s Of c e at (8 50 ) 22 9-8 26 1, Ex t. 11 4. Law Enforcement B6 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce LAW ENFORCEMENT SUMMARYAUG. 18-AUG. 24On Monday, Aug. 18 Deputy J. Brock was dispatched to the 500 block of Lake Grove Road in We wahitchka in reference to a theft. The complainant reported the theft of a lawn mower battery. The battery was valued at about $30. The theft occurred at some point during the previous two weeks. On T uesday, Aug. 19 Sgt. J. Wil liams responded to the area of Five Acre Farms after the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce received a 911 call regarding a possible burglary in progress. The caller reported he ob served someone coming out of his yard, in the 3500 block of County Road 381, stealing items. The suspect quickly left the property in a vehicle, which was described to the 911 operator and provided to deputies. After an attempt to keep the vehicle in sight until deputies arrived, the property owner lost sight of it in the Five Acre Farm area. Sgt. Williams and Deputy J. Brock patrolled the area the vehicle last was seen in and was provided information by a resi dent on a possible location. The vehicle was located at a residence and contact was made with Daniel L. Kincaid (30). Dur ing the investigation deputies lo cated the stolen property in the back of the Kincaids vehicle and at his residence. The property recovered in cluded two outboard motors, outboard motor parts, and other miscellaneous items that were valued at about $3,000. Kincaid was arrested and charged with Burglary of a Structure and Grand Theft. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility and later rst appeared. He was released on a $25,000 bond. On Aug. 19 School Resource Deputy D. Huggins arrested a male juvenile at Wewahitchka Junior Senior High School. The juvenile was found in possession of marijuana and items used to smoke it. He was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and transported to the GCDF. After completing the booking process, he was released to the custody of a parent. On Aug. 19 the GCSO received a complaint regarding a verbal disturbance in the area of Second Street near Lake Grove Road in Wewahitchka. Deputy J. Oquendo responded to the call. At the time it was determined that no unlaw ful activity occurred and Deputy Oquendo returned to service, but another complaint was received about three and one-half hours later. The caller reported a male subject was shooting a rie at a residence. The caller later claried the subject was possi bly in possession of a pellet rie. The incident occurred in the 100 block of Second Street. Witnesses reported they heard yelling and items being thrown inside before they noticed someone leave the residence and walk next door. Shortly thereafter, loud music began to play from within the residence and the male subject began to yell. They observed the subject came outside and shoot a pellet rie towards the residence the other party walked to while yell ing obscenities. The investigation led to the contact of Dewayne D. Veasey Jr. (24), who was intoxi cated. Veasey was arrested and transported to the GCDF for dis orderly iIntoxication. He later was rst appeared in court and conditionally released. On W ednesday, Aug. 2 0, Deputy S. Ferrell served Colby M. Jerkins (20) a warrant for violation of pro bation at the GCDF. Jerkins was arrested in Liber ty County and later transported back to Gulf County. Jerkins is on probation for possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana. He remains in custody. On Aug. 20 Sgt. R. Burkett was on patrol on CR 386 when he clocked a vehicle traveling 105 mph, in a posted 60 mph zone, using radar. The vehicle was stopped about 2 miles east of State Road 71 and contact was made with the driver Katy B. Gammons (32). Gammons stated she was late getting her children to school. It was determined the tag displayed on the vehicle was not registered to it and that it was not insured. Sgt. Burkett issued a criminal citation for attaching a tag unassigned, speeding cita tion which required a mandatory court appearance, and a citation for no vehicle insurance. The tag on the vehicle was seized and the vehicle was towed. On Aug. 2 0, the GCSO received a complaint of a residential bur glary in the 1900 block of SR 71 South in Wewahitchka. Deputy S. Willis responded to the call. The owner discovered the front door of the residence forced open. No items were reported sto len. Deputy Willis continues to investigate. On Aug. 20 Deputy B. Smith took a report of a stolen lawn mower from the 9900 block of CR 30A in Indian Pass. The mower was described as a yellow Cub Cadet riding mower valued at about $400. On Thursday, Aug. 21 the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a ve hicle possibly stuck on the beach in front of the Cape Villas Condos near Money Bayou. Deputy M. Layeld responded and deter mined the vehicle had rolled over on its top in the surf. The accident fatally injured one of the two occupants. The Florida Highway Patrol is inves tigating the accident. On Aug. 21 Lt. P. Beasley took a report of a stolen Garmin Sonar GPS unit stolen from a vessel as it was on its trailer in the 200 block of Bonita Street, in High land View. The offense was reported to have occurred during the last weekend of June. The device had a seven inch screen and was val ued at $920. On Aug. 21 Deputy S. Ferrell took a report of stolen medica tion. The report was taken at the GCSO Wewahitchka Sub station. The case is still under investigation. On Aug. 21 the GCSO received a complaint of the theft of a dia mond ring. Deputy S. Willis re sponded to the 200 block of Coro nado Street, in St. Joe Beach. The theft occurred between Aug. 9 and Aug. 21. The ring is described as an eight diamond nugget anniver sary ring. The GCSO continues to investigate the case. On Aug. 21 Deputy S. Ferrell investigated the complaint of suspicious vehicles in the area of Kemp Cemetery Road, west of Wewahitchka. The investigation resulted in the arrest of Terry G. Baxley (53) and Brenda G. Gort man (59) of Wewahitchka. Deputy Ferrell located the described vehicles and noticed that one had the side windows covered with sheets and a sun shade used to block the view into the front windshield. The vehicle was running. Deputy Ferrell observed through a void in the sunshade that someone was us ing a lighter to heat a glass bowl attached to a pipe. Contact was made with Baxley who dropped the pipe onto the passenger oorboard and conrmed he was smoking meth. He was placed under arrest. Gortman also was seated in the vehicle with Baxley and was the vehicles registered owner. A search of the vehicle yielded the discovery of $154 cash, small plastic baggies containing Meth amphetamine packaged for re sale, small plastic baggies with Methamphetamine residue, Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), small plastic baggies containing Cocaine packaged for resale, Alprazolam, a pill grinder, glass pipes, and digital scales. Baxley also was found in pos session of a rearm while on posted property. Gortman was ar rested and charged with posses sion of methamphetamine with intent to distribute, possession of cocaine with intent to distribute, possession of GHB and posses sion of drug paraphernalia. Baxley was charged with pos session of methamphetamine, possession of drug parapherna lia, and trespass with a rearm. Both were transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility and later rst appeared. Gortman was released on a $28,000 bond. Baxley remains in custody on a $3,500 bond. The GCSO has impounded Gortmans vehicle and will le for forfeiture. On Friday, Aug. 22 Lt. T. Wood served and arrested Jeffery A. Brown (31) on a writ of bodily at tachment for child support at the GCDF. Brown was booked and released after paying a $1,798 purge. On Saturday, Aug. 23 Deputy J. Brock responded to the 6300 block of Georgia Avenue in St. Joe Beach in regards to a broken door handle on a vehicle. The complainant reported the handle was damaged by someone dur ing the night. The vehicle was not entered. On Aug. 23 Deputy J. Oquendo responded to the 100 block of Burgess Creek Road in reference to a possible burglary. The com plainant reported that an air con ditioner window unit was pushed through and believed someone still might be inside. It was de termined no one was inside the residence and that no property was taken. The case is being investigated as criminal mischief. From Aug. 18-24 the Commu nications Division at the GCSO logged 39 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 46 calls for EMS, six calls for other depart ments/agencies and six calls for Gulf County Animal Control. F rom A ug. 18-24 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 153; Traf c Stop, 22; Civil Paper Service, 21; Information, 11; Field Contact, 10; Verbal Disturbance, 5; Suspi cious Person, 5; Citizens Assist, 4; Alarm, 3; Agency Assist, 3; Bur glary of Auto, 2; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 2; Recovered Property, 3; Special Detail, 3; Theft/Shoplift ing, 3; Trafc Accident, 4; Welfare Check, 3; Abandoned Vehicle, 2; Residence Burglary, 2; Crimi nal Mischief, 2; Fire, 2; Prisoner Transport, 2; Reckless Driver, 2; Street Obstruction, 2; Suspicious Vehicle, 2; Warrant Arrest, 2; Con tact Message, 1; Court Detail, 2; Disorderly Intox, 1; Noise Distur bance, 1; Domestic Disturbance, 1; Funeral Escort, 1; Vehicle Fire, 1; Fraud, 1; Missing Juvenile, 1; Harassing Phone Call, 1; Request for Security Check, 1; and Suspi cious Activity, 1.

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Special to The Star When you click the lock button on your cars keyless remote, that beep gives you peace of mind that your cars safe. But when it comes to your motorcycle, RV or boat, locking up isnt as simple. These tips from Roy Smith from Hannon Insurance in Port St. Joe can help you feel condent that your toys. SECURITY Remove temptation. In the off-season, make sure your toy is properly garaged or stored in an enclosed trailer or building. Out of sight means out of mind. Lock up. When camp ing, RVers should make sure to lock all doors and windows and consider investing in a coupler lock, which can pre vent someone from hooking up your trailer to a vehicle and driving off with it in tow. For motorcycles, a wheel lock prevents the tires from rotating and covers the lug nuts, keeping the wheels se curely in place. Check on it. To make sure your toy remains safe in the off-season, check on it regularly or ask someone to check on it for you. PROTECTION FROM THE ELEMENT S Store it indoors. If you can, nd a spot to store your toys indoors when you arent using them so that theyre safe from any weather damage. Winterize it. At the end of the season, make any es sential repairs to your boat or RV, turn off all battery switches, or remove the bat tery entirely. For trailers, store them on blocks if you can to protect the tires. Seal it up. Avoid leaks and unwelcome critters by securing and sealing doors and windows on your boat or RV as well as properly cover ing it.I N S URANCE Make sure youre cov ered. With the right insur ance, you will be condent that you wont have to miss a day on the road or water. Most companies, such as Progressive, offer special ized motorcycle, boat and RV insurance that can pro vide more coverage than if you just added to your auto or homeowners policy. Maintain your insur ance year round. If you can cel your insurance in the off season, consider maintain ing it all year. Insurance companies give loyal cus tomers reduced rates and reduced deductibles and you will have the freedom to en joy your toys 365 days a year. Hannon Insurance has been helping customers in the Port St. Joe area for 40 years and theyre ready to help you. Roy Smith is at 221 Reid Ave. and can be reached at 850-227-1133 or at rsmith@ hannoninsurance.com. Healthful outdoor ex ercise, a feeling of accom plishment, and potential saving on the family food bill are good reasons why more and more Floridians are turning to home veg etable gardening. Our in formation on garden plot preparation was provided by Emeritus vegetable specialist Jim Stephens, of the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agri cultural Science. Usually, the most physi cal part of a vegetable gar dening project is getting the soil ready for planting. But, whatever you do, dont give in to the temptation to cut corners on this phase of the operation. If you do a poor job of preparing the soil, you can expect poor results from your garden, even if you work hard on planting and culti vation. If youre plan ning a large garden, you may want to rent a rototiller or even a small tractor and plow, to use in preparing the soil. But, for a small backyard garden, you can do the work with a spade or shovel. The time to begin soil preparation depends to some extent on whats growing on your garden site now. If you have heavy weeds, or a cover crop, you intend to turn under; you should start a month to six weeks before plant ing. This also is the time to add lime, if needed. If youve kept the gar den site fallow, or you plan to remove all vegetation and no lime is required, you could prepare the soil and plant within two or three days. However, if you plan to work extra organic matter into the soil before planting, you should start two or three weeks ahead of time. To prepare the soil, dig down 6 to 8 inches, and turn each shovelful completely over. If youre turning in weeds, or a cover crop, you should re move all the wood plant material, because it wont decompose very well. After the soil is turned, break clods and level with a rake. Do this as soon as you can, to prevent excess drying of the soil, and to keep good soil texture. This is important, because a nely pulverized soil surface will make plant ing easier, give you better seed germination and help insure a more even stand of vegetables. Its espe cially important to have ne textured soil when planting small-seeded crops, like carrots. In some soil, its also necessary to add some kind of liming material well before planting at the same time you turn the soil. Lime reduces soil acidity. Without going into a chemistry lesion, lime adds calcium to the soil and makes minor ele ments move available to plants. The most common ly used form of lime is do lomite. Besides calcium, dolomite provides magne sium another important plant nutrient. You really should add lime only when a soil test indicates the need for it. Too much can be as bad as too little. If a soil test indicates your soil is too sweet, or alkaline, you might need a special fertilizer program. The best thing to do before liming or adding sulfur to reduce soil pH is consult your local County Exten sion Ofce. To summarize briey, to have a good garden, you need to prepare the soil properly. Be sure to start far enough ahead of plant ing to allow organic matter to decompose fairly well. Turn the soil to a depth of six or eight inches. Make sure you have a level, nely textured surface be fore planting. If a soil test indicates lime is needed to give your garden plot the right acid level, it should be applied when your turn the soil. For more information on garden plot prepara tion, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit http://gulf. ifas.u.edu or www.http:// edis.ifas.u.edu. Vi nc en t Iv er s, MD La bo r Da y Sp ec ia l 85 022 770 70 He al th y an d Be au ti fu l Sk in Ex pe ri en ce Co un ts Co mmi tme nt to Ex ce ll en ce Vi nc en t Iv er s, MD 30 1 Tw en ti et h St re et | Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 85 022 770 70 Digital Account Ex ecutiv e The Ne ws Herald is seeking a Digital Account Ex ecutiv e. To ap pl y, send rsum to LGrimes@pcnh.com The quali ed candidate will need experience in: Quali cations needed: Duties will include: Local The Star| B7 Thursday, August 28, 2014 Garden plot preparation a good way to save on food bill ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Heightened alert about recent Clerk email scams Special to The Star The Florida Court Clerks & Comptrol lers wishes to make all Florida residents aware of the most recent spike in fraud ulent e-mails by entities impersonating Clerks ofces across the state. This newest round of scams comes in the form of an email referencing a missed court appearance. Unlike past scams, these emails at tempt to retrieve personal data, forcefully, by computer virus attached as a .zip le. These malicious attachments contain a Trojan Horse virus that becomes active as soon as the le is unzipped. Recent examples of these scams have been signed by ctitious county clerks. The Florida Court Clerks & Comptrol lers would like to remind residents that all court-related communications are sent through normal mail. Jury summons and failure to appear notices are never sent via phone or email. Important tips to remember: The Clerks ofce does not call or email residents to request payment for missing jury duty. The ofce also never will request payment via any sort of pre paid debit card. The Clerks ofce does not call or email residents to verify information re lated to jury duty or to notify them they missed jury duty. Communications are only sent by mail. If a resident misses jury duty, the in dividual receives a failure to appear notice in the mail from the judge representing their Circuit Court. Arrest warrants usually are not is sued for failure to report for jury duty. Call the Clerks ofce if you receive one. Do not open an email attach ment from any unfamiliar source, and never provide personal information to an unfamiliar source, either by phone or email. The Florida Court Clerks & Comptrol lers, established in 1969, is a statewide, nonprot member association. The asso ciation is comprised of the Florida Clerks of the Circuit Court and Comptrollers. The association provides education and accreditation for Clerks of the Court and Comptrollers, information and technical assistance to local governments. Tips from Hannon Insurance

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL ICE NSE D& IN SUR ED Cy nd y sh ome cl ea nin g, or ga ni zin g, an dp et si tt in g IN SU RE DA ND RE AD YT OH EL PY OU WI TH YO UR HOUS EO RP ET CA LL 85 050 270 06 OR EM AI L cy ndyly nne _79 @y ah oo .c om the Florida Department of States Bureau of Archaeo logical Research with the goal of educating residents and visitors about Floridas maritime history. The trail, which begins in Destin and ends in Port St. Joe, features 12 wrecks for diving. The trail also features dozens of articial reefs and a variety of sea life. Trail Passports are avail able from participating dive shops and dive charter op erators. The Passport high lights discovered facts and historical data for each of the shipwrecks along the Trail, along with a log and of cial stickers to track each dive, encouraging water lov ers to take only pictures and leave only bubbles, the ofcial motto of the trail. The trail begins off of Pensacola with three sunk en coal barges, the San Pablo, Pete Tide II, YDT-14 and the U.S.S. Oriskany; moves to the remains of the Miss Louise off Destin; goes to Panama City for the sunken hulls of Black Bart, FAMI Tugs, U.S.S. Acco keek, U.S.S. Chippewa, and U.S.S. Strength; and ends with remains of the Vamar, located four miles off Mexi co Beach. Local diver Herman Jones, who has been diving for nearly 50 years and has written the histories of many area shipwrecks including the Empire Mica, the S.S. Tarpon and the Vamar. Jones said that even though the Vamar was de molished by the U.S. Army, many of the ships features are still visible and when the tide is low, the wreck can be seen from the surface, mak ing it an interesting spot for divers and visitors alike. The Vamar isnt very far from town and its a wreck where you can stay out all day and have something to do, Jones said. The Vamar, which sank on March 21, 1942, became the ninth Florida Underwa ter Archaeological Preserve in 2004 and was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 2006. The Vamar wreckage lies in 25 feet of water. The vessel sank just af ter leaving Port St. Joe, re portedly due to being over loaded with lumber for a voyage to Cuba. Originally built in England as a patrol gunboat, the steamer be came famous for carrying Admiral Richard E. Byrds American expedition to Ant arctica in 1928. Dive instructor Ross Bowman has run charters to the Vamar site an estimated 400 times since 2011. After receiving his dive instruc tor certication Bowman taught in Thailand before settling in Port St. Joe after vacationing to the area. The Vamar is a really good dive site, especially for beginners, Bowman said. Because of its depth, div ers can spend over an hour at the site. It has extremely good visibility with tons of marine life including nurse sharks, stingrays and turtles. The Vamar site is heav ily promoted throughout Dalys Dock & Dive in Port St. Joe from which Bow man operates, with posters of Shipwreck Trail and y ers advertising the Vamars nearby resting place. To help protect the his toric site and the environ ment, Bowman educates the divers on safety and explains the importance of not touching or taking any thing from the wreckage of the ship. Bowman said that to his knowledge he is the only local who takes divers to the site, making the local treasure accessible to the community. Every single year, I nd something new to explore at the site, Bowman said. For more information on the Florida Panhandle Ship wreck Trail, visit Florida PanhandleDiveTrail.com. COURTESY OF R OSS BOWMAN The Vamar shipwreck is perfect for divers of all skill levels due to its depth and abundance of sea life which includes grouper, stingrays and nurse sharks. SEA from page B1

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Local The Star| B9 Thursday, August 28, 2014 brisk northeast wind and only the numerous seabirds to notice as the ship dropped anchor and passengers began wading the shallows to catch sh. The once famous city of St. Joseph, located six miles to the east, was already being smothered by vines and palmettos. The once thriving sea port was now only occasionally visited by shermen who netted the enormous schools of mullet and other sh that thrived in the pristine bay. The captain had planned to anchor in the deep hole near the point until it was safe to round the Cape. It seemed a wise decision, but Fate was to intervene and in 48 hours, FLORIDA, the pride of the New Orleans to Key West run, would lie splintered and broken upon the shore of St. Josephs Bay. FLORIDA had been built in New York by Samuel Sneeden in l851 for Capt. Louis Coxetter of Jacksonville. The ship was 147 feet long, 28 feet wide, and had 44 berths in the staterooms. It had been nanced by the Flor ida Steam Packet Company of Charleston, of which John W. Caldwell was principal stock holder. FLORIDA had been built to provide transportation for win ter visitors from Charleston to Jacksonville and immediately be came a success. The ship was de scribed by the Jacksonville News as a splendid new boat, and a long way in advance, in every respect, of any steamer that had hitherto appeared in our waters. Many of the crew were slaves, as noted in the following adver tisement in the Florida News of March 19, 1853: For sale, a ca pable engineer of unexceptional character, a like Negro of 30, on liberal terms. Information of which may be obtained from Cap tain Willeys steamer, FLORIDA. Willey had become FLORIDAS captain in January 1853; Coxetter became captain of FLORIDAS newer and larger sister-ship, the S.S.CAROLINA. Few steamships have the du bious distinction of setting a city on re, but this apparently hap pened to FLORIDA on April 5, 1854. Supposedly, a spark from FLORIDAS stack ignited a hay shed on the Jacksonville wharf. Pushed by a strong westerly wind, the ames spread rapidly, destroying 70 buildings, including Capt. Willeys home. FLORIDA drew away into the St. Johns and was not damaged. Possibly due to ill will caused by the re, in Aug. 1855, the ship was sold to E.G. Rogers and Company of New Orleans. FLORIDA was en rolled in that port on Jan. 23, 1856. The ships new master was W.L. Cozzens. FLORIDA replaced the CORNELIUS VANDERBILT on the Key West run. The advertisement in the New Orleans Picayune read; Excur sions to Key West via Pensacola Navy Yard, Apalachicola, St. Marks, Cedar Keys, and Tampa Bay. Arriving at each port in the morning and through the day; giving ample time to sh and bathe at each place. Through to Key West from six to ten days and remaining in Key West six days. The U.S. Mail steamship, FLOR IDA, W.L. Cozzens commander, will leave as above on the 26th from the lake end of the Jefferson Railroad at 8 oclock a.m. carry ing the U.S. mails. Fare for the excursion, going and returning, $50, with privilege of remaining on board while in port, having unsurpassed stateroom accom modations. Apply for freight or passage to E.G. Rogers and Com pany, Agents, 72 Poydras Street. When FLORIDA left New Or leans on its last voyage on Aug. 26, it carried 162 barrels of our, 60 loaves of bread, 12 barrels and ve hogsheads of sugar, 200 sacks of corn, 150 sacks of oats, 250 coils of rope, 12 casks of bacon, and 150 bales of hay for the horses of Key West. Also aboard were ve men, two ladies, two children, and the crew. Saturday, still at anchor in St. Josephs Bay, began with fog and strong east-northeast winds. At noon, a second anchor, with more chain, was dropped. As both an chors began to drag, the engine was increased to full power to keep the ship in place. At 7 p.m. the anchors, even with the help of the engine, began to drag. At 8:15 the ship struck the shoal and the disintegration began. Huge seas boiled over the decks, and the upper saloon washed away at 10 p.m. The oc cupants gathered in the lower cabins for safety. At 2:30 Sunday morning the lower cabins began, to everyones horror, wash away. Everyone then climbed to the highest part of the ship, the gal lows frame, and lashed them selves to it. At 4 a.m., as the eye of the storm began to pass to the north, the wind came even hard er from the southwest. The ship continued to break apart. At daylight all that was left was part of the wheelhouse, the boiler, engine, and the hull. All the decks, cabins, and cargo were strewn in the turtle grass and pines. Finally, by 9 a.m., the wind sub sided, the storm tide began to fall and by 10 oclock everyone was able to walk to shore. Miracu lously, everyone survived. Then began the ordeal of build ing shelters and salvaging cargo. On Tuesday, the husband of one of the women passengers came from Apalachicola. His wife and two of the men passengers re turned with him. On Wednesday, three boats came from Apalach to help salvage the wreck, but soon left because terms could not be reached with the captain who decided to save what was left himself. On Saturday, Sept. 6, Cozzens allowed the remaining three pas sengers and the ships purser to take a lifeboat and try to reach Pensacola. They reached that city on Tuesday, eating only raw ba con and wet bread from the cargo on their voyage. Catching a ride on the schooner, DIAMOND, they succeeded in reaching New Or leans on Sunday the 14th, where they told the news of the disaster to the owners. At this point the FLORIDAS salvage is lost in the mists of his tory. Apparently the machinery and engine were saved and it was ofcially listed as abandoned in 1858. Since this section of Florida was uninhabited, the old sidewheeler was soon forgotten. Fishermen and campers would occasionally investigate the hulk, but salvagers and teredo worms soon caused destruction of all the wooden parts exposed above the sand. In a generation or two, even the ships name was forgotten. I rst wrote the story of FLORIDA in 1983. When archae ologists, unaware of my articles, came to the park in 2000, they promptly dubbed her as a mys tery wreck. A graduate student came the next year from UWF, did some excavating, wrote his thesis and proclaimed the wreck as FLORIDA, a fact I and my ear lier readers already knew. FLORIDA lies in the boundar ies of St. Josephs State Park and it is possible to wade or snorkel and examine the remains of the wreck. It lies buried under the sands of the turtle grass ats, only the rusting remains of the reboxes rising above the sur face like a grotesque tombstone, a silent warning to the destruc tive power of hurricanes and the fragility of mans constructions. PHOTOS S PECIAL TO T HE S TAR Map of St. Josephs Bay showing the path of the hurricane and the wreck. Part of a chamber pot showing Floridas emblem; a rattlesnake encircling a cabbage palm. (Private collection) S.S. FLORIDA from page B1 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, August 28, 2014 The Star | B9 33509S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000112 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, Plaintiff, vs. LUANN M. QUARANTA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 14, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 23-2009-CA-000112 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, is the Plaintiff and LUANN M QUARANTA; WILLIAM C. QUARANTA, SR.; CAPITAL CITY BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 11th day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED THIRTY (130), UNIT NUMBER TWELVE (12), OF THE ST. JOSEPHS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 13, 1982 IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 27 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2005 MARVIN AVENUE, PORT ST JOE, FL 324560000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on August 14, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. Mcghee-Collins Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. F09022212 August 21, 28, 2014 33529S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 863 Application No. 2014-34 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03426-530R Description of Property: COMMENCE at a concrete monument marking the Northwest Corner of the Northeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence go North 89 Degrees 30 Minutes 30 Seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 33, for 670.00 feet; thence South 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 67.60 feet to a point on the Southerly right of way line of a County Road (right of way as per field monumentation); thence continue South 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 420.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, go North 89 Degrees 30 Minutes 30 Seconds East for 210.00 feet; thence go South 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 105.00 feet, thence go South 89 Degrees 30 Minutes 30 Seconds West for 210.00 feet; thence go North 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds West for 105.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Northeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and having an area of 0.51 acre, more or less. ALSO, known as Lot 5. Name in which assessed: Glenn Earl Haney, III and Gail L. Haney All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 24th day of September, 2014. Dated this 19th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 21, 28, September 4, 11, 2014 33531S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2012-CA-000084 GMAC MORTGAGE LLC, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. FRANKLIN, KAREN K., et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA000084 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, and, FRANKLIN, KAREN K., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., on the 11th day of September, 2014, the following described property: WEST ONE-HALF OF LOTS 10 AND 12, BLOCK 66 OF PORT ST. JOE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK I, PAGES 19 AND 20, ALSO KNOWN AS WEST ONE-HALF OF LOTS 10 AND 12 IN BLOCK 66, ACCORDING TO OFFICIAL MAP NO. 12 OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 207 Sixteenth Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456

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B10| The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 15th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: B. McGhee-Collins Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaireed, call 711. File# 29039.0692 August 21, 28, 2014 33583S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1071 Application No. 2014-37 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 04154-000R Description of Property: Lots Two (2) and Four (4), Block Thirty-Two (32), Port St. Joe Beach Unit No. Two (2), as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 6 in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, same being located in Fractional Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West. Name in which assessed: Kenneth James Todd Gould, ET AL All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 1st day of October, 2014. Dated this 25th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33545S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-352-CA WELLS FARGO BANK, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MONICA E. EWING, HERBERT C. EWING, WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION and SECOND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 11th day of September, 2014, at 11:00 A.M. at the Gulf County Courthouse (Lobby), 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, the undersigned Clerk will offer for sale the following real and personal property more particularly described as: Lot 5, Block “4”, FISHERMAN’S VILLAGE NORTH AT WINDMARK BEACH, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 6, Pages 16-19, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, TOGETHER WITH: all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Action No. 2010-CA000352 now pending in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 15th day of August, 2014. BECKY NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: B. McGhee-Collins As Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 2014 33587S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 266 Application No. 2014-36 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 01369-110R Description of Property: BEGINNING at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the SE Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run South 86 Degrees 39 Minutes 48 Seconds West, along the South boundary line of said Section 35, for 228.13 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Road No. 71; then turn right along said R/W line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 4384.04 feet and a central angle of 05 Degrees 10 Minutes 23 Seconds, for an arc length of 395.82 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run North 85 Degrees 55 Minutes 02 Seconds East for 634.98 feet; thence South 03 Degrees 21 Minutes 05 Seconds East for 390.04 feet; thence South 85 Degrees 55 Minutes 02 Seconds West for 484.24 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in Sections 35 and 36, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, and having an area of 261,338.22 square feet or 6.00 acres, more or less. LESS AND EXCEPT that Deeded to Ladora L. Mombi, as per Deed recorded in O.R. Book 237, Page 267, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Donna K. Nickell All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 1st day of October, 2014. Dated this 25th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 33585S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 710 Application No. 2014-35 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03130-005R Description of Property: Lot 9, Block “D”, Money Bayou Subdivision, a subdivision as per plat or map thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 49, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Kevin Strickland All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 1st day of October, 2014. Dated this 25th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 2014 95750S PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2014 NOTICE OF ELECTION I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in Florida, on November 4, 2014, for the ratification or rejection of a proposed revision to the constitution of the State of Florida. No. 1 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 28 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Water and Land Conservation -Dedicates funds to acquire and restore Florida conservation and recreation lands Ballot Summary: Funds the Land Acquisition Trust Fund to acquire, restore, improve, and manage conservation lands including wetlands and forests; fish and wildlife habitat; lands protecting water resources and drinking water sources, including the Everglades, and the water quality of rivers, lakes, and streams; beaches and shores; outdoor recreational lands; working farms and ranches; and historic or geologic sites, by dedicating 33 percent of net revenues from the existing excise tax on documents for 20 years. Financial Impact Statement: This amendment does not increase or decrease state revenues. The state revenue restricted to the purposes specified in the amendment is estimated to be $648 million in Fiscal Year 2015-16 and grows to $1.268 billion by the twentieth year. Whether this results in any additional state expenditures depends upon future legislative actions and cannot be determined. Similarly, the impact on local government revenues, if any, cannot be determined. No additional local government costs are expected. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 28. Land Ac quisition T rust F und. a) Effective on July 1 of the year following pas sage of this amend ment by the voters, and for a period of 20 years after that effective date, the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall re ceive no less than 33 percent of net revenues derived from the exist ing excise tax on docu ments, as defined in the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, as amended from time to time, or any successor or replacement tax, af ter the Department of Revenue first deducts a service charge to pay the costs of the collec tion and enforcement of the excise tax on documents. b) F unds in the Land Acquisition T rust F und shall be expended only for the following pur poses: 1) As provided by law to finance or refinance: the acquisition and im provement of land, water areas, and re lated property interests, including conservation easements, and re sources for conserva tion lands including wetlands, forests, and fish and wildlife habitat; wildlife management areas; lands that pro tect water resources and drinking water sources, including lands protecting the water quality and quan tity of rivers, lakes, streams, springsheds, and lands providing re charge for groundwater and aquifer systems; lands in the Everglades Agricultural Area and the Everglades Protec tion Area, as defined in Article II, Section 7(b); beaches and shores; outdoor recreation lands, including recrea tional trails, parks, and urban open space; ru ral landscapes; work ing farms and ranches; historic or geologic sites; together with management, restora tion of natural systems, and the enhancement of public access or rec reational enjoyment of conservation lands. 2) T o pay the debt service on bonds is sued pursuant to Arti cle VII, Section 11(e). c) The moneys depos ited into the Land Ac quisition T rust F und, as defined by the statutes in effect on January 1, 2012, shall not be or become commingled with the General Reve nue F und of the state. No. 2 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 29 (Initiative) Ballot Title: Use of Marijuana for Certain Medical Conditions Ballot Summary: Allows the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating diseases as determined by a licensed Florida physician. Allows caregivers to assist patients’ medical use of marijuana. The Department of Health shall register and regulate centers that produce and distribute marijuana for medical purposes and shall issue identification cards to patients and caregivers. Applies only to Florida law. Does not authorize violations of federal law or any non-medical use, possession or production of marijuana. Financial Impact Statement: Increased costs from this amendment to state and local governments cannot be determined. There will be additional regulatory and enforcement activities associated with the production and sale of medical marijuana. Fees will offset at least a portion of the regulatory costs. While sales tax may apply to purchases, changes in revenue cannot reasonably be determined since the extent to which medical marijuana will be exempt from taxation is unclear without legislative or state administrative action. Full Text: ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS SECTION 29. Medical marijuana production, possession and use. (a) PUBLIC POLICY (1) The medical use of marijuana by a qualify ing patient or personal caregiver is not subject to criminal or civil liabil ity or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (2) A physician li censed in Florida shall not be subject to crimi nal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law for issuing a physi cian certification to a person diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition in a manner consistent with this section. (3) Actions and con duct by a medical mari juana treatment center registered with the De partment, or its em ployees, as permitted by this section and in compliance with De partment regulations, shall not be subject to criminal or civil liability or sanctions under Florida law except as provided in this sec tion. (b) DEFINITIONS. F or purposes of this sec tion, the following words and terms shall have the following meanings: (1) “Debilitating Medical Condition” means can cer glaucoma, positive status for human im munodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired im mune deficiency syn drome (AIDS), hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, P arkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis or other conditions for which a physician be lieves that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the po tential health risks for a patient. (2) “Department” means the Department of Health or its succes sor agency (3) “Identification card” means a document is sued by the Depart ment that identifies a person who has a phy sician certification or a personal caregiver who is at least twenty one (21) years old and has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana. (4) “Marijuana” has the meaning given canna bis in Section 893.02(3), Florida Stat utes (2013). (5) “Medical Marijuana T reatment Center” means an entity that acquires, cultivates, possesses, processes (including development of related products such as food, tinctures, aerosols, oils, or oint ments), transfers, trans ports, sells, distributes, dispenses, or adminis ters marijuana, prod ucts containing mari juana, related supplies, or educational materi als to qualifying pa tients or their personal caregivers and is regis tered by the Depart ment. (6) “Medical use” means the acquisition, possession, use, deliv ery transfer or admin istration of marijuana or related supplies by a qualifying patient or personal caregiver for use by a qualifying pa tient for the treatment of a debilitating medi cal condition. (7) “P ersonal caregiver” means a person who is at least twenty one (21) years old who has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana and has a caregiver identification card issued by the De partment. A personal caregiver may assist no more than five (5) quali fying patients at one time. An employee of a hospice provider nurs ing, or medical facility may serve as a per sonal caregiver to more than five (5) qualifying patients as permitted by the Department. P ersonal caregivers are prohibited from con suming marijuana ob tained for the personal, medical use by the qualifying patient. (8) “Physician” means a physician who is li censed in Florida. (9) “Physician certifica tion” means a written document signed by a physician, stating that in the physician’s pro fessional opinion, the patient suffers from a debilitating medical condition, that the po tential benefits of the medical use of mari juana would likely out weigh the health risks for the patient, and for how long the physician recommends the medi cal use of marijuana for the patient. A physician certification may only be provided after the physician has con ducted a physical ex amination of the patient and a full assessment of the patient’s medical history (10) “Qualifying patient” means a person who has been diagnosed to have a debilitating medical condition, who has a physician certifi cation and a valid qual ifying patient identifica tion card. If the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards within nine (9) months after the effec tive date of this section, then a valid physician certification will serve as a patient identifica tion card in order to al low a person to be come a “qualifying pa tient” until the Depart ment begins issuing identification cards. (c) LIMIT A TIONS. (1) Nothing in this sec tion shall affect laws re lating to non medical use, possession, pro duction or sale of mari juana. (2) Nothing in this sec tion authorizes the use of medical marijuana by anyone other than a qualifying patient. (3) Nothing in this sec tion allows the opera tion of a motor vehicle, boat, or aircraft while under the influence of marijuana. (4) Nothing in this law section requires the vi olation of federal law or purports to give immu nity under federal law (5) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any accommodation of any on site medical use of marijuana in any place of education or em ployment, or of smok ing medical marijuana in any public place. (6) Nothing in this sec tion shall require any health insurance pro vider or any govern ment agency or author ity to reimburse any person for expenses re lated to the medical use of marijuana. (d) DUTIES OF THE DEP ARTMENT The Department shall issue reasonable regulations necessary for the im plementation and en forcement of this sec tion. The purpose of the regulations is to en sure the availability and safe use of medical marijuana by qualifying patients. It is the duty of the Department to promulgate regulations in a timely fashion. (1) Implementing Regu lations. In order to al low the Department sufficient time after passage of this section, the following regula tions shall be promul gated no later than six (6) months after the ef fective date of this sec tion: a. Procedures for the issuance of qualifying patient identification cards to people with physician certifications, and standards for the renewal of such identifi cation cards. b. Procedures for the issuance of personal caregiver identification cards to persons quali fied to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of mari juana, and standards for the renewal of such identification cards. c. Procedures for the registration of Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers that include procedures for the issu ance, renewal, suspen sion, and revocation of registration, and stand ards to ensure security record keeping, testing, labeling, inspection, and safety d. A regulation that de fines the amount of ma rijuana that could rea sonably be presumed to be an adequate sup ply for qualifying pa tients’ medical use, based on the best available evidence. This presumption as to quantity may be over come with evidence of a particular qualifying patient’s appropriate medical use. (2) Issuance of identifi cation cards and regis trations. The Depart ment shall begin issu ing qualifying patient and personal caregiver identification cards, as well as begin register ing Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers no later than nine months (9) after the effective date of this section. (3) If the Department does not issue regula tions, or if the Depart ment does not begin is suing identification cards and registering Medical Marijuana T reatment Centers within the time limits set in this section, any Florida citizen shall have standing to seek judicial relief to compel compliance with the Department’s constitu tional duties. (4) The Department shall protect the confi dentiality of all qualify ing patients. All records containing the identity of qualifying patients shall be confidential and kept from public disclosure other than for valid medical or law enforcement purposes. (e) LEGISLA TION. Nothing in this section shall limit the legisla ture from enacting laws consistent with this pro vision. (f) SEVERABILITY The provisions of this sec tion are severable and if any clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this measure, or an ap plication thereof is ad judged invalid by any court of competent ju risdiction other provi sions shall continue to be in effect to the fullest extent possible. No. 3 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 10, 11 (Legislature) Ballot Title: Prospective Appointment of Certain Judicial Vacancies Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution requiring the Governor to prospectively fill vacancies in a judicial office to which election for retention applies resulting from the justice’s or judge’s reaching the mandatory retirement age or failure to qualify for a retention election; and allowing prospective appointments if a justice or judge is not retained at an election. Currently, the Governor may not fill an expected vacancy until the current justice’s or judge’s term expires. Full Text: ARTICLE V JUDICIARY SECTION 10. Retention; election and terms.(a) Any justice or judge may qualify for retention by a vote of the electors in the general election next preceding the expiration of the justice’s or judge’s term in the manner prescribed by law. When If a justice or judge is ineligible for retention or fails to qualify for retention, a prospective va cancy is deemed to oc cur at the conclusion of the qualifying period for retention for the pur pose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. When a justice or judge so qualifies, the ballot shall read substantially as follows: “Shall Justice (or Judge) ...(name of justice or judge)... of the ...(name of the court)... be retained in office?” If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to retain, the justice or judge shall be retained for a term of six years. The term of the justice or judge retained shall commence on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January following the general election. If a majority of the qualified electors voting within the territorial jurisdiction of the court vote to not retain, a prospective vacancy is deemed to occur im mediately following the general election for the purpose of appointing a successor justice or judge, and a vacancy shall exist in that office upon the expiration of the term being served by the justice or judge. (b)(1) The election of circuit judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that circuit approves a local option to select circuit judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of circuit judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (2) The election of county court judges shall be preserved notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a) unless a majority of those voting in the jurisdiction of that county approves a local option to select county judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election. The election of county court judges shall be by a vote of the qualified electors within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. (3)a. A vote to exercise a local option to select circuit court judges and county court judges by merit selection and retention rather than by election shall be held in each circuit and county at the general election in the year 2000. If a vote to exercise this local option fails in a vote of the electors, such option shall not again be put to a vote of the electors of that jurisdiction until the expiration of at least two years. b. After the year 2000, a circuit may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of circuit judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the custodian of state records a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the circuit in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. c. After the year 2000, a county may initiate the local option for merit selection and retention or the election of county court judges, whichever is applicable, by filing with the supervisor of elections a petition signed by the number of electors equal to at least ten percent of the votes cast in the county in the last preceding election in which presidential electors were chosen. The terms of circuit judges and judges of county courts shall be for six years. SECTION 11. Vacancies.(a)(1) Whenever a vacancy occurs in a judicial office to which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the vacancy by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. (2) Whenever a pro spective vacancy occurs in a judicial of fice for which election for retention applies, the governor shall fill the prospective va cancy by appointing a justice or judge from among at least three persons but not more than six persons nomi nated by the appropri ate judicial nominating commission. The term of the appointment commences upon the expiration of the term of the office being va cated and ends on the first T uesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next general elec tion. (b) The governor shall fill each vacancy on a circuit court or on a county court, wherein the judges are elected by a majority vote of the electors, by appointing for a term ending on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year following the next primary and general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. An election shall be held to fill that judicial office for the term of the office beginning at the end of the appointed term. (c) The nominations shall be made within thirty days from the occurrence of a vacancy or prospective vacancy unless the period is extended by the governor for a time not to exceed thirty days. The governor shall make the appointment within sixty days after the nominations have been certified to the governor. (d) There shall be a separate judicial nominating commission as provided by general law for the supreme court, each district court of appeal, and each judicial circuit for all trial courts within the circuit. Uniform rules of procedure shall be established by the judicial nominating commissions at each level of the court system. Such rules, or any part thereof, may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the legislature, or by the supreme court, five justices concurring. Except for deliberations of the judicial nominating commissions, the proceedings of the commissions and their records shall be open to the public. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 95756S ENMIENDAS CONSTITUCIONALES PROPUESTAS SOBRE LAS QUE SE VOTAR EL 4 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2014 AVISO DE ELECCI"N Yo, Ken Detzner, Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida, por el presente notifico que se llevarn a cabo elecciones en cada condado de la Florida, el 4 de noviembre del 2014, para la aprobacin o el rechazo de una propuesta de modificacin de la constitucin del Estado de la Florida. No. 1 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 28 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Conservacin de aguas y tierras: dedicar fondos para adquirir y restaurar tierras objeto de conservacin y recreacin en el Estado de Florida Resumen de la boleta: Provee fondos para el Fondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de Tierras con el fin de adquirir, restaurar, mejorar y administrar tierras objeto de conservacin, entre ellas pantanos y bosques; el hbitat de peces y vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, incluidos los Everglades, y la calidad del agua en ros, lagos y arroyos; playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre; establecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en actividad, y emplazamientos histricos o geolgicos. Para ello se dedicar el 33% de los ingresos netos obtenidos del impuesto especial existente sobre documentos durante 20 aos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: Esta enmienda no incrementa ni reduce los ingresos estatales. El ingreso estatal limitado para los propsitos especificados en la enmienda se estima en $648 millones para el ao fiscal 2015-16 y aumenta a $1.268 mil millones hacia el vigsimo ao. Si eso traer como consecuencia gastos estatales adicionales depende de futuras acciones legislativas y no puede determinarse. De la misma manera, tampoco puede determinarse el impacto sobre los ingresos de gobiernos locales, si los hubiera. No se prevn costos de gobiernos locales. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 28. F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras. a) Con vigencia el 1 de julio del ao poste rior a la aprobacin de esta enmienda por par te de los votantes y du rante un perodo de 20 aos a partir de esa fecha de entrada en vigor el F ondo Fiduci ario de Adquisicin de T ierras recibir no me nos del 33% de los in gresos netos derivados del impuesto especial existente sobre docu mentos, tal como se define en los estatutos vigentes al 1 de enero de 2012, enmendados de tanto en tanto, o de cualquier impuesto su cesor o de reemplazo, despus de que el De partamento de Haci enda deduzca primero un cargo de servicio con el fin de pagar los costos de recopilacin y aplicacin del im puesto especial sobre documentos. b) El dinero del F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisi cin de T ierras se emp lear nicamente con los siguientes props itos: 1) Como lo establece la ley para financiar o refinanciar: la adquisi cin o mejora de tier ras, reas de agua y derechos inmobiliarios relacionados, entre el los las servidumbres de conservacin y los re cursos para tierras ob jeto de conservacin, como, por ejemplo, pa ntanos, bosques y h bitat de peces y vida silvestre; reas de ad ministracin de vida silvestre; tierras que protegen los recursos hdricos y las fuentes de agua potable, entre ellos las tierras que protegen la calidad y cantidad del agua en ros, lagos, arroyos, manantiales, y tierras que brindan recarga de agua subterrnea y sistemas acuferos; tier ras en el rea agrcola de los Everglades y el rea de proteccin de los Everglades, como estn definidas en el Artculo II, Seccin 7(b); playas y costas; tierras de recreacin al aire libre, incluidos senderos recreativos, parques y espacios abiertos urbanos; pai sajes rurales; estab lecimientos agrcolas y ganaderos en activ idad, emplazamientos histricos o geolgi cos; junto con la ad ministracin, restaura cin de sistemas natu rales y mejoramiento del acceso pblico o disfrute recreativo de las tierras objeto de conservacin. 2) P ara el pago del servicio de la deuda sobre los bonos emiti dos conforme al Art culo VII, Seccin 11(e). c) El dinero depositado en el F ondo Fiduciario de Adquisicin de T ier ras, tal como se define en los estatutos vigen tes al 1 de enero de 2012, no estar mez clado ni se mezclar con el F ondo de In gresos Generales del Estado. No. 2 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO X, SECCI"N 29 (Iniciativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Uso de marihuana para algunas enfermedades Resumen de la boleta: Permite el uso mdico de la marihuana a las personas con enfermedades debilitantes, segn lo determine un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Florida. Permite a los cuidadores asistir a los pacientes en el uso mdico de marihuana. El Departamento de Salud deber inscribir y regular los centros que producen y distribuyen marihuana con fines mdicos y debern extender tarjetas de identificacin a pacientes y cuidadores. Se aplica nicamente a las leyes del Estado de Florida. No autoriza infracciones de la ley federal ni ningn uso, posesin o produccin de marihuana con fines que no sean mdicos. Declaracin sobre impacto financiero: El aumento de costos generado por esta enmienda para el gobierno estatal y los gobiernos locales no puede determinarse. Habr actividades adicionales de regulacin y aplicacin asociadas a la produccin y venta de marihuana con fines mdicos. Las tarifas compensarn al menos en parte los costos de regulacin. Si bien el impuesto sobre la venta se aplica a las compras, los cambios fiscales no pueden determinarse de manera razonable, dado que, si no existe una accin legislativa o administrativa estatal, no est claro en qu medida la marihuana con fines mdicos estar exenta de impuestos. Texto completo: ARTCULO X VARIOS SECCI"N 29. Pro duccin, posesin y uso de marihuana con fines mdicos. (a) POLTICA PBLICA (1) El uso mdico de marihuana por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal no est sujeto a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (2) Un mdico autori zado por el Estado de Florida no estar sujeto a responsabilidad pe nal o civil ni a san ciones, conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, por extender un certificado mdico a una persona diagnosti cada con una enferme dad debilitante de con formidad con esta sec cin. (3) Las acciones y el comportamiento de un centro de tratamiento de marihuana con fines mdicos inscrito ante el Departamento, o sus empleados, segn se contempla en esta sec cin y en cumplimiento de las reglamentacio nes del Departamento, no estarn sujetos a re sponsabilidad ni a san ciones penales o civiles conforme a las leyes del Estado de Florida, excepto segn se in dica en esta seccin. (b) DEFINICIONES. A los fines de esta sec cin, las siguientes pa labras y trminos ten drn los siguientes sig nificados: (1) “Enfermedad debili tante” significa cncer glaucoma, estado posi tivo del virus de inmu nodeficiencia humana (VIH), sndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SID A), hepa titis C, esclerosis lateral amiotrfica (ELA), en fermedad de Crohn, enfermedad de P arkin son, esclerosis mltiple u otras enfermedades para las cuales, a crite rio del mdico, los ben eficios del uso mdico de la marihuana proba blemente seran superi ores a los riesgos po tenciales para la salud de un paciente. (2) “Departamento” sig nifica el Departamento de Salud o su agencia sucesora. (3) “T arjeta de identifi cacin” significa un documento emitido por el Departamento que identifica a una per sona que tiene un cer tificado mdico o a un cuidador personal de por lo menos veintin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de marihuana. (4) “Marihuana” tiene el significado otorgado al cannabis en la Seccin 893.02(3) de los Esta tutos de Florida (2013). (5) “Centro de trata miento de marihuana con fines mdicos” sig nifica una entidad que adquiere, cultiva, po see, procesa (incluido el desarrollo de prod uctos relacionados ta les como alimentos, tinturas, aerosoles, aceites o ungentos), transfiere, transporta, vende, distribuye, de spacha o administra marihuana, productos que contienen mari huana, suministros re lacionados o material educativo a pacientes calificados o a sus cui dadores personales y que est inscrito ante el Departamento. (6) “Uso mdico” signif ica la adquisicin, po sesin, uso, entrega, transferencia o admin istracin de marihuana o suministros relac ionados por parte de un paciente calificado o un cuidador personal para ser usados por un paciente calificado para el tratamiento de una enfermedad debili tante. (7) “Cuidador personal” significa una persona de por lo menos vein tin (21) aos de edad que ha aceptado asistir a un paciente califi cado en el uso mdico de marihuana y tiene una tarjeta de identifi cacin de cuidador emitida por el Depar tamento. Un cuidador personal no puede asistir a ms de cinco (5) pacientes por vez. Un empleado de un proveedor de cuidados paliativos o de un cen tro mdico o de un ho gar de ancianos puede actuar como cuidador personal para ms de cinco (5) pacientes ca lificados, segn lo per mite el Departamento. Est prohibido para los cuidadores personales consumir marihuana obtenida para el uso personal y mdico del paciente calificado. (8) “Mdico” significa un mdico autorizado por el Estado de Flor ida. (9) “Certificado mdico” significa un documento por escrito firmado por un mdico, en el que se indica que, en la

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 28, 2014 The Star | B11 1129963 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Coordinatorfor PreschoolHome Instruction ProgramNeeded. Formoreinformation,visit www.paec.org andclickonJobVacancies 1131900 HomeVisitors forPreschool Instruction ProgramNeeded. Formoreinformation,visit www.paec.org andclickonJobVacancies 1130299 Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.com Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! opinin profesional del mdico, el paciente su fre de una enfermedad debilitante, que los be neficios potenciales del uso mdico de la mari huana probablemente sean superiores a los riesgos para la salud del paciente, y se in dica durante cunto tiempo el mdico reco mienda el uso mdico de marihuana para el paciente. Un certificado mdico slo puede ex tenderse despus de que el mdico haya re alizado un examen fsico del paciente y una evaluacin com pleta del historial m dico del paciente. (10) “P aciente cali ficado” significa una persona a la que se le ha diagnosticado una enfermedad debilitante, que tiene un certificado mdico y una tarjeta de identificacin vlida de paciente calificado. Si el Departamento no comienza a emitir tar jetas de identificacin dentro de los nueve (9) meses posteriores a la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin, un certificado mdico vlido servir como tarjeta de identificacin de paciente para per mitir que una persona se convierta en “paci ente calificado” hasta tanto el Departamento comience a emitir tar jetas de identificacin. (c) LIMIT ACIONES. (1) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin afectar a las leyes referidas al uso no m dico, posesin, pro duccin o venta de ma rihuana. (2) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin autoriza el uso de mari huana con fines mdi cos a cualquier per sona que no sea un paciente calificado. (3) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin permite la operacin de un vehculo de mo tor embarcacin o aer onave mientras se est bajo la influencia de la marihuana. (4) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requiere que se in frinjan las leyes feder ales o pretende otorgar inmunidad conforme a las leyes federales. (5) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir adaptacin alguna para el uso mdico de marihuana en ningn lugar de educacin o trabajo, ni para fumar marihuana con fines mdicos en ningn sitio pblico. (6) Nada de lo con tenido en esta seccin requerir que ningn proveedor de seguros de salud u organismo o autoridad del gobier no reembolse a ningu na persona por los gastos relacionados con el uso mdico de marihuana. (d) OBLIGACIONES DEL DEP ART AMENTO El Departamento debe r emitir reglamenta ciones razonables y necesarias para la im plementacin y apli cacin de esta seccin. El propsito de las reglamentaciones es garantizar la disponi bilidad y el uso seguro de marihuana con fines mdicos por parte de los pacientes califi cados. Es obligacin del Departamento promulgar reglamenta ciones de manera oportuna. (1) Implementacin de reglamentaciones. Con el objeto de otorgarle al Departamento tiem po suficiente despus de la aprobacin de esta seccin, las siguientes reglamen taciones debern pro mulgarse a ms tardar seis (6) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta sec cin: a. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de paciente calificado a las personas porta doras de certificados mdicos, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. b. Procedimientos para la emisin de tarjetas de identificacin de cuidador personal a personas calificadas para asistir a un paciente calificado en el uso mdico de mari huana, y estndares para la renovacin de dichas tarjetas de iden tificacin. c. Procedimientos para la inscripcin de Cen tros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos, que incluyan procedimientos para la emisin, renovacin, suspensin y revoca cin de inscripciones, y estndares para garan tizar la seguridad in formtica, el manteni miento de registros, anlisis, etiquetado, in speccin y seguridad. d. Una reglamentacin que defina la cantidad de marihuana que po dra considerarse un suministro adecuado y razonable para el uso mdico de los pa cientes calificados, so bre la base de las me jores pruebas disponi bles. Esta presuncin referida a la cantidad puede contrarrestarse con pruebas del uso mdico apropiado por parte de un paciente calificado en particular (2) Emisin de tarjetas de identificacin e in scripciones. El Depar tamento comenzar a emitir tarjetas de identi ficacin de paciente calificado y cuidador personal, y tambin ini ciar la inscripcin de Centros de T ratamiento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos a ms tardar nueve (9) meses despus de la fecha de entrada en vigor de esta seccin. (3) Si el Departamento no emite las reglamen taciones, o si el De partamento no comien za a emitir tarjetas de identificacin y a inscri bir a Centros de T rata miento de Marihuana Con Fines Mdicos dentro de los plazos establecidos en esta seccin, cualquier ciu dadano del Estado de Florida tendr derecho a valerse de recursos judiciales para obligar al cumplimiento de las obligaciones constituci onales del Departa mento. (4) El Departamento deber proteger la con fidencialidad de todos los pacientes califi cados. T odos los regis tros que contengan la identidad de los pacie ntes calificados debe rn ser confidenciales y estar exentos de divul gacin pblica excepto con fines mdicos o referidos al cumpli miento de la ley vli dos. (e) LEGISLACI"N. Nada de lo contenido en esta seccin limitar a la legislacin para promulgar leyes coher entes con esta dispos icin. (f) DIVISIBILID AD Las disposiciones conteni das en esta seccin son divisibles, y si cual quier tribunal compe tente declara la inval idez de cualquier clusula, oracin, pr rafo o seccin de esta medida, o su aplica cin, las dems dis posiciones continuarn vigentes en la mayor medida posible. No. 3 ENMIENDA CONSTITUCIONAL ARTCULO V, SECCIONES 10, 11 (Asamblea Legislativa) Ttulo de la boleta: Nombramiento Eventual para Ciertos Cargos Judiciales Vacantes Resumen de la boleta: Proponer una enmienda a la Constitucin del Estado en la que se establezca que el Gobernador debe cubrir las vacantes eventuales en los cargos judiciales que estn sujetos a elecciones de retencin cuando los jueces o magistrados se encuentren por cumplir la edad legal para jubilarse o en el supuesto de que no califiquen para la eleccin de retencin; y permitir los nombramientos eventuales si un juez o magistrado no se retiene en su cargo en una eleccin de retencin. En la actualidad, el Gobernador no puede cubrir una vacante prevista hasta que termine el mandato del juez o magistrado actual. Texto completo: ARTCULO V PODER JUDICIAL SECCI"N 10. Retencin; eleccin y mandatos.(a) Cualquier juez o magistrado puede calificar para la retencin, la cual se produce mediante el voto de los electores en la prxima eleccin general que sea anterior a la conclusin del mandato del juez o magistrado por las causas establecidas por ley. Cuando Si un juez o magistrado no est habilitado para ser retenido o no cumple con los requisitos para la retencin, se producir una vacante eventual al finalizar el periodo de calificacin de retencin a fin de nombrar un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. Cuando un juez o magistrado califique como tal para la retencin, en la boleta se deber leer claramente lo siguiente: “Deber el Magistrado (o Juez) ...(nombre del juez o magistrado)... de la...(nombre de la corte)... ser retenido en el cargo judicial?” Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen retenerlo, entonces, el juez o magistrado continuar ejerciendo sus funciones durante un periodo de seis aos. Este mandato del juez o magistrado que ha sido retenido comenzar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero siguiente a la eleccin general. Si la mayora de los electores calificados que votan dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte eligen no retenerlo, una vacante eventual se producir inmediatamente luego de la eleccin general con la finalidad de nombrar a un juez o magistrado sucesor, y se producir una vacante en ese cargo judicial a la finalizacin del mandato cumplido por el juez o magistrado. (b)(1) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de jueces de circuito sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho circuito aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces de circuito mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces de circuito deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (2) Se deber mantener el mtodo de eleccin de los jueces de la corte del condado, sin perjuicio de las disposiciones de la sub-seccin (a), excepto que la mayora de los votantes en la jurisdiccin de dicho condado aprueben la opcin local de elegir a los jueces del condado mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. La eleccin de los jueces del Condado deber realizarse mediante el voto de electores calificados dentro de la jurisdiccin territorial de la corte. (3)a. En la eleccin general del ao 2000 se deber votar en cada jurisdiccin territorial de circuito y de condado para decidir si el modo de elegir a los jueces de circuito y a los jueces del condado ser mediante el sistema de seleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin en lugar de mediante una eleccin. Si los electores votan por no ejercer esta opcin local, esta opcin no podr someterse a votacin de los electores en esa jurisdiccin hasta que hayan transcurrido al menos dos aos. b. A partir del ao 2000, cada circuito puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o de la eleccin de jueces de circuito, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el encargado de los registros estatales. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en la jurisdiccin de ese circuito en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. c. A partir del ao 2000, cada condado puede presentar la opcin local de eleccin por mrito y elecciones de retencin o la eleccin de los jueces del condado, segn corresponda, al presentar una solicitud ante el supervisor de las elecciones. Dicha solicitud deber estar firmada por un nmero de electores igual a por lo menos el diez por ciento de los votos emitidos en el condado en la ltima eleccin presidencial efectuada. Los mandatos de los jueces de circuito y los jueces de condado sern de seis aos. SECCI"N 11. Vacantes.(a)(1) Siempre que se produzca una vacante en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir la vacante mediante el nombramiento de una persona entre al menos tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que finalizar el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a las prximas elecciones generales que se efecten al menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. (2) Siempre que se produzca una vacante eventual en un cargo judicial sujeto a la eleccin de retencin, el gobernador deber cubrir esa vacante eventual mediante el nombramiento de un juez o un magistrado de entre al menos tres personas y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos corresponiente. El plazo del nombramiento comienza cuando finaliza el plazo del cargo que qued vacante y concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao siguiente a la prxima eleccin general. (b) El gobernador deber cubrir cada vacante de una corte de circuito o de una corte de condado, en donde los jueces sean elegidos por mayora de votos de los electores, al nombrar a una persona entre no menos de tres y no ms de seis personas nominadas por la comisin judicial de nombramientos correspondiente, por un periodo que concluye el primer martes luego del primer lunes de enero del ao que sigue a eleccin primaria y general que se efecte por lo menos un ao despus de la fecha del nombramiento. Se deber realizar una eleccin para cubrir ese cargo judicial por el periodo del cargo que comienza al finalizar el periodo del cargo por nombra miento. (c) Los nombramientos se debern realizar dentro de los treinta das desde que se ha producido la vacante o vacante eventual, excepto que el gobernador extienda el perodo por un lapso que no podr exceder los treinta das. El gobernador deber realizar el nombramiento dentro de los sesenta das desde que los nombramientos hayan sido certificados ante el gobernador. (d) Tal como lo establece la legislacin general, debern existir diferentes comisiones judiciales de nombramientos para el Tribunal Supremo, para cada tribunal de apelacin de distrito, y para cada circuito judicial en todos los juzgados de primera instancia del circuito. Las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos debern establecer reglamentos de procedimiento uniformes en cada nivel del sistema judicial. Tales reglamentos, o cualquier parte de ellos, podrn ser derogados por las leyes generales promulgadas con la mayora de votos de cada cmara de la Asamblea Legislativa, o por el Tribunal Supremo de Justicia con el voto concurrente de cinco magistrados. A excepcin de las deliberaciones realizadas por las comisiones judiciales de nombramientos, los procedimientos de las comisiones y sus registros debern estar abiertos al pblico. Aug 28, Sep 25, 2014 95922S IN THE FOURTEENTH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232013CA000063XXXXXX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLIE BLACK A/K/A CHARLES F. BLACK; ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY BY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated August 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 232013CA 000063XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CHARLIE BLACK A/K/A CHARLES F. BLACK; DANA HUNT BLACK; SUNTRUST BANK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at at the Front Door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port Saint Joe, Florida 32457, 11:00 a.m. on September 11, 2014, following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 39, BLOCK A, SEA SHORES A/K/A PORT ST. JOE BEACH UNIT THREE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 34, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Port Saint Joe, Florida, on August 15, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk, Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1440-132959 August 21, 28, 2014 95924S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 23 2013 CA 000006 CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. WENDY R. MURNAN A/K/A WENDY R. WHITE, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2014 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Gulf, Florida, on September 11, 2014, at 11:00 AM, at Courthouse steps/lobby 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 for the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING RAILROAD SPIKE IN THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 71 MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 9.30 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECOND WEST A DISTANCE OF 1,600.30 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC, THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.44 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID ROAD, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 516.66 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 144.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 673.30 FEET TO AN EXISTING 2” IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 339.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 586.33 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 230.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 197.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THIS PARCEL CONTAINS 5.15 ACRES MORE OR LESS AND IS LOCATED IN THE NORTH 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. COMMENCING AT AN EXISTING RAILROAD SPIKE IN THE C/L OF STATE ROAD NO. 71 MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 12, T5S, R1 OW, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 45’33” WEST A DISTANCE OF 9.30 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 34’09” WEST A DISTANCE OF 1,66.30 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC, THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 5829” WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.44 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET ON THE WESTERLY RlOW OF SAID ROAD; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33’28” WEST ALONG SAID R/W DISTANCE OF 210.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND CALL THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33’28” WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY R/W OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 306.66 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 12’01” WEST A DISTANCE OF 197.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 33’28” EAST A DISTANCE OF 230.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 28’51” EAST A DISTANCE OF 218.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING THIS PARCEL CONTAINS 1.21 ACRES MORE OR LESS AND IS LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, T5S, R10W, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. Dated: August 15, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A. 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850747-5717 or at ADARequest@jud14.flco urts.org, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 21, 28, 2014 95926S IN THE FOURTEENTH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232009CA000486XXXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE HARBORVIEW 2004-8 TRUST FUND, Plaintiff, vs. JAN M. PORTER A/K/A JAN PORTER; ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated August 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 232009CA 000486XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE HARBORVIEW 2004-8 TRUST FUND is Plaintiff and JAN M. PORTER A/K/A JAN PORTER; ROBERT M. PORTER A/K/A ROBERT PORTER; BARRIER DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at at the Front Door the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port Saint Joe, Florida 32457, 11:00 a.m. on the September 11, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 12 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF GOVERNMENT LOT 2 IN SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, FOR A DISTANCE OF 1200.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF GOVERNMENT LOT 2, RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 47 MINUTES, 36 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 359.73 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF PARKSIDE CIRCLE AND ITS PROJECTION FOR A DISTANCE OF 461.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 220.64 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 75 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 220.64 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 32 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 205.04 FEET ) TO A POINT ON A COMPOUND CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 145.00 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 66.49 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 83 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 65.91 FEET) THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 17.79, THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR 6.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING. THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR 42.50 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR 16.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 09 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR 42.50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR 16.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appear-

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B12| The Star Thursday, August 28, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519197 4 5 1 0 1 6 1 113 0 335 113 0 334 LIKE NEW! 2012 Honda CRV -EX for sale. 20,600 miles, super clean, loads of features. Moving, must sell. Call 850-648-58494518813 Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6 519482 6 519481$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6 51948 0Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6 519479I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com COMMERCIAL SPACE AVAILABLE IN PRIME LOCATIONCORNER OF REID AVE AND 3RD STREET. APPROXIMATELY 900 SQUARE FEET$1000.00 PER MONTH(INCLUDES UTILITIES)CALL 251-978-25384518814 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 42-2 Carlton 2 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities No pets. 5. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 6. 39-1 Carlton 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 650.00 mo. Includes utilities up to 200.00. No pets. 7. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 8. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets. 9. Mariner's View #9 3 bedroom 3 bath fully furnished, $850mo. No utilities. Pet friendly 10. 46-4 Carlton Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath unfurnished apartment, $375mo. No utilities. Pet friendly.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 45188 0 1 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254518515 Summer Job Coming To An End?General Dynamics IT is Hiring Temporary Customer Service Representatives!General Dynamics offers company-paid bene ts and pays an extra 10 percent for night shifts and bilingual (English/Spanish) skills! General Dynamics Information Technology is an equal opportunity/af rmative action employer, supporting employment of quali ed minorities, females, disabled individuals, and protected veterans.The following positions are available: Temporary Customer Service Representatives English and Bilingual (English/Spanish) Apply Online: www.gdit.com/ jobsearch Job ID # 226219 (English) Job ID # 226145 (Bilingual English/Spanish) New hire classes starting throughout SeptemberWe seek candidates who possess the following: € A high school diploma or GED (or above) € Six months customer service experience € Ability to type a minimum of 20 WPM € Ability to speak and read English pro“ ciently € Previous call center experience preferred € Ability to successfully pass a background check € Bilingual (Spanish) skills a plus1129991 11312 6 1 you canLOVE YOUR JOB! EXPAND YOUR CAREER & have the best of both worlds. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!forMulti-Media Sales Consultants Join a company that is committed to helping you succeed in your career and earn top dollars.We’re seeking Multi-Media Sales Consultants who are: ‰ Strong sales-minded individuals‰ Self-motivated and customer service driven‰ Can develop, present and close sales to new and existing customers utilizing The News Herald’s print and digital media solutions If this is you, send your resume to: LGrimes@pcnh.comAsk us about the great bene ts in sales base pay + commission, bene ts including Medical, Dental & Vision Insurance, Flexible Spending, 401(k) Plan, Vacation & Sick Leave. Sales Opportunities: 45188 0 2INTERESTED IN BECOMING A CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT(CNA) at no cost? Contact Marcia Dickey, RN at 850-229-8244 ext# 106 at the Bridge. Classes starting soon. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe 220 9th Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The Bridge at Bay is needing 2 full time Cooks and 3 Dietary AidesFor more information call 850-229-8244 45188 0 8 4518817 The City of Mexico Beach is accepting applications for one full time Mechanic I for our Public Works Department. Starting salary range is $13.74 to $19.43 per hour depending on qualications. Applications and a complete job description are available at City Hall located at 114N 22nd Street. Mexico Beach FL. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 p.m., C.T. on September 3, 2014 at City Hall. For more information, please contact Troy Williams Public Works Director at 850-648-5700 The city of Mexico Beach enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Afrmative Action Employer. 4518832GUNS FOR SALEFox Sterlingworth ShotgunOld Military revolver-22 semi-automatic rie Call:850-826-6869Leave Message ance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Port Saint Joe, Florida, on August 15, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk, Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1463-70007 August 21, 28, 2014 95938S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2014-CA-000016 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. BONNIE L. PETERSON AKA BONNIE LEE PETERSON, BONNIE L. PETERSON AKA BONNIE LEE PETERSON AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF SAMUEL F. PETERSON AKA SAMUEL FREDRICK PETERSON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE L. PETERSON AKA BONNIE LEE PETERSON, BILLY DAVID PARKER AKA BILLY DAVID PARKER, SR. AKA BILLY D. PARKER, SR. AKA BILLY PARKER, SR., ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, CREDITORS, DEVISES, BENEFICIARIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST SAMUEL F. PETERSON AKA SAMUEL FREDRICK PETERSON, DECEASED and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION of 424 Big Daddy Nook Road, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Bonnie L. Peterson a/k/a Bonnie Lee Peterson, Unknown Spouse of Bonnie L. Peterson a/k/a Bonnie Lee Peterson, Bonnie L. Peterson a/k/a Bonnie Lee Peterson as personal representative of the Estate of Samuel F. Peterson a/k/a Samuel Fredrick Peterson, Billy David Parker a/k/a Billy David Parker, Sr. a/k/a Billy D. Parker, Sr. a/k/a Billy Parker, Sr., and All unknown Heirs, Creditors, Devises, Beneficiaries, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Trustees, and all other parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against Samuel F. Peterson a/k/a Samuel Fredrick Peterson, deceased YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose that mortgage, originally in favor of Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, dated March 16, 2010 and recorded on March 22, 2010 in Official Records Book 488, at Page 569, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc. is the attorney in fact/servicing agent for Plaintiff; encumbering the following real property located in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 9 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT OF “THE NOOK”, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 5 AND 6, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING VACATED OR ABANDONED BY THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ON 12-2178; THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 18, 964.65 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST, 200.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST, 1508.66 FEET TO A FOUND 4 INCH SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT STAMPED L.S. 1787; THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST, 742.78 FEET TO A FOUND 4 INCH SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT STAMPED L.S. 1787; THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST, 33.00 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHWESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 384.71 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 18 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 120.86 FEET (CHORD BEARING NORTH 13 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST, 120.36 FEET); THENCE DEPARTING SAID CURVE, NORTH 67 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST, 769.05 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST, 97.88 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 123.49 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 168.11 FEET (CHORD BEARING SOUTH 59 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST, 155.43 FEET) TO A POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST, 124.39 FEET TO A SET 112 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 7556 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, NORTH 04 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST, 216.88 FEET TO A SET 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED LB. 7556; THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST, 148.38 FEET TO A SET 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 7556; THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, 282.14 FEET TO A SET 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 7556; THENCE SOUTH 26 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST, 191.50 FEET TO A SET 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 7556; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST, 115.35 FEET TO A SET 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 7556; THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST, 415.44 FEET TO A SET 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 7556; THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST, 260.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SAID PARCEL OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 9 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2010 SOUTHERN HOMES, MODEL NUMBER NH700, MANUFACTURED HOME, ID#’S: DSD4AL55672A AND DSD4AL55672B. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to SONYA K. DAWS, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A. 215 S. Monroe Street, Suite 510, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, within thirty (30) days, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys OT immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on April 16th. REBECCA NORRIS CLERK GULF COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Aug. 28, Sept. 4, 2014 Carefree Consignmen tOpening Saturday 6518 Hwy 98, St Joe Beach. Call Now to Reserve Your Space! 850-340-0263 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternFront Desk MaintenanceWeekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34298690 HospitalityNOW HIRING Reservationist and MaintenanceTo apply visit one of our offices at 1200 Hwy 98 in Mexico Beach or 4693 Cape San Blas Rd in Cape San Blas Web Id 34297340 Admin/ClericalJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for oneStaff Assistant for our Emergency Management/ E-9-1-1 DepartmentThis is an hourly position with full benefits. Salary TBD based on experience. Applications and a complete job description are available in our HR Office or at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov. Application deadline is Thursday, September 4th at 5:00pm, E.T. There will be a T.A.B.E. test given on Thursday September 11, 2014 from 5:30pm -7:30pm at the Gulf-Franklin Center. A score of 12.0 or higher is required in order to be considered for this position. ALL APPLICANTS MUST TAKE THE T.A.B.E. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at 850-229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at 850-227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. Web Id 34298544 Available For Lease 4 Offices w/ Kitchen Located at 149B Commerce Blvd, PSJ $850/mo+ $850/dep 1-3 Year Lease Call 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 Available For Lease Office, Bath, Storage w/ Large Warehouse Space Location 151-E Commerce Blvd PSJ, $600/mo + $600/dep 1 Year Lease Call 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Bryk FlooringWood Floor, Carpet, & Tile Installation, Carpet Cleaning. No Job Too Small! Reasonably Priced. 850-381-5333 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.