The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03956


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A8 Sports ..................................... A9 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 Thursday, AUGUST 21, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 45 King sh tourney Saturday, A7 Permits, revenue focus of port board By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com During the Mexico Beach City Councils regular meeting in July, city attorney Paul Komarek reported that in 2008, former city clerk Patricia Hutchinson received retirement payments of more than $70,000, money intended to be paid to 19 different retired employees. The mistake was found in April and had been researched by Komarek before bringing it to the councils attention. At the encouragement of the council, interim city administrator Marcus Collins led a claim with Kemper Insurance to compensate the 19 employees still awaiting payouts. Last week, Collins reported that the claim had been turned over to an adjustor and that starting this week, he would be receiving weekly updates while the insurance company decided whether or not they would reimburse the city for the funds. (The adjustor) will be taking care of business until they reach a nal conclusion, Collins said. At the July regular meeting, city attorney Paul Komarek suggested the city work with Bay County to open a criminal investigation as well to investigate whether the money was mistakenly given to Hutchinson with or without the authorization of the council. Insurance claim led in Mexico Beach retirement payout By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Permits to dredge the federally authorized shipping channel remain on track as the Port St. Joe Port Authority looked beyond dredging last week. Tommy Pitts, project manager with Hatch Mott MacDonald, said the nal obstacles to dredging appear close to being cleared, and an application for a permit to dredge the shipping channel and open development of the Port of Port St. Joe remained on a timely course. We continue to make signi cant progress on the permitting, Pitts said, noting that the application is still likely to be submitted sometime next month, with a goal of having permits in hand by the rst of 2015. The hope is to have the See PORT A2 See MEXICO BEACH A2 INSIDE BOCC, Port Authority nalize loan, Page A2 PSJ commissioners remain divided on solid waste contract By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com As Mayor Mel Magidson has said several times in recent weeks, Port St. Joe commissioners again kicked the can down the road on a solid waste contract. During the bi-monthly meeting on Tuesday, commissioners decided to once again delay any action pending further discussions with contractors seeking to step in Oct. 1, when the current contract with Waste Pro can be opened for renegotiation. City attorney Tom Gibson made the recommendation to bid out the contract to offer Waste Management and Waste Pro, which have traded proposals before commissioners for more than a month, the opportunity to come in with a price and scope of service. Commissioner Rex Buzzett made a motion to Gulf County students back to school By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Time to hit the books after some fun, of course. On Monday, Gulf County Schools resumed from summer break, kicking off a brand new school year. At Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, the day began with a welcome from Principal Duane McFarland, who greeted a student body more than 500 strong and provided an overview of what to expect for the year. He addressed the changes to math and English classes to fall in line with new regulation requirements and a new cell phone policy that students would need to follow. I challenge you to be the best you can be, McFarland said. Our goal for the 201415 year is to work together. Face the year positively and respectfully and remember that smiles are the universal welcome. Students then were treated to a speech from Student Government Association President Caitlin Godwin, who covered the school rules. With the formalities out of the way, the year was launched with a round of Wacky Olympics, which pit class against class in a series of oddball events, all with a board game theme to encourage students to succeed in the game of life. At Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School, students started the day by receiving their class shirts, each a different color to mark their progress through school. From there, students gathered in the gymnasium for a morning pep rally. Principal Jay Bidwell welcomed the students back from summer break and took the opportunity to give IN SESSION SPECIAL TO THE STAR Above and at top, at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School, students opened the year with fun activities, games and a rock star welcome for the teaching staff. PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star At Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, students competed in Wacky Olympics throughout the morning. Above seventh-graders fought hard to overtake the seniors during a two-person relay race. Below students pass a beach ball down a line using only their feet. See IN SESSION A6 See PSJ A6

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 21, 2014 yo u can LO VE Y OUR J OB EXP AND YO UR CA REER & ha ve the best of both wo rl ds IMMEDIA TE OPENINGS! fo r Multi-M edia Sa les Co nsultan ts Join a co mpan y tha t is co mmitt ed to helping yo u suc ce ed in yo ur ca re er and earn to p dollars We r e seek ing Mu lti-M edia Sa les Co nsultan ts who ar e: St ro ng sales-minded individuals Se lf-motiv at ed and cust omer ser vic e dr iv en Ca n dev elop pr esen t and close sales to new and ex isting cust omers utilizing Th e New s Her ald s pr in t and dig ital media solutions If this is yo u, send yo ur re sume to : LG rimes@p cnh.c om As k us ab out the gr eat be ne ts in sales base pay + co mmission, be ne ts including Medic al De ntal & Vi sion Insur anc e, Fl exible Sp ending 401(k) Pl an, Va ca tion & Sick Le av e. Sa les Op po rt unities: Yo u still ha ve time Yo u still ha ve time Yo u still ha ve time Yo u still ha ve time to nomina te and v ot e! to nomina te and v ot e! to nomina te and v ot e! to nomina te and v ot e! FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST Nomina te and vo te no w fo r yo ur fa vo ri te businesses people re staur an ts and let them be re co gn iz ed in Th e 2014 Reader s Ch oic e To Vo te : GO TO star .c om OR apalach times .c om AND CLICK ON THE No mina tions and Vo ting Au g. 14-S ept 4 TO P THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN Th e 2014 Reader s C hoic e Th e 2014 Reader s C hoic e FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST apalach times .c om C LICK ON THE thr ough Se pt. 4 channel dredge work complete sometime in the second half of next year. Hatch Mott is working on the disposal areas for dredge material; an intensive analysis of available lands, native ora and fauna; and potential costs of constructing berms, among other aspects. Pitts said nailing down disposal lands has been complicated by AgReserves, the company that bought hundreds of thou sands of acres from the St. Joe Company earlier this year, including land above the power lines adjacent to the Gulf County canal that had been identied as potential sites. Pitts said thus far, AgReserves has not been inclined to discuss allowing some of those acres to be used for disposal. Less actual acreage, Pitts said, means higher berms, which will add to the cost of constructing the disposal sites. Hatch Mott has mapped out two possi ble scenarios, one using the land above the power lines and one without, and within the next couple of weeks, an application that side of the dredging will be submitted to the Florida Department of Environmen tal Protection. We are almost there, Pitts said. Lands that have been identied as vi able disposal sites include the federally delineated sites along the canal, both adja cent and parallel to the water, and the for mer chemical plant sites along the canal, some 300 acres in all, Pitts said. Parallel to the disposal site effort is that being undertaken by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to secure the actual dredge permit. A nal hurdle, Pitts said, is the tip of St. Joseph Peninsula, which has accreted into the authorized shipping channel. Initially, Hatch Mott proposed simply swinging around the tip, but the Corps is working to shift the shipping channel by 300 feet to accommodate the changing topography. They believe they will have that com pleted by the end of the month and then complete the dredge permit, Pitts said. The Corps is working under a contrib uted funds agreement with the Port Au thority by which the Port Authority would provide up to $40 million to dredge the channel. Those funds, $20 million of which was appropriated by Florida lawmakers this year, will come from the state. The port board also began to examine options beyond the dredging of the chan nel and how the Port Authority will gener ate revenue. Attorney Tom Gibson said the issue of tariffs is a legal process, and there will be some legal study required to justify any fees and tariffs. Pitts, the former port director, noted that as a special governing body estab lished by the Florida Legislature, the Port Authority has the ability to establish use fees for lands within the port planning area. The port planning area is roughly 300 acres and includes Port Authority and St. Joe Company land. It includes the former Arizona Chemi cal site, which board chair Leonard Costin said was generating serious interest from a potential lessee, another potential source of revenue. St. Joe reports that funding agreements with two energy companies to ship through the Port of Port St. Joe upon the comple tion of dredging are being nalized. Those agreements would include the Port Authority as partner. The agreement with Green Circle LLC needs only an ofcial signature from the FDOT. Another, with Enova Energy, has yet to be signed off on by Enova. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Board of County Commissioners and Port St. Joe Port Authority last week settled the details of a loan that will pro vide the Port Authority some relief from day-to-day nancial pressures. And for the second time, during a pair of special meetings, no mention was made by either body of the Port Authoritys request for additional funds, a request made with a comment from Port Authority member Eugene Rafeld that the extra dollars would indicate whether the BOCC was supporting or axing the Port Authority. County commissioners even ex pressed reservations about the deal on the table. That would expand a current loan to the Port Authority of $199,000 by $120,000 over the next two years with an interest of 3 percent on the package. The loan would also push a rst pay ment out three years; the current time table as the Port of Port St. Joe opera tional within three years. In return for the loan, the rst-year dollars of which will be available to the Port Authority this week upon comple tion of documents, the Port Author ity agreed to put the BOCC in the rst mortgage position on the previously un encumbered former Arizona Chemical site. The Port Authority also agreed it would not ght any foreclosure by the BOCC on the basis of not having the authority to mortgage public property, its defense in a recent foreclosure case with Capital City Bank concerning the ports former bulkhead property. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said she had reservations because of phase one environmental assessment, which is performed to bring property up to mini mal standards, not the preferable phase two, a more stringent assessment. That phase one assessment also raised several issues. Port Authority attorney Tom Gibson said the phase one issues have been addressed, and he provided county at torney Jeremy Novak with all pertinent documents prior to closing on the loan. Bryan also said the BOCC should de mand certain, minimum benchmarks to receive the money in the second year. If they dont exist, I dont want to be on the hook if nothing is happening, Bryan said. Novak noted that the terms of the original $199,000 loan included regular updates to the BOCC on activity and any job growth realized from the Port of Port St. Joe. They must fully comply with their obligations to get the second-year mon ey, Bryan said. And, Novak said, the environmental issues were moot at this point given the BOCC was not taking possession of the land. The environmental health of the site would only be pertinent to the BOCC in the event of a foreclosure. Bryan remained hesitant. I do support development of the port, Bryan said. I do have some con cerns regarding the history of the Port Authority. Warren Yeager said history was al tered in recent years when the St. Joe Company became a collaborator to port development. He said all discussions hes had with state ofcials about the port have been positive. He further noted that the BOCC had, until last week, not provided one dime of property tax dollars. They are still tax dollars, but every dollar we have put in to the port are federal EDA economic development dollars, Yeager said of the original $199,000 loan. Those are not property tax dollars. The day after the BOCC meeting, the Port Authority met and agreed to the terms of the loan, though the board was silent about the request for an addition al $80,000 a year, an amount board mem ber Jason Shoaf had said was essential to bring the boards debts current. The BOCC loan emerged from discus sions that began after the Port Authority went out for proposals on a $500,000 line of credit. That advertisement generated one proposal from a private investor. The board chose not to hear about a second proposal mentioned during last weeks meeting. Shoaf, who participated by phone last week, said he would like to review the documents before voting on the loan, but was in the minority as his fellow board members wanted to move beyond the matter. Though on track for dredging the shipping channel (see related story, Page A1), the Port Authority, without revenue, has been plagued by mount ing debts and the lack of staff beyond volunteers. BOCC, Port Authority nalize loan The paperwork for Hutchinsons payment was signed by former city administrator Chris Hub bard, but it only allotted Hutchinson her share. The insurance company also will decide what to do about the funds dispersed to her. Collins said it would be up to the insurance com pany to decide if a criminal investigation was in order. Weve led the claim, and we hope to get the money, get the employees paid and put this to rest as soon as possible, Collins said. New city administrator The search for a new city administrator has ended. During a special meet ing held earlier in the month, the council contin ued interviews for the va cant city administrator po sition, vacated by Hubbard in April. John McInnis lled in as interim for several months and was followed by Collins. After a second round of interviews, the council se lected Mell Smigielski of Il linois. Smigielski will be re locating to the area and will assume his duties Oct. 1. PORT from page A1 MEXICO BEACH from page A1

PAGE 3

Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 21, 2014 To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Last Thursday at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/ Franklin Center more than 60 local educators attend ed a seminar on Mental Health First Aid presented by Life Management Cen ter of Northwest Florida. Brought to Gulf County in partnership with the Department of Health in Gulf County, the goal of the day-long presentation was to improve mental health literacy and to help partici pants identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illness in students and prevent suicide within the community. According to the Nation al Center for Injury Pre vent and Control, suicide is the third leading cause of death in young people 1524 years old and in the U.S. there is one teen suicide every 15 minutes. The training was espe cially poignant for educa tors in Wewahitchka. The community experi enced four youth suicides over the past year. Weve had several crisis in our community and the teachers decided to act, said Principal Jay Bidwell of Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. They did it out of love and care for the stu dents and I appreciate the steps they took to ensure the well-being of the kids. Clinical Social Worker at Life Management Center in Port St. Joe Jill Nance heard about the training and was instrumental in bringing the training to Gulf County. As teachers come into the new year I wanted to bring them some tools to help, said Nance. I wanted to help with the healing. The certication course teaches a ve-step action plan to assess a situation, select and implement in terventions and secure appropriate care for the individual. During the training par ticipants discussed risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems and common treatments. Instructors also sought to reduce the stigma as sociated with most mental illnesses. The Florida Depart ment of Health in Gulf County values the part nerships with our schools, government, law enforce ment and health providers that make these trainings possible for our commu nity, said DOH adminis trator Marsha Lindeman. Suicide is a major public health issue. Our shared goal is to educate and prepare our people to recognize signs of stress, depressing and risk of self-harm and be able to successfully intervene to provide the needed help. Life Management Cen ter community relations specialist Tricia Pearce has presented the program in Northwest Florida for the past year and a half. She said the program is important to her since her mother suffers from men tal illness. Its very important that we get out in the commu nity to share knowledge, said Pearce. Mental ill ness has a stigma associ ated with it where most people dont recognize it as an actual illness. Were giving them the skills to help not only stu dents, but their family and friends as well. Emilee Jones, a certi ed peer specialist techni cian with Life Management Center since 2012, said her reasons for being involved with the program are more personal. Jones lives with bipolar disorder and said she spent years of her life undiagnosed. By under standing the illness she was able to increase her quality of life. I hope that the things Ive been through can help someone else, said Jones. I provide perspective so classes can see a per son who lives with mental illness. I was born to do this. Pearce and Jones said that because the educa tors in the class had been affected by tragedy they veered off the curriculum and gave plenty of time for attendees to ask questions. Jones said that it was the most interactive class she had seen to date. Theyve been affected by mental illness directly, said Jones. Four trag edies is a lot, especially for a small community. Its too many. The certication gives attendees the ability to recognize signs of mental illness and discuss options in those affected though it does not require the holder to intervene. Life Management Cen ter, which operates in six counties throughout North west Florida, rst offered the courses in Bay County in 2013. The program start ed in Melbourne, Australia but not has a presence in all 50 states across the U.S. and numerous other coun tries including Hong Kong, Scotland, England, Canada, Finland and Singapore. The Life Management Center in Port St. Joe is located at 311 Williams Ave. and can be reached by phone at 227-1145. A 24hour helpline is available to those in need at 888785-8750. The organization offers treatment for those with mental illness in the community. Gulf County educators receive mental health rst aid certications SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Last Thursday, 60 Gulf County educators received a mental health rst aid certication during a training presented by Life Management Center of Northwest Florida.

PAGE 4

Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINI O N www.starfl.com Thursday, August 21, 2014 A Section In the late 1800s, the rst garden gnomes were being produced in Germany. As one would expect, the world wars took their toll on the production of these little fellows in Germany. However, they began to start coming out from under rocks and popping their heads out of holes again in the 1960s in a more cartoonish plastic form. Other countries got in on the gnome breeding and seemed to kind of ruin the bloodline with plastic version. Why put gnome in the garden or in a ower bed? Well, gnomes were originally thought to bring good luck and possibly bring protection to things like buried treasure or a moonshine stock that had been hidden underground. This tradition has continued with folks using them to watch over lawns, crops, barns, and livestock and most importantly cause consternation with homeowners associations. That is where I come in Do I have gnomes in my yard? No, I have voles in my yard. The voles live in the dirt and dig trenches throughout my lawn like it is some sort of vole resort or vacation destination. However, I do have a very active homeowners association that employs at least one person who is responsible for doing nothing but driving around looking for pink amingos, statues of angels, party balloons, tomato plants being grown in the ground and signs that do not say For Sale or Building Permit. With another daughter going off to college, I will admit to leaving the numbers 2014 in my yard for about a week when this daughter was graduating high school. A few weeks later at her college freshman orientation, I picked up a sign noting where my daughter would be going to college in the fall. The parents group was passing them out; I decided I needed one. It has been in the yard for three weeks, maybe four. I got this nice email from the person responsible for catching folks like me. Somewhere in the nice email, it said, Signs of any kind are not allowed to be displayed to the public view within the neighborhood except For Sale signs and Builder signs. The email was nice in tone and the lady was just doing her job. Honestly, I thought it was a bit humorous. The way I gure it, she has a quota to meet and getting rid of an orange sign in someones yard probably will go a long way in verifying that she is doing her job. After a quick trip around my street, I did note there were other folks in violation of the rules, but I would never turn them in. What am I supposed to do? Call them up and turn in the angel statue. What would God think about me? I like the angel statue What about the lady with three different college yard ags? Not a chance, I love that family and every time I ride by their house, it makes me proud. It makes me proud because I know the story behind how that family got here. What about the house with the orange shutters? No way the man who lived there has long since passed away, but I spent many an afternoon talking to him and his dog in the street. Those orange shutters and that house out of the 70s make me think of him. One fellow seems to have a sign in his yard noting the name of his house. Ive never really thought about naming my house, but I might give it some thought. What about the fellow with a full edge garden in his backyard? There is not a chance I would turn him in he gives me green tomatoes and there are not many things I enjoy more than fried green tomatoes. So, the way I gure it, Im taking one for the team or least for my street. By taking my orange sign down, Ive probably saved a few garden gnomes, an angel and a very large complicated grill/cooking contraption that quite possibly could be a moonshine still. Maybe, I will name my house, Hughie after the major league baseball career leader in being hit by a pitch. Not only is Hughie Jennings the record holder in getting plunked, but had his skull fractured three times by pitches. The most serious incident saw a pitch knock him unconscious for four days in 1897 (about the time they started mass producing garden gnomes). Therefore, Im taking one for the team and the gnomes. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. The worst thing about going back to school at the end of the summerwas going back to school! We all understood from the rst grade the necessity of the thing. I just didnt like the mandated participation. We were like cattle being run through Tri-County Stockyards. Or at least I thought so until Leon pointed out that our graduation fate didnt turn up rare, medium or well done. Maybe I lacked the right attitude. I was more worried about spelling multiple or disassociate correctly than I was looking around at the multiple friends that I would never, from that time on, disassociate from. You dont think that far ahead in the third grade. You gure last week you were running free. chasing dogs, lightening bugs and each other. Today, youre stuck in a desk, behind the tallest guy in the room, listening to Miss Belle fawn over the merits of George Washington, Daniel Boone and Thomas Edison. Listen, they made you put your head down after lunch and not move, say a word or breathe for twenty minutes! We didnt have a clue back then about those ancient prisoners trapped in that infamous Mouse Tower on the Rhine but we could identify with each and every one of them! We didnt see the sun from August to May. Ill tell you how bad it was, my piano lessons were during recess! LaRenda skipped the Blue Bird Reading Class as she went down to the music room for her scheduled practice. Anne got out of English. Bob missed spelling. Im stuck inside playing the Wind Sock song while everybody else is racing for the monkey bars. I only got to dust the erasers twice the whole year! If it hadnt abeen for Yogi I might not have made it. He showed us how to roll the clay into little pieces, swish them around in your mouth to wet them down a mite and see if you could throw one (when the coast was clear) hard enough to stick it to the chalkboard. Sometimes wed toss them gently into an unsuspecting hairdo. He brought the rst grasshopper to class. and it wasnt show and tell. It was mostly, for Yogi, seek and destroy. He could make that Creature from the Black Lagoon sound without moving his lips. It would drive Pam and LaRenda nuts! Im not sure if it was Yogi or Ricky who gured out how to rotate the cap on the old metal radiator. Wed unscrew it to the just barely hanging on position so when the pressure from the heat built upit would blow that thing across the room. Steam would shoot out like an old fashion locomotive was rolling through. Im telling you, the class would go wild! We used our imagination. like every teacher had been spurring us to do. We moved up to the big school for our seventh grade year. It was like starting all over, with a different teacher every hour. We exchanged baseball and swimming for Weekly Readers and Bunsen burners. Wed gone from Kick the Can to studying the major crops produced in the Great Steppe region of Russia. I was ready to chunk it all in until Yogi led me down to the boiler room in the basement. I dont know how he found it. It will start getting cold in a month or so. If we could nd a dead squirrel, he was always thinking, and lay it across that top plate on the back side where it wouldnt be noticed. We were, as everyone taught us, preparing for the future. It was late September when Mr. Danner stoked that old coal furnace. Folks, the aroma coming out of that ventilation system would have gagged a fty year old maggot! Our English teacher, Miss Bryant, near bout swooned. We heard stories of people throwing up, passing out and jumping out of the third oor windows. Someone sounded the re alarm. I thought things might have gone too far Yogi was standing on the re escape with the most innocent look Ive ever seen on a face, What happened? Where did that awful smell come from? Is it always like this in the seventh grade? By high school youd think wed be maturing enough to enjoy the learning curve. The problem was Shakespeare, bar graphs and some guy named Chaucer, who I guarantee you, couldnt even speak English! We were learning in spite of ourselves. And if we were not enjoying it, we could at least see the end in sight. Truth be told, we didnt know anything else. Wed been going to school all of our lives. I wouldnt say trained monkeys; but learned youngsters might be applicable.with a few original thoughts thrown in along the way. We did come to appreciate every classmate. They made the whole process tolerable. We leaned on one another for survival. Plus, the individuality of each brought a different slant into your growing world. I love Ricky, Buddy, Ruth Ann, Graylene, Yogi, the whole bunch to this day because we fought those learning battles side by side. We garnered as much from each other as we did in any classroom. And I appreciate that they allow me to share our story all these years later. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Taking one for the Team, the Gnomes Why I Dont Play The Piano Today Why government fails, and what we should do about it By Lee H. Hamilton Special to The Star As election season approaches, Ive been pondering a crucial issue about the role of government in our society. Its that our government often fails and that we need to address this. Whats odd is that while the frequent failures in governments performance are very much on ordinary peoples minds, politicians dont talk much about fixing them. True, you might hear a few words about the issue when members are back in their districts this month revving up their re-election campaigns, but for the most part theyll be focused on issues like jobs and the economy. This is understandable, because thats what their constituents expect to hear about. But its also a shame, because we need a healthy dialogue about why government often fails and how to fix it. Theres ample cause for concern. The VA appointments scandal; the botched launch of the Affordable Care Act; duplicative programs to help low-income families; the 28 years of missed inspections that led to the explosion of the fertilizer plant in West, Texas; scandals at the General Services Administration and the Secret Service; a broken federal appointments process; the regulatory screwups that contributed to the Great Recession; auto recalls that should have happened much sooner than they did; the failure to prevent the 9/11 terrorist attacks by sharing information within government; bridge collapses and infrastructure failures.... Theres a long and dispiriting list of occasions when the federal government has fallen short. Yet the issues surrounding government performance dont stir the passions. Progress comes slowly, the medias not especially interested in the tedious story of building competence, and politicians themselves look for home runs, not singles. They want to make grand proposals, not spend their time digging into the nuts and bolts of fixing bureaucracies. Moreover, as political scientist Paul C. Light has amply demonstrated, government failures happen for a long list of reasons that cannot be fixed easily, painlessly or quickly. Sometimes problems are rooted in policies that were ill-conceived, too complicated, or not well communicated. Sometimes the policies were fine, but the resources necessary to implement them were inadequate or misused. Politics often gets in the way of good policy, with efforts to undermine programs by making their implementation difficult or by cutting staffs and budgets. There are organizational and institutional problems, poor oversight, poor leadership no matter how good a policy, if good people arent available to carry it out, it will fail and governments alarming difficulty attracting and keeping highly qualified administrators. Often, leaders are bored by the nittygritty of management. Still, these are challenges, not barriers. If our political leaders wanted to focus on improving government management and policy implementation, theres no shortage of fixes they could make. They could ensure that federal agencies use pilot and trial programs much more frequently than they do now. They could mandate better and more rigorous evaluation procedures and the use of metrics that lay bare what works and what doesnt. Theres more attention being paid these days to efficacy than there used to be, but its still a trickle compared to whats needed. They could avoid rushing to announce programs, strive to get it right rather then get it quickly, and pay as much attention to follow-through as to the launch. Think about long term, not the next election, and make sure the mission is sharply defined. They could devote far more attention to how government will recruit, retain, and train the smart, highly qualified workers we need to carry out ever-morecomplex programs. And they could vow to reduce the number of political appointees in favor of filling most positions on the basis of merit. They should certainly flatten the chain of command and reduce the layers of bureaucracy within federal departments and agencies, so that its easier for top administrators to see whats taking place on the front lines. In the case of Congress, it needs to ensure that vigorous oversight of programs becomes a habit, not the rarity it is now. All of us want government to fail less often, whatever our political stripe. So heres my suggestion: As election season approaches, insist that your favored candidate work harder on making government more effective and efficient. Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. Page A4

PAGE 5

LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, August 21, 2014 A Section Dear Editor, In a couple of weeks, the voters of the 14th Judicial Circuit will be presented with an important decision concerning the issue of whether or not to re-elect Circuit Judge Jim Fensom to another six year term of of ce. To me, its not even close. Jim has been an attorney for almost four decades. During that time, he has acquired invaluable experience in virtually all areas of the law. Not only has he prosecuted and defended criminal cases, but he has also served both as a plaintiffs attorney and as a defense attorney in the civil arena. During his long run in private practice, he racked up approximately 100 jury trials. As a trial attorney myself, I can assure you that nothing rivals the experience one gains in actually trying a case before a jury from beginning to end. Equally impressive is that while Jim was doing all of this, he was also active in the management of his law rm signi cantly contributing to its success year after year. That, in and of itself, is no easy feat and is obviously another indication of Jims talents. But, that is not the end of the analysis. Since becoming a judge approximately eight years ago, Jim has worked tirelessly to do the very best job possible for the citizens of the 14th Judicial Circuit and has personally presided over approximately 50 jury trials. Obviously, all cases are important but some more so than others. Contained within these 50 jury trials were numerous criminal cases involving serious bodily injury to a victim or even death, and civil cases involving the litigation of millions of dollars. The total value of Jims cumulative experience to our community, and its contribution to his ability to do his job wisely, is incalculable. To be fair, Jims two opponents are very nice young lawyers. However, their level of experience, even if combined, does not come remotely close to that of Jims. Before concluding this letter, I feel compelled to respond to the two areas of criticism I sometimes hear concerning Jim. First, he held a lawyer in contempt for misbehaving in a jury trial. Secondly, he suppressed evidence in a criminal case, and in doing so criticized the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce for their improper conduct that actually triggered the suppression in the rst place. My response to this criticism, good work Judge Fensom! Citizens need to understand that a large part of a judges duty is to make everyone play by the rules, including lawyers and law enforcement of cers. When a lawyer crosses the line in a trial, it is the duty and obligation of the presiding judge to promptly address the misdeed and rectify the situation. And, on occasion, that may even require the use of the courts contempt powers. The same scrutiny applies to law enforcement. When they cross the line and engage in improper behavior in order to gather evidence, it is the judges responsibility to intervene and remind law enforcement that they too must play by the rules. Otherwise, we would have anarchy in our courtrooms and chaos in our law enforcement agencies. In summary, it is readily apparent that on election day the voters will be presented with a stark contrast when it comes to their choice for judge. Obviously, any rational observer recognizes the wisdom of re-electing a senior experienced judge versus replacing him with a lawyer who has but a mere fraction of the experience of the incumbent. Waylon Graham Panama City Digital Account Ex ecutiv e The Ne ws Herald is seeking a Digital Account Ex ecutiv e. To ap pl y, send rsum to LGrimes@pcnh.com The quali ed candidate will need experience in: Quali cations needed: Duties will include: Page 5 Dear Editor, I recently sat down to watch the budget meetings being held by the county commission, and I was simply stunned by what appeared to be the complete lack of education held by our elected of cials. I honestly couldnt tell if they just dont know any better, or if they just dont care. Issue after issue was discussed. County departments of all kinds approached the commission asking for increases in their individual budgets, and some departments didnt even ask for increases. But one thing was obvious. The County Commission needs to take a class in Florida law. Since they seem to be completely oblivious, let me explain. The bulk of county revenue comes from tax dollars, more speci cally, property tax dollars. An up-todate ef cient Property Appraisers Of ce results in more revenue for the county. It does so as follows: When a new home is built on vacant land, someone from the Property Appraisers Of ce must visit the property, determine the value based on sales, and add that to the tax roll. The same goes for when people add on rooms to their existing homes, add swimming pools, porches, patios, etc. If the of ce is understaffed, these new houses and additions can sit there for years before they added to the tax roll, resulting in lost revenue for the county. So basically, the most important county of ce to improve is the Property Appraisers Of ce. Without them, you have no money to fund anything else. It is that simple, but sadly, not to the geniuses on the County Commission. When I saw Mr. Burke stand before the County Commission and get turned down when asking to increase his already short staff, my jaw hit the oor. Florida state statute requires that every property in the county be physically inspected at least once within a 5-year period. That is state law. Mr. Burke even brought this up during his request. According to Florida state statute, once the Department of Revenue agrees that staff should be added to an of ce, it is then the responsibility of the County Commission to approve it. There was a similar situation last year in a larger Florida county where the County Commission refused to disperse funds to the Property Appraisers Of ce. That Property Appraiser led a lawsuit the County Commission. That lawsuit is not yet settled, but the result is expected to favor the Florida Department of Revenue and the Property Appraiser of that county. The County Commission is not more powerful than the DOR when it comes to the Property Appraisers Of ce, but apparently, no one bothered to tell them that. I think that citizens should be aware that Mr. Burke appeared to be trying to make his of ce as ef cient as possible to do the job required by state law, and the County Commission ignorantly denied his request, because apparently they have no clue as to where the countys revenue comes from. The state statutes on the assessment of Florida properties are public record. As a citizen, I took the time to read them myself. Why havent the people we voted into of ce to represent us? Clearly they are not doing their jobs. Maybe it is time to vote them out. Disappointed, J. Albright Cape San Blas Stock Picks, Mutual Funds, and The Electric Horseman Somehow I think them experts aint so expert. Robert Redford as Sonny Steele in The Electric Horseman The Electric Horseman is a silly little dramatic comedy from 1979, starring Robert Redford and featuring Willie Nelson in his first major acting role. Sonny Steele, played by Redford, is a former five-time world champion rodeo cowboy who now hawks Ranch Breakfast cereal. The corporation which owns Ranch Breakfast and employs Sonny Steele also owns Rising Star, a multi-million dollar stallion. But the corporate horse handlers are shooting Rising Star full of steroids and barbiturates so the animal can be paraded on stage in Las Vegas at the corporations press revue. Steele, realizing that Rising Star is injured and drugged, rides the horse out of the casino hotel, down the strip in Vegas, and out into the mountains of Nevada. His goal? To restore the horses health and release Rising Star into a canyon with other wild horses. Prior to Steeles horse thievery, he argues with the corporation president about the treatment of the animal. The executive assures Steele that the horse is under expert care. Steele replies, Somehow I think them experts aint so expert. Many investors and advisors feel the same way about opinions offered by mutual fund experts. Mutual funds are essentially a packaged group of individual securities. One advantage of mutual funds is that the investor is less susceptible to significant loss, since the fund is diversified. A valid criticism of mutual funds is the inherent layers of shareholder fees. For example, many mutual funds charge 12b-1 fees, which are expenses related to the distribution and marketing of the fund. Broker commissions and advertising, for example, would be paid by 12b-1 fees. In addition to 12b-1 fees, there are management fees, administrative fees and operating costs to be paid by shareholders. An alternative to consider might be to choose individual securities and essentially build your own mutual fund. Many investors and advisors choose this route. At one trading custodian, its $8.95 to buy a stock, and $8.95 to sell it, and those are the only costs associated with owning it. Thats a lot less expensive than buying a Class A, front-loaded mutual fund. So how can an investor know enough about individual stocks to serve as his/her own stock picker? You work at it. You rise early each morning and study the activity of the overseas markets. You read incessantly about economic trends and global market interactions. You learn which equities have historically risen in value and have periodically increased their payouts to shareholders over time. You analyze a companys underlying fundamentals. Its much more difficult and complicated than simply buying a bunch of mutual funds, but the long term payoff may be worth it. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-6086121~www.arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specific strategy or investment will be suitable or profitable for an investor. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Disappointed Judge race not close Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

PAGE 6

Thursday, August 21, 2014 the faculty a rock star welcome as they entered the gym through a tunnel created by the cheerleaders. The Student Government Association and the National Honor Society treated the student body to team-building activities and games, and everyone eased their way into another school year. Our vision for this year is to be a productive and pleasant place for students to learn and for staff to work, so today, we started building the pleasant atmosphere we are trying to foster, Bidwell said. Tomorrow, and the rest of the year, we are dedicated to the creation of a productive learning environment which will provide the great education our students need. Naturally, we will continue to pepper in fun activities designed to build special memories, which we hope will last a lifetime. go out for a request for pro posal on solid waste, as he did at the prior meeting, but the motion again died for lack of a second. If we bid it out, we can get a better price, Buzzett said. We need to get the biggest bang for our buck for the citizens. Commissioner Bo Pat terson made his own mo tion to re-negotiate a con tract with Waste Pro for consideration which passed 4-1 with Magidson dissent ing in favor of going out for bids.CAPE SAN BLA S L IGHTHOU S E City manager Jim An derson said grading and landscaping around the Cape San Blas Lighthouse site was projected to be complete by Aug. 30, and the lighthouse complex will be completely open by Sept. 1. Two weeks before the move, which relocated the lighthouse from the Cape to George Core Park, the city received a combined $25,000 in invoices for the lowering and raising of power lines. Magidson said the costs werent anticipated and that it left just over $16,800 to close out the lighthouse contract. Reminding his fellow commissioners they had not budgeted city funds for the move, Magidson sug gested using BP funds to cover those costs. Patterson countered, suggesting us ing money from the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA). Every time we turn around, were grabbing BP money, Patterson said. Magidson warned that using PSJRA funds would call for changes to the bud get and reminded Patter son that in past votes, Pat terson had supported the use of BP funds for other projects. Patterson agreed, saying though he supported using the funds for the other proj ects, he didnt support us ing them this time. The city already has spent $103,000 of available BP money and has $432,000 remaining. The vote to utilize the funds passed 3-2 with Pat terson and Commissioner Phil McCroan dissenting.G ULF P INE S PROPERTY Commissioners received preliminary designs from Preble Rish on platting the former Gulf Pines Hospital site into six single-home lots. Gibson said a certicate of discharge on a lien held by the Internal Revenue Service had been received.P SJ RA PSJRA director Gail Al sobrook asked the commis sion to approve spending $14,356 for design costs on gateway entrances to the city, to be placed on U.S. 98, Third Street and Fourth Street. Previously, the project was put out for bid with lo cal business Coastal Design being the only company to submit. Alsobrook said she would work with the com pany on several designs for the councils consideration. Alsobrook said public work shops on the gateway proj ect would be scheduled in the near future. Commissioners passed the request unanimously.M L K S IDEWAL KS City engineer Clay Smallwood reported that water line tie-ins in North Port St. Joe were completed Monday and that all under ground work would be com pleted this week. Above-ground work to be completed included repair ing driveways torn up dur ing construction. That work, Smallwood said, should be completed by Friday with next week being devoted to repairing the sidewalks along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Smallwood projected all construction on the side walk and water distribution line replacement would be complete by the end of the month. W ILLIA M T HUR SB AY As the meeting came to a close, commissioners sent well-wishes to Commission er William Thursbay, who had recently been diag nosed with cancer. Though treatment will cause Thursbay to miss upcom ing meetings, he assured citizens he would attend in person when he could, and by phone while he received treatment. Im sick, and now I have to go get better, Thursbay said. Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR PU BL IC N OT IC E SA LE O F H IG HL AN D V IEW P RO PE RT Y PU RS UA NT T O R es ol ut io n 13 -0 7, T HE D IS TR IC T SC HO OL BO AR D OF G UL F CO UN TY wi ll b e di sp osi ng o f th e fo ll ow in g re al p ro pe rt y lo ca te d in Hig hla nd V ie w, G ul f Co un ty Fl orid a b y se al ed b id s: Co mm enc in g at t he N E Co rne r of L ot 22, G ov er nm en t Or ig inal S ec ti on 2 6, T W P 7 S. R n g. 1 1 W es t, G ul f C ou nt y, F lori da al so s ai d p oi nt l oc at ed b y a St J oe P ap er C om pa ny mon um en t; t henc e ru n du e No rt h 98 .8 7 fe et to a s ta ke ; th en ce d ue W es t 44 .7 9 fe et to a st ak e for t h e p oi nt o f be gin ni ng F r o m th e po in t of b eg in ni ng, r un d ue We st 4 45 .1 92 fe et t o a co nc re te m ar ke r; t henc e ru n So ut h 8 de gr ee s 37 m in ut es E as t 5 10 .2 8 fe et to a s ta ke; T HE NC E So ut h 18 d eg re es 1 0 mi nu te s We st 1 54 .3 f ee t to a s ta ke; a nd t o th e No rt he as t co rne r of a l ot s ol d to L Wo od b y de ed d at ed A ug us t 7, 1 95 1, r ec or de d in D eed B oo k 21 Pa ge 5 69 o f th e Pu bl ic R ec or ds o f Gu lf C ou nt y, F lori da ; th enc e ru n So ut h 45 d eg re es 4 0 mi nu te s We st 1 20 .0 0 fe et t o th e Ea s t bo un dar y li ne o f St at e Ro ad No 30, a ls o kn ow n a s U. S. H ig hw ay 9 8, t henc e So ut h 44 d eg re es 2 0 mi nu te s Ea s t 99 .8 8 fe et t o th e No rt h bo un da ry l in e o f Se ve nt h St re et, B ay vi ew He ig ht s Su bd iv is ion o f Gu lf C ou nt y, F lor id a; t henc e al ong t he N or th er n bo un dar y li ne of s ai d Se ve nt h St re et, No rt h 89 de gr ee s 55 mi nu te s Ea st 55 2. 8 fe et; th enc e du e No rt h 20 6. 7 fe et; th enc e No rt h 11 de gr ee s 19 mi nu te s We st 61 0. 73 fe et to th e po in t of beg in ni ng, co nt ai ni ng 8. 17 ac re s, mo re or le ss LE SS AN D EX CEP T th e fo ll ow in g thr ee pa rc el s: (1 ) a 15 0 fo ot by 15 0 fo ot tr ac t re co rd ed in Dee d Bo ok 22 pa ge 46 1; (2 ) A tr ac t of l an d de ed ed to J. A. McC as ke ll in De ed Bo ok 20 Pa ge 22 2; an d (3 ) a tr ac t of la nd de ed ed to Gu lf Co un ty by ou tf al l di tc h ea seme nt in Dee d Bo ok 21 Pa ge 7. Da id pa rc el to be co nv ey ed be in g th e sa me pa rc el de sc ri be d in Dee d Bo ok 23 Pa ge 63 -6 4 of th e Pu bl ic Re co rd s of Gu lf Co un ty Fl ori da Be gin ni ng at a po in t f ty (5 0) fe et No rt h of th e No rt hw es t co rn er of Lot Ni ne (9 ) in Blo ck G , Ba yv ie w He ig ht s add it io n to Hig hla nd Vi ew Fl ori da an d ru n th enc e No rt h 13 5 fe et, th enc e We st 15 0 fe et, th enc e So ut h 13 5 fe et, th enc e Ea st 15 0 fe et to th e po in t of beg in ni ng Th e ab ove la nd be in g lo ca te d in th e So ut hw es t co rner of th e No rt h hal f of Go ve rn men t Lo t 11 an d So ut hea st co rne r of th e No rt h Ha lf of Go ve rn men t Lot 12 Se ct ion 26 To wn sh ip 7 Sou th Ra nge 11 We st Gu lf Co un ty Fl ori da Sa id pa rc el be in g th e sa me as co nv ey ed in Deed Bo ok 23 Pa ge 12 3 of th e Pu bl ic Re co rd s of Gu lf Co un ty Fl orid a. Fr om th e No rt he as t co rn er of orig inal Lo t 12 Se ct io n 26 To wn shi p 7 So ut h, Ra nge 11 We st ru n No rt h 11 de gr ee s 19 mi nu te s We st fo r a di st an ce of 99 .9 5 fe et to a po in t; th enc e tur n We st al ong th e No rt h pr op er ty li ne of th e Hig hla nd Vi ew Gr amm ar Sc ho ol for a di st an ce of 47 5. 29 fe et to a co nc re te P. R. M. ; th enc e tu rn Sou th 8 de gr ee s 37 mi nu te s Ea st for a di st an ce of 510 .2 8 fe et to an ir on pi pe ; th en ce tu rn rig ht an d ex te nd a li ne So ut h 18 de gr ee s 10 mi nu te s We st fo r a di st an ce of 15 4. 3 fe et to an ir on pi pe ; th enc e tur n rig ht an d ex te nd a li ne Sou th 45 de gr ee s 20 mi nu te s We st fo r a di st an ce of 12 0 fe et to an ir on pi pe th at is 33 fe et Ea st of th e ce nt erl in e of th e Ri gh t of Wa y of U. S. Hi gh wa y 98 for a po in t of be gin ni ng. Sa id pa rc el be in g th e sa me as co nv ey ed in Deed Bo ok 26 Pa ge 42 1 of th e Pu bl ic Re co rd s of Gu lf Co un ty Fl or id a. Fr om th e ab ove po in t of beg in ni ng ru n a li ne No rt h 45 de gr ee s 20 mi nu te s Ea st for a di st an ce of 12 0 fe et to a po in t; th en tur n le ft an d ex te nd a li ne No rt h 18 de gr ee s 10 mi nu te s Ea st fo r a di st an ce of 15 4. 3 fe et to a po in t; th en tu rn l ef t an d ex te nd a li ne No rt h 8 de gr ee s 37 mi nu te s We st a di sta nc e of 10 0. 62 fe et to a po in t; th enc e tur n le ft an d ru n a lin e So ut h 45 de gr ee s 20 mi nu te s We st fo r a di st an ce of 33 7. 56 fe et, sa id li ne be in g pa ra ll el to th e So ut he as t bo un dar y li ne of thi s tr ac t, to a po in t th at is 33 fe et Ea st of th e ce nte rl in e of th e Ri gh t of Wa y of U. S. Hig hw ay 98 th en tur n le ft an d ex te nd a lin e So ut hea st al ong th e Ea st Ri gh t of Wa y lin e of U. S. Hi gh wa y 98 for a di st an ce of 15 0 fe et mo re or le ss to th e po in t of be gin ni ng. Sa id pa rc el be in g th e sa me as th at co nv ey ed in De ed Bo ok 26 Pa ge 42 1 of th e Pu bl ic Re co rd s of Gu lf Co un ty Fl ori da The dea d li ne fo r su bm is si o n of se ale d bi ds sh al l be 4: 00 pm ED T, Se pt em be r 2, 20 14 If th e su bm it te d bi ds m eet or ex ce ed th e Fa ir Ma rk et Va lu e se t by th e Bo ar d, th e boa rd w ill ac ce pt th e highe st an d bes t bi d. If th e su bm it te d bi ds ar e be lo w th e Fa ir Ma rk et Va lu e se t by th e Boa rd th e Boa rd rese rv es th e ri gh t to ne g ot ia te wi th bi dd ers fo r a pr ic e wi th in a st at ed ra ng e. The Boa rd rese rv es th e ri gh t to re je ct al l bi ds In te rest ed pa rt ie s ca n co nt ac t Bi ll Carr at bca rr @gul f. k1 2. us or Siss y Wo rl ey at sw or l ey @gul f. k1 2. us Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Boa rd 15 0 Mi dd le Sch ool Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6. Ph one : (8 50 ) 229 -8 25 6 Fa x: (8 50 ) 229 -6 08 9 VO TE Sh alene Gro ve r for Circuit Judge, 14th Judicial Circuit Fr iends and Ci tiz ens of Gulf Co un ty Judicial assig nmen ts in the 14th Ci rc uit tha t ser ve Ba y, Ca lhoun, Gulf Jackson, Holmes and Wa shingt on Co un ties ar e decided by senior it y. Mo st new cir cuit judges ar e assig ned to a rur al co un ty Sinc e eigh t of the elev en judges ar e fr om Ba y Co un ty these new judges usually aw ait the da y when another new judge is appoin te d or elec te d so they can re tur n to Ba y Co un ty Fr equen t re assig nmen t of judges can cause an in te rr uption in the qualit y of co ur t ser vic es to the rur al co un ties and to Ba y Co un ty A change in judges of te n br ings a change in pr oc edur e. Th is can cause cases to be dela ye d and can cr ea te a ba ck log of cases Not ha ving the same judge can also cr ea te a la ck of co nsist enc y in co ur t decisions Re ducing fr equen t judicial co ur t assig nmen ts stabiliz es co ur t func tions in the rur al co un ties and pr omot es e cienc y in Ba y Co un ty I re side in a rur al co un ty and I wo uld co nsider it an honor to ser ve in Gulf Co un ty to ensur e a fair and e c ien t co ur t. Yo ur vo te and supp or t ca n help achie ve this goal Th ank Yo u Sh alene Grover In this elec tion, Gu lf Co un ty ca n mak e the di er enc e. Yo u ca n mak e the di e re nc e. Po litic al adv er tisemen t paid fo r and appr ov ed by Shalene Gr ov er fo r Ci rc uit Ju dge 14th Ju dicial Ci rc uit Gr oup 10 IN SESSION from page A1 Local A6 | The Star PSJ from page A1 W E S L O C HER | The Star While blindfolded, Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School students had to locate their partner by making the noise of the animal on their mask.

PAGE 7

Local The Star| A7 Thursday, August 21, 2014 If you are concerned about how to protect your identity, the BBB has advice Special to The Star PENSACOLA Another massive data breach is in the headlines. This one follows on the heels of other high prole data breaches involving Target, Michaels, Mozilla, PF Changs and many more. Since data security is the responsibility of individual merchants and websites, theres not much that you as a consumer can do to prevent data breaches from occurring. However, you can take steps to prevent your identity from being compromised. Better Business Bureau urges you to make identity theft protection a routine priority. You should be proactive and vigilant to minimize the risk of identity theft for every member of your family by: using passwords that include complex characters changing your passwords frequently not using the same password for every online account or website monitoring your banking and credit card accounts frequently, if not daily setting up automatic activity alerts on banking and credit card accounts so that you are notied every time a transaction is made setting up alerts on your credit reports with the three credit reporting agencies checking your childrens credit reports for unauthorized activity being careful about the types of information that you disclose online discussing identity theft and online security with every member of your family who uses the Internet, from the youngest to the oldest. By taking these steps, you may be able to detect unauthorized activity earlier so that you can minimize the damage that identity theft can do. For more information about protecting your identity, please visit www.bbb.org DA T A BREACHES NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 8/31/2014 CODE: SJ00 We ems Memorial Rehab Car e of fers in-patient re habilitative services, designed to impr ove function and maximize potential for re tur ning to home, school, work, and the community Our team customizes each patient s car e to meet both patient and family needs. We ar e committed to re tur ning those individuals who have been impair ed by accident or disease to their highest level of independence. Re hab Re stor e, Re turn to Home Call To day (850 ) 653-8853 135 Av enue G, Apalac hicola We ems Memorial Re hab Car e Yo ur Jour ney Back Home MBARA Kingsh Tournament Saturday Star Staff Report The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association will host the 18th annual MBARA Kingsh Tour nament from 5 a.m. until 5 p.m. CT on Saturday, Aug. 23. The tournament is the biggest fundrais er for the MBARA and volunteers will use the money to build additional reefs for deployment in the Gulf of Mexico in 2015. Since its inception in 1995, more than $1.4 million of articial reefs have been placed off the shores of Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe. Fees for the tournament are $160 per boat, which can have as many shermen as the cap tains can safely t. The entry fee can be paid on line at www.mbara.org. Registrations will also be taken during the Captains Party, to be held beginning at 5 p.m. CT at Beacon Hill Veterans Memorial Park on Fri day, Aug. 22. Attendance at the Captains Party is not mandatory. The weigh-in will be held at Mexico Beach Ma rina on Saturday afternoon from 1-5 p.m. CT. The public is invited to come to watch the weigh-in and have their photos taken with Miss Kingsh 2015. What you can do to protect your identity

PAGE 8

SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Au g. 21 90 79 40 % Fr i, Au g. 22 92 80 30 % Sa t, Au g. 23 92 81 30 % Sun, Au g. 24 91 80 40 % Mo n, Au g. 25 88 80 50 % Tu es Au g. 26 88 79 50 % We d, Au g. 27 87 78 80 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer is almost gone! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Page 8 Thursday, August 21, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Inshore/Bay Inshore fishing has slowed down somewhat due to the hot weather and school starting back in many locations, however, good reports from St. Joe Bay and Indian Pass have anglers excited this week. Large schools of red fish have been spotted running parallel to the beaches from Cape San Blas to Indian Pass but are very picky about bait choice. Live pinfish, finger mullet or smaller croakers should get you in the action. Flounder are starting to show up under the George Tapper bridge and at Mexico Beach canal, but watch your tides and bring along some live bull minnows for best results. King Fish are still hanging around most near shore structure and over most artificial wrecks and in the shipping channels out of Mexico beach. Cigar minnow and duster lures work very well for trolling and flat line fishing. SPONSORED BY By TOM BAIRD Special to The Star At the time of this writing, female loggerhead sea turtles have laid over a hundred and fty clutches of eggs on St. Joseph Peninsula and the State Park, and this doesnt include nests on Eglin AFB beaches. Many of the nests have begun to hatch, and little hatchlings are making their way to the water. They run a gauntlet of natural predators, including ghost crabs and birds. Now they also have to negotiate around unlled sand pits, trash, beach furniture, cabanas, and vehicles left on the beach overnight. For those fortunate enough to make it to the water, their trials are not over. Besides marine predators, both adult and juvenile sea turtles continue to face many threats from humans. Degradation of nesting beaches and near shore habitats has decimated sea turtle populations, and new predators, such as coyotes and re ants, have reduced nesting success. What the public often doesnt see are the cruel losses to boat collisions and shing gear entanglements. These take a large toll annually. According to the Sea Turtle Conservancy and based on estimates by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA), each year more than 250,000 sea turtles are accidentally captured, injured or killed by U.S. shermen. This includes both commercial and recreational shermen. These are staggering losses for marine species that are threatened or endangered and whose continued existence is in peril. Marine turtles are some of the most remarkable creatures you may encounter out on the water. Whether on the water or on shore, we all need to do our part to ensure the survival of these magnicent creatures. Turtles often mistake oating bits of plastic debris as food and can choke or have fatal internal blockage from ingesting bits of trash. Do not discard trash overboard from your boat and be sure to properly remove all trash, especially wrappers and bits of plastic, from the beach or your boat. Anyone who has participated in beach clean-up events knows that people leave an amazing amount of trash on the beach. A lot of that is plastic, which takes years and years to break down. All those little pieces of candy wrapper are oating death sentences for turtles that mistakenly ingest them. Trash can also entangle turtles. Marine debris can include plastic bags, plastic pellets, balloons, and ghost shing gear, such as nets. These entanglements can lead to suffocation or drowning. Marine turtles spend either all or a signicant part of their lives in the open ocean. Juvenile loggerhead and green turtles, because of their size, are especially at risk from trash in the ocean. Discarded monolament shing line is a major threat to marine turtles. Monolament is nonbiodegradable and can remain intact and dangerous in the marine environment for over 600 years. One rescued turtle was recorded ingesting approximately 590 feet of monolament. According to the Florida FWC, over 298 sea turtles were entangled in shing line in Florida from 2000 to 2006. Besides ingestion, turtles can become entangled in monolament leading to drowning if the line gets caught on the sea oor or in gear. Line wrapped around a ipper can lead to infection, loss of the ipper, or death. Proper disposal or recycling of monolament line can not only save a turtle, but also prevent costly engine repairs from entanglement on the propeller or shaft. What do you do if you encounter an injured or entangled sea turtle? According to the FWC, gently bring the turtle close to you, use a dip net or rmly hold its front ipper and shell to safely lift it out of the water. Do not lift the turtle above water by pulling the linethis will result in further injury. Avoid the turtles mouth and ipper claws. Cut the line using blunt scissors or a knife and remove any excess line that has become entangled around the turtle. Do not remove any shing hooks unless the turtle is lightly hooked and it can be taken out without further injury. If you are uncertain, do not remove hooks. Turtles with serious cuts, ingested, or deeply embedded hooks need veterinary care. Keep the turtle in the shade and DO NOT transport. Immediately call the 24hour FWC Wildlife Alert Hotline at 1-888-404-FWCC (3922). If the turtle is alive, please be prepared to stay with it until help arrives. Also be prepared to answer some simple questions: What is the exact location of the animal? Is the turtle alive or dead? What is the approximate size of the turtle? Is the turtle marked with spray paint? (This may indicate that the turtle has been previously documented.) What is the location of the closest access point to the turtle? As far as sea turtle entanglements, it just all boils down to being aware of your trash and not disposing of ropes, nets, lines, hooks and leaders, plastics or other refuse off your boat. For beach goers it means taking a little effort to clean up after your day at the beach. And if someone else has left trash, pick it up. These are all just simple things that require very little effort, and youll be teaching your kids good beach habits. All this can make a big difference to sea turtle survival. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. SPEC I AL TO T HE STAR Marie Romanelli provided this photo of a tourist and a regal kingsh he recently snagged off Indian Pass. Special to The Star As fall slowly begins to replace the long summer days, many varieties of plants are beginning to show some distinguishable characteristics that you may remember seeing. At St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, one of the most visible to our visitors at this time of year is the summer grape (vitis aestivalis). This species of grape is native to eastern North America. It is a vigorous vine, growing to 30 feet or more. The leaves are usually a little broader than long and varies in shape. The fruit is a small grape, dark purple or black in color about 3/8 of an inch in size. Some species of wild grape have historically been used by the Native Americans for medicinal purposes as a relief from diarrhea, hepatitis, stomach aches and thrush. Externally, they made a poultice of wilted leaves for, rheumatism, headaches and fever. Grape and their vines were also used in sacred rituals. Europeans would put whole wild grape leaves in the bottom of crocks to preserve the color of stored beans. Leaves were also used to wrap fresh made butter, which helped preserve the butter from spoilage. Here at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, the vines and fruit of the summer grape are food for birds, opossum, deer and raccoons. Many of the plants at the park are producing fall foliage and seeds for next years growth. On your next visit to the park, keep your camera ready for the wild grape and many other late summer plants. Be sure to ask a Park Ranger to help you identify any photos of plants or animals you have seen during your visit. STATE P ARK NEWS Have you seen this plant? P HOTO S COURTE S Y OF R ANDY L AYMAN At left a turtle egg chamber, protected with screening from the local turtle patrol, shows evidence that hatchlings have undertaken their march to the water. At, right this egg chamber is vulnerable as it sits within a tidal region. Sea turtle entanglements A KING OF A FISH

PAGE 9

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORT S www.starfl.com Thursday, August 21, 2014 A Section Si gn Up Fo r Ge ne Ra f el d Fo ot ba ll Si gn -u ps for th e Gen e Ra f el d Fo ot ba ll Le ag ue wi ll be he ld Tu esd ay Au gu st 19 20 14 fro m 6: 00 8: 00 pm Th ur sd ay Au gu st 21 20 14 fr om 6: 00 8: 00 pm an d Sa tu rd ay Au gu st 23 20 13 fr om 9:0 0 AM to 1: 00 PM at th e Fi re St at io n on Wi ll ia ms Av e. Pl ea se br in g a fe e of $6 0.0 0, ev id en ce of hea lt h in su ra nc e, an d a co py of hi s bi rt h ce rt i ca te Ev er y pl ay er mu st ha ve a phy si ca l ex am pr io r to pl a yi ng We su gg es t tha t yo u ge t th is do ne as so on as po ss ib le. Eq ui pm en t di st ri bu ti on wi ll be do ne im me di at el y fo ll ow in g re gi st ra ti on so th e pl ay er mu st be pr ese nt We wi ll co mp et e in tw o ag e br ac ke ts in 20 14 Th e Do lp hi ns wi ll el d pl ay er s tha t ar e 7, 8 an d 9 ye ar s ol d. Th e Ja gu ar s wi ll be 10 11 an d 12 ye ar s ol d. Th ose wh o si gn up rs t wi ll ha ve th e mo st an d be st eq ui pm en t to ch oo se fr om Ev er yo ne wh o wi sh es to pl ay mu st re gi st er no la te r th an 1: 00 PM on th e 23 rd No ap pl ic at io ns wi ll be ac ce pt ed aft er tha t da te If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s wh at soe ve r ab ou t th is gr ea t pr og ra m, pl ea se co nt ac t Ma tt He rr in g at 24 7984 2. Port St. Joe Yo uth Soccer registration for the fall soccer season will be held on Friday August 22nd and 29th from 5:00 pm until 7:00 pm, Saturday August 23rd and 30th from 9:00am until 12:00 noon at the ST AC House The ST AC House is located on 8th street in Port St. Joe. Boys and Girls ages 4 to 13 are invited to play soccer Players must be at least 4 years old before September 1st in order to play Bring a copy of your child s birth certi cate to the registration. No experience is necessary Registration fee is $60 per player A limited number of scholarships available. Coaches, referees and sponsors are needed. Please sign up at the time of registration! UP WA RD SO CC ER pr ek 6t h gr ad e Re gi st ra ti on fe e $6 0. 00 Ev al ua ti on s & Si gn Up Sa t. Au g. 2n d & Sa t Au g. 23 rd 9:0 0a m 12 :0 0p m Ho ne yv il le Pa rk So cce r Fi el d In th e ca se of ra in it wi ll be he ld at Gl ad Ti di ng s As sem bl y of Go d Fe ll ow sh ip Ha ll 1s t pr ac ti ce Se pt 2n d 1s t ga me Se pt 13 th la st ga me Oc t 25 th Star Staff Report The 2014 high school foot ball season comes to life Fri day with both public schools hosting Kickoff Classics. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School hosts Blountstown at 7 p.m. ET Friday at Shark Stadium. Meanwhile, the Gators of Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School will host Franklin County at 7 p.m. CT at Ga tor Field. The two county teams begin the regular season against each other 7:30 p.m. ET Aug. 29 at Shark Stadium. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com To head, heat, heart and history toss in holistic health and what comes into focus is the out-sized services provided scholastic pub lic school athletes in Gulf County. Head, heat, heart and history are the central tenets of assessing the wellbeing of athletes; holis tic health was demonstrated last week at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Coaches from across the sports seasons gathered for a presen tation concerning concussions given by athletic trainer Rick Wil liams with Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic. The session dealt with the only the head, but it was a just the latest example of the growth over three years of a health care network that would be the envy of much larger cities and counties. In a sense, the foundation was rst poured three years ago when Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe began providing free athletic physicals to all Gulf County athletes, setting up mul tiple days to provide plenty of op portunities for all athletes to take advantage of the service. By last school year, the hospital was providing the free physicals and an orthopedic surgeon and physicians assistant at county home football games, on-site care for any serious injury. And this year, the physicals con tinue while the hospital is near a deal to bring a full-time orthope dic surgeon to the Medical Ofce Building on the hospitals campus with an aim toward providing sev en-day care and early morning ap pointments after athletic contests for scholastic athletes. Further, the hospital recently brought on board Dr. Rachel Bixler, a Port St. Joe native who Williams calls a brilliant, true physician. This coordinated effort started three years ago, Williams said. We feel condent Sacred Heart is committed to doing things the way they ought to be done. This is all part of a coordinated team approach. Communication at all levels is vital. Communication about that team concept is vital. Other players on the team pro vided assists. Williams, through TOC, provides presentations on a host of injury is sues, particularly heat-related and concussions, to schools in several counties and has worked for years on the sidelines and locker rooms of county high schools assisting coaches and athletes. The Panhandle Area Education Consortium (PAEC) two years ago began providing the funding across its service region for IMPACT tests for athletes in all sports. The IMPACT test, developed at the University of Pittsburgh, the leader in the treatment of concus sions, is a multi-question test that measures normal brain function. The test provides a normal picture of how an athletes brain functions, Williams said. If athletes sustain an injury with concussion-like symptoms, an ath lete must pass the IMPACT test when compared to the baseline re sults it will reect if normal brain function has returned before being returned to competition. And concussions, Williams not ed, are not just an issue in football. Womens soccer is second nation ally in the percentage of concus sion injuries, and closing the gap into third place is cheerleading. Cheerleaders comprise just 17 percent of all high school athletes, yet 64 percent of traumatic injuries to high school athletes are related to cheerleading, Williams noted. Further, a national study showed that roughly 9 percent of all injuries in high school athletics are concussion-related. However, for football, 8-11 per cent of all injuries are concussions, indicating, Williams said, That football is not the bad actor. This is an injury that should no longer scare us, Williams said. It is a lot safer to play now with all the information around today. Weve learned more about it, what it is, how to treat it and how to manage recovery. The recent surge in outreach on injuries has been spurred by Florida lawmakers and the Florida High School Athletics Association over the past two years. The Florida Legislature passed legislation mandating the FHSAA adopt rules pertaining to the treat ment and management of injuries. The FHSAA has in turn adopted those rules, including a form that must be lled out by parents or guardians and treating physicians before an athlete is returned to competition after a concussion. Part of the goal was to align big sports medicine groups to make sure medical safety is known throughout the state, Williams said. SHARK 100 BEGINS ANOTHER SEASON OF SUPPORT T IM CROFT | The Star The Shark 100 Club, which has donated almost $150,000 to Port St. Joe athletics, kicked off another season this week. Starting the campaign off were the following individuals and businesses: Farnsley and Johnston, Gary Howze, Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union, Durens Piggly Wiggly/Bluewater Outriggers, Mel C. Magidson Jr.,PA, Centennial Bank, Hannon Insurance, Carpet Country, Bayside Florist & Gift, Ramseys Printing and Ofce/One Way Fitness, Bo Knows Pest Control, Charles W. Norton, Americas Mini Storage, Catheys Ace Hardware, St. Joe Rent All, Rafeld Fisheries, Jim and Rosemary Haynes, Cape Trading Post, Theo Johnson, Mitch and Sabrina Burke and Robert and Charlotte Nedley. Page 9 T IM CROFT | The Star High school football underway Friday F ILE PHOTO S Three years ago, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf began coordinating with athletic trainer Rick Williams to provide free physicals for local high school athletes. From that collaboration, a network of sportsrelated medicine has grown. A team approach to athletic injuries

PAGE 10

Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star.com Local A10 | The Star Thursday, August 21, 2014 COURTESY OF MI C HELLE KENDRI CK Using a special lens, two turtle hatchling are captured on their way to the sea. COURTESY OF PA M JONES Rascal Jones watches intently as a 6-foot shark cruises the shallow waters of Pompano Cove on St. Joseph Peninsula COURTESY OF JULIE WATTERSON A fun day on the beach COURTESY OF T ERRY L IND A spider crab dances along the bottom of the bay COURTESY OF MELINA E LU M A golden hue over the path to the beaches of Cape San Blas COURTESY OF JUSTINE JULIAN Evening on St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF CATHY KREI M ER Manatees grazing around WindMark Beach on Aug. 9 COURTESY OF D EBBIE H OO P ER A J OEBAY. CO M The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is backlit by the city of Port St. Joe in this shot from St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF D AN E THERIDGE Visitor Austin Etheridge and a ddler crab

PAGE 11

By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Get ducky. Not to mention provide a valuable assist to the volunteer guild at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. For the second year in a row the guild will present a Duck Derby during next months Scallop and Music Festival. This is a visible event and a fun event, said Ann Jarosz with the volunteer guild. It is a chance to in teract with the community and have some fun. The derby concept is simple. Adopt a duck, one, three, six or a ock and watch them join hundreds of oth er ducks for a race across the lagoon at George Core Park. The race takes place during a break from the music on the stage, at ap proximately 4 p.m. ET. Prizes, such as an iPad Air and Samsung Gear FIT and an array of gift cer ticates from local vendors will be handed out to the sponsor(s) of the rst ducks to cross the nish line. This is important for the guild because it is one of the top fundraisers each year, Jarosz said. It helps us with our funding and we in turn help the hospital. The volunteer guild is growing with more than 150 volunteers. Over the past four years the guild has contributed over $15,000 to the hospital for items beyond the hospitals resources and reach. For example, the guild has provided funding for additional specialized train ing and equipment, a spe cialized surgical gurney or specialized IV equipment increasing the hospitals capacity. The guilds funds are growing, Jarosz said. We have only been active for four years and so it has been a growing process. Now we are putting a process in place to receive and act upon requests from the hospital and staff. The guild also contrib uted to the Cricket Fund, named after a young wom an in the community who died due to complications from breast cancer. The Cricket Fund pro vides free mammograms to women in underserved ar eas of the community and women who lack adequate health insurance for regu lar mammograms. The volunteers at Sa cred Heart Hospital on the Gulf provide a host of services every day at the hospital, from carrying outpatients to cars to visiting with in-patients, checking folks in or just providing a smile. We are blessed to have the community support, Jarosz said. For the tour ists and the community, we want them to know there is a place they can go if they have trouble. Those tourists also bol ster the volunteer ranks. Jarosz said many snow birds and other tourists volunteer at the hospital. Calling all ducks By Tim CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ|Star tcroft@star.com A hint for a celebratory gathering make sure the honoree attends. Former Gulf County health ofcer Doug Kent recently received a lifetime achievement award for his work in envi ronmental health. He just didnt re ceive it the night it was awarded since he was not in attendance at the annual dinner for the Florida Environmental Health Association. I had no idea, I didnt even know I was nominated, said Kent, the current Bay Coun ty health ofcer. Nobody mentioned it to me and I didnt even attend the meeting. I told a friend of mine that would was a meeting I would have liked to attend. The award, the Billy G. Tennant Award, recognizes the accomplish ments, over a long period of time, of en vironmental health professionals. Kent has over 30 years with the Flor ida Department of Health, all in Gulf and Bay counties, and has maintained his environmental health director certi cation even after being rst appointed health department administrator in Gulf County in 1997. I still work in environmental health, Kent said. Ive kept my certication. I visit the schools. I have a lot of projects going on. I think the staff is proud to have an administrator who knows what they have to do. Kent started with the FDOH in en vironmental health in Bay County and spent 17 years in Gulf County as a supervisor and then director of envi ronmental health before moving up to administrator. He established one of the rst under ground storage tank program in Gulf County and brought same-day permit ting while encouraging education and public outreach through the promotion of an array of web-based services. That is the key, education and let Kent receives lifetime award By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The 18th annual Florida Scallop and Music Festival will bring two days of food, fun, music and mussel ap preciation to George Core Park in Port St. Joe Sept. 12-13. Less than a month away, details for the event are be ing released as the festival continues to take shape. One new change to the festival will be found in the Kids Zone where this year four bounce houses will take center stage to help children burn off some ex cess energy. Rather than pay by the visit, Gulf County Chamber of Commerce President Paula Pickett said that parents can purchase an armband for $5 that will allow kids access to the in atable fun all day. Pickett said that while its something a bit differ ent, the Scallop Fest com mittee wanted to move away from kids enter tainment that used live animals, recalling the ex treme temperatures of last summer. With an emphasis on lo cal grub, 13 food vendors have been invited to the festival to serve up good ies ranging from gelato to fried Oreos, seafood tacos, chowders, gumbos and of course, scallops. Its going to be lots of good food and many of the vendors will be serving up scallops, said Pickett. Two years ago we didnt have enough food and last year we had too much, so this year should be perfect. More than 40 arts and crafts vendors will also decorate the park to sell paintings, photography, pottery, furniture and jewelry. Theres going to be something for everyone, said Pickett. You can come out to eat, to shop, or you can do both. See KENT B6 DOUG KENT Scallop Fest COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, August 21, 2014 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Whats the chess scenario where all possible moves are to the players disadvantage? Stalemate, Castling, Zugzwang, Shanked 2) What was Mary Anns last name on older TVs Gilligans Island? Howell, Grumby, Grant, Summers 3) Where did the card game of Canasta originate in the 1940s? Uruguay, Pakistan, Wales, Canada 4) Which state has the smallest number of universities? Rhode Island, Delaware, Wyoming, Alaska 5) What is the traditional dish with roast possum? Greens, Okra, Yams, Peaches 6) Where are the Iron Ranges? Pensylvania, Minnesota, California, Colorado 7) Statistically which of these has the highest percentage of winning as the home team? Soccer, Basketball, Football, Baseball 8) What did the Hawaiian Pineapple Company change its name to in 1960? Caliman, Naisa, Pratt, Dole 9) Who got his rst big break lling in for an injured Red Skelton? Abbott, Philbin, Carson, Berle 10) How is a talent school described that lures students with special gifts? Glue, Magnet, Hook, Harvest 11) As located in Pennsylvania, whats the worlds largest mushroom farm? Green Head, Creek, Piedmont, Moonlight 12) Where is the Cave of the Wind? S. Dakota, W. Virginia, Utah, Montana 13) Who married Shakira Baksh after seeing her in a coffee commercial? Michael Caine, Robert Duvall, Clint Eastwood, Paul Newman ANSWERS 1) Zugzwang. 2) Summers. 3) Uruguay. 4) Wyoming. 5) Yams. 6) Minnesota. 7) Soccer. 8) Dole. 9) Carson. 10) Magnet. 11) Moonlight. 12) S. Dakota. 13) Michael Caine. T rivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com FILE PHOTOS Food vendors at this years Scallop Festival will sell goodies ranging from gelato to fried Twinkies, seafood tacos, chowder, gumbo and of course, scallops. The Kids Zone will be made up of four bounce houses. Kids can play all day for $5. See DUCKS B6 See SCALLOP B6 Event less than 1 month away

PAGE 12

B2 | The Star Thursday, August 21, 2014 Wy at t is a 40 lb 10 mo Cu r/ Te rr ie r Mi x. He is a lo w en er gy wi ll si t on co mma nd an d wa lks ve ry we ll on a le as h. On a re cen t tr ip to th e be ach Wy at t le arn ed to lik e th e wa te r an d lo ve s to ex plor e what is sw im min g ar ound He is cra te tr ai ne d an d ac co rd in g to hi s fo st er di d no t ha ve an y ac cide nt s in th e ho use whe n no t cra te d. He lo ve s ev er yo ne he me ets an d wo ul d mak e a gr ea t fa mi ly pe t. Wy at t ev en lik es oth er do gs an d ev en ki tt ie s. If yo u ar e unable to adop t at thi s ti me pe rh aps yo u co ul d fo st er or ma ke a Do nat ion Al l pe ts adop te d fr om SJ BHS wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc in at ion s an d sp ay ed /n eu te re d. Pl ease do no t he sit at e to em ai l tow nse nd .h sd ire ct or @ gm ai l. co m or ad o pt ba ys tj oe@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Huma ne So ci et y at 85 022 7-1 10 3 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at ww w. sjb hu mane so ciet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur sd ay -S at urd ay fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh elt er lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! LIVE ON TH E PO OP DECK BILL Y, JILLIAN & JUSTIN L AST CA LL SA TURD AY 9P M FRID AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M RAND Y ST ARK BO S PRING BAND ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON T HE PO OP DECK BILL Y, J ILLIAN & JUSTIN LA ST C ALL UPCOMING EVENTS ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S KARAOKE THURSD AY FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH NA TA LIE AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 45 18 65 3 Society Special to The Star The Bridge at Bay St. Joe has received accreditation for 2014 as a skilled nursing facility actively performing Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement activities. The accreditation, presented by independent accreditor Providigm, LLC, demonstrates that the facility is continually assessing residents quality of life with regard to concerns such as pain, dignity, respect for resident choice, and quality of care problems such as whether there are enough staff to meet resident needs, weight loss, infections, rehabilitation following acute injury or illness, and prevention of readmissions to hospital. The bridge at Bay St. Joe also received an Embracing Quality Award for Customer Satisfaction. This accreditation signies that The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is committed to continuously improving the care that they provide based on feedback from residents and families, says Dr. Andrew Kramer, Providigm CEO, and international expert on measuring quality of elder care. We congratulate The Bridge at Bay St. Joe on their commitment to improve the quality of life and care given to our elders. Unlike other such rating systems, the Providigm QAPI Accreditation is based on actions that Nursing Centers take to identify and correct quality problems. The methodology of QAPI is widely used in various health care settings, and is becoming a major focus of Nursing Home Regulation. We are extremely proud of the work our care team has accomplished to achieve this accreditation, said Ron Reid, CEO and Administrator at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe. We take quality seriously. We strive to give our residents the quality of life and level of dignity they deserve. For more about The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, visit www.bridgeatbaystjoe. com. For more about the Providigm Embracing Quality Awards and Accreditation, visit www.providigm. com/recognition. Special to The Star Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative Member Relations Specialist Lindsay Peak recently completed the Center for Development of Security Excellences JPAS/JCAVS Virtual Training for Security Professionals. The eight-hour course provided an overview of the Joint Personnel Adjudication System and a detailed explanation of its subsystem, the Joint Clearance and Access Verication System, used extensively by Department of Defense Personnel Security Managers and contractor Facility Security Ofcers. The target audience for the course is DoD civilian, military and contractor personnel who support the DoD Personnel Security Program. GCEC works with the Department of Defense through a utilities privatization contract at Tyndall Air Force Base. To successfully complete the course, Lindsay had to pass a nal exam. The Center for Development of Security Excellence provides security education and training to DoD security professionals through formal classroom and distributed learning methodologies (i.e., computer-based, webbased and tele-training). Pennies for Hope The Gulf Coast Hope Center, a non-prot agency serving the needs of individuals and families at risk is sponsoring a Pennies for Hope fundraising campaign. The Center is asking patrons of local businesses to consider placing their change into a water bottle found at the stores to support the mission of the Gulf Coast Hope Center. All donations will go toward the Centers mission of assisting those in need. Jars can be found at Piggly Wiggly, Gracies, Ace Hardware and St. Joe Bar. 2nd Infantry Division reunion Attention 2nd Infantry Division Veterans -The Florida Branch of the Second Indianhead Division Association will have its annual reunion in Titusville, Florida on October 17-19, 2014 at the Best Western Space Shuttle Inn. All veterans of the 2nd Infantry Division are invited. For more information, call Mike Davino at 919-498-1910 or send an email to 2ida. mail@charter.net. 2014 annual Noma community reunion The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building Saturday, Aug. 30. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon CT. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a welllled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. Anyone desiring additional information may contact Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. Scout news United Methodist Church sponsored Cub Scout Pack 347 and Troop 347 will be holding a new scout registration at 6:30 p.m. ET Aug. 25 at the Methodist Church at the corner of U.S. Highway 98 and Monument Avenue. The leaders from both units will be at the school the same day speaking with the boys to see who is interested. Applications will be available at the church when you show up with your son. Registration fee until the end of the year is $8. If you are unable to attend that evening or have any questions contact Cub Master Abby Cozine at 340-0960 or Scoutmaster Bill Van Der Tulip at 247-9091. Come join the fun. Senior Citizens meals programs Gulf County Senior Citizens at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe and 314 E. Third Street in Wewahitchka provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to meal sites. The senior center in Port St. Joe is in need of donation of bingo prizes for seniors that love to play bingo several times a week. Small inexpensive prizes or individual packages of cookies, crackers, chips, juice, etc. would be appreciated. The center is also looking for volunteers that might play piano, or who would like to call bingo or that might have other games in mind that seniors would enjoy. Call Debbie at 229-8466 for more information. Special to The Star A fundraiser will be held from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET on Friday, Aug. 22 at Carefree Consignment in St. Joe Beach for 3-year-old Stephen Weyard. Stephen was in a tragic accident which resulted in the loss of his leg, among other injuries. All money raised will go toward covering medical expenses. The Yikes Great Food truck will sell $5 hotdog plates. There will also be door prizes given away and a silent auction. Carefree Consignment is at 6518 U.S. 98, between Atlantic and Bay Street. Please come out and show your support. Society BRIEFS The Bridge at Bay St. Joe receives national accreditation S P E CI AL TO TH E STAR Fundraiser for Stephen Weyard Lindsay Peak earns certication THE PORT ST JOE STAR Like us on

PAGE 13

The Star| B3 Thursday, August 21, 2014 Implants & Cr ow ns Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Wi lliam C. Knapk e, DDS Gen er al De nt is t Pa nam a City Sq uar e 61 7 We st 23 rd Str eet Pa nam a Ci ty FL Ca ll Fo r In fo rm at ion 1-8 88336 -16 15 Fe es ef fe ctiv e thr ough 11 /2 1/14 Addition al fe es ma y be incurr ed depend ing on in div idu al cases Same-da y Cr ow n ser vice ma y no t be av ailable in cer ta in case s. Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Of ce #: (8 5 0 ) 87 26 1 5 5 Gr eat vs other Dent al pr ov iders 20144-4-T4 Single To oth Implant inc luding Cr ow n st ar ting at $ 1 89 5 De ntur e Im pla nts st ar ting at $ 1 59 5 Lo we r Ar ch $ 1 99 5 Sam eDa y Cr ow ns $ 69 5 Upper Ar ch EL EC T SA ND Y E QU IN N JR FO R GU LF CO UN TY CO MM IS SI ON DI ST RI CT 4 Pa id an d Ap pro ve d by Sa nd y E Qu inn Jr Special to The Star Faith Christian School is very excited to introduce four new faces in our faculty, staff, and board. Each new member brings fresh ideas and enthusiasm that is very contagious. We are so thankful for the Lords faithfulness in bringing these four wonderful, talented ladies to the ministry of FCS. First, Mrs. Heather Peacock has joined our faculty as the elementary/ middle school teacher of science and math. Mrs. Peacock is a native of Port St. Joe and a member of Long Avenue Baptist Church. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in middle school science and math from the University of West Florida in Pensacola, FL. Mrs. Peacock is anxious to begin her new career in Christian Education and is looking forward to meeting all of her new students and their families. Second, Mrs. Shanna Prine is our new Kindergarten teacher. Mrs. Prine received her elementary education degree from the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville, FL. Mrs. Prine is a member of Long Avenue Baptist Church where her husband is Senior Pastor. She is creative, fun, and her gentle spirit will be a great asset in the K5 classroom. Kindergarten students will be very happy and engaged during their year in Mrs. Prines class. Third, Mrs. Latisha Richards joins our team as our new school secretary. She will be the friendly voice on the phone, the smiling face in the front ofce, and will do her best to help all students and their parents stay informed and resolve any ofce issues during the school year. Mrs. Richards comes from Louisiana and has lived in Port St. Joe for the past 8 years. She is a member of Long Avenue Baptist Church where she is active in the nursery and childrens ministries. Finally FCS welcomes Mrs. Kay Geohagen. She has graciously agreed to serve the Lord as a board member. The Geohagens daughters attended FCS when they were elementary students and this family has been strong supporters of Christian Education and FCS ever since. We are privileged to welcome Mrs. Geohagen to the Faith Christian School family. TROY UNIVERSI T Y RECOGNIZES NEW SORORI T Y MEMBERS The Troy University Panhellenic Council held its largest ever Sorority Recruitment week Aug. 5-9 at the Troy Campus, with 310 women pledging Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Gamma Delta, Chi Omega, Kappa Delta and Phi Mu sororities. Local residents who pledged sororities this fall include: Lauren Costin of Port St. Joe, Alpha Delta Pi; Anna Haynes of Port St. Joe, Chi Omega; and Chandler Vines of Wewahitchka, Alpha Delta Pi. FREE BOOKS AVAILABLE A T P S J ES Port St. Joe Elementary School has free fourth-, fth-, and sixth-grade Storytown reading textbooks and Language Arts textbooks. The school is changing curriculum. There are lots of student textbooks, as well as teacher materials. If interested, please come by the school during normal school hours. After Labor Day, the remaining books will be disposed. School News Special to The Star Many of the Panhandle Area Educational Consortiums FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project participants will begin the academic year with new skills, developed through participation in one of the project-sponsored Summer Challenges. The Summer Challenges gave gifted and talented students in the consortiumserved small and rural districts opportunities to explore STEM content in depth, collaboratively problem solve and conduct investigations, enhance leadership skills and learn about STEM careers. STEM Scholars from Franklin and Gulf Counties participated in a fourday STEM experience, Surviving with Water AKA the 21st Century MacGyver, at the Advanced Technology Center located on the Panama City Campus of Gulf Coast State College. Associate Professor Antonio Adessi, Coordinator of Engineering Programs at GCSC and Associate Professor of Physical Science, Jamie Webb, challenged students to create, design and construct a solar desalinization device to extract fresh water from seawater and a personal water purication device to remove waterborne pathogens from drinking water. This challenge heightened student awareness of the scarcity of suitable drinking water from a global perspective as they were immersed in the work of a hydrologist. Collaborating as a team, students learned how to use computer modeling tools and 3-D printers to produce prototypes of their products. This engagement in an authentic STEM research experience, under the guidance of Professors Adessi and Webb, provided students with valuable information about potential STEM career options as they worked as a research team to creatively solve a real-world problem. School BRIEFS The Lions Tale HEA THER PEACOCK SHANNA PRINE KAY GEOHAGEN LA TISHA RICHARDS SP ECIAL T O T H E ST AR Students from Gulf County show off their solar desalinization devices. STEM scholars summer challenge

PAGE 14

FAITH Thursday, August 21, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Keep Your Eyes on Jesus If youre a born-again Christian, God has a job for you. Are you fullling your mission, Or do you know what to do? The word will tell you, If you seek youll nd. But too many times while seeking; Things like self get on our mind. To get self out of the way, We have to put Jesus rst. If you dont stay focused on Jesus, You had better get ready for the worst. Chastisement is sure to come, If we dont do what were told. Surely you remember in His word, How severely He can scold. So keep your eyes on Jesus, And what He would have you do. Youll then be a better witness, And very much happier too. Billy Johnson Special to The Star Strategies for coping with difcult times will be shared at 7 p.m. CT Monday, Aug. 25 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Bouncing Back: Turning Disasters Into Opportunities, features a screening of the awardwinning short lm Dancing Outside the Box. The lm features Ray Leight, whose near-fatal motorcycle accident left him permanently in a wheelchair. Youre 20 years old and think youve got your whole life ahead of you. The next thing you know, tubes are sticking out of you, and doctors are telling you they know how you feel. Let me take a baseball bat to you then youll know how I feel, Leight said. Leights months of depression turned toward hope when a friend invited him to attend a ballroom dancing class. Participants in the Lifetree program will explore how to overcome the challenges in their lives by applying the principles learned by Leight. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. SOUTHERLAND FA MIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 10 0 E 19 th St re et Pa na ma Ci ty Fl or id a Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. Fred Greer, age 83, of Wewahitchka, passed away Saturday, Aug.16, 2014, in Panama City. Fred was born in Glasgow, Ky., July 5, 1931, to the late Robert and Rebecca (Cook) McPherson. He served in the United States Air Force during the Korean conict and made Wewahitchka his home in 1956. Fred worked for St. Joe Paper Company and was a member of First Baptist Church of Wewahitchka where he served on the building and grounds committee. In his free time, he enjoyed shing and sports. Survivors include his wife of 59 years, Feraldine Greer of Wewahitchka; a son, Mac Greer and his wife, Susan of Summerville, S.C.; two grandchildren, Megan and Delainey Greer, also of Summerville, and a sister, Sandra Ladd of Antioch, Tenn. Funeral services were held 10 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 19, from the First Baptist Church of Wewahitchka with Reverend Mike Stroud ofciating. Interment will follow in Roberts Cemetery in Wewahitchka. The family received friends 6-8 p.m., Monday, Aug. 18 at the church. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. 6745449. Online condolences may be made at our website adamsfh.com. Fred Greer Mr. James Martin Kent, Sr., age 70 of Wewahitchka, passed away Friday, Aug. 8, in Panama City. James was born in Bay County and lived in Gulf County for most of his life. He retired from the railroad with 13 years of service. James, along with his companion, were owner and operators of an alligator processing plant along with other game. James dearly loved the outdoors, shing, hunting and nature. He helped raise a lot of children, calling them his own. He was loved by many family and friends and will be greatly missed by all. He was of the Baptist Faith. Survivors include companion of 27 years, Tarry Marshall of Wewahitchka; sons, James Martin Kent, Jr. and his wife Michele of Panama City, Christ Brand and his wife, Becky, of Wewahitchka, and Jason Brant and his wife, Kayla, of Port St. Joe; three grandchildren, Heather, Brandon and Lauren Brant. Funeral services were held Friday, Aug. 15, at Highland View Baptist Church in Port St. Joe with the Rev. Ben Armstrong ofciating. Internment followed at Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. The family received friends earlier in the day at Highland View Baptist Church. Arrangements were handled by Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown. James Martin Kent, Sr. Special to The Star The Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church cordially invites the community to attend the annual Mens Day celebration to be held at 11 a.m. ET on Sunday, Aug. 24. This years speaker will be the Rev. Donald Nickson from Body of Christ Church. Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church is located at 280 Avenue C in Port St. Joe. Come and be blessed. Overcoming difculties explored at Lifetree Caf Obituaries Annual Mens Day celebration WANT TO GO? WHAT: Annual Mens Day Celebration WHEN: 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 24 WHERE: Zion Fair Missinoary Baptist Church

PAGE 15

The Star| B5 Thursday, August 21, 2014 ARRH M A T E Y Y ou n g & Old e P i r a t e C r u ise TM h a s S o met h i n g fo r E v e r yo ne C r u ise A w a y i n t o t he F a n t a s y W o r ld of F r ie nd ly S w a shbuck le rs & P i r a t es 2H ou r C r u ises D o l p h in S i g h t ing s Gr ea t M u sic Co ld B e e r F u n fo r a l l a g es 5325 N o r t h La g o o n D r iv e, P a n a m a C it y F lo r id a 32408 L o c a t e d a t L ig h t hou se M a r i n a N ex t t o B o a t y a r d R es t a u r a n t 850.234.7400 Y E T A M ARRH T H E G R E A T E S T S I G H TS E E I N G A DV E N T U R E ... E V E R $1.00 Off Adult T ick et Se a Dr ag on Pir a t e Cr uise Located at Lighthouse Marina on Grand Lagoon Sea Dragon Pirate Cruise discount. Present coupon before purchase. L o c a t e d a t L ig h t h o u s e M a r in a N ext t o B ud & A l le y's NO TI CE OF IN TE ND ED AC TI ON TH E GU LF CO UN TY SC HO OL BO AR D Pu rp os e an d Ef fe ct : Th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d pr op os es to am en d an d ad op t po li ci es as pr ov id ed fo r in th e Ad mi ni st ra ti ve Pr oc ed ur es Ac t, fo r th e pu rp os e of br in gi ng sa id po li ci es in to co mp li an ce wi th Fl or id a St at ut es an d St at e Bo ar d of Ed uc at io n Ru le s. Su mm ar y: Th e fo ll ow in g is a br ie f de scr ip ti on of ea ch pr op os ed ch an ge 5. 32 Ze ro To le ra nc e fo r Sc ho ol Re la te d Cr im es Ec onom ic Im pa ct : Th es e pr op os al s ma y re su lt in di re ct co st s ass oc ia te d wi th im pl em en ta ti on IF RE QU ES TE D, A HE AR IN G WI LL BE HE LD AT : Ti me : 9: 00 AM ES T Da te : Au gu st 19 2 01 4 Pl ac e: Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Ro om 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Th e en ti re te xt of th e pr op os ed ru le s ca n be in sp ec te d du ri ng re gu la r of c e ho ur s at th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Of c e, 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Sp ec ia l le ga l au th or it y un de r wh ic h th e ad op ti on is au th or iz ed an d th e la w be in g im pl em en te d an d in te rp re te d is ma de sp ec i c. Th e ad di ti on an d ch an ge s ar e pr op os ed by Bi ll Ca rr As si st an t Su pe ri nt en de nt fo r Bu si ne ss Se rv ic es an d ap pr ov ed fo r co ns id er at io n by Ji m No rt on Su pe ri nt en de nt Am end me nt s: Se e ab ov e AUG. 11-17 On Monday, Aug. 11, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) executed two transport orders. Amanda L. Shipman (24) was transported from Gadsden Correctional Facility to the Liberty County Jail for her Aug. 12 court appearance in Gulf County. Corey R. Craig (33) was transported from the Gulf Correctional Institution to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) for his court appearance the following day. Both inmates were returned to their respective facilities on Wednesday, August 13th. Shipman was returned with the assistance of the GCDF. On Aug. 11, Deputy S. Willis responded to the 100 block of Conch Street in St. Joe Beach after the GCSO received a complaint of criminal mischief. The offense occurred at a construction site of a new residence. The complainant reported about $1,200 in damage. On Aug. 11, Investigator L. Greenwood arrested Stephanie D. Grimes (28) and Jonathan F. Sapp (30). The case stems from a complaint led with the GCSO on July 10, regarding a residential burglary in the 100 block of Audubon Lane in Wewahitchka. Grimes was charged with two counts of Burglary and Sapp was charged with one of count Burglary. Grimes remains in custody on a $20,000 bond and Sapp on a $10,000 bond. On Tuesday, Aug. 12, the GCSO assisted the GCDF in the transportation of female inmates from the Liberty County Jail to the GCDF. About 12 female inmates were due to appear in Circuit Court. On Aug. 12, Deputy P. Williams responded to the 700 block of 7th Street in Wewahitchka after the GCSO received a complaint of a theft. The complainant reported her air conditioning unit was stolen from her residence during the late evening hours. The unit was removed from a window of the residence. On Aug. 12, Deputy S. Ferrell served a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support on Johnny J. Jones (47) at the GCDF. Jones was taken into custody on August 8th, by the St. Petersburg Police Department in Pinellas County. Jones was extradited to the GCDF. He remains in custody on a $1,000 purge. On Aug. 12, Deputy S. Ferrell served a warrant on Carlos D. Rhodes (41) for Violation of Probation. Rhodes is on probation for a felony count of Driving While License Suspended/Revoked (DWLS/R). He turned himself in at the GCDF and posted a $1,500 bond. On Aug. 12, Deputy G. Skipper arrested Eugene P. Allen (28) at the Gulf County Courthouse on a warrant issued out of Calhoun County for Grand Theft. On Aug. 12, Deputy G. Skipper arrested Asia N. Whitley (21) at the Gulf County Courthouse. Whitley was wanted for Violation of Probation (VOP). She is on probation for Child Abuse. This is the second warrant served by the GCSO on Whitley for VOP. She remains in custody. On Aug. 12, the GCSO received a report of a theft from the 1200 block of West River Road in Wewahitchka. Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the call. The complainant reported the theft of a Chicago Electric 4.5 inch electric angle grinder. The tool was valued at about $29. On Wednesday, Aug. 13, the GCSO traveled to the Walton County Jail to extradite Daniel A. Peacock (35) back to Gulf County. Peacock was wanted on an arrest order for Failure to Appear on his charge of Disorderly Intoxication. He was taken into custody on August 11th in Walton County and was later released from the GCDF on August 16th. On Thursday, Aug. 14, Deputy M. Ward served Melissa R. Brewer (41) with two warrants for her arrest at the GCDF. The GCSO held two active warrants on Brewer for Workers Compensation Fraud and Grand Theft. Brewer turned herself in. She was rst appeared and given a conditional release. On Aug. 14, the GCSO received a complaint regarding criminal mischief. Deputy J. Oquendo responded to the 100 block of Tennessee Avenue in Wewahitchka. The complainant reported someone had attempted to enter a shed door by trying to pry it open. The screen to a window was also damaged. No entry to the building was made and nothing was stolen. On Aug. 14, the GCSO received a 911 call from the 700 block of West Creekview Drive in Stone Mill Creek. The residents arrived home and discovered the front door open. Deputy J. Oquendo responded to the call. It was determined no property was removed from the home, but that the front door was pried open. On Friday, Aug. 15, Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the 4300 block of State Road (SR) 71 North, in Wewahitchka, to assist a Department of Children and Family Services caseworker. While assisting the agency, Deputy Ferrell located a shotgun which was possessed by Anthony L. Turner (30). The investigation further revealed that the weapon was reported stolen to the GCSO in December 2013. Turner was placed under arrest and transported to the GCDF. He was charged with Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon and Grand Theft. Turner was later rst appeared and conditionally released. On Aug. 15, Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the 100 block of Henry Avenue in Wewahitchka after the GCSO received a complaint regarding the theft of tools. The complainant reported that a black and red toolbox was stolen from a shed on the property. The toolbox contained about $200 in hand tools. On Aug. 15, Deputy P. Williams served an arrest order on Kenneth M. Dunham (50) at the GCDF. The order was for Contempt of Court. Dunham was already in custody at the GCDF. On Saturday, Aug. 16, Deputy M. Layeld responded to the 200 block of West River Road in Wewahitchka. The GCSO received a complaint regarding shoplifting. The complainant reported that the suspect walked out of the store with a bag of potatoes and a pack of rib eye steaks. On Sunday, Aug. 17, Deputy M. Layeld responded to the 400 block of Ling Street in Highland View after the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance. At the conclusion of the investigation, Melanie M. Forston (38) was arrested for Domestic Battery. Forston was transported to the GCDF where she was later rst appeared and given a conditional release. On Aug. 17, Sgt. R. Burkett and Investigator L. Dickey assisted the Port St. Joe Police Department in an investigation regarding the theft of shing equipment. Deputies assisted the department in the execution of two separate search warrants within the City of Port St. Joe. Anyone with information regarding any of the above mentioned cases are asked to contact the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce at 850-227-1115, or remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 850-785-TIPS. From Aug. 11-17 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 71 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 38 calls for EMS, 14 calls for other departments/agencies and 10 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From Aug. 11-17 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/ Zone Checks, 121; Civil Paper Service, 63; Field Contact, 16; Trafc Stop, 12; Alarm, 7; Information, 7; Warrant Arrest, 7; Theft/Shoplifting, 6; Criminal Mischief, 5; Prisoner Transport, 5; Request for Security Checks, 5; Agency Assist, 4; Trafc Accident, 4; Welfare Check, 4; Unknown Disturbance, 3; Funeral Escort, 3; Reckless Driver, 3; Suspicious Person, 3; Abandoned Vehicle, 2; Domestic Disturbance, 2; Trespass, 2; Sexual Offender Reregistration, 2; Special Detail, 2; Suspicious Activity, 2; Animal Call, 1; Battery, 1; Deceased Person, 1; Disabled Vehicle, 1; Drunk Driver, 1; Hit and Run Accident, 1; Lost/Stolen Tag, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Harassing Phone Call, 1; Recovered Property, 1; and Suspicious Vehicle, 1. GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE, LA W ENFORCEMENT SUMMARY Special to The Star A Wewahitchka man was arrested Tuesday on burglary and grand theft charges. Daniel L. Kincaid, 30, was arrested after deputies responded to the area of Five Acre Farms after a 911 call. The caller said he observed someone coming out of his yard stealing items. The offense took place in the 3500 block of County Road 381 in Dalkeith. The suspect quickly left the property in a vehicle, which was described to the 911 operator and provided to deputies. The property owner attempted to keep the suspects vehicle in sight, but later lost it. Deputies patrolled the area the vehicle was last seen in and were provided information by a citizen on a possible location. The vehicle was located at Kincaids residence. During the investigation deputies located the stolen property in the back of the Kincaids vehicle and at his residence. The property recovered included two outboard motors, outboard motor parts, and other miscellaneous items that were valued at about $3,000. Kincaid was arrested and charged with Burglary of a Structure and Grand Theft. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility and is awaiting rst appearance. GCSO: Wewahitchka man arrested for grand theft Law Enforcement

PAGE 16

Local B6 | The Star Thursday, August 21, 2014 They do it at home and they want to give back, Jarosz said. And, maybe, for some in the community who have come to accept the presence of the new hos pital as a fact of life, those seasonal volunteers pro vide perspective. It is easy to forget how special some of the things we have are, Jarosz said. Those snowbirds remind us. They tell us that not all communities have a hospital like we do. They say not all communities have the kind of nice peo ple that are here. Ducks may be adopt ed for the Duck Derby with a donation of $10 for three ducks, $15 for six, or $25 for a ock of 12. To get your ducks in a row to swim in this race, please visit the hospitals gift shop or adopt online at www.duckderbysacred heart.com. To learn more about sponsorship of the Duck Derby, please visit on line www.duckderbysa credheart.com or contact Jarosz at 229-1531. For information on Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, please visit www.sa cred-heart.org/gulf. Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL ICE NSE D& IN SUR ED Cy nd y sh ome cl ea nin g, or ga ni zin g, an dp et si tt in g IN SU RE DA ND RE AD YT OH EL PY OU WI TH YO UR HOUS EO RP ET CA LL 85 050 270 06 OR EM AI L cy ndyly nne _79 @y ah oo .c om Gulf fr on tt op oor 2BD/2BA co ndo with panor amic view so ft he gulf .L ar ge open ki tc hen, living and dining ar ea with gr ea tv iew s. Th is spacious co ndominium fe at ur es gor geous hear to fp ine oors ,g ra nit ec oun te r to ps thr oughout ,s tainless ki tc hen applianc es and 10 fo ot ce ilings .F ur nished and re ady fo ry ou ting the people know why you are doing what you are doing, Kent said. Its about public access and the public understanding what you are doing. He was also instrumen tal in the creation of com munity gardens on several public schools. In Bay County, he and staff have worked to pro vide septic tank locations for all properties on the internet. He also has annual meetings with septic sys tem contractors on rule changes and permitting issues and initiated the countys rst project for working with community partners to identify and ad dress residents environ mental concerns. He has initiated com munity outreach into an underserved community and assisted law enforce ment in the disposal of dilapidated vehicles and cleaning of neighborhood trash. Programs have also in cluded urging residents to get out and walk. The Bay County Health Department has earned a 96.8 percent composite an nual score on a state evalu ation of programs for onsite sewage treatment and dis posal systems and earned the fourth highest score in the state on an evaluation of health programs. You look at the years of your life and people recog nizing you; that is appreci ated, Kent said. You work for the public and your col leagues recognize the work you do for the people; that is really appreciated. KENT from page B1 DUCKS from page B1 SCALLOP from page B1 Several rafes will take place throughout the day with drawings done on-site. The Port St. Joe Lions Club will rafe off a Plein Air painting completed dur ing the 2014 festival, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School baseball teams will rafe gas cards and Wewa hitchka Project Graduation will rafe off a car. Those interested claim ing a vendor spot at the festival should call the Chamber at 227-1223. For a current list of festival activi ties, visit the ofcial website at www.scallopfest.com.

PAGE 17

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 21, 2014 The Star | B7 33455S PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC MEETING OF THE AUGUST 26, 2014 PRIMARY ELECTION CANVASSING BOARD The Canvassing Board will meet at 10:00 AM EST on August 25, 2014 at the Supervisor of Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St. Joe, Florida. The Canvassing Board will meet to canvass the absentee ballots for the August 26, 2014 Primary Election and to receive queries from the public about absentee ballots. Absentee ballots for the August 26th Primary Election received prior to August 25, will be available for public inspection until 10:00 AM EST on August 25, 2014 at the Gulf County Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St. Joe, Florida. The canvassing board will reconvene on August 25, at 5:00 PM EST. Ballots received from August 25 through August 26, will be available for public inspection until August 26 at 5:00 PM EST when the canvassing board will reconvene. At 7:00 PM EST all remaining absentee ballots will be canvassed and tabulated. These meetings are open to the public. All interested parties are encouraged to attend. NOTE: Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes states that if a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. John M. Hanlon Gulf County Supervisor of Elections 401 Long Ave Port St Joe, FL 32456 Pub: August 21, 2014 33323S IN THE CIRCUIT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 14-05-PR IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOHN THOMAS AGURAS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOHN THOMAS AGURAS, Deceased, File Number 14-05 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmature, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 14, 2014. PETITIONER: Melissa L. Ramsey ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jeremy T.M. Novak Novak Law Offices 402 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Phone: (850) 229-4700 Fax: (850) 229-1148 August 14, 21, 2014 33509S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000112 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, Plaintiff, vs. LUANN M. QUARANTA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 14, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 23-2009-CA-000112 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, is the Plaintiff and LUANN M QUARANTA; WILLIAM C. QUARANTA, SR.; CAPITAL CITY BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 11th day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED THIRTY (130), UNIT NUMBER TWELVE (12), OF THE ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 13, 1982 IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 27 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2005 MARVIN AVENUE, PORT ST JOE, FL 324560000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on August 14, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. Mcghee-Collins Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. F09022212 August 21, 28, 2014 33527S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1339 Application No. 2014-33 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 06276-050R Description of Property: COMMENCING at the SW. Corner of Lot 49, Cape San Blas Gulfside and Bayside Subdivision, as per plat, thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 24 to 24C, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, thence North 20 Degrees 14 Minutes 55 Seconds West along the West line of said Lot 49, a distance of 108.00 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue North 20 Degrees 14 Minutes 55 Seconds West 108.00 feet; thence North 69 Degrees 45 Minutes 05 Seconds East 342 feet, more or less, to the approximate mean high water line of St. Joseph’s Bay; thence meandering Southerly, Southeasterly and Westerly along and with said approximate mean high water line to a point that bears North 69 Degrees 45 Minutes 05 Seconds East from the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence South 69 Degrees 45 Minutes 05 Seconds West 554 feet, more or less to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO: a Private Pedestrian Beach/Bay Easement dated July 30, 1990. Name in which assessed: Bobbi M. Walker All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 24th day of September, 2014. Dated this 19th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 21, 28, September 4, 11, 2014 33529S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank As Custodian for Caz Creek FL, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 863 Application No. 2014-34 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03426-530R Description of Property: COMMENCE at a concrete monument marking the Northwest Corner of the Northeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence go North 89 Degrees 30 Minutes 30 Seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 33, for 670.00 feet; thence South 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 67.60 feet to a point on the Southerly right of way line of a County Road (right of way as per field monumentation); thence continue South 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 420.00 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, go North 89 Degrees 30 Minutes 30 Seconds East for 210.00 feet; thence go South 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds East for 105.00 feet, thence go South 89 Degrees 30 Minutes 30 Seconds West for 210.00 feet; thence go North 00 Degrees 07 Minutes 40 Seconds West for 105.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Northeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, and having an area of 0.51 acre, more or less. ALSO, known as Lot 5. Name in which assessed: Glenn Earl Haney, III and Gail L. Haney All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 24th day of September, 2014. Dated this 19th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk August 21, 28, September 4, 11, 2014 33531S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2012-CA-000084 GMAC MORTGAGE LLC, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. FRANKLIN, KAREN K., et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA000084 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, and, FRANKLIN, KAREN K., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., on the 11th day of September, 2014, the following described property: WEST ONE-HALF OF LOTS 10 AND 12, BLOCK 66 OF PORT ST. JOE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK I, PAGES 19 AND 20, ALSO KNOWN AS WEST ONE-HALF OF LOTS 10 AND 12 IN BLOCK 66, ACCORDING TO OFFICIAL MAP NO. 12 OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 207 Sixteenth Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 15th day of August, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: B. McGhee-Collins Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaireed, call 711. File# 29039.0692 August 21, 28, 2014 95818S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000078 CAAXMX DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LEZLIE E. HOLLIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 29th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000078CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Lezlie E. Hollis, Billy Rich Wynn, Capital One Bank (USA), National Association, successor in interest to Capital One Bank, successor in interest to Capital One, F.S.B. are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 11th day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 3, BLOCK 14, PORT ST. JOE BEACH UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 58, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 248 SANTA ANNA ST PORT SAINT JOE FL 32456-6557 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 1st day of August, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw @albertellilaw.com File No.: 018707F01 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. August 14, 21, 2014 95884S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Section: Case No.: 23-2010-CA000281 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CYNTHIA J. ANDERSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; THE ESTATE OF HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON; DONALD G. ANDERSON; MIRANDA NICOLE ANDERSON NKA MIRANDA JARVIS; UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, LIENORS, AND OTHER PARTIES TAKING AN INTEREST UNDER HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON AKA HERSHEL D. ANDERSON; JAMES PRESTON HAMBRICK Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order On Motion To Cancel And Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated July 9, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 23-2010-CA-000281 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 11th day of September, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE (121), OF UNIT NO. NINE (9), ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION TO CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated at Port Saint Joe, Florida, this 8th Day of August, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk MORRIS, HARDWICK, SCHNEIDER, LLC ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF, 5110 EISENHOWER BLVD, SUITE 120, TAMPA, FL 33634 FILE NO.:FL-9700272310 August 14, 21, 2014 95922S IN THE FOURTEENTH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232013CA000063XXXXXX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLIE BLACK A/K/A CHARLES F. BLACK; ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY BY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated August 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 232013CA 000063XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and CHARLIE BLACK A/K/A CHARLES F. BLACK; DANA HUNT BLACK; SUNTRUST BANK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at at the Front Door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port Saint Joe, Florida 32457, 11:00 a.m. on September 11, 2014, following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 39, BLOCK A, SEA SHORES A/K/A PORT ST. JOE BEACH UNIT THREE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 34, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Port Saint Joe, Florida, on August 15, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk, Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1440-132959 August 21, 28, 2014 95924S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 23 2013 CA 000006 CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. WENDY R. MURNAN A/K/A WENDY R. WHITE, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 22, 2014 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Gulf, Florida, on September 11, 2014, at 11:00 AM, at Courthouse steps/lobby 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 for the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING RAILROAD SPIKE IN THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 71 MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 9.30 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECOND WEST A DISTANCE OF 1,600.30 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC, THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.44 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID ROAD, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 516.66 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 144.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 673.30 FEET TO AN EXISTING 2” IRON PIPE, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF

PAGE 18

B8| The Star Thursday, August 21, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 11 3 0 33 4 11 3 0 335 4 5 1 9 1 97 4 5 1 8 66 8 The Department of Health Has an Opening for a Family Support WorkerAnnual Salary 22,453.60 Qualications:€ High School Diploma or GED€ One year experience working with children/families€ Valid driver's license Please apply on-line at:peoplerst.myorida.com. Refer to requisition number 64085295-51262405-20140806094501 € Top Compensation € Competitive & New In-DemandŽ Products€ Large Provider Network € Industry Leading Sales Support € State of the Art Lead Management System € Leads and Dialer System € Agent Support to place cases Join Florida Blues progressive agents successfully selling in the Medicare & Health Care Reform markets.Call 855-669-4625 or email resume to info@flhealthconnector.com.Qualified agents only. AGENCY SALES OPENING Florida Health Connector, Inc.16500 Panama City Beach Pkwy, Ste. A-1Panama City Beach, FL 32413If you are currently appointed to sell individual products with Florida Blue, please disregard this advertisement. Flor ida Blue is an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. 81806-0814/81387-0614 Agt 11 3 1 89 6 4 5 1 88 0 2INTERESTED IN BECOMING A CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT(CNA) at no cost? Contact Marcia Dickey, RN at 850-229-8244 ext# 106 at the Bridge. Classes starting soon. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe 220 9th Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The Bridge at Bay is needing 2 full time Cooks and 3 Dietary AidesFor more information call 850-229-8244 4 5 1 88 0 8 6 5 1 9 4 79I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 6 5 1 9 4 8 0Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6 5 1 9 4 8 1$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6 5 1 9 4 82 6 5 1 9 4 83Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254 5 1 8379 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 416-J Marine St 1 bedroom 1.5 bath, furnished, on river with boatslip. 900.00 mo. No utilities. No pets. 5. 42-2 Carlton 2 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities No pets. 6. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 7. 39-1 Carlton 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 650.00 mo. Includes utilities up to 200.00. No pets. 8. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 9. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4 5 1 8 6 39 Medical/HealthCase Manager Review SpecialistHuman Services Agency is seeking a Clinical Case Manager to provide input and case oversight to a Juvenile Diversionary Alternative Program for arrested youths. Position will require travel throughout Pensacola, Panama City, and Tallahassee areas. The incumbent must have a master’s degree in a social or behavioral science and two years of experience in youth and family counseling. Familiarity with the juvenile justice system and community resources are preferred. Please note the position title for which you are applying on any correspondence. Qualified applicants must complete a DISC Village employment application and submit to: 3333 W. Pensacola St., Suite 330, Tallahassee, FL 32304. Applications may be downloaded at www .discvillage.com A separate application is required for each position applied for. EOE/Drug-Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34298165 339.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 586.33 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 230.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 197.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THIS PARCEL CONTAINS 5.15 ACRES MORE OR LESS AND IS LOCATED IN THE NORTH 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. COMMENCING AT AN EXISTING RAILROAD SPIKE IN THE C/L OF STATE ROAD NO. 71 MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 12, T5S, R1 OW, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 45’33” WEST A DISTANCE OF 9.30 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 34’09” WEST A DISTANCE OF 1,66.30 FEET TO A NAIL AND DISC, THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 5829” WEST A DISTANCE OF 18.44 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET ON THE WESTERLY RlOW OF SAID ROAD; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33’28” WEST ALONG SAID R/W DISTANCE OF 210.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND CALL THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 14 DEGREES 33’28” WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY R/W OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 306.66 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 12’01” WEST A DISTANCE OF 197.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 14 DEGREES 33’28” EAST A DISTANCE OF 230.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 28’51” EAST A DISTANCE OF 218.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING THIS PARCEL CONTAINS 1.21 ACRES MORE OR LESS AND IS LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, T5S, R10W, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. Dated: August 15, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A. 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850747-5717 or at ADARequest@jud14.flco urts.org, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 21, 28, 2014 95926S IN THE FOURTEENTH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232009CA000486XXXXXX DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE HARBORVIEW 2004-8 TRUST FUND, Plaintiff, vs. JAN M. PORTER A/K/A JAN PORTER; ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated August 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 232009CA 000486XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE HARBORVIEW 2004-8 TRUST FUND is Plaintiff and JAN M. PORTER A/K/A JAN PORTER; ROBERT M. PORTER A/K/A ROBERT PORTER; BARRIER DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at at the Front Door the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port Saint Joe, Florida 32457, 11:00 a.m. on the September 11, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF GOVERNMENT LOT 4, IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 12 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF GOVERNMENT LOT 2 IN SAID FRACTIONAL SECTION 36, FOR A DISTANCE OF 1200.00 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF GOVERNMENT LOT 2, RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 47 MINUTES, 36 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 359.73 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF PARKSIDE CIRCLE AND ITS PROJECTION FOR A DISTANCE OF 461.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 220.64 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 75 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 220.64 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 32 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 205.04 FEET ) TO A POINT ON A COMPOUND CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 145.00 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 66.49 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 83 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 65.91 FEET) THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 17.79, THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR 6.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING. THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR 42.50 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR 16.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 09 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR 42.50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR 16.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Port Saint Joe, Florida, on August 15, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk, Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954) 564-0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com File No. 1463-70007 August 21, 28, 2014 St. Joe Beach: 206 Coral Dr, Saturday, Aug 23, 8am-5pmEstate Sale5 Rooms of Furniture, Vacuum Cleaner, Lawn Mower, & Lots More. txt FL98250 to 56654 GUN SHOW PENSACOLA FAIRGROUNDSAugust 23rd & 24th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL97098 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $443/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Carefree Consignmen tOpening Saturday 6518 Hwy 98, St Joe Beach. Call Now to Reserve Your Space! 850-340-0263 EducationAssistant Coordinator for Preschool Home Instruction Program Needed .For more information, visit www.paec.org and click on Job Vacancies Web ID#: 34297722 Text FL97722 to 56654 EducationHome Visitors for Preschool Instruction Program Needed .For more information, visit www.paec.org and click on Job Vacancies Web ID#: 34297721 Text FL97721 to 56654 HospitalityNOW HIRING Reservationist and MaintenanceTo apply visit one of our offices at 1200 Hwy 98 in Mexico Beach or 4693 Cape San Blas Rd in Cape San Blas Web Id 34297340 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Port St Joe 2Bd 1.5Ba Apartment, New Appliances/Washer/Dryer. Close to everything! 2 minutes to downtown, St Joe Bay, Marina, & Beaches. $850/mo and All Utilities. 1yr Lease 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL96334 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts R.E. Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Bryk FlooringWood Floor, Carpet, & Tile Installation, Carpet Cleaning. No Job Too Small! Reasonably Priced. 850-381-5333 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.