The star

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Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03955


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classied deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 76, NUMB ER 44 Thursday, AUGUST 14, 2014 OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM TOURNAMENT RULES & INFORMATION Submit one completed entry form for each individual entrant along with full entry fee. Entry fee to be paid in cash checks or credit cards will not be accepted. Indicate Open or Junior Division by checking the appropriate box below. Your contact information is for official tournament use only and will not be shared. Open Division $50.00 Junior Division $20.00 REGISTRATION & CHECK-IN Entrants must be properly registered, checked-in and paid in full prior to fishing to be eligible for any prize. Every entrant must register, check-in and pay in person Friday, August 15, 2014 at the Port St. Joe Marina between 9:00am and 5:00pm, between 5:00pm and 9:00pm at the Dockside Tiki Bar (Captains Party), or between 5:00am and 11:00am on August 16, 2014 under the Port St. Joe Marina tournament tent. CHECK-IN IS MANDATORY FOR EVERY ANGLER! DIVISIONS & ENTRY FEES Entrants must register to compete in one Division only. Open Division: all anglers male and female regardless of age $50.00. Junior Division: anglers male and female below 16 years of age $20.00. Entry fees are non-refundable. All entrants can weigh fish in every category within their division. FISHING SCHEDULE Fishing begins at first light on Saturday morning, August 16, 2014. Weigh-in begins at 4:00pm EST that afternoon. Anglers must be in line to weigh by 6:00pm EST on Saturday, August 16, 2014. The Bayou Bash will not be postponed due to adverse weather/sea conditions, and will be rescheduled only in the event of a hurricane. TACKLE & METHODS Fish must be taken via hook and line by a single angler. Spearing, gigging, netting and other fishing methods are prohibited. Evidence of prohibited methods will result in disqualification. HANDLING & FRESHNESS Every fish weighed will be inspected by tournament officials. Fish must be fresh, intact and caught between first light and 6:00pm on August 16, 2014 with no evidence of spearing or weight tampering. Anglers are responsible for removing all foreign objects from fish including leaders, hooks, baits, ice, weights, etc. Fish judged in violation by tournament officials will be disqualified. TAKE GOOD CARE OF YOUR FISH! Protests and/or appeals will not be entertained. TIES In the event of a tie in any category, prizes will be split evenly. SAFETY & CONDUCT Participants are expected to follow laws and rules for safe boating and the taking of marine fish. Sportsmanship and courtesy are the rule of the day. Illegal conduct or violation of rules will result in disqualification. Fish sharing and teaming up are prohibited. LIABILITY All entrants participate in the Bayou Bash at their own risk. Officials, sponsors, host facilities and all other persons and entities directly or indirectly connected with the operation of the Bayou Bash are exempt from any liability for loss, damage, injury, negligence, or harm to any entrant, their companions or other participants, boat captains, crew members, vessels, or equipment which may occur during the tournament. Participation in the Bayou Bash constitutes acceptance of these terms. NAME AGE HOME ADDRESS PHONE EMAIL EMERGENCY CONTACT EMERGENCY CONTACT PHONE CATEGORIES & PRIZES CATEGORY OPEN DIVISION JUNIOR DIVISION Speckled Trout Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Redfish Winners determined by most spots on a single slot-sized fish. Flounder Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Pompano Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Spanish Mackerel Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Catfish Winners determined by aggregate weight of all catfish caught. 1st $1000 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $500 2nd Silver Prize Pack 3rd $300 3rd Bronze Prize Pack 4th $200 5th $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 3rd $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 3rd $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 3rd $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 2nd Silver Prize Pack 3rd $100 3rd Bronze Prize Pack 1st $300 1st Gold Prize Pack Bayou Bash officials may amend or remove any category from competition, without notice, at any time to comply with federal or state requirements. Based on 120 registered Open Division anglers. P LEASE SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY FORM AND ENTRY FEE ( CASH ONLY ) AT R EGISTRATION & C HECK IN S EE T OURNAMENT R ULES & I NFORMATION ( BELO W, RIGHT ) FOR TIMES AND LOCATIONS Bayou Bash Saturday B1 Opinion ................................. A4 Outdoors ............................... A8 Sports ..................................... A9 Scene Around ...................... A10 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B5 Classieds ........................ B7-B8 Teachers return; students join them Monday By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Saying a new school year will bring changes was clich years ago. But really, the year about to start brings signicant chang es to Gulf County Schools. Teachers got the year roll ing Monday, enjoying a morn ing county-wide celebration at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School sandwiched between time spent networking within schools and getting class rooms ready. This is my fourth year, and this is the rst time weve had this opportunity to all get together, Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton said. Students will arrive back Monday. The changes begin in the classrooms, where the district will welcome 11 new teachers, with another position at Wewa hitchka Elementary School to be lled. The number of new teach ers is almost double each of the past three years. In addition, none of the four public schools begins the year with the same top administra tor as one year ago, though each new principal will be a familiar face. Jay Bidwell, who became principal at WES in January, moves to the junior/senior high school as Lori Price moves to the district ofces. Tracy Bowers, district Teacher of the Year last year, goes from a classroom at WES to the front ofce as principal. In Port St. Joe, Sandra Cook, who has spent the past four Early voting begins Saturday By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The election season begins Satur day with the start of the 10-early vot ing period leading up primary Tuesday, Aug. 26. Gulf County voters will have 10 days to be the early worm for the fall elec tion season, with primary elections in both parties, local, regional and state, as well as universal primary and a non partisan election. Just bring your identication. All they really need is a photo and signature ID, Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon said. We are geared up. A universal primary occurs when all candidates running for a single of ce are from the same party. In such instances, there is no primary, and all voters cast ballots on that race, which is decided in the Aug. 26 primary. That is the case for the Dis trict 4 seat on the Board of County Commissioners. Affordable housing project on go By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com A shot in the dark turned into a bit of needed light for a project to bring af fordable housing to Gulf County. Mark Du Mas, president and found er of The PACES Foundation, informed the Board of County Commissioners Tuesday that an application for loan dol lars to construct affordable housing had been approved by the governors ofce. The Gulf County project was one of just four that received federal HOME funds. The award was $5.5 million and will be used to build 50 townhouse-type units on a 40-acre parcel in the city of Port St. Joe off Clifford Sims Road. The funds are distributed to the states by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Gov. Rick Scott, after lobbying from the Legislatures small county caucus, recommended that the states allot ment be prioritized for projects to bring affordable housing to smaller, more ru ral counties, Du Mas said. Du Mas noted that in the past, more than 90 percent of Florida housing funds end up in larger counties such as Orange, Miami-Dade, Broward and Duval. Schools kick off year with open houses By WES LOCHER 229-7843 | @PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Those summer days are winding down. Monday, Aug. 18, is the big day for those students returning to school around Gulf County. WEWAHITCHKA ELEMENT ARY At Wewahitchka Elementary School, the school day runs 7:50 a.m. to 2:40 p.m. CT. An open house for students and parents will be 5:45-7 p.m. CT on Thursday, Aug. 21, in the cafeteria. There, Principal Tracy Bowers and her faculty will discuss with attendees their mission statement and goals for the new school year. Were looking forward to a wonderful school year, Bowers said. POR T ST. JOE ELEMENT ARY At Port St. Joe Elementary School, the school day runs 7:45 a.m. to 2:50 p.m. ET. Orientation for Pre-K students will be 2-2:30 p.m. ET today, Aug. 14. On Friday, Aug. 15, orientations will be every hour with kindergarten at 8 a.m., rst grade at 9 a.m., second grade at 10 a.m., third grade PHOTOS B Y W E S L OCH ER | The Star After being welcomed back from summer break Monday at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, Gulf County teachers had time to network with other faculty members in their disciplines. See EARL Y VOTING A2 BACK TO THE BOOKS 2014 GULF COUNTY PREPS FOR SCHOOL YEAR See HOUSING A5 See OPEN HOUSE A5 Principals of the Gulf County Schools Jay Bidwell (Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School), Tracey Bowers (Wewahitchka Elementary School), Dr. Sandra Cook (Port St. Joe Elementary School) and Duane McFarland (Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School) were welcomed by administrators and staff. Below former director of special education Deborah Crosby brought out the team spirit in the teaching staff with some cheerleading. See TEACHERS A5

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 14, 2014 Sandy Quinn is challeng ing one-term incumbent Commissioner Tan Smiley. Whoever emerges with the most votes Aug. 26 and all voters in that dis trict can cast ballots will sit in the District 4 chair the next four years. The nonpartisan race is for the District 2 seat to the Gulf County School Board. All school board races are nonpartisan in Florida, meaning there is no prima ry and all District 2 voters can cast a ballot in the race, which pits political new comers James Taunton and Brooke Wooten in a race to succeed George Cox, who is retiring. The other local race of note is in the Republi can race for the District 2 Board of County Commis sioners seat. Tom Semmes, who won the GOP primary four years ago, faces Vicki Ad kison Armstrong. The winner will face one-term incumbent Com missioner Ward McDaniel, a Democrat, and former commissioner Billy Tray lor, running with no party afliation after losing to Semmes in the GOP pri mary four years ago, on the November ballot. Beyond those races, primary voters will see an array of races for governor, lieutenant governor and Florida attorney general, as well as a primary for cir cuit court judge. Early voting contin ues through Aug. 23 at the Supervisor of Elec tions Ofce, 401 Long Ave. in Port St. Joe, and the Charles Whitehead Public Library meeting room in Wewahitchka. Each weekday, early voting hours are 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET (6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT). On the two Saturdays, Aug. 16 and 23, hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET (7 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT). On the one Sunday, Aug. 17, hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET (9 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT). Voters in Port St. Joe are urged to park along the Fourth Street entrance to the Supervisor Elections Ofce and use the new ear ly voting entrance. Whatever location you have set up for early vot ing, that becomes a polling place, Hanlon said. Now we have created that sepa rate polling place (in Port St. Joe). Early voters are asked to park in front of the ear ly voting door on Fourth Street or park on Long Av enue and walk around to the early voting entrance. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com If at rst. The Gulf County School Board decided Monday to put the old Highland View Elementary School site on the market as district of cials try to shore up a seep ing budget with an asset no longer part of the districts inventory. Last summer, school board members formally declared the land surplus with an eye toward sell ing the property, which is zoned for mixed-use residential/commercial. However, after garnering no interest from potential buyers, the district backed up, went out for a new ap praisal of the property and, Monday, adopted a formal process for divesture. Most importantly, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, the school board provided some fuel and buy-in to selling the property to bring much needed, though nonrecur ring or one-time, dollars into the general fund. The importance of sell ing that property is to have a little bit of safe footing go ing into the budget for next year, Norton said. It is a safety issue for a lot of is sues we are going to face. Norton said the district budget has eroded steadily over the past seven years, and the district had re duced its unrestricted fund balance to the minimum al lowed by law, 3 percent. Having cut staff and dol lars from the budget for sev en consecutive years, there was little room to wiggle. And in two years, the school board must decide whether or not to ask vot ers for a third time to fund a one-mill additional oper ating levy that essentially foots the bill for teacher salaries, Norton said. The sake of this dis trict is contingent on selling this property, Norton said. Weve got to have it sold. If we werent as tight on our margins as we are, maybe we could wait for a better price, but the price is where we are. The rst step outlined by attorney Charles Cos tin was to set a fair market value for the property, effec tively a benchmark to frame bidding and negotiations. The district will adver tise for sealed bids and open those bids. If the bids meet or exceed the mar ket value set by the school board, Costin said, go with the high bidder. If the bids are below the value set by the board, ne gotiate with bidders for a price within a stated range. Arriving at those num bers proved the tough nut. The school board had the chance to unload the property, estimated to be worth several million dol lars at the time, in a bull real estate market more than a decade ago. However, as board chair man Linda Wood noted Monday, at the time North Florida Child Development Inc. and its Head Start pro grams occupied the build ing, and the board did not want to displace children in that program. What were we going to do the children? Wood said. We decided not to sell because of those children. In addition, that ap praisal was rendered all but meaningless with the decline in property values over the past seven to eight years. After NFCD left for its new school three years ago, the property was sub sequently re-appraised for $900,000 to $1 million. Matt Terry appraised the property again in Feb ruary and reached a price of $710,000 based on like sales of which there were few in the county since 2006 and $500,000 for a short-sale or liquidation-type of sale. Somewhere in between is where the sale price will occur, I think, Norton said. Norton also noted the district lacks the funds to improve the property or building, which has a roof that is falling in. He said the cost of demolition has been estimated at $100,000, again the money the district does not have. Would it bring a better price in the future? Maybe. The district, Norton said, could not afford to wait. And board member Billy Quinn Jr. said he was stuck on a price of $1 mil lion and moved the board set that, instead of $710,000, as the fair market value and use that gure as the start point in advertising for pro posals and negotiations. Wood dissented on the motion, which passed 31 (board member John Wright was not present). We ems Memorial Rehab Car e of fers in-patient re habilitative services, designed to impr ove function and maximize potential for re tur ning to home, school, work, and the community Our team customizes each patient s car e to meet both patient and family needs. We ar e committed to re tur ning those individuals who have been impair ed by accident or disease to their highest level of independence. Re hab Re stor e, Re turn to Home Call To day (850 ) 653-8853 135 Av enue G, Apalac hicola We ems Memorial Re hab Car e Yo ur Jour ney Back Home NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 8/31/2014 CODE: SJ00 Digital Account Ex ecutiv e The Ne ws Herald is seeking a Digital Account Ex ecutiv e. To ap pl y, send rsum to LGrimes@pcnh.com The quali ed candidate will need experience in: Quali cations needed: Duties will include: EARLY VOTING from page A1 School Board puts Highland View on market WES LOCHER | The Star Empty now for almost three years, the old Highland View Elementary School is decaying with trees falling atop the structure and ceilings reportedly falling in. TIM C ROF T | The Star Early voters in Port St. Joe are urged to use the new Fourth Street entrance to the Supervisor of Elections Ofce.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 14, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The insurance battle over the Parker House has ended. After voting last month to halt progress on con structing a new city hall, pending legal review of the contract with Cathey Construction, the Mexico Beach City Council formal ized its vote at Tuesdays regular monthly meeting. Councilman Jack Mullen reported that the claim on the Parker House property had ofcially been settled and the city received its insurance monies totaling $801,590. The city purchased the Parker House property in 2011 for use as a new city hall but the building caught re several days later. Af ter a three-year battle with the insurance company to receive funds for damages and rent reimbursement on a temporary city hall, the settlement is complete. The city has been paid, we have the check and our discussions and claims are settled, Mullen said. The claim didnt provide adequate funds to cover construction of a planned city hall building on the Parker House property which spurred workshop discussions to scrap the project entirely. At the councils request city attorney Paul Kom arek examined the exist ing contract and offered the council its cancellation options. Komarek said that the contract was merely a request for qualications led in 2011 and contained many blank sections for prices, times and deliveries for constructing a new city hall. Its a piece of paper that says its a contract, Kom arek said. The situation changed entirely and this was unforeseeable to us. In my opinion, its not a true contract. Komarek told the coun cil he believed the contract could be safely canceled without penalty. During a special meet ing last month, Council woman Tanya Castro ex pressed concern that in the case of cancelation, the project would need turned over to the second bidder, Southern Cat. Komarek said that since the document with Cathey Construction wasnt an of cial contract that would not be the case and rec ommended the city send Southern Cat an ofcial letter to let them know of the decision to cancel the project. The next step is for the city to do whatever it wants to do to build a new city hall, Mullen said. According to the city clerk, Cathey Construction led an invoice, though the council members said they didnt know what it was for or for how much. Castro said it may be a consulting fee for the project. If someone did what you asked them to do, youre obligated to pay it, Komarek said. Mullen called for a work shop to discuss the project further. The meeting will be scheduled after the invoice had been reviewed. Councilman Jeff Tendler made a motion to cancel the contract with Cathey Construction and start over on the project which passed 3-1 with Mullen dissent ing and Mayor Al Cathey abstaining. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m To bid or not to bid that was the question before Port St. Joe city commissioners last week. With still another offer on the table regarding the cost of garbage service, commissioners were di vided whether to move forward or if they even could move forward. With the city attorney recom mending a new path while two commissioners believed theyd reach the end of the road, commis sioners again delayed, for the third meeting in a row, a decision on their solid waste contract. The trail on which commission ers now travel was not even one of their making. Rewind to spring and the Board of County Commissioners, con tinuing a discussion of more than a year, went out for bids on a solid waste contractor. County ofcials asked the city to join the process as prelude to a move to mandatory countywide garbage pickup. Bids were submitted by Waste Pro, Port St. Joes current hauler, and Waste Management based on a city/county contract and city-only collection. The BOCC, then a customer of Waste Management, chose to en ter into a new contract with Waste Pro, but only for collection in unin corporated Gulf County. The BOCC also abandoned its direction toward countywide man datory garbage pickup. After putting off implementa tion last year, the BOCC has not revisited a compromise proposal to put a referendum on the fall ballot pertaining in a one penny sale tax to underwrite a move to manda tory garbage pickup. The BOCC now proposes to undertake a study to justify estab lishing a Municipal Benet Taxing Unit and countywide tax collection for mandatory pickup. For Port St. Joe ofcials, how ever, the countys effort led to ad ditional discussion over contract numbers with Waste Management and Waste Pro even though the citys contract with Waste Pro was not up until Oct. 1, when it is open for renegotiation. That discussion was spurred by the initial proposal from Waste Management, which provided cost savings to the city. Also in the mix for commission ers was an uptick in customer com plaints, attributed largely to Waste Pro expansion in the region. What followed over the ensu ing weeks were proposals and counters from each company, with Waste Pro ultimately matching the cost numbers provided by Waste Management. Last week commissioners con sidered additional issues beyond the price tag. Most prominently, the citys transfer station off Industrial Road. Waste Management proposed to continue operations at the sta tion, but Waste Pro, which is com mitted to constructing a new trans fer station at Five Points Landll as part of its contract with the BOCC, would provide monthly rental for the city station but operate out of Five Points. While Waste Pro has indicated it would have the transfer station built by Jan. 1, when Five Points Landll is scheduled to close, com missioners and city staff were con cerned about potential costs the city currently pays $60 a ton at Five Points if the new transfer station is not built. The two main concerns staff has is service and the transfer station, said city manager Jim Anderson. Ralph Wilson with Waste Pro said the company had worked on the numbers in good faith and noted there was an existing agree ment with the city. He questioned the need for two transfer stations in a small county, but said the com pany would work out details in good faith. I think you guys will step up when we need you to, said Com missioner Bo Patterson, who moved to accept the current pro posal from Waste Pro. Lynn Yort with Waste Manage ment said the company has also dealt in good faith and asked for additional time to respond to the latest offer from Waste Pro. While she previously believed there was no need to bid the con tract, Yort said she was not sure now. This whole process has been a bit off, Yort said. And that process was the pri mary concern for city attorney Tom Gibson. He questioned whether com missioners had not established a trail that could lead to a lawsuit from whichever hauler is not the citys as of Oct. 1 due to a poten tial bending of the rules on bidding such contracts. Every time we get a price from either company the numbers go down, Gibson said. We may be forced to bid. Mayor Mel Magidson said he was concerned how commissioners reached this point, from a BOCC/ city joint bid to ongoing discussions between the companies and city of cials and staff over prices and de tails of service; effectively informal bidding which might violate rules. The dilemma is the corner we have painted ourselves into, he said. My concern is that we are possibly on thin ice. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said he felt that residents and commis sioners would be more comfortable if the contract was bid out, provid ing the specic specications com missioners wanted from their solid waste hauler. Commissioner William Thurs bay seconded Pattersons motion to accept Waste Pros latest offer, but Magidson, Buzzett and Com missioner Phil McCroan dissented, saying they wanted more time to examine the citys options. Gibson said he would also re search whether commissioners, at this point, should put the contract out for formal bid. What does this guy have to do with your electricity ? gcec PowerSouth s Ener gy Sour ces (2013) 64.8% NA TURA L GAS 5.3 % HYD RO 0.3% RENE WA BLES 29.6% COAL In 2013, 95 per cent of our members electricity was made using fossil fuels like coal and natural gas. Ba y, Gu lf Hol me s & Wa sh in gt on RT P Mee ti ng Th e Ba y, Gu lf Hol me s an d Wa sh in gt on Re gi ona l Tr an sp or ta ti on Pa rt ne rs hip (R TP ) wi ll hol d a pu bl ic me et in g at 10 am (C en tr al ), Au gu st 18 20 14 at th e Wa sh in gt on Cou nt y Ad mi ni st ra ti ve Bu il di ng, 13 31 So ut h Bl vd in Ch ipl ey Th e RTP wi ll co ns ide r: mo di fy in g th e Tr an sp or ta ti on Re gi on al In ce nt iv e Pr og ram (T RI P) pr oj ec t ran ki ng cri te ri a; add in g Sc ot ts Fe rr y Roa d, pa rt s of CR 38 9 in Ba y Co un ty an d CR 383 in Gu lf Co un ty to th e RT P Re gi on al Ne tw or k Ma p; ado pt io n of po li cy fo r fe de ral tr an sp or ta ti on fu nd in g le gi sl at ion ; al te rn at iv e me et in g lo ca ti on s; an d an up da te on TR IP pr oj ec ts Fo r a co mp le te ag en da, vis it www .w fr pc .o rg Pu bli c pa rt ic ip at io n is so li ci te d wi th ou t re ga rd to ra ce col or na ti on al or ig in se x, ag e, re li gi on di sa bili ty or fa mi ly st at us Re as on ab le acco mm od at io ns wi ll be ma de fo r ac ce ss in ac cord an ce wi th th e Am eri can s wi th Di sa bili ti es Act Co nt ac t Br an di Wh it eh ur st 80 022 689 14 x2 04 Po r fa vo r a la Sr Da n De an da de lo s re qu is to s de ac ce so o el id io ma en el 80 099 587 71 ex t. 22 7 o 180 099 587 71 pa ra TT YFl or id a al me no s 48 ho ra s de an te la ci on To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL Commissioners painted into corner on solid waste Mexico Beach council cancels city hall contract

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Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, August 14, 2014 A Section I was sneaking a French fry from my granddaughters Happy Meal in Andalusia, Alabama, when I saw the tattoo. It was high up on the forearm, about where I always wanted mine to be. The owner was an older gentleman, a farmer for sure. His overalls and work boots had the authentic stamp on them. He nodded as he passed, completely oblivious to the trip he was sending me on. Only two things kept me from getting a tattoo back in my high school days. They cost money and we didnt have a tattoo parlor in town. Daddy might have been a third reason but the rst two made the latter unnecessary! I tried. Wed take a ball point pen in study hall in the ninth grade and draw crossbones on our arms. The sinking ship was out because Mrs. Ingram wouldnt let you take your shirt off in the library. And neither me, Hollis or Ricky Lynn could draw a snake or a snorting bull worth a hoot. We were reduced to coming up with slogans or cool sayings to dash across the skin. I experimented with Eat My Dust, East of Eden and You Aint Nothing But A Hound Dog. But my favorite, then and now, was always Momma, Youre The Most! I inked on several that freshman year. But permanent ink aint too permanent on your left forearm, especially if you have football or basketball practice right after school. By the time we got home in the evening it would mostly be a faded mess. You couldnt even impress your little brother, much less Bonnie, Ann Carol or Susie Cozart with convoluted bluish streaks across your arm! Brewer said we might be able to get a tattoo in the back room of Ed Newballs Recreation Center. I thought he was kidding. But he insisted that you could get anything you wanted back there. Recreation Center was a fancy name for pool hall. And I never went in the place for two reasons. It cost money to play and I wasnt tough enough to hang around in there. My Daddy might have been a third reason but the rst two.. A tattooed baseball bat in motion with a ball careening over the left eld wall would have been special. Alfred E. Neumans oversized head with What, Me Worry? underneath was kicked around by all of us. A favorite coon dog barking up a tree would have been a winner. Flowers or two headed monsters were not so high up on our list. And inking on your best girlfriends name would have been very risky at our age. The Andalusia farmer got his own fries and steered his way over to a booth near us. I nished my drink, waited patiently for Addison to chew the last of her apples, and pondered deeply on exactly when, why and how my new friend came to tattoo Born to Lose on his arm. This wasnt no study hall drawing. It was professionally done with red and green curly cues running around the distressed message. Me and Hollis would never have thought of something like that! Maybe Born to Win, Born to be Wild, Born Happy, Lucky to be Born, Born to grow up and marry Mary Hadley Hayden.Life was just too endearing, even to little high school punks, to toss it off with such a depressing slogan. Life is full of twists and turns. And some heartbreak, I will admit. But to start out thinking you dont have a chance would be giving up before the horses got to the starting gate. I know about that glass half full and/or half empty thing. But to stick Born to Lose in way past permanent ink on your arm was not seeing any water at all! Or hope. Or light. Or much of a future A Ray Cunningham fastball drilled me in the left shoulder in my rst ever Little League game. It almost killed me! He struck me out the next two at bats. I lost a y ball in the lights and threw to the wrong base on the only other hit out to right eld. We got beat ten to nothing! I was dejected. Sad. Mad. Embarrassed. But it never crossed my eight year old mind that I was Born to Lose. I was just proud to be in the game. And as Daddy said, Son, your career can only go up from here. Listen, I dated a girl back in my college days whose father owned miles and miles of rich bottomland. They lived in a near bout castle! And, as a special added attraction, this girl was beautiful. I was majoring in marrying right up to the semester where she told me to get lost. I was going to have to work for the rest of my life! I was down..but not out! Maybe I could nd a girl with a rich grandfather who was feeling poorly! I have never considered my birth as a detriment to my life. My heart went out to this man Id never met. He missed something along the way. And I gave Addisons beautiful little hand a reassuring squeeze as we crossed the parking lot toward our car. Respectfully, Kes Noting it many times before, I love going to the Farmers Market, talking to folks, studying vegetables and getting my boiled peanuts. On this particular Saturday morning, our weather was not so good it was starting to rain and I needed to pick up the things that I could not live without on this particular day. To be speci c, I wanted a patty pan squash, some green tomatoes and a couple of bags of boiled peanuts. As the rain started to drizzle down, I found three nice green tomatoes and one perfectly sized patty pan squash. Patty pan squash look a little like an in ated ower and they grill up real nice. All I needed to pick up was my boiled peanuts. I wanted two bags, because it seems I never have enough once I get home with them. Breakfast was bearing on my mind. I was going to walk over to the coffee house in town and have a concoction of stone ground grits with country ham and cheddar jack cheese mixed in them. They top this mixture with poached eggs. Im not a very good egg poacher, but I do enjoy them so I was looking forward to breakfast. These folks grits are good too; good grits are hard to nd. As I started toward my peanut farmers canopy to pick up my most desired purchase of the day, I noticed a fellow standing there talking (to my boiled peanut provider). It was raining; this fellow was not buying anything. The peanut farmer is there to sell and to keep his tractors running and pay the light bill. I enjoy talking to folks as much as anyone, but I am not going to block a sale by standing there chewing the cud. Trying to be nice, I gave this fellow a minute; I was hoping he would move on. He did not. I was getting wet and I wanted my boiled peanuts and I wanted my poached eggs over real grits speckled with ham and cheese. So I made my move. The farmer knows me he knows that I want to buy his boiled peanuts. He was being nice, pretending to listen to this cud chewing fellow. Where I live, it is easy to identify some folks. I know it is not nice to pro le people, but sometimes it is necessary. There are people from here, there are people who moved here and there are many folks who move south here to retire (thinking they are in the real South). Most of these folks who retire to my area are from New York or New Jersey. If I had to bet on it and take your money, this fellow talking to my boiled peanut farmer was from New Jersey. I could tell he didnt even have to open his mouth. Again, I try to be nice to everyone and I honestly like meeting different types of folks. This fellow hadnt done anything to me yet Not willing to wait and getting tired of being spit on by the rain, I went on up to my peanut farming fellow and said, I need two bags of boiled peanuts. My peanut farmer seemed relieved to be rescued from the yankee fellow blocking the sale of ne Virginia peanuts. I did it. I upset the cud chewing New Jersey retiree. I said to myself, Oh mercy, this fellow is about to lay into me. He turned to me and said, This is the South, we take things slow here. I think I took my glasses off before I spoke. I had all of these things that I wanted to say that were not nice at all. I was trying to keep in mind that it was me who interrupted this fellows useless conversation getting me more wet and keeping me from my peanuts (and grits). I was going to try to come up with a nice reply. However, when a yankee tells me how it is in the South, it bothers me. It is not that I mind sharing my heritage with folks; its just that I dont like folks claiming something that is not theirs. It is like a Methodist going in and telling folks in a Baptist church the proper depth of their baptism pool, or worse telling them to install a shower. I looked at him and formed my words. I smiled and I spoke in my native language, Trust me I know about the South and I know what WE do. You seemed to be just chewing the cud. He walked off. My peanut farmers wife was sitting on a cooler behind him. After the fellow walked off, she said, And we are not afraid to speak our mind. I smiled and headed off to get my grits. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Page 4 HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Showers in the Baptism Pool Tattoos I Have Known In Florida, toxic algae is a year-round ght By David Guest Earthjustice A toxic algae outbreak that recently caused of cials in Toledo, Ohio to ban citizens from drinking tainted city water for several days, grabbed headlines around the world. For those of us living here in sunny Florida, these noxious green slime outbreaks are now a yearround occurrence. A water plant that is supposed to serve 30,000 people along Southwest Floridas Caloosahatchee River, near Fort Myers, has been repeatedly shut down over the years because toxic algae makes the water unsafe. The main thing to realize is that these outbreaks are preventable. At Earthjustice, we have been in court for 15 year s ghting to get enforceable, numeric limits on the main culprits in these outbreaks sewage, manure and fertilizer. We have taken our case to the state capital in Tallahassee and all the way to Washington, D.C. We are ghting for commonsense control of these pollutants. That means using fertilizer in a targeted way on plant roots, and not broadcast spraying it over the land, where most of it is wasted when it runs off into waterways. Several South Florida communities have passed laws that prevent people from fertilizing their lawns during the rainy season, because what they end up fertilizing instead are our public rivers and lakes. These local laws are a great step forward in solving a pollution problem. But agricultural pollution is the biggest culprit. Despite proven ways to reduce this pollution, agricultural corporations have bitterly fought even the most modest proposed restrictions on their behavior. A few years ago, we watched as lobbyists for agricultural corporations, and their political friends in Congress, actually held the entire budget of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency hostage until they got lawmakers to remove language that would have enforced stronger limits on this pollution in Florida. A big polluter like an industrial plant would be ned if it spilled toxic materials into a river. But thats not true for Florida agricultural operations. Florida allows them to use voluntary goals called best management practices. All the corporation has to do is say it is implementing a plan to control pollution, and it is exempt from monitoring. Its as if you were allowed to speed on the freeway so long as you gave the highway patrol a speed-limit compliance plan. How many times are we going to have to watch green slime wreck our drinking water, our swimming holes and our beaches? We need to demand that American leaders hold polluters accountable. Every day, factory farms send fertilizer and manure into our public waters, when they could be controlling this pollution on-site. Everyone should be required to meet speci c pollution limits, and they should face consequences if they exceed those limits and trash our water. Thats what the Clean Water Act intended. Its the fair thing to do for those of us who depend on clean water. And thats every one of us. Time to count costs Dear Editor, The following comes from Proverbs 22:7 New International Version (NIV) 7 The rich rule over the poor, and the borrower is slave to the lender. The Bible tells us that the borrower is slave to the lender. So the person that sells out their position (whatever it may be) will becomes a slave to those that they let buy their in uence. Once a person allows it to happen even one time, it makes it easier for it to happen again and again. What eventually happens is either the person just sells themselves completely over to the in uence or they get so fed up; they end it which costs them either way. My father said that a good name is worth more than all the money in the bank. He was right. A good name is heard far and wide and goes before you to open doors; just like a bad name (reputation) can close many doors before you even get there to knock on them. A day of reckoning is coming for Gulf County. Its coming for the individuals that sell out at any cost to citizens and groups in the local public. To the individuals and companies that are buying in uence, you have made a name for yourself and your company. Im not so sure its a name I would want associated with me or a company I owned. Gulf County was once a thriving county and advancing with a bright future. I see the county going backwards the infrastructure falling apart, people moving away and school enrollment diminishing. This speaks volumes about the condition of the county. Its time to count the costs of decisions being made by the Board of County Commissioners, the Tourism Development Council and the Gulf County School Board. All these entities are making decisions that affect every citizen in Gulf County. Are the decisions being made in the best interest of the citizens of the county or the members of BOCC, the TDC and the GCSB? You decide. Former Gulf County resident, Barbara Redmon Vickery Letter to the EDITOR

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Local The Star| A5 Thursday, August 14, 2014 Its a hard way to nd out that trouble is real Hickory Wind As recorded by The Byrds A characters movie arc is how an actor changes and evolves during a lm. The most common arc is one that features a character who rises quickly to the top, takes a tumble, then slowly regains stature, until he eventually reaches his zenith as credits roll. Or at least nishes the lm in a better position than when he started. Boxing is the last sport Id ever watch, either televised or in person. But minus the pugilism, I love the movie Cinderella Man. Released in 2005, starring Russell Crowe, Renee Zellweger and Paul Giamatti, and directed by Ron Howard, the lm depicts the incredible true story of boxer James J. Braddock. Professionally successful and personally wealthy, Braddock loses his his life savings and home during the Great Depression. Then a series of bad breaks, including a broken hand, render him completely penniless. Braddock accepts government relief and at one low juncture, appears hat in hand to the boxing commission to ask for a handout. The reason? He needs $37 to get the lights and heat turned back on in the familys one-room, cold water at in New Jersey. Eventually Braddocks hand heals, and the Popular Battler claws his way back, regains the heavyweight title, and rebuilds his familys personal balance sheet. Market movements, like the arcs of our favorite lm gures, do not trend upward without interruption. Sometimes markets are hit with a roundhouse right and temporarily stumble. And this is a good thing. Markets which trend upward continually without ceasing beget securities which become overvalued. Then these same markets are indeed more vulnerable to a drastic correction. Markets tumbled on July 31st, when the S&P 500 lost just under 2% in one day. Several factors converged: wage increases, the Argentine default controversy, and a 4% second quarter growth report (thats a good thing, of course, but may indicate that the Federal Reserve will end its articial stimulation sooner than expected; thus, the negative impacts on markets). Wage increases are certainly also good news for wage earners, but may foretell pressure to raise interest rates to offset potential ination. So again, that was perceived as a negative for markets. A report in the Wall Street Journal stated recently that market downturns have served as a buying opportunity for long-term investors, but that many short term investors were selling. These market dips also remind us that like the arc of our favorite movie characters, investments do not continually increase in value unabated; that the most important thing is to be in a better place when you nish your investing process than you were at the beginning. Just like Jimmy Braddock. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC, 608-6121, www.arborwealth.net, a feeonly and duciary registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. Market downturns, soup lines and Jimmy Braddock MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook The PACES Foundation made an ap plication roughly two years ago to secure housing tax credits it would leverage for funding in the private market to under write building more than 75 affordable housing units. The city of Port St. Joe amended the zoning of the 40-acre parcel to accommo date affordable housing, but the founda tion fell short in the lottery system used to distribute the housing tax credits. Du Mas said the foundation would con tinue to pursue the tax credits, but the HOME dollars allowed the foundation to move ahead on an initial 50 units in Gulf County. This is just phase one, said Ron Thomasson out of Panama City, who is working with the Smyrna, Ga., foundation as a planner. PACES has made a longterm commitment to the community. The application was completed with assistance from the BOCC, which voted to provide $350,000 in State Housing Initia tives Partnership (SHIP) program funds as a local match for the low interest loan Du Mas said ultimately, the loan would come at no cost to PACES. The governor wanted some local skin in the game, and (the BOCC) stepped up, Du Mas said. The foundations application now will be reviewed by a third-party underwriter to determine the project and foundation are viable. In the meantime, Du Mas said, the foundation would move ahead on de sign and permitting. The project would mean the construc tion of 50 two-, threeand four-bedroom units carrying rents from $450 to $650. Those are incredibly affordable rents, Du Mas said. The units would be specically target ed to those earning under $30,000 a year. That provides the working folks with long-term affordable housing, he added. After 15 years, the state will deter mine whether renters will be provided an option to purchase. Other PACES developments, con structed through tax credit nancing, typ ically carried a 15-year term after which renters could buy the units they were renting. Du Mas said in this instance, the nal word would be up to state ofcials. Du Mas said the hope is to begin work on the complex within four to six months with the rst units available roughly six months after that. By the start of the school year next year through, say, Halloween, we will be hoping to open the doors to those units, Du Mas said. We are condent we will begin building once (permitting, etc.) was done. Commissioner Tan Smiley, who has worked through the processes with the PACES Foundation, said the housing project was crucial. He said companies considering locating to Gulf County expressed concern about housing for workers. I think weve covered the rst step to ward bringing jobs to the county, Smiley said. Gulf Coast Parkway Voices apparently carried from Gulf County to the Florida Department of Transportation. Included in the information packet for Tuesdays meeting was a letter from FDOT ofcials indicating they had acted on concerns out of Gulf County over the agency-identied preferred alternative for the Gulf Coast Parkway. County ofcials contended that public meetings on the parkway held earlier this year showed ofcials leaning toward a route that would benet Bay County but had few of the ingredients critical to Gulf County, such as quicker and more direct access to U.S. 231 and an overland ship ping link to the Port of Port St. Joe. State ofcials have identied another alternative that would meet the Bay and Gulf County interests, Commissioner Warren Yeager said, and had taken that to federal highway ofcials for approval. If approved on the federal level, the al ternative would go before the public. at 11 a.m., fourth grade at noon, fth grade at 1 p.m. and sixth grade at 2 p.m. (all times ET). Parents are asked to bring each students school supplies to his or her homeroom teacher. At the orientations, Principal Dr. Sandra Cook will present the schools procedures and programs to be followed by classroom visits to meet the teachers. The orientation sessions are an opportunity for children to look forward to returning to school. Like many of the teachers, I have been busy getting my classroom ready and look forward to meeting and getting to know my students this year, rst-grade teacher Joni Mock said. The faculty and staff has been gearing up for the new school year with several in services over the summer to address full implementation of the Florida Standards and new statewide assessments. W ewahitchka Jr./ Sr. High School At Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School, the day begins at 7:55 a.m. and dismisses at 2:55 p.m. CT. An open house will be 5-6 p.m. CT today, Aug. 14. Students and parents are encouraged to attend. During the presentation, Principal Jay Bidwell will introduce the faculty and discuss ways parents, students and staff can create a learning community that is both challenging and pleasant. Obviously, our high school is primarily concerned with student learning, but we are also in the business of creating memories and helping to form productive citizens, Bidwell said. When I walk around the campus and it seems like a hub of activity, I feel like the world is somehow right. After the meeting, students will have an opportunity to pick up their class schedules and meet their teachers for the upcoming school year. Though this will be his rst year as principal for the high school, Bidwell brings more than 23 years of teaching experience to the role and served as principal last year at the elementary school. When one becomes the principal of a school, the responsibility increases exponentially, and fortunately, the wonderful staff at Wewahitchka Elementary School aided me greatly in my transition to a larger leadership role, Bidwell said. I realize what our school means to this town and its children, and its an awesome sight. At Wewa High School, we are well aware of our responsibility to our youth and we embrace that role. We cannot wait to start a new year. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High At Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, the rst bell rings at 7:53 a.m., and students are dismissed at 3 p.m. ET. Principal Duane McFarland invited parents of students entering grades 9 to 12 to an open house from 5:30-6:30 p.m. ET today, Aug. 14. Students are encouraged to attend the meetings. During these open houses, McFarland will introduce the faculty, make the attendees aware of several new policies and allow students to pick up their schedules and visit their classrooms. This isnt my rst rodeo, McFarland said. My three years as assistant superintendent for business are going to benet me as principal. I know how the system works. Im looking forward to the new school year, and Im excited. Hopefully the kids are, too. years as a math teacher at the elementary school, replaces Sue Gannon as principal. Gannon will teach math at the junior/senior high school. And Duane McFarland, former principal at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School before spending three years at the district ofces, remains at the junior/senior year high school where he has been since March after Jeremy Knapp left on a leave of absence and did not return. Stepping away from the schools, the district ofces will see major change. Sara Joe Wooten, the depu ty superintendent for instruc tion and a part of the district for more than 30 years, re tires at the end of the month. Price succeeds Wooten un der a different title and job specications. Deborah Crosby, with more than 40 years with the district, also retires at the end of the month as Director of Special Services. Martha Weimorts succeeds Crosby, though, like Price, with a different job title and specications. The departure of more than 90 years of service to the district necessitated a re structuring of district ofces this summer. If all that was not enough change, the district will lose another 50 years of experi ence when George Cox, the District 2 School Board mem ber, retires, his successor to be decided Aug. 26. If there were changes for the district, some things re mained the same and not all in a good way. The district will be lighter a projected 70-75 students, though the states rst for mal count will not be until October. If proved correct, that es timate will reduce enrollment to less than 1,800 students a decline of more than 400 over the past decade. The result is felt at the dis tricts bottom line, which bled some $355,000 of additional cuts this year with the budget reduced to roughly $12.5 mil lion more than $5 million less than seven years ago. The number of employees is 265, down almost 100. A bright spot an in crease in property values, and the tax base, for the rst time in seven years. We think our situation will improve next year bud get-wise, Norton said. We have had seven years of cuts. We are not going to talk about cuts any more until further notice. As optimists, well say the glass is half full. And school board members preferred Monday morning to follow that lead, looking ahead to the opening of schools and putting a difcult summer in the rearview mirror. Were looking forward to another fantastic year, board member Billy Quinn Jr. said. I think the parents are ex cited school is starting, and I think the kids are, too. HOUSING from A1 OPEN HOUSE from page A1 P H OTO S BY W E S L O CH ER | The Star During a presentation Monday at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton welcomed Gulf County teachers back from summer break. Below faculty members were treated to entertainment from students in the 21st Century Enrichment Program, held over the summer months. TEACHERS from page A1

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, August 14, 2014 Special to The Star HAVANA The North west Florida Water Man agement District has launched the second cycle of a competitive grant pro gram to help local govern ments and utilities across the Florida Panhandle ad dress important local water supply challenges and meet regional water supply pro tection and management needs. The Districts proposed Tentative Fiscal Year (FY) 2014-2015 Budget includes $8 million to provide assis tance for new water sup ply development projects. This initiative builds on the success of the FY 20132014 grant program, which resulted in the award of nearly $10 million for 24 pri ority water supply projects across Northwest Florida. Among those projects was improvements to the Chipola Pump Station used by the city of Port St. Joe. Ensuring a clean and sustainable supply of water is important to the environment and economy of Northwest Florida, said District Executive Direc tor Jon Steverson. The District continues to work with local governments and utilities to identify and implement water supply projects that will benet our natural resources and communities. Parties interested in applying are encouraged to attend an informational workshop at 2 p.m. CT on Aug. 26 at the Gibson Lec ture Hall, Gulf Coast State College, 5230 West U.S. 98, Panama City. We encourage local governments and pub lic and nonprot utilities across our 16-county area to learn more about the program and submit wa ter supply projects both large and small that will help meet the needs of their communities and of the re gion, said Paul Thorpe, the Districts Resource Plan ning Manager. Grant applications are due by Oct. 1. Eligible proj ects include traditional water supply development projects, water reuse and other alternative water supply development proj ects, and water conserva tion projects that result in quantiable water savings. Projects that demonstrate new or innovative tech niques are encouraged. District staff will evalu ate grant applications based on criteria that include, but are not limited to, support of the Districts core missions and statutory water sup ply priorities, environmen tal benets, readiness for implementation, nancial need, and the ability to op erate and maintain funded facilities. District staff will present recommendations to the Districts Governing Board for nal project se lections in late 2014. Workshop details, along with application materials and guidelines, are avail able on the Districts web site at www.nwfwater.com. Interested applicants can contact the District at 5395999 or Paul.Thorpe@nw fwater.com for more infor mation or assistance. NWFWMD announces cycle for water supply development grants Aug. 4-10 On Monday, Aug. 4, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) received a call regarding damage to a mailbox. Sgt. J. Williams responded to the 2500 block of Indian Pass Road. Based on Sgt. Williams observation it appeared someone pushed the mailbox over. While at the scene he located two other mailboxes which suffered the same damage. On Aug. 4, the GCSO received a criminal mischief complaint at the Highland View Boat Landing. Sgt. J. Williams investigated the complaint. A kiosk, operated by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, was damaged by someone who used a permanent marker to write on it. The public bathroom was also spray-painted inside. This was the third time this had occurred. The GCSO also had an open case regarding damage to the kiosk from July 30. A suspect was developed in the damage regarding the kiosk. Warrants for Criminal Mischief (two counts) were sought and later served on Eugene A. Dykes (62). Dykes turned himself in on Aug. 8. He was released on his own recognizance. On Aug. 4, Deputy J. Brock arrested Fabian G. Islas (30) in the 200 block of Abby Drive in Wewahitchka. Islas was charged with Unauthorized Possession of a Drivers License after he presented Deputy Brock with a ctitious North Carolina identication card. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on a $1,000 bond. On Tuesday, Aug. 5, while on patrol in the area of Stonemill Creek Road and Diana Street, Deputy G. Desrosier observed an ATV being operated on the roadway. Contact was made with the driver, Jason A. Harmon (38), who was determined to be wanted by the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce. Harmon was arrested and transported to the GCDF. He was wanted for Violation of Probation on his original charges of two counts of Grand Theft and two counts of Petit Theft. On Aug. 5, Deputy G. Desrosier arrested Selina R. Culpan (23) on an arrest order for Contempt of Court. Cuplan failed to pay nes in her case of Disorderly Conduct. She was transported to the GCDF. Cuplan was released after paying a $200 purge. On Wednesday, Aug. 6, Deputy S. Ferrell conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle for running a stop sign. The incident occurred at 2nd Street and Lake Grove Road in Wewahitchka. The driver of the vehicle, Jonathan C. Gates (30), was unable to produce his drivers license for Deputy Ferrell. It was determined Gates was operating the vehicle on a suspended license. He was arrested and charged with Driving While License Suspended/Revoked (DWLS/R) and transported to the GCDF where he was released on a $500 bond. On Aug. 6, the GCSO extradited Brian D. Traylor (37) from the Bay County Jail. Traylor was arrested in Bay County and held for the GCSO on a warrant for Violation of Probation. He is on probation for DWLS/R. Traylor was rst appeared and released on his own recognizance. On Aug. 6, Deputy M. Layeld responded to the 200 block of West River Road in Wewahitchka. The GCSO had received a complaint in reference to shoplifting. The business captured video footage of a suspect taking approximately $80.00 worth of merchandise. Deputy Layeld continues to investigate. Criminal charges are forthcoming. On Thursday, Aug. 7, Deputy S. Willis responded to the 1000 block of County Road (CR) 386 in reference to the theft of a rearm. The complainant reported the theft occurred sometime between September 2013 and July 2014. The rearm stolen was reported to be a Winchester .22 Cal rie. On Aug. 7, the GCSO received a complaint regarding theft. Deputy S. Willis responded to the call located near the end of the Lake Grove Road. The complainant reported the theft of a Stihl Chainsaw, vehicle radiator, a hunting stand and miscellaneous tools. The property was last seen approximately one year ago. On Aug. 7, Deputy J. Oquendo responded to the 200 block of Parkside Circle on Cape San Blas. The GCSO had received a complaint regarding the burglary of a vehicle. The complainant reported the theft of an iPod, iPod Nano, and Samsung digital camera from within her vehicle. The offense occurred sometime between Aug. 4-7. The vehicle was not locked. On Saturday, Aug. 9, Deputy J. Oquendo was dispatched to the 8200 block of West U.S. Highway 98 in St Joe Beach. A local business phoned the GCSO reporting problems with a customer. Gary L. Hudson (45) was arrested and charged with Disorderly Intoxication. He was transported to the GCDF. Hudson was rst appeared and given a $250 bond. On Aug. 9, Sgt. J. Murnan responded to the 900 block of East River Road in Wewahitchka in reference to a burglary. The complainant reported the burglary of a tool shed in her back yard. A diamond plate tool box, hydraulic transmission jack, two boxes of 9mm ammunition, and other items were reported stolen. The offense occurred between July 18 and Aug. 9. On Sunday, Aug. 10, the GCSO received a complaint of a residential burglary in the 1700 block of Apalachee Drive in Indian Pass. The complainant reported she returned to her residence and discovered alcoholic beverages and food missing. There were no signs of forced entry. Anyone with information regarding any of the above mentioned cases are asked to contact the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce at 227-1115, or remain anonymous by calling Crime Stoppers at 785-TIPS. From Aug. 4-10 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 50 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 44 calls for EMS, 18 calls for other departments/ agencies and 11 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From Aug. 4-10 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 176; Civil Paper Service, 26; Trafc Stop, 16; Field Contact, 13; Information, 13; Criminal Mischief, 6; Verbal Disturbance, 4; Escorts, 6; Sexual Offender Reregistration, 4; Suspicious Person, 4; Trafc Accident, 4; Warrant Arrest, 4; Abandoned Vehicle, 3; Agency Assist, 3; Citizens Assist, 3; Reckless Driver, 3; Theft/Shoplifting, 3; Alarm, 2; Residential Burglary, 2; Unknown Disturbance, 2; Harassing Phone Call, 2; Request for Security Check, 2; Suspicious Vehicle, 2; Welfare Check, 2; Auto Burglary, 2; Deceased Person, 1; Disorderly Intox, 1; Noise Disturbance, 1; Domestic Disturbance, 1; Physical Disturbance, 1; Drunk Pedestrian, 1; Fire, 1; Vehicle Fire, 1; Lost Items, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Prisoner Transport, 1; and Recovered Property, 1. WE ARE SEEKING STRONG SALES MINDED INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE ABLE TO: Manage multiple tasks Pr ospect for new business & deliver excellent customer service Develop and pr esent sales pr esentations to potential customers utilizing The News Herald s print and digital media solutions The Panama City News Herald is adding talented and motivated Multi-Media Sales Pr ofessionals to our advertising team. Please submit r esume & co ve r lett er to : LG rimes@p cnh.c om As k us ab out the gr eat be ne ts in sales base pay + co mmission, be ne ts including Medic al De ntal & Vi sion Insur anc e, Fl exible Sp ending 401(k) Pl an, Va ca tion & Sick Le av e. LIVE ON TH E PO OP DECK KO NKRETE SOUL SA TURD AY 9 PM FRID AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M RAND Y ST ARK KT & MEXIC O JOE ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON T HE PO OP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S KARAOKE THURSD AY FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH NA TA LIE AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Law Enforcement Summary GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, August 14, 2014 Success for young adults one rung at a time Special to The Star The program helped me build up some condence and get a good job. Now, Im dreaming about my next steps. Its cool just a great feeling. This from Port St. Joe resident Alex King who took the risk, grabbed the opportunity, and now fully lives the promise of change. In fact, his fulltime security position at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf has him looking forward to buying his rst car. There may be just one way to spell success, but there are many paths to it. For motivated young adults in Gulf County like Alex, The Ladder Program offers a comprehensive and intensive set of course components to help them think about their future in a more realistic and condent way. This intense work readiness program was aptly named The Ladder to symbolize the ladder to success, not only for work, but for life. Many young adults do not realize that for their work life to be successful, their personal life needs to be in order as well, and this program addresses not only skills and work behaviors, but life management issues such as personal budgeting and healthy relationships. We know that many young people sort of drift around after high school, not really nding their niche, both socially and work-related, said Kim Bodine, Executive Director of CareerSource Gulf Coast. The Ladder Program was developed because research showed us that up to 70 percent of the young adults who did not enter post-secondary training or the military took three years before they attached to the workforce. Now theres a better option. The Ladder Program is taking applications for its fall class. The next 12week session starts Sept. 17 and those who wish to participate must apply by Friday, Sept. 12. The Ladder Program is open to residents of Gulf County aged approximately 18 to 21 who are unemployed and economically disadvantaged. Over the course of 12 weeks, the program offers a wide array of education and preparation including Life Coaching, Employability Skills Training, Healthy Relationships, GED prep if needed, Career Exploration, Financial Literacy, Dale Carnegie Training, Resume Building, Interviewing Techniques and more, including the opportunity to earn a training allowance. Hopefuls for The Ladder Program must get started now by completing an application, as spaces are limited. To secure and complete an application, visit the Port St. Joe Community Resource Center, open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET MondayFriday. There, workforce professionals will help with the process. Please note; no applications will be accepted after Sept. 12. The Ladder Program is operated by CareerSource Gulf Coast in Port St. Joe. It is nancially sponsored by the Jessie Ball duPont Port St. Joe Capacity Building Fund. CareerSource Gulf Coast is well known for matching trained, skilled job seekers with employers across Bay, Gulf and Franklin County, Bodine said. What is little known is that we work just as hard on job readiness with many groups, so that the job matching can begin for them. The Ladder Program is just one of many special opportunities we offer and we are very proud of the partnerships that exist to make this possible. Ke ep your business moving with our 4x4 Equipment Loan : New or Used Equipment Financing Av ailable $25,000 Minimum Loan Fo ur -Y ear Te rm with Fixed Rates as low as 4% APR ^ Quick Approval Process Call your Capital City Banker to apply today 504 Monume nt Av e. | 229.8282 www .ccbg .com FINAN CING FO R NEW & US ED TR UC KING EQ UIPMEN T Call to Schedule Yo ur School and Ye ar ly Ph ysicals Don t Fo rget Skin Cancer Scr eening EL EC T SA ND Y E QU IN N JR FO R GU LF CO UN TY CO MM IS SI ON DI ST RI CT 4 Pa id an d Ap pro ve d by Sa nd y E Qu inn Jr Application period now open for Ladder Program Alex King, a spring graduate of The Ladder Program, went on to gain employment as a security ofcer at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Thursday, August 14, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net Yep, its much like shing in a sauna, except with occasional bolts of lightning thrown in. But August marks the beginning of the fall redsh run on the west coast, and that makes it well worth deserting the air-conditioning for a few hours to get in on the action. Most anglers pursue redsh in the 18 to 27 inch slot; these sh are just under spawning size, which is the reason for the upper limit those which reach adulthood about age 4 become the spawners which renew the population. But the big attraction of slot reds is that they spend much of their time in water anywhere from ankle deep to about 4 feet, making them ideal sight-shing targets. Tailers are a special attraction; on low tides, reds often tip up to root crabs and shrimp out of the bottom, causing their tails to wave above the surface. Alert anglers can spot a tail at a hundred yards, and this allows them to pole, paddle or wade into range and make a presentation to a visible sh. Shallow-water reds are extremely wary and its a test of skill to make the cast accurately, work the lure just right and fool the sh as you watch it, but for many this is the most exciting type of angling. Plastic jerkbaits rigged weedless are the favorite lure for this action, but topwaters and weedless spoons also work well, as do yrod streamers. Some of the vast ats of the western Panhandle are ideal for this type of action, and the back side of many of the barrier islands all the way from Apalach to Pensacola have good areas. Good ats typically have lots of turtle grass, with slightly deeper sloughs of grassy area between shallower white sand bars. Fishing is often best on the lowest low tides, which occur on the new and full moons each month. On Panhandle waters, a strong north or northwest wind on a falling tide during one of these strong moon periods is prime time; it pushes the water out and makes for extreme low water where redsh tails are easy to see. Reds often settle into potholes in the ats and around docks, as well as over rockpiles and wrecks in the open bays, as well, and in these locations live bait is the ticket; a live pinsh or shrimp under a popping cork often draws an instant strike. And some anglers do well with cut threadns or ladysh, using pieces of the baitsh both as chum and as bait reds home in on the scent, particularly when they cruise marshy shorelines on high tide. The Berkley articial bait known as Gulp! also does the job, again through scent attraction its a favorite among tournament pros when the sh are hard to fool with articials. Preferred tackle for ats reds is spinning gear loaded with 10-pound-test microber line; this allows long casts, and the nostretch ber gives plenty of power to handle the hard-running drum. An 18-inch length of 20-poundtest uorocarbon leader will stiffen the connection and prevent the line from tangling the hooks frequently as you work the lure, as braid often does. Flyrodders typically use 8-weight gear and weightforward oating lines. Juvenile reds remain inshore pretty much year around, and theres a good shery in the coastal rivers and creeks of the Panhandle at times from October into early December as sh gather in deeper holes on the rst cold fronts of the year this action is best on live shrimp, or on shrimptipped jigs. ON THE BEACHES Much larger redsh typically begin to prowl the beaches and inlets this month, with the run continuing into October as the adults move inshore to spawn. These are typically sh from 15 to 40 pounds, big bronze giants that are far beyond the legal slot, but that make great gamesh for catch and release. The sh can be anywhere from right against the sand to out several miles anglers who walk the beach at dawn and dusk often connect with some of these giants simply by fan casting as they move down the shore, dropping the rst cast right in the spindrift at the edge, then working out to deeper water. Large wobbling plugs or swimbaits are usually a good bet. These are big sh, so lures at least 6 inches long are called for. (I once saw a 40-pounder inhale a 15-inch seatrout on my buddys Mirrolure so dont be afraid to sh big lures.) They also take big topwaters like the Super Spook at times. Best gear for handling the sh from the beach is a saltwater duty spinning rig, with a reel in what is known as the 4000 size, capable of holding several hundred yards of 30pound test microber or braided line the tough, no-stretch braid gives the power needed to control big sh when you cant follow them in a boat. For shorebound anglers, some areas naturally produce better than others. The beaches for several hundred yards on either side of an inlet are always worth shing, as is the inlet itself, particularly around jetty rocks. And runouts that form where the wash of the surf pours back into the Gulf can also create feeding areas look for spits and points, anything that might give the reds a spot to trap bait. Panhandle shing piers are also sh magnets, and many big reds are caught from them each year. Big schools of reds also gather just off the beaches from now through fall, and sometimes these gatherings can be enormous, covering several acres. There are so many sh that they literally turn the water red as the sun reects off their pinkish-red backs, and when you spot one of these aggregations from a boat, its simply a matter of easing close and throwing any lure or live bait of your choosing into them hook-ups are instant, and can continue so long as the sh stay near the surface. Heavy tackle is necessary otherwise the sh run back through the school and the line breaks on the backs of the freeswimming sh. Some of these sh will also move through the inlets and spawn on the deep edge of ats in the bays in fall, so its not uncommon for trout and ounder anglers to occasionally get a 40-pound surprise that wrecks their tackle. RELEASING REDS TO FIGHT AGAIN Reds are durable sh, and readily survive the handling that goes with catch-and-release shing. Just remember the usual cautions with sh that are to be released have long-nosed pliers or hook removers at hand, get the hooks out quickly, leaving the sh in the water if possible, hold her up horizontally for a photo one hand holding the jaw, the other the tail and then get her back into the water promptly. Fish that sink to bottom and lie there exhausted can be brought back to life by tapping them lightly with a rod tip dont leave a worn-out sh upside down on bottom or it will die. REDFISH ON THE MENU Reds are excellent table fare, but like many species they taste best if the skin is removed and the red line cut away before cooking. The usual llet procedure works ne with them, and the llets, cut into 3 inch pieces, are delicious dusted with seasoned cornmeal and fried in peanut oil. For reds near the maximum slot size, cooking in the shell is a good option gut the sh but leave the skin, llets and head in place. Salt the body cavity, then stuff with fresh-cut oranges or lemons. Wrap the sh in heavy duty aluminum foil and place on a low heat grill. Cook until a fork goes into the thick part of the shoulder easily. This cooking method basically steams the esh, making it exceptionally delicate and tasty, almost like crab meat. Serve with melted butter and lemon slices. REDFISH RULES Floridas redsh regulations for Panhandle waters allow two sh per angler per day between 18 and 27 inches long. Fish must be landed in whole condition and no more than six can be possessed by one person away from the water at one time which is to say loading your cooler for the trip back to Alabama is a no-no. Theres no closed season. Commercial harvest is prohibited. Hot weather, hotter shing SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Au g. 14 87 77 50 % Fr i, Au g. 15 87 77 40 % Sa t, Au g. 16 87 77 40 % Sun, Au g. 17 87 77 40 % Mo n, Au g. 18 86 77 60 % Tu es Au g. 19 87 78 80 % We d, Au g. 20 87 78 80 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om Page 8 SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Inshore fishing has slowed down some due to the extremely hot weather and water temperatures this week. Good fish are being caught in the Shark Hole area using live shrimp and small pin fish for bait. The bite is slow, however, the new moon and tide changes should have this week looking better for trout and red fish. Flounder have been showing up at the docks lately with good numbers in St. Joe and East Bay so far this month, but most are on the smaller side right now. King fish are still thick on all near shore and offshore wrecks right now. Slow trolling, drifting, or even night time fishing will all prove to be productive as the water stays hot. Sharks are a huge problem with our fisheries ,and we have seen some huge ones this summer on many of our favorite spots. Beach fishing from Indian Pass is sure to be a great place to land a huge shark this week. Dog days redsh PH O T O S BY F R AN K SA R GEANT | Special to The Star Juvenile reds are found inshore, in bays and back country, until theyre about four years old. This sh is at the age where it is about to mature and move offshore. Below in shallow ats, reds often tail or tip up to expose the tips of tail and dorsal n as they feed, typically at depths of 12 inches or so.

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Si gn Up Fo r Ge ne Ra f el d Fo ot ba ll Si gn -u ps for th e Gen e Ra f el d Fo ot ba ll Le ag ue wi ll be he ld Tu esd ay Au gu st 19 20 14 fro m 6: 00 8: 00 pm Th ur sd ay Au gu st 21 20 14 fr om 6: 00 8: 00 pm an d Sa tu rd ay Au gu st 23 20 13 fr om 9:0 0 AM to 1: 00 PM at th e Fi re St at io n on Wi ll ia ms Av e. Pl ea se br in g a fe e of $6 0.0 0, ev id en ce of hea lt h in su ra nc e, an d a co py of hi s bi rt h ce rt i ca te Ev er y pl ay er mu st ha ve a phy si ca l ex am pr io r to pl a yi ng We su gg es t tha t yo u ge t th is do ne as so on as po ss ib le. Eq ui pm en t di st ri bu ti on wi ll be do ne im me di at el y fo ll ow in g re gi st ra ti on so th e pl ay er mu st be pr ese nt We wi ll co mp et e in tw o ag e br ac ke ts in 20 14 Th e Do lp hi ns wi ll el d pl ay er s tha t ar e 7, 8 an d 9 ye ar s ol d. Th e Ja gu ar s wi ll be 10 11 an d 12 ye ar s ol d. Th ose wh o si gn up rs t wi ll ha ve th e mo st an d be st eq ui pm en t to ch oo se fr om Ev er yo ne wh o wi sh es to pl ay mu st re gi st er no la te r th an 1: 00 PM on th e 23 rd No ap pl ic at io ns wi ll be ac ce pt ed aft er tha t da te If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s wh at soe ve r ab ou t th is gr ea t pr og ra m, pl ea se co nt ac t Ma tt He rr in g at 24 7984 2. UP WA RD SO CC ER pr ek 6t h gr ad e Re gi st ra ti on fe e $6 0. 00 Ev al ua ti on s & Si gn Up Sa t. Au g. 2n d & Sa t Au g. 23 rd 9:0 0a m 12 :0 0p m Ho ne yv il le Pa rk So cce r Fi el d In th e ca se of ra in it wi ll be he ld at Gl ad Ti di ng s As sem bl y of Go d Fe ll ow sh ip Ha ll 1s t pr ac ti ce Se pt 2n d 1s t ga me Se pt 13 th la st ga me Oc t 25 th Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR Page 9 PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, August 14, 2014 A Section PORT ST. JOE TIGER SHARKS 2013: 8-4 (3-0 District 4-1A) Head coach: John Palmer, rst year Starters returning: 6/5 SCHEDULE 6:30 p.m. Aug. 29 Wewahitchka 7 p.m. Sept. 5 at Bay 7 p.m.Sept. 12 at Bozeman 6:30 p.m. Sept. 19 Jefferson County 6:30 p.m. Sept. 26 Chipley 6:30 p.m. Oct. 3 at Franklin County 6:30 p.m. Oct. 17 Florida A&M 6:30 p.m. Oct. 24 at West Gadsden 6:30 p.m. Oct. 31 at Liberty County 6:30 p.m. Nov. 7 Arnold RESULTS at Wewa 45-20 Bay 0-19 Bozeman 35-0 at Jefferson Co. 38-6 at Chipley 16-28 Franklin County 49-6 at Florida A&M 21-12 West Gadsden 17-3 Liberty County 24-7 at Arnold 0-38 South Walton 45-21 at Blountstown 0-34 Standouts: Riley Burke (jr. OL/DL), Clay Raf eld (jr. OL/DL), Marcel Johnson (jr. OL/DL), Umstead Sanders (jr. OL/DL), Will Ramsey (jr. OL/DL), Marquez Johnson (sr. TE), Jarkeice Davis (sr. RB), Cole Cryderman (sr. RB), Aaron Paul (so. RB), Jak Riley (sr. RB), Carter Thacker (sr. RB), T.J. Williams (jr. QB). Palmer returns to guide Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com PORT ST. JOE John Palmer is no typical rst-year coach at Port St. Joe. That makes sense because it isnt really his rst year in charge of the Tiger Sharks football program. Palmer coached PSJ to a 57-27 record over seven years, including a state championship in 2005, before leaving to take over coaching duties at Hernando in 2008. Since vacating that post, Palmer served as a volunteer assistant for previous PSJ coach Chuck Gannon the past two years before he was named Gannons successor in January. Luckily Im familiar with Chuck and the staff and everybody here, Palmer said. Most of the coaches coached with me before when was here. Getting acclimated to the coaching staff is not as pronounced as it would be for somebody coming into a new situation. Getting to know the players, its the same as going in anywhere else. But having known a lot of them when they were younger, that has made the transition a lot easier. Im fortunate in those areas. The Tiger Sharks staked a District 4-1A title last year, and Palmer did not enter his post expecting or desiring to overhaul the coaching staff and the programs philosophy on offense and defense. Our base offense is out of the Wing-T we ran here before, and weve added a couple wrinkles to it, Palmer said. Its not a huge, total revamping of offense or defense. The packages remained the same. Weve just added a couple packages that t the personnel. Palmer said the Tiger Sharks success on offense will be predicated on their ability to block up front. Palmer mentioned his ve offensive linemen (Riley Burke, Clay Raf eld, Marcel Johnson, Umstead Sanders and Will Ramsey) and tight end (Marquez Johnson) by name and another half-dozen players who will tote the football. Palmer said he sees a lot of parity in Class 1A both in the region and the state, and he credited the FHSAA for creating the classi cation for rural-based public schools. That parity has made offseason work in the weight room even more important, however. Were not the biggest team, Palmer said, but hopefully it translates into being a well-conditioned team. Palmer wants to see consistent improvement throughout the season. That might not always result in victories against the bigger, deeper teams on PSJs schedule, which includes two Class 5A schools (Bay and Arnold) and a Class 2A opponent (Florida A&M). I dont think about wins and losses, Palmer said. Weve got to improve each week in terms of execution and level of play. If we do that, we have a chance to be district champions. Thats our rst goal: To go out there and prepare well enough to have a chance to win the district. Tillman starts anew at Wewahitchka By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA Loren Tillman wanted a challenge. He will get one in Wewahitchka. The longtime Bozeman coach left Sand Hills for a new position this fall, one that brings with it a football team that took another dip in 2013. The Gators won two games last year, one fewer than in the previous campaign, and fell to the depths of District 2-1A. They were blown out in most of their games and gave up 48 or more points to three district opponents. Wewas two victories came against winless North Bay Haven and Franklin County. In other words, theres much work for Tillman, but he remains con dent. Things are de nitely on the upswing and I feel comfortable with where were at, he said. We have 11 sophomores and a bunch of those are gonna play. But theyre ready to play. They need to play. Tillman is aware of the cyclical nature of the Rural division. The states grouping of smaller schools provides a more level playing eld. He learned at Bozeman the importance of timing, as the Bucks used the seasons when they had more talent than other smaller schools to win up to a school-best eight games and advance to the playoffs. The division also helped Wewa, when three seasons ago the Gators nished second in the district for their rst playoff berth since 2005 under Greg Jordan. Five wins over two seasons wont produce the same magic, obviously, but theres always the potential for a 2011 repeat should things fall the Gators way. Weve been pushing them toward the district ballgames, Tillman said. Were making strides to be ready and stressing the importance of Week 2. We dont expect to be great in May, we dont have to be perfect in August, but when the calendar changes to September we need to be pretty good. Wewa might have a ways to go to contend with Vernon in the district, but Tillman believes the Gators could make a leap in the coming years. Theres talent on the team already with a few offensive threats back in the lineup, including standout Rashard Ranie at quarterback and a line featuring four players at 260 pounds or heavier. The goal this season is to build experience and depth. Outlasting foes in Class 1A helped Bozeman reach new heights. It did the same for Chipley, Blountstown, Vernon and Cottondale, which have made long runs in the playoffs in recent seasons. Stability will be important in potentially bringing back respect to the Gators. We worked hard in the summer and they pounded in the weight room, Tillman said. Theyre ready to play. WEWA GATORS Last season: 2-8 (0-4 District 2-1A) Head coach: Loren Tillman, rst year Returning starters: 5/5 SCHEDULE 7 p.m. Aug. 22 Franklin County 6:30 p.m. Aug. 29 at Port St. Joe 7 p.m. Sept. 5 Cottondale 7 p.m. Sept. 12 Liberty County 7 p.m. Sept. 19 Graceville 7 p.m. Oct. 3 at North Bay Haven 7 p.m. Oct. 10 Maclay 7 p.m. Oct. 17 at Sneads 7 p.m. Oct. 24 at Vernon 6:30 p.m. Oct. 31 at Franklin County 7 p.m. Nov. 7 West Gadsden RESULTS Port St. Joe L 45-20 at Cottondale L 22-14 at Liberty County L 46-8 at Graceville L 48-0 Franklin Co. W 40-14 N. Bay Haven W 34-13 at Maclay L 40-12 Sneads L 53-14 Vernon L 55-0 at W.Gadsden L 49-34 Standouts: Rashard Ranie (jr. QB/DB), Tad Gaskin (sr. WR/DB), Jarod Melvin (sr. OL), Chipper Gainey (sr. OL/LB), Brett Satter eld (sr. LB), Kaleb Shiver (jr. DB). Port St. Joe will play a purple/gold scrimmage 6 p.m. ET Friday. Admission is a canned good or $1 to be donated to the local food bank.

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, August 14, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star .com. COURTESY OF MELINA ELUM Sunset on St. Joe Beach during a mid-July evening. Surf boarding at dusk along St. Joe Beach. COURTESY OF KENNETH MONETTE COURTESY OF LAURA AT DRAGONFLY PHOTOGRAPHY Sea oats frame a late afternoon shot of St. Joe Beach. COURTESY OF DAN ETHERIDGE St. Joseph Bay as seen from the shoreline of St. Joseph. Peninsula. COURTESY OF HENRY HESTER Storm clouds form over Jetty Park in Port St. Joe. Mom and son leave behind a day at the beach. COURTESY OF LOUISE LOWERY MUSSELWHITE COURTESY OF STEVE AT KAYAK DOG ADVENTURES A shell we think. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER Puppy love Gracelyn, granddaughter of Debbie and Jon Hooper, and puppy Tebow have a laugh. COURTESY OF JULIE WATTERSON At left the object of desire during the season the bay scallop. GET YOUR PHOTOS PUBLISHED To submit your photos, send them to tcroft@star .com or share them on our Facebook page.

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, August 14, 2014 B Page 1 Section By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The 18th annual Florida Scallop and Music Festival will bring two days of food, fun, music and mussel ap preciation to Port St. Joe on Sept. 12-13. While still a month away, details for the event are be ing released as the festival continues to take shape. Gulf County Chamber of Commerce President Paula Pickett, one of the events main organizers, said this year, she was de termined to get the down town merchants involved with the festival. In years past the festival was held on Reid Ave., but was relocated to George Core Park as the festival became larger and the crowds grew in size. To encourage the festi vals ever-growing crowd to visit the downtown corri dor, Pickett has organized a free trolley that will shuttle attendees from the festival grounds to Reid Ave. and back. This will get people moving, Pickett said. This way, were engaging the local businesses and the local economy. On Saturday the trolley, sponsored by BlueWater Outriggers, will pick up travelers at the main en trance to George Core Park and drop them off midway down Reid Avenue. The trolley will begin its rounds at 11 a.m. and run non-stop until 6 p.m. ET. Also planned for Satur day afternoon will be the an nual duck derby fundraiser, sponsored by Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and in the evening attendees can enjoy live music from Tobacco Road, followed by country legend Joe Dife. Currently 40 vendors have signed up to showcase at the event, but spaces still remain. Emphasis will be placed on the local vendors with unique booths. Pick ett said it was important to shine the spotlight on local vendors to highlight whats available in the community. Were always trying to gure out how the Scallop Festival can better the com munity, Pickett said. The best way for us to survive is to help others to thrive. Those interested claim ing a vendor spot at the festival should call the Chamber at 227-1223. For a current list of festival activities, visit the ofcial website at www.scallopfest. com. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Who reportedly numbered the eggs his chickens produced so he could eat them in order? Shakespeare, Jefferson, Franklin, Orville Wright 2) Of these, which towns previous religious history notably believed the earth was at? St. James, MO; Zion, IL; Algona, IO; Chapin, SC 3) Whose presidential farewell address was never delivered orally? Washington, Jackson, Truman, Eisenhower 4) Which state has the International Vinegar Museum in Roslyn? Kentucky, Tennessee, Kansas, S. Dakota 5) What do you call a group of larks? Exaltation, Pride, Den, Book 6) When did Chicago become incorporated as a city? 1802, 1837, 1869, 1910 7) Albert Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany whose current population is approximately? 200; 2,000; 20,000; 120,000 8) In 1967, which Scandinavian country switched to driving on the rightside of the road? Norway, Denmark, Finland, Sweden 9) World shrimp production is over 5 billion pounds a year with about what percentage being farmed? 10%, 20%, 35%, 50% 10) What was the real last name of singer/songwriter/ actor Jerry Reed? Hubbard, Bradshaw, Hoover, Brown 11) In racing slang what do stickers and scuffs refer to? Pit crew, Seats, Tires, Fans 12) Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious was a magic word sung in which movie? Sound of Music, Wizard of Oz, Mary Poppins, Spartacus ANSWERS 1) Orville Wright. 2) Zion, IL. 3) Washington. 4) S. Dakota. 5) Exaltation. 6) 1837. 7) 120,000. 8) Sweden. 9) 20%. 10) Hubbard. 11) Tires. 12) Mary Poppins. 13) SPARS. 14) Jeep. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com FILE PHO T O The 18th annual Florida Scallop and Music Festival will be held on Sept. 12-13. Scallop Fest plans take shape SPECIAL T O THE S T AR Who needs a light when the moon will sufce? Jon Hooper of joebay.com snapped this shot over the weekend, capturing a bright moons arc past the top of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse at its new home in Port St. Joe. A beacon of the night By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association will host the 18th annual MBA RA Kingsh Tournament from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT on Saturday, Aug. 23. The tournament is the biggest fundraiser for the MBARA and volunteers will use the money to build additional reefs for deploy ment in the Gulf of Mexico in 2015. Since its inception in 1995, more than $1.4 mil lion of articial reefs have been placed off the shores of Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe. The organization has operated the tournament since 1997, starting off with just 25 boats. Recent years have seen a peak of 196 boats and tournament di rector Ron Childs believes that 2015 will be the year the tournament will break 200. The king shing has been outstanding this year and were going to set a record, Childs said. Of course, the weather is a big key factor. WE S L OCHER | The Star The next Salt Air Farmers Market will be held on Saturday, August 16 at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmers Market promotes a sustainable food system on Floridas Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. FARMERS MARKET MBARA prepares for Kingsh Tournament SPECIAL T O THE S T AR This years Miss Kingsh is Port St. Joes own Morgan Guilford By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com After a six-year absence, the Bayou Bash inshore shing tournament returns to Gulf County. This years tournament will be held on Saturday, Aug. 16 with the shing kicking off at rst light and ending at 6 p.m. ET. The Bash features an open di vision for anglers over 16 years of age, and youth division. Anglers will take to the St. Joseph Bay waters from Indian Pass to Crooked Island Sound, seeking out speckled trout, redsh, ounder, pompano, Span ish mackerel and catsh with cash prizes for the largest sh caught in each category. Tournament organizers Dan Anderson and Mark Moore said it wasnt easy resurrecting the tourna ment, and more than 800 T-shirts were sold over the summer months to help fund the ambitious event. Anderson praised the lo cal businesses that gave up rack space to help sell them Bayou Bash inshore tournament returns See KINGFISH B6 See BAYOU B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, August 14, 2014 Ca ss id y is a 1y r+ DS H Or an ge Ta bb y. Sh e is ve ry lo vi ng an d cu dd ly Ca ss idy wa s sur re nd er int o our ca re w h en he r fa mi ly had a ne w ba by Sh e ha s be en wa it in g fo r a fo re ve r home fo r qui te so me ti me If yo u can gi ve th is be au ti fu l gi rl a ho me ple as e do no t he sit at e to co nt ac t us If yo u ar e unab le to ado pt at thi s ti me pe rh ap s yo u co ul d fo st er or mak e a Do nat ion Al l pe ts adop te d fr om SJ BH S wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc in at io ns a nd spa ye d/ ne ut er ed Pl eas e do no t he sit at e to em ai l tow nse nd hsd ire ct or @g mai l. co m or ad op tb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 7-1 10 3 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at io ns a nd pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at ww w. sj bh um an es oc iet y. or g Sh el te r hou rs : Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur sd ay -S at urd ay fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e. If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! St unning sunsets ri gh t out yo ur back door ov er look ing St. Joe Ba y. Fu lly fur nished tow nhome loca te d on 4 acr es of land cov er ed with lar ge pr istine oak tr ees and palm tr ees As yo u take in all the na tur al beaut y of the ar ea yo u can star t to plan yo ur da y's ac tivities such as shing snor keling scalloping ka ya ki ng or boa ting (all of which can be done fr om yo ur back door). Th is tow n house has spacious living and ki tc hen ar ea and has 3 bedr ooms each with their ow n pr iv at e balc on y. Special to The Star Local writer Jo Richardson Grogan of Wewahitchka won a July writing contest sponsored by Midlife Collage. Jo writes under the pen name Jo Loving. The local writer describes how she turned around her life in the short story So THIS Is Early Retirement! Jo inspires readers, For the rst 300 miles, I secondguessed my decision. But the remainder of the trip was different; I was looking forward to this new chapter. This rstplace story is now on the Winners Circle page of www.midlifecollage.com. Scout news United Methodist Church sponsored Cub Scout Pack 347 and Troop 347 will be holding a new scout registration at 6:30 p.m. ET Aug. 25 at the Methodist Church at the corner of U.S. 98 and Monument Avenue. The leaders from both units will be at the school the same day speaking with the boys to see who is interested. Applications will be available at the church when you show up with your son. Registration fee until the end of the year is $8. If you are unable to attend that evening or have any questions contact Cub Master Abby Cozine at 340-0960 or Scoutmaster Bill Van Der Tulip at 247-9091. Come join the fun. Amateur radio license exams Amateur radio license exams will be given at 10 a.m. ET Aug. 16 at the Emergency Operations Center in Port St. Joe. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade an existing license. An amateur radio license can put you in contact with the world. If you need information, assistance or to register for an exam contact C.H. Tillis (AJ4xJ) at 648-8251. Late summer is a hard time to get inspired about working in the garden. Its really an in-between season, too late for summer owers, and too early for winter varieties. But most of all, its just too hot to spend much time working outdoors. However, there are plenty of easy jobs in the garden that really need to be done at this time. My information on Tips for Summer Gardening was provided by Emeritus Extension Horticulture Specialist Dr. Robert J. Black, of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). If youre growing roses, its a good idea to prune them late in August. Remove the healthy top growth, as well as the dead twigs and branches, and any diseased injured, thin, or spindly growth. Shorten the main canes and lateral branches. Leave at least half the length of each main can thats one to three years old. If you follow these pruning recommendations, the rst owers can be expected in eight or nine weeks. And the owers will be larger than they could have grown without the pruning. If youre growing mums or poinsettias, this is the last month that you should pinch these plants to increase blooms. Pinching back the stem tips will increase branching, and promote heavier owering in the late fall. Dont wait too long before you do this. Otherwise youll be pinching off the ower buds instead of the stem tips will reduce the number of owers that bloom in the fall. August is also the time to pinch off some of the buds on your camellias. As soon as you can distinguish the rounded ower buds from the pointed vegetative buds, twist off all but one of the owers buds at each tip. The remaining bud should develop into a large ower, so be very careful not to injure it. Many common ornamental, such as oleander, hydrangeas, and azaleas can be propagated by cuttings this time of year. For azaleas, take tip cutting, three to ve inches long, with several leaves still attached. Place the cuttings in a rooting medium, and keep them moist by covering them with a plastic bag, or using a mist system. Many rooting mediums can be used. The most common are sand, and mixtures of peat and perlite. You may want to use a rooting hormone to hasten root growth. If you have any cold sensitive ornamentals in you landscape, you might think about rooting a few cuttings before winter, and keeping the young plants in a protected place. That way, if your ornamental plants freezes, youll have replacement for the spring. If you want to plant things during August, you might try bulbs of Louisiana Iris, Ginger, Daylilies, Amaryllis, and Zephyr Lilies. You can still plant wood ornamentals as well, but hurry up so that theyll have a chance to become well established before the winter comes. Now is also the time to plant for your winter annuals, such as babys breath, calendulas, and pansies. Start ordering your seeds, and preparing the ower beds. Keep a careful watch for insects on your lawn and shrubbery. Late summer is when chinch bugs and mole crickets are very active on lawns, and white ies, scales, aphids, and caterpillars are damaging ornamentals. For more information on some tips for summer gardening contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website at gulf.ifas.u.edu or edis.ifas.u.edu. SPECI A L TO T HE ST A R The Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10069 recently donated $500 to Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High Schools Odyssey of the Mind team to help with expenses as they competed at the world nals in Iowa in June. Society VFW DONA TES TO PSJHS ODYSSEY OF THE MIND TEAM JO LOVING Local writer wins contest ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Tips for summer gardening Society BRIEFS

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The Star| B3 Thursday, August 14, 2014 Wewahitchka schools No. 89 Bruce Husband W. Hwy 22, Kemp Cemetery and Williamsburg Road, Hwy 22A E. of Creamer Road No. 81 Debbie Gillespie Hwy 386, Whispering Pines, Lester Drive No. 82 Eddie Price Dalkeith Hwy 381, S. Hwy 71 No. 77 Mike Dunn Lands Landing, Roberts Cem. Road, Forehand Road, Hysmith Drive, Angela Court,S Acre Farms No. 87 Carol Clavtorr Redbullisiand, Lakegrove/ Dam Road, Jehu Cemetery Road, Courthouse No. 74 Barbara GautierStonemill Creek, Gary Rowell Roadd/State Park, Lakeside Lodge, County Line South No. 75 Pam Stiles N. Hwy 71 (County line North), Dead Lakes Fish Camps, E. Diana Street (Stonemill Creek) Michael Street, White City and Howard Creek Port St. Joe schools No. 86 Paul Davis Jones Homestead, Simmons Bayou, Cape San Bias, Indian Pass No. 85 Sherri Matthews Mexico Beach No. 84 Michelle Rivers White City, Howard Creek No. 80 (sub) Julie Hedberg Beacon Hill, Overstreet, Hwy 38G and Highland View (Whiting Street and Victoria Avenue) No. 88 -Bob Pelc Gulf Aire, St. Joe Beach and Windmark No. 73 Sheila Fennell North PSJ-Avenue O-F (Avenue D-Battle to Peters Avenue E-F Hodrick to Peters Street) No. 62 Pam Harris Lizville and Avenue A No. 72 (sub) Gary Haase Highland View No. 78 Paulette Best North PSJ-Avenue B-O (U.S. 98 to Battle Street), Busy Bee You can contact the Transportation Department at 227-1204 if you have any questions. NO TI CE OF IN TE ND ED AC TI ON TH E GU LF CO UN TY SC HO OL BO AR D Pu rp os e an d Ef fe ct : Th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d pr op os es to am en d an d ad op t po li ci es as pr ov id ed fo r in th e Ad mi ni st ra ti ve Pr oc ed ur es Ac t, fo r th e pu rp os e of br in gi ng sa id po li ci es in to co mp li an ce wi th Fl or id a St at ut es an d St at e Bo ar d of Ed uc at io n Ru le s. Su mm ar y: Th e fo ll ow in g is a br ie f de scr ip ti on of ea ch pr op os ed ch an ge 5. 32 Ze ro To le ra nc e fo r Sc ho ol Re la te d Cr im es Ec onom ic Im pa ct : Th es e pr op os al s ma y re su lt in di re ct co st s ass oc ia te d wi th im pl em en ta ti on IF RE QU ES TE D, A HE AR IN G WI LL BE HE LD AT : Ti me : 9: 00 AM ES T Da te : Au gu st 19 2 01 4 Pl ac e: Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Ro om 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Th e en ti re te xt of th e pr op os ed ru le s ca n be in sp ec te d du ri ng re gu la r of c e ho ur s at th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Of c e, 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Sp ec ia l le ga l au th or it y un de r wh ic h th e ad op ti on is au th or iz ed an d th e la w be in g im pl em en te d an d in te rp re te d is ma de sp ec i c. Th e ad di ti on an d ch an ge s ar e pr op os ed by Bi ll Ca rr As si st an t Su pe ri nt en de nt fo r Bu si ne ss Se rv ic es an d ap pr ov ed fo r co ns id er at io n by Ji m No rt on Su pe ri nt en de nt Am end me nt s: Se e ab ov e Yo u still ha ve time Yo u still ha ve time Yo u still ha ve time Yo u still ha ve time to nomina te and v ot e! to nomina te and v ot e! to nomina te and v ot e! to nomina te and v ot e! FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST Nomina te and vo te no w fo r yo ur fa vo ri te businesses people re staur an ts and let them be re co gn iz ed in Th e 2014 Reader s Ch oic e To Vo te : GO TO star .c om OR apalach times .c om AND CLICK ON THE No mina tions and Vo ting Au g. 14-S ept 4 TO P THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN Th e 2014 Reader s C hoic e Th e 2014 Reader s C hoic e FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST apalach times .c om C LICK ON THE thr ough Se pt. 4 Special to The Star Open House: Open House for ninth through 12th grade will be on Thursday, Aug. 14, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Volleyball: The volleyball team will be conducting a carwash at the high school from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday. Team members will be pre-selling tickets for the carwash, but tickets are not necessary. Donations accepted at the carwash. We will have a limited number of hot dogs and hamburgers being grilled for donations. Look for us in the parking lot. As always, thanks for supporting our athletic programs. Senior Portraits: Senior portraits will continue today (Thursday). Scheduling information has already been mailed home. If you have not received information concerning your scheduled date and time for portraits and sitting fees, please call the photographer in Panama City at 769-6277. Purple & Gold Scrimmage game is scheduled for Friday at 6 p.m. at Shark Field. Star Staff Report During an annual award ceremony held on July 13, the Davida Byrd Scholarship Foundation awarded students Natron C. Lee, Talene Malone, Maya Robbins, Dantasia Welch and DeShauntae Willis each with a $500 scholarship toward their college educations. The students were chosen by Deacon Taylor Jenkins, the scholarship chairman. The scholarship was initiated in memory of Davida Byrd, a 1995 graduate of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Deacon Jenkins took it upon himself, along with the assistants of others, to set up a fund to help young high school graduates further their education. Special to The Star A new Correctional Of cer program will be starting at the Gulf/ Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe, on Aug. 25. The purpose of this program is to prepare students for employment as correctional of cers. The program includes the basic standards courses mandated for certi cation as a correctional of cer in the state of Florida. Students who graduate from this program would typically work as correctional of cers within a county or state correctional facility. Upon completion of this program, students are eligible to take the State Of cer Certi cation Exam for correctional of cers. The program will be conducted using the new shorter curriculum and will meet Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET for about three months. For more information, call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507, or email bburkett@gulfcoast. edu The application deadline for Pell Grants and other nancial aid is fast approaching, so call today or come by the of ce located in Building B at the Gulf/Franklin Campus, 3800 Garrison Ave. in Port St. Joe to pick up your application packet. Correctional of cer program offered at Gulf/Franklin Local students receive Davida Byrd scholarship BUS SCHEDULES School News

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FAITH Thursday, August 14, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. Special to The Star How ancient practices can help us connect with God will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Aug. 18, at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Encountering God: What Ancient Practices Can Teach Us Today, features a short lm depicting how various groups and individuals have tried to grow spiritually. Spirituality isnt new, said Lifetree national director Craig Cable. Theres a lot to learn from people who have come before us. Lifetree participants will explore how ancient practices might benet their own spiritual lives. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. But for this Book of Grace, Id fall at on my face. If not the one who inspired it, Woe be unto the human race. All of lifes lessons are in this Book. The reader only has to look. This Book will keep you from sin, Or sin will keep you from this Book. Remember when you have a problem, The Bible is the best place to look. Every problem thats ever been is written on the pages there-in. If you read and heed the Word each day, It will help keep you from sin. Billy Johnson OAK GR O VE DAYCARE EXPAN D S The Oak Grove Church Daycare is proud to announce the start of our new 3K program for the 2014-2015 school year. We have only a few spots available for children for this year. With the expansion of our daycare, part-time teaching positions are available immediately. If you are interested in joining our team please call Kristy at 227-4320 or stop by 613 Madison to apply. BACK T O SCH OO L C O NCERT AT FUM C First United Methodist of Port St Joe will be hosting a community Back-toSchool event on Aug. 16. The church has secured the Christian alternative rock band Remedy Drive to headline this event. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. ET and the show closes at 9 p.m. ET. Remedy Drive has recorded six albums. They have toured the Rock and Worship Roadshow, with artists such as David Crowder Band, Mercy Me, Family Force 5, Fee, and Sidewalk Prophets. The Remedy Drive song, Hope, was used for the Vancouver Olympic Games commercial in 2009 and 2010. Tickets for the event are $8 in advance and $10 at the door. All proceeds will be divided up between Imagine No Malaria and The Exodus Road. FUMCs desire is to reach every middle/high school student in our area and extended areas. For more information, call 2271724. For tickets, go to bit. ly/portstjoe. Special to The Star Nothing is more important than ensuring a successful future for your child. At Faith Christian School, we focus on each students heart, soul, and mind. With individualized student plans and small class sizes, each child is given the attention he or she needs to help with individual challenges. In every setting we reinforce the same Christian values and character qualities you teach at home. We strive to instill a Biblical worldview while offering the very best education possible. As we educate, we inspire your child to reach his or her full potential with caring, involved teachers and challenging curriculum. In this world of unlimited opportunities, make the decision now to give your child the best education possible. Open House for preschool, elementary, and middle school students is Friday, Aug. 15. A parent meeting will take place in the auditorium at 11 a.m. It is important that parents attend this meeting to stay current on all changes for the 2014-2015 school year. Classrooms will be open from 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. This is a great opportunity to meet the teachers, examine the curriculum, and see what FCS can offer your family. Faith Christian School is still enrolling students for the upcoming school year. Visit the campus Monday through Friday between the hours of 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., call 229-6707, or visit our website at www. FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. Growing closer to God explored at Lifetree Caf The Lions Tale Faith BRIEFS Oscar Curtis Hammond Jr., 71, of Mexico Beach, passed away Aug. 8, 2014, at his home. He was born Dec. 14, 1943 in Panama City, Florida to Oscar Curtis Hammond Sr. and Ruth Lindsey Hammond. He graduated from Port St. Joe High School and attended college at FSU, transferred to the University of Florida, and earned his Mechanical Engineer Degree. He worked on various aerospace projects such as F-35, F-22, B-2 Stealth Bomber and many more. He enjoyed his boats, hunting and shing with his two Labrador Retrievers. He was preceded in death by his father; and brother, Eric Hammond. He is survived by three children; Natalie Franks (Richard), Dr. Kelley Batten (Joel), and Joseph Christian Herring; mother, Ruth Hammond; two grandchildren, Brooks Batten and Cooper Batten; sister, Betty Rich (David); nieces and nephews, David Rich, Amy Rich Kirkus (Jason), Michael Hammond, Pam Nunnery, Eric Pitts; and special friend, Susan Langford. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday in the First United Methodist Church of Wewahitchka with Pastor Darryl Roberts ofciating. Interment will follow in Buckhorn Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the church from 10-11 a.m. on Saturday before the service. Active pallbearers will be Joel Batton, Richard Franks, George Duren, Lawrence Lindsey, Michael Hammond, David Christopher Rich and Jason Kirkus. Those desiring can make a donation to the Humane Society of Port St. Joe in memory of Mr. Hammond. Oscar Curtis Hammond, Jr. OSCAR CURTIS HAMMOND, JR. Obituary See more obituaries on B5 OWNERS MANUAL FOR LIFE

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The Star| B5 Thursday, August 14, 2014 Serving all of Gulf and Fr anklin Counties Pr ev entati ve Maintenance Email us at inf o@portstjoeac.com www .portstjoeac.com Larry Smith, age 64, off Sweet Water, A.L. passed away on Saturday, Aug. 9. Born March 19, 1950 in Butler, A.L., he spent his younger years in Pensacola and then moved to Sweet Water where he worked at Georgia Pacic until he retired. Larry loved hunting and spending time with his grandchildren and dogs. He also enjoyed playing the guitar and singing. He is preceded in death by his father, James Cecil Smith (Cat). He is survived by his wife, Patricia Smith, mother Betty E. Rowland, son Gabriel Smith, daughter Jessica McMorris (Sean), sister Cathy Reedy Smith (Cecil) of Selma, brothers Bobby Ray Reedy, Scotty Allcox, Joe Pat Rowland II of Panama City and Howard Creek and three grandchildren. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to your favorite animal shelter or Veterans organization. A memorial is pending. James Larry Smith JAMES LARRY SMITH Pauline was preceded in death by her parents John and Johanna Macik, niece Kimberly Race (Beaulieu), exhusband Howard L. Johnston, and son-in-law Dennis D. Calvarese. She is survived by her daughters Deborah Armstrong (Rick) and Janet Calvarese; sister Dottie Race (Richard) and nephew Mark Race (June) from Tempe, AZ; Grandchildren Heather Calvarese (Elton), Jennifer Pitts (Kevin), and Katelyn Calvarese (Mike); Greatgrandchildren Blake Wood, Kaiden & Rese Pitts; great-niece Nicole Beaulieu (Cleveland, OH) and great-nephew Beau Beaulieu (Glendale, AZ); great-great nieces Brianna, Emily, Elizabeth & Brooke (Cleveland, OH) and great-great nephew Scott Race (Tempe, AZ). Pauline was born in Cleveland, Ohio and moved to St. Joe Beach in 1994 to be with her two daughters. Her great-grandkids kept her young, she said. That and cooking for everyone! She was an avid reader and you would always nd a book in her hand, purse, and bedside table! PAULINE T JOHNSTON Funeral services for Mr. Damon P. Peters, Jr. of Port St. Joe will be held at 11 a.m. ET on Saturday, Aug. 16 at the New Bethel AME Church located at 146 Avenue C. Reverend Lawrence E. Gantt, Sr. will ofciate. Public viewing is being held at the church from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ET on Friday, Aug. 15. Mr. Peters, a retired real estate and business owner passed away on Saturday, Aug. 9 after a short illness. A 1950 graduate of Morehouse College in Atlanta and a veteran of the U.S. Army, Mr. Peters was a longtime resident of Port St. Joe where he and his father, Damon P. Peters (deceased) were real estate business partners and share owners of the former Money Bayou Beach Corporation. Mr. Peters was a longtime member of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity, the NAACP and the New Bethel AME Church, and was an avid photographer who enjoyed many creative arts. He is survived by Jean Corrin Peters, his wife of 64 years, and daughters Darylynn Peters Lewis of New York City and Fay Peters Hackney of Atlanta, his beloved pet, Max, an aunt and uncle, along with numerous cousins, nieces nephews, other relatives and friends. Comforter Funeral Home of Port St. Joe is handling the arrangements. The family requests that in lieu of owers, donations be sent to Morehouse College, Ofce of Institutional Advance, 830 Westview Dr. SW in Atlanta, GA 30314. Damon P. Peters, Jr. DAMON P. PETERS, JR. Funeral services for Hazel Marie Barton, 80, of Port St. Joe were held on Wednesday, Aug. 13 at the First Baptist Church. The Rev. Bruce Hodges ofciated and burial followed. Mrs. Barton died Monday, Aug. 11 at her daughters home in Eufaula. Chapman Funeral Home was in charge of Eufaula, A.L. arrangements. Born Oct. 14, 1933 in Alton, M.O., Mrs. Barton was the daughter of the late Charlie and Ollie Ellen Boaz Johnson. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe. Survivors include: children Phyllis (Larry) Rudisill of Indianapolis, I.N., Carol Rich of Eufaula, David (Linda) Barton of Tallahassee; seven grandchildren, Jonathan Wyche, April (Jeff) Kirkland, Justin (April) Rich, Hannah (Kirk) Reid, Patrick Barton, Paige (Corey) Vowell, Rhonda Barton; eight great-grandchildren, one brother, Leo (Opal) Johnson of Alton. Pallbearers were Jeff Kirkland, Trevor Kirkland, Kirk Reid. Christian Rich, Jonathan Wyche and Robert Whittle. Hazel Marie Barton Safely Home You have fought the ght, you have kept the faith, you have stood your watch; Welcome home thou good and faithful servant. These were the spoken words as my precious Toe entered into his eternal resting place on Tuesday morning, Aug. 5, 2014. Waiting hand in hand with his Lord & Savior Jesus Christ to welcome him home were his parents, Alto, Sr. and Maude Borland; his siblings, Sara and Boyce Borland; his beloved children, Lynn and Rhett Borland. Left behind to cherish all their memories is his beloved wife and best friend of 30 years, Vanessa Borland; brother and sister-in-law, Alvin and Noel Phelps; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins, all whom he loved dearly. Toe was born at home on Sept. 6, 1927 in Pinckard, Alabama where he remained until graduating high school and joining the U.S. Navy for 3 years. He then returned home to attend college in Birmingham where he received his degree in Pharmacy in 1953. After moving around several years with his family, he settled in Panama City for the last 22 years of his career at Bay Medical Center where he became their rst pharmacist in 1967. Toe retired in 1989 moving full time to his beloved Howards Creek. He was an avid sherman and loved being on the river as often as possible. At the end of the day there was nothing better than one of his sh fries and stories from days gone by. He was the quintessential southern story teller with the gift of a lively imagination and the unique ability to weave a story around an event, lace it with his infectious humor and deliver in convincingly. Most of all he was a good man who loved his Lord and studied his bible every day. Till I get there my best friend, you have been my true love and greatest joy. Ill meet you at the gate!! I will always love you!! Funeral services were held 2 p.m. CDT on Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 at Southerland Family Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed in Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Active pallbearers were: Jimmy Alford, Dusty Alford, Ron White, Steve Garrett, Ralph Garrett and Thomas Starling. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted at www. southerlandfamily.com. Alto Alexander T oe Borland, Jr. Mr. David Wayne Glass passed away on Thursday August 7, 2014 at his residence. Born in Apalachicola, Florida on December 21, 1957, he was a lifelong oysterman and resident of Eastpoint, Florida. He was preceded in death by his mother Annie Glass and brother John L Glass, Jr. (JL). He is survived by his wife Donna Glass; daughter Tonya Creamer and husband Daniel; granddaughters, Magen & Emily Creamer; father John L Glass and wife Rachel; brothers and sisters Mayce Rogers and husband Boe, Rodney Glass and wife Lisa, Brenda Henry and husband Mark, Joy Burkett and husband Steve, Leon Glass and wife Angela, Crystal Cooper and husband Rusty; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. EDT on Monday, Aug. 11,2014 at Deliverance Tabernacle with interment to follow in Eastpoint Cemetery with the Rev. Larry Hateld and the Rev. Bobby Shiver ofciating. Asked to serve as pallbearers are: Charles Brannon, Chris Estes, Henry Jackson, Earl Moses, Kelley Shiver, Richard Brim, Jr., with Charles Hicks being Honorary. Services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. David Wayne Glass Mr. Donald Joseph Kosin, 81, of Port St. Joe, FL, went to be with the Lord on Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. Mr. Kosin was a veteran of the Korean Conict serving his country in the United States Army. Born in Cleveland, OH, he was a graduate of Miami University of Ohio. He was a devoted husband, father and granddaddy. Mr. Kosin worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for 30 plus years and was a member of First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe. He was a member of the Gideons International, the Walk to Emmaus and taught a conrmation class at his church to the middle school students. Mr. Kosin is preceded in death by his parents, Joseph Frank Kosin and Libbie Kosin, son, Donnie Kosin and brother, Joseph F. Kosin, Jr. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Judy Kosin of Port St. Joe, FL; two sons, David Kosin and wife Denise of Georgetown, Kentucky, Joe Kosin and wife Sarah of Lexington, KY; one daughter, Elizabeth Roberson and husband Matt of Tallahassee, FL; grandchildren, Matthew and Caleb Roberson, Mac and Jay Kosin. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. EDT on Friday, Aug. 8, 2014 at First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe with Pastor Geoffrey Lentz ofciating. Graveside services were held in Wilmore Cemetery, Wilmore, Kentucky. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or submitted at www. southerlandfamily.com. In lieu of owers, donations may be made in memory of Mr. Kosin to the Gideons International at www. gideons.org. Donald Joseph Kosin Pauline T Johnston Oct. 5, 1925 to Aug. 6, 2014 Obituaries SUBMISSIONS Send obituaries to tcroft@star.com Faith

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, August 14, 2014 in order to raise funds that would resurrect the tour nament and be given right back to the shermen in the form of cash prizes. Anderson said that there used to be many in shore shing tournaments in Gulf County, but many have disappeared and its something the community wants. Were excited to bring back the Bayou Bash, An derson said. We were go ing to bring it back last year, but it was intimidating. We waited to do it this year so we could do it right. Now, its back to stay. Fish entered into the competition must be caught with the use of hook and line by a single angler. Spear ing, gigging, netting and any other shing methods are prohibited. Evidence of prohibited methods will result in disqualication for the angler. Every sh entered into the weigh-in will be inspect ed by tournament ofcials. Fish must be fresh, intact and caught during tourna ment hours. Weigh-in will begin at 4 p.m. ET and runs until 6 p.m. Mandatory registration for the event must be com pleted between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET on Friday, Aug. 15 at the Port St. Joe Marina or 5 a.m. to 11 a.m. on the day of the event. The price is $50 for the open division and $20 for juniors and there is no ad vance registration. In addition to the live music, prizes and give aways during the tourna ment, a large digital screen will track the tournament results in real time with leaderboards for each sh category. Its going to be a neat setup, and itll let people brag about their catches, Anderson said. Anderson said the last Bayou Bash, held in 2008 welcomed more than 260 sherman to the competi tion and he hopes to meet, if not exceed that number this year. A captains and sponsors appreciation party will be held at 5 p.m. ET on at the Port St. Joe Marina on Fri day at the new Tiki deck lo cated at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar. The event will feature a low country boil and drinks donated by Oyster City Brewing Company. The event is free for cap tains and sponsors. Guest fees will be donated to the St. Joseph Bay Preserves. Proceeds from Saturdays after party on the tiki deck will be donated to the Mex ico Beach Articial Reef Association. The Bayou Bash will not be postponed because of poor weather conditions and will only be rescheduled in the event of a hurricane. I encourage everyone to come out, Anderson said. Its always a good time. Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL ICE NSE D& IN SUR ED KINGFISH from page B1 Fees for the tourna ment are $160 per boat, which can have as many shermen as the captains can safely t. The entry fee can be paid online at www. mbara.org or in person at the Mexico Beach Marina or Half Hitch Tackle and Bluewater Outrigger in Port St. Joe. Registrations will also be taken during the Cap tains Party, to be held beginning at 5 p.m. CT at Beacon Hill Veterans Memorial Park on Friday, Aug. 22. Attendance at the Captains Party is not mandatory. The Captains Party will be held for partici pating captains and crew members and will feature thousands of dollars in giveaways along with pre views of the latest shing gear and food and drink. Childs said he is also excited to debut new digi tal scoreboards that will be stationed at the Mex ico Beach Marina which will display the weigh-in results and keep a run ning tally of the top three boats. Weve increased the technology for the tourna ment, Childs said. We have such big crowds and this way everyone will instantly know whos ahead. Ofcial rules and re quirements for the tour nament are available on the MBARA website. Anglers will be divided into two divisions; Rec reational/Amateur or Professional/Masters. To keep with tradi tion, cash prizes will be awarded to the anglers for King mackerel, Span ish mackerel and Wahoo in the Recreational/Ama teur division. Miss Kingsh 2014 has been announced as Port St. Joes own Morgan Guilford. She will be at the weigh-in on Saturday afternoon from 1-5 p.m. CT for pictures with the anglers and their sh. The public is invited to come to the Mexico Beach Marina for the weigh-in. After the tournament ends on Saturday, cap tains, anglers and their families are invited to a dance Toucans Bar and Grill in Mexico Beach. Since we started this tournament 18 years ago, its been a great way of raising money for the reefs, Childs said. Its been so successful and great way for the MBARA to get its name out there. BAYOU from page B1 SPECIAL TO T HE STAR OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM TOURNAMENT RULES & INFORMATION Submit one completed entry form for each individual entrant along with full entry fee. Entry fee to be paid in cash checks or credit cards will not be accepted. Indicate Open or Junior Division by checking the appropriate box below. Your contact information is for official tournament use only and will not be shared. Open Division $50.00 Junior Division $20.00 REGISTRATION & CHECK-IN Entrants must be properly registered, checked-in and paid in full prior to fishing to be eligible for any prize. Every entrant must register, check-in and pay in person Friday, August 15, 2014 at the Port St. Joe Marina between 9:00am and 5:00pm, between 5:00pm and 9:00pm at the Dockside Tiki Bar (Captains Party), or between 5:00am and 11:00am on August 16, 2014 under the Port St. Joe Marina tournament tent. CHECK-IN IS MANDATORY FOR EVERY ANGLER! DIVISIONS & ENTRY FEES Entrants must register to compete in one Division only. Open Division: all anglers male and female regardless of age $50.00. Junior Division: anglers male and female below 16 years of age $20.00. Entry fees are non-refundable. All entrants can weigh fish in every category within their division. FISHING SCHEDULE Fishing begins at first light on Saturday morning, August 16, 2014. Weigh-in begins at 4:00pm EST that afternoon. Anglers must be in line to weigh by 6:00pm EST on Saturday, August 16, 2014. The Bayou Bash will not be postponed due to adverse weather/sea conditions, and will be rescheduled only in the event of a hurricane. TACKLE & METHODS Fish must be taken via hook and line by a single angler. Spearing, gigging, netting and other fishing methods are prohibited. Evidence of prohibited methods will result in disqualification. HANDLING & FRESHNESS Every fish weighed will be inspected by tournament officials. Fish must be fresh, intact and caught between first light and 6:00pm on August 16, 2014 with no evidence of spearing or weight tampering. Anglers are responsible for removing all foreign objects from fish including leaders, hooks, baits, ice, weights, etc. Fish judged in violation by tournament officials will be disqualified. TAKE GOOD CARE OF YOUR FISH! Protests and/or appeals will not be entertained. TIES In the event of a tie in any category, prizes will be split evenly. SAFETY & CONDUCT Participants are expected to follow laws and rules for safe boating and the taking of marine fish. Sportsmanship and courtesy are the rule of the day. Illegal conduct or violation of rules will result in disqualification. Fish sharing and teaming up are prohibited. LIABILITY All entrants participate in the Bayou Bash at their own risk. Officials, sponsors, host facilities and all other persons and entities directly or indirectly connected with the operation of the Bayou Bash are exempt from any liability for loss, damage, injury, negligence, or harm to any entrant, their companions or other participants, boat captains, crew members, vessels, or equipment which may occur during the tournament. Participation in the Bayou Bash constitutes acceptance of these terms. NAME AGE HOME ADDRESS PHONE EMAIL EMERGENCY CONTACT EMERGENCY CONTACT PHONE CATEGORIES & PRIZES CATEGORY OPEN DIVISION JUNIOR DIVISION Speckled Trout Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Redfish Winners determined by most spots on a single slot-sized fish. Flounder Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Pompano Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Spanish Mackerel Winners determined by heaviest weight of single fish. Catfish Winners determined by aggregate weight of all catfish caught. 1st $1000 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $500 2nd Silver Prize Pack 3rd $300 3rd Bronze Prize Pack 4th $200 5th $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 3rd $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 3rd $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 3rd $100 1st $500 1st Gold Prize Pack 2nd $300 2nd Silver Prize Pack 3rd $100 3rd Bronze Prize Pack 1st $300 1st Gold Prize Pack Bayou Bash officials may amend or remove any category from competition, without notice, at any time to comply with federal or state requirements. Based on 120 registered Open Division anglers. P LEASE SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY FORM AND ENTRY FEE ( CASH ONLY ) AT R EGISTRATION & C HECK IN S EE T OURNAMENT R ULES & I NFORMATION ( BELO W, RIGHT ) FOR TIMES AND LOCATIONS Its going to be a neat setup, and itll let people brag about their catches ... I encourage everyone to come out. Dan Anderson tournament organizer

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 14, 2014 The Star | B7 95884 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Section: Case No.: 23-2010-CA000281 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CYNTHIA J. ANDERSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; THE ESTATE OF HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON; DONALD G. ANDERSON; MIRANDA NICOLE ANDERSON NKA MIRANDA JARVIS; UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, LIENORS, AND OTHER PARTIES TAKING AN INTEREST UNDER HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON AKA HERSHEL D. ANDERSON; JAMES PRESTON HAMBRICK Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order On Motion To Cancel And Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated July 9, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 23-2010-CA-000281 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 11th day of September, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE (121), OF UNIT NO. NINE (9), ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION TO CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated at Port Saint Joe, Florida, this 8th Day of August, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk MORRIS, HARDWICK, SCHNEIDER, LLC ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF, 5110 EISENHOWER BLVD, SUITE 120, TAMPA, FL 33634 FILE NO.:FL-9700272310 August 14, 21, 2014 33323S IN THE CIRCUIT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 14-05-PR IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JOHN THOMAS AGURAS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOHN THOMAS AGURAS, Deceased, File Number 14-05 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmature, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 14, 2014. PETITIONER: Melissa L. Ramsey ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jeremy T.M. Novak Novak Law Offices 402 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Phone: (850) 229-4700 Fax: (850) 229-1148 August 14, 21, 2014 33435S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USE PERMIT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for a water use permit has been received by the Northwest Florida Water Management District: Application number I07489 filed July 25, 2014 St. Joseph’s Bay Country Club, Inc., 700 Country Club Road, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Requesting a maximum withdrawal of 131,000 gallons per day from the Intermediate and Surficial Aquifers for Golf Course Irrigation use by existing facilities. General withdrawal location(s) in Gulf County: Section 25, Township 8 South, Range 11 West Interested persons may submit written comments/ objection or submit a written request for the notice of proposed agency action (NOPAA) regarding the application by writing to: Division of Regulatory Services, Northwest Florida Water Management District, Attn: Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Havana, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only to persons who have filed such requests. A NOPAA must be requested in order to be advised of further proceedings and any public hearing date. Written comments/ objection or NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00 p.m. eastern time on August 28, 2014. No further public notice will be provided regarding this application. Publication of this notice constitutes constructive notice of the permit application to all substantially affected persons. August 14, 2014 95810S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13-176CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. DOUGLAS BOUCHER, ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 31, 2014 and entered in Case No. 13-176CA in the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circui in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. was the Plaintiff and DOUGLAS BOUCHER, ET AL., the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on the 28th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 524.88 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 100.00 FEET; THENCE N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 50.00 FEET; THENCE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 110.00 FEET; THENCE N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 155.00 FEET; THENCE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 50.00 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 283.67 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE WATERS EDGE OF A BAYOU; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID WATER’S EDGE FOR 210.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT THAT IS S 89 29’ 30” W, 162.50 FEET AND S 00 30’ 46” E, 426.03 FEET FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE LEAVING SAID WATER’S EDGE RUN N 000 30’ 46” W FOR 426.03 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 162.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 15.00 FOOT WIDE EASEMENT ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE THEREOF. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Rebecca Norris Clerk Circuit Court B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, FL 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-9558771; Email: ADARe quest@jud14.flcourts. org. GINA L. BULECZA, ESQUIRE PENDERGAST & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 6675 CORPORATE CENTER PKWY, STE 301 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32216 File No.: 13-09500 DA_FL August 7, 14, 2014 95818S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000078 CAAXMX DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LEZLIE E. HOLLIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 29th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000078CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Lezlie E. Hollis, Billy Rich Wynn, Capital One Bank (USA), National Association, successor in interest to Capital One Bank, successor in interest to Capital One, F.S.B. are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 11th day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 3, BLOCK 14, PORT ST. JOE BEACH UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 58, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 248 SANTA ANNA ST PORT SAINT JOE FL 32456-6557 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 1st day of August, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servealaw @albertellilaw.com File No.: 018707F01 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. August 14, 21, 2014 99943S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 13 000048 CA ALS VII-RVC, LLC Plaintiff, vs. CYNTHIA F. BROOKS; DONALD H. BROOKS Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 29, 2014, and entered in 13 000048 CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein ALS VII-RVC, LLC, is the Plaintiff and CYNTHIA F. BROOKS; DONALD H. BROOKS are the Defendant(s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit 95834S NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Coastal Towing and Roadside Service, Inc. Gives Notice of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on August 19, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. ET at 4258 County Road 386, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. Coastal Towing and Roadside Service, Inc. reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. 1999 Chevrolet VIN# 1GCCS1940X8181177 1994 Chevrolet VIN# 1GNDM15ZXRB147647 August 14, 2014

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 14, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519197 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St. Lanark Village 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities inc. Small Pet 2. Pickett's Landing E-5 3 bedroom 3 bath boatslip, pool, 1600.00mo. Includes water, sewer, trash, Wi and cable. Pet friendly. 3. 234 Peggy Ln. 2 bedroom 2 bath garage close to beach 1600.00 mo. No utilities. Pet friendly. 4. 416-J Marine St 1 bedroom 1.5 bath, furnished, on river with boatslip. 900.00 mo. No utilities. No pets. 5. 42-2 Carlton 2 bedroom 1 bath furnished 550.00 mo. No utilities No pets. 6. 295 River Rd. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Furnished on river with dock. 1100.00 mo. No utilities. 7. 39-1 Carlton 1 bedroom 1 bath furnished 650.00 mo. Includes utilities up to 200.00. No pets. 8. 703-C 3rd St. Mariners View #12 3 bedroom 3 bath unfurnished. 850.00 mo. No utilities Pet friendly. 9. 509-D Meridian St, 3 bedroom 2 bath unfurnished $1000 mo., No utilities, No pets.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4518639 6519480Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6519479I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254518379 Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6519482 6519481$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 6519483Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 4518978 In Wewahitchka off Road 5 in the Stonemill area 10.7 acres with 5 ponds. $45,000Call: 227-5276 LAND FOR SALE 1130335 1130334 4 5 10161 Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM on August 28, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: I LOT 4, BLOCK “H”, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE NORTH 0117’24” EAST, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 808.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0117’24” EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 222.03 FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 116.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4459’26” WEST, 56.57 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 0000’34” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4524’48”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 2109’29” WEST, 182.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 187.85 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE RUN NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 218.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 0118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 31250’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 0000’34” WEST, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5619’45” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3840’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 7540’09” EAST, 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 8459’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9207’41”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 4430’55” EAST, 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 0000’34” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 4459’26” EAST, 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE NORTH 0117’24” EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4459’26” WEST, 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 0000’34” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9300’26”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4457’18” WEST, 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 8459’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3840’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 7540’09” WEST, 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 5619’45” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8111’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 0834’29” WEST, 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 8118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 6118’02” EAST, 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 4118’02”EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 6538’59” EAST, 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8842’03”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 4538’58” EAST, 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 0118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE SOUTH 9000’00” WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8842’04”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4538’58” WEST, 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4841’59”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 6538’59” WEST, 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 4118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 6118’02” WEST, 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 8118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 4254’14” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3349’51”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 2559’18” EAST, 122.20 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 0904’22” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2155’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 0620’44” WEST, 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE SOUTH 9000’00” WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2118’47”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 0745’39” EAST, 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE SOUTH 0904’22” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3349’52”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 2559’18” WEST, 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 4254’14” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8544’46”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 0646’55” EAST, 581.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 5619’45” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5715’51” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 28615’35”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 3244’09” EAST, 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE NORTH 5715’51” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5619’45” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 31250’38”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 0000’34” EAST, 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By. B. McGhee-Collins As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are, person, with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 859-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14. flcourts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Tele: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File #13-03366 August 7, 14, 2014 99949S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000391 FINANCIAL FREEDOM SFC, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE CHRISTOPHER KING; CAROLYN DELOACH DIXSON KING AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF, PHILLIP KING AKA PHILLIP ROY KING, DECEASED, ET AL; MARY ALICE BETSY; CAROLYN DIXSONKING F/K/A CAROLYN N. DIXSON F/K/A CAROLYN DIXSON; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST, PHILIP KING A/K/A PHILP ROY KING, DECEASED; SARAH A. DUNSTON A/K/A SARAH KING DUNSTON; MARY ALICE BETSY; ROY KING A/K/A ROY J. KING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 26, 2014, and entered in 2009-CA-000391 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB N/K/A ONEWEST BANK N.A. is the Plaintiff and WAYNE CHRISTOPHER KING; CAROLYN DELOACH DIXSON KING AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF, PHILLIP KING AKA PHILLIP ROY KING, DECEASED, ET AL; MARY ALICE BETSY; CAROLYN DIXSONKING F/K/A CAROLYN N. DIXSON F/K/A CAROLYN DIXSON; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST, PHILIP KING A/K/A PHILP ROY KING, DECEASED; SARAH A. DUNSTON A/K/A SARAH KING DUNSTON; MARY ALICE BETSY; ROY KING A/K/A ROY J. KING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT are the Defendant(s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, 32456, at 11:00 AM, on August 28, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 16 AND 18 BLOCK 1015 “REVISED” MILL VIEW ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 AT PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGhee-Collins As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Tele: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File # 13-24199 August 7, 14, 2014 99961S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000121-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES FARINA, ET. AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on the 28th day of August, 2014, at 11:00 A.M at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 158, WETAPPO ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 36 THROUGH 42 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 1st day of August, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: B. McGhee-Collins Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Geoffrey B. Sanders Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H # 315142 August 7, 14, 2014 School Supplies Drive Drop off locations: Rich’s IGA, 201 W River Road in Wewahitchka; Piggly Wiggly, 125 W. U.S. 98 and Dollar General Market, 550 U.S. 98, in Port St. Joe. Supplies will be distributed Aug. 16. Call: 348-5885 for more information. Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $443/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 GUN SHOW PANAMACITY FAIRGROUNDSAugust 9th & 10th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL96336 to 56654 Carefree Consignmen tOpening Saturday 6518 Hwy 98, St Joe Beach. Call Now to Reserve Your Space! 850-340-0263 HospitalityNOW HIRING Reservationist and MaintenanceTo apply visit one of our offices at 1200 Hwy 98 in Mexico Beach or 4693 Cape San Blas Rd in Cape San Blas Web Id 34297340 Medical/HealthCNA’sLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for position of CNA’s If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot email to tblackwell@shccs.com **We are offering a $1,000 sign on bonus for CNAs WEB ID 34293034 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate Apalachicola Beauty Salon space available in Sept. for nail tech, massage therapist or esthetician. Call 850-653-2255 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Port St Joe 2Bd 1.5Ba Apartment, New Appliances/Washer/Dryer. Close to everything! 2 minutes to downtown, St Joe Bay, Marina, & Beaches. $850/mo and All Utilities. 1yr Lease 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL96334 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. PSJ, 3br 1 ba, 116 Hunters Circle, $700 Call 850-227-5152 or 227-5272 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts R.E. Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Bryk FlooringWood Floor, Carpet, & Tile Installation, Carpet Cleaning. No Job Too Small! Reasonably Priced. 850-381-5333 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.