The star

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Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03953


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, JUNE 26, 2014 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion ................................. A4 Letters to the Editor ............. A4 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B6-B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 76, NUMBER 37 Enriching summer B1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners stepped back for the future Tuesday. During their regular bimonthly meeting, commissioners unanimously approved a resolution that, with added information, restates the case for a preferred alternative for the Gulf Coast Parkway. The resolution reiterates the BOCCs long-held position that the best route is so-called Alternative No. 15, which is the most northerly and direct link among the alternatives between U.S. 231 and U.S. Highway 98 in South Gulf County. The resolution also spells out the original intent of the parkway to enhance economic development in an economically disadvantaged county and provide a safe alternative for hurricane evacuation. The resolution was drafted and approved at the direction of Florida Department of Transportation Secretary Anand Persad, said Commissioner Warren Yeager, and stemmed from discussions following recent public workshops on the parkway and BOCC reaction to those meetings. During those workshops the FDOT presentation emphasized two alternatives which did not exist ve years ago which Gulf County of cials saw as a bene t primarily to Bay County in contrast to the original intent of the parkway. County of cials said the process of designing the parkway and alternatives had been hijacked and instead of adhering to the purpose of the parkway the road was becoming a boom for citizens of the county who wished to travel to Walmart in Callaway. There is nothing in there for Gulf County, said Commissioner Ward McDaniel last month. During a recent meeting with Yeager, who had traveled to Tallahassee to present the countys argument on how the parkway routes had changed, Persad suggested the county formally present its argument through resolution. That in turn would provide a foundation for FDOT discussions with federal highway of cials about the parkway and funding, Yeager said. An important part of the resolution was also providing a preferred alternative, Yeager said, and the BOCC approved alternative No. 19, also a northerly route, which provides an almost direct link to U.S. 231. BOCC pushes Parkway case See PARKWAY A5 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The races are on. Candidate qualifying for the 2014 election cycle closed last Friday with the two county commission seats drawing multiple candidates. Both sitting county commissioners will face opposition. For Commissioner Tan Smiley and challenger Sandy Quinn Jr. there is a bit of urgency in the District 4 race. With both candidates Democrats, the Aug. 26 primary is universal, meaning all voters in the district may cast a ballot and the race will be decided in the primary, not advancing to the November general election. Commissioner Ward McDaniel, the lone Democrat in the District 2 race, has no primary challenger for his run at a second term and advances to the November ballot. He is automatically joined there by former commissioner Billy Traylor, who is running to regain the seat with no party af liation. On the Republican side, Tom Semmes, who ousted Traylor in the primary four years ago before losing to McDaniel in the general Local election slate set See ELECTION A5 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Three letters proved too controversial in Dusty Mays effort to protect St. Joseph Bay: FWC. Men and women who make their living on the bay came out in numbers for last weeks regular bimonthly meeting of the Port St. Joe City Commission to protest a letter that could lead to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission playing a role in the effort May was proposing. May, a resident of Port St. Joe who spends much time on the bay, approached commissioners earlier this month with a multi-prong plan to save St. Joseph Bay and particularly boat scarring of valuable seagrass beds. Commissioners gave their blessing to proceed while maintaining communication on steps taken, but momentum stopped with a letter May was proposing to send to a high-ranking FWC of cer. The letter attempts to begin at least a dialogue with the agency on enforcing existing laws pertaining to the destruction of seagrass beds. But any contact with the FWC was a step too far for shermen who, several mentioned, have long had a bitter taste about how the state agency charged with protection and safety of the waterways does its job. Once you get the FWC in here they have legislative authority and you can open a can of worms you cant close, said Mark Moore. Further, several shermen wondered whether addressing boat scarring would even be a x for the serious degrading of seagrass beds which has occurred over the past several years. Some pointed directly to dispersant used by BP following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, while others noted the decline of seagrass across the region which has been identi ed by some experts as a wasting disease. And one sherman noted ooding which has occurred the past three years and the amount of chemicals, fertilizers and the like, which are brought into the bay from stormwater runoff. The grass is gone, said Eckley Sanders. Prop scars probably wont matter. Over the last three Fishermen: Save the bay without FWC See BAY A5 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Surveys indicate scallop numbers should continue to improve in St. Joseph Bay as the season opens this weekend. Bay scallop harvest season begins Saturday and researchers studying St. Joseph Bay indicate that after a lean year in 2012 followed by a rebound in 2013 the adult scallop population should continue an upward climb. The recreational season opens June 28, after Gov. Rick Scott requested an early open to the season last month for state waters from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. The season has opened early every year since the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The season will continue through Sept. 24. Scallops may be collected by hand or with a landing or dip net. Scallops cannot be taken ashore outside of an open area for harvesting. There is no commercial harvest for bay scallops in Florida state or federal waters. The average number, or density, of scallops observed in St. Joseph Bay doubled last year as researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg conducted their surveys, although the distribution of scallops around the bay was spotty. Given research early this spring into juvenile recruitment, researchers are predicting that St. Joseph Bay abundance will increase, according to a report from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. In fact, according to researchers, St. Joseph Bay is one of just three of the major bay scallop harvest areas where the abundance is projected to increase. Each year, researchers place 20 transect lines of 300 meters in length at 12 stations around St. Joseph Bay. The con guration works like this: the rst station is just off the boat ramp at Frank Pate Park and researchers work in a horseshoe around the south end of the bay and up to T. H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. In all, about 12,000 square meters of the bay are surveyed, a diver dipping underwater at one end of each transect and counting scallops Scallop season FILE PHOTO Scallop hunters can ply the waters of St. Joseph Bay in the search for scallops beginning Saturday. Numbers continue rebound as state opens season See SCALLOPS A5

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FIRS TCL AS S MAI L PRES OR TE D U.S. POST AG E PA ID OMAHA, NE PERM IT NO. 608 FIRS TCL AS S MAI L PRES OR TE D U.S. POST AG E PA ID OMAHA, NE PERM IT NO. 608 Co nve rt Yo ur Lo wIn ter es t CD s int o a Gu ar an te ed Pa yc he ck fo r Lif e Single Pr emi um Immedi ate Ann uity Ann ual Guaran teed Pa yo ut Rate* *A nn ua l pa yo ut ra tes inc lu de re tu rn of pr em iu m an d inte re st Th e ra te s ar e ba se d on ma le si ng le li fe 10 -y ea r ce rt ai n pa yo ut at issu e ag es 65 75 an d 85 An im med ia te annuit y has no ca sh va lu e an d ca nno t be sur re nd er ed In co me pa yo ut s ar e gu ar ante ed fo r 10 ye ar s ( xe d pe rio d) Af ter th e x ed pe ri od pa ym en ts ar e gu ar an tee d fo r li fe Gua ra nt ees ar e bas ed o n th e cl ai ms -p ay ing ab ili ty of th e in sur er Ce rt ic at e 90 -x x02 12 ; Ce rt i ca te 91 -x x02 12 CD1152W OW 5/14 Ag e 65 6 .5 % Ag e 75 8 .4 % Ag e 85 1 0. 3% Ca ro l Di xo n, Fi el d Re pr es en ta tiv e 10 1 Re id Av e Po rt St Jo e FL 32 45 6 85 062 555 30 Local A2 | The Star Thursday, June 26, 2014 Fun on the Fourth FILE PHOTO Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka and Mexico Beach will celebrate the Fourth of July with reworks shows. Star staff report Independence Day is ahead and the night sky will soon be lit up with the glittering explosions of local/area rework displays. Its an annual event that everyone looks forward to, so heres where you can get your x for the Fourth. PORT ST. JOE On Friday, July 4, Port St. Joe will commemorate the historic event starting at 6:30 p.m. ET with a parade down Reid Avenue featuring golf carts, go-karts and bicycles. Immediately following the parade, a low country boil fundraiser and ag ceremony to honor Americas founding fathers will take place at City Commons Park. A street dance will take place on Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. starting at 6 p.m. ET that will run into the night, ending at 1 a.m. Starting at 8:30 p.m. ET, 15-piece Panama City big band, Go Big or Go Home will perform an hour-long set on the George Core Park stage. During an intermission in the music, the annual reworks display will be launched over St. Josephs Bay. Once complete, Go Big or Go Home will play another 60-minute set to round out the celebration. WEW AHITCHKA The City of Wewahitchka will kick off its celebration at 10 a.m. CT with a festival at Lake Alice Park to feature arts, crafts, food and local vendors. At dark, the annual reworks display will light up the sky and immediately will be followed by a street dance, also at Lake Alice Park. MEXICO BEACH On Thursday, July 4, Mexico Beach will host the annual Best Blast on the Beach celebration. Americas birthday party begins bright and early at 7 a.m. CT with the Sandy Shoes 5K Fun Run at Under the Palms Park on 7th Street. Pre-registration is available at the Mexico Beach Welcome Center or on race day from 6 to 6:45 a.m. After the race, a kids shing tournament will be held at Canal Park. Children ages 2-14 are invited to bring their poles and try to reel in a big one. The tournament runs from 9:30 to 11 a.m. CT. There is no entry fee. Hot dogs, chips and drinks will be provided to the young anglers and their families. At 8:30 p.m. CT the annual reworks show will light up Mexico Beach for residents and guests alike. Attorney: Hurdles to countywide voting By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com If a majority of county commissioners wish to move to countywide vot ing in the future they have some corrections to make in the present. Michael Spellman, an attorney consulting with the Board of County Com missioners on redistrict ing and voting issues, said if commissioners aim to overturn or amend a feder al decree that implement ed single-member district voting in the county xes had to be made through redistricting. Spellman said to walk into a federal court with clean hands and make the case for either lifting or amending the decree ap proved by a federal judge in 1986, the county would have to get its house in order. We need to get our house in order before we stand in front of a federal judge, Spellman said. Most prominently, the BOCC must redistrict counting inmates housed in state prisons as part of the population. The BOCC did not do so during the most recent redistricting, which was in 2011 and had not in previous redistricting. Sometimes the law doesnt make sense and this is one of those cases, Spellman said, adding that inmates are felons who cannot vote, are not likely from Gulf County and are not free to enjoy the coun ty-provided services. However, he said there is no exemption from the provision in federal or state law, though he said some other jurisdictions such as Texas have considered test ing the provision in court. To date, the only x would be legislative, not in the courts, Spellman said. While there is some movement among counties in several states to ignore the mandate on counting prisoners, the difference for Gulf County was going into federal court and adhering to all dictates of state and federal law. You must count prison ers, Spellman said. Given the inmate popu lation in the county about 3,000 that would signicantly impact district lines, Commissioner Ward McDaniel said. We need to work with our legislative delegation to change the law, Com missioner Warren Yeager said. This affects small counties. Most of your pris ons are in small counties. Secondly, is the federal decree as it pertains to race. Normally, Spellman said, a redistricting can not consider race but Spellman said under the decree the county must consider race and draw a district that was geographically compact and could be considered a minority majority dis trict, meaning the majority of voters are minorities. Given the events over the years since the decree, Spellman said, his research and demographic data in dicate that such a district may no longer be District 4 in Port St. Joe, which was the majority minority dis trict established under the decree. He said there were pock ets of minority voters in the south end of the county and pockets in the central area of the county but given cur rent trends a majority mi nority district would likely be on the north end of the county. The numbers support the majority minority dis trict will be in the north end of the county, Spellman said. In sum, Spellmans rec ommendation is that com missioners prepare for any redistricting in 2015 it must occur by law in oddnumbered years by hir ing a consultant versed in GIS and redistricting work. And that the county in clude the prison population and identify what would currently be a sufciently large, geographically com pact minority population to honor the decree. Early is better and I would stress that, Spell man said. You should do the work as early as possible. Only then, he said, would he feel comfortable going before a federal judge to al ter or eliminate the decree. Commissioner Tan Smi ley said commissioners shouldnt be working to x something that was not broken. He said he saw no problem with single-mem ber districts and noted that taking the action Spellman outlined would push me off the table. We dont have the mon ey, Smiley said. There is so much we can focus on but here we are focusing on something that doesnt amount to a hill of beans. We need to worry about jobs. Lets focus on jobs. Redrawing lines dont put food on the table. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said three commis sioners ran on a platform that included countywide voting and said redistrict ing and moving to county wide would not only leave a commissioner in each citi zens district but also allow for all voters to cast ballots for all ve commissioners. I think that is the im portant point, Bryan said. Tom Graney of St. Joe Beach said the federal de cree was the epitome of federal intervention and that he was personally of fended to be considered a racist and ignorant due to a federal judge. He said only in Gulf County can residents not exercise their full consti tutional rights because of a federal judge preventing all from voting on how they are governed. I want this xed from the top down not the bottom up, Graney said. Lets get this straightened out and it is your jobs to do it. It limits me as a citizen and it limits you as a citi zen. It insults me for some judge to tell me Im too rac ist or too ignorant to govern myself. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR MB council inches closer to Parker House settlement By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The Parker House in surance battle nally is winding down. The council has a settle ment offer of $750,000 on the table for the loss of the historic Parker House, which was purchased by the city in 2011 and caught re days later. After consulting with a lawyer in May, the coun cil decided that additional funds were available and agreed to le a claim for $62,400 to recoup rent costs on a bank building used as a temporary city hall. The building was purchased by a Georgia-based bank in April and city employees were forced to move into the Public Works ofces. At the councils approv al, the rent claim was led and the city supplied proof of payment to the insurers. During Tuesdays work shop, Councilman Jack Mullen reported that an insurance adjustor said a counter offer to pay $61,100 on the rent claim was likely to come back, though they had not received a formal offer, as it was still subject to insurer approval. At their June regular meeting the council decid ed they would accept the $750,000 claim as long as they also received the rent reimbursement. After two years of negotiations a nal settlement would allow the city to move forward with plans for a new city hall to be built on a site near the Parker House, which was demolished in April. Previously, the council agreed to make a decision whether to accept or decline the settlement by July 1. A special meeting will be scheduled once a nal for mal offer is received. PEDDLERS LICENSE At a previous meet ing the council discussed peddlers licenses, which allow satellite businesses to operate from a truck or tent in Mexico Beach, pro vided they have afliated themselves with a local business. Several business owners attended Tuesdays meeting to address the council with their concerns when it came to people setting up on the side of the road to make a quick buck. Mexico Beach is some thing to make an invest ment in, said Dena Frost, owner of Frost Pottery Gar den. To allow people with no afliation to the city to take, but not give back, why would we do that? The council, several business owners among them, agreed that competi tion was healthy and said that as long as peddlers follow the rules, there wouldnt be any problems. As peddlers have popped up in recent months, police ofcers actively removed those sellers not following the ordinance. The current price of a peddlers license is $25, which is good for six months. The council said they would explore the pos sibility of raising the price to $65 in the future to meet the average business li cense price, but the group didnt believe a change to the current ordinance was necessary.

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P. O. Bo x 244, Pa nama City FL 32402 jim@judgefensom.com I take my job seriously I kno w ev er y decision aects someone s Constitutional rights to life, liber ty and pr oper ty I take ty Na tiv e of Po rt St Jo e, Re sident of Ba y County Si nce 1976 Gr aduated fr om Po rt St Jo e Hi gh School Early jobs included St Jo e Pa per Mi ll, City of Po rt St Jo e, St Jo e Na tural Ga s and painter s helper Me t wife, Ja n, in college and enjo ys ov er 40 ye ars of marriage together Gr aduate of Au burn Un iv ersity and FSU School of Law Tw o childr en, both ar e UF graduates Ac tiv e in many community outdoor and civic organizations civic organizations Fl orida St ate College of Law Gr aduate Wo rk ed as Assistant St ate At torney Wo rk ed in Wa shington D.C. for Congr essman Do n Fu qua Wo rk ed in Ta llahassee for St ate Re pr esentativ e Bi lly Jo e Rish Tr ied Ov er 100 Ju ry Tr ials in local practice Me mber of the Ju dicial No minating Committee for the Fi rst Di strict Cour t of Ap peal Rated nationally A V by Ma rt indaleHu bbell A indicates pr eeminent attorney V indicates highest ethical standar ds Pr esident of the Ba y County Ba r Association El ected Cir cuit Re pr esentativ e to the Boar d of Go ve rnors Me mber of the Di sciplinar y (E thics) Re vie w Committee At torney at Law ye ars ye ars ye ars ttorney at ye ars 8 8 Ap pointed Cir cuit Ju dge by Go ve rnor Je b Bu sh El ected without opposition in 2008 Se rv es as Chief Civil Ad ministrativ e Ju dge Cer tied by the Su pr eme Cour t to handle death penalty cases Re cogniz ed by Gu ar dian ad Litem for his positiv e and inuential wor k with yo uth Fo unding member of the Ju stice Te aching gr oup for the judicial eduction of students Cir cuit Cour t Liaison to the Pr ofessionalism Committee Chairman of the Pr o Bono Committee Chairman of the Tr ansition Committee to the cour thouse addition curr ently under constr uction Cir cuit Ju dge dle death penalty cases Re cogniz ed b y G uar dian ad Litem for his positiv e and inuential wor k with y outh Fo unding member of the J ustice Te aching gr oup for the judicial eduction of students Cir cuit Cour t Liaison to the Pr ofessionalism Committee Chairman of the P ro Bono Chairman of the Tr ansition Committee to the cour t house addition curr ently under Local The Star| A3 Thursday, June 26, 2014 Concerns raised about water line project delays By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com A project to replace wa ter lines in the neighbor hood of North Port St. Joe continues to experience delays. The latest news for city commissioners arrived courtesy of Bruce Ballister of the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, which administers the Commu nity Development Block Grant funds for the project, who said last week the con tractor on the project was well behind. As noted on the most re cent payment request from the contractor, Ballister said, the work is about 60 percent complete, meaning at least another 30 days of work on a project that was to be completed by the time this sentence is read. With rain days built in, the substantial comple tion date is July 3-4 and Ballister said the contrac tor would not meet that deadline. They are seriously be hind on the project, Bal lister said. And that raises questions about trouble with the CDBG. The crux of the issue is the CDBG application cycle. A government entity is allowed only one CDBG grant at a time, so in order to apply for another grant the current project must be completed. The city is trying to fund the North Port St. Joe work through CDBG in order to reduce the amount of mon ey borrowed from the State Revolving Fund. Given the demograph ics, economics and the need to improve drinking water in the area, North Port St. Joe was carved out of the rst two phases of citywide water line replacement in order to use CDBG funds. The initial phase of the project Avenues C-E between Battle Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. was delayed due to coordination with a proj ect funded by the USDA to replace sidewalks along MLK. With the two federal agencies involved in ap proving nal construction plans and bid packages, that rst phase, once pro jected to be completed last year, was pushed back until summer, with the projected completion date on water line replacement the mid dle of June. Rain days have added to the timeline. Ballister said the delays in the project might have affected applying for the next round of CDBG funds if the funding cycle also had not been delayed. Ballister said the next cycle the city can apply for wont come until early next year, but the current proj ect must be closed out. Clay Smallwood with Preble Rish Engineers, the citys engineers of re cord, said the contractor was aware of the penalties in place for failure to com plete the project on time. Commissioner William Thursbay told Smallwood that he would have no prob lem seeking compensation from the contractor for the delay on closing. In either case, it now appears that funding for the second phase of line replacement will not be in city hands until the sec ond quarter of 2015, at the earliest. ADVISORY COMMITTEE On a separate note, a di vided Commission replaced two members of the Citi zens Advisory Task Force which meets at least once during the CDBG applica tion cycle to discuss and identify potential projects. The current committee has been in place for several years. The replacement came at the behest of Commis sioner Bo Patterson and came just after commis sioners approved a new ap plication for those wishing to serve on city boards or advisory councils. Patterson said the CATF needed new blood and requested the replacement of Quen Lamb and Eddie Fields from the board. Lamb recently had a nasty verbal exchange with Patterson during a board meeting and Fields has indicated he will stand for election to the city commis sion during the next elec tion cycle. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said Pattersons replacements were worthy but suggested any opening on a board or council be ad vertised to allow all those interested to apply. I think it is a bad prec edent not to advertise to give everybody a chance, Buzzett said. Patterson contended there wasnt technically an opening; he just wanted to add new blood. Commissioners voted along what have become familiar lines, 3-2, with Commissioners Phil Mc Croan and Thursbay join ing Patterson in making the changes to the board. APPLICA TION DEBA TE The passing of the new application process also exposed a familiar ssure during the debate. Mayor Mel Magidson attempted to make an argument that the appli cation should include a question about any convic tions for a felony, but after Patterson moved to elimi nate two other questions from the application, Magidson was repeatedly interrupted. Those interruptions came from Thursbay, who chided Magidson that they had heard it all before and weve already had this discussion and to stie himself, adding that he and Magidson had plowed similar ground during prior meetings and it was time to move on. In his comments at the end of the meeting Magid son said commissioners would always have to de bate various issues and wondered if commission ers could cite a time he cut off debate, asked them to stie or shut them off in any way. He said he offered commissioners basic re spect during meetings and expected to provid ed that same respect in return. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative introduces open usage Special to The Star Gulf Coast Electric Coopera tive has introduced a tool to help members track their energy us age. Open Usage is available at www.gcec.com. To access the program, log on to the cooperatives web site and click the Access Your Account and Pay Online link on the left side of the homepage. From there, you will be prompted to enter your email address and password. If you arent registered to view your account(s) and pay your bills online, you must do so to access Open Usage by clicking the Register Now link. Once you are signed in, select Open Us age from the menu on the left side of the screen to access the program. If you have multiple ac counts, you can select the ac count that you wish to view from the dropdown menu at the top of the screen. Enter a date range for the data you wish to view, or select a timeframe of the last two weeks, month, three months or year-to-date. Once you make your selec tion, a chart will appear that shows both the high and low temperatures and your energy usage in relation to the weath er. If you hold your mouse over each bar on the chart, your daily energy usage will appear. Week days are depicted by blue bars, while weekends are shown in gray. You can also view this infor mation in a list format at the bot tom of the screen. Scroll down to see your average consump tion, total consumption, lowest use and highest use during the selected timeframe, as well as the highest and lowest outdoor temperatures. The data can be saved as a PDF or exported to a spreadsheet for your records. Open Usage is a great tool that is now available to GCEC members, GCEC manager of member services Justin Barnes said. By combining crucial weather and meter data, mem bers can better track and man age their usage.

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After youve taught school for a while, you get to where you know what to expect from different types of students. Im not saying that some college students dont make dramatic improvements they do, especially in math courses. A light bulb will come on and suddenly, they get it. Actually, its a fun thing to see However, when you have a good student who suddenly makes a huge turn for the worse, you know something is going on. Recently, I had an experience where I did think something was going awfully wrong. After grading all of students tests, I went back through and noticed where one of my best students had failed this particular test and she failed it miserably. Whereas this lady normally almost always gets close to all of the answers correct, she had missed about half of the questions on this test I had just graded. It puzzled me. I returned the graded tests at the end of class as the students were leaving the classroom. This particular lady who had surprisingly failed this test came back in crying. Crying students generally do not affect me. Ive taught at the college level for 20 years, I can handle crying and ruining your 4.0 grade point average. I dont want anyone to cry and I dont want to ruin anyones GPA, but you get what you get. This lady was different; she had never done poorly on any type of assignment, so I listened to her. She had left about half of the questions blank didnt bother to answer them at all. The rst thing out of her mouth was, The answers were there, they disappeared. Of course I responded with a What do you mean? I took her graded test over to the window in the sunlight and could indeed see the impressions of her work on this math test. I had to tilt the paper back and forth, but I could see the answers in the sunlight. She missed one and got her normal A. How did it happen? She showed me the pen; it was some sort of erasable pen. In the shufing and grading of papers I guess the erasable pen work got erased. It was very interesting, because the answers were missing on the top half of every page. There was no doubt she did the work and I was happy to consider the invisible answers. I did tell her that she needed to use a normal pencil in the future and Im pretty sure she will. Men are different than women when it comes to purging their closets, wardrobes, etc. At least I am different. I am much more likely to keep an old T-shirt or a beat-up pair of blue jeans that have holes everywhere. It is usually because they either feel better than new stuff or have good memories. You know how clothes have memories. You remember buying that T-shirt on vacation or how you got that hole in the backside of those jeans. Other things like sweatshirts just feel good, particularly worn out cotton sweatshirts. My preference is gray. I have a favorite old sweatshirt that I have had for many years, it has NASA logo on it and many folks have worn it. But it is mine. I am doubtful that I will ever see my sweatshirt again. It disappeared on my oldest daughters body as she went to the airport to travel back to Nashville, Tenn., to work for the summer. This is one time that I was happy to let my prized possession go. If wearing my perfectly broken-in gray sweatshirt that felt so good on a cool night (it was like I was being hugged) means half as much to my daughter as it meant to me, I will be happy. Really I will be happy, you dont have to bring it back Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor.com. I didnt say Im gonna quit. I said, Ive got to get out of this writing business. You can say semantics. The point was, is, we cant cruise Franks Dairy Bar forever! We cant linger in front of Cannons Rexall Drugstore until the cows come home. The distinct smell from the hoop cheese on Mr. Woodow Kennons back counter fades over time. At some point in life, weve got to let LaRenda Bradeld, Richard Lynn Hale and Hollis Mayo grow up. Even the Saturday afternoon double feature at the Park Theatre nally came to an end. Im been writing these little blurbs for years like we were sitting on your front porch, sharing the breeze and the lemonade as the sun dropped behind the trees. The conversation was great, the company even betterthen it dawned on me, aint NOBODY doing much front porch sittin these days! Life seems to have passed my little stories by. So I wrote that it was getting late, Ive got to nish my lemonade and get home before dark. Besides, youve already heard most all the good tales, some tall others not so tall, that I have. And since Mother died, I didnt think anyone was reading these things except for the editor and one of my brothers. You guys never cease to amaze me. Folks have stopped me going into the grocery store and asked me to continue. Ive had phone calls from friends that I havent spoken to in quite some time, encouraging me to keep writing. There have been letters to the paper with some very nice comments. Please understand that I appreciate each and every one of you from the bottom of my heart. Apparently more people understand the times and places Im talking about than I realized. And that is the most encouraging thing. I dont think any of us are talking about living in the past. We just remember with great feeling a time when the pace was a little slower. Neighbors had time to be neighbors. The milk seemed to be a little colder, the watermelon a little sweeter. You could send your kids out to play and be assured that the whole town would take care of them. There is just something so special to me when you get out to where the blacktop ends. You dont know how much I have enjoyed throwing rocks at Pet Milk cans with you. We have caught a lot of water in those Prince Albert Tobacco tins. And we have spent countless hours dropping a knife off our elbow and tossing washers at cut out circles in the ground. I bet we have sung Que Sera Sera more times than Doris Day! Lets cherish those moments. Lets pass as much of it as we can on to our children and grandchildren. But lets not be foolish or too sentimental here. Ive said often times before, nobody wants to go back to cutting okra or cleaning out fence rows! ESPN and The Golf Channel are two modern conveniences that I appreciate as much as I did that old Western Flyer. One guy caught up with me at the little league eld, Are you through writing for good? I couldnt tell if he was sorry or relieved! Maybe he gured I ought to write something bad for a while. Most everyone asks about Leon. He will get along just ne without me bringing up some off the wall thing he did or said every other week. I did realize this as person after person mentioned him you get what Im doing here! Im not selling anything or trying to be the next Ernest Hemmingway. Im simply and straightforwardly discussing life as I see, and have seen, it. Im not mad at anyone, grinding on an ax or politically inclined to bring you around to my way of thinking. You genuinely care about Leon. You see the love and admiration I have for him, notwithstanding what I might say or write about him. I wish you could have shared those brown beans and cornbread around our family table just once in your life. Maybe thats what I have been trying to explain to you all these years. I fully believe that you share my love for the town, the buildings, the history and the folks we talk about week after week. Life is so full of good people, good times and great possibilities. Sure, we live in a world that turns more toward the negative, cant do, regulated and dangerous each day. But that doesnt mean we have to accept it. Or give into it. Surely a little light hearted, nothing story from time to time cant hurt. And if it brings a brief respite from the headlines of today, gives you a chuckle or a nod of remembrance, all the better. You have been kinder to me than I deserve. You have become a big part of my life and for that, I am grateful. As for me continuing this writing gig, Ive told you the tank is about empty in as many ways as my limited ability allows. But if I can think of something for next week, I will certainly pass it along to you. Respectfully, Kes Future of the American workplace Disappearing answers & sweatshirts As I put my kids to bed I wonder what lies ahead Changes Comin On Written by Dean Dillon, Buddy Cannon, and Jimmy Darrell and recorded by Alabama Some time back I was asked to speak to an investment class at the University of Alabama. The experience was invigorating. Theres nothing like being around tens of thousands of young people enjoying the best years of their lives on a gorgeous spring day. Author Bill Bryson said the same about living in Hanover, N.H., but they dont conclude classes at Dartmouth with a resounding Roll Tide. The presentation focused on how our team makes investment decisions, how these choices differ for varying client objectives, and methods for establishing a productive balance of equities and xed income instruments in portfolios. The students questions afterwards centered around these same issues: investment strategies, inquiries involving particular securities, and how decisions are reached on market buys and sells. As I returned to Florida, I realized that while we had engaged in a theoretical discussion regarding investment choices, no one had asked about how to build an investment advisory rm as a business. There were no questions about client services apart from portfolio management. No inquiries about the costs of ofce space or software. No questions about payroll or employee benets. What the students really needed was not only a presentation on investing, but insights into the entrepreneurial experience. Somewhere around 75 percent of all self-made millionaires in America are business owners. As the U.S. job market devolves, this number is likely to increase. The days when someone handed you a solid paycheck with benets and a pension right out of college are rapidly disappearing. The ability of a young person to identify a need and ll it with a start-up enterprise may represent the lifeblood of our economy in coming decades. Unemployment is now at 6.3 percent. This is down signicantly from 2009, when our unemployment rate stood at 10 percent. Yet, our domestic economic landscape is in trouble. There are still 1.49 million construction jobs missing, write Josh Boak and Chris Rugaber in an article entitled U.S. Job Market Recovers Losses Yet Appears Weaker. Factories have 1.65 million fewer workers Government payrolls have shrunk, taking middle class pay with them. Local school districts have 255,400 fewer employees. The U.S. Postal Service has shed 194,700 employees. Globalization and automation are wiping out millions of traditional employment opportunities. One of the best skills that a young person, or any person, can have is the ability to create and sustain ones own business. Small business has always been and remains the backbone of the U.S. economy. Creating a successful one may be the prime path to wealth for many younger Americans. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www.arborwealth. net), a Fee-Only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard OPINI O N www.starfl.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 A Page 4 Section Im on the week to week plan Dear Editor: We have been coming to Cape San Blas for the month of January for the past seven years. When retirement age comes, we plan to spend entire winters on the Cape. The initial draw was the areas dog friendly beaches. We have made many good friends, all of them dog lovers. Part of the joy we experience has to do with daily walks on the beach with our friends and their dogs. Almost daily, we travel from Boardwalk and Florida Avenue all the way to the lighthouse, traversing the AFB section, which now, we understand, is in danger of being closed to our four-legged friends. What a shame it would be to lose that stretch of beach for walking. Many enjoyable hours are spent, meeting new people (mostly other snowbirds), nding treasures and picking up debris left behind by storms or less caring people. I worry that such a restriction will force the winter population to nd other areas to spend their time and their money. I hope the Air Force will reconsider their position. Perhaps a seasonal allowance could be considered, if, during the summer, high trafc to that area is deemed detrimental. Dennis and Karen Gagnon Putnam, CT Losing dog-friendly beach would be a shame LETTERS MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook

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Local A5 | The Star Thursday, June 24, 2014 The Gulf Coast Parkway was also originally intended as a security measure as it would bypass trafc around Tyndall Air Force Base. A $25 million federal earmark was provided for initial planning and development of the highway, which was to promote and enhance transportation to economically disadvantaged counties, the resolution reads in part, mirroring language in the original federal act creating the project. In addition to providing a direct route for tourists and visitors from U.S. 231 to South Gulf County, the Gulf Coast Parkway is seen by local economic development ofcials as critical to development of the Port of Port St. Joe. The St. Joe Company, a collaborator with the Port St. Joe Port Authority in developing the port, also sees the parkway as a boost to the Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport and the parkway would provide a needed four-lane route for overland shipping. The parkway also would provide freight connections to Enterprise Zones along County 386 and U.S. 98 in Gulf County from U.S. 231 and other major routes out of Bay County. The resolution notes the Apalachee Regional Planning Council has long championed the parkway as a link from Gulf County to major transportation routes and the counties of Jackson and Calhoun have also weighed in in support of Alternative No. 15. This can help spur economic growth (in the region), Yeager said. Affordable housing Commissioners agreed to provide $350,000 in State Housing Initiative Plan (SHIP) funds as a local match to a proposal from the Paces Foundation to build 50 affordable housing units on a portion of 40 acres donated to the city of Port St. Joe for that purpose. Paces is pursuing federal HOME funds distributed to Florida by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The non-prot is pursuing $6 million in HOME funds and the match is intended to demonstrate community support to bring in affordable housing. The county will get its money back if Paces fails to secure the grant, but a representative of the foundation said the local match would move their application up the priority list. The $350,000 represents less than half the SHIP funds available to the county after it receives its July 1 state allotment, said county administrator Don Butler. 7-day beach driving permits The BOCC will hold a public hearing July 8 on rescinding an ordinance passed last year that created a temporary, or 7day, beach driving permit. The BOCC also will formally increase the ne for beach driving violations to $500. The new rules would take effect July 8. PARKWAY from page A1 TIM CROF T | The Star Candidates handed in paperwork last Friday as candidate qualifying ended at noon. ELECTION from page A1 election, will face Vicki Adkison Armstrong in the primary. The winner will join McDaniel and Traylor on the general election ballot. In addition to the commission seats, three school board seats were in play this year but only one drew multiple candidates. Sitting school board members Danny Little (District 1) and John Wright (District 5) drew no opposition and automatically secured new four-year terms. With George Cox retiring from the District 2 seat, James Taunton and Brooke Wooten will face off in the primary to decide who occupies the seat the next four years, as school board races are non-partisan by law. The registration book for the primary closes at 5 p.m. EDT July 28. Voters new to the county or those who have changed addresses or party afliation have until that date to make changes to the voter registration. Voters are encouraged to contact the ofce of Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon at 229-6117 to make appropriate changes to their registration record. Early voting begins Aug. 16 and continues through Aug. 23. The early voting locations will be the Supervisor of Elections Ofce on Long Avenue and the Charles Whitehead Wewahitchka Public Library. Each weekday, early voting hours are 7:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. EDT (6:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. CDT). On the two Saturdays, the hours are 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. EDT (7 a.m. until 4 p.m. CDT) and on the one Sunday the hours are 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. EDT (9 a.m. until 5 p.m. CDT). BAY from page A1 years ood waters have been bring ing all kind of chemicals into the bay. Buddy Wood of Woods Fisheries blamed BP and dispersant, saying, Half the grass in the bay is dead. Once you get the FWC in here you cant stop (what they do). May countered that the fear should be an entity beyond the FWC, such as the Pew Foundation or the federal government, which has se verely limited shing seasons that locals should be concerned about. He said if the bay grass beds con tinue to decline, local stakeholders may have no say in the future and access to the bay. The last thing I want to see done is to have the Pew Fund or some body else come in here and limit our access, May said. My intent was to help the city by being proactive. If we dont protect our bay from people who are damaging our habi tat we are going to be in trouble. May said the majority of culprits are visitors who are renting the bay for their vacation. Beyond a lack of knowledge about channels and protecting the seagrass, many just dont care. I didnt think anything (I pro posed) was controversial, May said. I want it to stay open so we can all enjoy it. And I want it to be healthy. Beyond the contact with the FWC exploring enforcement of ex isting rules about grass destruc tion, Mays initiative included edu cational material at boat ramps and launches, billboards and signs as well as seeking funding to mark the existing channels. As several people mentioned last week, the old buoy system marking the channels worked to reduce sea grass destruction. We all want conservation, said Commissioner Phil McCroan. We are in favor of education. We should start in-house with these men and women that make their living on the bay. The common theme among the shermen was education before writing nes. And another place to start was marking the chan nel, which would require no small amount of dollars. They want something done but they dont want to deal with the law, said Commissioner William Thursbay. May argued that carrots were ne but what was also needed was a stick in the form of enforcement. He said education would only work with the addition of monetary motivation for boaters to protect the bay. Commissioner Rex Buzzett de fended May and his efforts. This is a serious problem and you all know we have a problem out there, Buzzett said. Weve got to do something. His suggestion is we are going to get serious about it. We need to let somebody do something. We dont need to sit around and just talk about it and do nothing. Buzzett, echoing comments about chemical runoff, added that it was time the city enforced taking people on Cape San Blas off septic tanks. The city had run a sewer line the length of the cape and peninsula. Now was the time to rid the southern end of the county of septic tanks. May said he hoped somebody would pick up the baton and con tinue the effort to save the bay, al though given the resistance to his strategy he said he was obviously not that man. But he said it was an effort worth undertaking. Mayor Mel Magidson said the burden really fell on those in atten dance who rejected Mays plan but who have a vested interest in the fu ture health of the bay. I think everybody is on the same page about saving the bay because it is the goose that laid the golden egg, Magidson said. The question is how we do it. I think to an extent that has to start with you. TIM CROF T | The Star Commissioners Rex Buzzett and Phil McCroan were sworn in for new two-year terms last week. SCALLOPS from page A1 along the length of the line. In 2012, after two banner years, the average number of scallops per tran sect line in St. Joseph Bay fell to 10.9. Last year, researchers found 23 scallops per transect line, indicating a successful year for juvenile growth. That juvenile growth continued through the fall and winter and re searchers projected that adult num bers would be very similar if not up compared to what was seen in 2013. In 2010 the average per transect was 138; in 2011 it was 154. Homosassa and Steinhatchee are also expecting an increase in density, according to researchers. The average at St. Marks contin ues to decrease, a trend that began in 2012. Once again this year, the FWC is asking for the publics help in assess ing the bay scallop population as well as how long it took folks to nd and harvest scallops. The FWC is asking those seeking scallops to ll out an online survey at http://svy.mk/bayscallops. For questions or to seek additional information about scallop season, email BayScallops@MyFWC.com. Learn more by visiting MyFWC. com/Fishing and clicking on Salt water, Recreational and Bay Scallops. F ILE PHO T O Scallop hunters can ply the waters of St. Joseph Bay in the search for scallops beginning Saturday. MORE INFO There is a daily limit of two gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or one pint of bay scallop meat per person. No more than 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or one-half gallon of bay scallop meat may be possessed aboard any vessel at any time. Folks are allowed to harvest bay scallops only by hand or with a landing or dip net. Bay scallops may not be harvested for commercial purposes. Bag limits are daily limits; it is illegal to take a limit of scallops in the morning and return later in the day and collect another limit of scallops. Unless otherwise exempt, a regular Florida saltwater shing license is required when using a boat to harvest scallops. If folks wade from shore, a regular Florida saltwater shing license or a free resident shore-based license is needed. Divers and snorkelers are required to display a diversdown ag (red with a white diagonal stripe) while in the water. Boaters must stay at least 100 feet away from a diversdown ag in a river, inlet or channel. In open waters, boaters must stay 300 feet away from a divers-down ag. More information on bay scallop s including management rules, dive-ag regulations and boating safety is available online at MyFWC.com/Fishin g (click on Regulations under Saltwater Fishing). Information about scallop researc h is available at MyFWC/Research/Saltwate r under the Mollusc section. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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By Tom Baird Special to The Star Summer is a great time to observe life in our salt marshes. Hidden in the grasses of our vast bay and coastal marshes is a multitude of wildlife, though it sometimes takes a keen eye to observe it. However, readily apparent to the marsh visitor are three species of small herbivorous snails that nd a home on and around the marsh grasses. The snails exist in vast numbers and they are totally gentle creatures. When exploring the edge of the marsh, carefully remove one of the snails from a stalk of cord grass and place it on your open palm. Within a few seconds, the snail will begin crawling around with tentacles waving about. A unique relationship exists between the grasses of the coastal salt marsh and these snails. In fact, were it not for these silent little grazers, the salt marsh would not be as productive. The interaction between these snails and the marsh grasses is one of the most intriguing aspects of salt marsh ecology. Living on the stalks of our marsh grasses is a small tan or brown snail, the salt marsh periwinkle (Littorina irrorata). Periwinkles crawl up and down the leaves of the marsh grasses, staying up above the water surface during high tide. At low tide, they may be seen crawling around the bases of the plants. Like many marine snails, periwinkle mouths possess a rasping, le-like radula. As they crawl over the plant stalks, they scrape off and eat the algae growing on the moist leaves. At low tide, they consume algae, bacteria and detritus around the base of the plants. This activity is benecial to both the plants and the snails. Without the snails the leaves of the marsh grasses would soon become coated with algae and bacteria, which would block the sunlight necessary for photosynthesis. As snails keep the surface of the leaves clean, they, in turn, obtain food for themselves. There is another, more far-reaching benet however. As the periwinkles feed, they loosen much of the algae, bacteria and detritus, not all of which are consumed. At the next high tide, this material is carried into the nearby bay or Gulf, thus providing a valuable energy source to near-shore aquatic food webs. In addition, the feeding habits of the snails create more surface area upon which more algae can colonize. This creates more food for other lower species, which in turn are grazed upon by many commercially important organisms, especially those that inhabit salt marshes as juveniles. However, if things get out of balance, these snails can harm marsh grasses. The size of periwinkle populations is kept in check by their predators blue crabs and stone crabs. Thats one reason these snails crawl up the stalks and get up out of the water on high tides to avoid the crushing claws of blue crabs. If blue crabs are overharvested, and there arent enough blue crabs to eat the periwinkles, the periwinkle populations increase. With too many snails consuming what algae is available on the grass stalks, the snails will begin to scrape into the tissues of the plants, thereby injuring the marsh grasses. Also, if there is a prolonged drought that prevents enough algae growth on the surface of the leaves, the snails will also scrape into the plant tissues. Large sections of marsh have been destroyed by periwinkles during prolonged droughts. All the components of a salt marsh need to be in balance for the salt marsh to thrive. Periwinkles are equipped with the typical trap door, or operculum, found in most marine snails. The operculum is that stiff, dark brown appendage that closes the opening to a snails shell as it withdraws its foot. Periwinkles can withdraw into their shells for protection against cold weather or to prevent drying out. During dry periods in the marsh, or when the temperature falls below 46 degrees Fahrenheit, they withdraw into their shells and secrete a sticky mucus, anchoring themselves to the cord grass above the high water mark. There are other marsh snails that play a role in the marsh economy. Coffeebean snails (Melampus coffeus) lack operculums, and must therefore remain under moist detritus to prevent drying out. Coffeebean snails also clean the stalks of cord grass and needle rush, but generally prefer higher elevations in the marsh, since they will drown on prolonged immersion. The ladderhorn snail (Cerithidea scalariformis), another marsh species that similarly contributes to the habitat, is often found feeding on algae around the bases of the marsh grasses or out in the open on the moist sands. Like the saltmarsh periwinkles, the ladder-horn snails have operculums and they are able to remain dormant for a considerable period of time. These three species provide a dramatic testimonial to the contributions of small animals to the overall environment. Considering the role that these gentle grazers play in the living marsh surrounding them, they deserve to be better understood by human visitors to the salt marsh. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, June 26 87 79 30 % Fr i, June 27 86 78 20 % Sa t, June 28 87 78 20 % Sun, June 29 86 78 30 % Mo n, June 30 86 79 30 % Tu es July 1 87 79 30 % We d, June 2 86 80 40 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Page 6 Thursday, June 26, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A Offshore/Bottom Inshore/Bay Pier/Surf SPONSORED BY Offshore action is in between right now as federal red snapper is over and the July 1st re-opening of gag grouper. King sh have taken over all near shore wrecks and reefs with huge numbers. Good trout reports are the norm for St Joe Bay and East Bay. Hot summer weather has the sh biting at rst light, so dont sleep in. Other species, such as ounder and red sh, are abundant as well but are constantly moving because of tides and water temperature. Local area streams and creeks are producing nice bream and even good bass right now as well. Marsh snails P H O T OS CO URTE S Y O F TO M BA I RD At top is a marsh periwinkle and above is a ladderhorn snail. FWC supports Operation Dry Water for sixth year Special to The Star Last year, nine people died from boating acci dents related to alcohol and drug use in Florida. That represents 15 per cent of the states boating fatalities for 2013. Alcoholand drug-re lated boating accidents are preventable, said Capt. Tom Shipp of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con servation Commissions Boating and Waterways Section. Even one death is too many. We want all boaters to enjoy the free dom to get out on the wa ter and the opportunity to do it safely. That is why law enforce ment agencies around the state and country are par ticipating in Operation Dry Water this weekend. This nationwide, public ed ucation effort is designed to prevent alcohol-related accidents and fatalities. FWC ofcers, along with local law enforcement and the U.S. Coast Guard, will be on the lookout for boat ing under the inuence violations. While our ofcers al ways look for BUIs, Shipp said, this week end, they will be making a special effort to stop this dan gerous activity. Boaters who have had too much to drink or who are impaired by drugs are a great danger to the boat ing public. If youre caught boat ing under the inuence, you may be ned and jailed, your boat may be seized, and you could lose your boating privileges, Shipp said. But most im portantly, you are risking your life, the lives of your passengers and the lives of other people out on the water. Sav ing lives is what Op eration Dry Water is re ally all about. Law enforce ment agen cies in all 50 states and several U.S. territories typically participate, inter acting with tens of thou sands of boaters through out the weekend each year and taking hundreds of impaired operators off the water before they could kill or injure themselves or someone else. Being under the inu ence of alcohol or drugs impairs a boat operators vision and reaction time, Shipp said. Sun, wind, fa tigue and other conditions can intensify the effects alcohol or drugs have on a boater. Intoxicated boaters also are susceptible to in juries or falling overboard because of impaired coor dination and balance. The FWC reminds boat ers to be careful and that they are responsible for making decisions that keep themselves and oth ers safe. We want everyone to have a great time and stay safe on the water, Shipp said. Carelessly choos ing to operate a boat while impaired is a decision that can result in a tragic end ing to an otherwise won derful day on the water. For more information, visit www.operationdry water.org or MyFWC. com/Boating.

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By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com There is power in poultry for Port St. Joe High School athletics. Willie Ramsey, president of the Shark 100 Club, presented athletic director/football coach John Palmer with a check for more than $2,600, bringing to more than $8,000 the donations this year from the club which supports Tiger Sharks athletics. Ramsey was closing the operational account for the 2013-2014 as the Shark 100 Club prepares to enter its 28th year. Over that time it has donated at last $135,000 to Port St. Joe High School athletics. We are denitely grateful for what they do for high school sports, not just football but all sports, Palmer said. The largest portion of the clubs contributions this year, as in every year, comes from the annual chicken dinner fundraiser. This years event sold about 900 tickets, collecting almost $6,000. The Shark 100 Club picks up the tab for the meal, including chicken, coleslaw, baked beans and beverages. The club also supplies the long-standing cooking team that brings the ingredients together, led by School Board member John Wright, do most of the cooking. So many people put so much into cooking those chicken dinners, Ramsey said. On top of that, the coaching staffs do of the serving. Tickets to the fundraiser are sold in advance throughout the community. Each athletic team at the high school receives an allotment of tickets to sell. There can be a real competition among the sports and the players, Palmer said. We had so many kids participating; it worked really, really well. This year was very good outstanding. We sold almost 900 tickets which is pretty amazing. The proceeds, represented by the check last week, are disbursed in turn among all sports teams whose athletes participate. There is sweat-equity in there for the athletes, Ramsey said. I think the number of tickets sold this year was testimony to all the athletes and coaches who know the value of what we are trying to do. Palmer said funds raised are divided among the sports programs based on several factors: involvement in the fundraiser and ability to bring in fans being two of the most prominent. Some sports use the funds for offseason camps, other for basic operations and nearly all use the funds for equipment. That is becoming more and more expensive, Palmer said. The support from the community, even in lean years, Ramsey said, has been outstanding. Ramsey noted even folks who might live out of town, who might not be able to collect their chicken dinners, will still send along a donation as if they had been one of the almost 700 people who chowed down this past year. It always amazes me the support we get, Ramsey said. Its all about the kids. We are kind of an underthe-radar club. We have been blessed to have so many people in the community who support what we are doing. Club membership this year was up, Ramsey said. After dipping during hard economic times during the middle of the past decade, more and more folks are becoming involved. It went well this year, Ramsey said. The number of members was up. It doesnt rival some of the early years, but it was up and that is good. The Shark 100 Club sells memberships in four categories. After covering minor costs for items such as hats and T-shirts, the membership fees go entirely to Tiger Shark athletics. Anyone interested in joining the Shark 100 Club, may submit their contribution to the Shark 100 Club, P.O. Box 524, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. By LOIS SWOBODA Halifax Media Group On a June afternoon 55 years ago, one of Apalachicolas favorite sons set a record for baseball prowess when he pitched a perfect game. It was 1959, Ron Bloodworth, just 22 years old, had left the Washington Senators after a salary dispute and was lead pitcher for the Lincoln Chiefs a member of the Midwestern Three-I League. It had started as a bad season. The Chiefs were on a losing streak. Bloodworths wife taught school in Apalachicola. When she called to discuss coming to stay with him at the end of the school year, he told her shed better wait until after his next game. He was worried. Bloodworths record for the season stood at 2-4 and he was just returning from a disastrous three game series against Des Moines. I had to do something, Bloodworth said. I decided I was going to be the leanest, meanest pitcher the Sherman Field had ever seen. The June 10 game was a double hitter against the Green Bay Bluejays, the No. 1 team in the league with a record of 10 wins out of 12 and six straight wins before June 10. The evenings rst game went poorly with the Chiefs losing 10 to 1. The evenings second game brought the Chiefs losing streak to a halt. The following account of Bloodworths perfect game comes from Del Black writing for the Lincoln Evening Journal. Thursday nights action started in a dismal fashion when Green Bay whipped the deep left-center to open the second, only to nd Pug Williams starting at the crack of the bat and hauling in the drive over his shoulder and near the fence. In the same inning, Fran Boniar, the winner of two minor league batting titles, hit a frozen rope, to the left of second base where Don Bacon was moving, leaning and stretching to haul in the shot. Tim Harkness brought the Shermantown crowd to its feet in the seventh with his screeching one-hopper, which was only inches foul. If fair, it would have gone for a triple. Pinch hitter John Osborne, batting with one out in the ninth, became the rst man to run the count to 3-2 on Bloodworth. Cool Ronnie came in with a curve ball that Osborne fouled over the grandstand for new life. Osborne then looked at a called third strike. One sports writer praised Bloodworth saying, (He) kept mixing up his multiplespeed curve and fast ball. His control was excellent. He ran the count to three balls on only three players. In the course of the game, only ve balls were hit into the outeld. Bloodworth said, I just kept moving the ball around trying to keep it breaking inside on all the hitters. The catcher would give me a signal and Id shake it off to confuse the batter. Theres a lot of mental stuff going on in batters head wondering what youre going to throw. The game nished 3-0. Centerelder Jim Lynn hit a 370-foot homer in the fourth inning. The Chiefs scored additional runs in the sixth and seventh innings. Bloodworths masterpiece was only the second perfect game ever pitched in the Three-Is. The rst, on Aug. 18, 1910 was the work of Red Faber. That game also nished 3-0. When the game was done, more than 600 fans stood to honor Bloodworth with applause. He remembers that, People started to leave before the game was over, but they must have been listening to the radio because, somehow, word got out. They started ling back in at the end. Perhaps the greatest honor bestowed on Bloodworth was praise from the manager of the Bluejays. Stan Wasiak told sports writers, This is what is good for baseball, especially minor league baseball. What a game that boy pitched. Its a great thing for the boy and a great thing for Lincoln. Bloodworth said, In those days, we had some good guys in the sport. Some real gentlemen. On leaving the mound, Bloodworth wrote his way through a throng of autograph seekers. When he reached the clubhouse, he was met by club president A. Q. Schimmel. Great game, Ronnie. The steaks are on me, Schimmel said as he shook the young pitchers hand. Bloodworth told reporters his greatest regret was that his wife didnt see the game. He said, I called her afterwards and told her she could come on to Lincoln. I told her I had pitched a perfect game and she said, Whats a perfect game? Ron now lives back in Apalachicola and has been with SunCoast Realty for about 20 years. THE CAM PA IG N FOR OUR CO MMUN IT Y S UNIVE RSIT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs THANKS FOR 25 YEARS OF SER VICE & SUPPOR T DR KEN SHA W, FSU PA NAMA CIT Y DEAN $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL We ar e ma ki ng gr eat pr ogr ess to war d our goal of raising $5 million by 2017, and we striv e to continue the momentum. We invite yo u to suppor t e Ca mpaign for Ou r Commu nity s Un iv ersity To learn mor e about ho w yo u can suppor t FSU Pa nama City contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORT S www.starfl.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 A Page 7 Section Celebrating Ron Bloodworths record Shark 100 Club closes another successful year TIM CROF T | The Star The Shark 100 Club, represented here by president Willie Ramsey, donated about $8,000 to Tiger Shark athletics. CONTRIBUTIONS Tiger S hark for a donation of $100 the individual, businesses or organization receives one Shark 100 hat, two reserved seats to home football games, program recognition and reserved parking at football games. M ako S hark for a contribution of $250 an individual, businesses or organization receives two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. B ull S hark for a contribution of $500, individuals, businesses or organizations receive two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, two reserved seats at home basketball games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. S and S hark for a $50 donation, parents of Tiger Shark athletes receive one Shark 100 hat and program recognition.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, June 26, 2014 Scene around STAR S TAFF REPORT This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. We are hoping to make this page a regular feature, an opportunity for photogs from this community, resident and visitor alike, to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, the weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please send your photos to tcroft@star. com and help us shine a spotlight on Gulf County. COURTE S Y OF MARIE R O M ANELLI COURTE S Y OF L AURA AT DRAGONFLY P HOTOGRAPHY COURTE S Y OF T ERRY L IN D COURTE S Y OF SA M ANTHA L AYFIEL D COURTE S Y OF KRI S TY R AFFIEL D COURTE S Y OF MELINA E LU M COURTE S Y OF VIN C E BI S HOP COURTE S Y OF KAYA K DOG ADV ENTURE S A beach wedding takes place along Indian Pass. A glowing sun sets over the Port St. Joe Marina. The march of the ddler crabs. Storm clouds roll into a beautiful sunset as seen from Frank Pate Park. Beating the heat with some water at Oak Grove Church Daycare. A pelican in the surf along St. Joe Beach. Lightning illuminates the sky over St. Joseph Peninsula during a weekend storm. Not often seen a starsh just out of the water.

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Ye s! Yo uc an be co me am em be r! If yo u, yo ur fa mi ly me mb er sa nd /o ry ou rb us in ess li ve ,w or k, wo rs hi p, or at te nd sc ho ol in Gu lf or Fr an kl in Co un ty or th eC it yo fM ex ic oB ea ch ,t he ny ou can be co me me mb er Ex pe ri en ce th eB es tF in do nt he Fo rg ot te nC oa st Wh en yo uj oi nE me ral dC oa st FC U, yo ub ec ome pa rt of ou rf am il y. Yo u re a me mb er ,n ot ac us to me r, an dy ou l ln ot ic et he di ff er en ce im me di at el y. Ou r co mm it me nt is to yo u, ou rm em be rs ,a nd we hop ey ou l lt ak ea dv an ta ge of ou r lo wl oa nr at es ,a sw el la s, our wi de ran ge of pr od uc ts an ds er vi ce s. We ar e he re fo ry ou 50 2W ood wa rd Av en ue ,P or tS ai nt Jo e, Ph :( 85 0) 22 711 56 10 1E as tR iv er Road ,W ew ah it ch ka ,P h: (8 50) 63 950 24 24 8U SH ig hw ay 98 ,E as tp oi nt ,P h: (8 50) 67 011 99 Em ai l: em er al dc oa st @f ai rp oi nt .n et www .e me ral dc oa st fc u. co m Th eF or go tt en Co as t s Co mm un it yC re di tU ni on fo r7 5Y ea rs BRING YO UR CHAIRS No Cooler sA llo we d. We t, Dry &O ut side Slips The Gu lf Coa st's Fr ie nd liest Ma rina! C e l e b r a t i o n Scallop Season Opens June 28 th Liv eM usic 4pm until dark "Roc kt he Doc ks" Plenty of Room on the Lawn to See Fi rew orks

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) What was Aaron Spellings rst TV series as a writer/producer? Paladin, Johnny Ringo, Burkes Law, Love Boat 2) In 1965 who patented Pampers disposable diapers? Woodruff, Williams, Duncan, Johnson 3) Which mountain is the highest point above sea level in Louisiana? Sassafras, Mitchell, Daemon, Driskill 4) In relation to Elvis, who was Jesse Garon Presley? Father, Brother, Uncle, Cousin 5) How old was Stevie Wonder on having his rst No. 1 song? 10, 12, 14, 16 6) What year marked the death of humorist Erma Bombeck? 1985, 1990, 1996, 2002 7) What singing group did the Wilson brothers form in 1961? Doobie Brothers, Jan and Dean, Lettermen, Beach Boys 8) What former boxing champion is/was famed for his cooking grills? Holy eld, Foreman, Ali, Frazier 9) When did China detonate its rst atomic bomb? 1944, 1954, 1964, 1974 10) Whos Robert Allen Zimmerman? Bob Dylan, Neil Diamond, Mick Jagger, David Bowie 11) What is a Canada two-penny black? Stamp, Bird, Car, Ri e 12) How many dice are used in the game of Yahtzee? 2, 3, 4, 5 13) What city bills itself as the Biggest Little City in the World? Reno, Atlantic City, Gatlinburg, Myrtle Beach 14) Rats fed a lowcalorie diet do what about 50 percent longer than other rats? Live, Sleep, Squeak, Run ANSWERS 1) Johnny Ringo. 2) Duncan. 3) Driskill. 4) Brother. 5) 12. 6) 1996. 7) Beach Boys. 8) Foreman. 9) 1964. 10) Bob Dylan. 11) Stamp. 12) 5. 13) Reno. 14) Live. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Battle of the bands accepting submissions By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Get ready to rock at this years Florida Scallop and Music Festival. In addition to the vendors, the games, the attractions and of course, the scallops, the biggest draw of the festival is the music. In an effort to turn this years event up to 11, coordinators are hosting an online battle of the bands that will culminate in four nalists performing live on the opening night of the 18th annual festival, which runs Sept. 12-14. At last years festival, 11 bands took the stage at George Core Park and entertained an audience of 2,500 over three nights. We want to bring in talent from outside of the area, said Rick Ott, a coordinator of the battle of the bands. We want to expose outside musicians to the area, and the area to outside musicians. Its a win-win situation. Bands and singers from across the U.S. can submit their music online for consideration at www.scallopfest.com. The entry fee is $5 and artists have until Tuesday, July 15 to submit their tunes and a bio. Once submissions close, the Scallop Fest committee will begin the task of listening to groups and narrowing them down to the nal four. At the festival, guest judges, including Nashville songwriters Charlie and Dana Black, will select a winner who will take home $1,000 and be invited back for the 2015 event to open for the national headliner. If you sing, well listen to it, said Chamber president and event organizer Paula Pickett. We want to hear something new. To encourage music acts from other markets to submit to the battle of the bands, the committee will reimburse a percentage of travel expenses for nalists. Most battle of the bands expect bands to be responsible for everything, including travel and lodging, and thats not always realistic now with higher gas prices, said Ott. What were doing, offering some reimbursement, is a very positive thing. The contest will provide big exposure for the nalists, giving them the opportunity to have their music heard by thousands of festival attendees and an opportunity to sell merchandise. The following year, theyll add opening for a national act to their credentials. Port St. Joe and Gulf County has a thriving music scene, said Pickett. The quality of music we have is impressive and wed love to showcase new talent to the area. This year, multi-platinum country artist Joe Dif e will take center stage for the festival. Dife had a hot streak in the 90s with 12 No. 1 hits. SCALLOP FEST FILE PHOTOS An online battle of the bands will bring four nalists to the stage at the Florida Scallop and Music Festival in September. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Students enrolled in the Gulf District 21st Century Summer Enrichment Program celebrated the end of the month-long camp last Thursday with a water day at Lamar Faison Park. Provided water slides and water guns, students took a break from their regular curriculum of computer programming, math, science and music to cool down and enjoy a beautiful summer day. The program, led by Port St. Joe Elementary School principal designee Jo Clements, utilized the month of June to teach students in grades kindergarten through sixth how to program their own computer games. By using the popular videogame Minecraft, students used geometry, science and problem-solving skills to build their own computerized villages. These villages translated into art projects in which students built 3-D replicas of their worlds out of clay and also learned how to graph them on paper. The program is fun and theyre learning skills that rural areas traditionally dont have, said Clements. Lynn Marshall, mother of rst-grade twins Jacob and Costin, said the program was perfect for her boys. Marshall recently moved back to the area and said she liked the fact that her kids could continue to learn and have fun over the summer months. They come home and cant wait to go back the next Making Gulf County safer, one placemat at a time By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Emergency Management director Marshall Nelson wants everyone to think about safety. Even while eating. To put emergency preparedness awareness at the forefront of the minds of both residents and visitors in Gulf County, Nelson has distributed paper placemats to area restaurants that help alert children and their families to the importance of having a disaster plan. Nelson said that hes spent many a meal watching his grandchild color on placemats at restaurants and immediately knew it would be a good investment. It was a new market I hadnt thought of, said Nelson. Its another way for us to get emergency preparedness awareness out to the public. The placemats lay out the dangers of each natural disaster, covering hurricanes, ood, re, tornadoes and earthquakes but also includes word scramble games, mazes and connect-the-dots. The mat also contains disaster facts, a disaster kit list and encourages kids to write two re escape plans, emergency contacts and an emergency meeting WES LOCHER | The Star Students in the Gulf District 21 st Century Summer Enrichment Program celebrated the completion of the camp with a water day at Lamar Faison Park. Below: Armed with water guns and energy the kids kept cool on a summer day. See PLACEMAT B5 Summer learning 21st Century Enrichment Program celebrates a month of fun See SUMMER B5 WES LOCHER | The Star Emergency Management director Marshall Nelson has provided area restaurants with placemats designed to promote emergency preparedness awareness.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, June 26, 2014 Special to The Star Nancy Brockman, a former library assistant at the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Public Library in Port St. Joe, is back! The current branch manager, Carl Copeland, is retiring after 12 years with the library. As the new Gulf County Coordinator, Nancy will manage the Port St. Joe library and will oversee operations at the Charles Whitehead Public Library in Wewahitchka. Nancy plans to help both Gulf County branches of the Northwest Regional Library System by continuing to provide needed services and information to the communities. Nancy received her Masters in Library and Information Science from Florida State University in 2012. It was during her time as a paraprofessional at the Port St. Joe Middle/High School Media Center that she decided she wanted to be a librarian. So after 30 years of being out of school, she went back and nished her Associates Degree, and then went on to get her Bachelors and Masters Degrees. She is very fortunate that she had the unfailing support of her husband and children during this endeavor. Nancy has been working as a reference librarian at the Bay County Public Library since 2013, but always hoped to return to the library in Port St. Joe. Finding my way back to the Costin Gibson library in Port St. Joe is a long anticipated goal, she said. The path led me to an opportunity with the Bay County Public Library, which allowed me to develop a much greater understanding of how the library system operates, and about the wonderful people that work there. I will miss being at the Bay County Public Library, but I look forward to the challenges ahead, and Im thrilled to be going back to Gulf County. Nancy will start her new position in early July, so be sure to stop by and see her at the library! Sa ri a is a 62 lb 3y r Ma la mu te mi x. Sh e is ve ry fr ie nd ly an d pla yf ul Sa ri a wa lks ve ry we ll on a le as h an d kn ow s th e co mm an ds of sit do wn an d pa w. Sh e lo ve s to be th e cen te r of at te nt ion an d lo ve s ev er yo ne Sa ri a wo ul d do we ll wi th an ac ti ve fa mi ly an d wo ul d mak e a gr ea t pe t. If yo u ar e unabl e to adop t at th is ti me pe rh ap s yo u co ul d fo st er or mak e a Do na ti on Al l pe ts adop te d fr om SJ BHS wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc inat io ns an d sp aye d/ ne ut er ed Pl ea se do no t he sitat e to em ai l tow nse nd .h sd ire ct or @g ma il .c om or adop tb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 711 03 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On lin e app li ca ti ons an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at ww w. sjb hu mane soc iet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur s da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! Society Special to The Star The First United Methodist Church (FUMC) of Port St. Joe recently received approval from the district ofce of Boy Scouts of America to charter a new Boy Scout troop. The new troop, Boy Scout Troop 347, will join Cub Scout 347, also sponsored by the FUMC, in providing local boys the opportunity to participate in scouting activities in Port St. Joe. Boy Scout Troop 347 will focus on providing young scouts with the opportunity to earn their Eagle badge and to develop other essential leadership and survival skills. Camp outs, eld trips and other activities are planned. Scouts will also have the opportunity to attend scouting camps to further develop their wilderness skills. Scholarships are available and scouts will have the opportunity to earn money to pay for camps, uniforms and supplies. The rst ofcial event of the new troop was held on June 22 at the First United Methodist Church. The cross over ceremony recognized three Webelo scouts who received their Arrow of Light and thus were eligible to crossover from Cub Scout troop 347 to Boy Scout troop 347. The new boy scouts that were recognized at the event were Cherokee Braun, Tyler Guthrie and Cory Phelps. For more information about Boy Scout Troop 347, contact Scout Master Bill Van DerTulip at 850Bridget Bryan, Jason Mills to wed Ernest and Anitra Bryan of Port St. Joe are pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter Bridget Denise Bryan to Jason Edwin Mills of Climax, Ga. The couple will be married at Beacon Hill Park in St. Joe Beach at 6:30 p.m. ET on June 27. Invitations will not be sent, but all family and close friends are invited to attend. Wedding Look whos 50! Ronda, You still look as young as you did in high school, not many people can say that!! Love your little sis, Linda Birthday Live DJ at Senior Center Gulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, invites the public to join the center from 10 a.m. until noon ET on Tuesday, July 1 for Dancing to the Oldies by DJ Frances Markham. Folks will listen and dance to music from the 70s, 80s, 90s and current hits. This is open to the public and donations are needed and appreciated. The center is also in need of bingo prizes for seniors that love to play bingo several times a week. Small inexpensive prizes, or individual packages of cookies, crackers, chips, juice, water and snack cakes, etc. would be appreciated. We are looking for volunteers that might play piano, sing or who would like to call bingo or that might have other games in mind that senior would enjoy. For information please call Debbie at 229-8466. Free fresh veggies at Community Resource Center The Community Resource Center in Port St. Joe is offering free vegetables from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET every Tuesday during the summer. The vegetables are provided by Farm Share, a large-scale food bank and charitable packinghouse working to end hunger. The organization specializes in getting fresh fruits and vegetables donated to communities in need. The Community Resource Center is at 414 Kenny St. in Port Saint Joe. Society BRIEFS FUMC charters new Boy Scout troop Nancy Brockman back at Port St. Joe Library NANCY BROCKMAN SPE C IA L TO T HE STA R

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Special to The Star Troy University has recognized stu dents from your area for making the Chan cellors List for the 2014 Spring Semester/ Term 4. The Chancellors list honors students who have earned a 4.0 Grade Point Average during that term. Among those named to the Chancellors List were Mary Bouington of Port St. Joe and Shelby Wood of Wewahitchka. Recapping student artists of the month at PSJHS Above left Jacobi Jones was Marchs student artist of the month. He enjoys drawing people and animals and hopes to have a career in graphic design. Above right Anastasya Paul was Aprils student artist of the month. Anastasya plans to attend college to pursue a major in graphic design and, after establishing a career, may pursue ne arts or animation degrees. Far left Sophia Harrison was Mays student artist of the month. Sophia grew up in an artistic family and enjoys creating art with pottery, watercolor, acrylics and charcoal. She said she plans on becoming an occupational therapist, but art will remain one of her hobbies. Special to The Star A new Correctional Of cer program will be starting Aug. 25 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe. The purpose of this pro gram is to prepare students for employment as correc tional ofcers. The program includes the basic standards courses mandated for certi cation as a correctional of cer in the state of Florida. Students who graduate from this program would typically work as correctional of cers within a county or state correctional facility. Upon completion of this program, students are eligible to take the State Ofcer Certication Exam for correctional ofcers. The program will be conducted using the new shorter curriculum and will meet Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET for about three months. For more informa tion, call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507, or email her at bburkett@gulfcoast. edu. The application deadline for Pell Grants and other nancial aid is fast approach ing, so please call today or come by the ofce in Build ing B at the Gulf/Franklin Campus, 3800 Garrison Ave. in Port St. Joe to pick up your application packet. Real Es ta te Pi cks Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Th is co tt ag es ty le ho me is gr ea tf or si tt in gb ac ka nd re la xi ng wi th th eg ul fb re ez es .E ac hd ec kh as ad if fe re nt vi ew :o ne of Gu lf of Me xic o, one of St .J oe Ba y. Co mpl et ely fu rn is he da nd fr es hl yp ai nt ed ,t hi so pen o or pl an is ful ly fu rn is he da nd ve ry spaci ou s. Go od re nt al po te nt ia l. La rg e op en de ck an ds cr ee ne dp or ch .S paciou sg ar ag ea nd st ora ge ar ea on gr ou nd le ve l. 850-227-8890 /8 50-227-7770 www .coastal re alt yinfo.com SOLD 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL A T THE MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S LIVE ON THE POOP DECK KO NKRET E SOU L SA TURD AY 9P M FRI DA Y 9P M SUND AY 8P M WEDNESD AY 8P M CO MING THURSD AY JUNE 10 TH 8P M DEBI JORD AN CO MING T HURSD AY JUNE 10 TH 8 PM RAND Y ST ARK TH E CUR RY S SOUTHERN SUND AY ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON THE POOP DECK MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T S ELEC TION O F A LL Y OUR F AV ORITE B EER W INE & SPIRIT S CO MING T HURSD AY JUNE 10 TH 8 PM CO MING T HURSD AY JUNE 10 TH 8 PM UPCOMING EVENTS KARAOKE THURS DA Y, FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH DEBRA AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST School News The Star| B3 Thursday, June 26, 2014 S P ECIAL TO TH E STA R Davida Byrd Scholarship Foundation to host 5K run Special to The Star The Davida Byrd Scholarship Foundation will host a 5K walk/run at 9 a.m. Saturday, July 5, at Peters Park in Port St. Joe. Registration will take place before the run at 8:30 a.m. The registration fee is $10 and all proceeds will support students of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. For more information call 227-1721. C orrectional O fcer program to begin at Gulf/Franklin Courtney Cummings named to Provosts List at Troy University Special to The Star Courtney Cummings of Mexico Beach has been named to the 2014 Spring Semester/Term 4 Provosts List at Troy University. The Provosts List honors students who have earned a 3.65 or higher Grade Point Average during the previous academic period. Troy University is a pub lic, internationally recog nized institution serving a broad range of students on four campuses in Alabama, online and around the world, providing a wide va riety of academic programs from the associate to the doctoral level. Founded in 1887, with the motto Edu cate the mind to think, the heart to feel, and the body to act, Troy Universitys continuing mission is to pre pare future leaders through teaching the importance of service to the community. With in-class and online programs in elds, such as business, education, nurs ing, computer science and criminal justice, students can pursue an in-demand education with a university that continues to receive accolades from the nations top publications. TROY has been recognized by the Princeton Review as one of the best in the South east, by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top universities in the South, and by Military Times as a top university for troops. Kayla Minger graduates from University of North Georgia Special to The Star Kayla Janie Minger of Port St. Joe, Florida has graduated from the Uni versity of North Georgia (UNG) with an Associate of Science in Nursing. The universitys spring commencement ceremo nies were held May 9-10 on UNGs Dahlonega and Gainesville campuses. This semester, UNG conferred a total of 1,445 degrees, including 603 associate, 718 bach elors degrees, and 124 graduate degrees. UNG also awarded 10 oneyear certicates for work in specialty areas. Thirtythree graduating members of the Corps of Cadets also took oaths as second lieu tenants in the National Guard or U.S. Army; com missioning ceremonies were observed separately May 9. Positioned in the fast est-growing region of the state, the University of North Georgia comprises four campuses united by a single mission focused on academic excellence and academic and co-curricular programs that develop students into leaders for a diverse and global society. The University of North Georgia is a University System of Georgia lead ership institution and is The Military College of Georgia. With more than 16,000 students, the University of North Georgia is the states sixth-largest public univer sity. The university offers more than 100 programs of study ranging from certi cate and associate degrees to professional doctoral programs. L ocal students named to T roy University C hancellors L ist FILE PH OTO S

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FAITH Thursday, June 26, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net Brandico Granite & Stone, LLC Monuments, Markers, Mausoleums, Coping lots etc. Pr oviding all your cemeter y needs (850) 215-4679 6913 E. Hwy 22, Callaway Florida 6913 E. Hwy 22, Callaway Florida Brandico Granite & Stone, LLC Monuments, Markers, Mausoleums, Coping lots etc. Pr oviding all your cemeter y needs (850) 215-4679 6913 E. Hwy 22, Callaway Florida Li mi te d Ti me O er 10 x 11 Co ping lo t (2 gr av e lo t) Ch ip an d Se al Co mp an io n "W in g Mo nu me nt $ 24 95 .0 0 Co nt ac t Br an di co Gr an it e & St one LL C 850 -2 15 -4 67 9 FI F TH SUNDAY S ERVICE S AT PHILADEL P HIA PRIMITIVE Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will host 5th Sunday Fellowship Services with Mt. Zion Primitive Baptist Church of Panama City here in Port St. Joe. The services will begin with a 10 a.m. Church School session and conclude with an 11 a.m. Worship Service. The Elder Huet Sampson will bring the sermon for the worship services. Pastor Jessie Hawkins and the Philadelphia congregation are inviting everyone to come and participate in these services. The church is on Avenue D. N EW CHILDREN S MINI S TRY AT F UMC First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe welcomes Krystal Terry to its staff. Krystal has been a popular teacher at St. Joe Elementary and now is coming to be in ministry at the Methodist Church as the full-time director of Childrens Ministry. Each Wednesday this summer, she is hosting a Wacky Wednesday for children to have fun and celebrate summer. For more information about this, or other childrens ministry call the church at 227-1724. GRAND OLD F O URTH AT N EW BETHEL New Bethel A.M.E. Church, located at the corner of U.S. 98 and Avenue C in Port St. Joe, will hold a Grand Old Fourth of July Celebration on July 3. There will be a yard sale and food vendors. Anyone wishing to participate should call Vanessa Fennell at 774-5448, Christine White at 2296693 or Pastor Lawrence Gantt at 832-8452 to reserve your space ($50). SENI O R W O MEN MI SS I O NARY AUXILIARY CL O THE S G IVEAWAY Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Senior Women Auxiliary will sponsor a clothes giveaway from 8 a.m. until noon ET on Friday, June 27 at the church, 280 Avenue C in Port St. Joe. FI F TH SUNDAY FELL O W S HI P AT ZI O N FAIR Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will host a worship service at 11 a.m. ET on June 29. Guests will include Rev. James Williams and his congregation from Friendship Missionary Baptist Church of Apalachicola. Pastor Rev. Wilson Hall asks everyone to come and be blessed. Dinner will be served following the service. Yvonne Sue Harris arrived in heaven May 24, 2014. She was warmly greeted in the loving arms of our Lord Jesus Christ. Her husband Frank Harris and parents Russell and Gladys Watts and brothers Billie Jack and Russell, Jr. were also there to welcome her home. Her family who love and miss her are sister Rebecka Smith; daughters, Julie Moore and Jenny Smith; grandchildren, Jason Moore, Beth Shelton and Keri Kerr; greatgrandchildren, Gabriel and Noah Shelton, Katie and Dillon Metzger. Her nieces Tammy Walsh, Andrea Wieland, Tiffany Davis and Kimberly Reis look forward to seeing her again one day. Miss Sue was born in Huntington West Virginia, and was a resident at The Bridge at Bay St. Joseph. She loved music and was a member of Beach Baptist Chapel. Miss Sue was a dedicated Mother, loving wife and loyal friend. Yvonne Sue Harris is in heaven and will welcome us home, to the greatest homecoming ever. With a place reserved for all those who place their trust in our Lord Jesus Christ. In memory of Miss Sue please bring your love gift to Beach Baptist Chapel where you too will be warmly greeted and experience Gods Love and Salvation through faint in Jesus Christ our Lord. Y vonne Sue Harris A memorial service for Olivia Landry, 72, was held at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 21, 2014, at Dunbar Funeral Home, Devine Street Chapel in Columbia, SC. The family received friends following the service at the funeral home. Mrs. Landry, affectionately known as Gramma, passed away Tuesday, June 17, 2014. Born in Bethel, N.C., she was a daughter of the late Roy Clinton Whitehurst and Alma Ruth Reddick Whitehurst. She retired as an administrator with the Wewahitchka Medical Center in Wewahitchka, Fla. Surviving are her son, Joseph A. Webster, II (Denise) of Columbia; daughter, Susan Olivia Webster of Manassas, Va.; three grandchildren, Shelby and Olivia Webster of Columbia and Holly Webster of Pensacola, Fla.; one great-granddaughter, Heidi Jayne. In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her husband, William R. Landry, Sr. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to Susan G. Komen for the Cure at www.komen.org. Please sign the online guestbook at www. dunbarfuneralhomedevine. com. Olivia Landry Special to The Star Those who have served in the military will be honored at 7 p.m. CT Monday, June 30 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Saluting Those Who Serve, features a screening of the award-winning short lm Memories of the Tuskegee Airmen. The lm includes interviews with surviving airmen and shares the story of their struggle, as black Americans, to serve their country as pilots during World War II. At this program well honor both veterans and those currently serving in the military, says Lifetree representative Craig Cable. This is a chance to thank the men and women who serve as well as their families. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. OBITUARIES Faith BRIEFS Military personnel honored at Lifetree The family of Harlon Ray Miller is saddened by his sudden passing on Saturday, June 21. Funeral services will be held on Sunday, June 29, at Long Avenue Baptist Church, 1601 Long Ave, Port St Joe, FL. Arrangements include (all times Eastern) a private family viewing at 2 p.m., friends and family visitation 3-4:30 p.m., funeral service at 4:30 p.m. with graveside service following at Holly Hill Cemetery. The family humbly requests honorariums and donations in lieu of oral arrangements to assist with nal expenses. Donations may be received in the name of Scott and Wendy Baker at Tyndall Federal Credit Union or contact Scott and Wendy direct at 227-6804. The Miller family is thankful for your support during this time as we celebrate the life of our brother, father, grandfather and friend, Ray Miller Harlon Ray Miller

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, June 26, 2014 place. When dealing with any type of natural weather disaster Nelson said that simply having a plan should always be priority number one. The rst 500 placemats have already been distrib uted and Nelson has al ready received requests for more. He said that Patti Blaylock, owner of Sun set Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe, was happy to accept the placemats and provide them to children who visit the restaurant. Over the 22 years that Nelson has held the title of director, he and the team at the Emergency Operations Center have distributed more than 1,000 free weath er radios to low income fam ilies in the area. Nelson said hes always on the hunt for new and in novative ways to keep natu ral disasters in the public consciousness, especially considering Gulf Countys location and susceptibility to hurricanes. In addition to opening a dialogue among chil dren and families, Nelson stressed the importance of keeping beach visitors, who may not have any knowl edge when it comes to hur ricanes, readily informed. The people who visit might not be from an area where hurricanes are a dan ger, said Nelson. During any disaster, the worst thing you can do is panic. Even though Gulf Coun ty hasnt faced a hurricane since 2005, Nelson said that continuing education is the key to a positive outcome when the next big storm does come around. I worry that everyone has become complacent, said Nelson. So much of our emergency manage ment program is education. If I can get one person to create a plan with these placemats, then Ive done my job, said Nelson. Additionally, families can go online to www.oridadi saster.org and create their emergency plan for free. The Jou rn ey Back Home With We ems Memorial Rehab Car e When you or a loved on e need a little mor e time to ge t back on your feet, We ems Memorial Re hab Car e is her e Right in your own ne ighborhood Give us a call today and let us help you make that jour ney back hom e. We ems Mem orial Rehab Ca re 135 Av enue G, Apalach icola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 7-15-14 CODE: SJ00 PLACEMAT from page B1 day, said Marshall. They think that doing things at the school is neat and it makes them think of the school as theirs. Its not a babysitting program. The kids are learning new things ev ery day. During the day students also spent an hour on art and music, two sub jects that dont fall into the schools normal curriculum. Students in grades 4-6 learned to play the recorders, grades 1-3 learned rhythm and kindergarteners learned how to rap Yankee Doodle. Music can be fullling in all as pects of life and it helps kids to grow, said music teacher Becky Hare. Their comprehension of music jumped during the program and they picked it up very quickly. Andria Dixon applauded the way the programs curriculum kept all its activities related to the Minecraft game, allowing students to build on their knowledge over the course of the month. Were helping them to learn things they may not have been ex posed to during the school year. Dixon, the ESE Stafng Specialist for Port St. Joe Elementary School, jumped at the opportunity to partici pate. The former guidance counselor at the middle school, Dixon she said she really enjoys connecting with stu dents and watching them learn. Student volunteers from the high school joined the program as teach ing assistants for community service hours. In addition to all that learning, students had plenty of fun, partici pating in concerts, game shows and movie days. Soon-to-be second-grader Aydan Davis said he knew about Minecraft prior to the program which made the learning process more fun. This was Davis third year attending the free program. It was a good experience, said Davis. We had awesome teachers and I want to do the program again next year. Teachers capped the celebration by doling out sno-cones to keep the kids cool and the energy levels high. SUMMER from page B1 WES LOCHER | The Star Some students stayed cool with sno-cones in their favorite avors. Other students cooled off with an adrenaline-fueled trip down a water slide. Pampas Grass You dont have to pamper pampas grass! This attractive perennial, which is native to Latin American Brazil, Argentina, and Chile is practically trouble free. Its well adapted to all areas of Florida. Pampas grass grows in large clumps, eight to ten feet high. In late summer, it produces showy silver white or pinkish silken plumes, which may reach a height of 12 feet. Pampas grass can be very eye-catching when used as a specimen plant in the landscape. Because it grows very rapidly into a massive plant, pampas grass can provide an excellent screen for sunny locations. Unfortunately, it is often used improperly as a foundation plant. In such cases, it usually is purchased from a nursery when its small and planted very near the home. At rst, it will look ne, but, after several years, it will have reached such a large size that it will be difcult to nd the house for the old pampas grass. There are many ornamental forms of pampas grass. The plum-like blooms differ between male and female plants. The female plumes are broad and full, due to the silky hairs covering the tiny owers. The male plumes look narrow and short, because of the absence of hair on the owers. Also, there is considerable variation among seedlings in growth habit, period of owering, and size and shape of plumes. If uniformity is desired, pampas grass should be propagated by dividing clumps, rather than by seed. The plumes of pampas grass are highly prized for indoor decorations. Plumes used for this purpose should be cut as soon as they have fully emerged. If mature plumes are brought indoors, they will ll the home with delicate uffy owers which can be a bigger problem than a shedding dog or cat. This shedding can be prevented by spraying mature plumes with hair spray. When selecting planting site for pampas grass, special attention should be paid to the potential danger or injury to passersby from contact with the very sharp, saw-like edges of the leaves. Pampas grass should be planted where it will receive full sun for most of the day. In shady locations, it will grow very slowly and produce few, if any, plumes. As we said, pampas grass suffers from practically no pest or disease problems. It has good salt tolerance, and will grow in almost any soil. Once its established, about all you need to do is give it adequate fertilizer. For healthy growth and good plume production, pampas grass should be fertilized four times a year with a balanced fertilizer, such as an 8-8-8, applied at the rate of two pounds per 100 square feet. In North Florida, pampas grass leaves are often killed by freezing temperatures. But, new leaves will sprout in the spring. Before spring growth begins, you should prune away brown leaves and other dead material that has accumulated at the base of your plants. When working around pampas grass, its a good ideas to wear long pants, a longs sleeve shirt, and gloves to protect you from the sharp leaf blades we mentioned earlier. The striking, feathery plumes and large, graceful clumps of foliage make pampas grass a very desirable addition to a landscape. Since it so trouble free, perhaps youd like to try some around your home. For more information contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf.ifas.u.ed u or edis.ifas.u.ed u ROY LEE CARTER County extension director

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B6 | The Star Thursday, June 26, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-1324 TO PLACE YO UR AD IN THE TRADES AND SER VICE SECTION CALL MARCIA AT 227-7 847 B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL IC ENSED &I NS UR ED Po rt St Jo eM et al Re cy cl in g Bu ye rs of Al umin um Ca ns an do th er me ta ls Lo ca te d1 29 Tr ad eC ir cl e, pha se 2d ow nf ro mS her wi nW illi am s No wo ff er sf re eu se da pp li an ce and sc ra pm et al dr op of fb ehi nd ou r bui ld in g. No Ga rb ag e, wo od ,e tc .o nl ym et al. Dr op of fo nl y, no ta ke of f. Me ta lt he ft is ac ri me Ki rb yH ut ch ins on 85 059 108 33 June 16-22 On Monday, June 16, Deputy M. Layeld responded to the area of Indian Pass in reference to a report of stolen beach chairs. The caller left several beach chairs on the beach during the night and discovered them stolen the following day. The chairs were valued at $414.00. This investigation is ongoing, anyone with information concerning this investigation is asked to contact the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) at 850-227-1115 or CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS (8477). On June 16, GCSO Deputies, Wewahitchka EMS, Overstreet Volunteer Fire Department and The Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) responded to a single vehicle trafc accident involving a dump truck. The two occupants in the dump truck sustained injuries and were transported to Bay Medical Center. The accident investigation was conducted by FHP. On Tuesday, June 17, Deputy P. Williams recovered two abandoned bicycles from Windmark Lane, in the area of the east beach access. The bicycles currently do not match the description of reported stolen property to the GCSO. The owner(s) are asked to contact the GCSO to make a claim. On June 17, a Good Samaritan found a females wallet that contained cash and personal identication. The property was turned into the GCSO Wewahitchka Substation. It was returned to its rightful owner. On June 17, Deputy M. Layeld responded to the area of Indian Pass in reference to a report of stolen beach chairs. The complainant left their chairs on the beach during the night and discovered them stolen the following day. The beach chairs were valued at $150.00. This was the second report received in two days regarding the theft of beach chairs left unattended on the beach during the night. This investigation is ongoing, anyone with information concerning this investigation is asked to contact the GCSO at 850227-1115 or CrimeStoppers at 850-785-TIPS (8477). The GCSO would like to caution citizens and visitors not to leave valuables in an unsecured vehicle, or unattended on the beach, especially overnight. On June 17, Deputy M. Layeld responded to a St. Joe Beach residence in reference to a residential burglary. Through further investigation, Deputy Layeld arrested Ty J. Weaver (24) of St. Joe Beach for unlawfully entering the residence and stealing approximately $400.00 in coins. Weaver was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. He was rst appeared and given a $5,000.00 bond. On June 17, Deputy P. Williams conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle for a trafc violation in the area of North 2nd Street in Wewahitchka. The vehicle was driven by Corey N. Hooper (21), of Wewahitchka. Inside the vehicle, Deputy Williams observed a large amount of copper wire. Due to recent thefts, Deputy Williams questioned Hooper about the material. Hooper told Deputy Williams he had obtained permission from the owner of a residence on McGlon Drive to remove the copper wire from the structure. Deputy Williams contacted the property owner to verify Hoopers story and discovered no one had given Hooper permission to remove the copper wiring. Through further investigation it was determined Hooper burglarized the residence on McGlon Drive and caused extensive damage to the structure to obtain the stolen copper wire he was in possession of. Hooper was arrested and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was charged with Burglary and Criminal Mischief. He was rst appeared and given a $5,500.00 bond. On June 17, Deputy S. Willis arrested Jonathan Paul Pierce (37), of Port St. Joe, at his residence on a warrant obtained by GCSO Investigators. The arrest was the result of a burglary investigation where several rental houses were burglarized on Cape San Blas. The investigation revealed Pierce sold four televisions to a second hand dealer. One of the televisions was positively identied as stolen from one the burglaries. Pierce was charged with Dealing in Stolen Property and False Representation of Ownership. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was rst appeared and conditionally released. This investigation is ongoing. Anyone with information concerning this investigation is asked to contact the GCSO at 850227-1115 or Crime Stoppers at 850-785-TIPS (8477). On June 17, Kimberly A. Clarkson (31), of Port St. Joe, contacted the GCSO and requested to meet with a deputy regarding a civil matter. Deputy S. Willis responded to the call and was informed prior to his arrival that Clarkson was wanted for Trespass by the GCSO. Deputy Willis arrested Clarkson and transported her to the Gulf County Detention Facility. She was rst appeared and released on a $250.00 bond. On Wednesday, June 18, Deputy S. Ferrell conducted a trafc stop on vehicle occupied by Dominik Noel Roberts (24), of Wewahitchka, in the area of Stone Mill Creek. Deputy Ferrell had prior knowledge GCSO Investigators had obtained a warrant for Roberts for Lewd or Lascivious Battery on a Child under the Age of 16. Roberts was taken into custody and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. She was rst appeared and given a $31,000.00 bond. On June 18, the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce (BCSO) Warrants Division apprehended William J. Haney (43), of Gulf County, at a residence in Panama City Beach. Haney was wanted by GCSO for Lewd or Lascivious Battery on a Child Under the Age of 16. The arrest warrant was the result of a child molestation investigation conducted by GCSO Investigators that began in May 2014. Haney was extradited to Gulf County where he was rst appeared. Haney is currently being in the Gulf County Detention Facility on a $50,000.00 bond. On Thursday, June 19, GCSO Investigators responded to a vacation rental house at Cape San Blas in reference to an unattended death investigation. The investigation revealed the decedent, a 46 year old female passed away from natural causes. On June 19, GCSO Investigators responded to a residence in Wewahitchka in reference to an unattended death investigation. The investigation revealed the decedent, a 43 year old female passed away from natural causes. On June 19, Deputy K. Starnes responded to the apartment complex located on 7th Street in Wewahitchka in reference to the theft of utilities. According to a representative of St. Joe Natural Gas Company the tenants natural gas had been turned off and a lock placed on the meter due to nonpayment. The investigation revealed the lock was unlawfully removed and the gas turned back on. This is an ongoing investigation and criminal charges are pending. On June 19, Deputy J. Oquendo responded to a residential burglary in the Highland View area. During the burglary rearms were stolen, along with other property. This investigation is ongoing, anyone with information is asked to contact the GCSO at 850-227-1115, or call CrimeStoppers at 850-785TIPS (8477). On Friday, June 20, Sgt. J. Williams conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle occupied by Richard Wayne Lancaster (59), of Howard Creek. Sgt. Williams conducted a burglary investigation reported to the GCSO on June 13th where more than $1,200.00 of shing equipment was stolen. The investigation revealed Lancaster sold the stolen shing equipment to an individual for $80.00. Sgt. Williams obtained an arrest warrant for Lancaster taking him into custody during the trafc stop. Lancaster was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was rst appeared and conditionally released. This investigation is ongoing, anyone with information concerning this investigation is asked to contact the GCSO at 850227-1115 or CrimeStoppers at 850-785-TIPS (8477). On June 20, Deputy B. Smith served an arrest order for Failure to Appear on Carrie Kathleen Strain (28), of Port St. Joe. Strain was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility where she was later rst appeared and conditionally released On Saturday, June 21, the GCSO received a call regarding an aggravated assult. Deputy S. Ferrell responded to a complaint in the 5800 block of Ganley Road. It was reported the offense took place in a vehicle as several individuals were traveling. The case is still under investigation. Page 4 of 4 On June 21, Deputy S. Ferrell arrested Tony H. Beck (31) for Driving While License Suspended, or Revoked. Deputy Ferrell stopped a vehicle Beck drove and discovered his license was not valid. Beck was also wanted by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce on a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Beck is awaiting extradition to Wakulla County. On Sunday, June 22, Deputy S. Ferrell conducted a trafc stop on State Road 71 near the Honeyville Park due to a trafc violation. The stop resulted in the arrest of Brian L. Cruse (34) for Driving While License Suspended, or Revoked. Cruse was also wanted by the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce on a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was later rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On June 22, Sgt. J. Williams conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle driven by Christopher D. Maxwell (36) in the area of Dolphin Street in Highland View. Maxwells drivers license was revoked for being a habitual trafc offender. The vehicle operated by Maxwell displayed an expired tag, which expired in 2012. Maxwell was arrested. A search of his person revealed he was in possession of less than twenty grams of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility and charged with Possession of Less Than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Driving While License Revoked. He was rst appeared and later released on a $1,000 bond. On June 22, the GCSO received a complaint regarding criminal mischief in the 400 block of Ling Street in Highland View. Deputy S. Willis responded to the call. The complainant discovered his property vandalized by someone operating a vehicle spinning its tires. From June 16-22 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 62 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 33 calls for EMS, 25 calls for other departments/ agencies and 10 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From June 16-22 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 228; Civil Paper Service, 46; Trafc Stop, 25; Field Contact, 20; Information, 7; Request for Security Checks, 7; Suspicious Person, 7; Unknown Disturbance, 5; Abandoned Vehicle, 4; Suspicious Activity, 4; Suspicious Vehicle, 4; Theft/Shoplifting, 4; Trafc Accident, 4; Alarm, 3; Agency Assist, 3; Residential Burglary, 3; Disabled Vehicle, 3; Escort, 3; Reckless Driver, 3; Warrant Arrest, 3; Death Investigation, 2; Noise Disturbance, 2; Domestic Disturbance, 2; Physical Disturbance, 2; Lost/Stolen Tag, 2; Prisoner Transport, 2; Animal Call, 1; Animal Attack/Bite, 1; Aggravated Assault, 1; Citizens Assist, 1; Contact Message, 1; Criminal Mischief, 1; Funeral Escort, 1; Fire, 1; Missing Juvenile, 1; Shooting Incident, 1; and Welfare Check, 1. GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE LAW ENFORCEMENT SUMMARY Law Enforcement

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 26, 2014 The Star | B7 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! 112495625DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546WebID34284625 SECURITYOFFICERS ANDSUPERVISORS.Startingat$9.50/hr.Allpositionsarepermanent.1-888-948-2738or 850-563-1022WebID#:34292398 NOWHIRING 1124983 1124986SalesAssociate/PawnBrokerWouldyouliketomakegreatmoneyworking4x10 hrdaysaweek?Dan'sPawnislookingforenergetic, friendly,hard-workingteammembersinterestedin long-termemployment.Weoersalescommissions andfull-timeemployment,performancerewards, referralbonuses,professionaldevelopment,exible scheduleandagreatteamofco-workers!Ifyou areactiveandoutgoing,wecantrain.Mustbe18, physicallyt,andHSD/GED.DrugFree.NOcriminal background,ValidFLDL.Experienceaplus! Bilingualaplus!Checkusoutatdanspawn.comand applyinpersonat1314BayviewAve.,Mon-Fri10AM4PM,orcallforanappt(850)481-1115. WebID#:34292608 1129191 fornewKFCinCallaway.1+yearsmanagerial experiencepreferred.Applyatjobs.kfc.comorfax resumeto334-702-0302 RESTAURANT GENERALMANAGER 95220S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2008-CA-000274 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, DARRELL HAMANN; PATRICIA HAMANN; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA000274, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is Plaintiff and DARRELL HAMANN; PATRICIA HAMANN; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash IN THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 1000, CECIL G. COSTIN BOULEVARD, PORT ST. JOE in GULF County, FLORIDA 32456, at 11:00 A.M. ET, on the 10th day of July, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A ROD AND CAP MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 15, BLOCK “4”, OF CORRECTIVE RE-PLAT OF CAPE SAN BLAS SHORES SUBDIVISION, UNIT NUMBER 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 50, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING A POINT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NUMBER 30-E; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY, NORTH 18 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 52.63 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID PUNT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 18 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 53.08 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 105.71 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 52.87 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 105.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 6th day of June, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk This Notice is Provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least (7) seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-08590 STM June 19, 26, 2014 95222S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2010CA-000154CAXXXX DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CLINTON T. MCCAHILL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 3rd, 2014, and entered in Case No. 23-2010CA-000154CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Clinton T. McCahill, Citibank N.A., f/k/a Citibank, Federal Savings Bank, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET, the 13th day of November, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 15 AND 17, BLOCK 31, CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP THEREOF AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 305 6TH STREET, MEXICO BEACH, FL 324561934 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 7th day of June, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813)221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com MA-10-62969 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. June 19, 26, 2014 95228S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 13000105CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff vs. UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENOR, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF JACKSON D. JAMISON A/K/A JACKSON DONALD JAMISON, DECEASED, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENOR, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF JACKSON D. JAMISON A/K/A JACKSON DONALD JAMISON, DECEASED 1406 LONG AVENUE PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 1406 LONG AVENUE PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 OVIDIO ZENTINO AVILA A/K/A OVIDIO ZENETO AVILA 1406 LONG AVENUE PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENOR, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF PATRICIA L. JAMISON A/K/A PATRICIA LOUISE JAMISON A/K/A PATRICIA WRIGHT, DECEASED JAMES OWEN JAMISON SR. 1406 LONG AVENUE PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 JAMES OVVEN JAMISON SR. 450 FOXCHASE DR WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 6052 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 6, BLOCK 65, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP #12 OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES 2022, SAID MAP SHOWING SAID LOT TO BE LYING IN AND A PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, in the STAR on or before July 14, 2014; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 4th day of June, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850-747-5338. If hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System. June 19, 26, 2014 95322S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 2014-31CP IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS EDWARD MCENIRY, JR. a/k/a THOMAS E. MCENIRY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of Thomas Edward McEniry, Jr., a/k/a Thomas E. McEniry, Deceased, File Number 201431CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the Personal Represen-tative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 26, 2014. Personal Representative: Karen M. Diggs 9126 Robey Meadows Lane Indianapolis, IN 46234 Attorney for Petitioner J. Patrick Floyd FL Bar No. 257001 Law Offices J. Patrick Floyd, Chtd. 408 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32546 (850) 227-7413 June 26, July 3, 2014 95372S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning and Development Review Board, sitting as the local planning agency, at their meeting on July 8, 2014 at 4:00 p.m., EDST, at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will review Ordinance 506 and recommend it to the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe; and the Board of City Commissioners, at its meeting on the 15th day of July, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EDST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, Port St. Joe, Florida, will consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 506 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA ADDING ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS TO THE PORT ST. JOE LAND DEVELOMENT REGULATIONS SECTION 3.16 PROVIDING FOR LOCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR RESIDENTIAL USES IN AREAS DESIGNATED AS MIXED USE; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 229-8261, Ext. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: Mel Magidson, Jr. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: Charlotte M. Pierce City Clerk June 26, 2014 95380S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 12 CA 000181 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, VS. EMMA MAE PLAIR, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARY RUTH RHODES Last Known Address Unknown TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARY RUTH RHODES Last known Address Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 6, BLOCK 26, IN THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, P.A., attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is P.O. BOX 9908, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33310-0908 on or before July 14, 2014, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the (THE STAR) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 13t day of June, 2014. Rebecca Norris as Clerk of the Court by: BA Baxter as Deputy Clerk File No. 11-17791 June 26, July 3, 2014 95402S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2010-CA-000403 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD M. WILLIAMS ,ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC.; GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered April 29, 2014 in Civil Case No. 2010CA-000403 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is Plaintiff and RONALD M. WILLIAMS ALICIA R. WILLIAMS, GRAMERCY PLANTATION COMMERCIAL OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., GRAMERCY PLANTATION OWNERS` ASSOCIATION, INC., are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 13th day of August, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 19, GRAMERCY PLANTATION, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of June, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk 13-04551-3 June 26, July 3, 2014 99223S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank Custodian for TLCF, 2012A, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 556 Application No. 2014-32 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 02432-000R Description of Property: COMMENCE at a concrete monument set by John E. Pennel, Registered Florida Land Surveyor, at the NW. Corner of NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and run South along the

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B8| The Star Thursday, June 26, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4 5 1 8282 Cyndy's Home Cleaning Let me help you! Cleaning Home Management Personal Shopper Organizer Pet Care (850) 502-7006cyndylynne_79@yahoo.com 11 29 6 35 11 29 6 3 4 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 550.00/mo. 2. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Furnished. W/D, fenced yard. 525.00/mo. 3. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, unfurnished. 450.00/mo. 4. 39-1 Carlton. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, carport. 650.00/mo. incl. utilities 5. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach. 1400.00/mo. 6. 202 1st St NE, Carrabelle. 5 bedroom, 2 baths, unfurnished. 1000.00/mo. 7. 1108 Tallahassee St., Carrabelle. 3 bedroom, 3 baths, unfurnished. 500.00/mo.8. 302 Woodill Rd., Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, W/D, 1 acre. 500.00/mo.9. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished. 550.00/mo. 10. 33-2 Holland. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished 500.00/mo. 11. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 12. 811 Three Rivers Rd. 1 bedroom, 1 bath, on water, deep water dock, garage, fenced yard, parking. 1000.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4 5 1 83 00 125 Venus Drive (off Garrison Ave) Port St. Joe, FL 32456(850) 227-7451TTY Acs 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. PINE RIDGE LTD.1 Bedroom Apartment for rentFamily apartment community income guidelines applyEqual Opportunity Provider and Employer4 5 1 9 1 99 4 5 1 8 41 9 4 5 1 9 1 97 4 5 1 8 4 22The MainStay Suites is NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Guest Service Agent Full Time Position Thursday to Sunday 3:00 PM to 11:00PMCandidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. MainStay Suites 3951 E. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 4 5 1 8 41 8EXPERIENCED MAINTENANCE PERSONto do grounds and maintenance on a 51 unit apartment community. Must have experience in painting, general carpentry, basic plumbing, electrical and appliance repair. HVAC preferred, but not required. Knowledge in ground keeping. Must be able to pass a background check, have their own tools, and valid driver’s license. Pick up application at:125 Venus Dr, Port St. Joe or call 850-227-7451 Oce Hours: Mon. 1-5, Tues, Wed, Thurs. 9-5, Closed on Fridays.This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. NOW HIRING PINE RIDGE APARTMENTS 4 5 1 827 4 Preschool / VPK Teachers North Florida Child Development is seeking full-time Preschool and VPK teachers for our Centers located in Blountstown, Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe. This position will provide daily curriculum to children ages 3-5 years old. Must have a Bachelor’s degree in early child development/education or related eld and two years of experience. Infant & Toddler Teachers North Florida Child Development is seeking full time Infant & Toddler Teachers for our Centers located in Blountstown, Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe. This position will provide daily curriculum to children ages 0-3 years old. Must have an Associate degree in Early Childhood Education or a FCCPC (CDA) with experience. Substitute Teachers NFCD is seeking qualied applicants for Substitute Teacher positions at our centers in Blountstown, Port St. Joe, and Wewahitchka. Requirements include a High School Diploma. NFCD offers an attractive benet package (health, dental, life, disability, sick leave, 401k, etc.)Contact: For detailed information view careers at www.oridachildren.org Send resumes to Sebrina McGill at smcgill@oridachildren.org Fax (850) 639-6167.DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE JOB ANNOUNCEMENTS Food Svs/Hosp.Chef/Kitchen ManagerFull time position. High volume restaurant. Good salary. Must have experience in labor control, inventory, and menu development. Apply in person: 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach 850-648-8207 Web ID#: 34291470 Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. West line of NE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 for 264.15 feet to a point on the Northern right of way line of State Road 22, for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, extend a line North along the West line of the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, for 210.00 feet; then turn right 90 degrees for 202.34 feet to a point on the Northern right of way line of State Road 22, then turn right and extend a line Westerly along said Northern right of way line for 210.36 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being an area of one acre, more or less, in Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, City of Wewahitchka, Florida. Name in which assessed: Thomas L. Semmes, ET AL. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 16th day of July, 2014. Dated this 10th day of June, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 12, 19, 26 July 3, 2014 99249S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-0254CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE OF THE HARBORVIEW 2006-12 TRUST FUND Plaintiff, vs. JANNA NEAL BUSH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANNA NEAL BUSH; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on the 10th day of July, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., EST, at Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45, F.S., offer for sale and sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida, to wit: LOTS FIVE (5), SIX (6), EIGHT (8), AND THAT PART OF LOT SEVEN (7) BLOCK 4, YON’S ADDITION TO BEACON HILL DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7 FOR POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE BOUNDARY LINE DIVIDING PONCE DE LEON STREET AND LOT 7 FOR A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES RIGHT AND RUN A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES RIGHT AND RUN A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET; THENCE TURN 90 DEGREES RIGHT AND RUN A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL OF THE ABOVE LYING AND BEING IN BLOCK 4, YON’S ADDITION TO BEACH HILL, ACCORDING TO AN OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property address: 7672 Highway 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style and case number of which is set forth above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 7th day of June, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk June 19, 26, 2014 99245S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-17-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF ANNA SHOAF VAUGHAN Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of ANNA SHOAF VAUGHAN, deceased, whose date of death was March 28, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 19, 2014. Personal Representative: Stuart L. Shoaf P.O. Box 772 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com June 19, 26, 2014 99279S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-32-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF DESSIE L. BELL Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of DESSIE L. BELL, deceased, whose date of death was February 12, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is June 19, 2014. Personal Representative: Barbara J. Presnell 2093 CR-30A Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com June 19, 26, 2014 99337S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of the following Ordinance Amendment with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; WHEREBY AMENDING GULF COUNTY ORDINANCE NO. 97-02 TITLED IN PART “ALLOWING FOR VEHICULAR TRAFFIC ON CERTAIN COASTAL BEACHES WITHIN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA”; SPECIFICALLY AMENDING THE ORDINANCE PROVISION “PROVIDING FOR A PERMIT FEE” AND “FINES”; PROVIDING FOR REPEALER, SEVERABILITY, MODIFICATIONS THAT MAY ARISE FROM CONSIDERATION AT PUBLIC HEARING; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. *Complete Ordinances on file in the Clerk’s Office* A public reading, introduction and public hearing will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioner’s Regular Meeting on Tuesday, July 8th at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissioner’s meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. All interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the Gulf County Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/ she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for inspection on weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and 5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WARD MCDANIEL, CHAIRMAN June 26, 2014 CKC Yorkie Female Pup 5mo Old. All Shots Up to Date. Call Karen 850-227-8666 Puppies: Hybrid Labra-Gold Retrievers $375 includes over $125 of vet preventitive care Born 3/20/14 Website: www .gracefulgoldenretriever atindianpass.com or Call Bob 850-227-2185 txt FL92479 to 56654 Gorgeous Haverty’s Sofa $150 89” burgundy/green traditional sofa owned by non-smoking owner with no pets. Excellent condition. Includes 4 pillows. 850-615-5764 Port St. Joe: 514 4th St. Saturday, 6/28, 8AM till...Yard SaleFurniture, Pictures, Dishes, Toy Trains, Rich a Rack Text FL93045 to 56654 GUN SHOWJuly 5 & 6 Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL92777 to 56654 GUN SHOW PENSACOLA FAIRGROUNDSJune 28th and 29th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL91098 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291810 Banking Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 EducationEarly Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and organizational skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34293147 Text FL93147 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler CaregiversThis position provide quality early care and education to children age 0-3 years. CDA plus training and experience in working with young children accepted along with the willingness to receive additional training. Pay scale: $10.10-$12.70, plus excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34293148 Text FL93148 to 56654 Food Svs/Hosp.Kitchen StaffExperience required. Day and night shift. Apply in person: 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach 850-648-8207 Web ID#: 34291704 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291809 Food ServicesDietary CookLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for the position of Dietary Cook. If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot an email to tblackwell@shccs.com We are offering a $300 sign on bonus for experienced cooks. WEB ID 34293032 Medical/HealthClinical Case ManagerHuman Services Agency is seeking a Clinical Case Manager to provide input and case oversight to a Juvenile Diversionary Alternative Program for arrested youths. Position will require travel throughout Pensacola, Panama City, and Tallahassee areas. The incumbent must have a master’s degree in a social or behavioral science and two years of experience in youth and family counseling. Familiarity with the juvenile justice system and community resources are preferred. Please note the position title for which you are applying on any correspondence. Qualified applicants must complete a DISC Village employment application and submit to: 3333 W. Pensacola St., Suite 330, Tallahassee, FL 32304. Applications may be downloaded at www.discvillage.com. A separate application is required for each position applied for. EOE/Drug-Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34291658 Medical/HealthCNA’sLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for position of CNA’s If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot email to tblackwell@shccs.com **We are offering a $1,000 sign on bonus for CNAs WEB ID 34293033 Medical/HealthSchedulerLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for the position of Scheduler. If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot an email to tblackwell@shccs.com WEB ID 34293015 Commercial Building For Rent. Hwy 98 Apalach 1000sf High Traffic 850-653-6900 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 1 Bedroom ApartmentsIncome Based Elderly-Disabled M,W,F 8-5 pm 850-229-6353 Equal Opportunity Housing Port St JoeCommercial/ ResidentialRental 2Bd 1.5Ba Efficiancy; short term 6 Mo, $1500 incl util or long term 12 Mo. @ $1,100 plus utilities Location! 2 minutes to St. Joe Bay, beaches, river and down town Port St. Joe 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL92003 to 56654 PSJ 3 br, 1 ba, Laundry room, fenced yard, $900 mo, Unfurn, Call 651-325-7731 White City Clean 3/2 House! Nice updates + small yard. Long term lease, Close to public boat ramp! 635 + Dep, (850) 329-0543 In Wewa RV for Rent$140/week. + $140/dep. Great for 1-2 people. Includes water, sewage, electric & WIFI 850-639-5721 Text FL82785 to 56654 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat, AWD Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. Ultimate Off Road SUV $21,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you.

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