The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03951


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Opinion ................................. A4 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A8 Sports ..................................... A9 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B2 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 Thursday, AUGUST 7, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 43 quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 76, NUMBER 43 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Young anglers B1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Having completed the work, local economic development of cials hope to be on more competitive ground. A community celebration Monday completed the initial effort under a Competitive Florida Partnership grant with city and county economic development stakeholders transitioning into the next phase of lling in the vision of a more economically-competitive community. The celebration completed about six months of work under the grant, an effort from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. The city of Port St. Joe was one of four communities selected to participate in the pilot program. The layered aim of the Competitive Florida Partnership was to extend the growth in Floridas economy over the past four or ve years into rural and smaller communities which may be experiencing economic bene ts in scattershot fashion. Since the cratering of the real estate market and slowdown in the economy in the middle of the past decade, Florida has added 600,000 private sector jobs, seen the unemployment rate drop more than two percentage points and become one of the top states in economic growth, said Jesse Panuccio, executive director of the DEO, who attended Mondays event at Capital City Bank. But, he said, not all communities, particularly small rural communities, have been equal. We now have some of the highest Creating a more competitive community TIM CROFT | The Star Jesse Panuccio, executive director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, spoke to local of cials during the community celebration completing the Competitive Florida Partnership grant process. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com P ort St. Joe is known for many things, and soon, a brewing company will be the latest. Port St. Joe Brewing Company, founded by Steve Wich, Bill Kennedy and Mike Cohoon, will release its rst draft, White Sands Wheat, at a launch party to be held at the Haughty Heron at 2 p.m. EDT on Saturday, Aug. 16. The event will mark the rst time the beer is available. After being exclusive to the Haughty Heron for two weeks the beer will be available in stores from Pensacola to Apalachicola. The brewing company has been almost two years in the making. Kennedy, who has a background in food and pharmaceuticals, was approached in 2012 by Cohoon, who ran the Chicago Brewing Company for many years before moving to Gulf County. The men then contacted Wich, who operates the Port Cottages, due IN YOUR FLIP-FLOPS SPECIAL TO THE STAR PSJ Brewing President Steve Wich adds Tupelo Honey to the White Sands Wheat ale. Left, after two years in the works, the Port St. Joe Brewing Company will hold its launch event on Aug. 16. See POP A TOP A7 See COMPETITIVE A7 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The concept was one thing: implementation quite another. The advisory board of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council approved in concept an additional one penny in bed taxes for the coming scal year. That would bring to ve the number of cents collected in bed taxes. But board members wanted assurance that the additional funds would be devoted toward construction of a new sports complex and not providing additional revenue for the Board of County Commissioners to shift the burden on cleaning and maintaining parks. Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the TDC, submitted a proposed budget for the additional penny which re ected her concept of having the penny earmarked for parks and recreation. But board member Ronald Pickett said looking at the proposed budget the TDC appeared to be taking on tasks for maintaining parks that would reside with the BOCC. The budget, which Jenkins repeatedly said was tentative and guesswork, re ected spending the additional revenue, estimated at roughly $285,000 next year, largely on existing parks as the BOCC and city of Port St. Joe work toward a new sports complex. It looks like we are raising additional funds for what we are already doing and for which we have money in the budget, Pickett said. While he agreed with the concept of a sports complex, he did not want any new dollars spent on TDC approves concept of an additional penny See TDC A6 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Illuminating the lighthouse By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Now for the encore. With the Cape San Blas Lighthouse successfully moved to George Core Park in Port St. Joe, the effort to preserve and restore the lighthouse and ancillary buildings moves into a new phase. The move, completed without apparent harm to any of the structures, which include two keepers quarters and an oil house, also came in under bid estimates. During Tuesdays regular bi-monthly meeting of the City Commission contractor GAC submitted, and had unanimously accepted, a change order reducing the price of the move by $17,500. I was impressed, said Commissioner Rex Buzzett of the raising of the lighthouse. I was impressed with the number of folks who came out to watch. I was impressed with the workers and the job they did. I was most impressed with the workers, after everybody gathered for last instructions, they all took off their helmets and said a prayer. That impressed me. It was like they knew they needed divine intervention for what they had to do. A popular question concerns whether the lighthouse will ever light again and on plans for the park and lighthouse complex. The lens, which had not beamed in decades, was removed last year under contract from the U.S. Coast Guard. The Coast Guard owns the lens, which was insured for half a million dollars, Mayor Mel Magidson said. It is a rare and unique item, Magidson said. The Coast Guard would not agree to reinstall the lens. However, the city and Coast Guard entered into a See LIGHTHOUSE A6

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NO TI CE OF IN TE ND ED AC TI ON TH E GU LF CO UN TY SC HO OL BO AR D Pu rp os e an d Ef fe ct : Th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d pr op os es to am en d an d ad op t po li ci es as pr ov id ed fo r in th e Ad mi ni st ra ti ve Pr oc ed ur es Ac t, fo r th e pu rp os e of br in gi ng sa id po li ci es in to co mp li an ce wi th Fl or id a St at ut es an d St at e Bo ar d of Ed uc at io n Ru le s. Su mm ar y: Th e fo ll ow in g is a br ie f de scr ip ti on of ea ch pr op os ed ch an ge 5. 32 Ze ro To le ra nc e fo r Sc ho ol Re la te d Cr im es Ec onom ic Im pa ct : Th es e pr op os al s ma y re su lt in di re ct co st s ass oc ia te d wi th im pl em en ta ti on IF RE QU ES TE D, A HE AR IN G WI LL BE HE LD AT : Ti me : 9: 00 AM ES T Da te : Au gu st 19 2 01 4 Pl ac e: Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Ro om 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Th e en ti re te xt of th e pr op os ed ru le s ca n be in sp ec te d du ri ng re gu la r of c e ho ur s at th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Of c e, 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Sp ec ia l le ga l au th or it y un de r wh ic h th e ad op ti on is au th or iz ed an d th e la w be in g im pl em en te d an d in te rp re te d is ma de sp ec i c. Th e ad di ti on an d ch an ge s ar e pr op os ed by Bi ll Ca rr As si st an t Su pe ri nt en de nt fo r Bu si ne ss Se rv ic es an d ap pr ov ed fo r co ns id er at io n by Ji m No rt on Su pe ri nt en de nt Am end me nt s: Se e ab ov e Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 7, 2014 Ethics complaints against commissioners dismissed By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Complaints led against three county commissioners were dismissed last week by the Florida Commission on Ethics. The complaints were led by Jim Garth, chairman of Citizens Improving Gulf County, against Commissioners Carmen McLemore, Ward McDaniel and Tan Smiley. The Commission on Ethics found all three complaints lacked legal suf ciency to be reviewed by the commission, with the issues raised largely outside the purview and jurisdiction of the Commission. The commission noted the dismissal did not re ect conclusions concerning the accuracy of the allegations and also suggested that the issues could be reviewed by the court system. The allegations, in another form, provide some of the substance behind a Circuit Court case led in an effort to overturn the the April granting by the BOCC of a land variance for property immediately adjacent to Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. Beacon Hill resident Bo Williams has sued the Board of County Commissioners, contending the variance was granted illegally. The case currently is before Circuit Court Judge John Fishel. The lawsuit seeks to overturn the variance, which opponents argue would, along with changes to the county Land Development Regulations by the BOCC, permit not only the building of an illegal structure abutting the park but also would negatively impact density requirements in Gulf County. During a recent community meeting on the lawsuit, about 40 interested individuals came out in support. An earlier default nding against the county has been stricken, with the agreement of Williams lawyer Pat Floyd, while lings seeking reimbursement to the county of legal fees expended to defend the default were denied. Fishel is awaiting additional lings in the case in advance of further hearings. The Ethics Commission complaints alleged six violations of state ethics laws by McDaniel, McLemore and Smiley during the consideration of the variance. None of the allegations, nor the conclusory assertion, indicates a possible violation of ethics laws, the opinion issued by the Commission detailed in part. Those allegations centered around voting con icts and whether approving the variance was a violation of the authority granted by their of ces. Other allegations are that the three shut down discussion or comments from those opposed to the variance, but the Commission on Ethics opinion read, in part, that the allegations did not rise to a violation of ethics laws. In sum, rather than substantively alleging a possible violation of a standard within the Commission on Ethics jurisdiction, the complaint is indicative of a dispute regarding a land-use variance, commission chairwoman Linda McKee Robison wrote. Such a matter may be subject to review or further consideration in the courts or before local boards, but not before this Commission on the facts alleged. Man accidentally killed at work Star staff report A Port St. Joe man was accidentally electrocuted while at work last Friday. Richard Dewayne Lancaster, 59, was found unresponsive inside a forklift at Raf eld Fisheries, 1624 Grouper Avenue in Highland View. Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce deputies were noti ed by dispatchers of an accident following a 911 call at 8:40 a.m. EDT last Friday. The caller noti ed a dispatcher that a man was driving a forklift when it became entangled in power lines. The initial information was that the subject was shocked by the electricity and unconscious. When they arrived emergency personnel found Lancaster in the forklift. He was transported to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe where he later was pronounced dead. The GCSO continues to investigate the accident. An autopsy will be conducted by the Medical Examiners Ofce of the 14th Judicial Circuit. RICHARD LANCASTER Richard Lancaster was electrocuted inside a forklift Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The Wewahitchka Med ical Center held its annual Back to School health fair last Friday and celebrated the 10 th anniversary of pro viding services in its cur rent location. The event, which was open to the public, wel comed 155 members of the community and featured 18 vendors that offered free medical screenings for blood pressure, pulse oxygen, body mass, vision and hearing. This event is huge for the community, said Paulina Pendarvis, pub lic awareness director for North Florida Medi cal Centers. It can re veal people who may have health issues they didnt know about. Children in grades K-12 receive a free back pack lled with school supplies, which included helpful items like glue sticks, pencils, pens and notebooks. Center Manager Ka trina Saunders said left over school supplies still are available for pickup at the medical center and those in need are welcome to stop by and pick them up. Supplies also were do nated to Wewahitchka El ementary School and the library. This is an example of how we can all work to gether to help people, Saunders said. At the various informa tion booths attendees had an opportunity to meet with doctors, medical pro viders, nurses and medical assistants to collect infor mation and get any ques tions answered. Local nursing and physical therapy business A&A Homecare showed children the value of clean hands. A&A owner, Amy Miller and co-worker Nicki Skiles put a special lotion on childrens hands to simulate germs and then asked them to wash their hands. Under a black light, unwashed areas glowed white, giving children some insight into where they needed to wash a bit better. If we teach them healthy hand washing practices, well keep them healthy, Skiles said. Gulf County EMS, We wahitchka Search and Rescue and Volunteer Fire Departments were on-site with a re truck and boats for the children to explore. The search and rescue vehicles added an extra little icing to the cake, Saunders said. Our ven dors felt like it was a good event for them to connect with people in the com munity, and were thankful to them for donating their time. Dr. Angel Cortes, who joined the facility in April 2013, praised the health fair and the services offered. People can have access to some tests that cant normally be afford ed, Cortes said. Resi dents should denitely get the screenings. Saunders said that dur ing last years event, Bell Tone identied two chil dren with hearing issues and helped them get im mediate support. Its always worthwhile when we catch something and can help them imme diately, Saunders said. The fact we can help them out makes this event very gratifying. The Wewahitchka Med ical Center is a Federally Qualied Health Center that has operated for 35 years. The center ac cepts Medicaid and Medi care and has a sliding fee scale for patients without insurance. Saunders thanked the Board of County Commis sioners and the City of Wewahitchka for helping with preparations for the event including the lling of potholes and bringing in a new dumpster. Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 7, 2014 CE LE BR AT ING 19 YE AR S OF SE RV IC E IN PO RT ST JO E 22 770 70 WW W. IV ER S MD .C OM MAN AG ING AL L YO UR FA MIL Y NE ED S FR OM : We ems Memorial Rehab Car e of fers in-patient re habilitative services, designed to impr ove function and maximize potential for re tur ning to home, school, work, and the community Our team customizes each patient s car e to meet both patient and family needs. We ar e committed to re tur ning those individuals who have been impair ed by accident or disease to their highest level of independence. Re hab Re stor e, Re turn to Home Call To day (850 ) 653-8853 135 Av enue G, Apalac hicola We ems Memorial Re hab Car e Yo ur Jour ney Back Home It 's H er e! It 's H er e! It 's H er e! It 's H er e! FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST NOMINA TE no w yo ur fa vo ri te businesses people re staur an ts or other ca te gor ies fo r Th e 2014 Reader s Ch oic e Be st of Th e Fo rg ott en Co ast FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST To submit nomina tions in each ca te gor y: GO TO star .c om OR apalach times .c om AND CLICK ON THE COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST apalach times .c om CLICK ON THE On line No mina tions: Au gust 7th-13th On line Vo ting: Au gust 14th 26th TO P THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN W ewahitchka Medical Center welcomes 155 to health fair PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Wewahitchka Search and Rescue and Volunteer Fire Departments brought a re truck, at right, and boat, above and below, for children to explore. The event played host to 18 local vendors who provided various free screenings to members of the community.

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With another daughter about to go off to college, we are crossing our ngers and hope she makes good decisions and understands what she is there to do. Im pretty sure she will and does. We were recently invited to Send-Off Party for all of the students from our area that would be going to Clemson University in a few weeks. Hoping to meet new folks and classmates, we thought it was a great idea and it was. Having visited the Clemson campus in South Carolina with my daughter, I understand what she likes about it. The professors I met were nice people who seemed to genuinely care about their students. The community is pretty much all about the university and its reputation and I like that. However, Im from Alabama and not used to the Clemson colors of purple and orange but I will wear them proudly for my daughter. On this day of the party, I donned an orange shirt, shook hands and talked to a lot of folks. They were nice, they were genuine, they were Southern they could easily be my people. I had a long conversation with the young lady who was in charge of organizing the party and sticking name tags on people. She was in her mid-twenties and had a glow to her that I really liked. She was explaining to me how friendly the students, faculty and people in the community were and how many different organizations there were to get involved with on campus. We talked about church organizations, sororities and a lot of other groups on campus. Again, this young lady glowed. Her name was Natalie. Natalie made a statement that required me to inquire what she meant. She said something to the effect of, There are so many organizations that you can end up in one without knowing it. She said it with a grin, thus I knew there was a story behind it and I had to ask. I was glad I did. She said while at Clemson, she was asked to attend a fraternity/sorority type meeting, probably to plan social or university events. However, when she got in the room where the meeting was supposed to be, she noticed about the time the meeting was supposed to start she seemed to be the only girl in the room and was de nitely in the wrong place. In her words, I was there in my sorority shirt, pearls and a smile with a bunch of fellows in camou age. She smiled Well, being a good Southern girl, Natalie decided to stay put and not admit she had wandered into the wrong meeting. This is what Southern women do Even if they make a mistake, they gracefully hang in there. Before she could gure out the nature of this club she had barged in on, these fellows in camou age started electing of cers. Natalie sat there. Then, the of ce of Secretary came up and yes, these fellows had the gall to say something along the lines of, You are the only girl here, you should be the Secretary. I have taught my girls not to take such, but then again I know the truth of the matter One Glowing Southern girl, a bunch of guys in camou age dipping snuff I dont care what her title is; she would be running this club in a matter of minutes. Just stand back and watch. She stayed until the end of the meeting and yes she was happy to be the Secretary. You know I had to ask. What did you do then? With a Scarlett OHara smile, Natalie looked me in the eyes and simply said, I called my Daddy and told him I needed a gun, I had joined the Shotgun Club. Not only did she join the Shotgun Club, but she liked it. Lord have mercy, this girl is single and living in Richmond, Virginia. Send your eligible sons her way In addition to learning that Clemson University has a lot of organizations for their students to become involved, I learned that Clemson girls have this Orange Glow about them. The best way to describe it would be to compare it to a moth being attracted to a ame or light. The way I gure it, the camou age boys at Clemson couldnt resist the Orange Glow of a Clemson girl. Upon further research, I found out that moths really arent attracted to re and lights as much as they are disoriented by them. Southern Women their smiles and words disorient you and put you in a trance Dont let them fool you they are smart and probably dont need any sort of weapon to get you. They just glow and you come toward them in a daze My daughter is going to the right place. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Someone once called Israel a stiff-necked people. Boy howdy! I dont claim to be an international expert here foreign countries to us back home was Nashville or Memphis but that doesnt keep me from pondering hard into the night on this latest round in the Middle East. I cant tell exactly who is wearing the white hat here. But you can bet Israel once again is going to get the short end of the world opinion stick. You gure they are probably used to that now, after six thousand years of it. By all accounts it appears this Hamas group is hunkered down in caves, tunnels and U. N. hospitals in the Gaza Strip and lobbing rockets, bombs and missiles over into Israel. That would irritate even the most peace minded among us in a fairly short order. Its not about turning the other cheek here to a militant neighbor, its about survival! I dont know if Israel asked Hamas politely to stop. I dont know if they tried to broker a peace arrangement through the United States, France or with some other faction of the Palestine government. A period of non-action by Israel and the peace loving nations of the world allowed the Hamas ghters to grow bolder as they sent rockets further across the border.Israel nally retaliated in kind. As the rst Israeli shot landed the world, including the United States, immediately demanded a unilateral cease re. Im more than baf ed by this! Where was the world out cry for peace when the rst Hamas bomb landed in Israel? Wouldnt it have been much easier to have stopped this thing BEFORE it got started? When Mother was separating me, Leon and David after we had fought from the bedroom, down the hall, through the kitchen, out to the porch the rst thing she wanted to know was Who threw the rst blow? I reckon that doesnt matter anymore. Its like the biggest guy in the elementary school at recess. Some of the smaller kids pick on him. The big guy is not mad at anyone. He hasnt especially done anything wrong, except maybe grow at a faster rate than the others. The taunts become a little meaner, more personal as they are not curbed by any authority. The unfortunate young soul gets tormented on the monkey bars, assailed over by the swing set and nally a rock or two comes from somewhere out of the crowd. Ive seen this happen with my own eyes. One day, the bewildered big guy pushes one of the vilest offenders. You would have thought World War III was upon us! Teachers run over to stop the mayhem, the principal shows up out of nowhere. This cant take place in our school yard! The bully must be restrained! Conferences break out all over the school system. Counselors and parents are called in. Order must be restored! You wonder why better judgment wasnt used before things got so out of hand. And it needs to be remembered, the guy getting the worst of the beating is often times not the innocent bystander. What if Mexico was building tunnels into California and lobbing bombs into Texas? Wait a minute, they have built tunnels! We had the Border Patrol, National Guard, CHiPs, Secret Service and Geraldo Rivera down there securing things quick as a wink. Mexico did, maybe, could have, almost red on American troops in Texas. It depends on whether the Rio Grande or the Nueces River was the actual boundary between the two countries in May of 1846. There was some dispute to that fact at the time. Manifest Destiny was reigning high and President James K. Polk declared that American blood had been shed on American soil. We sent ground troops all the way to Mexico City to ensure the safety of our citizens. Poor Israel cant win for losing. Their bombs seem to do more damage than the Hamas rockets. Somehow the world thinks that is unfair. And every Hamas rocket apparently hits an Israel soldier while every Jewish bomb lands on a school house, hospital or United Nations building. I never realized the U.N. had so many buildings in the Gaza Strip! The world is appalled by the body count, as it should be in any war, earthquake, Tsunami or other disaster. But Im a little leery of death reports coming from within the ghting factions. The accuracy of those gures is like me and Leon counting stars. On a clear night wed see how many we could count in thirty seconds. Id cheat a little bit and declare I spotted a hundred and six. Leon, in the same amount of time, counted fortyve thousand stars! Heres the most disturbing thing in this whole mess. There is ghting today in the Ukraine. They are ghting in Syria. Groups are on the attack once again in Iraq. And, as we are well aware, the con ict is ongoing in Afghanistan. Which war headlines the news? Where is the most world-wide pressure being applied for the ghting to stop? Over which bombings have people in France, Germany and I dare say, the United States, taken to the streets to protest? As a matter of fact, by the time you read this, I wouldnt be surprised if a cease re hasnt been pushed on the Israelis. Folks, this reeks of anti-Semitism. Havent we seen this movie before.. Respectfully, Kes Coal ash threat to Apalachicola River An orange glow By Lynn Ringenberg, M.D. Special to The Star A national epidemic has come to Florida. It is a silent threat, growing every day. Pollution contaminates our waters, poisons our sh and wildlife and increases our risk of cancer and other diseases. The culprit is coal ash, and here in Florida we generate more than 6 million tons of this toxic waste every year, making our state 7 th in the nation for coal ash generation. Even though its full of dangerous contaminants, coal ash is even less regulated than our household garbage. In February, a coal ash pond in North Carolina ruptured, sending 140,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River along the Virginia border. In 2008, a coal ash pond in Tennessee burst, sending more than 1 billion gallons of coal ash into the Clinch and Emory Rivers and damaging 40 nearby homes. Although the coal ash problem in Florida isnt as obvious, it is still just as dangerous. Coal ash is the waste left over when coal is burned for electricity. In 2007, power plants nationwide generated 140 million tons of this waste enough to ll a line of train cars stretching from the North Pole to the South Pole. Many power plants simply dump their coal ash into unlined and unmonitored pits. There are no federal regulations ensuring safe disposal and handling of this waste, so coal ash can often contaminate nearby lakes, rivers, streams and drinking water aquifers with toxic pollutants. Across the country, coal ash has contaminated water at more than 200 sites. Floridas most recent instance of contamination is along the Apalachicola River. On June 5, environmental groups sued Gulf Power Company for illegally discharging coal ash into the river at its Scholz Electric Generating Plant, a violation of the Clean Water Act. Water tests near the coal ash dumps found that arsenic levels coming out of the unlined pits were 300 times higher than federal safety standards. High levels of cadmium, chromium well known carcinogens as well as lead, selenium and mercury were also found. Unfortunately, as coal plant pollution controls become more effective at trapping emissions and decreasing coal plant air pollution, the waste being dumped into coal ash waste streams is becoming more toxic. Coal ash is a witchs brew of toxic heavy metals that poses signi cant health threats. These pollutants can cause cancer, damage organs, impair development in young children, cause heart and lung disease and a host of other dangerous ailments. But coal ash threats arent limited to water pollution. In a report released this month titled Ash In Lungs: How Breathing Coal Ash is Hazardous to Your Health, Physicians for Social Responsibility and Earthjustice outline the danger of breathing coal ash dust. Increased asthma attacks and lung disease often result when the ne particle pollution of coal ash dust enters our bodies through the air we breathe. In numerous ways, coal ash continues to threaten our lives. There is hope. Physicians for Social Responsibility and Earthjustice, along with Appalachian Voices, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, Environmental Integrity Project, Kentuckians For The Commonwealth, Moapa Band of Paiutes, Montana Environmental Information Center, Prairie Rivers Network, Sierra Club, Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and Western North Carolina Alliance, sued the EPA in federal court for its failure to follow the law and propose coal ash regulations in a timely manner. As a result of that lawsuit, the EPA will nalize a federal coal ash regulation by Dec. 19, 2014. This will mark the rst time the EPA has set such a standard, and we hope it is strong and protective of public health and the environment. Until that rule is nalized, no federal protections for coal ash currently exist. Industry lobbyists are turning to some members of Congress to thwart the EPAs authority and pass legislation that will ban the EPA from ever regulating coal ash waste. Delay is victory for the polluters; the longer they can postpone any regulations, the longer Floridians will have to pay the price of more pollution into our air and water. There are simple solutions for this complex problem, but we need to institute them before its too late. Florida should not be the site of the next coal ash disaster. Lynn Ringenberg, M.D., is emeritus professor of pediatrics at the University of South Florida in Tampa and a retired Army colonel. She is co-founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility Florida and president-elect of the national Physicians for Social Responsibility (http://www.psr.org). HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, August 7, 2014 A Page 4 Section Dachau Was A Long Time Ago Dear Editor, About two years ago, I rushed my beloved husband with crushing back pain and extremely high blood pressure to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe. The staff there and especially Dr. Pablo were unbelievably courteous, professional, and caring. My husband was in bad condition; the top two chambers of his heart were barely functioning and his blood pressure was excessively high. Dr. Pablo moved my husband to a room directly in front of his of ce, so Dr. Pablo could monitor my husband at all times. Dr. Pablo explained that he had to stabilize my husband before he could be transported to the cardiac unit at Bay Medical Hospital in Panama City. Dr. Pablo did stabilize my husband who was then transported to Bay Medical where he underwent heart bypass surgery a few days later. I sincerely believe that Dr. Pablo initiated the saving of my husbands life by his methodical and professional decisions and procedures. All of us who live in Gulf County are blessed to have Sacred Heart Hospital and staff and especially Dr. Pablo to provide health care for this area. I thank you more than I can express. TK Loy Gulf County resident LYNN RINGENBERG LETTER OF APPRECIATION

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I bet theres rich folks eatin in a fancy dinin car Theyre probly drinkin coffee and smokin big cigars. Folsom Prison Blues Written and Recorded by Johnny Cash If you recently received a card from your broker postmarked in Hawaii, you may have helped send him there. A broker at an investment conference stated in a luncheon recently that he would never consider leaving his rm. Why?, someone asked. The vacations, he said. Every year, depending on how many annuities I sell, they send my wife and me to a place weve never been. Last year we went to Rome. The year before we took an Alaskan cruise. This year were going to Paris. And its all free. When markets tumbled in 2008 these trips were downsized or cancelled. Now, though, in concert with recent bullish markets, complimentary vacations to resort destinations are once again on the rise. Some educational sessions are usually hosted at conferences now, to lend some professional credence to the trips. A recent article in the WSJ is entitled Wall Street Revives Reward Junkets for Top Brokers. The accompanying photo reveals beachside cabanas at the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua. In late April, a few hundred of Morgan Stanleys top stockbrokers and their spouses jetted off to Hawaii for a gathering spiced with golf, deep-sea shing and suntanning, writes Corrie Driebusch. When they arrivedthe rst perks of their allexpenses paid trip were waiting for themGoPro cameras and Maui Jim sunglasses Perhaps nothing else delineates so clearly the difference between brokers and fee-only advisors. If an advisor is being rewarded by his parent company with a lavish vacation for reaching a certain plateau of annuity sales, or for steering client investment dollars into parent company mutual funds, he will naturally aspire to please the parent company, which provides his income. The problem is that investing in an annuity or the rms parent company mutual fund may or may not be in the clients best interest. The client may wonder: Is the advisor selling or recommending this product because its good for me nancially, or because it earns him more points toward a year-end vacation? This is one of the reasons why brokers are not duciaries and fee-only advisors do serve as duciaries to their clients. The duciary advisor maintains a legal obligation to act in the clients best interest. Independent, fee-only advisors have no parent companies. Thus, they are not rewarded with vacations, salary, benets or perks from a company which nancially benets from the sale of certain nancial instruments. Fee-only advisors sell no products. Every dime of an independent, fee-only advisors income is derived from client fees, and thus, his focus is on his clients, not on packing a suitcase. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Since Memorial Day weekend, the Gulf Coun ty Tourist Development Council has upped its cred ibility exponentially when it comes to cleaning up the beaches. With the addition of three beach ambassadors, residents who spread good will from the shorelines of St. Joe Beach to Indian Pass, also came the role of the beach maintenance technician. The role of a technician until this year inmate crews cleaned the beaches but restrictions on those crews led to problems is to keep the area parks and beaches clean of refuse and to ensure that public areas are in good shape. Since July, the four tech nicians have hauled more than 80,000 pounds of trash to keep Gulf County clean for both its residents and visitors. When the pilot program began, Napoleon Hill, a life long county resident, was the only technician, but as visitors ooded the area to begin summer vacations, Hill found himself quickly overwhelmed. TDC Executive Director Jennifer Jenkins sought approval to hire additional employees. The technicians now are overseen by Mark Co thran in the countys Public Works department. Cothran restructured the program and hired new technicians Jesse Hyman, Alex Jenkins and Austin Clayton to help stay ahead of the trash. The team cleans public parks from Overstreet to Indian Pass. The clean up rubbish and ensure public restrooms are clean and in working order. They also look for damage to any dune walkovers and make repairs when necessary. When it was just me, Id start in Indiana Pass and by the time I got to St. Joe Beach, Indiana Pass was dirty again, Hill said. Rather than Hill hav ing to cover all the ground alone, having a larger group allows trucks to start at each end of the beach and work there way toward the center. Currently, the crews nd themselves haul ing anywhere from 450-900 pounds of trash daily. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, the trash can be taken to the landll, but throughout the rest of the week the crew lls up every available dumpster Public Works has available. Other times it must be taken directly to Panama City for disposal. Each day the techni cians ll out a report to show what areas they cleaned, how much refuse was collected as well as notate any public areas in need of repairs or cleaning. This data will be ana lyzed at the end of the sea son and may be used to help reinforce a request for a Leave No Trace ordi nance for Gulf County. The many complaints of residents in regard to items being left on the beaches are not falling on deaf ears. The technicians share the pain more so because theyre the ones who clean it up. Its a respect thing, said Alex Jenkins, a threeyear resident. Its up to us to preserve and maintain these beaches. Jenkins said the main source of trash the team runs across during their workday are the metal frames of abandoned beach tents. If left on the beach dur ing a storm, they often come loose from the sand and become mangled in the dunes. Technicians must then cut them apart so the pieces will t into the trucks and trailers used to haul the junk away. Any large item left on the beach for more than 24 hours is agged by beach ambassadors while out on patrol and cleaned up by the technicians. In addition to tent frames, the crew has hauled full-size freezers, blenders, grills, boats and jet skis from the Gulfs white sands. They also are facing an epidemic of holes on the beach, which are dug during the day but not lled back in. These holes, some of which Jenkins said can be up to 6 feet deep, pose perils to both beach drivers and sea turtles. I dont understand it, said Hyman, a 21-year resi dent. People spend all this money to travel here. No one wants a trashy beach. Much like the beach am bassadors, the technicians also interact with visitors, answering questions or providing copies of the Visi tors Guide. Hill said not everyone is a problem, and he encoun ters many visitors who are also doing their part to keep the beaches clean. We all have to work together, said Jenkins. In the beginning we un derestimated the amount of trash and the amount of people who would be on the beaches. For Hill, who has been cleaning the beaches the longest, he said he realizes how fortunate he is to have a position where he could contribute to anothers en joyment of the area. I enjoy the people I work with, theyre a great group, and I get to meet a lot of great people while out on the beach, Hill said. Additional technicians allowed Cothran to pull inmate crews off neces sary beach cleanup duty for more other beautica tion jobs. He said he didnt want to use the inmates on the beaches in the rst place but knew it was the only option to stay ahead of the buildup. Jenkins said the inmates werent a good brand presence and he was happy to nd a solution. People leave stuff on the beach because they can, said Cothran. At the end of the week, hauling all this stuff home is not on their mind. Its sad, but its up to us to make sure we educate the visitors and control the situation. Despite being kneedeep in trash at times, each technician said they enjoyed their role. Jenkins said it wasnt by any means a glory job. Its a thankless job, said Cothran. But we have a really good group. All technicians received brand training from Jen kins prior to starting and all live in the area. Crews are currently on patrol 10 hours a day, seven days a week. Cothran encouraged residents to call him at 227-1401 if they notice prob lem areas that arent be ing addressed in a timely manner. If we dont know theres a problem and people are dissatised, we cant help, said Co thran. Residents and guests want to have a great experience here, and we want them to. The program is much larger than I ever anticipat ed, but its always evolving into something better. Jenkins said that while shell still have to crunch some numbers at the end of the season, she said she feels condent the pilot program will be a success and believes it will return again next summer. Local Thursday, August 7, 2014 The Star| A5 Taking out the trash TDC beach maintenance technicians keep busy during summer Courtesy of JE FF ROSS | Special to the Star The trash on Cape San Blas and other beaches has been a concern with residents and visitors. WES LO C HE R | The Star Beach Maintenance Technicians Jesse Hyman, Alex Jenkins, Napoleon Hill, Austin Clayton (not pictured) and supervisor Mark Cothran spend 40 hours each week keeping Gulf Countys beaches clean. MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Send your letters to : L ETTE R S TO THE E DI TO R P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S H A RE YOU R O PINI O N S Maui Jims, GoPros and Folsom Prison Blues

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anything but the construction of the complex. Im not for spending an extra pen ny for any of this, Pickett said, refer ring to the proposed draft budget. The BOCC has approved the addi tional cent; with the TDC approval the county will now draft and advertise an ordinance, with two public hearings preceding a nal vote, to codify the ad ditional penny. That ordinance would also set the time frame for the collection of the ad ditional penny. We need to implement this and move forward on a plan, said County Commissioner Warren Yeager, who sits on the TDC board. The BOCC will be involved in bringing this project forward. The new park is the focus. The TDC board unanimously ap proved the concept. The sports complex, a concept originally codied in an interlocal agreement between city and county which has since been amended, would be built on 70-odd acres the St. Joe Company donated to the city. The BOCC and city originally pledged equal funding of $800,000 each to the complex, but due to shrinking budgets over the past ve years nei ther could afford the sticker price. The TDC, under state laws estab lishing the agency, may collect an ad ditional penny for a project aimed at promoting tourism. This is one of the few things the TDC can do as a project to put heads in beds and is a benet to the whole community, the whole county, said board member Tony Whiteld. The benets to such a complex are tangible. The Bay County TDC estimates youth sports tournaments constitute a $35 million annual economic impact and account for tens of thousands of room nights. A recent youth league baseball tournament in Chipley, which offers few of the amenities that Gulf County can, brought an economic impact of $300,000 to Washington County for a one week tournament. I think it will really help those shoulder seasons, Yeager said, who added that some small bonding of the revenue stream from the additional penny was likely the path to go to con struct the sports complex. MINDFUL OF GROWTH Those comments and vote came after a lengthy discussion about les sons learned this summer. The consensus among board mem bers is that the summer months have been busier than anticipated and that has drawn both praise for the TDCs efforts to grow revenue into the coun ty as well as complaints about the volume of visitors and trash being left behind on the beaches. In part that means we are doing our job because people are coming here, said board member Alyson Gerlach. Look at the progress that we have made. This is a really good problem to have. One side effect, at least for this year, has been seven additional seasonal employees added to the TDC staff to address issues on the beach with Jen kins looking at adding even more em ployees next year. I grossly underestimated the need for this, Jenkins said of a beach main tenance program. Pickett said it was important for the TDC to establish the standards for beach health. The cleaner we keep it the cleaner people will keep it, he said. But board member Chris Petrie said comments he had heard this summer indicated a level of discon tent the TDC staff and board had to be aware of and that the situation was un dermining the brand and was some thing we need to get ahead of. Even though sheer bed tax num bers didnt reect it bed taxes were down slightly in June, a;though there was one less weekend this year than last and last June was a quarterly col lection month, which have been elimi nated the volume of visitors told a different story. There is a concern about growth and we need to be mindful of it, Jen kins said. We need to strive to grow in a sustainable manner. That is our mantra for the next year. And it is not just tourism; it is the entire county, the port, economic de velopment. We have to balance our growth. Jenkins, with the boards help, also honed her focus for marketing in the coming year. More emphasis will be placed on shoulder seasons such as fall and spring, where growth opportuni ties exist and less on summer where growth has been exponential. We have no need to promote summer, Whiteld said. Two years ago we were worried about getting people back here. We need to be careful what you wish for. We cant get any more growth in the summer. The growth can come in the spring and fall. TDC from page A1 Local A6 | The Star Thursday, August 7, 2014 NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 8-15-14 CODE: SJ00 4516380 850 -227889 0/8 50-22 7-77 70 ww w. coas tal re alty info .com Th er ei sp le nt yo fr oo mw it h4 be dro om s, 4. 5b at hs an d3d ec ks to en jo yt he vi ew th eg or ge ou ss uns ets Ov er 2, 000 sq ft .o fl ivi ng spa ce wi th pri va te el ev at or ac ce ss to ea ch le ve l. Ti le Fl oor sa nd cr ow nm old in g in ki tc he n, di ni ng an dl iving ar eas .5 40 sq ft .o fd ec ks Be au ti fu ll yf ur ni sh ed an dr ea dy fo ry ou 21 04 Mon ume nt Av en ue Fo rA pp oi nt me nt Ca ll 85 022 711 20 Cu st om ho m ew it hm an ye xt ra si np re mi er ne igh bor ho od .2 25 7s qf t4b ed ro om ,2 .5 bat h hom ew it hl ar ge se pa ra te din in ga re a. La rg es cr ee n por ch an dp at io .L ar ge la und ry ro om ,2c ar ga ra ge ga rde ns he d, an dw ra pa rou nd por ch .B ea ut if ul 1/ 2 ac re la nds ca pe dl ot wi th ir ri gat ion sy st em 4516380 850 -227889 0/8 50227 -7770 ww w. coast al rea ltyinfo .com Th er ei sp le nt yo fr oo mw it h4 be dro om s, 4. 5b ath s an d3d ec ks to en jo yt he vi ew th eg or ge ou ss uns ets Ov er 2, 000 sq ft .o fl ivi ng sp ac ew it hp ri va te el ev at or ac ce ss to ea ch le ve l. Ti le Fl oor sa nd cr ow nm old in g in ki tc he n, di ni ng an dl ivi ng ar eas .5 40 sq ft .o fd ec ks Be au ti fu ll yf ur ni sh ed an dr ea dy fo ry ou Th is 3BR /2 BA ch arm in gc ot ta ge is ju st as ho rt wa lk to th eb ea ch .T il e oor st hr ou gho ut la rg eo pe nd ec ko ff mai nl ivin ga re aa sw el la s sc re en ed por ch .M as te rs ui te on to p oo rw it h pr iv at es cr ee ne dp or ch and su nde ck .E le va to r ac ce ss to al ll ev el s. FE MA in su ra nc ea va il abl e. 850-227-8890 /8 50-227-7770 www .coast alr eal tyi nfo.c om LIGHTHOUSE from page A1 loan agreement by which the city will be allowed to display the lens for the public. That exact location has not been determined, but the long-term goal has been to re turn the lens to the lighthouse complex at George Core Park for display. It needs to be somewhere people can see it and enjoy it, Magidson said. As for lighting at the light house, Magidson said discus sions were ongoing with the Coast Guard concerning what sort of lighting might be per missible both for the top of the lighthouse itself and to accen tuate the structure itself. Any lighthouse atop the lighthouse could only be turned on occasionally, Magid son said, not full-time. Lighting at the complex, said resident Ann White, was needed immediately. At night the park area is very dark, she said, given the closest lighting comes a near by street. The city was vulnerable to a lawsuit should someone be injured in the dark, White continued, and the lighthouse and buildings make the situa tion more pressing. Something really needs to be done soon, she said. As for the rest of the com plex, focus will be on paint ing the lighthouse tower and rehabbing the keepers quarters. One keepers quarters was restored by the U.S. Air Force, which deemed the lighthouse surplus two years ago, and the other by the St. Joseph Histor ical Society, which used state historic preservation dollars to restore the second, nick named Sleeping Beauty. But two years after the Lighthouse Gift Shop was moved out of Sleeping Beau ty after the lighthouse was closed due to shoreline ero sion issues, the two buildings are now in a state of disrepair. A plan to restore them and how to fund that effort is part of the current process. Getting it moved was kind of on the front burner, Magid son said. We will have things we have to do at the park. A lot of that is still in the planning stage.NPSJ WATER LINE REPLACEMENT The project to replace ag ing water lines in a large por tion of the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe should be completed by the end of the month, said Clay Smallwood of Preble Rish Engineers, the citys engineer of record. The completion falls after the end of a 30-day extension that commissioners, frus trated by the pace of work, granted contractor GAC last month and which arrived Wednesday. The project, delayed by nearly a year by governmen tal red tape due to the coor dination of state and federal grants, lately, the slow prog ress of work, is the rst phase of line replacement in the north side of the city. Magidson said he was sat ised if the end of the month would bring full completion. Also pertaining to water, water plant staff continues to see good progress in ad dressing manganese in water through pre-treatment with chlorine, said plant supervi sor Larry McLamma. Florida Department of En vironmental Protection of cials have visited, McLamma said, and were pleased with the progress and the proper ties of the water coming out of the plant. Manganese was identied as the culprit in the number of complaints about dirty or ice tea water. The number of those com plaints, said Public Works supervisor John Grantland, have dropped signicantly. McLamma and staff con tinue to explore moving to introducing lime to the treat ment protocol to address red water issues, which are being largely addressed with the water line replacement work of the past several years. Rachel Bixler brings hometown physician to SHH in PSJ Special to The Star Boa rd-certied family medicine physician, Rachel Bixler, MD, has joined Sacred Heart Medical Group in Port St. Joe. Bixler was born and raised in Port St. Joe and graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 2004. She earned her medical degree from Florida State University College of Medicine in Tallahassee. She completed her residency training in family medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center where she was chief resident of her program from 2013 2014. I am excited about returning home as a family medicine physician with Sacred Heart Medical Group, said Dr. Bixler. I love this community and cannot wait to serve as one of their doctors. Bixler has a special medical interest in womens health. She also has interests in dermatology as well as child health from infancy to adolescence. She will accept same-day appointments and new patients at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf located at 3801 E. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call her ofce at 229-5661. RACHEL BIXLER

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Thursday, August 7, 2014 to his background in sales. A brewing company was something I always wanted to see, I just didnt have the expertise, said Wich, who is president of the company. Together the group spent six months creating a business plan and began seeking the required government approvals. After ling the paperwork to brew, the next step was a tricky one Wich and his cohorts had to actually make the beer. Its not uncommon for smaller breweries to contract brew, using the facilities of a more established company like Anheuser Busch or the MillerCoors Brewing Company until they grow large enough to construct their own. Wich and company visited several breweries before landing on the independent bottler Lazy Magnolia, based out of Kiln, M.S. We wanted the best t for us, said Wich. We needed a distributor that knows how to deal with their clients and had a high level of customer satisfaction. The next major task was to nd a distributor, which they did in the Lewis Bear Company, who distributes more than 300 brands of beer across the globe. Before Lewis Bear picked up PSJ Brewings beverages, Wich found himself in the odd position of having to describe in detail a product that didnt yet exist. That was the biggest hurdle we had to jump, said Wich. We were dead in the water if we didnt get distribution. Luckily, Wich had worked with Kerigan Marketing Associates in Port St. Joe to build his brand and design the packaging. Emblazoned with the logo motto, pop a top in your ipops, and beach imagery, the cardboard six-pack holder landed Wich his distribution contract. Even though the brewing companys product will be available along the Forgotten Coast to start, Wich said he aims to be statewide within the rst year and regional by the second. The packaging has a beach feel. Its laid back and relaxed, said Wich. Were selling what we have here in Gulf County. Wich has driven out to Mississippi two to three times a month to oversee the brewing process to ensure a consistent and quality product. In preparation for the launch part, the rst batch is currently in the fermenting tanks. White Sands Wheat, a Belgianstyle honey ale, was engineered to be a refreshing drink and features Tupelo honey straight from Wewahitchka and purchased from the 4-H Club. The next beers to be produced include the Lighthouse Lager and the Pelican Pale Ale. Wich said he plans to include local ingredients in their brews whenever possible. Were helping to support endeavors in the community, Wich said. The more community support we have, the faster we can grow our brand. The nal piece of the puzzle comes in the form of a taproom and brewery that Wich aims to open in Port St. Joe within three years. In addition to the commercial operation creating 50-100 new jobs, Wich said the brewery would allow the product to be made on-site. The taproom would feature the latest avors and provide a social gathering spot for residents and visitors alike while the brewery would be open for tours, a common day trip option as craft beer continues to take off in the U.S. We want visitors to try our beer and take it home to share with their friends, said Wich. They can tell their friends about their trip to Port St. Joe and everything we have to offer. Were marketing Gulf County and this is an opportunity to put us on the map. The launch party will feature food, live music from Baby Gray and $1,000 in giveaways. Most importantly, it will be the communitys rst opportunity to sip some White Sands Wheat. The people in the community have been so supportive of our plan to brew this beer, said Wich. Im thrilled we can nally give it to them. POP A TOP from page A1 growth in the country and our goal is to reach out to smaller communities and use the resources of the state to be part of that growth, Panuccio said. In particular, the goal was to map community assets to identify strengths on which to capitalize and weaknesses toward which more must be focused. In mapping those assets, the hope was to ensure the history of a community would be continued and studied well into the future, Panuccio said. Staff from the DEO, along with of cials from other communities in the pilot program, visited Port St. Joe and Gulf County to assist in the mapping of assets, applying new eyes and new ideas. The communitys strengths quickly become clear to study groups, evidenced by comments made during a visioning exercise in the spring. Stand outs included the Gulf/ Franklin campus of Gulf Coast State College and its host of educational offerings and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, providing jobs and excellent health care as well as security for those wishing to relocate to Gulf County, said Bill Killingsworth of the DEO, whose of ce oversaw the Competitive Florida Partnership. Also standing out was the historic downtown avor of Port St. Joe, as well as parks and other recreational opportunities. The historic nature of downtown, Killingsworth added, has only been enhanced with the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Not too many people have a historic lighthouse in the downtown, Killingsworth said. That lighthouse is a cool addition to the city. And, most of all considering the effort centered on economic development, the Port of Port St. Joe and the mission to create an operational port at Floridas only undeveloped deepwater port. Those assets are the things that make a community unique, Killingsworth said. Leveraging those assets has to be unique to them. This program gives control back to the community and lets them plan their future. And all these assets have Port St. Joe poised to create a sustainable future. In addition to identifying assets, the work also focused on collaboration and how county/city of cials could cwork together, and with state resources, to strengthen and capitalize upon those assets. One example of ideas emerging from the grant work involves the Port Theatre. Through education from state of cials about grant possibilities, an effort is underway to secure ownership of the theater through historic preservation grant in order to create a performing arts center. That theater can be a real diamond to anchor downtown, Killingsworth said. What the community provided the state, the DEO in particular, was an understanding of how state resources can best be deployed to ignite and foment economic development. The four pilot communities, in effect, established a database for ideas that worked and didnt, strengths and weaknesses in economic development efforts, upon which future efforts may draw. You guys are paying back by adding to us (and what we do), Killingsworth said. We want to grow and expand the resources of the state to assist other communities. The work under the Competitive Florida Partnership grant segues into a plan intertwined with the economic development element of the citys comprehensive plan. We have a plan now and were getting ready to implement that plan, said Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. Hopefully that plan will bear fruit in economic development, particularly for the pet project, the port. The plan that emerged from the Competitive Florida Partnership has been submitted to state stakeholders for comments, which are expected to be returned to the city soon, said city attorney Tom Gibson. This has been a wonderful experience, said Gail Alsobrook, executive director of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency. The asset mapping report is an excellent tool. COMPETITIVE from page A1 Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Local The Star| A7 Thursday, August 7, 2014

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Thursday, August 7, 2014 www.starfl.com Section Section A By Tom Baird Special to The Star When the economy is bad and legislatures dont have much money to spend, we often see a lot of Feel Good bills introduced. They dont cost any money, but look like the legislators are doing something. One category of Feel Good bills is designations of state symbols like State Bird, State Mammal, State Fungus, etc. For instance, the State Gem of Florida is the Moonstone, which does not even occur in Florida. It was passed in the wake of the Apollo program and is symbolic of Floridas role in the moon landings. One designation that the legislators got right is the State Shell. The Horse Conch (Triplofusus giganteus, formally Pleuroploca gigantea) is the largest snail in North America and it is a resident of St. Joseph Bay. Individuals can attain a length of two feet, also making it one of the largest snails in the world. Horse Conchs are predators and are large enough to prey of other large gastropods in the bay like the Lefthanded or Lightening Whelks. Horse Conchs prefer sandy bottoms and smaller specimens can be seen hunting in shallow water. The Horse Conch is found all around the Florida peninsula, but is most abundant on the southwest coast around Naples and Sanibel Island, and is rarely found in the Big Bend part of the coast with its abundance of grass ats. There is evidence that Horse Conchs were much more numerous in our bay. The Indian middens on the shore and islands of the bay all have weathering Horse Conch shells. Some of these are truly gigantic. In other parts of Florida Indians utilized Horse Conch shells to fashion tools. Here, it appears that they mainly used the shells of Left-handed Whelks for tool making and harvested the Horse Conchs for food. Nevertheless, there are fewer Horse Conch shells in the Indian middens than the Whelks. This could either re ect the relative abundance of whelks to conchs, or possibly the Indians just preferred the meat of the Left-handed Whelk. We would also expect the prey species (Whelks) to be more numerous than the predators (Conchs). Numerous factors account for the decline in the Horse Conch population, but one is shell collecting. Oral accounts tell of past collecting activities that took large numbers of live Horse Conch shells. If collecting, take only empty shells, and leave even small empty conch shells for the Hermit Crabs. Shell collecting hurts not only the conchs but other species as well. It is illegal to collect live shells without a license. Nevertheless, there remain some very large Horse Conch specimens in the bay, and their egg masses are occasionally seen. Unlike the coiled egg masses of the Lightening Whelks, Horse Conch egg masses are in a twisted clump with each egg looking somewhat like a attened bugle. You may also nd the large operculum or trap door of a Horse Conch when snorkeling. This is the rich, dark brown, horn-like material that the conch uses to close the opening of its shell. If you have ever picked a live Horse Conch you know that the body is a bright reddish-orange color that retracts into a dark maroon shell. It is a truly handsome marine snail. Far more numerous and easy to see are the Crown Conchs (Melongena corona). Crown conchs will reach a maximum size of ve inches, but smaller specimens are more common. Unlike Horse Conchs, Crown Conchs are scavengers. After cleaning your scallops in shallow water, youll soon have sh, crabs, and a slow motion procession of Crown Conchs moving in to take advantage of the spoils. Crown Conchs also invade baited traps, and can sometimes be seen in mass feeding on a dead Horseshoe Crab. Crown Conch shells are also found in Indian middens and the dark meat is edible although a bit chewy. Crown conchs get their name from the spires around the axial ribs. Turned point upward, the spikes look like a monarchs crown. There is a lot of variability in Crown Conchs. Some have long, curved, hollow spikes; others have only short nubs. There is also a good amount of color variation in live specimens. Nevertheless, most have bands of brown, tan, and maroon circling the shell and are quite pretty. Others have very pale bands. These variations are the result of genetic differences in both individuals, as well as populations, and also diet. Crown conchs live around mangroves and salt marshes, but are always found in shallow, quiet bay waters or estuaries. Hermit crabs also prize empty Crown Conch shells, so it is best to collect the empty shells on the beach and not in the bay. Despite the common names we use, Crown Conchs are actually Whelks, and Horse Conchs are actually Spindle Shells and are not true conchs. They are more closely related to Tulip shells. By whatever names we call them, the little Crown Conchs and the massive Horse Conchs are part of the rich diversity of life in St. Joseph Bay. The conditions that have made them ourish here in the past must be guarded so that their numbers continue. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Au g. 07 88 77 20 % Fr i, Au g. 08 87 77 30 % Sa t, Au g. 09 87 77 30 % Sun, Au g. 10 85 76 40 % Mo n, Au g. 11 87 78 50 % Tu es Au g. 12 87 77 80 % We d, Au g. 13 86 78 80 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om OUTDOORS Page A8 Horse conchs and crown conchs A HORSE CONCH A CROWN CONCH Photos SPECIAL TO THE STAR SPONSORED BY Action is still being dominated by kingfish. All tackles and baits are producing 15 class fish around near-shore wrecks and slow trolling around the buoys out of Mexico Beach. Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Fishing is still very productive as we enter into August. Trout and red fish are showing up in the usual spots in St. Joe Bay. Try fishing close to grass beds and with live shrimp or minnows at first light. Top water action is great late in the afternoon north of Eagle Harbor. Scallops are getting easier to find as the summer moons have grown the scallops to decent size. Pig Island and Blacks Island are great places to start your hunt.

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Special to The Star The Forrest Wood Cup presented by Walmart, the world championship of bass shing, will return to Lake Murray and the Columbia, S.C. area Aug. 14-17 to crown bass shings top angler of 2014. Hosted by Capital City/Lake Murray Country Regional Tourism, the tournament will feature 45 of the worlds best bass pros and co-anglers casting for the sports biggest awards $500,000 cash in the pro division and $50,000 cash in the co-angler division. Defending Forrest Wood Cup champion Randall Tharp of Port Saint Joe, will be one of the 45 anglers competing in the championship event. Fishing against 179 of the best anglers in the world on the Walmart FLW Tour, Tharp nished the season ranked No. 27 in the Kelloggs Angler of the Year race and quali ed for the fth Forrest Wood Cup appearance of his career. If he wins, Tharp will be the rst angler to ever win the prestigious championship twice. One of the anglers competing against Tharp is Chevy pro Anthony Gagliardi, who lives on Lake Murray and is considered an early favorite. The 2008 Forrest Wood Cup on Lake Murray was won by California pro Michael Bennett, who junkshed for the rst two days of competition, moving down the bank casting to junk laydowns, trees, grass, docks or anything else that could hold sh. Bennett then moved shallow for the nal two days of competition and shed a topwater frog around docks with grass to seal his win and earn the title of Forrest Wood Cup champion. I think that if a guy can catch 11 pounds a day, hell make it through to the weekend top-20 cut, Gagliardi said. I think the winner is going to have a four-day total right around 60 pounds. Fishing fans that cant make the trek to South Carolina can still follow along with all of the tournament action at ForrestWoodCup.com. Live on-the-water tweets, updates and videos will be posted throughout the four days of competition as well as a live streaming video feed of the weigh-in at 5 p.m. each day. Coverage of the Forrest Wood Cup will be broadcast in high-de nition (HD) on NBC when FLW airs Oct. 5 from 2-3 p.m. ET. The Emmy-nominated FLW television show is hosted by Jason Harper and is broadcast to more than 564 million households worldwide, making it the most widely distributed weekly outdoors-sports television show in the world. For complete details and updated information visit FLWOutdoors.com. For regular updates, photos, tournament news and more, follow us on Facebook at Facebook.com/FLWFishing and on Twitter at Twitter. com/FLWFishing e ne w College of Ap plied St udies at FSU Pa nama City was appr ov ed by th e F SU Boar d of Tr ustees in Ju ne 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily re spond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. We in vite yo u to suppor t e Campaign for Ou r Community s Un iv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr ow s jobs. Ou r goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of Ap plied St udies by 2017, which will allo w FSU Pa nama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr ov ide ne w equipment and technol ogy To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, August 7, 2014 A Page 9 Section Quinn heating up in Clearwater By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Roman Quinn is getting his legs back. The Port St. Joe graduate heated up over the past few weeks while coming back from serious injury. Quinn, a former second round pick of the Philadelphia Phillies, is playing for the Clearwater Threshers in Class A Advanced ball. Quinn had four hits last Thursday, just a few days after collecting ve in one game and as of the beginning of this week had steadily raised his batting average during the past month. During his past 10 games, Quinn hit .385 with a .913 OPS. He has raised his batting average to .257 with 37 runs scored, 27 RBIs and 13 extra base hits in 62 games. He has also stolen 22 bases in 29 attempts, leaving him in the top ve of the Florida State League, even though he was not even in the lineup until mid-May. In two-plus seasons of pro ball Quinn, the fastest player clocked for the 2011 MLB Amateur Draft, has stolen 84 bases in 106 attempts. Quinn missed the rst six weeks of the season due to a ruptured Achilles tendon while running wind sprints last October. He said he failed to warm-up properly before the sprints. He told a Philadelphia columnist he is close to 100 percent. He also missed the last 10 weeks of the 2013 season after breaking his wrist when hit by a pitch while with Lakewood in Class A. Slated not to return until late June, at the earliest, Quinn was in the lineup May 19. Quinn, 21, entered the season as the No. 10 prospect in the Phillies system according to Baseball America; he was ranked No. 4 by MLB.com. During the course of his rehabilitation and days with the Threshers, Quinn also took on a change in position. The Phillies drafted J.P. Crawford 16th overall last year and Crawford is rated the organizations top prospect. He is also, as was Quinn until June, a shortstop. But when Crawford was promoted to the Threshers Quinn returned to centereld, where he had played most of his games while a Port St. Joe Tiger Shark. He now has played 42 games in center eld while making just four errors, far below the pace at which he made errors at shortstop in his two previous years of pro ball. The move also re ects the dearth of out eld prospects in the Phillies system. I miss shortstop a little bit, Quinn told Bob Brookover of the Philadelphia Inquirer. I worked pretty hard at shortstop and I was getting better at that position, but whatever is best for the organization. Nelson Prada, Clearwater manager, told Brookover he thought the move to center eld would work out best for Quinn. In my opinion, when you move a guy from the in eld to the out eld, it is more relaxing to him, Prada told Brookover. Hes going to cover a lot of ground out there, and with the kind of athlete he is I think hes going to be very good in center eld. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Port St. Joes Roman Quinn is rebounding from an Achilles injury. PSJ angler set to defend Forrest Wood Cup RANDALL THARP Athletic banner renewal at PSJHS Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School team is now taking banner renewals for banners hanging at Shark Stadium. The cost to renew your banner on the football eld is $100; if the banner will need to be moved to the R. Marion Craig Coliseum during basketball season add $100. New banners, full color and 3-feet by 5-feet, will cost $150. Select your logo, layout and colors and the banner will be displayed in a highly visible area around the football eld and in the gym. Dont own a business? Thats OK. Display a message to a special athlete in your life. You may order by email to Josh Dailey at jdailey@gulf. k12. .us or fax an order to 2271803. You also can contact Dailey by mail at 100 Shark Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The Tiger Sharks will be hosting a purple-and-gold scrimmage game at 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 15. Entrance at the gate is a canned good or $1 which will be donated to the local food bank. Port St. Joe hosts Blountstown at 7 p.m. EDT Friday, Aug. 22, in a Kickoff Classic and host Wewahitchka in the regular-season opener Aug. 29.

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, August 7, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star .co m COURTESY OF DAN ETHERIDGE The march of the ddler crabs COURTESY OF JULIE WATTERSON A little sur ng on St. Joseph Peninsula. COURTESY OF TOM BAIRD The telltale tracks of hatchling turtles attempting to make their way to the sea. COURTESY OF MICHELLE KENDRICK Sea oats frame the sunset over St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF LAURA AT DRAGONFLY PHOTOGRAPHY A sunset glows over the Port St. Joe Marina COURTESY OF BO AND LYNN WILLIAMS From its new home in George Core Park in Port St. Joe, the Cape San Blas Lighthouse looms over St. Joseph Bay. COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI A sailboat and jet sky pass veeerrrryyy close to one another off Indian Pass. COURTESY OF DOROTHY ROGERS Mellow. COURTESY OF STEVE AT KAYAK DOG ADVENTURES A star sh just out of the water.

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Special to The Star Summer is a busy time on the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. The sea turtle patrol is operating full time, the red wolves are being carefully monitored with hopes for a new litter of pups, several research projects are underway, and several summer interns are working on the island. There are no tours of the island during the summer months because of the heat and bugs, but the refuge will be offering a special week of island tours during National Wildlife Refuge Week in October. WILD WEEK, which stands for Wonder Inspire Learn Do, all of which can occur on St. Vincent Island, will take place during National Wildlife Refuge Week. During the week of Oct. 14-18 there will be a themed tour of the entire island each day. Each tour will have a narrator and a specialist who share their knowledge about the island and the featured theme of that days tour. The focus of each of the ve tours will be Photography, History of St. Vincent Island, Birds, Native Plants, and a Kids/Family oriented tour. More specic information about the WILD WEEK tours will be posted on the Events page on the Supporters website www.stvincentfriends. com after Labor Day. Reservations for the tours will be on a rstcome, rst-served basis. Beginning Wednesday, September 3, reservations for WILD WEEK island tours can be made on the BIRDS-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND Summer 2014 on St. Vincent Island By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The kids won again last Saturday. After a slight derailment in June due to poor weather, the twelfth annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament was held last week end at the Port St. Joe Marina. Presented by the Kids Win Foundation, the tournament welcomed children ages three to 16 to show off their skills, sh ing in-shore or near-shore, from boats, docks, bridges, piers, or beaches. Each of the 371 registered participants received a trophy and additional prizes were given out to the boy or girl with the biggest catch and the most sh caught. Kids aged 3-8 competed in the small fry division and those nine to 16 competed as juniors. Those who registered in ad vance of the event were treat ed to a rod and reel, tackle packet, ofcial Kids Win shirt and goodie bag. I think we had a great event, and Im thrilled with how it turned out, said Rick Carrie, President of the Kids Win Foundation. It seemed like everyone enjoyed themselves. Among the Kids Win partici pants were Mikey, Korbin, Lo gan and Kelsey Ellwood of Port St. Joe who spent their morning shing from the shores of Jetty Park. Special to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf has reached another growth milestone by expanding surgical ser vices available in Gulf and Franklin Counties. In late June, the surgical team as sisted with the hospitals rst-ever total joint replace ment surgery, performed by Alfred Cardet, MD, an orthopedic surgeon based out of Panama City. The patient was Bob Comer, 70, of Port St. Joe, who had been treated for several years for knee in juries and the resulting de bilitating pain. Comer had had several positive experi ences at Sacred Heart and wanted to have knee re placement surgery close to his home. We were ordering the necessary instruments and equipment and complet ing specialized training to do joint replacement sur geries, said Glenda Lane, Patient Care Manager of Surgical Services. Mr. Comer chose to wait sever al months until we had the capability to do that type of surgery here. I believe he is happy he made that choice. Dr. Cardet was im pressed with the level of preparedness of the Sacred Heart surgical staff. I have no hesitation to do future to tal joint replacements here with this team, he said. Dr. Cardet also performed the rst total hip replacement at Sacred Heart in late July. First joint-replacement surgeries at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, August 7, 2014 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) What does about half of the worlds population depend on for its main daily food supply? Beans, Rice, Corn, Potatoes 2) Which of these was not one of the sons on TVs Bonanza? Hoss, Adam, Joseph, David 3) What do you call a beavers dwelling? Den, Lair, Lodge, Hive 4) Poopdeck is/ was whose father? Hank Hill, Popeye, Homer Simpson, Bugs Bunny 5) The ostrich is native to which continent? N. America, Africa, Asia, Europe 6) Where did the majority of the ghting take place during the War of 1812? France, Canada, U.S., Spain 7) What was Alfred Hitchcocks rst lm in color? Rope, Spellbound, Notorious, Suspicion 8) What do biddles refer to in hobo slang? Lice, Kids, Eggs, Potatoes 9) Whats the rst property after GO in British Monopoly (board game)? Piccadilly Circus, Mayfair, Old Kent Road, Palace King 10) Which president lived from Aug. 10, 1874, to Oct. 20, 1964? Taft, Hoover, Wilson, Eisenhower 11) Who coined the term Tinseltown for Hollywood? Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Oscar Levant, John Ford 12) How many days after Robert E. Lees surrender was Lincoln assassinated? 5, 15, 55, 155 13) Whose nicknames include the Bay State? California, Massachusetts, Maine, Louisiana 14) What two-time heart transplant recipient tied for second at the 2014 U.S. Open (golf)? Brooks Koepka, Keegan Bradley, Henrik Stenson, Erik Compton 15) Is the book of Pergamos in the Old or New Testament or neither? 16) From the book of Genesis, how did the animals enter Noahs ark? Single le, In pairs, Huddles of 3, Clusters of 4 ANSWERS: 1) Rice, 2) David, 3) Lodge, 4) Popeye, 5) Africa, 6) Canada, 7) Rope, 8) Eggs, 9) Old Kent Road, 10) Hoover, 11) Oscar Levant, 12) 5, 13) Masachusetts, 14) Erik Compton, 15) Neither, 16) In pairs Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com SPEC I AL T O THE S T AR Following his knee-replacement surgery, Port St. Joe resident Bob Comer has physical therapy sessions twice-a-week at Sacred Heart Rehabilitation next to the hospital. KIDS WIN WE S L OCHER | The Star Families shed from the shore and by boat around the Port St. Joe Marina during the Kids Win Fishing Tournament. At left kids aged 3-8 competed in the small fry division and those nine to 16 competed as juniors. See KIDS B6 Each of the 371 registered participants received a trophy See ISLAND B6 See SURGERIES B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, August 7, 2014 Sw ee t Sa ss y is one of man y un wa nt ed pe ts th at ne ed fo re ve r home s. Sa ss y ha s le ar ne d to wa lk on he r le as h fa ir ly we ll an d wi ll si t fo r a tre at Sh e lo ve s ki ds an d adu lts al ik e an d wo ul d mak e a gr ea t fa mi ly do g. If yo u ar e una ble to ado pt at thi s ti me pe rh ap s yo u co ul d fo st er or mak e a Do nat ion Al l pe ts ado pt ed fr om SJ BH S wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc inat io ns an d sp ay ed /n eu te re d. Pl eas e do no t he si ta te to em ai l tow nse nd hsd ire ct or @g ma il .c om or ado ptb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 7-1 10 3 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il abl e at www .s jb hu man es oc iet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur sd ay -S at urd ay fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e. OF THE WEEK PET If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty St. Joseph Ba y Humane Society www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! Society/Obituaries Mr. Charlie Willard Alsobrook of White City, Florida known to his family and friends as Willard, went to be with the Lord on Friday Aug. 1, 2014. Willard is survived by his two sons and daughtersin-law, Curtis and Bobbie Alsobrook of Milton, and Charles and Karen Alsobrook of Tallahassee.; two granddaughters, Tiffany and Curtis Crisco (Asa & Chloe) and Stephanie and Kyle Lawson; two step-grandchildren, Caleb Murphy & ance Jessica Ivey and Melissa and Daniel Olsen (Hank, Finn & Cash). He is also survived by three brothers; Donald Pumphrey of Pensacola., Doyle Pumphrey (Lynette) of Lynchburg, VA, and David Pumphrey (Anita) of Cairo, Ga.; and four sisters, Verneal Runnels, Ozark, Ala., Norma Ellis, Grand Ridge, Mae Bishop, Cottondale, and Berta Keene (John) of Mauldin, S.C. He is also survived by brother-in-law Lonnie (Mary) Widner, Macon, Ga., and Sisters-in-law, Ruby (Tommy) Ward, Altha, and Peggy Pumphrey, Winder, Ga. Willard is also survived by many nieces and nephews who he dearly loved. He is preceded in death by his wife, Dorothy Dot Alsobrook, granddaughter, Johanna Alsobrook, mother Lucretia Pumphrey and brother Paul Pumphrey. A viewing was held 6-8 p.m. EST on Tuesday, Aug. 5 at the Comforter Funeral Home, 601 Long Avenue, Port. St. Joe. Graveside services were held at 11 a.m. EST Wednesday, Aug. 6, at Holly Hill Cemetery Port. St. Joe. The family would like to express their heartfelt gratitude to the Hospice staff along with the staff at Blountstown Rehabilitation and Nursing Home for the wonderful care they gave Mr. Alsobrook during this time. Rest with Jesus sweet Father, youve won the battle! All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Charlie Willard Alsobrook David Lee Armstrong, 36, of Corrigan, Texas, and formerly of Wewahitchka and Bettstown, Ga., passed July 25 in Corrigan as the result of an automobile accident. He was born Feb. 5, 1978 in Wewahitchka to William S. and Anne Leynes Armstrong. Graveside service will at 11 a.m. CT on Thursday, Aug. 7 at Jehu Cemetery in Wewahitchka. Armstrong is survived by his wife, Rochelle Armstrong of Corrigan; Children Haley Armstrong of Perry and David Jeremiah, Gavin and Nathaniel Armstrong of Corrigan; Mother Anne Leynes Singletary of Bettstown; Father William S. Armstrong, St. of Wewahitchka; Brothers Robert Carl (Bobby) Rhodes, William S. (Billy) Armstrong, Jr., and James A. Armstrong, Sr. of Bettstown; Sisters Lisa Anne Hire of Wewahitchka, Rebecca (Becky) L. Darley of Quincy and Elizabeth Groans of Indiana, plus a number of nieces and nephews. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge of arrangements. David Lee Armstrong Rommie Joyce Britt, 83, of St. Joe Beach was called homed to Heaven on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Mrs. Britt was preceded in death by her husband, Chuck Britt, her parents, Samuel and Gorganna Hornbuckle of Omega, Ga., brothers, Sammy, James, Herman, and Johnny Hornbuckle all of Omega, Ga.; sisters, Ann and Dot of Orange Park, and sonin-law, Mike White of Port St. Joe. She is survived by daughter, Marion Punkin White of Port St. Joe, FL; son, Charles Britt and wife, Terri of Helen, Ga.; grandchildren, Matthew White and wife, Sarah, Adam White and wife, Marci, all of Port St. Joe, Haylee Britt of Orlando; ve great grandchildren, sisters, Liz Phillips and Jo Haynes, both of Orange Park, and numerous other family members. Mrs. Britts life was full of things she loved most: her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, her family, her church, and all of her friends she considered extended family. She was the epitome of generosity, which was made evident if you ever had the privilege of dining at her restaurant of 36 years, The Gulf Sands. Through her successful career as a restaurant owner, Mrs. Britt loved each person who entered her doors through food and service. She leaves behind a legacy that can be easily summed up in one word. Love. Celebration of life services were conducted at 10 a.m. EST Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014, at Highland View Assembly of God Church in Port St. Joe. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery. The family received friends 5-7 p.m. ET Monday, Aug. 4, 2014, at Highland View Assembly of God Church. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Rommie Joyce Britt Richard Wayne Lancaster (aka Rick or Ricky), born Aug. 30, 1954, died in a tragic accident Aug. 1, 2014. Rick was born in Port St. Joe, FL to Richard and Myra Lancaster. He was preceded in death by his daddy, Richard Lancaster, and his wife, Fleeca Thomas Lancaster. He leaves behind to miss him, his mother, Myra Lancaster of Port St. Joe, FL, his brother, Jimmy Lancaster and his family of Panama City, and his sister, Gail Jones of Weaverville, N.C., and her family. Also left behind to mourn is his soul mate of several years, Vickie Trickey of Howard Creek, and her family. There are, in addition, left behind many aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and friends from every walk of life to remember his love and cherish his memories. Rick was a Christian man, afliated with Howard Creek Baptist Church and a man who loved deeply. He was a sherman whom began his shing career at 17 years of age with Rafeld Fisheries. His rst years on a boat were spent with Captain Harold, where in Ricks words he learned the best basics of commercial shing a man could ever hope for. Within a few years Rafelds promoted him to Captain of Fishermans Pride where he served for 20 plus years. During those years he was heard to say many times that he had the best job in the world when he went under the Highland View Bridge. He later worked a few years as Captain of the Salty. His most recent time was spent making and repairing nets. This was a skill he had learned as a young man and apparently was very good at. Many thanks to Rafeld Fisheries for having given him the job at a young age and becoming his family away from home. There was a visitation time with the family 10 a.m. ET on Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014 at First Baptist Church, Port St. Joe followed by the funeral service at 11 a.m. EST. Presiding was pastor of the church, Rev. Bruce Hodge, Rev. Buddy Caswell and his friend and mentor, Rev. Henry Hester. Asked to serve as pallbearers are Rick Lamberson, Mark Lyle, Leo Kennedy, Randy Phillips, Danny Rafeld, Randy Rafeld, and as honorary pallbearers, Harold Rafeld, Robert Rafeld, Ronnie Rafeld, Eugene Rafeld, Joey Rafeld, Skipper Drew, and Jeff Ursery. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery. From his family Rick had been on kidney dialysis for almost 3 years. It changed his life considerably but he was never despondent or down trodden. Be encouraged one and all, no matter what life hands you. Trust the Lord, work hard, and enjoy the good life you have. That is what he called his life. Thanks to all of you, family, friends, and health care workers, who made this possible. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed at www. southerlandfamily.com. Richard Wayne Lancaster RICHARD W A YNE LANCASTER Obituaries SC OUT NE W S United Methodist Church sponsored Cub Scout Pack 347 and Troop 347 will be holding a new scout registration at 6:30 p.m. ET Aug. 25 at the Methodist Church at the corner of U.S. Highway 98 and Monument Avenue. The leaders from both units will be at the school the same day speaking with the boys to see who is interested. Applications will be available at the church when you show up with your son. Registration fee until the end of the year is $8. If you are unable to attend that evening or have any questions contact Cub Master Abby Cozine at 340-0960 or Scoutmaster Bill Van Der Tulip at 2479091. Come join the fun. JUNIO R S E R VI C E LE A GUE NE W MEM B E R P AR TY The Junior Service League of Port St. Joe invites women, ages 21 and up, to our annual New/ Potential Member Party at 7 p.m. ET on Monday, Aug. 11 in the upstairs conference room of the Port Inn. It will be a meet and greet gathering and very casual. We want to offer a nice evening of getting to know each other, League project details and food and drinks will be provided. There will be a special drawing for new members who join and pay their $60 yearly dues that night. We are looking forward to an exciting year full of community service projects and fun times together. The Junior Service League of Port St. Joe is an organization of women committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of volunteers. For questions about this party or the JSL, email jslpsj@gmail.com or contact Michelle Perrin at 899-0094. Visit the organization on Facebook at www.facebook. com/jslpsj. During late summer, caterpillars cause problems for gardeners all over our state. As you know, caterpillars are the larval stage of butteries and moths. While many of the winged adults are attractive, the damage caused by the larvae certainly is not. Because caterpillars are ravenous feeders, they can cause considerable damage in a short time. Early detection and prompt counter measures are very important. There are many kinds of pest caterpillars for too many to cover in a single article. Sod webworms and fall armyworms seriously damage lawns. Its not unusual for both to attack at the same time. Webworms are the smaller of the tow species, reaching a length of only about three-quarters of an inch, compared to one-and-a half inches for army worms. In general, both are greenish in the young sage turning brown as they mature. Their feeding is similar, resulting in notched or ragged leaf edges. However, webworms tend to feed in patches, while armyworms cause more scattered damage. The orange dog caterpillar is a common pest on citrus trees. Its black with white markings, and slimy looking. Its eggs, which look like small yellow beads, are laid on the newest plant growth. At maturity, the orange dog becomes a swallowtail buttery. If youve ever suddenly felt a sharp, stinging sensation while pruning a plant, you may have come in contact with an Io (Eyeoh) moth caterpillar. This caterpillar is pale green, with two stripes, one white and one maroon down both sides of its body. It has many clumps of stiff poisonous hairs. Touching these is painful to most people. In some cases, the reaction is bad enough to require hospitalization. The Io moth caterpillar, which is only one of several stringing varieties, if found on such plants as hibiscus, poinsettias, palms, and many others. Caterpillars can be controlled mechanically, or with chemical sprays. If the caterpillars are large, and few in number, they can be removed from plants by hand. If egg masses are recognized, these can be destroyed before they hatch. Chemical control materials include sevin, Malathion, and Bacillus thuringiensis (Thur-in-gen-en-sis.) Sevin is a stomach poison, thats good to use on small caterpillars that are hard to nd. However, sevin isnt a very good contact poison. It cant be used against caterpillars that are already quite large. Malathion is a good contact poison, but a poor stomach poison. So, its best for use on large caterpillars. Malathion must be applied thoroughly, to insure contact with all the caterpillars. This can sometimes be hard to do, especially on large shrubs and trees. Bacillus thuringiensis isnt a chemical. Its a bacterial concentrate thats deadly only to caterpillars. It wont harm any other insects. When applying pesticides, you should always use caution and common sense. Avoid contact with the concentrate, and stay out of the spray drift. Read the product label carefully, and follow all directions exactly. For more information on caterpillar control contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website at gulf.ifas.u. edu or edis.ifas.u.edu and see Publication EENY 009 SP152. Society BRIEFS SUBMISSIONS Send obituaries to tcroft@star.com Problems with caterpillars and ornamentals ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director

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The Star| B3 Thursday, August 7, 2014 Special to The Star Port St. Joe resident Jennifer Sue Collier graduated from the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing as a part of the summer 2014 class, which included 563 students from throughout Oklahoma, the country and world. Located just north of Oklahoma City in Edmond, the University of Central Oklahoma is the states largest metropolitan university, serving more than 17,000 students pursuing degrees in 114 undergraduate and 65 graduate major areas of study and is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Central prides itself as a smart investment for success, preparing future leaders in an opportunity-rich environment, with access to more than 200 student organizations and the internship, employment, entertainment and cultural offerings of the rapidly growing Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Founded as a teachers college in 1890, Central considers itself an institution where teaching comes rst, and, with a 19:1 student/faculty ratio, students can enjoy personal relationships with faculty and staff who are committed to transforming lives. PSJs Collier graduates from University of Central Oklahoma LIVE ON TH E PO OP DECK KT & MEXIC O JOE SA TURD AY 9P M FRID AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M RAND Y ST ARK FL ABBERGAST ED ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON T HE PO OP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S KARAOKE THURSD AY FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH NA TA LIE AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 Special to The Star Faith Christian School believes that for education to be true, Jesus Christ and the reality of the Bible must be the forefront. We believe in nurturing students hearts, souls and minds with challenging, Christcentered curriculum and personal attention. When you visit the campus, you will notice the improvements of the property. This is just another sign of the dedication of parents that believe in the importance of the ministry of Faith Christian School. Thank you to those that volunteer their time, energy, and resources in support of our school and your children. Open House for preschool, elementary, and middle school students is Friday, Aug.15. There will be an assembly at11 a.m. for all parents. This is a good time for parents to keep up with new policies and procedures for the upcoming school year. Classrooms will open at 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. Meet the teachers, examine the curriculum and sign up to volunteer for special events in your childs classroom. Please mark your calendar and make plans to attend. School will begin 8 a.m. ET Monday, Aug. 18. Faith Christian School is still enrolling students for the 2014-2015 school year. Visit the campus Monday through Friday between the hours of 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., call 2296707, or visit our website www.FaithChristianPSJ. net for more information. The Lions Tale Special to The Star Open House: 7th and 8th grade open house will be noon until 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 13. Open House for 9th 12th grade will be 5:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. ET on Thursday, Aug. 14 Volleyball: Car-wash fundraiser. The volleyball team will be conducting a carwash at the high school from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 15. Team members will be pre-selling tickets for the carwash but tickets are not necessary. Donations accepted at the carwash. We will have a limited number of hot dogs and hamburgers being grilled for donations. Look for us in the student parking lot. As always, thanks for supporting our athletic programs. Senior Portraits: Senior portraits are scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 13-14. Scheduling information has already been mailed home. If you have not received information concerning your scheduled date and time for portraits and sitting fees, please call the photographer in Panama City at 769-6277. Special to The Star Through the Panhandle Area Educational Consortiums FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project STEM Talent Development Program, talented and gifted high school juniors and seniors from small and rural districts across Florida had the opportunity to take part in locally-available Field Site/Workplace Experiences this summer. These experiences, made possible through partnerships with leaders in STEM (Science, Technology Engineering, and Math) industries, such as local businesses, agencies, the military, and higher education faculty, gave students an opportunity to actively engage in doing real STEM work. STEM Scholars from Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka took part in one of two eightday experiences at the Tyndall Air Force Base, Air Force Civil Engineer Center. The experiences were coordinated by Joe Wander, Ph.D., and led by researchers Robert Diltz, Ph.D., and Jeffery Owens, Ph.D. Teacher leaders were Scott Lamberson and Pam Watford from Port St. Joe High School. Upon arrival, the junior scientists were given one of two missions under a common theme, Protect Your Soldier. The mission for students Bailey Amison and Keith Wadleigh was to develop an anaerobic digester. This is a reactor that contains two populations of bacteria that can make methane, which can be used as a fuel source, in the absence of oxygen. Port St. Joe High School student Dallas Bird and Wewahitchka High School student Cordale Green were tasked with creating a master fabric sample that could be used to protect soldiers from harmful microorganisms they might encounter in the eld. While at Tyndall, students gained insights into potential STEM career options and a greater understanding of the relevance of the rigorous math and science courses they are taking while in high school. They also beneted by learning professional workplace expectations, using precise laboratory equipment and procedures to conduct a meaningful scientic investigation, collecting and making sense of data, presenting ndings and interacting with highlyskilled researchers. S P ECIAL T O TH E STAR Students, from left to right, Dallas Bird and Cordale Green learn about some of the highly technical equipment they will be using to carry out their mission. STEM Scholars spend summer learning School News

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Rick Lancaster was a great stepdad even though he and my mom never married. We were all close family. On the weekends, we would hang out and watch the race together or would be cheering against each other, him for the Seminoles and me for the Gators. We would all gather in the kitchen, frying up them good ole scorpion sh. It seems like Rick and I would always be the last two at the table. I would tell him, I think Ill have one more piece, and he would say, Ill join you. He had a saying that this is called sport eating. When my boys were small, mom would call and ask me to meet her under the bridge because Rick was coming in. Rick would get a kick out of Trent and Jacob screaming and waving as he came past us up the canal. Rick would blow the horn. Momma would tell us stories about Granny Wood waiting for my Paw to come home off the boat and she would say, Im ready for Captain Rick to come home. Winter time would be coming and I would say, Yall dont need to go to South Florida mullet shing after capsizing the boat one year, and then the next year Rick losing his kidneys. But guess what? They went anyways. Fishing was Ricks life, not a job, thats who he was. Well known all the way to Louisiana, folks may not have met him, they knew Captain Rick Lancaster as one of the best, if not the best Captain for nding Butter sh. I will always take time out and remember Rick during sunsets. He would tell me, red skies at night, sailors delight, red skies in the morning, sailors take warning. We will always love and miss you, Captain Rick. Casey Trickey Hayes Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 FAITH Thursday, August 7, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Radical Islam explored at Lifetree Caf Special to The Star Why Islamic radicals hate America and the West will be discussed at 7 p.m. CDT Monday, Aug. 11, at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Why Do They Hate Us? Understanding Radical Islam, features lmed interviews with Middle East experts Carl Medearis and Gregory Johnsen, as well as best-selling author Mark Bowden ( Black Hawk Down and The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden ). There are 1.7 billion Muslims in the world, and far less than 1 percent might be radical enough to become terrorists, said Medearis, an adviser on Arab affairs to members of the U.S. Congress. Medearis, who lived for a dozen years in Beirut, identi es key forces that lead to radicalizing Muslims and suggests how common ground might be found. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Faith BRIEF Its a Hat Show Special to The Star A Hat Show will be at 5 p.m. EDT Sunday, Aug. 10, at New Bethel AME Church. Ladies and gentlemen, come and show off your most awesome and/or most beautiful or handsome hat. Yes, men you are welcome to participate as well. Come out and join in this program which also will feature the history of hats in the church, etc. The church is on the corner of Avenue C and Highway 98. Pastor Gantt and the Womens Day Committee welcome you to this program. Oak Grove Daycare expands The Oak Grove Church Daycare is proud to announce the start of its new 3K program for the 20142015 school year. There are only a few spots available for children for this year. With the expansion of the daycare, part-time teaching positions are available immediately. If you are interested in joining the team, call Kristy at 2274320 or stop by 613 Madison to apply. Sail on, Captain Rick Back to school concert at FUMC Special to The Star First United Methodist of Port St Joe will be hosting a Community Back-to-School event Aug. 16. The church has secured the Christian Alternative Rock Band, Remedy Drive to headline this event. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. EDT, and the show closes at 9 p.m. EDT. Remedy Drive has recorded six albums. They have toured the Rock and Worship Roadshow, with artists such as David Crowder Band, Mercy Me, Family Force 5, Fee and Sidewalk Prophets. The Remedy Drive song Hope was used for the Vancouver Olympic games commercial in 2009 and 2010. Tickets for the event are $8 in advance and $10 at the door. All proceeds will be divided up between Imagine No Malaria and The Exodus Road. FUMCs desire is to reach every middle/high school student in our area and extended areas. Come and help support two amazing causes. For more information call 850-227-1724. For tickets via online go to http://bit. ly/portstjoe.

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Special to The Star Attention 2nd Infantry Division Veterans The Florida Branch of the Sec ond Indianhead Division Association will have its an nual reunion in Titusville, Florida on Oct. 17-19, 2014, at the Best Western Space Shuttle Inn. All veterans of the 2nd Infantry Division are invited. For more information, call Mike Davino at 919498-1910 or send an email to 2ida.mail@charter.net. 2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. Wa lton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE PA RKING Concealed We apons Class Sat/Sun 11 am or 2pm Floridagunshows.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 Pa nama Ci ty Fa irgr ounds AU GUS T 9th & 10 th Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR Digital Account Ex ecutiv e The Ne ws Herald is seeking a Digital Account Ex ecutiv e. To ap pl y, send rsum to LGrimes@pcnh.com The quali ed candidate will need experience in: Quali cations needed: Duties will include: Local The Star| B5 Thursday, August 7, 2014 GCSO LAW ENFORCEMENT SUMMARYJULY 28 AUG. 3 On Tuesday, July 29, Deputy S. Ferrell served a warrant for violation of probation by arresting Jared M. Schloerb, age 40, in the 200 block of Sunshine Road in Over street. Schloerb was on probation for driving while license suspended/revoked (DWLS/R). He was trans ported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) where he was later rst ap peared and released on a $1,053 bond. On July 29, Deputy P. Wil liams responded to the 800 block of Woodward Avenue in Port St. Joe regarding an incident that occurred under the Highland View Bridge. The complainant reported she was battered at a gathering under the bridge. Gulf County Sher iffs Ofce (GCSO) Inv. Dickey continues to inves tigate the case. On Wednesday, July 30, Sgt. J. Williams conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle in the area of U.S. Highway 98 and Westview Drive. It was discovered the passenger of the vehicle, Paul OHara Jr., was wanted by the Tay lor County Sheriffs Ofce for violation of probation DWLS/R. OHara was transported to the GCDF where he posted a $300 bond. On Thursday, July 31, Deputy G. Desrosier was dispatched to the 900 block of Old Transfer Road in We wahitchka. The complain ant contacted the GCSO to report a criminal mischief. Two of the complainants mailboxes were struck by a vehicle sometime during the night. On July 31, Sgt. J. Mur nan was dispatched to the 300 block of East Reid Av enue in Wewahitchka in reference to a complaint of credit card fraud. The com plainant reported a credit card was discovered miss ing and that two unauthor ized charges were made on the card. Sgt. Murnan con tinues to investigate. On Friday, Aug. 1, GCSO deputies assisted the Port St. Joe Police Department serve a felony warrant in the 900 block of Gar rison Avenue. Mano W. Whitehead was arrested and transported to the GCDF. On Aug. 1, deputies re sponded to the 1600 block of Grouper Avenue in High land View after a 911 call was received. Initial in formation provided by the caller revealed a subject was driving a fork lift and was shocked by electric ity after the lift touched the power lines. Once emer gency personnel arrived, Richard Dewayne Lancast er, age 59, was found unre sponsive inside the fork lift. He was transported to Sa cred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe where he was later pronounced deceased. On Aug. 1, the GCSO re ceived a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance. Deputy P. Williams located the suspect driving a ve hicle on State Road 22 just west of Wewahitchka. An attempt to stop the vehicle was made, but the suspect accelerated the vehicle. After approximately one mile the suspect stopped. Tami M. Lauderback, age 47, was the driver of the vehicle. Based on the initial contact with her, Deputy P. Williams developed reason to believe she was operat ing the vehicle under the inuence. At the conclu sion of the investigation Lauderback was arrested and charged with driving under the inuence, reck less driving, DWLS/R, and domestic battery. Lauder back was transported to the GCDF where she was later rst appeared and re leased on a $4,500 bond. From July 28 through Aug. 3 the Communica tions Division at the GCSO logged a total of 54 calls for the Port St. Joe Police De partment, 33 calls for EMS, 23 calls for other depart ments/agencies and 7 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From July 28 Aug. 3 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Secu rity/Zone Checks, 160; Civil Paper Service, 37; Trafc Stop, 36; Field Contact, 15; Information, 7; Reckless Driver, 7; Abandoned Vehi cle, 6; Sexual Offender Re registration, 6; Unknown Disturbance, 5; Welfare Check, 4; Alarm, 3; Citizens Assist, 3; Trafc Accident, 3; Assist Agency, 3; Domes tic Disturbance, 2; Verbal Disturbance, 2; Hit & Run Accident, 2; Prowler/Tres pass, 2; Sexual Offender Address Verication, 2; Suspicious Person, 2; Ani mal Call, 1; Simple Assault, 1; Simple Battery, 1; De ceased Person, 1; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 1; Noise Dis turbance, 1; Fraud, 1; Lost/ Stolen Tag, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Missing Juvenile, 1; Re quest for Security Check, 1; and Warrant Arrest, 1. Special to The StarH A V ANA The North west Florida Water Man agement District submit ted its proposed tentative budget for scal year 20142015 to Gov. Rick Scott and the Florida Legislature. The districts proposed budget of $52.4 million re duces the millage rate for taxpayers and focuses on mission-critical projects, including springs protec tion; the development of minimum ows and levels; water supply development assistance to local com munities; and protection of the Apalachicola River and Bay and St. Andrew Bay watersheds. Through this Tenta tive Budget, the district will continue to imple ment projects that will have a direct benet to the communities and nat ural resources of North west Florida, said gov erning board chairman George Roberts. This budget also reects our commitment to pro tecting the environment without adding to the nancial burden of our residents. The FY 2014-2015 Ten tative Budget proposes levying the roll-back mill age rate of .039, which is less than the 0.04 as sessed in FY 2013-2014 and 22 percent below the con stitutional and statutory cap of 0.05. The districts budget is comprised of a combina tion of ad valorem revenue, state and federal funding, and other revenues, in cluding timber sales. The district also will continue to direct state revenue appropriated during prior scal years to fund key water resource protection projects. The district continues its focus on core mission objectives of water sup ply, water quality, natural system protection and ood protection through numerous projects including: $8.2 million for springs restoration and protection projects. This includes more than $6.8 million in newly appropriated funding that was recommended by Gov. Scott and appro priated by the legislature during the 2014 legisla tive session to implement projects to improve the health of springs ecosys tems throughout North west Florida. $2.4 million for the development of minimum ows and levels (MFLs). This funding will be used to help the district accom plish its ambitious sched ule to develop MFLs a major component of its overall effort to ensure the long-term protec tion and sustainabil ity of Northwest Floridas water resources. The district will move forward with intensive hydrologic, ecologic and water qual ity data collection that is vital to a successful MFL program. $15 million for wa ter supply development assistance to local gov ernments and non-prot utilities. This includes $8 million for a new cycle of competitive grant funding designed to help commu nities in Northwest Flori da meet local water sup ply challenges, building on the almost $10 million in water supply grants awarded during the cur rent scal year. $3.8 million for the protection and restora tion of the Apalachicola River and Bay watershed. The district will continue to partner with state and local agencies to improve the health of this environ mentally and economically important natural system, including the development of a hydrodynamic model that will help assess and evaluate potential actions to improve and maintain a healthy bay. $3.6 million for the restoration and protec tion of the St. Andrew Bay watershed. This includes grant funding assistance to local governments for water quality improve ment activities, including four stormwater retrots that will treat runoff gen erated from more than 500 acres of drainage area. The District will host two public hearings on the budget. The rst will take place 5:05 p.m. EDT Thursday, Sept. 11, at the districts headquarters, 81 Water Management Drive, Havana. The sec ond will be at 5:05 p.m. EDT Thursday, Sept. 25, at Gulf Coast State Col lege, Student Union Room 243, 5230 West U.S. Highway 98, Panama City The districts governing board will vote to adopt the nal budget at the Sept. 25 meeting. Visit www.nwfwater.com for more information. NWFWMD budget reduces taxes while focusing on resource protection 2nd Infantry Division reunion Amateur radio license exams Star Staff Report Amateur radio license exams will be given at 10 a.m. EDT Aug. 16 at the Emergency Operations Center in Port St. Joe. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade an existing license. An amateur radio license can put you in contact with the world. If you need information, assistance or to register for an exam, call C.H. Tillis (AJ4xJ) at 648-8251.

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, August 7, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL ICE NSE D& IN SUR ED KIDS from page B1 Kelsey, age 8, seemed to be hav ing all the luck, catching a small trout early in the day. Its so coolI sat and watched the sh come near my line and then I caught him, said Kelsey. Im having so much fun. Dad Chris Ellwood relocated his family to Gulf County from Pennsyl vania two years ago to take advan tage of the many shing opportuni ties. He said he was happy to see his kids enjoying a sport that he loves. Its so great to bring the kids out, said Ellwood. The Kids Win tournament gives them something to do and gets them out of the house. Kids Win participants enjoyed a kickoff party on Friday night with a cookout and on-site classes to get tips on rod casting, knot tying and casting nets. After weighing in their catches on Saturday, contestants and their families were treated to hot dogs at the Marina. Carrie extended a thank you to everyone who volunteered their time and energy to make the event a success. The weather was great and I saw a lot of big smiles, Carrie said. ISLAND from page B1 Supporters of St. Vincent Islands web page www. stvincentfriends.com Sea turtle nesting got off to a slow start this season perhaps because of the cool spring weather? It will be interesting to see if the numbers catch up to last years record pace as the season progresses. As of Aug. 1 the turtle patrol volunteers and staff had conrmed 51 sea turtle nesting sites, all of which have been loggerhead sea turtles (the most common sea turtle in this region). The nests hatch approximately 60 days after the eggs were laid. Thus far two nests have hatched. Of those 51 nests, 22 have been adopted through the Supporters Adopt a Nest program. There is still plenty of time to adopt a nest. A $25 adoption donation will help pay for the cost of the wire cages, supplies, and fuel for the patrol vehicles. A donor will receive an adoption certicate, a photo of the nest, and a complete activity report at the end of the nesting season. To adopt a nest call 229-6735. This summer St. Vincent Island has served as an outdoor laboratory for several interesting research projects. A doctoral student at Florida State University is studying several venomous reptiles on the island to determine if the snakes specic dietary limitations (prey) drive an evolutionary response and changes to their venom composition. By comparing specic island populations to mainland venomous snakes the study will help provide more information about the limits of genetic change given the geographic isolation on an island. This should help increase the understanding of local adaptation. A post-doctoral student from the University of Amherst (MA) is conducting a long term study of the Gulf Coast Box Turtle. This research is to establish a baseline for population numbers as well as to better understand the effects of habitat changes. Researchers from Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales are collecting seeds from the Lupinus Westianus (Gulf Coast Lupine). They hope to increase knowledge about the species and to secure the species into the National Collection for preservation. John Murphy from the Florida Ornithological Society is conducting visual and audio surveys to catalog the bird species present on the island. He will also be conducting specic breeding surveys to identify any species missed in the initial visit. This long term study will be completed and published in 2017 as part of the Breeding Bird Atlas for the state of Florida. For those of you waiting for hunting season, here is the Hunt Schedule for this winter (2014-15 ) on St. Vincent Island: Nov. 20 -22, Archery Hunt Dec. 4-6, Sambar Deer Hunt Jan. 22-25, 2015, Primitive Weapons Hunt Permits are available on a rst-come, rst served basis for the Archery and Primitive Weapons Hunts. The Sambar Deer Hunt is limited entry hunters are chosen by lottery from those who have applied for a permit. You can apply for any of these hunts on the Florida Fish and Wildlife website at www.myfwc. com/hunting Remember registration for the WILD WEEK tours (Oct. 14-18) begins Wednesday, Sept. 3. Until then you can always visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive bring everything you need, including drinking water and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit our web page for more information and volunteer opportunities www.stvincentfriends. com and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. SURGERIES from page B1 The patients surgery and recovery have gone re markably well, says Lane. He was up and walking with help of his inpatient rehab team, and he was able to leave the hospital in record time. Comer says he is pleased with the care he received from the out standing staff at Sacred Heart. He now is continu ing his recovery at home with twice-a-week physi cal therapy sessions at Sa cred Heart Rehabilitation next to the hospital. At just three weeks post-surgery, he is getting around well with the use of a walker and cane and looks forward to taking his dog for walks again soon. We are thrilled to be able to provide joint re placement services now in Port St. Joe, said Roger Hall, president of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. This is a great step for ward for our community hospital, and our enhanced surgical capabilities will open the door for us to offer many other surgeries close to home for patients in our community. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Dr. Alfred Cardet, Orthopedic Surgeon, far right, performed the rst two total joint replacement surgeries at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in July. (L to R as heads appear) Marie Cambell, ORT; Tonya Barber, ORT; Mary Harrell ORT, Dr. Ralph Matthews, Anesthesiologist; Dr. Alfred Cardet, Orthopedic Surgeon. Kelsey Ellwood seemed to be having all the luck, catching several sh in the rst hour. WE S L OCHER | The Star Kids aged 3-8 competed in the small fry division and those nine to 16 competed as juniors.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 7, 2014 The Star | B7 95650S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 23-2011-CA-000479 Section: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT DONEHEW; JOHN RIEDL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN RIEDL NKA MRS. RIEDL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. DONEHEW NKA MARY BETH DONEHEW, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 23, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 23-2011-CA-000 479 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 13th day of November, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 38, WINDMARK BEACH, ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 1 THROUGH 5, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property address: Lot 38 Windmark Beach, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated at PORT SAINT JOE, Florida this17th day of July, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARD WICK SCHNEIDER LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 File No.: FL-9700467111-LIT July 31, August 7, 2014 95728S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No.: 23-2012-CA-000251 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SIMS, MELVIN E., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA000251 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and, SIMS, MELVIN E., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 am on the 21st day of August, 2014, the following described property: SEAGULL UNIT #7, described as follows: Commencing at a concrete monument located on the NE rightof-way line of State Road 30 (also U. S. 98), said monument being the West corner of Lot 6 in Block 17 of YON’S ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, FLORIDA, a subdivision of parts of Original Lots 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 10, in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 45, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence N.39 20’45”W., (D.N.R. Meridian) along the NE right-of-way line of State Road 30 for a distance of 676 feet; thence run S.5039’ 15”W. perpendicular to the N. E. right-of-way line of said State Road 30 for 100 feet to a point on the Southwesterly rightof-way line of said State Road for the Point of Beginning; thence N.3920’45”W. along said SWLY rightof-way line 16.00 feet; thence S.5039’15”W. 225.5 feet more or less to the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeasterly along and with said mean high water line 16 feet more or less to a point that bears S.5039’15”W. from the Point of Beginning; thence N.5039’ 15”E. 225 feet, more or less to the Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 24th day of July, 2014. REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700, 100W CYPRESS CREEK ROAD, FT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850747-5338. at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. July 31, August 7, 2014 95674S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 232011CA 000374CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. MARTENA ADAMS A/K/A MARTINA ADAMS, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July, 15 2014 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Gulf, Florida, on August 14, 2014 at 11:00 AM, at Courthouse steps/lobby-1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456 for the following described property: LOT 137, WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. Dated July 21, 2014 Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A. 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at ADARe quest@jud14.flcourts. org, P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File No.: 16066178 July 31, Aug 7, 2014 95810S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13-176CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. DOUGLAS BOUCHER, ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 31, 2014 and entered in Case No. 13-176CA in the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circui in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. was the Plaintiff and DOUGLAS BOUCHER, ET AL., the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on the 28th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 524.88 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 100.00 FEET; THENCE N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 50.00 FEET; THENCE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 110.00 FEET; THENCE N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 155.00 FEET; THENCE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 50.00 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE S 00 30’ 46” E FOR 283.67 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT ON THE WATERS EDGE OF A BAYOU; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID WATER’S EDGE FOR 210.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT THAT IS S 89 29’ 30” W, 162.50 FEET AND S 00 30’ 46” E, 426.03 FEET FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE LEAVING SAID WATER’S EDGE RUN N 000 30’ 46” W FOR 426.03 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE N 89 29’ 30” E FOR 162.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 15.00 FOOT WIDE EASEMENT ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE THEREOF. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Rebecca Norris Clerk Circuit Court B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, FL 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-9558771; Email: ADARe quest@jud14.flcourts. org. GINA L. BULECZA, ESQUIRE PENDERGAST & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 6675 CORPORATE CENTER PKWY, STE 301 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32216 File No.: 13-09500 DA_FL August 7, 14, 2014 95776S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a Financial Meeting on August 14, 2014 at the Destin Wine Bar, located at 4424 Commons Drive East, Suite E3, Destin, FL. The meeting will begin at 10:00 a.m. CST. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in these meetings is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or alicia.stephen@hdrinc.co m. August 7, 2014 99809S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2010-CA-000319 RBC BANK (USA) FKA RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WENDT, FRANK, et. al., Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2010-CA000319 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, and, WENDT, FRANK, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., on the 14th day of August, 2014, the following described property: LOT 10, BLOCK B OF SEAGRASS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE (S) 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 22nd day of July, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: B. McGhee-Collins Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaireed, call 711. File# 20851.0395 July 31, August 7, 2014 99943S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 13 000048 CA ALS VII-RVC, LLC Plaintiff, vs. CYNTHIA F. BROOKS; DONALD H. BROOKS Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 29, 2014, and entered in 13 000048 CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein ALS VII-RVC, LLC, is the Plaintiff and CYNTHIA F. BROOKS; DONALD H. BROOKS are the Defendant(s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM on August 28, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: I LOT 4, BLOCK “H”, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE NORTH 0117’24” EAST, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 808.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0117’24” EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE OF SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 222.03 FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT ROAD; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 116.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4459’26” WEST, 56.57 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 0000’34” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4524’48”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 2109’29” WEST, 182.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 187.85 FEET TO A POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE RUN NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 218.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 0118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 31250’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 0000’34” WEST, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5619’45” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3840’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 7540’09” EAST, 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 8459’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9207’41”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 4430’55” EAST, 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 0000’34” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 4459’26” EAST, 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE NORTH 0117’24” EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4459’26” WEST, 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 0000’34” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9300’26”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4457’18” WEST, 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 8459’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3840’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 7540’09” WEST, 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 5619’45” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8111’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 0834’29” WEST, 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 8118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 6118’02” EAST, 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 4118’02”EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 6538’59” EAST, 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8842’03”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING 99857S PUBLIC NOTICE The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is seeking qualified landscape firms to bid on the landscape maintenance of a limited portion of the Historic Downtown area. Complete bid packages are available on request from Gail Alsobrook, Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency, 308 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or at www.PSJRA.com. Bids must be received by noon on Friday, August 15, 2014. Phone: 850229-6899. July 31, August 7, 2014 99935S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID#1314-29 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive sealed bids from any person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: Printing of the 2015 Official Gulf County Visitor Guide Proposals due by Friday, August 22, 2014 no later than 4:30 PM ET Proposals will be opened on Monday, August 25, 2014 at 10:00 AM ET Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please provided one (1) original and five (5) copies of your proposal. Please indicate on the outside of the sealed envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER. Complete bid specifications may be obtained from the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain Fred’s Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, 850229-7800, or from the Gulf County website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. August 7, 2014 /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 7, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! 11 3 0 335 11 3 0 33 4 4 5 1 8978 In Wewahitchka off Road 5 in the Stonemill area 10.7 acres with 5 ponds. $45,000Call: 227-5276 LAND FOR SALE 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, 550.00 mo. 2. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle, 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach, $1600.00 mo.3. 25-2 Pine St, Lanark, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, $550.00 mo. 4. Picketts Landing, 3 bedroom, 3 baths, boatslip, pool, $1600.00 mo. 5. 1 bedroom, 1.5 baths, furnished, on river, boat slip, $900.00 mo. 6. 295 River Rd, 3 bedroom, 2 baths, on river, dock, $1100.00 mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4 5 1 8958 4 5 1 9 1 97 2006 Honda Pilot 2WDEXLR 85K miles, beige+pearl, leather, moon roof, dvd, back up senser, in excellent condition, $11,000. Call 850-647-9200 PSJ, 3br 1 ba, 116 Hunters Circle, $700 Call 850-227-5152 or 227-5272 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts R.E. 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254 5 1 8379 Port St Joe 2Bd 1.5Ba Apartment, New Appliances/Washer/Dryer. Close to everything! 2 minutes to downtown, St Joe Bay, Marina, & Beaches. $700/mo + Utilities. 1yr Lease 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL96334 to 56654 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate Apalachicola Beauty Salon space available in Sept. for nail tech, massage therapist or esthetician. Call 850-653-2255 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4518987 Wanted: Reservationist for busy Vacation Rental Of ce. Excellent customer service and computer skills required. Apply in Person or call (850) 229-1200 4518944 Install/Maint/RepairJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for oneFull-time Mechanic Ifor our Public Works Department. Starting salary is $18.67 per hour. This is a bargaining unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applications and a complete job description are available in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T. on August 7, 2014 at the Gulf County Human Resources Office. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at (850) 229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at (850) 227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Web Id 34295789 Medical/HealthCNA’sLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for position of CNA’s If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot email to tblackwell@shccs.com **We are offering a $1,000 sign on bonus for CNAs WEB ID 34293034 Install/Maint/Repair GCA Services Group will be holding aJob Fair on Wednesday, August 13th starting at 6pm.This will be held at the Gulf County School Board at 150 Middle School Road in Piort St Joe. We are looking to fill several hourly janitorial positions. Full and/ or part time. Prospective employees must be able to pass a background check. Web Id 34296938 4518979Saturday August 9th7:30am 12:00pm212 Gautier Memorial Lane Port St Joe€ Household items € Furniture € Freezer € Older refrigerator € Jewelry and some toys. THE PERFECT CAREER OPPORTUNITY Multi-Media Advertising Sales WE ARE SEEKING STRONG SALES MINDED INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE ABLE TO:‰ Manage multiple tasks ‰ Prospect for new business & deliver excellent customer service‰ Develop and present sales presentations to potential customers utilizing The News Herald’s print and digital media solutions The Panama City News Herald is adding talented and motivated Multi-Media Sales Professionals to our advertising team. Please submit resume & cover letter to: LGrimes@pcnh.comAsk us about the great bene ts in sales base pay + commission, bene ts including Medical, Dental & Vision Insurance, Flexible Spending, 401(k) Plan, Vacation & Sick Leave. 1131262 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Bryk FlooringWood Floor, Carpet, & Tile Installation, Carpet Cleaning. No Job Too Small! Reasonibly Priced. 850-381-5333 Spot Advertising works! NORTH 4538’58” EAST, 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 0118’02” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE SOUTH 9000’00” WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8842’04”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 4538’58” WEST, 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4841’59”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 6538’59” WEST, 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 4118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 4000’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 6118’02” WEST, 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 8118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 4254’14” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3349’51”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 2559’18” EAST, 122.20 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE NORTH 0904’22” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2155’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING NORTH 0620’44” WEST, 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE SOUTH 9000’00” WEST, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2118’47”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 0745’39” EAST, 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE SOUTH 0904’22” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 3349’52”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 2559’18” WEST, 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 4254’14” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 8544’46”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 0646’55” EAST, 581.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 5619’45” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5715’51” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 28615’35”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 3244’09” EAST, 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE NORTH 5715’51” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 5619’45” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8959’26” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 31250’38”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 0000’34” EAST, 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0118’02” WEST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE NORTH 8959’26” EAST, FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By. B. McGhee-Collins As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are, person, with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 859-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14. flcourts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Tele: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File #13-03366 August 7, 14, 2014 99949S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000391 FINANCIAL FREEDOM SFC, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE CHRISTOPHER KING; CAROLYN DELOACH DIXSON KING AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF, PHILLIP KING AKA PHILLIP ROY KING, DECEASED, ET AL; MARY ALICE BETSY; CAROLYN DIXSONKING F/K/A CAROLYN N. DIXSON F/K/A CAROLYN DIXSON; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST, PHILIP KING A/K/A PHILP ROY KING, DECEASED; SARAH A. DUNSTON A/K/A SARAH KING DUNSTON; MARY ALICE BETSY; ROY KING A/K/A ROY J. KING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 26, 2014, and entered in 2009-CA-000391 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB N/K/A ONEWEST BANK N.A. is the Plaintiff and WAYNE CHRISTOPHER KING; CAROLYN DELOACH DIXSON KING AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF, PHILLIP KING AKA PHILLIP ROY KING, DECEASED, ET AL; MARY ALICE BETSY; CAROLYN DIXSONKING F/K/A CAROLYN N. DIXSON F/K/A CAROLYN DIXSON; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST, PHILIP KING A/K/A PHILP ROY KING, DECEASED; SARAH A. DUNSTON A/K/A SARAH KING DUNSTON; MARY ALICE BETSY; ROY KING A/K/A ROY J. KING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT are the Defendant(s). Rebecca Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, 32456, at 11:00 AM, on August 28, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 16 AND 18 BLOCK 1015 “REVISED” MILL VIEW ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 AT PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGhee-Collins As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Tele: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 File # 13-24199 August 7, 14, 2014 99961S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000121-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES FARINA, ET. AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on the 28th day of August, 2014, at 11:00 A.M at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 158, WETAPPO ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 36 THROUGH 42 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 1st day of August, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: B. McGhee-Collins Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Geoffrey B. Sanders Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Suite E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H # 315142 August 7, 14, 2014 ADOPTION: Adoring Teacher (will stay home) & Attorney Love awaits 1st baby. Sheila & Justin 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Reward $200Small chihuahua mix, lost in St Joe Beach/ Mexico Beach Area, 14yrs old, mostly white w/ tan spots. weighs about 6lbs. Lost 8/2 about 8am. 850-227-4516 Mexico Beach 42nd St, Saturday Aug 9th 8am-until CSTHuge Inside & Outside Yard SaleAntiques, Jewelry, Wicker, Buttons, Yard Items & more!! GUN SHOW PANAMACITY FAIRGROUNDSAugust 9th & 10th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL96336 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $443/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 August SpecialOur New Consignment Store Opening in St Joe Beach on Hwy 98. Call Now to Reserve Your Space! 850-340-0263 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020