The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03950


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m With a hoot of cheers from spectators last Thursday morning, roughly two hours after workers began, the Cape San Blas Lighthouse ascended to its position as the highest point in Port St. Joe. The 91-foot, 60-ton structure was raised from its side to its rightful stature standing sentinel in George Core Park as three cranes and more than a dozen workers skillfully and without event put the lighthouse on its new foundation along the waterfront in Port St. Joe. Its surreal, said Charlotte Pierce of the St. Joseph Historical Society which has worked for more BOCC raises tentative millage By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The Board of County Commissioners set a tentative millage rate last week that was over fourtenths of a mill higher than the current millage. Remaining in the budget to this point is a 5-cent increase in county gas taxes as commissioners aim to lessen the property tax burden from the Public Works budget. Taxing bodies have until Aug. 1 to submit a tentative millage to the Property Appraiser. The tentative millage is the number on the Truth in Millage (TRIM) notices property owners receive, though it does not necessarily reect the millage rate nalized in September. The tentative millage rate is 6.9936, up .4328 mills. A mill represents $1 for every $1,000 in assessed property value. For the BOCC, each mill is worth BOCC approves addition to bed tax By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m County of cials are hoping to build it and watch them come. The Board of County Commissioners last Thursday unanimously approved adding an additional penny to the county bed tax beginning Oct. 1 in order to facilitate the addition, through expansion of existing facilities and new construction, of sports elds to the Tourist Development Council inventory. The additional cent, which still must be approved by formal resolution of the BOCC, would bring the TDC bed tax collection to ve cents. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The Gulf County Tourist Development Council marketing committee met on Monday to discuss strategies for the upcoming scal year but most of all talked trash. Executive director Jennifer Jenkins said that while she had hired seven seasonal employees at the TDC, three of them were focused on handling the trash building up in public trash cans and on the beaches themselves, the largest problem area being Cape San Blas. The TDC beach maintenance technician roles were created to empty trash cans at parks, do upkeep work on walkovers and provide maintenance to public restrooms. According to Jenkins, there isnt time for anything but trash hauling. She said that currently, three employees are spending 40 hours a week just on refuse disposal and another employee is dedicated 20 hours per week. The beach maintenance crews are now hauling trailers behind their trucks to allow adequate room for trash transportation. Ive never seen this many people here, said Tourist Development Council committee talks trash COURTESY OF JEFF ROSS TDC beach maintenance technicians are hauling 450-900 pounds of trash from public areas each day around Gulf County. See TRASH A7 See TAX A7 See MILLAGE A9 YEAR 76, NUMBER 42 Thursday, JULY 31, 2014 DAWGS graduation B1 THIS IS HISTORY Cape San Blas Lighthouse now looms over George Core Park See LIGHTHOUSE A6 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER AND TIM CROFT | The Star Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A8 Scene Around ...................... A10 School News ........................... B3 Faith .................................... B4-5 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ................... B10-B12

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The closer to the nish line the more dire nancial circumstances have become for the Port St. Joe Port Authority. And whether a $60,000 a year commitment over two years, at interest, from the Board of County Commissioners will relieve that situation remained unclear last week after special meetings by both boards. In fact, the nal motions passed by the Port Authority last Wednesday, to accept the BOCC offer and ask for an additional $80,000 were never discussed by the BOCC the following day. In reaf rming the $60,000 commitment the BOCC released the money immediately to a Port Authority that is at least $80,000 in arrears on debt now. The money is coming from a fund established for the county Industrial Park and which can only be used for economic development. Commissioner Warren Yeager told his fellow commissioners, without providing a reason, that he would see if I can nd some additional funds to make available over the next couple of years. Yeager, Commissioner Joanna Bryan and county attorney Jeremy Novak attended the Port Authority meeting the previous day. After nearly two hours of debate on whether the Port Authority should accept the countys loan or enter into an agreement with a private lender who responded to an advertisement for proposals on a line of credit, Eugene Raf eld made the motion to accept the BOCC proposal but ask that it to be raised. I move we accept and ask for an extra $20,000, Raf eld said, adding that he believed the BOCC could meet that number by taking it out of money from the former Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. The EDA reimbursed the county some $46,000, which last week was put in reserves. I guess well nd out if the county is going to support us or axe us, Raf eld said. Novak suggested the motions, to accept the offer and ask for more, be separated. Last weeks meeting was the conclusion of months of communication between the BOCC and Port Authority regarding the progress toward dredging the shipping channel and the Authoritys need for basic operating dollars. Urgency was injected when the Port Authority advertised for proposals on a half million dollar line of credit. We have been begging the county for a while before we went out for proposals, said Port Authority board member Jessica Rish. After the Port Authority received a proposal, which in nal form amounted to just under $500,000 to be drawn on over the next three to four years provided speci c benchmarks to developing the Port of Port St. Joe were met, the BOCC raised concerns over a three-year-old $199,000 loan on which the rst payment was delinquent. Technically we are in default, Gibson said in answer to whether the BOCC could call the note. In addition, Novak said, the loan Community Development Block Grant dollars, not property taxes, originally sent to the county as assistance to Raf eld Fisheries was unsecured after Capital City Bank foreclosed on the ports bulkhead property in April. The primary asset of the Port Authoritys, the former Arizona Chemical site, is owned free and clear. Both the BOCC and the private lender, Stuart Shoaf of St. Joe Natural Gas, wanted the rst mortgage on the property. Novak and Gibson differed as to whether the BOCC must be in the rst position due to the CDBG loan. That loan was originally secured by putting the BOCC in second position on the port bulkhead property. Novak said the loan requires the countys interest be secured Gibson said the Arizona Chemical property had enough appraised value to secure the BOCC and the private lender and the second position was suf cient to secure the CDBG loan. Novak noted the BOCCs ongoing support of the port, that in making the $60,000 additional loan the county would extend the required rst payment another three years and as well as a spirit of cooperation. There was expression among county commissioners that in light of the $199,000 loan, they should have been approached rst about additional nancing through a loan or similar package. We have an obligation to the county, said Port Authority board member Johanna White. They are our partners. We need to continue that partnership. The allure of the private line of credit, at least for some Port Authority members, was its aim to bring the Port Authority completely out of debt including meeting its annual obligations on the CDBG loan while allowing breathing room to concentrate on becoming an operational port. We owe people a lot of money, said Jason Shoaf, a member of the Port Authority board, noting the Authority has immediate need for roughly $80,000. Shoaf, Stuarts son, could not vote on the proposal. Of particular concern are attorneys fees. The Port Authority owes the Tallahassee law rm that has long represented their interests in the Capital City Bank loan and foreclosures. At some point, Gibson said, the Port Authority would have to call on the rm again to assist with a study to determine tariffs levied at the port and also to defend any lawsuit from Capital City contending the bank is owed more than the value it will realize from the bulkhead property. The county is making us a business loan, Jason continued. When we dont perform, they come here and ask us to perform. This (private line of credit) will help us pay our debts, meet our obligations and ensures money for expenses to the nish line. And we dont have to spend any more time lobbying where we can get money for next month. Its distracting and its not necessary. Port Authority chair Leonard Costin agreed, making the motion to accept the private line of credit. We need to focus on being a port instead of spending time wondering where we are going to get more money, Costin said. His motion died for lack of a second. The vote to accept the countys initial offer was 31, as was the vote to ask for an additional: Rish voted no on both motions. Raf eld continually came back to a central point; this was not just about the Port Authority but about jobs, the community, the county and the region. This isnt about us, he said. This is about the bigger picture. This isnt just about helping out the port; it is about helping the county and the whole region. How much of that (economic development money) is coming to the Port Authority, if any at all, because if you are in the process of putting together a budget for economic development there is nothing more important for economic development than the port. We ems Memorial Rehab Car e of fers in-patient re habilitative services, designed to impr ove function and maximize potential for re tur ning to home, school, work, and the community Our team customizes each patient s car e to meet both patient and family needs. We ar e committed to re tur ning those individuals who have been impair ed by accident or disease to their highest level of independence. Re hab Re stor e, Re turn to Home Call To day (850 ) 653-8853 135 Av enue G, Apalac hicola We ems Memorial Re hab Car e Yo ur Jour ney Back Home NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 8-15-14 CODE: SJ00 BOCC, Port Authority agree on additional loan This (private line of credit) will help us pay our debts, meet our obligations and ensures money for expenses to the nish line. And we dont have to spend any more time lobbying where we can get money for next month. Its distracting and its not necessary. Jason Shoaf, Port Authority board member Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, July 31, 2014 P. O. Bo x 244, Pa nam a City FL 32 402 Na tiv e of Po rt St Jo e, Re sident of Ba y County Si nce 1976 Gr aduated fr om Po rt St Jo e Hi gh School Early jobs included St Jo e Pa per Mi ll, City of Po rt St Jo e, St Jo e Na tural Ga s and painter s helper Me t wife, Ja n, in college and enjo ys ov er 40 ye ars of marriage together Gr aduate of Au burn Un iv ersity and Fl orida St ate Un iv ersity School of Law Tw o childr en, both ar e UF graduates Hi stor y of activity in community chur ch, school, outdoor and civic organ izations. I take my jo b serious ly I kno w ev er y decisi on aects so meone s Co nsti tutional rights to life, lib er ty and pr oper ty school, outdoor and civic organizations. Wo rk ed as Assistant St ate At torney Wo rk ed in Wa shington D.C. for Congr essman Do n Fu qua Wo rk ed in Ta llahassee for St ate Re pr esentativ e Bi lly Jo e Rish Tr ied Ov er 100 Ju ry Tr ials in local practice Me mber of the Ju dicial No minating Committee for the Fi rst Di strict Cour t of Ap peal Rated nationally A V by Ma rt indaleHu bbell A indicates pr eeminent attorney V indicates highest ethical standar ds Pr esident of the Ba y County Ba r Association El ected Cir cuit Re pr esentativ e to the Boar d of Go ve rnors Me mber of the Di sciplinar y (E thics) Re vie w Committee At torney at Law ye ars ye ars ye ars ttorne y at ye ars 8 8 Ap pointed Cir cuit Ju dge by Go ve rnor Je b Bu sh El ected without opposition in 200 8 Se rv es as Chief Civil Ad ministrativ e Ju dge Cer tied by the Su pr eme Cour t to handle death penalty cases Re cogniz ed by Gu ar dian ad Litem for his positiv e and inuential wor k with yo uth Fo unding member of the Ju stice Te aching gr oup for the judicial eduction of students Cir cuit Cour t Liaison to the Pr ofessionalism Committee Chairman of the Pr o Bono Committee Chairman of the Tr ansition Committee to the cour thouse addition curr ently under constr uction Cir cuit Ju dge dle death penalty case s Re cogniz ed b y G uar dian ad Litem for his positiv e and inuential wor k with y outh Fo unding member of the J ustice Te aching gr oup for the judicial eduction of students Cir cuit Cour t Liaison to the Pr ofessionalism Committee Chairman of the P ro Bono Chairman of the Tr ansition Committee to the cou rt house addition curr ently under By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The Gulf County School Board on Monday approved a tentative budget but not before getting an earful about what was not in the document. Several residents of We wahitchka spoke to board members about the cut to music programs in the We wahitchka schools for the coming school year, saying it was taking away from the poorest of the poor in the school district. Parents, several student members of the band and several other Wewahitchka residents approached the board and Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. They wanted to under stand why music was being cut and when it might return, ideas for preserving the pro gram and asking what op tions remained for parents making nancial invest ments in their childs musi cal ambitions. These kids are being denied a well-rounded edu cation, said resident Mary Gould, who said she lives part-time in Wewahitchka but pays school board taxes though not allowed to vote locally. Norton said he was com mitted to maintaining the Wewahitchka school system. But due to losses in en rollment the district is pro jected to lose another 73-74 students this year, a loss tilt ed heavily toward the north end and resulting loss in revenue tough cuts were needed. And while Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School needed to add an English teacher, the circumstances surrounding the music and band programs dictated the district not hire a full-time instructor. Last year the high school had a full-time instructor in music, with six periods a day of music education, but due to health reasons that in structor retired mid-year. An instructor hired to re place him left the county af ter the school year. The district, in working to cut $355,000 from this years budget, decided not to ll the position, Norton said. Right now we want to save the life of that school, Norton said, noting the tight restrictions the state places on local school boards when it comes to spending funds. We had to look at the money and what we could afford. We cant give what we dont have. An instructor already on staff will conduct a limited schedule of mu sic instruction, two to three periods, Norton said, with the possibility of some afterschool opportunities. The district, Norton said, is taking similar steps with the boys basketball pro gram at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Derek Kurnitsky, who coached the Tiger Sharks for a decade, left for a program in the Jacksonville area this summer. The district will not ll his social studies teaching position and will ll the bas ketball coaching position in-house. Another signicant com ponent of the internal debate over the Wewahitchka band program for district staff, said director of curriculum Melissa Ramsey is that band is not a required course while English is. It is a balancing act and it is unfortunate, Ramsey said. Also factoring into the equation, said board mem ber George Cox is the num ber of students interested in band had steadily declined. There are fewer current members, Cox noted, than in 1962, when the graduating class numbered two dozen. Student Matthew Hunter said he had ideas for gen erating money and interest in the band program and agreed to sit down to discuss those ideas with Norton and board chair Linda Wood. This (cutting music) is not something that we want to do, Wood said. Hunters mother said other parents of band stu dents were also interested in exploring fundraising op tions to sustain the program, which she said some parents invested substantially in with holiday gifts of instruments to children. Six years ago supporters of the Wewahitchka High School wrestling team, with the prospect of the program being eliminated, undertook a similar community effort to save that program. Norton said that he hopes the student population on the north end would stabilize along with the budget and that he would be committed to bringing back full-time in struction next year. Band is not being elimi nated, Norton said. It is be ing idled back for a year. Gould said she heard from the debate that the district is hamstrung by funding formulas and due to those formulas Wewahitchka schools were becoming pro gressively poorer in relation to schools on the south end. Shame on whoever is making these formulas that they would deny the poorest of the poor a more well-rounded education, Gould said. It is about the children. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m A new Mexico Beach City Hall is headed back to the drawing board. During a special meeting on Monday, the City Council unani mously voted to accept an insur ance settlement on the historic Parker House. The nal offer on the structure, which was purchased by the city in 2011 and caught re days later, was $750,000 plus $61,100 in rent reimbursement for the years spent on a temporary building used as a city hall. When that building was pur chased by PeoplesSouth Bank, city employees moved into the Public Works ofces. The acceptance of the settle ment, which came nearly three years to the day of the claim, leaves the council with $649,000 to pay for a new city hall. Original estimates from Cathey Construction for a two-story city hall held a price tag of more than $1 million dollars. With $649,000 left, we cant build what is proposed, said Councilwoman Mary Blackburn. I think we have to start with a blank slate. Mayor Al Cathey was absent from the voting due to Cathey Constructions afliation with the project. The new city hall was planned to sit in a new location on the Park er House property. The historic Parker House underwent demoli tion in April. An ofcial contract between the city and Cathey Construction was never drafted due to the state of ux in the project and all that was led was a Request for Qualica tions on the project. The council referred to the document as an agreement to agree. Blackburn and Councilman Jeff Tendler agreed that canceling the contract with Cathey Construction was the best course of action. Councilman Jack Mullen want ed city attorney Paul Komarek to look at the agreement to ensure that if it was canceled, they werent legally obligated to offer the proj ect to the second bidder, Southern Cat. Mullen added that Komarek should be able to share his nd ings for the councils regular meet ing in August. Councilwoman Tanya Castro suggested that if the scope of work completely changed, it may relieve the council of any monetary penal ties toward either company. Mullen had concerns about can celing the agreement without legal review since the city still owed Cathey Construction $40,000 for services rendered on the property. We need a comprehensive le gal review of where we stand be fore we go out and do something, said Mullen. The issue is not what to do with the property; the issue is the next step. Blackburn said she wanted to keep the citys promise to citizens that the city project wouldnt cost taxpayer money and the group unanimously passed a motion to halt the project, pending legal re view of the agreement, in order to develop a structure the city can afford. Mexico Beach council halts city hall project Cuts in music at Wewahitchka schools draws protest ENROLLMENT WOES Declining enrollment in the district has been exacerbated, said Deborah Crosby, director of special services who is retiring next month, by eligible students not in public schools. She said there are 73 home-schooled students in the county and 15 students at the Growing Minds Center for Autism. Those students represent $560,000 to the district. Board member John Wright said he had spoken to several parents of homeschooled students who said their children just didnt want to get up early in the morning to attend school. Of note for this issue, Crosby said, is a home-schooled student can participate in district extracurricular activities, such as band.

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OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, July 31, 2014 A Section How is the middle Colbert boy today? I wasnt dead certain positive Mr. Abernathy knew my first name but he got me in the right place, in the right family. Id drop by his hardware store from time to time to look over the toys down in the basement. Anything special I can show you? If I thought it was neat that the owner of the business was giving a ten year old his undivided attention, it didnt register on me. It was pretty common. Mr. Abernathy was about as friendly as they come. No sir. Im just looking. Both of us understood that shopping was all I could do. I didnt have the money to actually buy anything. Course, I didnt realize at the time that wonderful memories dont cost one red cent. Billy Bradleys father ran the Golden Rule right across Broadway Street from Abernathys Hardware, close to where the old bank stood. It was a five and dime that was crowded with back to school items, assorted candies, Tinker Toys, cap pistols and Lone Ranger masks. It was another fun place to look around. Mr. Bradley treated me just like a paying customer. He let me browse for hours. I could pick up the rubber baseballs and test the seams. I could pull out the spyglass and bring the bamboo picture frames hanging on the back wall up close. When I got a little older he hired me to take his advertising flyers door to door. It was a favorite place to shop. And the memories are still alive of the Clove Gum smell, the big glass windows and the friendlessness of the staff and customers. Mr. Howard Freeman owned a mens store over on Cedar Avenue. As I grew into the dating stage his place became more and more important. I couldnt take Jane Hill to the movie wearing blue jeans and a tee shirt! And I had real money made from picking cotton, unloading lumber or working at the swimming pool burning a hole in my pocket. Mr. Howard seemed more interested in Fridays nights ballgame than selling me a Penguin sweater with the suede leather elbow patches. And he loved my older brother. I havent seen Leon in a while. Is he staying out of trouble? You had to do a bit of socializing before you got down to business at Freemans Menswear. And it was the same all around the square. Folks took time to talk, catch up a mite and enjoy the moment whether you were the seller or the sellee. Those special memories way outlasted the cap pistols and the sweaters. Most anybody growing up in a small town in the late 50s knows exactly what Im talking about here. We still bask in the laid back attitude, the slow pace, the Mayberry feel.. I thought of Mr. Abernathy this week as I went into our local hardware store. My first wife was doing a little rearranging in the attic and I needed some boards or plywood or something. As usual I was about half prepared. Greg talked baseball and grandkids. Deb was still laughing over something Id said about Irene a year ago. The owner asked if he could help. When they decided what I needed, they rushed to get it loaded and squared away. And Greg let me know if I could wait until Saturday, hed come over and help me nail it up. Cathy thought a small strip of carpet would keep the storage boxes off the plywood. I hustled out to the carpet place. Now folks, they knew right off that I wasnt spending much money on this project. Wed already carpeted the house in 1983. It still looked pretty good to me if you dont count the grape stain Josh poured into it the first month we had it. I just needed a small remnant on this day. But before we discussed the reason I was there we had to compare our kidney stone pains. Dennis was knocking on wood, Kenny was carrying two or three even as we spoke and Danny was thrilled it was me instead of him! They all listened politely to my carpet story and Danny found exactly what I needed and loaded it up as we talked church, world affairs and retirement. Mr. Bradley never treated me so good. I stopped by the auto parts store on the way home to get some oil for my lawnmower. It was the same thing. We had to catch up on family and friends before we got down to the NAPA Know How part. Dick even asked about Leon. When I was emptying my pockets to see if I had enough for two quarts, Glen was ringing it up for me. They were sending me home with the oil. I reckon they figured we could worry about the money tomorrow or next week. Folks, you dont know how lucky I am to be living in a town with no Lowes, no Home Depot and no Walmart. And the special memories I have made shopping this week will linger longer than the stain on the carpet or the junk in the attic. Respectfully, Kes Almost every day, I pass through a gate with security guards. Most of these guards know me by name because I see them daily, sometimes multiple times a day. One of these guards is always giving me water or Gatorade, noting that I should stay hydrated. It worries me. Not that he is giving me water and Gatorade, but that I may look dried up or dehydrated. Some folks would wonder why this fellow keeps giving them things. I do not. There are nice people in this world and nice gestures should simply be appreciated. Yes, I do realize that this fellow goes to the college where I teach and there is a high probability that he will end up in one of my mathematics courses. Grades cant be bought in my classes; Im pretty sure he understands and is simply being kind. On a recent pass through the gate this fellow handed me a Gatorade and said, You need to stay hydrated. I simply said, Thanks. With no vehicles behind me, he continued his conversation wanting to talk about Robert Frost and his poem, The Mending Wall. It was a poem I had not looked at in many years, so I took a look at it as soon as I got the chance (knowing he would want to talk about it again the next time I passed through the gate/hydration station). It is an interesting poem and I guess it is one that you could sit around and drink Gatorade (or something else) and discuss. My basic take on it is that you have a couple of neighbors who get together to repair the wall between their properties on a regular basis. One questions the need for the wall, whereas the other notes that Good fences make good neighbors. You kind of see the points both fellows are making, but its the fellow who thinks walls are not needed who is most interesting. You see, this fellow doing all the talking who thinks there doesnt need to be a wall, is the one who initiates the wall xing or mending. It is a bit humorous That is my take on it. You can probably pay ten dollars and get a much more educated analysis of Robert Frosts poem. Im sure they will use a lot of ten dollar words, thus making your investment seem worthwhile. We are at a time in the world when the case can be made that we need more walls, fences and boundaries or at least need to mend the ones we have. These are decisions that I am glad I do not have to make. However, if we are talking about boundaries in general, I think it is always a good idea to have them with children, dogs and perhaps to keep rabbits out of the garden. On second thought, perhaps we should reinvest in mending walls such as family, country and just plain good ole American logic. Everybody has a different idea as to what a fence should look like just try putting one up that has to be approved by a homeowners association. Robert Frost died around the time I was born and we are (at least I am) still studying his work. Frost was born in 1874 in San Francisco. His father named him after a Southern hero, General Robert E. Lee. I nd that interesting from a boundary standpoint. Robert Frosts father requested to be buried back on the east coast where he was from. Robert, his wife, family and his sister took his father there to be buried and didnt have enough money to get back to California. His granddaddy offered him a house in Massachusetts. Not having enough money to get home, he took the house and stayed. He attempted chicken farming at one point in his life and he didnt do so well so he became a poet and an educator and won four Pulitzer Prizes. As for the failed chicken farmers poem, The Mending Wall, I think I will keep my side of the fence mended and keep hoping my neighbor treats his dog better, learns to put his garbage can in the right direction for the robotic truck to pick up and gets his little convertible shining to his satisfaction. A taller fence or wall would be useful in blocking my view of my neighbor polishing his snappy little convertible while I am bailing water out of the oorboard of my car after it has rained. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Dj Vu All Over Again! Fixing Walls CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Government cannot be run like a business Government is about essential services; business is about profit. Business types have no business running government. That is the purview of elected officials. Governments focus should be on solving problems, not on available dollars. The challenge is to find the resources, not cut the programs. Its a different way of thinking and the best example of a failed businessman-politician is Floridas Gov. Rick Scott. By hook or crook, he has become a very successful businessman. But as a governor, he will be rated among the worst. He has been insensitive to the needy, has undermined public education, hurt the environment, and assaulted the health and wellbeing of Florida citizens. No one likes taxes but everyone wants services. Private enterprise sells a product or service to customers. Government provides essential services to every citizen. It is not possible to use a business model to run government any more than it is sensible to run a business like a government. Government programs should not be about profits. For example, public health communicable disease programs are complex. The patient must be treated and then those who have had contact with the patient must be found and examined. This effort is important to prevent the spread of serious disease such as tuberculosis, AIDS, and sexually transmitted diseases. Florida had one tuberculosis hospital. The most difficult patients were housed there. Floridas Lantana TB hospital enjoyed an international reputation for treatment and training. A business decision based on costs closed the hospital. Improper patient placement put communities as risk. The hospital closed during one of the most dangerous TB outbreaks in the country that centered on Floridas homeless population. A concerned governor would have worked with public health officials to protect health and welfare. The high-speed-rail effort could have connected Miami, Jacksonville, Tampa, Orlando, Tallahassee, and Pensacola. Scott refused federal money for the train, terminating the project. Thousands of jobs were lost, a long-term plan fell victim to running government like a fortune 500 company. Purging talent and politicizing the health department and other state agencies moved money and jobs to patronage. The health department lost food service and environmental regulatory authority. Other agency authority was neutralized, putting citizens at risk. It is difficult to quantify prevention. Professionals understand this. Businessmenpoliticians generally do not. Not everything of social value is profitable. The push to privatize education through charter schools and vouchers continues to undermine public education. It pushes tax dollars to the private sector. Critical resources to public schools are lost. This is another example of a governor who runs government like a car lot. Public schools cannot be run like a department store; public health cannot be run like Microsoft. Public education needs adequate funding and skilled staff. The profit from effective Government is better and healthier communities. Scotts rejection of Affordable Care Act money (Obamacare) is the most egregious decision of his administration. It blocked 1 million Floridians from health coverage. This decision should keep responsible elected officials awake at night. Diseases are left untreated, chronic illness unmanaged, and preventable death unchecked. A communitys quality of life requires limiting the spread of disease, addressing road and bridge repair, public safety and education. Essential services must be improved, not cut. Government must protect the common good. It has never and will never be successfully run as a business. Marc Yacht is a semi-retired physician living in Hudson, Fla. Column courtesy of Context Florida. Page 4 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 MARC YACHT, MD, MPH Special to The Star

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, July 31, 2014 A Section De ned Bene t Plans, Investing and The Rockford Files This is Jim Rockford. At the tone leave your name and number Ill get back to you. Opening line from The Rockford Files Something special was taken from our generation when James Garner passed recently. Through hard work and good luck Garner landed parts in theatre productions and eventually in lms. Garner fought the Hollywood moguls for fair pay, marched for civil rights with Brando and Newman in 1963, and also starred in Maverick and The Rockford Files. Jim Rockford was a moderately successful private detective who lived in a trailer on a beach in Malibu; who ate tacos for breakfast on the pier; and who scuf ed to make a living without running afoul of the crooks or the law. Garner brought every imaginable co-star onto the show, from Rita Moreno to Isaac Hayes, from Lou Gossett, Jr. to Lindsay Wagner. Rockfords gold Pontiac Firebird was a symbol of modern mobility, and the tough-talking, wise-cracking detective gave us a glimpse of a fast-paced and rapidly changing world in L.A. Jim Rockford did jail time on a false charge, and his life was different because of it. James Garners life was even more exceptional. He suffered a dif cult childhood with a family that offered little advice and no nancial support. When he left home at 14, all he took with him was the dream of success. Not all of us can live on the beach in Malibu or star in Hollywood movies. But like James Garner, we all have dreams. Many times these dreams are relatively simple nancial goals: a comfortable retirement, funding a grandchilds college tuition, or the ability to travel extensively. One thing I have learned in twenty years of offering investment advice is that it is never too late to initiate a savings and investment plan. If youre still working and can utilize your rms 401(k) opportunity, cut back on your personal spending and maximize your contributions. If you can forego one or two frivolous expenses each week, you can plow that money into a nest egg that can work for you in retirement. Following your nancial dreams is often simply a matter of executing self discipline and exercising personal will. Many of us fail to save and invest simply because we fail to start the process. The goal of a secure retirement is beyond us, we think, so we commit nothing instead. Just get started. The more you save and invest, the more youll want to. If youre a business owner, consider starting a de ned bene t plan if its appropriate to your enterprise and situation. Some DB plans are designed to allow business owners to put away signi cant catch-up dollars if they havent been able to fund a good retirement program to date. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-6086121~www.arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. Arbor OUTLOOK MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Protecting the beaches Dear Editor, Kudos to Nancy Thomson for her Letter to the Editor, Protecting St. Joseph Peninsula. Its time the BOCC seriously consider a Leave No Trace ordinance for Gulf County as other Florida coastal counties have done. Not only have our beaches become an obstacle course for nesting turtles and emerging hatchlings, but they are now dangerous for people as well with large un lled pits, volleyball nets left up and beach equipment washing out with the tide. People need to understand that they do not get a deed to a portion of the beach. The beach is for everyone (including birds and turtles) to enjoy not turned into a parking lot. Thanks. Tom Baird Cape San Blas Leave no trace Dear Editor, Thanks to Nancy Thomson for voicing her opinion in regards to protecting our beaches! Her comments in the editorial represent my exact sentiments. The Cape area is a true treasure and we need to take the initiative to preserve it. We have the responsibility to protect the natural habitat of the turtles, birds, etc. and stop the irreversible negative effects on the beaches/dunes. People will still vacation at the Cape if not allowed to drive on the beach or the Leave No Trace ordinance is put in place! Visitors come here to enjoy the beauty, but it needs to be enjoyed in a responsible manner. I am asking our commissioners to consider the need to save this treasure for future generations. Please be open to limiting vehicle traf c on the beaches and by helping us keep the beaches clean! Cathy Belew Cape San Blas Clean up the beaches Dear Editor, My wife and I have owned our home on beautiful Cape San Blas for over ten years, leaving for a few months during the summer. We came down for a week to visit friends and check on our house the third week in July. When we took our early morning beach walk I was astounded and disgusted, to say the least. I could not believe the amount of pop-up tent canopies, chairs, umbrellas and trash that was left, with no one around. It looked like a refugee camp without the refugees! Down by the Air Force property was a real treat with all kinds of beer cans, bottles, and other trash thrown about. I thought we had a leave no trace code. What happened? The TDC and the BOCC like to rave about all the number of tourists bringing in thousands in bed taxes, as well as the hiring of beach ambassadors at the costs of thousands in tax payer dollars. However, from where I see it, it doesnt seem to be working, or is it that they dont want it to work because they might mess with somebodys vacation. I believe the money would be better spent on bona de law enforcement of our beaches and citation pads (especially at night). Maybe then we could eliminate reworks, vehicles racing and carrying on; and make a real effort to get the offenders to clean up after themselves instead of waiting for the maid or high tide to do it. If the TDC and BOCCs objective is to have our beaches look like PCB, they are off to a good start. Doug Calendine Cape San Blas Thanks for the response Dear Editor, I want to publicly express my appreciation to several individuals who responded so quickly and kindly to my concern when I heard of the swim advisory issued for the public access dock at Salinas Park due to a ruptured/damaged sewer line near the Marnie Island Preserve on Thursday, July 24. Since Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost is within one mile of the affected area, we were quite concerned for the safety of our customers. As soon as I heard of the news release, I left messages with the Gulf County Health Department and Commissioner Warren Yeager, and nally spoke to Michelle at the TDC Welcome Center who immediately emailed a copy of the release to me. Mr. Yeager returned my call within the hour, and the very next morning, Friday, Gwen called from the Health Department and fully explained the facts of the swim advisory and agreed to test the water in the bay at Happy Ours as I requested. Kevin Pettis and Lynn Todd from The City of Port St. Joe arrived early afternoon with their test kit, and by end of day Gwen called to advise me that the test sample at Salinas Park was good and the advisory was lifted. Gwen even called on Saturday to assure me the test sample at our location was clean. Due to the quick response of all these individuals, I was able to allay the fears of a few customers who heard rumors that the whole bay was contaminated with sewage. Thank you. Debbie VanVleet Port St. Joe Sector separation, red snapper Dear Editor, Sector separation (amendment 40) will do nothing to help Red Snapper of the recreational sherman All of my clients want to know why they catch a Red Snapper 95 percent of the time when they are bottom shing or even at lining and yet they can only keep them for nine days out of the year. At the same time they question why they can eat Red Snapper seven days a week year round at restaurants and yet cannot go catch one for themselves to eat. Their other main question is why are their fresh Red Snapper available at seafood markets seven days a week 365 days a year and yet they cannot go catch one for themselves? These red snapper are a public resource and should be available to the public rst or at least equally to those who wish to sh for them themselves (just like our freshwater sh, Quail, Dove, Grouse, Ducks, Deer, etc., etc.). The privatizing of our natural resources for monetary gain is not correct. If they are going to let people commercial sh for Red Snapper and Grouper it should be on a lottery type basis and anyone who wants to provide sh for sale should be able to catch and sell them. Even if it is still on an IFQ system. They should never have given away 51 percent of the Red Snapper to private individuals and it should never have been that big of a split Perhaps a more realistic split would be 30 percent of the Red Snapper for the commercial side and let some people go catch their own supper more often. Something has to be done about the mismanagement of our sheries. The Charter for hire has been screaming this for years, and now they punish us for not having better data collection which only the Gulf council /NMFS can implement. Catch 22. It is a shame that everyone going shing can see and document the overabundance of Red Snapper that is hurting the balance of the Gulf, and yet our seasons get shorter every year, and still with no data collection system being implemented. Why can you buy Red Snapper anytime at restaurants and seafood houses (and they even export some too!) to make other people rich --but you cannot catch your own to eat???? Tom Adams Mexico Beach Charters The Apology Dear Editor, In the last Gulf County Commission meeting an individual was allowed to ask if I was ready to make an apology to Gulf County for the frivolous law suit that supposedly cost the county a lot of money. I thought most intelligent people understood the event and what happened but to clear this once and for all, I will speak to this. Keep in mind that I am the initiator of the complaint and suit led against the County Commissioners as a direct result of their behavior immediately prior to the 2012 election and because I led the suit, only I could stop it. It was my decision to stop the suit not theirs. In case you do not know, Frivolous law suits result in whoever led the suit having to paying for all attorney fees and the fact that the county agreed to pay their portion is evidence that an injustice was committed on their part. This was NOT a frivolous law suit by any stretch of the imagination. It was and still is a very serious breach of the public trust. Consequently, they knew that was the best route to take was to pay their fees and hope this went away. But, they keep allowing the subject to come up so let get to the truth. The deal breaker for me on the complaint and suit was a legal glitch found after detailed research which gives immunity to a degree for elected of cials from what they say. When this was discovered, I realized that a lot of the complaint and suit would be overturned but that did not in any way prove they were innocent. They in fact planned and deliberately attacked in public the PAC, myself and others that were their political opponents. They created lies about all of us and tried to demonize a group of citizens who only want the best for the county but did not agree with them. They used their political connections to in uence the SAO of ce to have an investigation against me and others on drummed up false charges which was proven not to hold up. Lets address the so called cost to the county; First of all if they had behaved properly, it never would have happened but they have our tax dollars to use as a weapon against anyone who challenges or questions them so they do not care.. If you le a law suit, unless the attorney agrees to take in on a contingency then you pay and have no public funding to abuse and risk as they did. So in a way, as a tax payer I was paying both ways. There were two very serious workers comp claims along with some other claims that had an impact on the counties insurance premiums. My law suit had little impact on the new cost. If you know insurance company underwriters, it is all about risk when they determine new costs. For example, if you have several wrecks or tickets for driving badly then your automobile insurance will increase accordingly. I think the underwriters took a hard look at our Commissioners and realized the risk had increased considerably from their actions and behavior and that was the main reason for the increased cost. They knew that if these Commissioners continued that other law suits would follow and sure enough they have. If you honestly believe that the Gulf County Commission, the $104,000.00 a year County Administrator, the $180,000 a year County Attorney are not all wrapped up with each other for personal bene t and not for the people, then you have not been paying attention. I am very sorry for the following: 1. That the Commissioners electioneered the last election to their advantage. 2. That we do not have County Wide Voting and the elected are dragging their heels in the background as they know we can easily get it but it does not work to their bene t. 3. The ethics commission believed that Commissioner Yeager does not work for Preble Rish in Gulf County and has no in uence on votes. 4. That Sunshine Laws have been repeatedly broken by McDaniel, Smiley and McLemore resulting in my current ling a complaint about them. 5. That the Commissioner changed the comp plan to allow McLemores illegal river house to become legal after the fact. 6. That the Land Development Regulations were changed recently to destroy what we love about this county by allowing dense construction which will bring about congestion and crime like Panama City. Yes, I am sorry for all this and more than you realize but I am not sorry for ling the suit and will never apologize for protecting my rights and freedoms. Jim Garth Chairman, Citizens Improving Gulf County Page 5

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 than a decade to save and preserve the lighthouse. We would have loved for it to stay on the Cape but obviously that was not an option. Im just excited to see it saved and preserved for generations to come to and enjoy. And unlike the last time Mother Nature forced the lighthouse further inland more than a century ago the images of this move will last beyond many of our lifetimes as dozens were stationed around the park with video cameras, personal cameras, phones and most any other device with which to snap a memory. Spectators came with lawn chairs and towels to sit on and folks ringed the park as the lighthouse was carefully raised and its four legs seems hardly the proper word for the large steel beams of the base placed on footers poured more than two weeks ago. This is history, said local photographer Clarence Monette who lmed the work. The process of raising the lighthouse, like the move last Tuesday of the tower and ancillary buildings from Cape San Blas to town, went remarkably smoothly, save for the sound of a heavy chain breaking early in the process that seemed to unnerve all but the contractor and his crew from Ducky Johnson House Movers. In fact, the Ducky Johnson crew, which lost its namesake leader several years ago, reinforced its legend established, at least in Port St. Joe, after crews moved several giant structures, including an 800ton condenser, off the old paper mill site. But with the lighthouse and two keepers quarters now in place the oil house is to be moved this week the work is hardly over. As noted by Mayor Mel Magidson two weeks ago there is cleanup needed to the lighthouse structure sanding, maybe a new coat of paint but particularly to the keepers quarters. The house that was once home to the Cape San Blas Lighthouse Gift Shop has, in the nearly two years since it was deemed the lighthouse was under threat of coastal erosion and declared surplus by the U.S. Air Force, has come under disrepair. The Gift Shop, in the short term, will continue to operate from the adjacent historic Maddox House. One of the quarters has a restroom, but the other does not which will be consideration for future plans. We just dont know what we will do with the gift shop, yet, Pierce said. Pierce said the Historical Society will likely undertake a community fundraising campaign to facilitate necessary work to the structures. Pierce said in addition to some cleaning and general spifng up the lighthouse tower will be inspected to ensure it survived the relocation without injury, with an aim toward resuming the full-moon climbs that were so popular before nature forced a stop. The Historical Society is also reaching out to the Coast Guard to examine options for installation of some kind of light it can not impact navigation in the lighthouse lantern room. Landscaping around the complex is also on the to-do list. That, however, is in the future. For now there was satisfaction for the members of the Historical Society, a couple of dozen strong, who wrote applications for state grants, appeared at state hearings for those grants and somehow came away with the funds to restore the keepers quarters and rehabilitate the lighthouse tower. The organization also worked through the red tape of the Air Force and the Board of County Commissioners to broker a lease for the property and buildings, which paved the way, eventually, for the fullmoon climbs. So few people, with the help of others just look at what they were able to accomplish, Pierce said. At this point, I am sure it was the good Lords blessing that got us through. I think it is going to be an awesome asset to the community and to the county. 4518947 NO TI CE OF IN TE ND ED AC TI ON TH E GU LF CO UN TY SC HO OL BO AR D Pu rp os e an d Ef fe ct : Th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d pr op os es to am en d an d ad op t po li ci es as pr ov id ed fo r in th e Ad mi ni st ra ti ve Pr oc ed ur es Ac t, fo r th e pu rp os e of br in gi ng sa id po li ci es in to co mp li an ce wi th Fl or id a St at ut es an d St at e Bo ar d of Ed uc at io n Ru le s. Su mm ar y: Th e fo ll ow in g is a br ie f de scr ip ti on of ea ch pr op os ed ch an ge 5. 32 Ze ro To le ra nc e fo r Sc ho ol Re la te d Cr im es Ec onom ic Im pa ct : Th es e pr op os al s ma y re su lt in di re ct co st s ass oc ia te d wi th im pl em en ta ti on IF RE QU ES TE D, A HE AR IN G WI LL BE HE LD AT : Ti me : 9: 00 AM ES T Da te : Au gu st 19 2 01 4 Pl ac e: Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Ro om 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Th e en ti re te xt of th e pr op os ed ru le s ca n be in sp ec te d du ri ng re gu la r of c e ho ur s at th e Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Of c e, 15 0 Mi dd le Sc ho ol Ro ad Po rt St Jo e, FL 32 45 6 Sp ec ia l le ga l au th or it y un de r wh ic h th e ad op ti on is au th or iz ed an d th e la w be in g im pl em en te d an d in te rp re te d is ma de sp ec i c. Th e ad di ti on an d ch an ge s ar e pr op os ed by Bi ll Ca rr As si st an t Su pe ri nt en de nt fo r Bu si ne ss Se rv ic es an d ap pr ov ed fo r co ns id er at io n by Ji m No rt on Su pe ri nt en de nt Am end me nt s: Se e ab ov e Dr Vincent Ivers left July 23, 2014 for a humanitarian mission to an Indian reser va tion in the Republic of Pa nama. These Indians are called Ngobe Bugle and are one of the poorest in the nation. Dr Ivers is honored to have the privilege to assist with such a worthy cause. He will return August 3rd. Dr Ivers and staff would like to thank all our loy al patients and will continue to strive to pro vide the ver y best medical care possible. Normal Clinical Hours Will Resume VINCENT IVERS, M.D. 301 Tw entieth Str eet Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www .iversmd.com 4 Co mmi tm en t to Ex ce ll en ce fo r ov e r 23 Ye ar s Ce le br at in g 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e in Po rt St Jo e Let s We lcome Dr Ivers Back On Aug. 4th at 10:30 am LIGHTHOUSE from page A1 DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.com PH OTOS B Y WES LOC H ER AN D T IM C ROFT | The Star

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, July 31, 2014 The aim is to facilitate the creation of a joint county/city of Port St. Joe sports complex on land donated to the city by the St. Joe Company. Additionally, the dollars the additional penny would be leveraged for bond revenue would assist in the expansion of existing parks, such as Honeyville Community Park, through the addition of sports elds. Sports elds are big business in the Panhandle. Each year the arrival of tournament play in baseball, softball and soccer brings more than 500,000 room nights to Bay County and an annual economic impact to the community that exceeds $15 million. During the past week Chipley has hosted a youth league World Series with roughly a dozen teams and the Washington County Tourist Development Council expects an economic impact to the county of over $300,000. These are big events for their communities, said Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the Gulf County TDC. And, at least in the case of Chipley, there are few beaches or other amenities that Gulf County can offer, Jenkins said. We need to get to marketing those events as sport-vacations, she said. She said the TDC could include a youth athletic event packages which included amenities from a Dead Lakes excursion to a beach getaway. The emphasis, Jenkins said, will be on creating multi-purpose elds on which soccer, softball, baseball and the fastest-growing youth sport, lacrosse, could be played. Port St. Joe and county of cials have long discussed the joint creation of a sports complex. Such an effort was part of an interlocal agreement crafted in 2005 after the WindMark Beach Development of Regional Impact (DRI) process and review, with each governing body pledging more than half a million in funding and joint effort on acreage off U.S. Highway 98 near the Gulf/Franklin Center donated to the city. However, as budgets were tested by shrinking revenue in the wake of the collapse of the real estate market in the ensuing years, county and city of cials could not fund the effort and ultimately relieved themselves of the obligation when amending the interlocal agreement. The extra bed tax penny is an allowable use of such funds and city and county of cials, as well as the TDC advisory council, have all voiced at least tentative approval of the concept. I will formally put it to my council next week, Jenkins said of next weeks monthly meeting. I will have to have a scope of work (on how funds will be used). Jenkins calls the additional penny a Parks and Recreation penny. We have other parks we need to take of, she said. She said the county has many parks to which funds could be earmarked for expansion and beauti cation, part of providing a supply to meet tourist demand. But doing so while maintaining the essence of the brand that is Gulf County. We have to have sustainable growth, Jenkins said. That is a primary focus. 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Beach maintenance crews are currently hauling 450-900 pounds of trash a day. Jenkins said the sheer volume is requiring multiple trips to area dumpsters, often leading to the crew having to take the refuse to Public Works once the dumpsters are full. Though the TDCs beach ambassadors keep an eye on beach items, agging anything that has been idle for 24-48 hours, Jenkins said storms will mangle tents and their frames, sending beach items into the dunes. Someone left a full-size freezer on the beach, Jenkins told the committee. You would not believe the stuff people leave behind. Even though Gulf County beaches dont operate under a Leave No Trace ordinance, it has been discussed by the Board of County Commissioners by TDC advisory council. Even if passed, it would still need to be enforced. In her budget for the new scal year, Jenkins is recommending a full-time beach ambassador who will be trained in code enforcement. Weve grown, we just need to do so responsibly from here, said committee member Alyson Gerlach. Jenkins said that since the Fourth of July she has received calls daily from residents who complain about the trash on the beach, the amount of people and the vehicles on the beach. I dont think we do enough to educate our community partners, said Whiteld. We need to build more awareness with the public that this is a tourism-based community. A bigger piece of the marketing statement should be getting the word out. Gerlach said that while she understands the frustration with the trash, she remained optimistic, hoping that those visitors enjoyed their visit and would consider coming back. This community has to run somehow, said Gerlach. Without tourism, the community wouldnt exist. Marketing plan Jenkins said that moving forward; the TDC will operate under the mantra of, growing Gulf County in a balance and sustainable manner. Areas of focus for this years marketing plans include further brand promotion, evaluating and adding partner programs, operation of the Welcome Center, administration and operation excellence and beach grooming. This years Winter Fun schedule will be managed directly by the TDC and will include social events to bring together visitors and residents. The plan will be complete by September and marketing will begin in October. Jenkins also shared results of a survey that went out to members of the TDC council along with lodging and travel industry partners and TDC staff members. Results showed that partners believed the TDC was on the right track with high marks given to goals, objectives, seasonal marketing, and communication programs. According to the survey results, the biggest concerns were in the growth of the area outpacing infrastructure, especially areas such as internet and cell phone service, which get easily bogged down with additional users in the area. According to Jenkins data, 63 percent of partners who responded to the survey saw growth in the winter season of December through February. She said that winter guests came mainly from Canada and the Mid-West and was trending toward an age of 50-60 rather than the median age of 70 seen in past years. The numbers showed that these guests were saying longer, one to two months on average. Another 60 percent say growth in the spring months and 60 percent of partners said they had retooled their own marketing plans based off TDC efforts. Since launching the new Visit Gulf website in May, Jenkins said nearly 60,000 people have visited. We were being tactical last year, said Jenkins. Now, we have to be visionary. TRASH from page A1 TAX from page A1 Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Special to The Star During a recent trip to Key West, U.S. Congressman Steve Southerland, (R-Pana ma City), who serves on the House Natural Resources Committee and its Fisher ies Subcommittee, got an up-close, personal look at an invasive lionsh. Two rapidly reproducing and voracious non-native lionsh species, imported from the Indo-Pa cic region, are wreaking havoc on sheries and ma rine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico, Western Atlantic and the Caribbean Sea. Southerland, who was attending a Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting, spent extra time to learn more about the lionsh invasion which is also grow ing more populous on the reefs near his hometown of Panama City. The congress man serves Floridas second district which includes more than half of the Florida Pan handles coastal waters. Capt. Bill Kelly, execu tive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fisher mens Association, and Sean Morton, superintendent of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, showed Southerland a lionsh on display in an aquarium at the sanctuarys Eco-Discovery Center in the southernmost city. Kelly, a speaker at the rst-ever Lionsh Summit last October by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commis sion in Cocoa Beach, ex plained to Mr. Southerland how the invasion has grown to enormous proportions and detailed efforts now be ing considered to launch a commercial lionsh trapping program in hopes of contain ing their spread. We discussed the signicance of this in vasion and impacts on indigenous species, Kelly said. While the typical sh erman may not know much about them, since lionsh are rarely caught on con ventional shing tackle, thousands of recreational divers, descending to 100 foot depths, have observed growing numbers of them on popular Florida reefs, sub merged wrecks and other underwater sites. However, these population densities pale in comparison to li onsh aggregations found deeper (120-300 feet or more) beyond safe recreational div ing depths. Anglers and the general public should be very con cerned, Kelly said. For ex ample juvenile groupers and snappers are among some 100 documented sh which lionsh prey on and despite its now 1 pound average size, the lionsh can live for about 15 years and most likely double in size again. Marine researchers at the Lionsh Summit reported a single lionsh necropsy veri ed consumption of 20 tropi cal sh in only 30 minutes time. In highly infested areas native sh populations have been reduced by as much as 80 percent in ve weeks. Crustaceans like crab, shrimp and even juvenile spiny lobster are also popu lar food sources found in the stomach contents, Kelly added, as are herbivores, the very important small col orful sh that help keep cor al reefs free of algae. Divers in many communities have helped keep lionsh popula tions in check through or ganized lionsh derbies and contests by spearing and hand-netting them. In the ve year history since 2009 when lionsh were rst spotted in the Keys, commercial lobster trappers have been nding increasing numbers as bycatch in their spiny lobster traps. The numbers and siz es of lionsh have skyrocket ed from 49 lbs at a 1/3 lb aver age caught the rst year, to more than 10,000 pounds in 2013 averaging more than a pound apiece, as reported by just one commercial sher man during an eight month shing season. And as we explained to Congressman Southerland, our commercial lobster trap pers have seen denser popu lations of lionsh in much deeper waters from 100 to 300 feet, said Kelly. By developing the right trap ping methods, lionsh could become a very valuable and nutritious consumer com modity while protecting our ecosystems. HISTORY OF THE LIONFISH INVASION The rst sighting of lion sh in U.S. waters was re ported in 1985 in the Atlantic waters off Dania Beach near Fort Lauderdale. It was be lieved to have been released by a tropical sh enthusiast who may have grown tired of caring for the exotic im port, which may have been eating other expensive and colorful sh in his tank. Indigenous to the tropi cal waters of the South Pa cic, lionsh populations are held in check in their native habitat by natural predation. However, inva sive lionsh have no natural predators and have spread rapidly in the past 29 years in sub-tropical and temper ate waters of the northern hemisphere. Just one fe male is capable of producing as many as 30,000 eggs ev ery four days or more than two million eggs a year. With a thermal tolerance of about 50 degrees, some 35 degrees less than their native habitat, lionsh have been found in Atlantic wa ters as far north as Rhode Is land. In the U.S. the heaviest concentrations have been from Carolina waters south to the Florida Keys. They have also spread through out the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the Bahamas, the Caribbean Islands and east ern Central and northern South America. The ornate red and white stripped lionsh possesses 18 venomous spines on its dorsal n and its pelvic and anal ns, which are used for defense. Its venom, a protein-based neurotoxin, can cause severe pain and swelling. Spearshermen and commercial sher men use safety techniques such as long spears, hand nets and puncture proof gloves to carefully avoid the spines. Though the spines, which are removed during the cleaning process, are venomous, it has no effect on the lionsh meat which is considered a delicacy and cooked in a variety of recipes. NEXT STEPS Kelly said he and South erland discussed several core issues. Besides talking about how quickly this invasion occurred, the damages to the ecosystem and how widespread it has become, our hour long conversa tion included containment methods such as divers using spears and nets near shore, and major emphasis on a well-monitored com mercial trapping program offshore. Once that be gins well tie-in consumer awareness and educational program, leading to bigger demand for these sh in more restaurants, seafood houses and grocery store sh counters. Mr. Southerland, Kelly said, was very concerned and indicated he would call for a subcommittee hear ing before the House Natu ral Resources Committee. The alarm was sound ed over 20 years ago by NOAA biologist and ecolo gist Dr. James Morris. Now, in a relatively short period of time, we may very well be facing one of the most threatening marine inva sions of our lifetime. Until such time as native spe cies of sh acquire an ap petite for lionsh, if they ever do, our most promis ing method of containment will be a well-designed and closely monitored commer cial trapping venture. Time is of the essence, Kelly said. Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, July 31 87 74 20 % Fr i, Au g. 01 87 75 40 % Sa t, Au g. 02 87 75 30 % Sun, Au g. 03 84 76 50 % Mo n, Au g. 04 83 76 50 % Tu es Au g. 05 84 77 40 % We d, Au g. 06 84 77 40 % Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Page 8 Thursday, July 31, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Offshore shing is slowing down some, but the kingsh bite is still strong. Dusters and cigar minnows will nd sh fast but drifting live baits is very productive also. Scallops are growing and are getting easier to nd as summer progresses. Good spots are east of Eagle Harbor Fire Tower area and east of Blacks Island. Bay shing continues to be very productive as the heat wave remains us of summer. Trout and redsh are being caught in St. Joe Bay and Crooked Island under popping corks and topwater shots. Southerland considers hearing on lionsh Special to The Star Florida is known as a touristfriendly state, but starting Aug. 1, one visitor no longer be will welcome: the invasive lionsh. Introduced into Florida waters in the late 1980s, lionsh populations have boomed in recent years, negatively impacting native wildlife and habitat. Several management changes go into effect Aug. 1 that will help the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission combat the growing problem by making it easier for lionsh hunters to remove the spiny predators and limiting further introduction of the species into the waters. Changes include: Prohibiting the importation of live lionsh; Allowing lionsh to be removed via spearshing when diving with a rebreather, a device that recycles air and allows divers to remain in the water for longer periods of time (currently, you cannot spear any sh when using a rebreather); and Allowing participants of approved tournaments and other organized events to spear lionsh or other invasive species in areas where spearshing is not currently allowed (such as certain state parks or refuges). This will be done through a permitting system. See or catch a lionsh? Report a sighting by downloading the new Report Florida Lionsh app on a smart device or by visiting MyFWC. com/Fishing and clicking on Recreational Regulations (under Saltwater) and then Lionsh. To learn more about lionsh, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Lionsh. Imported lionsh not welcome in Florida Amberjack, gray triggersh reopen Aug.1 in Gulf state waters Special to The Star The recreational harvest of greater amberjack and gray triggersh in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) reopens Aug. 1. In Gulf federal waters, greater amberjack also will open Aug. 1, but gray triggersh will remain closed through Dec. 31. In both state and federal Gulf waters, greater amberjack must be larger than 30 inches when measured from the tip of the lower jaw to the fork of the tail to be harvested when the season is open. There is a daily bag limit of one sh per person. Gray triggersh must be larger than 14 inches when measured from the lower jaw to the fork of the tail to be taken in state and federal Gulf waters when the season is open. There is a two-sh daily bag limit per person. Seasonal harvest closures, as well as size and bag limits, help conserve Floridas valuable greater amberjack and gray triggersh populations and improve opportunities in these sheries for the future. Learn more about recreational shing at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on Saltwater and Recreational Regulations.

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Local The Star| A9 Thursday, July 31, 2014 roughly $1.3-$1.4 million. Earlier in the week commissioners made a lengthy series of cuts to the proposed budget, which essentially represented a wish list from department heads and constitutional of cers. Entering last Thursdays special meeting the tentative millage rate was up just over a quarter of a mill before commissioners, by a narrow majority in one instance, made adjustments and additions. The adjustment was downsizing revenue estimates out of EMS. Sherry Herring from the Clerk of Courts said she believed an estimate of $916,000 in revenue for EMS, which operates on run costs, was optimistic. I believe that revenue estimate is too high, Herring said. She recommended, based on history, that commissioners carve $200,000 off that number. Commissioners decided, at least for now, to bump the millage to accommodate the reduction in revenue projections. County administrator Don Butler said staff is still looking at the EMS budget for potential cuts and that proposals are due next month on privatization of ambulance service, either of which could mitigate the revenue adjustment. There is also an ongoing thorn for commissioners in the EMS budget the failure of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf to compensate for ambulance runs from that hospital to another facility. Discussions between the BOCC and Sacred Heart of cials have gone on for some 18 months, Commissioner Ward McDaniel said, without a resolution on those types of ambulance runs. We have an institution that uses this service that doesnt want to pay us, McDaniel said. We dont owe it to them. Its not right for us to foot the bill. County staff is recommending approaching the citizen board overseeing disbursement of the halfcent sales tax dollars collected to address care for the indigent and underinsured to take out $70,000 for this year and an equal amount for the coming year. Sacred Heart has argued before that very health board that sales tax collections are below projections found in an agreement between the hospital and county implementing the sales tax and that the hospital will lose some $6 million this year, county attorney Jeremy Novak said. Commissioners, by a 32 vote with Commissioners Tan Smiley and Carmen McLemore dissenting, also added $40,000 to the budget to hire a GIS consultant to begin the demographic study required to begin bringing the county into compliance on districting. That is the rst step suggested by a consultant if the BOCC seeks to bring back countywide voting. Last month consulting attorney Michael Spellman recommended the GIS study, by an independent GIS expert, to study of the countys demographics, urging the BOCC to take steps toward bringing the county into compliance with state laws on counting inmates as part of the population. Commissioners also expressed a desire to lobby for a legislative change to that mandate of counting inmates in state prisons within the county as part of the population. The BOCC, despite an Attorney General opinion on the issue, has ignored the mandate. We are out of compliance with state law, McDaniel said. Spellman said he would only be comfortable pursuing countywide voting, if the BOCC chose to pursue it, if the county was in compliance as far as district boundaries. Not only does the BOCC not count prisoners, but district populations are out of balance compared to the federal and state mandate that district populations be within 10 percent of the average of all ve. District 2, for example, has a population 15 percent higher than the mean while District 4, the countys majority-minority voting district, has a population nearly 30 percent below the mean, McDaniel noted. Compliance with state law, Spellman said, was essential for entering a federal courtroom to amend or overturn a federal decree mandating single-member districts. At some point we have to redistrict, said Commissioner Warren Yeager. It is part of what we are responsible to do. Weve got to bite the bullet. McLemore argued that there was no point expending money until a resolution on the inmate question was found by legislative at. Until we get it cleared up with the inmates we should leave that alone, Smiley said. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said voters had spoken on their desire for countywide voting and that three commissioners, indicating she, Yeager and McDaniel, ran on the issue. We need to move forward on this, Bryan said. *Commissioners also voted 4-1 (Bryan dissenting) to leave $46,750 in reimbursement money from the former Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. in the reserves for the new county-operated economic development. Bryan noted that was in addition to a budget of more than $187,000 for the department three times the amount the BOCC had budgeted for the EDA during the current year. The amount is more than double the full-year pledge to the former Economic Development Council prior to the formation of the EDA. Why would we fund this amount for economic development? Bryan wondered. She had earlier in the week asked that the proposed economic development department budget be pulled from a meeting agenda for additional analysis. Weve cut important services to the people of our county, she continued. We cut a lot of things that important to the people in the county. As you know I was against our taking back economic development. Government cant carry the full weight of economic development. There has to be private (participation). UP WA RD SO CC ER pr ek 6t h gr ad e Re gi st ra ti on fe e $6 0. 00 Ev al ua ti on s & Si gn Up Sa t. Au g. 2n d & Sa t Au g. 23 rd 9:0 0a m 12 :0 0p m Ho ne yv il le Pa rk So cce r Fi el d In th e ca se of ra in it wi ll be he ld at Gl ad Ti d in gs As sem bl y of Go d Fe ll ow sh ip Ha ll 1s t pr ac ti ce Se pt 2n d 1s t ga me Se pt 13 th la st ga me Oc t 25 th To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL WE WA HI TC HK A CI TY EL EC TI ON Th e Ci ty of We wa hi tc hk a wi ll hol d an ele ct io n on Se pt em be r 23 20 14 Ca nd id at es fo r CI TY CO MM IS SI ON WA RD II I AN D CI TY CO MM IS SI ON WA RD IV mu st qu al if y be tw ee n no on on Au gu st 26 th an d no on Se pt em be r 3, 20 14 Ce nt ra l Ti me Qu al if yi ng fe es ar e $3 7. 00 Re gi st ra ti on bo ok s fo r th is ele ct io n wi ll cl os e on Au gu st 25 20 14 5: 00 PM Ea st er n Ti me Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR MILLAGE from page A1 Anglers divided on red snapper amendment By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY A proposed amendment to split the recreational red snapper sector has caused a split among anglers in the Gulf region. The amendment, under consideration by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, proposes dividing the current recreational red snapper allocation between for-hire operators, which includes charter and head boats, and private recreational anglers who now share the same portion of the catch. Under current regulations, the red snapper catch is split between just two sectors, with 51 percent allotted to commercial anglers and 49 percent to recreational anglers. While most stakeholders agree something needs to be done to boost the number of shing days in federal waters this years recreational season was just nine days the opinions on how to get there are divided. The main purpose of this is to address the fact that the for-hire share of the catch has gone way down over the last ve years or so, said Roy Crabtree, Southeast regional administrator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries. Thats largely a result of state waters being opened up outside of the federal season. Despite a longer season in state waters this year, many charter boats were kept onshore due to a provision in the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the law that governs U.S. sheries management, that says federal for-hire permit holders can sh only when federal waters are open. I think theres general agreement among everyone that what were doing now is not working, Crabtree said. We need to nd a different way to manage the shery. If the Gulf Council chooses to move forward with sector separation, which would break out the roughly 1,300 boats that hold federal for-hire permits, it also would need to take action on how to split the quota and set the seasons. Additionally, the council will consider adopting an option for federal for-hire anglers to opt out and rejoin the private recreational sector. Beginning next month, the Gulf Council will host a series of public scoping meetings on the controversial issue, with one set in Panama City on Aug. 12. Crabtree said the council will discuss sector separation at its next meeting in Biloxi, Miss., on Aug. 25-29, but it is unlikely to make a decision before an October meeting in Mobile, Ala. While proponents of sector separation say it would give for-hire anglers more exible seasons and better accountability, those in opposition see it as an attempt to further restrict access to the resource by potentially requiring sh tags or catch-share programs similar to those used in the commercial red snapper shery. Ultimately, the Magnuson-Stevens Act will dictate how long recreational anglers can sh, regardless of how many sectors are split. By law, the shery must be shut down if the Gulf-wide recreational quota is met, even if one of the subsectors hasnt met its quota. Under current regulations, the red snapper catch is split between just two sectors, with 51 percent allotted to commercial anglers and 49 percent to recreational anglers.

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star .co m COURTESY OF MICHELLE KENDRICK A little surf shing at sunset on St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF NORMA FRASER She picked sea shells by the seashore COURTESY OF WAYNE TAYLOR A sailboat on St. Joseph Bay bobs in the setting sun COURTESY OF ESTHER ROSENTHAL Grandma, I dont want to leave. COURTESY OF LAURA AT DRAGONFLY PHOTOGRAPHY A glowing sun sets over the Port St. Joe Marina COURTESY OF SUSIE PITTS Sara and Savanna Hysmith show off the sh they snagged on The Brothers River while out with their greatgrandparents Mike and Pat Stripling of Wewahitchka COURTESY OF MELINA ELUM A sandpiper skips across St. Joe Beach COURTESY OF TERRY LIND A wide-angle shot of driftwood in St. Joseph Bay COURTESY OF STEVE AT KAYAK DOG ADVENTURES A man, his dog, his kayak and a gentle ride down the river

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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Whats the area called that has over 75% of the worlds active volcanoes? Gods Wrath, Ring of Fire, Lava Land, Flame Ridge 2) Which African country lies on the Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden? Sudan, Nigeria, Somalia, Egypt 3) What was the worlds 1st atomicpowered merchant ship? Savannah, Charleston, Roosevelt, Columbia 4) Which of these innovations came into being the earliest? Neon lights, Calculus, Stethoscope, Richter scale 5) What is ophidiophobia a fear of? Orthodontists, Shadows, Eagles, Snakes 6) How many U.S. states border the Pacic Ocean? 3, 4, 5, 6 7) What is the least populous state to have any sports team in either the NBA, NFL, NHL, or MLB? Utah, Wisconsin, Oregon, Arizona 8) Where was the birthplace of the International Red Cross? Sweden, Ireland, Switzerland, Florida 9) Whats the only play of Shakespeare to mention America? Comedy of Errors, Tempest, Macbeth, Hamlet 10) Which main river ows through Rome, Italy? Euphrates, Tiber, Danube, Nile ANSWERS: 1) Ring of Fire, 2) Somalia, 3) Savannah, 4) Calculus, 5) Snakes, 6) 5, 7) Utah, 8) Switzerland, 9) Comedy of Errors, 10) Tiber By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Independence Fund be gan with a chair. A new advisory board now in cludes a sister. Port St. Joe resident Brenda Garth, president of the Semper Fi Sisters, was recently named to the advisory board of the Miamibased The Independence Fund, a volunteer organization that strives to provide tools and thera pies to assist injured veterans. In addition, Semper Fi Sisters, which began seven years in Port St. Joe and has blossomed into a nationwide network of hundreds of wives, mothers, sisters, aunts and grandmothers of members of the military, was named one of two ofcial non-prot partners of The Independence Fund. The advisory board was cre ated to help guide The Indepen dence Funds strategic direction and will undertake an array of projects, especially helping to plan and coordinate the upcom ing Lt. Dan Weekend in Charles ton, SC. In addition to Garth, Blair Hughes of Hartford, CT (a wound ed veterans wife), Jane Horton of Washington, D.C. (Hortons hus band was killed in combat), Sarah Verardo of Charlotte, NC (her husband was severely injured in battle) and Capt. John Woodall of North Carolina (a wounded veter an) were named board members. We are extremely honored to have these leaders on board with us, said Steve Luker Dany luk, the president and founder of the Independence Fund. They represent a broad spectrum of advocates and expertise in the military and wounded veteran community. Collectively their voices will help guide Indy Fund into the next chapter as we continue to offer initiatives and programs to best serve our nations most de serving population our severely injured veterans. Garth had already been tabbed, along with Hughes, to as sist the Fund to reconstruct, or ganize and produce the annual WES LOCHER | The Star The next Salt Air Farmers Market will be held on Saturday, Aug. 2, at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmers Market promotes a sustainable food system on Floridas Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Celebrate a healthy life. On Friday, the Wewahitchka Medical Cen ter will hold a Back to School Health Fair at the facility from 2-4 p.m. CT. The annual event, which is open to the public, will feature 18 vendors and offer free medical screenings for blood pressure, pulse oxygen, body mass, vision and hearing. These free health screenings could make you aware of an issue that could be a concern, said center manager Katrina Saunders. Last years health fair welcomed 180 mem bers of the community through the door and this year is poised to be equally successful. Kids are invited to try a clean hands screening where they wash with a special soap that shows missed areas when exposed to a black light. Children in grades K-12 will receive a free backpack with school sup plies, including glue sticks, pencils, pens and By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Paws for celebration. Last Wednesday, the Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability (DAWGS in Prison) program, based out of the Gulf Forestry Camp in White City, graduated its 34th class. The program, a partnership be tween the Florida Department of Corrections, the Board of County Commissioners and the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, provides in mates the opportunity work as train ers for the rescued dogs, teaching the animals basic obedience skills and making them adoptable. In the ve years since the pro grams inception, 355 dogs have grad uated the program and 398 inmates have learned the skills of compassion, patience, tolerance and teamwork, all of which will aid them in securing em ployment upon release. During each class dogs are brought from the humane society in Port St. Joe to spend eight weeks with a group of inmate trainers, handlers and caretakers. If our dogs could talk, they would marvel at the compassion and atten tion they receive here, said DAWGS co-director Sandi Christy during her graduation speech where she ad dressed inmates, volunteers and adopters. They would tell us they nally have a purpose and enjoy learning new things. Once the commencement cer emony was complete, the dogs were reintroduced to their new families for COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, July 31, 2014 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com SALT AIR F ARMERS MARKET Changing lives for injured veterans Semper Fi Sisters president named to Independence Fund board See FUND B9 S PECIA L T O THE ST AR LEFT : Scout was adopted by the Hughes family from Massachusetts. RIGHT: Trio was adopted by the Noles family from Panama City. Canine commencement FI L E PHO T O The Wewahitchka Medical Center will hold a Back to School Health Fair on Friday and celebrate the facilitys 10th anniversary. Wewa medical center to hold health fair Friday See F AIR B9 DAWGS in Prison graduates Class 34 See DA WGS B9 If our dogs could talk, they would marvel at the compassion and attention they receive here. Sandi Christy DAWGS co-director

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 Scoo te r is a 8m o 60l bs La b/ Mi x. He wa lks en er get ic al ly on hi s le as h, is cra te tr ai ne d an d cra ve s at te nt ion Sc o ot er lo ve s ki ds an d adu lts an d lo ve s to pla y wi th t he m. He wo ul d mak e a gr ea t fa mi ly pe t fo r an ac ti ve fa mi ly Sc o ot er get s al ong wit h hi s do gg ie fr ie nd s bu t is st ill un sur e of ca ts. If yo u ar e una bl e to ado pt at th is ti me pe rh aps yo u co ul d fo st er or mak e a Do nat ion Al l pe ts adop te d fr om SJ BH S wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc inat io ns an d spa ye d/ ne ut er ed Pl ea se do n ot he sit at e to em ai l tow nse nd hsd ire ct or @g mai l. co m or ado ptb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 7-1 10 3 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il abl e at www .s jb hu mane soc iet y. or g Sh el te r hou rs : Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur sd ay -S at urd ay fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e. OF THE WEEK PET If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty St. Joseph Ba y Humane Society www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! Fr ee S ch oo l S up pl ie s for 350 S tu de nt s Fr ee H ea lt h S cr ee ni ng s for E ve ry on e A or da bl e, Q ua li ty C ar e, Fr om P eo pl e W ho C ar e AC CEPTIN G NE W P AT IENT S 850-639-5828 Nor th Florida Medical Centers Inc MEDI CAL CEN T ER W ew ahitchka Ba ck to Sc ho ol He al th Fa ir Au gus t 1, 2:00-4:00 p. m. CD T Society VFW seeks Korean War veterans The John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 is asking all Korean War Veterans who served from June 25, 1950 through July 27, 1953 and veterans who participated in U.N. Peace-keeping operations until the end of 1955 to complete an application for the Republic of Korea Ambassador for Peace medal. The application form can be obtained from VFW Post 10069 located at 1774 Trout Ave. in Highland View. You must provide a copy of your discharge papers to be attached to the application. Deadline for submission is Sept. 10. POC for this award is David E. Kelly, Jr., Veterans Service Ofcer of VFW Post 10069. Please contact David Kelly with questions at 227-5023. Amateur radio license exams Amateur radio license exams will be given at 10 a.m. ET Aug. 16 at the Emergency Operations Center in Port St. Joe. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade an existing license. An amateur radio license can put you in contact with the world. If you need information, assistance or to register for an exam contact C.H. Tillis (AJ4xJ) at 648-8251. American Legion Post 116 meeting There will be a general session American Legion Post 116 meeting at 4 p.m. ET, Thursday, July 31. The meeting will be held at the VFW Post 10069 on Trout Avenue in Highland View. Members are urged to attend. Eligibility for membership and benets can be found on the American Legion website: http://www.legion.org/. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. For God and Country. Ashley McCrae Stephens, Nichole Stone engaged Arden and Susan Stephens of Tallahassee, formerly of Port St. Joe are pleased to announce the engagement of their son, Ashley McCrae to Nichole Stone. She is the daughter of Robert Stone of Sneads, Florida and Katherine Stone of Tallahassee, Florida. Nichole is the granddaughter of Joanne Stone and the late Robert Stone of Sneads, Florida and the late Larry Jackson and Joyce Baker. Ashley is the grandson of the late Emory and Ruby Stephens and the late Ralph and Mamie (Harper) Dupree. Nichole is a 2006 graduate of Leon High School. She completed her certication in Dental Assisting from Tallahassee Community College in 2010 and then went on to graduate with an Associate of Science degree in Dental Hygiene. Nichole currently practices as a Dental Hygienist at Family Dentistry of Southwood in Tallahassee, Florida. Ashley is a 2000 graduate of Port St. Joe High School. He attended Flagler College where he earned a B.A. degree in Business Administration. Ashley is currently employed with the State Board of Administration in Tallahassee, Florida. Ashley and Nichole are planning a March wedding. Engagement Special to The Star The Corrine Costin Gibson Memorial Library in Port St. Joe will offer Tales on Tuesdays for the little ones weekly beginning Sept. 9. Children from 9 months to preschoolers are welcome to join us every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. ET for stories, games, and fun. This will be a parent/child activity that helps develop a love for books and literacy. Please make plans to join us! The Charles Whitehead Public Library in Wewahitchka will offer their After School Program for school-aged children at 3:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month beginning Aug. 12. They also offer Wee Read for preschoolers every Monday at 11 a.m. During the rst two weeks of August, the library in Port St. Joe will be holding a book sale featuring mysteries and young adult selections. Teachers should stop in to stock up on some great bargains. We will also have lots of magazines (such as National Geographic) to help your student projects get off to a great start. And theres a selection of free Readers Digest Condensed Books for the taking-anyone interested? Keep your eyes and ears open for a guest author at the end of September. Bestselling Florida author Tim Dorsey will be at the Port St. Joe location at 3:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 30 to talk to his fans on this edge of the coast. Hell sign and sell books and other Serge-related memorabilia. Check out his hilarious books, including his latest, Tiger Shrimp Tango, at the library. The library in Wewahitchka will serve as a site for early voting from Aug. 16-23 in the conference room. The Corrine Costin Gibson Memorial Library is at 110 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, 229-8879. The Charles Whitehead Public Library is at 314 N. 2nd St. in Wewahitchka, 639-2419. By TRACI GADDIS Special to The Star Diane McKeithen has worn many hats in her life, wife, mother, teacher, grandmother but most recently she has added published author to her list. In the late nineties Diane could be found behind a desk at Port St. Joe High School where she taught English, Public Speaking and Drama for six years. She is also the wife of former Gulf County Sheriff Frank McKeithen. The family relocated to Panama City and Diane continued to teach until her retirement in 2010. After retirement Diane toyed with the idea of writing a book.just for herself.just for her own pleasure. The book she thought she would write and the book that she ended up writing became two entirely different books. I was writing a short story about the ending of technology, she said and she had a working title: In An Instant, but when I sat down to write, chapter by chapter started to emerge. At one point Diane had absolutely no idea where the storyline was going. This went on and off for over a year. By the end of the year she had an intriguing rst draft and a tale of survival, life challenges, loss and rebuilding. There were still no plans to publish it but after her husband read the rst draft he strongly encouraged her to get the book published. At rst it was thought that maybe she would just get it in book form for her children and grandchildren something to leave to them. After speaking with her friend Ruth Corley this changed as she quickly learned how and where to get help to self-publish. Rewriting is the most important part of writing a book, Diane told me. The teacher had become the student. She now had a great respect for her students who she would make write and rewrite their papers. A classy cover was selected for the book. A sweet dedication was written, mentioning all of the students and all of the schools where Diane taught. Editing was completed and the book headed for Kindle sales and printing. Diane said she was so scared I have never felt so vulnerable in my life knowing that her work would be out there for people to like or criticize and then wondering if anyone was actually going to read it was constantly weighing on her mind. The day her book arrived was an emotional time for Diane. It was amazing, I felt like I was somebody, she said. A dream come true that I didnt even know I had. Then came the book signings and TV and newspaper interviews and the realization that yes, people did want to buy and read her book. She had fans and readers like myself who wanted to know when they reached the end of the book.. What happens to Toni and Chase now? Is Mrs. Owens alive? What is happening in the nearby towns? Okay here is an exclusive just for you but dont say I told youthere is in fact another book being written and a sequel to that one is highly possible. The sequel would merge the two books together for a third and nal book. Probably one of Dianes biggest fans is Ali Edmunds, her daughter who told me, I am so proud of her. I hope to run into a complete stranger one day who is reading her book. I have a feeling that Alis hope will very soon be realized. Library news: story times, book sale and a famous author Society BRIEFS W ANT TO GO? Diane McKeithen will be signing copies of her new book in Port St. Joe on Saturday. For an opportunity to meet Diane, purchase a copy of her book, or just say hello, she will be at the No Name Caf, 325 Reid Ave., from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET Aug. 2. For additional information, call 229-9277. Diane McKeithen talks rst book S P E C I AL TO T HE ST A R Diane McKeithen and a young fan at a book signing in Bay County.

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The Star| B3 Thursday, July 31, 2014 The Gulf Co as t State Colleg e Fo undatio n is pr oud to announc e it s 20 14 -2 015 Gener al and En do we d sc holar ship re cipient s. Ou r mis sion is to pr ov ide sc holar ship support to st udent s who ar e at te nding, or planning to at te nd, Gulf Co as t St at e Co lleg e. Th e Fo undation specializ es in se rving re ce nt high sc hool gr aduat es as we ll as adult s, by pr ov iding funding in the fo rm of tuition as sis ta nc e and book vo ucher s. The Fo undation is co mmit te d to the belie f that ev er y de se rving st udent, or pot ential st udent, merit s a chanc e to co ntinue his or her edu ca tion. The se sc holar ship opportunitie s wo uld not be po ss ible without the co ntinuing nancial support of our co mmunit y donor s. On behalf of the Fo undation Bo ar d of Dir ect or s, we wo uld lik e to thank our donor s fo r their co mmitment to help our co mmunit y and we co ngr atulat e all of our 20 14 -2 015 re cipient s. Commitment to education Dr Jame s Ander son Fo undation Pr es ident Mar gie Mazur Ex ecutiv e Dir ect or 20 14 -2 015 GU LF AND FRANKLIN CO UNTIE S SC HOL AR SHIP RE CIPIENT S Gabrielle Anthon y, Wi lliam Ba ile y, Sierr a Ba ke r, Andr ew Bidw ell, Ja ko b Bidw ell, Kris te n Burk et t, Am y Butler Camer on But ts Kat elyn Calv ar ese Ashle y Carr oll, Annalis a Childr es s, Carle y Clement s, Chels ea Cook, Homer Dav is, Ro bert Dyk es Jo shua Epp s, La vo niy a Fa ulk, Sheno ya Fe nnell, Mor ga n Fisher Ann a Gaskin, Jenn y Gibbens, Rhonda Gibb s, Ke vi n Gib so n, Bry ce Godwin, Mik aleh Gr aham, Aly ss a Gr aziano Ro se Griffin, Br andon Hall, Ta bitha Har dy Ja mie He ath, AnMar ee He ss Jus tin Hit es Laur a Ho we ll, Allis on Ho wz e, Mat the w Ho wz e, Sha wn Jenkins, Connie Jens en, Laur en Jone s, Abriale Ke mp Katherine Ke nningt on, Brit ta ny King Gr ac yn Kirvin, Gr aham Kirvin, Chris tian Laine Cailyn LaPlant e, Ja me s Le st er Ka yla Linds ey Mat the w Ludlam, Le xie McGhee Tr ent McGill, Tr ey McGill, Ang ela Mer cado Ke ls ey Mile s, St ev en Odom, Te vis Pa ge Aly ss a Pa rk er Brit tnee Pe ak, Br ook Pit tman, Mar chelle Pr yo r, Shakinah Quinn, Sa wy er Ra ffield, Cathlyn Ro ble s, Brhiannan Scrugg s, Ke lv er SIlie za r, Br adlee Sinor Lac ey Strickland, Bry anna Stuart, Ty moth y Stuart, Dav id Thomas, To ri Thomas, Brit ta nie Thomp so n, Chels ey To ne y, Le a Ve nable Le onar d Wa rd Gr ant Whit en, Ja mie Whitfield, Anna WIlc ox Katie Wo od, Ka yla Wo od, Lilly Wr ight, Ra heem Wr ight, Shatiar a Za cc ar o, Kar a Zu cc i 850 .8 72 .381 0 or 850 .8 72 .3862 www .g cscf oundation. or g Title I orientation at Port St. Joe Elementary Port St. Joe Elementary School will hold Title I orientation for parents/ guardians and their children Aug. 14-15. From 2-2:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 14, orientation for pre-K will be held. The schedule for Friday, Aug. 15 is as follows: Kindergarten: 8-8:30 a.m. First grade: 9-9:30 a.m. Second grade: 10-10:30 a.m. Third grade: 11-11:30 a.m.; Fourth grade: noon to 12:30 p.m. Fifth grade: 1-1:30 p.m. Sixth grade: 2-2:30 p.m. Parents/guardians are asked to bring their childs supplies to his/her homeroom teacher. PreK and kindergarten registration Parents of students entering Pre-K or kindergarten at a public school in the full is urged to register their child as soon as possible. Port St. Joe Elementary School is open 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday and may be contacted at 227-1221 for more information. Wewahitchka Elementary School is open 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT Monday through Thursday and can be contacted at 639-2476. School News POR T S T JO E JR./SR. H I G H SC H OOL OPE N HOU SE : Seventh and eighth grade open house will be noon until 1 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Aug. 13. Open House for ninth through 12th grade will be 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. ETon Thursday, Aug. 14. VOLL E YBALL: Volleyball practice begins 3 p.m. EDT on Monday, Aug. 4. Tryouts will start Wednesday. All players must have a valid physical form EL2, Consent and release form EL3 and concussion and heat related illness form EL3CH. Players will NOT be allowed to practice or tryout without these forms. S E N I OR POR T RA ITS : Senior portraits are scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 13-14. Scheduling information has already been mailed home. If you have not received information concerning your scheduled date and time for portraits and sitting fees, call the photographer in Panama City at 769-6277. Special to The Star Choosing a school for your child is one of the most important decisions you will ever make. If a family atmosphere with nurturing teachers and a stimulating, God-based curriculum is what you are looking for, then Faith Christian School is the place for you. Interactive learning will be a part of your childs day, along with Spanish classes for all grades. Discovery learning days are incorporated into the academic year, and technology classes enhance the elementary program. Your child will experience academic excellence through Godly instruction. Faith Christian has a website (www. FaithChristianPSJ.net). Please take a few minutes and browse through our different links. Communication with teachers will be available through this site as well as the latest news. Faith Christian school is taking applications for new students. Partial scholarship opportunities for tuition are available for K5 through the eighth grade. Contact the ofce at 229-6707 to ensure your childs spot. The Lions Tale Special to The Star The Jessie Ball duPont Fund recently awarded the Gulf Coast State College Foundation a $46,120 grant from the Port St. Joe Capacity Building Fund to finance a counselor position at the Gulf/Franklin Campus. At the Jessie Ball duPont Fund, we are very interested in helping young people access higher education and be successful, said Sherry Magill, president of the Fund. Having counselors in place who can serve as guides for students greatly increases the likelihood that students will stay in school and complete their education. The new counselor at the Gulf/Franklin Campus will provide academic, personal and financial counseling to students to improve success and retention. The counselor will also conduct workshops and group sessions designed to provide students with the skills needed to be successful in college and in their careers. The grant also includes funding for field trips and conferences in order to provide Gulf/Franklin students with a broader array of experiences. We are very excited about the addition of a counselor to our team at the Gulf/Franklin Campus, said Loretta Costin, Director of the Gulf/Franklin Campus. With this addition, we will be able to provide increased support to our students and we are thankful for their continued support. The Gulf Coast State College Foundation and the Jessie Ball duPont Fund continue to partner in their vision to provide Gulf and Franklin County students academic support and opportunities to achieve success, said Margie Mazur, Executive Director, GCSC Foundation. The Foundations core mission is to provide educational opportunities for students and this project is one that will ensure student success. GCSC Foundation awarded grant for counselor at Gulf/Franklin Campus School BRIEFS

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SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net Cu mb aa Mo nu me nt s, In c. Se rvi ng NW Fl or id a Si nc e 1963 JA MES (J R) GR OV ER Ph : 850-674-8449 Ce ll : 850-899-0979 jrg ro v@ms n.c om Bl ou nt st ow n, FL 32424 Cu mb aa Mo nu men ts has be en at 19041 Sr 20 We st Bl ou ns to wn for 50+ Ye ar s. We ta ke p ride in hel pi ng yo u wi th se le ct in g the ri gh t mo nu men t for yo ur lo ve d on e. So co me by or gi ve us a ca ll or we wil l co me by you r ho me, gr av es it e, et c. SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. FAITH Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Overcoming childhood pain explored at Lifetree Caf Special to The Star How to overcome child hood pain will be discussed at 7 p.m. CDT Monday, Aug. 4, at Lifetree Caf. The program features the lmed story of Delisa Mayer, whose family took part in an ill-fated university study dur ing Mayers childhood. The outcome of that study to introduce a new born chimpanzee into the family and raise it as a hu man child shaped May ers childhood and led to her parents divorce. Our family was torn up, Mayer said. It was a hard thing to live through. Admission to the 60-min ute event is free. Snacks and beverages are avail able. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Gov ernor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for con versation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions can be di rected to Gary Grubb at 334806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. From staff reports Learn How to Tame your Dragon at VBS Oak Grove Church will host Vacation Bible School, under the title How to Tame your Dragon, from 6 to 8 p.m. EDT Aug. 4-8. This is for children kindergarten through fth grade. Join us for a week of food, games, music and learning how to tame the dragons the devil likes to send our way. It will be a week you will not want your child to miss. OBITUARIES Ruthann DeGraff of Wewahitchka went to be with Jesus on July 1. She was born on Oct. 17, 1972 in Stuart, Fla., Ruthann was preceded in death by her father, Lewis Ernest DeGraff of Clarksville; niece Melody Neel of Wewahitchka; maternal grandparents Coy and Elizabeth Vance; paternal grandparents Robert and Ruth DeGraff; Uncles Evan Vance of Balto, M.D., George DeGraff of Calif., Samuel DeGraff of Stuart, Gary Hinton of Fort White.; Aunt Louise Zachos of Balto. She is survived by her mother Anne DeGraff of Wewahitchka; sisters, Louann Naylor (Billy) and Georgeann Baker (Larry), both of Wewahitchka; brother, Tim DeGraff (Kim) of Port St. Joe; stepmother Barbara De Graff of Clarksville; stepbrother Nathan Wingham of Clarksville; special friend, Donna Hyatt of Stuart; and a very special aunt, Evelyn King of S.C., along with numerous cousins, nieces and nephews. Ruthann DeGraff Mrs. Virginia Jenny C. Richardson, 85, of Port St. Joe, went to be with her Lord and Savior on Saturday, July 26, 2014. Mrs. Jenny was born Feb. 9, 1929, in St. Petersburg, Fla., to Edward and Lillian Collier. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, Fla. Mrs. Jenny loved her family and church family. She was preceded in death by her husband, R.B. Richardson. Mrs. Jenny is survived by her two sons, David Richardson and wife, Stephanie, of Port St. Joe, Fla., and Barry Richardson and wife, Julie, of Pisgah Forest, N.C.; sister, Mary Lou Ison and husband, Dick, of Orlando, Fla.; ve grandchildren, Jeremy Richardson, Chris Richardson and wife, Karen; Jason Richardson and wife, Elisha, Jonathan Richardson and Traci Naff and husband, David; and great-grandchildren, Mia and Josiah Richardson. A funeral was at 3 p.m. EDT Wednesday, July 30, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe with the Rev. Bruce Hodge, the Rev. Buddy Caswell, and the Rev. David Nichols ofciating. In lieu of owers, family request donations to be made to the Gideons for Bibles in Jennys name. Virginia Jenny C. Richardson Kathy Childs Little, 59, of Mexico Beach, Florida died July 25, 2014 at her beach home. She is survived by her husband of 11 years Lanny Ray Little, one daughter, Leslie Hall (Brent) of Marianna, Fla.; aunt, Peggy Thomas of Panama City, Fla.; brother, Philip ( Betsy) Childs of Folkston, Ga.; and nephew, Michael (Janine) Childs of Atlanta, Ga. Kathy was known as Katkee to her two grandchildren, Madison Hall of Marianna, Fla., and Brody Little of Wewahitchka, Fla. She also had two great-nephews Bobby and Jackson Childs of Atlanta, Ga. She is preceded in death by her father Robert Bobby Childs, mother Leslie Jenny Childs of Marianna, Fla., and stepson Jared Little of Port St. Joe, Fla. Kathy was born in Marianna, Fla., on March 19, 1955, but lived in Grand Ridge, Fla., and Graceville, Fla., until her family moved to Marianna where she grew up. She graduated from Marianna High School in 1973, she then went to Judson College in Marion, Ala., where she earned her bachelors Degree in elementary education with a Minor in Art. Kathy then went on to earn her masters degree in education from Troy University. Later on in her career as a teacher she decided to go back to school where she attended Florida State University where she earned her specialist degree in administration and educational Leadership. Kathy started her teaching career in Baker Hill, Ala.,, then moved to Pensacola, Fla., for a few years until she moved back to Marianna, Fla. She was a teacher at Cottondale Elementary and then went to F.M. Golson Elementary where she taught for the remainder of her career, while there she taught computer lab, art and many different grades. Every chance Kathy had during her lifetime she loved being at the beach. Kathy also had a love for Art and could draw or paint anything. She will greatly be missed by her family and all her friends. Her celebration of life service will be Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014, at 10 a.m. CST on Mexico Beach, Fla. Family and friends will meet at the 6th Street beach access walk-down to celebrate her life. We ask in lieu of owers that donations be made to Jackson County Education Foundation-Backpack for Kids in memory of Kathy Childs Little. Please send donations to: Backpack for Kids c/o Mary Nell Grifn, P.O. Box 225, Alford, FL 32420. To extend condolences, visit www.heritagefhllc. com. Kathy Childs Little Special to The Star The First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe will host a blood drive from 1 to 6 p.m. EDT Monday, Aug. 4. All donors will receive a beach towel and wellness checkup including blood pressure, temperature, iron count and cholesterol screening. Those who donate blood two times between May 1 and Aug. 31 will receive a free lunch offer courtesy of Outback Steakhouse and be entered to win Outback for a year. Make an appointment online at www.oneblooddonor.org and use sponsor code #G7016. Summer blood drive set for Aug. 4 at First Baptist

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Faith/Local The Star| B5 Thursday, July 31, 2014 Real Es ta te Pi cks Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast Th is co tt ag es ty le ho me is gre at fo rs it ti ng ba ck an d re la xing wi th th eg ul fb re ez es .E ac hd ec kh as ad if fe re nt vi ew :o ne of Gu lf of Me xic o, one of St .J oe Ba y. Co mpl et ely fu rn is he da nd fr es hly pa int ed ,t hi so pen o or pl an is ful ly fur ni she da nd ve ry spaci ou s. Go od re nt al po te nt ia l. La rg e op en de ck an ds cr ee ne dp or ch .S pac iou sg ar age an d st ora ge ar ea on gr ou nd le ve l. 850-227-8890 /8 50-227-7770 www .coastalr eal tyinfo. com Th er ei sp le nt yo fr oo mw it h4 be dro om s, 4. 5b at hs 850-227-8890 /8 50-2277770 www .coastalr eal tyin fo.com Oak Grove Daycare expands The Oak Grove Church Daycare is proud to announce the start of our new 3K program for the 2014-2015 school year. We have only a few spots available for children for this year. With the expansion of our daycare, part-time teaching positions are available immediately. If you are interested in joining our team, call Kristy at 227-4320 or stop by 613 Madison to apply. Make someones day You never know what a smile might do. If you have any spares, give away a few. You might make someones day, Youll surely get back a few. Youre bound to feel much better, after the day is through. To speak a kind word has been known to lift one up. So smile, speak kindly, and overow someones cup. Billy Johnson Back to school concert scheduled at FUMC Special to The Star First United Methodist of Port St Joe will be hosting a Community Back-toSchool event Aug. 16. The church has secured the Christian alternative rock band Remedy Drive to headline this event. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. EDT, and the show closes at 9 p.m. EDT. Remedy Drive has recorded six albums. They have toured the Rock and Worship Roadshow, with artists such as David Crowder Band, Mercy Me, Family Force 5, Fee, and Sidewalk Prophets. The Remedy Drive song Hope was used for the Vancouver Olympic Games commercial in 2009 and 2010. Tickets for the event are $8 in advance and $10 at the door. All proceeds will be divided up between Imagine No Malaria and The Exodus Road. FUMCs desire is to reach every middle/high school student in our area and extended areas. Come and help support two amazing causes. For more information, call 850-227-1724. For online tickets, go to http://bit. ly/portstjoe. Department of Health launches worksite wellness By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The Department of Health urges a healthy county, and the practice must start at home. Coinciding with the start of the new scal year, the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County has implemented a worksite wellness program for its employees. The Department of Health and North Florida Child Development Center volunteered to move for ward with the one-year pilot program, which began in July and will last through June 2015. Upon the pro grams completion, Commu nity Health I m provement Partners (CHIP) will evalu ate the results. The pro gram also was selected as a Healthiest Weight Florida strategy which aims to in crease the percentage of adults at a healthy weight. In May, members of the CHIP invited Gulf Countys largest employers to the worksite wellness seminar, hosted by Biz Fit Wellness, a corporate program based at Big Bend Health Education Center. The pro gram assists employees in making voluntary behav ioral changes, which help reduce health and injury risk, improve health con sumer skills and enhance individual productivity and well-being. With a worksite well ness program, healthy op portunities are available for employees to create a bet ter balance between work and home life, said Marsha Lindeman, administrator for the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County. We hope to develop and sustain a wellness culture in the workplace that in creases lifestyle change success. Biz Fit will provide health risk assessments for all em ployees, including biometric screenings, access to a well ness online portal to track progress and read about the benets of behavioral changes and a tobacco ces sation program. Individualized health plans also will guide em ployees. These plans are implemented with the as sistance of a wellness coach who will provide a minimum of four one-hour sessions to each enrolled employee per contract year. Program activities will be evaluated for employee satisfaction, participation, improvement in knowledge, intent to change behavior and actual changes in be havior and health risk. Internal resources will be coordinated by Educa tion Program Manager Sarah Hinds, who recently completed training to be come a certied worksite wellness specialist and will coordinate voluntary ac tivities including 30-minute lunch and learns focused on various health topics, walking meetings to en courage physical activity, an exercise video library available to employees during their break times or lunch hour, stretch and ex times throughout scheduled during the day to remind employees to get up from their desks and blood pressure stations for avail able to employees. The Department of Health and North Florida Child Development are very excited to move forward with the wellness program, Hinds said. Providing health-focused opportuni ties and support services at the worksite will hopefully improve the quality of life for all employee participants. According to the Nation al Wellness Institute, more than one-third of deaths can be attributed to low physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use and poor diet. Last year, medical costs of obesity in the U.S. were estimated at $147 billion while costs re lated to diabetes were esti mated at $174 billion and $58 billion was spent in indirect costs attributed to disability, work loss and premature mortality. Much of the country works eight-hour jobs be hind desks with little mobili ty throughout the day which can lead to health issues. The goal of the program is to bring those statistics down in Gulf County. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH A group tasked with paving the way for allocating bil lions of dollars in Deepwa ter Horizon oil spill nes has moved one step closer to putting those dollars to work. The Gulf Coast Eco system Restoration Coun cil moved forward with a submission and evaluation process for Gulf of Mexico restoration projects Friday, opening the door for the council to receive propos als as soon as next month, with evaluation and selec tion to be completed later in the fall. Established by the 2012 RESTORE Act, the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restora tion Council is chaired by the secretary of the U.S. of Department of Commerce and also includes repre sentatives from ve other federal agencies and gov ernor-appointed represen tatives from each of the ve states affected by the 2010 oil spill. Together, the council is responsible for developing a comprehensive restora tion plan using a portion of the Clean Water Act nes and other civil and admin istrative penalties imposed on BP. Under the RESTORE Act, 80 percent of civil nes from the spill will be used for restoration projects in the ve Gulf States. Of those dollars, which will be channeled into the Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund, 30 percent will be al located to the council. Currently included in the trust fund is $1 billion Transocean Ltd. paid out last year for the companys involvement in the spill. Fines against BP will be determined in the third and nal phase of the civil trial against BP, set to begin in January. Two years after the pas sage of the RESTORE Act, and four years after the ex plosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, the council is well-positioned to begin the process of selecting restoration projects, said Council Executive Director Justin Ehrenwerth. These foundational steps serve to expedite our ability to fund ecosystem restoration projects as funds become available. HOW IT WORKS Last August the council adopted an Initial Compre hensive Plan, a document that provides an overarch ing list of goals and priori ties geared at revitalizing and restoring the Gulfs environment and economy. Any entity or the gen eral public can submit res toration project ideas, but they must be sponsored by a council member to be considered. Projects will be selected based on merit, with a vet ting process that includes an independent science review and provides for co ordination with other res toration efforts. According to the council, the process will give the highest prior ity to projects that meet one or more restoration priorities. The council will publish a draft list for public com ment next year outlining projects that will be funded using the available Trans ocean settlement money. This process is the most efcient and respon sible way to honor the requirements of the RE STORE Act, Ehrenwerth said. It will also assure the public that the selected projects are grounded in the best available science, have a positive impact on the natural resources of the Gulf, and provide transpar ency as the council applies consistent and objective criteria during the selec tion process. Kara Lankford, interim director of Ocean Conser vancys Gulf Restoration Program, applauded the council for developing a science-based evaluation system. Ocean Conservancy has been one of the stron gest supporters for a science-based platform for successful Gulf res toration, Lankford said. Thanks to the actions tak en by the council proj ects to restore the Gulf will be chosen based on merit, not on politics. Serving all of Gulf and Fr anklin Counties Pr ev entati ve Maintenance Email us at inf o@portstjoeac.com www .portstjoeac.com 2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. Wa lton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE PA RKING Concealed We apons Class Sat/Sun 11 am or 2pm Floridagunshows.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 Pa nama Ci ty Fa irgr ounds AU GUS T 9th & 10 th PA NA MA RO OF IN G si nc e 19 20 Bond ed In su re d SU MME R SA LE 20 % OF F AL L Res id en ti al Ro o ng 85 026 511 51 Fl or ida 's Ol de st Ro o ng Fi rm Re -R oo f Sp ec ia li st FL LI C CCC 13 29 654 Ki ds Wi n To ur na me nt FR EE to Re gis te r at th e Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na Fi rs t 35 0 Ki ds Ge t a Ro d & Re el Ta ck le & a Go od y Ba g! Fr id ay Au gu st 1s t Si gn in 3p m 6: 30 pm ES T Sa tu rd ay Au gu st 2n d Fi sh in g Co mm en ce s at 7: 00 am ES T We ig h in 10 am 12 pm ES T www .K id sW in Fi shi ng .c om Do na ti on s Ac ce pt ed AN EXCITING SALES OPPORTUNITY IN THE NEWS HERALD, WORKING ON: To apply send resume to LGrimes@pcnh.com. Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check The News Herald is seeking a Sales Support Coordinator The ideal candidate will need: St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR Sacred Heart to host new-volunteer orientation Aug. 15 Special to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will host a newvolunteer orientation for community-minded individu als who want to become a volunteer at the hospital. The orientation session will be held 1-4 p.m. ET on Friday, Aug. 15 in the conference room at Sacred Heart. At the core of the Sacred Hearts long and proud tra dition of caring for the sick, the poor, the aged and the vulnerable, stands a group of volunteers whose willing hearts and helping hands have served generations of families during their time of need. Today, volunteer roles within the hospital include greeting visitors, escorting and assisting guests, as well as helping with special projects throughout the hospital. Sacred Heart volunteers share a sense of pride in the service they provide to the families who seek care at our door. Some volunteers work a few hours a week, while others serve a few days a week. Several volunteers are needed to provide assistance in the gift shop, physical therapy, and at the welcome desk, on shifts that range from morning to evening seven days a week. The rewards of volunteering are as individual as each volunteer, and all volunteers enjoy meal vouchers, free u vaccines and an open invitation to participate in Sacred Hearts special events. For more information about volunteer opportuni ties at the hospital, please contact Sharon Abele at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, at (850) 225-8134 or sabele@shhpens.org. For more information about Sa cred Heart, visit www.sacredheartonthegulf.org Sacred Heart establishes community councils to advise on enhanced care Special to The Star Sacred Heart Health System has added a fourth Pa tient & Family Advisory Council (PFAC) with the addi tion of an Advisory Council at The Childrens Hospital at Sacred Heart in Pensacola. The Council helps advise the hospital on ways it can enhance patient care. Patient & Family Advisory Councils now provide in put at the following Sacred Heart facilities: *Sacred Heart Hospital Pensacola, with Geri Sav age as chair; *The Childrens Hospital at Sacred Heart in Pen sacola, with Theresa Chmiel as chair; *Sacred Heart Hospital on the Emerald Coast in Mi ramar Beach, with George Hendrix as chair; and *Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe, with Martha Sandford as chair. We want to give our patients and family members a voice in making decisions and plans that affect them, says Ann Erickson, RN, Patient/Staff Advocate. Our goal is to improve the healthcare of our community, so it makes sense to include the community in how we provide healthcare. The purpose of the Advisory Council is to: *Ensure care at Sacred Heart is patient/family centered. *Bring patient/family needs and concerns to the hospitals staff and leadership. *Improve patient and family satisfaction. *Guide the hospitals priorities and planning. *Further build a positive relationship between the hospital and members of the community. For more information about any of Sacred Hearts Patient & Family Advisory Councils, please contact Ann Erickson at 850-416-7000. Restoration Council OKs RESTORE process Two years after the passage of the RESTORE Act, and four years after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, the council is well-positioned to begin the process of selecting restoration projects. These foundational steps serve to expedite our ability to fund ecosystem restoration projects as funds become available. Council Executive Director Justin Ehrenwerth F I L E PH O T O BP-contracted workers clean up the beach at St. Andrews State Park near Panama City Beach in July 2010 after the Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, spilling oil into the Gulf.

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Local The Star| B7 Thursday, July 31, 2014 Implants & Cr ow ns Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Wi lliam C. Knapk e, DDS Gen er al De nt is t Pa nam a City Sq uar e 61 7 We st 23 rd Str eet Pa nam a Ci ty FL Ca ll Fo r In fo rm at ion 1-8 88336 -16 15 Fe es ef fe ctiv e thr ough 11 /2 1/14 Addition al fe es ma y be incurr ed depend ing on in div idu al cases Same-da y Cr ow n ser vice ma y no t be av ailable in cer ta in case s. Af fo rd able Dentur es -P anama City P. A. Of ce #: (8 5 0 ) 87 26 1 5 5 Gr eat vs other Dent al pr ov iders 20144-4-T4 Single To oth Implant inc luding Cr ow n st ar ting at $ 1 89 5 De ntur e Im pla nts st ar ting at $ 1 59 5 Lo we r Ar ch $ 1 99 5 Sam eDa y Cr ow ns $ 69 5 Upper Ar ch Three species of mole crickets were rst detected in the southeastern United States about 1900, and are now serious plant pest. Those species are the tawny mole cricket, southern mole cricket and shortwinged mole cricket. Mole crickets live in the soil and feed on plant roots. Their front legs are short and stout well adapted for tunneling. Their velvety skin is light brown, and the adults, which reach a length of about one-anda-half inches, have prominent wings folded over their back. Each spring, mole crickets lay eggs in the soil. The nymphs, which hatch in about two weeks, look like the adults, except theyre smaller and lack fully developed wings. These nymphs mature very gradually, reaching adulthood the following spring. Thus, there is only one generation per year. Although mole crickets live mostly below the ground, the adults are readily attracted to lights especially in the spring, and through the summer. At these times, theyre commonly found under street lamps, electric signs, and similar illumination. Mole crickets are most active at night, especially after a rain or irrigation, when the temperature is about 70 degrees Fahrenheit, under these conditions; they make burrows in the upper inch or two of the soil. Occasionally, theyll partially emerge to gather bits of food. These surface burrows, which range from about one-eighth to three-quarter of an inch in diameter, look like miniature mole runs. This burrowing loosens the soil, causing plants to dry out. However, the most serious damage is caused by the crickets feeding on the roots of lawn grass. Mole crickets can be controlled by either sprayer baits. Apply sprays or bait when the overnight temperature is expected to be 70 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, and be sure the soil is moist. If necessary, sprinkle the area for about an hour before application. Moisture aids soil penetration of sprays, and with baits, it attracts the mole crickets to the surface to feed. To insure even pesticide coverage, its best to treat no more than 500 square feet at a time. Mark off the area to be covered, and apply half the recommended amount evenly, back and forth in one direction. Then, turn at right angles and apply the rest. After spraying, irrigate for 40-60 minutes. Do not water after applying baits. Baits are more effective when the fast-growing nymphs need a lot of food from late June through September. The sooner baits are applied after damage is noticed, the more effective theyll be. Baits may be applied by hand, but be sure to wear rubber gloves. For sprays, a garden hose attachment applicator is recommended one that requires 15 to 20 gallons of water passing through the hose to empty a quart jar. For more information on controlling mole crickets, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: http://gulf. ifas.u.ed u or www.http://edis.ifas. u.ed u and see publication ENY 234, ENY 300. Mole crickets a serious lawn pest ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director New doctors at the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County Special to The Star The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County would like to welcome their newest members of the medical team, Charlie Richardson, M.D. and Musab Al-Yahia, M.D. Dr. Charlie Richardson is a graduate of the Meharry Medical College, School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee and an undergraduate of Florida State University in Tallahassee. He brings experience working in community health centers to provide medical care to underserved populations. Dr. Richardson is board certied in general surgery and a member of the American College of Surgeons. He is a world traveler, enjoys shing and loves to practice medicine. Dr. Richardson looks forward to developing a strong partnership with your family, and strives to deliver a pleasant and positive family practice. Dr. Musab Al-Yahia is a graduate of the Florida State University, Pediatric residency program in Pensacola and an undergraduate of the University of South Florida in Tampa. A long-time Panama City resident, he enjoys scuba diving, shing and spending time with his wife and four children. Dr. Musab brings pediatric emergency room experience and looks forward to working with Gulf County families with the highest quality care. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County accepts Prestige and Staywell Medicaid, Medicare and most other third party insurances. Call today to schedule your appointment! (850) 227-1276 The mission of the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County is to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts. Special to The StarP A N A M A C I TY The un employment rate in the CareerSource Gulf Coast region (Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties) remained un changed from May to June, according to data released today by the Florida Depart ment of Economic Opportu nity. A county breakdown, however, shows a slight in crease in Gulf County. The unemployment rate in the three-county region was 5.7 percent in June 2014. The good news is that the gure is nearly a full percentage point below June 2013 (6.6 percent), and outpaces the states current unemployment rate of 6.2 percent. However, almost 6,000 CareerSource Gulf Coast job seekers are out of work. The June DEO report shows that out of a labor force of 105,266, there were 5,955 unemployed Career Source Gulf Coast resi dents. But there were more than 1,000 additional job seekers in the labor force since the May data was re leased. Just a month ear lier, the local regions labor force was 104,180, with 5,851 unemployed. It is encouraging to see the labor force growth, said CareerSource Gulf Coast Executive Director Kim Bodine. This is an in dication that some job seek ers who chose to sit on the sidelines through the worst of the recession are now among those seeking em ployment. The condence level seems to be slowly increasing among employ ers and job seekers alike. I also believe that we had an inux of high school and college graduates in June, accounting for some of that increase. Major occupational groups with the most online ads in June 2014 were sales and related occupations; healthcare practitioners and technical occupations; and ofce and administra tive support occupations. Labor demand in the re gion, measured by online advertised vacancies, bot tomed out in December 2010 and has increased by 2,101 openings since then. Special to The StarTALLA H A SS EE The Florida Depart ment of Health reminds residents and visitors that it is important to Drain and Cover this National Mosquito Control Awareness Week. The Depart ment encourages everyone to take sim ple precautions to protect themselves and their neighbors from mosquitoborne illnesses which have received increased attention recently in Florida. A simple and easy way to prevent mosquito-borne illnesses is to follow the Drain and Cover method, said Dr. Celeste Philip, Deputy Secretary for Health and Deputy State Health Ofcer for Childrens Medical Servic es. Drain water from any contain ers around your home, cover your skin with clothing and mosquito re pellent and cover doors and windows with screen to keep mosquitoes out of your home or business. DRAIN standing water to stop mos quitoes from multiplying: Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, ower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. COVER skin with clothing or repellent: Wear shoes, socks, and long pants and long-sleeves. This type of pro tection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mos quitoes are present. Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing. Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, pi caridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective. Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old. UNEMPLOYMENT RATES (%) (NOT SEASONALLY ADJUSTED) June-14 May-14 June-13 Gulf County 6.1 6.0 7.0 Bay County 5.6 5.6 6.6 Franklin County 5.6 5.6 5.6 Regional labor force grows as unemployment unchanged DOH reminds residents to drain and cover

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LAW ENFORC E M E NT SUMMARY JU L Y 21-27 On Tuesday, July 22, Sgt. J. Williams and Dep uty J. Brock arrested Matthew R. Green (19) on a warrant for False Rep resentation of Owner ship. Green was arrested in the 400 block of Catalpa Street in Wewahitchka. Investigator L. Dickey ini tiated an investigation af ter receiving a complaint regarding the theft of a 20 gauge shot gun. During the course of the investi gation it was determined Green pawned the item. Green was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) where he was later first appeared. He remains in custody on a $1,000 bond. On Thursday, July 24, Deputy S. Ferrell con ducted a traffic stop in the 100 block of West Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. Lesley D. Strickland (38), the driver, was operating the vehicle without a valid license. Strickland was placed under arrest for knowingly Driving While License Suspended/ Revoked (DWLS/R). While conducting an in ventory of the vehicle, Deputy Ferrell discovered Strickland was in posses sion of hydrocodone and paraphernalia. Strick land was transported to the GCDF and charged with DWLS/R, Posses sion of Controlled Sub stance, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. She was first appeared and later released on a $2,000 bond. On Friday, July 25, In vestigators and Deputies arrested Joann P. Wilder (56) and Joanna M. Wild er (39) in the 100 block of Burgess Creek Road in Dalkeith. The GCSO held active warrants on Joann Wilder for Principle to the Sale of Meth and active warrants on Joanna Wild er for the Sale of Meth within 1,000 feet of a Park. Both were transported to the GCDF where they were later first appeared. Joanna Wilder remains in custody on a $25,000 bond and Joann Wilder remains in custody on a $15,000 bond. On July 25, investiga tors and deputies arrest ed Dennis L. Emanuel (50) in the 100 block of Sunset Drive in Wewahi tchka. The GCSO held ac tive warrants on Emanuel for Sale of Oxycodone and Unlawful use of a Twoway Communications Device. Emanuel was transported to the GCDF where he was later first appeared and released on a $20,000 bond. On July 25, Rebecca L. Terry (44) was arrested by investigators and dep uties in the 100 block of Christopher Robin Drive in Wewahitchka. A war rant for Principle to the Sale of Meth was issued for Terrys arrest. She was taken to the GCDF where she was later first appeared. Terry remains in custody on a $15,000 bond. On July 25, Mark W. Moore (57) was arrest ed by Investigators and Deputies in the 300 block of East River Road in Wewahitchka. The GCSO held an active warrant for the Sale of Meth within 1,000 feet of a School and Unlawful Use of a Two-way Communication Device. At the time of Moores ar rest, he was found in pos session of hydrocodone, possession of a prescrip tion drug without a pre scription and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later first appeared and given a $41,000 bond. Moore re mains in custody. On July 25, Sgt. J. Wil liams arrested Stephen D. Lemieux (33) after he ob served him drive on a sus pended license. Sgt. Wil liams stopped the vehicle driven by Lemieux in the 100 block of Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. Lemieux was arrested and trans ported to the GCDF. He was charged with DWLS/ R and Possession of a Suspended Drivers Li cense. Lemieux was first appeared and given a conditional release. On Saturday, July 25, Sgt. J. Williams took a re port of a battery that took place in a vehicle on Cape San Blas Road. After investigating the case, Sgt. Williams arrested Shanette T. Beachum (24) for Battery. She was transported to the GCDF where she was later first appeared. She remains in custody on a $5,000 bond. On July 26, Deputy J. Oquendo conducted a traffic stop in the area of State Road (SR) 22 and Past Time Drive in We wahitchka. The driver of the vehicle, Carmen G. Poirier (37), was placed under arrest for DWLS/ R. She was transported to the GCDF and later first appeared. Poirier remains in custody on a $5,000 bond. On Sunday, July 27, Deputy G. Desrosier ar rested Timothy R. Clark (40) in the vicinity of 2 nd Street and Osceola Avenue in Wewahitchka. The GCSO held an ac tive warrant for Deal ing in Stolen Property. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later first appeared and released on a $2,500 bond. The charges stemmed from a 2013 burglary case investigated by Inv. L. Greenwood. On July 27, Sgt. M. Herring responded to the 2100 block of Indian Pass Road in reference to the theft of two iPhones. The complainant reported the phones were left on the beach with other person al belongings and when they returned they were discovered stolen. On July 27, about 9:47 p.m. (Central Time) Sgt. J. Murnan responded to a 911 call from the 4200 block of SR 71 South in Wewahitchka. The com plainant reported that he heard a breaker switch off and back on in the area of their laundry room. When he went to investigate the noise he discovered an unknown white male (ap proximately six feet tall, thin build, and unshaven) standing on the owners porch. The subject fled af ter he was yelled at. The male was said be wear ing a green shirt and blue jeans. From July 21-27 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 46 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 52 calls for EMS, 13 calls for other departments/agen cies and 14 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From July 21-27 the GCSO logged the follow ing department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 146; Traffic Stop, 33; Field Contact, 22; Civil Paper Service, 18; Informa tion, 9; Warrant Arrest, 6; Noise Disturbance, 5; Reckless Driver, 5; Alarm, 4; Domestic Disturbance, 4; Verbal Disturbance, 4; Request for Security Checks, 4; Abandoned Vehicle, 3; Animal Call, 3; Disturbance, 3; Prowler/ Trespass, 3; Sexual Of fender Reregistration, 3; Suspicious Person, 3; Suspicious Vehicle, 3; Simple Battery, 2; Spe cial Detail, 2; Suspicious Activity, 2; Traffic Acci dent, 2; Assist Agency, 1; Physical Disturbance, 1; Drunk Pedestrian, 1; Lost/Stolen Tag, 1; Missing Person, 1; Ha rassing Phone Calls, 1; Sexual Offender Address Verification, 1; Stolen Tag, 1; and Theft, 1. Law Enforcement B8 | The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST GO TO star .c om OR apalach times .c om AND CLICK ON THE On line No mina tions: Au g. 7th-13th On line Vo ting: Au g. 14th-26th TO P THREE WINNERS WILL BE CHOSEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN FO RG OT TEN COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST COA ST TO MA KE YO UR NOMINA TIONS it s time ag ai n to ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING ANNOUNCING Ta ke the oppor tunit y to NOMINA TE YO UR FA VORITE businesses people re staur an ts or other ca te gor ies fo r Th e 2014 Reader s Ch oic e Digital Account Ex ecutiv e The Ne ws Herald is seeking a Digital Account Ex ecutiv e. To ap pl y, send rsum to LGrimes@pcnh.com The quali ed candidate will need experience in: Quali cations needed: Duties will include: Arrest REPORTS GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local The Star| B9 Thursday, July 31, 2014 some face-to-face time. During a training over view inmate caretakers covered basic commands, feeding, kenneling and tips for integrating the dogs into their homes. Once the proud new owners had mastered the commands the pups headed out of the camp to live with families in Florida, Rhode Island and New York. Of the 11 in the class, nine were adopted into forever homes, though Christy said that if dogs arent adopted from a class, it doesnt mean theres anything wrong with them. Some dogs may not do well around cats or children and simply have more specic needs. Christy said she strives to nd the best ts for both pets and their owners. This journey will bring you more love and devotion than you have ever known, Christy told adopters during the ceremony. Randall Hughes, who lives outside of Boston, was visiting her parents on Cape San Blas earlier in the year when she read about the DAWGS pro gram in the newspaper. I read about it in the paper and thought it would be a great program if we wanted to get a dog, said Hughes. Just a few months later, Hughes made the decision to increase the family size by one and adopt a dog. True to her word, Hughes returned to Gulf County in April where she and her children, ages ve and seven, visited the humane society. After be ing introduced to several dogs, Hughes decided on Scout, a female black lab mix. Scout was very ener getic and friendly, said Hughes. Shes a really good t. Hughes said that the program was more than a benet to adopters; it also helped the trainers involved. She admitted she felt some remorse for taking Scout from the men who had built such a connec tion with the dog over the training period, but was happy that a new class of canines would quickly be brought in to take her place. Its a brilliant idea, said Hughes. You can see the program benets the inmates too and those benets outweigh the sadness. Every day across the U.S. 10,000 dogs are eu thanized due to lack of homes and limited shel ter space and resources. Christy reminded Gulf County residents of the free spay and neuter pro grams offered by the hu mane society and asked pet owners not to let their animals roam. Lt. Dan Weekend, which takes place in September. Primary lming for the movie Forrest Gump took place in South Carolina. The character Lt. Dan, played by Oscar-nominated actor Gary Sinise, was se verely wounded in Vietnam but rehabilitated to become a partner in a shrimp busi ness with the movies title character. Lt. Dan came to symbol ize the recovery process of todays war wounded and the annual Lt. Dan Week end is a weeklong com munity-based event which begins in Beaufort, S.C., and closes with a concert in North Charleston, SC with the Lt. Dan Band, led by Sinise. This years event will be the fth edition. All pro ceeds from the Lt. Dan Weekend benet veterans. The Independence Fund started at one of the rst Lt. Dan concerts. In 2012, Danyluk was presented with a check for $12,000 by a veterans mo torcycle club. By coincidence, that years concert was attend ed by a Sgt. John Peck, who lost his legs in Iraq. Peck had spoken to Danyluk about an all-ter rain wheelchair that would be perfect for a new piece of property Peck was mov ing to in Virginia. Putting that $12,000 con tribution with $1,000 in do nated funds, Peck and an other veteran received new wheelchairs, presented at the Walter Reed Army Hos pital Christmas party that same year. Not long after that, television personality Bill OReilly endorsed the work of The Independence Fund and that in turn helped steer millions of dollars into the organization. The Fund has provided nearly 500 all-terrain devic es to severely injured veter ans with service-connected injuries. The Independence Fund is a registered 501(c)3 nonprot that has provided more than $11 million in services including $5 mil lion in mobility devices that assisted over 1,000 severely injured veterans. The Independence Funds three pillars are: pro viding the necessary tools and therapies otherwise not provided to veterans; fund and promote physical and leisure/athletic activi ties that enhance a veter ans physical and emotional well-being; and advocacy and case management. Ninety-nine percent of all donations are devoted to veterans. Sgt. Major Jesse Acosta of California, who lost his eyes in Iraq, is one the board of directors of The Independence Fund. He was the keynote speaker at the most recent Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend held in Gulf County. In addition to the ap pointment of Garth to the advisory board, Semper Fi Sisters and the New York City Fire Department were selected as the two ofcial non-prot partners of The Independence Fund. The Semper Fi Sisters have held a Beach Blast in Gulf County the past seven years, growing from 12 Ma rine moms to more than 70 participants. I have been blown away, humbled and hon ored at the same time, Garth said of her appoint ment to The Independence Fund advisory board. It is truly such an honor to work in tandem with such a ne organization. Tr ades & Ser vi ces 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL ICE NSE D& IN SUR ED Cy nd y sh ome cl ea nin g, or ga ni zin g, an dp et si tt in g IN SU RE DA ND RE AD YT OH EL PY OU WI TH YO UR HOUS EO RP ET CA LL 85 050 270 06 OR EM AI L cy ndyly nne _79 @y ah oo .c om FUND from page B1 notebooks while Centen nial Bank will hand out free healthy snacks. At the information booths attendees will have the opportunity to meet with doctors, medical pro viders, nurses and medical assistants to collect infor mation and get any ques tions answered. Gulf County EMS, and Wewahitchka Search and Rescue and Volunteer Fire Department will be on-site with a re truck and boats for the kids to explore. The health fair isnt the only big event happening at the center. The same day, the facility will celebrate its 10th year in the current building. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland is scheduled to attend the event to help celebrate the anniversary. I think its a good time to celebrate the building and what its given to the com munity, said Saunders. Saunders encouraged the community to come out to meet, see and re connect with those in the community. The Wewahitchka Medi cal Center is a Federally Qualied Health Center that has operated for 35 years. The center accepts Medicaid and Medicare and has a sliding fee scale for patients without insurance. We try to connect with health partners in the area, said Saunders. There are lots of public services and its our mission to provide this one-stop shop. Its our opportunity to give back to the community by providing this service once a year, The medical center is at 255 West River Road in Wewahitchka. DAWGS from page B1 Special to The Star Four GCEC employ ees Cole Bareld, Chad Creamer, Mark Jones and Hal Walden recently com pleted the Florida Depart ment of Transportations 16-Hour Maintenance of Trafc course. During the training, the employees gained knowl edge and understanding of the equipment, techniques and procedures necessary to safely and correctly set up work zone trafc con trol devices, as well as how to maintain trafc on state and federal highways. By using visual and hands-on techniques, the employ ees learned how to set up a work area that complies with all state and federal laws, therefore creating a safe environment for the utility workers, as well as drivers approaching work crews along highways. The training was con ducted by the North Florida Safety Council, a communi ty service organization that collaborates with several health and safety organiza tions to promote injury pre vention and increase safety awareness. Gulf Coast Electric Co operative is part of the Touchstone Energy na tional alliance of local, con sumer-owned electric co operatives providing high standards of service to members large and small. Approximately 75 employ ees serve approximately 20,000 meters and 2,600 miles of line in Bay, Cal houn, Gulf, Jackson, Wal ton and Washington coun ties and in the municipali ties of Wewahitchka, Ebro, White City, Fountain and Southport. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Cole Bareld, Mark Jones, Chad Creamer and Hal Walden GCEC employees achieve MOT certication F AIR from page B1

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B10| The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95650 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 23-2011-CA-000479 Section: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT DONEHEW; JOHN RIEDL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; WINDMARK BEACH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOHN RIEDL NKA MRS. RIEDL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. DONEHEW NKA MARY BETH DONEHEW, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 23, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 23-2011-CA-000 479 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 13th day of November, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 38, WINDMARK BEACH, ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 1 THROUGH 5, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property address: Lot 38 Windmark Beach, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated at PORT SAINT JOE, Florida this17th day of July, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk MORRIS HARD WICK SCHNEIDER LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 9409 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, BALTIMORE, MD 21237 File No.: FL-9700467111-LIT July 31, August 7, 2014 95610S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO:13000136CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff vs. ELIZABETH L. PICKRON A/K/A ELIZABETH PICKRON Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 3, 2014 and entered in 13000136CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and ELIZABETH L. PICKRON A/K/A ELIZABETH PICKRON are the Defendant(s). Benny Lister as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Lobby 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd. Port St. Joe FL 32456, at 11:00 AM on August 7, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 8 AND 9 OF BLOCK 2 OF HARDEN’S SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 22 THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 14th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator. P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850)747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADAR equest@jud14.flcourts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Ste 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No.: 13-09587 July 24, 31, 2014 95614S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-172-CA GEORGE W.SIMMONS &, HAZEL H.SIMMONS Husband and Wife, Plaintiffs, vs. SUNCATCHER SERVICES, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company and UNKNOWN TENANTS # 1, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 3, 2014, entered in Civil Case No.: 13-172 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 14th day of August, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. ET at the Gulf County Courthouse, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, BLOCK 94, OF UNIT NO. 2 OF ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THERE OF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO IDENTIFIED AS: 1612 MARVIN AVENUE, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provision of certain assistance; Please contact: Court administration, Gulf County, Phone: 8509-229-6112 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 (V), via Florida Relay Service no later than 7 days prior to the proceeding. Dated at Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida this 14th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: B.A. Baxter Deputy Clerk Clinton T. McCahill, Attorney for the plaintiffs mccahilllaw@fairpoint.net 305 Sixth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 July 24, 31, 2014 95622S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-41 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of THOMAS DANIEL DAVIS, also known as THOMAS D. DAVIS deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of THOMAS DANIEL DAVIS, also known as THOMAS D. DAVIS, deceased, File Number 14-41 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and that ancillary personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 24, 2014. Ancillary Personal Representative Claudia Davis Mullins 8 Summer Lane Fairhope, AL 36532 ATTORNEY FOR ANCILLARY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457 (850) 229-8211 FL BAR NO. 0350583 Pub.: July 24, 31, 2014 95626S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 13148 CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. BONNIE S. KEIGANS A/K/A BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; CAPTIAL ONE BANK (USA), NA; BILLY F. KEIGANS A/K/A BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BILLY F. KEIGANS AKA BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE S. KEIGANS AKA BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; UKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 3rd day of July, 2014 and entered in Case No. 13148 CA, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and BONNIE S. KEIGANS A/K/A BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; CAPTIAL ONE BANK (USA), NA; BILLY F. KEIGANS A/K/A BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BILLY F. KEIGANS AKA BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE S. KEIGANS AKA BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM on the the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF NORTH 1/2 OF NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 186 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A STAKE ON STATE ROAD #6, (NOW STATE ROAD #71); THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO SAID STATE ROAD A DISTANCE OF 231 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THIS DESCRIPTION; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY 162 FEET; THENCE RUN DUE WEST 95 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 162 FEET TO A STAKE ON SAID STATE ROAD; THENCE EASTERLY AND PARALLEL TO SAID STATE ROAD 95 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 14th day of July, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk Of The Circuit Court B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Choice Legal Group, P.A. P.O. Box 9908 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-0908 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No.: 13-06488 July 24, 31, 2014 95628S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 14000057CAAXMX The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS 200511 Plaintiff, vs. Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin; Unknown Spouse of Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin and Unknown Spouse of Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin Last Known Address: 146 Cape Dunes Drive, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: COMMENCING AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK “A”, TREASURE BAY UNIT 1, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 32, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 89 17’ 15” E, 68.42 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY R/W LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30, SAID R/W BEING 66.00 FEET IN WIDTH; THENCE ALONG SAID EASTERLY R/W LINE AS FOLLOWS: N 15 27’ 30” E. 2581.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, SAID CURVE HAVING AN CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5 58’35” AND A RADIUS OF 3852.83 FEET: THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE FOR 401.88 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N 12 28’12.5” E, 401.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 9’ 28’ 55” E, 2214.92 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 9’ 28’ 55” E, 101.18 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID R/W LINE S 89 17’ 15” E. 217.81 FEET; THENCE S 9’ 28’55” W, 101.18 FEET; THENCE N 89 17’ 15” W, 217.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING LOCATED IN SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 9 SOU-TH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 12, OF TREASURE BAY UNRECORD-ED, PHASE VII. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jeremy Apisdorf, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 15 1 N.W. 49th Steet, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL. 33309, on or before August 13, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relif demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on July 14th, 2014 Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk July 24, 31, 2014 95674S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 232011CA 000374CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., PLAINTIFF, vs. MARTENA ADAMS A/K/A MARTINA ADAMS, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July, 15 2014 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Gulf, Florida, on August 14, 2014 at 11:00 AM, at Courthouse steps/lobby-1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456 for the following described property: LOT 137, WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. Dated July 21, 2014 Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of Circuit Court By: B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk of the Court Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A. 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at ADARe quest@jud14.flcourts. org, P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File No.: 16066178 July 31, Aug 7, 2014 95728S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No.: 23-2012-CA-000251 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SIMS, MELVIN E., et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA000251 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and, SIMS, MELVIN E., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 am on the 21st day of August, 2014, the following described property: SEAGULL UNIT #7, described as follows: Commencing at a concrete monument located on the NE rightof-way line of State Road 30 (also U. S. 98), said monument being the West corner of Lot 6 in Block 17 of YON’S ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, FLORIDA, a subdivision of parts of Original Lots 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 10, in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 45, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence N.39 20’45”W., (D.N.R. Meridian) along the NE right-of-way line of State Road 30 for a distance of 676 feet; thence run S.5039’ 15”W. perpendicular to the N. E. right-of-way line of said State Road 30 for 100 feet to a point on the Southwesterly rightof-way line of said State Road for the Point of Beginning; thence N.3920’45”W. along said SWLY rightof-way line 16.00 feet; thence S.5039’15”W. 225.5 feet more or less to the mean high water line of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeasterly along and with said mean high water line 16 feet more or less to a point that bears S.5039’15”W. from the Point of Beginning; thence N.5039’ 15”E. 225 feet, more or less to the Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 24th day of July, 2014. REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., TRADE CENTRE SOUTH, SUITE 700, 100W CYPRESS CREEK ROAD, FT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850747-5338. at least 7 days before your sche95688S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Emerald Coast Transcription located at 722 Gulf Aire Drive, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 22nd day of July, 2014. Rebecca E. Funk Pub.: July 31, 2014

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 31, 2014 The Star | B11 1130297 EMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! MedicalOfceInsurance ClaimsSpecialist Insurance&Scrubbing ClaimsRequired DropOffResumewithReferencesat1936JenksAveOrFaxto850-785-0574WebID# 34295875 1130402 Mediacom CommunicationsThe7thlargestcablecompany intheUnitedStates.Immediate opening-MexicoBeach ENTRYLEVELINSTALLERPerformsinstallsforcableand highspeedinternet.Musthavea validdriver'slicense.Mediacom offerscompetitivepayandgreat benetsalongwithadvancement opportunities.Forimmediate consideration,visitourwebsiteat: www.mediacomcable.com/careers Job7021 Weareanequalopportunity employerandallqualied applicantswillreceive considerationforemployment withoutregardtorace,color, religion,sex,nationalorigin, disabilitystatusprotectedveteran status,oranyothercharacteristic protectedbylaw.1131849 SOCIALWORKERPrimaryfunctionsofthispositionaretoprovidepersonal,academic &nancialcounselingtothestudentsattheGulf/FranklinCampus. Thispositionpromotes&enhancestheoverallacademicmission byprovidingservicesthatstrengthenhome,College,&Community Partnerships,&alleviatesbarrierstolearning.Incumbentmusthave stronginterpersonalskills,includingempathy,&theabilitytolisten withoutjudgment;mustberesourcefulinordertobestcounsel students,&shouldhaveexperienceworkingwithunderrepresented groups.Musthavetheabilitytoworkexiblehours&haveregular attendanceatwork;mustbeabletotravellocally&outoftownfor Collegebusiness&training.Additionalinfo:www.gulfcoast.edu/hrQualications:MastersDegreeinSocialWorkorrelatedeldwith3 yearsofexperience.LicensureinSocialWorkrequired. SalaryRangeStartsAt:$31,212.00 Deadlinetoapply:08/11/2014ApplicantsmayapplyinpersonatGCSCHumanResources,5230W.U.S. Highway98,viafaxat(850)913-3292,ore-mailyourapplicationto bcollins2@gulfcoast.eduGulfCoastStateCollegedoesnotdiscriminateagainstanypersononthebasisofrace, color,nationalorigin,ethnicity,sex,age,maritalstatus,ordisabilityinitsprograms, activitiesoremployment.RobertaMackey,ExecutiveDirectorofHumanResources, 850-872-3866,hasbeendesignatedasthepersontohandleallinquiriesregarding nondiscriminationpolicies.1131850 duled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. July 31, August 7, 2014 99721S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000190 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. BLANCA R. LAMIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 6, 2014, and entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA000190 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Blanca R. Lamis, Pano Lamis, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 2A BEING A PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 11 OF SAN BLAS ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 20, 21, AND 22 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A FOUND 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD (NO IDENTIFICATION) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11, IRON ROD LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30E (100 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 11 A DISTANCE OF 325.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 590.66 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 11 AS PER SAID PLAT, THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 50.06 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY RUN THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 592.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PART LYING BELOW THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE (M.H.W.L.) OF THE GULF OF MEXICO (ACREAGE INCLUDES THAT PART BELOW THE MHWL) ALSO SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH: 4 FOOT PEDESTRIAN EASEMENT LYING 2 FOOT EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT RLS #1787 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11 SAN BLAS ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 20, 21 AND 22 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY COUNTY ROAD NO. 30E (100’ RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 29 DEGREES EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY 50.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 432.27 FEET TO ‘THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE; FROM SAID POINT OE BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGRESS 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 485.34 FEET TO THE TERMINAL POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PART LYING BELOW THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO. ALSO SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WMI: ACCESS EASEMENT: LYING IN THE BOUNDARIES OF LOT 11, SAN BLAS ESTATES, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH DIAMETER CONCRETE MONUMENT RLS#1787 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11, SAN BLAS ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED HT PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 20, 21 AND 22 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY FLORIDA, CONCRETE MONUMENT ALSO BEING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO 30E (100 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY 35.00 FEET TO A POINT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61,82 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 27.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 138.84 FEET; THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 29.78 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 86.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 27.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 66.64 FEET; THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 38.99 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 15.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 31.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 75.59 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 27.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 78.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 67 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 29.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 146.92 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 36 MIN-UTES 06 SECONDS EAST 27.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 57.60 FEET TO THE SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD 30E, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 38 MIN-UTES 29 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT A/K/A 104 RACHEL BEACH LANE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 15th day of July, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk, Gulf County, Florida By: Bridgette McGheeCollins Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 Fax: (813) 221-9171 eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com JR -11-76387 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. July 24, 31, 2014 99687S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-35-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF VERNON C. EPPINETTE Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of VERNON C. EPPINETTE, deceased, whose date of death was May 12, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 24, 2014. Personal Representative: Judith K. Eppinette 279 Annie Avenue Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com July 24, 31, 2014 99737S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2014-06 Reid Avenue Sidewalk Cleaning Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for Reid Avenue sidewalks, crosswalks and curbing will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Friday August 15, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday August 15, 2014, at 3:30 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and RFP number for “Reid Avenue Sidewalk Cleaning”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Bid shall be for the cleaning of all sidewalks, crosswalks and curbing along the East and West sides of Reid Avenue. Specifications are listed in the Base Bid Documents which may be obtained on the City’s website at www.cityofportstjoe. com For questions concerning this Bid, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer July 24, 31, 2014 99739S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000112 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, Plaintiff, vs. LUANN M. QUARANTA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 15, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 23-2009-CA-000112 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, is the Plaintiff and LUANN M QUARANTA; WILLIAM C. QUARANTA, SR.; CAPITAL CITY BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED THIRTY (130), UNIT NUMBER TWELVE (12), OF THE ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 13, 1982 IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 27 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2005 MARVIN AVENUE, PORT ST JOE, FL 324560000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 16, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: Bridgette McgheeCollins Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. F09022212 July 24, 31, 2014 99771S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000153-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KIM L. MCDANIEL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM L. MCDANIEL; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on the 14th day of August, 2014, at 11:00 A.M at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Gulf County, Florida: Lots 5 and 6, Block 2, UNIT NO. 1, RISH’S ADDITION to WEWAHITCHKA, Gulf County, Florida, according to an official plat thereof on file in the Office of the Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 2, Page 16. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity

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B12| The Star Thursday, July 31, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1129690 1129691 45 10161 6519532Brand New 28X80 4 Bed Rm $59,900 28X60 3 Bed Rm $49,900 Set Up w/A/C, Steps & Skirt850.683.1777 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com Biggest Sale Ever All Homes 20% Off w/FREE Furniture Ends 8/1/2014 850.683.0035 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com6519531 4 519197 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark, 2 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, 550.00 mo. 2. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle, 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach, $1600.00 mo.3. 25-2 Pine St, Lanark, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, $550.00 mo. 4. Picketts Landing, 3 bedroom, 3 baths, boatslip, pool, $1600.00 mo. 5. 1 bedroom, 1.5 baths, furnished, on river, boat slip, $900.00 mo. 6. 295 River Rd, 3 bedroom, 2 baths, on river, dock, $1100.00 mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4 518958 6519528I Buy Used Mobile Homes! Cash Paid Immediately.. 352.316.2434 familyhomecenter @hotmail.com 6519529Brand New3 Bed 16X80 $39,900 3 Bed Double Wide $48,900 Furnished 850.683.0858 6519530$0 Down To All Land Owners! Your Deed Is Your Down Payment 3 & 4 BR Homes Under $500 A Month. Call Today! 850.683.0035 THEPERFECTCAREEROPPORTUNITY Multi-MediaAdvertisingSales WEARESEEKINGSTRONGSALESMINDED INDIVIDUALSWHOAREABLETO:‰ Managemultipletasks ‰Prospectfornewbusiness&deliverexcellentcustomerservice‰Developandpresentsalespresentationstopotential customersutilizingTheNewsHerald’sprintanddigitalmedia solutions SP103358ThePanamaCityNewsHeraldisaddingtalentedandmotivated Multi-MediaSalesProfessionalstoouradvertisingteam. Pleasesubmitr esume&coverletterto:LGrimes@pcnh.comAskusaboutthegreatbenetsinsales-basepay+commission,benetsincludingMedical, Dental&VisionInsurance,FlexibleSpending,401(k)Plan,Vacation&SickLeave. 1131212 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4518906 Wanted: Reservationist for busy Vacation Rental Of ce. Excellent customer service and computer skills required. Apply in Person or call (850) 229-1200 4518944 Estate Sale248 Willow Dr., Port St., Joe BeachFurniture, Glassware, Books, Kitchen Items Saturday 8:00 am til? Sunday 8:00 am til? 4518975 Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in DestinPrivate equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 17th day of July, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Bridgette McGheeCollins ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Brian T. Dunmire Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H # 292975 July 24, 31, 2014 99773S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No.: 2009-CA-000454 Division #: CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. John R. floats a/k/a John Hoats; CGL Enterprises, Inc. d/b/a CGL Enterprises (Georgia), Inc.; Beth A. Hoats; George T. Peacock, Individually and as Co-Personal Representative of the Estate of Glenn Peacock, Deceased; Sarah Jackson, Individually and as Co-Personal Representative of the Estate of Glenn Peacock, Deceased; CitiBank, N.A., as Successor in Interest to CitiBank, Federal Savings Bank; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000454 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and John R. Hoats a/k/a John Hoats are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DESK OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on November 13, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 10 AND ALL OF LOT 12, BLOCK “0”, INDIAN PASS BEACH GROUP ONE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Gulf County, Florida Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 File #09-148494 July 24, 31, 2014 99797S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No. 13-149-CA LINDA WILLIAMS 168 Annie Avenue Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Plaintiff, vs. BETTY CELEDONIA, 414 Church Street Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 1, 2014, and entered in Civil Case No. 13-149CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein BETTY WILLIAMS is the Plaintiff and BETTY CELEDONIA is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., E.T., on the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 10 Meeks Lake Subdivision as per Plat Book 2, Page 11, Gulf County Circuit Court being parcel Tax ID# 01590-000 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or Telephone (850)229-6113 prior to such proceedings. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 21st day of July, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: Bridgett McGheeCollins Deputy Clerk Costin & Costin Charles A. Costin 413 Williams Ave. P.O. Box 98 Port St. Joe, Fl. 32457 850-227-1159 July 24, 31, 2014 99809S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2010-CA-000319 RBC BANK (USA) FKA RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WENDT, FRANK, et. al., Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2010-CA000319 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, and, WENDT, FRANK, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., on the 14th day of August, 2014, the following described property: LOT 10, BLOCK B OF SEAGRASS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE (S) 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 22nd day of July, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: B. McGhee-Collins Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaireed, call 711. File# 20851.0395 June 5, 12, 2014 99871S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USE PERMIT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application for a water use permit has been received by the Northwest Florida Water Management District: Application number I 07488 filed 07/17/2014 Gulf American Shrimp, LLC, 127 Heritage Lane, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Requesting an annual average daily withdrawal of 499,999 gallons per day from the Floridan Aquifer System for Aquaculture use by an existing facility. General withdrawal location(s) in Gulf County: T06S, R09W, Sec. 36 Interested persons may submit written comments/ objection or submit a written request for the notice of proposed agency action (NOPAA) regarding the application by writing to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Havana, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only to persons who have filed such requests. A NOPAA must be requested in order to be advised of further proceedings and any public hearing date. Written comments/ objection or NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00 p.m. eastern time on August 14, 2014. No further public notice will be provided regarding this application. Publication of this notice constitutes constructive notice of the permit application to all substantially affected persons. July 31, 2014 99825S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST PRIMARY ELECTION AUGUST 26, 2014 GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA The Logic and Accuracy test for the M100 Tabulation System and the Ivotronic Touch Screen System to be used for the August 26, 2014 Primary Election will be held at the Gulf County Supervisor of Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St Joe August 6, 2014 -9:00 AM EST. This test is open to the public. John M. Hanlon Supervisor of Elections Gulf County, Florida July 31, 2014 99857S PUBLIC NOTICE The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is seeking qualified landscape firms to bid on the landscape maintenance of a limited portion of the Historic Downtown area. Complete bid packages are available on request from Gail Alsobrook, Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency, 308 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or at www.PSJRA.com. Bids must be received by noon on Friday, August 15, 2014. Phone: 850229-6899. July 31, August 7, 2014 ADOPTION: Adoring Teacher (will stay home) & Attorney Love awaits 1st baby. Sheila & Justin 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Drop me a Line....Dolls & Doll Magazines For Sale Doll Lady, P.O. Box 56, PSJ, FL 32457 Port St. Joe 2337 SR 30A Fri-Sat Aug 1 & 2, 9am-1pm EST Rain or ShineMulti Family Yard SaleLinens, Antiques, Books, Furniture, Lamps, Glassware, & Many Decorator Items. No Junk! Text FL96259 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $443/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternFront Desk Breakfast AttendantWeekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34293798 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291812 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291811 Install/Maint/RepairJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for oneFull-time Mechanic Ifor our Public Works Department. Starting salary is $18.67 per hour. This is a bargaining unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applications and a complete job description are available in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T. on August 7, 2014 at the Gulf County Human Resources Office. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at (850) 229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at (850) 227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Web Id 34295789 Medical/HealthCNA’sLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for position of CNA’s If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot email to tblackwell@shccs.com **We are offering a $1,000 sign on bonus for CNAs WEB ID 34293034 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Port St Joe 2Bd 1.5Ba Apartment, New Appliances/Washer/Dryer. Close to everything! 2 minutes to downtown, St Joe Bay, Marina, & Beaches. $700/mo + Utilities. 1yr Lease 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL96334 to 56654 6529 Americus Ave. St. Joe Beach Home, 2br/2ba. 1400 sqft, Fenced yd. Open Floorplan. Quiet Neighborhood. $975/mo Call 360-305-9138. Port St Joe: 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, references call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 White City corner lot, 3 br, 2 ba, kitchen/ dine-in combo, carport, $650 mo. Call (850) 899-3283 or 227-5272 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts R.E. 2006 Honda Pilot 2WDEXLR 85K miles, beige+pearl, leather, moon roof, dvd, back up senser, in excellent condition, $11,000. Call 850-647-9200 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. 2000 Square Foot Enclosed Storage 500 Square Feet Climate Controlled Storage850-229-91254518379