The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03949


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 76, NUMBER 41 Thursday, JULY 24, 2014 Camp Amigo B1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The budget presented to the Board of County Commissioners last week included a lengthy wish list. Commissioners began Monday snuf ng out those wishes. The BOCC was presented last week by its budget committee with a budget that would see expenditures increase by more than $2.6 million, a 27 percent increase from the current year and representing a 1.7 millage rate hike compared to this year. It is not going to be an easy year, said Clerk of Courts Becky Norris. By the end of a special meeting Monday commissioners had closed the gap but remained looking at a budget that will demand a tax increase. Commissioners also tentatively approved a 5-cent increase to the county gas tax. One signi cant concern is the amount of cash carry forward in the budget, those dollars that are intended as a kind of rolling reserve into which commissioners have dipped over recent years to plug holes in the budget in order to avoid raising millage rates, said county administrator Don Butler. However, those funds, after being used consistently since 2010, have dropped by 30 percent this year, Butler said, representing $1.5 million-$2 million. At some point with us cutting budgets I knew that number would come down, said Commissioner Warren Yeager. Cash carry forward was $5.8 million in each of the past two years this year it is $4.169 million, with $3 million that is restricted by obligations to maintain cash carry forward levels for reserves and the county capital fund as recommended for county government. There is not a lot of money left to plug into this years budget, Butler said. It is going to be tight this year. Not included in the budget as currently crafted are dollars for pursuing recommendations made by consulting counsel on redistricting and any loan agreement with the Port St. Joe Port Authority. Butler said the BOCC was also hamstrung in some areas such as the land ll and EMS due to shortfalls in revenue compared to projections before the current budget year began. All county of ces are also feeling a 12 percent increase in Florida retirement system obligations. Before the work of cutting began in earnest Monday, commissioners decided to freeze all county budgets, including constitutional of cers, to allow staff Current county budget includes tax hikes See TAX A6 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m No matter the overhead, there is Blue Skies in Port St. Joe. Since 2010, Blue Skies Ministries has treated pediatric cancer patients along with their families and siblings to a weeklong trip to Port St. Joe. In 2014 the organization, based out of Marietta, G.A., planned eight trips to Gulf County, each time staying in WindMark Beach homes and condos. Founder of Blue Skies Melinda Mayton said that families faced with childhood cancer are often stretched emotionally, nancially, physically and spiritually, oftentimes to the breaking point. A nurse practioner of more than 13 years, Mayton switched her college major from business to nursing after her sister fell ill. After becoming a nurse she worked with pediatric cancer patients and watched what the families went through and became determined to do something to help. Mere years later, the organization was making its rst pilgrimage to Port St. Joe. I cant change places with the families, but for one week, I can walk beside them, said Mayton. With the exception of travel costs to and from WindMark Beach, there is no cost to the families who attend the retreats. Activities are pre-planned and a large group of volunteers handle the cooking, cleaning and laundry so families can focus on relaxing. While days are lled with activities like snorkeling, horseback riding, and plenty of time on the beach, each night has a different theme. During Hollywood Night, families arrive in WindMark by limo and walk a red carpet where their photos are taken and theyre interviewed by volunteers. Pediatric cancer patients and their families get a week of normal School millage falls further By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Taxpayers will see even more of a drop in school taxes than initially projected. The Gulf County School Board approved a tentative millage rate that will see school taxes drop even more than preliminary numbers released two weeks ago indicated. The biggest drop was additional shaving of the required local effort (RLE) component of the funding formula with the state adjusting the number down to accurately re ect the preliminary tax roll submitted by Property Appraiser Mitch Burke earlier this month. As with the other two major components of a school district budget, the RLE, the largest component representing what the district must collect locally to access state funding, is established each spring by the See MILLAGE A9 WES LOCHER | The Star The Cape San Blas Lighthouse (left) is scheduled to be raised and placed at its new home in George Core Park today. The exact time was not known at press time. The two keepers cottages (above) and oil house are in place. The lighthouse was moved from the Cape to Port St. Joe last week. Putting it in place: WES LOCHER | The Star Blue Skies founder Melinda Mayton hosts week-long retreats for pediatric cancer patients and their families to WindMark Beach. See NORMAL A8 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................. A10 Sports ................................... A11 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 Lighthouse to be raised Thursday

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By Paula Pickett Special to The Star It has been a very busy time at the chamber this summer. We have relocated to 308 Reid Ave. in the heart of our retail district and could not be more pleased. Our visitor walk-ins have substantially increased, allowing us more opportunity to promote our and your business. We invite you to stop by and see how we can help you. The Gifted Gourmet re cently hosted a grand opening and showcased their wonder ful array of ne wines and cheeses. Owner Pamela Wool ery has created a beautiful environment specialized in gourmet gift baskets that may be sent anywhere. So if you are looking a memo rable gift to someone spe cial, let Pamela or her team help you. The Gifted Gourmet is at 220 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe. Additionally, we welcomed The Port Cottages Bayview. The Port Cottages expanded from six to 10 va cation rental homes located near downtown shopping, dining and a beautiful sunset view. These pet friendly cot tages are available for week ends, single night and extend ed stays. For reservations call The Port Inn at 850-229-7678. Shoobies! If you do not know about this, do yourself a favor and nd out! Shoobies is parked at 143 Acklins Island Drive, Cape San Blas (across from the Cape San Blas Inn) for the Summer 2014. Parked? Yes, parked! Shoobies is another great food truck owned by Kellee Novak, owner of delicious Mason Dixon in Port St. Joe. But the menu is much different. How does softserve boardwalk ice cream, Gelato, and water ice sound to you? In addition to these grand openings, we have welcomed several new businesses that are relocating to our area. This is a great sign for our economy. There is an obvious move ment in our real estate mar ket and with this come nec essary support services. This spike increases our banking, insurance, construction and retail businesses. The trickledown effect is strengthening the economy and many of our business are experiencing re turns better than those of six10 years ago. In conjunction with the City of Port St. Joes Competitive Florida Partnership, a techni cal assistance program aimed at assisting our community develop ideas and strategies for economic development, we have become much more proactive in developing an environment conducive for growth. We want to ensure that the chamber help create a strong economic opportu nity for our area and develop jobs for the next generation. If you are interested in learning more about the Gulf County Chamber of Com merce, we would be happy to meet with you. We can be reached at 227-1223 or stop by 308 Reid Ave., PSJ. Lo ca ls Su nd ays Loc al s wi th a Fl or id a ID re ce iv e 50 % of f Ge ne ra l Pa rk ad mi ss io n on ev er y Su nd ay Da il y sh ow s fe at uri ng do lp hi ns se a li on s, tr op ic al bi rd s an d mu ch mo re Op en da il y ra in or sh in e 15 41 2 Fr on t Be ac h Rd Pa nama Ci ty Be ac h www .g ul fw or ld ma ri nep ar k. co m Ar e yo u sic k an d ti re d of fe el in g sic k an d ti re d? Le t ou r ne w c om pu te r te ch no lo gy de te ct th e hi dde n ca us e of yo ur pa in F. D. A. re gi st er ed co mp ut er ai de d te ch no lo gy is no w b e in g u se d to as sis t in det ec ti ng und er lyi ng ne rv e an d mu sc le pr ob le ms th at can be re sp ons ib le fo r: Fi br om ya lg ia Mi gr ai ne s, He ad ac he s & C hr on ic Ne ck /B ac k Pa in My nam e is Dr To ny Sa lam ay DC I ha ve be en st udyi ng abo ut br om ya lg ia an d ch ro ni c fa ti gue fo r ma ny ye ar s an d he lp ed co un tl ess pat ie nt s fe el b et te r an d be at th ei r br om ya lg ia I us e adv an ce d te st in g an d tre at me nt s in ch irop ra ct ic ne ur ol ogy blo od ch em is tr y an d cl in ic al nu tr it ion to nd th e unde rl yi ng ca us e of th ei r br om ya lg ia As pa rt of ou r Fi br om ya lg ia Aw ar en es s Mon th I am of fe ri ng a co mpl im en ta ry co nsu lt at io n an d an ex am ina ti on at a sp ec ia l pr ic e of ($ 47 ) fr om Monda y Jul y 28 th un ti l Monda y Au gu st 11 th 20 14 to th e rs t 20 cal le rs of br om ya lg ia s uf fe re rs (T hi s is no rm al ly a $2 25 ch ar ge fo r ne w pat ie nt s! ) 16 13 Sa in t An dre ws Bl vd Pa na ma Cit y, FL 32 405 We bs ites : www .t heb ay do ct or .c om www .g ul fc oa st bro .c om No hi dde n ch ar ge s. Th e pat ie nt an d an y oth er pe rs on re sp o ns ib le fo r pa ym en t ha s th e ri ght to re fuse to pa y, cancel pa ym en t or b e re imb ur se d fo r pa ymen t fo r an y oth er se rv ic e, ex am in ati on or tr ea tm en t wh ich is p er fo rm ed a s a re su lt of and wi th in 72 hour s of re sp ond in g to th e adv er ti se me nt fo r th e fre e, di scou nt ed or re duc ed fe e se rv ic es ex am in atio n or tr ea tm en t. Due to in sura nce re gulat io ns we ar e not a l l owe d to pr ov ide Me di ca re pa tie nt s an d som e ot he r co mpanie s wi th th is of fe r. Of ce Nu mbe r: 850 -7 85 -9 37 2 Ad va nc ed Cu tt in g Ed ge Tr ea tm en ts Of fe r Gr ea t Re su lt s Fo r Fi br om ya lgi a An d Ch ro ni c Pa in Su ff er er s! Th e of fe r in cl ud es : Local A2 | The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014 PSJ commissioners clear hurdle on Gulf Pines By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com One by one the hurdles to razing and cleaning up the old Gulf Pines Hospital site and putting the land on the tax rolls are fall ing away for Port St. Joe commissioners. City attorney Tom Gib son reported last week that the Board of County Com missioners had voted not to pursue at this time a tax deed based on delinquent property taxes on the Gulf Pines site, which clears away one more obstacle. With the BOCC willing to wait on the selling of the property to realize revenue from the back taxes, which would have to be divided among the cities, meaning Port St. Joe would get some back, the lone obstacle to addressing the elephant in the equation are two pri vate companies holding tax certicates. By paying about $38,000, commissioners can satisfy those certicates. The Internal Revenue Service, which has a $1 mil lion lien on the property in lieu of back taxes, has indi cated a willingness to dis charge the property of any obligation. Once we get rid of the IRS we have a lot more op tions, Gibson said. The BOCC has agreed to waive the $75,000 it is owed to allow the city to move ahead on rendering the property suitable for the property tax roll. Commissioner Rex Buzzett motioned, and com missioners unanimously agreed, to pay off the two certicates, using BP ne funds and to return the funds to the same BP ne money account upon selling the property. Commissioners hope to raze the hospital building, clean the site and sell the land with the potential for ve-seven single-member dwellings on the property. The Commission has al ready changed the zoning for the property to singlefamily residential. Commissioners aim is to sell the land to a private developer, hoping to recoup cost of razing the build ing and clearing the site through that sale. The city of Port St. Joe owns the property, which was leased as a hospital for more than ve decades before closing almost a de cade ago. The property has be come an eyesore and haven for feral animals, though the city has cleaned the prop erty up several times. The roof in some areas is falling into the building. The big stumbling block for any entity wishing to do something with the property say those companies with tax certicates has been the IRS lien and the cost of razing the building and clearing the site, along with asbestos abatement, the latter of which is estimated to be at least $110,000. TENT A TIVE MILLAGE RA TE Commissioners set the tentative millage rate at 4.5914, exactly one mill above the current millage. Taxing bodies must sub mit a tentative millage rate to the Property Appraiser by Aug. 1. That is the number that will appear on Truth in Millage (TRIM) notices re ceived by mail by taxpayers. After Aug. 1, that millage can not go up, but can be reduced. In each of the past ve years commissioners have increased the tentative mill age up one mill to provide exibility in budgeting only to return to the same mill age by ratication of the budget. Weve always set it higher and we always bring it back down, Mayor Mel Magidson said. It is a little game with play (with the state). FILE PHO T O The former Gulf Pines Hospital site soon could be history. Chamber of Commerce relocates, hosts grand opening SPECIAL T O THE S T AR

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, July 24, 2014 P. O. Bo x 244, Pa nam a City FL 32 402 Na tiv e of Po rt St Jo e, Re sident of Ba y County Si nce 1976 Gr aduated fr om Po rt St Jo e Hi gh School Early jobs included St Jo e Pa per Mi ll, City of Po rt St Jo e, St Jo e Na tural Ga s and painter s helper Me t wife, Ja n, in college and enjo ys ov er 40 ye ars of marriage together Gr aduate of Au burn Un iv ersity and Fl orida St ate Un iv ersity School of Law Tw o childr en, both ar e UF graduates Hi stor y of activity in community chur ch, school, outdoor and civic organ izations. I take my jo b serious ly I kno w ev er y decisi on aects so meone s Co nsti tutional rights to life, lib er ty and pr oper ty school, outdoor and civic organizations. Wo rk ed as Assistant St ate At torney Wo rk ed in Wa shington D.C. for Congr essman Do n Fu qua Wo rk ed in Ta llahassee for St ate Re pr esentativ e Bi lly Jo e Rish Tr ied Ov er 100 Ju ry Tr ials in local practice Me mber of the Ju dicial No minating Committee for the Fi rst Di strict Cour t of Ap peal Rated nationally A V by Ma rt indaleHu bbell A indicates pr eeminent attorney V indicates highest ethical standar ds Pr esident of the Ba y County Ba r Association El ected Cir cuit Re pr esentativ e to the Boar d of Go ve rnors Me mber of the Di sciplinar y (E thics) Re vie w Committee At torney at Law ye ars ye ars ye ars ttorne y at ye ars 8 8 Ap pointed Cir cuit Ju dge by Go ve rnor Je b Bu sh El ected without opposition in 200 8 Se rv es as Chief Civil Ad ministrativ e Ju dge Cer tied by the Su pr eme Cour t to handle death penalty cases Re cogniz ed by Gu ar dian ad Litem for his positiv e and inuential wor k with yo uth Fo unding member of the Ju stice Te aching gr oup for the judicial eduction of students Cir cuit Cour t Liaison to the Pr ofessionalism Committee Chairman of the Pr o Bono Committee Chairman of the Tr ansition Committee to the cour thouse addition curr ently under constr uction Cir cuit Ju dge dle death penalty case s Re cogniz ed b y G uar dian ad Litem for his positiv e and inuential wor k with y outh Fo unding member of the J ustice Te aching gr oup for the judicial eduction of students Cir cuit Cour t Liaison to the Pr ofessionalism Committee Chairman of the P ro Bono Chairman of the Tr ansition Committee to the cou rt house addition curr ently under Early voting gets room of its own By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Early voting in Port St. Joe has always created heavy trafc inside the Supervisor of Elections Ofce. With the increase in number of voters taking advantage of early voting combined with the busi ness of an election season candidate paperwork, voter registration, main taining registration books the main entrance at the Elections Ofce could be, well, crowded. But now those early voters have a place to call their own. The transition began under former Supervisor of Elections Linda Grifn who asked the Board of County Commissioners to expand into the space in the old Health Depart ment building on Long Avenue after Sacred Heart Rehabilitation moved to the hospital. The request was grant ed and Grifn opened a wall and created a space for voting machines and ballot reader. A counter and comput ers and shelves to handle ballots and sign-in for early voters arrived later and this year the BOCC ap proved work to open a door off Fourth Street, along with some additional park ing to handle early voters. Whatever location you have set up for early voting that becomes a poll ing place, Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon said. Now we have cre ated that separate polling place. During early voting we used to have to han dle candidate paperwork and voter registration through the back door. Now we will be back to using the front counter. The idea was to create a space similar to the early voting location in Wewahi tchka, which is the meeting room of the Charles White head Public Library. That meeting room has a door that can be closed and a separate entrance. This is really going to work out well, Hanlon said of the Port St. Joe upgrades. We can truly maintain a separate location for early voting. Early voters will be asked to park in front of the early voting door on Fourth Street or park on Long Avenue and walk around to the early voting entrance. There are multiple vot ing machines and when Oak Grove Church re placed its pews Grifn was given one to use for a comfortable sitting area for voters waiting for their turn at the ballot box. Early voting begins Aug. 16 and continues through Aug. 23. Each weekday, early voting hours are 7:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET (6:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. CT). On the two Saturdays, the hours are 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. ET (7 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT) and on the one Sunday the hours are 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. ET (9 a.m. until 5 p.m. CT). PHOTOS BY T IM CROFT | The Star A new entrance for early voting has been created on the Fourth Street side of the Supervisor orf Elections Ofce. Given heavy trafc during campaign season, the creation of a separate polling place for early voting was a priority for Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon. State road funding increases for county By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The county will continue to see increases in state road funding over the next several years. The Board of County Commis sioners were presented Tuesday with the Florida Department of Transportation ve-year work plan along with commissioner input on priorities. During the coming year and four years, millions of dollars will be owing into the county for re construction or resurfacing of sev eral major byways as well as for the dormant Gulf to Bay Highway. One reason, explained Keith McCarron of the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, was that state legislators have in creased funding for a program specically earmarked for small counties. FDOT District III saw dollars from that fund double this year, from $9 million to $18 million, Mc Carron said. Commissioner Warren Yeager said the Small Counties Coalition with the Florida Association of Counties, of which he is an ofcer, has made a priority of increas ing state road funding for small counties. The second phase of the Gulf to Bay Highway, which would cre ate a back beach road behind St. Joe Beach, is funded for the current scal year, which began July 1, includes dollars for right-ofway and future capacity design and engineering. The project, the rst phase of which was the realignment of U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe as part of the development of WindMark Beach, has been somewhat less a priority because of a less than ro bust economy and state revenues. It is good to see it is in the work plan and making progress, McCarron said. There are some very challenging permitting issues going on there. Several critical projects are on tap for the current scal year. The reconstruction of two-lane Jarrott Daniels Road, which links to County 386 and State 22, is slated for this year as is the completion of the resurfacing of State 30A from Cape San Blas Road to the Frank lin County line. (Jarrott Daniels) is a vital ar tery between two highways, Com missioner Ward McDaniel said. Resurfacing of Old Bay City Road from south of Ross Stripling Road to Crossover Road is also to be completed this year. The third phase of the Old Bay City Road project, from Crossover to Clyde Teat Road is up for next year, said grant coordinator Towan Kopinsky. In addition, a bike path/trail from Pine Street to Beacon Hill Park Road is slated for completion. McCarron noted that instead of performing resurfacing of the Overstreet Road (County 386) in phases the decision has been made to resurface the entire length of the road in 2017. Beach driving permits Commissioners completed their tweaks to the ne structure for beach driving permits. The board has already eliminat ed seven-day permits, leaving only the $200 seasonal pass available. The board also increased the ne for a rst offense from $250 to $500. The ne structure was changed so that drivers who are ticketed for driving permit might have the $500 ne reduced to $300 total the permit plus $100 if they come to the Tax Collectors Ofce and pur chase their permit within seven days of being ticketed.

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Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINI O N www.starfl.com Thursday, July 24, 2014 A Section I was standing in the buffet line after church when the ght broke out. Now, folks, we werent in the Green Lantern in Natchez, Missis sippi, where a ght is as near as your mother-in-law on a cross country road trip. This was a moderately fancy restaurant with attentive serv ers and well-appointed accouter ments. I backed away quickly from the fried chicken livers to avoid the fray and instinc tively sought out the source of the pushing and shoving. It was a gaggle of ladies wrestling over the beets! We had to be in West Tennessee. Its the only place in the world where sticuffs are and feelings run hot over a vegetable that has never sponsored a TV show or had poems written about them. Im not anti-beet by any means. I have actually eaten them on occasion. Aunt Beatrice would serve up pickled beets at Thanksgiving and Christmas that would melt in your mouth. Mother pushed them off on us as a very healthy food. Of course, she said the same thing about spinach, Brussels sprouts, cauliower and spam. I might could have envisioned a stand-off over the last country fried steak or maybe the sole remaining piece of homemade coconut cream pie. Leon, David and I once fought all afternoon over a lone chicken leg. But were talking beets here, people! Ive crawled on my belly like a reptile through the wild Johnson weeds to bust open one of Mr. Archie Moores ripening watermelons. I walked Cynthia Wheat home so many times we wore out a path across Bethel Colleges front lawn to get close to her mothers sugar cookies. Ive had wild crawvings for chocolate milk shakes, pork shank and baked beans, Milk Duds, peanut butter and banana sandwiches, rutabagas and fried catsh. But beets dont exactly set your heart on re as a go to dish. And ghting over them in a public restaurant seems to me to fall into the Bridge Too Far category. Jerry Springer couldnt have orchestrated this! We were in fact in West Tennessee; Milan to be exact. And this is no indictment on that particular partition of the great Volunteer state. Im just saying that I doubt womenfolk go toe to toe over beets at an upper Manhattan eatery, in a dinner club in New Orleans or at a fancy Hollywood bistro. And I cant picture any scenario where the Chicago police rush in and arrest fourteen ladies for brawling over an emptying pan of beets. West Tennessee people take their eating a mite more serious than some. I had already taken note of the hominy on this buffet going like fty cent pan cakes at a Kiwanis sale. The lines were long in front of the cabbage and mustered greens bins as you would expect. But nothing beat (no pun intended) the throng congregated around the ruby complexioned root. I held my plate over my head and elbowed my way toward the center of the action. I had to get a closer look. Order was near bout restored before I could snake my way to the front. I couldnt tell if the red faced men breaking up the fracas were mad or embarrassed. What happened? I asked the petite little girl that had seated us. Wilma Dean was late getting the beets out. She said it like the restaurant was somehow responsible. Does this happen often? I was craning my neck under the glass to get a look at what must be the best tasting beets on earth. The cupboard was bare. Only when Wilma Dean takes one of her slow notions. I tried to picture a slow notion as I moved back to let Wilma Dean empty a whole new bucket of beets onto the buffet. The crowd standing around with half lled plates cheered. You cant even get this kind of stuff on Duck Dynasty. We have plenty; please line up in an orderly fashion. The petite girl apparently doubled as referee. I wasnt about to line up for beets. I moseyed over to the country ham and red-eye gravy, green beans, squash, fresh tomatoes and cornbread. I could survive without the beets. You know how the Lord will work on you right out of the blue at times. I was buttering up my cornbread when it dawned on me, How many of those nice folks ghting over the beets had just come from church? Many were sporting their Sunday best. I wondered if any of the morning sermons were on that peace that passes all understanding, the patience of Job or Jesus command to love thy neighbor. Them West Tennesseans are truly a peculiar people! I was standing up to ask for a show of hands of all that had just come from a worship service when that verse about judge not lest you be judged smote me in the eye. I gured wed had about as much fun as could be had at one meal. Im pretty sure Jesus never turned beets into wine or fed ve thousand with them. But I thanked Him for our meal anyway, and was especially grateful that Olive Loaf wasnt on the buffeta full blown riot might have broken out! Respectfully, Kes What in the world has this fellow been drinking? Nothing other than the leftover juice from my watermelon rind pickles. It is good for what ails you. My daughter is spending the summer in Nashville, Tennessee doing an internship and enjoying life it seems to her daddy. She sends us pictures from shoe shopping; I understand this. She also made it to the Wildhorse Saloons 20th Anniversary Celebration, taking advantage of tickets from a friend of a friend. She also hits the Nashville Farmers Market every chance she gets. Im proud of her. Good grades, good country music and she sends me pictures of Toe Jam. Toe Jam? Yes, it seems that some of the vendors there at the Nashville Farmers Market are pushing these ne canned goods from a family in the rolling hills of Kentucky and Tennessee. But Toe Jam? Tangerines, Oranges and Elderberry TOE Jam. After I stopped laughing, I told her to learn a little marketing from these smart farmers. I was serious. She does well in school, but if you want a good education, you need to pay attention to smart farmers and farming families. This farm Spring Valley Farms, makes more than just Toe Jam; they have Frog Jam, Trafc Jam and all kinds of other jams, jellies and butters. The FROG Jam has Figs, Raspberries, Oranges and Ginger. The Trafc Jam seems to be packed with blueberries, strawberries, rhubarb, raspberries and slowed down with cane sugar. I decided I might like to try the Toe Jam, maybe even cover myself with it. Ive always enjoyed tangerines and orange marmalade type spreads; elderberry makes sense to me. So just spread it on me. These tickets she had to the Wildhorse Saloon were evidently some type of VID tickets Very Important Daughter. She got to meet the fellows in Lonestar and seemed to be excited. When I asked her about meeting them, she noted, They are short. At just over ve feet, my oldest daughter knows short so I believed her. She loved Lonestar, she didnt give me an actual report on the performance, other than they were short. Also performing at the Wildhorse on this night were the country bands, Trick Pony and Ricochet. My daughter didnt tell me how tall they were. Oh well, she still turned me on to the Toe Jam While I was thinking about all of this important stuff, I was in the kitchen cleaning one of my cast iron skillets thinking how nice it would be if somebody treated me like I treat my cast iron skillets. Yes, I was. I do it just like the folks at Lodge Cast Iron in South Pittsburg, Tennessee tell me to do it. Hand wash. Dry immediately even before first use. Rub with a light coat of vegetable oil after every wash. How much oil? Just enough to restore the sheen, without being sticky. You do this to keep the iron seasoned and to protect it from moisture. Wouldnt you like to be loved like that? Think about it. The hand wash and just enough vegetable oil to keep your sheen (but not be sticky). It does sound wonderful to me. The country band Shenandoah, sang the song, I want to be Loved Like That. A song about wanting to be loved like you want to be loved. Maybe I should ask my daughter how tall the folks in Shenandoah are. On second thought, maybe I should write my own country song. Cover me with Toe Jam and Love Me Like a Cast Iron Skillet has a nice ring to it. I need to get myself a pair of boots and practice my acceptance speech for the Academy of Country Music Awards Song of the Year. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Page 4 Special to The Star Medicare health coverage is fairly comprehensive. But if you need a lot of care, Medicare can leave you with significant out-of-pocket costs. Thats why most people have some kind of supplemental insurance to help cover the costs that Medicare doesnt. Choosing a supplemental plan that makes sense for you is not always easy. Here are some tips that will help. What are the types of supplemental coverage? About a third of people with Medicare have supplemental insurance from a former employer. If you are lucky enough to have this type of coverage, it is probably your best option. Be careful if you ever decide to drop it you might not be able to get it back. People with low incomes may qualify for their states Medicaid program (and other related programs) that cover Medicare premiums and prescription drug costs. If you dont fall into these categories, you may want to consider buying either a private Medicare supplement plan (often called Medigap) or a Medicare Advantage plan. Both options have advantages and disadvantages, and you should do careful research before selecting one or deciding to change your current coverage. What are Medigap plans? Medigap plans work with original Medicare and pay costs that are left over after Medicare has paid what it covers. Depending on the plan, they pay for some amount of Medicares deductibles and co-insurance. They do not usually offer additional services, so they will not pay for an item or service that Medicare does not cover. For example, they do not cover prescription drugs, so most people with original Medicare and a Medigap plan also buy a Part D plan. Medigap plans are sold by private insurance companies. These plans come in several different categories, each designated by a letter: For example, Medigap Plan F. Every plan with the same letter must offer the same benets, so it is easy to compare plans from different insurers. In addition, these plans have to follow state and federal rules. What are Medicare Advantage plans? Medicare Advantage plans are different from Medigap plans. Medicare Advantage plans are run by private insurers that contract with Medicare to provide all Medicare benets. Many of these plans include prescription drug coverage, and some plans also offer extra services that are not covered by traditional Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans usually have provider networks that limit which doctors and hospitals you can go to. Medicare Advantage plans also have rules about what you will have to pay out of pocket that differ from the rules for traditional Medicare. Sometimes these rules are benecial and can protect you from high out-of-pocket costs. For example, a Medicare Advantage plan may have a low copayment for ofce visits. But sometimes you may pay more for a service if you have a Medicare Advantage plan compared to traditional Medicare. What factors should I consider if Im deciding between buying a Medigap plan and a Medicare Advantage plan? There is no insurance that is right for everyone. Here are some key factors to consider: Medicare Advantage premiums may be more affordable than Medigap premiums. Medigap may offer better protection against high outof-pocket costs (deductibles, copayments, and co-insurance) than Medicare Advantage. Medicare Advantage plans may offer extra services not covered by Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans can change what services they cover every year. Medigap plans usually do not change what they cover, but they can, and do, raise premiums. Medicare Advantage may limit your choice of doctors to a particular network and may require you to get a referral from your primary care doctor to see a specialist. Medigap will not. One key concern is that in many states, Medigap premiums can increase as you get older. And if you decide to drop your Medigap plan, you may have to pay a much higher premium to get that plan back in the future if you can get it back at all. So be careful about making any changes to your Medigap coverage. When can I enroll? Normally, you can enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan only during Medicares annual open enrollment period, which runs from October 15 to December 7. Once you pick a Medicare Advantage plan, you must stick with it for the whole year (unless you qualify for a special enrollment period). Sign-up periods for Medigap plans vary from state to state. How can I get more information? Anyone with Medicare can get help from a local counselor through their State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). Call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local SHIP, or go to www.Medicare.gov and click on Find someone to talk to. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Cover me with toe jam and love me like a cast iron skillet Beets eclipsed only by olive loaf HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Your options for Medicare supplemental coverage

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, July 24, 2014 A Section Page 5 My wish for you is that this life becomes All that you want it to . My Wish written by Steve Robson and Jeffrey Steele and recorded by Rascal Flatts The cost of educational expenses, which includes college tuition, increased by over 2 percent last year. Nevada just enacted a 17 percent university tuition increase over the next four years. Lets hope last winters freeze applies to tuition hikes at Floridas public universities. College is affordable for fewer American families than ever before. Ironically, a college education is, more than ever, widely viewed as a prerequisite to decent employment in todays tight job market. How much does college cost these days? Say last year you paid $15,000 in tuition, plus housing, a meal plan, activity fees, and spending money, and your childs total college expenses were $25,000. And lets say you currently have a senior and a freshman in college. Well, with a 2 percent increase, now your total annual expenses are $51,000 instead of $50,000. Many parents and grandparents utilize 529 education savings plans to fund college expenses. Investors fund the account and their dollars grow taxfree, and stay that way as long as distributions are for qualied college expenses. Any form of savings is benecial, but in the case of 529s, sometimes college parents and grandparents may be better off simply investing their discretionary income in a taxable brokerage account in their own name. Simply put, the fees associated with many 529 plans sometimes offset the benets of utilizing them. While you forego tax deferred growth by utilizing a taxable brokerage account, you have a much wider selection of investment options without any restrictions on how the funds can be spent. Say little Johnny Angel becomes little Johnny Devil. You own the account and can use the funds for your own retirement needs or anything else, for that matter. Or say your child is an exceptional student and receives several scholarships. You can provide nancial assistance as you see t; perhaps send them on an interim trip to Europe or help them buy a car. Locking in tuition rates with a state sponsored pre-paid tuition program is usually a money saver. Some twenty states currently offer such plans, usually under a 529 Plan umbrella. Floridas ofcial website details four of these pre-paid tuition options, which include two 2-year plans and two 4-year plans. Start a pre-paid tuition plan while your child is a toddler, and youll save signicant dollars by the time they start college. College always costs so much more than we think it will. Children still need all the nancial support they normally accept from you, in addition to their college expenses: health and medical insurance, doctor visits, car payments, car insurance, clothes and more. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-6086121~www.arborwealth. net), a Fee-Only and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any specic strategy or investment will be suitable or protable for an investor. Special to The Star There is controversy as to who said, There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics. Perhaps Mark Twain, perhaps British Prime Minister Disraeli, but few would argue the meaning. Politicians twist data all the time and with Obamacare, the misinformation reaches new levels. While conservatives try to destroy the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the programs popularity increases. Millions have signed up and the 26 states and D.C. have accepted billions of federal dollars to expand Medicaid. Those governments have reduced their uninsured by 6 points; the states that refused the money trimmed the number of uninsured by only 1.7 points. Those are citizens who will reap the benefits of having healthier families. They are counted in the millions. Mark Twain did say, The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated. So it is with Obamacare. The program is growing. In fact, its critics are moving on to other issues. The GOP lawsuit challenging President Barack Obamas use of his executive powers in implementing the ACA may be the last exercise in the bizarre. Bernard Tyson, CEO of Kaiser Permanente, said that Obamacare heads us in the right direction. Citizens need to be covered. Health care must be made more efficient. We need to take it to the people. He said more sophisticated technology that can bring costs down and increase efficiency. Telemedicine and health education kiosks in malls can prevent expensive doctor office visits. Wendall Potter, a columnist at the Center for Public Integrity, suggests that the ads attacking the Affordable Care Act may have contributed to the impressive number of people who signed up for insurance under Obamacare. Opponents have spent more than $450 million to kill Obamacare and the register is still ringing. Thats a lot of money down the drain. Paul Krugman, columnist and economist, says that Obamacare has improved millions of lives. The predictions of disaster have not occurred. Premiums have not soared. The nations health-care system has not collapsed. States cooperating with Obamacare may have seen premiums come down. The average cost for Obamacare is $82 per month. Thats a bargain. Many needy people in the states that refused Obamacare money find insurance unaffordable. In Florida, 1.3 million citizens could have been insured if Gov. Rick Scott and the Legislature had accepted the Medicaid expansion money. David Plouffe, a political strategist, predicts that ultimately all states will accept Obamacare. It is the law of the land and it is here to stay. Conservatives would be smart to offer proposals to improve the program rather than trying to kill it. Ideally the move to a Medicare for All makes sense. Supplemental insurance for people who want more could be made available. Moving health insurance costs away from businesses could be the focus for discussion. Obamacare is working. Eventually the public will become more aware of the millions of families that can now afford decent health care. Americans will remember who opposed Obamacare and take that memory to the polls. Dr. Marc Yacht, MD is a semi-retired physician living in Hudson, Fla Tuition Hikes, the 529 Plan and Rascal Flatts Obamacare is working! MARC YACHT Dear Editor, Tuesday, July 14, was a hard day for us here on the Cape to watch the desecration of history and have to navigate and try to do business with closed roads. The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is NO longer located on the Cape that is for sure. Just as the Cape San Blas Lighthouse rolled by Salinas Park and before she turned off the Cape the lightning roared and thunder crashed. It was almost like the good Lord was giving us a clue that He wasnt pleased that His lady, who had watching over His Gulf, was being stolen from His Cape. That is the only positive thing I can tell you happened that day. Perhaps Mayor Mel might want to stay indoors during the thunder storms for a while. Jim Anderson, the city manager, had made a comment earlier that he realized it would be a minor inconvenience for the day of the move for some people. If he bothers to check, he will find out there was nothing minor about it. All South Gulf County businesses lost considerable revenue during the busy season with little to no notice by the city of when the move was going to occur. All South Gulf County residents had major scheduling and routing problems throughout the day. Construction on homes came to a standstill on the Cape so all the workers who couldnt get to their work sites lost a days wages. More than inconvenient! Thanks goes out to the County for picking up the pieces that the city wouldnt do. The Sheriffs Department had officers out trying to help with traffic, the County EMS located an ambulance at County expense out at the Cape in case of emergencies, and the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department spent the day strategically locating their rescue and fire vehicles in case of an emergency. TDC tried to keep travel advisories up to help out. We county tax payers paid for all these expenses for the day, so much for no tax payer dollars being used for the move. And finally, Mayor Mel made the statement on TV that 99 percent of Gulf County residents agreed with moving the lighthouse to town. Now, I know he is a politician and therefore we dont know what to expect when a politician wants to spin their numbers, but I can assure you that 99 percent of the Gulf County residents in South Gulf County, who pay 42 percent of all Gulf County property taxes, did not and do not agree with moving our historic lighthouse to town. However, now the city residents will have the burden of the cost to keep her up. Victors rewrite history, but lets not get too far from the truth, Mel. All of us in South Gulf County will miss her. The Cape San Blas Lighthouse was not saved by the city. It was moved to the City for perceived financial gain. Patricia K. Hardman, Phd President, Coastal Community Association Good ole summertime Dear Editor, Here we are in the good old summertime. When the living is easy, that is if the air conditioning is working, but if not oops. Of course, there are ways we can cool off by taking a dive into the swimming pool or taking a cold shower. When I was young and living in the country I experienced many things that could help you be strong and help you endure things even if they were unpleasant. My dad passed away when I was very young. He had planted an acre of blueberries which we had to pick and get ready for market to help out with our finances. Summertime was a very hot time to spend in a blueberry patch. We also had to fight the feisty birds fighting to get the berries they wanted. While picking blueberries in the hot sun your mind would remember the creek just down the hill from where you lived and how nice it would be to go down and take a dip in the creek to cool off. When I think about my experiences I wonder, Did it cause me to be tougher or to just be a survivor. Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe Citizens U nited Dear Editor, Gulf County citizens reaffirmed their commitment to stand against the County Commissioners recent decision changing land development regulations immediately affecting Beacon Hill Veterans Memorial Park. Approximately 40 Gulf County citizens held a cookout at Veterans Park to discuss the latest developments in the lawsuit filed against the County Sunday afternoon. They braved meeting between thunderstorms reflecting the determination to make the County Commissioners undo their decision which they consider illegal. Attorney Pat Floyd representing Bo Williams spoke to the group explaining the current status of the suit to include the latest attempt by the Commissioners to avoid answering questions as to why they made the decision under oath. The fear amongst the Gulf County Citizens supporting this action is if this is left unchallenged and allowed to pass then our beautiful community will soon look like Panama City or Fort Walton Beach with dense construction, congestion and heavier crime. One individual spoke out and said we live here because we love this place and if we wanted to live in Panama City we would. People interested in joining this effort to protect Gulf County should see Barbara Radcliff at the No Name Caf downtown Port St. Joe who can take donations and provide more information. Jim Garth Port St. Joe Hard day at the Cape MARGARET R. M c DOWELL A rbor O utlook

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014 Real Es ta te Pi cks Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast 29,000 The Jou rn ey Back Home With We ems Memorial Rehab Car e When you or a loved on e need a little mor e time to ge t back on your feet, We ems Memorial Re hab Car e is her e Right in your own ne ighborhood Give us a call today and let us help you make that jour ney back hom e. We ems Mem orial Rehab Ca re 135 Av enue G, Apalach icola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 to gain a better handle on what money is remaining compared to obligations. Butler said staff identied some $323,974 in potential savings to be gleaned from the current budget. Yeager also continued his call, which he has made for at least ve years, for commissioners to look at alternative sources of funding. And for the second year in a row one proposal is to raise the county gas tax by 5 cents and take $200,000 of those dollars, which ow into the countys secondary road and bridge fund, to plug into the Public Works budget, which is allowed by law. We have got to nd alternative sourc es of revenue, Yeager said. We can not continue to go back to the property tax payer who is not 100 percent of us living in the county to absorb these increases. According to Property Appraiser Mitch Burke the percent of taxpayers in the county is north of 80 percent of coun ty residents. After considerable debate between Yeager and Commissioner Carmen McLemore, a replay of last year, com missioners approved 4-1 the additional 5 cents. Commissioners did the same thing at this juncture last year only to reverse course on abandon the proposal in the nal budget. Much of that wish list that boosted the tentative budget fell by the wayside dur ing Mondays special meeting. Probably everything on this list is needed, Butler said, adding that the county had done without some items up to this point; another year, he hoped, would not make a difference. Commissioners nixed pay raises for employees in the Clerk of Courts and Supervisor of Elections ofces as well as two new positions for the Property Ap praiser as well as money for a new pay roll system and equipment upgrades for the board meeting room. Funds to allow live online streaming of BOCC meetings was cut as was money for an excavator and new fueling system for Public Works, the latter two big ticket items costing a combined $320,000. Id like to have everything on this list, said Commissioner Carmen McLemore after a testy exchange with Public Works director Joe Danford over the need for the excavator. But we are not going to be able to do it. Dollars to the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce for a new investigator and vehicle replacement were axed. Cuts to outside agency funding pro posed by staff at 25 percent per agency met with mixed support, with commis sioners agreeing to cuts to the public library system, county Health Depart ment and ARC, but resisting cuts to the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and Gulf County Senior Citizens. Yeager said the fact that the BOCC had a contract with the Humane Soci ety and is essentially a partner with the agency on animal control mitigates con sideration of cuts. He said a community should also take care of their kids and their older people as a reason to maintain funding to Senior Citizens. Overall, staff identied $995,187 in cuts, nearly all of which were approved by commissioners. Estimates on selling equipment used at the landll after the landll closes at the end of the year would mean another $300,000 in revenue. In total, staff and commissioners closed the shortfall to roughly $682,628, which would still represent an increase in the millage rate of half a mill. Commissioners indicated they are not done working to bring the numbers down. Commissioners must set a tentative millage rate by Aug. 1. TAX from page A1 Special to The Star The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission (FWC) has sched uled a series of Gulf of Mex ico red snapper workshops for recreational stakehold ers beginning in late July to discuss state and federal management of recreation al red snapper. The workshops will also explore potential future approaches to managing this shery in an effort to ensure optimal access for Floridas resident and vis iting anglers. Anglers who would like to share their ideas and help improve management are encouraged to attend. All meetings will be from 6 to 8:30 p.m. local time and are set for: July 28: Pensacola, Pen sacola City Hall (2nd-oor Hagler Mason room), 222 W. Main St. July 29: Destin, Destin Community Center, 101 Stahlman Ave. July 30: Panama City, Florida State University Panama City, lecture hall of Holley Center, 4750 Col legiate Drive July 31: Carrabelle, Car rabelle City Hall cafeteria, 1001 Gray Ave. Aug. 11: St. Petersburg, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, 3rd-oor confer ence room, 100 Eighth Ave. SE. Red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico off Florida are managed by the FWC in state waters (from shore to 9 nautical miles) and by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council in federal waters (beyond 9 nautical miles). These snapper are largely harvested in fed eral waters, but also occur and are harvested recre ationally in state waters off northwest Florida. Because of manage ment constraints, the fed eral season has consis tently been shortened for several years in a row even though the recreational quota, or total poundage of sh that could be caught by anglers, has increased and the red snapper population has improved. This years federal sea son was the shortest yet, at nine days. Floridas state season was 52 days. The FWC is seeking input from recreational anglers about how to bet ter manage recreational harvest of this species at the state and federal level while continuing to rebuild the shery. Several management options that are being con sidered for federal waters by the Gulf of Mexico Fish ery Management Council will be discussed, including sector separation, which entails dividing the federal recreational red snapper quota into separate privateangler and for-hire quotas; an individual shing quota (IFQ) program for feder ally permitted charter and head boats, similar to the existing program for com mercial vessels, which al lots a specic portion of sh to individual vessels; and regional management, in which the recreational sh ery in federal waters could be managed on a state-bystate basis. These workshops offer stakeholders an opportu nity to share their expecta tions for the red snapper shery and their ideas on potential management op tions for state and federal waters. Please call 850-487-0554 or email Marine@MyFWC. co m for more information. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater and Rulemaking for more on these workshop s Red snapper workshops start this month

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, July 24, 2014 BU DG ET SUM MA RY TH EP RO PO SED OP ER AT ING BU DG ET EX PE NDI TU RE SO FG UL FC OU NT YS CHOO L DI ST RIC TA RE 4. 0P ER CE NT MORE TH AN LA ST YE AR S TO TA L OP ER AT IN GE XP EN DI TU RE S. FI SC AL YE AR 20 14 -2 01 5 TH ET EN TAT IV E, AD OP TE D, AN D/O RF IN AL BU DG ET SA RE ON FI LE IN TH EO FFI CE OF TH EA BO VE ME NTI ON ED TA XIN GA UT HO RI TY AS AP UBL IC RE CO RD NO TI CE OF BU DG ET HE AR IN G Th eG ul fC ou nt yS ch oo lD is tr ic t wi ll so on co ns id er ab ud ge t fo r2 01 415 .Ap ub li ch ea ri ng to mak ea DE CI SI ON on th e bu dg et AN DT AX ES wi ll be hel do n: Ju ly 28 th ,2 01 4 5: 15 PM at Gu lf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar d Me et in gR oo m, 15 0M id dl e Sc ho ol Rd ,P or tS t. Jo e, Fl or id a NO TI CE OF TA XF OR SCH OO L CA PI TA LO UT LA Y Th eG ulf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar dw ill soon co nside ram eas ur et oc on ti nu et o im po se a. 57 60 mi ll pr op er ty ta xf or ca pit al ou tl ay pr oj ec ts li st ed he re in Th is ta xi si na dd it io nt ot he sch oo lb oa rd s pr op ose dt ax of 6. 36 2m ill sf or op er at in ge xp en se sa nd is pr op ose ds ole ly at th ed is cr et io no ft he sc ho ol bo ar d. Th ec ap it al ou tl ay ta xw ill ge ne ra te appr ox im at el y$ 79 6, 59 1t ob eu se df or th ef ol lo wing pr oj ec ts : MA IN TE NA NC E, RE NO VA TI ON ,A ND RE PA IR R ei mb u rs em en to ft he ma in te na nc e, re no va ti on ,a nd re pa ir sp ai dt hr ou gh th eG en er al Fu nd as pe rm it te db yF lo ri da Sta tu te HV AC Sy st em s Li gh ti ng Fi re Al arm s Po rt St .J oe El em en ta ry Po rt St .J oe Jr .S r. Hi gh Sc ho ol We wa hi tc hk aE le me nt ar y We wa hi tc hk aJ r. S r. Hig hS ch oo l Di st ri ct Of c e Ad ul tS ch oo ls Up gr ade Bat hro oms Re pla ce Doo rs Re plac eF lo ori ng MO TO RV EH IC LE PU RC HA SE S Pu rc ha se of 3s ch oo lb us es Pu rc ha se of mai nt en an ce ve hi cle s Pu rc ha se of ma te ri a ls an de qui pm en td el iv er yv eh icl e NE WA ND RE PL AC EM EN TE QU IP ME NT ,C OM PU TE RS EN TE RP RI SE RE SO UR CE SO FT WA RE ,A ND S. 10 11 .7 1( 2) ,F .S ., EL IG IB LE EX PE ND IT UR ES IN SUP PO RT OF DIG IT CL AS SR OO M PL ANS PU RSU AN TT OS .1 01 1. 62( 12 ), F. S. Sc ho ol Fu rn it ur ea nd Eq ui pm en t Da ta Pr oce ss in gE qui pm en ta nd So ft wa re Co mm un ic at io ns Eq ui pm en t Ma in te na nc eE qui pm en t Ent er pri se So ft wa re PA YM EN TO FP RE MIU MS FO RP RO PE RT YA ND CA SU AL TY IN SUR AN CE NE CE SS AR YT OI NS UR ET HE ED UC AT ION AL AND AN CI LL AR YP LA NT SO FT HE SCH OO LD IS TR IC T In sura nc ep re mium so nd is tr ic tf aci li ti es Al lc onc ern ed cit iz en sa re in vi te dt oap ub li ch eari ng to be he ld on Jul y2 8t h, 20 14 at 5: 15 p. m. at th eG ulf Co un ty Sc ho ol Bo ar dm ee ti ng ro om ,1 50 Mi dd le Sch oo lR oad ,P or tS t. Jo e, Fl or ida AD EC IS ION on th ep rop ose dC AP IT AL OU TL AY TA XE Sw ill be ma de at th is he ari ng

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014 On Red, White and Blue Skies day, kids decorate their bicycles in patriotic streamers and participate in a parade around WindMarks common area. The parade is led by members of the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce and Port St. Joe Volunteer Fire Department. The evening is closed out by families releasing lanterns to signify them lifting their cares above the clouds. When dealing with pediatric cancer, oftentimes that affected child must take center stage. Mayton and her crew of 40 adult volunteers go out of their way to ensure that the parents and siblings of the child receive as much attention as possible during the trip. Parents attend nightly discussions where they can speak openly about their experiences dealing with their childs condition, good or bad. Last week Jud and Jessica Greene of Birmingham, A.L. attended their second Blue Skies retreat with their 5-year-old son Wyatt, who is currently battling brain cancer. Wyatt hasnt had an opportunity to be a kid and the best thing here is to see the smile on his face, said Jud. It allows him to engage with other kids kids who understand what hes going through, and thats tough to come by. The couple heard about the program through a friend at the hospital where Wyatt was being treated and welcomed the opportunity for some relaxation and socializing. Its such a great week, said Jud. You get to rest and take a break from the craziness. Mike Beasley of Marietta, father to 4year-old son with cancer, echoed the sentiment. Sometimes cancer is the least of the concerns for the families, said Beasley. The retreats give families a chance to relax, exhale, and take a break from the doctors appointments, stress and bills. Its like a cruise that never leaves the shore. Mayton said that once children are pulled out of school to receive treatment, its not uncommon for them to lose friends as their lives continue on. Justin Mack, an 11year-old cancer patient from Marietta, enjoyed his second retreat last week and said that his favorite part was being with everyone and having a lot of fun. Mack said hed made many friends at his retreats and looks forward to seeing many of the other kids each year. Its on the beach and its a nice treat, said Mack. I like being around so many really nice people. Volunteers, coming to Port St. Joe from Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, and South Carolina, spend the retreat caring for the families and not only give their time, but also raise nancial support to help cover costs for the guests, whether its through fundraisers or their own donations. Volunteers serve the families to free them from the burdens of daily tasks, creating a safe and welcoming environment. Many volunteers often bring their children, who develop friendships with patients and often return for future retreats. Its unbelievable to be around families that promote volunteerism, said Kim Epps, a rst-year volunteer from Kennesaw, G.A. Its all about the kids who just want to feel normal this week. Sissy Persichetti, a second-year volunteer, said that for many kids, attending the retreat is non-negotiable and compared the event to summer camp. Most people who come, come back and until youve experienced it, its hard to articulate the feeling it gives you, said Persichetti. Our friends got us down here, but the kids got us back. The overall cost per trip is $50,000 for lodging alone; to help keep the trips going Mayton regularly receives donations from hospitals, churches and families who have been helped by the organization. The retreat is in full effect this week as well, and others arrive in September and October. Those who may be interested in volunteering can apply online at www. blueskiesministries.org. While we cant change the childrens future, we can make sure they have a place to laugh, eat, play, hang out and enjoy creation, said Mayton. Families launched lanterns to signify lifting their cares above the clouds. The parade was led by members of the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce and Port St. Joe Fire Department. 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL A T THE MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S LIVE ON TH E PO OP DECK TRUE SOUL SA TURD AY 9P M FRID AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M CO MING THURSD AY JUL Y 31 ST 8P M RAND Y ST ARK THE CURR YS SOUTHERN SUND AY ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON T HE PO OP DECK MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T S ELEC TION O F A LL Y OUR F AV ORITE B EER W INE & SPIRIT S UPCOMING EVENTS KARAOKE THURSD AY FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH DEBRA AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST NO HID DEN CHA RG ES: It is our policy tha tt he pa tient and an yo ther pe rson re spo nsible fo rp ay men ts has the ri ght to re fuse to pa y, can cel pa yme nt or be re imburs ed by pa ymen to ra ny othe rs ervic e, exam ina tion or tr ea tment whic hi sp erf or med as ar esu lt of and wit hin 72 hou rs of re sp ondi ng to the adv er tiseme nt fo rt he fr ee, dis count ed fe eo rr edu ced fe es erv ice, examin ation or tr eat ment. ww w. mull ise ye .c om Medical Ey eE xam with fo rG laucoma, Catar acts and other eye diseases 850-7 63-666 6 59 ye ars and older ,n ot pr esently under our car e. Sm ar tL en se s SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on Boar dC er tified and Catar act Sur ge on 11 09456 Coupon Expir es: 8-15-14 CODE: SJ00 NORMAL from page A1 WES LOCHER | The Star Each night of the week has a theme and last Thursday was Red, White and Blue Skies.

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Local The Star| A9 Thursday, July 24, 2014 Florida Legislature based on projections of enrollment, taxable property values and other factors. However, the RLE is adjusted in July based on comparisons of the property tax roll to those projections. The result for Gulf District Schools was a further decrease in RLE, carving it by 5.44 percent. The required local effort came down more than we expected, which is good, said district nance of cer Sissy Worley. Discretionary funding, that money allowed the district to sustain day-today operations primarily workforce salaries and bene ts remained the same. An adjustment due to prior year changes in property tax collections also remained the same. In the one component over which the School Board actually has a voice, capital outlay, or bricks and mortar, the small increase in property values this year allowed the board to take that millage while still collecting the funds needed for pressing concerns, particularly beginning the process of churning an aging bus eet. The overall millage rate including the voter-approved one mill additional operating levy for the coming year will be 6.938, down from 7.063, a drop of just under 2 percent. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of assessed taxable property. Taxing authorities must submit a tentative millage rate by Aug. 1. Those are the numbers taxpayers will see on their annual Truth in Millage statements to be mailed after Aug. 1. The millage can not go up after that date but can come down, though school district budgets are unlike any other in that the board members have little to no say over the major components of the funding formula. Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton said that in lieu of assessing the maximum capital outlay millage under law 1.25 mills the board has kept the component down to mitigate the one mill operational levy. This board has decided to park one mill of what it could levy, Norton said. The board this year brought the capital outlay millage up to address the bus eet after years of maintaining one of the lowest, if not the lowest, LCI millage in the state. This year the board moved LCI over half a mill .576 for the rst time in at least seven years. The major reason was the need to spend $292,000 on two new school buses to get the district back on a rotation of replacing buses which the district has not done in nearly a decade. The current bus eet averages 11-12 years of age, said transportation director Greg Lay eld. The district also proposed to spend $115,000 in new lighting for Shark Stadium in Port St. Joe. The balance of the LCI funds will go to annual upkeep and maintenance costs as well as insurance. The rst public hearing on the Gulf District School budget is 5:15 p.m. ET Monday in the School Board meeting room at the district of ces on Middle School Road in Port St. Joe. Honoring Sara Joe Wooten The board unanimously approved naming the current Of ce of Instructional Services in honor of Sara Joe Wooten. Wooten, the assistant superintendent of instruction for more than a decade, is retiring next month after more than 40 years in education, most of them in Gulf County. I cant think of a more appropriate honor, said School Board member George Cox, noting Wootens work bringing technology and instructional upgrades and millions in grants to the district. She has spent many days and nights in that building. *In other announcements during Mondays meeting, the 2014-15 school year begins for students Aug. 18. Fr ee S ch oo l S up pl ie s for 350 S tu de nt s Fr ee H ea lt h S cr ee ni ng s for E ve ry on e A or da bl e, Q ua li ty C ar e, Fr om P eo pl e W ho C ar e AC CEPTIN G NE W P AT IENT S 850-639-5828 Nor th Florida Medical Centers Inc MEDI CAL CEN T ER W ew ahitchka Ba ck to Sc ho ol He al th Fa ir Au gus t 1, 2:00-4:00 p. m. CD T www gcec .com PowerSouth s Ener gy Sour ces (2013) 64.8% NA TURA L GAS 5.3 % HY DRO 0. 3% REN EW ABLES 29.6% COAL In 2013, 95 per cent of ou r me mber s el ec tri cit y was mad e us ing fossil fuels like coal and natural gas. Yo ur electricity doesnt just come out of the wall. AN EXCITING SALES OPPORTUNITY IN THE NEWS HERALD, WORKING ON: To apply send resume to LGrimes@pcnh.com. Ca ndida te s should ha ve prior ex perienc e in a sales en vir onmen t along with high school diploma or equiv alen t. Th e Ne ws He ra ld o e rs a co mpetitiv e bene t pack age including health, den tal lif e insur anc e, and 401(k) plan. Ca ndida te hir ed pending pr eemplo ymen t dr ug scr een and criminal back gr ound check The News Herald is seeking a Sales Support Coordinator The ideal candidate will need: St ro ng co mmunica tion sk ills and ve ry high at te nt ion to detail Ex ce llen t cust omer ser vic e, or ganiza tional sk ills and co mput er sk ills re quir ed Mu st be pr oc ess dr iv en and be able to fu nc tion e ec tiv ely and independen tly with asser tiv e, inno vat iv e and persuasiv e personalit y to ac hiev e sales objec tiv es on a re gular basis Th is position will wo rk co llabor at iv ely with the assig ned te am to en sur e ex ce ptional cust omer ser vic e to co mpan y s cur re nt an d pr ospec tiv e adv er tisers by helping set appoin tmen ts fo r sales te am and tak ing calls fr om clien ts SALES SUPPORT COORDINA TOR MILLAGE from page A1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m School and county of cials are trying to get on the same page when it comes to redistricting. With the Gulf County School Board and Board of County Commissioners each facing upcoming issues regarding the drawing of district lines, the two governing bodies on Monday began a conversation, at least by proxy, to nd a way to have similar, if not overlaying, district maps. The School Board must consider district lines during evennumbered years en route to implementation of any changes during an odd-numbered year. The Board of County Commissioners is under a similar mandate under state law. The boards, however, have glaring differences in mandates, the major one being that the school board is not under the same federal decree of some three decades that controls districts at the county level. And, in addition, the two boards have had little coordination in the most recent respective efforts to redistrict and the result is maps that are much different and have had the effect of creating 10 different districts for the Supervisor of Elections. The issue is more pronounced, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, on the south end of the county where the boundary lines for Districts 3 and 4 are quite different between BOCC and School Board. I can tell you what happened back in the day and that was there was no coordination, said School Board attorney Charles Costin, alluding to a decade ago when the two boards began going their own way on redistricting. There were personal agendas and no coordination. In addition, when the BOCC redrew its lines in 2011 it created additional variance between the district maps governing the constituencies electing representatives to the respective boards. That, in turn, has raised the cost of administering elections for Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon, said county administrator Don Butler. If we have the same lines as the county the county would save money, School Board member John Wright said. But redrawing the lines will be a complexly layered proposition, said county attorney Jeremy Novak. The BOCC is on the tail end of a two-year process to examine its options for redistricting, countywide voting and the impact on the county of Supreme Court changes to the Voting Rights Act and the federal decree that brought in single-member districts. An attorney working as a consultant on the issues recently submitted a report recommending the BOCC take certain steps toward addressing issues with current district boundaries. The most signi cant is that District 4, the countys majority minority district now has much fewer voters as commissioners have redrawn the other four districts without touching District 4 due to the federal decree pertaining to minority representation. For the BOCC, District 4 has 1,276 registered voters. Only District 2 on the north end, with 1,625 voters, has less than 2,000 voters. There are more than 2,200 voters in Districts 3 and 5. For the School Board, the disparity is even larger. District 4 has 1,195 voters. No other district has less than 2,000 voters. Michael Spellman, the attorney consulting with the BOCC, suggested that District 4 may no longer be the majority minority district in the county, suggesting demographic changes may have moved that potential district north. Another major factor in redistricting is a 2001 Attorney General opinion which said that the county should count its prison population at least 3,000 inmates housed in Districts 1-2 as part of its population when redrawing district lines, Novak said. The percentages would be changed dramatically if prisoners were counted, Novak said. The aim, he added, is to bring back district lines (for the county and school board) into correlation. Novak noted that the BOCC was wrestling with how to count prisoners, a question Norton asked. Would they be counted for the district in which they were housed? Or as part of the overall population in order to draw ve districts within the 10 percent deviation mandated by law? Spellman of the law rm consulting for the county has recommended the BOCC expend the funds to hire a GIS expert to look at the county demographics as well as count the prison population. Those steps must be taken, he said, before the BOCC could go into federal court to try to amend or overturn the federal decree as part of a move to countywide voting. Novak said the BOCC is exploring options on the counting of inmates, whether through legislative review and a x or to seek a state or federal review of the issues. Costin recommended that School Board members coordinate a joint meeting with the BOCC to examine options and that board members should wait to see in what direction the BOCC goes before deciding a course of action. We need to do something, Costin said. I think we need to be consistent. School Board member Billy Quinn, Jr. said his priority was maintaining the majority minority district. We need to make sure a minority candidate has a chance, Quinn said. BOCC, school board trying to coordinate redistricting Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star.com Thursday, July 24, 2014 OUTD OO RS www.starfl.com Section A By Tom Baird Special to The Star A scene is played out almost daily along the shores and marshes of the Gulf coast. A blue crab warily approaches a scrap of meat in about ve inches of water. After sampling for a moment, she settles down to serious feeding, tearing strips of esh with her claws and passing them to her mouth. Lulled by this activity, the blue crab, attracted to the bait, realizes her mistake too late and is netted by a weekend crabber. Of all the edible crabs, the blue crab is the most abundant and popular. Many Americans prefer crab meat to any other kind of seafood, and yet, these leggy crustaceans were once believed to be poisonous. Crab shing is one of the largest shell sh operations in the U.S., employing thousands of shermen and processors. According to the latest gures from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, in 2012, 8,089,890 pounds of hard-shelled blue crab were commercially harvested in Florida waters with a dockside value of $9,934,882. This number pales in comparison to North Carolina with over 30 million pounds of blue crabs harvested commercially, with a dockside value of $21 million. The Chesapeake Bay area has traditionally been the leader in the blue crab harvest industry, contributing signicantly to the economies of Maryland and Virginia, yet there have been major declines in the blue crabs harvested from Chesapeake Bay, and Louisiana now ranks number one in blue crab harvest. If Florida harvests about 8 million pounds of blue crab annually, when you consider that it takes 5 to 6 hard crabs to make a pound, thats a lot of blue crabs. No gures are available for pounds taken by recreational shermen or school kids. Although for many years blue crabs were believed to be restricted to the U.S. Atlantic Coast and Gulf of Mexico ranging from Massachusetts to Texas, the blue crab also inhabits the waters of Bermuda and mysteriously appeared in the Mediterranean Sea in 1948. Essentially a shallow water crab, it lives in bays, sounds and mouths of coastal rivers. Normally an inhabitant of salt water, the blue crab is also found in brackish and freshwater. Many Florida rivers have blue crab populations far from the sea. The scientic name of the blue crab describes it nicely. From Latin, calli meaning beautiful and nectes meaning swimmer. In 1896, Mary Rathbun described the blue crab and gave it the species name sapidus meaning savory. Very apt. Hence, Callinectes sapidus says savory, beautiful swimmer to scientists regardless of their national language. The blue crab swims beautifully through the water with great speed and ease using a pair of modied appendages that act as paddles. Mature crabs are often brilliant deep blue against a basic creamy white beneath. Bright red may be on the spines of the shell or carapace and on the tips of the claws. Like all true crabs, the blue crab has 10 legs which may be specialized to walk, swim or pinch. The abdomen is a thin ap tucked below the main body part called the cephalothorax. Inside this hard carapace are the gills and internal organs. The rst pair of legs are the large claws, used for catching, cutting and tearing food, and for defense. Behind these are three pairs of walking legs, followed by a pair of swimming legs or paddles. The sex of the crab may be determined by examining the abdomen or tail folded up under the body. It is usually narrow, triangular, T-shaped and white in the male, but is broad, round and brownish in the female. Crabs must molt or shed their outer covering or exoskeleton in order to grow. They also have the power to regenerate lost appendages. Ordinarily, the crab increases one-quarter to one-third in size with each molt. During its life cycle a blue crab molts or sheds its shell about twentysix times. Once the crab sheds its shell, it generally digs into the sand for protection or hides under submerged objects. From this soft state the carapace will pass through stages of hardness until the new shell is quite brittle. Mating takes place about now, starting in June and through October, and is timed to when the female sheds her covering. The male blue crab carries the female two or more days until she sheds. You may have witnessed this behavior and wondered why one crab was carrying another. As the female mates only once in a molt this insures that the male will be present at the critical moment of shedding and will also be able to protect the soft female until her new shell is hard. Eggs are carried in a mass containing 700,000 to 2,000,000 eggs in a fold between the abdomen and carapace. The eggs hatch in about 15 days. Of the vast numbers of eggs produced, less than 1 in 1,000,000 will hatch and survive disease, predation and pesticides to become a mature crab. It is illegal to harvest a gravid female with her egg mass. While legal to harvest females, it is also considered good conservation practice to release all female crabs. According to the Florida FWC, mature females may store sperm in their bodies for several months after mating in order to spawn at a later date. If a mature female is harvested, though she may not exhibit eggs, there is no certainty that she has spawned. The molted or soft-shelled crab is quite a delicacy to eat and can be battered, fried and eaten entire. In 2012, 68,898 pounds of soft-shell crabs were harvested in Florida, worth $627,246. Considering the blue crabs importance both ecologically and commercially, we need to take care that pollution, habitat destruction, watershed development and overharvesting dont damage this Florida resource as has happened in Chesapeake Bay. Crab cakes sound good for dinner tonight. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Summer time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, July 24 85 78 30 % Fr i, July 25 85 78 30 % Sa t, July 26 85 78 30 % Sun, July 27 85 78 30 % Mo n, July 28 85 78 40 % Tu es July 29 85 77 80 % We d, July 30 84 77 80 % Page 10 Some important facts about the blue crab SPECIAL TO THE STAR SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Trolling is heating up with king mackerel taking top spot again this week. Good weed beds are forming due south of Cape San Blas and are holding great numbers of Mahi-Mahi. Trout are still close to shore at Towns Beach. Try using a larger top-water bait such as top dog or a Zara spook in gold/silver. Scallop is beginning to be more productive as the season continues. Larger shells are being found in 3-6 feet of water, but plenty of smaller shells are east of Blacks Island.

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Special to The Star Last weekend, the annual Founders day tournament was at St. Joe Golf & Country Club. We cannot thank our spon sors, volunteers and staff enough for their hard work in putting this together. Tour nament Director Jim Terry wanted to thank all of the par ticipants for making this tour nament such a fun outing and competitive event. More than 30 teams signed up to play a handicap best ball two-man event with dinner and covered dish fol lowing the round of golf. The winners were: rst Dick Race and Bobby Burns; second Mike McGarl and Rick Matela; third Wayne Rich and Jim Harrison. The longest drive was made by Boyd Bulger and the longest putt by Mish Fuller. We are extremely thank ful for our sponsors who made this tournament possible; Waterfront Auto, Gilbert Pump & Mechanical Inc., Dan and Barb Van Treese, Seahorse Water Safaris, No Worries Vacation Rentals, Big Fish Construction LLC, Harmon Realty Vacation, Jim and Barbara Terry, Roberson & Associates, 98 Real Estate, The Port Wine & Fine Spirits, St. Joe Gas, St Joe Rent-All, GPM Land Management, Gulf 2Bay Dev & Const, Tom Gibson, Manhattan Sniff Club, St Joe Ace Hardware, St. Joe Tire, Port St. Joe Marina, Haughty Heron, Centennial, Bluewater Out riggers, KWICO, LLC, Tight line Charters, Boyd & Mitzi Bulger, Paul Penn, Catheys Ace Hardware, Tyndall FCU, Capital City, Mel Magidson, Ralph Rish, Aaron Farns ley, Current Solutions, GAC Contractors, Gulf Coast Real Estate Group, Hannon Insurance, Provisions, For gotten Coast Adventures, Buy-Rite Drugs, Town Talk, Atlas Golf, London Optics, Titlest, Powerbilt, Thirsty Goat, Port Inn, Sunset Coastal Grill, Edwin Watts Golf, Seahorse Water Sa faris, Ramseys, Shoreline Spa and Gulf County Tourist Development Council. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com There is no I in team but there is plenty of heat. The Port St. Joe Tiger Shark football team expe rienced the warmth last week during a three-day camp in Marianna held during a blistering week; one of the hottest in Mari anna for the time of year. The Tiger Sharks car ried 35 varsity and junior varsity players to Marian na to attend a Fellowship of Christian Athletes camp that promoted team con cepts on the eld and les sons of faith off. Port St. Joe was one of 10 teams that participated, all Class 1A schools save for Wakulla. There was re gional representation, from Bozeman and Blountstown to Mayo Lafayette. The meat of the camp was the opportunity to scrimmage, in pads, helmets and shorts, against every other team. Port St. Joe scrimmaged nine teams, skipping only larger-school Wakulla. Teams scrimmaged 30 minutes, in eight-, seven-, six-play sequences, rotat ing offense and defense. The team just runs around and learns to work together, said Coach John Palmer, who is returning to Port St. Joe, where he coached seven years, af ter ve years at Hernando High. The action is at full speed with hitting, though no tackling at least that is the goal. We did have one or two that tackled, other teams did too, but that quickly stopped, said Palmer with a laugh. But we hit and it was hot. The summer camp was a rst for the football team in several years, said Coach Chuck Gannon, who retired from the school district but returns as defensive co ordinator on a volunteer basis. It is a team-building camp, Palmer said. The format is designed to get team time in, to work the kids. This was a good op portunity to see our kids. We have an idea of what we need to work on and com ing into (fall practice) gives us an idea of what we have. It was good camp for the players. And the coaches, Gan non added. We havent done something like that in a few years. Palmer said the camp represented a teaching tool. Using the basic play book from each side of the ball, coaches were able to see players against other teams, including those like Bozeman and Blountstown that are on the upcoming regular season schedule. You had a lot of time to coach, Palmer said. And for the players to understand, to compre hend basics and to practice what could make them per fect in the fall. The kids learn by do ing, Palmer said. We are in a work phase and we have a lot of work to do. And after each day of work, the players and coaches retired to what, judging by the looks on the faces of Palmer and Gan non, was modest housing that included few amenities beyond a bed and a roof. The camp, including transportation, was paid for out of donations, Palm er said. The players also hosted a work day to raise money. They had raised money or the community donated the money, Palmer said. We had a lot of community support and we thank the community for that. With out them we could not have gone. And it was a good expe rience. A good camp for the kids. Practice for the upcom ing season begins Aug. 4. The Tiger Sharks will host Blountstown in a Kickoff Classic on Friday, Aug. 22, at Shark Stadium. To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORT S www.starfl.com Thursday, July 24, 2014 A Page 11 Section More than 30 teams participate in Founders Day Tournament at Golf Club PHOTOS S PECIAL TO T HE S TAR Jim Terry goes over the instructions with the golfers before teeing off. Joe Whaley and Phillip Lanford prepare to putt. Guerry Magidson, Herschel Neel and Benny Sherrill on the green. S PECIAL TO T HE S TAR Summer camp promotes team building for Tiger Sharks

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Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by readers. Thanks to all who help make this page happen each week. This is intended to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please submit your photos to tcroft@star.com COURTESY OF S TEVE AT KAYA K DOG AD VENTURES Kayaking the Chipola River COURTESY OF T ERRY LIN D A heron invades a familys beach spread feed me COURTESY OF KRISTY R AFFIE LD A couple of train conductors in the making at Oak Grove Church Daycare COURTESY OF LAURA AT DRAGON FL Y PHOTOGRA P HY A sunset glows over Jetty Park in Port St. Joe COURTESY OF ME L INA EL U M A smiling turtle on the Port City Trail in Port St. Joe COURTESY OF MARIE R O M ANE LL I A young boy frolics on the beach at Indian Pass COURTESY OF KENNETH MONETTE The sun sets over folks strolling along St. Joseph Peninsula COURTESY OF LOUISE LOWERY MUSSE L WHITE All in the family COURTESY OF CHU CK AN D CO LL EEN A beach babe on St. Joe Beach Local A12 | The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, July 24, 2014 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Who was ragtime pianist-composer Eubie Blakes partner for 57 years? James Reese Europe, Noble Sissle, William Bolcom, Robert Kimball 2) By best road mileage which of these is closest to Buffalo, NY? Boston, Cincinnati, New York City, Philadelphia 3) Which auto tire company has used the avertising slogan, Time to re-tire? Michelin, Fisk, Goodyear, Firestone 4) What was the pet dogs name of B. J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell) in TVs M*A*S*H? Otho, Manhattan, Superman, Waggles 5) What golfer is/ was nicknamed the Walrus? Gary McCord, Craig Stadler, Hale Irwin, Greg Norman 6) When did German cartographer Martin Waldseemuller publish the rst-ever map bearing the name America? 1490, 1507, 1620, 1776 7) Which American city grew up around the colonial Fort Lowell? Savannah, San Diego, Tacoma, Tucson 8) Whose citizens generally buy the most books per capita? Florida, Utah, Alaska, Montana 9) What is cheechako the Alaskan word for? Fearless, River, Greenhorn, Telephone 10) What famous works rst line is, I was born in the year 1632 in the city of York? Roots, Lord Jim, Robinson Crusoe, Call of the Wild 11) Which of these doesnt have the Mississippi River as its eastern border? Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas 12) In real life what does Max Baer Jr. (Jethro from the Beverly Hillbillies) have a degree in? Business, Biology, Chemistry, Psychology 13) What year marked the passing of Louis Armstrong, Nikita Khrushchev, and Jim Morrison? 1971, 1973, 1975, 1977 14) Which state has a unicameral legislature? Wyoming, Nebraska, Rhode Island, Delaware 15) Biblical Is the book of Psalms in the Old or New Testament or neither? ANSWERS: 1) Noble Sissle, 2) Philadelphia, 3) Fisk, 4) Waggles, 5) Craig Stadler, 6) 1507, 7) Tucson, 8) Montana, 9) Greenhorn, 10) Robinson Crusoe, 11) Kansas, 12) Business, 13) 1971, 14) Nebraska, 15) Old Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The St. Joseph Bay Buf fer Preserve is hopping. Each year, the Buffer Preserve plays home to a handful of researchers from all over the U.S. who live on-site while conduct ing research in the area. One of the men currently calling the Buffer Preserve home is Andrew Marbury, a graduate research as sistant currently working toward his masters degree in sheries science at the University of Georgia. Marbury arrived at the Preserve in May and will stay through August as he studies sturgeon in the Brothers and Apalachicola rivers. While doing his un dergraduate two years ago, Marbury studied sh along the Georgia coast, and when he reached grad school, a professor told him about a grant written that would allow a student to study sturgeon along the Florida coast. The sturgeon is a cool, awesome sh, and I love eld work, Marbury said. Needless to say, I jumped at the opportunity. Marbury spent May through August of 2013 be ginning his research at the Buffer Preserve, but his progress was hampered by constant rains, forcing a re turn trip. Not that he was broken up about it. This year, Marburys goal is to track juvenile sturgeon, a sh that live in the salt waters of the Gulf part of the year before mov ing to freshwater rivers in February to spawn. Stur geon is considered feder ally endangered and Mar bury aims to track where they go in the river system, what habitats they prefer, as well as trying to estimate the number of juvenile stur geon currently in the river system. While there have been numerous studies con SPECIAL T O THE S T AR Andrew Marbury, a graduate research assistant from the University of Georgia lives at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve while researching juvenile sturgeon. Georgia researcher conducts sturgeon study By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Rescheduled from June, the 12th an nual Kids Win Fishing Tournament will take place Aug. 1-2 at the Port St. Joe Marina. Presented by the Kids Win Founda tion, the tournament is open to children ages three to 16. Those who register will learn the ba sics of shing and be armed with the know-how to reel in a big one. Trophies will be given out for the big gest sh and most sh caught within each division. The Small Fry division is for kids aged three to eight and Junior, for chil dren nine to 16. The contest is limited to inshore, nearshore, Intracoastal Waterway shing and contestants can be no further than three miles from shore. Fishing can take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. The whole idea of the tournament is to get kids involved in the outdoors, said Rick Carrie, president of the Kids Win Foundation. We want them to be come stewards of the water and the environment. The rst 350 kids who register for the event will receive a rod-and-reel, a tackle packet, T-shirt and goodie bag. With 342 participants in the 2013 event, Carrie predicted 2014 to be the biggest tournament to date. Camp Amigo welcomes juvenile burn victims to Cape San Blas By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The only thing noticeable was the smiles. Last week, the Tallahassee-based Childrens Burn Camp of North Flori da spent a week at the William J. Rish State Park on Cape San Blas. Known as Camp Amigo, more than 50 juvenile burn victims from Florida, Georgia and South Carolina attended the annual camp for a week of relaxation and camaraderie. See RESEARCHER B6 FILE P HO T O The rescheduled 12th annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament will be held Aug. 1-2 Kids Win again PHO T O S BY WE S L OCHER | The Star Camp Amigo founder Rusty Roberts (in hat) brings juvenile burn victims to the beach each year. HEALING BURNS FROM THE INSIDE Counselors Summer McKinney and Michelle Barnett each take care of a child during the week-long trip. See CAMP B6 See KIDS B6 Its hard work. But whats better than shing all summer for a job? Zach Cummins researcher Andrew Marburys technician assistant

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014 Port St. Joe High School Class of 1974 reunion The Port St. Joe High School class of 1974 invites those from the class of 1973 and 1975 to join them for their 40th class reunion on Sept. 19-20. On Sept. 19, attendees are invited to Bubba Harmons home for a time of reacquainting. A dinner will be held on Sept. 20 at Ronnie Bs restaurant. RSVPs are needed as soon as possible. Contact Traci Middleton Gaddis at 648-5474 or Ida Whiteld Garrett at 227-6185. The cost will be $40 per person with the choice of seafood or steak. Check can be made payable to the class of 1974 and mailed to Ida Garrett at 402 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe, 32456. A class reunion meeting will be held on Aug. 8 at 6:30 p.m. ET at the above address. We look forward to hearing from everyone. Join us on Facebook by searching class of 1974. Amateur radio license exams Amateur radio license exams will be given at 10 a.m. ET Aug. 16 at the Emergency Operations Center in Port St. Joe. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade an existing license. An amateur radio license can put you in contact with the world. If you need information, assistance or to register for an exam contact C.H. Tillis (AJ4xJ) at 648-8251. VFW seeks Korean War veterans The John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 is asking all Korean War Veterans who served from June 25, 1950 through July 27, 1953 and veterans who participated in U.N. Peace-keeping operations until the end of 1955 to complete an application for the Republic of Korea Ambassador for Peace medal. The application form can be obtained from VFW Post 10069 located at 1774 Trout Ave. in Highland View. You must provide a copy of your discharge papers to be attached to the application. Deadline for submission is Sept. 10. POC for this award is David E. Kelly, Jr., Veterans Service Ofcer of VFW Post 10069. Please contact David Kelly with questions at 227-5023. An ge li na is a wo nd er fu ll y we ll soc ia li ze d ca t. Sh e lo ve s th e at te nt ion of ki ds ad ul ts an d th e co mpa ny of oth er ca ts An ge li na is sp ay ed up -t o-d at e on va cc in at ion s an d re ady fo r a ne w home If yo u ca n gi ve th is pr et ty gi rl th e hom e sh e de se rv es ple as e do no t he si ta te to co nt ac t us If yo u ar e una ble to ado pt at thi s ti me pe rh aps yo u co ul d fo st er or mak e a Do na ti on Al l pe ts ado pt ed fr om SJ BH S wi ll be cu rr en t on va cc inat io ns an d sp ay ed /n eu te re d. Pl eas e do no t he si ta te to em ai l tow nse nd hsd ire ct or @g ma il .c om or ado ptb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or cal l th e St Jo se ph Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 7-1 10 3 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne ap pl ic at ion s an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il abl e at www .s jb hu man es oc iet y. or g Sh el te r hour s: Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t hour s: Th ur sd ay -S at urd ay fr om 10 am3 pm Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e. If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! The summer months are the most difcult times to garden in Florida. The high temperature and humidity make working outdoors extremely uncomfortable. This is also the time of year when insect and disease problems seems to be at an all-time high. Fortunately, Florida gardeners are a rugged group that believes the gain is worth the pain. The summer season are important times to provide extra care for azaleas and camellias, while they are establishing ower buds for next seasons blooms. During the summer, a lack of water and plant food or insects and diseases may limit next seasons production. An attractive lawn somehow makes summer days seem a little cooler, yet it takes effort to maintain a healthy lawn during the summer. It requires frequent mowing, edging and watering, water lawns thoroughly when needed, applying one half to three quarters inch of water. Yes, it is chinch bug time again! Chinch bugs which feed on St. Augustine lawns occur during hot, dry weather and can cause serious damage if not controlled. Damage usually occurs as a patch with a brown, dead center and yellowish margin. It seems chinch bugs get the blame and often unjustly for everything. Be sure the damage is not because of other reasons. Summer annuals always provide quick and easy color during the hot, summer days. Fast growing and colorful annuals will continue to provide beauty if given proper care. Feed established annuals with a complete fertilizer and remove faded blooms. Water annuals well during hot, dry periods and control major annual pests to insure good production. The summer months are good times to take cuttings or your favorite ornamentals. Take cuttings four to six inches in length from current years growth and place them in a well-drained rooting media and cover with clear plastic or glass to achieve high humidity. Dont place the cuttings in full sun since heat will build up under the plastic and kill the cuttings. Some plants that are common commonly grown from cuttings include: Abelia, Gardenia, Croton, Coleus, Poinsettia, Ligustrum, Holly, Bottle Brush, Podocarpus, Althea, Crape Myrtle, Oleander and many others. Other timely suggestions may include ordering seed catalogs for fall planting. Inch back Chrysanthemums, to induce branching and more blooms for the fall. Plan to fertilize established mums every two weeks until owers buds appear. Water Coleus and Caladiums often as they demand a cool, moist, yet never wet soil. Keep owers removed from Coleus and Caladiums and allow all the vigor of the plant to go into providing attractive foliage. Take frequent rest between gardening, chores during hot, summer days and begin making plants for fall gardening. For more information on how summer gardening chores contact the Gulf County Extension Service 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf. ifas.u.edu or www.edis.ifas.u.edu. ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director Gregory and Wanda Lewis of Grand Ridge, Florida are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Courtney Lewis to BJ Strickland, son of Rex and Denise Strickland of Port St. Joe, Florida. Courtney is the granddaughter of Darthy Lewis of Grand Ridge, Florida, the late RH Lewis, and the late Phillip and Wilma Wagner. Courtney graduated from Grand Ridge School in 2006. She earned an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing from Chipola College in 2009 and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing in 2010. Courtney is employed with Jackson Hospital in Marianna, Florida. She will begin graduate school at the Gooding Institute of Nurse Anesthesia in Panama City, Florida in August of this year. BJ is the grandson of Daryl and Doris Strickland of Port St. Joe, Florida, Ed and Marsha Bond of Donalsonville, Georgia, and the late Barbara Blacka. BJ graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 2004. He earned an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing from Gulf Coast State College in 2010 and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of West Florida in 2011. BJ will graduate from the Gooding Institute of Nurse Anesthesia with his Masters Degree in Nurse Anesthesia in December of this year. The wedding and reception will take place on Friday, Aug. 15, 2014, in St. Joe Beach, Fla. Engagement Society Society BRIEFS Summer gardening chores Courtney Lewis, BJ Strickland engaged

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The Star| B3 Thursday, July 24, 2014 School News By Melanie Taylor Extension Agent, 4-H/Family & Consumer Sciences 4-H fun was had by ALL! Youth from Gulf, Franklin, and Bay counties attended a joint-county ve-day, fournight residential camp, July 7-11, at Camp Timpoochee in Niceville. This years theme, Welcome to Our Jungle, provided a great opportunity for learning about the animal and plant life of the jungle. While at camp the youth participated in many opportunities to expand their leadership skills, make new friends, and learn community living skills and other basic life skills, while away from the comforts of home. The Florida 4-H camping program strives to build youths life skills through outdoor adventure. Instilling a sense of wonder of the natural world, respecting wildlife and its habitat, and encouraging kids curiosity about the outdoors are major components of 4-H camping. However, 4-H camp is not just about nature. Science and technology, sports and leisure, teambuilding and healthy lifestyles are all part of todays camping phenomenon. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) workshops were a major focus during the camp day. These included activities in robotics, marine science, geocaching/GPS, and environmental science. Recreation was a big part of camp, too! Kayaking, snorkeling, swimming, volleyball, archery, marksmanship, dance, scavenger hunts, and team building games are just a few of our recreational activities. Creativity was emphasized through camp songs, skits, and crafts. The youth also enjoyed a eld trip with a day of swimming, snorkeling, and playing in the sand at Henderson State Park in Destin along with a picnic lunch. The emerald water was crisp and clear, perfect for a day of swimming, and hanging-out, and enjoying time with new friends. After a very busy, enthusiastic and fun-lled week at 4-H camp, the youth arrived back home on Friday with lots of funlled memories and unique experiences to share with their friends and family. 4-H is a youth development program for youth ages 5-18, managed through the local UF/IFAS Extension Ofce that is assisted greatly by adult volunteers. If you are interested in participating as an adult volunteer or involving your child in the county 4-H program, please contact Melanie Taylor at the Gulf County Extension Ofce, 639.3200, or Erik Lovestrand at the Franklin County Extension Ofce, 653.9337. Find out more about what UF/IFAS Extension offers your community by visiting gulf. ifas.u.edu and franklin. ifas.u.edu. 4-H is MORE than you ever IMAGINED! Come join the FUN! Open House: 7th and 8th grade open house will be noon until 1 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Aug. 13. Open House for 9th 12th grade will be 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. ETon Thursday, Aug. 14. Volleyball: Volleyball practice begins 3 p.m. ET on Monday, Aug. 4. Tryouts will start on Wednesday. All players must have a valid physical form EL2, Consent and release form EL3 and concussion and heat related illness form EL3CH. Players will NOT be allowed to practice or tryout without these forms. Senior portraits are scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 13-14. Scheduling information has already been mailed home. If you have not received information concerning your scheduled date and time for portraits and sitting fees, please call the photographer in Panama City at 769-6277. P HO T OS SPECIAL T O TH E STAR At right Gulf County teen counselor takes aim as she sharpens her archery skills. At left Franklin, Gulf, and Bay County youth enjoying the crisp, emerald waters of the Gulf of Mexico at Henderson State Park. Lions, Tigers and 4H Camp oh my! Gulf and Franklin County campers and teen counselors learn how to kayak off the camp shore in the Choctawhatchee Bay.

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SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. Cu mb aa Mo nu me nt s, In c. Se rvi ng NW Fl or id a Si nc e 1963 JA MES (J R) GR OV ER Ph : 850-674-8449 Ce ll : 850-899-0979 jrg ro v@ms n.c om Bl ou nt st ow n, FL 32424 Cu mb aa Mo nu men ts has be en at 19041 Sr 20 We st Bl ou ns to wn for 50+ Ye ar s. We ta ke p ride in hel pi ng yo u wi th se le ct in g the ri gh t mo nu men t for yo ur lo ve d on e. So co me by or gi ve us a ca ll or we wil l co me by you r ho me, gr av es it e, et c. FAITH Thursday, July 24, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com OBITUARIES Marilyn E. Duncan, (nee Welker), 79, of Beacon Hill, Florida passed Thursday, June 26, at Covenant Hospice Care in Panama City, Fla. Born in Springeld, Ill., Marilyn attended Illinois State University and married LeRoy E. Duncan on Sept. 17, 1955. Marilyn was an active volunteer in the community while raising six children in Williamsville, Ill., and was a lifelong member of the Williamsville United Methodist Church. Marilyn pursued a professional career as a supervisor in policy owners and agents services at Franklin Life Insurance Company in Springeld, Ill. Upon retirement in 1995, she moved to Beacon Hill. There she continued her community involvement with several civic and environmental organizations, including the Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club, Tauton Family Childrens Home, and the Community Development Council of Mexico Beach. A dedicated animal lover, Marliyn was a lifetime charter member of the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. She was a patron of the arts and lover of nature and supported many such causes. Marilyn was preceded in death by her parents, Charles and Viola Welker and brother, Ronald Welker. She is survived by her loving husband, LeRoy E. Duncan, of Beacon Hill, sister, Judie Woods, of Dayton, O.H., and brother, Charles Welker, of Springeld. Six children include Michael Duncan, Terri Annis (Jeffery Annis), Gaithersburg, M.D., Denise Morris (George Morris Jr.), Flossmoor, Ill., Deborah Duncan, Littleton, Colo., David Duncan, Commerce City, Colo, and Jennifer Duncan, Chicago, Ill. In addition to many other nieces and nephews, beloved grandchildren include Rebecca and Miriam Annis and Mathew, Veronica and Madeline Morris. A celebration of life ceremony is planned for a future date. Interment will take place at Walnut Hill Cemetery, Williams Township, Sangamon County, Ill. Those wishing to support Marilyns legacy may contribute to Covenant Hospice in Pensacola or the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society in Port St. Joe. Marilyn E. Duncan Memorial services for James E. Hurd Jr. will be at 1 p.m. CT Saturday, July 26, 2014, at Triumph Church of God Inc. at 1278 W. River Road in Wewahitchka with Pastor Joseph Jackson ofciating. James leaves to mourn his passing one son, K.A. Hurd of California; a brother, R.R. Hurd; a sister, V.R. Hurd; a loving, devoted mother D.W. Richards all of Macon, Ga.; a special friend and partner, Linda Bannister and a host of friends, cousins and well-wishers. James E. Hurd Jr. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our community for the overwhelming acts of love and friendship shown our family throughout our loved ones lengthy illness and passing. We have been humbled by your many calls, cards, visits, owers and food. Your prayers and presence at Genes service were truly appreciated. We do live in a special place. If we have failed to acknowledge your thoughtfulness, please forgive the oversight. You have blessed our family. We would especially like to thank the First United Methodist Church for their response in our hour of grief. With sincere thanks, The family of Gene Abrams Abrams family CARD OF THANKS Tyler Gray 7-30-1997 6-27-2014 We would like to express our sincerest thanks and appreciation to our community, relatives and friends for attending Tylers funeral. Your support, visits, phone calls, cards, food and donations have and will forever touch our hearts. Thank you all so much for your condolences and prayers during this difcult time. From the depths of our hearts, please accept this as our personal thank you. A ne young man is now forever in Gods care. The Tyler Gray Family Gray family CARD OF THANKS Modern day miracles explored at Lifetree Caf Special to The Star The question of whether miracles are real and happening today will be explored at 7 p.m. CDT Monday, July 28 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Miracles or Mere Coincidences? Does Everything Happen for a Reason? features the lmed story of Robin Alm, a woman who believes a miracle occurred in her life. Theres no way what happened could have happened without God being involved, Alm said. I absolutely believe miracles happen today. This program will provide an opportunity for those who believe they have experienced a miracle to share and explore their stories. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Faith BRIEFS From staff reports UMW Fashion Show, luncheon The United Methodist Woman will be hosting a fashion show and luncheon at noon EDT Saturday, July 26, in the Fellowship Hall at First United Methodist Church of Port St Joe. Tickets are $10 for adults, $3 for children and can be purchased from any United Methodist Woman or in the church ofce. All proceeds from the event will go towards missions. Choir anniversary at Zion Fair Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church Choir and the entire church family invites the community to come out and share with them in celebrating their Annual Choir Anniversary together with the City-Wide Choir Union at 3 p.m. EDT on Sunday, July 27, at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church, 280 Avenue C, Port St. Joe. The Rev. Wilson Hall and First Lady Sister Margaret Hall welcome you.

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, July 24, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m In part, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce is charged with saving lives. Even when it comes to its own. Last Tuesday, ofcers from the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce, along with law enforce ment ofcers from Franklin, Gadsden, Liberty, Calhoun and Bay counties attended a Be low 100 training seminar, held at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Center. The goal of the training was to get the number of police ofcer deaths in the state of Florida below 100 each year by holding accountable those who stray outside of what is consid ered common sense. In Florida, there are no mandates for ofcers to wear their bullet-proof vests while on duty, even though theyre made to save lives. Our main focus is to en courage our ofces to wear their vests and seatbelts and be mindful of their speed while driving, said Gulf County Sher iff Mike Harrison. If we focus on those three things, our line-of-duty deaths in Florida should drop below 100 each year. Harrison, who has been working to bring the seminar to Gulf County for several years, said it was especially important since Florida hasnt been below 100 deaths in a year since 1943. Ofcers attended a fourhour presentation by Tommy Loftis, who currently serves at the Law Enforcement Coordi nator for the U. S. Attorneys Ofce in the Southern District of Alabama. Loftis served as a police of cer, narcotics investigator, and Chief of Police in his 13 years of law enforcement service. Since April 2012 he has presented the Below 100 seminar to more than 70 law enforcement groups. After the initial training, of cers were to spend an addi tional four hours delivering the information to those on-duty ofcers who were unable to at tend the seminar. This seminar lets us net work out a bit and get the infor mation to those ofcers need ing it, said Harrison. Its been a very good experience. The Below 100 training was presented by the Florida Sher iffs Association, Florida Depu ty Sheriffs Ofce, Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce, U.S. Attorneys Ofce North District in part nership with ROCIC. Funding for the training was provided by the Florida Sheriffs Ofce Risk Management Fund. July 14-20 On Monday, July 14, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) executed an order to transport. Amanda L. Shipman (24) was transported from the Gadsden Correctional Facility to the Liberty County Jail for her court appearance the following day in Gulf County. She was returned on Wednesday, July 16th. On July 14, Deputy S. Willis responded to the 6900 block of County Road (CR) 30A near Money Bayou. The GCSO received a complaint regarding a theft. The complainant reported the theft of several beach items that included a pair of diving ns, snorkels, mesh bags, beach towels and chairs. The items were stored in an unsecured area beneath the residence. The total estimated value of the items reported stolen was $882. On July 14, Sgt. R. Burkett responded to the 600 block of Dolphin Street in Highland View after the GCSO received a complaint of a disturbance. After conducting an investigation, Thomas C. Gainous (19) was placed under arrest for Criminal Mischief. Gainous was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) where he was later rst appeared and given a conditional release. On July 14, the GCSO executed an order to transport by traveling to the Bay County Jail and transporting Nicholas A. Pierce (36) to Gulf County. Pierce was scheduled to appear in court the following day. The GCSO also extradited Kendrick L. Gray (34) back to Gulf County. Gray was arrested in Bay County and held for the GCSO on a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support. Gray was later released on July 16th on his own recognizance. On July 14, Deputy P. Williams served William C. Quaranta (41) with a warrant for Violation of Probation at the GCDF. Quaranta is on probation for Driving While Licenses Suspended or Revoked. He remains in custody. On July 14, while on patrol in the area of State Road (SR) 30-A, Deputy J. Oquendo observed a vehicle exceeding the posted speed. Using radar, Deputy Oquendo clocked the vehicles speed at 100 mph in a posted 35 mph zone. The driver, Kenyon R. Orr (39), was placed under arrest for Reckless Driving. Orr was booked into the GCDF and released on a $1,000 bond. On Tuesday, July 15, Deputy P. Williams was dispatched to the 8700 block of CR 386 in reference to a stolen vehicle. A description of the vehicle was given to Deputy Williams. While enroute to the call, he located the vehicle and conducted a trafc stop on SR 71 and Reid Avenue in Wewahitchka. The driver of the vehicle was identied as Dylan J. Martinez (18), who was the suspect in the case. Also in the vehicle was a juvenile. When asked, Martinez admitted to possessing marijuana in the vehicle. A search of the vehicle yielded a small baggie of marijuana, two pipes used to ingest marijuana, a set of digital scales that had a residual substance on its surface that eld tested positive for the presence of meth. Martinez was arrested and charged with Possession of Less Than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor Child. The complainant did not wish to le charges for Grand Theft of an Automobile. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on a $4,500 bond. On July 15, the GCSO executed an order to transport by traveling to the Bay County Jail and transporting Ladora Nunnery (44) to Gulf County for court. Nunnery and Nicolas A. Pierce were returned to the Bay County Jail on this date. On Wednesday, July 16, the GCSO traveled to the Jackson County Jail to extradite Tammy J. Melton (45). Melton was arrested by the Calhoun County Sheriffs Ofce on a GCSO warrant for Dealing in Stolen Property. The case stems from an investigation into a 2013 burglary. Melton was transported to the GCDF where she was later rst appeared and issued a $2,500 bond. Melton remains in custody. On July 16, Deputy G. Desrosier responded to the 700 block of 7th Street in Wewahitchka in reference to the theft of a bicycle. The complainant reported the theft of a 20 inch Avigo Fade (BMX style) bicycle. The bicycle was described as navy blue with lime green foot pegs. The reported value was $100.00. On July 16, Deputy J. Brock conducted a trafc stop on a vehicle operated by Ellery L. Dobbins (29). Deputy Brock had knowledge that Dobbins drivers license was suspended. The stop was conducted on Long Avenue near SR 71, where Dobbins was taken into custody. He was transported to the GCDF where he remains in custody. On Thursday, July 17, Curt L. Johnson (30) was arrested by Sgt. J. Williams and Deputy J. Brock in the 200 block of Canning Drive in Wewahitchka. Johnson was wanted by the GCSO for Violation of Probation. He is on probation for Felony Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. Johnson was transported to the GCDF where he remains in custody. On July 17, Sgt. J. Williams arrested Sidney L. Robbins (21) for Violation of Probation. Robbins was arrested in the 1300 block of CR 381 in Dalkeith. Robbins is on probation for the Sell of Meth within 1,000 feet of a School/Park. She was transported to the GCDF where she remains in custody. On July 17, Deputy J. Brock arrested and served two warrants on Harold C. Lester (42). Lester was wanted for Failure to Appear on Violation of a Domestic Violence Injunction and Failure to Appear on Domestic Battery. He was transported to the GCDF. On Friday, July 18, Deputy S. Willis served Ezekial Register Jr. (49) with a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support. Register was arrested in Baker County, Florida and extradited to Gulf County. He remains in the GCDF. On Saturday, July 19, Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the 100 block of SR 71 North in Wewahitchka. The complainant reported the theft of a set of keys that was removed from inside a vehicle. It was reported the vehicle was not locked at the time of the offense. On July 19, Deputy M. Layeld was dispatched to the 4400 block of CR 386 in reference to criminal mischief. The complainant discovered that his mail box had been run over by a vehicle. On July 19, Steve D. Gibson (42) was arrested by Deputy M. Layeld. Deputy Layeld responded to the 8600 block of West Highway 98 in St. Joe Beach regarding trespass. Gibson was previously warned on two separate occasions stay off of the property. He was transported to the GCDF and charged with Trespass. He was later rst appeared and released on his own recognizance. On Sunday, July 20, Deputy P. Williams served an arrest warrant on Jason A. Jenks (35). Jenks turned himself in at the GCSO. He was wanted for Failure to Appear on his original charge of Failure to register as a Sexual Offender. He remains in custody. From July 14-20 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 46 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 43 calls for EMS, 25 calls for other departments/ agencies and 10 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. From July 14-20 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 138; Trafc Stop, 51; Civil Paper Service, 40; Field Contact, 24; Information, 9; Abandoned Vehicle, 8; Warrant Arrest, 8; Noise Disturbance, 7; Alarm, 5; Prisoner Transport, 5; Reckless Driver, 5; Unknown Disturbance, 4; Request for Security Check, 4; Theft/Shoplifting, 4; Welfare Check, 4; Fire, 3; Recovered Property, 3; Sexual Offender Address Verication, 3; Suspicious Person, 3; Simple Battery, 2; Criminal Mischief, 2; Obscene/Harassing Phone Call, 2; Trespass, 2; Sexual Offender Reregistration, 2; Special Detail, 2; Trafc Accident, 2; Animal Call, 1; Citizens Assistance, 1; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 1; Fraud, 1; Hit and Run Accident, 1; Lost/Stolen Tag, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Missing Juvenile, 1; Shooting Incident, 1; Stolen Vehicle, 1; Street Obstruction, 1; and Suspicious Vehicle, 1. Sheriffs Ofce completes Below 100 training WES LOCHER | The Star Law enforcers from Gulf, Franklin, Gadsden, Liberty, Calhoun and Bay counties attended the Below 100 training seminar, held at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Center. The training, presented by Tommy Loftis, aims to bring police ofcer deaths in the state of Florida below 100 each year. GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE LA W ENFORCEMENT SUMMARY

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014 ducted on adult and sub-adult sturgeon, very little research is available on juveniles, something Marbury means to rectify. I came down here to ll in that gap with information, Mar bury said. By understanding where stur geon spawn and thrive, Marbury hopes eventually his research can take them off the endangered species list. Currently, Marbury and his technician assistant Zach Cum mins, a sophomore at Georgia Southern College, spend ve days a week on the river, launching from Howard Creek. Each day they cast four to six gill nets. These nets, designed to catch only smaller sh, are 50 me ters long and anchor at the bot tom of the river. Standing 10 feet tall, the juvenile sturgeon swim in, but they dont swim out. Once the nets are recovered, each sh is tagged with a 15-digit number and electronic chip. The chip allows Marbury to track their location via software. Marbury anchored numerous acoustic receivers at the bottom of the river that ping a signal ev ery 90 seconds. If a sturgeon with a chip is nearby, they will show up within the software. Hell continue getting up-todate information even when he returns to Georgia. If Marbury catches a sh thats already been tagged, the number tells him where it was caught previously, giving him further insight into the sturgeons travel habits. The data is collected and cata logued and will be analyzed at the end of the season. Marbury said that Gulf County is the best area in the country for studying Gulf sturgeon and has been thrilled to have the opportunity. The sturgeon congregate here, and its a prime time to sample those sh, Marbury said. By living here while studying, Ive been able to learn about the area and get a feel for the entire ecosystem. What fascinates Marbury most about the species is that theyre prehistoric, having been on Earth for more than 220 million years. In the 1900s, sturgeon num bers dropped as they were over shed for caviar while water pol lution, dredging and damming also complicated their spawn ing process, blocking access to the many areas where sturgeon would typically lay their eggs. Feeding mainly on inverte brates on the bottom of the ocean, sturgeon will gorge themselves while in the Gulf waters and bare ly eat once its time to spawn. The sh can grow up to eight feet in length and weigh more than 200 pounds. Theyre different than any oth er sh, Marbury said. Theyre very boney, very sharp, and theyve been around forever. Marbury believes that the sturgeons naturally sharp ns and lack of predation is the only thing to keep it from becoming extinct altogether. So what do Marbury and Cum mins do when they arent shing for research purposes? They sh recreationally, of course. Cummins, whose brother stud ies with Marbury, grew up on the water and was recruited to help Marbury drive the boat, mend the nets and help with prep work. Its hard work, Cummins said. But whats better than sh ing all summer for a job? On Friday, Aug. 1, registered con testants can pick up their shing equipment at the Port St. Joe Marina between 4-6 p.m. ET. Participants will also enjoy a kick off party with a cookout and on-site classes to get tips on rod casting, knot tying, and casting nets. These classes will provide kids with important infor mation to ensure they have a fun and active day of catching sh instead of remembering the one that got away. Following the kickoff, the ofcial rules meeting will begin at 6 p.m. at the Marina. The tournament will begin at 7 a.m. ET Saturday morning with weigh-in beginning at 10 a.m. Fishing ends at noon with trophy presentations to follow. Children can sh with an adult but must be the ones to reel in all sh en tered into the competition. Anybody who wants to learn to sh or even just learn about the bay are encouraged to come out, Carrie said. Kids Win was established to ex pose youngsters to the thrill of shing in a fun and safe environment. Registration is free and is open un til the end day on Thursday, July 31. More than 200 kids have already registered for the event. Those inter ested in volunteering for the shing tournament should call the Port St. Joe Marina at 227-9393. Originally scheduled for June, the event was canceled because of bad weather. We didnt want to put people in jeopardy, Carrie said. This time, short of a hurricane, Kids Win will go on. Founded by Tallahassee reghter Rusty Roberts, Camp Amigo doesnt adhere to a strict schedule of activities but instead is focused on let ting kids be kids. Our motto is healing burns from the inside, Rob erts said. I feel we do that by providing a loving, family-like atmosphere. The camp comes at no cost for the kids, ages 6-17, and Rob erts works with re stations and burn hospitals across the state to raise funds throughout the year for the annual event. Roberts got his start work ing with another burn camp, but as a counselor he said he couldnt help but see how it could be improved. After several years of his suggestions falling on deaf ears, he began taking classes at the American Camp Insti tution, learning how to create and operate his own camp that would meet the same stan dards as any other. After becoming afliated with the American Burn As sociation and Shands Hospital in Gainesville, he launched his rst camp in 2001 with just six kids. Throughout the year Rob erts volunteers with burn vic tims at the local hospital and at Shands, taking them video games, books, gifts and friend ly conversation to keep them occupied during treatment. Of course, he never misses a chance to tell them about Camp Amigo. Theres a counselor for each camper, many of them adult burn victims and even more who attended Camp Amigo as they grew up. The adult survivors be come role models for the camp ers, said Michelle Barnett, a former reghter who sits on the camps board of directors. It shows the kids that they too can grow up to be professional, successful people. Despite their injuries they can be living the same life as everyone else a normal life. Campers spent last week enjoying the pool and shing in the gulf waters. In addition to the friends, the fun and the beach, Camp Amigo offers one-on-one coun seling and massage therapy for the children. The rest of the staff, made up of Florida reghters, also serve as the camps kitchen staff, lifeguards and medical specialists. Roberts said that his goal was to bring kids together who have something in common. He wanted them to make friends, build self-condence, and per haps most importantly, have a lot of fun. Though the camp has been held in various locations, Rob erts prefers Camp Amigo to be located at William J. Rish Park because the facility is ful ly accessible to special needs children. He said that being out in the middle of nowhere where cell phones dont work was de nitely a bonus. Counselor Rebekah John son from Hawthorne, who is a burn victim herself, applauded Camp Amigo for bringing to gether children who can relate on a level that no one else can. Johnson said she had trou ble adjusting to her injuries and the camp allowed her to learn from the children. This camp made some thing not so great the best time of my life, Johnson said. The burns are just a part of who you are, but you can be whoever you want. Often times the parents cant relate, and even though its hard to let go, letting their kids come here I can think of no better treatment. Counselor Summer McKin ney is a nurse at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She heard about the camp through her friends and volunteered for her rst trip this year. Its been an amazing expe rience, McKinney said. Its become a home away from home, and I cant wait to do it again. Campers Kamiya Rich ards and Reina Smith agreed with the counselors and both 16-year-olds have been Camp Amigo regulars for more than ve years. Im going to keep coming here until they kick me out, said Smith, who plans to be come a counselor when she turns 18. We get to meet other kids who were burned, and it makes you feel comfortable and not judged. Richards said the camp helped her improve her selfesteem and led her to meet her best friend, Smith. The girls attend another camp during the year to spend more time together since Richards lives in Jacksonville and Smith in Panama City Beach. As some of the oldest camp ers, the girls said they try to be big sisters to the younger kids and try to be positive role models. There are misconceptions that kids with their type of in juries are sad, Barnett said. There arent any sad kids here. The camp got its name dur ing the rst year when three girls, who had never met be fore, became best friends on the rst day and were known by counselors as the three amigos. For Roberts, the girls were a prime example of what he wanted the camp to do: bring kids together. It takes hundreds of people to make this camp happen, Roberts said. The smiles make it all worth it. Tr ades & Ser vi ces B a r l o w W a t e r S e r v i c e s WE LL DR IL LI NG De ep or Sh all ow We ll s Pu mp Sal es &R ep air VET OW NE D (8 50 ) 63 993 55 (8 50 ) 81 474 54 ST AT EL ICE NS ED &I NS UR ED Cy nd y sh ome cl ea nin g, or ga ni zin g, an dp et si tt in g IN SU RE DA ND RE AD YT OH EL PY OU WI TH YO UR HOUS EO RP ET CA LL 85 050 270 06 OR EM AI L cy ndyly nne _79 @y ah oo .c om 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-13 24 RESEARCHER from page B1 CAMP from page B1 KIDS from page B1 SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Marburys research will help understand the spawning habits of the prehistoric sturgeon and ideally, increase the population.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 24, 2014 The Star | B7 95524S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 14000061 CAAXMX SUN WEST MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., Plaintiff vs. EDNA S. BUTLER; et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: EDNA S. BUTLER 7447 ALABAMA AVENUE PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 EDNA S. BUTLER THE BRIDGE AT BAY ST JOE 220 9TH ST PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EDNA S. BUTLER 7447 ALABAMA AVENUE PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HER-EBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located-in Gulf County, Florida: PARCEL A: A PORTION OF LOTS 2 AND 4, BLOCK 35, PORT ST JOE BEACH UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA., BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHERLY CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 35, OF SAID PORT ST. JOE BEACH UNIT TWO: THENCE ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 2 SOUTH 37 22’ 19” EAST 74.95 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHEASTERLY LINE, SOUTH 52 41’ 56” WEST, 150.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF LOT 4, BLOCK 35 OF SAID PORT ST. JOE BEACH UNIT TWO; THENCE ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY LINE NORTH 37 22’ 11” WEST, 75.11 FEET TO THE WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 4 THENCE ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4 OF SAID LOT 2, NORTH 52 45’ 37” EAST 150.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT; THAT PORTION OF LOT 4 BLOCK 35, PORT ST JOE BEACH UNIT TWO DEED TO JIMMY BARFIELD IN THAT CERTAIN WARRANTY DEED DATED FEBRUARY 9, 1993, SAID PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS: A PORTION OF LOT 4, BLOCK 35 PORT ST JOE BEACH UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHERLY CORNER OF LOT 4, BLOCK 35 OF SAID PORT ST JOE BEACH UNIT TWO, THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4, NORTH 37 22’ 11” WEST, 150.22 FEET TO THE WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE ALONG THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4, NORTH 52 45’ 37” EAST, 25.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 37 22’ 11” EAST, 150.17 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 4, SOUTH 52 38’ 28” WEST 25.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 and the file original 30 days after the first publication of this notice, in THE STAR on or before August 8th, 2014; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 1ST day of JULY. REBECCA L (BECKY) NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By: B. McGee. Collins As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act persons needing, a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should no later than seven (7) days prior contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850-747-5338. If hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System 34864.0107/LT July 17, 24, 2014 95614S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-172-CA GEORGE W.SIMMONS &, HAZEL H.SIMMONS Husband and Wife, Plaintiffs, vs. SUNCATCHER SERVICES, LLC, a Florida Limited Liability Company and UNKNOWN TENANTS # 1, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 3, 2014, entered in Civil Case No.: 13-172 CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 14th day of August, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. ET at the Gulf County Courthouse, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, BLOCK 94, OF UNIT NO. 2 OF ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THERE OF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO IDENTIFIED AS: 1612 MARVIN AVENUE, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provision of certain assistance; Please contact: Court administration, Gulf County, Phone: 8509-229-6112 TDD: 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 (V), via Florida Relay Service no later than 7 days prior to the proceeding. Dated at Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida this 14th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: B.A. Baxter Deputy Clerk Clinton T. McCahill, Attorney for the plaintiffs mccahilllaw@fairpoint.net 305 Sixth Street Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 July 24, 31, 2014 95610S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO:13000136CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff vs. ELIZABETH L. PICKRON A/K/A ELIZABETH PICKRON Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 3, 2014 and entered in 13000136CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC., is the Plaintiff and ELIZABETH L. PICKRON A/K/A ELIZABETH PICKRON are the Defendant(s). Benny Lister as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Front Lobby 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd. Port St. Joe FL 32456, at 11:00 AM on August 7, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 8 AND 9 OF BLOCK 2 OF HARDEN’S SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 22 THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 14th day of July, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator. P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850)747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADAR equest@jud14.flcourts.org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Ste 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No.: 13-09587 July 24, 31, 2014 95626S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 13148 CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. BONNIE S. KEIGANS A/K/A BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; CAPTIAL ONE BANK (USA), NA; BILLY F. KEIGANS A/K/A BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BILLY F. KEIGANS AKA BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE S. KEIGANS AKA BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; UKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 3rd day of July, 2014 and entered in Case No. 13148 CA, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and BONNIE S. KEIGANS A/K/A BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; CAPTIAL ONE BANK (USA), NA; BILLY F. KEIGANS A/K/A BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BILLY F. KEIGANS AKA BILLY FRANKLIN KEIGANS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BONNIE S. KEIGANS AKA BONNIE SUE KEIGANS; UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM on the the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF NORTH 1/2 OF NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 186 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A STAKE ON STATE ROAD #6, (NOW STATE ROAD #71); THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO SAID STATE ROAD A DISTANCE OF 231 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THIS DESCRIPTION; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY 162 FEET; THENCE RUN DUE WEST 95 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 162 FEET TO A STAKE ON SAID STATE ROAD; THENCE EASTERLY AND PARALLEL TO SAID STATE ROAD 95 FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 7475338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 14th day of July, 2014 Rebecca Norris Clerk Of The Circuit Court B. McGee-Collins Deputy Clerk Choice Legal Group, P.A. P.O. Box 9908 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-0908 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No.: 13-06488 July 24, 31, 2014 95622S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-41 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of THOMAS DANIEL DAVIS, also known as THOMAS D. DAVIS deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of THOMAS DANIEL DAVIS, also known as THOMAS D. DAVIS, deceased, File Number 14-41 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and that ancillary personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 24, 2014. Ancillary Personal Representative Claudia Davis Mullins 8 Summer Lane Fairhope, AL 36532 ATTORNEY FOR ANCILLARY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457 (850) 229-8211 FL BAR NO. 0350583 Pub.: July 24, 31, 2014 95628S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 14000057CAAXMX The Bank of New York Mellon fka The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWMBS 200511 Plaintiff, vs. Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin; Unknown Spouse of Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin and Unknown Spouse of Michael Martin a/k/a Michael D. Martin Last Known Address: 146 Cape Dunes Drive, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: COMMENCING AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK “A”, TREASURE BAY UNIT 1, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 32, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 89 17’ 15” E, 68.42 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY R/W LINE OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30, SAID R/W BEING 66.00 FEET IN WIDTH; THENCE ALONG SAID EASTERLY R/W LINE AS FOLLOWS: N 15 27’ 30” E. 2581.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT, SAID CURVE HAVING AN CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5 58’35” AND A RADIUS OF 3852.83 FEET: THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE FOR 401.88 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF N 12 28’12.5” E, 401.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N 9’ 28’ 55” E, 2214.92 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE N 9’ 28’ 55” E, 101.18 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID R/W LINE S 89 17’ 15” E. 217.81 FEET; THENCE S 9’ 28’55” W, 101.18 FEET; THENCE N 89 17’ 15” W, 217.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING LOCATED IN SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 9 SOU-TH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 12, OF TREASURE BAY UNRECORD-ED, PHASE VII. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jeremy Apisdorf, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 15 1 N.W. 49th Steet, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL. 33309, on or before August 13, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relif demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on July 14th, 2014 Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: B. McGee-Collins As Deputy Clerk July 24, 31, 2014 99639S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1314-28 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any persons, company, or corporation interested in purchasing the following: 1 -1988 GMC Flatbed Truck, VIN #: 1GDG6D1F2JV533958 1 -1999 Ford E350 Van VIN#: 1FBSS31S0XHA13075 1 -1994 Chevrolet C10 Pick-Up Truck VIN#: 1GCDC14Z9RZ113333 1 -1988 Ford F150 Truck, VIN#: 1FTDF15Y2JNB18687 1 -2000 Chevrolet 4X4 Extended Cab Pick-Up Truck, VIN#: 2GCEK19V9Y1126491 1 -1997 International 4700 Flat Bed Truck VIN#: 1HTSCABL9VH461464 To see any of these vehicles you must make contact with authorized personnel at the Gulf County Public Works Department. Please indicate on the outside of the envelope that this is a SEALED BID, the BID NUMBER, and what the BID is for. Please include one (1) original and three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed bids will be received until Friday, August 1, 2014 at 4:30 p.m., E.T., at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 and will be opened at this same location on Monday, August 4, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all proposals. GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman /s/ Becky Norris, Clerk July 17, 24, 2014 95652S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of C & R’s Feed & Seed Lawn & Garden located at, 1730 Trout Avenue in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St Joe, Florida 32456 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St Joe, Florida, this 18 day of July, 2014. Deborah Renee Smith Pub.: July 24, 2014 99631S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS: #1314-27 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners of Gulf County, Florida, will receive sealed bids from any persons, company, or corporation interested in purchasing the following: 2011, 16’ Metal Shark Aluminum Boat 2010, 40 HP Evinrude E-tech E 400 S L SE C Mc Clain Trailer Bidding will start at $10,000.00. Please indicate on the outside of the envelope that this is a SEALED BID, Bid Number 1314-27, and what the Bid is for. Please submit one (1) original and two (2) copies. Sealed bids will be accepted until 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, August 1, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 and will be opened at this same location on Monday, August 4, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Any questions regarding this bid can be directed to Brad Price 850-229-2639 or Nick Vacco 850-227-7338. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk July 17, 24, 2014 99679S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2014-05 2nd and 4th Streets Sealing and Restriping Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for sealing and restriping two roadways will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Friday, August 1, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday, August 1, 2014, at 3:30 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and RFP number for “2nd and 4th Street Sealing and Restriping”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Bid shall be for the sealing and restriping of 2nd and 4th Streets between Reid Avenue and Williams Avenue. Specifications are listed in the Base Bid Documents which may be obtained on the City’s website at www.cityofportstjoe. com For questions concerning this Bid, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer July 17, 24, 2014 99647S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 14-000036-PRAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF KATHLEEN MERLE BLACKMAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Kathleen Merle Blackman, deceased, whose date of death was January 22, 2014; File Number 14-000036-PRAXMX is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, Fl. 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: July 17, 2014. Personal Representative: Billy Blackman 941 Bill McGill Rd. Havana, FL 32333 Attorney for Personal Representative: CAROLYN T. LEBOEUF, ESQ. Carolyn@tallahassee attorneys.com FL Bar No. 0362409 909 East Park Avenue Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850) 222-2000 Fax: (850) 222-9757 July 17, 24, 2014 99703S PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) gives notice that it proposes to approve a No Further Action Proposal with Institutional and Engineering Controls and issue a Site Rehabilitation Completion Order with controls for a contaminated site. Triple Tails, LLC and Donna D. Spears are seeking this order in reference to FDEP Site ID # 8508580 (referred to as the Triple Tails, LLC facility located at 2411-2413 County Road 30A, Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida) and intend to restrict exposure to contamination in the following manner: implementation of institutional controls restricting groundwater use, stormwater facilities, and future dewatering activities and implementation of engineering controls through an engineering control maintenance plan. Complete copies of the No Further Action Proposal and the FDEP’s preliminary evaluation are available for public inspection during normal business hours 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the FDEP Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Street, Suite 308, Pensacola, Florida 32502. Local governments with jurisdiction over the property subject to the Institutional Control, real property owner(s) of any property subject to the Institutional Control, and residents of any property subject to the Institutional Control have 30 days from publication of this notice to provide comments to the FDEP. Such comments must be sent to Ms. Dominique Harding, FDEP Northwest District, 160 W. Government Street, Suite 308, Pensacola, Florida 32502 or to dominique.harding@ dep.state.fl.us. July 24, 2014 99687S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-35-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF VERNON C. EPPINETTE Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of VERNON C. EPPINETTE, deceased, whose date of death was May 12, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is July 24, 2014. Personal Representative: Judith K. Eppinette 279 Annie Avenue Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com July 24, 31, 2014 99721S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000190 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. BLANCA R. LAMIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 6, 2014, and entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA000190 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Blanca R. Lamis, Pano Lamis, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: DESCRIPTION: PARCEL 2A BEING A PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 11 OF SAN BLAS ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 20, 21, AND 22 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A FOUND 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON ROD (NO IDENTIFICATION) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11, IRON ROD LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30E (100 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 11 A DISTANCE OF 325.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 590.66 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 11 AS PER SAID PLAT, THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 50.06 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY RUN THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 592.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PART LYING BELOW THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE (M.H.W.L.) OF THE GULF OF MEXICO (ACREAGE INCLUDES THAT PART BELOW THE MHWL) ALSO SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH: 4 FOOT PEDESTRIAN EASEMENT LYING 2 FOOT EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT RLS #1787 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11 SAN BLAS ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 20, 21 AND 22 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY COUNTY ROAD NO. 30E (100’ RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 29 DEGREES EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY 50.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 432.27 FEET TO ‘THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE; FROM SAID POINT OE BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 70 DEGRESS 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 485.34 FEET TO THE TERMINAL POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PART LYING BELOW THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO. ALSO SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WMI: ACCESS EASEMENT: LYING IN THE BOUNDARIES OF LOT 11, SAN BLAS ESTATES, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH DIAMETER CONCRETE MONUMENT RLS#1787 MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11, SAN BLAS ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED HT PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 20, 21 AND 22 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY FLORIDA, CONCRETE MONUMENT ALSO BEING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO 30E (100 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY 35.00 FEET TO A POINT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61,82 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 27.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 138.84 FEET; THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 29.78 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 86.86 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 27.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 66.64 FEET; THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 38.99 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 19 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 15.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 31.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 75.59 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 27.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 78.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 67 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 29.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 146.92 FEET; THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 36 MIN-UTES 06 SECONDS EAST 27.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 57.60 FEET TO THE SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD 30E, THENCE NORTH 19 DEGREES 38 MIN-UTES 29 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 10.00 FEET TO THE POINT A/K/A 104 RACHEL BEACH LANE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 15th day of July, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk, Gulf County, Florida By: Bridgette McGheeCollins Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 Fax: (813) 221-9171 eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com JR -11-76387 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven

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B8| The Star Thursday, July 24, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 4510161 11 29 6 9 1 Travel/TransportationPilot Needed in DestinPrivate equity firm in Destin area is seeking a contract pilot to fly its refurbished Piper PA-31T1. Pilot must hold a commercial pilot certificate with multi-engine land and instrument ratings, have logged at least 4,000 hours total time, including at least 2,000 hours multi-engine land and at least 1,000 hours in multi-engine turbo prop aircraft, of which at least 200 hour being logged in Cheyenne I model aircraft, and who has attended and successfully completed ground and flight (or simulator) training for the Cheyenne I conducted by FLIGHTSAFETY or SIMCOM within the last 12 calendar months. Send resume and cover letter to info@pcpaviation.com. Web ID#: 34293919 2006 Honda Pilot 2WDEXLR 85K miles, beige+pearl, leather, moon roof, dvd, back up senser, in excellent condition, $11,000. Call 850-647-9200 2013 Honda 200 4 stroke Outboard, Full Controls, 4+ yrs of warranty left, clean & quiet $13,000 Call 850-319-7784 for more Info 11 29 6 9 0 4 5 1 9 1 97 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 25-2 Pine St., Lanark, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished $550.00 mo. 2. 2626 Craig St. 3 bedroom, 2 baths $1000.00 mo.3. The Landings, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, furnished, utilities included $910.00 mo.4. Picketts Landing, 3 bedroom, 3 bath, boatslip, pool $1600.00 mo. 5. 234 Peggy Lane, 2 bedroom, 2 baths, garage, close to beach $1400.00 mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4 5 1 8 4 93 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts R.E. PSJ: 116 Hunter Circle 3br/1ba, separate dining room, CH&A, $800/mo Call (850) 899-3283 or 227-5272 White City corner lot, 3 br, 2 ba, kitchen/ dine-in combo, carport, $650 mo. Call (850) 899-3283 or 227-5272 Owner Retiring138 unit facility in PSJ, good cash flow, possible owner financing.$499k Call Scott 850-866-0958 Counts Real Estate PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Port St JoeCommercial/ ResidentialRental 2Bd 1.5Ba Efficiancy; short term 6 Mo, $1500 incl util or long term 12 Mo. @ $1,100 plus utilities Location! 2 minutes to St. Joe Bay, beaches, river and down town Port St. Joe 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL95271 to 56654 Port St Joe: 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, references call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 youcanLOVEYOURJOB! EXPANDYOURCAREER&havethebestofbothworlds. IMMEDIATEOPENINGS!forMulti-MediaSalesConsultants Joinacompanythatiscommittedtohelpingyou succeedinyourcareerandearntopdollars.We’reseekingMulti-MediaSalesConsultantswhoare: ‰ Strongsales-mindedindividuals‰Self-motivatedandcustomerservicedriven‰Candevelop,presentandclosesalestonewandexistingcustomers utilizingTheNewsHerald’sprintanddigitalmediasolutions SP103344Ifthisisyou,sendyourresumeto:LGrimes@pcnh.comAskusaboutthegreatbenetsinsales-basepay+commission,benetsincludingMedical, Dental&VisionInsurance,FlexibleSpending,401(k)Plan,Vacation&SickLeave. SalesOpportunities: 11 3 1 2 11 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4518906 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34291811 Medical/HealthWeekend RN SupervisorSend resume to hr .baystjoe@signature healthcarellc.com or mail to 220 9th St, PSJ FL32456. Web ID 34295696 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternFront Desk Breakfast AttendantWeekends a must. Apply in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-2pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34293798 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34291812 Medical/HealthBusiness Office ManagerMedical Billing experience a must. Send resume to hr .baystjoe@signature healthcarellc.com or mail to 220 9th St, PSJ FL32456. Web ID 34295698 Medical/HealthCNA’sLooking for a little more creativity, challenge, and growth opportunity in your workday? Didn’t think it was possible? Might be time to reconsider. At Signature HealthCARE, our team members are permitted -no, encouraged-to employ their talents and abilities to solve problems. Our culture is built on three distinct pillars: Learning, Spirituality and Intra-preneurship. But this isn’t just hollow corporate sloganeering. Each pillar has its own staff and initiatives, ensuring that our unique culture permeates the entire organization. Oh, by the way, we’re an elder care company. Our mission? To radically change the landscape of long-term care forever. We’re currently hiring for position of CNA’s If this sounds like the right fit for you, give us a call or shoot email to tblackwell@shccs.com **We are offering a $1,000 sign on bonus for CNAs WEB ID 34293034 Logistics/TransportJOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following positions:Operator Trainee or Licensed Operator, Surface Water Treatment PlantPlease submit an application, cover letter and five references to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 229-8261. The Position will close on August 1, 2014. The entry level salary for an Operator Trainee will be $12.08 per hour. All other licensed operators will be based on qualifications. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34294621 Text FL94621 to 56654 (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. July 24, 31, 2014 99739S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2009-CA-000112 DIVISION: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, Plaintiff, vs. LUANN M. QUARANTA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 15, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 23-2009-CA-000112 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR JPALT 2006-S2, is the Plaintiff and LUANN M QUARANTA; WILLIAM C. QUARANTA, SR.; CAPITAL CITY BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED THIRTY (130), UNIT NUMBER TWELVE (12), OF THE ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 13, 1982 IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 27 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2005 MARVIN AVENUE, PORT ST JOE, FL 324560000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 16, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: Bridgette McgheeCollins Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. F09022212 July 24, 31, 2014 99737S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2014-06 Reid Avenue Sidewalk Cleaning Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for Reid Avenue sidewalks, crosswalks and curbing will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 3:00 PM EST, Friday August 15, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday August 15, 2014, at 3:30 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and RFP number for “Reid Avenue Sidewalk Cleaning”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Bid shall be for the cleaning of all sidewalks, crosswalks and curbing along the East and West sides of Reid Avenue. Specifications are listed in the Base Bid Documents which may be obtained on the City’s website at www.cityofportstjoe. com For questions concerning this Bid, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer July 24, 31, 2014 99773S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No.: 2009-CA-000454 Division #: CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. John R. floats a/k/a John Hoats; CGL Enterprises, Inc. d/b/a CGL Enterprises (Georgia), Inc.; Beth A. Hoats; George T. Peacock, Individually and as Co-Personal Representative of the Estate of Glenn Peacock, Deceased; Sarah Jackson, Individually and as Co-Personal Representative of the Estate of Glenn Peacock, Deceased; CitiBank, N.A., as Successor in Interest to CitiBank, Federal Savings Bank; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000454 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and John R. Hoats a/k/a John Hoats are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DESK OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on November 13, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 10 AND ALL OF LOT 12, BLOCK “0”, INDIAN PASS BEACH GROUP ONE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Gulf County, Florida Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 File #09-148494 July 24, 31, 2014 99771S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000153-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KIM L. MCDANIEL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM L. MCDANIEL; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on the 14th day of August, 2014, at 11:00 A.M at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Gulf County, Florida: Lots 5 and 6, Block 2, UNIT NO. 1, RISH’S ADDITION to WEWAHITCHKA, Gulf County, Florida, according to an official plat thereof on file in the Office of the Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 2, Page 16. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 17th day of July, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Bridgette McGheeCollins ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF Brian T. Dunmire Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 B&H # 292975 July 24, 31, 2014 99797S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No. 13-149-CA LINDA WILLIAMS 168 Annie Avenue Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Plaintiff, vs. BETTY CELEDONIA, 414 Church Street Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 1, 2014, and entered in Civil Case No. 13-149CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein BETTY WILLIAMS is the Plaintiff and BETTY CELEDONIA is the Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., E.T., on the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 10 Meeks Lake Subdivision as per Plat Book 2, Page 11, Gulf County Circuit Court being parcel Tax ID# 01590-000 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or Telephone (850)229-6113 prior to such proceedings. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 21st day of July, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: Bridgett McGheeCollins Deputy Clerk Costin & Costin Charles A. Costin 413 Williams Ave. P.O. Box 98 Port St. Joe, Fl. 32457 850-227-1159 July 24, 31, 2014 ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Beach House, Music, LOVE, awaits 1st baby. Trish 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Drop me a Line....Dolls & Doll Magazines For Sale Doll Lady, P.O. Box 56, PSJ, FL 32457 Port St. Joe -2022 Marvin Ave., Fri: 6pm-8pm EST, Sat: 7am-10am ESTYard SaleVarious Household Items Including Small Kitchen Appliances, Men’s Dress Clothing, Women’s Dresses, Professional & Casual Wear txt FL95730 to 56654 GUN SHOW TALLAHASSEE FAIRGROUNDSJuly 19th and 20th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL94099 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $443/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 6519206I Buy Used Mobile Homes! 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