The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03945


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 34Opinion ...........................A4-A5Letters to the Editor .............A5Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports.....................................A7School News ...........................B3Faith ........................................B4 Obituaries ...............................B4Classi eds ........................B6-B8 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Startcroft@starfl.comGov. Rick Scott signed the 2014-2015 Florida budget in Panama City on Monday and several local projects survived a potential veto threat. The most signi cant was an appropriation to begin the dredging of the ship channel at the Port of Port St. Joe. The governor can veto individual line items in the budget. Remaining in the nal budget was a $20 million appropriation for dredging the federally-authorized shipping channel as a critical rst step in developing the Port of Port St. Joe. The appropriation represents roughly half the estimated cost of dredging, but it is a down payment on the most crucial piece of the port puzzle. Without dredging nothing will ever happen, Port Authority member Eugene Raf eld has said several times over the past eight months. The nal application for a dredge permit is to be submitted to state agencies by fall with permitting and dredging beginning early next year. The hope is that once underway, additional private/public funds will be secured for the dredging project, which would open the port for shipping by two energy companies which have entered into agreements with the St. Joe Company and the Port St. Joe Port Authority. Final contracts for those deals are being crafted. The city of Port St. Joe, the Board of County Commissioners and Port Authority will meet in a joint workshop at 10 p.m. ET June 11 to discuss the progress at the port and potential Port dollars, local projects survive vetoSee VETO A2 COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLIA dog and its owner out on the beach for an afternoon stroll in Indian Pass and notice the dog leash ordinance being adhered to. This is one photo submitted by our readers that provides a glimpse at life in and around Gulf County. Find more photos on Page A10, and in the process help offer a look at life in our county in the weeks and months to come. We are starting a photo page, and the assistance of readers is critical to its success. See more on Page A10.Capturing the beauty OF GULF COUNTYBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Startcroft@starfl.comSt. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge is a part of the brand for the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, board member Tony Whit eld said Tuesday. As such the countys agency on tourism has a vested interest in the future and status of St. Vincent Island. During its regular monthly meeting the TDC advisory council passed a resolution to reach out and join the lobbying campaign from the Board of County Commissioners requesting no change to the current status of St. Vincent. The concern, as the BOCC heard more than a month ago after which the board wrote a letter to pertinent federal of cials, is that St. Vincent could be mothballed by the federal government. That would likely mean a reduction in management of the island, one of the last remaining areas in the country where wildlife has not been impacted by vehicular traf c, said Marie Romanelli, who is partner with her husband in a shuttle service from Indian Pass to the island and is a member of a non-pro t support group for the island. The federal term for the action is putting the island in custodial status. Staff would be reduced to two employees from seven just ve years ago and of cials with the U.S. Department of Interior have said the cuts would impact management of the island. Public access which is allowed currently during daytime hours would also be restricted, though to what extent is not yet clear. That is a resource that has helped Gulf County even in ways you dont know, Romanelli said. She noted that in addition to tourism, the island typically hosts wildlife researchers in the winter and seagrass beds around the island serve as valuable ecosystem for several local shery habitats. In addition, Sambar deer hunts each year attract hunters from across the country. Landy Luther, with the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge, said his group provides monthly tours during the season which have become an attraction. Due to management and public-access constraint, Luther said, it is unclear whether the supporters will be able to continue the tours. The tours are sold out months in advance, Luther said. We have to turn people away. You take those away and you are taking away public education about the island. Jennifer Jenkins, TDC executive director, said the island is a popular destination for tourists and noted that much of the interest for the island comes during so-called shoulder months outside of the typical tourist season.TDC weighs in on potential St. Vincent mothballingTo be mothballed by the federal government would likely mean a reduction in management of the island, one of the last remaining areas in the country where wildlife has not been impacted by vehicular traf c.See ST. VINCENT A9As good a chance as there has ever been for portBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com State Rep. Halsey Beshears (R-Monticello) drew a straight line last week between economic development and the school districts bottom line. Beshears provided a legislative update to the Gulf County School Board, offering insight into legislation pertaining to Florida schools. While much education work during the recent session of the Florida Legislature pertained to issues not pertinent yet to Gulf County, particularly charter schools, nonetheless there is impact every year in the form of the state budget. And how funding in that state budget affects local schools. As example, legislators increased funding per district this year but nearly all the increase comes in the form of dollars for technology, another way, Superintendent Jim Norton said, the state removes spending decisions from the control of local of cials. Norton said the states unwillingness to allow district exibility on all of its statutorily-allowed millage constrains local decisions. Each of the four components of the districts budget is deter-See BESHEARS A12 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 76, NUMBER 34 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR TAR TAR Graduates claim diplomas, dollars, A8 REP. BESHEARS:

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LocalA2 | The Star AUTOINSURANCEHannonInsurance(850)227-1133 Aline'sMerleNorman 315WilliamsAvenue PortStJoe,FL 850-229-6600Aline'sMerleNormanSummerOpenHouseFriday,June6th 9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.*SpecialDiscounts *Refreshments *DoorPrizes 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS LIVEONTHEPOOPDECK RANDYSTARK SUNDAY7PM FRIDAY&SATURDAY9PM WEDNESDAY7PM DEBIJORDAN TRUESOUL ALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMES LIVE ON THE POOP DECK MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITS UPCOMINGEVENTS KARAOKE-THURSDAY,FRIDAY& SATURDAY-9PMWITHDEBRAATTHETOPOFTHECROWSNEST assistance the local gove rnments can provide. Also surviving a veto pen was $200,000 for sav i ng through relocation the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The appropriation fol l ows a similar appropriation for $350,000 which was in c luded in the current scalyear budget. The appropriation car r ies proviso language under which the city of Port St. Joe and the Board of Coun t y Commissioners would have to mutually agree on a new location for the lighthouse. T he city possesses the deed for the lighthouse, two keepers quarters and oil house and contractors have begun the site preparation in George Core Park in ad v ance of moving the light h ouse sometime this year. The city w as awarded the lighthouse and ancillary b uildings by the federal gov e rnment, which disposed of the structures because of the threat of erosion along the shore at the current site of the lighthouse. This years $200,000 ap p ropriation would eliminate a shortfall between what has already been secured to move the lighthouse and the estimated cost of the re l ocation, including the tem p orary downing of power lines to accommodate the move. A lso remaining in the nal budget was an appro p riation of roughly $1 mil l ion for renovations at Billy Joe Rish Park on St. Joseph Peninsula and parks and recreation grant funding for the city of P ort St. Joe and the Board of County Commissioners. I n addition, some $9 mil l ion in road projects remain in the nal budget. VETO from page A1 Star Staff ReportThings are heating up. T he first First Friday Music and Art event of summer will be held on Friday, June 6 at the Thirsty Goat in Port St. Joe. T his months art showcase will feature Dolores Lowery of Mexico Beach who creates encaustic paintings using beeswax and pigments. The featured charity will be the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and 20 percent from each of Lowerys sales from June 6 through July 3 will be donated to help shelter area animals. L owerys work won best in show at the 2013 Mexico Beach Art and Wine Festival and she exhibits her paintings at numerous g alleries along the Forgotten Coast from St. George Island to Grayton Beach. The First Friday celebration will begin at 5 p.m. ET with live music by the LPs and free food and drink courtesy of The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, Centennial Bank, Cape San Blas Realty and Hannon Insurance. Humane Society volunteers will also serving drinks for tips and donations. Art event of the summer is here Special to The StarOnce a year, the Capital City Bank Group (CCBG) Foundation donates funds to charitable organiza tions in the communities it serves. During the 2014 grant cycle, the CCBG Foun dation reinvested $2,500 into the Gulf County com munity by way of a grant awarded to the Junior Service League of Port St Joe. The grants provided by the CCBG Foundation help these organizations enhance the lives of local citizens. W e are grateful to be in a position to help or ganizations make an im pact in our communities, said Amy Geiger, Capital City Bank President of Wakulla County. Com munity involvement has always been a hallmark of Capital City Bank and by donating valuable funds to worthwhile organiza tions such as these, the Capital City Bank Group Foundation can help build stronger communities. The CCBG Foundation is a non-prot organiza tion created in 1983 by Capital City Bank Group that provides grants to non-prot, charitable or ganizations and institu tions exempt under Sec tion 501(c)(3) of the Inter nal Revenue Code. The mission of the CCBG Foundation is to invest in initiatives that benet local communities. A majority of the funds are distributed to specic areas of focus, including: arts and culture, children and youth services, eco nomic and community development, education, health and sciences and human services. Grant applications are available through a local Capital City Banker upon request. These applica tions are reviewed once a year and are due by April 1. For more information on the Capital City Bank Group Foundation, visit www.ccbgfoundation. com.SPECIAL TO TT HE STARCapital City Bank Community Banker Sandy Price, Market Service Manager Stacey Price, and President of Gulf County Amy Geiger present an award to Kaci Rhodes and Michelle Perrin of the Junior Service League of Port St Joe.Capital City Bank Group Foundation announces grant SPECIAL TO THE STARThe featured artist will be encaustic painter Dolores Lowery and the featured charity will be the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. This months First Friday Music and Art event will be Friday, June 6. Thursday, June 5, 2014

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The Star| A3The Villagers rock Gulf County for fundraiserBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com They partied like it was 1960. To raise community funds for the upcoming Fourth of July celebration, 1960s rockers The Villagers performed at the Centennial Building two weeks ago as part of the down home, allAmerican holiday kickoff. The event boasted more than 100 attendees and brought in $3,000 to help fund this years reworks display and other holiday events. Those who joined the party enjoyed grub from Toms hot dogs in Panama City, and lemonade was donated by Centennial Bank. Prior to the concert, Scott McKinley, DJ for 93.5 FM WTKP did a live remote broadcast of The Ticket show from the Centennial Building. McKinley built anticipation for the concert and featured local businesses on the program. He called Port St. Joe one of the last true small southern towns on the coast. The extra exposure, it seemed, didnt hurt. Along with locals, people came from Marianna, Crawfordville and Panama City specically for this event, said Fourth of July committee member Steve Kerigan. People never stopped dancing. The Villagers, fronted by college basketball coach Cliff Ellis and best known for their hit, Laugh it Off, performed at the Centennial Building on July 4, 1968 and 2014 marked their triumphant return to the location. The following night, The Villagers treated patrons of the Thirsty Goat to an encore performance where they performed requests for $20 donations that went into the July 4 pot. Thanks to the Villagers who decided to make Port St. Joe the site for their yearly reunions, after the response they received in 2013, said committee chairman Dana Boyer. Every member of the band and their families fell in love with our community. It takes a Village(r) to raise moneySPECIAL TO TT HE STARThe Villagers performed at the Centennial Building to help raise funds for Port St. Joes Fourth of July celebration. Attendees were treated old fashioned food that included popcorn, hot dogs and lemonade. Friends enjoyed good company and dancing as The Villagers played into the evening. LocalThursday, June 5, 2014

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Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionPage 4 Thursday, June 5, 2014The bicycle was a gift. It, like me, had a few miles under the hood. I was looking to lessen the strain running everyday was putting on my legs. My brother spotted the bike in a throw-away pile in a neighbors front yard. It was two old retreads each seeking a new perspective on life. I eyed that thing nervously. Whats the old saying, You never forget how to ride a bicycle Maybe I hadnt forgotten. But I couldnt recall the last time Id straddled one in earnest. It had been close to half a century ago for sure. As I gingerly reached a foot down to the pedal it crossed my mind that regardless of axioms, truisms and old sayings, a man can forget a lot of things in fty years! The fall as a child was more embarrassing than hurtful. Learning to ride had been an adventure in itself. I was way past the embarrassment stage. I didnt want to break my fool neck! Adventure for me these days is watching Rawhide on the Western Channel. I didnt make any turns on that rst ride. And your Aunt Matildas one legged sister could have beaten me to town by a country mile. But speed wasnt my goal here. When I got just about out of sight of the house I rolled to a complete stop, got off and turned the bike around, and then pushed off carefully in a straight line back toward the house. I wanted desperately to wave to a couple of passing friends but I couldnt get either hand off of the handlebars. A man has got to know his limitations. Life takes the most wonderful turns when you least expect it. Within a week I was cruising with, if not complete con dence, a feel that allowed me to at least get one hand up to wave howdy to a neighbor. I enjoyed the wind in my face, the hum of the tires against the pavement and the extra ow of blood fairly leaping through my veins. The magic crept upon me from out of nowhere. I was riding down Garrison Avenue in Port St. Joe, but suddenly I saw Terry Kennon on his front steps. Billy Webb, one house over, was playing pitch with Karen. The Twin Pools had a fair weekday crowd and Mr. Pete Joyner backed his electrician truck right out in front of me. I blinked hard and there was Richard Gregg waving to me and a yard down Phil Chandler was climbing a tree. Paula Pinson was chasing Darrell around the corner of their house and Paul David Campbell had a basketball game going at the far end of his driveway. Jim and Joe Williams were ghting over something and Anne Alexander was getting in the car with her parents. Folks, my bike had turned down Stonewall Street in McKenzie, Tennessee! I had ridden into the Twilight Zone! As Bobby Ridley gave me a grin and the big wave, like he had done a thousand times when I sped by his house as a child, I thought, Jules Verne has already written this story! I pedaled faster in hopes the little town I remembered so well wouldnt disappear before I could get there. I slowed in front of the City Caf and automatically checked my pockets. I couldnt nd the needed quarter for a hamburger. This WAS just like old times! The Ben Franklin Store was in its customary spot, cattycornered across from the National Shirt Shop. I passed Motherals Drugstore, Howard Freemans Mens Store, the Western Auto, Utotem Groceries and paused in front of the Park Theatre. I remember when Rhett and Scarlett dated on that big screen. I saw Tarzan whip alligators and call elephants in the darkness of that wonderful place. I had ridden into my past! I turned right, and coasted by the post of ce and Dr. Holmes little clinic where I (and most everyone else) was born. I would have stopped at Bill Argos Gulf Station but I didnt have time for a weather report or the weekly debate on whether a John Deere could out pull an International Harvester. Calvin Purvis waved to me from the back of the garbage truck. I circled the town square slowly, absorbing the wonderful sights and sounds of a place that I had once taken for granted. I wheeled back to my house.. and the present. David wasnt getting this bicycle back! I remembered how our old Western Flyers gave us so much freedom. We could be anywhere in town in eight minutes. This new bike could do it even faster! I found a 1954 Ted Williams baseball card and clothespinned it to the rear spokes. I was going back with a motor sound to spur me on. And I slipped my old Spalding Form Pocket Frank Bolling autographed glove over the handlebar. Next time Im pedaling over to that empty lot between Ricky Hale and the Mabry house. You cant never tell when a game might break out! If you see me on that bike in Port St. Joe, proceed with caution. I may not be there. If you see me riding in McKenzie, get your ball and bat and hustle over to Forrest Avenue. Respectfully, Kes Wheels of DreamsMotivating TeenagersIn spite of the widespread effort to normalize marijuana, Montana knows rsthand the societal problems it can cause. In effect this crusade of acceptability has undone years of zero tolerance and the drug free campaign in our schools and communities. Most legalizers agree that marijuana is dangerous for adolescents, and argue that it will still be illegal for them. But its those young adults the industry targets. They are the primary users, consuming the majority of illegal drugs and suffer the most from its long term consequences. Montana passed an initiative to legalize marijuana for medical purpose. The industry exploded and became a multi-million dollar operation. By 2011 Montana had the 6th highest rate of youth marijuana use in the country and the 4th highest rate of youth addiction. As a State legislator I was inundated with complaints from cities, towns, communities, law enforcement of cials, treatment centers and schools about disruption, safety, crime, dropout rates, students stoned and apathetic towards school and life in general. This new enterprise was making drugs so familiar and acceptable that it was changing Montanas culture. Montanans felt duped. Come to nd out the initiative was promoted and paid for by the Marijuana Policy Project, an organization whose purpose is for the total legalization of the drug. I heard of growers destroying neighborhoods, reducing the values of homes and the foul language, harassment, and stench of crowds at the dispensaries. Parents complained that kids could not play in their own yards. Multiple dispensaries set up near schools, targeting our youth. Students wrote asking who was defending their rights to a safe, drug free school. They wanted their friends back. Major industries in Montana reported the inability to nd job applicants who didnt test positive for drugs. Montanas Chief of Narcotics testi ed, The current situation is a public health and safety disaster as well as a law enforcement nightmare . and an embarrassment to Montana on a national level. He said Montana was growing so much marijuana it had become a source country for illegal export of the drug. Organized crime moved in and one of the worlds largest outlaw motorcycle gangs was involved in running drugs to their east coast counterparts. Our surrounding states did not consider us good neighbors. The 2011 Montana legislature reined in the exploding marijuana industry, curbing commercial grows. The Of ce of National Drug Policy recently stated that the confusing messages being presented by popular culture, media, proponents of medical marijuana, and political campaigns to legalize all marijuana perpetuate the false notion that marijuana is harmless. Marijuana is a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse and no currently accepted medical use in treatment. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reports that where marijuana laws have been relaxed throughout the world, marijuana usage and addiction rates go up. That was certainly the case in Montana. THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, chemically acts on speci c molecular targets in brain cells called cannabinoid receptors, part of a neural communication network. It replaces the natural reward system in the brain, the same as other addictive drugs. Extensive medical research has shown marijuana affects brain development of this network when used regularly by young people and can cause permanent cognitive damage and also permanently reduce IQ. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports the negative effects of marijuana can last for days or weeks after the acute effects wear off and someone who smokes marijuana daily may be functioning at a reduced intellectual level most or all of the time. A grave concern when you think of an impaired surgeon, airline pilot, or heavy equipment operator. Its no surprise that increased marijuana use is associated with lower grades, higher dropout rates, increased absences and tardiness in school and the workplace, work related accidents, compensation claims, job turnovers and crime. Theres an illogical deluge of propaganda out there. Facts tend to get shouted down by those pressing for legalization. It leaves one to wonder if we are not only losing the war on drugs but the war on common sense. Mike Milburn served as a Montana State Representative from 2005-2012 and served as Speaker of the Montana House of Representatives in 2011 and 2012.Floridians should be wary of marijuana legalization If you will just send me $29.99 or maybe even $79.99 or maybe three equal installments of $33.33, we will tell you how to x your problem. There are folks on the radio and television hawking all kinds of solutions to the problems parents face every day. Whether its math, music or motivation, there is someone with a program that will x your childs problems. Im not saying that all of these programs are bad or useless Im just saying they are out there. And many times, its the parents problems. Looking at a calendar, I see that I have a little more than three years left of teenagers Ive been lucky thus far, in my opinion. About the only issue that I have is the one who sleeps on the sofa all afternoon and stays up late to work on his music. Homework and yard work have to fall into that equation somewhere. He sometimes has a hard time understanding some of these real-world equations and prioritizing his time. I would be lying if I said I never had some of those same issues I did. My Daddy explained most things pretty well to me and he didnt send his money off to some motivation guru to get help. Daddy simply told me the way it was going to be, and thats the way it was. As a parent, Im pretty good at telling my children the way it is going to be, however I sometimes fail on the following through part of it. Admittedly, that is the most dif cult part following through. Its the part that is no fun at all We live in a time when it seems like many others do the same thing They tell you one thing and later pretend like they didnt say it. In other words, they move the goal posts on you or even pretend the goal posts werent there. There is a lot of information on the internet and in books for parents who need help motivating their teenagers. I decided to take a look at what one group had to say that might help me to follow through. I didnt pay for the advice it was free. These folks had some helpful hints to make sure that your follow through was effective. The rst hint was to make sure that you keep your comments short, simple and effective. They gave an example of something like, I noticed that you havent had the chance to walk the dog. Would you please do that now? This is nice. However, I dont remember my Daddy ever asking me to do anything twice. Im sure he did have to ask me twice one time and I didnt want to remember him having to do it then and never want to remember it again. The second hint noted that you should respond to any objections from your teenager with, What was our agreement? Agreement? My Daddy told me what to do, I trusted him I did it. I did it because I wanted to make him happy, proud and continue living under his roof. The third hint tells you what to do if the second hint doesnt work. The experts note to use nonverbal communication such as pointing at your watch, smiling or giving them up a hug. This is one hint my Daddy would agree with them on. As a matter of fact, I think he might just skip hint number 2 and go straight to this nonverbal communication part. Oh goodness gracious he wouldnt have said a word. Daddy didnt have to do this, but there was no doubt he would have picked up a stick or a belt or used some other sort of nonverbal communication. Hint 4 gives advice on what to do when your teenager does what you have asked them to do. You are supposed to say, Thank you for keeping our agreement. I think saying thank you is always good. All I know is that I wanted to please my Daddy that was my goal in life. Somewhere in that fear equation, Daddy made that happen. Thats what good fathers do. I was thinking about this just the other day and how proud my Daddy would have been. I moved all of the cars out of the driveway except for my teenaged sons vehicle. I left it at the bottom of the driveway next to the house. When the fellow in the mulch truck arrived with the big load of hardwood mulch to be spread in the beds around the house, I had him dump it right in the middle of the driveway. Then I told my son that he could leave as soon as he could get his car out. It worked. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert MIKE MILBURNSpecial to The Star

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LETTERS www.starfl.com ASectionBy Rebecca Batson-ByrdCenter Director, North Florida Child Development, Inc. Special to The Star Physical development combined with good health is a one of the key aspects of that begins the lifelong learning process. In instances, it has been said to be the foundation of child development. When preschool age children are physically active and healthy, this heightens their social well-being. This in turn allows them to be active learners, children learn through play. Physical development sharpens the auditory and visual skills that are needed throughout the formal school years. Healthy eating habits incorporated with hygiene skills prevents or reduces sicknesses that prevent children from being able to focus to learn. Proper diet and exercise is a couple of ways to help children to stay healthy, this lessens the absenteeism rates at school. Keeping children happy and healthy also makes happy learners. Education is a broad eld with many facets that would take months to cover all its areas. However, physical development plays an important role in getting young children prepared to become lifelong learners in a formal education. Abdul-Jabbar couldntve made these priceswith a sky hook. From a song by Johnny Guitar WatsonDo things cost more or less than they did a year ago? Lets see. Costs associated with housing went up 2.8 percent. But it costs a whopping 7.7 percent more to heat and cool it. (Honey, cancel the purchase of that new McMansion!). Rental costs escalated 2.9 percent. Homeowners insurance has gone up by 3.5 percent. Water, sewer and trash collection services have increased in cost by 3.4 percent. Heres more. Health and hospital related services both cost 4.7 percent more than they did a year ago. It costs 2.3 percent more to dine out than it did last year. But grocery food skyrocketed across the board: meat prices jumped by 5.2 percent and fresh fruits by 5 percent. A haircut will cost you 1.4 percent more. A drink and a smoke is more expensive (We may need both before were done here). Alcohol went up by 1.1 percent and tobacco and smoking products by 3.7 percent. Tuition escalated in price by 3.3 percent. Whew. Now, consider things that have decreased in price. Seems impossible, right? Expenses related to transportation are actually 1.2 percent less expensive than a year ago. New vehicles are down in price by 0.5 percent. Motor fuel has declined in price by 4.6% (lets wait until summer is over to declare victory on this one). Wireless and landline telephone services? Now theyre 2.3 percent less expensive. Shoes? A percent less costly. Household furnishings have declined in price by 1.5 percent. Airline fares have decreased by 4.1 percent (Hard to believe, right?). Whats it all mean? We do indeed have signi cant in ation in essential (nondiscretionary) service items, like heat and air conditioning, food and health insurance. But many frequently used services actually cost less, like gas and cell phones. So in ation is really not rampant. In fact, most economists consider de ation a greater current threat to the economy. What is causing us to think that prices are outrageous is that wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. A person earning robust compensation is meeting his grocery bill with ease. But without a quality paycheck, everything looks expensive. In ation not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with signi cant opportunities to pro t from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register. Prudent investors and advisors seek out those sectors and companies that have in exible demand, or whose customers have to continue buying their products or services, whether the price of the product goes up 5 percent or not. As always, an investors age, risk tolerance, unique nancial goals and time horizon should be considered. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121, www. arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. May21,2014ATTENTION:ALLGULFCOUNTYRESIDENTSIN UNINCORPORATEDCOUNTYTheGulfCountyBoardofCountyCommissionersis proudtoannouncethatWasteProhasbeenawarded thecontractforgarbageserviceseffectiveJune1st. Cartsarebeingdelivered,startingthisweek.Ifyou areintheunincorporatedCountyandarereceiving WasteManagementgarbageservice,youwillbe receivinganewgarbagecartfromWastePro.Ifthe newcarthasadecalonit,yourdayofpickupwillbe indicatedonthatdecal.Ifyoureceiveyourcartand itdoesnthaveadecal,yourroutedaywillstaythe sameasitisnow. WasteManagementhasindicatedthatanyservice paidforwiththeircompanypastJune1st,willbe refundeddirectlybythem.Theywillalsobepicking uptheircartsonorafterthelastpickupdayforyour area,priortoJune1st. ITISVERYIMPORTANTTHATYOUDONOTPUT GARBAGEINTHEWASTEMANAGEMENTCARTS AFTERTHELASTDAYOFPICKUPFORYOUR AREA,NORPUTGARBAGEINTHEWASTEPRO CARTSPRIORTOJUNE1ST. WasteProwillbesendingbillstoeachcustomer.If youdonotreceiveacartandhadservice,orwishto addservice,pleasecontactWasteProatthenumber below. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecontactWastePro at(850)872-1800. THANKYOU GULFCOUNTYBOCCANDADMINISTRATION Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONSPage 5 Thursday, June 5, 2014Interim federal red snapper season update Dear Editor, As the owner and operator of the only marina and bait & tackle store here in Mexico Beach, I wanted to give a quick update: We sit right in front of one of the nest red snapper sheries in the Gulf. On day one of this years nine-day Federal season we enjoyed terri c weather and a strong day of sales, primarily in bait and fuel. We also issue shing license and have a day to day clear understanding of the shing pressure or lack of, here in our area of the Gulf. Sunday, June 1 revealed trailers overlling our public ramp area all the way out to U.S. 98 and back to the marina. Lets forget the fact the season opened on Sunday and not Saturday for now. Fast forward to this morning, I have a Accuweather app on my phone that I refer to daily. This morning we had a small-craft advisory and the next three days show rough seas at best. I am able to see the ramp area from our condo and can tell you this morning we had four trucks with trailers in the lot and so far today the marina has sold a fraction of what was sold yesterday in bait and fuel. Last Tuesday, my family went out approximately six miles and caught twelve red snapper totaling 175 pounds (do the math on the average). Ten years ago this was impossible! Now, before one of the hired hacks with the EDF, who already has pen in hand and begins to write, lets understand this: The shery was re-built years ago and I have a good idea they know it. They can continue to collect and manipulate their bogus data, but one thing they cannot do is hide the obvious over owing red snapper shery that we are all literally tripping over now. Meanwhile, what does NOAA, NMFS and Gulf Council do? They continue to restrict access to the recreational sherman. We are all about conservation; the vast majority of all recreational shermen get it! What we dont get it is why do we keep losing more and more access to a shery that has obviously rebounded ten-fold? Could it be because its not about the shery at all and part of a much bigger agenda? We will save catch shares and sector separation for another day and discussion. Remember! You cant hold back the tide or hide the obvious forever. But Ill bet theyll keep trying. Stay tuned! Nate OdumMexico Beach Marina & Out tters Mexico Beach Yamaha & Action Craft Performance BoatsRead the ne printDear Editor, If you are planning to vote for Steve Southerland keep this in mind, he is sending out political brochures with the ne print reading, this mailing was prepared, published and mailed at taxpayer expense. It is provided as a service to 2nd Congressional District residents. Really. Looks to me like he is trying to get reelected and we get to pay for his advertising.Marcia LowMexico BeachConcerns about bear habitatDear Editor, I was pleased to read that the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting public input about black bears (The bear necessities covered at FWC workshop May 29). Im concerned, however, that if the agency focuses too closely on smaller bear management units that Florida might fail to see the forest for the trees, when it comes to recovering the Floridas rare and unique subspecies of black bears on a statewide level. Right now, Florida really doesnt have a singular bear populationwe have several smaller populations that are largely isolated from one another. Bears need large areas of habitat connected to other bear populations in order to maintain genetic diversity, but land development in Florida has destroyed much of these habitat linkages. In the early 1970s, only a few hundred bears remained in Florida, due largely to habitat loss and trophy hunting. Threatened species protections, including a statewide ban on trophy hunting, helped bring bears back from the brink of extinction. Until 2012, the Florida black bear remained a threatened species, and bears in In ation, De ation, McMansions and Johnny Guitar Watson MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor OutlookPhysical activity key in child development Florida still have an uphill climb if they are to thrive in the long term. Wildlife professionals anticipate that millions more acres of bear habitat will be lost to development by 2060. Bear management units in some areas may also push the agency to reopen an ill-advised bear trophy hunt. Florida would be wise to keep the big picture in mind when it comes to helping this magni cent keystone species survive.Laurie HoodFounder / President www.AlaquaAnimalRefuge.org Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A By LOIS SWOBODAHalifax Media Group Its a bad year for yellow ies. Yellow y is the common name for tabanids. The family also includes horse ies. There are over 300 species of tabanids in North America. Other common names for tabanids are pine ies and deer ies. Tabanid ies are among the most highly evolved insects making them one of the most highly adapted animals on the planet. All tabanids are erce biters with slashing/ sponging mouthparts adapted to consuming blood. The mouthparts feature a blade similar to a Ginsu knife with a serrated edge. Because they are blood-feeders, they can transmit diseases between prey animals including tularemia and anthrax. Some people develop allergic reactions to the bites, which swell and turn into nasty red sores. Fly attacks result in lowered gains and low milk production in livestock animals. In 1976, estimated losses in the United States were $40 million. Adult tabanids are swift, strong iers and may y more than a mile from their breeding areas. Most deer ies require a blood meal to develop eggs. However, they also feed on pollen, nectar honeydew excreted by sucking insects like aphids. Adult tabanids are encountered in Florida between the months of May and September. Most tabanids overwinter as larvae, form a cocoon and emerge during the spring and early summer. Most tabanid larvae develop in water, animal droppings or mud. The majority has a yearlong life cycle but some larger species may take two or three years to mature. Adult life span is 30 to 60 days. Tabanids are ambush attackers that lie in wait in shady areas under bushes and trees for a chance to feed. They locate prey mainly by vision. Attacks occur during daylight hours with a peak activity beginning at sunrise and two hours before sunset. They are drawn to moving objects especially dark colored ones and are attracted to the color blue. There are no effective biological control programs for controlling tabanids. Native insects including some dragon ies feed on them. They are also parasitized by a number of wasp species that place paralyzed yellow ies in their nests as food for developing wasp larvae. The large burrowing sand wasps seen in late spring and early summer are among the most effective yellow y predators and, although they have a hornet-like appearance, do not sting. Cattle egrets and killdeer also feed on tabanids. There is no known chemical method of control for yellow y populations. Traps can be effective in small areas. Commonly used traps take the form of a dark ball covered with glue to ensnare the pests reducing the population in the immediate area. DEET, citronella and geranium oil are effective repellants. Ear tags and collars impregnated with pesticides help control attacks on animals. For personal protection, avoid being outside around dusk and dawn. Use a repellant. Wear long pants and a long sleeved shirt and choose light colors. Most tabanids tend to swarm around the highest point on their prey although yellow ies also attack the legs. There is evidence that wearing a tall hat will help discourage them from biting. It has been suggested that the tall peaked hats depicted on crackers or hillbillies were worn to discourage tabanids. Early Florida settlers used the leaves of beautyberry as a repellant for ies and other biting insects. They rubbed them on exposed skin and tucked them under the harness of horses, mules and oxen. Modern research has found that this plant is an effective insect repellant and a commercial formulation is under development. Several Franklin County residents have suggested ways to live with deer ies. Gill and Lane Autrey drink a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar every morning. They say it acts as a natural repellant to the ies. This author has experimented with drinking cider vinegar and it does seem to discourage yellow ies. Glynda Ratliff of St. George Island is highly sensitive to yellow y bites. She has a suggestion for those who have already been bitten. As soon as possible, tape a slice of raw potato over the bite. Ratliff has found it signi cantly reduces her swelling. The University of Florida has developed a trolling y trap they have found to be highly effective in tabanid control. The trap is a blue cylinder mounted on a slow moving object and coated with glue. The cylinder can be mounted on a lawnmower, fourwheeler, golf cart or a cap. According to researchers, you can create an effective personal protection device by coating a blue plastic cup with tanglefoot, a glue for trapping insects available in hardware stores. Mount the inverted cup on a blue ball cap and the ies will be more attracted to it than to the wearer. Flies drawn to you by the CO2 you exhale will land on the cup and be trapped. Some people may nd wearing such a device embarrassing. A trap for the general area of outdoor activity can be made by painting a six-inch plastic owerpot blue and coating in with tanglefoot. The pot must then be mounted on a moving object like a lawn mower or golf cart. This trap is only effective when in motion. Circling an area several times will reduce the number of yellow ies temporarily until more y in from the surrounding area. The trap will not work if it sits in one place even if it is rotating or shaking. Traps must be moved through space. If you keep a trolling trap mounted on your lawnmower or golf cart, you will reduce y numbers during their regular use. Deer ies usually y at heights lower than 10 feet and usually attack the highest available area on the human body rst. Walking with a trap mounted on a pole and shaken overhead can be effective. Tanglefoot can be messy but can be readily removed with hand cleaners that contain citrus extracts. GoJo Natural Orange Pumice Hand Cleaner works very well. SPONSORTHEWEEKLYALMANACCALLTODAY!6538868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,June583 7520% Fri,June684 7520% Sat,June784 7520% Sun,June884 7630% Mon,June984 7630% Tues,June1084 7540% Wed,June1184 7530% Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com NoticeofFinalAgencyActionTakenbythe NorthwestFloridaWaterManagementDistrictNoticeisgiventhatstormwaterpermitnumber1582wasissuedonMay28,2014,to GulfRieandPistolClub,Inc.fortheconstructionofasurfacewatermanagement facilitytoservethenewdevelopmentofGulfRieandPistolClub,LLC. ThelecontainingtheapplicationforthispermitisavailableforinspectionMonday throughFriday(exceptforlegalholidays),8:00amto5:00pmattheNorthwestFlorida WaterManagementDistrict'sERPOfce,CarrBuilding,Suite2253800Commonwealth Blvd.,MSLS225,Tallahassee,FL32399. ApersonwhosesubstantialinterestsareaffectedbytheDistrictpermittingdecision maypetitionforanadministrativehearinginaccordancewithSections120.569and 120.57F.S.,ormaychoosetopursuemediationasanalternativeremedyunder Section120.573,FloridaStatuesandRules28-106.111and28-106.401-404,Florida AdministrativeCode.PetitionsmustcomplywithrequirementsofFloridaAdministrative Code,Chapter28-106andbeledwith(receivedby)theDistrictClerklocatedat DistrictHeadquarters,81WaterManagementDrive,Havana,FL32333-4712.Petitions foradministrativehearingontheaboveapplicationmustbeledwithintwenty-one(21) daysofpublicationofthisnoticeorwithintwenty-six(26)daysoftheDistrictdepositing noticeofthisintentinthemailforthosepersonstowhomtheDistrictmailsactual notice.Failuretoleapetitionwithinthistimeperiodshallconstituteawaiverofany right(s)suchperson(s)mayhavetorequestanadministrativedetermination(hearing) underSections120.569and129.57,F.S.,concerningthesubjectpermit.Petitions whicharenotledinaccordancewiththeaboveprovisionsaresubjecttodismissal. Becausetheadministrativehearingprocessisdesignedtoformulatenalagency action,thelingofapetitionmeansthattheDistrict'snalactionmaybedifferentfrom thepositiontakenbyitinthisnoticeofintent.Personswhosesubstantialinterests willbeaffectedbyanysuchnaldecisionsoftheDistrictontheapplicationhave therighttopetitiontobecomeapartytotheproceedings,theaccordancewiththe requirementssetforthabove. Page A6 Thursday, June 5, 2014 SPONSORED BY The week of Red Snapper season in federal waters is here. The Gulf is full of Red Snapper and not just a few fishermen chasing them. The marine forecast is favorable for the next few days and off shore fishing should be very good. Most are being caught in the middle of the water column with an ample amount of chum on wrecks and off hard bottom. The MBARA sites out of Mexico Beach also have an abundance of fish, but get out early so as to get a good spot. Surf fishing is doing well for those anglers prowling the shoreline with many nice trout and red fish being caught. Surf fishing on the Cape is still producing great pompano and whiting catches. Dont be surprised if you occasionally hook up with a shark. Beating the bite: yellow y solutionsTrolling yellow y trap.ILLUSTRATIONS COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDATabanid ies ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMABeautyberry Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection ShopatHomeBOATINSURANCEHannonInsurance(850)227-1133 KidsWinTournamentFREEtoRegisteratthePortSt.JoeMarinaFirst350Kidsgetarodandreel,tackleandagoodybag! www.Kidswinfishing.com Friday,June13th Signin3pm-6:30pmEST Saturday,June14th Fishingcommencesat7:00amEST Weighin10am-12pmEST DonationsAccepted! NauticalFleaMarketFREEtoRegister. Saturday,June14th9am-3pmEST OPENTOEVERYONEANDANYONE! Mustprovideyourowntableandchairs. saltwaterclassic.comFather'sDayWeekend June13-14,2014REGISTRATIONISJUNE12TH@6PM LOCATEDATTHEHAUGHTYHERONPortSt.JoeMarina willbeaweighinlocation. Learnmoreathttp://www.nationalmarinaday.org/Saturday,June14th By TIM CROFT227-7827|@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Kayla Parker is nearing the nish line to her collegiate track career. And she is positioned in an inside lane. The Port St. Joe alum and University of Kentucky hurdler quali ed last week for the NCAA Track and Field Championships, which begin next week in Eugene, Ore. I am very happy, very excited, Parker said. The track at Eugene (named after famed middle-distance runner Steve Prefontaine) is where some of the best athletes in the world have run. It is an honor to run there. It has been a very good year. In fact, if Parker was conceiving a sendoff to her collegiate career she graduated May 10 with a Bachelor of Science degree in kinesiology she would be hard-pressed to alter the script shes written. During the indoor season, she was all-Southeastern Conference after nishing third at the SEC Indoor Championships in the 60 meter hurdles. That earned a spot in the NCAA Indoor Championships, where she nished 12th, just off the pace for allAmerican honors. That was my rst trip to the indoor meet, and that was really a great experience, Parker said by phone from her apartment in Lexington. You have to be in the top 16 in the nation to qualify for indoors. I also got my rst NCAA indoor medal, and that was great. This year has been an amazing transition, and I really feel good about how things are progressing. It gives me con dence that there is so much more to come. She was all-SEC in the 4x100 relay during the outdoor season while also competing in the 100 meter hurdles. Her trip to the NCAA Outdoor Championships, earned by placing third in the 100 hurdles at last weekends East Quali er, is the secondstraight for Parker, who nished 13th last year. That momentum fueled her indoor season this winter, which included posting early in the season, for the second consecutive year, the top 80 meter hurdle time in the country. Parker has also seen her times drop consistently she ran in the 13.20s to qualify for last years NCAA Outdoor Championships but last weekend ran 13.05. Her goal for the outdoor meet in Eugene is simple reach the nals of the 100 hurdles. I want to be a rst-team all-American, Parker said, which would happen with a top-eight nish. Beyond the NCAA meet, Parker is pointing to the USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Sacramento, Calif., later this summer. She quali ed and competed last year, reaching the hurdle semi nals. The progress over her past two years mitigates two years of relative frustration upon her arrival at Lexington, progress she said is largely due to Coach Edrick Floreal. Floreal arrived before Parkers junior season and allowed her to run to her specialty, sprints and hurdles after competing in the heptathlon her rst two years. The biggest thing Ive learned over the past four years is everything is a process, and you have to go through the process, Parker said. I would say a big difference this year is a good relationship with a coach who is very supportive. I also have strong teammates. We brought in a great class of hurdlers this year, including one of the best in the country (SEC champ Kendra Harrison). I am in a good position to go fast because I am training with some of the best in the country. The UK teams progress under Floreal is highlighted in the numbers the Wildcats will take to Eugene. After sending 10 athletes competing in 11 events to last years NCAAs, the Wildcats send 14 athletes competing in 15 events this year. Parker said she plans to concentrate this summer on her running. She wants to continue to run competitively; she also has goals to work down the road with athletes in a training/administrative/coaching capacity. The horizon looms and expands with graduation from college and upcoming collegiate and national championships. This is where I planned to be four years ago, Parker said. It took a while to get there, but this is where I wanted to be. Im looking forward to what the future holds.Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 7Star Staff ReportsYouth golf clinicThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is pleased to offer a free youth golf clinic again this year. The clinic will take place 9-11 a.m. ET each Friday in June (6, 13, 20 and 27) at the club, 700 Country Club Road. If students have their own clubs, they should bring them. If not, the club will furnish a set to each student in need. The clinic will be taught by the clubs teaching professional, Ethel Bardsley, assisted by dedicated members of the club. Free pool privileges will also be extended to the students after each session. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751 to register. Summer soccer campAll-Pro Soccer will have a Summer Soccer Camp from 5-7 p.m. CT June 16-19 at the Callaway Sports Complex, hosted by the Callaway Youth Soccer Club. The camp will be supervised by former professional player and coach Gary Hindley. Coach Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Year selectee, recently was named head coach of the Pensacola City FC team of the National Premier Soccer League and has been the head coach of both the girls and boys teams at Port St. Joe High School for the past ve years. At the camp, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 7-17. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, contact Coach Hindley at 2766353 or gjhallpro@aol.com.Golf club to offer swim lessonsThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is offering swim lessons on the following dates: July 2, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28 and 30. Starting time is 9 a.m. ET for three age groups for the swim lessons, plus the possibility of an advanced class (children would have to pass a short test with the instructor to be admitted), each lasting 30 minutes. One class will be a Parent-Tot Class for parents with children 6 months to 3 years. The cost of the lessons is $100, with a nonrefundable 50 percent deposit necessary upon registration. The deposit, however, would be refunded if the classes are canceled by the club. Registration and deposit must be made no later than 5 p.m. ET June 18 at the club. For questions, call the instructor, Rama, at 3700895 or the club at 227-1751. Star Staff ReportMexico Beachs threetournament summer series kicks off Saturday, June 7, with the Golly Whopper Classic featuring a one-day Catchem If You Can kingsh and red snapper shootout. A kids division will be included again this year, as well as an inaugural category: red snapper spear shing. One-hundred percent of the entry fees will be paid out to the winners. Tournament entry fees are $150 per boat, $35 per diver (spear shing) and $25 per child 14 and under. Last year, Charlie Lanford caught the largest red snapper, weighing 22.81 pounds, aboard the Gulf Business 3 with Capt. Lee Cathey. The king mackerel division also brought several sizeable sh to the scales, said Golly Whoppers co-director and sponsor, Zach Childs, but none could compete with the 55.13-pound smoker caught aboard the Salty Mule, captained by Blake Anderson. The Golly Whopper Captains Party will be Friday, June 6, at the Mexico Beach Marina. For rules and more information, visit 98realestategroup.com/ gollywhopper or call Childs at 819-0933. Other upcoming tournaments in Mexico Beach include the 10th annual Offshore Classic on July 25-26 and the 18th annual MBARA King sh Tournament on Aug. 23.By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com NEW YORK Nothing soothes the pain of dental work quite like a few million dollars. Port St. Joe and Louisville standout Calvin Pryor signed with the New York Jets on Monday. The No. 18 overall selection at safety penned a four-year rookie deal worth an estimated $8.56 million, according to CBSsports. com. The contract also calls for an estimated $4.55 million signing bonus. Rookie contracts are based on draft position. Complete details of the contract were not released by the Jets, as of Tuesday. Pryor missed portions of the Jets Organized Team Activities last week due to extraction of three wisdom teeth. He was able to participate in individual drills but was held out of team activities when swelling was too great to wear a helmet. He spent time on a stationary bicycle and observed practice. The lack of OTA work wasnt a concern for Jets coach Rex Ryan. He lauded the selection of Pryor on draft day and said the former Tiger Shark was very impressive during rookie minicamp May 16-18. Pryor voiced frustration to nj.com about not being able to compete, saying I want to be out there with the guys. He added that he was still engaging in mental reps and was looking forward to full contact. Contact became his trademark, as he was nicknamed Louisville Slugger for his hard hits with the Cardinals. The physical mentality immediately attracted the Jets and they made him the teams sixth consecutive rst-round defensive selection. The 5-foot-11, 207-pound Pryor had 218 tackles and seven interceptions in three seasons at Louisville. Ryan called Pryor an enforcer and eagerly awaits his punishment of NFL running backs and wide receivers. Pryor joins Bay graduate Khyri Thornton as NFL signees. Thornton, a defensive lineman, was selected in the third round by Green Bay and signed on May 19. His total contract was slotted close to $3 million with an estimated signing bonus of almost $600,000. Sports SHORTSMexico Beach summer shing tournaments begin Saturday Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STARPryor signs with Jets for expected $4.55 million bonus CALVIN PRYOR Kayla Parker hurdles into NCAA meet FILE PHOTOFormer Port St. Joe standout Kayla Parker is hoping to earn allAmerica honors during next weeks NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships.

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LocalA8 | The StarBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com During the week leading up to the Memorial Day holiday, Gulf District Schools graduated 114 seniors into the next passage in their lives. In addition to the sheepskins, in addition to the opportunity to turn tassels and enjoy a nal festive evening with classmates, the Class of 2014 also walked away with hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships earned through work of excellence the past four years.Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High SchoolPort St. Joe graduated 72 seniors among the Class of 2014 The motto for the Class of 2014 was Our lives are before us, the past is behind us, but our memories are forever with us. The class ower was Purple and Yellow Gerber Daisies and the class song was If Today Was Your Last Day by Nickelback. Homer Allen Davis was the valedictorian and Anastasia Gabrielle Thomason the salutatorian. High Honor graduates (GPA of 3.85 or above) DanTasia Yvette Welch, Kayla Lucile Lindsey, Grant Franklin Whiten, Maya Elizabeth Robbins, Kristen Denise Burkett, Bryce Taylor Godwin, Andrew Michael Lacour, Angel Roberto Padilla, Morgan Brooks Kennington. Honor graduates (GPA of 3.5 to 3.849) Christian Rose Laine, Lauren Michelle Costin, Antonio Michael Moree, Laura Kathleen Sinor, Jack Curtis Cummings, Amy Rachelyn Butler, Sawyer Jackson Rafeld, Nicholas Warren Renfro, Brittany Nicole King, Lexie Dianne McGhee, Cailyn Marie LaPlante, Katerina Nicole Nelson, Sydney Marian Owens, Brittney Deshawn Shoemaker, Kallie Louise Bateman. Graduates Demeriyah AShanti Alexander, Gabrielle Ivana Anthony, Candice Elizabeth Bright, Kylee Alexis Carter, Annalisa Brooke Childress, Koen Michael Cortellini, Kapril Nicole Darnall, Robert Anthoney Dykes, Nicole Mae Endres, Heather Nicole Faircloth, SheNoya Renee Fennell, Dwayne Griggs, Brandon Michael Hall, Anna Nicole Haynes, Justin Schwab Hites, Allison Nicole Howze, Matthew Cameron Jackson, David Matthew Jacobs, Michael Anthony Johnsen, Jacobi Richard Jones, Katherine Renee Kennington, Taylor Addison Laue, Natrone Carlton Lee, Jonathan Wesley Leffew, Nicholas Dwight Lewis, Tanene Enoya Malone, Alexander Carrol Maughan, Dequan Montay McCloud, Austin Daniel McNeill, Kelsey Christine Miles, Steven Kaleb Odom, Tommie John Parker, Anastasya Kristen Paul, Bryan Adison Powell, William Tristan Reynolds, Cathlyn Palmiano Robles, Destiny Brianne Shoemaker, Mason Richard Simmons, Alexis Nichole Strickland, Allie Jovon Stripling, Tori Jo Thomas, Corey James Williams, Torey Jerome Williams, DeShawntae Tyell Willis, Shatiara Nashay Zaccaro. Scholarships Academic Award ($100): Antonio Moree, Jack Cummings, Nicholas Renfro, Katerina Nelson Brittney Shoemaker; A Challenge ($250): DanTasia Welch, Shatiara Zaccaro; A Challenge ($1,000): DanTasia Welch; American Legion 116 ($300): Mason Simmons, Morgan Kennington; Ann Comforter ($100): Laura S inor; Aveda ($1,000): DeShawntae Willis; B. Walter Wilder ($1,000): Brittany King; Band Boosters ($500): Tristan Reynolds; Bateman-Wooten ($250): Jacobi Jones; Billy Tapper 1564 ($390): DeShawntae Willis; Billy Tapper 1713 ($390): Lexie McGhee; Bryce Nelson ($500): Allison Howze; C. Leonard Belin ($1,300): Allen Davis, Sawyer Rafeld; City Wide Missionary ($500): DanTasia Welch; Deanna Ramsey ($250): Angel Padilla; Delta Kappa Gamma ($250): Morgan Kennington; Fairpoint ($600): DanTasia Welch; Forgotten Coast ($1,500): Bryce Godwin; George Tapper ($1,000): Allen Davis; Durans ROTC ($500): Robert Dykes, Sawyer Rafeld; Gibson Rotary ($4,000): DanTasia Welch; GCEA ($600): Bryce Godwin; Gulf Sheriff ($500): Annalisa Childress; Hosie/CocaCola ($3,000): Kristen Burkett; J & S Wilder ($1,300): Grant Whiten, Angel Padilla, Cathlyn Robles, Cailin LaPlante, Tori Thomas; J. Lamar Faison ($500): DanTasia Welch; Jr. Service League ($1,000): DanTasia Welch; Kiwanis Academic ($1,300): Lexie McGhee; Kiwanis ($100): Amy Butler, Lauren Costin, Allen Davis, Anastasia Thomason; Kiwanis Vocational ($1,000): Bryan Powell; Knights of Pythias ($300): Drew Lacour, Maya Robbins, Sawyer Rafeld, DanTasia Welch; Leadership Award ($100): Robert Dykes; Principals Award ($100): Kristen Burkett, Sydney Owens, Kallie Bateman, Lauren Costin; Linda Lewis Wright ($500): Maya Robbins; Marilyn Witten ($1,000): Maya Robbins, Grant Whiten; Mediacom ($1,000): DanTasia Welch; Methodist Care PSJ ($1,000): Morgan Kennington; Methodist Care Wewa ($250): Jacobi Jones; National Jr. Beta ($250): Anastasia Thomason; Oliver/Laura Taylor ($470): Tori Thomas; PACE 379/GC($1,300): Allison Howze, Christian Laine, B rittany King; Pecola ($250): SheNoya Fennell, Tanene Malone; R. Marion Craig ($500): Natrone Lee; Principals Award ($400): Kayla Lindsey; Principals Award ($100): Kristen Burkett, Sydney Owens, Kallie Bateman, Lauren Costin; Ryan Teall ($500): Maya Robbins; Sam Cox Memorial ($1,500): Drew Lacour; Sea Oats Girl/Boy ($250): Christian Laine, Allen Davis; SGA Leadership ($300): Lexie McGhee; Spanish Award ($100): Anna Haynes; Troy University ($24,000): Anna Haynes; Troy University ($35,000): Bryce Godwin, Drew Lacour; Troy University ($60,000): Anastasia Thomason; VFW Ladies ($500): Allie Stripling; WASWA ($500): Maya Robbins; Zedoc Baxter ($470): Tori Thomas.Wewahitchka Jr./ Sr. High SchoolWewahitchka High School graduated 42 seniors among the Class of 2014. The class motto was What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us. The class ower was the red rose and the class song was Dont You (Forget about Me) by Simple Minds Jacob Seth Goodwin was the valedictorian and Jakob Alan Bidwell the salutatorian. High Honor Graduates (GPA of 3.85 or higher) Jacob Seth Goodwin, Jakob Alan Bidwell, Chelsea Nicole Cook, Kara Jean Zucci. Honor Graduates (GPA of 3.5-3.849) William Hunter Bailey, Chandler Mae Vines, Cory Matthew White, Shawn Kory Jenkins, Chelsey Danielle Toney. Graduates Tyler Lee Adams, Eddie Ray Bowles III, Jennifer Wondale Bryan, Braden Matthew Buckalew, Caitlin Marie Burch, Troy Steven Collins, Michael Adrien Cox, Calvin Grady Dean III, Brianna Kaye Edmondson, Morgan Danielle Fisher, Johnna Renee Florio, James Larry Hensley, Jr., AnMaree Teodora Hess, Jarvar Javon Hill, Zachary Allen Hire, Kimberly Dale Hughes, Damien Dwayne Hunter, Abriale Marie Kemp, James Edward Lester III, Issac Benjamin Madrid, Joshua Liam Mayer, Nicole Renee Morrill, Janie Savannah Pippen, Corey Austin Rhames, Kelver Siliezar, Kirsten Mariea Stalnaker, Sheneshia Mercedes Stansel, Kristopher Jon Taylor, Danielle Katherine Ward, Brooke Ashley Weatherly, Christina Rena Whiteld, Jamie Michael Whiteld II, Anna Maria Wilcox. Scholarships African-American collegiate Scholarship ($550) Seth Goodwin; ($450): Chelsea Cook, Jakob Bidwell; ($400): Abriale Kemp, Chandler Vines, Hunter Bailey; ($350): Jamie Whiteld, Morgan Fisher, Sheneshia Stansel, Tyler Adams; Florida State University Alfredia Owens Scholarship ($250): Sheneshia Stansel; Bateman-Wooten Scholarship ($350): Kara Zucci: ($300): Abriale Kemp; ($250): Hunter Bailey; ($200): Chelsea Cook; Charles and Betty Scholarship ($TBD): Abriale Kemp; College For Every Student ($TBD): Abriale Kemp; Courtney Erin McMillion Memorial Scholarship ($1,000): Jakob Bidwell; ($500): Josh Mayer; Delta Mu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma International ($250): Jakob Bidwell; Employees Club of Wewahitchka ($500): Abriale Kemp, Hunter Bailey, Johnna Florio, Nicole Morrill, Seth Goodwin, Shaneshia Stansel; Employees Club of Wewahitchka Ricky L. McMillion Scholarship ($500): Cheslea Cook, Morgan Fisher; Florida Academic Scholarship ($TBD): Seth Goodwin; Florida Medallion Scholarship ($TBD): Jakob Bidwell; FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Program ($TBD): Chelsea Cook, Jakob Bidwell, Seth Goodwin; Frank & Violet Graddy Memorial Scholarship ($500): Trey Lester; FSU Freshmen Scholarship ($9,600): Seth Goodwin; FSU Grant ($1,800): Seth Goodwin; Geraldine Williams Scholarship ($250): Sheneshia Stansel; Gulf Coast State College Honor Scholarship (2 year scholarship): Jakob Bidwell; Gulf County Education Association Scholarship ($600): Chandler Vines, Jakob Bidwell; Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Employees Club Scholarship ($1,000): Nicole Morrill; James Moss and Julia Wood Cleckley Memerial Scholarship ($TBD): Trey Lester; JH Grant Memorial Scholarship ($TBD): Kristen Stalnaker; Jimmy and Susan Wilder Scholarship ($TBD): Abriale Kemp, AnMaree Hess, Chelsea Cook, Kara Zucci; Methodist Care Closet Scholarship ($1,000): Anna Wilcox; Oscar Redd Memorial Scholarship ($TBD): Anna Wilcox; Ryan Flowers Memorial Scholarship ($1,500): Cheslea Cook; Ryan Teall Memorial Scholarship ($750): Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell; St. Johns Episcopal Church Women of Wewahitchka ($500): Abriale Kemp, Seth Goodwin; Trojan Opportunity Scholarship ($9,600): Chandler Vines; Troy Heritage Scholarship ($2,500): Chandler Vines; Troy University Excellence in Leadership Scholarship ($7,000): Chandler Vines; Tupelo Lodge Scholarship ($500): Seth Goodwin; U.S. Army ($85,000): Jamie Hensley, Savannah Pippen; U.S. Army Reserve Scholar Athlete ($TBD): Chelsea Cook, Jakob Bidwell; Walter Wilder S cholarship ($TBD): Shawn Jenkins; Wewahitchka Bull Gator Scholarship ($500): Jakob Bidwell; Wewahitchka Methodist Care Closet Scholarship ($250): Hunter Bailey; Wewahitchka Search & Rescue ($500): Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell, Johnna Florio; Wewahitchka Womans Club ($500): Abriale Kemp, Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell, Seth Goodwin.Graduates claim diplomas, dollarsPh H OTOs S BY TT IM CROFT aA ND Sp P Ec C Ia A L TO ThTH E STa A RAbove are WHS salutatorian Jakob Bidwell and valedictorian Seth Goodwin. At left, WHS honor students are recognized in front of the audience. Ph H OTOs S BY TT IM CROFT aA ND Sp P Ec C Ia A L TO ThTH E STa A RStudents at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School created last-minute memories by posing with friends before receiving their diplomas. Thursday, June 5, 2014

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LocalThe Star| A9 We have a tremendous amount of visitors who come to see St. Vincent, Jenkins said. I cant stress how important this is to Gulf County. In addition, the islands management staff no longer has an ofce after the city of Apalachicola declined to pick up the lease for next year and the budgetary issues are complicated since the island was put under the management umbrella of St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The situation has been awful since it went under St. Marks, Romanelli said. Several TDC board members wondered if the agency should not examine ways to bring the ofce to Indian Pass, where most visitors to the island launch their visit. Luther said a petition circulated by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island garnered 810 signatures and has been forwarded to federal ofcials. The BOCC has also chimed in and Luther had a meeting with the staff of U.S. Sen. Bill Nelsons ofce in Tallahassee last week. He is seeking meetings with the staff of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio and Congressman Steve Southerland. Anything the TDC could do to support what we are doing now would be welcome, Luther said. The Supporters are the only group promoting St. Vincent. The TDC board unanimously approved having Jenkins correspond with all relevant federal ofcials to express concerns about the future status of the island. This is obviously an issue that is important to us and a threat to our tourism here, said board chair David Warriner. ShopatHomeHOMEOWNERINSURANCEHa nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 1 33 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:6-15-14CODE:SJ00 ST. VINCENT from page A1By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County Tourist Development Council is overseeing an upswing in visitors and bed taxes. But with the Board of County Commissioners wishing to tap into the expertise of the agency administration, TDC advisory board members expressed concern about maintaining full focus. TDC executive director Jennifer Jenkins presented to her board a plan for the agencys staff to assist interim Economic Development Council director Towan Kopinsky in formulating a marketing plan for the EDC. Under the plan, which was urged by the BOCC, Jenkins and staff members Kelli Jackson, the nancial ofcer at the agency, and Michelle Perrin, who spearheads TDC marketing, would divide their time between TDC and EDC duties. In short, they would help Kopinsky develop and implement a marketing plan and program for the EDC. Jackson and Perrin would each expand their marketing work as the BOCC looks to establish an EDC using similar guidelines an executive director, any staff and an advisory council to that under which the TDC operates. We are learning a lot, but we need to gure out how to market things for economic development, Jenkins said. However, members of her board expressed reservations with the entire concept. I dont like the idea of the TDC splitting its focus, said board member Tony Whiteld, who added that he sure the BOCC saw an effective agency with operations worth duplicating. Im on the TDC, not the EDC. Im concerned about the impacts to the TDC. The primary concern of board chair David Warriner was the physical cohabitation of the two agencies as Kopinsky moves into the TDC Welcome Center at least for the summer. Warriner said the Welcome Center as already a beehive of activity with tourists and wondered how effective the physical arrangement could be, if, for example, some businessmen looking to locate arrive at Welcome Center in business attire at the same time a tourist enters in sandals and shorts to nd out where to clean sh., This building is stressed to the max, Warriner said. Im afraid we are going to take our eye off the ball a bit. We need full focus on what we are doing. County attorney Jeremy Novak said the marketing of Gulf County, whether tourismor business-related, were part of the same pie. As they get the EDC up and running you (the TDC) want to be a part of that, Novak said. Warriner, who has served in the past with the Chamber of Commerce, an EDC advisory council and the TDC, said the duties of the EDC are voluminous and distracting and added, There is a difference between collaboration and cohabitation. Warriner said Novak should pass along concerns expressed by the TDC board about the EDC proposal and its impacts on the tourism agency and said board members would be vigilant of those impacts. We are concerned, Warriner said. This is a crucial time for us.Bed taxes upBed taxes in April spiked 11.03 percent compared to the same month last year, during which an increase of 11.79 was on the books. Jenkins said the growth in April year-to-year indicated there was still room to grow the month. We have room to stay strong and steady in April, Jenkins said. We can do more to ll capacity. All indications are that May was a banner month, with the Memorial Day holiday weekend resembling a Fourth of July, Warriner and Whiteld each said. Jenkins said she remains committed to her goal of 20 percent growth for the year and said her projections for revenue next year call for continued growth in the double digits.Bed taxes rising, TDC council seeks to keep eye on ball Thursday, June 5, 2014By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com If at rst. Even though the Paces Foundation failed to secure tax credits last year to fund 72 affordable housing units in North Port St. Joe, representatives Rick Haymond and Ron Thomason came back before the Port St. Joe Commission during Tuesdays bi-monthly meeting to inform them about a new Florida housing grant that had the potential to fund 50 units. Haymond and Thomason asked commissioners to allow them apply for those funds on behalf of the city, the deadline for which is approaching on July 1, while ensuring the specics of the project could still be worked out in the meantime. Its a small piece of the overall proposed project, Thomason said. We can put in as much affordable housing as the community needs over time. Thomason said though approving the project for a lower number of units would seem simpler, markets can be dynamic and change, and if the city later decided to build more apartments, theyd face additional expenses. As more units were added, the city would incur additional costs for more roads and the extension of sewer and water lines. County Commissioner Tan Smiley took the podium and expressed the need for affordable housing in the area. He said he had visited many residents who struggle to live two to three people to a home. The mayor is a bulldog to get the lighthouse moved, but Id like to see some bulldogging on getting these affordable homes, Smiley said. Build 150 apartments, and I guarantee theyll be full within a year. With Mayor Mel Magidson on vacation, Commissioner Rex Buzzett acted as chairman for the meeting. We need affordable housing, Buzzett said. We also have to think of the infrastructure and think of the neighborhoods over there, too. Were ready to go forward on the recommendation of our attorney. The commission passed a motion to advertise the rst reading of an ordinance that would allow the ball to begin rolling again. The proposed location for the housing is just off Clifford Sims Road and was donated to the city by the St. Joe Company specically for affordable housing. The location was chosen because of its proximity to Commerce Park and could act as a gateway as new jobs are created with the opening of the Port.PSJRAAfter exploring relocation options for the ofce of Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency director Gail Alsobrook, only two options were considered. Commissioners could either relocate Alsobrook to an ofce at a cost of approximately $4,000 a year or repurpose the existing le room in city hall. Commissioners Bo Patterson and William Thursbay agreed moving the citys les to accommodate Alsobrook was the best choice and would save taxpayers money. City manager Jim Anderson warned commissioners that if the room was repurposed, a secure location would need to be found for the archived paperwork. Thats the most important room in city hall, Anderson said. If the building caught on re, the rst room you should save is that room. In a 3-1 vote, with Buzzett dissenting, Thursbay passed a motion to relocate the PSJRA to city hall.Algae problemsSeveral residents of Highland View attended to complain of a strong sewage that had invaded the neighborhood over the past week. One resident reported the smell was so bad that her kids didnt want to go outside and that her daughter had gone to the Health Department with breathing problems. In her report, Wastewater Plant Manager Lynn Todd told commissioners that because of recent rainstorms, a dense layer of algae had built up on the wastewater plants reservoir. As the algae began to rot, it caused the smell reported by the residents. Todd said the smell was not harmful to humans, though it could activate some allergies or respiratory conditions. Only three aerators are currently being used on the reservoir, but Todd said it would take seven to prevent that type of algae growth. She said the city could purchase chemicals to kill the algae, and if successful, they could be kept on hand to prevent the same situation from occurring in the future. Commissioners agreed to obtain the chemicals, which would arrive in three to ve days.City restarts affordable housing conversationThe mayor is a bulldog to get the lighthouse moved, but Id like to see some bulldogging on getting these affordable homes.County Commissioner Tan Smiley

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A10 | The Star Thursday, June 5,, 2014 Local Star Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by our readers. We would like to make this page a regular feature, an opportunity for the shutterbugs does that even apply in this digital age? from this community, resident and visitor alike, to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, the weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please send your photos to tcroft@star .com and help us shine a spotlight on Gulf County.Scene Scene aroundCOURTESY OF BILL FAUTHA familiar site, the George Tapper Bridge, through an unusual lens and angle. COURTESY OF BILL FAUTHDuring a recent heavy downpour a sheriffs deputy was forced to pull to the side of U.S. 98 in St. Joe Beach as lightning slashes the horizon. The tip of St. Joseph Peninsula is in the background.COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPERThe Bo Spring Band, aboard the Illustrious, provided musical entertainment during the annual Memorial Day party off the tip of St. Joseph Peninsula. Above right, a little water play at Oak Grove Daycare provided some relief on a warm afternoon last week. At right, kites populate the sky over Indian Pass.COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI COURTESY OF KRISTY RAFFIELD COURTESY OF DAN CHRISTIEIf the sunset is spectacular, Dan Christie from Simmons Bayou typically snaps a spectacular photo. At right, a dolphin swims along the shore near Indian Pass.COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI

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The Star| A11Special to the StarOn Monday, May 26, the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce (GCSO) received a complaint regarding the theft of an irrigation pump from the 400 block of Gulf Pines Drive. Deputy B. Smith investigated the theft. On Tuesday, May 27, Deputy J. Oquendo took a report at the GCSO regarding a missing rearm. The victim in the case stated that he discovered his Browning 9mm pistol missing from his vehicle at the beginning of the month. It was unclear where the rearm went missing from, or if it was taken from within Gulf County. On May 27, the GCSO received a call regarding the theft of three water faucets and two Everstart batteries. Deputy B. Smith investigated the complaint, which was in the 4700 block of Cape San Blas Road. On May 27, Deputy J. Brock responded to the 200 block of Catalpa Avenue in Wewahitchka after the GCSO received a report of a theft. The complainant discovered their pellet gun missing from the front porch. Deputy Brock investigated the complaint and determined Aaron W. Smiley (30) was the suspect in the case. A warrant was issued for Burglary to a Structure. He was arrested and served with a warrant on Monday, June 2. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF). On Wednesday, May 28, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a physical disturbance in the 400 block of Angel Fish Street in Highland View. Deputy G. Desrosier responded and investigated the call. One of the parties involved had already left the scene when he arrived. The case is still under investigation. On May 28, Deputy P. Williams took a report of the theft of a rearm from a vehicle in the 8900 block of Wentletrap Drive in Beacon Hill. The complainant stated his Fie model TZ 9mm pistol was stolen from within his vehicle between May 26th and May 27th. The vehicle was left unlocked. On May 28, the GCSO received a complaint regarding a residential burglary in the 5500 block of SR 71 in Wewahitchka. The complainant reported the offense occurred sometime between April 19th and May 28th. The following items were reported as stolen: a 12 foot aluminum ladder, a hot water heater, a water pump and tank, along with a refrigerator. The total value of the property reported stolen was $500. On Thursday, May 29, Pamela R. Davis (32) turned herself into the GCSO on active warrants for Violation of Probation. Davis is on probation for Reckless Driving with Property Damage and Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. She was booked into the GCDF where she was later rst appeared and released on a $1,500 bond the same day. On May 29, the GCSO received a complaint regarding the theft of tools and copper tubing in the 6200 block of Ganley Road in Five Acre Farms. Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the call. The complainant said the following items were stolen from within a shed: two Poulan chainsaws; a Makita circular saw new in the box; a fty foot roll of copper tubing; a metal and a plastic tool box; four ATV tires and wheels; a Hytachi roof nailer; and a Baja two wheel scooter. The total value of the property stolen was $2,180. If you have any information regarding this offense, please contact the GCSO or call CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS(8411). On May 29, Deputy B. Smith was approached by a complainant who wished to le a report regarding the theft of a water pump. The offense occurred between May 24 and May 29. The pump belonged to the home owners association of Marnie Island Reserve near Cape San Blas. The pump was a one horse power Berkley pump and was valued at $700. At the same time, Deputy Smith took a report of the theft of the same style pump from the property at the Cottages of Indian Summer. The value of that pump was $1,000. On Friday, May 30, John E. Burrows (31) turned himself in and was arrested for a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support. Burrows was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) and was released after paying a $1,600 purge. On May 30, Sgt. J. Williams arrested Austin R. Hysmith (28) for Driving While License Suspended or Revoked and Unlawful Use of a Drivers License. Hysmith was observed driving a vehicle on suspended drivers license and was arrested at West Church Avenue and SR 71 in Wewahitchka. He was taken into custody and transported to the GCDF. He remains in the GCDF on a $1,150 bond. On May 30, Deputy J. Brock responded to the 100 block of Hensley Lane in Overstreet after the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance. After the investigation it was determined the complainant, Timothy D. Buell (34), was wanted for Violation of Probation. Buell was arrested and transported to the GCDF. He is on probation for Indecent Exposure. He remains in the GCDF on a $1,100 bond. During the late evening hours on Friday, May 30, and the early morning hours of Saturday, May 31, GCSO Narcotics Investigators and Deputies arrested the following individuals on warrants issued the sale of narcotics: Anthony S. Crocker (30) Principle to the Sale of Meth; Warren M. Bowers (28) Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of Park; Brenda J. Neel (24) Principle to the Sale of Meth; Gordon F. Hammond (38) Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of Park, Possession of Meth, two counts of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, DWLS/R, and Unlawful Use of a Drivers License; April K. Holmes (35) -Traf cking in Hydrocodone; Rex A. Veasey, Sr. (48) Sale of Meth, Possession of Meth with Intent to Distribute, two counts of Possession of a Controlled Substance, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia; Veronica L. Pickron (40) Principle to the Sale of Meth and Unlawful Use of a TwoWay Communications Device; Sean F. Porras (37) -Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of Church; Robert C. Hill (29) Sale of GHB within 1,000 Feet of a Child Care Facility, Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of a Child Care Facility, and Unlawful Use of a Two-Way Communications Device; Melissa A. Sims (35) Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of a Church; Rebecca P. Smith (70) Traf cking in Hydrocodone; Joseph D. Turner (28) Traf cking in Hydrocodone; and Shelby A. Scheffer (23) Principle to Traf cking in Hydrocodone. Each case is the culmination of investigations conducted by the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce Narcotics Unit, some of which began three months ago. In addition to the sale of meth, Hammond and Veasey faced additional charges at the time of their arrest. The following bonds were issued at rst appearance: Bowers, $10,000; Neel, ROR; Hammond, $18,000; Holmes, $10,000; Veasey, $22,500; Pickron, $15,000; Porras, $10,000; Hill, $28,000; Sims, $10,000; Smith, $10,000; Turner, $10,000, and Scheffer, $10,000. On Saturday, May 31, Deputy J. Oquendo stopped a vehicle on Stone Mill Creek Road and SR 71 regarding a moving violation. It was determined the driver, David M. Hewitt Jr. (18), was wanted out of Holmes County and operated the vehicle without a drivers license. He was arrested and charged with Driving Without a License and an out of county warrant. Hewitt was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and given a $2,500 bond for Driving Without a License. He remains in custody awaiting extradition to Holmes County. On May 31, the GCSO received a complaint regarding the theft of construction materials from the 100 block of East Seascape Drive. Deputy M. Lay eld responded to the call. The complainant stated that two incidents of theft had occurred at the residence. The rst was reported to have occurred around Sept. 15, 2013. The incident involved the theft of a shipment of thin set which is material used to hold down oor tile. The second incident was reported to have occurred around the rst two weeks of April 2014. The complaint said it involved the shipment of approximately eight boxes of tile. The total value of the items taken was approximately $2,605. The complainant stated a report was not led earlier, because they felt the property would not be able to be traced. Citizens are strongly encouraged to le reports as soon as they become aware of a possible crime. On May 31, Sgt. J. Williams stopped a vehicle for traveling at a high rate of speed in the area of County Road 22-A and Parker Farm Road. When Sgt. Williams contacted the driver, Eddy Adorno (20), he could smell a strong odor of burnt marijuana coming from within the vehicle. K9 Marco was deployed and alerted to the presence of illegal narcotics inside of the vehicle. A search of the vehicle revealed a plastic bag of less than twenty grams of marijuana and a pipe used to smoke marijuana. Adorno was arrested and charged with Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On Sunday, June 1, Deputy K. Starnes responded to the 8000 block of US Highway 98 on St. Joe Beach regarding the theft of several reel and rods. The complainant reported the theft occurred during the early morning hours of June 1. The reel and rods were stolen from a boat parked near the complainants home. The total value of the reel and rods was $440. On June 1, Henry H. Watford Jr. (29) turned himself in on a warrant for Violation of Probation. The warrant was issued out of Bay County. He bonded out on a $2,500 bond. On June 1, Deputy J. Oquendo and Sgt. J. Murnan arrested Rodney D. Adkison (33) on an active warrant for Violation of Probation. At the time of his arrest he was determined to be in possession of drug paraphernalia. Adkison was transported to the GCDF where has charged with Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Violation of Probation. He is on probation for Possession of Listed Chemicals, Manufacturing Controlled Substance, and Felony DWLS/R. He remains in custody at the GCDF. On June 1, the GCSO received a call regarding a verbal disturbance in the 6900 block of Doc Whit eld Road in Howard Creek. Deputy J. Brock responded to the call. After investigating the incident, William T. Knox (63), was arrested and charged with Domestic Battery. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and given a conditional release. On May 26-June 1, the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 51 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 45 calls for EMS, 16 calls for other departments/ agencies and 5 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. On May 26-June 1, the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 283; Traf c Stop, 28; Civil Paper Service, 25; Field Contact, 23; Warrant Arrests, 14; Theft/ Shoplifting, 9; Abandoned Vehicle, 4; Information, 4; Suspicious Activity, 4; Traf c Accident, 4; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 3; Domestic Disturbance, 3; Verbal Disturbance, 3; EMS Assist, 4; Harassing Phone Calls, 3; Reckless Driver, 3; Sexual Offender Address Veri cations, 3; Request for Security Check, 3; Alarm, 2; Assist another agency, 2; Residential Burglary, 2; Disturbance, 2; Trespass, 2; Street Obstruction, 2; Suspicious Person, 2; Suspicious Vehicle, 2; Welfare Check, 2; Animal Call, 2; Burglary of Auto, 1; Citizens Assist, 1; Deceased Person, 1; Noise Disturbance, 1; Physical Disturbance, 1; Escort, 2; Fire Call, 3; Fraud, 1; Lost Items/Personal, 1; Lost/ Stolen Tag, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Missing Juvenile, 1; Recovered Property, 1; and Sexual Offender Reregistration, 1. PleaseJoinUsforaMeetandGreet SupportingtheRe-electionofBornandRaisedinPortSt.JoeHostedBy:Ralph&MargaretRoberson David&TrishWarriner Greg&LindaJohnson Mel&HelenMagidson Guerry&SusanMagidson Rex&NancyBuzzett Jim&BarbaraTerry Boyd&MitziHendrix Bubba&BarbaraHarmon Roy&FranSmithThursday,June12,2014 5:30pmto7:30pm ThePortInn "OnthePorch" 501MonumentAve. PortSt.Joe,FloridaJudgeJimFensomCurcuitJudgeGeorge&HildaDuren Leonard&LorettaCostin Jay&JessicaRish Ronald&LeisaPickett Al&CarolCathey Charles&TanyaCostin Pat&VivianFloyd CarolRish Dusty&CarlaMay FoodandReeshmentsproided Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce Law Enforcement Summary GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Law EnforcementThursday, June 5, 2014

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A12 | The StarOfcials say planBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Just a single number matters during Atlantic hurricane season, which began June 1. The number is one. Though the National Hurricane Center is predicting a less-active-thannormal hurricane season, it only takes one storm to ruin a year for an impacted community. Hurricane season ends Nov. 30, and the emphasis as the season arrives is preparedness, which began May 25 with the arrival of National Hurricane Preparedness Week. Everybody has got to know their piece of the puzzle, said Gulf County Emergency Manager Marshall Nelson said. When everybody does that, it works real well. You have got to be ready. It is everybodys responsibility. That is such a big part of it. National hurricane experts have been particularly outspoken in urging planning and preparing for the season while reminding folks that this is the 10th anniversary of one of the worst seasons in recent decades. There were 16 named storms in 2004, half of which at least brushed against the United States mainland and six of which reached Category 3. Among those storms were Charley, Frances, Ivan residents of the Northwest Florida remember Ivan and Jeanne, four names which were retired after the 2004 season, tying a record that was broken the following year. In 2004, 3,258 people were killed, and storms caused $50 billion in damage. Nelson still has boxes of les from 2004 lining his ofce oor, not to mention shelves of playbooks for storms through the years. For home and business owners, Nelson said, there are few better places to hone a hurricane plan than www.oridadisaster.org. They have some very good tools, Nelson said. They are very easy. You dont really have to think, just follow the (prompts). The website provides information and tips for crafting a plan for a home, a business and also has links to create a plan for your pets. There is also a childfriendly link that provides planning activities for kids. If you already have a plan, update it and understand what supplies need to be restocked or recycled. Forecasters predict between 8 and 13 named storms this year, of which 3-6 could become hurricanes including 1-2 major hurricanes. Although predictions call for a below average to average season, Floridians are reminded that it only takes one storm to impact a community, according to a press release from the Florida Division of Emergency Management. Tolearnhowyoucansupportour communitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat(850)770-2108 ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY PANAMACITYTHECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL mined, both in amount and use, in Tallahassee. For one component, the district is allowed to assess up to 1.25 mills for bricks and mortar, but can not use that money for any other purpose. In Gulf County, that means the School Board must leave most of that 1.25 mills on the table while being forced to solicit support from voters for an additional mill to cover operating expenses. We need to have local exibility for those capital outlay dollars, Norton said. Norton also said legislators should reexamine the so-called wealth adjustment in the states funding formula for public schools. That adjustment based on property values in the county requires the district to collect more of its budget locally because the state sends down fewer dollars, even though declining enrollment and other factors have carved the districts overall budget by more than $4 million in the past three years. The district, Norton said, is pushing the limit on constitutionally-mandated class size/teacher ratios and has shed more than 20 percent of its workforce the past four years. Public education in this county is threatened, Norton said. Jobs, school board members agreed, would provide a lot of salve to the wounds. School board member George Cox noted the series of industry closures the county has absorbed, from the box plant and paper mill to chemical plants and the material transfer station along the Intracoastal Waterway. That has left the county with expensive land that has lost value over much of the past decade. It has been devastating to the operations of the school system, Cox said. Consolidating the community school systems on either end of the county Is not what we want to do, Norton said. Beshears said the port is poised, as it never has been, to inject life into desultory economic development. Noting money in the state budget to at least begin the dredging a $20 million appropriation pending governor approval and more than $1 million spent drafting an application and required studies to undertake dredging of the shipping channel, have moved the ball. There is a public/private partnership in place between the St. Joe Company and Port St. Joe Port Authority to develop the port. All signs, he said, pointed to momentum that must, he added, bear fruit in the next 18 months. There is as good a chance the port will come to fruition as there ever has been, Beshears said. It is as good a chance for Port St. Joe, for Gulf County, as there ever has been. The success or progress toward success of the port was also crucial for county ofcials to make a case for a preferred alternative for the Gulf Coast Parkway, Beshears added. The Parkway has returned to the radar recently through Florida Department of Transportation public hearings on the project, which remains not fully funded for construction. County ofcials contend that while the project was dormant for several years, the project has changed from its original intent to connect south Gulf County and U.S. 231. This (project) has to include us, to tie in to us, Norton said. I hate to say it, but this is all or bust for us. Cognizant of the preference for a more direct and northerly linkage with U.S. 231, Beshears said the countys argument would be bolstered by port development. In 12 months, if the port comes to fruition, you can make the argument you need (the alternative preferred by county ofcials), Beshears said. There is a real Rubics cube of what is happening right now. We have a good chance of this all coming to fruition. Our odds are as good as they have ever been because of that port. BESHEARS from page A1 LocalThursday, June 5, 2014 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County School Board this week is likely to complete the lling of its administrative roster for the coming school year. Whatever the decisions during Thursdays meeting, which begins at 6 p.m. ET inside the board meeting room, each of the four public schools will begin 2014-2015 with a principal other than the one in place at the beginning of last school year. Some changes have already occurred. Jeremy Knapp, who took a leave of absence as principal at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School in March will not be back. His interim replacement, former principal Duane McFarland is likely to return as permanent principal. Lori Price, principal at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School, is leaving for the district ofces, where retirements will bring change. Jay Bidwell, who was interim principal at Wewahitchka Elementary School last year, is moving to the high school. The elementary school principals are to be named Thursday as Port St. Joe Elementary School principal Sue Gannon has requested the opportunity to return to teaching. In addition to losing George Cox, a xture in Gulf County education for 50 years who is retiring from the School Board, the district also loses two of its longest-serving administrator. Deborah Crosby, director of special education in the district and an educator for over 30 years, will be retiring in August. She is being replaced by Martha Weimorts. Sara Joe Wooten, the assistant superintendent for instruction, is also retiring in August. She will be succeeded by Price.Crosby/Cox recognitionsThe School Board approved naming two educational pods in honor of Cox and Crosby. The business/vocational department at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School will be named for Cox. The Bridges suite at Port St. Joe Elementary School will be named in honor of Crosby. Ceremonies will follow later in the year.Administrative changes coming to district Hurricane season arrives

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The milestones dont stop for the Gulf Countys DAWGS in Prison program. Last Wednesday, the Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability program, based out of the Gulf Forestry Camp in White City, graduated its 33rd class, and all nine pups were adopted into forever homes. The partnership between the Florida Department of Corrections, the Board of County Commissioners and the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society provides inmates the opportunity to train rescued dogs with basic obedience skills. The pairing leads to the creation of socialized dogs ready for adoption while the inmates learn a viable job skill that can be put to use upon release. By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Kids Win Fishing Tournament keeps reeling in area children. The 12th annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament will take place at the Port St. Joe Marina on June 13-14. Presented by the Kids Win Foundation, the tournament is open to children ages 3 to 16. Those who register will learn the basics of shing and be armed with the know-how to reel in a big one. Trophies will be given out for the biggest sh and most sh caught within each division. The Small Fry division is for kids ages 3 to 8, and Junior is for children 9 to 16. The contest is limited to in-shore, near-shore and Intracoastal Waterway shing, and contestants can be no farther than 3 miles from shore. Fishing can take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. The whole idea of the tournament is to get kids involved in the outdoors, said Rick Carrie, president of the Kids Win Foundation. We want them to become stewards of the water and the environment. The rst 350 kids who register for the event will receive a rod and reel, a tackle packet, T-shirt and goodie bag. With 342 participants in the 2013 event, Carrie predicted 2014 to be the biggest tournament to date. On Friday, June 13, registered contestants can pick up their shing equipment at the Port St. Joe Marina between 3 and 6:30 p.m. ET. Participants also will enjoy a kickoff party with a cookout and on-site classes to get tips on rod casting, knot tying and casting nets. These classes will provide kids with important information The Artery to host kids art campStar Staff ReportThis summer, The Artery in Port St. Joe will offer two art camp sessions for kids ages 6 and up. The art camp is structured around projects chosen to give the kids a variety of art experiences, whether its paints, clays or mosaics. Each week of the camp will feature an emphasis on clay, though each day will showcase a unique medium for children to learn. Projects are designed to be fun and creative and will be taught by The Arterys owner and operator, Leslie Wentzell. Art always helps a kids attention span, Wentzell said. Art is a great way for kids to use their brains, and its fun. I always try to allow students freedom to express themselves and their own creativity. The rst session will run from 9 a.m. to noon ET July 7-10. The second session will be July 14-17 at the same time. The cost per session is $120 and will cover all materials used during the camps. A 10 percent family discount is available as well as full and partial scholarships to those who qualify. For more information call 227-5741. Registration can be completed at www.arterystudio. com/register.html. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) On a technicality, what other state besides Alaska and Hawaii was of cially admitted to the Union in 1950s? TX, OH, IA, OK 2) What was the Titanics emergency lifeboat #1 dubbed as by the press? Lucky Stars, Money Tree, Millionaires Boat, Cash Bow 3) Reportedly on his historic ight, what doll did Charles Lindbergh take along? G.I. Joe, Felix the Cat, Raggedy Andy, Bugs Bunny 4) When did Tom Brokaw sign off (retire) as anchor of NBC Nightly News? 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006 5) What are ASL, BSL, JSL, and DSL types of? Sign languages, UFOs, Signature loans, Dreams 6) Which of these sports or sporting activities has a sin bin? Boxing, Bowling, Hockey, Snowboarding 7) Whats a split among the members of a church when they no longer agree on what they believe? Sceptre, Scherzo, Schism, Scrag 8) From Harry Potter whats the name that most witches and wizards fear to speak? Voldemort, Flitwick, Diagon, Dumbledore 9) What do more school kids say is the worst thing served in the school cafeteria? Broccoli, Meatloaf, Fish sticks, Lima beans 10) Where is National Museum of Roller Skating located? Atlantic City, NJ; Fresno, CA; Lincoln, NE; Florence, SC 11) What is known medically as trimethylxanthine? Morphine, Glucose, Starch, Caffeine 12) A scimitar is a type of what? Headache, Sword, Fence, Stallion 13) When did newscaster Paul Harvey make his rst national broadcast from Chicago? 1945, 1950, 1955, 1960 14) A state of complete happiness is known as whatnumber heaven? First, Third, Seventh, Tenth ANSWERS 1) OH. 2) Millionaires Boat. 3) Felix the Cat. 4) 2004. 5) Sign languages. 6) Hockey. 7) Schism. 8) Voldemort. 9) Meatloaf. 10) Lincoln, NE. 11) Caffeine. 12) Sword. 13) 1950. 14) Seventh. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com WES LOCHER | The StarThe next Salt Air Farmers Market will be Saturday, June 7, at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase, and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmers Market promotes a sustainable food system on Floridas Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. FARMERS MARKET SATURDAYKids Win shing tournament June 14SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Artery will host two kids summer art camps in July. See FISHING B5 DAWGS IN PRISONDAWG-GONE!PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarPauley, a hound mix, was adopted by Chris Kirkland of Hilliard. Below, Belle, a hound mix, was adopted by Lynda and Jim White of Cape San Blas.All pups from class 33 of DAWGS in Prison nd forever homesSee DAWGS B5Thursday, June 5, 2014

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Society Juneisa45lb3yrLab/Catahoula mix.Shehaslearnedtowalkon herleashandislearningother commands.Juneisalittleshy aroundnewsurroundsandpeople butwarmsupquickly.Thispretty girlwouldloveaforeverhomeof herveryown.Ifyoucangiveher asafeandlovinghome,pleaselet usknow. Onlineapplicationsandpetphotos areavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrent vaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4 pm!Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,and alltheproceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare! ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3 pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandour shelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetin PortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon! Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyor Shelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org DowntownPortSt.Joe850-229-6161 bowwowbeach.com301REIDAVENUE PORTST.JOEFLORIDA,32456 NowyoursourceforNewNutroSourceGrainFreeDogFood! Special to The StarThe Gulf County Chamber of Commerce invites you to attend the grand opening/ribbon cutting for our newest member, The Gifted Gourmet. Pam Woolery and her son, Kamden, opened The Gifted Gourmet last month and specialize in gourmet food, wine and gift items that can be packaged and sent worldwide or enjoyed just down the street. Craft cheeses and chocolate-covered espresso beans are only a few of the delicious treats offered. The Gifted Gourmet is at 220 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe. Come and meet the Woolerys from 5-7 p.m. ET on Monday, June 9, as we welcome them to our Chamber and our community.Happy Birthday Christina! We love you! Christina Clayton turned six on June 2, 2014. She celebrated her birthday with a pool party surrounded by all her family and friends. Christina is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton, granddaughter of Keith and Debbie Ford, and Sam Sr. and Jeannette Amerson, and the niece to Sam Jr. Amerson and Jeremy Owens. Summertime is vacation time for people, not plants! While getting ready for that long awaited trip, its easy to forget about your lawn, landscape, vegetable garden and house plants. A little time spent preparing your leafy friends for your absence could save you needless worry and hours of extra work when you get back. A vacation may be relaxing and rejuvenating for you and your family, but it can be hazardous even deadly for your plants. Unless you make adequate preparations before leaving, you could return to vegetable disaster. One of the rst things you might do before leaving home is ask a neighbor to check your plants periodically while youre gone. All plants need some care. But, during and extended vacation, container grown plants require special attention and different species have different needs. Be sure you give your friend speci c instructions for the care of each type. Even if you cant nd someone to personally look after your plants while youre away, theres plenty you can do prior to departure to make sure you dont come home to a limp landscape and sickly house plants. Outdoor, container grown plants should be placed in a shady area to conserve moisture. Under a tree or on the north side of a building are good locations. A thick layer of mulch will help conserve moisture for landscape plantings. Mow your lawn just before leaving, cutting the grass a little closer than usual. And unkept lawn can encourage disease, and its a tell-tale sign that no ones home. Give lawn and landscape plants a heavy watering especially recently planted beds, which will need extra moisture. Also, thoroughly spray or dust your plants to protect them from insects and diseases while youre away. If you have owering annuals, cut the blossoms before departing. If you dont, theyll soon stop blooming. And, harvest all ripe or nearly ripe fruits and vegetables. Like owers, they will continue to produce only if theyre picked frequently. Otherwise, theyll go to seed. Do a thorough job of weeding. If weeds are allowed to go to seed while youre away, you can expect to encounter much more dif cult problems later in the season even next year when the seeds sprout. And, remember that weeing eliminates a major source of competition for your landscape plants food and water, which may be in short supply during your absence. Plants kept indoors require special consideration. Before leaving home, place your house plants in a room which receives indirect sunlight. Direct exposure to the sun will dry the soil too quickly. Of course, you dont want to put your plants in a room thats too dark, either. Too little light will almost always result in leaf drop. And, just before you depart, be sure to water your house plants thoroughly. This is especially vital, because unlike lawn grass and landscape ornamentals house plants cannot bene t from any rain that may fall while youre gone. Youll enjoy your vacation more by making sure your plants are well prepared for your absence. For more information on how to vacation care for plants contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf. ifas.u .edu or edis.ifas.u .edu. BirthdayCovered in cake and icing, You smile from ear to ear. Six candles celebrate Our joy of your sixth year. We sing Happy Birthday And you play with the wrapping and bows We are amazed at how you have touched our lives Just six short years ago. Vacation care for plantsSenior Citizens selling spaghetti platesSpecial to The StarGulf County Senior Citizens will be selling spaghetti plates from 46:30 p.m. ET Friday, June 6 at the Senior Center at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe. The plates will cost $7.50 and will include spaghetti with meat sauce, breadsticks, salad and homemade dessert. You can eat at the center or carry out. All proceeds will go to providing services to the elderly of Gulf County. Tickets are available at the Senior Citizens Center or from any employee of board member. Call 229-8466 for more information. Donations are greatly needed and appreciated.Senior Service Day at PSJ Senior CenterStar Staff ReportRepresentatives from the Area Agency on Aging of North Florida from Tallahassee will be providing free application and counseling assistance at Gulf County Senior Citizens located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe from 10:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on June 12. The representatives will provide information on Medicare enrollment, Medicare Part D prescription plans, Medigap, prescription assistance programs, Medicaid/Food Stamp assistance program, free ampli ed telephones for the hard of hearing and Emergency Home Energy Assistance program for the elderly. This is free to the public, please call 229-8466 for more information.Chamber holds ribbon cutting ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension directorB2 | The Star Thursday, June 5, 2014 Do a thorough job of weeding. If weeds are allowed to go to seed while youre away, you can expect to encounter much more dif cult problems later in the season even next year when the seeds sprout. And, remember that weeing eliminates a major source of competition for your landscape plants food and water, which may be in short supply during your absence.

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The Star| B3Port St. Joe class of 1974 reunionThe Port St. Joe High School Class of 1974 is now planning its next reunion. Anyone from the class interested in helping to coordinate the event is asked to contact Traci Middleton Gaddis at 6485474, Ida Whiteld Garrett at 227-6185 or Susie White at 227-4046.PSJs Welch awarded Mediacom scholarship Mediacom Communications presented DanTasia Welch, a 2014 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, with a $1,000 scholarship as part of the companys World Class Scholarship Program. The award recognizes the Port St. Joe resident for outstanding leadership and academic accomplishments. Mediacom annually gives $1,000 scholarships to 60 graduating seniors to provide support for the students post-secondary education. Mediacoms Technical Operations Supervisor, Robert Kissam, presented the scholarship to Ms. Welch during the high schools recognition program. As a technology company, Mediacom understands how important it is to invest in future leaders like DanTasia Welh, said Kissam. Im proud that my company supports local students with scholarship support. More than 1,500 students applied for the scholarships. This is the thirteenth consecutive year Mediacom has funded World Class Scholarships for students who live in areas served by the cable and broadband company. To receive the Mediacom scholarships, recipients must attend an accredited two-year or four-year college, university or technical school within the United States. A congratulatory photo album of this years World Class Scholars will be available at Facebook. com/MediacomCable as well as videos featuring this years scholarship winners at YouTube.com/ MediacomCable beginning this May. Mediacom plans to continue funding its World Class Scholarships in all areas where it provides digital cable and broadband services. High school administrators will be notied in the fall of 2014 when scholarship applications become available online for students in the Class of 2015 Mediacom Communications is the nations eighth largest cable television company and one of the leading cable operators focused on serving the smaller cities in the United States, with a signicant concentration in the Midwestern and Southeastern regions. Mediacom Communications offers a wide array of broadband products and services, including traditional and advanced video services such as digital television, video-on-demand, digital video recorders, highdenition television, as well as high-speed Internet access and phone service. Through Mediacom Business, the Company offers affordable broadband communications solutions that can be tailored to any size business. Special to The StarNorth Florida Child Development, Inc.s, South Gulf County Early Learning Center, located across from the Gulf/Franklin Center, on Field of Dreams Avenue off of Highway 98; held its second annual PreK graduation since relocating to their new 7,800 square foot state of the art Early Child Development Facility. The ceremony under the direction of Center Manager, Mrs. Jan Cherry was held on Thursday, May 22. Family, friends, and community were invited to attend the ceremony to witness 18 students perform and celebrate their readiness for kindergarten. The ceremony began with the welcome by Mrs. Melanie Quinn-Larry, the four year old classroom teacher, who worked so very hard along with Mrs. Gina Hamilton to prepare the children to give their families such a delightful treat before the children received their Readiness Certicate. Ms. Sherry Bolden, Family Case Manager, did a wonderful introduction of each program performance and of all the children as they received their diplomas. The Pledge of Allegiance was led by Ashley Rojas and Rion Farmer; the class sang Tooty Tot, one of their very favorites, a song that teaches through music and movement and develops listening skills; the days of the week was recited by Darion Cherry, Brandon Johnson and Aubrey Armstead; the months of the year was recited by Brody Little, Kaylee Lowery and Bernard Simmons; counting to 10 in Spanish was recited by Ashley Rojas and Jose Ruiz; counting to 100 by 10s was recited by Jayden Reese, Aubree Purdy and Abigail Levins. The students preformed various nursery rhymes: Hickory Dickory Dock was recited by Casen Hill, Samuel Erickson and Bernard Simmons; Humpty Dumpty was recited by Aubree Purdy, Ahsley Rojas and Brandon Johnson; Jack and Jill was recited by Kaylee Lowery, Darion Cherry and Jayden Reese. The guest speaker was Midshipman 4th Class Javarri Beachum. Javarri began his education and discovered his love for learning while attending North Florida Headstart in downtown Port St. Joe and transitioned with the program to the Highland View location. Javarri is a 2000 graduate of North Florida Child Development and entered formal education at Port St. Joe Elementary; from there he continued at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and was a member of the Class of 2013. While attending Port St. Joe High School he enjoyed playing soccer and baseball for the Sharks. During this time of Javarris life he dedicated a lot of his time to helping others and being a role model. Javarri recently completed the Naval Academy Prep School in Rhode Island where he had a great year meeting new friends and learning new things. He is preparing to go to Annapolis, MD to attend the United Stated Naval Academy. Javarris long term goal is to be a pilot and y the worlds best planes. During his speech Javarri spoke directly to the students and their parents; he told them that they could achieve anything they dreamed. He also asked the students to give their parents a big hand of applause and thanks for helping and supporting them. He reminded the parents of the value of their continued support. Mrs. Jan Cherry, the Center Manager, closed by making special recognitions of those employees and volunteers who spent many hours preparing for the wonderful event. Special thanks to parents; teachers Melaine Quinn-Larry, Jessica Williams and Gina Hamilton for their hard work and dedication to educating our students; FCM Harmony Booker for helping develop our program; teacher Joanna Levins for the great end of the year slide show; Hilary Patterson (Juice Box Photography) for the great cap & gown and class pictures; Mr. Ronnie Cherry and Mr. Algy Wade for grilling the food; Ms. Nicole Laquera our Chef for preparing the remaining food for the children, families, community, staff and friend; Peppers Mexican Restaurant for supporting our program throughout this school year; Policy Council Members and the Board of Directors of North Florida Child Development. 2014 South Gulf County Early Learning Centers Graduates include: Aubrey Armstead, Darion Cherry, Michael Ellwood, Samuel Erickson, Rion Farmer, Arturo Fonseca, Michael Garcia, Casen Hill, Brandon Johnson, Abigail Levins, Brody Little, Kaylee Lowery, Aubree Purdy, Jayden Reese, Ashley Rojas, Jose Ruiz, Bernard Simmons III and Curtis Whiddon. DOGSFORDOGS-4-Saturday,June7,2014$5.00donation,2Hotdogs,Chips&Drink 850-227-9393AllproceedsgototheSt.JosephHumane SocietyinPortSt.Joe!! Comeouttothemarinaforlunchand Adoptapettoday! ShopatHomeLIFEINSURANCEHa nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 13 3 The Lions TaleSp P ECIAL TO TT HE STARCongratulations to the top Honor Students for Faith Christian School: First grade, Austin Ramsey; second grade, Taylor Burkett, Carter Costin, Mazie Hodges; third grade, Magnolia Sarmiento; and fourth grade, Kristen Bouington. Graduation day at North Florida Child Development School News School BRIEFsS PHOTOs S spSP ECIAL TO TT HE STARThursday, June 5, 2014

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comSpecial to The StarForty percent of American children will sleep tonight in a home where their fathers dont live. The impact of that reality will be explored at 7 p.m. CT Monday, June 9 Lifetree Caf. A lmed interview with Donald Miller (best-selling author of Blue Like Jazz and Father Fiction) will be screened during the Lifetree program. In the interview, Miller describes growing up without a father and his attempts to reconnect with his father later in life. This program, titled FatherLess, is for those whove been abandoned, ignored, or abused by their fathers, said Lifetree Caf representative Craig Cable. Its also for dads who have, for some reason, lived away from their children. And it will help anyone who cares about either a father or child whos had to cope with this dif cult situation. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org BruceHodge, Pastor SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 Thomas BranchMay 28, 1959 to January 1, 2014 We loved you and we miss you.Mother Nadine Branch, Brother Charles Branch, Brother Robert Branch and wife Cindy; all your nieces and nephews, and especially Elizabeth Branch In loving MEMORYEdwin Randall Skip Bulkley, II, age 75, of Cottondale, Fla., passed away on March 29, 2014, at his home in the loving care of his wife and family. Skip was born in Bellefonte, Penn., to the late Edwin Randall Bulkley, Sr., and Elsie Alice Novak. He was a graduate of Mooseheart Schools in Mooseheart, Ill., and Illinois State University. He served honorably in the Illinois Air National Guard for six years. Skip spent most of his career in sales of electronic media development in the metro Atlanta area before retiring in Mexico Beach, Florida. He is survived by his loving wife of 20 years, Alberta Howell Bulkley. He is also survived by two daughters whom he adored, Wendi Bizub of Port Orange, Fla., and Kerri Rodgers, of Lakewood, Ohio; his daughters mother, Linda Richardson, Bay Village, Ohio; two stepchildren, Christopher Howell of St. Joe Beach, and Cheryl Clark, of Newnan, Ga.; one grandson, Khristian Brown; and two granddaughters, Jessica Clark, and Ashley Clark; his siblings, Sally Bulkley Pancrazio of Bloomington, Ill., William David Bulkley, Batavia, Ill., and Penny Bulkley Schafer, Terre Haute, Ind. Skip was a member of the Loyal Order of the Moose for 40 years, and served as President of the Florida Mooseheart Alumni group for several years. He believed the Moose Organization to be an excellent provider for the care and education of youth at the Child City of Mooseheart and for the elderly at Moose Haven. He was most recently a member of the Loyal Order of the Moose in Marianna. A celebration of Skips life will be held at the interment of his cremains at Vestal Hills Memorial Park, in Vestal, N.Y., on June 5, 2014, at 2 p.m. Skips family greatly appreciates the service of the Veterans Administration in providing care and assistance to him in his illness. Edwin Randall Skip BulkleyMinnie L. Price, age 68, passed away on May 28, 2014, after battling a long illness. She was preceded in death by Charles Price, her husband of 34 years who she loved dearly. She was also preceded in death by her parents, Curt and Jessie Louise Johnson, and eight siblings. She is survived by her sons, Max Wood, Jr. (Patty), Kenneth Price (Michell), Tony Price (Susan) all of Wewahitchka, and Gary Holmes (Angie) of Dalton, Ga.; a daughter, Faye Hysmith (Billy)of Wewahitchka.; a sister, Idella Williams (Julian); brothers, Lavon Johnson (Teresa) and Lamar Johnson (Katrina). She is also survived by sister-in-law and special friend Elese Price, 11 grandchildren; 16 greatgrandchildren; and a host of nieces and nephews. She was a loving wife, mother, daughter, and sister. She was loved by many. The visitation was held at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church on Friday, May 30, in Wewahitchka. Graveside services were at Cypress Creek Cemetery in Kinard, Fla., on Saturday May 31 at 10 a.m. CT. Those who wish may make donations to Sacred Heart Hospital or St. Judes Children Hospital in her memory. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Minnie L. Price ObituariesSpecial to The StarA summer kids event called Weird Animals will be hosted at Long Avenue Baptist Church from Sunday, June 15 through Thursday, June 19. At Weird Animals, kids participate in memorable Bible-learning activities, sing catchy songs, dig into yummy treats at the Critter Cafe, experience one-of-a-kind Bible adventures and test out Sciency-Fun Gizmos at Imagination Station that theyll take home and play with all summer long. Plus, kids will learn to look for evidence of God all around them through something called God Sightings. Each day concludes with The Tail End a celebration that gets everyone involved in living what theyve learned. Family members and friends are encouraged to join in daily for this special time at 8 p.m.! Kids at Weird Animals will also take part in a mission effort to pour out Gods love to people in India by providing clean water. For $2.50, a child in India can have clean water for a year at school! Weird Animals is for kids 4 years old through sixth grade (completed) and will run from 6-8:30 p.m. each day. For online preregistration visit the www.groupvbspro. com/vbs/ez/longavenue. For more information, call the church of ce at 229-8691. Growing up without a father explored at Lifetree CafLong Avenue Baptist invites children to Weird Animals: Where Jesus Love Is One-of-a-Kind THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on Thursday, June 5, 2014

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, June 5,, 2014With the latest graduation numbers added to the programs ve-year tally, 344 dogs have graduated to new homes and 392 inmates have participated in the program. During each class, dogs are brought from the humane society in Port St. Joe to spend eight weeks with a group of inmate trainers, handlers and caretakers. While the dogs learn new skills the inmates learn compassion, patience, tolerance and teamwork. Most of these men have never known unconditional love in their lives, DAWGS co-director Sandi Christy told the adopters who were present to watch the graduation ceremony. The dogs teach the inmates so much about love. Youll be changed forever by this dog. Once the canine commencement was complete, dogs left to live with new families in Mexico Beach, Panama City, Cape San Blas and as far away as Indiana, New Jersey and Connecticut. Before the ceremony ended, Assistant Warden Steve Roddenberry took to the podium to thank Christy and co-director Judy Miick for their hard work and dedication to the DAWGS program. He presented them with a plaque in recognition of their accomplishments. Were so thankful to have a very forwardthinking warden, Christy said. So much goes into the work with the dogs, and were so grateful to the adopters for giving them a better life. Pauley, a hound/pointer mix was headed to Hilliard to live with new owner, Chris Kirkland, a former Nassau County commissioner. Kirkland said while serving as commissioner, he was heavily involved in Nassaus animal control duties. After taking a stray English sheepdog off the streets, he later adopted the animal, and after many years together, Kirklands dog passed away from cancer earlier in the year. He saw the DAWGS program as the perfect route to nd a new companion. The program was intriguing, and its a winwin for the inmates and the animals, Kirkland said. These programs are rehabilitating dogs that may otherwise be euthanized. After completing the application process, Kirkland visited the SJBHS and met Pauley. Kirkland said because of Pauleys good disposition and compatibility with his other dog, a Malamar, he knew hed found the latest addition to the family. There are so many pets and so few homes, Kirkland said. A pet is a commitment. Do your homework, and dont make a snap decision. Lynda and Jim White hadnt owned a dog in eight years, but after recently moving to Cape San Blas and seeing the dog-friendly side of Gulf County, they knew it was time. The couple wanted a sweet, medium-sized dog, and after their own visit to the SJBHS, they found their perfect match in Belle, a hound mix Jim described as loveable, but not too crazy. People should consider a program like this before buying a dog from a puppy mill, Lynda said. There are so many great dogs that need a home. I like that we get to save a life. After the celebration concluded with cake, adopters attended a class that covered basic commands, feeding, kenneling and tips for integrating the dogs into their homes. Adopters were given time to learn one-on-one from the trainers on how to best handle their pups while they practiced the commands. Adopters also received DVD videos from the training teams to remind them how each command worked, along with visual aids. John Dykema, a Port St. Joe resident, has been a volunteer with the DAWGS program for the last four months. Before moving to Gulf County, Dykema spent eight years training puppies as service dogs in Michigan. He visits the Gulf Forestry Camp once a week to oversee training and offer assistance to the inmates. I see a drastic difference in the inmates a huge difference as their self-esteem and patience goes up, he said. They become a different individual. Dykema said he volunteers because he enjoys watching the advancement of the inmates but also because he enjoys seeing the trainers appreciate and love the dogs. Those dogs give it all back to their adopters, Dykema said. As graduation came to a close, many dogs took their rst car rides with their new owners while other graduates soon would board a transport where theyd be picked up by their adopters. Every day across the U.S., 10,000 dogs are euthanized because of lack of homes and limited shelter space and resources. Christy reminded Gulf County residents of the free spay and neuter programs offered by the humane society and asked pet owners not to let their animals roam. We work hard to set the dogs up for success, Christy said. Its critical we keep this program going. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast 4516380850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com 4519030 850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SOLD to ensure they have a fun and active day of catching sh instead of remembering the one that got away. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Gulf County Turtle Patrol and St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve will have displays to provide additional information to kids on how they can do their part in keeping the environment safe. After the kickoff, the ofcial rules meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the marina. The tournament will begin at 7 a.m. ET June 14 with weigh-in beginning at 10 a.m. Fishing ends at noon with trophy presentations to follow. Children may sh with an adult but must be the ones to reel in all sh entered into the competition. Anybody who wants to learn to sh or even just learn about the bay are encouraged to come out, Carrie said. Kids Win was established to expose youngsters to the thrill of shing in a fun and safe environment. Registration is free and is open until Thursday, June 12. More than 200 kids have already registered for the event. Those interested in volunteering or making donations can contact the Port St. Joe Marina at 227-9393. A small fry shows off his big win at the Kids Win shing tournament. This years tournament will begin at 7 a.m. ET June 14. Registration ends Thursday, June 12.FILE PHOTO FISHING from page B1 PHOTOS BY WES LL OCHER | The StarAbove is the 33rd DAWGS graduating class. Below left, Pauley, a hound mix, was adopted by Chris Kirkland of Hilliard. Below right, Gulf Forestry Camp Assistant Warden Steve Roddenberry presented codirectors Judy Miick and Christi Sandy with a plaque commemorating their hard work.People should consider a program like this before buying a dog from a puppy mill, Lynda said. There are so many great dogs that need a home. I like that we get to save a life.LL ynda White, Cape San Blas DAWGSGS from page B1

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LocalB6 | The Star Trades&Services BrykPropertyManagementVacationRentalCleaning Maintenance Flooring/CarpetInstallation/CarpetCleaning SpecializinginAbsenteeOwners PropertyManagement(850)381-5333 Seeuson TomGoldsmithPhotographyCustomPhotography Services:Events, Family,Corporate, Location,RealEstate FineArtPrints; tom-goldsmith .artistwebsites.com PortraitStudio 318ReidAve PortSt.Joe,FL 32456 850-899-2883 tom.goldsmith@ fairpoint.net F.W.C.Florida Window CoveringCompanyFactoryDirectWindowTreatments ResidentialandCommercialForAllYourWindowCoveringNeedsCallFlorida Window CoveringCompany 850-697-3066 or 850-528-9355amsrohrs@fairpoint.net 4516042 19Years of Service! 229-1324 TOPLACEYOURADIN THETRADESANDSERVICE SECTIONCALLMARCIAAT227-7847 B6| The Star Thursday, June 5, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95096S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No. 23-2012-CA-000138 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. SANDRAG. CORBIN A/K/ASANDRAG. BROXSON, ETAL; Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 23-2012-CA-000138 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, where-in WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff and M SANDRAG. CORBIN A/K/ASANDRAG. BROXSON, ETAL; are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT FRONTLOBBYof the Gulf County Courthouse 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES, AT11:00 AM, ETon June 26, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 15, BLOCK 6, LAKE ALICE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, TRADE NAME -ANNIVERSARY, MODEL YEAR 2005, MODEL NO. 6763 AND MANNO. GAFL407A53417AV31. Property Address: 237 RHODES AVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 21st day of May, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C. 100 WESTCYPRESS CREEK ROAD, SUITE 1045 FORTLAUDERDALE, FL33309 PHONE: (954)644-8704 File No. 11-09236 June 5, 12, 2014 95102S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2008-CA-000337 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KNIGHT, WESLEY PAUL, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA000337 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, KNIGHT, WESLEY PAUL, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00am, ET on the 26th day of June, 2014, the following described property: LOT 12 OF INDIAN SUMMER SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGE 41 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-491-1120 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850-747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaireed, call 711. 01891.0203 June 5, 12, 2014 99007S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Leigh Gable Holdings, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1031 Application No. 2014-29 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03806-520R Description of Property: Lot 12, Block D, SeaShores/St. Joe Beach, Unit No. 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 35, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Margot A. Valencik All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day of June, 2014. Dated this 19th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 22, 29 June 5, 12, 2014 99031S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James M. Holcombe the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 699 Application No. 2014-30 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03083-415R Description of Property: Lot 43, Palm Breeze Subdivision according to the plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 4, Page 46. Name in which assessed: Richard & Delilah Henderson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of July, 2014. Dated this 27th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 29, June 5, 12, 19, 2014 99033S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009CA 000254CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff, vs. SUELLEN FLEMING, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 18, 2014 and entered in 2009CA 000254CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, is the Plaintiff and SUELLEN FLEMING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY are the Defendant(s). Rebecca L. Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM ET on June 19, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Thursday, June 5, 2014 Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 5, 2014 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST FOR 1341.09 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30-E (FORMERLY STATE ROAD NO. 30-E); THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST FOR 1642.44 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11426.79 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS FOR 427.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR 1711.69 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11415.15 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 1058.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST FOR 2813.88 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 574.11 FEET TO A RE-ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 319.00 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 59.78 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST ALONG A PARTY WALL AND A PROJECTION THEREOF 314.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 59.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY 18.00 FEET AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY 12.00 FEET OF THE NORTHEASTERLY 74.00 FEET THEREOF. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of May, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts. org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-14008 May 29, June 5, 2014 99039S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12000218CA-AXMX WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA KAY REEDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBRA KAY REEDER; JOSEPH C. REEDER; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order or Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: A parcel of land located in Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast of the Northwest of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence North 00 West, 39.40 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 88 West, 126.48 feet to a point on the East R/W line of SR No. 71; said point being on the arc of a non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northwesterly along said East R/W line, along the arc of said curve; having a radius of 11034.28, a central angle of 00, an arc distance of 64.98 feet: chord to said curve bears North 28 West, 64.98 feet; thence leaving said East R/W line, North 65 East, 171.90 feet; thence South 00 East, 125.24 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.31 acres, more or less. Property Address: 1660 Hwy 71 South Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Parcel I.D.: R 02614-000R at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Courthouse lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. E.T. on 26th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Enrico G. Gonzalez, P.A. Attorney at Law Enrico G. Gonzalez, Esq. 6255 E. Fowler Ave. Temple Terrace, FL 33617 FL Bar #861472 (813)980-6302 In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding via the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771. May 29, June 5, 2014 99049S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-27 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, deceased, File Number 14-27 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the co-personal representatives and the co-personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 29, 2014. /s/ Doris Jean Whitten Doris Jean Whitten P.O. Box 397 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Co-Personal Representative Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Barbara Ann Johnson Barbara Ann Johnson P.O. Box 573 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON 116 Sailors Cove Drive P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457 (850) 229-8211 ATTORNEY FOR CO-PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES FL Bar No. 0350583 May 29, June 5, 2014 99043S PUBLIC NOTICE PSJRABoard of Directors Meeting Regular Board of Directors Meetings of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency are held on the third Tuesday of each month at 4:30 PM. Specific dates for the remainder of FY14 are June 17, July 15, August 19, and September 16. Meeting location is City Hall, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL. All persons are invited to attend and participate. Anyone want to appeal an official decision made on any subject at the meeting must have a verbatim record of the meeting that includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is based. June 5, 2014 99065S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROPOSAL NO. 1314-24 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for a: PAYAND CLASSIFICATION STUDYFOR THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Copies of the Proposal Provisions and Forms may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or found on the Gulf County website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov. Additional technical information relative to this RFPmay be obtained from Denise Manuel, Central Services Director, at (850) 227-2384 or dmanuel@gulfcountyfl.gov during normal business hours. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide five (5) bound copies and one (1) electronic copy of your proposal. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will accept sealed proposals at the Gulf County Clerk of Courts Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, until June 26, 2014, at 4:00 PM, ET. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 30, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. ET. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99057S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: Bid #1314-23 GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS ROOF INSTALLATION The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for the purchase and installation of: ROOF FOR THE GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS BUILDING Specifications may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, or at the website at www.gulfcountyfl.gov. Further information can be obtained by contacting Tony Price at (850) 227-8335. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, June 6, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 10: 00 a.m., E.T. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99089S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDASTATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ANIMALHOSPITAL OF PORTSTJOE located at 300 Long Avenue, in the County of GULF, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 23rd day of May, 2014. AG4382, Inc. June 5, 2014 99083S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-28-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE GIBSON GLASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jane Gibson Glass, deceased, whose date of death was September 16, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 29, 2014. Personal Representative: Nancy G. Cowles 3174 Paces Mill Rd SE Atlanta, GA30339 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKETSTREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 FLBar No.: 63869 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net May 29, June 5, 2014 99133S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2013-CA000122-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. EDNA E. NEWSOME, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in GULF County, Florida, described as: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, THENCE RUN EAST FOR 580 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH FOR 567 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNIING; THENCE RUN EAST 130 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 60 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 130 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LOT OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 172 N Duck Avenue Wewhitchka, FL 32465 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at AT SOUTH ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1000 CECIL COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET on June 26, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this count on the 28th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File# 153868/tam June 5, 12, 2014 99103S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Public Workshop The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency will host a workshop for public comment on the proposed Open-Air Information Center, to be constructed on the deck of the Billy Joe Rish parking lot, on Tuesday, June 10, 5 PM at the City Hall Commission Chambers, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL. All persons are invited to attend and participate. June 5, 2014 99115S PUBLIC NOTICE Under Florida State Law Self-Service Storage Facility Act 83.801 -83.809, F.S., BEACH STORAGE located at 7942 Americus Ave., St. Joe Beach, FL, will sell or otherwise dispose of the contents of the following units on JUNE 14, 2014, at 9:00 am ET. #13-Johnny Chandler #16-Lora Williams #33-Shirley Glenn #36-Rod Bradford The unit contents may be redeemed by the owner prior to sale or disposal by cash payment in full of the total amount due on the unit. Beach Storage reservesf the right to dispose of the contents in anyway necessary and reserves the right to cancel sale without notice. June 5, 12, 2014 99131S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 23-2011-CA000448-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division FEDERALNATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. RUSSELLA. WOOD, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the abovestyled case, I will sell the property located in GULF County, Florida, described as: LOT22, BLOCK 13, CORRECTIVE REPLATOF TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION, UNITNUMBER 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 2, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 181 E. Lakeview Dr. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at AT SOUTH ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1000 CECIL COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORTST. JOE, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ETon June 26, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this count on the 28th day of May, 2014. REBECCAL. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File# 152798/tam June 5, 12, 2014 99135S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2008-CA000555-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL GARRETT, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in GULF County, Florida, described as: Lot 11, Block H, RISH SUBDIVISION, being an unrecorded subdivision of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter and the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows:. COMMENCING at the Southeast Corner of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, running thence South 89 West along the South line of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36 for a distance of 252.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue South 89 West along said South line for a distance of 179.42 feet; thence North 01 East for a distance of 245.25 feet to the South R/W line of a 60 foot road; thence North 89 East along said South 11/W line for a distance of 179.42 feet; thence leaving said South R/W line run South 01 West for a distance of 245.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION: COMMENCING at the Southeast Corner of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36, running thence South 89 West along the South line of said North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 652.42 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 01 East for a distance of 245.25 feet; thence North 89 East for a distance of 499.32 feet to a point of curvature of a curving cul-de-sac concave to the West, having a radius of 75 feet, a central angle of 312 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 00 West, 60.00 feet; thence Easterly, Northerly and Westerly along said curving cul-de-sac an arc distance of 409.52 feet to a point of nontangency of said curve; thence South 89 West for a distance of 497.94 feet; thence North 01 East for a distance of 456.59 feet; thence South 56 East for a distance of 25.72 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast having a radius of 150.00 feet, a central angle of 38 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 75 East, 99.35 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 101.27 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 84 East for a distance of 144.94 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 237.00 feet, a central angle of 92 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 44 East, 341.34 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 381.09 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 00 West for a distance of 11.34 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 40.00 feet, a central angle of 90 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 44 East, 56.57 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 62.83 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 89 East for a distance of 118.30 feet to the East line of said Section 36; thence North 01 East along said East line for a distance of 60.00 feet, thence South 89 West for a distance of 118.30 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 100.00 feet, a central angle of 90 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 44 West, 141.42 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 157.08 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 00 East for a distance of 12.95 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 177.00 feet, a central angle of 93 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 44 West, 256.80 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 287.32 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 84 West for a distance of 148.08 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast, having a radius of 90.00 feet, a central angle of 38 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 75 West 59.61 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 60.76 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 56 West for a distance of 432.04 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast, having a radius of 367.00 feet, a central angle of 81 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 08 West 477.23 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 519.54 feet to a point of non tangency of said curve; thence North 81 East for a distance of 244.86 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 334.75 feet, a central angle of 40 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 61 East, 228.98 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 233.70 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 41 East for a distance of 136.68 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 146.20 feet and being subtended by a chord bearing North 65 East, 120.56 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 124.26 feet to a point of reverse curvature, said curve being concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 155.46 feet, a central angle of 68 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 45 East, 217.35 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 240.67 feet to the point of tangency of said curve, thence North 01 East for a distance of 18.56 feet to the North line of said Section 36; thence South 90 West along said North line for a distance of 60.02 feet; thence South 01 West for a distance of 17.20 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 95.46 feet, a central angle of 88 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 45 West, 133.46 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 147.78 feet to a point of reverse curvature, said curve being concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 206.20 feet, a central angle of 48 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 65 West, 170.03 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 175.26 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 41 West for a distance of 136.68 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 274.75 feet, a central angle of 40 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 61 West, 187.94 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 191.81 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 81 West for a distance of 175.00 feet; thence North 42 East for a distance of 38.36 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 210.00 feet, a central angle of 33 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 25 East, 122.20 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 124.00 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 09 East for a distance of 78.94 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the West, having a radius of 487.00 feet, a central angle of 21 and being subtended by a chord bearing North 06 West, 185.24 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 186.37 feet to the North line of said Section 36; thence South 90 West along said North line for a distance of 63.28 feet to a point on a curve, said curve having a radius of 427.00 feet, a central angle of 21 and being subtended by a chord bearing South

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B8| The Star Thursday, June5, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 4519197 125 Venus Drive (off Garrison Ave) Port St. Joe, FL 32456(850) 227-7451TTY Acs 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. PINE RIDGE LTD.1 Bedroom Apartment for rentFamily apartment community income guidelines applyEqual Opportunity Provider and Employer4519199 4519199 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519140 4518209 2005 Lincoln Town CarOne owner, garaged, 97 K Miles, Good gas mileage 25+, Leather.$6900 OBO Car for SaleCall 850-229-8642 45101 61 4518321HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAILABLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. ** 2013 GULF COUNTY DELINQUENT TAX ROLL 2013 **Pursuant to Chapter 197.432, Florida Statutes, Subsection (16) Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Sale for Delinquent Gulf County Property Taxes will be conducted online on the Gulf County Tax Certificate Auction Website at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com. Bids can be entered on the site starting on Monday, May 5, 2014. Tax Certificates will be awarded on Friday, May 30, 2014. Bidders are asked to register at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com prior to sale. SHIRLEY J. JENKINS, CFC TAX COLLECTOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA1600 R-1288400 $590.94 04917-003R BEARDEN HAROLD SR CITY OF PORT ST JOE LOT 10 & S/2 OF LOT 9 ORB 330/525 QC FR BENNETT MAP 50A BLK 39 ORB 444/29 FR KNOTT 4519131 07 East, 178.66 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 158.84 feet to the point of tangency, thence South 09 West for a distance of 76.53 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 150.00 feet, a central angle of 33 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 25 West, 87.29 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 88.57 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 42 West for a distance of 111.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the East, having a radius of 427.00 feet, a central angle of 85 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 06 East, 581.04 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 639.03 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 56 East for a distance of 120.10 feet; thence South 57 West for a distance of 272.77 feet to the point of curvature of a curving cul-de-sac concave to the East, having a radius of 50.00 feet, a central angle of 286 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 32 East, 60.00 feet; thence Westerly, Southerly and Easterly along said curving cul-de-sac an arc distance of 249.81 feet to a point of non-tangency in said curving cul-de-sac; thence North 57 East for a distance of 298.97 feet; thence South 56 East for a distance of 153.33 feet; thence South 01 West for a distance of 496.00 feet; thence South 89 West for a distance of 454.26 feet to the point of curvature of a curving cul-de-sac concave to the East, having a radius of 75.00 feet, a central angle of 312 and being subtended by a chord bearing South 00 East, 60.00 feet; thence Westerly, Southerly and Easterly along said curving cul-de-sac an arc distance of 409.52 feet to a point of non-tangency and said curving cul-de-sac; thence North 89 East for a distance of 452.89 feet; thence South 01 West for a distance of 245.25 feet to the South line of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36; thence North 89 East for a distance of 60.02 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. To include a: 2001 MOBILE HOME VIN CV01AL0256443A Title #82712413 2001 MOBILE HOME VIN CV01AL0256443B Title # 82712924 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at AT SOUTH ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1000 CECIL COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET on June 26, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this count on the 28th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File# 1426891/tam June 5, 12, 2014 Basset pups. $450. 8 weeks. AKC, vet health cert. 850-225-4379 Apalachicola: 208 Ellis Van Vleet Sat. June 7th 8a-untilMoving SaleMisc. Furniture, Desks, Books, Clothes, Dishes, and Even a Kitchen Sink. Text FL91144 to 56654 Eastpoint 93 Rose Dr(Off N Bayshore Dr. in Magnolia Bluff, Follow Signs.) Sat. June 7th 8a-?Large Garage Sale/ Estate SaleLots of Treasures and Collectibles. Something For Everyone. Port Saint Joe 505 Avenue A. Sat June 7th 8a-untilYard/Bake SaleSomething For All! Text FL90737 to 56654 Port Saint Joe, 674 Jones Homestead Rd, Friday, Saturday and Sunday June 6th, 7th and 8th, 8am to 5pm.2 Family Yard SaleLots of Items! Text FL90750 to 56654 Port St. Joe 2104 Monument Ave.Multi-Family Yard Sale -Come See What Weve Got!Sat. June 7th 8:00 am -1:00 pm Text FL91016 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Port St. Joe DEMO SALE Building Mat. Of Existing Structure and Restaurant Eqpt. For Sale. Remove Yourself. Contact Bob Windolf @850-527-2583 Acct Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 Acct/FinanceBookkeeperPT position. To apply call 850-648-8161 Web Id 34290817 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAdministrative ReceptionistThis full-time position requires excellent customer service skills & a smile! Must be neat, organized & attentive to detail with good computer skills & knowledge of Microsoft Word, Outlook & Excel. Good grammar, spelling & punctuation. Varied office duties including phones & walk-in traffic. Prefer prior office experience. Full-time Mon-Fri w/ great benefits. Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-5pm at: 123 W Gulf Beach Dr or call Sandra 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34290509 Install/Maint/RepairCoastal Design & Landscape HiringLandscape Maintenance Crew LeadLandscape maintenance experience required. Irrigation experience a plus. Must have valid drivers license. Mon-Fri Position. Send info to: info@coastaldesign.biz Web Id 34290479 Logistics/TransportWarehouse/ Delivery PositionPT position. To apply call 850-648-8161 Web Id 34290817 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 1 Bedroom ApartmentsIncome Based Elderly-Disabled M,W,F 8-5 pm 850-229-6353 Equal Opportunity Housing Efficiency Apt with all Utilities Included. Ideal for single person. 1st & Last mo rent req. CALL 850-648-5033 Port St. Joe-1bd cozy cottage: $450/mo + utils. New paint & tile floor in bathroom. No smoking or pets. 1st 850-229-1215. PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, Laundry room, fenced yard, $900 mo, Unfurn, Call 651-325-7731 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Spot Advertising works! 1129113 Call or text Jay Rish Licensed Real Estate Broker direct at 850-227-5569 or email jay@oridagulfcoast.comEXPERIENCED REAL ESTATE AGENTS NEEDED NOW.



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, JUNE 5, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 34 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B6-B8 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Gov. Rick Scott signed the 2014-2015 Florida budget in Panama City on Monday and several local projects survived a potential veto threat. The most signi cant was an appropriation to begin the dredging of the ship channel at the Port of Port St. Joe. The governor can veto individual line items in the budget. Remaining in the nal budget was a $20 million appropriation for dredging the federally-authorized shipping channel as a critical rst step in developing the Port of Port St. Joe. The appropriation represents roughly half the estimated cost of dredging, but it is a down payment on the most crucial piece of the port puzzle. Without dredging nothing will ever happen, Port Authority member Eugene Raf eld has said several times over the past eight months. The nal application for a dredge permit is to be submitted to state agencies by fall with permitting and dredging beginning early next year. The hope is that once underway, additional private/public funds will be secured for the dredging project, which would open the port for shipping by two energy companies which have entered into agreements with the St. Joe Company and the Port St. Joe Port Authority. Final contracts for those deals are being crafted. The city of Port St. Joe, the Board of County Commissioners and Port Authority will meet in a joint workshop at 10 p.m. ET June 11 to discuss the progress at the port and potential Port dollars, local projects survive veto See VETO A2 COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI A dog and its owner out on the beach for an afternoon stroll in Indian Pass and notice the dog leash ordinance being adhered to. This is one photo submitted by our readers that provides a glimpse at life in and around Gulf County. Find more photos on Page A10, and in the process help offer a look at life in our county in the weeks and months to come. We are starting a photo page, and the assistance of readers is critical to its success. See more on Page A10 Capturing the beauty OF GULF COUNTY By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge is a part of the brand for the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, board member Tony Whit eld said Tuesday. As such the countys agency on tourism has a vested interest in the future and status of St. Vincent Island. During its regular monthly meeting the TDC advisory council passed a resolution to reach out and join the lobbying campaign from the Board of County Commissioners requesting no change to the current status of St. Vincent. The concern, as the BOCC heard more than a month ago after which the board wrote a letter to pertinent federal of cials, is that St. Vincent could be mothballed by the federal government. That would likely mean a reduction in management of the island, one of the last remaining areas in the country where wildlife has not been impacted by vehicular traf c, said Marie Romanelli, who is partner with her husband in a shuttle service from Indian Pass to the island and is a member of a non-pro t support group for the island. The federal term for the action is putting the island in custodial status. Staff would be reduced to two employees from seven just ve years ago and of cials with the U.S. Department of Interior have said the cuts would impact management of the island. Public access which is allowed currently during daytime hours would also be restricted, though to what extent is not yet clear. That is a resource that has helped Gulf County even in ways you dont know, Romanelli said. She noted that in addition to tourism, the island typically hosts wildlife researchers in the winter and seagrass beds around the island serve as valuable ecosystem for several local shery habitats. In addition, Sambar deer hunts each year attract hunters from across the country. Landy Luther, with the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge, said his group provides monthly tours during the season which have become an attraction. Due to management and public-access constraint, Luther said, it is unclear whether the supporters will be able to continue the tours. The tours are sold out months in advance, Luther said. We have to turn people away. You take those away and you are taking away public education about the island. Jennifer Jenkins, TDC executive director, said the island is a popular destination for tourists and noted that much of the interest for the island comes during so-called shoulder months outside of the typical tourist season. TDC weighs in on potential St. Vincent mothballing To be mothballed by the federal government would likely mean a reduction in management of the island, one of the last remaining areas in the country where wildlife has not been impacted by vehicular traf c. See ST. VINCENT A9 As good a chance as there has ever been for port By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com State Rep. Halsey Beshears (R-Monticello) drew a straight line last week between economic development and the school districts bottom line. Beshears provided a legislative update to the Gulf County School Board, offering insight into legislation pertaining to Florida schools. While much education work during the recent session of the Florida Legislature pertained to issues not pertinent yet to Gulf County, particularly charter schools, nonetheless there is impact every year in the form of the state budget. And how funding in that state budget affects local schools. As example, legislators increased funding per district this year but nearly all the increase comes in the form of dollars for technology, another way, Superintendent Jim Norton said, the state removes spending decisions from the control of local of cials. Norton said the states unwillingness to allow district exibility on all of its statutorily-allowed millage constrains local decisions. Each of the four components of the districts budget is deterSee BESHEARS A12 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 76, NUMBER 34 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR TAR TAR Graduates claim diplomas, dollars A8 REP. BESHEARS:

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Local A2 | The Star AU TO IN SUR AN CE Ha nno n In su ran c e (8 50) 22 711 33 Al in e' s Me rl e Nor ma n 31 5 Wi lli am s Av en ue Po rt St Jo e, FL 85 022 9-6 60 0 Al in e' s Mer le Nor ma n Su mm er Op en Ho us e Fr ida y, Ju ne 6t h 9:0 0 a. m. 5: 00 p. m. *S pe ci al Di sc ou nt s *R ef re sh me nt s *D oor Pr ize s 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL A T THE MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S LIVE ON THE POOP DECK RAND Y ST ARK SUND AY 7 PM FRI DA Y & SA TURD AY 9P M WEDN ESD AY 7P M DEBI JORD AN TRUE SOUL ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON THE POOP DECK MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T S ELEC TION O F A LL Y OUR F AV ORITE B EER W INE & SPIRIT S UPCOMING EVENTS KARAOKE THURSD AY FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH DEB RA AT THE T OP OF THE CRO WS NEST assistance the local gov ernments can provide. Also surviving a veto pen was $200,000 for sav ing through relocation the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The appropriation fol lows a similar appropriation for $350,000 which was in cluded in the current scalyear budget. The appropriation car ries proviso language under which the city of Port St. Joe and the Board of Coun ty Commissioners would have to mutually agree on a new location for the lighthouse. The city possesses the deed for the lighthouse, two keepers quarters and oil house and contractors have begun the site preparation in George Core Park in ad vance of moving the light house sometime this year. The city was awarded the lighthouse and ancillary buildings by the federal gov ernment, which disposed of the structures because of the threat of erosion along the shore at the current site of the lighthouse. This years $200,000 ap propriation would eliminate a shortfall between what has already been secured to move the lighthouse and the estimated cost of the re location, including the tem porary downing of power lines to accommodate the move. Also remaining in the nal budget was an appro priation of roughly $1 mil lion for renovations at Billy Joe Rish Park on St. Joseph Peninsula and parks and recreation grant funding for the city of Port St. Joe and the Board of County Commissioners. In addition, some $9 mil lion in road projects remain in the nal budget. VETO from page A1 Star Staff ReportThings are heating up. The first First Friday Music and Art event of summer will be held on Friday, June 6 at the Thirsty Goat in Port St. Joe. This months art showcase will feature Dolores Lowery of Mexico Beach who creates encaustic paintings using beeswax and pigments. The featured charity will be the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and 20 percent from each of Lowerys sales from June 6 through July 3 will be donated to help shelter area animals. Lowerys work won best in show at the 2013 Mexico Beach Art and Wine Festival and she exhibits her paintings at numerous galleries along the Forgotten Coast from St. George Island to Grayton Beach. The First Friday celebration will begin at 5 p.m. ET with live music by the LPs and free food and drink courtesy of The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, Centennial Bank, Cape San Blas Realty and Hannon Insurance. Humane Society volunteers will also serving drinks for tips and donations. Art event of the summer is here Special to The StarOnce a year, the Capital City Bank Group (CCBG) Foundation donates funds to charitable organiza tions in the communities it serves. During the 2014 grant cycle, the CCBG Foun dation reinvested $2,500 into the Gulf County com munity by way of a grant awarded to the Junior Service League of Port St Joe. The grants provided by the CCBG Foundation help these organizations enhance the lives of local citizens. We are grateful to be in a position to help or ganizations make an im pact in our communities, said Amy Geiger, Capital City Bank President of Wakulla County. Com munity involvement has always been a hallmark of Capital City Bank and by donating valuable funds to worthwhile organiza tions such as these, the Capital City Bank Group Foundation can help build stronger communities. The CCBG Foundation is a non-prot organiza tion created in 1983 by Capital City Bank Group that provides grants to non-prot, charitable or ganizations and institu tions exempt under Sec tion 501(c)(3) of the Inter nal Revenue Code. The mission of the CCBG Foundation is to invest in initiatives that benet local communities. A majority of the funds are distributed to specic areas of focus, including: arts and culture, children and youth services, eco nomic and community development, education, health and sciences and human services. Grant applications are available through a local Capital City Banker upon request. These applica tions are reviewed once a year and are due by April 1. For more information on the Capital City Bank Group Foundation, visit www.ccbgfoundation. com.SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Capital City Bank Community Banker Sandy Price, Market Service Manager Stacey Price, and President of Gulf County Amy Geiger present an award to Kaci Rhodes and Michelle Perrin of the Junior Service League of Port St Joe. Capital City Bank Group Foundation announces grant SPECIAL TO THE STAR The featured artist will be encaustic painter Dolores Lowery and the featured charity will be the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. This months First Friday Music and Art event will be Friday, June 6. Thursday, June 5, 2014

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The Star| A3 The Villagers rock Gulf County for fundraiser By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m They partied like it was 1960. To raise community funds for the upcoming Fourth of July celebration, 1960s rockers The Villagers performed at the Centennial Building two weeks ago as part of the down home, allAmerican holiday kickoff. The event boasted more than 100 attendees and brought in $3,000 to help fund this years reworks display and other holiday events. Those who joined the party enjoyed grub from Toms hot dogs in Panama City, and lemonade was donated by Centennial Bank. Prior to the concert, Scott McKinley, DJ for 93.5 FM WTKP did a live remote broadcast of The Ticket show from the Centennial Building. McKinley built anticipation for the concert and featured local businesses on the program. He called Port St. Joe one of the last true small southern towns on the coast. The extra exposure, it seemed, didnt hurt. Along with locals, people came from Marianna, Crawfordville and Panama City specically for this event, said Fourth of July committee member Steve Kerigan. People never stopped dancing. The Villagers, fronted by college basketball coach Cliff Ellis and best known for their hit, Laugh it Off, performed at the Centennial Building on July 4, 1968 and 2014 marked their triumphant return to the location. The following night, The Villagers treated patrons of the Thirsty Goat to an encore performance where they performed requests for $20 donations that went into the July 4 pot. Thanks to the Villagers who decided to make Port St. Joe the site for their yearly reunions, after the response they received in 2013, said committee chairman Dana Boyer. Every member of the band and their families fell in love with our community. It takes a Village(r) to raise moneySPECIAL TO T HE STAR The Villagers performed at the Centennial Building to help raise funds for Port St. Joes Fourth of July celebration. Attendees were treated old fashioned food that included popcorn, hot dogs and lemonade. Friends enjoyed good company and dancing as The Villagers played into the evening. Local Thursday, June 5, 2014

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Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com A Section Page 4 Thursday, June 5, 2014 The bicycle was a gift. It, like me, had a few miles under the hood. I was looking to lessen the strain running everyday was putting on my legs. My brother spotted the bike in a throw-away pile in a neighbors front yard. It was two old retreads each seeking a new perspective on life. I eyed that thing nervously. Whats the old saying, You never forget how to ride a bicycle Maybe I hadnt forgotten. But I couldnt recall the last time Id straddled one in earnest. It had been close to half a century ago for sure. As I gingerly reached a foot down to the pedal it crossed my mind that regardless of axioms, truisms and old sayings, a man can forget a lot of things in fty years! The fall as a child was more embarrassing than hurtful. Learning to ride had been an adventure in itself. I was way past the embarrassment stage. I didnt want to break my fool neck! Adventure for me these days is watching Rawhide on the Western Channel. I didnt make any turns on that rst ride. And your Aunt Matildas one legged sister could have beaten me to town by a country mile. But speed wasnt my goal here. When I got just about out of sight of the house I rolled to a complete stop, got off and turned the bike around, and then pushed off carefully in a straight line back toward the house. I wanted desperately to wave to a couple of passing friends but I couldnt get either hand off of the handlebars. A man has got to know his limitations. Life takes the most wonderful turns when you least expect it. Within a week I was cruising with, if not complete con dence, a feel that allowed me to at least get one hand up to wave howdy to a neighbor. I enjoyed the wind in my face, the hum of the tires against the pavement and the extra ow of blood fairly leaping through my veins. The magic crept upon me from out of nowhere. I was riding down Garrison Avenue in Port St. Joe, but suddenly I saw Terry Kennon on his front steps. Billy Webb, one house over, was playing pitch with Karen. The Twin Pools had a fair weekday crowd and Mr. Pete Joyner backed his electrician truck right out in front of me. I blinked hard and there was Richard Gregg waving to me and a yard down Phil Chandler was climbing a tree. Paula Pinson was chasing Darrell around the corner of their house and Paul David Campbell had a basketball game going at the far end of his driveway. Jim and Joe Williams were ghting over something and Anne Alexander was getting in the car with her parents. Folks, my bike had turned down Stonewall Street in McKenzie, Tennessee! I had ridden into the Twilight Zone! As Bobby Ridley gave me a grin and the big wave, like he had done a thousand times when I sped by his house as a child, I thought, Jules Verne has already written this story! I pedaled faster in hopes the little town I remembered so well wouldnt disappear before I could get there. I slowed in front of the City Caf and automatically checked my pockets. I couldnt nd the needed quarter for a hamburger. This WAS just like old times! The Ben Franklin Store was in its customary spot, cattycornered across from the National Shirt Shop. I passed Motherals Drugstore, Howard Freemans Mens Store, the Western Auto, Utotem Groceries and paused in front of the Park Theatre. I remember when Rhett and Scarlett dated on that big screen. I saw Tarzan whip alligators and call elephants in the darkness of that wonderful place. I had ridden into my past! I turned right, and coasted by the post of ce and Dr. Holmes little clinic where I (and most everyone else) was born. I would have stopped at Bill Argos Gulf Station but I didnt have time for a weather report or the weekly debate on whether a John Deere could out pull an International Harvester. Calvin Purvis waved to me from the back of the garbage truck. I circled the town square slowly, absorbing the wonderful sights and sounds of a place that I had once taken for granted. I wheeled back to my house.. and the present. David wasnt getting this bicycle back! I remembered how our old Western Flyers gave us so much freedom. We could be anywhere in town in eight minutes. This new bike could do it even faster! I found a 1954 Ted Williams baseball card and clothespinned it to the rear spokes. I was going back with a motor sound to spur me on. And I slipped my old Spalding Form Pocket Frank Bolling autographed glove over the handlebar. Next time Im pedaling over to that empty lot between Ricky Hale and the Mabry house. You cant never tell when a game might break out! If you see me on that bike in Port St. Joe, proceed with caution. I may not be there. If you see me riding in McKenzie, get your ball and bat and hustle over to Forrest Avenue. Respectfully, Kes Wheels of Dreams Motivating Teenagers In spite of the widespread effort to normalize marijuana, Montana knows rsthand the societal problems it can cause. In effect this crusade of acceptability has undone years of zero tolerance and the drug free campaign in our schools and communities. Most legalizers agree that marijuana is dangerous for adolescents, and argue that it will still be illegal for them. But its those young adults the industry targets. They are the primary users, consuming the majority of illegal drugs and suffer the most from its long term consequences. Montana passed an initiative to legalize marijuana for medical purpose. The industry exploded and became a multi-million dollar operation. By 2011 Montana had the 6th highest rate of youth marijuana use in the country and the 4th highest rate of youth addiction. As a State legislator I was inundated with complaints from cities, towns, communities, law enforcement of cials, treatment centers and schools about disruption, safety, crime, dropout rates, students stoned and apathetic towards school and life in general. This new enterprise was making drugs so familiar and acceptable that it was changing Montanas culture. Montanans felt duped. Come to nd out the initiative was promoted and paid for by the Marijuana Policy Project, an organization whose purpose is for the total legalization of the drug. I heard of growers destroying neighborhoods, reducing the values of homes and the foul language, harassment, and stench of crowds at the dispensaries. Parents complained that kids could not play in their own yards. Multiple dispensaries set up near schools, targeting our youth. Students wrote asking who was defending their rights to a safe, drug free school. They wanted their friends back. Major industries in Montana reported the inability to nd job applicants who didnt test positive for drugs. Montanas Chief of Narcotics testi ed, The current situation is a public health and safety disaster as well as a law enforcement nightmare . and an embarrassment to Montana on a national level. He said Montana was growing so much marijuana it had become a source country for illegal export of the drug. Organized crime moved in and one of the worlds largest outlaw motorcycle gangs was involved in running drugs to their east coast counterparts. Our surrounding states did not consider us good neighbors. The 2011 Montana legislature reined in the exploding marijuana industry, curbing commercial grows. The Of ce of National Drug Policy recently stated that the confusing messages being presented by popular culture, media, proponents of medical marijuana, and political campaigns to legalize all marijuana perpetuate the false notion that marijuana is harmless. Marijuana is a Schedule I substance under the Controlled Substances Act, meaning that it has a high potential for abuse and no currently accepted medical use in treatment. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) reports that where marijuana laws have been relaxed throughout the world, marijuana usage and addiction rates go up. That was certainly the case in Montana. THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, chemically acts on speci c molecular targets in brain cells called cannabinoid receptors, part of a neural communication network. It replaces the natural reward system in the brain, the same as other addictive drugs. Extensive medical research has shown marijuana affects brain development of this network when used regularly by young people and can cause permanent cognitive damage and also permanently reduce IQ. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports the negative effects of marijuana can last for days or weeks after the acute effects wear off and someone who smokes marijuana daily may be functioning at a reduced intellectual level most or all of the time. A grave concern when you think of an impaired surgeon, airline pilot, or heavy equipment operator. Its no surprise that increased marijuana use is associated with lower grades, higher dropout rates, increased absences and tardiness in school and the workplace, work related accidents, compensation claims, job turnovers and crime. Theres an illogical deluge of propaganda out there. Facts tend to get shouted down by those pressing for legalization. It leaves one to wonder if we are not only losing the war on drugs but the war on common sense. Mike Milburn served as a Montana State Representative from 2005-2012 and served as Speaker of the Montana House of Representatives in 2011 and 2012. Floridians should be wary of marijuana legalization If you will just send me $29.99 or maybe even $79.99 or maybe three equal installments of $33.33, we will tell you how to x your problem. There are folks on the radio and television hawking all kinds of solutions to the problems parents face every day. Whether its math, music or motivation, there is someone with a program that will x your childs problems. Im not saying that all of these programs are bad or useless Im just saying they are out there. And many times, its the parents problems. Looking at a calendar, I see that I have a little more than three years left of teenagers Ive been lucky thus far, in my opinion. About the only issue that I have is the one who sleeps on the sofa all afternoon and stays up late to work on his music. Homework and yard work have to fall into that equation somewhere. He sometimes has a hard time understanding some of these real-world equations and prioritizing his time. I would be lying if I said I never had some of those same issues I did. My Daddy explained most things pretty well to me and he didnt send his money off to some motivation guru to get help. Daddy simply told me the way it was going to be, and thats the way it was. As a parent, Im pretty good at telling my children the way it is going to be, however I sometimes fail on the following through part of it. Admittedly, that is the most dif cult part following through. Its the part that is no fun at all We live in a time when it seems like many others do the same thing They tell you one thing and later pretend like they didnt say it. In other words, they move the goal posts on you or even pretend the goal posts werent there. There is a lot of information on the internet and in books for parents who need help motivating their teenagers. I decided to take a look at what one group had to say that might help me to follow through. I didnt pay for the advice it was free. These folks had some helpful hints to make sure that your follow through was effective. The rst hint was to make sure that you keep your comments short, simple and effective. They gave an example of something like, I noticed that you havent had the chance to walk the dog. Would you please do that now? This is nice. However, I dont remember my Daddy ever asking me to do anything twice. Im sure he did have to ask me twice one time and I didnt want to remember him having to do it then and never want to remember it again. The second hint noted that you should respond to any objections from your teenager with, What was our agreement? Agreement? My Daddy told me what to do, I trusted him I did it. I did it because I wanted to make him happy, proud and continue living under his roof. The third hint tells you what to do if the second hint doesnt work. The experts note to use nonverbal communication such as pointing at your watch, smiling or giving them up a hug. This is one hint my Daddy would agree with them on. As a matter of fact, I think he might just skip hint number 2 and go straight to this nonverbal communication part. Oh goodness gracious he wouldnt have said a word. Daddy didnt have to do this, but there was no doubt he would have picked up a stick or a belt or used some other sort of nonverbal communication. Hint 4 gives advice on what to do when your teenager does what you have asked them to do. You are supposed to say, Thank you for keeping our agreement. I think saying thank you is always good. All I know is that I wanted to please my Daddy that was my goal in life. Somewhere in that fear equation, Daddy made that happen. Thats what good fathers do. I was thinking about this just the other day and how proud my Daddy would have been. I moved all of the cars out of the driveway except for my teenaged sons vehicle. I left it at the bottom of the driveway next to the house. When the fellow in the mulch truck arrived with the big load of hardwood mulch to be spread in the beds around the house, I had him dump it right in the middle of the driveway. Then I told my son that he could leave as soon as he could get his car out. It worked. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert MIKE MILBURN Special to The Star

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LETTERS www.starfl.com A Section By Rebecca Batson-Byrd Center Director, North Florida Child Development, Inc. Special to The Star Physical development combined with good health is a one of the key aspects of that begins the lifelong learning process. In instances, it has been said to be the foundation of child development. When preschool age children are physically active and healthy, this heightens their social well-being. This in turn allows them to be active learners, children learn through play. Physical development sharpens the auditory and visual skills that are needed throughout the formal school years. Healthy eating habits incorporated with hygiene skills prevents or reduces sicknesses that prevent children from being able to focus to learn. Proper diet and exercise is a couple of ways to help children to stay healthy, this lessens the absenteeism rates at school. Keeping children happy and healthy also makes happy learners. Education is a broad eld with many facets that would take months to cover all its areas. However, physical development plays an important role in getting young children prepared to become lifelong learners in a formal education. Abdul-Jabbar couldntve made these priceswith a sky hook. From a song by Johnny Guitar Watson Do things cost more or less than they did a year ago? Lets see. Costs associated with housing went up 2.8 percent. But it costs a whopping 7.7 percent more to heat and cool it. (Honey, cancel the purchase of that new McMansion!). Rental costs escalated 2.9 percent. Homeowners insurance has gone up by 3.5 percent. Water, sewer and trash collection services have increased in cost by 3.4 percent. Heres more. Health and hospital related services both cost 4.7 percent more than they did a year ago. It costs 2.3 percent more to dine out than it did last year. But grocery food skyrocketed across the board: meat prices jumped by 5.2 percent and fresh fruits by 5 percent. A haircut will cost you 1.4 percent more. A drink and a smoke is more expensive (We may need both before were done here). Alcohol went up by 1.1 percent and tobacco and smoking products by 3.7 percent. Tuition escalated in price by 3.3 percent. Whew. Now, consider things that have decreased in price. Seems impossible, right? Expenses related to transportation are actually 1.2 percent less expensive than a year ago. New vehicles are down in price by 0.5 percent. Motor fuel has declined in price by 4.6% (lets wait until summer is over to declare victory on this one). Wireless and landline telephone services? Now theyre 2.3 percent less expensive. Shoes? A percent less costly. Household furnishings have declined in price by 1.5 percent. Airline fares have decreased by 4.1 percent (Hard to believe, right?). Whats it all mean? We do indeed have signi cant in ation in essential (nondiscretionary) service items, like heat and air conditioning, food and health insurance. But many frequently used services actually cost less, like gas and cell phones. So in ation is really not rampant. In fact, most economists consider de ation a greater current threat to the economy. What is causing us to think that prices are outrageous is that wages are not keeping pace with the cost of living. A person earning robust compensation is meeting his grocery bill with ease. But without a quality paycheck, everything looks expensive. In ation not only impacts the cost of living, it also provides savvy investors with signi cant opportunities to pro t from rising prices. If a company can charge more for its products each year, shareholders can enjoy a raise as well and not just feel the sting at the cash register. Prudent investors and advisors seek out those sectors and companies that have in exible demand, or whose customers have to continue buying their products or services, whether the price of the product goes up 5 percent or not. As always, an investors age, risk tolerance, unique nancial goals and time horizon should be considered. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121, www. arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. Ma y 21 20 14 AT TE NTI ON : AL L GU LF CO UN TY RE SI DE NT S IN UNI NC ORP OR AT ED CO UN TY Th e Gu lf Co un ty Bo ar d of Co un ty Com mi ss io ne rs is pr ou d to an noun ce th at Wa st e Pr o ha s be en awa rde d th e co nt ra ct fo r ga rb ag e se rv ic es ef fe ct iv e Ju ne 1s t. Ca rt s ar e bei ng de li ve re d, st ar ti ng th is we ek If yo u ar e in th e un in co rp or at ed Co un ty an d ar e re cei vi ng Wa st e Ma nag em en t ga rb ag e se rv ic e, yo u wi ll be re ce iv in g a ne w ga rb ag e ca rt fr om Wa st e Pr o. If th e ne w ca rt ha s a de cal on it yo ur da y of picku p wi ll be in di ca te d on th at de cal If yo u re cei ve yo ur ca rt an d it do es n t ha ve a de cal yo ur rou te da y wi ll sta y th e sa me as it is no w. Wa st e Ma nag em en t ha s in di ca te d th at an y se rv ic e pa id fo r wi th t he ir co mpa ny pa st Ju ne 1s t, wi ll be re fu nd ed di re ct ly by th em Th ey wi ll al so b e pi c ki ng up th ei r car ts on or af te r th e la st pi c ku p da y fo r yo ur ar ea pri or to Ju ne 1s t. IT IS V ER Y IM PO RT AN T TH AT YO U DO NO T PU T GA RB AG E IN TH E WA ST E MA NA GE ME NT CA RT S AF TE R TH E LA ST DA Y OF PI CK UP FO R YO UR AR EA NO R PU T GA RB AG E IN TH E WA ST E PR O CA RT S PR IOR TO JU NE 1S T. Wa st e Pr o wi ll be se nd in g bi ll s to ea ch cu st ome r. If yo u do no t re cei ve a car t an d had se rv ic e, or wi sh to ad d se rv ic e, pl ea se co nt ac t Wa st e Pr o at th e nu mb er bel ow If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s, ple as e co nt ac t Wa st e Pr o at (8 50 ) 87 218 00 TH AN K YO U GULF CO UNT Y BO CC AN D AD MI NI ST RA TIO N Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Page 5 Thursday, June 5, 2014 Interim federal red snapper season update Dear Editor, As the owner and operator of the only marina and bait & tackle store here in Mexico Beach, I wanted to give a quick update: We sit right in front of one of the nest red snapper sheries in the Gulf. On day one of this years nine-day Federal season we enjoyed terri c weather and a strong day of sales, primarily in bait and fuel. We also issue shing license and have a day to day clear understanding of the shing pressure or lack of, here in our area of the Gulf. Sunday, June 1 revealed trailers overlling our public ramp area all the way out to U.S. 98 and back to the marina. Lets forget the fact the season opened on Sunday and not Saturday for now. Fast forward to this morning, I have a Accuweather app on my phone that I refer to daily. This morning we had a small-craft advisory and the next three days show rough seas at best. I am able to see the ramp area from our condo and can tell you this morning we had four trucks with trailers in the lot and so far today the marina has sold a fraction of what was sold yesterday in bait and fuel. Last Tuesday, my family went out approximately six miles and caught twelve red snapper totaling 175 pounds (do the math on the average). Ten years ago this was impossible! Now, before one of the hired hacks with the EDF, who already has pen in hand and begins to write, lets understand this: The shery was re-built years ago and I have a good idea they know it. They can continue to collect and manipulate their bogus data, but one thing they cannot do is hide the obvious over owing red snapper shery that we are all literally tripping over now. Meanwhile, what does NOAA, NMFS and Gulf Council do? They continue to restrict access to the recreational sherman. We are all about conservation; the vast majority of all recreational shermen get it! What we dont get it is why do we keep losing more and more access to a shery that has obviously rebounded ten-fold? Could it be because its not about the shery at all and part of a much bigger agenda? We will save catch shares and sector separation for another day and discussion. Remember! You cant hold back the tide or hide the obvious forever. But Ill bet theyll keep trying. Stay tuned! Nate Odum Mexico Beach Marina & Out tters Mexico Beach Yamaha & Action Craft Performance Boats Read the ne print Dear Editor, If you are planning to vote for Steve Southerland keep this in mind, he is sending out political brochures with the ne print reading, this mailing was prepared, published and mailed at taxpayer expense. It is provided as a service to 2nd Congressional District residents. Really. Looks to me like he is trying to get reelected and we get to pay for his advertising. Marcia Low Mexico Beach Concerns about bear habitat Dear Editor, I was pleased to read that the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting public input about black bears (The bear necessities covered at FWC workshop May 29). Im concerned, however, that if the agency focuses too closely on smaller bear management units that Florida might fail to see the forest for the trees, when it comes to recovering the Floridas rare and unique subspecies of black bears on a statewide level. Right now, Florida really doesnt have a singular bear populationwe have several smaller populations that are largely isolated from one another. Bears need large areas of habitat connected to other bear populations in order to maintain genetic diversity, but land development in Florida has destroyed much of these habitat linkages. In the early 1970s, only a few hundred bears remained in Florida, due largely to habitat loss and trophy hunting. Threatened species protections, including a statewide ban on trophy hunting, helped bring bears back from the brink of extinction. Until 2012, the Florida black bear remained a threatened species, and bears in In ation, De ation, McMansions and Johnny Guitar Watson MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Physical activity key in child development Florida still have an uphill climb if they are to thrive in the long term. Wildlife professionals anticipate that millions more acres of bear habitat will be lost to development by 2060. Bear management units in some areas may also push the agency to reopen an ill-advised bear trophy hunt. Florida would be wise to keep the big picture in mind when it comes to helping this magni cent keystone species survive. Laurie Hood Founder / President www.AlaquaAnimalRefuge.or g Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A By LOIS SWOBODA Halifax Media Group Its a bad year for yellow ies. Yellow y is the common name for tabanids. The family also includes horse ies. There are over 300 species of tabanids in North America. Other common names for tabanids are pine ies and deer ies. Tabanid ies are among the most highly evolved insects making them one of the most highly adapted animals on the planet. All tabanids are erce biters with slashing/ sponging mouthparts adapted to consuming blood. The mouthparts feature a blade similar to a Ginsu knife with a serrated edge. Because they are blood-feeders, they can transmit diseases between prey animals including tularemia and anthrax. Some people develop allergic reactions to the bites, which swell and turn into nasty red sores. Fly attacks result in lowered gains and low milk production in livestock animals. In 1976, estimated losses in the United States were $40 million. Adult tabanids are swift, strong iers and may y more than a mile from their breeding areas. Most deer ies require a blood meal to develop eggs. However, they also feed on pollen, nectar honeydew excreted by sucking insects like aphids. Adult tabanids are encountered in Florida between the months of May and September. Most tabanids overwinter as larvae, form a cocoon and emerge during the spring and early summer. Most tabanid larvae develop in water, animal droppings or mud. The majority has a yearlong life cycle but some larger species may take two or three years to mature. Adult life span is 30 to 60 days. Tabanids are ambush attackers that lie in wait in shady areas under bushes and trees for a chance to feed. They locate prey mainly by vision. Attacks occur during daylight hours with a peak activity beginning at sunrise and two hours before sunset. They are drawn to moving objects especially dark colored ones and are attracted to the color blue. There are no effective biological control programs for controlling tabanids. Native insects including some dragon ies feed on them. They are also parasitized by a number of wasp species that place paralyzed yellow ies in their nests as food for developing wasp larvae. The large burrowing sand wasps seen in late spring and early summer are among the most effective yellow y predators and, although they have a hornet-like appearance, do not sting. Cattle egrets and killdeer also feed on tabanids. There is no known chemical method of control for yellow y populations. Traps can be effective in small areas. Commonly used traps take the form of a dark ball covered with glue to ensnare the pests reducing the population in the immediate area. DEET, citronella and geranium oil are effective repellants. Ear tags and collars impregnated with pesticides help control attacks on animals. For personal protection, avoid being outside around dusk and dawn. Use a repellant. Wear long pants and a long sleeved shirt and choose light colors. Most tabanids tend to swarm around the highest point on their prey although yellow ies also attack the legs. There is evidence that wearing a tall hat will help discourage them from biting. It has been suggested that the tall peaked hats depicted on crackers or hillbillies were worn to discourage tabanids. Early Florida settlers used the leaves of beautyberry as a repellant for ies and other biting insects. They rubbed them on exposed skin and tucked them under the harness of horses, mules and oxen. Modern research has found that this plant is an effective insect repellant and a commercial formulation is under development. Several Franklin County residents have suggested ways to live with deer ies. Gill and Lane Autrey drink a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar every morning. They say it acts as a natural repellant to the ies. This author has experimented with drinking cider vinegar and it does seem to discourage yellow ies. Glynda Ratliff of St. George Island is highly sensitive to yellow y bites. She has a suggestion for those who have already been bitten. As soon as possible, tape a slice of raw potato over the bite. Ratliff has found it signi cantly reduces her swelling. The University of Florida has developed a trolling y trap they have found to be highly effective in tabanid control. The trap is a blue cylinder mounted on a slow moving object and coated with glue. The cylinder can be mounted on a lawnmower, fourwheeler, golf cart or a cap. According to researchers, you can create an effective personal protection device by coating a blue plastic cup with tanglefoot, a glue for trapping insects available in hardware stores. Mount the inverted cup on a blue ball cap and the ies will be more attracted to it than to the wearer. Flies drawn to you by the CO2 you exhale will land on the cup and be trapped. Some people may nd wearing such a device embarrassing. A trap for the general area of outdoor activity can be made by painting a six-inch plastic owerpot blue and coating in with tanglefoot. The pot must then be mounted on a moving object like a lawn mower or golf cart. This trap is only effective when in motion. Circling an area several times will reduce the number of yellow ies temporarily until more y in from the surrounding area. The trap will not work if it sits in one place even if it is rotating or shaking. Traps must be moved through space. If you keep a trolling trap mounted on your lawnmower or golf cart, you will reduce y numbers during their regular use. Deer ies usually y at heights lower than 10 feet and usually attack the highest available area on the human body rst. Walking with a trap mounted on a pole and shaken overhead can be effective. Tanglefoot can be messy but can be readily removed with hand cleaners that contain citrus extracts. GoJo Natural Orange Pumice Hand Cleaner works very well. SPONSOR THE WEEKL Y ALM AN AC CA LL TO DA Y! 65 38 8 68 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MO NTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, June 5 83 75 20 % Fr i, June 6 84 75 20 % Sa t, June 7 84 75 20 % Sun, June 8 84 76 30 % Mo n, June 9 84 76 30 % Tu es June 10 84 75 40 % We d, June 11 84 75 30 % Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om No ti ce of Fi nal Ag en cy Ac ti on Ta ke n by t he No rt hw es t Fl or id a Wa te r Ma na ge me nt Di st ri ct No ti ce is giv en th at st or mw at er pe rm it nu mb er 15 82 wa s is sue d on Ma y 28 20 14 to Gu lf Ri e an d Pi st ol Club In c. fo r th e co ns tr uc ti on of a sur fa ce wa te r ma na ge me nt fa ci li ty to se rv e th e ne w de ve lop me nt of Gu lf Ri e an d Pi st ol Cl ub LL C. Th e l e co nt ai nin g th e ap pl ic at io n fo r th is pe rm it i s ava il ab le fo r in spe ct ion M on da y th rou gh Fr id ay (e xc ep t fo r le ga l hol id ay s) 8: 00 am to 5: 00 pm at th e Nor th we st Fl or id a Wa te r Ma na ge me nt Di st r ic t' s ER P Of c e, Ca rr Bu il di ng Su it e 22 5 38 00 Co mmon we al th Bl vd ., MS LS 22 5, Ta ll ah as se e, FL 32 39 9. A pe rs on wh os e su b st an ti al in te re st s ar e af fe ct ed by th e Di st ri ct pe rm it ti ng de cision ma y pe ti ti on fo r an adm in is tr at iv e he ari ng in ac co rda nc e wi th Se ct ions 12 0. 56 9 an d 12 0. 57 F. S. or ma y ch oo se to pu rs ue me di at ion as an al te rn at iv e re me dy un d er Se ct ion 12 0. 57 3, Fl or ida Sta tu es an d Ru le s 28 -1 06 .11 1 an d 28 -1 06 .4 01 -4 04 Fl or id a Adm in is tr at iv e Co de Pe ti ti on s mu st co mpl y wi th re qui re me nt s of Fl or id a Ad mi ni st ra ti ve Cod e, Cha pt er 28 -1 06 an d be l ed wi th (r ec ei ve d by ) th e Di st ri ct Cl er k lo ca te d at Di st ri ct He ad qu ar te rs 81 Wa te r Ma na ge me nt Dr iv e, Ha va na FL 32 333 -4 71 2. Pe ti ti ons fo r adm ini st ra ti ve he ar in g on th e abo ve ap pl ic at io n mu st be l ed wi th i n tw en ty -o ne (2 1) da ys of pu bl ic at io n of th is no ti ce or wi th in tw en ty -s ix (2 6) da ys of th e Di st ri ct de po sit in g no ti ce of thi s in te nt in th e ma il fo r th ose pe rs on s to wh om th e Di st ri ct mai ls ac tu al no ti ce Fa il ur e to l e a pe ti ti on wi th in th is ti me pe ri od sh al l co nst it ut e a wa iv er of an y ri ght (s ) su ch pe rs on (s ) ma y ha ve to re qu es t an adm ini st ra ti ve de te rm in at io n (h ea ri ng ) un de r Se ct io ns 12 0. 56 9 an d 12 9. 57 F. S. co nc ern in g th e su bj ec t pe rm it Pe ti ti ons wh ich ar e no t l ed in ac co rda nc e wi th th e ab ov e pr ov is io n s ar e su bj ec t to di sm is sa l. Be ca us e th e adm in is tr at iv e he ar in g pr oce ss is de si gne d to fo rm ulat e n al age nc y ac ti on th e l in g of a pe ti ti on me ans th at th e Di st ri ct 's n al ac ti on ma y be di ff er en t fr om th e po sit ion ta ke n by it in thi s no ti ce of in te nt. Pe rs on s who se subs ta nt ia l int er es ts wi ll be af fe ct ed by an y su ch na l de ci s i on s of t he Di st ri ct on th e app li ca ti on ha ve th e ri ght to pe ti ti on to be co me a pa rt y to th e pr oce ed in gs th e ac co rda nc e wi th th e re qu ir em en ts set fo rt h abo ve Page A6 Thursday, June 5, 2014 SPONSORED BY The week of Red Snapper season in federal waters is here. The Gulf is full of Red Snapper and not just a few fishermen chasing them. The marine forecast is favorable for the next few days and off shore fishing should be very good. Most are being caught in the middle of the water column with an ample amount of chum on wrecks and off hard bottom. The MBARA sites out of Mexico Beach also have an abundance of fish, but get out early so as to get a good spot. Surf fishing is doing well for those anglers prowling the shoreline with many nice trout and red fish being caught. Surf fishing on the Cape is still producing great pompano and whiting catches. Dont be surprised if you occasionally hook up with a shark. Beating the bite: yellow y solutions Trolling yellow y trap. ILLUSTRATIONS COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Tabanid ies ILLUSTRATION COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Beautyberry Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com A Section Sh op at Ho me BO AT IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on In su ra nc e (8 50 ) 22 711 33 Ki ds Wi n To ur nam en t FR EE to Re gis te r at th e Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na Fi rs t 35 0 Ki ds get a ro d an d re el ta ck le an d a goo dy bag www .Ki d sw in fi sh in g. co m Fr id ay Ju ne 13 th Si gn in 3 pm 6:3 0 pm ES T Sa tu rda y, Ju ne 14 th Fi sh in g co m m en ce s at 7: 00 am ES T We igh in 10 am -1 2p m ES T Do na ti ons Ac cep te d! Na ut ic al Fl ea Ma rk et FR EE to Re gi st er Sa tu rda y, Ju ne 14 th 9a m3p m ES T OP EN TO EV ER YO NE AN D AN YO NE Mu st pr ov id e yo ur ow n ta bl e an d ch ai rs sa lt wa te rc la ss ic .c om Fa th er 's Da y We ek en d Ju ne 13 -1 4, 20 14 RE GI ST RA TI ON IS JU NE 12 TH @ 6P M LO CA TE D AT TH E HA UG HT Y HE RO N Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na wi ll be a we igh in lo ca ti on Le arn mo re at ht tp :/ /w ww .n at io na lm ar in ad ay .o rg / Sa tu rd ay Ju ne 14 th By TIM CROFT 227-7827|@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Kayla Parker is nearing the nish line to her collegiate track career. And she is positioned in an inside lane. The Port St. Joe alum and University of Kentucky hurdler quali ed last week for the NCAA Track and Field Championships, which begin next week in Eugene, Ore. I am very happy, very excited, Parker said. The track at Eugene (named after famed middle-distance runner Steve Prefontaine) is where some of the best athletes in the world have run. It is an honor to run there. It has been a very good year. In fact, if Parker was conceiving a sendoff to her collegiate career she graduated May 10 with a Bachelor of Science degree in kinesiology she would be hard-pressed to alter the script shes written. During the indoor season, she was all-Southeastern Conference after nishing third at the SEC Indoor Championships in the 60 meter hurdles. That earned a spot in the NCAA Indoor Championships, where she nished 12th, just off the pace for allAmerican honors. That was my rst trip to the indoor meet, and that was really a great experience, Parker said by phone from her apartment in Lexington. You have to be in the top 16 in the nation to qualify for indoors. I also got my rst NCAA indoor medal, and that was great. This year has been an amazing transition, and I really feel good about how things are progressing. It gives me con dence that there is so much more to come. She was all-SEC in the 4x100 relay during the outdoor season while also competing in the 100 meter hurdles. Her trip to the NCAA Outdoor Championships, earned by placing third in the 100 hurdles at last weekends East Quali er, is the secondstraight for Parker, who nished 13th last year. That momentum fueled her indoor season this winter, which included posting early in the season, for the second consecutive year, the top 80 meter hurdle time in the country. Parker has also seen her times drop consistently she ran in the 13.20s to qualify for last years NCAA Outdoor Championships but last weekend ran 13.05. Her goal for the outdoor meet in Eugene is simple reach the nals of the 100 hurdles. I want to be a rst-team all-American, Parker said, which would happen with a top-eight nish. Beyond the NCAA meet, Parker is pointing to the USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Sacramento, Calif., later this summer. She quali ed and competed last year, reaching the hurdle semi nals. The progress over her past two years mitigates two years of relative frustration upon her arrival at Lexington, progress she said is largely due to Coach Edrick Floreal. Floreal arrived before Parkers junior season and allowed her to run to her specialty, sprints and hurdles after competing in the heptathlon her rst two years. The biggest thing Ive learned over the past four years is everything is a process, and you have to go through the process, Parker said. I would say a big difference this year is a good relationship with a coach who is very supportive. I also have strong teammates. We brought in a great class of hurdlers this year, including one of the best in the country (SEC champ Kendra Harrison). I am in a good position to go fast because I am training with some of the best in the country. The UK teams progress under Floreal is highlighted in the numbers the Wildcats will take to Eugene. After sending 10 athletes competing in 11 events to last years NCAAs, the Wildcats send 14 athletes competing in 15 events this year. Parker said she plans to concentrate this summer on her running. She wants to continue to run competitively; she also has goals to work down the road with athletes in a training/administrative/coaching capacity. The horizon looms and expands with graduation from college and upcoming collegiate and national championships. This is where I planned to be four years ago, Parker said. It took a while to get there, but this is where I wanted to be. Im looking forward to what the future holds. Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 7 Star Staff Reports Youth golf clinic The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is pleased to offer a free youth golf clinic again this year. The clinic will take place 9-11 a.m. ET each Friday in June (6, 13, 20 and 27) at the club, 700 Country Club Road. If students have their own clubs, they should bring them. If not, the club will furnish a set to each student in need. The clinic will be taught by the clubs teaching professional, Ethel Bardsley, assisted by dedicated members of the club. Free pool privileges will also be extended to the students after each session. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751 to register. Summer soccer camp All-Pro Soccer will have a Summer Soccer Camp from 5-7 p.m. CT June 16-19 at the Callaway Sports Complex, hosted by the Callaway Youth Soccer Club. The camp will be supervised by former professional player and coach Gary Hindley. Coach Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Year selectee, recently was named head coach of the Pensacola City FC team of the National Premier Soccer League and has been the head coach of both the girls and boys teams at Port St. Joe High School for the past ve years. At the camp, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 7-17. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, contact Coach Hindley at 2766353 or gjhallpro@aol.com. Golf club to offer swim lessons The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is offering swim lessons on the following dates: July 2, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28 and 30. Starting time is 9 a.m. ET for three age groups for the swim lessons, plus the possibility of an advanced class (children would have to pass a short test with the instructor to be admitted), each lasting 30 minutes. One class will be a Parent-Tot Class for parents with children 6 months to 3 years. The cost of the lessons is $100, with a nonrefundable 50 percent deposit necessary upon registration. The deposit, however, would be refunded if the classes are canceled by the club. Registration and deposit must be made no later than 5 p.m. ET June 18 at the club. For questions, call the instructor, Rama, at 3700895 or the club at 227-1751. Star Staff Report Mexico Beachs threetournament summer series kicks off Saturday, June 7, with the Golly Whopper Classic featuring a one-day Catchem If You Can kingsh and red snapper shootout. A kids division will be included again this year, as well as an inaugural category: red snapper spear shing. One-hundred percent of the entry fees will be paid out to the winners. Tournament entry fees are $150 per boat, $35 per diver (spear shing) and $25 per child 14 and under. Last year, Charlie Lanford caught the largest red snapper, weighing 22.81 pounds, aboard the Gulf Business 3 with Capt. Lee Cathey. The king mackerel division also brought several sizeable sh to the scales, said Golly Whoppers co-director and sponsor, Zach Childs, but none could compete with the 55.13-pound smoker caught aboard the Salty Mule, captained by Blake Anderson. The Golly Whopper Captains Party will be Friday, June 6, at the Mexico Beach Marina. For rules and more information, visit 98realestategroup.com/ gollywhopper or call Childs at 819-0933. Other upcoming tournaments in Mexico Beach include the 10th annual Offshore Classic on July 25-26 and the 18th annual MBARA King sh Tournament on Aug. 23. By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com NEW YORK Nothing soothes the pain of dental work quite like a few million dollars. Port St. Joe and Louisville standout Calvin Pryor signed with the New York Jets on Monday. The No. 18 overall selection at safety penned a four-year rookie deal worth an estimated $8.56 million, according to CBSsports. com. The contract also calls for an estimated $4.55 million signing bonus. Rookie contracts are based on draft position. Complete details of the contract were not released by the Jets, as of Tuesday. Pryor missed portions of the Jets Organized Team Activities last week due to extraction of three wisdom teeth. He was able to participate in individual drills but was held out of team activities when swelling was too great to wear a helmet. He spent time on a stationary bicycle and observed practice. The lack of OTA work wasnt a concern for Jets coach Rex Ryan. He lauded the selection of Pryor on draft day and said the former Tiger Shark was very impressive during rookie minicamp May 16-18. Pryor voiced frustration to nj.com about not being able to compete, saying I want to be out there with the guys. He added that he was still engaging in mental reps and was looking forward to full contact. Contact became his trademark, as he was nicknamed Louisville Slugger for his hard hits with the Cardinals. The physical mentality immediately attracted the Jets and they made him the teams sixth consecutive rst-round defensive selection. The 5-foot-11, 207-pound Pryor had 218 tackles and seven interceptions in three seasons at Louisville. Ryan called Pryor an enforcer and eagerly awaits his punishment of NFL running backs and wide receivers. Pryor joins Bay graduate Khyri Thornton as NFL signees. Thornton, a defensive lineman, was selected in the third round by Green Bay and signed on May 19. His total contract was slotted close to $3 million with an estimated signing bonus of almost $600,000. Sports SHORTS Mexico Beach summer shing tournaments begin Saturday Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Pryor signs with Jets for expected $4.55 million bonus CALVIN PRYOR Kayla Parker hurdles into NCAA meet FILE PHOTO Former Port St. Joe standout Kayla Parker is hoping to earn allAmerica honors during next weeks NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships.

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Local A8 | The Star By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com During the week leading up to the Memorial Day holiday, Gulf District Schools graduated 114 seniors into the next passage in their lives. In addition to the sheepskins, in addition to the opportunity to turn tassels and enjoy a nal festive evening with classmates, the Class of 2014 also walked away with hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships earned through work of excellence the past four years. Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School Port St. Joe graduated 72 seniors among the Class of 2014 The motto for the Class of 2014 was Our lives are before us, the past is behind us, but our memories are forever with us. The class ower was Purple and Yellow Gerber Daisies and the class song was If Today Was Your Last Day by Nickelback. Homer Allen Davis was the valedictorian and Anastasia Gabrielle Thomason the salutatorian. High Honor graduates (GPA of 3.85 or above) DanTasia Yvette Welch, Kayla Lucile Lindsey, Grant Franklin Whiten, Maya Elizabeth Robbins, Kristen Denise Burkett, Bryce Taylor Godwin, Andrew Michael Lacour, Angel Roberto Padilla, Morgan Brooks Kennington. Honor graduates (GPA of 3.5 to 3.849) Christian Rose Laine, Lauren Michelle Costin, Antonio Michael Moree, Laura Kathleen Sinor, Jack Curtis Cummings, Amy Rachelyn Butler, Sawyer Jackson Rafeld, Nicholas Warren Renfro, Brittany Nicole King, Lexie Dianne McGhee, Cailyn Marie LaPlante, Katerina Nicole Nelson, Sydney Marian Owens, Brittney Deshawn Shoemaker, Kallie Louise Bateman. Graduates Demeriyah AShanti Alexander, Gabrielle Ivana Anthony, Candice Elizabeth Bright, Kylee Alexis Carter, Annalisa Brooke Childress, Koen Michael Cortellini, Kapril Nicole Darnall, Robert Anthoney Dykes, Nicole Mae Endres, Heather Nicole Faircloth, SheNoya Renee Fennell, Dwayne Griggs, Brandon Michael Hall, Anna Nicole Haynes, Justin Schwab Hites, Allison Nicole Howze, Matthew Cameron Jackson, David Matthew Jacobs, Michael Anthony Johnsen, Jacobi Richard Jones, Katherine Renee Kennington, Taylor Addison Laue, Natrone Carlton Lee, Jonathan Wesley Leffew, Nicholas Dwight Lewis, Tanene Enoya Malone, Alexander Carrol Maughan, Dequan Montay McCloud, Austin Daniel McNeill, Kelsey Christine Miles, Steven Kaleb Odom, Tommie John Parker, Anastasya Kristen Paul, Bryan Adison Powell, William Tristan Reynolds, Cathlyn Palmiano Robles, Destiny Brianne Shoemaker, Mason Richard Simmons, Alexis Nichole Strickland, Allie Jovon Stripling, Tori Jo Thomas, Corey James Williams, Torey Jerome Williams, DeShawntae Tyell Willis, Shatiara Nashay Zaccaro. Scholarships Academic Award ($100): Antonio Moree, Jack Cummings, Nicholas Renfro, Katerina Nelson Brittney Shoemaker; A Challenge ($250): DanTasia Welch, Shatiara Zaccaro; A Challenge ($1,000): DanTasia Welch; American Legion 116 ($300): Mason Simmons, Morgan Kennington; Ann Comforter ($100): Laura Sinor; Aveda ($1,000): DeShawntae Willis; B. Walter Wilder ($1,000): Brittany King; Band Boosters ($500): Tristan Reynolds; Bateman-Wooten ($250): Jacobi Jones; Billy Tapper 1564 ($390): DeShawntae Willis; Billy Tapper 1713 ($390): Lexie McGhee; Bryce Nelson ($500): Allison Howze; C. Leonard Belin ($1,300): Allen Davis, Sawyer Rafeld; City Wide Missionary ($500): DanTasia Welch; Deanna Ramsey ($250): Angel Padilla; Delta Kappa Gamma ($250): Morgan Kennington; Fairpoint ($600): DanTasia Welch; Forgotten Coast ($1,500): Bryce Godwin; George Tapper ($1,000): Allen Davis; Durans ROTC ($500): Robert Dykes, Sawyer Rafeld; Gibson Rotary ($4,000): DanTasia Welch; GCEA ($600): Bryce Godwin; Gulf Sheriff ($500): Annalisa Childress; Hosie/CocaCola ($3,000): Kristen Burkett; J & S Wilder ($1,300): Grant Whiten, Angel Padilla, Cathlyn Robles, Cailin LaPlante, Tori Thomas; J. Lamar Faison ($500): DanTasia Welch; Jr. Service League ($1,000): DanTasia Welch; Kiwanis Academic ($1,300): Lexie McGhee; Kiwanis ($100): Amy Butler, Lauren Costin, Allen Davis, Anastasia Thomason; Kiwanis Vocational ($1,000): Bryan Powell; Knights of Pythias ($300): Drew Lacour, Maya Robbins, Sawyer Rafeld, DanTasia Welch; Leadership Award ($100): Robert Dykes; Principals Award ($100): Kristen Burkett, Sydney Owens, Kallie Bateman, Lauren Costin; Linda Lewis Wright ($500): Maya Robbins; Marilyn Witten ($1,000): Maya Robbins, Grant Whiten; Mediacom ($1,000): DanTasia Welch; Methodist Care PSJ ($1,000): Morgan Kennington; Methodist Care Wewa ($250): Jacobi Jones; National Jr. Beta ($250): Anastasia Thomason; Oliver/Laura Taylor ($470): Tori Thomas; PACE 379/GC($1,300): Allison Howze, Christian Laine, Brittany King; Pecola ($250): SheNoya Fennell, Tanene Malone; R. Marion Craig ($500): Natrone Lee; Principals Award ($400): Kayla Lindsey; Principals Award ($100): Kristen Burkett, Sydney Owens, Kallie Bateman, Lauren Costin; Ryan Teall ($500): Maya Robbins; Sam Cox Memorial ($1,500): Drew Lacour; Sea Oats Girl/Boy ($250): Christian Laine, Allen Davis; SGA Leadership ($300): Lexie McGhee; Spanish Award ($100): Anna Haynes; Troy University ($24,000): Anna Haynes; Troy University ($35,000): Bryce Godwin, Drew Lacour; Troy University ($60,000): Anastasia Thomason; VFW Ladies ($500): Allie Stripling; WASWA ($500): Maya Robbins; Zedoc Baxter ($470): Tori Thomas. Wewahitchka Jr./ Sr. High School Wewahitchka High School graduated 42 seniors among the Class of 2014. The class motto was What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us. The class ower was the red rose and the class song was Dont You (Forget about Me) by Simple Minds Jacob Seth Goodwin was the valedictorian and Jakob Alan Bidwell the salutatorian. High Honor Graduates (GPA of 3.85 or higher) Jacob Seth Goodwin, Jakob Alan Bidwell, Chelsea Nicole Cook, Kara Jean Zucci. Honor Graduates (GPA of 3.5-3.849) William Hunter Bailey, Chandler Mae Vines, Cory Matthew White, Shawn Kory Jenkins, Chelsey Danielle Toney. Graduates Tyler Lee Adams, Eddie Ray Bowles III, Jennifer Wondale Bryan, Braden Matthew Buckalew, Caitlin Marie Burch, Troy Steven Collins, Michael Adrien Cox, Calvin Grady Dean III, Brianna Kaye Edmondson, Morgan Danielle Fisher, Johnna Renee Florio, James Larry Hensley, Jr., AnMaree Teodora Hess, Jarvar Javon Hill, Zachary Allen Hire, Kimberly Dale Hughes, Damien Dwayne Hunter, Abriale Marie Kemp, James Edward Lester III, Issac Benjamin Madrid, Joshua Liam Mayer, Nicole Renee Morrill, Janie Savannah Pippen, Corey Austin Rhames, Kelver Siliezar, Kirsten Mariea Stalnaker, Sheneshia Mercedes Stansel, Kristopher Jon Taylor, Danielle Katherine Ward, Brooke Ashley Weatherly, Christina Rena Whiteld, Jamie Michael Whiteld II, Anna Maria Wilcox. Scholarships African-American collegiate Scholarship ($550) Seth Goodwin; ($450): Chelsea Cook, Jakob Bidwell; ($400): Abriale Kemp, Chandler Vines, Hunter Bailey; ($350): Jamie Whiteld, Morgan Fisher, Sheneshia Stansel, Tyler Adams; Florida State University Alfredia Owens Scholarship ($250): Sheneshia Stansel; Bateman-Wooten Scholarship ($350): Kara Zucci: ($300): Abriale Kemp; ($250): Hunter Bailey; ($200): Chelsea Cook; Charles and Betty Scholarship ($TBD): Abriale Kemp; College For Every Student ($TBD): Abriale Kemp; Courtney Erin McMillion Memorial Scholarship ($1,000): Jakob Bidwell; ($500): Josh Mayer; Delta Mu Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma International ($250): Jakob Bidwell; Employees Club of Wewahitchka ($500): Abriale Kemp, Hunter Bailey, Johnna Florio, Nicole Morrill, Seth Goodwin, Shaneshia Stansel; Employees Club of Wewahitchka Ricky L. McMillion Scholarship ($500): Cheslea Cook, Morgan Fisher; Florida Academic Scholarship ($TBD): Seth Goodwin; Florida Medallion Scholarship ($TBD): Jakob Bidwell; FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Program ($TBD): Chelsea Cook, Jakob Bidwell, Seth Goodwin; Frank & Violet Graddy Memorial Scholarship ($500): Trey Lester; FSU Freshmen Scholarship ($9,600): Seth Goodwin; FSU Grant ($1,800): Seth Goodwin; Geraldine Williams Scholarship ($250): Sheneshia Stansel; Gulf Coast State College Honor Scholarship (2 year scholarship): Jakob Bidwell; Gulf County Education Association Scholarship ($600): Chandler Vines, Jakob Bidwell; Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Employees Club Scholarship ($1,000): Nicole Morrill; James Moss and Julia Wood Cleckley Memerial Scholarship ($TBD): Trey Lester; JH Grant Memorial Scholarship ($TBD): Kristen Stalnaker; Jimmy and Susan Wilder Scholarship ($TBD): Abriale Kemp, AnMaree Hess, Chelsea Cook, Kara Zucci; Methodist Care Closet Scholarship ($1,000): Anna Wilcox; Oscar Redd Memorial Scholarship ($TBD): Anna Wilcox; Ryan Flowers Memorial Scholarship ($1,500): Cheslea Cook; Ryan Teall Memorial Scholarship ($750): Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell; St. Johns Episcopal Church Women of Wewahitchka ($500): Abriale Kemp, Seth Goodwin; Trojan Opportunity Scholarship ($9,600): Chandler Vines; Troy Heritage Scholarship ($2,500): Chandler Vines; Troy University Excellence in Leadership Scholarship ($7,000): Chandler Vines; Tupelo Lodge Scholarship ($500): Seth Goodwin; U.S. Army ($85,000): Jamie Hensley, Savannah Pippen; U.S. Army Reserve Scholar Athlete ($TBD): Chelsea Cook, Jakob Bidwell; Walter Wilder Scholarship ($TBD): Shawn Jenkins; Wewahitchka Bull Gator Scholarship ($500): Jakob Bidwell; Wewahitchka Methodist Care Closet Scholarship ($250): Hunter Bailey; Wewahitchka Search & Rescue ($500): Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell, Johnna Florio; Wewahitchka Womans Club ($500): Abriale Kemp, Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell, Seth Goodwin. Graduates claim diplomas, dollarsP H OTO S BY T IM CROFT A ND S P E C I A L TO TH E ST A R Above are WHS salutatorian Jakob Bidwell and valedictorian Seth Goodwin. At left, WHS honor students are recognized in front of the audience. P H OTO S BY T IM CROFT A ND S P E C I A L TO TH E ST A R Students at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School created last-minute memories by posing with friends before receiving their diplomas. Thursday, June 5, 2014

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Local The Star| A9 We have a tremendous amount of visitors who come to see St. Vincent, Jenkins said. I cant stress how important this is to Gulf County. In addition, the islands management staff no longer has an ofce after the city of Apalachicola declined to pick up the lease for next year and the budgetary issues are complicated since the island was put under the management umbrella of St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The situation has been awful since it went under St. Marks, Romanelli said. Several TDC board members wondered if the agency should not examine ways to bring the ofce to Indian Pass, where most visitors to the island launch their visit. Luther said a petition circulated by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island garnered 810 signatures and has been forwarded to federal ofcials. The BOCC has also chimed in and Luther had a meeting with the staff of U.S. Sen. Bill Nelsons ofce in Tallahassee last week. He is seeking meetings with the staff of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio and Congressman Steve Southerland. Anything the TDC could do to support what we are doing now would be welcome, Luther said. The Supporters are the only group promoting St. Vincent. The TDC board unanimously approved having Jenkins correspond with all relevant federal ofcials to express concerns about the future status of the island. This is obviously an issue that is important to us and a threat to our tourism here, said board chair David Warriner. Sh op at Ho me HOM EO WN ER IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 1 33 NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. ww w .m ulli se y e.c om Medical Ey e Exam with f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases 850-7 63-6666 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar d Cer tified and Catar act Sur g eon Boar d Cer tified and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 6-15-14 CODE: SJ00 ST. VINCENT from page A1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County Tour ist Development Council is overseeing an upswing in visitors and bed taxes. But with the Board of County Commissioners wishing to tap into the expertise of the agency administration, TDC ad visory board members expressed concern about maintaining full focus. TDC executive direc tor Jennifer Jenkins pre sented to her board a plan for the agencys staff to assist interim Economic Development Council di rector Towan Kopinsky in formulating a marketing plan for the EDC. Under the plan, which was urged by the BOCC, Jenkins and staff mem bers Kelli Jackson, the nancial ofcer at the agency, and Michelle Per rin, who spearheads TDC marketing, would divide their time between TDC and EDC duties. In short, they would help Kopinsky develop and implement a market ing plan and program for the EDC. Jackson and Perrin would each expand their marketing work as the BOCC looks to establish an EDC using similar guidelines an execu tive director, any staff and an advisory council to that under which the TDC operates. We are learning a lot, but we need to gure out how to market things for economic development, Jenkins said. However, members of her board expressed res ervations with the entire concept. I dont like the idea of the TDC splitting its focus, said board mem ber Tony Whiteld, who added that he sure the BOCC saw an effective agency with operations worth duplicating. Im on the TDC, not the EDC. Im concerned about the impacts to the TDC. The primary concern of board chair David War riner was the physical cohabitation of the two agencies as Kopinsky moves into the TDC Wel come Center at least for the summer. Warriner said the Wel come Center as already a beehive of activity with tourists and wondered how effective the physi cal arrangement could be, if, for example, some businessmen looking to locate arrive at Welcome Center in business attire at the same time a tour ist enters in sandals and shorts to nd out where to clean sh., This building is stressed to the max, Warriner said. Im afraid we are going to take our eye off the ball a bit. We need full focus on what we are doing. County attorney Jer emy Novak said the mar keting of Gulf County, whether tourismor busi ness-related, were part of the same pie. As they get the EDC up and running you (the TDC) want to be a part of that, Novak said. Warriner, who has served in the past with the Chamber of Com merce, an EDC advisory council and the TDC, said the duties of the EDC are voluminous and distracting and added, There is a difference be tween collaboration and cohabitation. Warriner said Novak should pass along con cerns expressed by the TDC board about the EDC proposal and its impacts on the tourism agency and said board members would be vigilant of those impacts. We are concerned, Warriner said. This is a crucial time for us. Bed taxes up Bed taxes in April spiked 11.03 percent com pared to the same month last year, during which an increase of 11.79 was on the books. Jenkins said the growth in April year-to-year indi cated there was still room to grow the month. We have room to stay strong and steady in April, Jenkins said. We can do more to ll capacity. All indications are that May was a banner month, with the Memorial Day holiday weekend resem bling a Fourth of July, Warriner and Whiteld each said. Jenkins said she re mains committed to her goal of 20 percent growth for the year and said her projections for revenue next year call for contin ued growth in the double digits. Bed taxes rising, TDC council seeks to keep eye on ball Thursday, June 5, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com If at rst. Even though the Paces Foundation failed to secure tax credits last year to fund 72 affordable housing units in North Port St. Joe, repre sentatives Rick Haymond and Ron Thomason came back before the Port St. Joe Commission during Tues days bi-monthly meeting to inform them about a new Florida housing grant that had the potential to fund 50 units. Haymond and Thoma son asked commissioners to allow them apply for those funds on behalf of the city, the deadline for which is approaching on July 1, while ensuring the spe cics of the project could still be worked out in the meantime. Its a small piece of the overall proposed project, Thomason said. We can put in as much affordable housing as the community needs over time. Thomason said though approving the project for a lower number of units would seem simpler, markets can be dynamic and change, and if the city later decided to build more apartments, theyd face additional ex penses. As more units were added, the city would incur additional costs for more roads and the extension of sewer and water lines. County Commissioner Tan Smiley took the podium and expressed the need for affordable housing in the area. He said he had vis ited many residents who struggle to live two to three people to a home. The mayor is a bulldog to get the lighthouse moved, but Id like to see some bull dogging on getting these affordable homes, Smiley said. Build 150 apartments, and I guarantee theyll be full within a year. With Mayor Mel Magid son on vacation, Commis sioner Rex Buzzett acted as chairman for the meeting. We need affordable housing, Buzzett said. We also have to think of the in frastructure and think of the neighborhoods over there, too. Were ready to go for ward on the recommenda tion of our attorney. The commission passed a motion to advertise the rst reading of an ordinance that would allow the ball to begin rolling again. The proposed location for the housing is just off Clifford Sims Road and was donated to the city by the St. Joe Company speci cally for affordable housing. The location was chosen because of its proximity to Commerce Park and could act as a gateway as new jobs are created with the open ing of the Port. PSJRA After exploring reloca tion options for the ofce of Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency director Gail Also brook, only two options were considered. Commissioners could either relocate Also brook to an ofce at a cost of approximately $4,000 a year or repurpose the existing le room in city hall. Commissioners Bo Pat terson and William Thurs bay agreed moving the citys les to accommodate Also brook was the best choice and would save taxpayers money. City manager Jim Anderson warned commis sioners that if the room was repurposed, a secure loca tion would need to be found for the archived paperwork. Thats the most im portant room in city hall, Anderson said. If the build ing caught on re, the rst room you should save is that room. In a 3-1 vote, with Buzzett dissenting, Thursbay passed a motion to relocate the PSJRA to city hall. Algae problems Several residents of Highland View attended to complain of a strong sewage that had invaded the neigh borhood over the past week. One resident reported the smell was so bad that her kids didnt want to go outside and that her daugh ter had gone to the Health Department with breathing problems. In her report, Wastewater Plant Manager Lynn Todd told commissioners that be cause of recent rainstorms, a dense layer of algae had built up on the wastewater plants reservoir. As the al gae began to rot, it caused the smell reported by the residents. Todd said the smell was not harmful to humans, though it could activate some allergies or respira tory conditions. Only three aerators are currently being used on the reservoir, but Todd said it would take seven to prevent that type of algae growth. She said the city could pur chase chemicals to kill the algae, and if successful, they could be kept on hand to prevent the same situation from occurring in the future. Commissioners agreed to obtain the chemicals, which would arrive in three to ve days. City restarts affordable housing conversation The mayor is a bulldog to get the lighthouse moved, but Id like to see some bulldogging on getting these affordable homes. County Commissioner Tan Smiley

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A10 | The Star Thursday, June 5,, 2014 Local Star Staff Report This page features photos submitted to The Star by our readers. We would like to make this page a regular feature, an opportunity for the shutterbugs does that even apply in this digital age? from this community, resident and visitor alike, to highlight the gorgeous, the interesting, the weird, fun or just plain best that Gulf County offers. Please send your photos to tcroft@star .com and help us shine a spotlight on Gulf County. Scene Scene around COURTESY OF BILL FAUTH A familiar site, the George Tapper Bridge, through an unusual lens and angle. COURTESY OF BILL FAUTH During a recent heavy downpour a sheriffs deputy was forced to pull to the side of U.S. 98 in St. Joe Beach as lightning slashes the horizon. The tip of St. Joseph Peninsula is in the background. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER The Bo Spring Band, aboard the Illustrious, provided musical entertainment during the annual Memorial Day party off the tip of St. Joseph Peninsula. Above right, a little water play at Oak Grove Daycare provided some relief on a warm afternoon last week. At right, kites populate the sky over Indian Pass. COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI COURTESY OF KRISTY RAFFIELD COURTESY OF DAN CHRISTIE If the sunset is spectacular, Dan Christie from Simmons Bayou typically snaps a spectacular photo. At right a dolphin swims along the shore near Indian Pass. COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI

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The Star| A11 Special to the Star On Monday, May 26, the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce (GCSO) received a complaint regarding the theft of an irrigation pump from the 400 block of Gulf Pines Drive. Deputy B. Smith investigated the theft. On Tuesday, May 27, Deputy J. Oquendo took a report at the GCSO regarding a missing rearm. The victim in the case stated that he discovered his Browning 9mm pistol missing from his vehicle at the beginning of the month. It was unclear where the rearm went missing from, or if it was taken from within Gulf County. On May 27, the GCSO received a call regarding the theft of three water faucets and two Everstart batteries. Deputy B. Smith investigated the complaint, which was in the 4700 block of Cape San Blas Road. On May 27, Deputy J. Brock responded to the 200 block of Catalpa Avenue in Wewahitchka after the GCSO received a report of a theft. The complainant discovered their pellet gun missing from the front porch. Deputy Brock investigated the complaint and determined Aaron W. Smiley (30) was the suspect in the case. A warrant was issued for Burglary to a Structure. He was arrested and served with a warrant on Monday, June 2. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF). On Wednesday, May 28, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a physical disturbance in the 400 block of Angel Fish Street in Highland View. Deputy G. Desrosier responded and investigated the call. One of the parties involved had already left the scene when he arrived. The case is still under investigation. On May 28, Deputy P. Williams took a report of the theft of a rearm from a vehicle in the 8900 block of Wentletrap Drive in Beacon Hill. The complainant stated his Fie model TZ 9mm pistol was stolen from within his vehicle between May 26th and May 27th. The vehicle was left unlocked. On May 28, the GCSO received a complaint regarding a residential burglary in the 5500 block of SR 71 in Wewahitchka. The complainant reported the offense occurred sometime between April 19th and May 28th. The following items were reported as stolen: a 12 foot aluminum ladder, a hot water heater, a water pump and tank, along with a refrigerator. The total value of the property reported stolen was $500. On Thursday, May 29, Pamela R. Davis (32) turned herself into the GCSO on active warrants for Violation of Probation. Davis is on probation for Reckless Driving with Property Damage and Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. She was booked into the GCDF where she was later rst appeared and released on a $1,500 bond the same day. On May 29, the GCSO received a complaint regarding the theft of tools and copper tubing in the 6200 block of Ganley Road in Five Acre Farms. Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the call. The complainant said the following items were stolen from within a shed: two Poulan chainsaws; a Makita circular saw new in the box; a fty foot roll of copper tubing; a metal and a plastic tool box; four ATV tires and wheels; a Hytachi roof nailer; and a Baja two wheel scooter. The total value of the property stolen was $2,180. If you have any information regarding this offense, please contact the GCSO or call CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS(8411). On May 29, Deputy B. Smith was approached by a complainant who wished to le a report regarding the theft of a water pump. The offense occurred between May 24 and May 29. The pump belonged to the home owners association of Marnie Island Reserve near Cape San Blas. The pump was a one horse power Berkley pump and was valued at $700. At the same time, Deputy Smith took a report of the theft of the same style pump from the property at the Cottages of Indian Summer. The value of that pump was $1,000. On Friday, May 30, John E. Burrows (31) turned himself in and was arrested for a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support. Burrows was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) and was released after paying a $1,600 purge. On May 30, Sgt. J. Williams arrested Austin R. Hysmith (28) for Driving While License Suspended or Revoked and Unlawful Use of a Drivers License. Hysmith was observed driving a vehicle on suspended drivers license and was arrested at West Church Avenue and SR 71 in Wewahitchka. He was taken into custody and transported to the GCDF. He remains in the GCDF on a $1,150 bond. On May 30, Deputy J. Brock responded to the 100 block of Hensley Lane in Overstreet after the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance. After the investigation it was determined the complainant, Timothy D. Buell (34), was wanted for Violation of Probation. Buell was arrested and transported to the GCDF. He is on probation for Indecent Exposure. He remains in the GCDF on a $1,100 bond. During the late evening hours on Friday, May 30, and the early morning hours of Saturday, May 31, GCSO Narcotics Investigators and Deputies arrested the following individuals on warrants issued the sale of narcotics: Anthony S. Crocker (30) Principle to the Sale of Meth; Warren M. Bowers (28) Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of Park; Brenda J. Neel (24) Principle to the Sale of Meth; Gordon F. Hammond (38) Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of Park, Possession of Meth, two counts of Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, DWLS/R, and Unlawful Use of a Drivers License; April K. Holmes (35) -Traf cking in Hydrocodone; Rex A. Veasey, Sr. (48) Sale of Meth, Possession of Meth with Intent to Distribute, two counts of Possession of a Controlled Substance, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia; Veronica L. Pickron (40) Principle to the Sale of Meth and Unlawful Use of a TwoWay Communications Device; Sean F. Porras (37) -Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of Church; Robert C. Hill (29) Sale of GHB within 1,000 Feet of a Child Care Facility, Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of a Child Care Facility, and Unlawful Use of a Two-Way Communications Device; Melissa A. Sims (35) Sale of Meth within 1,000 Feet of a Church; Rebecca P. Smith (70) Traf cking in Hydrocodone; Joseph D. Turner (28) Traf cking in Hydrocodone; and Shelby A. Scheffer (23) Principle to Traf cking in Hydrocodone. Each case is the culmination of investigations conducted by the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce Narcotics Unit, some of which began three months ago. In addition to the sale of meth, Hammond and Veasey faced additional charges at the time of their arrest. The following bonds were issued at rst appearance: Bowers, $10,000; Neel, ROR; Hammond, $18,000; Holmes, $10,000; Veasey, $22,500; Pickron, $15,000; Porras, $10,000; Hill, $28,000; Sims, $10,000; Smith, $10,000; Turner, $10,000, and Scheffer, $10,000. On Saturday, May 31, Deputy J. Oquendo stopped a vehicle on Stone Mill Creek Road and SR 71 regarding a moving violation. It was determined the driver, David M. Hewitt Jr. (18), was wanted out of Holmes County and operated the vehicle without a drivers license. He was arrested and charged with Driving Without a License and an out of county warrant. Hewitt was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and given a $2,500 bond for Driving Without a License. He remains in custody awaiting extradition to Holmes County. On May 31, the GCSO received a complaint regarding the theft of construction materials from the 100 block of East Seascape Drive. Deputy M. Lay eld responded to the call. The complainant stated that two incidents of theft had occurred at the residence. The rst was reported to have occurred around Sept. 15, 2013. The incident involved the theft of a shipment of thin set which is material used to hold down oor tile. The second incident was reported to have occurred around the rst two weeks of April 2014. The complaint said it involved the shipment of approximately eight boxes of tile. The total value of the items taken was approximately $2,605. The complainant stated a report was not led earlier, because they felt the property would not be able to be traced. Citizens are strongly encouraged to le reports as soon as they become aware of a possible crime. On May 31, Sgt. J. Williams stopped a vehicle for traveling at a high rate of speed in the area of County Road 22-A and Parker Farm Road. When Sgt. Williams contacted the driver, Eddy Adorno (20), he could smell a strong odor of burnt marijuana coming from within the vehicle. K9 Marco was deployed and alerted to the presence of illegal narcotics inside of the vehicle. A search of the vehicle revealed a plastic bag of less than twenty grams of marijuana and a pipe used to smoke marijuana. Adorno was arrested and charged with Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On Sunday, June 1, Deputy K. Starnes responded to the 8000 block of US Highway 98 on St. Joe Beach regarding the theft of several reel and rods. The complainant reported the theft occurred during the early morning hours of June 1. The reel and rods were stolen from a boat parked near the complainants home. The total value of the reel and rods was $440. On June 1, Henry H. Watford Jr. (29) turned himself in on a warrant for Violation of Probation. The warrant was issued out of Bay County. He bonded out on a $2,500 bond. On June 1, Deputy J. Oquendo and Sgt. J. Murnan arrested Rodney D. Adkison (33) on an active warrant for Violation of Probation. At the time of his arrest he was determined to be in possession of drug paraphernalia. Adkison was transported to the GCDF where has charged with Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Violation of Probation. He is on probation for Possession of Listed Chemicals, Manufacturing Controlled Substance, and Felony DWLS/R. He remains in custody at the GCDF. On June 1, the GCSO received a call regarding a verbal disturbance in the 6900 block of Doc Whit eld Road in Howard Creek. Deputy J. Brock responded to the call. After investigating the incident, William T. Knox (63), was arrested and charged with Domestic Battery. He was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and given a conditional release. On May 26-June 1, the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 51 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 45 calls for EMS, 16 calls for other departments/ agencies and 5 calls for Gulf County Animal Control. On May 26-June 1, the GCSO logged the following department activity: Security/Zone Checks, 283; Traf c Stop, 28; Civil Paper Service, 25; Field Contact, 23; Warrant Arrests, 14; Theft/ Shoplifting, 9; Abandoned Vehicle, 4; Information, 4; Suspicious Activity, 4; Traf c Accident, 4; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 3; Domestic Disturbance, 3; Verbal Disturbance, 3; EMS Assist, 4; Harassing Phone Calls, 3; Reckless Driver, 3; Sexual Offender Address Veri cations, 3; Request for Security Check, 3; Alarm, 2; Assist another agency, 2; Residential Burglary, 2; Disturbance, 2; Trespass, 2; Street Obstruction, 2; Suspicious Person, 2; Suspicious Vehicle, 2; Welfare Check, 2; Animal Call, 2; Burglary of Auto, 1; Citizens Assist, 1; Deceased Person, 1; Noise Disturbance, 1; Physical Disturbance, 1; Escort, 2; Fire Call, 3; Fraud, 1; Lost Items/Personal, 1; Lost/ Stolen Tag, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Missing Juvenile, 1; Recovered Property, 1; and Sexual Offender Reregistration, 1. Pl ea se Jo in Us for a Me et an d Gr ee t Su pp or ti ng th e Re -e le ct io n of Bo rn an d Ra is ed in Po rt St Jo e Hos ted By : Ra lp h & Ma rg ar et Ro be rs on Da vi d & Tr is h Wa rr in er Gr eg & Li nd a Jo hn so n Me l & He l en Ma gi ds on Gu er ry & Su sa n Ma gi ds on Re x & Na nc y Bu zz et t Ji m & Ba rba ra Te rr y Bo yd & Mi tz i He nd ri x Bu bb a & Ba rba ra Ha rm on Ro y & Fr an Sm it h Th ur sd ay Ju ne 12 20 14 5: 30 pm to 7: 30 pm Th e Po rt In n "O n th e Po rch 50 1 Mo nu me nt Av e. Po rt St Jo e, Fl or id a Ju dg e Ji m Fe ns om Cu rc ui t Ju dg e Ge or ge & Hi ld a Du re n Le on ar d & Lo re tt a Co st in Ja y & Je ss ic a Ri sh Ro na ld & Le is a Pi ck et t Al & Ca ro l Ca th ey Ch ar le s & Ta ny a Co st in Pa t & Vi vi an Fl oy d Ca ro l Ri sh Dus ty & Ca rl a Ma y Fo od an d Re es hm en ts pr o id ed Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce Law Enforcement Summary GULF COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Law Enforcement Thursday, June 5, 2014

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A12 | The Star Ofcials say plan By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Just a single number matters during Atlantic hurricane season, which began June 1. The number is one. Though the National Hurricane Center is pre dicting a less-active-thannormal hurricane season, it only takes one storm to ruin a year for an impact ed community. Hurricane season ends Nov. 30, and the emphasis as the season arrives is preparedness, which be gan May 25 with the arriv al of National Hurricane Preparedness Week. Everybody has got to know their piece of the puzzle, said Gulf County Emergency Manager Mar shall Nelson said. When everybody does that, it works real well. You have got to be ready. It is everybodys re sponsibility. That is such a big part of it. National hurricane ex perts have been particu larly outspoken in urging planning and preparing for the season while re minding folks that this is the 10th anniversary of one of the worst seasons in recent decades. There were 16 named storms in 2004, half of which at least brushed against the United States mainland and six of which reached Category 3. Among those storms were Charley, Frances, Ivan residents of the Northwest Florida re member Ivan and Jeanne, four names which were retired after the 2004 season, tying a record that was broken the following year. In 2004, 3,258 people were killed, and storms caused $50 billion in damage. Nelson still has boxes of les from 2004 lining his ofce oor, not to mention shelves of playbooks for storms through the years. For home and business owners, Nelson said, there are few better places to hone a hurricane plan than www.oridadisaster.org. They have some very good tools, Nelson said. They are very easy. You dont really have to think, just follow the (prompts). The website provides information and tips for crafting a plan for a home, a business and also has links to create a plan for your pets. There is also a childfriendly link that provides planning activities for kids. If you already have a plan, update it and un derstand what supplies need to be restocked or recycled. Forecasters predict between 8 and 13 named storms this year, of which 3-6 could become hurri canes including 1-2 major hurricanes. Although predictions call for a below average to average season, Flo ridians are reminded that it only takes one storm to impact a community, according to a press re lease from the Florida Division of Emergency Management. To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our commun ity s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST AT E UNIVE RSIT Y PA NAMA CIT Y THE CA MP AIGN FOR OUR CO MM UNIT Y S UN IVERS IT Y En do wment for To morr ow s Jo bs $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL mined, both in amount and use, in Tallahassee. For one component, the district is allowed to assess up to 1.25 mills for bricks and mortar, but can not use that money for any other purpose. In Gulf County, that means the School Board must leave most of that 1.25 mills on the table while being forced to solic it support from voters for an additional mill to cover operating expenses. We need to have local exibility for those capital outlay dollars, Norton said. Norton also said legis lators should reexamine the so-called wealth ad justment in the states funding formula for public schools. That adjustment based on property values in the county requires the district to collect more of its budget locally because the state sends down fewer dollars, even though declining enroll ment and other factors have carved the districts overall budget by more than $4 million in the past three years. The district, Norton said, is pushing the limit on constitutionally-man dated class size/teacher ratios and has shed more than 20 percent of its workforce the past four years. Public education in this county is threatened, Norton said. Jobs, school board members agreed, would provide a lot of salve to the wounds. School board member George Cox noted the se ries of industry closures the county has absorbed, from the box plant and pa per mill to chemical plants and the material transfer station along the Intra coastal Waterway. That has left the county with expensive land that has lost value over much of the past decade. It has been devastat ing to the operations of the school system, Cox said. Consolidating the com munity school systems on either end of the county Is not what we want to do, Norton said. Beshears said the port is poised, as it never has been, to inject life into desultory economic development. Noting money in the state budget to at least begin the dredging a $20 million appropriation pending governor approv al and more than $1 million spent drafting an application and required studies to undertake dredging of the shipping channel, have moved the ball. There is a public/pri vate partnership in place between the St. Joe Com pany and Port St. Joe Port Authority to develop the port. All signs, he said, point ed to momentum that must, he added, bear fruit in the next 18 months. There is as good a chance the port will come to fruition as there ever has been, Beshears said. It is as good a chance for Port St. Joe, for Gulf County, as there ever has been. The success or prog ress toward success of the port was also crucial for county ofcials to make a case for a preferred alter native for the Gulf Coast Parkway, Beshears added. The Parkway has re turned to the radar re cently through Florida Department of Transpor tation public hearings on the project, which re mains not fully funded for construction. County ofcials contend that while the project was dormant for several years, the project has changed from its original intent to connect south Gulf County and U.S. 231. This (project) has to include us, to tie in to us, Norton said. I hate to say it, but this is all or bust for us. Cognizant of the pref erence for a more direct and northerly linkage with U.S. 231, Beshears said the countys argument would be bolstered by port development. In 12 months, if the port comes to fruition, you can make the argument you need (the alternative preferred by county of cials), Beshears said. There is a real Rubics cube of what is happening right now. We have a good chance of this all coming to frui tion. Our odds are as good as they have ever been be cause of that port. BESHEARS from page A1 Local Thursday, June 5, 2014 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County School Board this week is likely to complete the lling of its ad ministrative roster for the coming school year. Whatever the decisions during Thursdays meeting, which begins at 6 p.m. ET inside the board meeting room, each of the four public schools will begin 2014-2015 with a principal other than the one in place at the be ginning of last school year. Some changes have al ready occurred. Jeremy Knapp, who took a leave of absence as prin cipal at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School in March will not be back. His interim re placement, former principal Duane McFarland is likely to return as permanent principal. Lori Price, principal at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School, is leaving for the district ofces, where retire ments will bring change. Jay Bidwell, who was interim principal at Wewa hitchka Elementary School last year, is moving to the high school. The elementary school principals are to be named Thursday as Port St. Joe El ementary School principal Sue Gannon has requested the opportunity to return to teaching. In addition to losing George Cox, a xture in Gulf County education for 50 years who is retiring from the School Board, the district also loses two of its longest-serving administrator. Deborah Crosby, direc tor of special education in the district and an educa tor for over 30 years, will be retiring in August. She is being replaced by Martha Weimorts. Sara Joe Wooten, the as sistant superintendent for instruction, is also retiring in August. She will be suc ceeded by Price. Crosby/Cox recognitions The School Board ap proved naming two educa tional pods in honor of Cox and Crosby. The business/vocational department at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School will be named for Cox. The Bridges suite at Port St. Joe Elementary School will be named in honor of Crosby. Ceremonies will follow later in the year. Administrative changes coming to district Hurricane season arrives

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The milestones dont stop for the Gulf Countys DAWGS in Prison program. Last Wednesday, the Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability program, based out of the Gulf Forestry Camp in White City, graduated its 33rd class, and all nine pups were adopted into forever homes. The partnership between the Florida Department of Corrections, the Board of County Commissioners and the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society provides inmates the opportunity to train rescued dogs with basic obedience skills. The pairing leads to the creation of socialized dogs ready for adoption while the inmates learn a viable job skill that can be put to use upon release. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Kids Win Fishing Tournament keeps reeling in area children. The 12th annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament will take place at the Port St. Joe Marina on June 13-14. Presented by the Kids Win Foundation, the tournament is open to children ages 3 to 16. Those who register will learn the basics of shing and be armed with the know-how to reel in a big one. Trophies will be given out for the biggest sh and most sh caught within each division. The Small Fry division is for kids ages 3 to 8, and Junior is for children 9 to 16. The contest is limited to in-shore, near-shore and Intracoastal Waterway shing, and contestants can be no farther than 3 miles from shore. Fishing can take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. The whole idea of the tournament is to get kids involved in the outdoors, said Rick Carrie, president of the Kids Win Foundation. We want them to become stewards of the water and the environment. The rst 350 kids who register for the event will receive a rod and reel, a tackle packet, T-shirt and goodie bag. With 342 participants in the 2013 event, Carrie predicted 2014 to be the biggest tournament to date. On Friday, June 13, registered contestants can pick up their shing equipment at the Port St. Joe Marina between 3 and 6:30 p.m. ET. Participants also will enjoy a kickoff party with a cookout and on-site classes to get tips on rod casting, knot tying and casting nets. These classes will provide kids with important information The Artery to host kids art camp Star Staff Report This summer, The Artery in Port St. Joe will offer two art camp sessions for kids ages 6 and up. The art camp is structured around projects chosen to give the kids a variety of art experiences, whether its paints, clays or mosaics. Each week of the camp will feature an emphasis on clay, though each day will showcase a unique medium for children to learn. Projects are designed to be fun and creative and will be taught by The Arterys owner and operator, Leslie Wentzell. Art always helps a kids attention span, Wentzell said. Art is a great way for kids to use their brains, and its fun. I always try to allow students freedom to express themselves and their own creativity. The rst session will run from 9 a.m. to noon ET July 7-10. The second session will be July 14-17 at the same time. The cost per session is $120 and will cover all materials used during the camps. A 10 percent family discount is available as well as full and partial scholarships to those who qualify. For more information call 227-5741. Registration can be completed at www.arterystudio. com/register.html. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) On a technicality, what other state besides Alaska and Hawaii was of cially admitted to the Union in 1950s? TX, OH, IA, OK 2) What was the Titanics emergency lifeboat #1 dubbed as by the press? Lucky Stars, Money Tree, Millionaires Boat, Cash Bow 3) Reportedly on his historic ight, what doll did Charles Lindbergh take along? G.I. Joe, Felix the Cat, Raggedy Andy, Bugs Bunny 4) When did Tom Brokaw sign off (retire) as anchor of NBC Nightly News? 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006 5) What are ASL, BSL, JSL, and DSL types of? Sign languages, UFOs, Signature loans, Dreams 6) Which of these sports or sporting activities has a sin bin? Boxing, Bowling, Hockey, Snowboarding 7) Whats a split among the members of a church when they no longer agree on what they believe? Sceptre, Scherzo, Schism, Scrag 8) From Harry Potter whats the name that most witches and wizards fear to speak? Voldemort, Flitwick, Diagon, Dumbledore 9) What do more school kids say is the worst thing served in the school cafeteria? Broccoli, Meatloaf, Fish sticks, Lima beans 10) Where is National Museum of Roller Skating located? Atlantic City, NJ; Fresno, CA; Lincoln, NE; Florence, SC 11) What is known medically as trimethylxanthine? Morphine, Glucose, Starch, Caffeine 12) A scimitar is a type of what? Headache, Sword, Fence, Stallion 13) When did newscaster Paul Harvey make his rst national broadcast from Chicago? 1945, 1950, 1955, 1960 14) A state of complete happiness is known as whatnumber heaven? First, Third, Seventh, Tenth ANSWERS 1) OH. 2) Millionaires Boat. 3) Felix the Cat. 4) 2004. 5) Sign languages. 6) Hockey. 7) Schism. 8) Voldemort. 9) Meatloaf. 10) Lincoln, NE. 11) Caffeine. 12) Sword. 13) 1950. 14) Seventh. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com WES LOCHER | The Star The next Salt Air Farmers Market will be Saturday, June 7, at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase, and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmers Market promotes a sustainable food system on Floridas Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. FARMERS MARKET SATURDAY Kids Win shing tournament June 14 SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Artery will host two kids summer art camps in July. See FISHING B5 DAWGS IN PRISON DAWG-GONE! PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Pauley, a hound mix, was adopted by Chris Kirkland of Hilliard. Below, Belle, a hound mix, was adopted by Lynda and Jim White of Cape San Blas. All pups from class 33 of DAWGS in Prison nd forever homes See DAWGS B5 Thursday, June 5, 2014

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Society Ju ne i s a 45 lb 3y r La b/ Ca ta houla mi x. Sh e ha s le ar ne d to wa lk on he r le as h an d is le ar ning oth er co mm an ds Ju ne i s a li tt le sh y ar ound ne w su rr ou nds an d pe op le bu t wa rm s up qu ic kl y. Th is pr et ty gi rl wo ul d lo ve a fo re ve r ho me of he r ve ry ow n. If yo u can gi ve he r a sa fe an d lo vin g home ple as e let us kn ow On li ne app li ca ti ons an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at www .s jb hu man es oc iet y. or g Ad op ti on fe es in cl ud e our co st of sp ay /n eu te r an d cu rr en t va cc in at ion s. Ou r hour s fo r th e sh el te r ar e Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t is al way s in ne ed of do nat ion s al so an d al l th e pr oc ee ds go di re ct ly to su pp or t th e an im al s in ou r ca re! Th e hour s fo r th e st or e ar e Th ur sd aySa tu rda y fr om 10 am3 pm Vo lu nt eer s ar e al way s we lc om e at bo th ou r st or e an d ou r sh el te r! Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e! Ho pe to se e yo u al l th er e soo n! If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-2 29-61 61 bo ww ow beach .com 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 No wy our sourc ef or Ne wN utro Sourc e Grain Free Dog Fo od! Special to The Star The Gulf County Chamber of Commerce invites you to attend the grand opening/ribbon cutting for our newest member, The Gifted Gourmet. Pam Woolery and her son, Kamden, opened The Gifted Gourmet last month and specialize in gourmet food, wine and gift items that can be packaged and sent worldwide or enjoyed just down the street. Craft cheeses and chocolate-covered espresso beans are only a few of the delicious treats offered. The Gifted Gourmet is at 220 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe. Come and meet the Woolerys from 5-7 p.m. ET on Monday, June 9, as we welcome them to our Chamber and our community. Happy Birthday Christina! We love you! Christina Clayton turned six on June 2, 2014. She celebrated her birthday with a pool party surrounded by all her family and friends. Christina is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton, granddaughter of Keith and Debbie Ford, and Sam Sr. and Jeannette Amerson, and the niece to Sam Jr. Amerson and Jeremy Owens. Summertime is vacation time for people, not plants! While getting ready for that long awaited trip, its easy to forget about your lawn, landscape, vegetable garden and house plants. A little time spent preparing your leafy friends for your absence could save you needless worry and hours of extra work when you get back. A vacation may be relaxing and rejuvenating for you and your family, but it can be hazardous even deadly for your plants. Unless you make adequate preparations before leaving, you could return to vegetable disaster. One of the rst things you might do before leaving home is ask a neighbor to check your plants periodically while youre gone. All plants need some care. But, during and extended vacation, container grown plants require special attention and different species have different needs. Be sure you give your friend speci c instructions for the care of each type. Even if you cant nd someone to personally look after your plants while youre away, theres plenty you can do prior to departure to make sure you dont come home to a limp landscape and sickly house plants. Outdoor, container grown plants should be placed in a shady area to conserve moisture. Under a tree or on the north side of a building are good locations. A thick layer of mulch will help conserve moisture for landscape plantings. Mow your lawn just before leaving, cutting the grass a little closer than usual. And unkept lawn can encourage disease, and its a tell-tale sign that no ones home. Give lawn and landscape plants a heavy watering especially recently planted beds, which will need extra moisture. Also, thoroughly spray or dust your plants to protect them from insects and diseases while youre away. If you have owering annuals, cut the blossoms before departing. If you dont, theyll soon stop blooming. And, harvest all ripe or nearly ripe fruits and vegetables. Like owers, they will continue to produce only if theyre picked frequently. Otherwise, theyll go to seed. Do a thorough job of weeding. If weeds are allowed to go to seed while youre away, you can expect to encounter much more dif cult problems later in the season even next year when the seeds sprout. And, remember that weeing eliminates a major source of competition for your landscape plants food and water, which may be in short supply during your absence. Plants kept indoors require special consideration. Before leaving home, place your house plants in a room which receives indirect sunlight. Direct exposure to the sun will dry the soil too quickly. Of course, you dont want to put your plants in a room thats too dark, either. Too little light will almost always result in leaf drop. And, just before you depart, be sure to water your house plants thoroughly. This is especially vital, because unlike lawn grass and landscape ornamentals house plants cannot bene t from any rain that may fall while youre gone. Youll enjoy your vacation more by making sure your plants are well prepared for your absence. For more information on how to vacation care for plants contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf. ifas.u .edu or edis.ifas.u .edu. Birthday Covered in cake and icing, You smile from ear to ear. Six candles celebrate Our joy of your sixth year. We sing Happy Birthday And you play with the wrapping and bows We are amazed at how you have touched our lives Just six short years ago. Vacation care for plants Senior Citizens selling spaghetti plates Special to The Star Gulf County Senior Citizens will be selling spaghetti plates from 46:30 p.m. ET Friday, June 6 at the Senior Center at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe. The plates will cost $7.50 and will include spaghetti with meat sauce, breadsticks, salad and homemade dessert. You can eat at the center or carry out. All proceeds will go to providing services to the elderly of Gulf County. Tickets are available at the Senior Citizens Center or from any employee of board member. Call 229-8466 for more information. Donations are greatly needed and appreciated. Senior Service Day at PSJ Senior Center Star Staff Report Representatives from the Area Agency on Aging of North Florida from Tallahassee will be providing free application and counseling assistance at Gulf County Senior Citizens located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe from 10:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on June 12. The representatives will provide information on Medicare enrollment, Medicare Part D prescription plans, Medigap, prescription assistance programs, Medicaid/Food Stamp assistance program, free ampli ed telephones for the hard of hearing and Emergency Home Energy Assistance program for the elderly. This is free to the public, please call 229-8466 for more information. Chamber holds ribbon cutting ROY LEE CARTER County extension director B2 | The Star Thursday, June 5, 2014 Do a thorough job of weeding. If weeds are allowed to go to seed while youre away, you can expect to encounter much more dif cult problems later in the season even next year when the seeds sprout. And, remember that weeing eliminates a major source of competition for your landscape plants food and water, which may be in short supply during your absence.

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The Star| B3 Port St. Joe class of 1974 reunion The Port St. Joe High School Class of 1974 is now planning its next reunion. Anyone from the class interested in helping to coordinate the event is asked to contact Traci Middleton Gaddis at 6485474, Ida Whiteld Garrett at 227-6185 or Susie White at 227-4046. PSJs Welch awarded Mediacom scholarship Mediacom Communications presented DanTasia Welch, a 2014 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, with a $1,000 scholarship as part of the companys World Class Scholarship Program. The award recognizes the Port St. Joe resident for outstanding leadership and academic accomplishments. Mediacom annually gives $1,000 scholarships to 60 graduating seniors to provide support for the students post-secondary education. Mediacoms Technical Operations Supervisor, Robert Kissam, presented the scholarship to Ms. Welch during the high schools recognition program. As a technology company, Mediacom understands how important it is to invest in future leaders like DanTasia Welh, said Kissam. Im proud that my company supports local students with scholarship support. More than 1,500 students applied for the scholarships. This is the thirteenth consecutive year Mediacom has funded World Class Scholarships for students who live in areas served by the cable and broadband company. To receive the Mediacom scholarships, recipients must attend an accredited two-year or four-year college, university or technical school within the United States. A congratulatory photo album of this years World Class Scholars will be available at Facebook. com/MediacomCable as well as videos featuring this years scholarship winners at YouTube.com/ MediacomCable beginning this May. Mediacom plans to continue funding its World Class Scholarships in all areas where it provides digital cable and broadband services. High school administrators will be notied in the fall of 2014 when scholarship applications become available online for students in the Class of 2015 Mediacom Communications is the nations eighth largest cable television company and one of the leading cable operators focused on serving the smaller cities in the United States, with a signicant concentration in the Midwestern and Southeastern regions. Mediacom Communications offers a wide array of broadband products and services, including traditional and advanced video services such as digital television, video-on-demand, digital video recorders, highdenition television, as well as high-speed Internet access and phone service. Through Mediacom Business, the Company offers affordable broadband communications solutions that can be tailored to any size business. Special to The Star North Florida Child Development, Inc.s, South Gulf County Early Learning Center, located across from the Gulf/Franklin Center, on Field of Dreams Avenue off of Highway 98; held its second annual PreK graduation since relocating to their new 7,800 square foot state of the art Early Child Development Facility. The ceremony under the direction of Center Manager, Mrs. Jan Cherry was held on Thursday, May 22. Family, friends, and community were invited to attend the ceremony to witness 18 students perform and celebrate their readiness for kindergarten. The ceremony began with the welcome by Mrs. Melanie Quinn-Larry, the four year old classroom teacher, who worked so very hard along with Mrs. Gina Hamilton to prepare the children to give their families such a delightful treat before the children received their Readiness Certicate. Ms. Sherry Bolden, Family Case Manager, did a wonderful introduction of each program performance and of all the children as they received their diplomas. The Pledge of Allegiance was led by Ashley Rojas and Rion Farmer; the class sang Tooty Tot, one of their very favorites, a song that teaches through music and movement and develops listening skills; the days of the week was recited by Darion Cherry, Brandon Johnson and Aubrey Armstead; the months of the year was recited by Brody Little, Kaylee Lowery and Bernard Simmons; counting to 10 in Spanish was recited by Ashley Rojas and Jose Ruiz; counting to 100 by 10s was recited by Jayden Reese, Aubree Purdy and Abigail Levins. The students preformed various nursery rhymes: Hickory Dickory Dock was recited by Casen Hill, Samuel Erickson and Bernard Simmons; Humpty Dumpty was recited by Aubree Purdy, Ahsley Rojas and Brandon Johnson; Jack and Jill was recited by Kaylee Lowery, Darion Cherry and Jayden Reese. The guest speaker was Midshipman 4th Class Javarri Beachum. Javarri began his education and discovered his love for learning while attending North Florida Headstart in downtown Port St. Joe and transitioned with the program to the Highland View location. Javarri is a 2000 graduate of North Florida Child Development and entered formal education at Port St. Joe Elementary; from there he continued at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and was a member of the Class of 2013. While attending Port St. Joe High School he enjoyed playing soccer and baseball for the Sharks. During this time of Javarris life he dedicated a lot of his time to helping others and being a role model. Javarri recently completed the Naval Academy Prep School in Rhode Island where he had a great year meeting new friends and learning new things. He is preparing to go to Annapolis, MD to attend the United Stated Naval Academy. Javarris long term goal is to be a pilot and y the worlds best planes. During his speech Javarri spoke directly to the students and their parents; he told them that they could achieve anything they dreamed. He also asked the students to give their parents a big hand of applause and thanks for helping and supporting them. He reminded the parents of the value of their continued support. Mrs. Jan Cherry, the Center Manager, closed by making special recognitions of those employees and volunteers who spent many hours preparing for the wonderful event. Special thanks to parents; teachers Melaine Quinn-Larry, Jessica Williams and Gina Hamilton for their hard work and dedication to educating our students; FCM Harmony Booker for helping develop our program; teacher Joanna Levins for the great end of the year slide show; Hilary Patterson (Juice Box Photography) for the great cap & gown and class pictures; Mr. Ronnie Cherry and Mr. Algy Wade for grilling the food; Ms. Nicole Laquera our Chef for preparing the remaining food for the children, families, community, staff and friend; Peppers Mexican Restaurant for supporting our program throughout this school year; Policy Council Members and the Board of Directors of North Florida Child Development. 2014 South Gulf County Early Learning Centers Graduates include: Aubrey Armstead, Darion Cherry, Michael Ellwood, Samuel Erickson, Rion Farmer, Arturo Fonseca, Michael Garcia, Casen Hill, Brandon Johnson, Abigail Levins, Brody Little, Kaylee Lowery, Aubree Purdy, Jayden Reese, Ashley Rojas, Jose Ruiz, Bernard Simmons III and Curtis Whiddon. DOG S FO R DOG S -4Saturday June 7, 2014 $5.00 donation, 2 Hotdogs, Chips & Drink 850-227-9393 All proceeds go to the St. Joseph Humane Society in Po rt St. Joe!! Come out to the marina for lunch and Adopt a pet today! Sh op at Ho me LI FE IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 13 3 The Lions Tale S P ECIAL TO T HE STAR Congratulations to the top Honor Students for Faith Christian School: First grade Austin Ramsey; second grade, Taylor Burkett, Carter Costin, Mazie Hodges; third grade Magnolia Sarmiento; and fourth grade Kristen Bouington. Graduation day at North Florida Child Development School News School BRIEFS PHOTO S SP ECIAL TO T HE STAR Thursday, June 5, 2014

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Special to The Star Forty percent of American children will sleep tonight in a home where their fathers dont live. The impact of that reality will be explored at 7 p.m. CT Monday, June 9 Lifetree Caf. A lmed interview with Donald Miller (best-selling author of Blue Like Jazz and Father Fiction) will be screened during the Lifetree program. In the interview, Miller describes growing up without a father and his attempts to reconnect with his father later in life. This program, titled FatherLess, is for those whove been abandoned, ignored, or abused by their fathers, said Lifetree Caf representative Craig Cable. Its also for dads who have, for some reason, lived away from their children. And it will help anyone who cares about either a father or child whos had to cope with this dif cult situation. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND AY 8:00 AM Wo rship at Sunset Pa rk (o n the sa nd) 10:00 AM Bible St udy at 1602 Hi gh wa y 98 MOND AY 7:00 PM Lif etr ee Ca f Join the Co nve rsation WEDNESD AY 10:00 AM 2:00 PM Op en House Co ee & Co nve rsation THURSD AY 6:30 PM Mi xe d Bible St udy To co ntac t wo rship leader : (850) 648.1151 or lw cpa st or@f ai rp oint .net Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g Bruce Hodge, Pa stor SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 Thomas Branch May 28, 1959 to January 1, 2014 We loved you and we miss you. Mother Nadine Branch, Brother Charles Branch, Brother Robert Branch and wife Cindy; all your nieces and nephews, and especially Elizabeth Branch In loving MEMORY Edwin Randall Skip Bulkley, II, age 75, of Cottondale, Fla., passed away on March 29, 2014, at his home in the loving care of his wife and family. Skip was born in Bellefonte, Penn., to the late Edwin Randall Bulkley, Sr., and Elsie Alice Novak. He was a graduate of Mooseheart Schools in Mooseheart, Ill., and Illinois State University. He served honorably in the Illinois Air National Guard for six years. Skip spent most of his career in sales of electronic media development in the metro Atlanta area before retiring in Mexico Beach, Florida. He is survived by his loving wife of 20 years, Alberta Howell Bulkley. He is also survived by two daughters whom he adored, Wendi Bizub of Port Orange, Fla., and Kerri Rodgers, of Lakewood, Ohio; his daughters mother, Linda Richardson, Bay Village, Ohio; two stepchildren, Christopher Howell of St. Joe Beach, and Cheryl Clark, of Newnan, Ga.; one grandson, Khristian Brown; and two granddaughters, Jessica Clark, and Ashley Clark; his siblings, Sally Bulkley Pancrazio of Bloomington, Ill., William David Bulkley, Batavia, Ill., and Penny Bulkley Schafer, Terre Haute, Ind. Skip was a member of the Loyal Order of the Moose for 40 years, and served as President of the Florida Mooseheart Alumni group for several years. He believed the Moose Organization to be an excellent provider for the care and education of youth at the Child City of Mooseheart and for the elderly at Moose Haven. He was most recently a member of the Loyal Order of the Moose in Marianna. A celebration of Skips life will be held at the interment of his cremains at Vestal Hills Memorial Park, in Vestal, N.Y., on June 5, 2014, at 2 p.m. Skips family greatly appreciates the service of the Veterans Administration in providing care and assistance to him in his illness. Edwin Randall Skip Bulkley Minnie L. Price, age 68, passed away on May 28, 2014, after battling a long illness. She was preceded in death by Charles Price, her husband of 34 years who she loved dearly. She was also preceded in death by her parents, Curt and Jessie Louise Johnson, and eight siblings. She is survived by her sons, Max Wood, Jr. (Patty), Kenneth Price (Michell), Tony Price (Susan) all of Wewahitchka, and Gary Holmes (Angie) of Dalton, Ga.; a daughter, Faye Hysmith (Billy)of Wewahitchka.; a sister, Idella Williams (Julian); brothers, Lavon Johnson (Teresa) and Lamar Johnson (Katrina). She is also survived by sister-in-law and special friend Elese Price, 11 grandchildren; 16 greatgrandchildren; and a host of nieces and nephews. She was a loving wife, mother, daughter, and sister. She was loved by many. The visitation was held at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church on Friday, May 30, in Wewahitchka. Graveside services were at Cypress Creek Cemetery in Kinard, Fla., on Saturday May 31 at 10 a.m. CT. Those who wish may make donations to Sacred Heart Hospital or St. Judes Children Hospital in her memory. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Minnie L. Price Obituaries Special to The Star A summer kids event called Weird Animals will be hosted at Long Avenue Baptist Church from Sunday, June 15 through Thursday, June 19. At Weird Animals, kids participate in memorable Bible-learning activities, sing catchy songs, dig into yummy treats at the Critter Cafe, experience one-of-a-kind Bible adventures and test out Sciency-Fun Gizmos at Imagination Station that theyll take home and play with all summer long. Plus, kids will learn to look for evidence of God all around them through something called God Sightings. Each day concludes with The Tail End a celebration that gets everyone involved in living what theyve learned. Family members and friends are encouraged to join in daily for this special time at 8 p.m.! Kids at Weird Animals will also take part in a mission effort to pour out Gods love to people in India by providing clean water. For $2.50, a child in India can have clean water for a year at school! Weird Animals is for kids 4 years old through sixth grade (completed) and will run from 6-8:30 p.m. each day. For online preregistration visit the www.groupvbspro. com/vbs/ez/longavenue. For more information, call the church of ce at 229-8691. Growing up without a father explored at Lifetree Caf Long Avenue Baptist invites children to Weird Animals: Where Jesus Love Is One-of-a-Kind THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on Thursday, June 5, 2014

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, June 5,, 2014 With the latest graduation numbers added to the programs ve-year tally, 344 dogs have graduated to new homes and 392 inmates have participated in the program. During each class, dogs are brought from the humane society in Port St. Joe to spend eight weeks with a group of inmate trainers, handlers and caretakers. While the dogs learn new skills the inmates learn compassion, patience, tolerance and teamwork. Most of these men have never known unconditional love in their lives, DAWGS co-director Sandi Christy told the adopters who were present to watch the graduation ceremony. The dogs teach the inmates so much about love. Youll be changed forever by this dog. Once the canine commencement was complete, dogs left to live with new families in Mexico Beach, Panama City, Cape San Blas and as far away as Indiana, New Jersey and Connecticut. Before the ceremony ended, Assistant Warden Steve Roddenberry took to the podium to thank Christy and co-director Judy Miick for their hard work and dedication to the DAWGS program. He presented them with a plaque in recognition of their accomplishments. Were so thankful to have a very forwardthinking warden, Christy said. So much goes into the work with the dogs, and were so grateful to the adopters for giving them a better life. Pauley, a hound/pointer mix was headed to Hilliard to live with new owner, Chris Kirkland, a former Nassau County commissioner. Kirkland said while serving as commissioner, he was heavily involved in Nassaus animal control duties. After taking a stray English sheepdog off the streets, he later adopted the animal, and after many years together, Kirklands dog passed away from cancer earlier in the year. He saw the DAWGS program as the perfect route to nd a new companion. The program was intriguing, and its a winwin for the inmates and the animals, Kirkland said. These programs are rehabilitating dogs that may otherwise be euthanized. After completing the application process, Kirkland visited the SJBHS and met Pauley. Kirkland said because of Pauleys good disposition and compatibility with his other dog, a Malamar, he knew hed found the latest addition to the family. There are so many pets and so few homes, Kirkland said. A pet is a commitment. Do your homework, and dont make a snap decision. Lynda and Jim White hadnt owned a dog in eight years, but after recently moving to Cape San Blas and seeing the dog-friendly side of Gulf County, they knew it was time. The couple wanted a sweet, medium-sized dog, and after their own visit to the SJBHS, they found their perfect match in Belle, a hound mix Jim described as loveable, but not too crazy. People should consider a program like this before buying a dog from a puppy mill, Lynda said. There are so many great dogs that need a home. I like that we get to save a life. After the celebration concluded with cake, adopters attended a class that covered basic commands, feeding, kenneling and tips for integrating the dogs into their homes. Adopters were given time to learn one-on-one from the trainers on how to best handle their pups while they practiced the commands. Adopters also received DVD videos from the training teams to remind them how each command worked, along with visual aids. John Dykema, a Port St. Joe resident, has been a volunteer with the DAWGS program for the last four months. Before moving to Gulf County, Dykema spent eight years training puppies as service dogs in Michigan. He visits the Gulf Forestry Camp once a week to oversee training and offer assistance to the inmates. I see a drastic difference in the inmates a huge difference as their self-esteem and patience goes up, he said. They become a different individual. Dykema said he volunteers because he enjoys watching the advancement of the inmates but also because he enjoys seeing the trainers appreciate and love the dogs. Those dogs give it all back to their adopters, Dykema said. As graduation came to a close, many dogs took their rst car rides with their new owners while other graduates soon would board a transport where theyd be picked up by their adopters. Every day across the U.S., 10,000 dogs are euthanized because of lack of homes and limited shelter space and resources. Christy reminded Gulf County residents of the free spay and neuter programs offered by the humane society and asked pet owners not to let their animals roam. We work hard to set the dogs up for success, Christy said. Its critical we keep this program going. Real Es ta te Pi cks Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast 4516380 850 -227889 0/8 50227 -7770 www .c oast al rea ltyinfo .com 4519030 850-227-8890 /8 50-227-7770 www .coastal re alt yinfo.com SOLD to ensure they have a fun and active day of catching sh instead of remembering the one that got away. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Gulf County Turtle Patrol and St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve will have displays to provide additional information to kids on how they can do their part in keeping the environment safe. After the kickoff, the ofcial rules meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the marina. The tournament will begin at 7 a.m. ET June 14 with weigh-in beginning at 10 a.m. Fishing ends at noon with trophy presentations to follow. Children may sh with an adult but must be the ones to reel in all sh entered into the competition. Anybody who wants to learn to sh or even just learn about the bay are encouraged to come out, Carrie said. Kids Win was established to expose youngsters to the thrill of shing in a fun and safe environment. Registration is free and is open until Thursday, June 12. More than 200 kids have already registered for the event. Those interested in volunteering or making donations can contact the Port St. Joe Marina at 227-9393. A small fry shows off his big win at the Kids Win shing tournament. This years tournament will begin at 7 a.m. ET June 14. Registration ends Thursday, June 12. FILE PHOTO FISHING from page B1 PHOTOS BY WES L OCHER | The Star Above is the 33rd DAWGS graduating class. Below left, Pauley, a hound mix, was adopted by Chris Kirkland of Hilliard. Below right, Gulf Forestry Camp Assistant Warden Steve Roddenberry presented codirectors Judy Miick and Christi Sandy with a plaque commemorating their hard work. People should consider a program like this before buying a dog from a puppy mill, Lynda said. There are so many great dogs that need a home. I like that we get to save a life.L ynda White, Cape San Blas DAWGS from page B1

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Local B6 | The Star Tr ades & Ser vi ces Bry kP ro pe rt yM an ag em en t Va ca ti on Re nt al Cl ea ni ng Ma in te na nce Fl oor in g/ Ca rpe tI ns ta ll at io n/ Ca rpe tC lea nin g Sp ec ia lizin gi nA bs en te eO wn ers Pr op er ty Ma nag em en t (8 50 )3 81 -5 333 Se eu so n To mG ol ds mi th Ph oto gr ap hy Cu st om Ph oto gr ap hy Se rv ic es :E ve nt s, Fa mi ly ,C or po ra te L oc at io n, Re al Est ate Fin eA rt Pr in ts ; to mgo ld sm it h .a rt is tw eb s it es .c om Po rt ra it St ud io 31 8R ei dA ve Po rt St .J oe ,F L 32 45 6 85 08 99 -2 88 3 to m. go ld sm it h@ fa ir poi nt .n et F. W. C. F lorida W indo w C ov ering Company Fa ctor yD ir ect Wi ndo wT re atments Re sidential and Commer cial Fo rA ll Yo ur Wi ndo wC ov ering Ne eds Ca ll F lorida W indo w C ov ering Company 850-697-3066 or 850-528-9355 amsr ohrs@fairpoint.net 45 16 04 2 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! 229-1324 TO PLACE YO UR AD IN THE TRADES AND SER VICE SECTION CALL MARCIA AT 227 -7 847 B6 | The Star Thursday, June 5, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 95096S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVILDIVISION Case No. 23-2012-CA-000138 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. SANDRAG. CORBIN A/K/ASANDRAG. BROXSON, ETAL; Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated May 20, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 23-2012-CA-000138 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, where-in WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff and M SANDRAG. CORBIN A/K/ASANDRAG. BROXSON, ETAL; are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT FRONTLOBBYof the Gulf County Courthouse 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES, AT11:00 AM, ETon June 26, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 15, BLOCK 6, LAKE ALICE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, TRADE NAME -ANNIVERSARY, MODEL YEAR 2005, MODEL NO. 6763 AND MANNO. GAFL407A53417AV31. Property Address: 237 RHODES AVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. DATED at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 21st day of May, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C. 100 WESTCYPRESS CREEK ROAD, SUITE 1045 FORTLAUDERDALE, FL33309 PHONE: (954)644-8704 File No. 11-09236 June 5, 12, 2014 95102S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2008-CA-000337 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KNIGHT, WESLEY PAUL, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA000337 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, KNIGHT, WESLEY PAUL, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00am, ET on the 26th day of June, 2014, the following described property: LOT 12 OF INDIAN SUMMER SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 AT PAGE 41 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-491-1120 IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402, 850-747-5338, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaireed, call 711. 01891.0203 June 5, 12, 2014 99007S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Leigh Gable Holdings, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1031 Application No. 2014-29 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03806-520R Description of Property: Lot 12, Block D, SeaShores/St. Joe Beach, Unit No. 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 35, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Margot A. Valencik All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day of June, 2014. Dated this 19th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 22, 29 June 5, 12, 2014 99031S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James M. Holcombe the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 699 Application No. 2014-30 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03083-415R Description of Property: Lot 43, Palm Breeze Subdivision according to the plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 4, Page 46. Name in which assessed: Richard & Delilah Henderson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of July, 2014. Dated this 27th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 29, June 5, 12, 19, 2014 99033S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009CA 000254CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff, vs. SUELLEN FLEMING, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 18, 2014 and entered in 2009CA 000254CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, is the Plaintiff and SUELLEN FLEMING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY are the Defendant(s). Rebecca L. Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM ET on June 19, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Thursday, June 5, 2014 Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 5, 2014 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST FOR 1341.09 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30-E (FORMERLY STATE ROAD NO. 30-E); THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST FOR 1642.44 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11426.79 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS FOR 427.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR 1711.69 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11415.15 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 1058.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST FOR 2813.88 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 574.11 FEET TO A RE-ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 319.00 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 59.78 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST ALONG A PARTY WALL AND A PROJECTION THEREOF 314.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 59.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY 18.00 FEET AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY 12.00 FEET OF THE NORTHEASTERLY 74.00 FEET THEREOF. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of May, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts. org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-14008 May 29, June 5, 2014 99039S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12000218CA-AXMX WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA KAY REEDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBRA KAY REEDER; JOSEPH C. REEDER; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order or Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: A parcel of land located in Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast of the Northwest of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence North 0017’48” West, 39.40 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 8838’05” West, 126.48 feet to a point on the East R/W line of SR No. 71; said point being on the arc of a non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northwesterly along said East R/W line, along the arc of said curve; having a radius of 11034.28, a central angle of 0020’15”, an arc distance of 64.98 feet: chord to said curve bears North 2814’36” West, 64.98 feet; thence leaving said East R/W line, North 6536’13” East, 171.90 feet; thence South 0017’48” East, 125.24 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.31 acres, more or less. Property Address: 1660 Hwy 71 South Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Parcel I.D.: R 02614-000R at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Courthouse lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. E.T. on 26th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Enrico G. Gonzalez, P.A. Attorney at Law Enrico G. Gonzalez, Esq. 6255 E. Fowler Ave. Temple Terrace, FL 33617 FL Bar #861472 (813)980-6302 In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding via the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771. May 29, June 5, 2014 99049S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-27 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, deceased, File Number 14-27 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the co-personal representatives and the co-personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 29, 2014. /s/ Doris Jean Whitten Doris Jean Whitten P.O. Box 397 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Co-Personal Representative Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Barbara Ann Johnson Barbara Ann Johnson P.O. Box 573 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457 (850) 229-8211 ATTORNEY FOR CO-PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES FL Bar No. 0350583 May 29, June 5, 2014 99043S PUBLIC NOTICE PSJRABoard of Directors Meeting Regular Board of Directors Meetings of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency are held on the third Tuesday of each month at 4:30 PM. Specific dates for the remainder of FY14 are June 17, July 15, August 19, and September 16. Meeting location is City Hall, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL. All persons are invited to attend and participate. Anyone want to appeal an official decision made on any subject at the meeting must have a verbatim record of the meeting that includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is based. June 5, 2014 99065S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROPOSAL NO. 1314-24 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for a: PAYAND CLASSIFICATION STUDYFOR THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Copies of the Proposal Provisions and Forms may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or found on the Gulf County website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov. Additional technical information relative to this RFPmay be obtained from Denise Manuel, Central Services Director, at (850) 227-2384 or dmanuel@gulfcountyfl.gov during normal business hours. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide five (5) bound copies and one (1) electronic copy of your proposal. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will accept sealed proposals at the Gulf County Clerk of Court’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, until June 26, 2014, at 4:00 PM, ET. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 30, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. ET. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99057S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: Bid #1314-23 GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS ROOF INSTALLATION The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for the purchase and installation of: ROOF FOR THE GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS BUILDING Specifications may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, or at the website at www.gulfcountyfl.gov. Further information can be obtained by contacting Tony Price at (850) 227-8335. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, June 6, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 10: 00 a.m., E.T. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99089S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDASTATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of ANIMALHOSPITAL OF PORTSTJOE located at 300 Long Avenue, in the County of GULF, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 23rd day of May, 2014. AG4382, Inc. June 5, 2014 99083S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-28-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE GIBSON GLASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jane Gibson Glass, deceased, whose date of death was September 16, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 29, 2014. Personal Representative: Nancy G. Cowles 3174 Paces Mill Rd SE Atlanta, GA30339 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKETSTREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 FLBar No.: 63869 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net May 29, June 5, 2014 99133S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2013-CA000122-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. EDNA E. NEWSOME, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in GULF County, Florida, described as: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, THENCE RUN EAST FOR 580 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH FOR 567 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNIING; THENCE RUN EAST 130 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 60 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 130 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LOT OF LAND LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 172 N Duck Avenue Wewhitchka, FL 32465 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at AT SOUTH ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1000 CECIL COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET on June 26, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this count on the 28th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File# 153868/tam June 5, 12, 2014 99103S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Public Workshop The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency will host a workshop for public comment on the proposed Open-Air Information Center, to be constructed on the deck of the Billy Joe Rish parking lot, on Tuesday, June 10, 5 PM at the City Hall Commission Chambers, 305 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL. All persons are invited to attend and participate. June 5, 2014 99115S PUBLIC NOTICE Under Florida State Law “Self-Service Storage Facility” Act 83.801 -83.809, F.S., BEACH STORAGE located at 7942 Americus Ave., St. Joe Beach, FL, will sell or otherwise dispose of the contents of the following units on JUNE 14, 2014, at 9:00 am ET. #13-Johnny Chandler #16-Lora Williams #33-Shirley Glenn #36-Rod Bradford The unit contents may be redeemed by the owner prior to sale or disposal by cash payment in full of the total amount due on the unit. Beach Storage reservesf the right to dispose of the contents in anyway necessary and reserves the right to cancel sale without notice. June 5, 12, 2014 99131S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIALCIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVILDIVISION Case No.: 23-2011-CA000448-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division FEDERALNATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. RUSSELLA. WOOD, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the abovestyled case, I will sell the property located in GULF County, Florida, described as: LOT22, BLOCK 13, CORRECTIVE REPLATOF TWIN LAKES SUBDIVISION, UNITNUMBER 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLATTHEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 2, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 181 E. Lakeview Dr. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at AT SOUTH ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1000 CECIL COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORTST. JOE, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ETon June 26, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this count on the 28th day of May, 2014. REBECCAL. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File# 152798/tam June 5, 12, 2014 99135S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2008-CA000555-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL GARRETT, et al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled case, I will sell the property located in GULF County, Florida, described as: Lot 11, Block H, RISH SUBDIVISION, being an unrecorded subdivision of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter and the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows:. COMMENCING at the Southeast Corner of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 36, running thence South 8959’26” West along the South line of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36 for a distance of 252.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue South 8959’26” West along said South line for a distance of 179.42 feet; thence North 0118’02” East for a distance of 245.25 feet to the South R/W line of a 60 foot road; thence North 8959’26” East along said South 11/W line for a distance of 179.42 feet; thence leaving said South R/W line run South 0118’02” West for a distance of 245.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS ACROSS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION: COMMENCING at the Southeast Corner of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36, running thence South 8959’26” West along the South line of said North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter for a distance of 652.42 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 0118’02” East for a distance of 245.25 feet; thence North 8959’26” East for a distance of 499.32 feet to a point of curvature of a curving cul-de-sac concave to the West, having a radius of 75 feet, a central angle of 31250’37” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 0000’34” West, 60.00 feet; thence Easterly, Northerly and Westerly along said curving cul-de-sac an arc distance of 409.52 feet to a point of nontangency of said curve; thence South 8959’26” West for a distance of 497.94 feet; thence North 0118’02” East for a distance of 456.59 feet; thence South 5619’45” East for a distance of 25.72 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast having a radius of 150.00 feet, a central angle of 3840’50” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 7540’09” East, 99.35 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 101.27 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 8459’26” East for a distance of 144.94 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 237.00 feet, a central angle of 9207’41” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 4430’55” East, 341.34 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 381.09 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 0000’34” West for a distance of 11.34 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 40.00 feet, a central angle of 9000’00” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 4459’26” East, 56.57 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 62.83 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 8959’26” East for a distance of 118.30 feet to the East line of said Section 36; thence North 0117’24” East along said East line for a distance of 60.00 feet, thence South 8959’26” West for a distance of 118.30 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 100.00 feet, a central angle of 9000’00” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 4459’26” West, 141.42 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 157.08 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 0000’34” East for a distance of 12.95 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 177.00 feet, a central angle of 9300’26” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 4457’18” West, 256.80 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 287.32 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 8459’26” West for a distance of 148.08 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast, having a radius of 90.00 feet, a central angle of 3840’50” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 7540’09” West 59.61 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 60.76 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 5619’45” West for a distance of 432.04 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast, having a radius of 367.00 feet, a central angle of 8111’00” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 0834’29” West 477.23 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 519.54 feet to a point of non tangency of said curve; thence North 8118’02” East for a distance of 244.86 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 334.75 feet, a central angle of 4000’00” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 6118’02” East, 228.98 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 233.70 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 4118’02” East for a distance of 136.68 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 146.20 feet and being subtended by a chord bearing North 6538’59” East, 120.56 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 124.26 feet to a point of reverse curvature, said curve being concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 155.46 feet, a central angle of 6842’03” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 4538’58” East, 217.35 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 240.67 feet to the point of tangency of said curve, thence North 0118’02” East for a distance of 18.56 feet to the North line of said Section 36; thence South 9000’00” West along said North line for a distance of 60.02 feet; thence South 0118’02” West for a distance of 17.20 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 95.46 feet, a central angle of 8842’04’ and being subtended by a chord bearing South 4538’58” West, 133.46 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 147.78 feet to a point of reverse curvature, said curve being concave to the Southeast, having a radius of 206.20 feet, a central angle of 4841’59” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 6538’59” West, 170.03 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 175.26 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 4118’02” West for a distance of 136.68 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 274.75 feet, a central angle of 4000’00” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 6118’02” West, 187.94 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 191.81 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 8118’02” West for a distance of 175.00 feet; thence North 4254’14” East for a distance of 38.36 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 210.00 feet, a central angle of 3349’51” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 2559’18” East, 122.20 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 124.00 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence North 0904’22” East for a distance of 78.94 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the West, having a radius of 487.00 feet, a central angle of 2155’37” and being subtended by a chord bearing North 0620’44” West, 185.24 feet; thence Northwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 186.37 feet to the North line of said Section 36; thence South 9000’00” West along said North line for a distance of 63.28 feet to a point on a curve, said curve having a radius of 427.00 feet, a central angle of 2118’47” and being subtended by a chord bearing South

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B8| The Star Thursday, June5, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 4519197 125 Venus Drive (off Garrison Ave) Port St. Joe, FL 32456(850) 227-7451TTY Acs 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. PINE RIDGE LTD.1 Bedroom Apartment for rentFamily apartment community income guidelines applyEqual Opportunity Provider and Employer4519199 4519199 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 4519140 4518209 2005 Lincoln Town CarOne owner, garaged, 97 K Miles, Good gas mileage 25+, Leather.$6900 OBO Car for SaleCall 850-229-8642 4 5 101 6 1 4518321HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAILABLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. ** 2013 GULF COUNTY DELINQUENT TAX ROLL 2013 **Pursuant to Chapter 197.432, Florida Statutes, Subsection (16) Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Sale for Delinquent Gulf County Property Taxes will be conducted online on the Gulf County Tax Certificate Auction Website at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com. Bids can be entered on the site starting on Monday, May 5, 2014. Tax Certificates will be awarded on Friday, May 30, 2014. Bidders are asked to register at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com prior to sale. SHIRLEY J. JENKINS, CFC TAX COLLECTOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA1600 R-1288400 $590.94 04917-003R BEARDEN HAROLD SR CITY OF PORT ST JOE LOT 10 & S/2 OF LOT 9 ORB 330/525 QC FR BENNETT MAP 50A BLK 39 ORB 444/29 FR KNOTT 4519131 0745’39” East, 178.66 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 158.84 feet to the point of tangency, thence South 0904’22’ West for a distance of 76.53 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northwest, having a radius of 150.00 feet, a central angle of 3349’52” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 2559’18” West, 87.29 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve an arc distance of 88.57 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 4254’14” West for a distance of 111.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the East, having a radius of 427.00 feet, a central angle of 8544’46” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 0646’55” East, 581.04 feet; thence Southeasterly along said curve an arc distance of 639.03 feet to the point of tangency of said curve; thence South 5619’45” East for a distance of 120.10 feet; thence South 5715’51” West for a distance of 272.77 feet to the point of curvature of a curving cul-de-sac concave to the East, having a radius of 50.00 feet, a central angle of 28615’35” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 3244’09” East, 60.00 feet; thence Westerly, Southerly and Easterly along said curving cul-de-sac an arc distance of 249.81 feet to a point of non-tangency in said curving cul-de-sac; thence North 5715’51” East for a distance of 298.97 feet; thence South 5619’45” East for a distance of 153.33 feet; thence South 0118’02” West for a distance of 496.00 feet; thence South 8959’26” West for a distance of 454.26 feet to the point of curvature of a curving cul-de-sac concave to the East, having a radius of 75.00 feet, a central angle of 31250’38” and being subtended by a chord bearing South 0000’34” East, 60.00 feet; thence Westerly, Southerly and Easterly along said curving cul-de-sac an arc distance of 409.52 feet to a point of non-tangency and said curving cul-de-sac; thence North 8959’26” East for a distance of 452.89 feet; thence South 0118’02” West for a distance of 245.25 feet to the South line of the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 36; thence North 8959’26” East for a distance of 60.02 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. To include a: 2001 MOBILE HOME VIN CV01AL0256443A Title #82712413 2001 MOBILE HOME VIN CV01AL0256443B Title # 82712924 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at AT SOUTH ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1000 CECIL COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET on June 26, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this count on the 28th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Court Administration at P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida, 32447. Phone number 850-718-0026, Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. File# 1426891/tam June 5, 12, 2014 Basset pups. $450. 8 weeks. AKC, vet health cert. 850-225-4379 Apalachicola: 208 Ellis Van Vleet Sat. June 7th 8a-untilMoving SaleMisc. Furniture, Desks, Books, Clothes, Dishes, and Even a Kitchen Sink. Text FL91144 to 56654 Eastpoint 93 Rose Dr(Off N Bayshore Dr. in Magnolia Bluff, Follow Signs.) Sat. June 7th 8a-?Large Garage Sale/ Estate SaleLots of Treasures and Collectibles. Something For Everyone. Port Saint Joe 505 Avenue A. Sat June 7th 8a-untilYard/Bake SaleSomething For All! Text FL90737 to 56654 Port Saint Joe 674 Jones Homestead Rd, Friday, Saturday and Sunday June 6th, 7th and 8th, 8am to 5pm.2 Family Yard SaleLots of Items! Text FL90750 to 56654 Port St. Joe 2104 Monument Ave.Multi-Family Yard Sale -Come See What We’ve Got!Sat. June 7th 8:00 am -1:00 pm Text FL91016 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Port St. Joe DEMO SALE Building Mat. Of Existing Structure and Restaurant Eqpt. For Sale. Remove Yourself. Contact Bob Windolf @850-527-2583 Acct Cadence Bank is hiring in Port St Joe for aPart Time Teller20-29 hours per week. This position will provide customer services such as cashing checks, receiving deposits, making withdrawals and receiving loan payments. Also, will sell products such as money orders travelers checks and savings bonds, as well as cross sell other products. Required skillsCash handling with a high degree of accuracy, excellent communication and customer service skills. Apply on-line at www.cadencebank.com/c areers. AA/EOE Web Id 34290745 Acct/FinanceBookkeeperPT position. To apply call 850-648-8161 Web Id 34290817 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAdministrative ReceptionistThis full-time position requires excellent customer service skills & a smile! Must be neat, organized & attentive to detail with good computer skills & knowledge of Microsoft Word, Outlook & Excel. Good grammar, spelling & punctuation. Varied office duties including phones & walk-in traffic. Prefer prior office experience. Full-time Mon-Fri w/ great benefits. Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-5pm at: 123 W Gulf Beach Dr or call Sandra 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34290509 Install/Maint/RepairCoastal Design & Landscape HiringLandscape Maintenance Crew LeadLandscape maintenance experience required. Irrigation experience a plus. Must have valid drivers license. Mon-Fri Position. Send info to: info@coastaldesign.biz Web Id 34290479 Logistics/TransportWarehouse/ Delivery PositionPT position. To apply call 850-648-8161 Web Id 34290817 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 1 Bedroom ApartmentsIncome Based Elderly-Disabled M,W,F 8-5 pm 850-229-6353 Equal Opportunity Housing Efficiency Apt with all Utilities Included. Ideal for single person. 1st & Last mo rent req. CALL 850-648-5033 Port St. Joe-1bd cozy cottage: $450/mo + utils. New paint & tile floor in bathroom. No smoking or pets. 1st 850-229-1215. PSJ 3 br, 1 ba, Laundry room, fenced yard, $900 mo, Unfurn, Call 651-325-7731 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich Located in PSJ 502/649-1520 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Spot Advertising works! 1129113 Call or text Jay Rish Licensed Real Estate Broker direct at 850-227-5569 or email jay@oridagulfcoast.comEXPERIENCED REAL ESTATE AGENTS NEEDED NOW.