The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03944


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m A Port St. Joe man has been formally charged with murder in the death of his mother in their Cape San Blas residence. Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, already in custody on arson charges stemming from incidents in 2012, was charged with an open count murder last Friday in the slaying of his mother, Renee Gail Coffey, 58. Slick was rst appeared on the murder charge Friday morning and is being held without bond in the Gulf County Jail. Investigators responding to a 9-1-1 call from Slick the afternoon of May 18 found Coffey unconscious and unresponsive in her home at 7525 Cape San Blas Road. Slick told dispatchers in the emergency call that his mother had been “assaulted”, according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Coffey died of her injuries at the scene. Slick was subsequently interviewed by deputies and later by investigators, Harrison said. Slick, a suspect in arsons of the Masonic Lodge in Port St. Joe in 2012, and who was out on bond secured by Coffey, quickly became the prime suspect and was taken into custody on the arson charges, for which he faces up to 30 years in prison. A home security indicated that Slick and Coffey were the lone occupants of the Cape San Blas home at the time of the incident, investigators learned. The system also revealed no indication of a breach of the house or any other person in or around the house during the timeframe of the incident. Slick told investigators he and his mother left the residence earlier in the day and made several stops in Callaway before returning home, which were con rmed through receipts and in-store By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Caps ew last weekend as the two public high schools graduated the Class of 2014. Clad in the red of Wewahitchka High School and the purple of Port St. Joe High School, 114 seniors walked the stage for their diploma and entrance into the next passage in life. Port St. Joe High bid farewell to its class of 72 last Thursday in the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. The ceremonies nished Friday night at the Wewahitchka High School gymnasium as the 42-member senior class takes their proud processional. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School The motto for the Class of 2014 was “Our lives are before us, the past is behind us, but our memories are forever with us.” The class ower was Purple and Yellow Gerber Daisies and the class song was “If Today Was Your Last Day” by Nickelback. Homer Allen Davis was the valedictorian and Anastasia Gabrielle Thomason the salutatorian. HIGH HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.85 OR ABOVE) DanTasia Yvette Welch, Kayla Lucile Lindsey, Grant Franklin Whiten, Maya Elizabeth Robbins, Kristen Denise Burkett, Bryce Taylor Godwin, Andrew Michael Lacour, Angel Roberto Padilla, Morgan Brooks Kennington, Homer Allen Davis. HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.5 TO 3.849) Christian Rose Laine, Lauren Michelle Costin, Antonio Michael Moree, Laura Kathleen Sinor, Jack Curtis Cummings, Amy Rachelyn Butler, Sawyer Jackson Raf eld, Nicholas Warren Renfro, Brittany County to make parkway case to FDOT head By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Two weeks ago the Board of County Commissioners decided to increase the intensity of the lobbying campaign concerning the proposed route for the Gulf Coast Parkway. Commissioner Warren Yeager picked up the baton this week. Yeager, accompanied by county administrator Don Butler and county attorney Jeremy Novak, was scheduled to meet with Florida Department of Transportation Anand Persad in Tallahassee on Tuesday to present the county’s arguments on the Gulf Coast Parkway. “We are going to make our case and we’ll see,” Yeager said during Tuesday’s regular bi-monthly BOCC meeting. The county’s argument is that the intent of the parkway is not being met by the latest proposed route alternatives being recommended by the DOT. The parkway, commissioners argued, was meant as economic development and tourism boon for south Gulf County, with a preferred alternative that would take the parkway well to the north on a direct link with U.S. 231. However, commissioners contended two weeks ago after a public hearing on the parkway, the proposed route will now primarily be a bene t for shoppers heading from Gulf County to Callaway. Commissioners also questioned road funding that appeared to be moved from Gulf County to bene t Bay County road projects. And they questioned cost estimates for the various alternative routes, noting that the route preferred by Gulf County of cials, was being shown as more expensive even though a proposed bridge over East Bay was shorter and the route was more direct to highway connections. But the primary argument Yeager and team hope to make is that the original intent of the parkway, to provide a four-lane connection from U.S. 231 to south Gulf County beaches, as well as the Port of Port St. Joe, has been mitigated by the new recommended route. “The intent has certainly changed over the years,” Butler said two weeks ago. “This is huge. Our opportunity is being hijacked.” Yeager said he would report back on the feedback he received from Persad. BP LITIGATION Rhon Jones from the Beasley Allen Law rm gave an update on BP litigation which continues in relative limbo. Jones said two aspects of the overall case against BP, litigation under the Clean Water Act which will come next year and a settlement of private sector claims were moving ahead. BP, Jones said, was likely hoping to get those cases “situated” before focusing again on the claims of local governments By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Susan Villafane’s husband, Jamie, was among the rst soldiers in Iraq to sustain catastrophic injuries in 2003. They have lived a day-today existence that has included countless surgeries, intensive physical therapy and the myriad issues that accompany serious physical and brain injuries. They also had to transition to civilian life and navigate those adjustments after Jamie was medically discharged from the service. But during a weekend earlier this month, 11 years after he was injured, Jamie and Susan enjoyed their rst Wounded Warrior event, the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend. Enjoyed? Well, that would be understating it a bit. “From the rst one we are hooked,” Susan said from her south Georgia home. “I’ve never seen my husband smile so much in those ve days since he returned from Iraq. From the beginning to the end it was perfection. “I feel like we arrived as strangers and left with many new forever friends. Everything we deal with every day just disappeared. It was a breath of fresh air. For a brief moment in time there were no disabilities.” Not that it was easy getting to get to the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend. The Villafanes were Suspect arrested on murder charges YEAR 76, NUMBER 33 Thursday, MAY 29, 2014 JARROD POWELL SLICK See PARKWAY A10 See MURDER A10 FCWWW: the caregivers’ perspective SPECIAL TO THE STAR A group shot of the 20 warriors and their caregivers who attended the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend May 14-18. See CAREGIVER A10 114 STRONG Gulf County Class of 2014 graduates TIM CROFT | The Star Before taking the stage, some nal photos with friends and classmates. See GRADUATES A10 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A8 Sports ..................................... A9 School News ........................... B2 Faith ........................................ B4 Memories ................................ B1 Classi eds ................... B11-B12 Beachum earns academy appointment B1

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The nomination was for Emergency Manager of the Year. At the annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference the year was transformed into a lifetime. Gulf County Emergency Management Director Marshall Nelson was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by his emergency management peers statewide during a recent annual conference in Orlando. “This means a lot,” Nelson said. “It is recognition. This is the top award given because it is for a lifetime. “Your peers nominate you and it is your peers that select you for the award and that means a lot. It is afrmation.” Nelson was initially nominated for emergency manager of the year, but when the threepage outline of his accomplishments reached desks in Tallahassee the impact extended so far beyond 2014 – which is the 20th anniversary of Nelson joining county emergency management – that the prestigious lifetime award seemed more apt. “The Lifetime Achievement Award is granted to an individual for his or her contributions and accomplishments over an entire career and (Nelson) embodied the essence of the award during his 20 years of service,” wrote Lynn Daines, executive vice president of the Governor’s Hurricane Conference. The evolution of emergency management began after Hurricane Andrew. What were known as civil defense efforts, which were largely volunteer, began to incorporate natural disasters, from hurricanes to earthquakes. The program was built and funding earmarked but over the decades the workload has increased – Nelson’s ofce includes closing paperwork on storms from 2004 as well as enough playbooks to satisfy an NFL team – while funding stagnated. In turn a critical part of the job for an emergency manager in a small county is pursuing federal and state grant funding to bolster local programs. Nelson was instrumental in securing funding for a state-of-theart Emergency Operations Center as well as funding to place NOAA weather radios throughout the county. He has also bolstered equipment in the EOC for amateur radio emergency operations in a county with an active amateur radio society and received grant funding to coordinate mock disaster drills throughout the county. “I am proud of all of it,” Nelson said. The grant funding also underwrites the planning for various disasters, from an active school shooter to mass casualties due to a bus crash or similar event. “This is not all weatherrelated,” Nelson said. “This is an all-hazard program. 9/11 was a big turning point.” During his tenure the county has also received funding for a storm-shelter allowing residents to stay within the county during a storm event. In addition, Nelson has directed the county response to 25 presidentially-declared emergencies, a key threshold given that the presidential declaration opens up the pipeline to federal funds to reimburse counties for emergency response efforts, from recovery to mitigation. “There is a constant cycle of planning, response and aftermath,” Nelson said, pointing to the boxes of documents from 20042005 storms. “The storm never ends. If the county does not document it all; they have paid for the response but they have to be reimbursed.” Emergency management, Nelson said, is the facilitator for the county’s response, more manager than director as the conduit for information, communication and assistance. “We are here to coordinate with the responding agencies,” Nelson said. “Our line really goes from the people of Gulf County who we represent all the way to the president, and when you get there it is all about funding. “I work very closely with surrounding counties, we work together, plan together because we do impact each other. You have to be ready to go.” Teamwork is essential, from the resident to the county ofcial to state ofcial and on up the chain. But the response must begin at the beginning, Nelson said. “Everybody has got to know their piece of the puzzle,” Nelson said. “When everybody does that it works real well. “You have got to be ready. It is everybody’s responsibility. That is such a big part of it.” And in that vein, Nelson said he nds himself part educator. A signicant aspect of his work is educating, particularly younger employees as they enter the school system or join the health department, those agencies that will have to respond in some way to disaster. “I am teaching more and mentoring more,” Nelson said. “I love the people of Gulf County. It is home and I love what I do. It is part of my life and it is just part of my nature to try to do the best for Gulf County.” And Gulf County, and its people, Nelson said, is as much a factor in his Lifetime Achievement Award as his team at the EOC or his lovely wife, Tracie and son Reis. They provide the support, they provide the encouragement, they provide the motivation to protect. And if awards come, all share. “This would not have been possible without the support of the county commissioners, the cities, the staff and citizens of Gulf County,” Nelson said. “In a small community you work together. We are doing this for the community and the people in this community.” HE AL TH Y ST AR T’ S BA BY SH OW ER Tu es da y, Ju ne 3, 20 14 4: 00 PM ES T Th e Ce nt en ni al Bu il di ng 30 0 Al le n Me mo ri al Wa y Po rt St Jo e, FL FR EE AD MI SS IO N Fo od Fu n, Ga me s an d LO TS OF DO OR PR IZ ES He al th y St ar t’ s 6t h An nu al Bab y Sh ow er We in vi te al l Fr an kl in and Gu lf Co un ty pr eg na nt wo me n, ne w par en ts wh o ha ve ha d a ba by wi th in th e la st si x mo nt hs an d th ei r fam il ie s to jo in us fo r: Th er e wi ll be in fo rm at io n st at io ns on var io us to pi cs su ch as : Ca r Se at Sa fe ty Sm ok in g Ce ss at io n, Ch il db ir th Sa fe Sl ee p, Co mm un it y Re so ur ce s an d ven do rs of fe ri ng me rc ha nd is e fo r pu rc ha se Pl us lo ts of fa bu lo us do or pr iz es Ev er y ba by de se rv es a He al th y St ar t! Fo r Mo re In fo rm atio n, Ca ll 180 089 595 06 Ba y, Fr an kl in & Gu lf Co un ti es ot„ Q‚ „ `‹ ™„ ‰€ ~‹ O| ”” | Ot ‡t ‰x | W k U U o t „ Q ‚ „ x ‡ t ‘ ‘ | ‘ t | v|„‰€ ‚|‡z t” ”‚| ~‹‡‡‹ š„‰€ ‡‹ xt”„‹‰‘h m | ‰ „ ‹  Q „ ” „ œ | ‰ ‘ Q | ‰ ” |  “ Š ^„v t › S„™| e‹” m”Y ]‹ | W^ “ ` t › “ “ – ] — ‰ | o — | ‘ z t › ‘ t ‰ z o ‚ —  ‘ z t › ‘ h Š Š t ˆ # Š h Š Š t ˆ U m o [ ‹ š t  z Q  | | † q ‹ ‡ — ‰ ” | |  W „  | S | Œ t  ” ˆ | ‰ ” “ S ‹x r‚„”~„ |‡z kzY r|št‚„”x‚†t W^ “ M Œ  „ ‡ > # ] — ‰ | o — | ‘ z t › ‘ t ‰ z o ‚ —  ‘ z t › ‘ h Š Š t ˆ # “ h Š Š Œ ˆ Q m o e‡| t‘ | xt‡ ‡ ] | ‘ ‘ „ | [ t › | ‘ t ” > Š  “ # > Š „~ ›‹— š‹ —‡z ‡„†| ˆ‹| „‰~‹ ˆt”„‹‰Y Nelson honored for emergency management efforts Gulf County Emergency Management Director Marshall Nelson received a Lifetime Achievement Award during the annual Governor’s Hurricane Conference.SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Nelson’s wife, Tracie, and county human resources director Denise Manuel were on hand to congratulate Nelson.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, May 29, 2014  t o‘’ LFgGF NO Cr edit REFUSED * Cer tain re str ictions and exclusions ap ply Applicants mu st meet all State and Fe der al identication ve ri cation re quir ements and State age re quir ements Of fe r not av aila ble to ap plicants in def ault on a Badcoc k account or in an activ e bankr uptc y. Of fe r va lid thr ough June 9, 2014 at par ticipating stor es only Pr ices and offer s effectiv e May 27 June 9, 2014. 515 Cecil G Cos tin Sr Blvd Po rt St Joe (850) 22 9-6 195 Car melle 109920 dual re clining sof a po we r chaise wa llsav er re cliner 11419 7 wh ile sup plies las t SA VE 201.95 $ 298 re g 499.95 Don’ t fo rget Da d on I™ ‹{ ' —~ ALL sof as sleeper s, futo ns & klik kla ks (w hile supplies las t excludes sectionals) av aila ble SA VE 225.95 $ 674 re g 899.95 after 25% discount 25 % sleeper s, futo ns 25 25 25 OF F Me talindo II 993809/10 queen pa nel bed (headboar d, fo otboa rd rails) dr esser & mirr or SA VE 320 .90 $ 479 re g 799.90 25 to 40 % 40 40 40 OF F ALL 5 pc bedr ooms af te r 40 % di sc ount SA VE 201. 95 $ 398 re g. 599.95 Pa nama 888208 4 pc inc ludes: lo ve sea t, cof fee ta ble, & 2 club ch air s SA VE 101. 95 $ 398 re g. 499.95 Outdoor Fur nitur e Cedar Key 901654 5 pc inc ludes: ta ble & 4 sid e chair s af te r 30 % di sc oun t

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What do Karl Marx, Winston Churchill, Frank Sinatra, James Bond, Groucho Marx and Orville Redenbacher have in common? What if I threw in Pee-Wee Herman? If I gave you Donald Duck and “The Cat in the Hat,” I would probably give it away. Bill Nye (the Science Guy) does because “it’s practical” and he started doing it in high school when he served as a waiter for a school function. He said he also does it because, “It stays out of his soup.” Yes, I’m talking about wearing bow ties. I found an article from “Psychology Today” where the writer discussed what it means to wear a bow tie. The writer concluded that it basically was a signature, kind of like wearing argyle socks or cowboy boots. It probably is a good conversation starter and honestly I have no problem with bow ties, other than tying them. They can be snappy for some occasions. However, I have found myself being prejudiced against bow tie wearers recently. It is a dif cult thing to admit, but I have been doing it. Here is my situation… On Saturday mornings, I love going to the Farmers Market where I live. It is a wonderful place to go get a cup of coffee, see a lot of dogs and study people. Our Farmers Market is a little on the high end side because our city attracts a lot of tourists and folks that want stuff on the high end side. Folks will be tasting wine at 8:30 in the morning and comparing four or ve types of kale. Don’t get me wrong – I like kale. You can buy lamb and buffalo meat or turkey, goose and duck eggs. I love to cook, but I don’t think I’d know what to do with a goose egg. You can even buy gourmet popsicles. I have not had the urge to try Creamy Avocado, Tangerine Basil or Blackberry Ginger Lemonade frozen on a stick yet – but I might. If I get the hankering, I can try all sorts of cheese, baked goods, seafood and soap, or have my knife sharpened. One lady sells organic earthworm castings. “Organic earthworm castings” are created when the worms digest rich organic material, then “pass it;” they say it is bene cial for plants. These folks call it what it is – “Worm Poop.” So if you want to buy a bag of worm poop – you can. My favorite thing at the Farmers Market is peanuts, speci cally boiled peanuts. I’m from the South, we eat boiled peanuts. We talk about them, we eat them and we talk about them some more. At our Farmers Market, there are two booths or places you can buy peanuts. One fellow wears a ball cap and sells all sorts of peanuts in plastic bags with labels his wife probably printed out on their home computer, the other fellow sells “gourmet peanuts” in fancy labeled cans. The fancy labeled cans fellow with the fancy named peanuts wears a bow tie. I want to buy peanuts from someone who looks like a farmer. I’m pretty sure the ball cap he wears is from a “feed and seed” store or Farmers Co-op. There is no doubt in my mind that the fellow I buy boiled peanuts from knows how to drive a tractor and run a farm. I realize it is not fair for me to judge the bow tie wearing fellow. He may very well know about farming and everything that goes with it. However, he dresses his peanuts and himself in “fancy cans.” I want the boy who picks my daughter up to go to the prom to wear a bow tie, but I want to buy peanuts from a fellow who has dirt under his ngernails. It’s just the way I am. That bow tie fellow doesn’t even sell boiled peanuts… Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Me and Leon ought to get the credit for all those medals David Mark garnered in Viet Nam. We beat on him most everyday during his formative years. It was our patriotic duty to toughen him up a mite! We double teamed him on slow days. He would never surrender to us. You talk about mule headed and obstinate. He wouldn‘t give in, he wouldn‘t give up; he wouldn‘t admit defeat. He‘d die before he‘d quit ghting back! He never counted the odds, consequences, licks or setbacks. You could say the younger brother got the short end of the stick…..or you might consider the survival skills that came early and natural for him. I‘ll tell you this, he was the toughest Colbert boy by a whole heap, and then some! We are a fortunate nation. We have always managed to nd the toughest, bravest and most stubborn men among us to send off to war. Duty, right, honor, pride, responsibility, love of country weren‘t lines in a John Wayne movie to soldiers like my little brother. That Green Beret training was a snap for David. The twenty parachute jumps a walk in the park. He wanted no part of Viet Nam. But then, he hadn‘t wanted those sneak attacks and blindsides from me and Leon either. When the call came, he answered without wavering simply and solely because his country asked him to. For the American soldier, from Lexington Green to Afghanistan, it had always been thus. Daddy had done his island hopping across the South Paci c with MacArthur before we were born. I didn‘t set up nights praying for his safety. It was different with David in Viet Nam. I worried every day. I checked the list of killed and missing in action. I actually let my thoughts drift to the very real possibility that he might not come back. I pondered the imponderable! It brought home in a very real sense the unimaginable tragedy of each and every single American soldier who ever laid down his life for this country. They all had a brother…..or mom, little sister, father, girl friend. They were not “objects“ in a history book. They were not statistics on a tally sheet. They were far more than political propaganda or names on a wall. It was a breath from God extinguished in this life. Yeah, I hugged Dave‘s neck on his safe return. I reminded him I could still “take him“ anytime I wanted to. He chuckled but didn‘t bother to qualify that fallacy with an answer. The conversation turned serious as I tried with all my might to “thank“ a returning hero. He dropped his head, there was a slight pause and the stare was long and went somewhere I couldn‘t see. He whispered a line we‘d heard our Dad say of his World War II stint, “K. C., the real heroes didn‘t come back“ What a special tribute from one soldier to another! I remember the time we both stood trans xed before an old magazine we‘d uncovered in our cluttered up attic. Mom kept most everything. This was in the mid fties. It was a cover of Life Magazine, Look, or maybe Stars and Stripes. The American soldier was laying face down in the sand. It could have been Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Biak or Omaha. The tide lapped at his boots. Nothing was moving. We were way too young to understand “Last full measure“, “Some gave all“ or “Supreme sacri ce“. We were old enough to realize this dead soldier had given up HIS future for SOMEOME else‘s future. And anybody could see this guy died trying. We noticed he was moving toward the enemy when he fell. He was so far from home, so lonely……the scene was so nal! It was the quietest magazine cover I‘ve ever seen in my life. It also brought a truth, a realism to that verse, “Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.“ The seventieth anniversary of D-Day is just a week away. Utah and Omaha beaches will again be the focus of the moment. Try to look past the dignitaries, speeches and the intervening years. Pause and do a little staring of your own. Remember that amid the thunder of the exploding 88mm shells, the M2 mortars raining down from the enemies‘ forti ed position on the cliffs, the clamor of the incessant machine gun re—twentyve hundred American warriors fell silent…….before their family and friends back in the states had even sat down for breakfast! Turn off your TV this Memorial Day week-end, step out in the yard, glance skyward and alert your neighbors if you hear any Japanese Zeros “kamikazing“ overhead. Rush out to the street and cup an ear toward town. Any German Panzers rumbling your way? Bounce around to the back and peer over the fence. Is anyone yelling at you in Kurdish from the other side? Ride by city hall and check for Middle Eastern ags rustling against the pole. That‘s a silence we‘ve taken for granted so long we don‘t hear it anymore. It didn‘t come cheap. And it sure wasn‘t free. I don‘t know what kind of salute you are planning on giving our fallen heroes this Memorial Day…….but I will tell you this, twenty-one guns ain‘t near enough! Respectfully, Kes ‘What not to wear (at the Farmers Market)’ HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard O PINION www.starfl.com Thursday, May 29, 2014 A Page 4 Section Listen To The Silence Special to The Star TALLAHASSEE — Florida ranked No. 28 for senior health this year, according to the second edition of United Health Foundation‘s America‘s Health Rankings Senior Report. Nationwide, seniors are showing encouraging gains in key health measures and taking more steps to improve their own health. Notable gains for senior health include declines in physical inactivity, improvements in quality of nursing home care, reductions in avoidable hospitalizations and increased preparation for end-oflife care. “United Health Foundation‘s America‘s Health Rankings Senior Report is a valuable tool for measuring and understanding the key challenges and opportunities facing Florida‘s senior population,” said Mayrene Hernandez, D.O., market medical director for UnitedHealthcare‘s South Florida and Orlando regions. “With the senior population expected to double in size in the next 25 years, it is important that we develop effective programs and solutions that address seniors‘ health needs in Florida and nationwide.“ FLORIDA‘S OVERALL HEALTH The America‘s Health Rankings Senior Report nds that Florida has its share of strengths and challenges. Florida‘s Strengths: • Low prevalence of physical inactivity – Florida ranks 5th for the low prevalence of physical inactivity among seniors. • High use of hospice care – Florida ranks 3rd for the use of hospice care, with utilization of nearly 60 percent among decedents aged 65 and older. • Low prevalence of falls – About 1 in 4 seniors in Florida reported falling in the last 12 months compared to 27.1 percent nationally. Florida‘s Challenges: • High prevalence of chronic drinking – Approximately 187,000 Florida seniors report chronic drinking, giving the state a rank of 44 on the measure. • High use of ICU – Florida ranks 49th for intensive care unit usage among decedents aged 65 and older, at about 23 percent. • Limited availability of home health care workers – With approximately 26.9 home health care workers per 1,000 adults aged 75 and older, Florida ranks last among all states for the availability of home health care workers. 50-STATE SNAPSHOT: MINNESOTA THE HEALTHIEST STATE FOR SENIORS According to the report, Minnesota is the healthiest state for seniors for the second year in a row. Hawaii ranks second, followed by New Hampshire (3), Vermont (4) and Massachusetts (5). Mississippi is the least healthy state for seniors, followed by Louisiana (49), Kentucky (48), Oklahoma (47) and Arkansas (46). To see the Rankings in full, visit: www.americashealthrankings. org/senior. NATIONWIDE: SENIORS PROGRESS IN KEY MEASURES The report shows that seniors are more active compared to last year, with physical inactivity declining from 30.3 percent of the senior population to 28.7 percent. Other notable gains for senior health include a reduction in preventable hospitalizations, dropping from 66.6 discharges per 1,000 Medicare bene ciaries to 64.9 discharges, and improvements in nursing home care, with quality nursing home beds rising from 42 percent of beds rated four or ve stars to 46.8 percent. In addition, more seniors are planning for and using their preferred end-of-life care. The report shows utilization of hospice care increasing from 36.7 percent to 47.5 percent among seniors in need of late-stage care. RAPIDLY EXPANDING SENIOR POPULATION POSES CHALLENGES With the senior population poised to double in the next 25 years, states and local communities should continue to address unhealthy behaviors that threaten to compromise seniors‘ health. More than 35 percent have four or more chronic conditions, while more than 25 percent of seniors are obese and 28 percent are physically inactive. Only about 60 percent of seniors received the u vaccine in the last 12 months. Older adults will account for roughly 20 percent of the U.S. population by 2030, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, making these challenges urgent. “This year‘s report shows important improvements,” said Rhonda Randall, D.O., senior adviser to United Health Foundation and chief medical of cer and executive vice president, UnitedHealthcare Retiree Solutions. “Declines in physical inactivity are especially promising. We as a nation need to continue promoting healthy behaviors among seniors and work with states and communities to improve the health of this growing demographic.” ABOUT AMERICA‘S HEALTH RANKINGS SENIOR REPORT America‘s Health Rankings Senior Report: A Call to Action for Individuals and Their Communities offers a comprehensive analysis of senior population health on a national and stateby-state basis across 34 measures of senior health. In commissioning the report, United Health Foundation seeks to promote discussion around the health of older Americans while driving communities, governments, stakeholders and individuals to take action to help improve senior health. Researchers draw data from more than 12 government agencies and leading research organizations to create a focused, uniquely rich dataset for measuring senior health at the state level, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the U.S. Department of Labor, The Dartmouth Atlas Project, the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger and the Commonwealth Fund. United Health Foundation also produces the annual America‘s Health Rankings report. For 24 years, America‘s Health Rankings has provided an analysis of national health on a state-by-state basis by evaluating a historical and comprehensive set of health, environmental and socioeconomic data to determine national health benchmarks and state rankings. The Rankings employs a unique methodology, developed and annually reviewed by a Scienti c Advisory Committee of leading public health scholars. For more information on both reports, visit www.americashealthrankings.org. Florida ranks 28th for senior health

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L ETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, May 29, 2014 A Section Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS By ROD BECKETT Special to The Star It was mid-morning on June 22, 1987. I was about 65 miles out, in the Eglin Gulf Range, having just completed an engagement with the second of two ights of F-15 shooters. I was working for Flight Systems Inc. (FSI) at the time and was on a dart-tow gig out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, in support of the F-15 weapons schools. Suddenly, my F-86 Sabre 6, N80FS began to vibrate violently which drew my attention to the engine gauges. I noticed the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) increasing through 900 C. I pulled the throttle back to try to lower the EGT. It appeared that the EGT was directly connected to the throttle. Remembering the max starting EGT for the Orenda 14 engine was 850 C, I retarded the throttle until the EGT was below 850 degrees, thinking that might make the engine last longer. That gave me an rpm of 55%, a high idle, which would keep the hydraulic pressures up and the generator on the line. (What more could I want except possibly a runway on the horizon?) I immediately informed the shooters of the engine problem and declared an emergency which terminated the engagement. Not being a good long distance swimmer, I began to descend to the west which would get me closer to land. The F-15 pilots immediately did just as we had briefed in case of an emergency. The element leader got on my wing and the wingman climbed to altitude and went to guard channel to get a rescue helicopter on the way. I assumed the best glide speed, 185 knots indicated air speed. The weather was clear with a thin scud layer below me that obscured my slant range vision towards the shore. The high man told me that he thought he saw a runway ahead and that if I turned about 10 right it would be on my nose. I “Rogered” that and took his vectors. I continued my descent at best glide speed. By this point I was probably descending through 15,000 feet above ground level. Since our procedure was just like the Air Force — i.e., if a bail-out was imminent we would eject at a minimum of 2,000 feet above the ground — I needed to be thinking about that. I decided it was time to dip down below the scud layer so I could see the coastline, which I did, and picked up what I thought could be a runway. At that point, all I could see was a clearing in the Southern pines beyond the coastline. I was a little high for a straightend approach but not high enough to set up a high key for a simulated ame out-landing (SFO). But as I got closer, sure enough, there was a runway. Not the kind I was used to but it was a clearing in the Southern pines. I decided it was time to get rid of some altitude since the decision had already been made that I was not going to go the SFO route. I put the speed brakes out, lowered the gear and aps, and knowing a go-around was out of the question, shut the engine down not wanting any thrust. I dumped the nose toward the clearing in the trees and did a little S-turn to lose some of the altitude. I dove toward the runway and made probably as good a landing as I’ve ever made in the F-86! The end of the runway was looming up quickly, so I got on the binders as hard as I could without blowing a tire, and came to a stop short of the end which was well-marked by pine trees. I heard the F-15 pilots tell range control that I was on the ground safely, so I gured that was taken care of. Clearly, those guys were way ahead of me! I slid the canopy back and climbed out of the airplane to survey the situation. Hearing a little ‘putt-putt’ noise behind me, I turned around to see two young boys pull up beside me on a three-wheeler. Their eyes were as big as saucers. I asked them where I was. Obviously being puzzled by my question, one of them drawled in his Florida accent: “Well, Mr., you’re at Apalachicola, Florida.” They got off their three-wheeler wanting to take a good look at the airplane. Because the overheated brakes were smoking, I was worried about the tires exploding, so I told the boys to stay away from the wheels and tires. I was very thirsty and asked them if they had any water. They said “no” but they would get me some. They got on their three-wheeler and disappeared into the pine trees. A little while later they returned with a jug of water, which I thanked them for, and proceeded to drain dry. I asked them where they lived. They replied that their dad had a saw mill back in the woods, pointing to the pine trees. A few minutes later, a man drove up in a car and seemed as surprised to see me as the boys were. I asked him if he could take me to a telephone. We drove to a little shack that turned out to be a closed FAA ight service and weather observation station. The man informed me that the runway had been closed for several months and was in disrepair. He was surprised that I didn’t wreck my airplane. I used his telephone to call my of ce at Holloman AFB, New Mexico. Our secretary told me that my crew chief at Tyndall who would have been awaiting my return had already been told by the Air Force where I was. He and our maintenance supervisor, Jay Featherstone, had decided that the airplane would need an engine change. This would be a two-man job. The maintenance supervisor asked for a volunteer mechanic to travel to Tyndall to assist with the engine change. In the meantime, my crew chief had already arranged for the spare engine which we kept at Tyndall for an emergency. Those FSI maintenance guys were always resourceful in planning ahead, and obviously didn’t need me making decisions. They had everything well under control. The following day, the crew chief and his newly-arrived maintenance man, proceeded to look around for a means to remove the aft-section and install the new engine. In an effort to put that act together, they located the saw mill that belonged to the boys’ parents. They arranged to borrow a forklift to use for the engine change. By the time they had the aft-section off, the spare engine had arrived. The new engine was subsequently installed and the faulty engine was placed in the engine can which was soon on its way to the FSI engine shop at Mojave, California. The guys at the engine shop were as anxious as I was to nd out what caused the engine failure. The ground crew had the spare engine installed and the airplane ready for a ground run — within about 24 hours! After a drive down the runway I decided a clean F-86 could get airborne with no problem. The runway was basically concrete slabs with the edges lifted up by tree roots, so that if I’d been anywhere but right down the middle when I landed, I would have knocked the landing gear off the airplane. Three days later, on June 25, 1987, I FCF’d the airplane from Apalachicola, and recovered at Tyndall AFB, where I completed eight more sorties that week with the new engine. Epilogue: For this little adventure, Flight Systems, Inc., awarded me with a letter of recognition and $50 gold piece, which I still have. It was found that the center bearing had failed and allowed the compressor to shift forward to the point that the compressor blades were rubbing on the stators. To prevent subsequent failures of this type, Bob Laidlaw, the FSI owner, immediately arranged to have new center bearings made out of a more heat-resistant material than the original ones. These new bearings were installed in all the F-86 dart-tow engines. I later heard a little after-story from one of the weapon school instructors, Lucky Eckman, a friend of mine, whom I had own F-105s with in Southeast Asia. He told me he heard some of the young students standing around one day discussing my Apalachicola landing, and one of the students said to the group: “Did you see the guy ying that thing? He was older than dirt!” I calculated my age at the time: I was 51. Any one of them would love to have a retirement job like the one I had with FSI! Re ection: Needless to say I’ve had to purge the word “luck” from my vocabulary. In recalling this event, and my two combat tours, one in the F-105 and one in the F-4 in Southeast Asia, plus 20 years with Flight Systems, Inc., my take-offs and landings all came out equal. I can only re ect on what has become my favorite psalm, Psalm 139:1-6, which speaks to God’s hand in our lives: “1 O LORD, Thou hast searched me and known me. 2 Thou dost know when I sit down and when I rise up; Thou dost understand my thought from afar. 3 Thou dost scrutinize my path and my lying down, And art intimately acquainted with all my ways. 4 Even before there is a word on my tongue, Behold, O LORD, Thou dost know it all. 5 Thou hast enclosed me behind and before, And laid Thy hand upon me. 6 Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; It is too high. I cannot attain to it.” The end “Who is gonna’ make it? We’ll nd out…in the long run…” “The Long Run” by Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Bob Seger Please allow me to introduce you to David and Rose, who have been married for 42 years. Like many young couples, David and Rose began their married lives with virtually no assets. Throughout their marriage, though, they lived on 80 percent of their combined salaries. The other 20 percent was invested, saved and tithed. As young adults, the couple used part of their savings as a down payment and bought the least expensive home in a nice neighborhood. Each month, they paid extra toward principal and eventually paid off the mortgage in 20 years. They still make their residence there. David earned over $100,000 annually only in the latter part of his career, and Rose’s pay grade never reached that level. The couple raised three children, took an annual family vacation and paid for braces for two kids. All three children attended college, but they all worked during school. David drove an older, dependable car, a mid-size sedan, and the odometer eventually passed 300,000 miles. While he kept his auto spotless, it was surrounded in his of ce parking lot by more attractive, newer models, and his af nity for his older car became a subject of mirth for his co-workers. David, who wore a coat and tie to work, always bought his suits on sale. Rose and David also bought needed household items on sale throughout their marriage. What’s the point? The couple now enjoys an investment account with a value of well over a million dollars. And they have no debt. When Rose retired, David asked her if she wanted anything special to celebrate that milestone. Rose asked for a trip to Ireland. The couple spent four weeks touring Europe, returned exhausted but ful lled, then resumed their relatively frugal lifestyle. It’s a happy habit they can’t seem to break. “I’m still a coupon clipper at heart,” says Rose. “I can’t stand wastefulness.” David bought a new BMW convertible recently, but only takes it out on weekends. Rose says he really prefers driving his old, dependable sedan, the one with 300,000 miles. The couple are the prototypical millionaires next door, and while they are completely ctional, their story rings true. In fact, you may recognize parts or all of your own lifestyle and history in this ctional portrayal. You would never recognize them as millionaires while waiting in line at Wal-Mart, where they did much of their shopping. Rose and David never attempted to emulate the lifestyles of those whose wealth seemed more obvious. The importance of saving and investing wisely can only be evaluated over time. It’s not fancy, but it still works. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC (6086121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. 42 years of living within your means MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook WWW.AF.MIL Any port in a storm Page 5 THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission held a workshop last Tuesday at the Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Campus to raise awareness for bear management units that would soon be put in place across the state. The FWC has grouped Florida into seven sections with plans to create a bear stakeholder group within each one. Gulf County falls under the East Panhandle section, which also covers the counties of Bay, Cal houn, Franklin, Gadsden, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla and Washington. The remaining areas are based in the West Pan handle, Big Bend, North, Central, South Central and South units. The meeting was an open forum for residents to provide thoughts about bear man agement but also to present common problems and pos sible solutions. The quorums will help the FWC work with local and state governments to create solutions based on each area’s need. “It gives people an op portunity to give input,” said Dave Telesco, a bear manage ment program coordinator. An example of the need stems from the North Flor ida Child Development on Field of Dreams Drive in Port St. Joe. Due to the lack of a bear-proof dumpster, the animals are constantly by passing the makeshift locks pulling food, diapers and other waste into the woods surrounding the facility. The bear management units would work with local government in an attempt to ensure that bear-proof items were made readily available to ensure safety and keep pollution at bay. The most common bear in the area is the black bear and the FWC’s goal is to cre ate one well-managed popu lation of the breed rather than seven sub-populations throughout the state. Bear conict statistics presented showed an in crease over the past several years and both people and bear populations continue to rise in Florida. Last year, the FWC re ceived more than 900 calls about bear conicts and an average of 50 bears is killed each year along U.S. High way 98. The black bears hunt at dawn and dusk and a lack of clear shoulder along the road makes it difcult for drivers to see the animals. While black bears are not naturally aggressive, the problems begin when they become used to people. “The goal is to maintain a sustainable black bear population for the benet of the species and the peo ple,” said Kaitlin O’Connell, a stakeholder liaison. “By coming to this meeting, at tendees have the undivided attention of the FWC.” The bear stakeholder groups are drafted on a vol unteer basis and the FWC is specically interested in input from local residents, homeowner associations, businesses and civic groups. Eventually, the groups will meet on a semi-monthly ba sis to provide updates and concerns that the FWC can begin to tackle. Attendees at the meeting were polled on how they felt about current bear manage ment practices and the desire for bear-proof trashcans to become available to the pub lic. The information would be provided to senior FWC lead ership for consideration. “Right now there are drastic differences between bear management units,” said O’Connell. “Florida is very diverse geographically and by breaking up each area we can better manage the interactions between people and bears. “We want to gather as much information as possible.” For more information on the bear management units, visit the FWC on line at www.MyFWC.com/bear. To volunteer for the bear stakeholder group, email Kaitlin O’Connell at bear plan@myfwc.com. NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 6-15-14 CODE: SJ00 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m After the rst round of state assessment scores Gulf District Schools are already operating at a decit. The Florida Department of Ed ucation released the initial group of Florida Comprehensive As sessment Test (FCAT) scores last week with the announcement of results for third graders in read ing and math and writing scores in fourth, eighth and 10th grades. Attempting to put sheen on the results for Gulf District Schools would be a mixed effort. The writing scores for eighthand 10th-graders at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School were above the state average but that was about the only highlight. “They were the one bright spot,” said Melissa Ramsey, dis trict supervisor of testing. “They were above the state average and that was good.” Eighth-graders averaged a 3.6 score on the writing FCAT, which while a slight drop from last year’s 3.7 was nonetheless above the state average of 3.4. A score of 3.0 is considered procient to the grade level. Among eighth-graders the dis trict still fell below the state aver age with a 3.3 as eighth-graders at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School averaged a 2.8, off 0.4 points from last year. Among 10th-graders, scores at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School in writing averaged 3.6 and the dis trict was even with the state av erage of 3.5 as Wewahitchka High School sophomores averaged a 3.4, an improvement of 0.6 points compared to last year. And that was about the extent of the positive news, Ramsey said. “We were below the state av erage in just about every other area,” Ramsey said. “And we are real low in some areas.” District fourth-graders scored an average of 2.9 on the writ ing FCAT, with both elementary schools scoring identically and dropping, compared to last year, by an identical 0.2 points. The state average was 3.3. The district ranked 73rd out of 75 districts in fourth-grade writ ing scores, easily the worst per formance for the district since the FCAT was implemented some 15 years ago. “That was historically low,” Ramsey said. “We have never scored below a 3.0.” At the third grade level, im portant because third-graders are experiencing the FCAT for the rst time in their schooling and because third grade is a level where children can be held back due to low test scores, the district struggled compared to the state average in reading and math. Thirty-seven percent of thirdgraders at Port St. Joe Elemen tary scored at prociency in math and 48 percent did so at Wewahi tchka Elementary. That was a drop of 13 and 28 percentage points, respectively, at the schools compared to last year and the district’s average of 45 percent was 13 points behind the state. The district ranked No. 70 out of 75 districts statewide in third— grade math. In reading, the results were slightly better. Fifty-two percent of Port St. Joe Elementary third-graders were procient in reading, a dip of just 1 percent. At Wewahitchka El ementary, 50 percent, represent ing a drop of 16 percentage points, were procient in reading. The state average was 57 per cent; the district’s 51 percent. “We are looking at individual classroom results and the ag gregate results to try to fully un derstand the data,” Ramsey said. “We are curious to see what the data in other grades will look like. “We have some challenges, but these are very preliminary numbers. Historically we have been better.” Additional FCAT results, and school grades, will be released in the coming months. District drops as initial FCAT scores released The bear necessities covered at FWC workshopWES LOc C HER | The Star The FWC presented a workshop for Gulf County residents to learn more about the bear management needs of the community.

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, May 29, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Expecting a new addition to the family? On Tuesday, June 3 the Healthy Start Coalition of Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties will present its sixth annual Community Baby Shower at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Mothers who have had children in the last six months and mommiesto-be are welcome to join the event for an evening of games, refreshments, community vendors, educational info and door prizes. Dads and family members are also invited to partake in the fun. “Anyone who is a caregiver to the baby will benet from the event,” said event organizer Suzy Nadler. “That includes daddies and grandparents.” More than 25 vendors will provide information to families on safe sleeping and the dangers of shaking babies. Nadler said that there are many infant deaths each year that could have been prevented by education. Last year, more than 130 attendees learned about baby safety and care and 33 door prizes were given away. This year, attendees will once again be up for door prizes including car seats, baby care products and the grand prize of a $200 gift card to Walmart. “We want to ensure that pregnant women have the best possible care.” said Nadler. “Our primary outreach is education, but we also want to have fun.” The event begins at 4 p.m. ET. For questions, call Healthy Start at 1-800-895-9506. The event will be sponsored by Prestige Health Choice, CareerSource Gulf Coast, Sacred Heart Health System and Staywell. We wi sh to ex pr es s ou r gr at it ud e to al l of th e fo ll ow in g fo r yo ur gen ero si ty an d co nt ribu ti on s fo r th e su cc es s of ou r com mu ni ty ’s We lc om e an d Ho no rin g Am eri ca n He ro es dur in g th e Ma y 14 th -1 8t h Fo rg ot te n Co as t Wa rr io r We ek en d. TH AN K YO U! 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We st on US A, Ret ir ed AU TO IN SUR AN CE Ha nno n In su ran c e (8 50) 22 711 33 + + 1 0 *)0' 2 ,10 1 +'+ )'11 && 2102+' 1'0 '( + '1/+ $ )2+ '* / '+.0+ + (+ 0+* 0 + 0/ # 2 + 0 +'(1+ '+ $ " 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL A T THE MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S LIVE ON TH E PO OP DECK BL AC KW AT ER FRID AY 9P M THURSD AY 7P M SA TURD AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M WEDNESD AY 7P M SUND AY 7P M CROSSTIE RAND Y ST AR K RAND Y ST AR K RAND Y ST AR K ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES LIVE ON T HE PO OP DECK MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T S ELEC TION O F A LL Y OUR F AV ORITE B EER W INE & SPIRIT S UPCOMING EVENTS KAROKE THURSD AY FRID AY & SA TURD AY -9PM WITH DEBRA AT THE T OP OF THE CRO W’S NEST COURTESY OF BEVERLY MOUNT DOUd D S Prep work began last week on the site in George Core Park in Port St. Joe where the Cape San Blas Lighthouse will be relocated. The next major milestone is the pouring of a foundation upon which the lighthouse will sit. The foundation must cure for at least 30 days. LIGHTHOUSE RELO cC ATION FF ILE PHOTO The sixth annual Healthy Start Baby Shower will be held on June 3 at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Healthy Start Gulf/Franklin baby shower June 3

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Thursday, May 29, 2014 O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MONTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Ma y 15 76 59 60 % Fr i, Ma y 16 77 62 20 % Sa t, Ma y 17 77 66 10 % Sun, Ma y 18 78 66 10 % Mo n, Ma y 19 79 68 0 % Tu es Ma y 20 79 70 0 % We d, Ma y 21 80 71 0 % JOE’S LA WN CA RE IF IT’S IN YO UR YA RD LET JOE TA KE CA RE OF IT • FULL LA WN SERV IC ES • TREE TRIM MIN GA ND RE MOV AL • ALSO CLEAN GU TTERS AND IRRIGA TION INST ALLA TION, PLANTIN GA ND BED DING AVA ILABLE CALL JOE @8 50-323-0741 OR E-MAIL JOES_LA WN@Y AHOO.COM SPONSORED BY As we enter the last week of May, most schools will be letting out for the summer and the crowds of anglers will soon arrive. Fishing is great now from the surf and from shore as well. Good inshore species such as trout and red fish are returning in good numbers to the head of St. Joe Bay. Surf fishing on the Cape has been producing great pompano and whiting catches with the occasional shark in the mix. State water red snapper opened last weekend to great success and many anglers took advantage of the good weather to bring in some great fish. Our state season is short this year, so get out when can. MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are loaded with red snapper and most are higher in the water than you think, so lighten up your tackle and bring plenty of chum. Page 8 By Tom Baird Special to The Star Sea turtle nesting season began May 1. Volunteers, U.S. Geological Survey employees, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) employees, and State Park personnel have begun monitoring Gulf County beaches for turtle crawls and signs of nesting activity. Teams cover nesting beaches at night, and other teams walk the beaches early in the morning. Why the effort? Because all marine turtles are either classi ed as threatened or endangered. Losses to shing gear entanglements and degradation of nesting beaches and near shore habitats in the past century, coupled with boat collisions and new predators, decimated sea turtle populations. Research and monitoring are aimed at ensuring maximum nesting success for these magni cent creatures. Fossils show there were once more marine turtle species. Now, only seven species of marine turtles remain worldwide. Five of these species roam Florida waters. They are the Loggerheads (Caretta caretta), Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas), the big Leatherbacks (Dermochelys coriacea), the mostly tropical and solitary Hawkbills (Eretmochelys imbricata), and the smallest and rarest, the Kemp’s Ridley turtle (Lepidochelys kempii). It is mainly Loggerheads that use Gulf County beaches for nesting, although there are occasional Green turtle nests, and a few Leatherbacks use Franklin County beaches. Loggerheads, Greens, and Kemp’s Ridleys use St. Joseph Bay to forage. Lush meadows of turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum) in St. Joseph Bay especially attract the herbivorous Green turtles, which are a common sight in the bay. The often crowded beaches of southeast Florida see the most turtle nesting activity in the state. However, the beaches of the northwest Florida gulf counties, from Escambia to Franklin, are important, traditional turtle nesting sites, with Gulf County usually having the most turtle nests per year in the northern Florida Gulf. The bay scallop is often the unof cial symbol of Gulf County, yet considering the number of sea turtles in the bay and on our beaches, and our critical location as turtle nesting habitat, our symbol should probably be a sea turtle. Both native and introduced predators take their toll on incubating eggs and the tiny hatchlings. Coyotes, raccoons, armadillos, ghost crabs, birds, cats, re ants, and on some beaches, feral hogs, will either dig and eat the eggs or take the hatchlings as they emerge from the nest. Human trash, like food wrappers, left on the beach can attract predators that get used to checking the beaches for food. Nest destruction increases on beaches with a lot of human trash. In the 2013 nesting season, there were 292 Loggerhead nests and 10 Green turtle nests on Gulf County beaches, according to FWC data. In a single sixmile stretch of the St. Joseph Peninsula from Stump Hole to the State Park boundary, there were 95 loggerhead nests alone and one green turtle nest, according to the St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol. This is down from 227 loggerhead nests on that section of beach in 2012. Considering that this is the section of beach on Cape San Blas with the heaviest concentration of renters and residents, the likelihood of human activity negatively affecting nest success is high. Lights and beach furniture left out overnight can disorient and trap hatchings, as well as confuse and block the females coming ashore to lay their eggs. Beachfront lighting is a well know problem. Research has shown that female turtles favor dark beaches to lay their eggs. While turtles will nest on beaches with arti cial lights, their hatchlings are at greater risk. The lights may confuse the hatchlings and cause them to move not toward the sea, but up the dunes toward lights, or meander disoriented. Arti cial lighting is the single greatest threat to hatchlings reaching the sea in Florida. Gulf County has a good and well-enforced beachfront lighting ordinance. Yet any lights on the beach including ashlights and headlights can confuse both adult nesting females and hatchlings. Turning off unnecessary lights is a simple, effective, energy ef cient solution to preventing turtle hatchling mortalities. Or just close the drapes. Our Gulf Co. beaches should be dark during the turtle nesting season – May 1 to Oct. 31. We can all do our part to help ensure the nesting success of marine turtles on our beaches. Taking care to remove all trash and debris from a beach outing will avoid attracting nest predators. Also, turtles often mistake oating bits of plastic debris as food and can choke or have fatal internal blockage from ingesting the bits of trash. Beach furniture should be moved off the beach at night. Other counties have enacted ordinances to require that beaches are left clear at night. Clutter on the beach, especially tents, cabanas, lounges, rugs and coolers, are not only unsightly, but can trap the hatchlings heading to the water. They become vulnerable to predators and can be weakened in their efforts to reach the sea. Remove all beach furniture and boats and gently educate visitors that leaving beach furniture overnight imperils sea turtles. Leave the marked nests alone and keep pets out of the nest area. These are all just simple things that require little effort and can make a big difference to sea turtle nesting success. Also, if you see Turtle Patrol volunteers walking the beach at sunrise, give them a wave. They are your neighbors giving their time and energy to help ensure that we will always have marine turtles in our waters. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. A Kemp’s Ridley turtle, small and rare, on its way back to the Gulf of Mexico after being rescued during a cold stun event. Volunteers with Gulf World Marine Institute return a loggerhead turtle to the Gulf of Mexico. FILE PHOTOS Protect nesting sea turtles A green sea turtle in the surf along St. Joseph Peninsula.

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Special to The Star The third Annual Golly Whopper Classic will be Saturday, June 7, in Mexico Beach. The tournament is a one-day shootout for red snapper and king mackerel. Entry fee for the tournament is $150 per boat and 100 percent of the entry fees will be paid out to the rst, secondand third-place winners in each species. A captain’s party will be June 6 at the Mexico Beach Marina with the nal weighin June 7. This year the tournament also will offer a spear shing division. Entry fee for is $35 per diver and they will compete in a winner-take-all format for the largest red snapper. Children younger than 14 can enter a youth division for $25. Last year, Charlie Lanford caught the largest red snapper aboard the “Gulf Business 3” with Captain Lee Cathey. Their sh weighed 22.81 pounds and barely edged out a 22.75 pound red snapper caught aboard the “Green Banana” captained by Josh Bloodworth. The king mackerel division saw a number of large sh brought to the scales but none could compete with a 55.13 pound smoker caught aboard the “Salty Mule,” captained by Blake Anderson. Call Zach Childs at 8190833 or Josh Bloodworth at 478-256-4460 for more information or visit 98real estategroup.com/gollywhopper Registration forms are available at 98 Real Estate Group and the Mexico Beach Marina. Sh op at Ho me BO AT IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on In su ra nc e (8 50 ) 22 711 33 Ki ds Wi n To ur nam en t FR EE to Re gis te r at th e Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na Fi rs t 35 0 Ki ds get a ro d an d re el ta ck le an d a goo dy bag www .Ki d sw in fi sh in g. co m Fr id ay Ju ne 13 th Si gn in 3 pm 6:3 0 pm ES T Sa tu rda y, Ju ne 14 th Fi sh in g co m m en ce s at 7: 00 am ES T We igh in 10 am -1 2p m ES T Do na ti ons Ac cep te d! Na ut ic al Fl ea Ma rk et FR EE to Re gi st er Sa tu rda y, Ju ne 14 th 9a m3p m ES T OP EN TO EV ER YO NE AN D AN YO NE Mu st pr ov id e yo ur ow n ta bl e an d ch ai rs sa lt wa te rc la ss ic .c om Fa th er 's Da y We ek en d Ju ne 13 -1 4, 20 14 RE GI ST RA TI ON IS JU NE 12 TH @ 6P M LO CA TE D AT TH E HA UG HT Y HE RO N Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na wi ll be a we igh in lo ca ti on Le arn mo re at ht tp :/ /w ww .n at io na lm ar in ad ay .o rg / Sa tu rd ay Ju ne 14 th \› M [ ›9‹‹ ; }› \›• ›> W •› \› M Ž—D }} •c ‚• Œ›… M U~” s‘‘Š…~— ŽŠ¢ š —…Ž‚Š~”~z~…‘š ’œsŠ…¢…Ž‚ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ 8 ‘”‹ ~~ …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| sŽ| …ŽzŠœ|~| …Ž š„~ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ ~’œsŠ š s ” ‘œ”z„s—~—  s=’’’ ” ‹”~‡ T ‹Žš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| Ž ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ …ŽzŠœ|…Ž‚ ”~Šsš~| ‘”‹ ~~: sŽ| ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš— s”~ ”~’œ…”~| ~’œsŠ š ‡s1b  …Ž…š…sŠ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ s‹œŽš œŽš…Š ‘”‹ …— ‘s…| …Ž œŠŠ‡ \„~ ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš …ŠŠ w~ ”œŽ|~| š š„~ Ž~¡š „…‚„~—š „Š~ |ŠŠs” sŽ| ‹s¢ w~ „…‚„~” š„sŽ š„~ ‹…Ž…‹œ‹ ‘s¢‹~Žš š„sš œŠ| w~ ”~’œ…”~| … š„~ ‘œ”z„s—~ s— s ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~‡ Z~‚œŠs” szzœŽš š~”‹— s‘‘Š¢ š ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ C” Ž~ szzœŽš—4 Vœ”z„s—~ 8VZ …— ‡--bq Q…Ž…‹œ‹ QŽš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š <„s”‚~ …— ‡ A¡…—š…Ž‚ zs”|„Š|~”— —„œŠ| —~~ š„~…” z”~|…š zs”| s‚”~~‹~Žš ” š„~…” s‘‘Š…zswŠ~ š~”‹—‡ [œw‡~zš š z”~|…š s‘‘”sŠ‡ PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, May 29, 2014 A Page 9 Section PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Mexico Beach Golly Whopper tournament is a one-day tournament for red snapper and king mackerel. Golly Whopper shing tourney schedule for June At last year’s event, members of team “Salty Mule” reeled in a 55.13 pound mackerel. Port St. Joe Basketball Clinic set for June 14 Special to The Star A basketball ball-handling clinic will be Saturday, June 14, at Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School. The clinic will be led by Raye Bailey and professional player coach and trainer Joe Flegler. Flegler is an assistant coach at Thomas University. As a high school senior, he led Washington, D.C., in scoring 26 points-per-game. Flegler had the best freshman season in the history of the College of Southern Maryland, named freshman of the year in Maryland JUCO, All-Maryland JUCO, All-Region XX and honorable mention All-American. The rst workshop, for ages 7-13 will take place from 9 a.m. to noon ET. The second workshop for ages 14 and up will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. ET. Early registration ends June 1 and is $15. On-site registration will be offered for $20. To register, call Bailey at 307-7197 or email baileyr04@gmail.com. Pre-registration ends June 1 All-Pro Soccer to host summer camp Star Staff Report All-Pro Soccer once again will be be hosting a summer soccer camp in the area June 16-19. On those dates, the Callaway Youth Soccer Club will host the camp from 5 to 7 p.m. (CT) at the Callaway Sports Complex. The camp will be supervised by former professional player and coach Gary Hindley. Coach Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Year selectee, recently has been named head coach of the Pensacola City FC team of the National Premier Soccer League and has been the head coach of both the girls and boys teams at Port St. Joe High School for the past ve years. At the camp, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 7-17. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, call Coach Hindley at 276-6353 or email gjhallpro@aol.com. St. Joseph Bay Golf Club offers youth clinic Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is pleased to offer a free youth golf clinic again this year. The clinic will take place 9-11 a.m. ET each Friday in June (6, 13, 20 and 27) at the club at 700 Country Club Road. If students have their own clubs, they should bring them. If not, the club will furnish a set to each student in need. The clinic will be taught by the club’s teaching professional, Ethel Bardsley, assisted by dedicated members of the club. Free pool privileges also will be extended to the students following each session. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751 to register before June 1. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Sh op at Ho me LI FE IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 13 3 31 5 Wi ll ia ms Av e Po rt St Jo e, FL | (85 0) 22 966 00 SP EC IA L TR UN K SH OW ME RC HA ND IS E 25 % OF F a ll in st oc k So rr el li on e da y on ly F J | An nu al Su m me r Op en H ou se Re gi st er to wi n a So rr e ll i gif t ce rt if ic at e Re ce iv e S or re ll i Bl in g Bu ck s on pu rc ha se s $1 00 + ’ wh il e su p pl ie s las t. video. Upon returning home, Slick told investigators, he went into the backyard to tend the family dog, remaining there for 30 minutes before going inside. He said he found his mother with “her throat slit and her head bashed in, but I didn’t know she was going to die,” according to the arresting af davit. The home security system, however, showed Slick going inside the residence upon returning home and Coffey following roughly one minute later, according to investigators. Slick sent a text message to his brother about bringing home a grocery item a few minutes later and is seen leaving the residence, phone in hand appearing to be in conversation, roughly three minutes prior to the 9-1-1 call. The system showed no other individual present. Investigators found what appeared to be blood spatters on Slick’s shoes. in the ve impacted states. “It is disappointing (there has been no progress on local government claims), but the positive is Gulf County is not being treated any differently than other local governments,” Jones said. “No local government is having any kind of active discussion with BP.” The amount the county is seeking has not been made public. The BOCC turned down a settlement offer last year and continued to pursue litigation. PLEDGE OF CIVILITY Commissioners approved, as they did in 2003 and 2011, a proclamation rendering May a month of civility in public discourse. “This is a good proclamation,” Yeager said. The proclamation is the recommendation of the Florida Bar Association, which suggests annual adoption of a proclamation aimed at providing for the free and civil exchange of ideas during public meetings without “anger”, “ridicule” or rudeness. As has been noted several times by Commissioner Joanna Bryan over the past year, commissioners have not always honed to the pledge during public discourse, particularly over controversial issues. WASTE PRO TRANSITION Waste Pro takes over the county contract for solid waste removal June 1. Waste Pro was awarded the BOCC’s garbage bid last month, replacing current contractor Waste Management. A representative of Waste Pro said Tuesday that 99 percent of customers had received new containers – which while shorter are wider and the same overall size as those from Waste Management – and Waste Management would have all its containers removed by week’s end. Some 90 percent of customers will continue to have their garbage picked up on the same day. Those with changes in service days were noti ed by a decal on the new cans. Waste Management is also processing refunds for any customers who have already paid for June and beyond. PARKWAY from page A1 MURDER from page A1 reluctant, Susan said, particularly her husband. They weren’t interested in being put on display and there was the expected self-consciousness wrought by the wounds of war. They initially declined an invitation. After organizers received a cancellation from one perspective warrior and caregiver, they reached out to the Villafanes. Seeing her husband’s reticence, Susan contacted SSG Steven Copeland, who was in her husband’s unit and who had a reserved spot on this year’s FCWWW. Copeland, Susan said, wrote to Jamie urging him to come, saying it would good to see his mate again. SSG Jamie Villafane relented and the couple became the last conrmed attendees to the FCWWW. “It was really great,” Susan said. “Everybody got along wonderfully. There was a connection that is very hard to put into words. “This experience really opened my eyes. I’m not alone. I don’t have to deal with this by myself. There are other women who understand what I go through. Any hesitance subsided with that welcome and those open arms.” Susan’s glee was palpable over a phone line, her excitement about the nightly bon res that turned into therapy and laughter sessions, her time on the shooting range during which she went from just a tad scared to hitting a target 300 meters away with a .308 – the “big gun” she proudly proclaimed – on her rst shot. “Nothing compares to this event,” said Barbara Armstrong, who with her husband Sgt. Robert Armstrong, made the trip from their San Antonio, Texas home. “I’ve never been to something so thoughtfully put together. Nothing compares. “Every detail was thought of. I don’t know how you improve on that. This was the perfect situation. We didn’t think about anything.” Included, in Barbara’s case, a toothbrush, which came to represent the swaddling the warriors and caregivers receive. Armstrong discovered she was without toothbrush – she added she and her husband would have left all the food they carried at home if they knew their living quarters would be so stocked – upon unpacking. She happened to mention the missing item during registration and before she could return to her room to locate through GPS a place to buy a new one, a brand new toothbrush had appeared in her room, by the brush fairy apparently. Barbara also noted that given her pale skin tone, she is not one for sunbathing. She gets her sun working in the yard with plenty of sun block and a hat. After a couple of days enjoying the pool and shing on open waters, she was proud to say she had “a pretty decent sunburn” for which she had no regrets. “We felt so relaxed,” Armstrong said. “It gave our husbands down time. I think it is one of the most amazing things we’ve been on. “The town is amazing. You don’t see that, a community that puts so much into people they don’t even know. We really want to come back.” For Theresa Botts and her husband, SSgt. Scott Botts, there isn’t any “want” about coming back to Port St. Joe, “We de nitely will be back to Port St. Joe,” Theresa said. In fact, Theresa said she is likely to return to the area when the Semper Fi Sisters descend for their Beach Blast in the fall as well as coming back to volunteer in the next FCWWW. “I believe in paying it forward,” Theresa said from her Tennessee home. “I don’t know if I can put my experiences into words. It was wonderful, the community, the warriors, the caregivers, the volunteers, it was all wonderful. “It was like we were with family. We went away with a lot of smiles. There was zero drama. We laughed so much and learned so much about each other, about our families.” Theresa and Scott had been invited to Wounded Warrior events before and found them challenging. There was too much scheduled into the day and too little exibility for the warriors and caregivers to select those activities they felt they could handle. But the FCWWW, with its emphasis on providing a host of activities and letting each individual warrior and caregiver decide what they were up, had none of the drawbacks the Bottses had experienced. “With my husband there are a lot of nerve issues due to his chemical exposure,” Theresa said. “He doesn’t normally mesh well. But we left there having built some very strong relationships. “It was really nice. The whole community, they weren’t up in your face or felt like they needed to be in your face. Everything was so peaceful and you felt enthralled by everything and you just felt so comfortable.” The good vibes even extended to the aftermath. Villafanes said the positive feelings continued though ultimately tempered by a return to the routine. The captain who took Scott Botts out to sh, unable to attend a subsequent banquet, sent a Facebook message to ensure the couple had returned home safetly. “He took that extra step and that means a lot to those guys, to us,” Theresa said. “People in the community just went out of their way and they did it out of the kindness of their hearts and you could just feel that.” CAREGIVER from page A1 Nicole King, Lexie Dianne McGhee, Cailyn Marie LaPlante, Katerina Nicole Nelson, Sydney Marian Owens, Brittney Deshawn Shoemaker, Kallie Louise Bateman. GRADUATES Demeriyah A’Shanti Alexander, Gabrielle Ivana Anthony, Candice Elizabeth Bright, Kylee Alexis Carter, Annalisa Brooke Childress, Koen Michael Cortellini, Kapril Nicole Darnall, Robert Anthoney Dykes, Nicole Mae Endres, Heather Nicole Faircloth, She’Noya Renee Fennell, Dwayne Griggs, Brandon Michael Hall, Anna Nicole Haynes, Justin Schwab Hites, Allison Nicole Howze, Matthew Cameron Jackson, David Matthew Jacobs, Michael Anthony Johnsen, Jacobi Richard Jones, Katherine Renee Kennington, Taylor Addison Laue, Natrone Carlton Lee, Jonathan Wesley Leffew, Nicholas Dwight Lewis, Tanene Enoya Malone, Alexander Carrol Maughan, De’quan Montay McCloud, Austin Daniel McNeill, Kelsey Christine Miles, Steven Kaleb Odom, Tommie John Parker, Anastasya Kristen Paul, Bryan Adison Powell, William Tristan Reynolds, Cathlyn Palmiano Robles, Destiny Brianne Shoemaker, Mason Richard Simmons, Alexis Nichole Strickland, Allie Jovon Stripling, Tori Jo Thomas, Corey James Williams, Torey Jerome Williams, De’Shawntae Tyell Willis, Shatiara Na’shay Zaccaro. Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School The class motto was “What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters…compared to what lies within us.” The class ower was the red rose and the class song was “Don’t You (Forget about Me)” by Simple Minds Jacob Seth Goodwin was the valedictorian and Jakob Alan Bidwell the salutatorian. HIGH HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.85 OR HIGHER) Jacob Seth Goodwin, Jakob Alan Bidwell, Chelsea Nicole Cook, Kara Jean Zucci. HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.5-3.849) William Hunter Bailey, Chandler Mae Vines, Cory Matthew White, Shawn Kory Jenkins, Chelsey Danielle Toney. GRADUATES Tyler Lee Adams, Eddie Ray Bowles III, Seth Michael BradshawJennifer Wondale Bryan, Braden Matthew Buckalew, Caitlin Marie Burch, Troy Steven Collins, Michael Adrien Cox, Calvin Grady Dean III, Brianna Kaye Edmondson, Morgan Danielle Fisher, Johnna Renee Florio, James Larry Hensley, Jr., AnMaree Teodora Hess, Jarvar Javon Hill, Zachary Allen Hire, Kimberly Dale Hughes, Damien Dwayne Hunter, Abriale Marie Kemp, James Edward Lester III, Issac Benjamin Madrid, Joshua Liam Mayer, Nicole Renee Morrill, Janie Savannah Pippen, Corey Austin Rhames, Kelver Siliezar, Kirsten Mariea Stalnaker, Sheneshia Mercedes Stansel, Kristopher Jon Taylor, Danielle Katherine Ward, Brooke Ashley Weatherly, Christina Rena Whit eld, Jamie Michael Whit eld II, Anna Maria Wilcox. GRADUATES from page A1 JACOB SETH GOODWIN WHS Valedictorian HOMER ALLEN DAVIS PSJHS Valedictorian

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, May 29, 2014 B Page 1 Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Prep work over, Javarri Beachum has earned his entrance into the U.S. Naval Academy. After spending the past year at the U.S. Naval Preparatory School in Newport, RI, Beachum will report to Annapolis at the end of next month to begin the voyage to induction in four years as an ensign in the U.S. Navy. “It is a pretty awesome feeling,” Beachum said during some By John Hentz Panama City, Fla. (Editor‘s note: The following are the memories of the Apalachicola River by the late Panama City native John Hentz. These were transcribed by Beverly Mount Douds.) It is interesting to note that during the steamboat years that a big part of the cargo the steamboats were carrying was oranges. During certain seasons of the year a lot of the boats would have from 150 to 200 boxes of oranges on them. I was one of the main cash crops of our ancestors. I‘ve heard that the freeze of 1898 just about wiped them out. There is a community about 18 miles south of Bristol in Liberty County named “Orange“. During my boyhood days there was a U.S. Post Of ce there, it was operated by Mrs. Wilder. After the Civil War, most of the people who lived up the river made a living cutting and rafting cypress timber down the river to the big saw mills in Apalachicola. They would catch a ride on the steamboat back to their camps up the river. Back in those days most of the people who lived up the river worked in timber. They established their camps in the area where they were cutting at the time and where they lived. Some of the names I remember that my father camped and worked with was Alex Turner, “Broze“ Ramsey, Jim White, Uncle Calvin Durham, his brothers, Frank and Dink (James T.) Hentz, Jake Harrell, a Mr. Kirkland, Mr. Jeter, a boy who camp to their camp, they never knew from where, who said his name was “John“. That‘s all he would tell them, but he worked with them for years. Dan Minton, Manny Howard, John Parrish, Mr. Hathcock, my grandfather William Hentz, Mr. Will Gunn, Tom and Sid Johnson, Isiah Rewells, Tense Dugger, Rob Hentz, Will Durham, and many more. The boy who they found in camp would only tell them that, “they didn‘t give poor folks but one name where he came from“, years later when he had grown up and got married he took the name, Kirkland. Nobody ever knew whether that was his real name or not. He lived in the little village of Sumatra for many years. My father always said he was a good boy. Back in logging days on the Apalachicola River timber crews cut on Government claims issued by the boundaries, etc. My Uncle Frank Hentz was a surveyor and I‘ve heard it said that he knew where every section corner in Liberty County was located. The holder of the claim could dell with other crew operators to do the cutting. My father and his brothers worked with Mr. W.H. Gunn who was the son of my grandfather‘s oldest sister. There was a man named Rish from Wewahitchka who had a timber crew in the area and he was always dissatis ed with something and causing trouble. They got by without any serious trouble, but I heard of two different occasions when they had to have an understanding with him at the end of a Winchester. The center of the river is the line between counties on opposite sides of the river, and back in steamboat days, when a crime was committed on a steamboat it always posted a problem to determine which county had jurisdiction. It depended on which side of the river the boat was on at the time of the crime was committed. Sometimes a steamboat would pick up a dead body oating in the river. It would usually be in a condition that it had to be buried immediately. They would send a crew in a small boat to the river bank and bury it. They would than nail up half of a wooden barrel head on a tree or post it at the head of the grave. Back in the rafting days, some of the people who operated up the Chipola River had a rough reputation and our people on the river kept an eye on them. They didn‘t trust those people too far. They used to tell a story about an old man who rafted down the Chipola, that the other loggers in the area accused of stealing their timber and putting it into his raft. One time they were chasing after him and found him with his raft tied up at Douglas Landing on the COURTESY OF BEVERLY MOUNT DOUDS | Special to The Star The Jim Woodruff Dam in Blountstown shortly after construction M EMORIES OF THE Apalachicola River The Star takes a look back at river’s history “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) “A Tisket, ATasket” was whose rst major hit song in 1938? Artie Shaw, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Billie Holiday 2) What “blood” would a nurse measure with a sphygmomanometer? Sugar, Alcohol, Pressure, Count 3) John P. Holland is credited with the invention of the modern? Submarine, Refrigerator, Guitar, Padlock 4) What’s the youngest age one can become President of the United States? 32, 35, 40, 42 5) Which stone did early man primarily use for starting res? Slate, Marble, Quartz, Flint 6) Whose “nest” is the lookout platform on sailing ships? Boar’s, Eagle’s, Bird’s, Crow’s 7) What is the smallest area country in the United Kingdom? Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, England 8) Refried beans are primarily made of what type of cooked beans? Garbanzo, Black, Kidney, Pinto 9) What name did blues singer McKinley Morgan eld adopt? Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, B. B. King, Fats Domino 10) Which city opened the rst aquarium in 1893? Boston, Chicago, Baltimore, Richmond 11) If you’re astraphobic what are you afraid of? Lightning, Astroturf, Stars, Mountains 12) What white creature is Ursus Maritimus? Owl, Whale, Polar bear, Bunny 13) Of these battery types which is largest in size? AA, AAA, C, D 14) A semenier chest ordinarily has how many drawers? 5, 6, 7, 8 ANSWERS 1) Ella Fitzgerald. 2) Pressure. 3) Submarine. 4) 35. 5) Flint. 6) Crow’s. 7) Northern Ireland. 8) Pinto. 9) Muddy Waters. 10) Chicago. 11) Lightning. 12) Polar bear. 13) D. 14) 7. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com See MEMORIES B8 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The governor and Florida Cabinet announced last week that the bay scallop season will begin three days early this year. That will mean bay scallops may be harvested in permitted areas June 28, ahead of the normal July 1 opening. June 28 is a Saturday. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced last week it would bring a proposal to its governing board to establish the Saturday prior to July 1 as the of cial opening of bay scallop season, unless July 1 is a Saturday. In a statement, Gov. Rick Scott said opening the season early and on a weekend will create additional recreational opportunities for Florida residents and visitors while recognizing the importance of economic bene ts to coastal communities where this activity occurs. “I requested the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission open the season early this year to bene t our communities who rely on our sheries,” Scott said. “The bay scallop shery is especially important to Florida’s Big Bend region and by opening the bay scallop season three days earlier, Floridians throughout this area will have more opportunities to enjoy our natural treasures and provide for their families.” During season, bay scallops may be harvested in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal. St. Joseph Bay is one of the prime bay scallop harvesting areas in the state, with populations on the rebound the past two years. The season closes Sept. 25. For every scallop season since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010 state of cials have opened the season early, from more than two weeks to this year’s three days. All other regulations, including bag and vessel limits remain the same. Scallop season to begin early again this year “I requested the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission open the season early this year to bene t our communities who rely on our sheries. The bay scallop shery is especially important to Florida’s Big Bend region and by opening the bay scallop season three days earlier, Floridians throughout this area will have more opportunities to enjoy our natural treasures and provide for their families.” Gov. Rick Scott TIM CROFT | The Star A year ago Javarri Beachum was among 250 candidates selected from over 18,000 applications to attend the U.S. Naval Preparatory School. Beachum earns U.S. Naval academy appointment See BEACHUM B5 FILE PHOTO A couple search for scallops during the 2013 season.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Port St. Joe Elementary School honor roll Special to The Star The following students made the honor roll for the fourth nine weeks at Port St. Joe Elementary. Kindergarten all A’s Hunter Ard, Cole Bailey, Joshua Baker, Maya Barnes, Zora Beauchamp, Christopher Bradley, Lauren Brant, Carson Brown, Corban Butts, Caitlin Cathey, Blake Childress, Christina Clayton, Brayden Dailey, Sumner Dickey, Trinity Farmer, Dominic Fitzgerald, Dru Flowers, Hailey Green, Fenix Grogan, Cole Hart, Kenley Hatcher, Shamyiah Hayes, Addison Hendricks, Donell Henry, Easton Herring, Emma Hill, Anderson Hodges, Johnnie Hood, Chloe Jones, Landon Layeld, Christopher Lee, Brody Lemieux, Stratton Levins, Nathan Lipford, Preston Magnussen, Jacob Marshall, Reagan Mathews, Kymani Mcadoo, Hallie Mize, Brody Mock, Kari Moore, Cameron Nichelson, Colby O’Neal, Colt Patterson, Jamie Rapier, Kaley Rhodes, Reagan Thomas, James Ward, Lexi Webb, Paisley White, Keiara Wineld, Jett Whicker, Lia Wood, Callee Wray, Amirah Yarrell. Kindergarten A’s and B’s Myles Acree, Juan Carlos Baxcajay, Ja’Leighya Becton, Christianna Causey, Harmony Dwight, Korbin Ellwood, Logan Ellwood, Jakwavian Gray, Eli Harris, Dovud Kouljanov, Bobby Landrum, Costin Marshall, Krissy Maxwell, Kaleigh Mohr, Nijah Quinn, Colton Raker, Leelyn Rollins, Melina Ruiz, Jenna Shively, Emily Sudduth, Jorgia Williams, Gabe Wood, Sha’Nari Woodruff. 1st grade all A’s Mikey Allen,Whitney Butler, Gannon Buzzett, Sara Beasley Flowers, MacKenzie Freiesleben, Colton Johnson, Makayan Jones, Ava Kennedy, Peyton Knox, Lyriq Larry, Olivia Leonard, Boston McGhee, Zoey Metcalf, Kiyleh Parker, Handley Pitts, Bionca Rafeld, Bella Ray, Leila Smith, Kole Street, Emily Warner, Leland Whitlock, Landon White. 1st grade A’s and B’s Ian Beck, Rashard Brown, Ta’Niyah Bryan, Camdon Buckley, Ashen Dady, Aydan Davis, Gregory Dean, Kate Fidler, Andruw Fountain, James Foxworth, Zuri Garner, Jamicia Glenn, Hailyn Levins, Chloe Harper, Carly Hatcher, Kaelee Johnson, Sydney Kingsland-Lormand, Eileen Madrid, Kensley Mathews, Harmony Mize, Draven O’Neal, Grady Player, Damien Quaranta, Jackson Reatherford, Levi Sanders, Jasmine Sandoval, Sunny Shearer, Andrew Sheppard, Zachary Shively, Kellie Simmons, Lisa Southerland, Lia Taylor, King Waters, Karis Whicker. 2nd grade all A’s Garrett Acree, Estevan Angel, Jenna Bareld, Zoey Burkett, Ashleigh Causey, Bella Canington, Sam Childers, Tanner Fogle, Arlena Gleichner, Brandon Heckenlively, Cassidy Lewis, Tyrus Strickland. 2nd grade A’s and B’s Ja’Marrien Becton, Phebe Buckley, Cody Combow, Juveryona Daniels, Devin Daves, Ella Dimitrijevich, Sara Durham, Chase Dykes, Kelsey Elwood, Mary Margaret Farrell, Dawson Fisher, Shauna Flowers, India Gant, Wake Giffen, Lauren Givens, Owen Grantland, Carson Hendricks, Thomas Hutchinson, Kylie Ingalls, Danica Kelly, Makenna Kurnitsky, Lance Larry, Landon Lee, Chasity Moore, Luke Pickels, Alivia Randall, Kaylee Schweikert, Ardarien Shackleford, Miracle Smiley, Dakota Tousignant, Fisher Vandertulip, Diamond Warner, Brooke White, Elyse Williams. 3rd grade all A’s Skylar Clayton, Eli Fidler, Celeste Hamm, Luke Lentz, Dane Mallon, Gabriella Price, Hannah Riley, Ricky Sherrill. 3rd grade A’s and B’s Mannie Allen, Sam Brown, Emma Grace Burke, Madison Burkett, Maelynn Butler, Alexis Causey, Walker Chumney, Donovan Cumbie, Marcus Cumbie, A.J. Davis, Nathan Duong, Jaydon Gant, Payton Garland, Rylan Greenland, Kaydan Haisten, Levi Hanlon, Raelynn Hardy, Prince Jones, Jacob Justice, Gavin Lee, Chase Lanford, Bladen Levins, Cole Moore, Jabara Pearson, Jasslyn Rafeld, Janasia Walker, Emigen Watkins, Addi Watts, Halee Whicker, Britt White, Dane Wright, LaJuan Zaccaro. 4th grade all A’s Elliana Burkett, Halston Fulk, Zoe Gerlach, Ashton McGlamery, Donovan Miniat, Megan Saleh, Lauren Woosley, Caleb Zur Heiden. 4th grade A’s and B’s Skylah Addison, Trent Antley, Briana Biagini, Paloma Burgos-Harris, Ace Cannon, Santana Causey, Destiny Dykes, Ricky Forbes-Rosado, Madelyn Gortemoller, Shadavia Hudgins, Laura Beth Hill, Porter Hodges, Caden Jackson, Emily Lacour, Aidan Lewis, Morgan Mills, Cliff Money, Amari Nickson, Erica Ramsey, Rylee Reatherford, Ava Ryan, Alexandria Thomason, Sarah Beth Thompson, Lily Wockenfuss. 5th grade all A’s Allie Godwin, Lauren Jenkins, Philip Riley, Caleb Wright. 5th grade A’s and B’s Austin Ard, Henry Balogh, Noah Bareld, Leanna Baumgardner, Savannah Burkett, Lyndsey Butler, Miles Butler, Parker Cornwell, Ali Evans, Sarah Fidler, George Foxworth, Judson Grifes, Tyler Guthrie, Haley Harriman, Corbin Ingalls, Kevin Lacivita, Lanecia Larry, Evelyn Laue, Bryson Lee, Bradley Lewis, Mattison Mills, Gabrielle Nicodemus, Terri Rae Phillips, Jack Randall, Alex Strickland, Hannah Tomlinson, Analisa Treglown, Gabrielle Wood. 6th grade all A’s Jade Cothran, Sean Farnsley, Bailey Lake, Malena Ramsey, Sara Whiteld. 6th grade A’s and B’s Brandon Barnes, Justice Bareld, Eliza Belcher, Adison Burkett, Brianna Butler, Wesley Chapman, Cheyenne Cole, Tristan Doran, Joseph Farrell, Micaela Fedd, Jireh Gant, John Austin Gee, Madi Gingell, De’Marion Gray, Brittany Hanson, Courtney Sh op at Ho me HOM EO WN ER IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 1 33 Ju ne i s a 45 lb 3y r La b/ Ca ta houla mi x. Sh e ha s le ar ne d to wa lk on he r le as h an d is le ar ning oth er co mm an ds Ju ne i s a li tt le sh y ar ound ne w su rr ou nds an d pe op le bu t wa rm s up qu ic kl y. Th is pr et ty gi rl wo ul d lo ve a fo re ve r ho me of he r ve ry ow n. If yo u can gi ve he r a sa fe an d lo vin g home ple as e let us kn ow On li ne app li ca ti ons an d pe t ph ot os ar e ava il ab le at www .s jb hu man es oc iet y. or g Ad op ti on fe es in cl ud e our co st of sp ay /n eu te r an d cu rr en t va cc in at ion s. Ou r hour s fo r th e sh el te r ar e Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t is al way s in ne ed of do nat ion s al so an d al l th e pr oc ee ds go di re ct ly to su pp or t th e an im al s in ou r ca re! Th e hour s fo r th e st or e ar e Th ur sd aySa tu rda y fr om 10 am3 pm Vo lu nt eer s ar e al way s we lc om e at bo th ou r st or e an d ou r sh el te r! Ou r st or e an d sh el te r lo ca ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et in Po rt St Jo e! Ho pe to se e yo u al l th er e soo n! If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g 4518169 Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-229-6 161 bo ww ow be ach.c om 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 Blue Buffalo ,T aste of the Wi ld and other brands av ailab le! Special to The Star Join us at the Gulf County Public Libraries this summer for weekly events featuring science experiments, stories, crafts and other fun activities. The Charles Whitehead Public Library in Wewahitchka’s summer reading program will be at 3 p.m. CT Tuesdays from June 3 through July 8. The Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Library in Port St. Joe’s summer reading program will be at 1 p.m. ET Tuesdays from June 3-24. This year’s theme is Fizz, Boom, Read, and this summer is all about experimenting with STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. For more information, visit www.nwrls.com or call the library in Wewahitchka at 639-2419 or Port St. Joe at 229-8879. Star Staff Report Gulf County Senior Citizens will be selling spaghetti plates from 46:30 p.m. ET June 6 at the Senior Center, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe. The plates will cost $7.50 and will include spaghetti with meat sauce, breadsticks, salad and homemade dessert. You may eat at the center or carry out. All proceeds will go to providing services to the elderly of Gulf County. Tickets are available at the Senior Citizens Center or from any employee of board member. Call 229-8466 for more information. Donations are needed and appreciated. Special to The Star Eighth-graders from Wewahitchka High School traveled to Washington, D.C., May 5-10 to explore our nation’s capital. Students visited with Rep. Steve Southerland on the steps of the Capitol and were treated with passes from Rep. Southerland to the House of Representatives’ Chambers to witness House bills being discussed. This annual trip is an educational experience for the students to see, up close, our government in action and learn about the history of our great country. Students also toured the following historical sites: Mount Vernon, The White House, Library of Congress, Arlington National Cemetery, World War II Memorial, Vietnam Memorial, Iwo Jima Memorial, Korean War Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, National Archives, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and Monticello. Furthermore, students enjoyed the opportunity to experience a subway ride to The National Zoo. We would like to extend our thanks to those individuals that made this trip possible: the Gulf County School Board, Mr. Jim Norton and the chaperones Lana Harrison, Lori Price, April Bidwell, Christina Morrill, Buck Watford, and Bill Carr. We especially appreciate School Board member Mr. George Cox for providing admission into Mount Vernon for our students. Port St. Joe Elementary School HONOR RR OLL School News WHS 8th-graders visit Washington, D.C.P h H OTOS Sp P ECIa A L TO Th H E STa A R Fizz, Boom, Read this summer at Gulf County public libraries Senior citizens selling spaghetti plates CC OURTESY OF ChaCHA RLOTTE PIERCE | Special to The Star Last week during the regular bi-monthly meeting, Port St. Joe city commissioners recognized an Odyssey of the Mind team from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School as the team prepared for the World Finals the end of this week in Ames, Iowa. COMMISSION RECOGNIZES ODYSSEY OF T hH E MIND TE aA M

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The Star| B3 Thursday, May 29, 2014 Special to The Star On May 20, the students in Mr. Brown’s class at Wewahitchka Elementary School took a walking eldtrip around their beautiful town. Leaving the school shortly after 8 a.m., they took a walk down East River Road. On the way, students spotted squirrels running on power lines and wondering why they don’t get electrocuted. (If anyone knows the real answer, please call the school and come and explain your theory to Mr. Brown’s class. Information will only be accepted in person!!!) Arriving at Second Street, the class headed toward the direction of the old Gulf County Court House. Listening to the birds and seeing the many beautiful owers in bloom helped make the several block walk seemed shorter than it was. Standing in front of the court house ag pole, the class completed their daily routine of reciting the Pledge of Allegiance followed by the singing of God Bless America. The class viewed the two historical markers that stood in front of the building as well as paying their respects to the Veterans Memorial that is located in the same area. The class was now eager to begin the tour of the court house. This tour was prearranged with Ms. Sharon Gaskin. Ms. Sharon is the Chief Executive Ofcer for the North Florida Child Development. The ofces that assist in the management of this very important organization are located within the old court house. When asked, Ms. Gaskin was proud to be able to share with the children all that has been done to help restore this special piece of Gulf County history. From the “wavy glass” that signies age to the display case with special artifacts associated with the building, the children were spell bound at all that there was to see. The highlight of the tour was to be able to walk through the beautifully restored court room. From the theatre-type seating to the jury area, the children were impressed. Of special interest were the stains on the oor where the judge sat. It seems that a few judges had trouble hitting the spittoon with their tobacco juice!! The class thanked one of Ms. Sharon’s assistants, Ms. Sebrina, for making the tour interesting for all. After leaving the court house, the class stopped by the local library for a brief tour by Ms. Marcy. Lunch was provided by Ann and Mitchel Johnson from The Corner Caf. The class was physically tired when they returned to the school, but all were excited by the promise of a return trip to the Court House. Gulf County and especially Wewahitchka should be proud to have this piece of history still available to be enjoyed. Real Es ta te Pi cks Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast 4516380 850 -227889 0/8 50227 -7770 www .c oast al rea ltyinfo .com Th er ei sp le nt yo fr oo mw it h4 be dro om s, 4. 5b at hs an d3d ec ks to en jo yt he vie wt he go rg eo us suns ets Ov er 2, 000 sq ft .o fl ivi ng sp ac ew it hp ri va te el ev at or ac ce ss to ea ch le ve l. Ti le Fl oor sa nd cr ow nm old in g in ki tc he n, di ni ng an dl ivi ng ar eas .5 40 sq ft .o fd ec ks Be au ti fu ll yf ur ni sh ed an dr ea dy fo ry ou St unn in gs uns ets ri gh to ut yo ur ba ck do or ove rl oo ki ng St Jo eB ay .F ul ly fur ni she dt ow nhome lo ca te do n4a cr es of la nd co ve re dw it hl ar ge pri st in eo ak tr ee sa nd pa lm tre es .A sy ou ta ke in al lt he na tu ra lb ea ut yo ft he ar ea yo uc an sta rt to pla n yo ur da y’ sa ct iv it ie ss uc ha s sh in g, sn or ke lin g, sca ll opi ng ka ya ki ng or bo at ing (a ll of wh ic hc an be do ne fro my our back do or ). Th is tow nh ou se ha ss pacio us li vi ng an dk it che na re a an dh as 3b ed ro om se ach wi th th ei ro wn pri va te ba lc on y. 850-227-8890 /8 50-227-7770 www .coastalr eal tyinfo.co m & & & # & $ % !" # & & # ! % %% "$ # SOLD !! Special to The Star Faith Christian School recently honored the graduates of its K5 class as they head off to kindergarten. Members of the class include Annie Cullen, Cade Costin, Celie White, Farrah Spring, Ellison Newman, Jacob Medina, Jakob Prine, Katie Pickett, Kimberly Padilla, Mary Beth McGufn, Peyton Herring, Ruby Williams and Tucker Ashcraft. Congratulations, graduates. The Lion’s Tale School News WES students visit historic Gulf County Court House PHOTOS SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR 23 WES students graduate pre-K at Dead Lakes Park By DARLENE AA KE Special to The Star Twenty-three students graduated from Ms. Darlene Ake’s pre-K class at Wewahitchka Elementary School and will be moving up to kindergarten in the fall. Five 3and 4-year-olds will be returning next year to pre-K. Thanks to the parents and CVS that gave the children goody bags full of treats/gifts and for the food and decoration. A special thank you to Mr. George Cox, Mr. Danny Little, Mr. and Mrs. James Taunton, Mr. and Mrs. Victor Gortman and WES for donations toward the purchase of the book, Dr. Suess’s “Oh The Places You’ll Go.” It has been a wonderful year.

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qY l ¦ ¨ S’ ¦Š’ OSS (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) !!! !!! !!! !!! !!! ! !! COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME e X ]†q~ 8†‚v†‹t‹ L>9 (850) 227-1818 +++&$%&!%& $†¢ † 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Y• <}• u} usˆ tx ›Š• }Š†x B ’ <}• u} Šz ’}x Vsœs xˆx & % "" "# & (850) 229-9596 '" '" % "# '" '" $ '" Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. Nz’ ’ ¡ 9’ ~z …}z ’ T SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 & % # % % % % % $ 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net "#!" !& # $#!! '$ # &!" &# $"0 $' 3073 $' # !'! 4 "' 1 &&& 5'$!5# 727 % 6 &#& !# #5 6 ).3,22+,./77 # & !$ "! $" # #! "$ ('*( $ )'*( SUNDA Y: Sunday School 9:15 Morning Wo rship 10:30 Evening Wo rship 5:00 1601 Long Av e Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 WEDNESDA Y: Family Dinner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children’ s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 Adult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y SCHEDULE B ’ :sŒ ’ ’ <}• u } $ && & 6 ’ rr 8oŒ –t F O {„{Œt‹ †v O’Œ{q {‹Œ 6oˆ {Œ 8y’‹qy ^’ „r o ^ qy† † e† ‹Œy {ˆ ^ t‹• {qt C' o ‚ ^ ’„ ro ^q y †† e† ‹Œy {ˆ ^ t‹• {qt 'S o‚ ^’ „r o < •t„ {„x 4r ’ 6 {pt ^ ’r ˆ‚ e tr „t Œr o R{ xy  ^’ˆˆt ‹ m'S ˆ ‚ ! #% ! # S ˆ‚ ! #% "% ! 'S ˆ ‚ ! #% % 'S ˆ ‚ www .f bcps j. or g www .fb cpsj .or g `›‹xu ¡ `›‹xu ¡ `w ~… Q* u‰ g ’” ~ `z’ wz *f u‰ ?~’ '* ‰ Rt– ^t‹•{ qt ^qytr’ t v†‹ >{‹Œ 6oˆ {Œ 8y’‹qy gz x‹z” xu ¡ @‹‹z’ ‡* '* ‰ 9g 9W 9 '* G* f ‰ `›’’ z‹ xz’ `— ›xz‹— T‹” —’ ¡ '* ‡ G* f ‰ [’ u¡ z’;v…z `— ›x¡ '*f G* f ‰ W›’ ”z’ ¡ '* G* f ‰ Bruce Hodge, Pa stor *+ ˆ Dr Geof fre y Lentz Pa stor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to Fa milies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST Wo rship on the Wa ter “under the sails” on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children’ s time. F AITH Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Doctor dangers explored at Lifetree Caf Special to The Star The dangers of medical mistakes will be discussed 7 p.m. CT Monday, June 2, at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled “Doctor Danger: What Every Patient Needs to Know,” features a lmed interview with Dr. Martin Makary, a cancer surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and author of Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won’t Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care “There are lots of things hospitals don’t tell you,” Makary said. “As many as 25 percent of patients are harmed by medical mistakes. It’s an epidemic, and it kills more people than HIV and car accidents combined.” Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum ABC Jesus Loves Me program helps children learn Special to The Star The Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum in its 3-year-old room. This curriculum uses both hands on learning and learning through play. Children will be prepared for preschool and by the end of the school year children will: z know several Bible stories, memory verses, nursery rhymes, nger plays and songs which they can recall when prompted z know the names of all of the uppercase and lowercase letters z know the phonetic sound of all of the letters z be able to correctly trace all uppercase and lowercase letters with their nger z know by name and be able to correctly trace the numbers 1-15 with their nger z be able to identify various colors and shapes z be able to demonstrate spatial concepts, sorting, and AB and ABA patterns z be able to say the letters of their rst name as well as write them using all capital letters z be introduced to many books z increase in ne and gross motor skills There are a few spots available in this great program which offers care from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call Kristy Raf eld at 227-4320 for enrollment or more information. The perfect gift A perfect gift was nailed to the cross. Only this gift could pay the cost. For the sins of the world He came to die. He did this folks for you and I. That’s not all, He arose from the grave. This man who came, for our souls to save. He said He would go and prepare us a place. If you believe in Him you’ll be saved by grace. If by chance you don’t believe. There will be no pardon and no reprieve. Billy Johnson Star Staff Reports Citywide Vacation Bible School The citywide Vacation Bible School will be hosted by Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church. This year’s theme will be “Jesus the Connection.” Children from ages 5-18 are welcome. The CWVBS will begin at 10 a.m. and continue until 1 p.m. June 2-6. There will be biblical lessons, crafts and snacks. For more information, call Sis. Gloria Q. Gant at 227-7441 or Sis. Minnie Likely at 229-8155. Clothing giveaway There will be clothing giveaway from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET May 31 at First Baptist Church of White City at 7210 State 71 S. The giveaway is sponsored by the Baptist Women’s Mission. Faith BRIEFS

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, May 29, 2014 down time from his sum mer job working at Rafeld Fisheries. “I’m excited and also anxious, anxious to get it started.” Beachum continues on a path that carried long odds. Coming out of high school, a commander in the Port St. Joe High School NJROTC ranks his senior year, Beachum was among 250 applicants accepted into the Preparatory School out of a pool of over 18,000. The winnowing contin ues between Preparatory School and Academy. “I was pretty impressed with what I was able to ac complish,” Beachum said. “I made some great friends and I got accustomed to military life.” There were, Beachum readily acknowledged, high waves to overcome. From the get-go he had to learn to put his person ality in check when in uni form and in the ranks. He found out quickly that con formity is part of the basic discipline of the military. “I consider myself to be a free-spirited person,” Beachum said. “In the mili tary you can’t hold on to that free-spiritedness too long. “But what we had to do each day, as far as drills and study, was very similar to what I did with NJROTC in high school. I was very well-prepared. Our high school program really pre pared me.” He did need to shore up his study habits. Beachum said he was unprepared for the rigorous academic demands of the Prepara tory School as he continued his education to the hopedfor destination of aviation school. The indoctrination pe riod at the Preparatory School, with the rising ear ly for calisthenics, eating, drilling and repeat through out the day, is taxing, but it is only one portion of the program. “There is a very aca demic side to the indoctri nation too,” Beachum said. “During the year, it is very intensive academically.” And learning how to study, the discipline of set ting aside the time to prop erly complete homework and preparation for class was a critical transition, Beachum said. “One of the biggest things I learned was gur ing out how to study,” Bea chum said. “There were times I thought I wasn’t go ing to get this. At rst it was very difcult. “But once I got my study habits down it got easier. It’s all about time management.” The results were evi dent on the GPA line. Struggling initially, Bea chum scored a 3.65 GPA in the year’s nal marking period to earn a 3.25 for the year. “I was glad I made the choice of the Preparatory School,” Beachum said. “I will be better prepared for the academy.” Beachum also carved out time for his favor ite athletic pursuit even though the Preparatory School did not have a soc cer team. Beachum was a standout soccer player in high school. He and some friends formed a team and played a series of club teams in the area. The transition to New port was also eased by an environment similar to home as the Rhode Island city, with a signicant Naval presence, is surrounded by Narragansett Bay. “It is a beautiful area, a nice area, but it does get cold,” Beachum said with a laugh. Beachum left Newport with an appreciation of what he can accomplish when he musters his brainand will-power. He also left with a better understanding that military life, with plenty of rewards, isn’t all glamour. “There were times that it really sucked, for lack of a better word,” Beachum said. “But you have to em brace the suckiness, so to speak. There are time it is miserable. “You just have to wake up every day, put a smile on your face and work hard.” And absorb the life-les sons that surround. “Probably the best thing I gured out, one of the most important things, is all you have to do is care,” Beachum said. “That is probably the best advice I ever heard. “When you care you do your best and when you do that it isn’t hard to distin guish yourself.” At 1600 hours, exactly, on June 30 Beachum will continue to navigate his distinguished path. (w it h co up on ) 30 % O FF P AI NT S & S TA IN S M AY 29 J UN E 16 ** NO PU RCHA SE NECE SSA RY A PUR CH AS E WILL NO T IN CRE AS E YO UR CHA NC ES OF WIN NIN G. LEG AL RE SID EN TS OF TH E 50 UNI TE D ST AT ES (D .C .) 18 YE AR S AND OLDE R. VO ID WH ER E PRO HI BI TE D. Sw ee ps ta ke s end s 6/ 30/1 4. For O cia l Ru le s, pr iz e de scri pt io ns and od ds d is cl os ure vi si t www .s wr ac et ov ic to ry co m. Th e Ch ase fo r the NA SC A R Sp ri nt Cu p™ lo go an d wo rd mar k ar e us ed under licen se by th e Nat io nal As soci at io n fo r St ock Ca r Au to Ra cin g, Inc and Sp ri nt. Sp on sor: Th e Sh er win -W il liams Co mp an y, 10 1 W. Pr os pec t Av enue Clev eland OH 44 11 5. NA SC AR Inc and S pr int are not sp on sor s of th is pr om otion En te r for a Ch an ce to Wi n a 20 14 Fo rd Ex pl or er AN D a VI P tr ip to a 20 14 Ch as e fo r th e NA SC AR Sp ri nt Cu p ™ Ra ce of yo ur ch oi ce ** ENTER AT SWR AC ET OV ICT OR Y. CO M *V alid on re ta il sa le s of reta il pr od uc ts on ly Dis co un t ta ke n o of ou r lis t pr ice Sa le pr ic in g or other o er s th at resul t in gr eat er sa vi ng s wil l sup er se de t his o e r. Mu st su rr ender cou po n at tim e of re demption. Ca sh val ue : 1/ 10 0 of 1¢ O er ex cl udes pre viou s pur ch as es an d pur ch as es of gi ft ca rd s, Multi -P ur po se pr ime rs Min wa x Wo od Fin is h qua rt s, la dd er s, sp ra y eq uipm ent an d ac ce ssor ie s. Ot he r ex cl us i o ns ma y ap pl y, se e st ore fo r de ta il s. Vo id if tra ns ferred pur ch as ed sol d, al ter ed dup lic ate d, or wh e re pr o hi bi te d by la w. Va li d at Sh er wi nWi ll iams an d Sh er wi nWi ll iams op er ate d re ta il pa int st or es on ly We re ser ve the ri ght to acce pt re fu se or li mi t the use of an y cou po n. O er val id 5/ 29 /1 4– 6/ 16 /1 4. 20 14 Th e Sh er wi nWil lia ms Co mpan y. S AV E 15 % ON PA INTIN G SUP PL IES Bring this co up on in an d sav e! S AV E 30 % ON PA IN TS & S TA INS MO N FR I: 7 AM TO 7 PM SA T: 8 AM TO 6 PM SU N: 10 AM TO 6 PM Sto re ho ur s may va ry Se e st or e fo r de ta il s. ST ORE HO UR S: To loc at e a Sh er winWi lliams st or e near yo u, visit sher win-williams .c om or ca ll 1-800-4-SHER WIN. BEACHUM from page B1 Star Staff Report Michael Lister is celebrating his 20 years as a writer with the release of his third Jimmy “Soldier” Riley noir novel, “The Big Hello.” This follows 2011’s “The Big Goodbye” and 2013’s “The Big Beyond.” “The Big Hello” is the conclusion of the thrilling noir trilogy set in the Panhandle of the 1940s. Find out Soldier and Lauren’s fate in the thrilling conclusion to Michael Lister’s landmark “Big” noir series. Walk the mean streets of wartime Panama City with Jimmy “Soldier” Riley, a wounded, woman-haunted knight errant in Michael Lister’s resonant new noir series Publisher’s Weekly calls “a promising private detective series set in 1940s Florida,” and Library Journal says “peppered with snappy dialog, this hard-boiled mystery by award winner Lister is a swell read.” John Dufresne said, “Michael Lister has the world of Florida Panhandle noir all to himself. Tough, violent, and hard-boiled, this novel of obsession and suspense will remind you of Raymond Chandler, Graham Greene, and why you started reading crime novels in the rst place.” Lister plans to celebrate the release of “The Big Hello” with a book release reception and signing at No Name Caf from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET Saturday, May 31. Lister will read from the book and sign copies. The following weekend the novel will come alive in the form of an old-time radio show on stage in front of an audience. Performances will be 7 p.m. CT June 6-7 at Sarzin Hall, Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Tickets can be ordered at MichaelLister.com or purchased at the No Name signing. Lister said it has been an amazing experience to see “The Big Hello” come off the page and onto the stage. Some of the most rewarding and interesting projects he’s been involved with in recent years have been GCSC stage adaptations of his novels “Double Exposure” and “The Big Goodbye.” “I love that these are presentations of the book more than just typical stage adaptations, which means the audience doesn’t lose anything from the books,” Lister said. “Our approach with all three is an enhanced experience of the book. But it’s even more so this time, since we’re doing the play as an old-time ’40s radio show on the stage.” “Shakespeare wrote that ‘the play is the thing,’” Lister said, “but for me the book is the thing. It’s all about the book — bringing the book to life for the audience, who I still view as ‘readers,’ and collaborating with the cast and crew to give the audience the best “reading” experience possible.” “The Big Hello” stars Allen Walker, who is playing the main character, private detective Jimmy “Soldier” Riley for the second time. Walker originally played Riley in GCSC’s production of “The Big Goodbye.” He has also performed all three audio books in the series. Each $20 ticket to the live performance includes a copy of the new novel. Lister’s ultimate goal with the play is to encourage people to read the book. “In fact, in the play we will be stopping short of presenting the entire book so that the audience can read the nal few chapters on their own — but with the voices of the actors and the experience of the play still fresh in their minds,” Lister said. “It’s going to be a unique and fascinating experience.” “Probably the best thing I gured out, one of the most important things, is all you have to do is care. That is probably the best advice I ever heard. When you care you do your best and when you do that it isn’t hard to distinguish yourself.” Javarri Beachum Lister marks new release with signing, play Chipola River about 3 miles from where the river ows into the Apalachicola. He was sitting there on the bank of the river smoking his pipe. They cursed him out and accused him of stealing their timber and said that they would shoot him if he moved that raft. He sat there and smoked his pipe and when he got through he just knocked the ashes out of his pipe, got and started untying the raft. They threw their guns on him and swore they‘d shoot him. He untied the raft, pushed out into the river and as he went down the river he holler back at them. “Well boys, talk is cheap, It takes money to buy liquor“. Nobody shot him. He went on to Apalachicola and sold the timber. Transcribing stories that John shared with us about his memories of the Apalachicola River. There are the rst of 25 pages of maps, one each page at points on the river he tells us his story. Here is what I copied……..BMD We start out at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, which would be at Apalachicola. Each page is heading (top of page) north, the bottom is the south end. PAGE 1 (Yellow Fever) On Sept. 14th 1878, the steamboat “Mary Elizabeth“ arrived in Apalach, the Federal Authorities boarded it and found no sick persons, but decided ____________ ____________ for 20 days in harbor but Capt. Comrick said his boat couldn‘t stand the conditions in the harbor that long. He proposed to go up into Lake Wemico, they refused, and so he headed up into Saul Creek. They __________ shot at his boat 40 or 50 times. Apalachicola was make a port in 1820 during the Admiration of President James Monroe, but did not ofcially belong to the US until 1821. It shipped its rst cotton in 1828, 317 bales, by 1836 it exceeded 51,000 annually. From 1828 until the Civil War started in 1861, more than 300 steamboats ran the river. By 1847 the port of Apalachicola was exporting 160,000 bales of cotton annually. In 1847, the trend started reversing when the big cotton mills were built at Columbus and cotton started going up river. The US Customs Ofce opened in Apalachicola in 1823. During its heydays of cotton exports, MEMORIES from page B1 See ME mM ORIES B7

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 ST JOS EP H BA Y GO LF CL UB SP EC IAL S JUN IOR GO LFE RS (1 7 AND UN DE R) PL AY FR EE WI TH AN AD UL T PA YI NG GO LF ER FR ANKL IN & GU LF CO UN TI ES ON LY SI NG LE AND FA MI LY ME MBE RS HI PS NO IN ITI AT ION FE E & FI RS T MO NTH DU ES FR EE WI TH A 12 MON TH CO MMI TM EN T (M US T PA Y BA LA NC E BY CA SH CH EC K, OR CR ED IT CA RD AT TI ME OF SI GN UP ) CA LL TH E PR O SH OP TO DA Y FO R MO R E INF ORM AT ION OR ST OP BY 850 -2 27 -1 75 1. CA LL TH E PR O SH OP FO R IN FO RM AT ION ON FR EE GO LF LE SS ON S FO R C HIL DR EN EA CH FR ID AY IN JUN E. 70 0 CO UN TR Y CL UB RO AD PO RT ST JO E, FL 32 456 We ca n be sa fe Li ne me n of te n wo rk be si de a bu sy ro ad wa y, an d th at ma ke s a da ng er ous job mo re ha za rd ous Wh en ap pr oa ch ing a ut ili ty ve hicl e, mo ve ov er if sa fe to do so cr ea ti ng an e mp ty la ne bu ff er Wh en ch an gi ng la ne s is n’ t po ss ib le ,r ed uc e yo ur sp ee d. Let ’s wo rk to ge th er to fo ll ow th e la w, pa y at te nt io n, sl ow do wn mo ve ov er an d sta y sa fe To ge th er we po we r yo ur li fe TO GE TH ER Special to The Star TAMPA — Marking its third year at Cooking for Solutions at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition (Coalition) is continuing the legacy of sharing wild, delicious Gulf seafood while highlighting its unique avors and versatility at the annual event, held this year May 16 through 18 in Monterey, Calif. Each year, the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Cooking for Solutions event brings together celebrated chefs from across the country to highlight ne food and wine, while discovering ways to preserve the oceans. Renowned chefs, including Chef Briana Sammut of Beach House Restaurant at Lovers Point in Pacic Grove, Calif.; former private chef to Oprah Chef Art Smith; Food Network Canada Star Chef John Ash; and Hawaii-based Kai Lanai Restaurant chef/owner and television personality Chef Sam Choy will be representing the Gulf of Mexico States by preparing fresh Gulf shrimp, provided by Cox’s Wholesale Seafood and Wood’s Fisheries of Port St. Joe. Both distributors’ shrimp are traceable via Gulf Seafood Trace, a program that allows consumers and retailers to discover their seafood’s story from boat to plate, ensuring that the species is sustainably managed. Attendees can nd Gulf shrimp at the Meet the Chefs reception on May 14, Sustainable Foods Institute 2014 Luncheon and Cooking for Solutions Gala on May 16, A Street Food Extravaganza on May 17, as well as DIY: Grilled Pizza with John Ash and DIY: Pupus and Poke with Sam Choy on May 18. The Coalition’s continued support of Cooking for Solutions each year is rooted in the Gulf of Mexico’s commitment to maintaining a sustained ecosystem for generations to come. This year, among many sustainability practices already in place, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission launched GulfFINFO, an all-inclusive website for everything consumers and chefs need to be condent that Gulf seafood is harvested from sustainable sheries. “With FINFO launching just earlier this year, this is an exciting time to be at Cooking for Solutions to share insight, information and appreciation about sustaining the wonderful resource of Gulf seafood for the future,” said Joanne McNeely Zaritsky, marketing director for the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition. “Both home and professional chefs already know and love Gulf seafood for its exceptional avor and quality, and now FINFO offers a new resource to communicate the sustainability of Gulf seafood.” FINFO is a compilation of the complex and oftenconfusing data from the Gulf of Mexico’s responsibly-managed sheries, synthesized into easy-to-understand answers about the source of your seafood. Gulf of Mexico sheries and organizations are constantly researching and monitoring seafood stocks to remain a leader in sustainability practices. Many of the Gulf States have received exemplary scores and designation for their enforcement groups. Gulf Coast seafood has been an integral part of our culture for decades, and the seafood community is dedicated to responsible shing for future generations. To extend the opportunity to enjoy succulent, sustainabilityraised Gulf seafood at home, Chef John Ash is sharing his Grilled Gulf Shrimp Pizza recipe that he is preparing at the DIY workshop at Cooking for Solutions (recipe at right). For more information about the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition and its sustainable practices, contact Joanne McNeely Zaritsky at joanne. zaritsky@gmail.com, 850224-1129 or 813-286-8390 or visit www.eatgulfseafood. com and follow the Coalition on Facebook at Gulf Coast Seafood and Twitter at @eatgulfseafood. About Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition The Coalition provides a framework for the seafood community to coordinate marketing efforts among the Gulf States with emphasis on working with tourism boards, restaurants, retailers and chefs. The Gulf & South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc. is coordinating the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition through funding provided by the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission’s (NOAA Award #NA10NMF4770481). For more information, visit www.eatgulfseafood.com and follow the Coalition on Facebook at Gulf Coast Seafood and Twitter at @ eatgulfseafood. About Gulf & South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc. The Foundation is a private, regional nonprot research organization with a general membership and Board of Trustees representing a wide spectrum of the commercial shing industry throughout the southeast U.S. Through the Foundation, the commercial seafood and shing industry can collectively identify industry needs, and address those needs through appropriate research and other activities. Representing the nine-state region from Virginia to Texas, the Foundation has sponsored more than 600 sheries related research projects. Provided to the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition by Chef John Ash INg G REDi I ENts TS f F OR D D OUg G H 1 envelope (2 teaspoons) active dry yeast 2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons sugar 1 teaspoons table salt (or 3 teaspoons kosher salt) cup nely-ground corn meal or whole wheat our 3 tablespoons olive oil 4 4 cups unbleached allpurpose our INg G REDi I ENts TS f F OR TOppi PPI N gs GS 1 pound peeled and deveined Gulf shrimp (21 – 25, depending on size) Prepared pizza dough divided into six portions cup extra virgin olive oil for brushing and drizzling 2 cups loosely packed shredded Sonoma Jack cheese cup freshly grated pecorino cheese 6 ounces fresh mozzarella, drained and sliced 3 cups canned and crushed tomatoes in puree, preferably with basil 1/3 cup coarsely chopped basil leaves Big pinch of crushed red pepper akes for each pizza • Slice the shrimp in half lengthwise. Blanc for 1 minute in simmering salted water. Drain and plunge into cold water to stop the cooking. Drain again and set aside. The shrimp will be just barely cooked at this point. • Prepare a two-level (one side cooler than the other) charcoal re, setting the grill rack 4 inches or so above the coals. Alternately, you can use a gas grill with one side hotter than the other. With a lightly oured work surface and rolling pin, roll the dough portion into 10 inch or so free-form circles as thinly as you can, about -inch thick. Don’t worry about the shape, as even thickness is the goal. Place them on a sheet pan divided by parchment or waxed paper. • When the coals are evenly lit and medium hot, brush the dough with olive oil and place it oiled side down onto the hot part of the grill. Within a minute or so the dough will puff and bubble, the underside will stiffen and grill marks will appear. • Using tongs or a spatula check to see that it is not burning. If so, move it to the cooler part of the grill. Flip the crust over, onto the cooler part of the grill and quickly brush the grilled surface lightly with olive oil. Spread a thin layer of the tomatoes on the dough and then quickly top with a bit of each of the cheeses, shrimp and basil. Remember that you don’t need or want to cover the entire surface of the pizza. • Immediately put the hood down and cook for another minute or two or until the cheeses are melted. Move pizza to a cutting board and cut into wedges and serve immediately. Cook remaining pizzas in the same manner. Chef’s note: When you have topped the pizzas if after a couple of minutes the cheese has not melted and bubbling a bit, either the coals were not hot enough or you have used too much cheese and toppings. A longer time on the grill will only dry out the pizza and toughen it. The ideal crust should be both chewy and crisp. This is why a good 2-level re is so important. • To make the pizza dough, in the bowl of an electric mixer tted with a dough hook stir the yeast into the warm water with sugar. After 5 minutes it should begin to bubble, then stir in the salt, corn meal and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Add the our, stirring at low speed until the dough forms a rough ball and pulls away from the sides of the bowl, about 4 minutes. You may need to add a little our or water here. Let the dough rest in the bowl for 15 minutes. It should be fairly soft. • Remove from the bowl and divide the dough into 6 equal pieces. Gently round each piece into a ball and brush or rub with a little olive oil. Place each into a zippered plastic storage bag and drizzle remaining olive oil (1 teaspoon or so) over each ball and seal the bags closed. Let the balls sit for at least 30 minutes. You can also refrigerate them overnight at this point and roll out and make pizzas the next day. Sitting overnight actually gives you a better avor in the dough. • If you’ve refrigerated them, plan to take them out of the refrigerator at least 1 hour before you plan to make the pizzas. Alternately you can freeze the dough for up to 3 months. Again, plan to let the dough thaw and come to room temperature before using. Makes six 10-inch pizzas Gulf Seafood continues support of Monterey Bay Aquarium Cooking for Solutions Wild-caught shrimp, from Wood’s Fisheries and others, showcased to support sustainabilityGR iI LLED GUL fF SHR impIMP P iI ZZ aA

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Local The Star| B7 Thursday, May 29, 2014 — Ma y 21 20 14 — AT TE NTI ON : AL L GU LF CO UN TY RE SI DE NT S IN UNI NC ORP OR AT ED CO UN TY Th e Gu lf Co un ty Bo ar d of Co un ty Com mi ss io ne rs is pr ou d to an noun ce th at Wa st e Pr o ha s be en awa rde d th e co nt ra ct fo r ga rb ag e se rv ic es ef fe ct iv e Ju ne 1s t. Ca rt s ar e bei ng de li ve re d, st ar ti ng th is we ek If yo u ar e in th e un in co rp or at ed Co un ty an d ar e re cei vi ng Wa st e Ma nag em en t ga rb ag e se rv ic e, yo u wi ll be re ce iv in g a ne w ga rb ag e ca rt fr om Wa st e Pr o. If th e ne w ca rt ha s a de cal on it yo ur da y of picku p wi ll be in di ca te d on th at de cal If yo u re cei ve yo ur ca rt an d it do es n’ t ha ve a de cal yo ur rou te da y wi ll sta y th e sa me as it is no w. Wa st e Ma nag em en t ha s in di ca te d th at an y se rv ic e pa id fo r wi th t he ir co mpa ny pa st Ju ne 1s t, wi ll be re fu nd ed di re ct ly by th em Th ey wi ll al so b e pi c ki ng up th ei r car ts on or af te r th e la st pi c ku p da y fo r yo ur ar ea pri or to Ju ne 1s t. IT IS V ER Y IM PO RT AN T TH AT YO U DO NO T PU T GA RB AG E IN TH E WA ST E MA NA GE ME NT CA RT S AF TE R TH E LA ST DA Y OF PI CK UP FO R YO UR AR EA NO R PU T GA RB AG E IN TH E WA ST E PR O CA RT S PR IOR TO JU NE 1S T. Wa st e Pr o wi ll be se nd in g bi ll s to ea ch cu st ome r. If yo u do no t re cei ve a car t an d had se rv ic e, or wi sh to ad d se rv ic e, pl ea se co nt ac t Wa st e Pr o at th e nu mb er bel ow If yo u ha ve an y qu es ti on s, ple as e co nt ac t Wa st e Pr o at (8 50 ) 87 218 00 TH AN K YO U GULF CO UNT Y BO CC AN D AD MI NI ST RA TIO N e ne w College of Ap plied St udies at FSU Pa nama City was appr ov ed by the FSU Boar d of Tr ustees in Ju ne 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily re spond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. We invite yo u to suppor t e Campaign for Ou r Community ’s Un iv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr ow ’s jobs. Ou r goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of Ap plied St udies by 20 17, which will allo w FSU Pa nama City to establish student scholarsh ips, impleme nt ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr ov ide ne w equipment and tech nology To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our community ’s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mb lo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR CO MMUN IT Y’ S UNIVER SIT Y En do wme nt for To morr ow ’s Jo bs % $ '# % # (# % (* *# # (# % & ) $ *# ## #! *# & ) $ & *# +' ( ( '# #! # * # # *# +' $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL The steamer Calhoun sails along the Apalachicola Apalachicola had 2 cotton presses that pressed the bales of cotton into smaller size for shipping our seas. One was docilely operated, the other was steam operated. Capt. Wing set another milestone on Monday, October 25th when he completed his 10,600th round trip, the “Crescent City“ from Apalachicola to Carrabelle, without a mishap, a record never equated. The years 1920 – 1927. PAGE 2 The Pinhook is in the middle where Jackson River and Sauls Creek Cutoff is at the Apalachicola River mile marker 5.7 (G.I.W. 345.7). At this point the Intra-Coastal Canal joins the Apalachicola River system. The Pinhook, the last bend in the Apalachicola River before it just empties into the Jackson River about 5 miles above Apalachicola is where the current ran for the log rafts .At this point the saw mill would send “Tug Boat“ to bring the logs to the mill. In the mid April 1847 the U.S. Mail boat “Augusta“ and the “Eufaula“ collided, the “Augusta“ sank. The 5 mile trestle on the Apalachicola River Northern Rail Road always aspersed me from the time I was a little boy I did not see how on earth men were to build it. Four Tree Cut-off just below the sh camps on the west bend of the river was a short cut for shermen, but got to be dangerous because of high speed boats running towards it. It is narrow, curved, and had high grass eight feet tall on both sides. Chipley Creek is somewhere in the area-ANRR-between Grassy Creek and MEMORIES from page B2 See MEMORIES B8

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Acorn Creek. The 5 mile trestle on it was from River Junction to Port St. Joe, the ANRR crossed the Apalachicola River system just about 4.5 miles north of Apalachicola on its way down from the NE, it rst crosses East River, the big St. Marks and the main Apalachicola River and all the sloughs and swamps between. PAGE 3 Anthony Apiary-heading north on the Big Excursion days our kin folks from Greensboro would come down on the train and we would meet them at Hosford or Telozia. On an “Excursion“ about the 1918 or 1919, we were crossing the 5mile trestle and my cousin from Greensboro, Wright Johnson and I saw a big alligator from the window of the couch swimming up the East River. The new year 1852 on Oct. 9th the steamboat “Alabama“ hit a snag on the river ans was lost. “Columbus“ (maybe snag boat) sank in Hurricane Reach one mile below St. Marks River. Visible at low water, built at Bainbridge in 1904. The A.N.R.R. was completed from River Junction to Apalachicola in the year 1907. In April of 1907 the 1st passenger train locomotive chugged into PSJ during the early years of its operation the Rail Road have “Excursions“ at a cut rate fare to PSJ that was a big deal with people who lived inland up the railroad to go to PSJ for a day of picnicking and swimming in the bay. The old St. Joe Hotel was headquarters. Before Highway 98 was built between the hotel and the bay. There was a boardwalk all the way from the front of the hotel to the bay. I once saw a one-legged man who had put on his bathing suit in the hotel and hop on one leg all the way down the walkway to the bay. PAGE 4 (North to Howard Creek, Berrisman Slough, Harrison Creek-left, right is Bloody Bluff Island) In the late 1940s Merle Bishop drowned in the lower Brothers (1948, I am kin to this man). In these days the International Paper Company furnished a recreation camp down on the West Bank of the Big Brothers with all the comfort of home for their employees. Merle Bishop was personnel ofcer for the company, he and two other company employers were on their way to camp on Saturday night, when Merle felled overboard and drowned. Here at the mouth of the Brothers, my father and his brother, who were teenagers at the time had been trading timber in the swamps. They had nished their job and hailed the steamboat for a ride up the river. They were standing on a small dock when the steamboat sung into it and knocked the deck out from under them. One of them had a bed roll and a rie in his hand and the others had a suit case and a rie, a deck hand caught my uncle by the leg, my father was knocked into the river. He dodged behind a tree to keep the steamboat from crushing him. They lost the bedrolls and the suit cases, but both of them held onto their ries. (Bloody Bluff Island-landing) This is where Mr. Richards of Wewahitchka and his party caught up with the Indians after they had killed all of his family except one little boy named Jehu who managed to escape and hide out in the swamps on the Dead Lakes. Mr. Richards and his party delivered such re power on those Indians until the river was red with blood for a great distance downstream. PAGE 5 (South is Bloody Bluff – North is Fort G G adsden Creek, near Smith Creek) At mile 18 site of the trading post owned the English rm of Panton & Leslie and Etc. A large chain, later taken over by Forbes. The had 1200 cows here at one time. In the early history of Florida, there was a frontier trading post on the East Bank of the river at about mile marker #18, known as Prepress Bluff. One time the trading company had over 1200 cattle here. Part of the land credit to Panton, Leslie and company, a British Trading Post by the Indians in payment in debts owed by the Indians. It was called the Forbes Purchase and was as far as St. Marks. Steamboat “Cuba“ snagged and sank 3miles above Bloody Bluff in March 1839, it was a side wheeler. PAGE 6 (Heading north is Owl Creek, entering Liberty County. South was Ft. G G adsden State Park, Forbes Island, and Harding Landing) Willis Landing on the upper Brothers with paved access out to Hwy 71. I have shed this area for many years. There is one BIG Gator that lives in the upper end of this swift water. The upper part of Brickyard-cut off slough next to the Apalachicola River was stopped up with logs and known as “Log Jam“. It was not accessible for many years until the U.S. Engineers cleared it out. One night back in 1940 before the road was paved from Willis Landing on the Brother‘s out to Hwy 71, a friend of mine was coming out from Willis Landing and was meeting a car. Before they met the other car came to a curve in the road and ran across the ditch and into the woods and hit a tree. My friend stopped his car and ran out and hollered, “my friend, what happened“? By that time the man had gotten out of his car and was staggering around and he says “I stopped up there at that lling station and asked the man which way to Willis Landing“ and he says, “you see this here straight road, and it went straight. In Spanish Florida, Fort Gadsden was built by the British on Spanish about 1814. A steamboat carries cotton down the Apalachicola River MEMORIES from page B7 See ME moMO R iI E sS B9

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Local The Star| B9 Thursday, May 29, 2014 It harbored runaway Negro slaves and hostile Indians and was known as a Negro Fort. It was from July 27, 1816 in orders from Andrew Jackson. There were 320 people in the fort at the time and 270 of them were killed and most of them wounded. The fort was later rebuilt by Capt. James Gadsden and named for him. He was General Jackson‘s engineer, it was rebuilt in 1817. North on Owl Creek is partly Franklin County and partly Liberty County. It‘s accessible by road on the Liberty County side and has a public camp and boat ramp. I‘ve seen some awful big gators on this creek. PAGE 7 (North is Kennedy Creek, Hentz, Simmons and Larkins Landings) (South of the page is Owl Creek in Franklin/ Liberty County). In 1846, the steamboat “Oconie“ sunk at the west bank of the river about 150/200 yards near Brushy Creek. It collided with the steamboat “Osceola“. The old steamboat boiler and pistons are on display at Fort Gadsden State Park and are probably off the “Oconie“ instead of the train as stated on the sign. In the 1800s Grandma Kelley saw one of the Hathcocks kill a man on deck of the steamboat here with a hatchet near Brushy and Neal‘s Landing in Liberty County. When Tom Scott was killed, he had taken my father‘s place as head of a Timber cutting crew for Cypress Lumber Company in Apalachicola. He was shot from the bushes at his camp one night. The case was not salved. PAGE 8 (North is mile marker 30, near Camp House, between the Chipola Cut/ off and A A palachicola Rivers. South is Kennedy Creek at Upper E E lbow). The William Hentz family lived for more than 20 years on the upper Reaches of Kennedy. They moved from here in 1889 when he was 16 years old. Battle Bend, the U S Engineers cut out this bend and stopped it up. (Middle of the page/map is Camp House at mile marker #28. There used to be a wharf here and a lot of turbulence. (Left side the river is now in Gulf County, and the right side is in Liberty, just at where the Brothers River begins).(Also known as Three Rivers. That includes Brothers, Chipola, and Apalachicola Rivers) Heading north near Douglas Landing……Before the Chipola Cut/off was dug in 1916 steamboats serving the area up down river including Wewa, & Vacincty had to turn around and go back down to the Junction. Of the Chipola and Apalach rivers to proceed up the Apalachicola River. Digging the Chipola Cut/off was a mighty big aid to the steamboat men. The Chipola Cut/off is mighty0000000000000000 crooked so I suspect there was a slough that ran through the cut and the cut/off fall _____ ______ it? PAGE 9 (North, Camp House, near mile marker #33. Left side of river shows Upper Piney Reach Dikes). The swiftest areas on the river is at Double Points. (Middle of page on Liberty County side.) The 3rd steamboat “Chipola“ was built in Apalachicola in 1911. It was snagged and lost in the Chipola River in 1923. I remember this boat. In the early 1950s, my father John Hentz Sr., nephew Jimmy Carmore (?) John L. Hentz, my son and I camped on the east of the river. I hunted the Liberty County side, the river was high and Jimmy got lost in the back water and almost froze to death, “Big Piney Reach“ called “Lower Piney Reach“ today used to be considered the swiftest part of the river. Back in logging days people had to paddle their boats up and down it. My father said once he heard an old Negro logging hand, swear under oath that it was 2 miles down river and four miles up the river. This happened in Federal Court. PAGE 10Top left side of page is the G G ulf County side, mile marker 38. In the year 1886 on May 2nd, the steamboat Lee was lost in Moccasin slough. It was a stern wheeler, 121 ft. long, 21 ft wide. I don‘t see how it got in there, that slough must have been a lot larger, back then than it is today. The steamboat Elizabeth, a paddle wheeler was built in 1842 in Marietta, Ohio, it sunk about 200 yards above Styx. My people and the men that worked with them used to run logs through the Virginia Cut. Note: written in the middle of the map at Judges Camp and River Styx under Louis Bend on Moccasin Slough. In the 1950s Judge Mercer Spear and I saw 13 wild turkeys around 1 p.m. in the day How in the world did the steamboat Bertha Lee get in here? (on the right side of the river near River Styx). On Jan 4th 1844, the steamboat Fanny Elssler burned at mile marker #35 in the narrows. The re started in the wood supply. She was run ashore, and all the people escaped. My Grandfathers‘ family build on the upper end of Kennedy Creek until the year 1889. River Styx, this was Bill Larkins and family‘s stamping grounds. This area is known as “The Briar Patch“, it‘s bounded on the east by Kennedy Creek and on the south by Sheppard Slough. Sheppard‘s Lake and River Styx and on the west by a River Swamp. PAGE 11 Top of the page is Iola Landing, mile marker #45, bottom (south) is G G ator Slough and Lanier A A piary, near mile marker #39. (right side rst) In the 1800 there was a post ofce and hotel here at Iola, in 1837 a railroad was built from St. Joe to here a distance of 28 miles. It was abandoned about 1839/40. The 2nd steamboat Chipola was built here in 1886, it was a stern wheeler. The Chipola Cut-off was completed in 1916 In the year 1899 on June 29, the steamboat Apalachee, a stern wheeler was snagged in the Chipola-Cut-off and at last, one killed. The John W. Callahan Jr. struck a snag about 2 miles south of Wewahitchka and was sunk. One life was lost, and the Captain was Roy Connell, this was on 3/25/23, if so, it was raised because it was still in operation in 1927. Lucille White says it was 1923 when the Callahan Jr. cut her father‘s launch in two at the Bristol Landing. People used to tell me that they could see the wreckage of the Callahan until a few years ago. In 1841 the term ??? of the railroad Iola was described as located upon a beautiful bluff of the Apalachicola River (m#45) connected with the steamer running Tri-weekly. Mr. Davidson is the post master and overseer of a ne orange grove as did S.S. Alderman, J.W. Keyes, and J.A. Donaldson. It was the site of a friendly Indians Settlement in 1823 occupied by John Blount. He was a friend and guide of General Andy Jackson. He later moved to Blountstown. The U.S. post ofce at Iola was established in 1838, and was discontinued in 1845. The site of Iola was originally owned by the Kentucky Deaf and Dumb Asylum. PAGE 12 North (top of the page) is Porter Landing in Calhoun County. During the 1980s on a Sunday afternoon, a boy named Ronnie Taylor struck something and was throw from his boat and drowned at upper end of Porter Reach. A big alligator lays out here on the west bank of the river at the lower end of this slough (mile marker #47). South (bottom of page) at mile marker #46 is the road to Iola Landing and the right side of the river is in Liberty County, also the Florida River is below Green Back Lake. One early Monday morning in October 1920, my father John Hentz Sr. and his cousin Will Durham and I came down to the old Lindsey place on the Florida River to go hunting and shing. We intended to go to Green Back Lake but got lost and wound up on Dog Slough. (top right side of page, on the Liberty County side) We killed 2 turkeys and caught all the sh we could carry. I was only nine years old at the time. Page 13. North is Coons Landing (mile marker #55) left side of river is Calhoun County, right side is Liberty. South is Dog Slough, Queen City Lake, and Dick‘s Point. The steamboat Queen City was one of the most ——fun?—boats that ran the river. It operated on the river for many years. It must have sunk here on Queen City Point, but I have not found a record of it. If it sank here it had to have been raised and put back into service. The records said that it was built in Columbus and dismantled there. About the year 1900 Charles B. Wingate was one of the pilots on the Queen City. One cold morning about 1950, I shot a squirrel on the west bank of Queen city Lake and the biggest buck I ever saw jumped in the lake right behind me and was all the way across the middle of the lake splashing water at least 40 feet in every direction. The lake was about belly deep on him. I just stood there with my little shot in my gun and watched him go. That was some sight with the sun glistering off the water. (Middle of the map/page at mile marker #52 is E E quiloxic, Liberty Co. side). I have hunted this Equiloxic Creek and Florida River swamp all my life. I have memories of hunting and shing trips in the area. (Red Hill and Double Bridges founded listed here. When Capt. Wingate blew that whistle it scared those Indians to death. Some ran to the deck and jumped in the river, and all that could ran down the gang plank.PAGE 14 WAs S missin MISSIN G PAGE 15. North is Lundy Lake (right side of river) at mile marker #65. Calhoun County is on the left side. William Augustus Bowles was an Indian Agent, he went back to the Bahamas before Andrew Jackson came to this area, he was Lucky. In the year 1839 on May 15th or 20th, the Creek Indians attacked the settlement of Roberts at Stiffnulgee and John and Nathan Smith home at Rico‘s Bluff. At Stiffnulgee the Indians burned the Roberts home and killed a little boy. Robert‘s was wounded but he his wife, and a man named Aldrich and four children escaped. At the Smiths‘ home at Rico‘s Bluff, Smith (Nathan), three children, a Mrs. Richards and her ve children and a man named White were all murdered. Smith, his wife, another woman, and two men escaped. Some 15 of the refugees came down river on the mail boat Commerce. They saw Indians on the bank of the river when the Commerce threaded through the narrows seven miles north of Fort Gadsden. (South at mile marker #60 is Muscogee Landing on the Liberty County side) When I was a little boy m father and I cut board timber out of this area. Here at Muscogee Bluff in the early 1800‘s, William Augustus Bowles, an English trader and adventurer tried to create an independent “Indian State“. He appeared to have the unofcial approval of the British. It was supposed to be an independent sovengin state with him at the head of it. His adventure failed. (Estiffanulga Landing, between mile marker #63 & 64). This bluff is between 30 to 40 feet high, it is between Apalachicola and Bristol. There used to be a big turpentine operation here. It had several different operators over the years, I remember Mr. Reddish, and Mr. Mizell. One night, in the 1920‘s Claude Bateman, my father, and I went cat shing with ___? On the outside of the lake, today very little water goes down it, since the U.S. Engineers cut out the bend in the river at Point Poloway and stopped it up. PAGE 16 North, is Bakers Landing (mile marker # 70). On May 11, 1838, the steamboat Irwinton was on the way down river with 200 bales of cotton when it caught are. All but 50 bales were thrown overboard. It sank in 13 feet of water and was later raised and ran the river for many more years. This happened a few miles south of Blountstown. The crew and passengers got ashore safely and were carried home by the Commerce. This happened at Points Poloway. In the early days the Johnson family had a steamboat Landing here at Points Poloway. (right side of river (Liberty Co. side) on the left is Outside Lake, to your upper right is another little lake, unnamed. This must be the Johnson sh lake. It was one of my favorite shing holes, when I was a little boy. Sometime about the year 1919, Mr. Theo Ford accidentally shot his hand off with a shotgun here at Point Poloway. His father in-law, Jule Michaux was with him at the time. They had to go home in a horse and wagon. Mr. Tom Johnson butcher beef and sent it to Apalachicola on the steamboat. He had a “catch dog“ that went with him all the time. Once Mr. Johnson met the boat at the landing and got off of it and went home, but the dog stayed on the boat and went to Apalachicola. He caught the boat on it‘s return trip and when home. The boat crew put a sign in his collar that said “I am Tom Johnson‘s dog, who‘s dog are you? Page 17, North now is at Sheppards Landing (mile marker #77), left is West Wynnton on the Calhoun County side of the river, and to the right in Liberty County is Wind Lake, south is Baker Lake and Poloway cut-off. On Friday afternoon in the fall of 1928, Mr. Will Fields was shot and killed in the river swamps on the Calhoun County side. Outside Lake runs down the outside of the swamp a distance of about 6 miles and back into the river at Estifangula. This used to be the worst bend in the river, timber rafters had to pole their rafts away from the bank all the way around this bend. Poloway Cutoff “The US Engineers cut this bend out of the river and allowed it to stop up. Capt. E.L. Maquder was Captain on the Big Callahan about the year 1919 and later. I remember him. In 1915 the “W.C. Bradley“ and the “City of Eufaula“ were two of the main stays on the river and had electric lights. The Callahan line also had electric lights. (north left side) Old River See m M E moriMORI E sS B10 The Cypress Creek sawmill MEMORIES from page B8

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Local B10 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL FLOOR CARE, INC. Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning Serving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceram ic Ti le and Grout Cleaning RV s-C ars -T rucks -V ans 24 Hou rE mer genc yW ater Extraction AL LD OG TR AI NI NG Ca ll fo rf re eq uo te s Me li ss a Mc Cu tc han Own er /T ra ine r 69 11 Da vi dW hi t el dR d. We wa hi tc hk a, Fl .3 24 65 Se eu so n To mG ol ds mi th Ph oto gr ap hy Cu st om Ph oto gr ap hy Se rv ic es :E ve nt s, Fa mi ly ,C or por at e, Lo ca ti on ,R ea lE sta te Fin eA rt Pr in ts ; to mgo ld sm it h .a rt is tw eb si tes .c om Po rt ra it St ud io 31 8R eid Av e Po rt St .J oe ,F L 32 45 6 85 089 928 83 to m. go ld sm it h@ fa ir poi nt .n et Br yk Pr op er ty Ma nag em en t Va ca ti on Re nt al Cl ea ni ng Ma in te na nce Fl oor in g/ Ca rpe tI ns ta ll at io n/ Ca rpe tC lea ni ng Sp ec ia lizi ng in Ab sen te eO wn ers Pr op er ty Man ag em en t (8 50 )3 81 -5 333 GET YO UR AD 227-784 7 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! (Calhoun Co, side) My Uncle James Hentz and his partner, H.B. Gaskin owned this swamp on Old River for many years. The steamboat “Commerce“ built in Albany, Ga. In 1836, exploded in 1840, with ve lives lost. In 1838 a white family‘s home opposable of Blountstown on the river was destroyed by Indians. There were about 30 in the party, but this was just a part of a large group of 80 to 100 more Indians. In 1842, Gen. Ethan Allen Hitchcock conducted, just about the last act of Indian removals of the 2nd Seminoles Indian Wars. He boarded the Chattahoochee‘s in the mid December with 80 men and ofcers and set after a band of Creeks “Pascofa“, they had completed despoliations up and down the river. He __________ them and per— ——them to take passage from O clock Bay to Cuba. This was accomplished in 1843. This pretty much nished the Indians troubles along the river. PAGE 18 North (m. m. #82) right side of the river is Ramsey‘s Landing. Left side is “The Bayou“. On Sunday, November 1st 1839 at 2 p.m. the boiler of the steamboat “LeRoy“ blew up two miles north of Blountstown. The pilot Halloman was thrown 100 yards up the river still holding on to the wheel in his hands. He swam to safety. The mail was returned by Slade Sutton and put on the steamboat “Louisa“. Six people were killed. The bridge between Calhoun and liberty counties was opened up about 1937, and Highway 20 was paved about the same time. (Hwy 20 and the Blountstown Bridge here on this page is located between mile markers #79/80). Pryor to that time we went down to the bank of the river at Bristal Landing and traveled down the west bank a distance of about four miles to the old Charley Cayson ferry and crossed over the river on a at pushed by a launch. The little wooden bridge across the sloughs were tied to the trees with wire to keep them from oating off during high water. The steamboat “Apalachicola“ was built here at Blountstown. It was lost at King‘s Rock, Alabama on May 16, 1848. On December 18, 1916 here at Blountstown, a distant relative died, she was Ellen Gaskin, she was the daughter of my grandfathers older sister. My father and older sister was going to the funeral of a friend, a dock boy (the rest of this story I could not make it out to nish telling you). An old Indian mound is here, possibility at Albert Cayson‘s Place, and also here at Charly Cayson‘s ferry. Sometime in the 1920s, Mr. Jim White had a mail contract to carry the mail back and forth from Bristol to Blountstown. He brought a new launch to do the runs with. The launch was tied up at Bristol and the steamboat (unnamed) ran down on it and it‘s paddles chopped the launch into. The steamboat “John C. Calhoun“ was built in Brownsville, Pa. In 1859, it‘s boilers exploded at 6 a.m. April 28, 1860 here at Bristol, killing eight people, another reported 12 killed. One of them was Leander M. Crawford, it‘s Captain. PAGE 19 North is a natural gas submarine pipeline crossing (at mile marker #87) Right side of river (Liberty Co.) is Beaver Dam & Little Sweetwater, Left side of river (Calhoun Co.) half way down is Hollis Landing. Indians trouble lasted up and down the river until the early 1840s, my grandmothers peoples‘ home along the banks of the river were raided many times. They would hide out in the swamps from the Indians and would have to put handkerchiefs in the children‘s‘ mouths so that the Indians couldn‘t hear them crying. The Indians would break up all their chinaware, cut up their feather beds, eat up every thing they could not steal of their livestock and poultry. No area of the State was more of a reason for the US to take Florida from Spain than our Apalachicola Valley area. There were constant troubles up and down our southern borders. The Indians could raid and kill our properties, then dodge back into Spanish Fla. And Spain did nothing about it. The massacre of the people on the Army boat one mile south of Chattahoochee by Himolle Micca and his band was the last straw. That happened in 1817. Negro Fort on the Apalachicola River was Jackson‘s base of operation. Old Chief John Blount (SORRY the rest of this page is cut, and I couldn‘t complete the story…..BMD) South, right side of river is Kelley Branch. Uncle Joe Kelleys‘ real name was James Archibald Kelley. “Joe“ was a nickname I think his wife used, her name was Bellona Mae Grifn, Kelley. Kelley Branch was named for old Uncle Joe Kelly‘s family. He owned property at Rock Buff, Bristol, and Kennedy Creek. PAGE 20North (m.m. #91) at A A kins Landing (left side of River)and Wayside Landing right of river). South, Porters Landing (Calhoun Co, side) In the late October 1840 Capt. Smith of the “Louisa“ reported seeing a raft along the river here that a band of Indians had used to cross the river. Sometime between Friday and Sunday, Colonel Mapes of the US Army examined it and decided it to have been built by whites. I have wondered if this was the same band of Indians that massacred the McClaine (or McLaine) family just a few miles to the north at Sycanore. (*note by John Hentz)I am sure that the name Himolle Micco was the position held by the Indian chief in the Indian ____ by and was old Chief Nemanthla from Fowltown that led the massacre of the two river boat loads of solders on the Apalachicola River on November 21, 1817. Nemanthila‘s Village had been destroyed about nine days earlier by US solders. PAGE 21 North is (m.m. #94) left is Johnson Landing, just below this is Ocheese Landing, and on the right side is Coopers Landing and Torreya State Park. One of the two places where the trees grow that built Noah‘s Ark is near by here. Rock Buff, in the mid 1800s this way was probably the main town in Liberty County, my grandmother and her brother were raised by an old Great grand Aunt, we called Grandma Kelley. There were Louise and Calvin Durham, they were left orphaned in Apalach when they were small. I think their parents died about the same time in the yellow fever epidemic in 1849. Rock Buff, during the Civil War a parade was held in Rock Buff by a unit of the 2nd Fla. Calvary and my grandfather William Hentz was the Commanding Ofcer. The speech was given and the ag was given and was presented by Lou Durham. Years later when my grandfathers‘ wife died he went back to Rock Buff and married Lou Durham. The ag she presented to his troops that day is in the State Archives in the State Capital today. The old Jason Gregory mansion stood here (on the right side of the river) on the Calhoun County side since before the Civil War, when Torreya State Park was established, the old mansion was moved across the river to the Park. Rock Buff Landing –The carnage sugar plantation was somewhere in this area, Old Great Uncle James A. Kelley was overseer. PAGE 22North and to the right (G G adsden County) side of the river is A A spalaga Landing (m.m. #98) to the left side of the river is Blue Springs and Hickory Landing (Jackson County) to the south is still Calhoun and Liberty counties. In the early days of steam boating on the Apalachicola River the boats were attached by the Indians. In some instances they were shot at from both side of the river. The steam boats would have to put up barricades along the decks to catch the bullets and arrows. Sometimes people were killed while being on the boats. The US Governor passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830 and the Indians problems were pretty much saved by the Spring of 1843. Here in the year 1840 a bunch of renegade Indians massacred almost all of the McLaine families. They are buried here in Sycamore graveyard. The local churches made a monument to the family and a plaque recovered the incident. The plaque reads: “McLane, In memory on April 10th 1840, Mrs. Nancy McLane, age 40 was shot, Catherine, age 13 was shot and scalded by Indians, 2 small children was killed by pine knots. John McLane killed the chiefs‘ son, this occurred close to Telogia Creek“. PAGE 23 North is Sampson Landing at (m.m. #102) Jackson Co, side. The steamboat “W.C. Bradley“ sank at Aspalaga sometime in 1919. At Coe‘s Landing in the year 1845 in early February on a Monday, the boiler of the steamboat “Siren“ blew up killing 10 people, all were employees of the steamboat crew. Capt. Sharples was blown 50 foot through the air. He landed in the water and swam to safety. A lady passenger was rescued from the water by the engineer, one person was saved by clinging to a bale of cotton oating. The boat was carrying 200 bales of cotton and was a complete lost. Pryor to the Civil War, my grandfather William Hentz had a cotton plantation, cotton gin, and a Negro slaves on the river in this area. He was make a free dealer by Special Act of the Fla. Legislature before he was 21 years old. PAGE 24AA BUSY PAGE AGE HE E R E E The City of Marianna on our right (mile marker #105) and the Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, also Highway 90 and the Victory Bridge. We also have the Louisville & Nashville Railroad on the right side of the river and on our left is the DcLiff Mat‘ls, south is the Farrel Landing and the G G ulf Power steam plant. On July 22, 1922 the Victory Bridge was opened on the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. In the year of 1840, on June 12th the steamboat “Barbara Hunt“ was lost at the site of Victory on the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. In the year 1842 near River Junction, the steamboat “Chamas“ exploded on Oct 31st, lives were lost. Fright on the Apalachicola River during the year 1911 (the year I was born) was valued at $15,784,029.00 which included 13,842 bales of cotton, 50,194 barrels of naval (stock/stores) and 1,200.000 packages of merchandise. The two steamboats that were most proment were the “Queen City“ and the “W.C. Bradley“ both of them ran the river for many years. The Indian chief Himolle Micco also know as NeMarthla. He was later executed at Fort Marks by Andrew Jackson. The woman who survived the massacre was Mrs. Stuart, she was later rescuered in Fla. And married John Dill and lived in Fort Gaines. In late November 1817 an open Army boat being propelled by hand oars with 20 able bodied solders some sick solders of woman who were solder wife‘s and four children were massacred here by several hundred Indians, one woman and six men escaped.PAGE 25 (LAst ST PAGE) North is Lake Simimole, (mile markers all start over, this is at m.m. 2 ) Georgia state line. The right side here is all water and Decatur County, and to the left is the Aplachee Correctional Institutional……………John‘s last memories……. Somewhere about here was located the Indian Village of Fowltown in 1817. It was the home of Seminole Chief Semthla and his band (Ne-marthla). *note Fowltown was farther to the N.E. Beginningsabout the year 1828, steamboats became the movers of people and fright, they opened the interior of the county, towns and communities sprang up all along thr interior waterways. Towns, and families had their steamboat landings along the waterways, the entire County depended on steamboats for their transportation, people even went shopping on the boats. Snags and rocks in the river were a peril to the steamboat, cleaning them out was a big job. It was nothing uncommon for groups of citizens from town along the waterways to go to Washington D.C., begging the Federal Government for help to clean them out. The US Army Corps of Engineers were to assigned the job of cleaning out and maintaining the waterways for trafc and have done a wonderful job of it for many years. The haydays of the steamboats lasted about 100 years, 1828 to 1928, a lot of old steamboat landings along the river still bear the old family names……….The End. ME mM ORIES from page B9

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 29, 2014 The Star | B11 ** 2013 GULF COUNTY DELINQUENT TAX ROLL 2013 ** Pursuant to Chapter 197.432, Florida Statutes, Subsection (16) Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Sale for Delinquent Gulf County Property Taxes will be conducted online on the Gulf County Tax Certificate Auction Website at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com. Bids can be entered on the site starting on Monday, May 5, 2014. Tax Certificates will be awarded on Friday, May 30, 2014. Bidders are asked to register at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com prior to sale. SHIRLEY J. JENKINS, CFC TAX COLLECTOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA1600 R-1288400 $590.94 04917-003R BEARDEN HAROLD SR CITY OF PORT ST JOE LOT 10 & S/2 OF LOT 9 ORB 330/525 QC FR BENNETT MAP 50A BLK 39 ORB 444/29 FR KNOTT 4519131 95024S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14000029CAAXMX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. LEVERAL RAFFIELD: KIMBERLY L. RAFFIELD: el al.. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Kimberly L. Raffield Last Known Residence: Unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: LOT 1: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 536.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES. MORE OR LESS. AND LOT 2: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION .13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 412.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE | CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiff’s attorney, at 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days of the first dtae of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before June 16, 2014, on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediateily thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on May 9th, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk File No. 1212-724B May 22, 29, 2014 95028S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA-000257 DIVISION: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-A7, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006A7, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID J. DELEO, AS TRUSTEE OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 13, SURFSIDE ESTATES, PHASE II, THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 46, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 126 PLUTO WAY, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456-4640 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before June 16, 2014, service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 8th day of May, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 PH-10-51962 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. May 22, 29, 2014 95078S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-26 PR IN PROBATE IN Re: The Estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, deceased, Case Number 14-26 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTCE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims within this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 22, 2014. /s/ Ronald C. Hewett Ronald C. Hewett 164 Deer Creek Circle Gray, GA 31032 Ancillary Personal Representative of the Estate of Coleman J. Hewett /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 SAILOR’S COVE DRIVE PO BOX 39 PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 (850)229-8211 FL BAR NO. 0350583 ATTORNEY FOR ANCILLARY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE May 22, 29, 2014 99007S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Leigh Gable Holdings, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1031 Application No. 2014-29 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03806-520R Description of Property: Lot 12, Block “D”, SeaShores/St. Joe Beach, Unit No. 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 35, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Margot A. Valencik All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day of June, 2014. Dated this 19th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 22, 29 June 5, 12, 2014 98965S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO: 1314-22 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company or corporation interested in purchasing the following: Parcel No: 02852-145R WIMICO PLACE SUB PB 6 PG 58 LOTS 9 & 10 ORB 459/721 FR WHITE CITY MAP 101C White City, Florida Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, May 30, 2014. Proposals received after the closing time will be returned unopened. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Gulf County Reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in the best interests of the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 22, 29, 2014 99033S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009CA 000254CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff, vs. SUELLEN FLEMING, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 18, 2014 and entered in 2009CA 000254CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, is the Plaintiff and SUELLEN FLEMING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY are the Defendant(s). Rebecca L. Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM ET on June 19, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST FOR 1341.09 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30-E (FORMERLY STATE ROAD NO. 30-E); THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST FOR 1642.44 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11426.79 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS FOR 427.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR 1711.69 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11415.15 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 1058.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST FOR 2813.88 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 574.11 FEET TO A RE-ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 319.00 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 59.78 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST ALONG A PARTY WALL AND A PROJECTION THEREOF 314.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 59.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY 18.00 FEET AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY 12.00 FEET OF THE NORTHEASTERLY 74.00 FEET THEREOF. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of May, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts. org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-14008 May 29, June 5, 2014 99031S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James M. Holcombe the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 699 Application No. 2014-30 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03083-415R Description of Property: Lot 43, Palm Breeze Subdivision according to the plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 4, Page 46. Name in which assessed: Richard & Delilah Henderson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of July, 2014. Dated this 27th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 29, June 5, 12, 19, 2014 99039S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12000218CA-AXMX WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA KAY REEDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBRA KAY REEDER; JOSEPH C. REEDER; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order or Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: A parcel of land located in Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast of the Northwest of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence North 0017’48” West, 39.40 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 8838’05” West, 126.48 feet to a point on the East R/W line of SR No. 71; said point being on the arc of a non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northwesterly along said East R/W line, along the arc of said curve; having a radius of 11034.28, a central angle of 0020’15”, an arc distance of 64.98 feet: chord to said curve bears North 2814’36” West, 64.98 feet; thence leaving said East R/W line, North 6536’13” East, 171.90 feet; thence South 0017’48” East, 125.24 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.31 acres, more or less. Property Address: 1660 Hwy 71 South Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Parcel I.D.: R 02614-000R at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Courthouse lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. E.T. on 26th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Enrico G. Gonzalez, P.A. Attorney at Law Enrico G. Gonzalez, Esq. 6255 E. Fowler Ave. Temple Terrace, FL 33617 FL Bar #861472 (813)980-6302 In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding via the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771. May 29, June 5, 2014 99049S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-27 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, deceased, File Number 14-27 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the co-personal representatives and the co-personal representatives’ attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 29, 2014. /s/ Doris Jean Whitten Doris Jean Whitten P.O. Box 397 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Co-Personal Representative Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Barbara Ann Johnson Barbara Ann Johnson P.O. Box 573 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457 (850) 229-8211 ATTORNEY FOR CO-PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES FL Bar No. 0350583 May 29, June 5, 2014 99057S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: Bid #1314-23 GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS ROOF INSTALLATION The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for the purchase and installation of: ROOF FOR THE GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS BUILDING Specifications may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, or at the website at www.gulfcountyfl.gov. Further information can be obtained by contacting Tony Price at (850) 227-8335. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 4:30 Gulf Coast Alarm, LLC Residential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343

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B12 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1123147ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 WebID#:34284633 1125201 NursePractitionerorPA Wantedforbusyfamily practice.Benetsavail.Send resumetoBlindBox3611co TheNewsHerald,P.O.Box 1940,PanamaCityFL32402 112316025DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546 WebID34284625 1125211WoundCareNurseMusthavelongtermcareexperience.Scheduler1yearmedicalexperience, homehealthpreferred.Sendresumeto hr.baystjoe@signaturehealthcarellc.com 1124944ServicePlumber2YearsVeriableService/Repair Exp.ValidDriversLicense. OTorOn-CallwillbeRequired. KnowledgeofSouthWaltonArea PleaseApplyat AJ'sPlumbingInc. 998BayDrive, SantaRosaBeach,FL. WebID#:34289477 HVACREFRIGERATIONMECHANIC (2positions)Withbenefits.5years documentedexper.inthefield. ToApply,goto:www.bay.k12.fl.us, EmploymentOpportunities,Support. Foradditionalassistance call850-767-4231. Deadlinetoapplyis: 4:30pmon5/26/2014 WebID#:342895651124951 1124950 Nowtakingapplicationsfor new KFC inCallaway. Applyat jobs.kfc.com or faxresumeto 334-702-0302 WebID34289468 TextFL89468to56654 ShiftManagers &TeamMembers 1125221 NursePractitionerpositionavailableforbusyinternal medicinepractice.Onlyexperienced needapply.PleaseincludeCVand references.Sendresumesto BlindBox3618c/oTheNewsHerald, P.O.Box1940,PanamaCity,FL32402 4519142 4 5 1 0 1 6 1 451913 6 Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking a seasonalpart-time, entry-level Housekeeping Inspector / Laundry Assistant Some experience is preferred but not required. Must be energetic, detailed oriented and possess great customer service skills. Weekends are required and must be able to start immediately. $12 per hour with paid training. Drug Screen & Background Check required. Please apply in person at 112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 4519175HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAIALBLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. p.m., E.T., on Friday, June 6, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 10: 00 a.m., E.T. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99065S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROPOSAL NO. 1314-24 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for a: PAYAND CLASSIFICATION STUDYFOR THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Copies of the Proposal Provisions and Forms may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or found on the Gulf County website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov. Additional technical information relative to this RFPmay be obtained from Denise Manuel, Central Services Director, at (850) 227-2384 or dmanuel@gulfcountyfl.gov during normal business hours. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide five (5) bound copies and one (1) electronic copy of your proposal. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will accept sealed proposals at the Gulf County Clerk of Court’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, until June 26, 2014, at 4:00 PM, ET. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 30, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. ET. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99083S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-28-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE GIBSON GLASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jane Gibson Glass, deceased, whose date of death was September 16, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 29, 2014. Personal Representative: Nancy G. Cowles 3174 Paces Mill Rd SE Atlanta, GA30339 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKETSTREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 FLBar No.: 63869 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net May 29, June 5, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish.j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. PSJ 511 7th St Fri May 30th 11a-Until Sat. May 31st From 8a-UntilYard SaleLost Of Misc. Something For Everyone! Text FL90427 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7 th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572) General Admission $6 850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair Cleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sunday’s. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in PORT ST JOE IMMEDIATELY Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Sal 850-227-6691 or Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34290225 Office BuildingFor Lease: 514 Florida Ave Space is plumbed for a medical/dental office but can be used for a variety of business types. Apprx. 2,184SF. Call For Details (850) 896-0609 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich 502/649-1520 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 451914 0



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com A Port St. Joe man has been formally charged with murder in the death of his mother in their Cape San Blas residence. Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, already in custody on arson charges stemming from incidents in 2012, was charged with an open count murder last Friday in the slaying of his mother, Renee Gail Coffey, 58. Slick was rst appeared on the murder charge Friday morning and is being held without bond in the Gulf County Jail. Investigators responding to a 9-1-1 call from Slick the afternoon of May 18 found Coffey unconscious and unresponsive in her home at 7525 Cape San Blas Road. Slick told dispatchers in the emergency call that his mother had been assaulted, according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Coffey died of her injuries at the scene. Slick was subsequently interviewed by deputies and later by investigators, Harrison said. Slick, a suspect in arsons of the Masonic Lodge in Port St. Joe in 2012, and who was out on bond secured by Coffey, quickly became the prime suspect and was taken into custody on the arson charges, for which he faces up to 30 years in prison. A home security indicated that Slick and Coffey were the lone occupants of the Cape San Blas home at the time of the incident, investigators learned. The system also revealed no indication of a breach of the house or any other person in or around the house during the timeframe of the incident. Slick told investigators he and his mother left the residence earlier in the day and made several stops in Callaway before returning home, which were con rmed through receipts and in-store By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Caps ew last weekend as the two public high schools graduated the Class of 2014. Clad in the red of Wewahitchka High School and the purple of Port St. Joe High School, 114 seniors walked the stage for their diploma and entrance into the next passage in life. Port St. Joe High bid farewell to its class of 72 last Thursday in the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. The ceremonies nished Friday night at the Wewahitchka High School gymnasium as the 42-member senior class takes their proud processional.Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High SchoolThe motto for the Class of 2014 was Our lives are before us, the past is behind us, but our memories are forever with us. The class ower was Purple and Yellow Gerber Daisies and the class song was If Today Was Your Last Day by Nickelback. Homer Allen Davis was the valedictorian and Anastasia Gabrielle Thomason the salutatorian.HIGH HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.85 OR ABOVE)DanTasia Yvette Welch, Kayla Lucile Lindsey, Grant Franklin Whiten, Maya Elizabeth Robbins, Kristen Denise Burkett, Bryce Taylor Godwin, Andrew Michael Lacour, Angel Roberto Padilla, Morgan Brooks Kennington, Homer Allen Davis.HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.5 TO 3.849)Christian Rose Laine, Lauren Michelle Costin, Antonio Michael Moree, Laura Kathleen Sinor, Jack Curtis Cummings, Amy Rachelyn Butler, Sawyer Jackson Raf eld, Nicholas Warren Renfro, Brittany County to make parkway case to FDOT headBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Two weeks ago the Board of County Commissioners decided to increase the intensity of the lobbying campaign concerning the proposed route for the Gulf Coast Parkway. Commissioner Warren Yeager picked up the baton this week. Yeager, accompanied by county administrator Don Butler and county attorney Jeremy Novak, was scheduled to meet with Florida Department of Transportation Anand Persad in Tallahassee on Tuesday to present the countys arguments on the Gulf Coast Parkway. We are going to make our case and well see, Yeager said during Tuesdays regular bi-monthly BOCC meeting. The countys argument is that the intent of the parkway is not being met by the latest proposed route alternatives being recommended by the DOT. The parkway, commissioners argued, was meant as economic development and tourism boon for south Gulf County, with a preferred alternative that would take the parkway well to the north on a direct link with U.S. 231. However, commissioners contended two weeks ago after a public hearing on the parkway, the proposed route will now primarily be a bene t for shoppers heading from Gulf County to Callaway. Commissioners also questioned road funding that appeared to be moved from Gulf County to bene t Bay County road projects. And they questioned cost estimates for the various alternative routes, noting that the route preferred by Gulf County of cials, was being shown as more expensive even though a proposed bridge over East Bay was shorter and the route was more direct to highway connections. But the primary argument Yeager and team hope to make is that the original intent of the parkway, to provide a four-lane connection from U.S. 231 to south Gulf County beaches, as well as the Port of Port St. Joe, has been mitigated by the new recommended route. The intent has certainly changed over the years, Butler said two weeks ago. This is huge. Our opportunity is being hijacked. Yeager said he would report back on the feedback he received from Persad.BP LITIGATIONRhon Jones from the Beasley Allen Law rm gave an update on BP litigation which continues in relative limbo. Jones said two aspects of the overall case against BP, litigation under the Clean Water Act which will come next year and a settlement of private sector claims were moving ahead. BP, Jones said, was likely hoping to get those cases situated before focusing again on the claims of local governments By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Susan Villafanes husband, Jamie, was among the rst soldiers in Iraq to sustain catastrophic injuries in 2003. They have lived a day-today existence that has included countless surgeries, intensive physical therapy and the myriad issues that accompany serious physical and brain injuries. They also had to transition to civilian life and navigate those adjustments after Jamie was medically discharged from the service. But during a weekend earlier this month, 11 years after he was injured, Jamie and Susan enjoyed their rst Wounded Warrior event, the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend. Enjoyed? Well, that would be understating it a bit. From the rst one we are hooked, Susan said from her south Georgia home. Ive never seen my husband smile so much in those ve days since he returned from Iraq. From the beginning to the end it was perfection. I feel like we arrived as strangers and left with many new forever friends. Everything we deal with every day just disappeared. It was a breath of fresh air. For a brief moment in time there were no disabilities. Not that it was easy getting to get to the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend. The Villafanes were Suspect arrested on murder chargesYEAR 76, NUMBER 33 Thursday, MAY 29, 2014 JARROD POWELL SLICK See PARKWAY A10 See MURDER A10FCWWW: the caregivers perspectiveSPECIAL TO THE STARA group shot of the 20 warriors and their caregivers who attended the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend May 14-18.See CAREGIVER A10 114 STRONGGulf County Class of 2014 graduatesTIM CROFT | The StarBefore taking the stage, some nal photos with friends and classmates. See GRADUATES A10Opinion ...........................A4-A5Letters to the Editor .............A5Outdoors ...............................A8 Sports.....................................A9School News ...........................B2Faith ........................................B4 Memories ................................B1Classi eds ...................B11-B12 Beachum earns academy appointment, B1

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The nomination was for Emergency Manager of the Year. At the annual Governors Hurricane Conference the year was transformed into a lifetime. Gulf County Emergency Management Director Marshall Nelson was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by his emergency management peers statewide during a recent annual conference in Orlando. This means a lot, Nelson said. It is recognition. This is the top award given because it is for a lifetime. Your peers nominate you and it is your peers that select you for the award and that means a lot. It is afrmation. Nelson was initially nominated for emergency manager of the year, but when the threepage outline of his accomplishments reached desks in Tallahassee the impact extended so far beyond 2014 which is the 20th anniversary of Nelson joining county emergency management that the prestigious lifetime award seemed more apt. The Lifetime Achievement Award is granted to an individual for his or her contributions and accomplishments over an entire career and (Nelson) embodied the essence of the award during his 20 years of service, wrote Lynn Daines, executive vice president of the Governors Hurricane Conference. The evolution of emergency management began after Hurricane Andrew. What were known as civil defense efforts, which were largely volunteer, began to incorporate natural disasters, from hurricanes to earthquakes. The program was built and funding earmarked but over the decades the workload has increased Nelsons ofce includes closing paperwork on storms from 2004 as well as enough playbooks to satisfy an NFL team while funding stagnated. In turn a critical part of the job for an emergency manager in a small county is pursuing federal and state grant funding to bolster local programs. Nelson was instrumental in securing funding for a state-of-theart Emergency Operations Center as well as funding to place NOAA weather radios throughout the county. He has also bolstered equipment in the EOC for amateur radio emergency operations in a county with an active amateur radio society and received grant funding to coordinate mock disaster drills throughout the county. I am proud of all of it, Nelson said. The grant funding also underwrites the planning for various disasters, from an active school shooter to mass casualties due to a bus crash or similar event. This is not all weatherrelated, Nelson said. This is an all-hazard program. 9/11 was a big turning point. During his tenure the county has also received funding for a storm-shelter allowing residents to stay within the county during a storm event. In addition, Nelson has directed the county response to 25 presidentially-declared emergencies, a key threshold given that the presidential declaration opens up the pipeline to federal funds to reimburse counties for emergency response efforts, from recovery to mitigation. There is a constant cycle of planning, response and aftermath, Nelson said, pointing to the boxes of documents from 20042005 storms. The storm never ends. If the county does not document it all; they have paid for the response but they have to be reimbursed. Emergency management, Nelson said, is the facilitator for the countys response, more manager than director as the conduit for information, communication and assistance. We are here to coordinate with the responding agencies, Nelson said. Our line really goes from the people of Gulf County who we represent all the way to the president, and when you get there it is all about funding. I work very closely with surrounding counties, we work together, plan together because we do impact each other. You have to be ready to go. Teamwork is essential, from the resident to the county ofcial to state ofcial and on up the chain. But the response must begin at the beginning, Nelson said. Everybody has got to know their piece of the puzzle, Nelson said. When everybody does that it works real well. You have got to be ready. It is everybodys responsibility. That is such a big part of it. And in that vein, Nelson said he nds himself part educator. A signicant aspect of his work is educating, particularly younger employees as they enter the school system or join the health department, those agencies that will have to respond in some way to disaster. I am teaching more and mentoring more, Nelson said. I love the people of Gulf County. It is home and I love what I do. It is part of my life and it is just part of my nature to try to do the best for Gulf County. And Gulf County, and its people, Nelson said, is as much a factor in his Lifetime Achievement Award as his team at the EOC or his lovely wife, Tracie and son Reis. They provide the support, they provide the encouragement, they provide the motivation to protect. And if awards come, all share. This would not have been possible without the support of the county commissioners, the cities, the staff and citizens of Gulf County, Nelson said. In a small community you work together. We are doing this for the community and the people in this community. HEALTHYSTARTSBABYSHOWER Tuesday,June3,2014 4:00PMEST TheCentennialBuilding 300AllenMemorialWay PortSt.Joe,FLFREEADMISSIONFood,Fun,GamesandLOTSOFDOORPRIZESHealthyStarts6thAnnualBabyShowerWeinviteallFranklinandGulfCounty pregnantwomen,newparentswhohavehad ababywithinthelastsixmonths,andtheir familiestojoinusfor:Therewillbeinformationstationsonvarioustopics suchas:CarSeatSafety,SmokingCessation, Childbirth,SafeSleep,CommunityResources andvendorsofferingmerchandiseforpurchase.Pluslotsoffabulousdoorprizes! EverybabydeservesaHealthyStart! ForMoreInformation,Call1-800-895-9506 Bay,Franklin,&GulfCounties Nelson honored for emergency management effortsGulf County Emergency Management Director Marshall Nelson received a Lifetime Achievement Award during the annual Governors Hurricane Conference.SPECIAL TO TT HE STARNelsons wife, Tracie, and county human resources director Denise Manuel were on hand to congratulate Nelson.

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What do Karl Marx, Winston Churchill, Frank Sinatra, James Bond, Groucho Marx and Orville Redenbacher have in common? What if I threw in Pee-Wee Herman? If I gave you Donald Duck and The Cat in the Hat, I would probably give it away. Bill Nye (the Science Guy) does because its practical and he started doing it in high school when he served as a waiter for a school function. He said he also does it because, It stays out of his soup. Yes, Im talking about wearing bow ties. I found an article from Psychology Today where the writer discussed what it means to wear a bow tie. The writer concluded that it basically was a signature, kind of like wearing argyle socks or cowboy boots. It probably is a good conversation starter and honestly I have no problem with bow ties, other than tying them. They can be snappy for some occasions. However, I have found myself being prejudiced against bow tie wearers recently. It is a dif cult thing to admit, but I have been doing it. Here is my situation On Saturday mornings, I love going to the Farmers Market where I live. It is a wonderful place to go get a cup of coffee, see a lot of dogs and study people. Our Farmers Market is a little on the high end side because our city attracts a lot of tourists and folks that want stuff on the high end side. Folks will be tasting wine at 8:30 in the morning and comparing four or ve types of kale. Dont get me wrong I like kale. You can buy lamb and buffalo meat or turkey, goose and duck eggs. I love to cook, but I dont think Id know what to do with a goose egg. You can even buy gourmet popsicles. I have not had the urge to try Creamy Avocado, Tangerine Basil or Blackberry Ginger Lemonade frozen on a stick yet but I might. If I get the hankering, I can try all sorts of cheese, baked goods, seafood and soap, or have my knife sharpened. One lady sells organic earthworm castings. Organic earthworm castings are created when the worms digest rich organic material, then pass it; they say it is bene cial for plants. These folks call it what it is Worm Poop. So if you want to buy a bag of worm poop you can. My favorite thing at the Farmers Market is peanuts, speci cally boiled peanuts. Im from the South, we eat boiled peanuts. We talk about them, we eat them and we talk about them some more. At our Farmers Market, there are two booths or places you can buy peanuts. One fellow wears a ball cap and sells all sorts of peanuts in plastic bags with labels his wife probably printed out on their home computer, the other fellow sells gourmet peanuts in fancy labeled cans. The fancy labeled cans fellow with the fancy named peanuts wears a bow tie. I want to buy peanuts from someone who looks like a farmer. Im pretty sure the ball cap he wears is from a feed and seed store or Farmers Co-op. There is no doubt in my mind that the fellow I buy boiled peanuts from knows how to drive a tractor and run a farm. I realize it is not fair for me to judge the bow tie wearing fellow. He may very well know about farming and everything that goes with it. However, he dresses his peanuts and himself in fancy cans. I want the boy who picks my daughter up to go to the prom to wear a bow tie, but I want to buy peanuts from a fellow who has dirt under his ngernails. Its just the way I am. That bow tie fellow doesnt even sell boiled peanuts Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Me and Leon ought to get the credit for all those medals David Mark garnered in Viet Nam. We beat on him most everyday during his formative years. It was our patriotic duty to toughen him up a mite! We double teamed him on slow days. He would never surrender to us. You talk about mule headed and obstinate. He wouldnt give in, he wouldnt give up; he wouldnt admit defeat. Hed die before hed quit ghting back! He never counted the odds, consequences, licks or setbacks. You could say the younger brother got the short end of the stick..or you might consider the survival skills that came early and natural for him. Ill tell you this, he was the toughest Colbert boy by a whole heap, and then some! We are a fortunate nation. We have always managed to nd the toughest, bravest and most stubborn men among us to send off to war. Duty, right, honor, pride, responsibility, love of country werent lines in a John Wayne movie to soldiers like my little brother. That Green Beret training was a snap for David. The twenty parachute jumps a walk in the park. He wanted no part of Viet Nam. But then, he hadnt wanted those sneak attacks and blindsides from me and Leon either. When the call came, he answered without wavering simply and solely because his country asked him to. For the American soldier, from Lexington Green to Afghanistan, it had always been thus. Daddy had done his island hopping across the South Paci c with MacArthur before we were born. I didnt set up nights praying for his safety. It was different with David in Viet Nam. I worried every day. I checked the list of killed and missing in action. I actually let my thoughts drift to the very real possibility that he might not come back. I pondered the imponderable! It brought home in a very real sense the unimaginable tragedy of each and every single American soldier who ever laid down his life for this country. They all had a brother..or mom, little sister, father, girl friend. They were not objects in a history book. They were not statistics on a tally sheet. They were far more than political propaganda or names on a wall. It was a breath from God extinguished in this life. Yeah, I hugged Daves neck on his safe return. I reminded him I could still take him anytime I wanted to. He chuckled but didnt bother to qualify that fallacy with an answer. The conversation turned serious as I tried with all my might to thank a returning hero. He dropped his head, there was a slight pause and the stare was long and went somewhere I couldnt see. He whispered a line wed heard our Dad say of his World War II stint, K. C., the real heroes didnt come back What a special tribute from one soldier to another! I remember the time we both stood trans xed before an old magazine wed uncovered in our cluttered up attic. Mom kept most everything. This was in the mid fties. It was a cover of Life Magazine, Look, or maybe Stars and Stripes. The American soldier was laying face down in the sand. It could have been Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Biak or Omaha. The tide lapped at his boots. Nothing was moving. We were way too young to understand Last full measure, Some gave all or Supreme sacri ce. We were old enough to realize this dead soldier had given up HIS future for SOMEOME elses future. And anybody could see this guy died trying. We noticed he was moving toward the enemy when he fell. He was so far from home, so lonelythe scene was so nal! It was the quietest magazine cover Ive ever seen in my life. It also brought a truth, a realism to that verse, Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends. The seventieth anniversary of D-Day is just a week away. Utah and Omaha beaches will again be the focus of the moment. Try to look past the dignitaries, speeches and the intervening years. Pause and do a little staring of your own. Remember that amid the thunder of the exploding 88mm shells, the M2 mortars raining down from the enemies forti ed position on the cliffs, the clamor of the incessant machine gun retwentyve hundred American warriors fell silent.before their family and friends back in the states had even sat down for breakfast! Turn off your TV this Memorial Day week-end, step out in the yard, glance skyward and alert your neighbors if you hear any Japanese Zeros kamikazing overhead. Rush out to the street and cup an ear toward town. Any German Panzers rumbling your way? Bounce around to the back and peer over the fence. Is anyone yelling at you in Kurdish from the other side? Ride by city hall and check for Middle Eastern ags rustling against the pole. Thats a silence weve taken for granted so long we dont hear it anymore. It didnt come cheap. And it sure wasnt free. I dont know what kind of salute you are planning on giving our fallen heroes this Memorial Day.but I will tell you this, twenty-one guns aint near enough!Respectfully,KesWhat not to wear (at the Farmers Market) HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, May 29, 2014 APage 4SectionListen To The Silence Special to The StarTALLAHASSEE Florida ranked No. 28 for senior health this year, according to the second edition of United Health Foundations Americas Health Rankings Senior Report. Nationwide, seniors are showing encouraging gains in key health measures and taking more steps to improve their own health. Notable gains for senior health include declines in physical inactivity, improvements in quality of nursing home care, reductions in avoidable hospitalizations and increased preparation for end-oflife care. United Health Foundations Americas Health Rankings Senior Report is a valuable tool for measuring and understanding the key challenges and opportunities facing Floridas senior population, said Mayrene Hernandez, D.O., market medical director for UnitedHealthcares South Florida and Orlando regions. With the senior population expected to double in size in the next 25 years, it is important that we develop effective programs and solutions that address seniors health needs in Florida and nationwide. FLORIDAS OVERALL HEALTH The Americas Health Rankings Senior Report nds that Florida has its share of strengths and challenges. Floridas Strengths: Low prevalence of physical inactivity Florida ranks 5th for the low prevalence of physical inactivity among seniors. High use of hospice care Florida ranks 3rd for the use of hospice care, with utilization of nearly 60 percent among decedents aged 65 and older. Low prevalence of falls About 1 in 4 seniors in Florida reported falling in the last 12 months compared to 27.1 percent nationally. Floridas Challenges: High prevalence of chronic drinking Approximately 187,000 Florida seniors report chronic drinking, giving the state a rank of 44 on the measure. High use of ICU Florida ranks 49th for intensive care unit usage among decedents aged 65 and older, at about 23 percent. Limited availability of home health care workers With approximately 26.9 home health care workers per 1,000 adults aged 75 and older, Florida ranks last among all states for the availability of home health care workers. 50-STATE SNAPSHOT: MINNESOTA THE HEALTHIEST STATE FOR SENIORS According to the report, Minnesota is the healthiest state for seniors for the second year in a row. Hawaii ranks second, followed by New Hampshire (3), Vermont (4) and Massachusetts (5). Mississippi is the least healthy state for seniors, followed by Louisiana (49), Kentucky (48), Oklahoma (47) and Arkansas (46). To see the Rankings in full, visit: www.americashealthrankings. org/senior.NATIONWIDE: SENIORS PROGRESS IN KEY MEASURES The report shows that seniors are more active compared to last year, with physical inactivity declining from 30.3 percent of the senior population to 28.7 percent. Other notable gains for senior health include a reduction in preventable hospitalizations, dropping from 66.6 discharges per 1,000 Medicare bene ciaries to 64.9 discharges, and improvements in nursing home care, with quality nursing home beds rising from 42 percent of beds rated four or ve stars to 46.8 percent. In addition, more seniors are planning for and using their preferred end-of-life care. The report shows utilization of hospice care increasing from 36.7 percent to 47.5 percent among seniors in need of late-stage care. RAPIDLY EXPANDING SENIOR POPULATION POSES CHALLENGES With the senior population poised to double in the next 25 years, states and local communities should continue to address unhealthy behaviors that threaten to compromise seniors health. More than 35 percent have four or more chronic conditions, while more than 25 percent of seniors are obese and 28 percent are physically inactive. Only about 60 percent of seniors received the u vaccine in the last 12 months. Older adults will account for roughly 20 percent of the U.S. population by 2030, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, making these challenges urgent. This years report shows important improvements, said Rhonda Randall, D.O., senior adviser to United Health Foundation and chief medical of cer and executive vice president, UnitedHealthcare Retiree Solutions. Declines in physical inactivity are especially promising. We as a nation need to continue promoting healthy behaviors among seniors and work with states and communities to improve the health of this growing demographic.ABOUT AMERICAS HEALTH RANKINGS SENIOR REPORT Americas Health Rankings Senior Report: A Call to Action for Individuals and Their Communities offers a comprehensive analysis of senior population health on a national and stateby-state basis across 34 measures of senior health. In commissioning the report, United Health Foundation seeks to promote discussion around the health of older Americans while driving communities, governments, stakeholders and individuals to take action to help improve senior health. Researchers draw data from more than 12 government agencies and leading research organizations to create a focused, uniquely rich dataset for measuring senior health at the state level, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Commerce, the U.S. Department of Labor, The Dartmouth Atlas Project, the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger and the Commonwealth Fund. United Health Foundation also produces the annual Americas Health Rankings report. For 24 years, Americas Health Rankings has provided an analysis of national health on a state-by-state basis by evaluating a historical and comprehensive set of health, environmental and socioeconomic data to determine national health benchmarks and state rankings. The Rankings employs a unique methodology, developed and annually reviewed by a Scienti c Advisory Committee of leading public health scholars. For more information on both reports, visit www.americashealthrankings.org. Florida ranks 28th for senior health

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LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, May 29, 2014 ASection Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONSBy ROD BECKETTSpecial to The Star It was mid-morning on June 22, 1987. I was about 65 miles out, in the Eglin Gulf Range, having just completed an engagement with the second of two ights of F-15 shooters. I was working for Flight Systems Inc. (FSI) at the time and was on a dart-tow gig out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, in support of the F-15 weapons schools. Suddenly, my F-86 Sabre 6, N80FS began to vibrate violently which drew my attention to the engine gauges. I noticed the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) increasing through 900 C. I pulled the throttle back to try to lower the EGT. It appeared that the EGT was directly connected to the throttle. Remembering the max starting EGT for the Orenda 14 engine was 850 C, I retarded the throttle until the EGT was below 850 degrees, thinking that might make the engine last longer. That gave me an rpm of 55%, a high idle, which would keep the hydraulic pressures up and the generator on the line. (What more could I want except possibly a runway on the horizon?) I immediately informed the shooters of the engine problem and declared an emergency which terminated the engagement. Not being a good long distance swimmer, I began to descend to the west which would get me closer to land. The F-15 pilots immediately did just as we had briefed in case of an emergency. The element leader got on my wing and the wingman climbed to altitude and went to guard channel to get a rescue helicopter on the way. I assumed the best glide speed, 185 knots indicated air speed. The weather was clear with a thin scud layer below me that obscured my slant range vision towards the shore. The high man told me that he thought he saw a runway ahead and that if I turned about 10 right it would be on my nose. I Rogered that and took his vectors. I continued my descent at best glide speed. By this point I was probably descending through 15,000 feet above ground level. Since our procedure was just like the Air Force i.e., if a bail-out was imminent we would eject at a minimum of 2,000 feet above the ground I needed to be thinking about that. I decided it was time to dip down below the scud layer so I could see the coastline, which I did, and picked up what I thought could be a runway. At that point, all I could see was a clearing in the Southern pines beyond the coastline. I was a little high for a straightend approach but not high enough to set up a high key for a simulated ame out-landing (SFO). But as I got closer, sure enough, there was a runway. Not the kind I was used to but it was a clearing in the Southern pines. I decided it was time to get rid of some altitude since the decision had already been made that I was not going to go the SFO route. I put the speed brakes out, lowered the gear and aps, and knowing a go-around was out of the question, shut the engine down not wanting any thrust. I dumped the nose toward the clearing in the trees and did a little S-turn to lose some of the altitude. I dove toward the runway and made probably as good a landing as Ive ever made in the F-86! The end of the runway was looming up quickly, so I got on the binders as hard as I could without blowing a tire, and came to a stop short of the end which was well-marked by pine trees. I heard the F-15 pilots tell range control that I was on the ground safely, so I gured that was taken care of. Clearly, those guys were way ahead of me! I slid the canopy back and climbed out of the airplane to survey the situation. Hearing a little putt-putt noise behind me, I turned around to see two young boys pull up beside me on a three-wheeler. Their eyes were as big as saucers. I asked them where I was. Obviously being puzzled by my question, one of them drawled in his Florida accent: Well, Mr., youre at Apalachicola, Florida. They got off their three-wheeler wanting to take a good look at the airplane. Because the overheated brakes were smoking, I was worried about the tires exploding, so I told the boys to stay away from the wheels and tires. I was very thirsty and asked them if they had any water. They said no but they would get me some. They got on their three-wheeler and disappeared into the pine trees. A little while later they returned with a jug of water, which I thanked them for, and proceeded to drain dry. I asked them where they lived. They replied that their dad had a saw mill back in the woods, pointing to the pine trees. A few minutes later, a man drove up in a car and seemed as surprised to see me as the boys were. I asked him if he could take me to a telephone. We drove to a little shack that turned out to be a closed FAA ight service and weather observation station. The man informed me that the runway had been closed for several months and was in disrepair. He was surprised that I didnt wreck my airplane. I used his telephone to call my of ce at Holloman AFB, New Mexico. Our secretary told me that my crew chief at Tyndall who would have been awaiting my return had already been told by the Air Force where I was. He and our maintenance supervisor, Jay Featherstone, had decided that the airplane would need an engine change. This would be a two-man job. The maintenance supervisor asked for a volunteer mechanic to travel to Tyndall to assist with the engine change. In the meantime, my crew chief had already arranged for the spare engine which we kept at Tyndall for an emergency. Those FSI maintenance guys were always resourceful in planning ahead, and obviously didnt need me making decisions. They had everything well under control. The following day, the crew chief and his newly-arrived maintenance man, proceeded to look around for a means to remove the aft-section and install the new engine. In an effort to put that act together, they located the saw mill that belonged to the boys parents. They arranged to borrow a forklift to use for the engine change. By the time they had the aft-section off, the spare engine had arrived. The new engine was subsequently installed and the faulty engine was placed in the engine can which was soon on its way to the FSI engine shop at Mojave, California. The guys at the engine shop were as anxious as I was to nd out what caused the engine failure. The ground crew had the spare engine installed and the airplane ready for a ground run within about 24 hours! After a drive down the runway I decided a clean F-86 could get airborne with no problem. The runway was basically concrete slabs with the edges lifted up by tree roots, so that if Id been anywhere but right down the middle when I landed, I would have knocked the landing gear off the airplane. Three days later, on June 25, 1987, I FCFd the airplane from Apalachicola, and recovered at Tyndall AFB, where I completed eight more sorties that week with the new engine. Epilogue: For this little adventure, Flight Systems, Inc., awarded me with a letter of recognition and $50 gold piece, which I still have. It was found that the center bearing had failed and allowed the compressor to shift forward to the point that the compressor blades were rubbing on the stators. To prevent subsequent failures of this type, Bob Laidlaw, the FSI owner, immediately arranged to have new center bearings made out of a more heat-resistant material than the original ones. These new bearings were installed in all the F-86 dart-tow engines. I later heard a little after-story from one of the weapon school instructors, Lucky Eckman, a friend of mine, whom I had own F-105s with in Southeast Asia. He told me he heard some of the young students standing around one day discussing my Apalachicola landing, and one of the students said to the group: Did you see the guy ying that thing? He was older than dirt! I calculated my age at the time: I was 51. Any one of them would love to have a retirement job like the one I had with FSI! Re ection: Needless to say Ive had to purge the word luck from my vocabulary. In recalling this event, and my two combat tours, one in the F-105 and one in the F-4 in Southeast Asia, plus 20 years with Flight Systems, Inc., my take-offs and landings all came out equal. I can only re ect on what has become my favorite psalm, Psalm 139:1-6, which speaks to Gods hand in our lives: O LORD, Thou hast searched me and known me. 2 Thou dost know when I sit down and when I rise up; Thou dost understand my thought from afar. 3 Thou dost scrutinize my path and my lying down, And art intimately acquainted with all my ways. 4 Even before there is a word on my tongue, Behold, O LORD, Thou dost know it all. 5 Thou hast enclosed me behind and before, And laid Thy hand upon me. 6 Such knowledge is too wonderful for me; It is too high. I cannot attain to it. The end Who is gonna make it? Well nd outin the long runThe Long Run by Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Bob SegerPlease allow me to introduce you to David and Rose, who have been married for 42 years. Like many young couples, David and Rose began their married lives with virtually no assets. Throughout their marriage, though, they lived on 80 percent of their combined salaries. The other 20 percent was invested, saved and tithed. As young adults, the couple used part of their savings as a down payment and bought the least expensive home in a nice neighborhood. Each month, they paid extra toward principal and eventually paid off the mortgage in 20 years. They still make their residence there. David earned over $100,000 annually only in the latter part of his career, and Roses pay grade never reached that level. The couple raised three children, took an annual family vacation and paid for braces for two kids. All three children attended college, but they all worked during school. David drove an older, dependable car, a mid-size sedan, and the odometer eventually passed 300,000 miles. While he kept his auto spotless, it was surrounded in his of ce parking lot by more attractive, newer models, and his af nity for his older car became a subject of mirth for his co-workers. David, who wore a coat and tie to work, always bought his suits on sale. Rose and David also bought needed household items on sale throughout their marriage. Whats the point? The couple now enjoys an investment account with a value of well over a million dollars. And they have no debt. When Rose retired, David asked her if she wanted anything special to celebrate that milestone. Rose asked for a trip to Ireland. The couple spent four weeks touring Europe, returned exhausted but ful lled, then resumed their relatively frugal lifestyle. Its a happy habit they cant seem to break. Im still a coupon clipper at heart, says Rose. I cant stand wastefulness. David bought a new BMW convertible recently, but only takes it out on weekends. Rose says he really prefers driving his old, dependable sedan, the one with 300,000 miles. The couple are the prototypical millionaires next door, and while they are completely ctional, their story rings true. In fact, you may recognize parts or all of your own lifestyle and history in this ctional portrayal. You would never recognize them as millionaires while waiting in line at Wal-Mart, where they did much of their shopping. Rose and David never attempted to emulate the lifestyles of those whose wealth seemed more obvious. The importance of saving and investing wisely can only be evaluated over time. Its not fancy, but it still works. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management LLC (6086121, www.arborwealth. net), a fee-only registered investment advisory rm near Destin. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. 42 years of living within your means MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor OutlookWWW.AF.MILAny port in a stormPage 5 THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission held a workshop last Tuesday at the Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Campus to raise awareness for bear management units that would soon be put in place across the state. The FWC has grouped Florida into seven sections with plans to create a bear stakeholder group within each one. Gulf County falls under the East Panhandle section, which also covers the counties of Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla and Washington. The remaining areas are based in the West Panhandle, Big Bend, North, Central, South Central and South units. The meeting was an open forum for residents to provide thoughts about bear management but also to present common problems and possible solutions. The quorums will help the FWC work with local and state governments to create solutions based on each areas need. It gives people an opportunity to give input, said Dave Telesco, a bear management program coordinator. An example of the need stems from the North Florida Child Development on Field of Dreams Drive in Port St. Joe. Due to the lack of a bear-proof dumpster, the animals are constantly bypassing the makeshift locks pulling food, diapers and other waste into the woods surrounding the facility. The bear management units would work with local government in an attempt to ensure that bear-proof items were made readily available to ensure safety and keep pollution at bay. The most common bear in the area is the black bear and the FWCs goal is to create one well-managed population of the breed rather than seven sub-populations throughout the state. Bear conict statistics presented showed an increase over the past several years and both people and bear populations continue to rise in Florida. Last year, the FWC received more than 900 calls about bear conicts and an average of 50 bears is killed each year along U.S. Highway 98. The black bears hunt at dawn and dusk and a lack of clear shoulder along the road makes it difcult for drivers to see the animals. While black bears are not naturally aggressive, the problems begin when they become used to people. The goal is to maintain a sustainable black bear population for the benet of the species and the people, said Kaitlin OConnell, a stakeholder liaison. By coming to this meeting, attendees have the undivided attention of the FWC. The bear stakeholder groups are drafted on a volunteer basis and the FWC is specically interested in input from local residents, homeowner associations, businesses and civic groups. Eventually, the groups will meet on a semi-monthly basis to provide updates and concerns that the FWC can begin to tackle. Attendees at the meeting were polled on how they felt about current bear management practices and the desire for bear-proof trashcans to become available to the public. The information would be provided to senior FWC leadership for consideration. Right now there are drastic differences between bear management units, said OConnell. Florida is very diverse geographically and by breaking up each area we can better manage the interactions between people and bears. We want to gather as much information as possible. For more information on the bear management units, visit the FWC online at www.MyFWC.com/bear. To volunteer for the bear stakeholder group, email Kaitlin OConnell at bearplan@myfwc.com. NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:6-15-14CODE:SJ00 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com After the rst round of state assessment scores Gulf District Schools are already operating at a decit. The Florida Department of Education released the initial group of Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) scores last week with the announcement of results for third graders in reading and math and writing scores in fourth, eighth and 10th grades. Attempting to put sheen on the results for Gulf District Schools would be a mixed effort. The writing scores for eighthand 10th-graders at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School were above the state average but that was about the only highlight. They were the one bright spot, said Melissa Ramsey, district supervisor of testing. They were above the state average and that was good. Eighth-graders averaged a 3.6 score on the writing FCAT, which while a slight drop from last years 3.7 was nonetheless above the state average of 3.4. A score of 3.0 is considered procient to the grade level. Among eighth-graders the district still fell below the state average with a 3.3 as eighth-graders at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School averaged a 2.8, off 0.4 points from last year. Among 10th-graders, scores at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School in writing averaged 3.6 and the district was even with the state average of 3.5 as Wewahitchka High School sophomores averaged a 3.4, an improvement of 0.6 points compared to last year. And that was about the extent of the positive news, Ramsey said. We were below the state average in just about every other area, Ramsey said. And we are real low in some areas. District fourth-graders scored an average of 2.9 on the writing FCAT, with both elementary schools scoring identically and dropping, compared to last year, by an identical 0.2 points. The state average was 3.3. The district ranked 73rd out of 75 districts in fourth-grade writing scores, easily the worst performance for the district since the FCAT was implemented some 15 years ago. That was historically low, Ramsey said. We have never scored below a 3.0. At the third grade level, important because third-graders are experiencing the FCAT for the rst time in their schooling and because third grade is a level where children can be held back due to low test scores, the district struggled compared to the state average in reading and math. Thirty-seven percent of thirdgraders at Port St. Joe Elementary scored at prociency in math and 48 percent did so at Wewahitchka Elementary. That was a drop of 13 and 28 percentage points, respectively, at the schools compared to last year and the districts average of 45 percent was 13 points behind the state. The district ranked No. 70 out of 75 districts statewide in third grade math. In reading, the results were slightly better. Fifty-two percent of Port St. Joe Elementary third-graders were procient in reading, a dip of just 1 percent. At Wewahitchka Elementary, 50 percent, representing a drop of 16 percentage points, were procient in reading. The state average was 57 percent; the districts 51 percent. We are looking at individual classroom results and the aggregate results to try to fully understand the data, Ramsey said. We are curious to see what the data in other grades will look like. We have some challenges, but these are very preliminary numbers. Historically we have been better. Additional FCAT results, and school grades, will be released in the coming months.District drops as initial FCAT scores released The bear necessities covered at FWC workshopWES LOc C HER | The StarThe FWC presented a workshop for Gulf County residents to learn more about the bear management needs of the community.

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LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, May 29, 2014By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Expecting a new addition to the family? On Tuesday, June 3 the Healthy Start Coalition of Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties will present its sixth annual Community Baby Shower at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Mothers who have had children in the last six months and mommiesto-be are welcome to join the event for an evening of games, refreshments, community vendors, educational info and door prizes. Dads and family members are also invited to partake in the fun. Anyone who is a caregiver to the baby will benet from the event, said event organizer Suzy Nadler. That includes daddies and grandparents. More than 25 vendors will provide information to families on safe sleeping and the dangers of shaking babies. Nadler said that there are many infant deaths each year that could have been prevented by education. Last year, more than 130 attendees learned about baby safety and care and 33 door prizes were given away. This year, attendees will once again be up for door prizes including car seats, baby care products and the grand prize of a $200 gift card to Walmart. We want to ensure that pregnant women have the best possible care. said Nadler. Our primary outreach is education, but we also want to have fun. The event begins at 4 p.m. ET. For questions, call Healthy Start at 1-800-895-9506. The event will be sponsored by Prestige Health Choice, CareerSource Gulf Coast, Sacred Heart Health System and Staywell. Wewishtoexpressourgratitudetoall ofthefollowingforyourgenerosityand contributionsforthesuccessofour communitysWelcomeandHonoring AmericanHeroesduringtheMay14th-18th ForgottenCoastWarriorWeekend.THANKYOU! GeorgeW.Duren,BrendaE.Garth,CharlotteM.Pierce,COL.CharlesW.Weston,USA,Retired AUTOINSURANCEHannonInsurance(850)227-1133 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS LIVEONTHEPOOPDECK BLACKWATER FRIDAY9PM THURSDAY7PM SATURDAY9PM SUNDAY7PM WEDNESDAY7PM SUNDAY7PM CROSSTIE RANDYSTARK RANDYSTARK RANDYSTARK ALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMES LIVE ON THE POOP DECK MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITS UPCOMINGEVENTS KAROKE-THURSDAY,FRIDAY& SATURDAY-9PMWITHDEBRAATTHETOPOFTHECROWSNEST COURTESY OF BEVERLY MOUNT DOUd D SPrep work began last week on the site in George Core Park in Port St. Joe where the Cape San Blas Lighthouse will be relocated. The next major milestone is the pouring of a foundation upon which the lighthouse will sit. The foundation must cure for at least 30 days. LIGHTHOUSE RELOcCATION FF ILE PHOTOThe sixth annual Healthy Start Baby Shower will be held on June 3 at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe.Healthy Start Gulf/Franklin baby shower June 3

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Thursday, May 29, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May1576 5960% Fri,May1677 6220% Sat,May1777 6610% Sun,May1878 6610% Mon,May1979 680% Tues,May2079 700% Wed,May2180 710% JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVAL ALSOCLEANGUTTERSAND IRRIGATIONINSTALLATION, PLANTINGANDBEDDING AVAILABLE CALLJOE@850-323-0741 ORE-MAILJOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM SPONSORED BY As we enter the last week of May, most schools will be letting out for the summer and the crowds of anglers will soon arrive. Fishing is great now from the surf and from shore as well. Good inshore species such as trout and red fish are returning in good numbers to the head of St. Joe Bay. Surf fishing on the Cape has been producing great pompano and whiting catches with the occasional shark in the mix. State water red snapper opened last weekend to great success and many anglers took advantage of the good weather to bring in some great fish. Our state season is short this year, so get out when can. MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are loaded with red snapper and most are higher in the water than you think, so lighten up your tackle and bring plenty of chum. Page 8By Tom BairdSpecial to The Star Sea turtle nesting season began May 1. Volunteers, U.S. Geological Survey employees, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) employees, and State Park personnel have begun monitoring Gulf County beaches for turtle crawls and signs of nesting activity. Teams cover nesting beaches at night, and other teams walk the beaches early in the morning. Why the effort? Because all marine turtles are either classi ed as threatened or endangered. Losses to shing gear entanglements and degradation of nesting beaches and near shore habitats in the past century, coupled with boat collisions and new predators, decimated sea turtle populations. Research and monitoring are aimed at ensuring maximum nesting success for these magni cent creatures. Fossils show there were once more marine turtle species. Now, only seven species of marine turtles remain worldwide. Five of these species roam Florida waters. They are the Loggerheads (Caretta caretta), Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas), the big Leatherbacks (Dermochelys coriacea), the mostly tropical and solitary Hawkbills (Eretmochelys imbricata), and the smallest and rarest, the Kemps Ridley turtle (Lepidochelys kempii). It is mainly Loggerheads that use Gulf County beaches for nesting, although there are occasional Green turtle nests, and a few Leatherbacks use Franklin County beaches. Loggerheads, Greens, and Kemps Ridleys use St. Joseph Bay to forage. Lush meadows of turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum) in St. Joseph Bay especially attract the herbivorous Green turtles, which are a common sight in the bay. The often crowded beaches of southeast Florida see the most turtle nesting activity in the state. However, the beaches of the northwest Florida gulf counties, from Escambia to Franklin, are important, traditional turtle nesting sites, with Gulf County usually having the most turtle nests per year in the northern Florida Gulf. The bay scallop is often the unof cial symbol of Gulf County, yet considering the number of sea turtles in the bay and on our beaches, and our critical location as turtle nesting habitat, our symbol should probably be a sea turtle. Both native and introduced predators take their toll on incubating eggs and the tiny hatchlings. Coyotes, raccoons, armadillos, ghost crabs, birds, cats, re ants, and on some beaches, feral hogs, will either dig and eat the eggs or take the hatchlings as they emerge from the nest. Human trash, like food wrappers, left on the beach can attract predators that get used to checking the beaches for food. Nest destruction increases on beaches with a lot of human trash. In the 2013 nesting season, there were 292 Loggerhead nests and 10 Green turtle nests on Gulf County beaches, according to FWC data. In a single sixmile stretch of the St. Joseph Peninsula from Stump Hole to the State Park boundary, there were 95 loggerhead nests alone and one green turtle nest, according to the St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol. This is down from 227 loggerhead nests on that section of beach in 2012. Considering that this is the section of beach on Cape San Blas with the heaviest concentration of renters and residents, the likelihood of human activity negatively affecting nest success is high. Lights and beach furniture left out overnight can disorient and trap hatchings, as well as confuse and block the females coming ashore to lay their eggs. Beachfront lighting is a well know problem. Research has shown that female turtles favor dark beaches to lay their eggs. While turtles will nest on beaches with arti cial lights, their hatchlings are at greater risk. The lights may confuse the hatchlings and cause them to move not toward the sea, but up the dunes toward lights, or meander disoriented. Arti cial lighting is the single greatest threat to hatchlings reaching the sea in Florida. Gulf County has a good and well-enforced beachfront lighting ordinance. Yet any lights on the beach including ashlights and headlights can confuse both adult nesting females and hatchlings. Turning off unnecessary lights is a simple, effective, energy ef cient solution to preventing turtle hatchling mortalities. Or just close the drapes. Our Gulf Co. beaches should be dark during the turtle nesting season May 1 to Oct. 31. We can all do our part to help ensure the nesting success of marine turtles on our beaches. Taking care to remove all trash and debris from a beach outing will avoid attracting nest predators. Also, turtles often mistake oating bits of plastic debris as food and can choke or have fatal internal blockage from ingesting the bits of trash. Beach furniture should be moved off the beach at night. Other counties have enacted ordinances to require that beaches are left clear at night. Clutter on the beach, especially tents, cabanas, lounges, rugs and coolers, are not only unsightly, but can trap the hatchlings heading to the water. They become vulnerable to predators and can be weakened in their efforts to reach the sea. Remove all beach furniture and boats and gently educate visitors that leaving beach furniture overnight imperils sea turtles. Leave the marked nests alone and keep pets out of the nest area. These are all just simple things that require little effort and can make a big difference to sea turtle nesting success. Also, if you see Turtle Patrol volunteers walking the beach at sunrise, give them a wave. They are your neighbors giving their time and energy to help ensure that we will always have marine turtles in our waters. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas.A Kemps Ridley turtle, small and rare, on its way back to the Gulf of Mexico after being rescued during a cold stun event. Volunteers with Gulf World Marine Institute return a loggerhead turtle to the Gulf of Mexico.FILE PHOTOSProtect nesting sea turtles A green sea turtle in the surf along St. Joseph Peninsula.

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Special to The StarThe third Annual Golly Whopper Classic will be Saturday, June 7, in Mexico Beach. The tournament is a one-day shootout for red snapper and king mackerel. Entry fee for the tournament is $150 per boat and 100 percent of the entry fees will be paid out to the rst, secondand third-place winners in each species. A captains party will be June 6 at the Mexico Beach Marina with the nal weighin June 7. This year the tournament also will offer a spear shing division. Entry fee for is $35 per diver and they will compete in a winner-take-all format for the largest red snapper. Children younger than 14 can enter a youth division for $25. Last year, Charlie Lanford caught the largest red snapper aboard the Gulf Business 3 with Captain Lee Cathey. Their sh weighed 22.81 pounds and barely edged out a 22.75 pound red snapper caught aboard the Green Banana captained by Josh Bloodworth. The king mackerel division saw a number of large sh brought to the scales but none could compete with a 55.13 pound smoker caught aboard the Salty Mule, captained by Blake Anderson. Call Zach Childs at 8190833 or Josh Bloodworth at 478-256-4460 for more information or visit 98real estategroup.com/gollywhopper Registration forms are available at 98 Real Estate Group and the Mexico Beach Marina. ShopatHomeBOATINSURANCEHannonInsurance(850)227-1133 KidsWinTournamentFREEtoRegisteratthePortSt.JoeMarinaFirst350Kidsgetarodandreel,tackleandagoodybag! www.Kidswinfishing.com Friday,June13th Signin3pm-6:30pmEST Saturday,June14th Fishingcommencesat7:00amEST Weighin10am-12pmEST DonationsAccepted! NauticalFleaMarketFREEtoRegister. Saturday,June14th9am-3pmEST OPENTOEVERYONEANDANYONE! Mustprovideyourowntableandchairs. saltwaterclassic.comFather'sDayWeekend June13-14,2014REGISTRATIONISJUNE12TH@6PM LOCATEDATTHEHAUGHTYHERONPortSt.JoeMarina willbeaweighinlocation. Learnmoreathttp://www.nationalmarinaday.org/Saturday,June14th PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.comThursday, May 29, 2014 APage 9Section PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Mexico Beach Golly Whopper tournament is a one-day tournament for red snapper and king mackerel.Golly Whopper shing tourney schedule for June At last years event, members of team Salty Mule reeled in a 55.13 pound mackerel.Port St. Joe Basketball Clinic set for June 14Special to The StarA basketball ball-handling clinic will be Saturday, June 14, at Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School. The clinic will be led by Raye Bailey and professional player coach and trainer Joe Flegler. Flegler is an assistant coach at Thomas University. As a high school senior, he led Washington, D.C., in scoring 26 points-per-game. Flegler had the best freshman season in the history of the College of Southern Maryland, named freshman of the year in Maryland JUCO, All-Maryland JUCO, All-Region XX and honorable mention All-American. The rst workshop, for ages 7-13 will take place from 9 a.m. to noon ET. The second workshop for ages 14 and up will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. ET. Early registration ends June 1 and is $15. On-site registration will be offered for $20. To register, call Bailey at 307-7197 or email baileyr04@gmail.com. Pre-registration ends June 1 All-Pro Soccer to host summer campStar Staff ReportAll-Pro Soccer once again will be be hosting a summer soccer camp in the area June 16-19. On those dates, the Callaway Youth Soccer Club will host the camp from 5 to 7 p.m. (CT) at the Callaway Sports Complex. The camp will be supervised by former professional player and coach Gary Hindley. Coach Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Year selectee, recently has been named head coach of the Pensacola City FC team of the National Premier Soccer League and has been the head coach of both the girls and boys teams at Port St. Joe High School for the past ve years. At the camp, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 7-17. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, call Coach Hindley at 276-6353 or email gjhallpro@aol.com.St. Joseph Bay Golf Club offers youth clinicStar Staff ReportThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is pleased to offer a free youth golf clinic again this year. The clinic will take place 9-11 a.m. ET each Friday in June (6, 13, 20 and 27) at the club at 700 Country Club Road. If students have their own clubs, they should bring them. If not, the club will furnish a set to each student in need. The clinic will be taught by the clubs teaching professional, Ethel Bardsley, assisted by dedicated members of the club. Free pool privileges also will be extended to the students following each session. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751 to register before June 1. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 ShopatHomeLIFEINSURANCEHa nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 13 3 315WilliamsAve.PortSt.Joe,FL|(850)229-6600 SPECIALTRUNKSHOWMERCHANDISE25%OFFallin-stockSorrelli,onedayonly!F,J|-AnnualSummerOpenHouseRegistertowinaSorrelligiftcertificate ReceiveSorrelliBlingBucksonpurchases$100+whilesupplieslast. video. Upon returning home, Slick told investigators, he went into the backyard to tend the family dog, remaining there for 30 minutes before going inside. He said he found his mother with her throat slit and her head bashed in, but I didnt know she was going to die, according to the arresting af davit. The home security system, however, showed Slick going inside the residence upon returning home and Coffey following roughly one minute later, according to investigators. Slick sent a text message to his brother about bringing home a grocery item a few minutes later and is seen leaving the residence, phone in hand appearing to be in conversation, roughly three minutes prior to the 9-1-1 call. The system showed no other individual present. Investigators found what appeared to be blood spatters on Slicks shoes. in the ve impacted states. It is disappointing (there has been no progress on local government claims), but the positive is Gulf County is not being treated any differently than other local governments, Jones said. No local government is having any kind of active discussion with BP. The amount the county is seeking has not been made public. The BOCC turned down a settlement offer last year and continued to pursue litigation. PLEDGE OF CIVILITYCommissioners approved, as they did in 2003 and 2011, a proclamation rendering May a month of civility in public discourse. This is a good proclamation, Yeager said. The proclamation is the recommendation of the Florida Bar Association, which suggests annual adoption of a proclamation aimed at providing for the free and civil exchange of ideas during public meetings without anger, ridicule or rudeness. As has been noted several times by Commissioner Joanna Bryan over the past year, commissioners have not always honed to the pledge during public discourse, particularly over controversial issues.WASTE PRO TRANSITIONWaste Pro takes over the county contract for solid waste removal June 1. Waste Pro was awarded the BOCCs garbage bid last month, replacing current contractor Waste Management. A representative of Waste Pro said Tuesday that 99 percent of customers had received new containers which while shorter are wider and the same overall size as those from Waste Management and Waste Management would have all its containers removed by weeks end. Some 90 percent of customers will continue to have their garbage picked up on the same day. Those with changes in service days were noti ed by a decal on the new cans. Waste Management is also processing refunds for any customers who have already paid for June and beyond. PARKWAY from page A1 MURDER from page A1reluctant, Susan said, particularly her husband. They werent interested in being put on display and there was the expected self-consciousness wrought by the wounds of war. They initially declined an invitation. After organizers received a cancellation from one perspective warrior and caregiver, they reached out to the Villafanes. Seeing her husbands reticence, Susan contacted SSG Steven Copeland, who was in her husbands unit and who had a reserved spot on this years FCWWW. Copeland, Susan said, wrote to Jamie urging him to come, saying it would good to see his mate again. SSG Jamie Villafane relented and the couple became the last conrmed attendees to the FCWWW. It was really great, Susan said. Everybody got along wonderfully. There was a connection that is very hard to put into words. This experience really opened my eyes. Im not alone. I dont have to deal with this by myself. There are other women who understand what I go through. Any hesitance subsided with that welcome and those open arms. Susans glee was palpable over a phone line, her excitement about the nightly bon res that turned into therapy and laughter sessions, her time on the shooting range during which she went from just a tad scared to hitting a target 300 meters away with a .308 the big gun she proudly proclaimed on her rst shot. Nothing compares to this event, said Barbara Armstrong, who with her husband Sgt. Robert Armstrong, made the trip from their San Antonio, Texas home. Ive never been to something so thoughtfully put together. Nothing compares. Every detail was thought of. I dont know how you improve on that. This was the perfect situation. We didnt think about anything. Included, in Barbaras case, a toothbrush, which came to represent the swaddling the warriors and caregivers receive. Armstrong discovered she was without toothbrush she added she and her husband would have left all the food they carried at home if they knew their living quarters would be so stocked upon unpacking. She happened to mention the missing item during registration and before she could return to her room to locate through GPS a place to buy a new one, a brand new toothbrush had appeared in her room, by the brush fairy apparently. Barbara also noted that given her pale skin tone, she is not one for sunbathing. She gets her sun working in the yard with plenty of sun block and a hat. After a couple of days enjoying the pool and shing on open waters, she was proud to say she had a pretty decent sunburn for which she had no regrets. We felt so relaxed, Armstrong said. It gave our husbands down time. I think it is one of the most amazing things weve been on. The town is amazing. You dont see that, a community that puts so much into people they dont even know. We really want to come back. For Theresa Botts and her husband, SSgt. Scott Botts, there isnt any want about coming back to Port St. Joe, We de nitely will be back to Port St. Joe, Theresa said. In fact, Theresa said she is likely to return to the area when the Semper Fi Sisters descend for their Beach Blast in the fall as well as coming back to volunteer in the next FCWWW. I believe in paying it forward, Theresa said from her Tennessee home. I dont know if I can put my experiences into words. It was wonderful, the community, the warriors, the caregivers, the volunteers, it was all wonderful. It was like we were with family. We went away with a lot of smiles. There was zero drama. We laughed so much and learned so much about each other, about our families. Theresa and Scott had been invited to Wounded Warrior events before and found them challenging. There was too much scheduled into the day and too little exibility for the warriors and caregivers to select those activities they felt they could handle. But the FCWWW, with its emphasis on providing a host of activities and letting each individual warrior and caregiver decide what they were up, had none of the drawbacks the Bottses had experienced. With my husband there are a lot of nerve issues due to his chemical exposure, Theresa said. He doesnt normally mesh well. But we left there having built some very strong relationships. It was really nice. The whole community, they werent up in your face or felt like they needed to be in your face. Everything was so peaceful and you felt enthralled by everything and you just felt so comfortable. The good vibes even extended to the aftermath. Villafanes said the positive feelings continued though ultimately tempered by a return to the routine. The captain who took Scott Botts out to sh, unable to attend a subsequent banquet, sent a Facebook message to ensure the couple had returned home safetly. He took that extra step and that means a lot to those guys, to us, Theresa said. People in the community just went out of their way and they did it out of the kindness of their hearts and you could just feel that. CAREGIVER from page A1Nicole King, Lexie Dianne McGhee, Cailyn Marie LaPlante, Katerina Nicole Nelson, Sydney Marian Owens, Brittney Deshawn Shoemaker, Kallie Louise Bateman.GRADUATESDemeriyah AShanti Alexander, Gabrielle Ivana Anthony, Candice Elizabeth Bright, Kylee Alexis Carter, Annalisa Brooke Childress, Koen Michael Cortellini, Kapril Nicole Darnall, Robert Anthoney Dykes, Nicole Mae Endres, Heather Nicole Faircloth, SheNoya Renee Fennell, Dwayne Griggs, Brandon Michael Hall, Anna Nicole Haynes, Justin Schwab Hites, Allison Nicole Howze, Matthew Cameron Jackson, David Matthew Jacobs, Michael Anthony Johnsen, Jacobi Richard Jones, Katherine Renee Kennington, Taylor Addison Laue, Natrone Carlton Lee, Jonathan Wesley Leffew, Nicholas Dwight Lewis, Tanene Enoya Malone, Alexander Carrol Maughan, Dequan Montay McCloud, Austin Daniel McNeill, Kelsey Christine Miles, Steven Kaleb Odom, Tommie John Parker, Anastasya Kristen Paul, Bryan Adison Powell, William Tristan Reynolds, Cathlyn Palmiano Robles, Destiny Brianne Shoemaker, Mason Richard Simmons, Alexis Nichole Strickland, Allie Jovon Stripling, Tori Jo Thomas, Corey James Williams, Torey Jerome Williams, DeShawntae Tyell Willis, Shatiara Nashay Zaccaro.Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High SchoolThe class motto was What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matterscompared to what lies within us. The class ower was the red rose and the class song was Dont You (Forget about Me) by Simple Minds Jacob Seth Goodwin was the valedictorian and Jakob Alan Bidwell the salutatorian.HIGH HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.85 OR HIGHER)Jacob Seth Goodwin, Jakob Alan Bidwell, Chelsea Nicole Cook, Kara Jean Zucci.HONOR GRADUATES (GPA OF 3.5-3.849)William Hunter Bailey, Chandler Mae Vines, Cory Matthew White, Shawn Kory Jenkins, Chelsey Danielle Toney.GRADUATESTyler Lee Adams, Eddie Ray Bowles III, Seth Michael BradshawJennifer Wondale Bryan, Braden Matthew Buckalew, Caitlin Marie Burch, Troy Steven Collins, Michael Adrien Cox, Calvin Grady Dean III, Brianna Kaye Edmondson, Morgan Danielle Fisher, Johnna Renee Florio, James Larry Hensley, Jr., AnMaree Teodora Hess, Jarvar Javon Hill, Zachary Allen Hire, Kimberly Dale Hughes, Damien Dwayne Hunter, Abriale Marie Kemp, James Edward Lester III, Issac Benjamin Madrid, Joshua Liam Mayer, Nicole Renee Morrill, Janie Savannah Pippen, Corey Austin Rhames, Kelver Siliezar, Kirsten Mariea Stalnaker, Sheneshia Mercedes Stansel, Kristopher Jon Taylor, Danielle Katherine Ward, Brooke Ashley Weatherly, Christina Rena Whit eld, Jamie Michael Whit eld II, Anna Maria Wilcox. GRADUATES from page A1 JACOB SETH GOODWINWHS Valedictorian HOMER ALLEN DAVISPSJHS Valedictorian

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, May 29, 2014 BPage 1SectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Prep work over, Javarri Beachum has earned his entrance into the U.S. Naval Academy. After spending the past year at the U.S. Naval Preparatory School in Newport, RI, Beachum will report to Annapolis at the end of next month to begin the voyage to induction in four years as an ensign in the U.S. Navy. It is a pretty awesome feeling, Beachum said during some By John Hentz Panama City, Fla. (Editors note: The following are the memories of the Apalachicola River by the late Panama City native John Hentz. These were transcribed by Beverly Mount Douds.) It is interesting to note that during the steamboat years that a big part of the cargo the steamboats were carrying was oranges. During certain seasons of the year a lot of the boats would have from 150 to 200 boxes of oranges on them. I was one of the main cash crops of our ancestors. Ive heard that the freeze of 1898 just about wiped them out. There is a community about 18 miles south of Bristol in Liberty County named Orange. During my boyhood days there was a U.S. Post Of ce there, it was operated by Mrs. Wilder. After the Civil War, most of the people who lived up the river made a living cutting and rafting cypress timber down the river to the big saw mills in Apalachicola. They would catch a ride on the steamboat back to their camps up the river. Back in those days most of the people who lived up the river worked in timber. They established their camps in the area where they were cutting at the time and where they lived. Some of the names I remember that my father camped and worked with was Alex Turner, Broze Ramsey, Jim White, Uncle Calvin Durham, his brothers, Frank and Dink (James T.) Hentz, Jake Harrell, a Mr. Kirkland, Mr. Jeter, a boy who camp to their camp, they never knew from where, who said his name was John. Thats all he would tell them, but he worked with them for years. Dan Minton, Manny Howard, John Parrish, Mr. Hathcock, my grandfather William Hentz, Mr. Will Gunn, Tom and Sid Johnson, Isiah Rewells, Tense Dugger, Rob Hentz, Will Durham, and many more. The boy who they found in camp would only tell them that, they didnt give poor folks but one name where he came from, years later when he had grown up and got married he took the name, Kirkland. Nobody ever knew whether that was his real name or not. He lived in the little village of Sumatra for many years. My father always said he was a good boy. Back in logging days on the Apalachicola River timber crews cut on Government claims issued by the boundaries, etc. My Uncle Frank Hentz was a surveyor and Ive heard it said that he knew where every section corner in Liberty County was located. The holder of the claim could dell with other crew operators to do the cutting. My father and his brothers worked with Mr. W.H. Gunn who was the son of my grandfathers oldest sister. There was a man named Rish from Wewahitchka who had a timber crew in the area and he was always dissatis ed with something and causing trouble. They got by without any serious trouble, but I heard of two different occasions when they had to have an understanding with him at the end of a Winchester. The center of the river is the line between counties on opposite sides of the river, and back in steamboat days, when a crime was committed on a steamboat it always posted a problem to determine which county had jurisdiction. It depended on which side of the river the boat was on at the time of the crime was committed. Sometimes a steamboat would pick up a dead body oating in the river. It would usually be in a condition that it had to be buried immediately. They would send a crew in a small boat to the river bank and bury it. They would than nail up half of a wooden barrel head on a tree or post it at the head of the grave. Back in the rafting days, some of the people who operated up the Chipola River had a rough reputation and our people on the river kept an eye on them. They didnt trust those people too far. They used to tell a story about an old man who rafted down the Chipola, that the other loggers in the area accused of stealing their timber and putting it into his raft. One time they were chasing after him and found him with his raft tied up at Douglas Landing on the COURTESY OF BEVERLY MOUNT DOUDS | Special to The StarThe Jim Woodruff Dam in Blountstown shortly after construction MEMORIES OF THEApalachicola RiverThe Star takes a look back at rivers historyTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) A Tisket, ATasket was whose rst major hit song in 1938? Artie Shaw, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Billie Holiday 2) What blood would a nurse measure with a sphygmomanometer? Sugar, Alcohol, Pressure, Count 3) John P. Holland is credited with the invention of the modern? Submarine, Refrigerator, Guitar, Padlock 4) Whats the youngest age one can become President of the United States? 32, 35, 40, 42 5) Which stone did early man primarily use for starting res? Slate, Marble, Quartz, Flint 6) Whose nest is the lookout platform on sailing ships? Boars, Eagles, Birds, Crows 7) What is the smallest area country in the United Kingdom? Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, England 8) Refried beans are primarily made of what type of cooked beans? Garbanzo, Black, Kidney, Pinto 9) What name did blues singer McKinley Morgan eld adopt? Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, B. B. King, Fats Domino 10) Which city opened the rst aquarium in 1893? Boston, Chicago, Baltimore, Richmond 11) If youre astraphobic what are you afraid of? Lightning, Astroturf, Stars, Mountains 12) What white creature is Ursus Maritimus? Owl, Whale, Polar bear, Bunny 13) Of these battery types which is largest in size? AA, AAA, C, D 14) A semenier chest ordinarily has how many drawers? 5, 6, 7, 8 ANSWERS 1) Ella Fitzgerald. 2) Pressure. 3) Submarine. 4) 35. 5) Flint. 6) Crows. 7) Northern Ireland. 8) Pinto. 9) Muddy Waters. 10) Chicago. 11) Lightning. 12) Polar bear. 13) D. 14) 7. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com See MEMORIES B8By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The governor and Florida Cabinet announced last week that the bay scallop season will begin three days early this year. That will mean bay scallops may be harvested in permitted areas June 28, ahead of the normal July 1 opening. June 28 is a Saturday. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced last week it would bring a proposal to its governing board to establish the Saturday prior to July 1 as the of cial opening of bay scallop season, unless July 1 is a Saturday. In a statement, Gov. Rick Scott said opening the season early and on a weekend will create additional recreational opportunities for Florida residents and visitors while recognizing the importance of economic bene ts to coastal communities where this activity occurs. I requested the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission open the season early this year to bene t our communities who rely on our sheries, Scott said. The bay scallop shery is especially important to Floridas Big Bend region and by opening the bay scallop season three days earlier, Floridians throughout this area will have more opportunities to enjoy our natural treasures and provide for their families. During season, bay scallops may be harvested in Gulf of Mexico state waters (shore to 9 nautical miles) from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal. St. Joseph Bay is one of the prime bay scallop harvesting areas in the state, with populations on the rebound the past two years. The season closes Sept. 25. For every scallop season since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010 state of cials have opened the season early, from more than two weeks to this years three days. All other regulations, including bag and vessel limits remain the same. Scallop season to begin early again this yearI requested the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission open the season early this year to bene t our communities who rely on our sheries. The bay scallop shery is especially important to Floridas Big Bend region and by opening the bay scallop season three days earlier, Floridians throughout this area will have more opportunities to enjoy our natural treasures and provide for their families.Gov. Rick Scott TIM CROFT | The StarA year ago Javarri Beachum was among 250 candidates selected from over 18,000 applications to attend the U.S. Naval Preparatory School.Beachum earns U.S. Naval academy appointmentSee BEACHUM B5FILE PHOTOA couple search for scallops during the 2013 season.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Port St. Joe Elementary School honor roll Special to The Star The following students made the honor roll for the fourth nine weeks at Port St. Joe Elementary.Kindergarten all AsHunter Ard, Cole Bailey, Joshua Baker, Maya Barnes, Zora Beauchamp, Christopher Bradley, Lauren Brant, Carson Brown, Corban Butts, Caitlin Cathey, Blake Childress, Christina Clayton, Brayden Dailey, Sumner Dickey, Trinity Farmer, Dominic Fitzgerald, Dru Flowers, Hailey Green, Fenix Grogan, Cole Hart, Kenley Hatcher, Shamyiah Hayes, Addison Hendricks, Donell Henry, Easton Herring, Emma Hill, Anderson Hodges, Johnnie Hood, Chloe Jones, Landon Layeld, Christopher Lee, Brody Lemieux, Stratton Levins, Nathan Lipford, Preston Magnussen, Jacob Marshall, Reagan Mathews, Kymani Mcadoo, Hallie Mize, Brody Mock, Kari Moore, Cameron Nichelson, Colby ONeal, Colt Patterson, Jamie Rapier, Kaley Rhodes, Reagan Thomas, James Ward, Lexi Webb, Paisley White, Keiara Wineld, Jett Whicker, Lia Wood, Callee Wray, Amirah Yarrell.Kindergarten As and BsMyles Acree, Juan Carlos Baxcajay, JaLeighya Becton, Christianna Causey, Harmony Dwight, Korbin Ellwood, Logan Ellwood, Jakwavian Gray, Eli Harris, Dovud Kouljanov, Bobby Landrum, Costin Marshall, Krissy Maxwell, Kaleigh Mohr, Nijah Quinn, Colton Raker, Leelyn Rollins, Melina Ruiz, Jenna Shively, Emily Sudduth, Jorgia Williams, Gabe Wood, ShaNari Woodruff.1st grade all AsMikey Allen,Whitney Butler, Gannon Buzzett, Sara Beasley Flowers, MacKenzie Freiesleben, Colton Johnson, Makayan Jones, Ava Kennedy, Peyton Knox, Lyriq Larry, Olivia Leonard, Boston McGhee, Zoey Metcalf, Kiyleh Parker, Handley Pitts, Bionca Rafeld, Bella Ray, Leila Smith, Kole Street, Emily Warner, Leland Whitlock, Landon White.1st grade As and BsIan Beck, Rashard Brown, TaNiyah Bryan, Camdon Buckley, Ashen Dady, Aydan Davis, Gregory Dean, Kate Fidler, Andruw Fountain, James Foxworth, Zuri Garner, Jamicia Glenn, Hailyn Levins, Chloe Harper, Carly Hatcher, Kaelee Johnson, Sydney Kingsland-Lormand, Eileen Madrid, Kensley Mathews, Harmony Mize, Draven ONeal, Grady Player, Damien Quaranta, Jackson Reatherford, Levi Sanders, Jasmine Sandoval, Sunny Shearer, Andrew Sheppard, Zachary Shively, Kellie Simmons, Lisa Southerland, Lia Taylor, King Waters, Karis Whicker.2nd grade all AsGarrett Acree, Estevan Angel, Jenna Bareld, Zoey Burkett, Ashleigh Causey, Bella Canington, Sam Childers, Tanner Fogle, Arlena Gleichner, Brandon Heckenlively, Cassidy Lewis, Tyrus Strickland.2nd grade As and BsJaMarrien Becton, Phebe Buckley, Cody Combow, Juveryona Daniels, Devin Daves, Ella Dimitrijevich, Sara Durham, Chase Dykes, Kelsey Elwood, Mary Margaret Farrell, Dawson Fisher, Shauna Flowers, India Gant, Wake Giffen, Lauren Givens, Owen Grantland, Carson Hendricks, Thomas Hutchinson, Kylie Ingalls, Danica Kelly, Makenna Kurnitsky, Lance Larry, Landon Lee, Chasity Moore, Luke Pickels, Alivia Randall, Kaylee Schweikert, Ardarien Shackleford, Miracle Smiley, Dakota Tousignant, Fisher Vandertulip, Diamond Warner, Brooke White, Elyse Williams.3rd grade all AsSkylar Clayton, Eli Fidler, Celeste Hamm, Luke Lentz, Dane Mallon, Gabriella Price, Hannah Riley, Ricky Sherrill. 3rd grade As and Bs Mannie Allen, Sam Brown, Emma Grace Burke, Madison Burkett, Maelynn Butler, Alexis Causey, Walker Chumney, Donovan Cumbie, Marcus Cumbie, A.J. Davis, Nathan Duong, Jaydon Gant, Payton Garland, Rylan Greenland, Kaydan Haisten, Levi Hanlon, Raelynn Hardy, Prince Jones, Jacob Justice, Gavin Lee, Chase Lanford, Bladen Levins, Cole Moore, Jabara Pearson, Jasslyn Rafeld, Janasia Walker, Emigen Watkins, Addi Watts, Halee Whicker, Britt White, Dane Wright, LaJuan Zaccaro.4th grade all AsElliana Burkett, Halston Fulk, Zoe Gerlach, Ashton McGlamery, Donovan Miniat, Megan Saleh, Lauren Woosley, Caleb Zur Heiden.4th grade As and BsSkylah Addison, Trent Antley, Briana Biagini, Paloma Burgos-Harris, Ace Cannon, Santana Causey, Destiny Dykes, Ricky Forbes-Rosado, Madelyn Gortemoller, Shadavia Hudgins, Laura Beth Hill, Porter Hodges, Caden Jackson, Emily Lacour, Aidan Lewis, Morgan Mills, Cliff Money, Amari Nickson, Erica Ramsey, Rylee Reatherford, Ava Ryan, Alexandria Thomason, Sarah Beth Thompson, Lily Wockenfuss.5th grade all AsAllie Godwin, Lauren Jenkins, Philip Riley, Caleb Wright.5th grade As and BsAustin Ard, Henry Balogh, Noah Bareld, Leanna Baumgardner, Savannah Burkett, Lyndsey Butler, Miles Butler, Parker Cornwell, Ali Evans, Sarah Fidler, George Foxworth, Judson Grifes, Tyler Guthrie, Haley Harriman, Corbin Ingalls, Kevin Lacivita, Lanecia Larry, Evelyn Laue, Bryson Lee, Bradley Lewis, Mattison Mills, Gabrielle Nicodemus, Terri Rae Phillips, Jack Randall, Alex Strickland, Hannah Tomlinson, Analisa Treglown, Gabrielle Wood.6th grade all AsJade Cothran, Sean Farnsley, Bailey Lake, Malena Ramsey, Sara Whiteld.6th grade As and BsBrandon Barnes, Justice Bareld, Eliza Belcher, Adison Burkett, Brianna Butler, Wesley Chapman, Cheyenne Cole, Tristan Doran, Joseph Farrell, Micaela Fedd, Jireh Gant, John Austin Gee, Madi Gingell, DeMarion Gray, Brittany Hanson, Courtney ShopatHomeHOMEOWNERINSURANCEHa nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 1 33 Juneisa45lb3yrLab/Catahoula mix.Shehaslearnedtowalkon herleashandislearningother commands.Juneisalittleshy aroundnewsurroundsandpeople butwarmsupquickly.Thispretty girlwouldloveaforeverhomeof herveryown.Ifyoucangiveher asafeandlovinghome,pleaselet usknow. Onlineapplicationsandpetphotos areavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrent vaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4 pm!Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,and alltheproceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare! ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3 pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandour shelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetin PortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon! Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyor Shelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4518169 DowntownPortSt.Joe850-229-6161 bowwowbeach.com301REIDAVENUE PORTST.JOEFLORIDA,32456 BlueBuffalo,Tasteof theWildandother brandsavailable! Special to The StarJoin us at the Gulf County Public Libraries this summer for weekly events featuring science experiments, stories, crafts and other fun activities. The Charles Whitehead Public Library in Wewahitchkas summer reading program will be at 3 p.m. CT Tuesdays from June 3 through July 8. The Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Library in Port St. Joes summer reading program will be at 1 p.m. ET Tuesdays from June 3-24. This years theme is Fizz, Boom, Read, and this summer is all about experimenting with STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math. For more information, visit www.nwrls.com or call the library in Wewahitchka at 639-2419 or Port St. Joe at 229-8879. Star Staff ReportGulf County Senior Citizens will be selling spaghetti plates from 46:30 p.m. ET June 6 at the Senior Center, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe. The plates will cost $7.50 and will include spaghetti with meat sauce, breadsticks, salad and homemade dessert. You may eat at the center or carry out. All proceeds will go to providing services to the elderly of Gulf County. Tickets are available at the Senior Citizens Center or from any employee of board member. Call 229-8466 for more information. Donations are needed and appreciated. Special to The Star Eighth-graders from Wewahitchka High School traveled to Washington, D.C., May 5-10 to explore our nations capital. Students visited with Rep. Steve Southerland on the steps of the Capitol and were treated with passes from Rep. Southerland to the House of Representatives Chambers to witness House bills being discussed. This annual trip is an educational experience for the students to see, up close, our government in action and learn about the history of our great country. Students also toured the following historical sites: Mount Vernon, The White House, Library of Congress, Arlington National Cemetery, World War II Memorial, Vietnam Memorial, Iwo Jima Memorial, Korean War Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, National Archives, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History and Monticello. Furthermore, students enjoyed the opportunity to experience a subway ride to The National Zoo. We would like to extend our thanks to those individuals that made this trip possible: the Gulf County School Board, Mr. Jim Norton and the chaperones Lana Harrison, Lori Price, April Bidwell, Christina Morrill, Buck Watford, and Bill Carr. We especially appreciate School Board member Mr. George Cox for providing admission into Mount Vernon for our students. Port St. Joe Elementary School HONOR RROLL School NewsWHS 8th-graders visit Washington, D.C.Ph H OTOS Sp P ECIa A L TO Th H E STa A R Fizz, Boom, Read this summer at Gulf County public librariesSenior citizens selling spaghetti plates CCOURTESY OF ChaCHA RLOTTE PIERCE | Special to The StarLast week during the regular bi-monthly meeting, Port St. Joe city commissioners recognized an Odyssey of the Mind team from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School as the team prepared for the World Finals the end of this week in Ames, Iowa. COMMISSION RECOGNIZES ODYSSEY OF ThHE MIND TEaAM

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The Star| B3Thursday, May 29, 2014 Special to The StarOn May 20, the students in Mr. Browns class at Wewahitchka Elementary School took a walking eldtrip around their beautiful town. Leaving the school shortly after 8 a.m., they took a walk down East River Road. On the way, students spotted squirrels running on power lines and wondering why they dont get electrocuted. (If anyone knows the real answer, please call the school and come and explain your theory to Mr. Browns class. Information will only be accepted in person!!!) Arriving at Second Street, the class headed toward the direction of the old Gulf County Court House. Listening to the birds and seeing the many beautiful owers in bloom helped make the several block walk seemed shorter than it was. Standing in front of the court house ag pole, the class completed their daily routine of reciting the Pledge of Allegiance followed by the singing of God Bless America. The class viewed the two historical markers that stood in front of the building as well as paying their respects to the Veterans Memorial that is located in the same area. The class was now eager to begin the tour of the court house. This tour was prearranged with Ms. Sharon Gaskin. Ms. Sharon is the Chief Executive Ofcer for the North Florida Child Development. The ofces that assist in the management of this very important organization are located within the old court house. When asked, Ms. Gaskin was proud to be able to share with the children all that has been done to help restore this special piece of Gulf County history. From the wavy glass that signies age to the display case with special artifacts associated with the building, the children were spell bound at all that there was to see. The highlight of the tour was to be able to walk through the beautifully restored court room. From the theatre-type seating to the jury area, the children were impressed. Of special interest were the stains on the oor where the judge sat. It seems that a few judges had trouble hitting the spittoon with their tobacco juice!! The class thanked one of Ms. Sharons assistants, Ms. Sebrina, for making the tour interesting for all. After leaving the court house, the class stopped by the local library for a brief tour by Ms. Marcy. Lunch was provided by Ann and Mitchel Johnson from The Corner Caf. The class was physically tired when they returned to the school, but all were excited by the promise of a return trip to the Court House. Gulf County and especially Wewahitchka should be proud to have this piece of history still available to be enjoyed. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast 4516380850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Thereisplentyofroomwith4bedrooms,4.5baths and3deckstoenjoytheviewthegorgeoussunsets. Over2,000sqft.oflivingspacewithprivateelevator accesstoeachlevel.TileFloorsandcrownmolding inkitchen,diningandlivingareas.540sqft.ofdecks. Beautifullyfurnishedandreadyforyou. StunningsunsetsrightoutyourbackdooroverlookingSt. JoeBay.Fullyfurnishedtownhomelocatedon4acresofland coveredwithlargepristineoaktreesandpalmtrees.Asyou takeinallthenaturalbeautyoftheareayoucanstarttoplan yourdaysactivitiessuchasshing,snorkeling,scalloping, kayakingorboating(allofwhichcanbedonefromyourback door).Thistownhousehasspaciouslivingandkitchenarea andhas3bedroomseachwiththeirownprivatebalcony.850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SOLD Special to The StarFaith Christian School recently honored the graduates of its K5 class as they head off to kindergarten. Members of the class include Annie Cullen, Cade Costin, Celie White, Farrah Spring, Ellison Newman, Jacob Medina, Jakob Prine, Katie Pickett, Kimberly Padilla, Mary Beth McGufn, Peyton Herring, Ruby Williams and Tucker Ashcraft. Congratulations, graduates. The Lions Tale School NewsWES students visit historic Gulf County Court House PHOTOS SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR23 WES students graduate pre-K at Dead Lakes ParkBy DARLENE AAKESpecial to The Star Twenty-three students graduated from Ms. Darlene Akes pre-K class at Wewahitchka Elementary School and will be moving up to kindergarten in the fall. Five 3and 4-year-olds will be returning next year to pre-K. Thanks to the parents and CVS that gave the children goody bags full of treats/gifts and for the food and decoration. A special thank you to Mr. George Cox, Mr. Danny Little, Mr. and Mrs. James Taunton, Mr. and Mrs. Victor Gortman and WES for donations toward the purchase of the book, Dr. Suesss Oh The Places Youll Go. It has been a wonderful year.

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(TraditionalServices1928BCP) COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org BruceHodge, Pastor Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. FAITHThursday, May 29, 2014 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comDoctor dangers explored at Lifetree CafSpecial to The StarThe dangers of medical mistakes will be discussed 7 p.m. CT Monday, June 2, at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Doctor Danger: What Every Patient Needs to Know, features a lmed interview with Dr. Martin Makary, a cancer surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and author of Unaccountable: What Hospitals Wont Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care. There are lots of things hospitals dont tell you, Makary said. As many as 25 percent of patients are harmed by medical mistakes. Its an epidemic, and it kills more people than HIV and car accidents combined. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum ABC Jesus Loves Me program helps children learnSpecial to The StarThe Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum in its 3-year-old room. This curriculum uses both hands on learning and learning through play. Children will be prepared for preschool and by the end of the school year children will: know several Bible stories, memory verses, nursery rhymes, nger plays and songs which they can recall when prompted know the names of all of the uppercase and lowercase letters know the phonetic sound of all of the letters be able to correctly trace all uppercase and lowercase letters with their nger know by name and be able to correctly trace the numbers 1-15 with their nger be able to identify various colors and shapes be able to demonstrate spatial concepts, sorting, and AB and ABA patterns be able to say the letters of their rst name as well as write them using all capital letters be introduced to many books increase in ne and gross motor skills There are a few spots available in this great program which offers care from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call Kristy Raf eld at 227-4320 for enrollment or more information.The perfect giftA perfect gift was nailed to the cross. Only this gift could pay the cost. For the sins of the world He came to die. He did this folks for you and I. Thats not all, He arose from the grave. This man who came, for our souls to save. He said He would go and prepare us a place. If you believe in Him youll be saved by grace. If by chance you dont believe. There will be no pardon and no reprieve. Billy Johnson Star Staff ReportsCitywide Vacation Bible SchoolThe citywide Vacation Bible School will be hosted by Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church. This years theme will be Jesus the Connection. Children from ages 5-18 are welcome. The CWVBS will begin at 10 a.m. and continue until 1 p.m. June 2-6. There will be biblical lessons, crafts and snacks. For more information, call Sis. Gloria Q. Gant at 227-7441 or Sis. Minnie Likely at 229-8155.Clothing giveawayThere will be clothing giveaway from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET May 31 at First Baptist Church of White City at 7210 State 71 S. The giveaway is sponsored by the Baptist Womens Mission. Faith BRIEFS

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, May 29, 2014down time from his summer job working at Rafeld Fisheries. Im excited and also anxious, anxious to get it started. Beachum continues on a path that carried long odds. Coming out of high school, a commander in the Port St. Joe High School NJROTC ranks his senior year, Beachum was among 250 applicants accepted into the Preparatory School out of a pool of over 18,000. The winnowing continues between Preparatory School and Academy. I was pretty impressed with what I was able to accomplish, Beachum said. I made some great friends and I got accustomed to military life. There were, Beachum readily acknowledged, high waves to overcome. From the get-go he had to learn to put his personality in check when in uniform and in the ranks. He found out quickly that conformity is part of the basic discipline of the military. I consider myself to be a free-spirited person, Beachum said. In the military you cant hold on to that free-spiritedness too long. But what we had to do each day, as far as drills and study, was very similar to what I did with NJROTC in high school. I was very well-prepared. Our high school program really prepared me. He did need to shore up his study habits. Beachum said he was unprepared for the rigorous academic demands of the Preparatory School as he continued his education to the hopedfor destination of aviation school. The indoctrination period at the Preparatory School, with the rising early for calisthenics, eating, drilling and repeat throughout the day, is taxing, but it is only one portion of the program. There is a very academic side to the indoctrination too, Beachum said. During the year, it is very intensive academically. And learning how to study, the discipline of setting aside the time to properly complete homework and preparation for class was a critical transition, Beachum said. One of the biggest things I learned was guring out how to study, Beachum said. There were times I thought I wasnt going to get this. At rst it was very difcult. But once I got my study habits down it got easier. Its all about time management. The results were evident on the GPA line. Struggling initially, Beachum scored a 3.65 GPA in the years nal marking period to earn a 3.25 for the year. I was glad I made the choice of the Preparatory School, Beachum said. I will be better prepared for the academy. Beachum also carved out time for his favorite athletic pursuit even though the Preparatory School did not have a soccer team. Beachum was a standout soccer player in high school. He and some friends formed a team and played a series of club teams in the area. The transition to Newport was also eased by an environment similar to home as the Rhode Island city, with a signicant Naval presence, is surrounded by Narragansett Bay. It is a beautiful area, a nice area, but it does get cold, Beachum said with a laugh. Beachum left Newport with an appreciation of what he can accomplish when he musters his brainand will-power. He also left with a better understanding that military life, with plenty of rewards, isnt all glamour. There were times that it really sucked, for lack of a better word, Beachum said. But you have to embrace the suckiness, so to speak. There are time it is miserable. You just have to wake up every day, put a smile on your face and work hard. And absorb the life-lessons that surround. Probably the best thing I gured out, one of the most important things, is all you have to do is care, Beachum said. That is probably the best advice I ever heard. When you care you do your best and when you do that it isnt hard to distinguish yourself. At 1600 hours, exactly, on June 30 Beachum will continue to navigate his distinguished path. (withcoupon)30%OFF*PAINTS&STAINSMAY29JUNE16 **NOPURCHASENECESSARY.APURCHASEWILLNOTINCREASEYOURCHANCESOFWINNING.LEGALRESIDENTSOFTHE50UNITEDSTATES(D.C.)18YEARS ANDOLDER.VOIDWHEREPROHIBITED.Sweepstakesends6/30/14.ForOcialRules,prizedescriptionsandoddsdisclosure,visitwww.swracetovictory. com.TheChasefortheNASCARSprintCuplogoandwordmarkareusedunderlicensebytheNationalAssociationforStockCarAutoRacing,Inc.and Sprint.Sponsor:TheSherwin-WilliamsCompany,101W.ProspectAvenue,Cleveland,OH44115.NASCAR,Inc.andSprintarenotsponsorsofthispromotion.EnterforaChancetoWina2014 FordExplorerANDaVIPtriptoa2014ChasefortheNASCARSprint CupRaceofyourchoice.**ENTERATSWRACETOVICTORY.COM *Validonretailsalesofretail productsonly.Discount takenoofourlistprice. Salepricingorotheroers thatresultingreatersavings willsupersedethisoer. Mustsurrendercouponat timeofredemption.Cash value:1/100of1.Oer excludespreviouspurchases, andpurchasesofgift cards,Multi-Purposeprimers,MinwaxWoodFinishquarts,ladders,spray equipmentandaccessories.Otherexclusionsmayapply,seestorefordetails. Voidiftransferred,purchased,sold,altered,duplicated,orwhereprohibited bylaw.ValidatSherwin-WilliamsandSherwin-Williamsoperatedretail paintstoresonly.Wereservetherighttoacceptrefuseorlimittheuseofany coupon.Oervalid5/29/146/16/14.2014TheSherwin-WilliamsCompany. SAVE15%*ONPAINTINGSUPPLIESBringthiscouponinandsave!SAVE30%*ONPAINTS&STAINS MONFRI: 7AMTO7PM SAT: 8AMTO6PM SUN: 10AMTO6PMStorehoursmayvary.Seestorefordetails.STOREHOURS:TolocateaSherwin-Williamsstorenearyou, visitsherwin-williams.comorcall1-800-4-SHERWIN. BEACHUM from page B1Star Staff ReportMichael Lister is celebrating his 20 years as a writer with the release of his third Jimmy Soldier Riley noir novel, The Big Hello. This follows 2011s The Big Goodbye and 2013s The Big Beyond. The Big Hello is the conclusion of the thrilling noir trilogy set in the Panhandle of the 1940s. Find out Soldier and Laurens fate in the thrilling conclusion to Michael Listers landmark Big noir series. Walk the mean streets of wartime Panama City with Jimmy Soldier Riley, a wounded, woman-haunted knight errant in Michael Listers resonant new noir series Publishers Weekly calls a promising private detective series set in 1940s Florida, and Library Journal says peppered with snappy dialog, this hard-boiled mystery by award winner Lister is a swell read. John Dufresne said, Michael Lister has the world of Florida Panhandle noir all to himself. Tough, violent, and hard-boiled, this novel of obsession and suspense will remind you of Raymond Chandler, Graham Greene, and why you started reading crime novels in the rst place. Lister plans to celebrate the release of The Big Hello with a book release reception and signing at No Name Caf from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET Saturday, May 31. Lister will read from the book and sign copies. The following weekend the novel will come alive in the form of an old-time radio show on stage in front of an audience. Performances will be 7 p.m. CT June 6-7 at Sarzin Hall, Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City. Tickets can be ordered at MichaelLister.com or purchased at the No Name signing. Lister said it has been an amazing experience to see The Big Hello come off the page and onto the stage. Some of the most rewarding and interesting projects hes been involved with in recent years have been GCSC stage adaptations of his novels Double Exposure and The Big Goodbye. I love that these are presentations of the book more than just typical stage adaptations, which means the audience doesnt lose anything from the books, Lister said. Our approach with all three is an enhanced experience of the book. But its even more so this time, since were doing the play as an old-time 40s radio show on the stage. Shakespeare wrote that the play is the thing, Lister said, but for me the book is the thing. Its all about the book bringing the book to life for the audience, who I still view as readers, and collaborating with the cast and crew to give the audience the best reading experience possible. The Big Hello stars Allen Walker, who is playing the main character, private detective Jimmy Soldier Riley for the second time. Walker originally played Riley in GCSCs production of The Big Goodbye. He has also performed all three audio books in the series. Each $20 ticket to the live performance includes a copy of the new novel. Listers ultimate goal with the play is to encourage people to read the book. In fact, in the play we will be stopping short of presenting the entire book so that the audience can read the nal few chapters on their own but with the voices of the actors and the experience of the play still fresh in their minds, Lister said. Its going to be a unique and fascinating experience. Probably the best thing I gured out, one of the most important things, is all you have to do is care. That is probably the best advice I ever heard. When you care you do your best and when you do that it isnt hard to distinguish yourself.Javarri BeachumLister marks new release with signing, play Chipola River about 3 miles from where the river ows into the Apalachicola. He was sitting there on the bank of the river smoking his pipe. They cursed him out and accused him of stealing their timber and said that they would shoot him if he moved that raft. He sat there and smoked his pipe and when he got through he just knocked the ashes out of his pipe, got and started untying the raft. They threw their guns on him and swore theyd shoot him. He untied the raft, pushed out into the river and as he went down the river he holler back at them. Well boys, talk is cheap, It takes money to buy liquor. Nobody shot him. He went on to Apalachicola and sold the timber. Transcribing stories that John shared with us about his memories of the Apalachicola River. There are the rst of 25 pages of maps, one each page at points on the river he tells us his story. Here is what I copied..BMD We start out at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, which would be at Apalachicola. Each page is heading (top of page) north, the bottom is the south end.PAGE 1(Yellow Fever) On Sept. 14th 1878, the steamboat Mary Elizabeth arrived in Apalach, the Federal Authorities boarded it and found no sick persons, but decided ____________ ____________ for 20 days in harbor but Capt. Comrick said his boat couldnt stand the conditions in the harbor that long. He proposed to go up into Lake Wemico, they refused, and so he headed up into Saul Creek. They __________ shot at his boat 40 or 50 times. Apalachicola was make a port in 1820 during the Admiration of President James Monroe, but did not ofcially belong to the US until 1821. It shipped its rst cotton in 1828, 317 bales, by 1836 it exceeded 51,000 annually. From 1828 until the Civil War started in 1861, more than 300 steamboats ran the river. By 1847 the port of Apalachicola was exporting 160,000 bales of cotton annually. In 1847, the trend started reversing when the big cotton mills were built at Columbus and cotton started going up river. The US Customs Ofce opened in Apalachicola in 1823. During its heydays of cotton exports, MEMORIES from page B1See MEm MORIES B7

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 ST.JOSEPHBAYGOLFCLUB SPECIALS JUNIORGOLFERS(17ANDUNDER)PLAYFREEWITHANADULTPAYING GOLFER-FRANKLIN&GULFCOUNTIESONLY SINGLEANDFAMILYMEMBERSHIPS-NOINITIATIONFEE&FIRSTMONTH DUESFREEWITHA12MONTHCOMMITMENT(MUSTPAYBALANCEBYCASH, CHECK,ORCREDITCARDATTIMEOFSIGNUP) CALLTHEPROSHOPTODAYFORMOREINFORMATIONORSTOPBY 850-227-1751. CALLTHEPROSHOPFORINFORMATIONONFREEGOLFLESSONSFOR CHILDRENEACHFRIDAYINJUNE. 700COUNTRYCLUBROAD. PORTST.JOE,FL32456 Wecanbesafe.Linemenoftenworkbesidea busyroadway,andthatmakesa dangerousjobmorehazardous. Whenapproachingautility vehicle,moveoverifsafetodo so,creatinganemptylanebuffer. Whenchanginglanesisnt possible,reduceyourspeed.Lets worktogethertofollowthelaw, payattention,slowdown,move overandstaysafe.Togetherwe poweryourlife. TOGETHER Special to The StarTAMPA Marking its third year at Cooking for Solutions at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition (Coalition) is continuing the legacy of sharing wild, delicious Gulf seafood while highlighting its unique avors and versatility at the annual event, held this year May 16 through 18 in Monterey, Calif. Each year, the Monterey Bay Aquariums Cooking for Solutions event brings together celebrated chefs from across the country to highlight ne food and wine, while discovering ways to preserve the oceans. Renowned chefs, including Chef Briana Sammut of Beach House Restaurant at Lovers Point in Pacic Grove, Calif.; former private chef to Oprah Chef Art Smith; Food Network Canada Star Chef John Ash; and Hawaii-based Kai Lanai Restaurant chef/owner and television personality Chef Sam Choy will be representing the Gulf of Mexico States by preparing fresh Gulf shrimp, provided by Coxs Wholesale Seafood and Woods Fisheries of Port St. Joe. Both distributors shrimp are traceable via Gulf Seafood Trace, a program that allows consumers and retailers to discover their seafoods story from boat to plate, ensuring that the species is sustainably managed. Attendees can nd Gulf shrimp at the Meet the Chefs reception on May 14, Sustainable Foods Institute 2014 Luncheon and Cooking for Solutions Gala on May 16, A Street Food Extravaganza on May 17, as well as DIY: Grilled Pizza with John Ash and DIY: Pupus and Poke with Sam Choy on May 18. The Coalitions continued support of Cooking for Solutions each year is rooted in the Gulf of Mexicos commitment to maintaining a sustained ecosystem for generations to come. This year, among many sustainability practices already in place, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission launched GulfFINFO, an all-inclusive website for everything consumers and chefs need to be condent that Gulf seafood is harvested from sustainable sheries. With FINFO launching just earlier this year, this is an exciting time to be at Cooking for Solutions to share insight, information and appreciation about sustaining the wonderful resource of Gulf seafood for the future, said Joanne McNeely Zaritsky, marketing director for the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition. Both home and professional chefs already know and love Gulf seafood for its exceptional avor and quality, and now FINFO offers a new resource to communicate the sustainability of Gulf seafood. FINFO is a compilation of the complex and oftenconfusing data from the Gulf of Mexicos responsibly-managed sheries, synthesized into easy-to-understand answers about the source of your seafood. Gulf of Mexico sheries and organizations are constantly researching and monitoring seafood stocks to remain a leader in sustainability practices. Many of the Gulf States have received exemplary scores and designation for their enforcement groups. Gulf Coast seafood has been an integral part of our culture for decades, and the seafood community is dedicated to responsible shing for future generations. To extend the opportunity to enjoy succulent, sustainabilityraised Gulf seafood at home, Chef John Ash is sharing his Grilled Gulf Shrimp Pizza recipe that he is preparing at the DIY workshop at Cooking for Solutions (recipe at right). For more information about the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition and its sustainable practices, contact Joanne McNeely Zaritsky at joanne. zaritsky@gmail.com, 850224-1129 or 813-286-8390 or visit www.eatgulfseafood. com and follow the Coalition on Facebook at Gulf Coast Seafood and Twitter at @eatgulfseafood. About Gulf Seafood Marketing CoalitionThe Coalition provides a framework for the seafood community to coordinate marketing efforts among the Gulf States with emphasis on working with tourism boards, restaurants, retailers and chefs. The Gulf & South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc. is coordinating the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition through funding provided by the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commissions (NOAA Award #NA10NMF4770481). For more information, visit www.eatgulfseafood.com and follow the Coalition on Facebook at Gulf Coast Seafood and Twitter at @ eatgulfseafood. About Gulf & South Atlantic Fisheries Foundation, Inc.The Foundation is a private, regional nonprot research organization with a general membership and Board of Trustees representing a wide spectrum of the commercial shing industry throughout the southeast U.S. Through the Foundation, the commercial seafood and shing industry can collectively identify industry needs, and address those needs through appropriate research and other activities. Representing the nine-state region from Virginia to Texas, the Foundation has sponsored more than 600 sheries related research projects. Provided to the Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition by Chef John Ash I Ng G REDi I ENts TS f F OR D D OUg G H 1 envelope (2 teaspoons) active dry yeast 2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons sugar 1 teaspoons table salt (or 3 teaspoons kosher salt) cup nely-ground corn meal or whole wheat our 3 tablespoons olive oil 4 4 cups unbleached allpurpose our I Ng G REDi I ENts TS f F OR TOppi PPI Ngs GS 1 pound peeled and deveined Gulf shrimp (21 25, depending on size) Prepared pizza dough divided into six portions cup extra virgin olive oil for brushing and drizzling 2 cups loosely packed shredded Sonoma Jack cheese cup freshly grated pecorino cheese 6 ounces fresh mozzarella, drained and sliced 3 cups canned and crushed tomatoes in puree, preferably with basil 1/3 cup coarsely chopped basil leaves Big pinch of crushed red pepper akes for each pizza Slice the shrimp in half lengthwise. Blanc for 1 minute in simmering salted water. Drain and plunge into cold water to stop the cooking. Drain again and set aside. The shrimp will be just barely cooked at this point. Prepare a two-level (one side cooler than the other) charcoal re, setting the grill rack 4 inches or so above the coals. Alternately, you can use a gas grill with one side hotter than the other. With a lightly oured work surface and rolling pin, roll the dough portion into 10 inch or so free-form circles as thinly as you can, about -inch thick. Dont worry about the shape, as even thickness is the goal. Place them on a sheet pan divided by parchment or waxed paper. When the coals are evenly lit and medium hot, brush the dough with olive oil and place it oiled side down onto the hot part of the grill. Within a minute or so the dough will puff and bubble, the underside will stiffen and grill marks will appear. Using tongs or a spatula check to see that it is not burning. If so, move it to the cooler part of the grill. Flip the crust over, onto the cooler part of the grill and quickly brush the grilled surface lightly with olive oil. Spread a thin layer of the tomatoes on the dough and then quickly top with a bit of each of the cheeses, shrimp and basil. Remember that you dont need or want to cover the entire surface of the pizza. Immediately put the hood down and cook for another minute or two or until the cheeses are melted. Move pizza to a cutting board and cut into wedges and serve immediately. Cook remaining pizzas in the same manner.Chefs note: When you have topped the pizzas if after a couple of minutes the cheese has not melted and bubbling a bit, either the coals were not hot enough or you have used too much cheese and toppings. A longer time on the grill will only dry out the pizza and toughen it. The ideal crust should be both chewy and crisp. This is why a good 2-level re is so important. To make the pizza dough, in the bowl of an electric mixer tted with a dough hook stir the yeast into the warm water with sugar. After 5 minutes it should begin to bubble, then stir in the salt, corn meal and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Add the our, stirring at low speed until the dough forms a rough ball and pulls away from the sides of the bowl, about 4 minutes. You may need to add a little our or water here. Let the dough rest in the bowl for 15 minutes. It should be fairly soft. Remove from the bowl and divide the dough into 6 equal pieces. Gently round each piece into a ball and brush or rub with a little olive oil. Place each into a zippered plastic storage bag and drizzle remaining olive oil (1 teaspoon or so) over each ball and seal the bags closed. Let the balls sit for at least 30 minutes. You can also refrigerate them overnight at this point and roll out and make pizzas the next day. Sitting overnight actually gives you a better avor in the dough. If youve refrigerated them, plan to take them out of the refrigerator at least 1 hour before you plan to make the pizzas. Alternately you can freeze the dough for up to 3 months. Again, plan to let the dough thaw and come to room temperature before using. Makes six 10-inch pizzasGulf Seafood continues support of Monterey Bay Aquarium Cooking for SolutionsWild-caught shrimp, from Woods Fisheries and others, showcased to support sustainabilityGRiILLED GULfF SHRimpIMP PiIZZaA

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LocalThe Star| B7Thursday, May 29, 2014 May21,2014ATTENTION:ALLGULFCOUNTYRESIDENTSIN UNINCORPORATEDCOUNTYTheGulfCountyBoardofCountyCommissionersis proudtoannouncethatWasteProhasbeenawarded thecontractforgarbageserviceseffectiveJune1st. Cartsarebeingdelivered,startingthisweek.Ifyou areintheunincorporatedCountyandarereceiving WasteManagementgarbageservice,youwillbe receivinganewgarbagecartfromWastePro.Ifthe newcarthasadecalonit,yourdayofpickupwillbe indicatedonthatdecal.Ifyoureceiveyourcartand itdoesnthaveadecal,yourroutedaywillstaythe sameasitisnow. WasteManagementhasindicatedthatanyservice paidforwiththeircompanypastJune1st,willbe refundeddirectlybythem.Theywillalsobepicking uptheircartsonorafterthelastpickupdayforyour area,priortoJune1st. ITISVERYIMPORTANTTHATYOUDONOTPUT GARBAGEINTHEWASTEMANAGEMENTCARTS AFTERTHELASTDAYOFPICKUPFORYOUR AREA,NORPUTGARBAGEINTHEWASTEPRO CARTSPRIORTOJUNE1ST. WasteProwillbesendingbillstoeachcustomer.If youdonotreceiveacartandhadservice,orwishto addservice,pleasecontactWasteProatthenumber below. Ifyouhaveanyquestions,pleasecontactWastePro at(850)872-1800. THANKYOU GULFCOUNTYBOCCANDADMINISTRATION enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL The steamer Calhoun sails along the ApalachicolaApalachicola had 2 cotton presses that pressed the bales of cotton into smaller size for shipping our seas. One was docilely operated, the other was steam operated. Capt. Wing set another milestone on Monday, October 25th when he completed his 10,600th round trip, the Crescent City from Apalachicola to Carrabelle, without a mishap, a record never equated. The years 1920 1927.PAGE 2The Pinhook is in the middle where Jackson River and Sauls Creek Cutoff is at the Apalachicola River mile marker 5.7 (G.I.W. 345.7). At this point the Intra-Coastal Canal joins the Apalachicola River system. The Pinhook, the last bend in the Apalachicola River before it just empties into the Jackson River about 5 miles above Apalachicola is where the current ran for the log rafts .At this point the saw mill would send Tug Boat to bring the logs to the mill. In the mid April 1847 the U.S. Mail boat Augusta and the Eufaula collided, the Augusta sank. The 5 mile trestle on the Apalachicola River Northern Rail Road always aspersed me from the time I was a little boy I did not see how on earth men were to build it. Four Tree Cut-off just below the sh camps on the west bend of the river was a short cut for shermen, but got to be dangerous because of high speed boats running towards it. It is narrow, curved, and had high grass eight feet tall on both sides. Chipley Creek is somewhere in the area-ANRR-between Grassy Creek and MEMORIES from page B2See MEMORIES B8

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LocalB8 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Acorn Creek. The 5 mile trestle on it was from River Junction to Port St. Joe, the ANRR crossed the Apalachicola River system just about 4.5 miles north of Apalachicola on its way down from the NE, it rst crosses East River, the big St. Marks and the main Apalachicola River and all the sloughs and swamps between.PAGE 3Anthony Apiary-heading north on the Big Excursion days our kin folks from Greensboro would come down on the train and we would meet them at Hosford or Telozia. On an Excursion about the 1918 or 1919, we were crossing the 5mile trestle and my cousin from Greensboro, Wright Johnson and I saw a big alligator from the window of the couch swimming up the East River. The new year 1852 on Oct. 9th the steamboat Alabama hit a snag on the river ans was lost. Columbus (maybe snag boat) sank in Hurricane Reach one mile below St. Marks River. Visible at low water, built at Bainbridge in 1904. The A.N.R.R. was completed from River Junction to Apalachicola in the year 1907. In April of 1907 the 1st passenger train locomotive chugged into PSJ during the early years of its operation the Rail Road have Excursions at a cut rate fare to PSJ that was a big deal with people who lived inland up the railroad to go to PSJ for a day of picnicking and swimming in the bay. The old St. Joe Hotel was headquarters. Before Highway 98 was built between the hotel and the bay. There was a boardwalk all the way from the front of the hotel to the bay. I once saw a one-legged man who had put on his bathing suit in the hotel and hop on one leg all the way down the walkway to the bay.PAGE 4(North to Howard Creek, Berrisman Slough, Harrison Creek-left, right is Bloody Bluff Island) In the late 1940s Merle Bishop drowned in the lower Brothers (1948, I am kin to this man). In these days the International Paper Company furnished a recreation camp down on the West Bank of the Big Brothers with all the comfort of home for their employees. Merle Bishop was personnel ofcer for the company, he and two other company employers were on their way to camp on Saturday night, when Merle felled overboard and drowned. Here at the mouth of the Brothers, my father and his brother, who were teenagers at the time had been trading timber in the swamps. They had nished their job and hailed the steamboat for a ride up the river. They were standing on a small dock when the steamboat sung into it and knocked the deck out from under them. One of them had a bed roll and a rie in his hand and the others had a suit case and a rie, a deck hand caught my uncle by the leg, my father was knocked into the river. He dodged behind a tree to keep the steamboat from crushing him. They lost the bedrolls and the suit cases, but both of them held onto their ries. (Bloody Bluff Island-landing) This is where Mr. Richards of Wewahitchka and his party caught up with the Indians after they had killed all of his family except one little boy named Jehu who managed to escape and hide out in the swamps on the Dead Lakes. Mr. Richards and his party delivered such re power on those Indians until the river was red with blood for a great distance downstream.PAGE 5(South is Bloody Bluff North is Fort G G adsden Creek, near Smith Creek) At mile 18 site of the trading post owned the English rm of Panton & Leslie and Etc. A large chain, later taken over by Forbes. The had 1200 cows here at one time. In the early history of Florida, there was a frontier trading post on the East Bank of the river at about mile marker #18, known as Prepress Bluff. One time the trading company had over 1200 cattle here. Part of the land credit to Panton, Leslie and company, a British Trading Post by the Indians in payment in debts owed by the Indians. It was called the Forbes Purchase and was as far as St. Marks. Steamboat Cuba snagged and sank 3miles above Bloody Bluff in March 1839, it was a side wheeler.PAGE 6(Heading north is Owl Creek, entering Liberty County. South was Ft. G G a dsden State Park, Forbes Island, and Harding Landing) Willis Landing on the upper Brothers with paved access out to Hwy 71. I have shed this area for many years. There is one BIG Gator that lives in the upper end of this swift water. The upper part of Brickyard-cut off slough next to the Apalachicola River was stopped up with logs and known as Log Jam. It was not accessible for many years until the U.S. Engineers cleared it out. One night back in 1940 before the road was paved from Willis Landing on the Brothers out to Hwy 71, a friend of mine was coming out from Willis Landing and was meeting a car. Before they met the other car came to a curve in the road and ran across the ditch and into the woods and hit a tree. My friend stopped his car and ran out and hollered, my friend, what happened? By that time the man had gotten out of his car and was staggering around and he says I stopped up there at that lling station and asked the man which way to Willis Landing and he says, you see this here straight road, and it went straight. In Spanish Florida, Fort Gadsden was built by the British on Spanish about 1814. A steamboat carries cotton down the Apalachicola River MEMORIES from page B7See MEmo MORiIEsS B9

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LocalThe Star| B9Thursday, May 29, 2014 It harbored runaway Negro slaves and hostile Indians and was known as a Negro Fort. It was from July 27, 1816 in orders from Andrew Jackson. There were 320 people in the fort at the time and 270 of them were killed and most of them wounded. The fort was later rebuilt by Capt. James Gadsden and named for him. He was General Jacksons engineer, it was rebuilt in 1817. North on Owl Creek is partly Franklin County and partly Liberty County. Its accessible by road on the Liberty County side and has a public camp and boat ramp. Ive seen some awful big gators on this creek.PAGE 7(North is Kennedy Creek, Hentz, Simmons and Larkins Landings) (South of the page is Owl Creek in Franklin/ Liberty County). In 1846, the steamboat Oconie sunk at the west bank of the river about 150/200 yards near Brushy Creek. It collided with the steamboat Osceola. The old steamboat boiler and pistons are on display at Fort Gadsden State Park and are probably off the Oconie instead of the train as stated on the sign. In the 1800s Grandma Kelley saw one of the Hathcocks kill a man on deck of the steamboat here with a hatchet near Brushy and Neals Landing in Liberty County. When Tom Scott was killed, he had taken my fathers place as head of a Timber cutting crew for Cypress Lumber Company in Apalachicola. He was shot from the bushes at his camp one night. The case was not salved.PAGE 8(North is mile marker 30, near Camp House, between the Chipola Cut/ o ff and A A palachicola Rivers. South is Kennedy Creek at Upper E E lbow). The William Hentz family lived for more than 20 years on the upper Reaches of Kennedy. They moved from here in 1889 when he was 16 years old. Battle Bend, the U S Engineers cut out this bend and stopped it up. (Middle of the page/map is Camp House at mile marker #28. There used to be a wharf here and a lot of turbulence. (Left side the river is now in Gulf County, and the right side is in Liberty, just at where the Brothers River begins).(Also known as Three Rivers. That includes Brothers, Chipola, and Apalachicola Rivers) Heading north near Douglas LandingBefore the Chipola Cut/off was dug in 1916 steamboats serving the area up down river including Wewa, & Vacincty had to turn around and go back down to the Junction. Of the Chipola and Apalach rivers to proceed up the Apalachicola River. Digging the Chipola Cut/off was a mighty big aid to the steamboat men. The Chipola Cut/off is mighty0000000000000000 crooked so I suspect there was a slough that ran through the cut and the cut/off fall _____ ______ it?PAGE 9(North, Camp House, near mile marker #33. Left side of river shows Upper Piney Reach Dikes). The swiftest areas on the river is at Double Points. (Middle of page on Liberty County side.) The 3rd steamboat Chipola was built in Apalachicola in 1911. It was snagged and lost in the Chipola River in 1923. I remember this boat. In the early 1950s, my father John Hentz Sr., nephew Jimmy Carmore (?) John L. Hentz, my son and I camped on the east of the river. I hunted the Liberty County side, the river was high and Jimmy got lost in the back water and almost froze to death, Big Piney Reach called Lower Piney Reach today used to be considered the swiftest part of the river. Back in logging days people had to paddle their boats up and down it. My father said once he heard an old Negro logging hand, swear under oath that it was 2 miles down river and four miles up the river. This happened in Federal Court.PAGE 10Top left side of page is the G G ulf County side, mile marker 38. In the year 1886 on May 2nd, the steamboat Lee was lost in Moccasin slough. It was a stern wheeler, 121 ft. long, 21 ft wide. I dont see how it got in there, that slough must have been a lot larger, back then than it is today. The steamboat Elizabeth, a paddle wheeler was built in 1842 in Marietta, Ohio, it sunk about 200 yards above Styx. My people and the men that worked with them used to run logs through the Virginia Cut. Note: written in the middle of the map at Judges Camp and River Styx under Louis Bend on Moccasin Slough. In the 1950s Judge Mercer Spear and I saw 13 wild turkeys around 1 p.m. in the day How in the world did the steamboat Bertha Lee get in here? (on the right side of the river near River Styx). On Jan 4th 1844, the steamboat Fanny Elssler burned at mile marker #35 in the narrows. The re started in the wood supply. She was run ashore, and all the people escaped. My Grandfathers family build on the upper end of Kennedy Creek until the year 1889. River Styx, this was Bill Larkins and familys stamping grounds. This area is known as The Briar Patch, its bounded on the east by Kennedy Creek and on the south by Sheppard Slough. Sheppards Lake and River Styx and on the west by a River Swamp.PAGE 11Top of the page is Iola Landing, mile marker #45, bottom (south) is G G ator Slough and Lanier A A piary, near mile marker #39. (right side rst) In the 1800 there was a post ofce and hotel here at Iola, in 1837 a railroad was built from St. Joe to here a distance of 28 miles. It was abandoned about 1839/40. The 2nd steamboat Chipola was built here in 1886, it was a stern wheeler. The Chipola Cut-off was completed in 1916 In the year 1899 on June 29, the steamboat Apalachee, a stern wheeler was snagged in the Chipola-Cut-off and at last, one killed. The John W. Callahan Jr. struck a snag about 2 miles south of Wewahitchka and was sunk. One life was lost, and the Captain was Roy Connell, this was on 3/25/23, if so, it was raised because it was still in operation in 1927. Lucille White says it was 1923 when the Callahan Jr. cut her fathers launch in two at the Bristol Landing. People used to tell me that they could see the wreckage of the Callahan until a few years ago. In 1841 the term ??? of the railroad Iola was described as located upon a beautiful bluff of the Apalachicola River (m#45) connected with the steamer running Tri-weekly. Mr. Davidson is the post master and overseer of a ne orange grove as did S.S. Alderman, J.W. Keyes, and J.A. Donaldson. It was the site of a friendly Indians Settlement in 1823 occupied by John Blount. He was a friend and guide of General Andy Jackson. He later moved to Blountstown. The U.S. post ofce at Iola was established in 1838, and was discontinued in 1845. The site of Iola was originally owned by the Kentucky Deaf and Dumb Asylum. PAGE 12North (top of the page) is Porter Landing in Calhoun County. During the 1980s on a Sunday afternoon, a boy named Ronnie Taylor struck something and was throw from his boat and drowned at upper end of Porter Reach. A big alligator lays out here on the west bank of the river at the lower end of this slough (mile marker #47). South (bottom of page) at mile marker #46 is the road to Iola Landing and the right side of the river is in Liberty County, also the Florida River is below Green Back Lake. One early Monday morning in October 1920, my father John Hentz Sr. and his cousin Will Durham and I came down to the old Lindsey place on the Florida River to go hunting and shing. We intended to go to Green Back Lake but got lost and wound up on Dog Slough. (top right side of page, on the Liberty County side) We killed 2 turkeys and caught all the sh we could carry. I was only nine years old at the time. Page 13. North is Coons Landing (mile marker #55) left side of river is Calhoun County, right side is Liberty. South is Dog Slough, Queen City Lake, and Dicks Point. The steamboat Queen City was one of the most fun?boats that ran the river. It operated on the river for many years. It must have sunk here on Queen City Point, but I have not found a record of it. If it sank here it had to have been raised and put back into service. The records said that it was built in Columbus and dismantled there. About the year 1900 Charles B. Wingate was one of the pilots on the Queen City. One cold morning about 1950, I shot a squirrel on the west bank of Queen city Lake and the biggest buck I ever saw jumped in the lake right behind me and was all the way across the middle of the lake splashing water at least 40 feet in every direction. The lake was about belly deep on him. I just stood there with my little shot in my gun and watched him go. That was some sight with the sun glistering off the water. (Middle of the map/page at mile m arker #52 is E E quiloxic, Liberty Co. side). I have hunted this Equiloxic Creek and Florida River swamp all my life. I have memories of hunting and shing trips in the area. (Red Hill and Double Bridges founded listed here. When Capt. Wingate blew that whistle it scared those Indians to death. Some ran to the deck and jumped in the river, and all that could ran down the gang plank.PAGE 14 WAs S missin MISSIN G PAGE 15.North is Lundy Lake (right side of river) at mile marker #65. Calhoun County is on the left side. William Augustus Bowles was an Indian Agent, he went back to the Bahamas before Andrew Jackson came to this area, he was Lucky. In the year 1839 on May 15th or 20th, the Creek Indians attacked the settlement of Roberts at Stiffnulgee and John and Nathan Smith home at Ricos Bluff. At Stiffnulgee the Indians burned the Roberts home and killed a little boy. Roberts was wounded but he his wife, and a man named Aldrich and four children escaped. At the Smiths home at Ricos Bluff, Smith (Nathan), three children, a Mrs. Richards and her ve children and a man named White were all murdered. Smith, his wife, another woman, and two men escaped. Some 15 of the refugees came down river on the mail boat Commerce. They saw Indians on the bank of the river when the Commerce threaded through the narrows seven miles north of Fort Gadsden. (South at mile marker #60 is Muscogee Landing on the Liberty County side) When I was a little boy m father and I cut board timber out of this area. Here at Muscogee Bluff in the early 1800s, William Augustus Bowles, an English trader and adventurer tried to create an independent Indian State. He appeared to have the unofcial approval of the British. It was supposed to be an independent sovengin state with him at the head of it. His adventure failed. (Estiffanulga Landing, between mile marker #63 & 64). This bluff is between 30 to 40 feet high, it is between Apalachicola and Bristol. There used to be a big turpentine operation here. It had several different operators over the years, I remember Mr. Reddish, and Mr. Mizell. One night, in the 1920s Claude Bateman, my father, and I went cat shing with ___? On the outside of the lake, today very little water goes down it, since the U.S. Engineers cut out the bend in the river at Point Poloway and stopped it up.PAGE 16North, is Bakers Landing (mile marker # 70). On May 11, 1838, the steamboat Irwinton was on the way down river with 200 bales of cotton when it caught are. All but 50 bales were thrown overboard. It sank in 13 feet of water and was later raised and ran the river for many more years. This happened a few miles south of Blountstown. The crew and passengers got ashore safely and were carried home by the Commerce. This happened at Points Poloway. In the early days the Johnson family had a steamboat Landing here at Points Poloway. (right side of river (Liberty Co. side) on the left is Outside Lake, to your upper right is another little lake, unnamed. This must be the Johnson sh lake. It was one of my favorite shing holes, when I was a little boy. Sometime about the year 1919, Mr. Theo Ford accidentally shot his hand off with a shotgun here at Point Poloway. His father in-law, Jule Michaux was with him at the time. They had to go home in a horse and wagon. Mr. Tom Johnson butcher beef and sent it to Apalachicola on the steamboat. He had a catch dog that went with him all the time. Once Mr. Johnson met the boat at the landing and got off of it and went home, but the dog stayed on the boat and went to Apalachicola. He caught the boat on its return trip and when home. The boat crew put a sign in his collar that said I am Tom Johnsons dog, whos dog are you? Page 17, North now is at Sheppards Landing (mile marker #77), left is West Wynnton on the Calhoun County side of the river, and to the right in Liberty County is Wind Lake, south is Baker Lake and Poloway cut-off. On Friday afternoon in the fall of 1928, Mr. Will Fields was shot and killed in the river swamps on the Calhoun County side. Outside Lake runs down the outside of the swamp a distance of about 6 miles and back into the river at Estifangula. This used to be the worst bend in the river, timber rafters had to pole their rafts away from the bank all the way around this bend. Poloway Cutoff The US Engineers cut this bend out of the river and allowed it to stop up. Capt. E.L. Maquder was Captain on the Big Callahan about the year 1919 and later. I remember him. In 1915 the W.C. Bradley and the City of Eufaula were two of the main stays on the river and had electric lights. The Callahan line also had electric lights. (north left side) Old River See mM EmoriMORIEsS B10The Cypress Creek sawmill MEMORIES from page B8

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LocalB10 | The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction ALLDOGTRAINING Callforfreequotes Melissa McCutchan Owner/Trainer 6911DavidWhiteldRd. Wewahitchka,Fl.32465 Seeuson TomGoldsmithPhotographyCustomPhotography Services:Events, Family,Corporate, Location,RealEstate FineArtPrints; tom-goldsmith .artistwebsites.com PortraitStudio 318ReidAve PortSt.Joe,FL 32456 850-899-2883 tom.goldsmith@ fairpoint.net BrykPropertyManagementVacationRentalCleaning Maintenance Flooring/CarpetInstallation/CarpetCleaning SpecializinginAbsenteeOwners PropertyManagement(850)381-5333GETYOURAD227-7847 19Years of Service! (Calhoun Co, side) My Uncle James Hentz and his partner, H.B. Gaskin owned this swamp on Old River for many years. The steamboat Commerce built in Albany, Ga. In 1836, exploded in 1840, with ve lives lost. In 1838 a white familys home opposable of Blountstown on the river was destroyed by Indians. There were about 30 in the party, but this was just a part of a large group of 80 to 100 more Indians. In 1842, Gen. Ethan Allen Hitchcock conducted, just about the last act of Indian removals of the 2nd Seminoles Indian Wars. He boarded the Chattahoochees in the mid December with 80 men and ofcers and set after a band of Creeks Pascofa, they had completed despoliations up and down the river. He __________ them and per them to take passage from O clock Bay to Cuba. This was accomplished in 1843. This pretty much nished the Indians troubles along the river.PAGE 18North (m. m. #82) right side of the river is Ramseys Landing. Left side is The Bayou. On Sunday, November 1st 1839 at 2 p.m. the boiler of the steamboat LeRoy blew up two miles north of Blountstown. The pilot Halloman was thrown 100 yards up the river still holding on to the wheel in his hands. He swam to safety. The mail was returned by Slade Sutton and put on the steamboat Louisa. Six people were killed. The bridge between Calhoun and liberty counties was opened up about 1937, and Highway 20 was paved about the same time. (Hwy 20 and the Blountstown Bridge here on this page is located between mile markers #79/80). Pryor to that time we went down to the bank of the river at Bristal Landing and traveled down the west bank a distance of about four miles to the old Charley Cayson ferry and crossed over the river on a at pushed by a launch. The little wooden bridge across the sloughs were tied to the trees with wire to keep them from oating off during high water. The steamboat Apalachicola was built here at Blountstown. It was lost at Kings Rock, Alabama on May 16, 1848. On December 18, 1916 here at Blountstown, a distant relative died, she was Ellen Gaskin, she was the daughter of my grandfathers older sister. My father and older sister was going to the funeral of a friend, a dock boy (the rest of this story I could not make it out to nish telling you). An old Indian mound is here, possibility at Albert Caysons Place, and also here at Charly Caysons ferry. Sometime in the 1920s, Mr. Jim White had a mail contract to carry the mail back and forth from Bristol to Blountstown. He brought a new launch to do the runs with. The launch was tied up at Bristol and the steamboat (unnamed) ran down on it and its paddles chopped the launch into. The steamboat John C. Calhoun was built in Brownsville, Pa. In 1859, its boilers exploded at 6 a.m. April 28, 1860 here at Bristol, killing eight people, another reported 12 killed. One of them was Leander M. Crawford, its Captain.PAGE 19North is a natural gas submarine pipeline crossing (at mile marker #87) Right side of river (Liberty Co.) is Beaver Dam & Little Sweetwater, Left side of river (Calhoun Co.) half way down is Hollis Landing. Indians trouble lasted up and down the river until the early 1840s, my grandmothers peoples home along the banks of the river were raided many times. They would hide out in the swamps from the Indians and would have to put handkerchiefs in the childrens mouths so that the Indians couldnt hear them crying. The Indians would break up all their chinaware, cut up their feather beds, eat up every thing they could not steal of their livestock and poultry. No area of the State was more of a reason for the US to take Florida from Spain than our Apalachicola Valley area. There were constant troubles up and down our southern borders. The Indians could raid and kill our properties, then dodge back into Spanish Fla. And Spain did nothing about it. The massacre of the people on the Army boat one mile south of Chattahoochee by Himolle Micca and his band was the last straw. That happened in 1817. Negro Fort on the Apalachicola River was Jacksons base of operation. Old Chief John Blount (SORRY the rest of this page is cut, and I couldnt complete the story..BMD) South, right side of river is Kelley Branch. Uncle Joe Kelleys real name was James Archibald Kelley. Joe was a nickname I think his wife used, her name was Bellona Mae Grifn, Kelley. Kelley Branch was named for old Uncle Joe Kellys family. He owned property at Rock Buff, Bristol, and Kennedy Creek. PAGE 20North (m.m. #91) at A A kins Landing (left side of River)and Wayside Landing right of river). South, Porters Landing (Calhoun Co, side) In the late October 1840 Capt. Smith of the Louisa reported seeing a raft along the river here that a band of Indians had used to cross the river. Sometime between Friday and Sunday, Colonel Mapes of the US Army examined it and decided it to have been built by whites. I have wondered if this was the same band of Indians that massacred the McClaine (or McLaine) family just a few miles to the north at Sycanore. (*note by John Hentz)I am sure that the name Himolle Micco was the position held by the Indian chief in the Indian ____ by and was old Chief Nemanthla from Fowltown that led the massacre of the two river boat loads of solders on the Apalachicola River on November 21, 1817. Nemanthilas Village had been destroyed about nine days earlier by US solders.PAGE 21North is (m.m. #94) left is Johnson Landing, just below this is Ocheese Landing, and on the right side is Coopers Landing and Torreya State Park. One of the two places where the trees grow that built Noahs Ark is near by here. Rock Buff, in the mid 1800s this way was probably the main town in Liberty County, my grandmother and her brother were raised by an old Great grand Aunt, we called Grandma Kelley. There were Louise and Calvin Durham, they were left orphaned in Apalach when they were small. I think their parents died about the same time in the yellow fever epidemic in 1849. Rock Buff, during the Civil War a parade was held in Rock Buff by a unit of the 2nd Fla. Calvary and my grandfather William Hentz was the Commanding Ofcer. The speech was given and the ag was given and was presented by Lou Durham. Years later when my grandfathers wife died he went back to Rock Buff and married Lou Durham. The ag she presented to his troops that day is in the State Archives in the State Capital today. The old Jason Gregory mansion stood here (on the right side of the river) on the Calhoun County side since before the Civil War, when Torreya State Park was established, the old mansion was moved across the river to the Park. Rock Buff Landing The carnage sugar plantation was somewhere in this area, Old Great Uncle James A. Kelley was overseer.PAGE 22North and to the right (G G adsden County) side of the river is A A spalaga Landing (m.m. #98) to the left side of the river is Blue Springs and Hickory Landing (Jackson County) to the south is still Calhoun and Liberty counties. In the early days of steam boating on the Apalachicola River the boats were attached by the Indians. In some instances they were shot at from both side of the river. The steam boats would have to put up barricades along the decks to catch the bullets and arrows. Sometimes people were killed while being on the boats. The US Governor passed the Indian Removal Act in 1830 and the Indians problems were pretty much saved by the Spring of 1843. Here in the year 1840 a bunch of renegade Indians massacred almost all of the McLaine families. They are buried here in Sycamore graveyard. The local churches made a monument to the family and a plaque recovered the incident. The plaque reads: McLane, In memory on April 10th 1840, Mrs. Nancy McLane, age 40 was shot, Catherine, age 13 was shot and scalded by Indians, 2 small children was killed by pine knots. John McLane killed the chiefs son, this occurred close to Telogia Creek.PAGE 23North is Sampson Landing at (m.m. #102) Jackson Co, side. The steamboat W.C. Bradley sank at Aspalaga sometime in 1919. At Coes Landing in the year 1845 in early February on a Monday, the boiler of the steamboat Siren blew up killing 10 people, all were employees of the steamboat crew. Capt. Sharples was blown 50 foot through the air. He landed in the water and swam to safety. A lady passenger was rescued from the water by the engineer, one person was saved by clinging to a bale of cotton oating. The boat was carrying 200 bales of cotton and was a complete lost. Pryor to the Civil War, my grandfather William Hentz had a cotton plantation, cotton gin, and a Negro slaves on the river in this area. He was make a free dealer by Special Act of the Fla. Legislature before he was 21 years old.PAGE 24AA BUSY PAGE AGE HE E RE E The City of Marianna on our right (mile marker #105) and the Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, also Highway 90 and the Victory Bridge. We also have the Louisville & Nashville Railroad on the right side of the river and on our left is the DcLiff Matls, south is the Farrel Landing and t he G G ulf Power steam plant. On July 22, 1922 the Victory Bridge was opened on the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. In the year of 1840, on June 12th the steamboat Barbara Hunt was lost at the site of Victory on the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. In the year 1842 near River Junction, the steamboat Chamas exploded on Oct 31st, lives were lost. Fright on the Apalachicola River during the year 1911 (the year I was born) was valued at $15,784,029.00 which included 13,842 bales of cotton, 50,194 barrels of naval (stock/stores) and 1,200.000 packages of merchandise. The two steamboats that were most proment were the Queen City and the W.C. Bradley both of them ran the river for many years. The Indian chief Himolle Micco also know as NeMarthla. He was later executed at Fort Marks by Andrew Jackson. The woman who survived the massacre was Mrs. Stuart, she was later rescuered in Fla. And married John Dill and lived in Fort Gaines. In late November 1817 an open Army boat being propelled by hand oars with 20 able bodied solders some sick solders of woman who were solder wifes and four children were massacred here by several hundred Indians, one woman and six men escaped.PAGE 25 (LAst ST PAGE)North is Lake Simimole, (mile markers all start over, this is at m.m. 2 ) Georgia state line. The right side here is all water and Decatur County, and to the left is the Aplachee Correctional InstitutionalJohns last memories. Somewhere about here was located the Indian Village of Fowltown in 1817. It was the home of Seminole Chief Semthla and his band (Ne-marthla). *note Fowltown was farther to the N.E. Beginningsabout the year 1828, steamboats became the movers of people and fright, they opened the interior of the county, towns and communities sprang up all along thr interior waterways. Towns, and families had their steamboat landings along the waterways, the entire County depended on steamboats for their transportation, people even went shopping on the boats. Snags and rocks in the river were a peril to the steamboat, cleaning them out was a big job. It was nothing uncommon for groups of citizens from town along the waterways to go to Washington D.C., begging the Federal Government for help to clean them out. The US Army Corps of Engineers were to assigned the job of cleaning out and maintaining the waterways for trafc and have done a wonderful job of it for many years. The haydays of the steamboats lasted about 100 years, 1828 to 1928, a lot of old steamboat landings along the river still bear the old family names.The End. MEmMORIES from page B9

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 29, 2014 The Star | B11 ** 2013 GULF COUNTY DELINQUENT TAX ROLL 2013 **Pursuant to Chapter 197.432, Florida Statutes, Subsection (16) Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Sale for Delinquent Gulf County Property Taxes will be conducted online on the Gulf County Tax Certificate Auction Website at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com. Bids can be entered on the site starting on Monday, May 5, 2014. Tax Certificates will be awarded on Friday, May 30, 2014. Bidders are asked to register at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com prior to sale. SHIRLEY J. JENKINS, CFC TAX COLLECTOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA1600 R-1288400 $590.94 04917-003R BEARDEN HAROLD SR CITY OF PORT ST JOE LOT 10 & S/2 OF LOT 9 ORB 330/525 QC FR BENNETT MAP 50A BLK 39 ORB 444/29 FR KNOTT 4519131 95024S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14000029CAAXMX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. LEVERAL RAFFIELD: KIMBERLY L. RAFFIELD: el al.. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Kimberly L. Raffield Last Known Residence: Unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: LOT 1: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 536.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES. MORE OR LESS. AND LOT 2: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION .13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 412.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE | CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiffs attorney, at 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days of the first dtae of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before June 16, 2014, on Plaintiffs attorney or immediateily thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on May 9th, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk File No. 1212-724B May 22, 29, 2014 95028S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA-000257 DIVISION: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-A7, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006A7, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID J. DELEO, AS TRUSTEE OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 13, SURFSIDE ESTATES, PHASE II, THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 46, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 126 PLUTO WAY, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456-4640 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before June 16, 2014, service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 8th day of May, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 PH-10-51962 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. May 22, 29, 2014 95078S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-26 PR IN PROBATE IN Re: The Estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, deceased, Case Number 14-26 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTCE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims within this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 22, 2014. /s/ Ronald C. Hewett Ronald C. Hewett 164 Deer Creek Circle Gray, GA 31032 Ancillary Personal Representative of the Estate of Coleman J. Hewett /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 SAILORS COVE DRIVE PO BOX 39 PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 (850)229-8211 FL BAR NO. 0350583 ATTORNEY FOR ANCILLARY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE May 22, 29, 2014 99007S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Leigh Gable Holdings, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1031 Application No. 2014-29 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03806-520R Description of Property: Lot 12, Block D, SeaShores/St. Joe Beach, Unit No. 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 35, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Margot A. Valencik All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day of June, 2014. Dated this 19th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 22, 29 June 5, 12, 2014 98965S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO: 1314-22 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company or corporation interested in purchasing the following: Parcel No: 02852-145R WIMICO PLACE SUB PB 6 PG 58 LOTS 9 & 10 ORB 459/721 FR WHITE CITY MAP 101C White City, Florida Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the Gulf County Clerks Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, May 30, 2014. Proposals received after the closing time will be returned unopened. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Gulf County Reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in the best interests of the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 22, 29, 2014 99033S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009CA 000254CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff, vs. SUELLEN FLEMING, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 18, 2014 and entered in 2009CA 000254CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS FOR AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC., SERIES 2002-C ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, is the Plaintiff and SUELLEN FLEMING; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY are the Defendant(s). Rebecca L. Norris as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash the Front Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, at 11:00 AM ET on June 19, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST FOR 1341.09 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE 100 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 30-E (FORMERLY STATE ROAD NO. 30-E); THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 23 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST FOR 1642.44 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11426.79 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS FOR 427.29 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST FOR 1711.69 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WHICH HAS A RADIUS OF 11415.15 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 1058.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST FOR 2813.88 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 574.11 FEET TO A RE-ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 319.00 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 59.78 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 69 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST ALONG A PARTY WALL AND A PROJECTION THEREOF 314.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 59.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY 18.00 FEET AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY 12.00 FEET OF THE NORTHEASTERLY 74.00 FEET THEREOF. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of May, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts. org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 File No. 13-14008 May 29, June 5, 2014 99031S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that James M. Holcombe the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 699 Application No. 2014-30 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03083-415R Description of Property: Lot 43, Palm Breeze Subdivision according to the plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 4, Page 46. Name in which assessed: Richard & Delilah Henderson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of July, 2014. Dated this 27th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 29, June 5, 12, 19, 2014 99039S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12000218CA-AXMX WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA KAY REEDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBRA KAY REEDER; JOSEPH C. REEDER; and UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TENANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against that defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order or Final Judgment entered in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: A parcel of land located in Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Northeast of the Northwest of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence North 00 West, 39.40 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 88 West, 126.48 feet to a point on the East R/W line of SR No. 71; said point being on the arc of a non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northwesterly along said East R/W line, along the arc of said curve; having a radius of 11034.28, a central angle of 00, an arc distance of 64.98 feet: chord to said curve bears North 28 West, 64.98 feet; thence leaving said East R/W line, North 65 East, 171.90 feet; thence South 00 East, 125.24 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.31 acres, more or less. Property Address: 1660 Hwy 71 South Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Parcel I.D.: R 02614-000R at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Courthouse lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. E.T. on 26th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 21st day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Enrico G. Gonzalez, P.A. Attorney at Law Enrico G. Gonzalez, Esq. 6255 E. Fowler Ave. Temple Terrace, FL 33617 FL Bar #861472 (813)980-6302 In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding via the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771. May 29, June 5, 2014 99049S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-27 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of BETTY B. RISH, also known as BETTY JO RISH, deceased, File Number 14-27 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the co-personal representatives and the co-personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 29, 2014. /s/ Doris Jean Whitten Doris Jean Whitten P.O. Box 397 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Co-Personal Representative Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Barbara Ann Johnson Barbara Ann Johnson P.O. Box 573 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Estate of Betty B. Rish /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON 116 Sailors Cove Drive P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457 (850) 229-8211 ATTORNEY FOR CO-PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES FL Bar No. 0350583 May 29, June 5, 2014 99057S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: Bid #1314-23 GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS ROOF INSTALLATION The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for the purchase and installation of: ROOF FOR THE GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS BUILDING Specifications may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, or at the website at www.gulfcountyfl.gov. Further information can be obtained by contacting Tony Price at (850) 227-8335. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 4:30 Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343

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B12| The Star Thursday, May 29, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS Janelle Rodabaugh 850-747-5013 or jrodabaugh@pcnh.com Jessica Branda 850-747-5019 or jbranda@pcnh.comEMPLOYMENT TODAY!!! Contact Us Directly For All Of Your Recruitment Needs! 1123147ClassACDLDriversNeededImmediatelyDumpTrailer Experience. $1000SignOn RetentionBonus Walton/Bay/ WashingtonCounties PanamaCityArea *HomeNightsApplyonline:www.perdidotrucking.com 1653MapleAvenuePanamaCity,Florida 32405 850-784-7940 WebID#:34284633 1125201 NursePractitionerorPAWantedforbusyfamily practice.Benetsavail.Send resumetoBlindBox3611co TheNewsHerald,P.O.Box 1940,PanamaCityFL32402 112316025DRIVERTRAINEES NEEDEDNOW!Learntodrivefor WernerEnterprises!Earn$800perweek!Noexperienceneeded!LocalCDLTraining JobReadyin15days.1-888-379-3546WebID34284625 1125211WoundCareNurseMusthavelongtermcareexperience.Scheduler1yearmedicalexperience, homehealthpreferred.Sendresumeto hr.baystjoe@signaturehealthcarellc.com 1124944ServicePlumber2YearsVeriableService/Repair Exp.ValidDriversLicense. OTorOn-CallwillbeRequired. KnowledgeofSouthWaltonArea PleaseApplyat AJ'sPlumbingInc. 998BayDrive, SantaRosaBeach,FL. WebID#:34289477 HVACREFRIGERATIONMECHANIC (2positions)Withbenefits.5years documentedexper.inthefield. ToApply,goto:www.bay.k12.fl.us, EmploymentOpportunities,Support. Foradditionalassistance call850-767-4231. Deadlinetoapplyis: 4:30pmon5/26/2014 WebID#:342895651124951 1124950Nowtakingapplicationsfor new KFC inCallaway. Applyat jobs.kfc.com or faxresumeto 334-702-0302 WebID34289468 TextFL89468to56654 ShiftManagers &TeamMembers 1125221 NursePractitionerpositionavailableforbusyinternal medicinepractice.Onlyexperienced needapply.PleaseincludeCVand references.Sendresumesto BlindBox3618c/oTheNewsHerald, P.O.Box1940,PanamaCity,FL32402 4519142 4510161 451913 6 Fickling & Company of Florida, located on beautiful St. George Island, is currently seeking a seasonalpart-time, entry-level Housekeeping Inspector / Laundry Assistant Some experience is preferred but not required. Must be energetic, detailed oriented and possess great customer service skills. Weekends are required and must be able to start immediately. $12 per hour with paid training. Drug Screen & Background Check required. Please apply in person at 112 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island, FL 32328. 4519175HUNTING LEASE IS ADDING NEW MEMBERS. DOG HUNTING, STILL HUNTING, BOATRAMPS AND CAMPSITE AVAIALBLE. S.E. GULF COUNTY. IF INTERESTED CALL HARLON HADDOCK 850-227-6983. p.m., E.T., on Friday, June 6, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 10: 00 a.m., E.T. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99065S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROPOSAL NO. 1314-24 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners requests proposals from qualified firms or individuals for a: PAYAND CLASSIFICATION STUDYFOR THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Copies of the Proposal Provisions and Forms may be obtained at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or found on the Gulf County website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov. Additional technical information relative to this RFPmay be obtained from Denise Manuel, Central Services Director, at (850) 227-2384 or dmanuel@gulfcountyfl.gov during normal business hours. Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide five (5) bound copies and one (1) electronic copy of your proposal. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will accept sealed proposals at the Gulf County Clerk of Courts Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, until June 26, 2014, at 4:00 PM, ET. The proposals will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 30, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. ET. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all proposals. Gulf County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 29, June 5, 2014 99083S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-28-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JANE GIBSON GLASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jane Gibson Glass, deceased, whose date of death was September 16, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SETFORTH ABOVE, ANYCLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 29, 2014. Personal Representative: Nancy G. Cowles 3174 Paces Mill Rd SE Atlanta, GA30339 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKETSTREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 FLBar No.: 63869 E-Mail Address: ddduncan@fairpoint. net May 29, June 5, 2014 ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish. 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. PSJ 511 7th St Fri May 30th 11a-Until Sat. May 31st From 8a-UntilYard SaleLost Of Misc. Something For Everyone! Text FL90427 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL June 7th & 8th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairCleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sundays. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in PORT ST JOE IMMEDIATELY Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Sal 850-227-6691 or Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34290225 Office BuildingFor Lease: 514 Florida Ave Space is plumbed for a medical/dental office but can be used for a variety of business types. Apprx. 2,184SF. Call For Details (850) 896-0609 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 HUMMER H2 SUV 2006 Excellent Condition, Original Owner, 97K Mi, Black/Wheat Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, All Books, Keys & Records. $23,995 Call Rich 502/649-1520 Spot Advertising works! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 4519141 Early Education Child Care TeacherTrinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, FL will be offering an early educational child care program starting in the fall. The name of the program will be St. Benedict Preschool. The educational program will be offered on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am-11:30 am. The program will be using Montessori methods and materials. The classroom will be located on church property at 79 Sixth Street and will serve prekindergarten children who are toilet trained below the age of 5. This advertisement is for a Part-Time teacher to work approximately 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Applicants must have as a minimum, a High School diploma and one of the following certicates/credentials: 1. An active National Early Childhood Credential (NECC). 2. Formal Educational Qualications. 3. An active Birth Through Five Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC); Florida Department of Education Child Care Apprenticeship Certicate (CCAC) or Early Childhood Professional Certicate (ECPC); 4. An active School-Age Child Care Credential awarded as a Florida Child Care Professional Credential (FCCPC) or School-Age Professional Certicate (SAPC). Graduates who successfully complete a school-age training program offered by a branch of the U.S. Military will be recognized as having met the School-Age FCCPC requirementApplicants must be willing to submit to background screening and ngerprinting. Qualied applicants need to submit their re sume, including a copy of their early child care certicate/credential, to the Trinity Annex, 76 Fifth Street, or by mail to Trinity Episcopal Church P.O. Box 667, Apalachicola, FL 3232 9-0667. For quest ions, call 850-653-9550. All applic ations must be submitted by June 12, 2014. 850-697-5300 314 St. James Avenue Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!!! 451914 0