The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03943


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, MAY 22, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 32Suspect in custody in Cape San Blas murderBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com A Cape San Blas woman was murdered in her home over the weekend and one of her two sons is being held as the prime suspect. On Sunday afternoon Renee Coffey was found murdered in her Cape San Blas home. The prime suspect is Coffeys son, Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, who lived with her at the residence, according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Slick is in custody on outstanding arson charges, but had not been charged with the murder as of press time. After receiving a 9-11 phone call from Slick at 1:45 p.m. ET, deputies found Coffey, 52, of 7525 Cape San Blas Road unresponsive in her home. By the time rst responders arrived on scene Coffey had expired from undisclosed injuries. The Florida Department of Law Enforcements unit from Pensacola was dispatched and processed the crime scene. Slick was charged with two counts of arson and two counts of burglary in the burnings of a Port St. Joe Masonic Lodge in December 2012. Slick was out on bond, which had been paid for by Coffey. Slick has not yet been prosecuted for the arson, but Slick already faces up to 30 years in prison and a ne of up to $40,000 if convicted. Harrison said that Slick was questioned at the scene of the murder and then taken to the Sheriffs Of ce where he was arrested shortly thereafter. This was an isolated incident and there is no public threat, said Harrison. We believe we have our prime suspect detained. Coffey has another son who lives at the residence, but he wasnt home at the time of the incident. Coffeys husband is currently deployed in Iraq, but has been noti ed and will soon be traveling back to Gulf County. It could happen anywhere, said Harrison of the incident. It just happened to happen at a very visible spot in this county.SPECIAL TO THE STARRenee Coffey was killed in her Cape San Blas home on Sunday.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Of late it seems that every knot of headwind on dredging that propels the Port St. Joe Port Authority is buffeted by a not. Last week the board heard continuing good news on a permit application to dredge the federally-authorized shipping channel to authorized depth. The Florida Legislature included in their budget an appropriation that represents at least a healthy down payment on the dredging. The U.S. Congress was scheduled this week to take up legislation negotiated by Senate and House leaders which would among other provisions buttress funding for dredging and maintenance projects across the country and would earmark a speci c percentage of dollars for emerging ports such as the Port of Port St. Joe. The St. Joe Company, the Port Authoritys collaborator in developing the port, is codifying in contract two letters of intent signed last year with energy companies wishing to ship through the port. In those agreements, for the rst time, the Port Authority would be a partner. And Holland Ware, whose foundation has expressed strong interest in shipping through the Port of Port St. Joe, attended last weeks regular monthly meeting and stated his ongoing support of efforts to unlock the potential of the port. That positive momentum was mitigated by ongoing issues pertaining to basic operations during what board member Eugene Rafeld said was a rubber meets the Port Authority navigates diverging streamsSee PORT A7 JARROD POWELL SLICK Effort to save the bay urgedBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Dusty May urged Port St. Joe commissioners Tuesday night to support a grassroots effort to address problems with bay bottom destruction that plague St. Joseph Bay. That would be one aspect of a multi-pronged approach, May said, to save the bay before somebody else takes action. Speci cally, May mentioned the Pew Charitable Trusts and its far-reaching program addressing environmental issues around the globe. While emphasizing he has no indication St. Joseph Bay is on the non-pro ts radar, he noted the organizations reach, resources and advocacy and said the organization was currently involved in an effort to shut down a bay in the Florida Keys. The Pew Charitable Trusts role in studying the Gulf of Mexico has been a signi cant factor, many regional shing organizations contend, in signi cant restrictions on season-length and catch-size for shing in the gulf. If we dont do something somebody else will, May said. (Pew does) ... their homework and that bay could be shut down or taken from us. The primary issue May addressed was the trenches and other evidence of deep scarring by boats in the bay bottom. The bottom, St. Joseph Bay, is home to some of the nest seagrass beds in the state, and is one of the few remaining bay scallop harvesting areas in the state that remain open. But the lushness of the grass beds is under threat in this region due to a mysterious wasting disease and, more pressingly, scarring by boats. One issue is proper and By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The wounded warriors arrived in Gulf County last Wednesday. They left on Sunday after a community applied a soothing balm. Other than rough seas that delayed the shing until Saturday the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend provided a great escape for 20 warriors and their caregivers who enjoyed postcard weather, a warm community embrace and plenty of fun. From the Honor Parade and Banquet that of cially kicked off the event last Thursday, and which saw hundreds line the parade route and gather at the Centennial Building for a welcoming salute, to a day of offshore shing, the weekend was one to remember. Coming here to the Forgotten Coast, that is a name, because I am not going to forget, said Sgt. Major Jesse Acosta who served as keynote speaker at the banquet and See SAVE THE BAY A7Im not going to forget WES LOCHER AND TIM CROFT| The StarThe Honor Parade drew folks to salute along the route and greet and salute warriors at the Centennial Building prior to the Honor Banquet.Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend offers salutes, smiles and sh See WARRIOR A7Opinion ...........................A4-A5Letters to the Editor .............A4Outdoors ...............................A8 Sports............................A9-A10Grad Pages .......................B6-B7Faith .................................B4-B5 Obituaries ...............................B4Classi eds ............................B12

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 ONCEAGAINOURWORLDFAMOUS 2014MEMORIALWEEKENDBUTTROAST STARTINGTHURSDAY22ndthroughSATURDAY24thMAY2014AtSalinasParkBaysideonCapeSanBlasRoad oppositeourrestationORDERYOURBUTTSATwww.sgcre.comTOGUARANTEEYOURORDER ORJUSTHOPEWESTILLHAVESOMELEFT ANDCOMEANDPICKTHEMUPONLY$35 ursdayandFridaybetween11amand6pm &Saturdaybetween11am-4pmWewillbesellingsandwichesfor$6 Includingasodaandchips.Family-To-Goboxesfor4(hotorcold)at$20whichwillinclude1lbofshredded barbecuepork,4buns,4sodas,4chipsand potsofcoleslawandbarbecuesauce. Alsoourlocalartistsandcraerswillbeexhibitingsomeoftheirtalentandwillhaveitems forsalepleasecomeandhavealook. By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com There were tears, yes, but they were blotted with laughter, admiration and respect last Saturday as the community said goodbye to the late Coach Vernon Eppinette. Eppinette died last week at the age of 65 after a lengthy battle with cancer. He understood the gravity of his health situation in midJanuary, said his brother-inlaw Rev. Mike Keppler, who Eppinette approached to preside over his memorial. Over the ensuing months Eppinette enlisted friends and family to participate in what ultimately was called a Celebration of the Life and Journey of Vernon Eppinette, which began with the sounding of the familiar gym horn signaling a game is about to begin. Last week in front of several hundred attendees that roster of enlistees provided what could be considered a masters class in Vernon Eppinette, this prince of a man, prince of a coach. His family and friend since boyhood, living in disparate parts of the globe, learned the impact Eppinette had on a school, community and young men many of whom lined consecutive rows on the oor of the R. Marion Craig Coliseum as hard-earned success dened Eppinette and the Port St. Joe High School Tiger Sharks. The family heard from former players and friends, and a fellow coach, and heard how Eppinette not only won ve state titles, earned trips to seven consecutive state championship games, but also forged men, taught life lessons focused on hard work and dedication, discipline and mental toughness. And instilled a bedrock principle: life and sports is about team over self. He was shaping us as young men to be men tomorrow, said former player Clay Smallwood. The rules were clear-cut. He had discipline. We all had personal accountability for how far we went as a team. Damien Byrd, another former player, added, He was molding young men into men. Coach made us believe we could do anything. Eppinettes family also heard healthy dollops of humor. The time Jeremy Dixon told Coach in the high school parking lot that he would not be coming out for his junior year, to which Eppinette paused before unlocking his car, saying, It will come to you before driving off, leaving a dumbfounded Dixon to wonder what that meant. Byrd provided the history behind the famed purple-and-gold horizontally striped Dr. Seuss socks that became the Tiger Sharks trademark. Those socks werent a fashion statement; they were to allow Coach to ensure he could see the players feet moving on grainy game lms. Traci Gaddis, a basketball mom by virtue of Eppinette deciding to no further discussion that her daughter would be videographer, talked about being left behind by the Eppinette-driven bus in violation of the coachs rules for transport and timeliness. When the coach returned not a word was spoken between the two until disembarking and Eppinette, with a wide smile, telling Gaddis that she would just love the concessions at the arena in which they were playing. And while the family learned, so too did those impacted by the man after he arrived in Port St. Joe in 1990. They learned about the future brother-in-law scared by the amount of protection Eppinette was directing toward his sister, Kepplers future wife. They learned about a boy who early on displayed some of the traits he would rene during his journey to Port St. Joe. He was somebody we looked up to, a hero, Keppler said of the man he met when Eppinette was around 10. He was a clinician, mentor, strategist and brilliant in a lot of ways. By the time Keppler had daughters, Eppinette became de-facto coach to a niece who ran track. Eppinettes closest and longtime friend Les Easter provided insight by reading snippets of letters between Eppinette, his parents and his company commander as a Marine in Vietnam. Eppinette would be forced from the service by a shoulder injury suffered during a convoy. The company commanders letter was an attempt to explain to Eppinettes parents why there had been a lapse in letters a letter that highlighted the young Marines discipline, knack for hard work and higher thinking, using adjectives such as dynamic, aggressive, efcient, a deep thinker constantly devising strategy. His departure, the commander wrote, was a loss to the Marine Corps and his country and predicted that Eppinette would make a great mark on men and go on to great things. And those who knew Eppinette since his arrival in Port St. Joe heard from his earliest coaching friend, Mike Herring, who highlighted a budding friendship as young coaches in Lake County and recounted his mentioning the Port St. Joe job to Eppinette. Again, those characteristics that would dene Eppinette in Port St. Joe were already on full display. You could not outwork him and you could not outprepare him, Herring said. It was the team, always the team. You had the perfect storm here, the perfect players for him, the perfect coach, the perfect school and the perfect community. Hundreds inside The Dome last Saturday left with far more understanding about the journey Coach Vernon Eppinette took to navigate that perfect storm.Celebrating Coach Eppinettes journeyCOURTESY OF SS TEVE WHEALTONMomentos from a life well-lived were in display, from an old uniform to plaques to favored photos. VVERNON E EPPINETTE

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, May 22, 2014 By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Get ready for some down home, all-American rock n roll on Friday. At 7:30 p.m. ET Friday, a fundraiser concert will be held at the Centennial Building where The Villagers will perform for the public to raise funds for this years Fourth of July Celebration. The Villagers, fronted by college basketball coach Cliff Ellis, are best known for their 1960s hit, Laugh it Off, which reached No. 1 on the WDLP Funtastic 59 chart in Michigan and Where Have You Been which No. 4 on the WBAM Top 40 in Montgomery. The group performed at the Centennial Building on July 4, 1968 and 2014 will mark their return visit. Tickets are available for $15 and volunteers will serve boiled peanuts, hot dogs, popcorn and peanuts and a cash bar will be onsite. More than 100 tickets have already been sold for the event. Two months ago, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson sanctioned a committee to plan the annual Fourth of July festivities with the intent of placing the ownership on the public. Due to economic hardships, many communities have foregone their reworks displays due to the high cost associated with them. Not wanting to cancel anything, the committee, consisting of Helen Magidson, Mike Lacour, Steve Kerigan, Barbara Radcliff, Charlotte Pierce, Terese Kent, Ann Jarosz and Dana Boyer quickly secured a $5,000 donation from the Tourist Development Council to combine with $5,000 raised during last summers Centennial Celebration events. The Fourth isnt just another day off from work, said Fourth of July committee head Dana Boyer. Were having a ag ceremony to remind people of the true meaning of the holiday. Festivities planned for the Fourth of July celebration in Port St. Joe will include a pancake breakfast at City Commons Park a ag ceremony complete with patriotic songs and a parade will make its way down Reid Avenue. Various childrens activities will take place throughout the day at George Core Park. Everybody loves the reworks, said committee member Steve Kerigan, Theyre a hometown tradition and, while in the past, local government paid for them, this year the moneys just not there. Not wanting to put nancial pressures on local businesses, who get tapped for many events throughout the year, the committee decided to look to the public for assistance in getting the reworks display off the ground and into the sky. The committee is seeking those citizens to donate $10-$25 dollars to help ensure that this years Independence Day celebration rivals all of those that came before it. You can only go to local businesses for so long, said Kerigan. Were not big corporate America, and they already get hit up for every other function. We need the publics help to keep the tradition alive and moving forward. The committee will reuse decorations from the Centennial Celebration and host a series of events on Friday, July 4. Additional funds raised will help create a reserve for the 2015 reworks display. By asking for help from area citizens, the committees goal is to leave money in the city account for the 2015 reworks and celebration so that tax dollars be used to support the services of the community. Donations to support this years Fourth of July celebration can be made a city hall. 4519124 WorkingTogether... ToBuildTheFuture MemorialDay,May26th, WEMUSTNEVERFORGET... ALLGAVESOME...SOMEGAVEALL!MEMORIALDAYSERVICE-VFWPOST10069 1174TroutAveHighlandViewService11:00ESTfollowedbyGrilledburgersandhotdoglunchWorldWarIIHEWEYALDAY JAMESE.BLACK JIMBROOKS RALPHCONNEL EDGARHAGANS JAMESN.HAYES JOHNC.HAYES BASILH.HICKS JIMMYJACKSON WINFREDC.JENKS RICHARDJONES HARRYDJOHNSONWALLACEA.JOUGHINLONNIEC.KINGBENJAMINC.KIRKLANDWAYNEL.LANGLEY WILLIEMARSHALL JESSEM.NICHOLSJAMESE.ROBERSONWILLISV.ROWAN CARLA.SODERBERGHOWARDC.TAUNTONJOHNW.WILLIAMSWILLIAMR.WILLIAMSKoreanWarJIMDANIELS,JR. ROYB.EVANSWILLIAMM.GARRETTGEORGEW.PARRISHKENNETHW.POWERSVietnamMOULTONL.FREEMANJOHNC.GAINOUSCALVINK.GRAESER,JR.FREDLAND CLIFFORDC.SIMS (MedalOfHonor) JAMEST.TINDELL ROBERTH.PILKGulfWarCHRISTOPHERM. BLASCHUM PUBLICINVITED KidsWinTournamentFREEtoRegisteratthePortSt.JoeMarinaDonationsAccepted!First350Kidsgetarodand reel,tackleandagoodybag! www.Kidswinfishing.com Friday,June13th Signin3pm-6:30pmEST Saturday,June14th Fishingcommencesat7:00amEST Weighin10am-12pmEST NauticalFleaMarketFREEtoRegister. Saturday,June14th9am-3pmEST OPENTOEVERYONEANDANYONE! Mustprovideyourowntableandchairs. saltwaterclassic.comFather'sDayWeekend June13-14,2014REGISTRATIONISJUNE12TH@6PM LOCATEDATTHEHAUGHTYHERONPortSt.JoeMarina willbeaweighinlocation. Learnmoreathttp://www.nationalmarinaday.org/Saturday,June14th The Villagers in concert FridayFILE PHOTOSLast year, The Villagers performed at the Thirsty Goat during the Centennial Celebration. The band will perform this Friday at the Centennial Building raise funds for the Fourth of July Celebration. Tickets to the down home, all-American holiday are available for $15 at city hall.

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Compassionate care at SHHDear Editor, Recently I was hospitalized for 18 days in Port St. Joe at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. I would like to share my experience at the local hospital with your readers. From the moment I arrived at the emergency room until the day I checked out, I received continuous excellent, professional, caring and competent treatment from the entire staff. Upon arrival, Dr. Cattow and his staff in the emergency room were very thorough, compassionate and understanding. He and his staff could not have been more ef cient or caring as they examined my medical situation and then made the decision to admit to the hospital. After my admission, the hospital physicians Dr. Brown and Dr. Woolery managed my tests, diagnosis and treatment in an exceptional manner making sure that they covered every possibility. They were kind, understanding and took time to talk to me and my family and to fully explain everything about my illness and treatment. I cant say enough good things about how the entire support staff of nurses, aides, respiratory staff, technicians, therapists, housekeeping staff and kitchen employees always went the extra mile to that my every need was met in a prompt manner. I never had to wait when I called for some type of need or for attention. They were always pleasant and understanding and made me feel special. We are so fortunate to have this wonderful quality medical facility located in our community and the entire staff is totally dedicated to making every encounter with patients a superior, pleasant and professional experience. Thank you Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf for all that you did for me and my family during this very important period of need for us. Your commitment to caring, professional service was superior in every way.Eve-Anne D. WallPort St. Joe I passed a sign at a local market advertising asparagus for $1.99 per pound. Youve got to be kidding me! I got whiplash and near bout rear ended an SUV taking a second look to make sure I saw what I saw! $1.99 for chocolate ice cream I could understand. Id pay that for an extra big slice of pecan pie, a jar of pickled peaches or a handful of fresh pig knuckles. But asparagus? Any self-respecting vegetable seller ought to pay you to take it off his hands! Mother served it up on a regular basis in our formative years with the admonition, It is good for you. Thats the same thing she said about carrots and cauli ower. Leon thought it taste like wet Bermuda grass with the weeds left in it. We ate it so often that it must have come as a shopping bonus. In like, You buy ve dollars worth of groceries, you get a free bag of asparagus. There had to be some logical explanation for how often it showed up on our plates. If it touched your mashed potatoes, you were out of luck. By osmosis the asparagus permeated the potatoes faster than you could eat them. If the blessing was extra long, the meal was a total disaster! Mom usually made a casserole out of it. She also served it up boiled (the worst), roasted, raw, fried and diced into a sandwich spread. She rolled it up and wrapped bacon around it. None of these enterprising offerings helped the taste one iota. You cant make a silk purse. I dated a girl once who was attractive, intelligent and wealthy. I gured Id hit the trifecta. Her father owned a couple hundred acres of rich, bottom land. It was the proverbial match made in Heaven! When she invited me up to the big house for supper with the family I gured my future was set. I noticed the asparagus dish even before her father began to quiz me on my college options. My almost, pertnear, semi-betrothed took two helpings. And shoved it in with both hands! I ate my roast beef in stunned silence. When she turned to me with little green bits and pieces stuck to her teeth and politely requested, Would you pass the asparagus, please, I mentally went to re guring my whole life even before Mrs. Carpenter served the orange sherbet. You talk about dodging a bullet! I read once that the ancient Egyptians used asparagus as a medicine. The Romans called it an herb. Early American pioneers rubbed it on rashes and insect bites. I rest my case. Now, I am aware of other asparagus lovers out there. The farmers daughter couldnt be the only one. And Im ok with that. American is well noted as the land of the free, and the home of the personal choice menu. Good sense would also argue there are people out there who dont crave pig knuckles on a regular basis. To each his own.. But Ive got to be in the majority on this one. The color, make up and taste of asparagus reminds me of broccoli and Brussels sprouts. I rest my case again. My wife, who once served us an asparagus casserole, contends that the dish has become fashionable, or a chic food, much like fried green tomatoes. She said it like that legitimized the consumption of the stuff. The only thing fried green tomatoes had over asparagus was they didnt ruin the mashed potatoes when placed side by side on your plate. And if possible, they were even easier to obtain. Mom just sent me, Leon or David Mark out to the garden to pull a couple before breakfast. I had the opportunity to eat at the infamous Golden Lantern in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, a few years back. Our host raved about the fried green tomatoes appetizer. It was the widely advertised specialty of the house. My good southern upbringing kept me from verbalizing my doubts. We ate those things out of necessity down at the end of Stonewall Street. I would have much preferred a City Caf hamburger, a malted shake from Franks Dairy Bar or a Chocolate Soldier and a Moon Pie from Pat Houstons Grocery. How could anything we used to walk out in the backyard and pick before daylight become a specialty of the house? I gured I was in for a treat. This Golden Lantern musta discovered a secret recipe for fried green tomatoes. Maybe they melted Hershey Bars over them, covered them with caramel ice cream or soaked them in a Root Beer oat. You can image my disappointment when the famous, chic, hot-to-trot, modern fried green tomatoes turned out to befried green tomatoes. Let me tell you, Ive eaten not fully ripe tomatoes BEFORE and AFTER they became fashionable. Being fashionable didnt do one thing for the taste. And it is the same for the asparagus weed. You can dress it up by sprinkling cheese sauce and mushroom slices over the top, you can advertise it to the cows come home, you can feature it on the cover of Bon Apptit Magazine and have it personally sauted by the Iron Chef. But you cant change the tasteand that, dear hearts, is the major aw in the dish. I rest my case forever. Respectfully,KesReal res and ctitious ones Recently, we had a friend whose house caught on re in the wee hours of the morning. Fortunately, she, her family and pets all got out of the house. As most folks can only imagine, it was a very traumatic experience for them. For those who have gone through such an experience, they know the feelings of helplessness and sadness of losing their belongings, sometimes even loved ones. It surprises me the way folks react sometimes. On some of our local internet news sites, at least one person questioned the number of resources/units that arrived to ght the re. Really, they did. This particular person thought the number of units that showed up was excessive and wanted to bring the neighborhood into the situation. They were complaining that if they had a re, they knew that all of those units wouldnt come to put the re out at their house. Perhaps, the complaining person was having a bad day, because I know most folks would not nd fault in the number of re ghters who come to help when they are needed. Especially when the number is more than what some people would expect. I just dont see complaining about a ctitious re or a re that you havent had and dont want to have. Our friend noted that their re/smoke alarms saved their lives she was very serious. She also begged everyone to check their alarm systems, batteries, etc. to make sure they were in working order. When a friends house one street over from you burns and she asks you to check your smoke alarms you do it. You should do it on a regular basis anyway, but like many folks, I sometimes forget. Hearing about our friends re made me think about it for a number of days, I was even dreaming about it. I was hearing the smoke alarms, I was checking them multiple times and I was paying particular attention to the things I was watching on television and reading. There seemed to be a lot of re related stories. Its not Fire Prevention Month thats October. However, I did see a dalmatian on a television show the other morning that did all of these tricks some having to do with carrying a smoke alarm and testing a smoke alarm. So, I was thinking about res and smoke alarms and nine volt batteries to go in my smoke alarms. Having friends and family, who are re ghters, I see and hear about res, but rarely know of a close friend who has experienced one. It does make you think about it. You smell smoke, you smell gas in the kitchen and you worry about the grill being too close to the house. This went on for a few days I was in my college classroom teaching my students about measurement conversions. We were converting from hectometers to decimeters and millimeters to decameters moving the decimal from left to right and right to left. King Henry Died Monday Drinking Chocolate Milk was written on the board. The mnemonic gives the students a funny and memorable way to keep the pre xes straight. As we were jumping the decimals around and converting within the metric system, I turned around and noticed that a student had a peculiar cloud of smoke coming from her head. I thought to myself, That girl is on re. It shook me up Had all of the thoughts of re gone to my head? By the expression on my face, I was asking, What in the world is going on? I stammered and mumbled and started thinking about that Alicia Keys song. You know the one This girl is on re, This girl is on re, etc. I had to leave the classroom after realizing this particular student had the gall to be using one of those electronic smoking things right in the middle of class. Honestly, it looked like one of long stemmed cigarette holders that Cruella de Vil used in the movie, A Hundred and One Dalmatians. I guess this could be considered a ctitious re. Over these last few days, I had been worrying about smoke and re and being thankful my friends were OK. Now, I had this student in my classroom on re or at least smoke coming out of her head. Im pretty sure between my expression and my stammering and my walking out of the classroom to compose myself this student understood that it wasnt a good idea to be doing that in the classroom. We live in a time when nothing is supposed to shock us anymore. Folks want to rede ne normal and what is acceptable. After checking the policies to see if this was against the rules, I found that there was nothing speci cally against it. There was also nothing speci cally against bringing your pet alligator or boa constrictor into the classroom. I worry sometimes about the direction we are heading. Ninety-nine percent of my students are wonderful and courteous and respectful.Every once in a while, one gets mixed up on what is acceptable. Im thankful my friends are OK and for the large number of re ghters who showed up to help them. Im still puzzled by ctitious res and scared of real ones. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, May 22, 2014 APage 4SectionLeafy, green not my favorite color Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Letters to the EDITOREckstine epitomized who a minister should beThe Rev. Joseph Cromer Eckstine died on Friday, March 21, and his service of committal was held at Trinity Episcopal Church Apalachicola. The Rev. Eckstine served as minister of the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Panama City from 1987 through 1989. During his ministry there, I served as an elder of the church. After retiring there, he served as supply minister at churches in Port St. Joe and Apalachicola. Many years later, the Rev. Eckstine conducted the funeral of my rst wife, Kendall H. Middlemas, and performed the marriage of my daughter Kendall and her husband, Steve, as well as my marriage to my present wife, Kay. Obviously, I knew Rev. Eckstine well, and I must say that I have never known a kinder nor gentler man. To me he was the epitome of what a minister should be. He understood and embraced the meaning of duty. He was a combat infantryman in Germany during World War II, and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. He would be honored throughout his life, for his fortitude and heart. In 1990, the Columbia Theological Seminary in Atlanta awarded its Distinguished Alumni Award to him. Included in the resolution of that presentation were these words: For his extraordinary leadership and service in the inner city (Macon, Georgia), serving the poor, the imprisoned, and the outcast, giving himself tirelessly to the mission of breaking down barriers of age, race, and class that divide Gods people. And For his remarkable sensitivity to the basic needs of persons, caring for their welfare and helping them to develop their potential and worth. And For his humility, his rm stand against bigotry, his commitment to education, his participation in city planning and many civic projects in the name of Jesus Christ. I can only aspire to be such a person, but I fear that I fall far short, that I do not measure up to that. But the Rev. Joseph C. Eckstine did measure up. I pray that we nd leaders throughout the world who will aspire to the guiding principles that governed Joseph Eckstines life.John Robert MiddlemasPanama City

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www.starfl.comThursday, May 22, 2014 ASection ShopatHomeLIFEINSURANCEHa nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 13 3 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERSPage 5I dont go for all that wine and dine, With that ray ban, fake tan, never mind I Want a Cowboy by Reba McEntire I read recently about several prominent investors who were taken on a seven-day trip to the NCAA Championship Football Game last January in California by their nancial advisor. The clients played golf at several upscale courses and dined each evening in a trendy restaurant. Apparently the advisor footed the bill for everything. During the ve working days when markets were open and the advisor was entertaining the entourage, who was monitoring his clients accounts? Probably the same person who normally monitors those accounts. In other words, someone other than the advisor. This advisors role appears to be more of a relationship manager, one who is charged with entertaining af uent investors and attending social functions. And thats ne, as long as the client understands that when he sits down to discuss his accounts, he is not visiting with the person who is actually making investment decisions. Say the Dow drops 500 points on the day of the championship game, 2008style. Who would have been in charge of making changes in the portfolio to minimize losses? Or, say the market hit an all-time high that day. Who was at the controls, possibly taking gains off the table and considering the tax consequences for the client? Perhaps the advisor actually manages these accounts, but believes in a buy and hold investment style. The thinking here is that the market always rebounds, so no need to react to market vagaries, because there may be upturns as well as downturns. Thus, weeklong football vacations dont really interfere with the advisors portfolio management activity. This investment philosophy works ne during steady uptrending markets, like those the late 1990s provided. However, investors nearing or in retirement risk damaging their portfolios signi cantly if they suffer large downturns like we witnessed in 2008. Set it and forget it may not work well for this demographic, especially in volatile or choppy markets. Additionally, the investor/client is probably paying for the trip one way or another. The advisor may have funded the football journey, but the money to nance those activities most likely came from the investor in the form of management fees, trading fees, and commissions. Ultimately, Its not show friends, its show business. Peoples retirement and life savings are at stake, and wealth preservation for someone nearing or in retirement is paramount. You may want to ask yourself: Do you want a football host? Or do you want someone who is in the of ce every day monitoring your accounts? Markets dont care how many games your advisor invites you to. The investment world is a meritocracy. It doesnt play favorites. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a FeeOnly and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor.Noles, war eagle and a football week in Pasadena MARGARET R. McDOWELLArbor Outlook Each day, approximately 10,000 Baby Boomers turn 65 and thereby become eligible for Medicare. But becoming eligible for and actually enrolling in Medicare are two very different things. In fact, if you miss the initial window to sign up for certain parts of Medicare and later decide to enroll, you could wind up paying signi cantly higher premiums for the rest of your life. If youre approaching 65, get familiar with these Medicare basics now: Medicare provides bene ts to people age 65 and older (and those under 65 with certain disabilities or end-stage renal disease). For most people, the initial enrollment period is the seven-month period that begins three months before the month they turn 65. If you miss that window, you may enroll between Jan. 1 and March 31 each year, although your coverage wont begin until July 1. Medicare offers several plans and coverage options, including: Medicare Part A helps cover inpatient hospital, skilled nursing facility and hospice services, as well as home health care. Most people pay no monthly premium for Part A, provided they or their spouse have paid FICA taxes for at least 40 calendar quarters. Medicare Part B helps cover medically necessary doctors services, outpatient care, durable medical equipment and many preventive services. Its optional and has a monthly premium. For most people theres a $147 yearly deductible; after thats met, youll be responsible for 20 percent of the Medicare-approved amount of the service, provided the doctor or other provider accepts Medicare. Medicare Part C (Advantage) plans are offered by Medicareapproved private insurers as alternatives to Original Medicare Parts A and B. Most cover prescription drugs and some include additional benefits such as dental and vision coverage for an extra cost. Youre usually required to use the plans doctor, hospital and pharmacy provider network, which may be more restrictive than providers you can access through Parts A and B. Medicare Part D helps cover the cost of prescription drugs. Its optional and carries a monthly premium. These privately run plans vary widely in terms of cost, copayments and deductibles and medications covered. If youre enrolled in a Part C plan that includes drug coverage, you dont need Part D. Many people purchase additional Medigap (or Medicare Supplemental) insurance, which is offered by private insurers and helps pay for many items not covered by Medicare. Medigap plans can vary widely in terms of cost, covered benefits and states participating so compare your options carefully. Keep in mind: For all Medicare plans, deductibles, copayments and coinsurance may apply, depending on the service provided. With Parts B and D, you'll often face sizeable penalties if you don't enroll when first becoming eligible Part B premiums could increase 10 percent for each 12-month period you were eligible but didn't sign up (the Part D penalty is more complicated); however, if you're currently covered by an employer's plan you can enroll later without penalty. Terms of Advantage and Part D plans such as premiums, copayments and covered medications can change from year to year, so carefully review enrollment materials from your current plans to make sure they still match your needs. Understanding and choosing the right Medicare options for your individual situation can be a complicated and time-consuming process. For assistance, call 1-800-633-4227 or visit www.medicare.gov, where youll find Medicare & You 2014, a detailed guide that explains Medicare in easy-tounderstand language, and tools to compare prescription plans, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies and Medigap plans in your area. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney.Explore Medicare before you turn 65 JASON ALDERMANSpecial to The StarTALLAHASSEE The 2014 Legislative Session was productive and meaningful for the State of Florida. Sen. Bill Montford, DTallahassee, was an active part in passing many bills that will help the hardworking communities of North Florida. Senator Montford maintained strong advocacy for the needs of his eleven counties: Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla. When asked about the 2014 Session, Montford said, The country can easily look to Florida as an example of how common sense and principled answers can be found on both sides of the aisle and quite frankly in the middle of the aisle. We have and will continue to work together, Senate and House, Democrat and Republican, to do what is best for Florida. In the 2014 Session, Senator Montford helped to shape the following legislative decisions: Springs Protection: Montford co-sponsored legislation with four other senators in a bi-partisan effort that became known as the Springs Bill. It addressed the many water issues that Florida is facing. While the bill passed the Senate, it did not make it out of the House. We started very important and dire conversations about the state of our invaluable and irreplaceable springs in Florida and we have every intention of continuing them next year, Montford said. Maintaining the Florida Retirement System and State Employee Health Insurance: Montford is well known in the Senate as an advocate and voice for state workers and as such he helped to maintain the current, sturdy Florida Retirement System that faced many challenges throughout the 2014 Session. He was also instrumental in defending the well-managed health insurance policies for state workers. Preservation of the Instructional Materials Process: Montford was pivotal in the preservation of the statewide instructional materials process, which will not only maintain cost savings for local school districts but also give parents more opportunity for input in their childs learning materials. Effective Timeline for School Accountability: As a long time educator, Montford advocated for a realistic timeline to ensure the proper implementation of the many facets in the Public School Accountability program including technology and testing. Local Pharmacy Choice: Communities will now be able to choose their local pharmacies or mailorder when ordering prescriptions on the State Group Insurance PPO (Preferred Provider Organization). Tax Cuts: The Florida Legislature came together this year to offer many hard working Floridians much needed tax cuts totaling $500 million. It included a reduced annual motor vehicle license renewal registration fee. This alone will save drivers between $20 and $25 each. Rural Areas of Critical Economic Concern (RACEC): The Legislature passed legislation to help cities in RACEC communities avert the cost of removing or relocating utility lines on the State Highway System in certain circumstances, by allowing FDOT to pay for such costs. In addition, the legislation will allow municipalities within a RACEC or a RACEC community to compete for project funding using Small County Outreach Program criteria. Flood Insurance Legislation: Legislation was also passed to establish a private ood insurance market in Florida, which will hopefully lower ood insurance rates for Florida Citizens. The proposal is aimed at addressing the federal ood insurance crisis caused by the rising rates being imposed by the National Flood Insurance Program. Budget Items: In recognition of the importance of acting this year on Floridas springs, the legislature funded $25 million for springs restoration plus another $1.7 million for springs monitoring. The legislature recognized the importance of improved learning environments for children and funded $14 million dollars for public school construction in Montfords district. The Senate and the House agreed on $6,937.23 per student, public school funding which is $176 more dollars per student than last year, and totals $18.9 billion towards public schools. LOCAL ITEMSMontford also worked tirelessly to ensure that Gulf County was awarded the following allocations: City of Port St. Joe Benny Roberts Sports Park: $50,000 Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Washington High School Complex: $50,000 Historic Cape San Blas Lighthouse Complex Rescue: $200,000 TOTAL: $300,000 FDOT ROAD PROJECTS TOTALCR 30A from Franklin Co. Line to E of Money Bayou: $2,300,000 CR 30B Indian Pass from CR 30A to Indian Pass Boat Ramp: $1,500,000 Jarrott Daniels Rd From CR 386 Overstreet Rd to SR 22: $3,600,000 Old Bay City Rd from S of Ross Stripling to Crossover Rd: $2,100,000 Port St Joe Channel Dredging: $20,000,000 Gulf County ARC Transit Nonurbanized Area 5311: $181,992 TOTAL: $29,681,992 GRAND TOTAL: $29,981,992 **All Line Items are Subject to the Governors VetoMontford supports Floridians with votes in Senate

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014Heavy rains expected to affect tupelo honey yieldBrian Bertonneau looks over a jar of honey. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE | The News Herald Brian Bertonneau checks on a colony of bees. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. WEAKENED HARVESTThe industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees dont want to stay alive.Don Smiley, former apiary owner By CHRIS OLWELL747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA Lovers of tupelo honey might have spent a little extra for a dab of the famous stuff during the Tupelo Honey Festival last weekend; this seasons harvest is projected to be less than sweet. The white tupelo gum tree blossoms that provide the bees with the nectar to create the honey only last about three weeks in the best years, said Brian Bertonneau, owner of Smiley Apiaries. Wet weather this year cut deeply into blooming period, and Bertonneau expects tupelo yields to be about 50 to 70 percent lower. Its not going to be a good year, Bertonneau said. Bees have to visit 2 million blossoms to gather a pound of honey. Its been ve or six years since the last hearty yield, he said. The precarious tupelo honey industry is also threatened by a mysterious phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder or CCD, which emerged about 10 years ago and has the potential to impact not just honey producers but food consumers the world over. Bees pollinate more than 90 percent of the owering crops on earth, according to the Associated Press. Just about all agriculture depends on some kind of insect pollination, said Don Smiley, who created Smiley Apiaries in 1989 and lost a whole harvest season when he was rst affected by CCD in the mid-2000s. Smiley sold his company to Bertonneau a few years ago. I wasnt seeing dead bees, Smiley said. I was just seeing weaker and weaker hives. There are several theories about what is leading to CCD, which causes bees to suddenly and inexplicably abandon their hives and die, although a Harvard study published this month blames pesticides that are already restricted in Europe. One of every four honeybee colonies died over the winter this year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture study, a decrease from the previous few years. The industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees dont want to stay alive, Smiley said. Smiley thinks beekeepers need federal disaster relief in the same way farmers of other crops needed relief after the heavy rains this spring. Bertonneau considers himself a hobbyist when it comes to beekeeping; he keeps two hives at his bottling plant and buys honey by the drum from partners with many more hives. Colony loss has been less of a problem in recent years as beekeepers split hives twice a year, he said. And heres some good news: Its trees and not the bees that give tupelo honey the distinctive sweetness Van Morrison sang about, Bertonneau said. The might be less honey, but the honey that remains is as sweet as it ever was. Wewahitchka and the Apalachicola river basin that runs behind Bertonneaus plant are home to some of the highest concentrations of white tupelo gum trees in the world, and the Tupelo Honey Festival draws hundreds of vendors and thousands of visitors to Wewa each year, said Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. Tourism is up here in Gulf Countyand tupelo honey is a part of it, Jenkins said. The TDC wants to emphasize tupelo honey production in its marketing of Gulf County as an alternative to the busier, more developed counties to its west, she said. Jenkins said the TDC is in the early stages of forming partnerships with apiaries like Smiley to promote and market the area, and the world-famous honey, to potential visitors.

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LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, May 22, 2014 The American ag welcomed the warriors as they made their way from WindMark Beach into Port St. Joe.WES LOCHER AND TIM CC ROFt T| The Starroad moment. Those issues were compounded by the end of last weeks meeting as Nadine Lee stepped down for personal reasons from her position as administrative assistant. With the departure of Lee, who had worked for much of the past two years as an unpaid volunteer, the Port Authority lacks any staff, having previously lost its port director. With looming payments for director liability insurance at the end of next month and dues to the Florida Ports Council, a lobbying and advocacy organization for ports in the state, sometime this summer, little in the bank and prospects for tenants unlikely before the next scal year and 2015, the board is battling for existence. A community fundraising effort has raised just under $30,000, far below the expectations of board chairman Leonard Costin. If we stop, this all stops, said board member Jessica Rish. Rafeld said the time had arrived for a sit-down with local governing bodies, a workshop to let everybody know what is at stake. A bullet point of what was needed for the Port Authority to maintain operations should be presented along with the progress being made toward dredging, with the permit application to be submitted by fall and dredging commencing early 2015. Its time for us to get organized and put a ne point on this, Rafeld said of a workshop with the county and municipalities at the soonest opportunity. Everything has changed. We all have a giant stake in this. The Port Authority needs additional assistance from the Board of County Commissioners in the form of relief from a payment looming this summer on a $199,000 loan, funded with federal economic development dollars. The BOCC and Port Authority had discussed linking that relief to new collateral on the loan, but attorney Tom Gibson said the state had heartburn with mortgaging the old Arizona Chemical property, owned outright by the Port Authority, due to the use of federal grant dollars in the securement of the land. I would hope the county would work with us, said board member Jason Shoaf. Rish said the loan should be part of a formal request to the BOCC for assistance in Port Authority operating expenses, pegged at $65,000 for the duration of the scal year. Gibson noted that beginning in 2016 the BOCC would begin to recoup signicant property taxes for the parcel recently foreclosed by Capital City Bank and Costin noted the BOCC had recently had funding to the former Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. returned by the agency. The county stands to benet the most from the port working, Rish said. With those dynamics as backdrop, the boxes for the process to dredging are being steadily ticked off. Tommy Pitts, project manager with Hatch Mott MacDonald on the dredging permit application said forward progress continues toward the September target for submitting the application. Dollars to further the cause of developing the port are also in the pipeline. A state appropriation for $20 million for dredging must survive a veto by the governor, but if approved would offer roughly half of the estimated cost of dredging. The hope is that once approved and the dredging underway next spring, further state investment will come, Costin said. The contracts with Green Circle and Enova energy companies are aimed at freeing up money already in the state budget to address rail improvements along the Genesse Wyoming rail line feeding into the port. The contracts would justify releasing the rail grant, Costin said. In Congress, the House and Senate are taking up the nal draft of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act. Among other provisions, the bill contains language that would require federal agencies to fully fun and spend the trust fund established to underwrite operation and maintenance activities at the nations ports/harbors. The bill also supports underserved and emerging ports, such as the Ports of Port St. Joe and Panama City, by allocating a specic percentage of those trust funds for ports/harbors that have output of less than 1 million tons annually. Further, when the trust fund expenditures exceed that of the scal year 2012, 10 percent of that excess must be directed to emerging ports and 5 percent to underserved ports. The bill would also streamline permitting requirements. I am pleased that were now on the verge of some tremendous victories for Floridas growing maritime industries, said Rep. Steve Southerland (R-Panama City). This legislation will direct new resources to Floridas emerging ports to help capitalize on the economic growth opportunities that come with the expansion of the Panama Canal. A further positive is recent direct communication with Doug Wheeler, president of the Florida Ports Council, by Rafeld during the councils recent annual meeting and by Costin in a face-to-face scheduled for this week. I am impressed with what you all are doing and appreciate what youre doing, Ware said. We are very supportive of the port. PORT from page A1 complete delineation of the beds, May said at one point, work he would gladly volunteer to spearhead and organize. In the immediate, May said, he would like the blessing of commissioners to contact ofcials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to begin the enforcement of rules and regulations about bay bottom destruction. May said what was needed was a carrotstick approach. Enforcement, he said, with a dollar ne but also a gentle suggestion to an offending boater that to preserve the good vibes of their vacation there are rules about destroying the bottom of the bay. Dont get ned and ruin your vacation, May said. Or, as May put it, if you look back behind your boat and you see mud and grass you are breaking the law. Education was also needed, May said. Through signage informing the public of the value of the seagrass and how best to protect the beds and providing information at boat ramps, the state park and other launch points, the effort would be to educate boaters before they get on the water, May said. He said any costs associated with such a program could be borne with BP ne money, adding that using that ne money ts with the efforts BP is professing to support for improving the regional environment. May said he would also like the citys blessing to explore potential grant funding to improve the damming system out of Buck Grifn Lake to the bay to improve the ltering of stormwater runoff before it hits the bay. The current dam has been effective, May said, but only addresses the stormwater in one direction. An additional dam would double the efcacy of the system. This is something that is important for saving what we have, May said. Without running people off we need to get control of our bay and protect what we have. Commissioner gave unanimous support and May will coordinate with city staff and commissioners as needed.WAt TERGood news on two fronts in the ongoing water saga. The substantially complete date for the replacement of water distribution pipes along areas of the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe is June 16, said Clay Smallwood with Preble Rish Engineers. That would complete the initial phase of replacement in the area and commissioners held the rst public hearing Tuesday for a Community Development Block Grant which is being considered as a potential funding source to complete pipe work on the north side of town. At the water plant, preparations begin today on a pilot study examining the pretreatment of water with lime. The study should begin in two weeks, plant supervisor Larry McLamma said. The hope is that the lime pretreatment will signicantly reduce levels of manganese which causes water to look black or the color of ice tea in the water. The addition of lime, the belief is, will also help reduce chemical costs by cutting the amount of other chemicals used in the treatment protocol. Im excited about the process, said Commissioner Rex Buzzett.GUlLF PINES HHOSpPItT AlLCity and county staff will begin discussing how to resolve or abate outstanding property tax bills on the old Gulf Pines Hospital site in an effort to allow the city, which owns the land, to resolve federal tax liens with the Internal Revenue Service. The long-term goal is to resolve the liens, tear down the hospital while abating asbestos and platting the land for a six-parcel single-family subdivision on the tax rolls for both city and county. SAVE THE BAY from page A1 snagged some sh, despite being totally blind, over the weekend. This is about the warriors and also those spouses and caregivers who continue to hang in there. By extending those arms, extending that hand, if we forget it is not because we want to but because of our issues. But the memory of this will come back. The honored guests sure had an opportunity to enjoy Gulf County under gleaming skies and warm, but not too warm, temperatures. Fishing wasnt the only pastime that warriors and their caregivers embraced. There were horseback rides at dawn, a trip to the local shooting range, a bit of retail therapy and opportunities to just relax on sugar sands. The shing was made possible by boat captains who donated vessels, time and supplies. They were fantastic, said SPC Ryan Campbell, an attendee of a prior FCWWW who returned as a mentor this year. We have had a lot fun. Weve spent a lot of time just joking around, ribbing each other. You have to have a thick skin around these guys. But I was here to help them with whatever they needed or wanted. I was glad to come. After rebooting the shing due to rough seas on Friday, all warriors returned safely on Saturday and in addition to bearing sh, and not small sh, either, all were wearing wide smiles. Everything went very, very well, said George Duren, who sits on the event organizing committee. Our warriors and caregivers were happy when they got here and even happier when they left. It was amazing to see them practically always smiling. They all gave our community high praise for the event. And the community turned out. In addition to those who lined the parade route or greeted the warriors at the Centennial Building, more than 200 members of the community volunteered their time to make the event a success. Those volunteers did everything from cooking and serving the Honor Banquet to providing entertainment for the banquet and weekend. That community involvement, Duren noted, has increased with each FCWWW, which was the point when the organizing committee conceived of the idea. Folks from beyond Gulf County, including Franklin County and Mexico Beach, were among the volunteers and many, along with boat captains, were lining up for next year. You guys pour your hearts into this event, said Staff Sgt. Glen Silva, who also spoke at Thursday nights banquet. Every warrior and caregiver feels it, it is genuine. This town opens its doors and that is unique. FFISHINgG AwAW ARDSAt a low country boil on Saturday evening, the warriors were awarded plaques for their shing acumen. First place was earned by Anthony Cerrone, with boat captain Zach Ferrell, for landing a 73.4 pound shark. Second place went to Ronald Cuevas for his 64.2 pounds of amberjack from the boat captained by Guy Williams Third was won by Kathy Champion, who snagged 52.2 pounds of amberjack aboard the boat of Langdon Flowers. Champion is blind from her war injuries.CCOURt T ESY OF GEORg G E DD UREN AND LANg G DON FlFL Ow W ERSFishing and a bit of shooting were just two of plenty of activities provided the warriors and their caregivers. Kathy Champion (standing with reel) and Jesse Acosta (in black shirt), were rendered completely blind by war. Commander Marty Jarosz sings God Bless America in front of a packed Centennial Building to kick off the Honor Banquet. WARRIOR from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Thursday, May 22, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May2283 70 0% Fri,May2385 7210% Sat,May2485 7210% Sun,May2585 7220% Mon,May2680 7210% Tues,May2780 71 0% Wed,May2880 720% SPONSORED BY Local area water are producing great inshore and now some offshore catches as the weather has finally settled down. We are expecting great turnouts of visitors this weekend so get to your favorite spot early. Red fish continue to be caught in the ICW canal and out in the Windmark location this week. Flounder and trout are in shallow water at the head of the bay, but not in vast numbers yet. Pompano and whiting continue to run the beaches along the Gulf side of Cape San Blas and further east down the coast. Offshore red snapper will open this Saturday in state waters to a much anticipated crowd of anglers. Many good sized red snapper are holding in 60-80ft of water and they will be big this weekend. By FRANK SARGEANTFrankmako1@outlook.com Flounder arent born at, but they soon get that way. All at sh start life looking rather unassuming as baby sh go until Mother Nature does her sleight of hand. Their eggs hatch into larvae that resemble typically symmetrical sh. The larvae quickly develop into a rounded form with protective spines on the head, over the gills and in the pelvic and pectoral ns. They are born with a swim bladder for buoyancy to make it easier to roam near the surface and feed on plankton, but as they grow they turn into Franken sh. One eye migrates across the top of the head onto the other side of the body, the swim bladder and spines literally disappear, the body coloration on the sightless side turns white, while the other side assumes a darker coloration that provides camou age for lying on the bottom. Thats important because the bottom is where these critters spend the majority of their time, either scavenging for a meal or lying in wait for a hapless sh or crustacean to get too close and wham! For Panhandle anglers, ounder are a favorite target species, not because they are a hardghting game sh, but because they are often easy to catch both from nearshore boats and even from area piers and jetties and absolutely great to eat. But before the eating comes the cleaning, and theres the rub. Yamaha spokesman Martin Peters shes all over America, picking up angling tips where ever he goes. Here are some cleaning tips, with how-to photos, he offers for north Florida shermen. For the best tasting ounder, try bleeding and icing them immediately after landing, says Peters. Lift the gill plate, cut the gill rakers with a scissor or knife, then put the sh in a live well or bucket of water to bleed out. When thats done, put the sh on ice in a cooler to rm up the meat for easier cleaning and to maintain the quality. After that, youre ready to follow the cleaning steps below:Cleaning flatfishStep 1To get started, all you need is a fish like this four-pound summer flounder and a long, straight, sharp, flexible fillet knife. The cleaning board with clamp is optional, but if youre cleaning a lot of fish, its a time saver. Step 2Start white side down, and make your first cut across the tail just forward of the fin.Step 3Insert the point of the knife into the first cut and slide it as far forward toward the head as possible running it alongside the spine, represented by the red line. Youll be able to feel it. Step 4With the knife angled just slightly down so the blade is running along the rib bones, slice carefully outward to detach the filet. On larger flounder you might have to reinsert the knife to complete the cut all the way to the head. Step 5Repeat the process on the belly side of the fish, but make the slice carefully so the knife doesnt cut into the stomach cavity outlined in red. Step 6This is what it looks like after the two cuts. The fillet is only attached directly behind the head. Step 7Detach the fillet with a single cut as shown, being careful not to penetrate the stomach cavity and set it aside.Step 8Turn the fish over and repeat the process on the bottom (white side) fillet.Step 9Carefully remove the feathers, the tiny muscles that power the fins around the flounders perimeter. Step 10Lay the fillets on the cutting board skin side down, and use your finger tips to hold the very end of the tail section. Make a downward cut to the skin, turn the blade almost horizontal to the table, and carefully push the blade toward the far end using a slicing motion to separate the meat from the skin.Step 11When done, you have a single fillet from the top and bottom of the fish that can be divided into four smaller fillets by slicing down the middle where it is thinnest, (the section that was over the backbone). For smaller fish this is not necessary; for larger fish the split fillets are more single-serving friendly. Page 8PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARCaptain Mike Parker goes to work on a catch of flounder at the cleaning table on the Destin docks.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.comThursday, May 22, 2014 ASectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Previous offers had been extended, but this time, Derek Kurnitsky said, he could not pass turn away. Kurnitsky, for the past 10 years the boys basketball coach at Port St. Joe High School, announced Friday that he was accepting the same position at Orange Park High School in the Jacksonville area. Kurnitsky will be moving up in school classi cation from Class 1A to Class 6A but in terms of class of community, he said that would be difcult to replicate. Ive learned how to coach here, Kurnitsky said. Ive been with awesome people and around an awesome place. It was a hard decision, and it is very bittersweet. But I coach from my gut, and my gut told me you dont pass up a great opportunity like this. Port St. Joe represented the rst extensive head coaching stint of Kurnitskys career. I could not have landed in a better place (than Port St. Joe), he said. I came here a bachelor, and I met my lovely wife, Kim, and had children. Life has been good to me in Port St. Joe. And I like to think I made a difference in the town, the community and the kids. After graduating college from Florida State University, he was a name manager for the 1993 Seminole team that reached the NCAA Elite Eight, Kurnitsky spent time as an assistant at Clearwater High School before moving to North Carolina and beginning to climb the ladder as a junior varsity coach. He landed at Tallahassee Godby for a season in 2003 before being hired by Port St. Joe High. In 10 seasons at Port St. Joe, the Tiger Sharks averaged just shy of 18 wins a season, won seven district titles, reached a regional title game ve times, reached four state nal fours and the 2007 state title game. He was the Big Bend Coach of the Year in 2006, the Dairy Farmers Coach of the Year in Class 2A in 2007 and coached two professional athletes, Roman Quinn, a former second-round pick in the Major League Baseball amateur draft, and Calvin Pryor, who was a rst-round pick in the NFL draft earlier this month. Five of his players nished their scholastic careers with over 1,000 points. The one thing that eluded Kurnitsky was a state title. A lot of coaches dont have the opportunity to go to four nal fours and a championship game, Kurnitsky said. If I never win a state championship, I am not going to jump off a building. And Kurnitsky arrives at Orange Park to resurrect a program that has had a losing record two years running. Kurnitsky said he begins June 1 to build a program, kicking off his summer program June 2. I do look forward to the challenge of going and building a program, Kurnitsky said. I also always wondered what it was like to coach at a larger school. Any coach at a smaller school who says they dont think about that isnt being completely honest. Ive had other places call and check on me, but it was never the right time or the right place. Orange Park is an awesome job and an awesome place. But it will be really tough leaving Port St. Joe. Special to The StarThe Ladies Golf Association of St. Joseph Bay Golf Club had its annual awards banquet this past week. Several awards were given out. During the year, different games are played on the Play Days, and these are added up to give out the divisions awards based on handicaps. Ethel Bardsley was rst in the A Division, Pat Hardman in the B division and Barbara McQuinn in the C division. Awards were given for most birdies on the Play Day. This is one less than par. Ethel Bardsley took rst in the A division, and Pat Hardman was rst in the B division. The Ringers was won by Beth Bauer. This is an accumulation of the best score on each hole during the year. Most improved LGA player for the year was Pat Hardman, reducing her handicap by three points over the year. The Ladies Golf Association plays on Thursday mornings and is looking for new members. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751, and they will hook you up with the Ladies Golf Association. ST.JOSEPHBAYGOLFCLUB SPECIALS JUNIORGOLFERS(17ANDUNDER)PLAYFREEWITHANADULTPAYING GOLFER-FRANKLIN&GULFCOUNTIESONLY SINGLEANDFAMILYMEMBERSHIPS-NOINITIATIONFEE&FIRSTMONTH DUESFREEWITHA12MONTHCOMMITMENT(MUSTPAYBALANCEBYCASH, CHECK,ORCREDITCARDATTIMEOFSIGNUP) CALLTHEPROSHOPTODAYFORMOREINFORMATIONORSTOPBY 850-227-1751. CALLTHEPROSHOPFORINFORMATIONONFREEGOLFLESSONSFOR CHILDRENEACHFRIDAYINJUNE. 700COUNTRYCLUBROAD. PORTST.JOE,FL32456 Page 9 Former Wewa standout signs to run at MontevalloSpecial to The StarMARIANNA Chipola College cross country runner Natalya Miller of Wewahitchka has signed to run for the University of Montevallo in Alabama. Miller, who was a track and cross country standout at Wewahitchka High School, will run cross country at Montevallo and will join the track team to compete in middle and long-distance events. Miller holds the Chipola school record of 19:52 at the 5K distance. She also has a personal best of 19:40 in an open race. She nished second overall in a eld of 30 at the Darton College meet in 2012 and nished third in 2013. Miller nished among the top 10 percent of runners in all meets during her two-year career at Chipola. She led the Chipola team in the schools rst-ever appearance in the NJCAA Division I National Championship in 2012. Id like to thank God for giving me the will to run, and my running partner Cedric Gillette for pushing me to get better, Miller said. I also want to thank Coach Rance Massengill for giving me the opportunity to run at Chipola and all of my teammates for helping me move on to the next level. Head coach Rance Massengill said, Natalya brought passion to the sport at a time when we needed to take the program to the next level. She helped push the other girls, and her performance raises the bar for the type of runner were looking to recruit. Miller is planning to major in exercise science. She is the daughter of Karen and John Curry of Wewahitchka. Were very proud of our womens cross country program, Chipola Athletic Director Dr. Steve Givens said. The team has improved each year since its inception in 2007. Cross country offers signi cant participation opportunities for female athletes in our area. Chipola offers tuition scholarships for women who compete in the program. For information, call coach Massengill at 718-2440. Star Staff ReportHAMMOND, La. Sophomore out elder Katie Lacour was one of three Southeastern Louisiana players named to the AllSouthland Conference Softball teams released last week. Lacour, a graduate of Port St. Joe High School, was joined by teammates Megan Moore, junior third baseman, and sophomore designated player Amber Sather. Lacour, an outstanding leadoff hitter on a Lady Tiger Shark team that reached the state Final Four, was named as a rstteam selection. Lacour, who was a second-team all-conference selection as a freshman, is the programs rst studentathlete to earn rst team All-Southland honors since former third baseman Heather Sherrill in 2008. All three SLU selections are on the All-Southland teams for the second straight season. Moore and Sather were both honorable mention choices. Lacour was the catalyst of the Southeastern offense from the leadoff spot, leading the team in batting with a .397 average, hits with 60, runs-scored with 27 and a .477 on-base percentage. Her batting average was the highest by a Lady Lion since Dee Rancher hit .405 in 1999. Lacour, who nished the season on an 11-game hitting streak, hit .425 in conference games and closed the season out strong by hitting .508 in the month of April. NATALYA MILLER Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STARPSJs Lacour named All-Southland Conference PSJs Kurnitsky heading to Orange ParkKATIE LACOUR Ladies Golf Association has awards banquetIt was a hard decision, and it is very bittersweet. But I coach from my gut, and my gut told me you dont pass up a great opportunity like this.Derek Kurnitsky retiring as PSJHS boys basketball coach Star Staff ReportAll-Pro Soccer will have a Summer Soccer Camp in the area June 16-19. The Callaway Youth Soccer Club will host the camp from 5-7 p.m. CT at the Callaway Sports Complex. The camp will be supervised by former professional player and Coach Gary Hindley. Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Year selectee, recently was named head coach of the Pensacola City FC team of the National Premier Soccer League and has been the head coach of both the girls and boys teams at Port St. Joe High School for the past ve years. At the camp, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 7-17. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, contact Hindley at 276-6353 or gjhallpro@aol.com.Summer soccer camp to be June 16-19

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A10 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL Special to The StarA basketball ballhandling clinic will be June 14 at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. The clinic will be led by Raye Bailey and professional player coach and trainer Joe Flegler. Flegler is an assistant coach at Thomas University. As a high school senior, he led Washington, D.C., in scoring 26 points per game. Flegler had the best freshman season in the history of the College of Southern Maryland and was named freshman of the year in Maryland JUCO, All-Maryland JUCO, All-Region XX and honorable mention All-American. The rst workshop, for ages 7-13, will be 9 a.m. to noon ET. The second workshop for ages 14 and up will be 1-4 p.m. ET. Early registration, before June 1, is $15. Onsite registration will be offered for $20. To register, contact Bailey at 307-7197 or baileyr04@gmail.com. Star Staff ReportThe Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football teams nished spring practice last Friday with a Jamboree at Shark Stadium. The jamboree brought 18 days of spring practice to a close as the squads welcome new head coaches, John Palmer in Port St. Joe and Loren Tillman in Wewahitchka. The coaches were able to empty benches and the teams played a spirited four quarters in what is a prelude to August and the beginning of fall drills. ShopatHomeBOATINSURANCEHannonInsurance(850)227-1133 Port St. Joe Basketball Clinic June 14 PHOTOS COURTESY OF SS TEVE WHEALTON | Special to The StarWewa meets PSSJ for jamboree Sports

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, May 22, 2014 BPage 1SectionTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star.1) Whose mom used to send letters to army superiors saying her son should be a general? Eisenhower, Pershing, MacArthur, Westmoreland 2) Statistically what are the most dangerous animals/creatues in the U.S. as to causing human deaths? Deer, Bees, Snakes, Dogs 3) Who explained to Jefferson, We pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it? Washington, Franklin, Hancock, Webster 4) In 2007 who became the rst female Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives? Johnson, Walsh, Byrd, Pelosi 5) The worlds oldest sheep died in England (1989) a week before its which birthday? 17th, 23rd, 29th, 32nd 6) What is Jacqueline Gagne famed for hitting? Paparazzi, Softball homeruns, Hole-in-ones, 3-pointers 7) Which state has had the only Congressman (Matthew Lyon) to be jailed for criticizing the president? Georgia, Maine, Ohio, Vermont 8) Who acted under the name of Ariztid Olt during his careers early days? Bela Lugosi, Johnny Depp, George Clooney, Will Smith 9) Whose president was the rst person to drive over the speed limit in a hydrogen powered car? France, Iceland, Germany, USA 10) Which has no blood supply and takes its oxygen directly from the air? Eardrum, Finger/toe nails, Cornea, Eyebrow 11) About what percentage of Americas pet dogs are overweight? 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% 12) BMW, famous for its cars, started out making what in 1923? Watches, Guns, Soaps, Motorcycles 13) When did Elvis Presley buy his Graceland estate? 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963 14) What is Taipei 101? Car, Fish, Building, Stadium ANSWERS 1) MacArthur. 2) Deer. 3) Washington. 4) Pelosi. 5) 29th. 6) Hole-in-ones. 7) Vermont. 8) Bela Lugosi. 9) Iceland. 10) Cornea. 11) 40%. 12) Motorcycles. 13) 1957. 14) Building.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Four becomes ve stars, that is. Last Wednesday, The Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing and rehabilitation center announced that it received a ve-star rating from the Centers for Medi care & Medicaid Services (CMS), the federal agency tasked with oversight of nursing home quality. Prior to the announcement, the sign that hung above the doorway for the past four years touted the facilitys four-star status. Needless to say, the employees and administrators were proud to raise an up dated banner. Five-star status has been a goal of ours, and now its a huge milestone, Administrator and CEO Ron Reid said. This is a huge accomplishment for us. Under the ve-star rating system, nursing homes are assessed in three main categories that include health inspections, quality measures and stafng. Star Staff ReportThis Saturday, May 24, the Gulf Coast Hope Cen ter will host a Community Food Distribution. From noon to 4 p.m. ET, students and families that qualify for free-and-re duced meals at the public schools can pick up hearty meals for free. Hope Cen ter staff and volunteers will distribute the food to qualied families, seniors and, depending on the amount of food remaining, the remainder of the com munity through its food pantry. Those who attend for food must provide verica tion of free-and-reduced lunch status along with photo identication. Sunshine Shuttle will provide a van or bus that will carry children from Wewahitchka Elementary School that morning to the Hope Center and back. There will be live music and grilled hot dogs and hamburgers. The Hope Center is lo cated at 772 W. U.S. 98 in front of Five Star Collision in Port St. Joe.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com After numerous courtroom battles, the 2014 Wewahitchka Teen Court came to a close last week. As part of Hattie Hunters Law Studies class, students at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School celebrated the end of a success ful semester with a pizza party. During the class, students are involved in teen court where they hosted mock trials for misde meanors of their peers. Students played roles from court clerk, to bailiff, to attorney as they gained a better understanding of the Florida judicial system. Its a great experience for the students, Hunter said. It shows them that there are laws, and if you break them, you will face the consequences. Those who went before the teen court were chosen by local ofcers and had already admitted guilt. It was up to the stu dents to decide on punishment, which ranged from community service, apology letters or essays to reect on their actions. Students also worked with County Judge Timothy McFar land who oversaw the mock tri als and gave assistance through out the process. Students were required to dress appropriately for their roles and also learned proper courtroom etiquette. This process exposes stu dents to roles that they may undertake later in life, whether its as jurors or as a career, Wewa students complete teen courtSee COURt T B10 Food distribution this Saturday at Hope Center WES LOCHER | The StarLast Wednesday at the Gulf County Courthouse, Sheriff Mike Harrison led a memorial for seven Florida police ofcers who died in the line of duty over the past year. As each name was read, a bell was sounded and a balloon was released into the sky. Harrison praised the fallen ofcers for their bravery and read a poem in their honor. James Wiley, Senior Pastor at Oak Grove Church led the audience in prayer while the Port St. Joe NJROTC ew the colors. Honoring the fallen WES LOCHER | The StarTo celebrate The Bridge at Bay St. Joe becoming a 5-star facility, the staff grilled up barbecue in the parking lot.The Bridge at Bay St. Joe earns 5-star honor See BRIDGE B10 Gulf County Judge Timothy McFarland presented Wewahitchka juniors McKenna Waters and Cheslee Williamson with plaques for their hard work as attorneys during the Teen Court program.WES LOCHER | The Star

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B2 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014Using the right amount for the right fungicide is essential for effective plant disease control. But, thats only half the battle! You must also know when to apply the selected materials. Unfortunately, garden hobbyists may nd timing to be as confusing as chemical selection. Fungicides work by preventing plant disease. They serve as shields against infection, not cures. These chemicals cant save plants that are already infected. They can only limit the spread of a disease to a healthy plant. So, its very important to begin a fungicidal spray program at the rst sign of attack or, better yet, even before you notice any symptoms at all. When you notice the rst signs of fungus disease, usually leaf spots or blight, you can be fairly sure that the affected plants have been infected for at least three days, and perhaps as long as two weeks. Symptoms of bacterial leaf spots and downy mildew usually appear three to 10 days after infection. Other leaf diseases have incubation periods of seven to 10 days, in some cases as long as 10 to 14 days. Generally, the longer the incubation period, the slower a disease spreads, and the more easily it can be controlled. Obviously then, diseases that have short incubation periods, such as bacterial blights, and downy mildews are the most difcult to control. Other variables, such as weather conditions, cultural control, fungicide toxicity and spray application techniques, also will have some effect on your attempts to control a disease. But the one factor that will have the most inuence is the time at which you begin your spray program. As weve said, the earlier you begin, the more successful you will be. So, you should always inspect your plants carefully and frequently, and begin spraying at the rst sign of infection. It may seem that extensive disease symptoms develop overnight. However, a few spots always appear on the leaves before a sudden explosion of symptoms. And, you should remain alert for these early warnings. Also, if you know from past experience that a disease problem is likely to develop, you should begin a spray program before you see any symptoms at all. Then, continue spraying at the intervals suggested on the product label. If disease symptoms that have appeared seem to get worse after youve sprayed, dont get discouraged. Remember that fungicides can only prevent not cure an infection. So, a disease may continue to produce symptoms for some time after spraying. However, you should notice a slowdown in symptom development within about 10 days following application of a fungicide. As weve said, you should begin control measure at the rst sign of infection. However, if you dont begin spraying until a disease has spread quite a bit, you should use the most effective material you can nd, and apply it at the highest rate allowed on the product label. Also, shorten the interval between sprays as much as the label recommends, and water the plants only when necessary. For more information on applying fungicides, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 6393200 or visit http://gulf. ifas.u.edu or www.http:// edis.ifas.u.edu and see Publication PP 233, PP275, PP154. KittenandPuppyseasonisuponusandwe haveanabundance.Pleaseconsideroneof ourfullyvettedpetsforyounextadditionto yourfurryfamily.Evenifyoucannotadopt, youcanhelpinotherways: Fosterhomesgiveourgreatpetstheattention andsocializationtheycrave.Weprovideall suppliesneeded. Weneedvolunteerstohelpwithmaintenance aroundtheshelter.Towelsandbeddingare alwayswelcome.Petcarriersandcrates. Donationsofkittylitterisingreatdemand aswellaspuppytoys.Monetarydonationsarealwayswelcome.Anydonationno matterhowsmallwillbegreatlyappreciated. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation. AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered. Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@ gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103andask forMelodyorDebbie!Onlineapplicationsandpetphotosareavailableatwww. sjbhumanesociety.orgAdoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrent vaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm!Faith'sThriftHut isalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupportthe animalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3 pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreand shelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon! Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyor Shelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4518169 DowntownPortSt.Joe850-229-6161 bowwowbeach.com301REIDAVENUE PORTST.JOEFLORIDA,32456 BlueBuffalo,Tasteof theWildandother brandsavailable! 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS LIVEONTHEPOOPDECKINTHECROWNEST THECURRYS THURSDAY7PM FRIDAY9PM SATURDAY9PM SUNDAY7PM WEDNESDAY7PMFLABBERGASTEDBANDKONKRETESOUL RANDYSTARK DEBIJORDAN ALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMES MEXICO BEACH CITY LIMITS 850 6478310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITS LIVE ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMINGEVENTS KAROKE-FRIDAY&SATURDAY-9PMWITHDEBRA GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM JoelRosenbaum,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients Society ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorSpecial to The StarEleven young adults dedicated numerous hours the past three months to gain skills vital to their successful transition into the workforce. Last week they graduated from The Ladder Program in a ceremony at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/ Franklin Center. Program graduates are Alyssa Lee Catha, Raheem Clemons, Sabrina Lynn Edge, Jessica Lynn Grifn, Joesph Julian, Alexander King, Joseph A. Love, Sidney Love, LaDonna Ann Faye Pelt, Marquez D. Quinn and Lora Elizabeth Stabler. Targeted specically at underprivileged and unemployed 18to 21year-olds, the program is aimed at helping participants learn that there are many opportunities out there for them to succeed in life, but they need to be prepared and recognize them when they present themselves, according to Kim Bodine, executive director of CareerSource Gulf Coast. We know that many young people sort of drift around after high school, not really nding their niche, both work wise and socially, Bodine said. The ladder program was designed because research showed us that up to 70 percent of the young adults who did not enter post-secondary training or the military took three years before they attached to the workforce. The Ladder is a progression from personal awareness and growth, into appropriate workplace behavior and, of course, nding a good job. Instilling a strong work ethic from the perspective of the employer, and discussing the lifelong value of ongoing education is a big part of The Ladder Program, Bodine said. It is a big job, as you can imagine, working with 20somethings, but we strive to fuel the drive in these young adults to lead successful lives through self-sufciency and hard work. Its about providing them with an opportunity that might not otherwise exist for them and thats an idea the Board of CareerSource Gulf Coast very much supports. Over a period of 12 weeks, seminars are offered in varied topics including career exploration, life coaching, nancial literacy, resume building, interviewing techniques, drivers education training for those who need it, Dale Carnegie training and so much more. The Ladder Program is operated by CareerSource Gulf Coast through the Community Resource Center in Port St. Joe. It is nancially sponsored by the Jessie Ball duPont Port St. Joe Capacity Building Fund. Special to The StarThe Kiwanis Club of Port St. Joe generously donated $300 to High School High Tech of Port St. Joe for summer internships. This donation will offset the salary for one of the HSHT students to be involved in a working environment with job and employability training this summer. There are nine HSHT students who have earned the right for summer internships this year. They earn points throughout the year for participation, citizenship, and volunteering in order to obtain an internship position. We appreciate all the local businesses that provide the opportunity for our HSHT students to learn employment skills. The HSHT program in Port St Joe is partially funded through a grant from the ABLE Trust and Vocational Rehabilitation of Florida through Dyslexia Research Institute. The annual Autumn Action Golf Tournament and donations raised the necessary funding to pay the summer salaries for the HSHT students. Special to The StarThe Ladies Auxiliary of the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 has had a very active calendar the last few weeks. On April 24, President Ginny Seefeldt and Scholarship Chairman Nancy Calendine attended the NJROTC Awards Banquet, presenting the Auxiliary annual scholarship to Cadet Allie Stripling. At the regular meeting of the Auxiliary and Post the room was lled with students from Port St. Joe High School. Awards were given to four young women who entered the Young American Creative Patriotic Art Awards, a National Contest of the Auxiliary which begins at the local level. Receiving awards were Sophia Harrison, Caroline Rish and Katharine Loden. Our winner at the local level was awarded to Laura Sinor. Her artwork will be on display at the State Convention in Jacksonville. Their families and teacher, Mrs. Julie Hodges, were in attendance. The Auxiliary was pleased to give a donation to the Odyssey of the Mind team headed to Iowa to compete at world level. The Ladies will be around the area at local businesses on Saturday, May 24 with poppies for donation in honor of Memorial Day. Please remember those who have served. Members are reminded that monthly meetings are at the Post on the second Tuesday at 7 p.m. ET. Those interested in joining our Auxiliary should contact the Post at 1774 Trout Avenue, Highland View. Applying fungicides to the landscape and vegetable gardenGraduation set for The Ladder Program SPECIAL TO TT HE STAr RCarl Sheline, HSHT student, who will be interning at the St Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve, Dr. Pat Hardman, CEO of Dyslexia Research Institute and HSHT, Johanna White, President, Kiwanis Club and Melissa Behee, Director of HSHT of Port St. Joe.Kiwanis donates to HSHTVFW Ladies Auxiliary news SPECIAL TO TT HE STAr RGinny Seefeldt and Cadet Allie Stripling Nancy Calendine and Laura Sinor

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The Star| B3Thursday, May 22, 2014By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Just because school has reached its end, it doesnt mean that the learning has to stop for the summer. Florida A&M University will hold its fourth annual Summer STEAM Camp from June 8-21. The Jessie Ball DuPont Foundation has provided $52,000 in funding for the free two-week summer camp for Gulf County students. This is the opportunity of a lifetime, said Eda Garcia, the grants coordinator for the camp. Many kids who have attended the camp in the past said that they are better prepared when returning to school. While on the campus, middle school and high school students will learn directly from FAMU scholars while they experience hands-on workshops focused on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Classes in robotics and rocketry will be taught at the Challenger Learning Center. Students will spend the second week of camp on an arts component featuring dance, drama, journalism and graphic arts. In journalism, students will nd themselves in front of and behind the camera and will contribute to creating a newspaper and magazine from the ground up. Students will live on the campus and get a feel for college life while they attend classes and even participate in ACT/SAT prep. We want students to come in and gain an understanding of what its like to be on a college campus, Garcia said. We want them to see that going to college is a choice. Participating students will be picked up in Port St. Joe and brought back on the nal day of the camp. During the last few days of the camp another bus will be sent to Port St. Joe to pick up parents who would like to attend the programs closing ceremonies. The aim of the program is to show students that FAMU is a viable option as a college choice, but also that attending any college after high school is a possibility. The camp is free of charge with meals, travel and housing provided. Applications are available at the Washington Improvement Group. The deadline is Wednesday, May 28 and limited space is available. For more information call Eda Garcia at 850-5993862 or Minnie Likely at 229-8251. Its a fun and enjoyable opportunity, Garcia said. Our hope is that students will bring their new skills back to the classroom. We hope that parents take advantage of this. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast 4516380850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Thereisplentyofroomwith4bedrooms,4.5baths and3deckstoenjoytheviewthegorgeoussunsets. Over2,000sqft.oflivingspacewithprivateelevator accesstoeachlevel.TileFloorsandcrownmolding inkitchen,diningandlivingareas.540sqft.ofdecks. Beautifullyfurnishedandreadyforyou. This3BR/2BAcharmingcottageisjustashort walktothebeach.Tileoorsthroughout, largeopendeckoffmainlivingareaaswellas screenedporch.Mastersuiteontopoorwith privatescreenedporchandsundeck.Elevator accesstoalllevels.FEMAinsuranceavailable. 850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SOLD AUTOINSURANCEHannonInsurance(850)227-1133 School News SPECIAL TO TT HE STARStudents at Faith Christian School enjoyed an end of the year celebration sponsored by the staff and PTO. The 2013-2014 has been one of the best years yet! The staff of Faith Christian School extends a warm thank you to every parent, teacher, business, and those with a heart for Christian education for making FCS a great place to go school. Most of all, praise to our Savior for His blessings on our campus every day! There are still openings for students for the 20142015 school year. Call 850-229-6707 or visit www.FaithChristianPSJ.net. FCS is where kids grow academically and spiritually. The Lions TaleSpecial to The StarTROTROY, ALAALA. Deborah McLeod of Mexico Beach graduated from Troy University during Spring Commencement ceremonies on May 9 in Trojan Arena on the Troy Campus. More than 700 students representing 24 states and 14 nations took part in the ceremony. Gen. Victor E. Renuart, Jr., a TROY alumnus and former commander of NORAD and the United States Northern Command, delivered the keynote address. Also during the ceremony, TROY awarded an honorary doctoral degree to international sculptor Hou Bao Zhu of Xian, China. Many of his works are displayed on Troy University campuses. Troy University is a public, internationally recognized institution serving a broad range of students on four campuses in Alabama, online and around the world, providing a wide variety of academic programs from the associate to the doctoral level. PPSJEES THANKsS VOLUNTEERsSSPECIAL TO TT HE STARPort St. Joe Elementary School is blessed to have many community members who volunteer their time to work with students and teachers each week. These faithful volunteers were recently honored at an after-school social in the Media Center where they enjoyed an array of delicious foods and were presented with a thank-you gift in appreciation for their dedication. FAMU presents free STEAM summer campDeborah McLeod graduates from Troy University SPECIAL TO TT HE STARThe 21st Century After School Enrichment Program presented a music and art event last week at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Participating students in grades K-3 displayed artwork created during the program and performed a music show for peers and parents titled Bullying is not for me. Everyone in attendance enjoyed the message. PPSJ AAFTER SCHOOL EENRICHMENT PROGRAM PERFORMsS FOR PEERsS

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FAITHThursday, May 22, 2014 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE Crystal Mapes Lewis, formerly of Port St. Joe, died Friday, April 25, at her home in Tallahassee, Fla. Crystal was born on July 31, 1948, in Edmore, Mich. Her parents were James and Martha Mapes, longtime residents of the Port St. Joe area. She was the eldest of two children. In 1960, Crystal and her family relocated to Port St. Joe, Fla., where she graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1966. Crystals compassionate nature and desire to help others led to her profession as a respiratory therapist. She assisted patients for many years and in many locations including Tampico, Mexico; Panama City, Fla.; and Dothan, Ala. Crystal was a great lover of nature and a loyal friend. Crystal is survived by her sister, Carol Carr of Tallahassee, Fla.; halfsister, Diane Spivey of Denver, Colo.; niece, Tiffany Carr of Tallahassee, Fla.; and granddaughter, Alex Naus of Mexico Beach, Fla. The family very much appreciates the love and support from our many friends during this special time.Crystal Mapes LewisMr. Carlton Henry Padgett, age 82, of Ponce de Leon, Fla., passed away May 15, 2014, at his home. He was born Dec. 2, 1931, in Holmes County, Fla., to the late George Walker Padgett and Mattie Elsie Padgett. In addition to his parents, Mr. Padgett was preceded in death by his wife, Joy Padgett; two brothers, Randall Padgett and Donnie Padgett; and one sister, Dessie Bell. Mr. Padgett served in the United States Air Force from 1951-1955. Mr. Padgett is survived by his son, Kevin Hedman of Niceville, Fla.; two grandchildren, Cassandra Worley of Chipley, Fla., and Carlton Hedman of Troy, Ala.; two greatgrandchildren, Bryndon Matthew Carroll and Broox Auburn Worley; one sister, Wilma Niel of Carrabelle, Fla. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Monday, May 19, 2014, at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church with the Rev. Ernie Grey of ciating. Interment followed with military honors in the Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church Cemetery. Family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Sunday at Peel Funeral Home.Carlton Henry PadgettMr. J.B. Porter, 84, of Blountstown, passed away Friday, May 16, in Panama City. Porter was born in Red Head, Fla., on Feb. 20, 1930, and lived in Blountstown for the past 43 years after relocating from White City. He retired from the St. Joe Telephone Company after 26 years. He also worked at Reichold Chemical Company in Telogia for a number of years. Porter was owner and operator of J.B. Porters Telephone Repair in Blountstown. He was a member of AA for 34 years and served as instructor in 16 districts and prisons for several years. He was an avid hunter and sherman. Porter was preceded in death by his wife, Gladys Porter; son, Buck Porter; and daughter, Wendy Porter. Survivors include three daughters, Mary Frances Parrish of Panama City, Mona Guetter and husband, Joe, of Panama City and Lucy Justin and husband, Van, of Panama City; 14 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchild. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, May 20, at 3 p.m. CT at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Chaplain Steve Watson of ciating. Interment will follow at Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, May 20 from 2-3 p.m. CT at Peavy Funeral Home. The family requests that in lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St. in Panama City, FL 32406. All arrangements are under the direction of Marlon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown. J.B. PorterJohn Farrell Scott, 84, of Marianna died Tuesday, May 13, 2014, in Calhoun County. John was born in Alford, Fla., and lived in Port St. Joe for more than 20 years, where he worked for the Port St. Joe Paper Company and Basic Magnesium. He spent most of his life in Jackson County, where he was the Owner/Operator of Scotts Gladiolus Farm. He was preceded in death by his parents, William Leslie and Myrtle Davis Scott; three brothers, Golden, Gene and Davis Scott; one sister, Phyllis Scott. He is survived by his wife, Wandis Daniels Scott of Marianna; two sons, John Carlton Scott and wife, Vicki, William Sim Scott and wife, Donna, all of Marianna; one daughter, Sandra Watson and husband, Craig, of Blountstown; One brother, Pete Scott and wife, Alice, of Alford; one sister, Annette Williams and husband, Jimmy, of Panama City; seven grandchildren and spouses; nine great-grandchildren. Funeral services were 10 a.m. Friday, May 16, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Marianna with Dr. Mark Long and the Rev. Jim McIntosh of ciating. Burial will follow in the Alford City Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, May 15, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Marianna. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikes funeralhomes.com.John Farrell ScottEllery Lewis Stickle, age 93, passed away with a sharp mind and his wonderful sense of humor on Tuesday, April 29, at Northside Hospital in Atlanta, Ga. He was preceded in death by his parents, Daniel Stickle and Gertrude Wynn; a sister Noel Wynn, and his son Danny Stickle. Ellery is survived by his wife of 68 years, Bernyce; his daughter Sherry Chambliss (Bill), Atlanta, Ga.; daughterin-law Sandra Jackson Stickle, Vero Beach, Fla.; sister Ariel Wynn, Arizona; brother Walter Wynn, New Jersey; grandsons Woods Chambliss (Kara), Georgia; Scott Stickle (Nicole), Florida; Ryan Stickle (Tiana), Florida; as well as three greatgrandchildren plus nieces and nephews. Ellery was born in Cobleskill, N.Y., in May 1920 and lived there until he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was a Mustang veteran of World War II; the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Following enlistment, he spent his rst ve Christmas holidays in overseas battle and did duty in Guam, Iceland, Samoa, Bougainville, Guadalcanal, New Zealand, China and Okinawa. Stateside, he was stationed at Camp LeJuene, N.C.; Camp Pendleton, Calif.; and Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany, Ga. In 1963, he retired as Chief Warrant Of cer 3 after 23 years while living in Albany. He was employed by Phoebe Putney Hospital before working and retiring from the Caterpillar equipment dealer; The Carlton Company. He and his wife retired to Port St. Joe Beach in 1992. There he enjoyed having company at their beach home, gol ng, shing, boating and reading. He was a member of St. James Episcopal Church in Port St. Joe. In May 2013, he and his wife moved to Atlanta to be near their daughter. While planning his upcoming 94th birthday on which he wanted to go out to a restaurant for some good Chinese food, he mentioned that hes had a really good life with little to complain about. A Celebration of Life Memorial with Military Honors will be held at Emeritus Dunwoody in Atlanta when arrangements can be made.Ellery Lewis StickleJane Burroughs Whit eld of Milledgeville, Ga., went to be with the Lord on May 17, 2014, after a 10-month battle with lung cancer. Jane was a resident of Milledgeville since 1999, moving there from Tallahassee, Fla. She resided in Panama City, Fla., for 25 years previous to that. She grew up in Dawson, Ga., and was a proud graduate of Florida State University. She was loved by her family and those who knew her. Her laugh (which often became a snort) was infectious. She was a member of First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville and the Emmaus Sunday School class. She was preceded in death by her parents, Forrest and Eva Burroughs of Dawson, Georgia. She is survived by her loving husband, John Michael Whit eld of Milledgeville; daughter Lara Kathleen Moore (Chad); son Clay Allen Whit eld (Kimberly); grandchildren, Hannah, Luke and Ava Moore, and Jacob and Emily Whit eld; and brother, Glenn Burroughs (Amy). She had lots of wonderful nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service celebrating her life will be held at First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville on Saturday, May 24, 2014, at 5 p.m. Visitation will be held prior to the service, from 3-4:45 p.m. at the Church. The family requests no owers. Donations may be made to cancer research, First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville, or another appropriate charity, in memory of Jane. I have fought the good ght, I have nished the course, I have kept the faith 2 Timothy 4:7 Express online condolences at www. williamsfuneralhome.net.Jane Burroughs Whit eld Obituaries

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The Star| B5Thursday, May 22, 2014 ARRHMATEY!Young&Old, ePirateCruiseTMhasSomethingforEveryone!CruiseAwayintotheFantasyWorldofFriendlySwashbucklers&Pirates! 2-HourCruisesDolphinSightingsGreatMusicColdBeerFunforallages! 5325NorthLagoonDrive,PanamaCity,Florida32408LocatedatLighthouseMarinaNexttoBoatyardRestaurant 850.234.7400 !YETA MARRH THEGREATESTSIGHTSEEINGADVENTURE...EVER! $1.00OffAdultTicket SeaDragonPirateCruiseLocatedatLighthouseMarinaonGrandLagoon SeaDragonPirateCruise discount.Presentcouponbeforepurchase. LocatedatLighthouseMarinaNexttoBud&Alley's There will be clothing giveaway 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET May 31 at First Baptist Church of White City, at 7210 S. State Road 71. The giveaway is sponsored by the Baptist Womens Mission. Faith BRIEFRemember Me Part of you will live in me Way down deep inside my heart We love and miss you still. Mom, dad, Pat, Susan, Becky, Maddie and Remi Special to The Star How to nd and live a life of meaning and purpose will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, May 26 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Living a Rich Life: Finding Meaning and Purpose, features the lmed story of Christine Garde, who left an inuential political position to launch a gang diversion program by moving into an urban gang-infested neighborhood. I want to look back at my life and know that I made a signicant difference in the world, said Garde, who believes shes not alone in her desire. People want their lives to matter. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net.Special to The StarThe Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum in its 3year room. This curriculum uses both hands on learning and learning through play. Children will be prepared for preschool and by the end of the school year children will: know several Bible stories, Memory Verses, Nursery Rhymes, Finger plays, and Songs which they can recall when prompted know the names of all of the uppercase and lowercase letters know the phonetic sound of all of the letters be able to correctly trace all uppercase and lowercase letters with their nger know by name and be able to correctly trace the numbers 1-15 with their nger be able to identify various colors and shapes be able to demonstrate spatial concepts, sorting, and Finding a life of purpose explored at Lifetree CafEErnie J. WoodrowDec. 5, 1959 to May 29, 2009 In Loving MEMORYClothing giveaway Keep your eyes on JesusWhen youre grounded in Christ, a new life will emerge. The life of this world you will have to purge. Just as a snake will shed his skin, a new life in Christ will shed his sin. Some nd this new life a hard road to trod. It will never be done without the help of God. When we get in the word and in one accord with Him, It will be much easier to shake each worldly whim. When we focus on Jesus and show His Godly love, We are sure to lead someone to that mansion above. Billy Johnson NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:6-15-14CODE:SJ00 The Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum AB and ABA patterns be able to say the letters of their rst name as well as write them using all capital letters be introduced to many books increase in ne and gross motor skills There are a few spots available in this great program which offers care from 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Please contact Kristy Rafeld at 227-4320 for enrollment or more information. Faith

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B6 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 Port St. Joe High SchoolCLASS OF 2014 Demeriyah AShanti Alexander Gabrielle Ivana Anthony Kallie Louise Bateman Seth Michael Bradshaw Candice Elizabeth Bright Kristen Denise Burkett Amy Rachelyn Butler Kylee Alexis Carter Koen Michael Cortellini Lauren Michelle Costin Jack Curtis Cummings Kapril Nicole Darnall Homer Allen Davis Robert Anthoney Dykes Nicole Mae Endres Heather Nicole Faircloth SheNoya Renee Fennell Bryce Taylor Godwin Dwayne Griggs Brandon Michael Hall Anna Nicole Haynes Justin Schwab Hites Allison Nicole Howze Matthew Cameron Jackson David Matthew Jacobs Michael Anthony Johnsen Jacobi Richard Jones Katherine Renee Kennington Morgan Brooks Kennington Brittany Nicole King Andrew Michael Lacour Christian Rose Laine Cailyn Marie LaPlante Taylor Addison Laue Natrone Carlton Lee Jonathan Wesley Leffew Nicholas Dwight Lewis Kayla Lucile Lindsey Tanene Enoya Malone Alexander Carrol Maughan Dequan Montay McCloud Lexie Dianne McGhee Austin Daniel McNeill Kelsey Christine Miles Antonio Michael Moree Katerina Nicole Nelson Steven Kaleb Odom Sydney Marian Owens Angel Roberto Padilla Tommie John Parker Anastasya Kristen Paul Bryan Adison Powell Sawyer Jackson Rafeld Nicholas Warren Renfro William Tristan Reynolds Maya Elizabeth Robbins Cathlyn Palmiano Robles Brittney Deshawn Shoemaker Destiny Brianne Shoemaker Mason Richard Simmons Laura Kathleen Sinor Alexis Nichole Strickland Allie Jovon Stripling Tori Jo Thomas Anastasia Gabrielle Thomason DanTasia Yvette Welch Grant Franklin Whiten Corey James Williams Torey Jerome Williams DeShawntae Tyell Willis Shatiara Nashay Zaccaro Annalisa Brooke Childress Graduation 2014

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The Star| B7Thursday, May 22, 2014 Wewahitchka High SchoolCLASS OF 2014 Tyler Lee Adams William Hunter Bailey Jakob Alan Bidwell Eddie Ray Bowles III Jennifer Wondale Bryan Braden Matthew Buckalew Caitlin Marie Burch Troy Steven Collins Chelsea Nicole Cook Michael Adrien Cox Calvin Grady Dean III Brianna Kaye Edmondson Morgan Danielle Fisher Johnna Renee Florio Jacob Seth Goodwin James Larry Hensley, Jr. AnMaree Teodora Hess Jarvar Javon Hill Zachary Allen Hire Kimberly Dale Hughes Shawn Kory Jenkins Abriale Marie Kemp James Edward Lester III Issac Benjamin Madrid Joshua Liam Mayer Nicole Renee Morrill Janie Savannah Pippen Corey Austin Rhames Kirsten Mariea Stalnaker Sheneshia Mercedes Stansel Kristopher Jon Taylor Chelsey Danielle Toney Chandler Mae Vines Danielle Katherine Ward Brooke Ashley Weatherly Cory Matthew White Christina Rena Whiteld Jamie Michael Whiteld II Anna Maria Wilcox Kara Jean ZucciNot Pictured: Damien Dwayne Hunter and Kelver Siliezar Graduation 2014 Congratulationsonyour accomplishmentClassof2014 Wishingyouallthebestin yourfutureendeavors!

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LocalB8 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com They came, they saw, they painted. Frank Pate Park was hopping recently for the annual Student Art Day, which paired local high school students up with participating Plein Air artists for mid-morning workshop. Four students from Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School and six from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School along with a handful of students from Franklin County employed watercolors, acrylics and oil paints to bring the St. Joseph Bay to canvas. Wewahitchka student artists included Kimberly Hughes, Hayley Melvin, Nicole Windolf and Emily Palmer. Port St. Joe student artists were Chloe Burke, Kerigan Pickett, Isaabel Bogaert, Keith Wadleigh, Caroline Rish and Jacobi Jones. Port St. Joe art teacher Julie Hodges praised the workshop for giving students, especially those considering a career in the arts, an opportunity to work on-on-one with artists who make a living through their work. The students are able to gain a new perspective and new ideas and even a new style, Hodges said. I hope they walk away with a different feel for what its like to be a professional artist. Debbie Cole, art teacher for Wewahitchka said she hoped that the students took an enthusiasm for creating great art from the experience. She said that participating students from her class had demonstrated an interest in pursuing art as a hobby, if not a career. (The students) see that art can be a profession while they get encouragement and lessons from professionals, Cole said. Students interested in participating in the experience had to submit an application of interest along with an essay explaining why they wanted to participate. Some students had participated in the event in prior years, while others enjoyed the workshop for the rst time. Port St. Joe students Burke, Pickett and Wadleigh are actively involved in their art classes and applied to spend an afternoon painting with the Plein Air artists. Burke, who worked with oil paints alongside Ken DeWaard, said that she enjoyed experimenting with different techniques and styles that she hadnt tried before and learned from DeWaard that she didnt have to feel pressured to paint exactly what she saw. I enjoyed getting to work one-on-one with an artist in a setting where I could see the scene I was painting, versus working off my phone, Burke said. Pickett worked with Tracey Frugoli, also using oil paints. Frugoli showed the student a trick of taking a photo of the scene to be painted in case the sun moves or the light changes. Pickett also said she experimented with the technique of holding the brush parallel to the canvas which gave her additional control. I felt appreciative to the artist for teaching me how to paint, said Wadleigh, who spent the afternoon with Leon Holmes. Wadleigh said Holmes suggestion of keeping his arm straight while painting was something hed apply in his own future work. Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition member Natalie Shoaf worked to pair students with artists and did her best to pair students who preferred a specic art medium with the artists who produce professional work using that same medium. The FCCC also provided each student with their own set of paints for the workshop. By giving them paint, we hope this encourages them to continue working with their art, said Shoaf. The artists are so generous with their time and talent, and hopefully, the kids understand the value of the day and reciprocate in some way by using their art to help others. Local volunteers were on hand to assist with the workshop, some traveling from as far away as Eastpoint and Carrabelle. The event was sponsored by Duke Energy.PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarArtists provided guidance, tips and tricks as the students worked to bring their visions to life.Area students receive one-on-one training from Plein Air artists CCOURTESY OF SS ANDIE YY ARBROUGH | Special to The StarStudents, artists, teachers and volunteers came together to make Student Art Day an educational and entertaining experience. Students from Gulf and Franklin Counties participated in the Student Art Day Workshop. The event, held at Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe paired students one-on-one with participating Plein Air artists.Art to art

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LocalThe Star| B9Thursday, May 22, 2014 VARIANCENOTICETheCityofPortSt.JoePlanningandDevelopmentReviewBoardwill holdMeetingtodiscussaRequestofaVarianceonTuesday,June10th, 20144:00pmEST,atCityHallat305CecilCostinSr.Blvd.,PortStJoe FlforHarryBoydlocatedat5109thStreet,Parcel#05099-000R.The ReasonfortherequestisPerSection3.04(2)(M)oftheLand DevelopmentRegulations.Theproposedplanscanbereviewedatthe BuildingDepartmentlocatedat100210thst.andcanbereachedfor questionsat(850)229-1093.Allpersonsareinvitedtoattendthismeeting.Anypersonwhodecides toappealanydecisionmadebythePlanningandDevelopmentReview Boardwithrespecttoanymatterconsideredatsaidmeetingwill needarecordoftheproceedings.ismade,whichrecordincludesthe testimonyandevidenceuponwhichtheappealistobebased.The PlanningandReviewBoardoftheCityofPortSt.Joe,Floridawillnot provideaverbatimrecordofthismeeting.INACCORDANCEWITHTHEAMERICANSWITHDISABILITIESACT,personsneedingspecialaccommodationstoparticipateinthese proceedingsshouldcontactCharlottePierce,CityClerk,CityofPortSt. Joe,atCityHall,(850)229-8261 ShopatHomeHOMEOWNERINSURANCEHa nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 1 33 Star Staff ReportTo celebrate the impending summer break, Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka students in grades K-6 participated in the annual eld day at Shark Stadium. Students competed in a series of events including the sack race, tug-of-war, 40-yard dash and even a sponge relay, during which teams had to ll a 5-gallon jug using only a sponge and a bucket of water situated several yards away. The competition was erce and once the events were complete, each student received a ribbon donated by Tommy Ts.Gulf County students enjoy annual eld day PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarMany erce matches of tug-of-war took place during the afternoon. Students competed in a series of events including the sack race. Also on the docket for the competition was the 40-meter dash. Another contest found teams discovering how fast they could ll a 5-gallon jug using only a sponge. At left, Principal Sue Gannon played emcee for the eld day events for students in grades K-2. Some students still found time to mug for the camera between events. Port St. Joe Elementary students battled it out with Wewahitchka across the various events. Parents attended the events to support their children. NOPURCHASENECESSARYTOENTERANDWIN.APURCHASEWILLNOTIMPROVEONESCHANCEOFWINNING.DRAWINGCONDUCTEDBYTYNDALLFEDERALCREDITUNION.VISITTYNDALL.ORG/WIN_GASFOROFFICIALRULES.*APR=AnnualPercentageRate.Subjecttocompletedapplicationandapproval.Qualifyinginterestrate,term,andloan-to-value(LTV)arebasedoncreditworthiness.Askforyourspecicrate. Forusedvehicles,thetermandloan-to-valuemayalsobedeterminedbythevehiclesmodelyearand/ormileage.PromotionalautoloanratebeginsApril1,2014andisforalimitedtimeonly;rateissubjecttochangewithoutnotice.Rateshownincludesa0.25%ratereductionforloansrepaidthroughanautomatictransferfromaTyndallFederalCreditUnionaccountonly.Firstpaymentmustbewithin45daysofthedateofloandisbursal.Thepaymentamountper$1,000onanauto loanoriginatedat1.79%APRnancedfor60monthswouldbe$17.45.OerdoesnotapplytoexistingTyndallloans.RateshownisforpurchasesorrenancesofaNewAuto;forratesonUsedAutopurchasesandrenances,pleasespeakwitha Representative.EligibilityfortheWinFREEGasforaYearPrizeDrawingislimitedtoqualiedresidentsofBayCounty,GulfCounty,JacksonCounty,orWashingtonCountyinFL,orHoustonCountyinAL.Itisalsoavailableformemberswhonalize theirTyndallAutoLoanatourBayCountybranches,ChipleyBranch,MariannaBranch,PortSt.JoeBranch,orDothanBranch,asstatedinthePrizeDrawingOcialRules.PrizeDrawingpromotionalperiod:April1,2014throughJune30,2014.Entrants mustbe18yearsofageorolder.TheDrawingissubjecttoallapplicablefederal,state,andlocallawsandregulations.WinFREEGasforaYearisapromotionalphrase,usedtorefertotheprizeofa$1,000GasCard.Dependinguponthepriceofgas atanygiventimeandthetypeofautomobilebeingdriven,theactualtimeframemayvary.Ayearisareasonableestimatebasedoncurrentfactors.WinnerswillbeissuedanIRSForm1099-MISCwhichmayrequirepaymentoffederalincometaxes forthisprize.Consultyourtaxadviser.Visittyndall.org/win_gasfordetails,disclosures,andPrizeDrawingOcialRules.Voidwhereprohibitedorrestrictedbylaw.Membereligibilityrequired;aninitial$1non-refundablemembershipfeewillapply.

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LocalB10 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction ALLDOGTRAINING Callforfreequotes Melissa McCutchan Owner/Trainer 6911DavidWhiteldRd. Wewahitchka,Fl.32465 Seeuson TomGoldsmithPhotographyCustomPhotography Services:Events, Family,Corporate, Location,RealEstate FineArtPrints; tom-goldsmith .artistwebsites.com PortraitStudio 318ReidAve PortSt.Joe,FL 32456 850-899-2883 tom.goldsmith@ fairpoint.net BrykPropertyManagementVacationRentalCleaning Maintenance Flooring/CarpetInstallation/CarpetCleaning SpecializinginAbsenteeOwners PropertyManagement(850)381-5333GETYOURAD227-7847 19Years of Service! COURT from page B1 McFarland said. The judge also present ed plaques to two students who went above and beyond during the course of the class. Juniors Cheslee Williamson and McKenna Waters acted as attorneys for the duration of the class, al ternating between defense and prosecution roles. Their responsibilities as lawyers called for Wa ters and Williamson to not only do plenty of research on their own time, but also prepare opening and clos ing statements for each of the cases handled by the class. Hunter and McFarland found the concept of the two facing off intriguing, since the two are best friends outside the courtroom. I didnt know anything about court, but I learned a lot over the year, Williamson said. I appreciate the opportunity. Waters swore that ar guments in the courtroom never translated to their personal life, especially since there were bigger sh to fry. She said at rst she struggled with the public speaking aspect of the role, but ultimately, the class helped her overcome her fears. It was a cool experience, Waters said. It helped me gain an under standing of the court sys tem and public speaking. Id do it again. Hunter said she was proud that the juniors and seniors who make up the class took each case seri ously and came to each session prepared. Once you turn 18, real life hits you, Hunter said. Everyone has to be held accountable. BRIDGE from page B1The overall rating com bines scores received in each of the categories. The system is intended to help consumers, families and caregivers compare nurs ing homes more easily and identify which will best suit their needs. Through the leadership of Ron Reid weve improved our rating for the rst time in the history of the nursing home, marketing director Chyspa Ross said. We owe a lot to the quality stake holders who provide care for the residents. Employees of the bridge celebrated the event with a barbecue in the parking lot. Ribs and chicken pro vided by Centennial Bank was served up to residents, staff and hungry news reporters. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe offers Alzheimers and dementia care, physical, occupational and speech therapies, a full-time chap lain and spiritual program ming. The facility is one of 96 locations operated by Louisville, Ky.-based Signa ture HealthCARE. I couldnt be more proud of our staff at The Bridge, Reid said. It is because of their daily com mitment, diligence, hard work and compassion that we received the ve-star rating which, most impor tantly, is a reection of the care we are providing and that our residents and pa tients so deserve.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com As exciting as it might be to get a drivers license, a recent presentation at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School showed stu dents how fast they can lose one, too. During an assembly held last Thursday for students, the National Save a Life Tour, op erated by Kramer Entertain ment, brought an interactive exhibit to help kids understand the dangers of driving while distracted. Students watched a series of videos that featured families impacted by accidents caused by distracted drivers. Victims reminded viewers how simple it was to set the phone aside while behind the wheel. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County received a Distracted Driving Preven tion Grant to work with com munity partners to promote health education and preven tion activities. The long-term goal is to reduce and ulti mately eliminate distracted driving vehicle deaths among Gulf County students of driv ing age. In addition to the dangers associated with texting while in the drivers seat, present ers warned of the dangers of drinking and driving, saying that as more universities con duct background checks on po tential students, a DUI arrest before college can change the course of someones career now more than ever. It is important to use a va riety of different teaching tech niques so that youth better understand consequences as sociated with distracted driv ing and make better decisions while behind the wheel, said Sarah Hinds, a government operations consultant for the Florida Department of Health. By making a pledge not to drive while texting or drink ing, students were able to get hands-on with several simulators. One simulated driving while intoxicated and another required students to respond to a text message every 30 seconds while still obeying the rules of the road. Needless to say, all volun teer drivers met with simulat ed disaster. Driving and texting dimin ishes a drivers focus. Young people have a higher risk of danger due to their increased exposure to technology paired with inexperience behind the wheel. I think this event did have an impact on us, junior Billy Quaranta said. It makes us think twice before we pick up that cell phone. WES LOCHER | The StarThe Bridge at Bay St. Joe became a 5-star facility during a ceremony last Wednesday. WES LOCHER | The StarAbove, during a distracted driving assembly last week, PSJHS students climbed into a simulator to experience what its like to drive while intoxicated. At right, Another similar showed students how texting while driving diminishes their focus.High school students learn danger of distracted driving Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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LocalThe Star| B11Thursday, May 22, 2014By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Taunton Family Childrens Home in Wewahitchka recently h ad its fourth annual Family Festival. More than 1,000 attendees from surrounding states and some local to Honeyville enjoyed a 5K run, obstacle course relay race, basketball sharpshooting, Frisbee golf and many other events. Founder of the Childrens Home David Taunton called the fundraiser, put on by the Lynn Haven United Methodist Church, very successful. To build local awareness we set aside one day each year to spotlight the childrens home and what we do, Taunton said. It was a beautiful day, and a good place for a family outing. Taunton thanked the community, attendees and the more than 50 volunteers who helped run the event. The Taunton Family Festival is held each year on the Saturday prior to Mothers Day. PHOTOS BY DEBBIE HOOPER OF JOEBAY.COMThe fourth annual Family Festival was held last weekend at the Taunton Family Childrens Home. The family-focused event takes place each year on the Saturday before Mothers Day.Taunton Family holds fourth annual festivalThe event drew more than 1,000 attendees from the Honeyville area and other states. Activities included a 5K run, obstacle course relay race and volleyball. CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 22, 2014 The Star | B11 99007 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Leigh Gable Holdings, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1031 Application No. 2014-29 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03806-520R Description of Property: Lot 12, Block D, SeaShores/St. Joe Beach, Unit No. 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 35, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Margot A. Valencik All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day of June, 2014. Dated this 19th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 22, 29 June 5, 12, 2014 94958S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO:10000460CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL DUNCAN; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 1st day of May, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10000460CA, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is the Plaintiff and PAUL DUNCAN STEPHANIE C. DUNCAN ROBERT M. BROOME RAYMOND E. BROOME; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM ET on the 5th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgement, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4, SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SECTION LINE FOR 150.0 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN WEST FOR 242.0 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF MOSSIE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG RIGHT OF WAY FOR 200.0 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST 242.0 FEET TO SECTION LINE, THENCE RUN SOUTH FOR 200.0 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A 15.0 FEET UTILITY EASEMENT IS RESERVED ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 26, ALL MINERAL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED BY SELLER. THIS DESCRIPTION DESCRIBED LOTS 5, AND 4. CLECKLEYS ADDITION III. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 5th day of May, 2014. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 10-44147 May 15, 22, 2014 95024S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14000029CAAXMX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. LEVERAL RAFFIELD: KIMBERLY L. RAFFIELD: el al.. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Kimberly L. Raffield Last Known Residence: Unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: LOT 1: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 536.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES. MORE OR LESS. AND LOT 2: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION .13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 412.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE | CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiffs attorney, at 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days of the first dtae of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before June 16, 2014, on Plaintiffs attorney or immediateily thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on May 9th, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk File No. 1212-724B May 22, 29, 2014 95028S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA-000257 DIVISION: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-A7, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006A7, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID J. DELEO, AS TRUSTEE OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST A S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 13, SURFSIDE ESTATES, PHASE II, THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 46, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 126 PLUTO WAY, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456-4640 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before June 16, 2014, service on Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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B12| The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1124922 Respiratory Therapy Program Coordinator IIIThe Coordinator of the Respiratory Care program is responsible for all aspects of the program, including the organization, administration, continuous review, planning, development, and general e ectiveness of the program.Minimum Quali cations: Bachelors degree required; must be credentialed as a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) eligible for FL license; 4 years teaching experience in an accredited program; 5 years acute care experience as a Respiratory Therapist. Salary: Commensurate with education and experience Deadline to apply: Open until lled**Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resource s, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. 1124924 Associate Director of Resource Development / Grant WriterThe primary function of this position will be to research grant opportunities through various mediums and be able to successfully write grants and implement new programs identifying potential public and private funding sources to support institutional priorities. Incumbent will be responsible for coordinating the work of proposal development teams, preparing and submitting proposals, and communicating with funding agencies by the targeted grants. Incumbent must have strong grant writing experience, excellent oral and written communication skills, computer skills, and have the ability to work exible hours, including coverage demands due to training periods and equipment problems. Incumbent must also be able to demonstrate strong organizational, planning, and budgeting skills, and be able to travel both locally, and out of town on College business and training. Minimum Quali cations: Master's Degree in related eld Salary range begins at: $46,818.00 **Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.eduAdditional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com Managers Hostesses Bartenders Servers/Bussers Cooks Shuckers Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS!4518701 850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!! 4519134 4510160 4510161 125 Venus Drive (off Garrison Ave) Port St. Joe, FL 32456(850) 227-7451TTY Acs 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. PINE RIDGE LTD. PINE RIDGE LTD.1 Bedroom Apartment for rentFamily apartment community income guidelines applyEqual Opportunity Provider and Employer4518795 Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 8th day of May, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 PH-10-51962 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. May 22, 29, 2014 95078S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-26 PR IN PROBATE IN Re: The Estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, deceased, Case Number 14-26 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTCE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims within this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 22, 2014. /s/ Ronald C. Hewett Ronald C. Hewett 164 Deer Creek Circle Gray, GA 31032 Ancillary Personal Representative of the Estate of Coleman J. Hewett /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 SAILORS COVE DRIVE PO BOX 39 PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 (850)229-8211 FL BAR NO. 0350583 ATTORNEY FOR ANCILLARY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE May 22, 29, 2014 98875S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 2014-PR-000018 IN RE: Estate of JAMES S. PRIDGEN JR., a/k/a JAMES PRIDGEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Florida Estate of JAMES S. PRIDGEN, JR., deceased, (the Decedent) whose date of death was January 3, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Clerk of Court, Attn: Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 under File Number 2014-PR000018. The names and addresses of the Ancilliary personal representative and the Ancilliary personal representatives attorneys are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 15, 2014. Ancilliary Personal Representative: DAN EDWARDS PRIDGEN, JR. 613 Skyline Drive E. Mobile, AL 36609 Attorney for Ancillary Personal Representative: RICHARD N. SHERRILL FL Bar No. 172812 CLARK, PARTINGTON, HART, LARRY, BOND & STACKHOUSE 125 West Romania St. Suite 800 P.O. Box 13010 Pensacola, FL 325913010 850-434-9200 Fax: (850) 433-9599 May 15, 22, 2013 98897S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-162-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK Plaintiff, vs. REGAN H. SCHOELLES; TAMMY M. MILLER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF REGAN H. SCHOELLES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TAMMY M. MILLER; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY (INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE); BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM, LLC D/B/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER-SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM, F/K/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER; CAPITAL CITY BANK; and UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3; and UNKNOWN TENANT #4, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Partial Summary Judgment dated May 1, 2014, in Case No.: 13-162-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Court-house in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on June 5, 2014 the following described property: P arcel No. 1: LOT 5: Commence at a S.J.P.C. concrete monument marking the Southeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and run N89W along the South boundary line of said Southwest Quarter of Section 35 for 828.57 feet; thence N00W for 1375.00 feet for the Point of Beginning From said Point of Beginning continue N00W for 125.00 feet; thence N89W 439.08 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Road No. 386; thence S00E along said Easterly R/W line for 125.00 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run S89E for 439.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. LOT 6: Commence at a S.J.P.C. concrete monument marking the Southeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N89W along the South boundary line of said Southwest Quarter of Section 35 for 828.57 feet; thence N00W for 1250.00 feet for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue N00W for 125.00 feet; thence N89W for 439.08 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Rood No. 386; thence S00E along said Easterly R/W line for 125.00 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run S89E for 439.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Together with that certain 2004 Gena Mobile Home, Identification Number GMHGA4150431523. P arcel No. 2: Lots 18 & 20, Block 25 of BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Together with a 2000 Bucc Mobile Home, ID #ALBUS29551. DATED: May 5, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 15, 22, 2014 98887S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROPOSAL NO. 1314-21 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: GROUP LIFE and AD&D PROGRAM Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide five (5) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the Clerks Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. All proposals, with original signature and five (5) additional copies, must be received at the Office of the Clerk by Thursday, June 5, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. ET. Proposals received after the closing time will be returned unopened. Bids will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. All interested insurance companies, or trusts, are invited to respond with proposals. Each proposal document must be clearly marked Proposal for GROUP LIFE and AD&D PROGRAM Any questions concerning the proposal should be addressed and submitted to the Countys Agent-of-Record and Employee Benefits Consultant, Todd Torgersen, Combined Insurance Services, at 850-433-9996. Inquiries may also be submitted via FAX (850-432-5726) or E-mail (todd@ ciscompanies.com). Combined Insurance Services mailing address is: 2704 North 12th Avenue, Pensacola, FL 32503. Proposals are not to be mailed to Combined Insurance Services. It is requested, however, that electronic copies be sent to his e-mail address (todd@ ciscompanies.com) on Friday, June 6, 2014. Gulf County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in the best interest of the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Ward McDaniel Chairman, Gulf County BOCC Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 15, 22, 2014 98911S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Case No.: 11-17 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., as successor by merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, formerly known as THE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ABCD PROPERTIES, LLC; DONALD P. DECORT, and PARK POINT AT SECLUDED DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 6th day of May, 2014, in Case Number 2011-17 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and ABCD PROPERTIES, LLC, DONALD P. DECORT, and PARK POINT AT SECLUDED DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 26th day of June, 2014, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 8, Block C, Park Point at Secluded Dunes, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, page 39, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICIES OF THE GULF COUNTY CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 7th day of May, 2014 REBECCA L. NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk May 15, 22, 2014 98965S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO: 1314-22 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company or corporation interested in purchasing the following: Parcel No: 02852-145R WIMICO PLACE SUB PB 6 PG 58 LOTS 9 & 10 ORB 459/721 FR WHITE CITY MAP 101C White City, Florida Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the Gulf County Clerks Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, May 30, 2014. Proposals received after the closing time will be returned unopened. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Gulf County Reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in the best interests of the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 22, 29, 2014 ADOPTION: ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish. 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. Beacon Hill: 212 CR 386 S., 1 block off 98, Friday-Monday, May 23 -26, 8:00 a.m. CST-?;Super Garage SaleBigger Than Ever! Lots of Furniture, Gas Dryer, Beds, Dining Room, Living Room, Tools, Household, Toys, Plants... Way Too Much To List! East Point Corner of Hickory Dip and 184 Daisey St. Sat. May 24th 8a-12pEstate SaleCamo Bedroom Suite, Dining Room Table, and Lots Of Household Items! Text FL89784 to 56654 Mexico Beach 424 Arizona Drive, off of 15th St. Saturday, Sat May 24th, 7:00 am (CST) to ?? Big Two Family Sale Large TV Stand, Exercise Bike, Patio Fireplace, Golf, Fishing, & Sports Equip. & Lots of Misc. Port St. Joe 306 Reid Ave Sat. May 24th 8a-UntilOver Stock SaleBay Breeze Antiques Come Get Some Bargains St. Joe Beach: 253 Willow St. Sat. May 24th 8a-UntilYard SalePower Tools, Holiday Items, Clothes, Movies Etc. Text FL89849 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairCleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sundays. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Port St JoeCommercial/ ResidentialRental 2Bd 1.5Ba Efficiancy; short term 6 Mo, $1500 incl util or long term 12 Mo. @ $1,100 plus utilities Location! 2 minutes to St. Joe Bay, beaches, river and down town Port St. Joe 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 CellText FL84510 to 56654 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 Chevy Celebrity 1986, 4 door, Gray, 70k mi, 1 Owner, $2200, 850-653-2577 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Gulf Coast Alarm, LLCResidential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 ** 2013 GULF COUNTY DELINQUENT TAX ROLL 2013 **Pursuant to Chapter 197.432, Florida Statutes, Subsection (16) Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Sale for Delinquent Gulf County Property Taxes will be conducted online on the Gulf County Tax Certificate Auction Website at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com. Bids can be entered on the site starting on Monday, May 5, 2014. Tax Certificates will be awarded on Friday, May 30, 2014. Bidders are asked to register at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com prior to sale. SHIRLEY J. JENKINS, CFC TAX COLLECTOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA1600 R-1288400 $590.94 04917-003R BEARDEN HAROLD SR CITY OF PORT ST JOE LOT 10 & S/2 OF LOT 9 ORB 330/525 QC FR BENNETT MAP 50A BLK 39 ORB 444/29 FR KNOTT 4519131



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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, MAY 22, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 32 Suspect in custody in Cape San Blas murder By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m A Cape San Blas woman was murdered in her home over the weekend and one of her two sons is being held as the prime suspect. On Sunday afternoon Renee Coffey was found murdered in her Cape San Blas home. The prime suspect is Coffey’s son, Jarrod Powell Slick, 23, who lived with her at the residence, according to Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. Slick is in custody on outstanding arson charges, but had not been charged with the murder as of press time. After receiving a 9-11 phone call from Slick at 1:45 p.m. ET, deputies found Coffey, 52, of 7525 Cape San Blas Road unresponsive in her home. By the time rst responders arrived on scene Coffey had expired from undisclosed injuries. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s unit from Pensacola was dispatched and processed the crime scene. Slick was charged with two counts of arson and two counts of burglary in the burnings of a Port St. Joe Masonic Lodge in December 2012. Slick was out on bond, which had been paid for by Coffey. Slick has not yet been prosecuted for the arson, but Slick already faces up to 30 years in prison and a ne of up to $40,000 if convicted. Harrison said that Slick was questioned at the scene of the murder and then taken to the Sheriff’s Of ce where he was arrested shortly thereafter. “This was an isolated incident and there is no public threat,” said Harrison. “We believe we have our prime suspect detained.” Coffey has another son who lives at the residence, but he wasn’t home at the time of the incident. Coffey’s husband is currently deployed in Iraq, but has been noti ed and will soon be traveling back to Gulf County. “It could happen anywhere,” said Harrison of the incident. “It just happened to happen at a very visible spot in this county.” SPECIAL TO THE STAR Renee Coffey was killed in her Cape San Blas home on Sunday. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Of late it seems that every knot of headwind on dredging that propels the Port St. Joe Port Authority is buffeted by a not. Last week the board heard continuing good news on a permit application to dredge the federally-authorized shipping channel to authorized depth. The Florida Legislature included in their budget an appropriation that represents at least a healthy down payment on the dredging. The U.S. Congress was scheduled this week to take up legislation negotiated by Senate and House leaders which would among other provisions buttress funding for dredging and maintenance projects across the country and would earmark a speci c percentage of dollars for “emerging ports” such as the Port of Port St. Joe. The St. Joe Company, the Port Authority’s collaborator in developing the port, is codifying in contract two letters of intent signed last year with energy companies wishing to ship through the port. In those agreements, for the rst time, the Port Authority would be a partner. And Holland Ware, whose foundation has expressed strong interest in shipping through the Port of Port St. Joe, attended last week’s regular monthly meeting and stated his ongoing support of efforts to unlock the potential of the port. That positive momentum was mitigated by ongoing issues pertaining to basic operations during what board member Eugene Rafeld said was a “rubber meets the Port Authority navigates diverging streams See PORT A7 JARROD POWELL SLICK Effort to ‘save the bay’ urged By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Dusty May urged Port St. Joe commissioners Tuesday night to support a grassroots effort to address problems with “bay bottom destruction” that plague St. Joseph Bay. That would be one aspect of a multi-pronged approach, May said, to “save the bay” before somebody else takes action. Speci cally, May mentioned the Pew Charitable Trusts and its far-reaching program addressing environmental issues around the globe. While emphasizing he has no indication St. Joseph Bay is on the non-pro t’s radar, he noted the organization’s reach, resources and advocacy and said the organization was currently involved in an effort to shut down a bay in the Florida Keys. The Pew Charitable Trusts’ role in studying the Gulf of Mexico has been a signi cant factor, many regional shing organizations contend, in signi cant restrictions on season-length and catch-size for shing in the gulf. “If we don’t do something somebody else will,” May said. “(Pew does) ... their homework and that bay could be shut down or taken from us.” The primary issue May addressed was the “trenches” and other evidence of deep scarring by boats in the bay bottom. The bottom, St. Joseph Bay, is home to some of the nest seagrass beds in the state, and is one of the few remaining bay scallop harvesting areas in the state that remain open. But the lushness of the grass beds is under threat in this region due to a mysterious wasting disease and, more pressingly, scarring by boats. One issue is proper and By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The wounded warriors arrived in Gulf County last Wednesday. They left on Sunday after a community applied a soothing balm. Other than rough seas that delayed the shing until Saturday the Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend provided a great escape for 20 warriors and their caregivers who enjoyed postcard weather, a warm community embrace and plenty of fun. From the Honor Parade and Banquet that of cially kicked off the event last Thursday, and which saw hundreds line the parade route and gather at the Centennial Building for a welcoming salute, to a day of offshore shing, the weekend was one to remember. “Coming here to the Forgotten Coast, that is a name, because I am not going to forget,” said Sgt. Major Jesse Acosta who served as keynote speaker at the banquet and See SAVE THE BAY A7 ‘I’m not going to forget’ WES LOCHER AND TIM CROFT| The Star The Honor Parade drew folks to salute along the route and greet and salute warriors at the Centennial Building prior to the Honor Banquet. Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend offers salutes, smiles and sh See WARRIOR A7 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A4 Outdoors ............................... A8 Sports ............................ A9-A10 Grad Pages ....................... B6-B7 Faith ................................. B4-B5 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ............................ B12

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 O N CE A GAIN O UR W O RLD F AMO US 2014 MEMO RI AL WEEKEND B U T T R O A S T S T AR TIN G THURS D A Y 22nd thr o ug h SA TURD A Y 24th MA Y 2014 A t Sa lin a s P a r k B a yside o n C a p e Sa n B l a s R o ad o p p osi t e o ur r e s t a t io n O RD ER Y O UR B UT T S A T w w w .s gc r e .c o m T O GU AR ANTEE Y O UR O RD ER O R JUS T H O P E WE S TILL H A VE SO ME LEFT AND C O ME AND P I CK THEM UP O NL Y $35 urs da y and F r ida y b etw e en 11am and 6p m & S a t ur da y b etw e en 11am-4p m W e w i l l b e s e l lin g s a n d w ic h es f o r $6 I n c l udin g a s o d a a n d c hi ps. F a mi l y-T o-G o b o x es f o r 4 (ho t o r c o l d ) a t $20 w hic h w i l l in c l ude 1l b o f s hr e dde d b a rb e c ue p o r k, 4 b un s, 4 s o d a s, 4 c hi ps a n d p o ts o f co les l a w a n d b a rb e c ue s a uce Als o o ur l o c a l a r t is ts a nd cr a e rs w i l l b e e xhi b i tin g s o me o f the ir ta l e n t a nd w i l l ha v e i t e ms f o r s a l e – p l e as e c o me a nd ha v e a l o o k. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m There were tears, yes, but they were blotted with laughter, admiration and respect last Saturday as the community said goodbye to the late Coach Vernon Eppinette. Eppinette died last week at the age of 65 after a lengthy battle with cancer. He understood the gravity of his health situation in midJanuary, said his brother-inlaw Rev. Mike Keppler, who Eppinette approached to preside over his memorial. Over the ensuing months Eppinette enlisted friends and family to participate in what ultimately was called a “Celebration of the Life and Journey of Vernon Eppinette”, which began with the sounding of the familiar gym horn signaling a game is about to begin. Last week in front of several hundred attendees that roster of enlistees provided what could be considered a masters class in Vernon Eppinette, “this prince of a man, prince of a coach.” His family and friend since boyhood, living in disparate parts of the globe, learned the impact Eppinette had on a school, community and young men – many of whom lined consecutive rows on the oor of the R. Marion Craig Coliseum – as hard-earned success dened Eppinette and the Port St. Joe High School Tiger Sharks. The family heard from former players and friends, and a fellow coach, and heard how Eppinette not only won ve state titles, earned trips to seven consecutive state championship games, but also forged men, taught life lessons focused on hard work and dedication, discipline and mental toughness. And instilled a bedrock principle: life and sports is about team over self. “He was shaping us as young men to be men tomorrow,” said former player Clay Smallwood. “The rules were clear-cut. He had discipline. We all had personal accountability for how far we went as a team.” Damien Byrd, another former player, added, “He was molding young men into men. Coach made us believe we could do anything.” Eppinette’s family also heard healthy dollops of humor. The time Jeremy Dixon told Coach in the high school parking lot that he would not be coming out for his junior year, to which Eppinette paused before unlocking his car, saying, “It will come to you” before driving off, leaving a dumbfounded Dixon to wonder what that meant. Byrd provided the history behind the famed purple-and-gold horizontally striped “Dr. Seuss socks” that became the Tiger Sharks’ trademark. Those socks weren’t a fashion statement; they were to allow Coach to ensure he could see the players’ feet moving on grainy game lms. Traci Gaddis, a basketball mom by virtue of Eppinette deciding – to no further discussion – that her daughter would be videographer, talked about being left behind by the Eppinette-driven bus in violation of the coach’s rules for transport and timeliness. When the coach returned not a word was spoken between the two until disembarking and Eppinette, with a wide smile, telling Gaddis that she would just love the concessions at the arena in which they were playing. And while the family learned, so too did those impacted by the man after he arrived in Port St. Joe in 1990. They learned about the future brother-in-law scared by the amount of protection Eppinette was directing toward his sister, Keppler’s future wife. They learned about a boy who early on displayed some of the traits he would rene during his journey to Port St. Joe. “He was somebody we looked up to, a hero,” Keppler said of the man he met when Eppinette was around 10. “He was a clinician, mentor, strategist and brilliant in a lot of ways.” By the time Keppler had daughters, Eppinette became de-facto coach to a niece who ran track. Eppinette’s closest and longtime friend Les Easter provided insight by reading snippets of letters between Eppinette, his parents and his company commander as a Marine in Vietnam. Eppinette would be forced from the service by a shoulder injury suffered during a convoy. The company commander’s letter was an attempt to explain to Eppinette’s parents why there had been a lapse in letters – a letter that highlighted the young Marine’s discipline, knack for hard work and higher thinking, using adjectives such as “dynamic”, “aggressive”, “efcient”, “a deep thinker” constantly devising strategy. His departure, the commander wrote, was “a loss to the Marine Corps and his country” and predicted that Eppinette would make a “great mark on men” and “go on to great things.” And those who knew Eppinette since his arrival in Port St. Joe heard from his earliest coaching friend, Mike Herring, who highlighted a budding friendship as young coaches in Lake County and recounted his mentioning the Port St. Joe job to Eppinette. Again, those characteristics that would dene Eppinette in Port St. Joe were already on full display. “You could not outwork him and you could not outprepare him,” Herring said. “It was the team, always the team. “You had the perfect storm here, the perfect players for him, the perfect coach, the perfect school and the perfect community.” Hundreds inside “The Dome” last Saturday left with far more understanding about the journey Coach Vernon Eppinette took to navigate that perfect storm. Celebrating Coach Eppinette’s journeyCOURTESY OF SS TEVE WHEALTON Momentos from a life well-lived were in display, from an old uniform to plaques to favored photos. VV ERNON E E PPINETTE

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, May 22, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Get ready for some down home, all-American rock n’ roll on Friday. At 7:30 p.m. ET Friday, a fundraiser concert will be held at the Centennial Building where The Villagers will perform for the public to raise funds for this year’s Fourth of July Celebration. The Villagers, fronted by college basketball coach Cliff Ellis, are best known for their 1960s hit, “Laugh it Off,” which reached No. 1 on the WDLP Funtastic 59 chart in Michigan and “Where Have You Been” which No. 4 on the WBAM Top 40 in Montgomery. The group performed at the Centennial Building on July 4, 1968 and 2014 will mark their return visit. Tickets are available for $15 and volunteers will serve boiled peanuts, hot dogs, popcorn and peanuts and a cash bar will be onsite. More than 100 tickets have already been sold for the event. Two months ago, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson sanctioned a committee to plan the annual Fourth of July festivities with the intent of placing the ownership on the public. Due to economic hardships, many communities have foregone their reworks displays due to the high cost associated with them. Not wanting to cancel anything, the committee, consisting of Helen Magidson, Mike Lacour, Steve Kerigan, Barbara Radcliff, Charlotte Pierce, Terese Kent, Ann Jarosz and Dana Boyer quickly secured a $5,000 donation from the Tourist Development Council to combine with $5,000 raised during last summer’s Centennial Celebration events. “The Fourth isn’t just another day off from work,” said Fourth of July committee head Dana Boyer. “We’re having a ag ceremony to remind people of the true meaning of the holiday.” Festivities planned for the Fourth of July celebration in Port St. Joe will include a pancake breakfast at City Commons Park a ag ceremony complete with patriotic songs and a parade will make its way down Reid Avenue. Various children’s activities will take place throughout the day at George Core Park. Everybody loves the reworks,” said committee member Steve Kerigan, “They’re a hometown tradition and, while in the past, local government paid for them, this year the money’s just not there.” Not wanting to put nancial pressures on local businesses, who get tapped for many events throughout the year, the committee decided to look to the public for assistance in getting the reworks display off the ground and into the sky. The committee is seeking those citizens to donate $10-$25 dollars to help ensure that this year’s Independence Day celebration rivals all of those that came before it. “You can only go to local businesses for so long,” said Kerigan. “We’re not big corporate America, and they already get hit up for every other function. “We need the public’s help to keep the tradition alive and moving forward.” The committee will reuse decorations from the Centennial Celebration and host a series of events on Friday, July 4. Additional funds raised will help create a reserve for the 2015 reworks display. By asking for help from area citizens, the committee’s goal is to leave money in the city account for the 2015 reworks and celebration so that tax dollars be used to support the services of the community. Donations to support this year’s Fourth of July celebration can be made a city hall. 4519124 Wo rk in g To ge the r. .. To Bu il d Th e Fu tu re Memor ial Day May 26th, WE MUST NEVER FORGET ... ALL GA VE SOME...SOME GA VE ALL! MEMORIAL DA Y SERVICE-VFW POST 10069 1174 Tr out Av e Highland View Service 11:00 EST follow ed by Gr illed bur ger s and hot dog lunch Wo rl d Wa r II HEWEY ALD AY JAMES E. BLA CK JIM BROOKS RALPH CONNEL EDGAR HA GANS JAMES N. HA YES JOHN C. HA YES BA SIL H. HICKS JIMMY JA CKSON WINFRED C. JENKS RICHARD JONES HARR Y D JOHNSON WA LLA CE A. JOUGHIN LONNIE C. KING BENJAMIN C. KIRKLAND WA YNE L. LANGLEY WILLIE MARSHALL JESSE M. NICHOLS JAMES E. ROBERSON WILLIS V. ROW AN CARL A. SODERBERG HOW ARD C. TA UNT ON JOHN W. WILLIAMS WILLIAM R. WILLIAMS Ko re an Wa r JIM DA NIELS JR. RO Y B. EV ANS WILLIAM M. GARRETT GEORGE W. PA RRISH KENNETH W. POWERS Vietnam MOUL TO N L. FREEMAN JOHN C. GAINOUS CAL VIN K. GRAESER, JR. FRED LAND CLIFFORD C. SIMS (Medal Of Honor) JAMES T. TI ND EL L RO BE RT H. PILK Gulf Wa r CHRIST OPHER M. BLASCHUM PUBLIC INVITED Ki ds Wi n To ur nam en t FR EE to Re gis te r at th e Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na Do na ti ons Ac cep te d! Fi rs t 35 0 Ki ds get a ro d an d re el ta ck le an d a go od y bag www .Ki d sw in fi sh in g. co m Fr id ay Ju ne 13 th Si gn in 3 pm 6:3 0 pm ES T Sa tu rda y, Ju ne 14 th Fi sh in g co m m en ce s at 7: 00 am ES T We igh in 10 am -1 2p m ES T Na ut ic al Fl ea Ma rk et FR EE to Re gi st er Sa tu rda y, Ju ne 14 th 9a m3p m ES T OP EN TO EV ER YO NE AN D AN YO NE Mu st pr ov id e yo ur ow n ta bl e an d ch ai rs sa lt wa te rc la ss ic .c om Fa th er 's Da y We ek en d Ju ne 13 -1 4, 20 14 RE GI ST RA TI ON IS JU NE 12 TH @ 6P M LO CA TE D AT TH E HA UG HT Y HE RO N Po rt St Jo e Ma ri na wi ll be a we igh in lo ca ti on Le arn mo re at ht tp :/ /w ww .n at io na lm ar in ad ay .o rg / Sa tu rd ay Ju ne 14 th The Villagers in concert Friday FILE PHOTOS Last year, The Villagers performed at the Thirsty Goat during the Centennial Celebration. The band will perform this Friday at the Centennial Building raise funds for the Fourth of July Celebration. Tickets to the “down home, all-American” holiday are available for $15 at city hall.

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Compassionate care at SHH Dear Editor, Recently I was hospitalized for 18 days in Port St. Joe at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. I would like to share my experience at the local hospital with your readers. From the moment I arrived at the emergency room until the day I checked out, I received continuous excellent, professional, caring and competent treatment from the entire staff. Upon arrival, Dr. Cattow and his staff in the emergency room were very thorough, compassionate and understanding. He and his staff could not have been more ef cient or caring as they examined my medical situation and then made the decision to admit to the hospital. After my admission, the hospital physicians — Dr. Brown and Dr. Woolery — managed my tests, diagnosis and treatment in an exceptional manner making sure that they covered every possibility. They were kind, understanding and took time to talk to me and my family and to fully explain everything about my illness and treatment. I can’t say enough good things about how the entire support staff of nurses, aides, respiratory staff, technicians, therapists, housekeeping staff and kitchen employees always went the extra mile to that my every need was met in a prompt manner. I never had to wait when I called for some type of need or for attention. They were always pleasant and understanding and made me feel special. We are so fortunate to have this wonderful quality medical facility located in our community and the entire staff is totally dedicated to making every encounter with patients a superior, pleasant and professional experience. Thank you Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf for all that you did for me and my family during this very important period of need for us. Your commitment to caring, professional service was superior in every way. Eve-Anne D. Wall Port St. Joe I passed a sign at a local market advertising asparagus for $1.99 per pound. You’ve got to be kidding me! I got whiplash and near ’bout rear ended an SUV taking a second look to make sure I saw what I saw! $1.99 for chocolate ice cream I could understand. I’d pay that for an extra big slice of pecan pie, a jar of pickled peaches or a handful of fresh pig knuckles. But asparagus? Any self-respecting vegetable seller ought to pay you to take it off his hands! Mother served it up on a regular basis in our “formative years” with the admonition, “It is good for you”. That’s the same thing she said about carrots and cauli ower. Leon thought it taste like wet Bermuda grass with the weeds left in it. We ate it so often that it must have come as a shopping bonus. In like, “You buy ve dollars worth of groceries, you get a free bag of asparagus.” There had to be some logical explanation for how often it showed up on our plates. If it touched your mashed potatoes, you were out of luck. By osmosis the asparagus permeated the potatoes faster than you could eat them. If the blessing was extra long, the meal was a total disaster! Mom usually made a casserole out of it. She also served it up boiled (the worst), roasted, raw, fried and diced into a sandwich spread. She rolled it up and wrapped bacon around it. None of these enterprising offerings helped the taste one iota. You can’t make a silk purse……. I dated a girl once who was attractive, intelligent and wealthy. I gured I’d hit the trifecta. Her father owned a couple hundred acres of rich, bottom land. It was the proverbial match made in Heaven! When she invited me up to the big house for “supper with the family” I gured my future was set. I noticed the asparagus dish even before her father began to quiz me on my college options. My almost, pert’near, semi-betrothed took two helpings. And shoved it in with both hands! I ate my roast beef in stunned silence. When she turned to me with little green bits and pieces stuck to her teeth and politely requested, “Would you pass the asparagus, please”, I mentally went to re guring my whole life even before Mrs. Carpenter served the orange sherbet. You talk about dodging a bullet! I read once that the ancient Egyptians used asparagus as a medicine. The Romans called it an herb. Early American pioneers rubbed it on rashes and insect bites. I rest my case. Now, I am aware of other asparagus lovers out there. The farmer’s daughter couldn’t be the only one. And I’m ok with that. American is well noted as the land of the free, and the home of the personal choice menu. Good sense would also argue there are people out there who don’t crave pig knuckles on a regular basis. To each his own….. But I’ve got to be in the majority on this one. The color, make up and taste of asparagus reminds me of broccoli and Brussels sprouts. I rest my case again. My wife, who once served us an asparagus casserole, contends that the dish has become fashionable, or a chic food, much like fried green tomatoes. She said it like that “legitimized” the consumption of the stuff. The only thing fried green tomatoes had over asparagus was they didn’t ruin the mashed potatoes when placed side by side on your plate. And if possible, they were even easier to obtain. Mom just sent me, Leon or David Mark out to the garden to “pull a couple” before breakfast. I had the opportunity to eat at the infamous “Golden Lantern” in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, a few years back. Our host raved about the fried green tomatoes appetizer. It was the widely advertised specialty of the house. My good southern upbringing kept me from verbalizing my doubts. We ate those things out of necessity down at the end of Stonewall Street. I would have much preferred a City Caf hamburger, a malted shake from Frank’s Dairy Bar or a Chocolate Soldier and a Moon Pie from Pat Houston’s Grocery. How could anything we used to walk out in the backyard and pick before daylight become a specialty of the house? I gured I was in for a treat. This “Golden Lantern” must’a discovered a secret recipe for fried green tomatoes. Maybe they melted Hershey Bars over them, covered them with caramel ice cream or soaked them in a Root Beer oat. You can image my disappointment when the famous, chic, hot-to-trot, modern fried green tomatoes turned out to be……fried green tomatoes. Let me tell you, I’ve eaten not fully ripe tomatoes BEFORE and AFTER they became fashionable. Being fashionable didn’t do one thing for the taste. And it is the same for the asparagus weed. You can dress it up by sprinkling cheese sauce and mushroom slices over the top, you can advertise it to the cows come home, you can feature it on the cover of Bon Apptit Magazine and have it personally sauted by the Iron Chef. But you can’t change the taste……and that, dear hearts, is the major aw in the dish. I rest my case forever. Respectfully, Kes Real res and ctitious ones Recently, we had a friend whose house caught on re in the wee hours of the morning. Fortunately, she, her family and pets all got out of the house. As most folks can only imagine, it was a very traumatic experience for them. For those who have gone through such an experience, they know the feelings of helplessness and sadness of losing their belongings, sometimes even loved ones. It surprises me the way folks react sometimes. On some of our local internet news sites, at least one person questioned the number of resources/units that arrived to ght the re. Really, they did. This particular person thought the number of units that showed up was “excessive” and wanted to bring the neighborhood into the situation. They were complaining that “if they had a re,” they knew that all of those units wouldn’t come to put the re out at their house. Perhaps, the complaining person was having a bad day, because I know most folks would not nd fault in the number of re ghters who come to help when they are needed. Especially when the number is more than what some people would expect. I just don’t see complaining about a “ ctitious re” or a re that you haven’t had and don’t want to have. Our friend noted that their re/smoke alarms saved their lives — she was very serious. She also begged everyone to check their alarm systems, batteries, etc. to make sure they were in working order. When a friend’s house one street over from you burns and she asks you to check your smoke alarms — you do it. You should do it on a regular basis anyway, but like many folks, I sometimes forget. Hearing about our friends’ re made me think about it for a number of days, I was even dreaming about it. I was hearing the smoke alarms, I was checking them multiple times and I was paying particular attention to the things I was watching on television and reading. There seemed to be a lot of re related stories. It’s not Fire Prevention Month — that’s October. However, I did see a dalmatian on a television show the other morning that did all of these tricks — some having to do with carrying a smoke alarm and testing a smoke alarm. So, I was thinking about res and smoke alarms and nine volt batteries to go in my smoke alarms. Having friends and family, who are re ghters, I see and hear about res, but rarely know of a close friend who has experienced one. It does make you think about it. You smell smoke, you smell gas in the kitchen and you worry about the grill being too close to the house. This went on for a few days… I was in my college classroom teaching my students about measurement conversions. We were converting from hectometers to decimeters and millimeters to decameters — moving the decimal from left to right and right to left. “King Henry Died Monday Drinking Chocolate Milk” was written on the board. The mnemonic gives the students a funny and memorable way to keep the pre xes straight. As we were jumping the decimals around and converting within the metric system, I turned around and noticed that a student had a peculiar cloud of smoke coming from her head. I thought to myself, “That girl is on re.” It shook me up… Had all of the thoughts of re gone to my head? By the expression on my face, I was asking, “What in the world is going on?” I stammered and mumbled and started thinking about that Alicia Keys song. You know the one — “This girl is on re, This girl is on re, etc.” I had to leave the classroom after realizing this particular student had the gall to be using one of those electronic smoking things right in the middle of class. Honestly, it looked like one of long stemmed cigarette holders that Cruella de Vil used in the movie, “A Hundred and One Dalmatians.” I guess this could be considered a “ ctitious re.” Over these last few days, I had been worrying about smoke and re and being thankful my friends were OK. Now, I had this student in my classroom on re — or at least smoke coming out of her head. I’m pretty sure between my expression and my stammering and my walking out of the classroom to compose myself — this student understood that it wasn’t a good idea to be doing that in the classroom. We live in a time when nothing is supposed to shock us anymore. Folks want to rede ne “normal” and what is acceptable. After checking the policies to see if this was against the rules, I found that there was nothing speci cally against it. There was also nothing speci cally against bringing your pet alligator or boa constrictor into the classroom. I worry sometimes about the direction we are heading. Ninety-nine percent of my students are wonderful and courteous and respectful.Every once in a while, one gets mixed up on what is acceptable. I’m thankful my friends are OK and for the large number of re ghters who showed up to help them. I’m still puzzled by ctitious res and scared of real ones. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard O PINION www.starfl.com Thursday, May 22, 2014 A Page 4 Section Leafy, green not my favorite color #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Alan Davis Editor: Tim Croft SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Letters to the EDITOR Eckstine epitomized who a minister should be The Rev. Joseph Cromer Eckstine died on Friday, March 21, and his service of committal was held at Trinity Episcopal Church Apalachicola. The Rev. Eckstine served as minister of the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Panama City from 1987 through 1989. During his ministry there, I served as an elder of the church. After retiring there, he served as supply minister at churches in Port St. Joe and Apalachicola. Many years later, the Rev. Eckstine conducted the funeral of my rst wife, Kendall H. Middlemas, and performed the marriage of my daughter Kendall and her husband, Steve, as well as my marriage to my present wife, Kay. Obviously, I knew Rev. Eckstine well, and I must say that I have never known a kinder nor gentler man. To me he was the epitome of what a minister should be. He understood and embraced the meaning of duty. He was a combat infantryman in Germany during World War II, and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart. He would be honored throughout his life, for his fortitude and heart. In 1990, the Columbia Theological Seminary in Atlanta awarded its Distinguished Alumni Award to him. Included in the resolution of that presentation were these words: “For his extraordinary leadership and service in the inner city (Macon, Georgia), serving the poor, the imprisoned, and the outcast, giving himself tirelessly to the mission of breaking down barriers of age, race, and class that divide God’s people.” And “For his remarkable sensitivity to the basic needs of persons, caring for their welfare and helping them to develop their potential and worth. And “For his humility, his rm stand against bigotry, his commitment to education, his participation in city planning and many civic projects in the name of Jesus Christ.” I can only aspire to be such a person, but I fear that I fall far short, that I do not measure up to that. But the Rev. Joseph C. Eckstine did measure up. I pray that we nd leaders throughout the world who will aspire to the guiding principles that governed Joseph Eckstine’s life. John Robert Middlemas Panama City

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www.starfl.com Thursday, May 22, 2014 A Section Sh op at Ho me LI FE IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 13 3 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS L ETTERS Page 5 “I don’t go for all that wine and dine, With that ray ban, fake tan, never mind…” “I Want a Cowboy” by Reba McEntire I read recently about several prominent investors who were taken on a seven-day trip to the NCAA Championship Football Game last January in California by their nancial advisor. The clients played golf at several upscale courses and dined each evening in a trendy restaurant. Apparently the advisor footed the bill for everything. During the ve working days when markets were open and the advisor was entertaining the entourage, who was monitoring his clients’ accounts? Probably the same person who normally monitors those accounts. In other words, someone other than the advisor. This advisor’s role appears to be more of a relationship manager, one who is charged with entertaining af uent investors and attending social functions. And that’s ne, as long as the client understands that when he sits down to discuss his accounts, he is not visiting with the person who is actually making investment decisions. Say the Dow drops 500 points on the day of the championship game, 2008style. Who would have been in charge of making changes in the portfolio to minimize losses? Or, say the market hit an all-time high that day. Who was at the controls, possibly taking gains off the table and considering the tax consequences for the client? Perhaps the advisor actually manages these accounts, but believes in a “buy and hold” investment style. The thinking here is that “the market always rebounds,” so no need to react to market vagaries, because there may be upturns as well as downturns. Thus, weeklong football vacations don’t really interfere with the advisor’s portfolio management activity. This investment philosophy works ne during steady uptrending markets, like those the late 1990’s provided. However, investors nearing or in retirement risk damaging their portfolios signi cantly if they suffer large downturns like we witnessed in 2008. “Set it and forget it” may not work well for this demographic, especially in volatile or choppy markets. Additionally, the investor/client is probably paying for the trip one way or another. The advisor may have funded the football journey, but the money to nance those activities most likely came from the investor in the form of management fees, trading fees, and commissions. Ultimately, “It’s not show friends, it’s show business.” People’s retirement and life savings are at stake, and wealth preservation for someone nearing or in retirement is paramount. You may want to ask yourself: Do you want a football host? Or do you want someone who is in the of ce every day monitoring your accounts? Markets don’t care how many games your advisor invites you to. The investment world is a meritocracy. It doesn’t play favorites. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121~www. arborwealth.net), a “FeeOnly” and Fiduciary Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin, FL. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. ’Noles, war eagle and a football week in Pasadena MARGARET R. M c DOWELL Arbor Outlook Each day, approximately 10,000 Baby Boomers turn 65 – and thereby become eligible for Medicare. But becoming eligible for and actually enrolling in Medicare are two very different things. In fact, if you miss the initial window to sign up for certain parts of Medicare and later decide to enroll, you could wind up paying signi cantly higher premiums for the rest of your life. If you’re approaching 65, get familiar with these Medicare basics now: Medicare provides bene ts to people age 65 and older (and those under 65 with certain disabilities or end-stage renal disease). For most people, the initial enrollment period is the seven-month period that begins three months before the month they turn 65. If you miss that window, you may enroll between Jan. 1 and March 31 each year, although your coverage won’t begin until July 1. Medicare offers several plans and coverage options, including: Medicare Part A helps cover inpatient hospital, skilled nursing facility and hospice services, as well as home health care. Most people pay no monthly premium for Part A, provided they or their spouse have paid FICA taxes for at least 40 calendar quarters. Medicare Part B helps cover medically necessary doctor’s services, outpatient care, durable medical equipment and many preventive services. It’s optional and has a monthly premium. For most people there’s a $147 yearly deductible; after that’s met, you’ll be responsible for 20 percent of the Medicare-approved amount of the service, provided the doctor or other provider accepts Medicare. Medicare Part C (Advantage) plans are offered by Medicareapproved private insurers as alternatives to Original Medicare Parts A and B. Most cover prescription drugs and some include additional benefits such as dental and vision coverage for an extra cost. You’re usually required to use the plan’s doctor, hospital and pharmacy provider network, which may be more restrictive than providers you can access through Parts A and B. Medicare Part D helps cover the cost of prescription drugs. It’s optional and carries a monthly premium. These privately run plans vary widely in terms of cost, copayments and deductibles and medications covered. If you’re enrolled in a Part C plan that includes drug coverage, you don’t need Part D. Many people purchase additional Medigap (or Medicare Supplemental) insurance, which is offered by private insurers and helps pay for many items not covered by Medicare. Medigap plans can vary widely in terms of cost, covered benefits and states participating so compare your options carefully. Keep in mind: •For all Medicare plans, deductibles, copayments and coinsurance may apply, depending on the service provided. •With Parts B and D, you'll often face sizeable penalties if you don't enroll when first becoming eligible – Part B premiums could increase 10 percent for each 12-month period you were eligible but didn't sign up (the Part D penalty is more complicated); however, if you're currently covered by an employer's plan you can enroll later without penalty. •Terms of Advantage and Part D plans such as premiums, copayments and covered medications can change from year to year, so carefully review enrollment materials from your current plans to make sure they still match your needs. Understanding and choosing the right Medicare options for your individual situation can be a complicated and time-consuming process. For assistance, call 1-800-633-4227 or visit www.medicare.go v where you’ll find “Medicare & You 2014,” a detailed guide that explains Medicare in easy-tounderstand language, and tools to compare prescription plans, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies and Medigap plans in your area. Jason Alderman directs Visa’s nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMone y Explore Medicare before you turn 65 JASON ALDERMAN Special to The Star TALLAHASSEE — The 2014 Legislative Session was productive and meaningful for the State of Florida. Sen. Bill Montford, DTallahassee, was an active part in passing many bills that will help the hardworking communities of North Florida. Senator Montford maintained strong advocacy for the needs of his eleven counties: Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla. When asked about the 2014 Session, Montford said, “The country can easily look to Florida as an example of how common sense and principled answers can be found on both sides of the aisle and quite frankly in the middle of the aisle. We have and will continue to work together, Senate and House, Democrat and Republican, to do what is best for Florida.” In the 2014 Session, Senator Montford helped to shape the following legislative decisions: Springs Protection: Montford co-sponsored legislation with four other senators in a bi-partisan effort that became known as the “Springs Bill.” It addressed the many water issues that Florida is facing. While the bill passed the Senate, it did not make it out of the House. “We started very important and dire conversations about the state of our invaluable and irreplaceable springs in Florida and we have every intention of continuing them next year,” Montford said. Maintaining the Florida Retirement System and State Employee Health Insurance: Montford is well known in the Senate as an advocate and voice for state workers and as such he helped to maintain the current, sturdy Florida Retirement System that faced many challenges throughout the 2014 Session. He was also instrumental in defending the well-managed health insurance policies for state workers. Preservation of the Instructional Materials Process: Montford was pivotal in the preservation of the statewide instructional materials process, which will not only maintain cost savings for local school districts but also give parents more opportunity for input in their child’s learning materials. Effective Timeline for School Accountability: As a long time educator, Montford advocated for a realistic timeline to ensure the proper implementation of the many facets in the Public School Accountability program including technology and testing. Local Pharmacy Choice: Communities will now be able to choose their local pharmacies or mailorder when ordering prescriptions on the State Group Insurance PPO (Preferred Provider Organization). Tax Cuts: The Florida Legislature came together this year to offer many hard working Floridians much needed tax cuts totaling $500 million. It included a reduced annual motor vehicle license renewal registration fee. This alone will save drivers between $20 and $25 each. Rural Areas of Critical Economic Concern (RACEC): The Legislature passed legislation to help cities in RACEC communities avert the cost of removing or relocating utility lines on the State Highway System in certain circumstances, by allowing FDOT to pay for such costs. In addition, the legislation will allow municipalities within a RACEC or a RACEC community to compete for project funding using Small County Outreach Program criteria. Flood Insurance Legislation: Legislation was also passed to establish a private ood insurance market in Florida, which will hopefully lower ood insurance rates for Florida Citizens. The proposal is aimed at addressing the federal ood insurance crisis caused by the rising rates being imposed by the National Flood Insurance Program Budget Items: In recognition of the importance of acting this year on Florida’s springs, the legislature funded $25 million for spring’s restoration plus another $1.7 million for springs monitoring. The legislature recognized the importance of improved learning environments for children and funded $14 million dollars for public school construction in Montford’s district. The Senate and the House agreed on $6,937.23 per student, public school funding which is $176 more dollars per student than last year, and totals $18.9 billion towards public schools. LOCAL ITEMS Montford also worked tirelessly to ensure that Gulf County was awarded the following allocations: City of Port St. Joe Benny Roberts Sports Park: $50,000 Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Washington High School Complex: $50,000 Historic Cape San Blas Lighthouse Complex Rescue: $200,000 TOTAL: $300,000 FDOT ROAD PROJECTS TOTAL CR 30A from Franklin Co. Line to E of Money Bayou: $2,300,000 CR 30B Indian Pass from CR 30A to Indian Pass Boat Ramp: $1,500,000 Jarrott Daniels Rd From CR 386 Overstreet Rd to SR 22: $3,600,000 Old Bay City Rd from S of Ross Stripling to Crossover Rd: $2,100,000 Port St Joe Channel Dredging: $20,000,000 Gulf County ARC Transit Nonurbanized Area 5311: $181,992 TOTAL: $29,681,992 GRAND TOTAL: $29,981,992 **All Line Items are Subject to the Governor’s Veto Montford supports Floridians with votes in Senate

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 Heavy rains expected to affect tupelo honey yield Brian Bertonneau looks over a jar of honey. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE | The News Herald Brian Bertonneau checks on a colony of bees. Bertonneau owns Smiley Apiaries, a honey bottling operation in Wewahitchka. WEAKENED HARVEST “The industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees don’t want to stay alive.” Don Smiley, former apiary owner By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA — Lovers of tupelo honey might have spent a little extra for a dab of the famous stuff during the Tupelo Honey Festival last weekend; this season’s harvest is projected to be less than sweet. The white tupelo gum tree blossoms that provide the bees with the nectar to create the honey only last about three weeks in the best years, said Brian Bertonneau, owner of Smiley Apiaries. Wet weather this year cut deeply into blooming period, and Bertonneau expects tupelo yields to be about 50 to 70 percent lower. “It’s not going to be a good year,” Bertonneau said. “Bees have to visit 2 million blossoms to gather a pound of honey.” It’s been ve or six years since the last hearty yield, he said. The precarious tupelo honey industry is also threatened by a mysterious phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder or CCD, which emerged about 10 years ago and has the potential to impact not just honey producers but food consumers the world over. Bees pollinate more than 90 percent of the owering crops on earth, according to the Associated Press. “Just about all agriculture depends on some kind of insect pollination,” said Don Smiley, who created Smiley Apiaries in 1989 and lost a whole harvest season when he was rst affected by CCD in the mid-2000s. Smiley sold his company to Bertonneau a few years ago. “I wasn’t seeing dead bees,” Smiley said. “I was just seeing weaker and weaker hives.” There are several theories about what is leading to CCD, which causes bees to suddenly and inexplicably abandon their hives and die, although a Harvard study published this month blames pesticides that are already restricted in Europe. One of every four honeybee colonies died over the winter this year, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture study, a decrease from the previous few years. “The industry is beginning to grow again, but the bees don’t want to stay alive,” Smiley said. Smiley thinks beekeepers need federal disaster relief in the same way farmers of other crops needed relief after the heavy rains this spring. Bertonneau considers himself a hobbyist when it comes to beekeeping; he keeps two hives at his bottling plant and buys honey by the drum from partners with many more hives. Colony loss has been less of a problem in recent years as beekeepers split hives twice a year, he said. And here’s some good news: It’s trees and not the bees that give tupelo honey the distinctive sweetness Van Morrison sang about, Bertonneau said. The might be less honey, but the honey that remains is as sweet as it ever was. Wewahitchka and the Apalachicola river basin that runs behind Bertonneau’s plant are home to some of the highest concentrations of white tupelo gum trees in the world, and the Tupelo Honey Festival draws hundreds of vendors and thousands of visitors to Wewa each year, said Jennifer Jenkins, executive director of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. “Tourism is up here in Gulf County…and tupelo honey is a part of it,” Jenkins said. The TDC wants to emphasize tupelo honey production in its marketing of Gulf County as an alternative to the busier, more developed counties to its west, she said. Jenkins said the TDC is in the early stages of forming partnerships with apiaries like Smiley to promote and market the area, and the world-famous honey, to potential visitors.

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, May 22, 2014 The American ag welcomed the warriors as they made their way from WindMark Beach into Port St. Joe. WES LOCHER AND TIM CC ROFt T | The Star road” moment. Those issues were com pounded by the end of last week’s meeting as Nadine Lee stepped down for per sonal reasons from her position as administrative assistant. With the departure of Lee, who had worked for much of the past two years as an unpaid volunteer, the Port Authority lacks any staff, having previously lost its port director. With looming payments for director liability insur ance at the end of next month and dues to the Florida Ports Council, a lob bying and advocacy organi zation for ports in the state, sometime this summer, little in the bank and pros pects for tenants unlikely before the next scal year and 2015, the board is bat tling for existence. A community fundrais ing effort has raised just under $30,000, far below the expectations of board chair man Leonard Costin. “If we stop, this all stops,” said board member Jessica Rish. Rafeld said the time had arrived for a sit-down with local governing bodies, a workshop “to let everybody know what is at stake.” A bullet point of what was needed for the Port Au thority to maintain opera tions should be presented along with the progress be ing made toward dredging, with the permit application to be submitted by fall and dredging commencing ear ly 2015. “It’s time for us to get organized and put a ne point on this,” Rafeld said of a workshop with the county and municipalities at the soonest opportunity. “Everything has changed. We all have a giant stake in this.” The Port Authority needs additional assistance from the Board of County Commissioners in the form of relief from a payment looming this summer on a $199,000 loan, funded with federal economic develop ment dollars. The BOCC and Port Au thority had discussed link ing that relief to new col lateral on the loan, but at torney Tom Gibson said the state had heartburn with mortgaging the old Arizona Chemical property, owned outright by the Port Author ity, due to the use of federal grant dollars in the secure ment of the land. “I would hope the coun ty would work with us,” said board member Jason Shoaf. Rish said the loan should be part of a formal request to the BOCC for assistance in Port Authority operating expenses, pegged at $65,000 for the duration of the s cal year. Gibson noted that beginning in 2016 the BOCC would begin to recoup sig nicant property taxes for the parcel recently fore closed by Capital City Bank and Costin noted the BOCC had recently had funding to the former Gulf County Economic Development Al liance, Inc. returned by the agency. “The county stands to benet the most from the port working,” Rish said. With those dynamics as backdrop, the boxes for the process to dredging are be ing steadily ticked off. Tommy Pitts, project manager with Hatch Mott MacDonald on the dredg ing permit application said forward progress contin ues toward the September target for submitting the application. Dollars to further the cause of developing the port are also in the pipeline. A state appropriation for $20 million for dredging must survive a veto by the governor, but if approved would offer roughly half of the estimated cost of dredg ing. The hope is that once approved and the dredging underway next spring, fur ther state investment will come, Costin said. The contracts with Green Circle and Enova energy companies are aimed at freeing up money already in the state budget to address rail improvements along the Genesse Wyoming rail line feeding into the port. The contracts would “justify releasing the rail grant,” Costin said. In Congress, the House and Senate are taking up the nal draft of the Water Resources Reform and De velopment Act. Among other provisions, the bill contains language that would require federal agencies to fully fun and spend the trust fund estab lished to underwrite op eration and maintenance activities at the nation’s ports/harbors. The bill also supports underserved and emerging ports, such as the Ports of Port St. Joe and Panama City, by allocating a specic percentage of those trust funds for ports/harbors that have output of less than 1 million tons annually. Further, when the trust fund expenditures exceed that of the scal year 2012, 10 percent of that excess must be directed to emerg ing ports and 5 percent to underserved ports. The bill would also streamline permitting requirements. “I am pleased that we’re now on the verge of some tremendous victories for Florida’s growing maritime industries,” said Rep. Steve Southerland (R-Panama City). “This legislation will direct new resources to Florida’s emerging ports to help capitalize on the eco nomic growth opportunities that come with the expan sion of the Panama Canal.” A further positive is re cent direct communication with Doug Wheeler, presi dent of the Florida Ports Council, by Rafeld during the council’s recent annual meeting and by Costin in a face-to-face scheduled for this week. “I am impressed with what you all are doing and appreciate what you’re doing,” Ware said. “We are very supportive of the port.” PORT from page A1 complete delineation of the beds, May said at one point, work he would gladly volunteer to spear head and organize. In the immediate, May said, he would like the blessing of com missioners to contact ofcials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to be gin the enforcement of rules and regulations about bay bottom destruction. May said what was needed was a “carrot—stick” approach. Enforcement, he said, with a dollar ne but also a gentle sug gestion to an offending boater that to preserve the good vibes of their vacation there are rules about de stroying the bottom of the bay. “Don’t get ned and ruin your vacation,” May said. Or, as May put it, “if you look back behind your boat and you see mud and grass you are break ing the law.” Education was also needed, May said. Through signage informing the public of the value of the sea grass and how best to protect the beds and providing information at boat ramps, the state park and other launch points, the effort would be to educate boaters be fore they get on the water, May said. He said any costs associated with such a program could be borne with BP ne money, add ing that using that ne money ts with the efforts BP is professing to support for improving the re gional environment. May said he would also like the city’s blessing to explore po tential grant funding to improve the damming system out of Buck Grifn Lake to the bay to improve the ltering of stormwater runoff before it hits the bay. The current dam has been effective, May said, but only ad dresses the stormwater in one di rection. An additional dam would double the efcacy of the system. “This is something that is im portant for saving what we have,” May said. “Without running people off we need to get control of our bay and protect what we have.” Commissioner gave unani mous support and May will coor dinate with city staff and commis sioners as needed. WAt T ER Good news on two fronts in the ongoing water saga. The “substantially complete” date for the replacement of wa ter distribution pipes along ar eas of the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe is June 16, said Clay Smallwood with Preble Rish Engineers. That would complete the ini tial phase of replacement in the area and commissioners held the rst public hearing Tuesday for a Community Development Block Grant which is being considered as a potential funding source to complete pipe work on the north side of town. At the water plant, prepara tions begin today on a pilot study examining the pretreatment of water with lime. The study should begin in two weeks, plant super visor Larry McLamma said. The hope is that the lime pre treatment will signicantly re duce levels of manganese – which causes water to look black or the color of ice tea – in the water. The addition of lime, the belief is, will also help reduce chemi cal costs by cutting the amount of other chemicals used in the treatment protocol. “I’m excited about the pro cess,” said Commissioner Rex Buzzett. GU lL F PINES HH OS pP I tT A lL City and county staff will be gin discussing how to resolve or abate outstanding property tax bills on the old Gulf Pines Hos pital site in an effort to allow the city, which owns the land, to re solve federal tax liens with the Internal Revenue Service. The long-term goal is to re solve the liens, tear down the hos pital while abating asbestos and platting the land for a six-parcel single-family subdivision on the tax rolls for both city and county. SAVE THE BAY from page A1 snagged some sh, despite being totally blind, over the weekend. “This is about the warriors and also those spouses and caregivers who continue to hang in there. By extending those arms, extending that hand, if we forget it is not because we want to but because of our issues. But the memory of this will come back.” The honored guests sure had an opportunity to enjoy Gulf County under gleaming skies and warm, but not too warm, temperatures. Fishing wasn’t the only pastime that warriors and their caregivers embraced. There were horseback rides at dawn, a trip to the local shooting range, a bit of retail therapy and opportunities to just relax on sugar sands. The shing was made possible by boat captains who donated vessels, time and supplies. “They were fantastic,” said SPC Ryan Campbell, an attendee of a prior FCWWW who returned as a mentor this year. “We have had a lot fun. We’ve spent a lot of time just joking around, ribbing each other. You have to have a thick skin around these guys. “But I was here to help them with whatever they needed or wanted. I was glad to come.” After rebooting the shing due to rough seas on Friday, all warriors returned safely on Saturday and in addition to bearing sh, and not small sh, either, all were wearing wide smiles. “Everything went very, very well,” said George Duren, who sits on the event organizing committee. “Our warriors and caregivers were happy when they got here and even happier when they left. “It was amazing to see them practically always smiling. They all gave our community high praise for the event.” And the community turned out. In addition to those who lined the parade route or greeted the warriors at the Centennial Building, more than 200 members of the community volunteered their time to make the event a success. Those volunteers did everything from cooking and serving the Honor Banquet to providing entertainment for the banquet and weekend. That community involvement, Duren noted, has increased with each FCWWW, which was the point when the organizing committee conceived of the idea. Folks from beyond Gulf County, including Franklin County and Mexico Beach, were among the volunteers and many, along with boat captains, were lining up for next year. “You guys pour your hearts into this event,” said Staff Sgt. Glen Silva, who also spoke at Thursday night’s banquet. “Every warrior and caregiver feels it, it is genuine. “This town opens its doors and that is unique.” FF ISHIN gG AwAW ARDS At a low country boil on Saturday evening, the warriors were awarded plaques for their shing acumen. First place was earned by Anthony Cerrone, with boat captain Zach Ferrell, for landing a 73.4 pound shark. Second place went to Ronald Cuevas for his 64.2 pounds of amberjack from the boat captained by Guy Williams Third was won by Kathy Champion, who snagged 52.2 pounds of amberjack aboard the boat of Langdon Flowers. Champion is blind from her war injuries. CC OURt T ESY OF GEORg G E DD UREN AND LANg G DON FlFL O w W ERS Fishing and a bit of shooting were just two of plenty of activities provided the warriors and their caregivers. Kathy Champion (standing with reel) and Jesse Acosta (in black shirt), were rendered completely blind by war. Commander Marty Jarosz sings “God Bless America” in front of a packed Centennial Building to kick off the Honor Banquet. WARRIOR from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Thursday, May 22, 2014 O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Monda y Th ursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | Fr ida y Sa tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) Su nda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! Sh op ou r hu ge se le ct io n of be ach wa re s, cha ir s, an d to ys Ne w ar ri va ls da il y of ka ya ks Pa dd le bo ar ds an d shi ng ge ar www .shopb wo .c om Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C Ca ll To da y! 653-8868 WEEK LY ALM ANA C ST .J OSEPH BA Y AP AL AC HIC OL A BA Y, WEST PA SS TIDE TA BLES MONTHL Y AV ER AG ES To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om these gi ve n fo r AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH LO W Ca t Po in t Mi nu s 0:40 Mi nus 1:1 7 East Pa ss Mi nu s 0:27 Mi nus 0:2 7 To nd the ti des of the fo llo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica te d times fr om those gi ve n fo r CA RR ABELLE: HIGH LO W Ba ld Po in t Mi nu s 9:16 Mi nus 0:0 3 Da te Hi gh Low % Pre cip Th u, Ma y 22 83 70 0 % Fr i, Ma y 23 85 72 10 % Sa t, Ma y 24 85 72 10 % Sun, Ma y 25 85 72 20 % Mo n, Ma y 26 80 72 10 % Tu es Ma y 27 80 71 0 % We d, Ma y 28 80 72 0 % SPONSORED BY Local area water are producing great inshore and now some offshore catches as the weather has finally settled down. We are expecting great turnouts of visitors this weekend so get to your favorite spot early. Red fish continue to be caught in the ICW canal and out in the Windmark location this week. Flounder and trout are in shallow water at the head of the bay, but not in vast numbers yet. Pompano and whiting continue to run the beaches along the Gulf side of Cape San Blas and further east down the coast. Offshore red snapper will open this Saturday in state waters to a much anticipated crowd of anglers. Many good sized red snapper are holding in 60-80ft of water and they will be big this weekend. By FRANK SARGEANT Frankmako1@outlook.com Flounder aren’t born at, but they soon get that way. All at sh start life looking rather unassuming as baby sh go until Mother Nature does her sleight of hand. Their eggs hatch into larvae that resemble typically symmetrical sh. The larvae quickly develop into a rounded form with protective spines on the head, over the gills and in the pelvic and pectoral ns. They are born with a swim bladder for buoyancy to make it easier to roam near the surface and feed on plankton, but as they grow they turn into “Franken sh.” One eye migrates across the top of the head onto the other side of the body, the swim bladder and spines literally disappear, the body coloration on the sightless side turns white, while the other side assumes a darker coloration that provides camou age for lying on the bottom. That’s important because the bottom is where these critters spend the majority of their time, either scavenging for a meal or lying in wait for a hapless sh or crustacean to get too close — and wham! For Panhandle anglers, ounder are a favorite target species, not because they are a hardghting game sh, but because they are often easy to catch both from nearshore boats and even from area piers and jetties — and absolutely great to eat. But before the eating comes the cleaning, and there’s the rub. Yamaha spokesman Martin Peters shes all over America, picking up angling tips where ever he goes. Here are some cleaning tips, with how-to photos, he offers for north Florida shermen. “For the best tasting ounder, try bleeding and icing them immediately after landing,” says Peters. “Lift the gill plate, cut the gill rakers with a scissor or knife, then put the sh in a live well or bucket of water to bleed out. When that’s done, put the sh on ice in a cooler to rm up the meat for easier cleaning and to maintain the quality. ” After that, you’re ready to follow the cleaning steps below: Cleaning flatfish Step 1 To get started, all you need is a fish like this four-pound summer flounder and a long, straight, sharp, flexible fillet knife. The cleaning board with clamp is optional, but if you’re cleaning a lot of fish, it’s a time saver. Step 2 Start white side down, and make your first cut across the tail just forward of the fin. Step 3 Insert the point of the knife into the first cut and slide it as far forward toward the head as possible running it alongside the spine, represented by the red line. You’ll be able to feel it. Step 4 With the knife angled just slightly down so the blade is running along the rib bones, slice carefully outward to detach the filet. On larger flounder you might have to reinsert the knife to complete the cut all the way to the head. Step 5 Repeat the process on the belly side of the fish, but make the slice carefully so the knife doesn’t cut into the stomach cavity outlined in red. Step 6 This is what it looks like after the two cuts. The fillet is only attached directly behind the head. Step 7 Detach the fillet with a single cut as shown, being careful not to penetrate the stomach cavity and set it aside. Step 8 Turn the fish over and repeat the process on the bottom (white side) fillet. Step 9 Carefully remove the feathers, the tiny muscles that power the fins around the flounder’s perimeter. Step 10 Lay the fillets on the cutting board skin side down, and use your finger tips to hold the very end of the tail section. Make a downward cut to the skin, turn the blade almost horizontal to the table, and carefully push the blade toward the far end using a slicing motion to separate the meat from the skin. Step 11 When done, you have a single fillet from the top and bottom of the fish that can be divided into four smaller fillets by slicing down the middle where it is thinnest, (the section that was over the backbone). For smaller fish this is not necessary; for larger fish the split fillets are more single-serving friendly. Page 8 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR Captain Mike Parker goes to work on a catch of flounder at the cleaning table on the Destin docks.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, May 22, 2014 A Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Previous offers had been extended, but this time, Derek Kurnitsky said, he could not pass turn away. Kurnitsky, for the past 10 years the boys’ basketball coach at Port St. Joe High School, announced Friday that he was accepting the same position at Orange Park High School in the Jacksonville area. Kurnitsky will be moving up in school classi cation — from Class 1A to Class 6A — but in terms of class of community, he said that would be difcult to replicate. “I’ve learned how to coach here,” Kurnitsky said. “I’ve been with awesome people and around an awesome place. It was a hard decision, and it is very bittersweet. But I coach from my gut, and my gut told me you don’t pass up a great opportunity like this.” Port St. Joe represented the rst extensive head coaching stint of Kurnitsky’s career. “I could not have landed in a better place (than Port St. Joe),” he said. “I came here a bachelor, and I met my lovely wife, Kim, and had children. Life has been good to me in Port St. Joe. “And I like to think I made a difference in the town, the community and the kids.” After graduating college from Florida State University, he was a name manager for the 1993 Seminole team that reached the NCAA Elite Eight, Kurnitsky spent time as an assistant at Clearwater High School before moving to North Carolina and beginning to climb the ladder as a junior varsity coach. He landed at Tallahassee Godby for a season in 2003 before being hired by Port St. Joe High. In 10 seasons at Port St. Joe, the Tiger Sharks averaged just shy of 18 wins a season, won seven district titles, reached a regional title game ve times, reached four state nal fours and the 2007 state title game. He was the Big Bend Coach of the Year in 2006, the Dairy Farmers Coach of the Year in Class 2A in 2007 and coached two professional athletes, Roman Quinn, a former second-round pick in the Major League Baseball amateur draft, and Calvin Pryor, who was a rst-round pick in the NFL draft earlier this month. Five of his players nished their scholastic careers with over 1,000 points. The one thing that eluded Kurnitsky was a state title. “A lot of coaches don’t have the opportunity to go to four nal fours and a championship game,” Kurnitsky said. “If I never win a state championship, I am not going to jump off a building.” And Kurnitsky arrives at Orange Park to resurrect a program that has had a losing record two years running. Kurnitsky said he begins June 1 to build a program, kicking off his summer program June 2. “I do look forward to the challenge of going and building a program,” Kurnitsky said. “I also always wondered what it was like to coach at a larger school. Any coach at a smaller school who says they don’t think about that isn’t being completely honest. “I’ve had other places call and check on me, but it was never the right time or the right place. Orange Park is an awesome job and an awesome place. But it will be really tough leaving Port St. Joe.” Special to The Star The Ladies Golf Association of St. Joseph Bay Golf Club had its annual awards banquet this past week. Several awards were given out. During the year, different games are played on the Play Days, and these are added up to give out the divisions awards based on handicaps. Ethel Bardsley was rst in the A Division, Pat Hardman in the B division and Barbara McQuinn in the C division. Awards were given for most “birdies” on the Play Day. This is one less than par. Ethel Bardsley took rst in the A division, and Pat Hardman was rst in the B division. The Ringers was won by Beth Bauer. This is an accumulation of the best score on each hole during the year. Most improved LGA player for the year was Pat Hardman, reducing her handicap by three points over the year. The Ladies Golf Association plays on Thursday mornings and is looking for new members. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751, and they will hook you up with the Ladies Golf Association. \› M [ ›9‹‹ ; }› \›• ›> W •› \› M Ž—D }} •c ‚• Œ›… M U~” s‘‘Š…~— ŽŠ¢ š —…Ž‚Š~”~z~…‘š ’œsŠ…¢…Ž‚ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ 8 ‘”‹ ~~ …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| sŽ| …ŽzŠœ|~| …Ž š„~ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ ~’œsŠ š s ” ‘œ”z„s—~—  s=’’’ ” ‹”~‡ T ‹Žš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š …ŠŠ w~ z„s”‚~| Ž ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ wsŠsŽz~ …ŽzŠœ|…Ž‚ ”~Šsš~| ‘”‹ ~~: sŽ| ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš— s”~ ”~’œ…”~| ~’œsŠ š ‡s1b  …Ž…š…sŠ ‘”‹ ‘œ”z„s—~ s‹œŽš œŽš…Š ‘”‹ …— ‘s…| …Ž œŠŠ‡ \„~ ~’œsŠ ‹Žš„Š¢ ‘s¢‹~Žš …ŠŠ w~ ”œŽ|~| š š„~ Ž~¡š „…‚„~—š „Š~ |ŠŠs” sŽ| ‹s¢ w~ „…‚„~” š„sŽ š„~ ‹…Ž…‹œ‹ ‘s¢‹~Žš š„sš œŠ| w~ ”~’œ…”~| … š„~ ‘œ”z„s—~ s— s ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~‡ Z~‚œŠs” szzœŽš š~”‹— s‘‘Š¢ š ŽŽ‘”‹š…ŽsŠ ‘œ”z„s—~—‡ C” Ž~ szzœŽš—4 Vœ”z„s—~ 8VZ …— ‡--bq Q…Ž…‹œ‹ QŽš„Š¢ …Žš~”~—š <„s”‚~ …— ‡ A¡…—š…Ž‚ zs”|„Š|~”— —„œŠ| —~~ š„~…” z”~|…š zs”| s‚”~~‹~Žš ” š„~…” s‘‘Š…zswŠ~ š~”‹—‡ [œw‡~zš š z”~|…š s‘‘”sŠ‡ ST JOS EP H BA Y GO LF CL UB SP EC IAL S JUN IOR GO LFE RS (1 7 AND UN DE R) PL AY FR EE WI TH AN AD UL T PA YI NG GO LF ER FR ANKL IN & GU LF CO UN TI ES ON LY SI NG LE AND FA MI LY ME MBE RS HI PS NO IN ITI AT ION FE E & FI RS T MO NTH DU ES FR EE WI TH A 12 MON TH CO MMI TM EN T (M US T PA Y BA LA NC E BY CA SH CH EC K, OR CR ED IT CA RD AT TI ME OF SI GN UP ) CA LL TH E PR O SH OP TO DA Y FO R MO R E INF ORM AT ION OR ST OP BY 850 -2 27 -1 75 1. CA LL TH E PR O SH OP FO R IN FO RM AT ION ON FR EE GO LF LE SS ON S FO R C HIL DR EN EA CH FR ID AY IN JUN E. 70 0 CO UN TR Y CL UB RO AD PO RT ST JO E, FL 32 456 Page 9 Former Wewa standout signs to run at Montevallo Special to The Star MARIANNA — Chipola College cross country runner Natalya Miller of Wewahitchka has signed to run for the University of Montevallo in Alabama. Miller, who was a track and cross country standout at Wewahitchka High School, will run cross country at Montevallo and will join the track team to compete in middle and long-distance events. Miller holds the Chipola school record of 19:52 at the 5K distance. She also has a personal best of 19:40 in an open race. She nished second overall in a eld of 30 at the Darton College meet in 2012 and nished third in 2013. Miller nished among the top 10 percent of runners in all meets during her two-year career at Chipola. She led the Chipola team in the school’s rst-ever appearance in the NJCAA Division I National Championship in 2012. ”I’d like to thank God for giving me the will to run, and my running partner Cedric Gillette for pushing me to get better,” Miller said. “I also want to thank Coach Rance Massengill for giving me the opportunity to run at Chipola and all of my teammates for helping me move on to the next level.” Head coach Rance Massengill said, “Natalya brought passion to the sport at a time when we needed to take the program to the next level. She helped push the other girls, and her performance raises the bar for the type of runner we’re looking to recruit.” Miller is planning to major in exercise science. She is the daughter of Karen and John Curry of Wewahitchka. “We’re very proud of our women’s cross country program,” Chipola Athletic Director Dr. Steve Givens said. “The team has improved each year since its inception in 2007. Cross country offers signi cant participation opportunities for female athletes in our area.” Chipola offers tuition scholarships for women who compete in the program. For information, call coach Massengill at 718-2440. Star Staff Report HAMMOND, La. — Sophomore out elder Katie Lacour was one of three Southeastern Louisiana players named to the AllSouthland Conference Softball teams released last week. Lacour, a graduate of Port St. Joe High School, was joined by teammates Megan Moore, junior third baseman, and sophomore designated player Amber Sather. Lacour, an outstanding leadoff hitter on a Lady Tiger Shark team that reached the state Final Four, was named as a rstteam selection. Lacour, who was a second-team all-conference selection as a freshman, is the program’s rst studentathlete to earn rst team All-Southland honors since former third baseman Heather Sherrill in 2008. All three SLU selections are on the All-Southland teams for the second straight season. Moore and Sather were both honorable mention choices. Lacour was the catalyst of the Southeastern offense from the leadoff spot, leading the team in batting with a .397 average, hits with 60, runs-scored with 27 and a .477 on-base percentage. Her batting average was the highest by a Lady Lion since Dee Rancher hit .405 in 1999. Lacour, who nished the season on an 11-game hitting streak, hit .425 in conference games and closed the season out strong by hitting .508 in the month of April. NATALYA MILLER Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR PSJ’s Lacour named All-Southland Conference PSJ’s Kurnitsky heading to Orange Park KATIE LACOUR Ladies Golf Association has awards banquet “It was a hard decision, and it is very bittersweet. But I coach from my gut, and my gut told me you don’t pass up a great opportunity like this.” Derek Kurnitsky retiring as PSJHS boys basketball coach Star Staff Report All-Pro Soccer will have a Summer Soccer Camp in the area June 16-19. The Callaway Youth Soccer Club will host the camp from 5-7 p.m. CT at the Callaway Sports Complex. The camp will be supervised by former professional player and Coach Gary Hindley. Hindley, a ve-time Coach of the Year selectee, recently was named head coach of the Pensacola City FC team of the National Premier Soccer League and has been the head coach of both the girls and boys teams at Port St. Joe High School for the past ve years. At the camp, there will be individual instruction for both eld players and goalkeepers, from ages 7-17. Spaces will be limited. For questions or to obtain a registration form, contact Hindley at 276-6353 or gjhallpro@aol.com. Summer soccer camp to be June 16-19

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A10 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 e ne w College of Ap plied St udies at FSU Pa nama City was appr ov ed by the FSU Boar d of Tr ustees in Ju ne 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily re spond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. We invite yo u to suppor t e Campaign for Ou r Community ’s Un iv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr ow ’s jobs. Ou r goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of Ap plied St udies by 20 17, which will allo w FSU Pa nama City to establish student scholarsh ips, impleme nt ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr ov ide ne w equipment and tech nology To learn ho w yo u can suppor t our community ’s univ ersity contact Ma ry Be th Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mb lo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR CO MMUN IT Y’ S UNIVER SIT Y En do wme nt for To morr ow ’s Jo bs % $ '# % # (# % (* *# # (# % & ) $ *# ## #! *# & ) $ & *# +' ( ( '# #! # * # # *# +' $4 ,500 ,0 00 $500 ,0 00 $1,500 ,0 00 $2,500 ,0 00 $3 ,500 ,0 00 $4 ,500 ,0 00 $0 $1, 000 ,0 00 $2, 000 ,0 00 $3 ,0 00 ,0 00 $4 ,0 00 ,0 00 $5 ,0 00 ,0 00 GO AL Special to The Star A basketball ballhandling clinic will be June 14 at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. The clinic will be led by Raye Bailey and professional player coach and trainer Joe Flegler. Flegler is an assistant coach at Thomas University. As a high school senior, he led Washington, D.C., in scoring 26 points per game. Flegler had the best freshman season in the history of the College of Southern Maryland and was named freshman of the year in Maryland JUCO, All-Maryland JUCO, All-Region XX and honorable mention All-American. The rst workshop, for ages 7-13, will be 9 a.m. to noon ET. The second workshop for ages 14 and up will be 1-4 p.m. ET. Early registration, before June 1, is $15. Onsite registration will be offered for $20. To register, contact Bailey at 307-7197 or baileyr04@gmail.com. Star Staff Report The Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football teams nished spring practice last Friday with a Jamboree at Shark Stadium. The jamboree brought 18 days of spring practice to a close as the squads welcome new head coaches, John Palmer in Port St. Joe and Loren Tillman in Wewahitchka. The coaches were able to empty benches and the teams played a spirited four quarters in what is a prelude to August and the beginning of fall drills. Sh op at Ho me BO AT IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on In su ra nc e (8 50 ) 22 711 33 Port St. Joe Basketball Clinic June 14 PHOTOS COURTESY OF SS TEVE WHEALTON | Special to The StarWewa meets PSS J for jamboree Sports

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, May 22, 2014 B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Whose mom used to send letters to army superiors saying her son should be a general? Eisenhower, Pershing, MacArthur, Westmoreland 2) Statistically what are the most dangerous animals/creatues in the U.S. as to causing human deaths? Deer, Bees, Snakes, Dogs 3) Who explained to Jefferson, “We pour legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it”? Washington, Franklin, Hancock, Webster 4) In 2007 who became the rst female Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives? Johnson, Walsh, Byrd, Pelosi 5) The world’s oldest sheep died in England (1989) a week before its which birthday? 17th, 23rd, 29th, 32nd 6) What is Jacqueline Gagne famed for hitting? Paparazzi, Softball homeruns, Hole-in-ones, 3-pointers 7) Which state has had the only Congressman (Matthew Lyon) to be jailed for criticizing the president? Georgia, Maine, Ohio, Vermont 8) Who acted under the name of Ariztid Olt during his career’s early days? Bela Lugosi, Johnny Depp, George Clooney, Will Smith 9) Whose president was the rst person to drive over the speed limit in a hydrogen powered car? France, Iceland, Germany, USA 10) Which has no blood supply and takes its oxygen directly from the air? Eardrum, Finger/toe nails, Cornea, Eyebrow 11) About what percentage of America’s pet dogs are overweight? 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% 12) BMW, famous for its cars, started out making what in 1923? Watches, Guns, Soaps, Motorcycles 13) When did Elvis Presley buy his Graceland estate? 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963 14) What is Taipei 101? Car, Fish, Building, Stadium ANSWERS 1) MacArthur. 2) Deer. 3) Washington. 4) Pelosi. 5) 29th. 6) Hole-in-ones. 7) Vermont. 8) Bela Lugosi. 9) Iceland. 10) Cornea. 11) 40%. 12) Motorcycles. 13) 1957. 14) Building. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Four becomes ve … stars, that is. Last Wednesday, The Bridge at Bay St. Joe nursing and rehabilitation center announced that it received a ve-star rating from the Centers for Medi care & Medicaid Services (CMS), the federal agency tasked with oversight of nursing home quality. Prior to the announce ment, the sign that hung above the doorway for the past four years touted the facility’s four-star status. Needless to say, the em ployees and administrators were proud to raise an up dated banner. “Five-star status has been a goal of ours, and now it’s a huge milestone,” Administrator and CEO Ron Reid said. “This is a huge accomplishment for us.” Under the ve-star rat ing system, nursing homes are assessed in three main categories that include health inspections, quality measures and stafng. Star Staff Report This Saturday, May 24, the Gulf Coast Hope Cen ter will host a Community Food Distribution. From noon to 4 p.m. ET, students and families that qualify for free-and-re duced meals at the public schools can pick up hearty meals for free. Hope Cen ter staff and volunteers will distribute the food to qualied families, seniors and, depending on the amount of food remaining, the remainder of the com munity through its food pantry. Those who attend for food must provide verica tion of free-and-reduced lunch status along with photo identication. Sunshine Shuttle will provide a van or bus that will carry children from Wewahitchka Elementary School that morning to the Hope Center and back. There will be live music and grilled hot dogs and hamburgers. The Hope Center is lo cated at 772 W. U.S. 98 in front of Five Star Collision in Port St. Joe. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com After numerous courtroom battles, the 2014 Wewahitchka Teen Court came to a close last week. As part of Hattie Hunter’s Law Studies class, students at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School celebrated the end of a success ful semester with a pizza party. During the class, students are involved in teen court where they hosted mock trials for misde meanors of their peers. Students played roles from court clerk, to bailiff, to attorney as they gained a better understanding of the Florida judicial system. “It’s a great experience for the students,” Hunter said. “It shows them that there are laws, and if you break them, you will face the consequences.” Those who went before the teen court were chosen by local ofcers and had already admit ted guilt. It was up to the stu dents to decide on punishment, which ranged from community service, apology letters or essays to reect on their actions. Students also worked with County Judge Timothy McFar land who oversaw the mock tri als and gave assistance through out the process. Students were required to dress appropriately for their roles and also learned proper courtroom etiquette. “This process exposes stu dents to roles that they may undertake later in life, whether it’s as jurors or as a career,” Wewa students complete teen court See COUR t T B10 Food distribution this Saturday at Hope Center WES LOCHER | The Star Last Wednesday at the Gulf County Courthouse, Sheriff Mike Harrison led a memorial for seven Florida police ofcers who died in the line of duty over the past year. As each name was read, a bell was sounded and a balloon was released into the sky. Harrison praised the fallen ofcers for their bravery and read a poem in their honor. James Wiley, Senior Pastor at Oak Grove Church led the audience in prayer while the Port St. Joe NJROTC ew the colors. Honoring the fallen WES LOCHER | The Star To celebrate The Bridge at Bay St. Joe becoming a 5-star facility, the staff grilled up barbecue in the parking lot. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe earns 5-star honor See BRIDGE B10 Gulf County Judge Timothy McFarland presented Wewahitchka juniors McKenna Waters and Cheslee Williamson with plaques for their hard work as attorneys during the Teen Court program. WES LOCHER | The Star

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B2 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 Using the right amount for the right fungicide is essential for effective plant disease control. But, that’s only half the battle! You must also know when to apply the selected materials. Unfortunately, garden hobbyists may nd timing to be as confusing as chemical selection. Fungicides work by preventing plant disease. They serve as shields against infection, not cures. These chemicals can’t save plants that are already infected. They can only limit the spread of a disease to a healthy plant. So, it’s very important to begin a fungicidal spray program at the rst sign of attack or, better yet, even before you notice any symptoms at all. When you notice the rst signs of fungus disease, usually leaf spots or blight, you can be fairly sure that the affected plants have been infected for at least three days, and perhaps as long as two weeks. Symptoms of bacterial leaf spots and downy mildew usually appear three to 10 days after infection. Other leaf diseases have incubation periods of seven to 10 days, in some cases as long as 10 to 14 days. Generally, the longer the incubation period, the slower a disease spreads, and the more easily it can be controlled. Obviously then, diseases that have short incubation periods, such as bacterial blights, and downy mildews are the most difcult to control. Other variables, such as weather conditions, cultural control, fungicide toxicity and spray application techniques, also will have some effect on your attempts to control a disease. But the one factor that will have the most inuence is the time at which you begin your spray program. As we’ve said, the earlier you begin, the more successful you will be. So, you should always inspect your plants carefully and frequently, and begin spraying at the rst sign of infection. It may seem that extensive disease symptoms develop overnight. However, a few spots always appear on the leaves before a sudden explosion of symptoms. And, you should remain alert for these early warnings. Also, if you know from past experience that a disease problem is likely to develop, you should begin a spray program before you see any symptoms at all. Then, continue spraying at the intervals suggested on the product label. If disease symptoms that have appeared seem to get worse after you’ve sprayed, don’t get discouraged. Remember that fungicides can only prevent – not cure – an infection. So, a disease may continue to produce symptoms for some time after spraying. However, you should notice a slowdown in symptom development within about 10 days following application of a fungicide. As we’ve said, you should begin control measure at the rst sign of infection. However, if you don’t begin spraying until a disease has spread quite a bit, you should use the most effective material you can nd, and apply it at the highest rate allowed on the product label. Also, shorten the interval between sprays as much as the label recommends, and water the plants only when necessary. For more information on applying fungicides, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 6393200 or visit http://gulf. ifas.u.edu or www.http:// edis.ifas.u.edu and see Publication PP 233, PP275, PP154. Ki tt en an d Pu pp y se aso n is up on us an d we ha ve an abun da nc e. Pl eas e co nsid er on e of our fu ll y ve tt ed pe ts fo r yo u ne xt add it ion to y our fu rr y fa mily Ev en if yo u can no t adop t, yo u ca n he lp in ot he r way s: Fo st er hom es gi ve our gr ea t pe ts th e at te nt io n an d soc ia liz at ion th ey cra ve We pr ov ide al l suppl ie s ne ed ed We ne ed vo lu nt ee rs to hel p with mai nt en an ce ar ound th e she lt er To we ls an d be dd in g ar e al way s we lc ome .P et car ri er s an d cra te s. Do nat io ns of ki tt y li tt er is in gr ea t de m an d as we ll as pu pp y to ys. Mo net ar y donat ions ar e al way s we lc ome .A ny do na ti on no ma tt er ho w sma ll wil l be gr ea tl y ap pr ec iat ed If yo u ar e unable to adop t at thi s tim e, pe rh aps yo u co ul d fo st er or mak e a Do nat io n. Al l pe ts a dop te d fr om SJ BH S wi ll be c ur re nt on va cc in at ions an d sp ay ed /n eut er ed P le as e do no t he si ta te to em a il tow nse nd .h sd ire ct or @g mai l. co m or a do ptb ay st jo e@ gm ai l. co m or ca ll th e St Jos ep h Ba y Hum an e Soc iet y at 85 022 711 03 an d as k fo r Me lo dy or Deb bie On li ne appl icat ions an d pe t pho to s ar e ava il abl e at www sj bh uma ne soc iet y. or g Ado pt io n fe es in cl ude ou r co st of sp ay /n eu te r an d cur re nt va cc in at ions. Ou r hour s fo r th e sh e lt er ar e Tu es da ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am4 pm Fa it h' s Th ri ft Hu t is al way s in ne ed of donat ions al so an d al l th e pr oce ed s go di re ct ly to supp or t th e an im al s in our car e! Th e hour s fo r th e st or e ar e Th ur sda ySa tu rda y fr om 10 am3 pm Vo lu nt eer s ar e al way s we lc ome at bo th our st or e an d ou r shel te r! Ou r st or e an d sh elt er loc a ti on is 10 07 Te nt h St re et i n Po rt St Jo e! Ho pe to se e yo u al l th er e soon If yo u ar e mi ss in g a pe t or wa nt to ad op t a new pe t, pl ea se ch ec k wi th yo ur loc al Hu ma ne So cie ty or Sh el te r. Fo llo w us on Fa ce bo ok : St Jo se ph Bay Hu ma ne So cie ty www .s jbh um ane soci et y. or g 4518169 Do wn to wn Po rt St .J oe 850-229-6 161 bo ww ow be ach.c om 301 REID AV ENUE PO RT ST .J OE FLO RID A, 32456 Blue Buffalo ,T aste of the Wi ld and other brands av ailab le! 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL AT THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 9454 HWY 98 BEA CO N HILL A T THE MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL YO UR FA VORITE BEER WIN E & SPIRIT S LIVE ON TH E PO OP DECK IN THE CRO W NEST THE CURR YS THURSD AY 7 PM FRID AY 9P M SA TURD AY 9P M SUND AY 7P M WEDNESD AY 7P M FL ABBERGASTED BA ND KO NKRETE SOUL RAND Y ST ARK DEBI JORD AN ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES MEXIC O B EA CH C IT Y L IMIT S 8 50 647 8 310 GREA T S ELEC TION O F A LL Y OUR F AV ORITE B EER W INE & SPIRIT S LIVE ON T HE PO OP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS KAROKE FRID AY & SA TURD AY 9PM WITH DEBRA Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Joel Rosenbaum, DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients Society ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Special to The Star Eleven young adults dedicated numerous hours the past three months to gain skills vital to their successful transition into the workforce. Last week they graduated from The Ladder Program in a ceremony at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/ Franklin Center. Program graduates are Alyssa Lee Catha, Raheem Clemons, Sabrina Lynn Edge, Jessica Lynn Grifn, Joesph Julian, Alexander King, Joseph A. Love, Sidney Love, LaDonna Ann Faye Pelt, Marquez D. Quinn and Lora Elizabeth Stabler. Targeted specically at underprivileged and unemployed 18to 21year-olds, the program is aimed at helping participants learn that there are many opportunities out there for them to succeed in life, but they need to be prepared and recognize them when they present themselves, according to Kim Bodine, executive director of CareerSource Gulf Coast. “We know that many young people sort of drift around after high school, not really nding their niche, both work wise and socially,” Bodine said. “The ladder program was designed because research showed us that up to 70 percent of the young adults who did not enter post-secondary training or the military took three years before they attached to the workforce.” The Ladder is a progression from personal awareness and growth, into appropriate workplace behavior and, of course, nding a good job. “Instilling a strong work ethic from the perspective of the employer, and discussing the lifelong value of ongoing education is a big part of The Ladder Program,” Bodine said. “It is a big job, as you can imagine, working with 20somethings, but we strive to fuel the drive in these young adults to lead successful lives through self-sufciency and hard work. It’s about providing them with an opportunity that might not otherwise exist for them – and that’s an idea the Board of CareerSource Gulf Coast very much supports.” Over a period of 12 weeks, seminars are offered in varied topics including career exploration, life coaching, nancial literacy, resume building, interviewing techniques, driver’s education training for those who need it, Dale Carnegie training and so much more. The Ladder Program is operated by CareerSource Gulf Coast through the Community Resource Center in Port St. Joe. It is nancially sponsored by the Jessie Ball duPont Port St. Joe Capacity Building Fund. Special to The Star The Kiwanis Club of Port St. Joe generously donated $300 to High School High Tech of Port St. Joe for summer internships. This donation will offset the salary for one of the HSHT students to be involved in a working environment with job and employability training this summer. There are nine HSHT students who have earned the right for summer internships this year. They earn points throughout the year for participation, citizenship, and volunteering in order to obtain an internship position. We appreciate all the local businesses that provide the opportunity for our HSHT students to learn employment skills. The HSHT program in Port St Joe is partially funded through a grant from the ABLE Trust and Vocational Rehabilitation of Florida through Dyslexia Research Institute. The annual Autumn Action Golf Tournament and donations raised the necessary funding to pay the summer salaries for the HSHT students. Special to The Star The Ladies Auxiliary of the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 has had a very active calendar the last few weeks. On April 24, President Ginny Seefeldt and Scholarship Chairman Nancy Calendine attended the NJROTC Awards Banquet, presenting the Auxiliary annual scholarship to Cadet Allie Stripling. At the regular meeting of the Auxiliary and Post the room was lled with students from Port St. Joe High School. Awards were given to four young women who entered the Young American Creative Patriotic Art Awards, a National Contest of the Auxiliary which begins at the local level. Receiving awards were Sophia Harrison, Caroline Rish and Katharine Loden. Our winner at the local level was awarded to Laura Sinor. Her artwork will be on display at the State Convention in Jacksonville. Their families and teacher, Mrs. Julie Hodges, were in attendance. The Auxiliary was pleased to give a donation to the Odyssey of the Mind team headed to Iowa to compete at world level. The Ladies will be around the area at local businesses on Saturday, May 24 with poppies for donation in honor of Memorial Day. Please remember those who have served. Members are reminded that monthly meetings are at the Post on the second Tuesday at 7 p.m. ET. Those interested in joining our Auxiliary should contact the Post at 1774 Trout Avenue, Highland View. Applying fungicides to the landscape and vegetable garden Graduation set for The Ladder Program SPECIAL TO TT HE STAr R Carl Sheline, HSHT student, who will be interning at the St Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve, Dr. Pat Hardman, CEO of Dyslexia Research Institute and HSHT, Johanna White, President, Kiwanis Club and Melissa Behee, Director of HSHT of Port St. Joe. Kiwanis donates to HSHT VFW Ladies Auxiliary news SPECIAL TO TT HE STAr R Ginny Seefeldt and Cadet Allie Stripling Nancy Calendine and Laura Sinor

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The Star| B3 Thursday, May 22, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Just because school has reached its end, it doesn’t mean that the learning has to stop for the summer. Florida A&M University will hold its fourth annual Summer STEAM Camp from June 8-21. The Jessie Ball DuPont Foundation has provided $52,000 in funding for the free two-week summer camp for Gulf County students. “This is the opportunity of a lifetime,” said Eda Gar cia, the grants coordinator for the camp. “Many kids who have attended the camp in the past said that they are better prepared when returning to school.” While on the campus, middle school and high school students will learn directly from FAMU schol ars while they experience hands-on workshops fo cused on science, technol ogy, engineering and math (STEM). Classes in robotics and rocketry will be taught at the Challenger Learning Center. Students will spend the second week of camp on an arts component featur ing dance, drama, journal ism and graphic arts. In journalism, students will nd themselves in front of and behind the camera and will contribute to creating a newspaper and magazine from the ground up. Students will live on the campus and get a feel for college life while they at tend classes and even par ticipate in ACT/SAT prep. “We want students to come in and gain an under standing of what it’s like to be on a college campus,” Garcia said. “We want them to see that going to college is a choice.” Participating students will be picked up in Port St. Joe and brought back on the nal day of the camp. During the last few days of the camp another bus will be sent to Port St. Joe to pick up parents who would like to attend the program’s closing ceremonies. The aim of the program is to show students that FAMU is a viable option as a college choice, but also that attending any college after high school is a possibility. The camp is free of charge with meals, travel and housing provided. Ap plications are available at the Washington Improve ment Group. The deadline is Wednesday, May 28 and limited space is available. For more information call Eda Garcia at 850-5993862 or Minnie Likely at 229-8251. “It’s a fun and enjoyable opportunity,” Garcia said. “Our hope is that students will bring their new skills back to the classroom. “We hope that parents take advantage of this.” Real Es ta te Pi cks Best Va lues on the Forgotten Coast 4516380 850 -227889 0/8 50227 -7770 www .c oast al rea ltyinfo .com Th er ei sp le nt yo fr oo mw it h4 be dro om s, 4. 5b at hs an d3d ec ks to en jo yt he vie wt he go rg eo us suns ets Ov er 2, 000 sq ft .o fl ivi ng sp ac ew it hp ri va te el ev at or ac ce ss to ea ch le ve l. Ti le Fl oor sa nd cr ow nm old in g in ki tc he n, di ni ng an dl ivi ng ar eas .5 40 sq ft .o fd ec ks Be au ti fu ll yf ur ni sh ed an dr ea dy fo ry ou Th is 3BR /2 BA ch arm in gc ot ta ge is ju st as ho rt wa lk to th eb ea ch .T il e oor st hr ou gho ut la rg eo pe nd ec ko ff mai nl ivin ga re aa sw el la s scr ee ne dp or ch .M as te rs ui te on to p oor wi th pr iv at es cr ee ne dp or ch and su nde ck .E le va to r ac ce ss to al ll ev el s. FE MA in su ra nc ea va il ab le 850-227-8890 /8 50-227-7770 www .coastal re alt yinfo.com & & & # & $ % !" # & & # % %% !$ # SOLD "" + + 1 0 *)0' 2 ,10 1 +'+ )'11 && 2102+' 1'0 '( + '1/+ $ )2+ '* / '+.0+ + (+ 0+* 0 + 0/ # 2 + 0 +'(1+ '+ $ " AU TO IN SUR AN CE Ha nno n In su ran c e (8 50) 22 711 33 School News SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Students at Faith Christian School enjoyed an end of the year celebration sponsored by the staff and PTO. The 2013-2014 has been one of the best years yet! The staff of Faith Christian School extends a warm thank you to every parent, teacher, business, and those with a heart for Christian education for making FCS a great place to go school. Most of all, praise to our Savior for His blessings on our campus every day! There are still openings for students for the 20142015 school year. Call 850-229-6707 or visit www.FaithChristianPSJ.net. FCS is where kids grow academically and spiritually. The Lion’s Tale Special to The Star TROTRO Y, ALAALA — Deborah McLeod of Mexico Beach graduated from Troy University during Spring Commencement ceremonies on May 9 in Trojan Arena on the Troy Campus. More than 700 students representing 24 states and 14 nations took part in the ceremony. Gen. Victor E. Renuart, Jr., a TROY alumnus and former commander of NORAD and the United States Northern Command, delivered the keynote address. Also during the ceremony, TROY awarded an honorary doctoral degree to international sculptor Hou Bao Zhu of Xian, China. Many of his works are displayed on Troy University campuses. Troy University is a public, internationally recognized institution serving a broad range of students on four campuses in Alabama, online and around the world, providing a wide variety of academic programs from the associate to the doctoral level. PP SJ EE S THANK sS VOLUNTEER sS SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Port St. Joe Elementary School is blessed to have many community members who volunteer their time to work with students and teachers each week. These faithful volunteers were recently honored at an after-school social in the Media Center where they enjoyed an array of delicious foods and were presented with a thank-you gift in appreciation for their dedication. FAMU presents free STEAM summer camp Deborah McLeod graduates from Troy University SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR The 21st Century After School Enrichment Program presented a music and art event last week at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Participating students in grades K-3 displayed artwork created during the program and performed a music show for peers and parents titled “Bullying is not for me.” Everyone in attendance enjoyed the message. PP SJ AA FTER SCHOOL EE NRICHMENT PROGRAM PERFORM sS FOR PEER sS

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F AITH Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Nz’ ’ ¡ 9’ ~z …}z ’ T SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 & % # % % % % % $ qY l ¦ ¨ S’ ¦Š’ OSS (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) !!! !!! !!! !!! !!! ! !! COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME e X ]†q~ 8†‚v†‹t‹ L>9 (850) 227-1818 +++&$%&!%& $†¢ † 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Y• <}• u} usˆ tx ›Š• }Š†x B ’ <}• u} Šz ’}x Vsœs xˆx & % "" "# & (850) 229-9596 '" '" % "# '" '" $ '" Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. "#!" !& #' $# !! '$ # &!" &# $"0 $' 3073 $' # !'! 4 1 &&& 5 $! 5 # 727 % 6 &#& !# #5 6 ).3,22+ ,./77 # & !$ "! $" # #! "$ ('*( $ )'*( 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children’ s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE Crystal Mapes Lewis, formerly of Port St. Joe, died Friday, April 25, at her home in Tallahassee, Fla. Crystal was born on July 31, 1948, in Edmore, Mich. Her parents were James and Martha Mapes, longtime residents of the Port St. Joe area. She was the eldest of two children. In 1960, Crystal and her family relocated to Port St. Joe, Fla., where she graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1966. Crystal’s compassionate nature and desire to help others led to her profession as a respiratory therapist. She assisted patients for many years and in many locations including Tampico, Mexico; Panama City, Fla.; and Dothan, Ala. Crystal was a great lover of nature and a loyal friend. Crystal is survived by her sister, Carol Carr of Tallahassee, Fla.; halfsister, Diane Spivey of Denver, Colo.; niece, Tiffany Carr of Tallahassee, Fla.; and granddaughter, Alex Naus of Mexico Beach, Fla. The family very much appreciates the love and support from our many friends during this special time. Crystal Mapes Lewis Mr. Carlton Henry Padgett, age 82, of Ponce de Leon, Fla., passed away May 15, 2014, at his home. He was born Dec. 2, 1931, in Holmes County, Fla., to the late George Walker Padgett and Mattie Elsie Padgett. In addition to his parents, Mr. Padgett was preceded in death by his wife, Joy Padgett; two brothers, Randall Padgett and Donnie Padgett; and one sister, Dessie Bell. Mr. Padgett served in the United States Air Force from 1951-1955. Mr. Padgett is survived by his son, Kevin Hedman of Niceville, Fla.; two grandchildren, Cassandra Worley of Chipley, Fla., and Carlton Hedman of Troy, Ala.; two greatgrandchildren, Bryndon Matthew Carroll and Broox Auburn Worley; one sister, Wilma Niel of Carrabelle, Fla. Funeral services were held at 1 p.m. Monday, May 19, 2014, at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church with the Rev. Ernie Grey of ciating. Interment followed with military honors in the Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church Cemetery. Family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Sunday at Peel Funeral Home. Carlton Henry Padgett Mr. J.B. Porter, 84, of Blountstown, passed away Friday, May 16, in Panama City. Porter was born in Red Head, Fla., on Feb. 20, 1930, and lived in Blountstown for the past 43 years after relocating from White City. He retired from the St. Joe Telephone Company after 26 years. He also worked at Reichold Chemical Company in Telogia for a number of years. Porter was owner and operator of J.B. Porter’s Telephone Repair in Blountstown. He was a member of AA for 34 years and served as instructor in 16 districts and prisons for several years. He was an avid hunter and sherman. Porter was preceded in death by his wife, Gladys Porter; son, Buck Porter; and daughter, Wendy Porter. Survivors include three daughters, Mary Frances Parrish of Panama City, Mona Guetter and husband, Joe, of Panama City and Lucy Justin and husband, Van, of Panama City; 14 grandchildren; numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchild. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, May 20, at 3 p.m. CT at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Chaplain Steve Watson of ciating. Interment will follow at Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, May 20 from 2-3 p.m. CT at Peavy Funeral Home. The family requests that in lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St. in Panama City, FL 32406. All arrangements are under the direction of Marlon Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown. J.B. Porter John Farrell Scott, 84, of Marianna died Tuesday, May 13, 2014, in Calhoun County. John was born in Alford, Fla., and lived in Port St. Joe for more than 20 years, where he worked for the Port St. Joe Paper Company and Basic Magnesium. He spent most of his life in Jackson County, where he was the Owner/Operator of Scott’s Gladiolus Farm. He was preceded in death by his parents, William Leslie and Myrtle Davis Scott; three brothers, Golden, Gene and Davis Scott; one sister, Phyllis Scott. He is survived by his wife, Wandis Daniels Scott of Marianna; two sons, John Carlton Scott and wife, Vicki, William Sim Scott and wife, Donna, all of Marianna; one daughter, Sandra Watson and husband, Craig, of Blountstown; One brother, Pete Scott and wife, Alice, of Alford; one sister, Annette Williams and husband, Jimmy, of Panama City; seven grandchildren and spouses; nine great-grandchildren. Funeral services were 10 a.m. Friday, May 16, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Marianna with Dr. Mark Long and the Rev. Jim McIntosh of ciating. Burial will follow in the Alford City Cemetery with James & Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family received friends from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, May 15, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Marianna. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikes funeralhomes.com. John Farrell Scott Ellery Lewis Stickle, age 93, passed away with a sharp mind and his wonderful sense of humor on Tuesday, April 29, at Northside Hospital in Atlanta, Ga. He was preceded in death by his parents, Daniel Stickle and Gertrude Wynn; a sister Noel Wynn, and his son Danny Stickle. Ellery is survived by his wife of 68 years, Bernyce; his daughter Sherry Chambliss (Bill), Atlanta, Ga.; daughterin-law Sandra Jackson Stickle, Vero Beach, Fla.; sister Ariel Wynn, Arizona; brother Walter Wynn, New Jersey; grandsons Woods Chambliss (Kara), Georgia; Scott Stickle (Nicole), Florida; Ryan Stickle (Tiana), Florida; as well as three greatgrandchildren plus nieces and nephews. Ellery was born in Cobleskill, N.Y., in May 1920 and lived there until he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was a Mustang veteran of World War II; the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Following enlistment, he spent his rst ve Christmas holidays in overseas battle and did duty in Guam, Iceland, Samoa, Bougainville, Guadalcanal, New Zealand, China and Okinawa. Stateside, he was stationed at Camp LeJuene, N.C.; Camp Pendleton, Calif.; and Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany, Ga. In 1963, he retired as Chief Warrant Of cer 3 after 23 years while living in Albany. He was employed by Phoebe Putney Hospital before working and retiring from the Caterpillar equipment dealer; The Carlton Company. He and his wife retired to Port St. Joe Beach in 1992. There he enjoyed having company at their beach home, gol ng, shing, boating and reading. He was a member of St. James Episcopal Church in Port St. Joe. In May 2013, he and his wife moved to Atlanta to be near their daughter. While planning his upcoming 94th birthday on which he wanted “to go out to a restaurant for some good Chinese food,” he mentioned that he’s “had a really good life with little to complain about.” A Celebration of Life Memorial with Military Honors will be held at Emeritus Dunwoody in Atlanta when arrangements can be made. Ellery Lewis Stickle Jane Burroughs Whit eld of Milledgeville, Ga., went to be with the Lord on May 17, 2014, after a 10-month battle with lung cancer. Jane was a resident of Milledgeville since 1999, moving there from Tallahassee, Fla. She resided in Panama City, Fla., for 25 years previous to that. She grew up in Dawson, Ga., and was a proud graduate of Florida State University. She was loved by her family and those who knew her. Her laugh (which often became a snort) was infectious. She was a member of First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville and the Emmaus Sunday School class. She was preceded in death by her parents, Forrest and Eva Burroughs of Dawson, Georgia. She is survived by her loving husband, John Michael Whit eld of Milledgeville; daughter Lara Kathleen Moore (Chad); son Clay Allen Whit eld (Kimberly); grandchildren, Hannah, Luke and Ava Moore, and Jacob and Emily Whit eld; and brother, Glenn Burroughs (Amy). She had lots of wonderful nieces and nephews. A Memorial Service celebrating her life will be held at First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville on Saturday, May 24, 2014, at 5 p.m. Visitation will be held prior to the service, from 3-4:45 p.m. at the Church. The family requests no owers. Donations may be made to cancer research, First United Methodist Church of Milledgeville, or another appropriate charity, in memory of Jane. “I have fought the good ght, I have nished the course, I have kept the faith” 2 Timothy 4:7 Express online condolences at www. williamsfuneralhome.net. Jane Burroughs Whit eld Obituaries

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The Star| B5 Thursday, May 22, 2014 ARRH M A T E Y Y ou n g & Old e P i r a t e C r u ise TM h a s S o met h i n g fo r E v e r yo ne C r u ise A w a y i n t o t he F a n t a s y W o r ld of F r ie nd ly S w a shbuck le rs & P i r a t es 2H ou r C r u ises D o l p h in S i g h t ing s Gr ea t M u sic Co ld B e e r F u n fo r a l l a g es 5325 N o r t h La g o o n D r iv e, P a n a m a C it y F lo r id a 32408 L o c a t e d a t L ig h t hou se M a r i n a N ex t t o B o a t y a r d R es t a u r a n t 850.234.7400 Y E T A M ARRH T H E G R E A T E S T S I G H TS E E I N G A DV E N T U R E ... E V E R $1.00 Off Adult T ick et Se a Dr ag on Pir a t e Cr uise Located at Lighthouse Marina on Grand Lagoon % $# "% &(&( Sea Dragon Pirate Cruise # # !% ) #% %'% ( # ) )% discount. Present coupon before purchase. L o c a t e d a t L ig h t h o u s e M a r in a N ext t o B ud & A l le y's ) $!)+*,' #&" ) &' # $!)+*)& )# ) &) $!)+*) & !!) & ( There will be clothing giveaway 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET May 31 at First Baptist Church of White City, at 7210 S. State Road 71. The giveaway is sponsored by the Baptist Women’s Mission. Faith BRIEF Remember Me Part of you will live in me Way down deep inside my heart We love and miss you still. Mom, dad, Pat, Susan, Becky, Maddie and Remi Special to The Star How to nd and live a life of meaning and purpose will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, May 26 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled “Living a Rich Life: Finding Meaning and Purpose,” features the lmed story of Christine Garde, who left an inuential political position to launch a gang diversion program by moving into an urban gang-infested neighborhood. “I want to look back at my life and know that I made a signicant difference in the world,” said Garde, who believes she’s not alone in her desire. “People want their lives to matter.” Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Special to The Star The Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum in its 3year room. This curriculum uses both hands on learning and learning through play. Children will be prepared for preschool and by the end of the school year children will: • know several Bible stories, Memory Verses, Nursery Rhymes, Finger plays, and Songs which they can recall when prompted • know the names of all of the uppercase and lowercase letters • know the phonetic sound of all of the letters • be able to correctly trace all uppercase and lowercase letters with their nger • know by name and be able to correctly trace the numbers 1-15 with their nger • be able to identify various colors and shapes • be able to demonstrate spatial concepts, sorting, and Finding a life of purpose explored at Lifetree CafEE rnie J. Woodrow Dec. 5, 1959 to May 29, 2009 In Loving MEMORY Clothing giveaway Keep your eyes on Jesus When you’re grounded in Christ, a new life will emerge. The life of this world you will have to purge. Just as a snake will shed his skin, a new life in Christ will shed his sin. Some nd this new life a hard road to trod. It will never be done without the help of God. When we get in the word and in one accord with Him, It will be much easier to shake each worldly whim. When we focus on Jesus and show His Godly love, We are sure to lead someone to that mansion above. Billy Johnson NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 6-15-14 CODE: SJ00 The Oak Grove Church Daycare uses the ABC Jesus Loves Me curriculum AB and ABA patterns • be able to say the letters of their rst name as well as write them using all capital letters • be introduced to many books • increase in ne and gross motor skills There are a few spots available in this great program which offers care from 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Please contact Kristy Rafeld at 227-4320 for enrollment or more information. Faith

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B6 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 Port St. Joe High School CLASS OF 2014 Demeriyah A’Shanti Alexander Gabrielle Ivana Anthony Kallie Louise Bateman Seth Michael Bradshaw Candice Elizabeth Bright Kristen Denise Burkett Amy Rachelyn Butler Kylee Alexis Carter Koen Michael Cortellini Lauren Michelle Costin Jack Curtis Cummings Kapril Nicole Darnall Homer Allen Davis Robert Anthoney Dykes Nicole Mae Endres Heather Nicole Faircloth She’Noya Renee Fennell Bryce Taylor Godwin Dwayne Griggs Brandon Michael Hall Anna Nicole Haynes Justin Schwab Hites Allison Nicole Howze Matthew Cameron Jackson David Matthew Jacobs Michael Anthony Johnsen Jacobi Richard Jones Katherine Renee Kennington Morgan Brooks Kennington Brittany Nicole King Andrew Michael Lacour Christian Rose Laine Cailyn Marie LaPlante Taylor Addison Laue Natrone Carlton Lee Jonathan Wesley Leffew Nicholas Dwight Lewis Kayla Lucile Lindsey Tanene Enoya Malone Alexander Carrol Maughan De’quan Montay McCloud Lexie Dianne McGhee Austin Daniel McNeill Kelsey Christine Miles Antonio Michael Moree Katerina Nicole Nelson Steven Kaleb Odom Sydney Marian Owens Angel Roberto Padilla Tommie John Parker Anastasya Kristen Paul Bryan Adison Powell Sawyer Jackson Rafeld Nicholas Warren Renfro William Tristan Reynolds Maya Elizabeth Robbins Cathlyn Palmiano Robles Brittney Deshawn Shoemaker Destiny Brianne Shoemaker Mason Richard Simmons Laura Kathleen Sinor Alexis Nichole Strickland Allie Jovon Stripling Tori Jo Thomas Anastasia Gabrielle Thomason DanTasia Yvette Welch Grant Franklin Whiten Corey James Williams Torey Jerome Williams De’Shawntae Tyell Willis Shatiara Na’shay Zaccaro Annalisa Brooke Childress Graduation 2014

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The Star| B7 Thursday, May 22, 2014 Wewahitchka High School CLASS OF 2014 Tyler Lee Adams William Hunter Bailey Jakob Alan Bidwell Eddie Ray Bowles III Jennifer Wondale Bryan Braden Matthew Buckalew Caitlin Marie Burch Troy Steven Collins Chelsea Nicole Cook Michael Adrien Cox Calvin Grady Dean III Brianna Kaye Edmondson Morgan Danielle Fisher Johnna Renee Florio Jacob Seth Goodwin James Larry Hensley, Jr. AnMaree Teodora Hess Jarvar Javon Hill Zachary Allen Hire Kimberly Dale Hughes Shawn Kory Jenkins Abriale Marie Kemp James Edward Lester III Issac Benjamin Madrid Joshua Liam Mayer Nicole Renee Morrill Janie Savannah Pippen Corey Austin Rhames Kirsten Mariea Stalnaker Sheneshia Mercedes Stansel Kristopher Jon Taylor Chelsey Danielle Toney Chandler Mae Vines Danielle Katherine Ward Brooke Ashley Weatherly Cory Matthew White Christina Rena Whiteld Jamie Michael Whiteld II Anna Maria Wilcox Kara Jean Zucci Not Pictured: Damien Dwayne Hunter and Kelver Siliezar Graduation 2014 Co ng ra tu la ti on s on yo ur ac co mp lis hme nt Cl ass of 2014 Wi sh in g yo u al l the be st in yo ur fu tu re en de av or s! WŠŸ 7ˆvŸ Im•Žm ;~ˆvŸ Hm Žxˆ mˆv ZŸ ƒxŽ

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Local B8 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com They came, they saw, they painted. Frank Pate Park was hopping recently for the annual Student Art Day, which paired local high school students up with participating Plein Air artists for mid-morning workshop. Four students from Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School and six from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School along with a handful of students from Franklin County employed watercolors, acrylics and oil paints to bring the St. Joseph Bay to canvas. Wewahitchka student artists included Kimberly Hughes, Hayley Melvin, Nicole Windolf and Emily Palmer. Port St. Joe student artists were Chloe Burke, Kerigan Pickett, Isaabel Bogaert, Keith Wadleigh, Caroline Rish and Jacobi Jones. Port St. Joe art teacher Julie Hodges praised the workshop for giving students, especially those considering a career in the arts, an opportunity to work on-on-one with artists who make a living through their work. “The students are able to gain a new perspective and new ideas and even a new style,” Hodges said. “I hope they walk away with a different feel for what it’s like to be a professional artist.” Debbie Cole, art teacher for Wewahitchka said she hoped that the students took an enthusiasm for creating great art from the experience. She said that participating students from her class had demonstrated an interest in pursuing art as a hobby, if not a career. “(The students) see that art can be a profession while they get encouragement and lessons from professionals,” Cole said. Students interested in participating in the experience had to submit an application of interest along with an essay explaining why they wanted to participate. Some students had participated in the event in prior years, while others enjoyed the workshop for the rst time. Port St. Joe students Burke, Pickett and Wadleigh are actively involved in their art classes and applied to spend an afternoon painting with the Plein Air artists. Burke, who worked with oil paints alongside Ken DeWaard, said that she enjoyed experimenting with different techniques and styles that she hadn’t tried before and learned from DeWaard that she didn’t have to feel pressured to paint exactly what she saw. “I enjoyed getting to work one-on-one with an artist in a setting where I could see the scene I was painting, versus working off my phone,” Burke said. Pickett worked with Tracey Frugoli, also using oil paints. Frugoli showed the student a trick of taking a photo of the scene to be painted in case the sun moves or the light changes. Pickett also said she experimented with the technique of holding the brush parallel to the canvas which gave her additional control. “I felt appreciative to the artist for teaching me how to paint,” said Wadleigh, who spent the afternoon with Leon Holmes. Wadleigh said Holmes’ suggestion of keeping his arm straight while painting was something he’d apply in his own future work. Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition member Natalie Shoaf worked to pair students with artists and did her best to pair students who preferred a specic art medium with the artists who produce professional work using that same medium. The FCCC also provided each student with their own set of paints for the workshop. “By giving them paint, we hope this encourages them to continue working with their art,” said Shoaf. “The artists are so generous with their time and talent, and hopefully, the kids understand the value of the day and reciprocate in some way by using their art to help others.” Local volunteers were on hand to assist with the workshop, some traveling from as far away as Eastpoint and Carrabelle. The event was sponsored by Duke Energy. PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Artists provided guidance, tips and tricks as the students worked to bring their visions to life. Area students receive one-on-one training from Plein Air artists CC OURTESY OF SS ANDIE YY ARBROUGH | Special to The Star Students, artists, teachers and volunteers came together to make Student Art Day an educational and entertaining experience. Students from Gulf and Franklin Counties participated in the Student Art Day Workshop. The event, held at Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe paired students one-on-one with participating Plein Air artists. Art to art

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Local The Star| B9 Thursday, May 22, 2014 VA RI AN CE NO TI CE Th e Cit y of Po rt St Jo e Pl an nin g an d De ve lo pm en t Re vie w Bo ar d wi ll ho ld Me et in g to di sc us s a Re qu es t of a Va ri an ce on Tu es da y, Ju ne 10 th 20 14 4: 00 pm ES T, at Ci ty Ha ll at 30 5 Ce ci l Co st in Sr Bl vd ., Po rt St Jo e Fl fo r Ha rr y Bo yd lo ca te d at 51 0 9t h St re et, Pa rc el #0 50 99 -0 00 R. Th e Re as on fo r th e re qu es t is Pe r Se ct io n 3. 04 (2 )( M) of th e La nd De ve lo pm en t Re gu lat io ns Th e pr op ose d pl an s can be re vie we d at th e Bu il di ng De pa rt me nt lo ca te d at 10 02 10 th st an d can be re ac he d fo r qu es ti on s at (8 50 ) 22 910 93 Al l pe rs ons are in v it ed to at te nd th is mee ti ng. An y pe rs on wh o de cid es to ap pe a l an y de ci si on ma de by th e Pl ann in g an d De ve lop men t Re vi ew Bo ard wi th re sp ec t to an y mat te r co ns id ered at sa i d mee ti ng wi ll need a re co rd of th e pr oc eedi ng s. is ma de wh ic h re co rd in cl ude s th e te st im on y an d ev id e nc e up on wh ic h th e ap pe al i s to be ba sed Th e Pl ann in g an d Re vi ew Bo ard of th e Ci ty of Po rt St Jo e, Fl ori da wi ll n ot pr ov id e a ve rb at i m re co rd of th is mee ti ng. IN AC CO RD AN CE WI TH TH E AM ER IC AN S WI TH DI SA BI LI TI ES AC T, pe rs on s ne ed in g sp ec ia l ac co mm od at io ns to pa rt ic ip at e in th es e pr oc eed in gs sh ou ld co nt ac t Cha rl ot te Pi er ce Cit y Cle rk Ci ty of Po rt St Jo e, at Cit y Hal l, (8 50 ) 22 982 61 Sh op at Ho me HOM EO WN ER IN SU RA NC E Ha nn on I ns ur an ce ( 85 0) 2 27 -1 1 33 Star Staff Report To celebrate the impending summer break, Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka students in grades K-6 participated in the annual eld day at Shark Stadium. Students competed in a series of events including the sack race, tug-of-war, 40-yard dash and even a sponge relay, during which teams had to ll a 5-gallon jug using only a sponge and a bucket of water situated several yards away. The competition was erce and once the events were complete, each student received a ribbon donated by Tommy T’s. Gulf County students enjoy annual eld day PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Many erce matches of tug-of-war took place during the afternoon. Students competed in a series of events including the sack race. Also on the docket for the competition was the 40-meter dash. Another contest found teams discovering how fast they could ll a 5-gallon jug using only a sponge. At left Principal Sue Gannon played emcee for the eld day events for students in grades K-2. Some students still found time to mug for the camera between events. Port St. Joe Elementary students battled it out with Wewahitchka across the various events. Parents attended the events to support their children. % $ $ & $ " # " # & " " # & " & & N O P U R CH A S E NECE S S A R Y T O E N T E R A N D WI N. A P U R CH A S E WI LL N O T I MP R O V E O NE ’ S CH A N CE O F WI N N I NG D R A WI NG C O N DUC T E D B Y T Y N D A LL F E D E R A L CR E D IT U N I O N. 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Local B10 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 Tr ades & Ser vi ces 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL FLOOR CARE, INC. Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning Serving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceram ic Ti le and Grout Cleaning RV s-C ars -T rucks -V ans 24 Hou rE mer genc yW ater Extraction AL LD OG TR AI NI NG Ca ll fo rf re eq uo te s Me li ss a Mc Cu tc han Own er /T ra ine r 69 11 Da vi dW hi t el dR d. We wa hi tc hk a, Fl .3 24 65 Se eu so n To mG ol ds mi th Ph oto gr ap hy Cu st om Ph oto gr ap hy Se rv ic es :E ve nt s, Fa mi ly ,C or por at e, Lo ca ti on ,R ea lE sta te Fin eA rt Pr in ts ; to mgo ld sm it h .a rt is tw eb si tes .c om Po rt ra it St ud io 31 8R eid Av e Po rt St .J oe ,F L 32 45 6 85 089 928 83 to m. go ld sm it h@ fa ir poi nt .n et Br yk Pr op er ty Ma nag em en t Va ca ti on Re nt al Cl ea ni ng Ma in te na nce Fl oor in g/ Ca rpe tI ns ta ll at io n/ Ca rpe tC lea ni ng Sp ec ia lizi ng in Ab sen te eO wn ers Pr op er ty Man ag em en t (8 50 )3 81 -5 333 GET YO UR AD 227-784 7 19 Ye ar s of Se rv ic e! COURT from page B1 McFarland said. The judge also present ed plaques to two students who went above and be yond during the course of the class. Juniors Cheslee Wil liamson and McKenna Wa ters acted as attorneys for the duration of the class, al ternating between defense and prosecution roles. Their responsibilities as lawyers called for Wa ters and Williamson to not only do plenty of research on their own time, but also prepare opening and clos ing statements for each of the cases handled by the class. Hunter and McFarland found the concept of the two facing off intriguing, since the two are best friends outside the courtroom. “I didn’t know anything about court, but I learned a lot over the year,” William son said. “I appreciate the opportunity.” Waters swore that ar guments in the courtroom never translated to their personal life, especially since there were bigger sh to fry. She said at rst she struggled with the public speaking aspect of the role, but ultimately, the class helped her overcome her fears. “It was a cool experi ence,” Waters said. “It helped me gain an under standing of the court sys tem and public speaking. “I’d do it again.” Hunter said she was proud that the juniors and seniors who make up the class took each case seri ously and came to each session prepared. “Once you turn 18, real life hits you,” Hunter said. “Everyone has to be held accountable.” BRIDGE from page B1 The overall rating com bines scores received in each of the categories. The system is intended to help consumers, families and caregivers compare nurs ing homes more easily and identify which will best suit their needs. “Through the leadership of Ron Reid we’ve improved our rating for the rst time in the history of the nursing home,” marketing director Chyspa Ross said. “We owe a lot to the quality stake holders who provide care for the residents.” Employees of the bridge celebrated the event with a barbecue in the parking lot. Ribs and chicken pro vided by Centennial Bank was served up to residents, staff and hungry news reporters. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe offers Alzheimer’s and dementia care, physical, occupational and speech therapies, a full-time chap lain and spiritual program ming. The facility is one of 96 locations operated by Louisville, Ky.-based Signa ture HealthCARE. “I couldn’t be more proud of our staff at The Bridge,” Reid said. “It is because of their daily com mitment, diligence, hard work and compassion that we received the ve-star rating which, most impor tantly, is a reection of the care we are providing and that our residents and pa tients so deserve.” By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com As exciting as it might be to get a driver’s license, a recent presentation at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School showed stu dents how fast they can lose one, too. During an assembly held last Thursday for students, the National Save a Life Tour, op erated by Kramer Entertain ment, brought an interactive exhibit to help kids understand the dangers of driving while distracted. Students watched a series of videos that featured families impacted by accidents caused by distracted drivers. Victims reminded viewers how simple it was to set the phone aside while behind the wheel. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County received a “Distracted Driving Preven tion Grant” to work with com munity partners to promote health education and preven tion activities. The long-term goal is to reduce and ulti mately eliminate distracted driving vehicle deaths among Gulf County students of driv ing age. In addition to the dangers associated with texting while in the driver’s seat, present ers warned of the dangers of drinking and driving, saying that as more universities con duct background checks on po tential students, a DUI arrest before college can change the course of someone’s career now more than ever. “It is important to use a va riety of different teaching tech niques so that youth better understand consequences as sociated with distracted driv ing and make better decisions while behind the wheel,” said Sarah Hinds, a government operations consultant for the Florida Department of Health. By making a pledge not to drive while texting or drink ing, students were able to get hands-on with several simulators. One simulated driving while intoxicated and another required students to respond to a text message every 30 seconds while still obeying the rules of the road. Needless to say, all volun teer drivers met with simulat ed disaster. Driving and texting dimin ishes a driver’s focus. Young people have a higher risk of danger due to their increased exposure to technology paired with inexperience behind the wheel. “I think this event did have an impact on us,” junior Billy Quaranta said. “It makes us think twice before we pick up that cell phone.” WES LOCHER | The Star The Bridge at Bay St. Joe became a 5-star facility during a ceremony last Wednesday. WES LOCHER | The Star Above during a distracted driving assembly last week, PSJHS students climbed into a simulator to experience what it’s like to drive while intoxicated. At right Another similar showed students how texting while driving diminishes their focus. High school students learn danger of distracted driving Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local The Star| B11 Thursday, May 22, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Taunton Family Children’s Home in Wewahitchka recently h ad its fourth annual Family Festival. More than 1,000 attendees from surrounding states and some local to Honeyville enjoyed a 5K run, obstacle course relay race, basketball sharpshooting, Frisbee golf and many other events. Founder of the Children’s Home David Taunton called the fundraiser, put on by the Lynn Haven United Methodist Church, “very successful.” “To build local awareness we set aside one day each year to spotlight the children’s home and what we do,” Taunton said. “It was a beautiful day, and a good place for a family outing.” Taunton thanked the community, attendees and the more than 50 volunteers who helped run the event. The Taunton Family Festival is held each year on the Saturday prior to Mother’s Day. PHOTOS BY DEBBIE HOOPER OF JOEBAY.COM The fourth annual Family Festival was held last weekend at the Taunton Family Children’s Home. The family-focused event takes place each year on the Saturday before Mother’s Day. Taunton Family holds fourth annual festival The event drew more than 1,000 attendees from the Honeyville area and other states. Activities included a 5K run, obstacle course relay race and volleyball. CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 22, 2014 The Star | B11 99007 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Leigh Gable Holdings, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1031 Application No. 2014-29 Date of Issuance: May 31, 2012 R.E. No: 03806-520R Description of Property: Lot 12, Block “D”, SeaShores/St. Joe Beach, Unit No. 3, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 35, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Margot A. Valencik All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 25th day of June, 2014. Dated this 19th day of May, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk May 22, 29 June 5, 12, 2014 94958S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO:10000460CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL DUNCAN; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 1st day of May, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10000460CA, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is the Plaintiff and PAUL DUNCAN STEPHANIE C. DUNCAN ROBERT M. BROOME RAYMOND E. BROOME; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM ET on the 5th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgement, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4, SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SECTION LINE FOR 150.0 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN WEST FOR 242.0 FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF MOSSIE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG RIGHT OF WAY FOR 200.0 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST 242.0 FEET TO SECTION LINE, THENCE RUN SOUTH FOR 200.0 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A 15.0 FEET UTILITY EASEMENT IS RESERVED ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 26, ALL MINERAL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED BY SELLER. THIS DESCRIPTION DESCRIBED LOTS 5, AND 4. CLECKLEY’S ADDITION III. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 5th day of May, 2014. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com File No. 10-44147 May 15, 22, 2014 95024S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14000029CAAXMX BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. LEVERAL RAFFIELD: KIMBERLY L. RAFFIELD: el al.. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Kimberly L. Raffield Last Known Residence: Unknown YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: LOT 1: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 536.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES. MORE OR LESS. AND LOT 2: COMMENCE AT THE LIGHT WOOD POST MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION .13, AS MONUMENTED, NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 1329.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST FOR 1052.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 1265.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF A 60 FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD (UNNAMED); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 412.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST FOR 126.24 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SUNSHINE ACRES. AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, SOUTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST FOR 175.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST FOR 126.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST FOR 175.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND CONTAINING 0.507 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ALDRIDGE | CONNORS, LLP, Plaintiff’s attorney, at 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone Number: (561) 392-6391), within 30 days of the first dtae of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before June 16, 2014, on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediateily thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on May 9th, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk File No. 1212-724B May 22, 29, 2014 95028S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA-000257 DIVISION: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-A7, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006A7, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID J. DELEO, AS TRUSTEE OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE SHARON K. DELEO TRUST DATED JULY 29, 1999 Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: LOT 13, SURFSIDE ESTATES, PHASE II, THEREOF RECORDED AT PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 46, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 126 PLUTO WAY, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456-4640 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before June 16, 2014, service on Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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B12 | The Star Thursday, May 22, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1124922 Respiratory Therapy Program Coordinator IIIThe Coordinator of the Respiratory Care program is responsible for all aspects of the program, including the organization, administration, continuous review, planning, development, and general e ectiveness of the program.Minimum Quali cations: Bachelors degree required; must be credentialed as a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) eligible for FL license; 4 years teaching experience in an accredited program; 5 years acute care experience as a Respiratory Therapist. Salary: Commensurate with education and experience Deadline to apply: Open until lled**Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resource s, 5230 W. U.S. Hig hway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the perso n to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. 1124924 Associate Director of Resource Development / Grant WriterThe primary function of this position will be to research grant opportunities through various mediums and be able to successfully write grants and implement new programs identifying potential public and private funding sources to support institutional priorities. Incumbent will be responsible for coordinating the work of proposal development teams, preparing and submitting proposals, and communicating with funding agencies by the targeted grants. Incumbent must have strong grant writing experience, excellent oral and written communication skills, computer skills, and have the ability to work exible hours, including coverage demands due to training periods and equipment problems. Incumbent must also be able to demonstrate strong organizational, planning, and budgeting skills, and be able to travel both locally, and out of town on College business and training. Minimum Quali cations: Master's Degree in related eld Salary range begins at: $46,818.00 **Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.eduAdditional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED: €Hostesses €Bartenders €Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com Managers Hostesses Bartenders Servers/Bussers Cooks Shuckers Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS! 4518701 850-697-5300 108 SE Ave. A Carrabelle, FloridaThe Forgotten Coast1. 42-2 Carlton, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 550.00/mo. 2. 51-4 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 525.00/mo. 3. 39-5 Holland, Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Fully furnished. W/D, fenced in yard. 575.00/mo 4. 234 Peggy Lane, Carrabelle. 2 bedroom, 2 baths. 2 car garage. 1 acre lot. Close to the beach. 1600.00/mo. 5. 24-3 Pine St., Lanark Village. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. 400.00/mo. 6. 2626 Craig St., Lana rk Village. 3 bedroom, 2 baths. 1000.00/mo. 7. 51-1 Pine St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 8. 39-2 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 3 bedroom, 1 bath. 600.00/mo. 9. 39-1 Carlton St., Lanark Village. 1 bedroom/ 1 bath. 450.00/mo.Please call 850-697-5300 to set up an appointment to let our friendly staff show you these properties!! 4519134 4 5 1 0 1 60 4 5 1 0 1 6 1 125 Venus Drive (off Garrison Ave) Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 227-7451 TTY Acs 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. P I N E R I D G E L T D P INE R IDGE L TD 1 Bedroom Apartment for rentFamily apartment community income guidelines apply Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer4518795 Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 8th day of May, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 PH-10-51962 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. May 22, 29, 2014 95078S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 14-26 PR IN PROBATE IN Re: The Estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ESTATE: The ancillary administration of the estate of COLEMAN J. HEWETT, deceased, Case Number 14-26 PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTCE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims within this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 22, 2014. /s/ Ronald C. Hewett Ronald C. Hewett 164 Deer Creek Circle Gray, GA 31032 Ancillary Personal Representative of the Estate of Coleman J. Hewett /s/ Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 SAILOR’S COVE DRIVE PO BOX 39 PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 (850)229-8211 FL BAR NO. 0350583 ATTORNEY FOR ANCILLARY PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE May 22, 29, 2014 98875S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 2014-PR-000018 IN RE: Estate of JAMES S. PRIDGEN JR., a/k/a JAMES PRIDGEN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Florida Estate of JAMES S. PRIDGEN, JR., deceased, (the “Decedent”) whose date of death was January 3, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Clerk of Court, Attn: Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 under File Number 2014-PR000018. The names and addresses of the Ancilliary personal representative and the Ancilliary personal representative’s attorneys are set forth below. All creditors of the Decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the Decedent and persons having claims or demands against the Decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is May 15, 2014. Ancilliary Personal Representative: DAN EDWARDS PRIDGEN, JR. 613 Skyline Drive E. Mobile, AL 36609 Attorney for Ancillary Personal Representative: RICHARD N. SHERRILL FL Bar No. 172812 CLARK, PARTINGTON, HART, LARRY, BOND & STACKHOUSE 125 West Romania St. Suite 800 P.O. Box 13010 Pensacola, FL 325913010 850-434-9200 Fax: (850) 433-9599 May 15, 22, 2013 98897S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-162-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK Plaintiff, vs. REGAN H. SCHOELLES; TAMMY M. MILLER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF REGAN H. SCHOELLES; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TAMMY M. MILLER; THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY (INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE); BAY COUNTY HEALTH SYSTEM, LLC D/B/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER-SACRED HEART HEALTH SYSTEM, F/K/A BAY MEDICAL CENTER; CAPITAL CITY BANK; and UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3; and UNKNOWN TENANT #4, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Partial Summary Judgment dated May 1, 2014, in Case No.: 13-162-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Court-house in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on June 5, 2014 the following described property: P arcel No. 1: LOT 5: Commence at a S.J.P.C. concrete monument marking the Southeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and run N8937’40”W along the South boundary line of said Southwest Quarter of Section 35 for 828.57 feet; thence N0010’00”W for 1375.00 feet for the Point of Beginning From said Point of Beginning continue N0010’00”W for 125.00 feet; thence N8937’40”W 439.08 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Road No. 386; thence S0010’00”E along said Easterly R/W line for 125.00 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run S8937’40”E for 439.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. LOT 6: Commence at a S.J.P.C. concrete monument marking the Southeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N8937’40”W along the South boundary line of said Southwest Quarter of Section 35 for 828.57 feet; thence N0010’00”W for 1250.00 feet for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue N0010’00”W for 125.00 feet; thence N8937’40”W for 439.08 feet to a point on the Easterly R/W line of State Rood No. 386; thence S0010’00”E along said Easterly R/W line for 125.00 feet; thence leaving said R/W line run S8937’40”E for 439.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Together with that certain 2004 Gena Mobile Home, Identification Number GMHGA4150431523. P arcel No. 2: Lots 18 & 20, Block 25 of BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Together with a 2000 Bucc Mobile Home, ID #ALBUS29551. DATED: May 5, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 15, 22, 2014 98887S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROPOSAL NO. 1314-21 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: GROUP LIFE and AD&D PROGRAM Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide five (5) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the Clerk’s Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Room 149, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. All proposals, with original signature and five (5) additional copies, must be received at the Office of the Clerk by Thursday, June 5, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. ET. Proposals received after the closing time will be returned unopened. Bids will be opened at the same location on Monday, June 9, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. All interested insurance companies, or trusts, are invited to respond with proposals. Each proposal document must be clearly marked “Proposal for GROUP LIFE and AD&D PROGRAM” Any questions concerning the proposal should be addressed and submitted to the County’s Agent-of-Record and Employee Benefits Consultant, Todd Torgersen, Combined Insurance Services, at 850-433-9996. Inquiries may also be submitted via FAX (850-432-5726) or E-mail (todd@ ciscompanies.com). Combined Insurance Services’ mailing address is: 2704 North 12th Avenue, Pensacola, FL 32503. Proposals are not to be mailed to Combined Insurance Services. It is requested, however, that electronic copies be sent to his e-mail address (todd@ ciscompanies.com) on Friday, June 6, 2014. Gulf County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in the best interest of the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Ward McDaniel Chairman, Gulf County BOCC Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 15, 22, 2014 98911S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Case No.: 11-17 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., as successor by merger with SUPERIOR BANK, N.A., as successor in interest to SUPERIOR BANK, FSB, formerly known as THE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ABCD PROPERTIES, LLC; DONALD P. DECORT, and PARK POINT AT SECLUDED DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 6th day of May, 2014, in Case Number 2011-17 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and ABCD PROPERTIES, LLC, DONALD P. DECORT, and PARK POINT AT SECLUDED DUNES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 26th day of June, 2014, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 8, Block C, Park Point at Secluded Dunes, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, page 39, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICIES OF THE GULF COUNTY CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 7th day of May, 2014 REBECCA L. NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk May 15, 22, 2014 98965S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO: 1314-22 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company or corporation interested in purchasing the following: Parcel No: 02852-145R WIMICO PLACE SUB PB 6 PG 58 LOTS 9 & 10 ORB 459/721 FR WHITE CITY MAP 101C White City, Florida Please indicate on the outside of your envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID, and include the BID NUMBER, and provide three (3) copies of your proposal. Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 149, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, May 30, 2014. Proposals received after the closing time will be returned unopened. Bids will be opened at the above location on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Gulf County Reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in the best interests of the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk May 22, 29, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j ACreative Financially Secure Family, Music, LOVE, Laughter awaits 1st baby Trish.j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Are you pregnant? Considering adoption? A childless, caring and loving, married couple seeks to adopt. Will be HANDS-ON mom and devoted dad. Financial security and emotional stability. All expenses paid. Call/Text Diane & Adam 1-800-790-5260. FBN 0150789. Beacon Hill: 212 CR 386 S., 1 block off 98, Friday-Monday, May 23 -26, 8:00 a.m. CST-?;Super Garage Sale Bigger Than Ever! Lots of Furniture, Gas Dryer, Beds, Dining Room, Living Room, Tools, Household, Toys, Plants... Way Too Much To List! East Point Corner of Hickory Dip and 184 Daisey St. Sat. May 24th 8a-12p Estate Sale Camo Bedroom Suite, Dining Room Table, and Lots Of Household Items! Text FL89784 to 56654 Mexico Beach 424 Arizona Drive, off of 15th St. Saturday, Sat May 24th, 7:00 am (CST) to ?? Big Two Family Sale Large TV Stand, Exercise Bike, Patio Fireplace, Golf, Fishing, & Sports Equip. & Lots of Misc. Port St. Joe 306 Reid Ave Sat. May 24th 8a-Until Over Stock Sale Bay Breeze Antiques Come Get Some Bargains St. Joe Beach: 253 Willow St Sat. May 24th 8a-Until Yard SalePower Tools, Holiday Items, Clothes, Movies Etc. Text FL89849 to 56654 Wanted Hunt Club Member on 2000 Acres Near Port St. Joe, Still Hunt Fee $450-$500/ Per Year. Call John Miller @227-5052 Food Service/Hosp. Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34288560 Text FL88560 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair Cleaning Peoplewanted, Sat 10-4pm, w/ some Sunday’s. Starting Mid April thru Oct. needs to be dependable and detailed oriented. Ref req. Call Cathy at 850-227-6952 Web ID#: 34288983 PSJ Warehouse Space For Rent. 1000sf, With Office Space & Bathroom. $600 month. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr Unit can be combined if tenant needs more space 850-238-7080 Port St JoeCommercial/ Residential Rental 2Bd 1.5Ba Efficiancy; short term 6 Mo, $1500 incl util or long term 12 Mo. @ $1,100 plus utilities Location! 2 minutes to St. Joe Bay, beaches, river and down town Port St. Joe 850-229-8014 or 850-258-4691 Cell Text FL84510 to 56654 Rent 1st Floor of My Beautiful Home on East End of St. George Island. 2 Queen Beds With 1 Bathroom. $1100 Weekly. No Smoking. w/ Cable and Wifi. Call 927-5166/294-0303 Chevy Celebrity 1986, 4 door, Gray, 70k mi, 1 Owner, $2200, 850-653-2577 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Gulf Coast Alarm, LLC Residential / Commercial Alarms FL Lic EC13004293 850-648-5484 Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 ** 2013 GULF COUNTY DELINQUENT TAX ROLL 2013 ** Pursuant to Chapter 197.432, Florida Statutes, Subsection (16) Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Sale for Delinquent Gulf County Property Taxes will be conducted online on the Gulf County Tax Certificate Auction Website at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com. Bids can be entered on the site starting on Monday, May 5, 2014. Tax Certificates will be awarded on Friday, May 30, 2014. Bidders are asked to register at http://gulfcountytaxcollector.com prior to sale. SHIRLEY J. JENKINS, CFC TAX COLLECTOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA1600 R-1288400 $590.94 04917-003R BEARDEN HAROLD SR CITY OF PORT ST JOE LOT 10 & S/2 OF LOT 9 ORB 330/525 QC FR BENNETT MAP 50A BLK 39 ORB 444/29 FR KNOTT 4519131