The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03937


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT27-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com All that rain had to go somewhere. According to Gulf County Emergency Management director Marshall Nelson, a lot of that water is heading into the Apalachicola and Chipola river basins in Gulf County. At the recommendation of Nelson, the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday declared a local state of emergency in anticipation of ooding in the north end of the county as soon as the weekend. There is already an issue on the north end with roads because of weeks and months of heavy rains. The timing of upcoming ooding, Nelson said, is unclear, but he asked commissioners to pass the emergency declaration in order to begin preparations. Primarily, that will be moving county assets and getting them in place, Nelson said. We know that it is coming. We have had a lot of rain in the river basin. As of Tuesday, the water at the Woodruff Dam in Blountstown was at 17.4 feet and due to crest at just under 22 feet on Friday. That means that level of water will begin arriving in Gulf County by the end of the week into the weekend. The water has built up and they have opened the gates on us, Nelson said. On the Apalachicola, Nelson said, ood stage is 15 feet but the concern arrives with water that reaches 2123 feet in depth. At that point, water begins to become an issue on roadways in low-lying areas and around boat landings. The issues are compounded, Nelson said, by the amount of water that is also entering the Chipola River basin. The Chipola is forecast to crest at near 21 feet by Wednesday. That is our problem, Nelson said. Nelson said his of ce was already working with Public Works on staging of equipment and preparations and said he thought ooding could begin as soon as Sunday or Monday. Right now we are trying to get a handle on how much By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Cape San Blas is making waves. In an online competition conducted by the website www.gopetfriendlyblog.com Cape San Blas was nominated as a Best City for Pet Travelers for the year 2014. Throughout several rounds of head-tohead voting by the public, the Cape has already beaten out Asheville, N.C., Ocean City, Md., Myrtle Beach, S.C. and Woodstock, Vt.. This week the peninsula went into the nal round against the dog-friendly public parks of Portland, OR. At press time, the Cape had received more than 57 percent of the vote and a winner was to be announced today. Check back next week for further details. The person responsible for nominating the winning city will receive a two-night stay in the Kimpton hotel of their choosing, a pet-friendly hotel chain, and a slew of pet travel gear and a medium Kalahari lounge dog bed.SPECIAL TO THE STARThe bald eagle nest just west of the Indian Pass Raw Bar was damaged during Mondays storms, but during the two days before the storm, Marie Romanelli of Indian Pass observed the adult eagles ferrying food back and forth from the nest. Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe municipal election was over when it started. Candidate qualifying ended last week and Commissioners Rex Buzzett and Phil McCroan were the lone candidates to submit all paperwork. Without opposition Buzzett and McCroan were returned to their respective seats, representing Group IV and Group III. Buzzett and McCroan earned new two-year terms, Buzzetts fourth and McCroans second.Flooding a concern in coming daysSee FLOODING A8 Buzzett, McCroan re-electedBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com In baseball parlance, the Gulf County Tourist Development Council enters the regular season off an excellent spring training. With bed tax revenue continuing its climb in February, the TDC advisory council held its regular monthly meeting last week as a spring promotion gathered steam and peak of the season looms. The revenue numbers from February maintained a positive winter trend. February bed tax revenue grew 18 percent over the same month last year and follows monthly increases of 3.48 percent in January, 48 percent in December went some tax collectors were still reporting quarterly and 6.8 percent in November. Year to date, year over year, revenue has climbed 7.8 percent. The goal for this year is 20 percent over the prior scal year and the countys tourist season is only now starting to pick up in earnest. We are pacing well, said TDC executive director Jennifer Jenkins. We clearly have room for growth. We are reporting monthly so these are accurate. The switch from quarterly to uniform monthly reporting was critical to Jenkins for honing her marketing focus throughout the year. Bed tax revenue mirrors a busy period of the shoulder season, typically and traditionally a slower time for vacationers and visitors, but one Jenkins Numbers rising, TDC enters seasonSee TDC A8 Eagle protecting her youngSPECIAL TO THE STARCape San Blas was nominated as Best City for Pet Travelers 2014 by www. gopetfriendlyblog.com.Cape San Blas nominated as Best City for Pet Travelers 2014 Opinion ...........................A4-A5Letters to the Editor .............A5Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports.....................................A7School News ...........................B3Faith ........................................B4 Obituaries ...............................B4Classi eds ........................B7-B8YEAR 76, NUMBER 26 Thursday, APRIL 10, 2014 Bay cleanup, B1

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 AutoInsuranceHannonInsurance227-1133ShopatHome! GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM JoelRosenbaum,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients By TONY SIMMONSHalifax Media Group MEXICO BEACH Cousins from a family of Mexico Beach pioneers, Cathey Parker Hobbs and Al Cathey worked together to compile a new entry in the Images of America book series focusing on their hometown. The authors were raised by families that were among the rst to settle Mexico Beach, and they say their childhood days were lled with some lasting beach kid memories: shell hunting without worries, scooping buckets of blue crabs from the Gulf, and shing from the surf or the pier. They will celebrate the release of their new book, Images of America: Mexico Beach, with a signing 4-6 p.m. April 12 at Graba Java Internet Caf, 2094 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach. Hobbs moved to Mexico Beach in 1949 with her parents, Charlie and Inky Parker, and her sister, Sue. Her parents took over development of the area, which had been purchased in 1946 by Charlies father, Gordon Parker, and two other investors, W.T. McGowan and J.W. Wainwright. Charlie Parker went on to become the citys rst mayor and a lifelong advocate of the familyfriendly community. Most of the pioneers that made Mexico Beach a reality are gone, said Hobbs, who still operates the family business, Parker Realty of Mexico Beach, alongside her husband, Ralph. I hope this book will help preserve their memories as well as the history of our wonderful town. I also hope it will bring pleasure to many by either introducing them to this paradise or by helping them remember wonderful moments they enjoyed in Mexico Beach. As described in the books introduction, very little is known of the area until the early 1900s, when businessman Felix du Pont purchased the land known today as Mexico Beach. Resin to make turpentine was harvested from the native pine trees, and shermen could not resist the migratory sh passing through the areas waters. By the 1930s, the book explains, U.S. 98 was completed along the coast, and visitors nally could reach the sugar-soft sand beaches. In 1946, Parker, McGowan and Wainwright purchased 1,850 acres along the beach for $65,000. Chapters in their book categorize the 200 blackand-white photos into nostalgic looks back at the origins of the town, shing and boating, fun pastimes and entertainment, mom-andpop businesses, pioneer families, early beach cottages, hurricane damage, the establishment of Beacon Hill and much more. Cathey moved to Mexico Beach in 1953 at age 5, graduated from Port St. Joe High School and earned a degree in communications from the University of Southern Mississippi. He returned home to raise two sons with his wife, and still lives in Mexico Beach, where he is the second-generation owner of Catheys Ace Hardware. Cathey said he hopes the book communicates the unique history of the town, and how special it is to call it home. He said he hopes the reader gains an appreciation of the pioneer spirit of the towns early families and the resolve they needed to establish such a community with the characteristics necessary to maintain a high quality of life for generations to come. Images of America: Mexico Beach is available through area bookstores, retailers and online at ArcadiaPublishing.com.  The cover of the book about Mexico Beach by Al Cathey and Cathey Parker Hobbs.Pictorial history of Mexico Beach published ImaMAGeES oOF AmeMERicaICA: MexicoEXICO BeachEACHAuthors: Al Cathey and Cathey Parker Hobbs Book Signing: 4-6 p.m. CT April 12 at Graba Java Internet Caf, 2094,  U.S. 98,  Mexico Beach Details: Arcadia Publishing; 128 pages, paperback, 200 images; $21.99 On the Web: ArcadiaPublishing.comBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com No one ever said removing a historic house would be easy. During last weeks preagenda meeting, Brian Cathey of Cathey Construction addressed the city council regarding an unforeseen issue following the demolition of the Parker House. Though the structure itself had been pulled down last week, Cathey reported that beneath the home a massive concrete footing roughly eight feet deep was discovered. Cathey sought authorization from the council to remove the concrete; a step required by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection permit, which he estimated would take 10-15 dump truck loads to remove after being broken up, and would come with a price tag of $5,000-$10,000. There was no way of knowing that (the concrete was there) when we put together a price for the demolition, said Cathey. Councilman Gary Woodham asked Cathey if the concrete could be covered up but Cathey said that it would cause major problems were anyone else to excavate in the location in the future. The council decided to add it to the tab of additional money they were seeking from the insurance company. At Tuesdays regular April meeting councilman Jack Mullen said that attorney Dion Moniz, whom the council consulted with, is still encouraging them to negotiate for additional funds. (Moniz) believes that there is more funding due to the city and hes still of that opinion, said Mullen. The insurance company has not provided a settlement satisfactory to build a new city hall. Mullen said that a request had been made by the city to the insurance company asking for an extension to avoid hitting the Statue of Limitations which would render the claim moot in July. They are currently awaiting a response.City HallMayor Al Cathey reported that the citys request to Peoples South Bank to stay in the current city hall building through October was denied. With an exit date of June 1 on the horizon the council made the call to move into the recently completed Public Works building and move those employees into a modular unit that would be rented and placed on site. Councilwoman Tanya Castro asked Cathey how it made sense to move Public Works employees out when theyd only just moved in. Cathey responded that if they chose to operate city hall from a modular unit, additional costs to ensure that the facility was accessible to everyone would be incurred. Cathey said, We need to have a facility thats going to service our people the best. A modular unit will be rented for $7,000 for one year while the new city hall is constructed at the old Parker House site.City AdministratorLast weeks pre-agenda meeting was the nal gathering for former city administrator Chris Hubbard who submitted his resignation the week prior. Hubbard requested that a reprimand that was placed in his personnel le for a 2012 incident concerning a Facebook site be removed prior to ending his employment. Upon delivery of the reprimand the council had voted to revisit it in a year, and Hubbard had waited a year and a half to bring it back up. During a special meeting the council voted to have it removed. Former city administrator John McInnis was selected to serve the city in the interim until Hubbards replacement is hired. McInnis started as a police ofcer and spent 14 years as city administrator prior to retiring. McInnis said that while the job is not easy, he found it rewarding and he was doing his part to help the community. At Tuesdays regular meeting Councilman Bobby Pollock took the opportunity to respond to comments made by Castro the day after Hubbard announced his resignation. Chris Hubbard was a very loyal and dedicated employee, said Pollock. It was very wrong and deceitful to have his character defamed. Once the meeting was opened to public comment, resident Mary Blackburn, who will run against Woodham in this months election, said she was offended that Pollock would say such things when another member of the council, referring to Castro, could be regularly slandered. Blackburn said, I dont think its right that another person who speaks their mind is crucied. Cathey asked all other comments to stick to city business.GGulf Coast ParkwayAlso during this weeks regular meeting, Greg Garrett, director of Atkins Global spoke to the council about the planned Gulf Coast Parkway, in the works since 2009. The road would add another route connecting Panama City to U.S. 98 with a focus on freight transport. Garrett said that the goal of the road was to ease congestion along the Tyndall Parkway. An open house and presentation to discuss the project, projected to begin in 2015, will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 6 at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. The public is encouraged to attend the meeting to learn more about the project and ask any questions.Police CarportIn February a group of volunteers, Heavens Hammers, volunteered to build a carport for the police station that would allow the cruisers to stay out of the sun. Chief Glen Norris told the council that such a cover would extend the lifespan of the electronics inside the vehicles, keeping them out of the sun. Project materials would need to be purchased for $2,600 but the labor would come at no cost to the city. In March some members of the council were apprehensive about the project. Cathey didnt want to amend the citys budget for the materials, but would support if Norris could nd a way to raise the funds. Mullen didnt want the city to appear as a charity case and felt that the volunteers should help others in Mexico Beach. By March the volunteers had left the area but Norris received a donation of $3,000 from a snowbird living in Pennsylvania. Norris plans to purchase the materials and told the council he will nd someone to provide the labor at a later date. Norris also took the opportunity to introduce three new police ofcers to replace those who have moved on to other opportunities. The council welcomed Sarah Powe-Butler, David Walker and George Record to Mexico Beach.Parker House problems continue for Mexico Beach We E S Loche OCHE R | The StarThe Parker House was demolished last Wednesday but 8 feet of concrete was discovered beneath the structure.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, April 10, 2014 1126818 at Vincent Ivers MD Monday, April 28 5:30 7:30 pmA Beauty Event Especially for You! Please join us for an evening of unique and informative insight into the latest trends and advances in cosmetic enhancement. Dr. Ivers will demonstrate and discuss a variety of Anti-Aging Treatments. Special guest from Obagi Medical Products, Michelle Keese will be on site to discuss cosmetic procedures and much more.... Door prizes, Discounts Hors d' oeuvres and Drinks.FREEGiveaways! 301 Twentieth Street, Port St Joe, 32456 Dr. Vincent Ivers MD Now an Exclusive Provider of Arte ll in the PanhandleLadies... You are Cordially Invited to Attend an Evening Of Beauty Limited SeatingRSVP Bring a Friend227-7070 LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, April 10, 2014By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Last weeks informational workshop about the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA) was equal doses education and frustration. The aim of the workshop was to provide a history of the PSJRA to date. Mayor Mel Magidson suggested at last weeks meeting during which city commissioners began the process of dissolving the PSJRA board that fueling the debate over the agencys future was a lack of understanding of the facts surrounding the history and operations of the redevelopment agency. While the theme of the workshop was how the agency got here, it at times turned into a pitched discussion about the path traveled the past month by a slim majority of commissioners. Those actions, one resident noted, had the community in an uproar. PSJRA executive director Gail Alsobrook and Magidson, the lone commissioner to attend the workshop, tried to steer the discussion to broad strokes, but the tenor of the debate often echoed that on the commission the past three meetings. In sum, commissioners and some residents express frustration with the agencys operational model and board makeup. A lot of people dont understand what is going on, period, resident Nathan Peters Jr. said. There is also equal, if not more, frustration in sectors of the community over a lack of understanding about the goal of the majoritys actions to dissolve the board. What is the problem? resident Gina Vicari said. Why are we trying to get rid of these un-paid people and replace them with the same ve (city) commissioners? They have other issues on their plate. The bones of contention, as framed by residents Thursday night, could be placed under several large umbrellas.THE MAKEUP OF t T HE BOARDThere is a sense, resident Tim Nelson said, the PSJRA board is insular and comprised of some of the same people who serve on other boards. He questioned the extent to which the board would be open to new members and new ideas from others in the community. Thats why we feel left out of the loop, Nelson said. Alsobrook and Magidson repeatedly said the PSJRA board meetings are public, advertised in advance by statute. Any input from the public I think the board would be very receptive, Alsobrook said, noting that PSJRA board meetings are lightly attended. If the public gets involved the board will listen. Debra Barnes said she thought the board should expand its numbers and suggested PSJRA board members go into the community to fully grasp feelings of resistance reected by the three commissioners voting to dissolve the board. Board chair Boyd Pickett said he had done just that. I have been out in the community and I havent found anybody (who doesnt approve of what we are doing) except the three commissioners and they wont even return my calls, Pickett said. Further, several PSJRA board members said of the three commissioners, two, Commissioners Phil McCroan and William Thursbay, had never attended a meeting. The board is also a reection of statutory-mandates concerning the makeup as well the goals set forth in the agencys master plan. The board vets ideas for the benet of the community, said Alsobrook, who was noncommittal about her future if the board is dissolved. They are helping the community, and they are professionals who are volunteers. It is working on more levels than you can imagine. It is work. It is like a second job. OO PERAt T IONS, SPENDING, HIRING, FIRINGCommissioners Thursbay and Bo Patterson have said they did not approve of a board that operates beyond the reach of voters, yet spends tax money and has the ability to hire and re an executive director. Board member Michael McKenzie said suggestions that spending is done outside the scope of governmental oversight is not factually accurate. Alsobrook, as executive director, has an annual budget approved by the PSJRA board and city commissioners which she must operate the agency from. Once commissioners approve the budget, spending must be done under the same constraints by which the city and county spend their budgets, he said. All spending, as well as who the PSJRA board can hire or re, Magidson added, is subject to review and nal approval by city commissioners. Nothing is done without their nal knowledge and say-so. Nothing the board does is done without our approval, Magidson repeatedly said. Nelson questioned whether the PSJRA board conveys all pertinent information to the commission, providing any and all options on any given issue or project.FF UNDINGMaybe the most confusing aspect of the redevelopment agency, several residents said, was the Tax Increment Financing that funds operations. A base year for property values within the original agency boundaries roughly, give or take some footage, First Street to the midline of State 71 to just beyond Garrison Avenuewas established in 1989. Of any increases in property values within the boundaries since, the redevelopment agency and as Magidson said, by turn the city recoups 95 percent of that increase while the city receives the remainder. No ones taxes increase resident Lorinda Gingell suggested taxes actually stay down because the redevelopment agency improves property values for all and its not an additional tax; the agency simply is getting a slice. The agency did not even draw funding until the early 2000s. That funding, much less since the decline of the real estate market, can only be spent within the agency boundaries, Alsobrook said. Further, it can only be spent on projects within the parameters of the agencys master plan. Property values in the expanded area nearly all of the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe established in 2009, have not rebounded yet to draw income. That has not prevented the agency, as noted by board member Patti Blaylock, from using dollars to leverage for grant funding for the expanded area, such as for new sidewalks on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and lights on David Langston Drive. State law allows the agency to use a small percentage of dollars from the original area for such purposes, Alsobrook said. Alsobrook summed up the workshop after 75 minutes by saying she hoped a solution other than throwing the baby out with the bath water by dissolving the board. I dont understand why the city commission wants to take over and wants to stop you from doing a successful job, resident Eddie Fields said.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com A group of 60 students and 20 adults from the Senior High Youth Group visited Port St. Joe last week to spend their spring break giving back to the community. The group, representing the Evangelical Free Church in in Gaylord, Michigan brought students from grades nine to 12 to the area as they have for more than 30 years. The students were split between the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and the Bay St. Joseph Care Clinic. Those stationed at the clinic helped with gardening, painting and power washing projects while those at the Humane Society walked and bathed dogs, socialized with cats and learned about the DAWGS in Prison program. We wanted to give back to the community, chaperone Brent Holmes said. Were called to serve. Its the little things showing the kids that they can serve anytime, anywhere, no matter what. Holmes said that the focal point of the trip was to help the students become service-minded and develop good hearts to helping others. Isaac Smith, a junior, was enjoying his third trip to Port St. Joe. I wanted to do my part to give back, Smith said. I like learning to serve others and God has given us so much. Its really enjoyable. Smith said he looked forward to coming back next year and was happy to have a reprieve from the two feet of snow that awaited him in Michigan. The group spent a week camping at the St. Joseph Peninsula State Park and headed back to Gaylord last Friday.PSJRA workshop offers opportunitiesMichigan volunteers help out in Gulf County

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USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, April 10, 2014 ASectionIt was easiest to conceal in early April and October, because the weather was such that a boy could wear a long sleeve shirt to school in Alabama and not look too odd. Both of these times of year were best because it meant I could hide my equipment for Major League Baseballs Opening Day and the World Series. Many more games were played during the day back then there was no ESPN or Internet or all these fancy phones that you could watch a baseball game on. There was radio It was AM radio It was heaven My Papa (grandfather) not only sold televisions, radios and record players, but he also liked buying and making cool gadgets and that was good for a grandson. One of the best gadgets he ever gave me was a very small transistor radio he had picked up or put together. It could easily be hidden in a pocket or taped to a young boys hairless chest making him feel like an undercover agent. An earpiece could be plugged in the radio and the wire fed through a long sleeve shirt leaving the little white earpiece speaker sticking out of the cuff of a long sleeve shirt. While the teacher was telling the class something that I probably thought I already knew, I could put an elbow on my desk, rest my head in my hand and listen to the Atlanta Braves play (and look very interested at the chalkboard). Almost 40 years later, I do realize that wasnt a great use of my time in junior high school, but it is a good memory. I thought about it the other day when my son sent me a text message wanting to know a password so that he could watch the Braves play on his phone on opening day. I told him, You dont need to be watching baseball while you are at school. That makes me a bit of a hypocrite I guess. The Braves nished last in their division that year, Dale Murphy was 20 years old, Phil Niekro was 37 and still hanging on. In 1976, only the Montreal Expos lost more games in the National League than my Atlanta Braves. It didnt matter. On Opening Day, the Braves were in rst (along with every other team). The Cincinnati Reds would go on to win the World Series, beating the New York Yankees in four straight games. Life is good in the South when Yankees lose. Future Hall of Fame catcher, Johnny Bench, was the World Series Most Valuable Player. Where is Johnny now? Last time I saw him, he was on television pushing some sort of miracle salve made from emu oil that is good for arthritis, muscle aches, bug bites and sunburn. The emu is a large ightless fast running, high jumping bird originally from Australia. They are rather ugly. There was a time back in the s and s that folks were raising emus hoping to get rich. They did not. There has to be some sort of connection to these failed dreams of emu meat lling US kitchens and restaurants and the one fellow who gured out emu oil mixed into a salve could be pushed by an exmajor league catcher. Im willing to bet that Johnny makes more money pushing the miracle bird salve than he did playing baseball back in the mid-1970s. His salary that year was about half what the minimum salary is today for a rookie and about 1 percent of the highest paid catcher in the major leagues. I love baseball, but it seems that in the overall scheme of things, these fellows make way too much money these days than when I had a wire running between my sleeve and my arm to listen to games. Im not saying the players should give the money back, Im just saying that it seems a little much. Now were talking about paying college kids to play ball. Perhaps, just perhaps, the miracle salve that Johnny Bench pushes on television would help me gure it out if I just rubbed a little on my head. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. I stood for a moment and took a deep breath. I had never actually interviewed for a job in my life. I was 21, wouldnt graduate from college until the following week, had driven ve hundred miles for this meeting and somehow sensed the next few minutes could be life changing for me. My feet were out-racing my brain as I moved toward the big man watching a P.E. class run across the eld. He stood as I neared and extended a hand. You must be the young man Walter told me about. My goodness, his handshake was like a vise! But his smile moved across his whole face. We talked for over an hour as one class was dismissed and another hurried unto the eld. He asked very few questions, mostly about my life and family. But he leaned in just enough on the answers for me to realize he was not going through the motions here. He was interested in me. His sincerity was real. I didnt need that college education to know this guy was as genuine as they come. He was excited about the young men coming back for the 1969 football season. He thought his center and quarterback were of excellent character. The offensive line was going to be the best he had since returning to Port St. Joe. We had one very good defensive end and linebackers that would run to the ball. We have a chance to win a lot of football games this year. He said we like I was already on the team. Wayne Taylor was the rst person ever to call me Coach. I was particularly struck by his forthrightness, his passion for life and his obvious love for the young men under his charge. The pride he had in the school, the sports programs and the community itself came through in every sentence. He made it seem like more of a calling than a job. His eyes lit up when he walked me back to my carand realized Id driven down in a 1963 Corvair Monza. I felt like Id come in on a wing and a prayer. That car smoked and coughed most of the ve hundred miles. Coach Taylor was going over that thing like it was a Ferrari or something! Im not sure till this day if he hired me for my potential or he just liked my car. I was near bout back to Birmingham when it dawned on me. He didnt ask one question about football. He hadnt sought out my thoughts on the veer offense versus the power I. We didnt talk balanced attack or a split middle defensive set. He seemed more interested in young men than pass routes or blocking assignments. I could still feel the goodbye handshake and his direct gaze as he offered me the job and wished me well no matter what I decided. Halfway through the rst week of practice Coach Taylor became upset because the scout team fullback wouldnt give his linebackers the correct look by barreling into the off-tackle hole. He turned his hat around backwards, took the fullbacks place and blasted into the appropriate lane. You can bet the entire practice revved up a few notches! And I learned real football coaching wasnt as much about xs and os as some people imagined. We won the rst 10 games of the season. I contributed nothing. As a matter of fact, I was a detriment at times. Coach Taylor had to do his duties and then coach me up a little as to the speci c techniques he wanted me to instill with my group the next day. He never lost patience. He never quit teaching meor the team. I just thought I had a work ethic. We watched lms of opposing teams until my eyes bled! We stayed on the eld until he was satis ed. Wed spend hours going over the next days practice schedule. He was the most detailed man I ever met. He didnt want the right guard to simply run over and block the play side tackle on quick 30 trap. He demanded that guard take a carefully measured 45 degree step with his inside foot into the line of scrimmage, pick up the target immediately, cross over with his back foot, avoiding the center and gaining speed with the next two steps before sticking his head in front and unloading his right shoulder into the mid-section of the unsuspecting defensive man. The thing about the thing he would say is in the details. Coach, he always looked right at you when he spoke, weve got to get these young men to lead with their chins...pretty good advice whether you are tackling eet running backs.or life. Winning was important with him. I stood in awe sometimes as we beat teams that we shouldnt have even been on the eld with. He out-coached opponents. He could have so many times taken either team, practiced for a week and beat the other guys. But it was never about winning. There is a big difference! Even the undefeated season and state championship didnt overshadow the players. It was always about the young men. He demanded that each individual be the best he could beit went way beyond the football eld for Coach Taylor. He understood the ups and downs of life. He knew what lay ahead for many of his guys. He used those ExerGenies and two a day practices to getem ready for Wewa, Blountstown, Chipley.and the next fty years! In the later days, when the coaching was over, I never heard him one time refer to a score or beating someone. He was talking about the young men and how well so many of them turned out. If he had a clue that he might have helped in so many lives, including mine, he never relayed it to me. I think that is the way the great ones operate. I was so glad to see so many of the young men back for Coachs funeral. A few got up and spoke, rightly recognizing Coach Taylor for his mentorship, guidance and love for them. I guarantee you, a thousand more Sharks in all walks of life echoed those same sentiments when they learned of his passing. He didnt take the high road on honesty, integrity and moral principles when it was convenient or easy. He lived on it! The last time we went off to play golf I tried to thank him for all he had done for me, my family, my career. He waved it off as nothing and then, as that wonderful grin spread across his face, said, You know Coach, you are not like most politicians. High praise indeed from the man I respected above all others. Young Coach CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardPage 4What freedom really costsDear Editor, With the recent shooting at the Naval Yard and Fort Hood, we are reminded once again of the disconnect between our citizens and our warriors who put their lives on the line to defend freedom. Much lip service is given to the slogan Freedom is not free, but very little thought is given to the cost. In the days and weeks following 9/11, we were indignant and outraged that our soil had been attacked for the rst time since the Japanese attacked American soil in Hawaii, Alaska and the coast of California. Flags ew from virtually every home in our great land. When I was a child, I can remember my mother talking about gas rationing; sugar and coffee rationing; investing in war bonds; and Victory gardens. Even on the home front, sacri ce was required. Nowadays, the ongoing war is a mere matter of inconvenience for most, certainly not for the families of those courageous young men and women in uniform. For my generation, there was no welcome home. We were portrayed by Hollywood and the press as baby killers and drug addicts, and the effects of PTSD were compounded by the publics disapproval. Another generation that suffered similar stings were the ne young lads and ladies who served in the Korean Con ict. Theirs has been oft characterized as the Forgotten War. It was largely swept under the rug in hopes that it would go away. Are we as a society going to continue to treat returning veterans as pariahs of society? Are we not going to insist that their wounds be treated, both the visible and those unseen? If so, we can expect to be plagued by further instances of inexplicable madness. About forty years ago, a Commander of Post #10069 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars wrote an article which was posted in The Star. In it, Commander Marvin Shimfessel described the public apathy of that time. Shimfessel is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and served during the Korean Con ict. Here are the Commanders words from four decades ago: Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10069 of Port St. Joe this week urged that all citizens speak out in support of the President of the United States and the efforts of the United States government to stem the ow of Communism in South Vietnam. Speaking on behalf of Post No. 10069, Commander Marvin A. Shimfessel said: The delegates attending the V.F.W. National Convention in August in Philadelphia, Pa., unanimously urged that our government continue to seek victory in Vietnam and that all of our citizens lend their full support to the men on the ghting front. Frankly, we are sick and tired of listening to a very vocal minority undermining the bargaining position of our President and in so doing endangering the lives of our men on the ghting front. It is my belief that the time has come when the much talked about silent majority should speak out. We must let the men on the battle eld know that they have the support of the people at home and we must let Hanoi know that the President has the support of the people in this country. It is my hope that the people of this area will speak out on this issue and that other patriotic, civic and fraternal groups will join with us in this crusade. I am fully conf(v)inced, Commander Shimfessel concluded, that if we fail to speak out now, the vocal minority in this country will most certainly take over all that is meaningful in this land of ours. No one seeks peace more urgently than the Veterans of Foreign Wars, but we will not seek peace at any price which is what the vocal minority is calling for today. Here, almost half a century later, we may readily see how clearly Marvin Shimfessels words still ring true. The names and faces of the enemy have changed. The attitude of the government concerning an honorable peace has varied, and majority and minority voices within the publics demographics have shifted. But, the basic premise still holds as true today as it did then. We are more concerned about whether Auburn or Alabama has the better football team. We are stressed about the high prices for gasoline. We casually enjoy our avored and iced coffees with brand names we had never heard of twenty, thirty, or forty years ago. We go to the gym to burn calories and bask in relative luxury while our troops put their lives on the line against an invisible and fanatical enemy. Our young heroes in uniform must restrain themselves in their engagements and are not allowed to bring to bear the full force of American power. America, have we really become so soft and so sel sh? Soon, a group of wounded servicemen and women will visit our community. Will we, as Commander Shimfessel once implored, let those from the battle elds know that they have our full support? Will we take time from our busy days to show our respect, to line the streets in a show of encouragement? Will we volunteer, contribute? Readers of The Star, in this new century, how will future generations judge that we treated our returning Veterans, and how will our patriotism compare? Let us hope that observers will say that we rose to the occasion and were in our nest hour. Please continue to pray for our troops and especially for those in harms way from Gulf County.Respectfully,Rodney L. Herring Rodney L. Herring, Cdr. John C. Gainous Post #10069Opening Day HUNKER DOWNKesley ColbertHe was the rst to call me coach

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LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, April 10, 2014 ASectionRural hospitals are the front line of care for millions of Americans who cant travel to big cities for medical treatment. Most are small, less than 25 beds, and many struggle to keep their doors open in the face of rising costs. A little-known prescription drug program called 340B helps these providers stay in businessand extend vital services to needy patients. More than 20 years ago, Congress created the 340B drug discount program with bipartisan support to help hospitals serving high numbers of economically vulnerable people. In 2010, Congress expanded the program to rural hospitals to help them in their efforts to treat uninsured, underinsured and other patients who have dif culty getting access to care. Under the program, eligible hospitals receive pharmaceuticals at discounted prices from drug companies. These savings are often passed on directly to outpatients. Healthcare providers also use the savings to fund dialysis, cancer and AIDS clinics as well as other services. The positive impact of the 340B program is tangible in small towns and rural communities across America. In Centerville, Tenn., St. Thomas Hickman Hospital reaches out to patients without cars, picks them up from home and brings them in for lunch and medical treatment. The hospital also provides free medications on a regular basis to outpatients who cant afford them. Cass County Hospital in Atlantic, Iowa, provides quali ed outpatients a full year of medications for free. And it gives its Emergency Room doctors vouchers to supply medicines at no cost to patients, based on need. At Regional Health System in the Black Hills of South Dakota, 340B savings fund patient treatment in a local detoxi cation clinic and a short-term crisis center. The bene ts of 340B ow far beyond the needy patients treated at Americas rural hospitals. Because savings are often passed on in low-cost or free prescriptions, people take their medications and return less to the hospital emergency room. That translates into lower costs for Medicare and Medicaid saving a bundle of taxpayer dollars. Millions of Americans receive care thanks to the 340B program, but it has powerful enemies in Washington. The pharmaceutical industry wants to restrict the program and some would like to kill it outright. Why? Because it cuts into drug company pro ts. Fact: The pharmaceutical industry turns a $7.5 billion per year pro t on sales through the 340B program to hospitals and related providers. We think thats plenty. If Big Pharma wins, hard-working Americans in the heartland of the country will lose as hospitals cut back on prescription discounts, treatment and services. Many of our hospitals and clinics would have to close altogether. That would be a travesty we cant let happen. Alan Morgan is Chief Executive Of cer of the National Rural Health Association based in Leawood, Kan. Dear Editor, First, I would like to commend Loren Siprell for his superb editorial in the April 3 edition of The Star. I, too, am an avid Facebook fan, always curious about what others are doing or the big stories ooding the web. I am also another of those that nd myself browsing the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce Facebook page to see, Who is in the news? Its all good you might say until it comes too close to home. One morning you go into work and by habit pick up the paper to your loved ones picture plastered across the page. Then you go to the GCSOs Facebook page to see people saying cruel things about him, making sarcastic remarks about how proud their mothers must be. My biggest argument with the immediate release of a story or alleged crime is whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty? The media and others are so quick to get a headline or their guy that they dont stop to think about how those key words will affect the family. What happened to getting to the truth before posting those glamorized headlines just to make it look like You are just doing your job? In the end, after all the dust has settled and the facts have come out that it just wasnt the case. After all is said and done, these people whether innocent or guilty are stereotyped. They are forever labeled, turned away from jobs, not to mention they will also be watched by law enforcement. They made, as Mr. Siprell stated, a poor decision that will undoubtedly affect them for a good portion of their lives. I feel as a Christian community we must forgive those that somehow, for one reason or another, took the wrong path. I would think very carefully about condemning someone because it might be someone close to you or even you that nds yourself in the news.Lisa LeonPort St. JoePSJRA voteDear Editor, We criticize and cuss the politicians in Washington for the backdoor deals they make. The city of Port St. Joe is no different. Whether we agree or not on an issue, an elected of cial should never be subjected to what three of our commissioners have been subjected to during this discussion of who controls the PSJRA. One of our commissioners had at least six of his customers cancel contracts because of his stand on this issue. Another commissioner lost a $4,000 dollar contract because of his stand on this issue. The third commissioner received a phone call reminding him of where he has gotten business in the past and it would not be there if he stayed on course with his support of this issue. It makes me ashamed to know that people in our town would resort to these lowly attempts to threaten a commissioner to change his mind on a vote. Sounds like a play out of a Ma a playbook. There is a group of people in our town that wants to control everything. If you go along they are your friends, and if not they turn on you and attempt to destroy you. I know this from my own personal experience as a commissioner. We need more elected of cials that stand on their principles regardless of personal loss. I do not always agree with the positions these three men take. However, I am proud they stood for their convictions. I also know that this post will generate some negative comments towards me. It will be okay. I have withstood the re in the kitchen. I was also proud of the way the two opposing men conducted themselves at the end of the meeting.John ReevesPort St. Joe Saying goodbye to friendsDear Editor: In the late afternoon last week, I said goodbye to two wonderful young people, my friends that were departing on a new and exciting adventure; their future spread before them to taste and see and explore. I was sad to see them leave but joyful that at last peace could become a part of their life. A letter posted previously stated that Chris Hubbard, Mexico Beachs City Manager, should have left long ago. I totally agree with Ms. Burgess. The unrealistic volume of tasks heaped upon one person was ridiculous! No human being should be treated in the manner that Mr. Hubbard endured. The position of city manager is one of the worst jobs, the most unthankful and demanding of any city employee; especially small towns that have very few employees. I am not making excuses but merely pointing out that there is no one to assist the Manager. And our city council, which insists there is no money to hire another city hall worker, ignored the reality of common sense and made Mr. Hubbard in charge of everything a few months ago. I voiced my opinion at that meeting stating that it was impossible for Mr. Hubbard to take on even more work. He is only one person! He cant do everything! Mr. Hubbard never was rude to the council and showed restraint when being bullied, at nearly every meeting, by a council member because he had not done something to the satisfaction of this member. Was it time for him to go? Yes, Candice it was; for his health, his future, for his time to enjoy life and not be constantly trying to please everybody. Farewell my friends, Chris and Debbie, and may God bless you with a happy life that had become impossible to achieve in Mexico Beach.Connie RisingerMexico BeachLetter a travestyDear Editor, It is with a sense of increasing disgust that I write to you today. Ive just nished writing yet another disgraceful article from Loren Siprell, this latest travesty titled On the Subject Of... Arrest Logs. This article is poorly written, lacks focus and direction, makes excuses for his own personal poor online behavior, and sidetracks off its chosen topic of whether arrest logs are pertinent, to sermonizing on the legality of prostitution. Mr. Siprell would have us follow the example of Europe, apparently forgetting that we shrugged off the European model of government over two centuries ago. Perhaps Mr. Siprell should read a history book or two, or read some studies on the health habits of prostitutes and those that frequent them. The arrest logs serve the purpose of educating the public on who the law-breakers are in the community that they occupy. I for one am interested in knowing who these law-breakers are, and where they live, so I can avoid these areas. Mr. Siprells articles consistently model poor writing and analogies, and consistently exhibit farleft Progressive memes. I must ask you: is this the model for editorial writing for your newspaper going forward? If so, you will have one less reader. Mr. Siprells politics and beliefs are one thing... being subjected to them serially on your editorial page, over and over, is something that I can do without.Steve SaundersMexico Beach 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 THE T A HILLONC BEA89 HWY4549 0138746 058 S LIMITY CITCH BEAOMEXIC GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS 0138746 058 S LIMITY CITCH BEAOMEXIC S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA LIVEONTHEPOOPDECKINTHECROWNEST UPCOMINGEVENTSJIMMYGILLIS THURSDAYPM FRIDAY&SATURDAY9PMSUNDAY7PM WEDNESDAY7PM APRIL16TH APRIL17TH THECURRYSFOLLOWCDRELEASEPARTYDEBIJORDANGIRLSNIGHTOUTWITHTHECHIPPENDALES JR.SERVICELEAGUECELEBRITYBARTENDERS ALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMES KAROKE-FRIDAY&SATURDAY-9PM AutoInsuranceHannonInsurance227-1133ShopatHome! Page 5Too close to home Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS A Critical Healthcare Program in Rural America THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on

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Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeishere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. www.shopbwo.com SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Apr.1069 57 0% Fri,Apr.1171 59 0% Sat,Apr.1273 62 0% Sun,Apr.1372 67 0% Mon,Apr.1473 6330% Tues,Apr.1568 5930% Wed,Apr.1668 62 0% The king is back in townSilver speedsters due in Panhandle waters this monthBy FRANK SARGEANTSpecial to The Star The king sh are in at Tampa! Thats big news for Panhandle anglers, because it means the run of the big mackerel has nally started to move north, after stalling for some time off Fort Myers this year because of a wave of late cold fronts. Water temperatures in the Panhandle still are at about 65 degrees, and thats too cold for any signi cant number of kings, but all it will take is a week of warm, sunny weather to make things right. When the water hits 68 degrees, the bait will move, and with it will come the kings to say nothing of the Spanish, the cobia, the bonito and a bit of everything else. Scientists with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute have learned that most of the kings that summer in Northwest Florida spend winters off the Florida Keys and in the Atlantic as far north as Palm Beach, but as soon as the waters begin to warm in spring, the sh move back into the Gulf and head north. They usually arrive in strength in the Panhandle shortly after April 15, with May through October offering steady action. When the big schools of cigar minnows and herring arrive, the kings will be with them, anywhere from a half-mile off the beach to the wrecks 15 miles out and farther. A lot of sh also typically run the breaks offshore at 80 and at 160 feet. Kings are members of the tuna family, but are for the most part found on the coastal shelf; they are green water sh rather than the true pelagics of the open sea. Theyre caught with some regularity from Panhandle piers. School kings, aka snakes, are slender speedsters that average 7 to 10 pounds; they make up the bulk of the king sh schools. But there are also plenty of smokers in the mix, sh of 20 pounds and up, which literally are capable of making a misty smoke y from a reel as they scream line off at 30 miles an hour. Kings reach lengths approaching 6 feet and weights more than 90 pounds in a lifespan maxing out close to 20 years. The current IGFA all-tackle record is 93 pounds, caught in Puerto Rico in 1999. Fish of 50 pounds are caught occasionally in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but most of the line class records come in winter around the Florida Keys. Catching school kings is fairly straightforward; most anglers nd the sh by watching for diving birds or for other boats already on the school and proceed to troll a 5inch Clark or Drone spoon weighted with a trolling lead of a couple ounces around the outer edges of the school, or around arti cial or natural reefs and current breaks. Pulling the spoon behind a No. 2 or 3 planer also is highly effective, and during the dawn bite when the sh are often on top, they can be caught on unweighted spoons and jigs and even occasionally on a big topwater lure worked very fast. Kings can also be caught on a number of big lures including the Yo-Zuri Crystal Minnow Magnum, the Manns Stretch 25 and Stretch 30 and Mirrolure 113MR, which can be trolled at speeds to 9 knots without broaching its a great locator lure. Some also do well with a large chrome Rat-LTrap, a vibrating slab lure. Another Panhandle favorite for these schoolers is a cigar minnow on a feather-duster rig the tubular body of the cigar minnow trolls true while many at-sided bait species tend to spin. Trolling speed is typically 4 to 6 knots. You can catch a lot of kings by just pulling a rigged minnow at sunrise while everybody else is trying to catch live bait. Frozen cigar minnows are available at all Panhandle bait shops. For the larger kings, live bait is generally best bet; a large blue-runner or thread herring (aka greenback) on a stinger rig is the ticket. Most anglers use No. 6 copper-color wire as leader to prevent cutoffs on the razor-like teeth of the mackerels. One small triple-X strong treble goes through the nostrils, and a second dangles along the sides about 6 inches back. The rig prevents kings chomping off the bait sh tail without getting hooked, as they frequently do otherwise. The baits often can be caught around channel markers on a sabiki rig, a chain of small ies. These channel markers also often hold both kings and Spanish never pass one up if youre hunting sh. The live baits are eased along at walking speed, considerably slower than rigged baits or spoons. Some anglers like to lay down a scent trail by dragging a chum bag chopped bait sh, dog food and menhaden oil is a popular mix as they troll a circular pattern around a reef or hard bottom area, or simply circle bait sh schools. A favorite trick of tournament anglers is to sh a live bait down the color break line that makes up outside the larger inlets on strong outgoing tides on the outside of this line is clear water, pale green, while on the inside the water is black from the tanninstained bays. Theres usually a lot of grass oating down the line, and lots of crabs and other edibles in the eddies. The anglers slowly work the live baits down the green side of this line. Either way, once the migration arrives, the action is near certain. Catching school kings is fairly straightforward; most anglers nd the sh by watching for diving birds. These charter boats are docked in Destin.Photos special to The Star Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, April 10, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomOffshore action to the west is all abuzz as the 2014 gag grouper season opened in Franklin County on April 1. A few pompano were caught this past week on Cape san Blas, so we are getting back to normal for spring. Local area waters are warming up this week as the months are slowly changing. Good trout reports from St. Joe Bay this week have all anglers eager to fish! Spanish mackerel are still very plentiful and easy to find by slow trolling spoons or Christmas Tree rigs close to shore.

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By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Khaliel Spearman is aware of history in the Halifax All-Star Classic. Now hes aware of his place in it. The Rutherford senior set the overall scoring record with 37 points in leading the East to a 120-115 win over the West at the Billy Harrison Field House on Saturday. His achievement was nearly matched by the Wests Austin Carnley, who broke a long-standing team record with 30 points. The outcome also was the highest-scoring game in the 10-year history of the event. Spearman battled East teammate Alex Brown for scoring honors early in the second half and nished the nal 20 minutes with 28 points. He and Brown were instrumental in crafting a 12-2 run in 70 seconds that turned a ve-point lead into a 9984 East cushion with 8:42 to play. Spearman had 31 points, one more than previous East scoring record-holder Jon Wade, with a little more than two minutes to go. East coaches Travis Blanton and Thomas Register called timeout in the nal minutes and informed Spearman that he was nearing Taliah Moores overall mark of 33 set last year. Spearman tied Moore with a jumper and surpassed her with four free throws, the nal two capping the score. Spearman spoke fondly of Wade, who also played at Rutherford, during Media Day on Friday. Spearman joked Well, hes a good Jon Wade, but hes no Khaliel Spearman. No, indeed, as Spearman became the fourth Ram to earn MVP honors since the award was instituted in 2007. With all of these great teammates I have, I didnt expect this, Spearman said. Its a great accomplishment and it feels good to continue the tradition of Rudd (Rutherford) winning that MVP. The East also extended its winning streak to four games and secured the seventh win in the series. The triumph looked to be in doubt for 30 minutes, as Carnley of Paxton hit four of his nine 3-pointers in the rst half and the West trailed by only two points, 53-51. Carnley, who was the West MVP, and Ronnie Baylark, who scored Rutherfords Spearman sets scoring mark in East boys winBy BRANDON WALKERHalifax Media Services PANAMA CITY In the fall, Malone High School senior Curteeona Brelove will take her talents to Virginia Commonwealth University. On Saturday, though, she put on one last show for local fans at the 10th Halifax All-Star Classic at Gulf Coast State College. Brelove, a 6-foot-3 forward, scored a team-high 24 points and grabbed 12 rebounds to help the East team earn an 81-73 win over the West in the game that pits seniors from The News Heralds eightcounty area against representatives from Okaloosa, Walton and Santa Rosa counties. I really like this team a lot, said Brelove, who scored 14 of her 24 points in the rst half. We had good chemistry, played well together. It means a lot to play well today. The victory for the East is the third in 10 years, and rst since 2012. For Chipley coach Kimberly Tuel, the win was satisfying. We had a lot of talent, said Tuel, who led her team to the Class 1A state Star Staff ReportThe Junior Service League of Port St. Joe hosted a new fundraiser over the weekend that invited visitors into the neighborhood of WindMark Beach for a healthy springtime event. The Breeze by the Bay, a 5K and 10K run, received 122 registrants, smashing the 100-runner goal. The event raised money for upcoming community-focused JSL events and runners enjoyed a morning run alongside the beach. On Friday evening, the night before the run, the JSL hosted a Movie on the Green to welcome participants, allowing them to pick up their packets and enjoy free entertainment. Food for the movie event was provided by Centennial Bank.Star Staff ReportAshley Price struck out four and gave up six hits while allowing a single unearned run as the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team slipped past Port St. Joe 3-2 on Tuesday. Price was also 1 for 3 at the plate and scored one of the Lady Gator runs. Tara Walding scored the other two while going 2 for 3 at the plate. Brianna Bailey drove in two and had two hits and Cecily Hale was also 2 for 3 and drove in a run. Jade McLemore had a single. Naomi Parker picked up the win and seven players scored a run, drove in a run or both as the Lady Gators pummeled visiting Graceville 19-1 last Friday. Parker faced 25 batters and allowed two hits, one unearned run and struck out 10. Shamario Cole had two hits and scored four runs for the Lady Gators while Ashleigh Price was 2 for 3 with a double and two runs scored. Tara Walding was 4 for 4 with a pair of triples and three RBIs, Cecily Hale had two hits and scored a run and Brianna Bailey was 3 for 5, scoring once and driving in a run. Jade McLemore scored four times after a double and three walks, Kayla Cody added a single and scored a run and Parker was 1 for 2 and scored twice. Tiger Sharks fall 5-3 to South WaltonStar Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School baseball team lost a close district game at South Walton 5-3. Ethan Sander took the loss on the mound and Jarkeice Davis led the Port St. Joe attack with a pair of hits. The Tiger Sharks were at West Gadsden Tuesday and host Bay High tonight at 7 p.m. ET. Port St. Joe hosts Bozeman at 6 p.m. Friday. Prior to the game seniors Drew Lacour and Bryce Godwin will be recognized. Star Staff ReportThe weightlifting coaches at the two county public high schools tossed a new wrinkle into the season, promoting a Gulf County championship aimed at awarding not a team title, but individual titles. The teams squared off last week in advance of this weeks Region 11A weightlifting meet at Tallahassee Maclay. The Gators of Wewahitchka had four lifters qualify for the region meet; Port St. Joe had six Drew Jones, Carter Thacker, Zaccarro, Greg Smith, Umstead Sanders and Alvin Dempsey.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School baseball coach Tony Muina knew his sophomoreladen team would develop into a good team. Just not quite this soon. The Gators are 14-4 after last weeks victories over Sneads, Vernon and Franklin County and are pursuing an undefeated district record with just two district games remaining. The Gators are 10-0 in District 2-1A with contests against Cottondale and Blountstown on tap this week. Wewahitchka has already clinched the top seed in the district tournament which begins April 25 in Blountstown. Not bad for a team that has ve sophomores in the starting lineup, 11 sophomores total on the roster and just one senior. I knew that we had a chance to be good, but I didnt think wed in a position to be where we so quick, said Muina. We are a young team and the sophomores really had to step in and play. We have a pretty simple philosophy: play solid defense, pitch well and get the hits when we need them. I have told them I just want them to play well. If they do that the rest will take care of itself. Another characteristic of this team, Muina said, is that it is a team. He said there are no prima donnas, no superstars, just a cast that goes 14-15 deep with contributors across the board. Consider just one game last week, a 19-8 road win at Vernon. The lone senior, Isaac Madrid was 4 for 6 with four RBIs. Complimenting that was Tad Gaskin, Rashard Ranie, Peter Setterich, Chipper Gainie, Jonathan Palmer and Tanner Harden who all added at least two hits, combined to hit four doubles, a triple and a home run and drove in a combined seven runs. Ranie hit the home run, his sixth. The Gators pounded out 21 hits. That kind of production has been the norm for a team averaging just under 10 runs a game and has outscored district opponents 114-52. Almost every game we nd a way where 13 or 14 different guys help us with the game, Muina said. This is a team that plays as a team. We hit the ball decent. We score a lot of runs. Were not a superstar team. Up and down the lineup anybody can contribute. The pitching staff is paced by Gaskin, who struggled early in the season but is 5-0 in district play, along with Charlie Laird, who is 50 and came into an 8-8 game and through four hitless innings against Vernon. The goal now is to continue the improvement while pointing to the district and regional playoffs. This is, Muina said, as good a team as hes had in the past four years. The young Gators have put themselves in a spot to some postseason damage; they need to remember how they got there, Muina said. We are such a balanced team, we just try to stay consistent to who we are, Muina said. Weve gotten better as the year as gone by. We have played well at times and weve played well in the district obviously. But there is a still a lot of baseball left to play.Gators primed for district playoffs SPECIAL TO THE STARNaomi Parker pitched a complete game and scored twice as Wewahitchka beat visiting Graceville.Lady Gators rout Graceville, edge Port St. Joe Brelove wins MVP as East girls top West SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Junior Service League welcomed more than 120 runners to the Breeze by the Bay 5K/10K run event over the weekend. Junior Service League hosts Breeze by the Bay run Gulf County weightlifting championships RESULTS 119 pounds: 1. Michael Hinsley (W), 325 total; 2. Drew Jones (PSJ), 190 total;129 pounds: 1. Blake Kemp (W), 365 total; 2. Matt Simpson (PSJ), 285 total;139 pounds: 1. Carter Thacker (PSJ), 445 total; 2. Cameron Laster (W), 350 total;154 pounds: 1. River Sewell (W), 395 total; 2. Zac Jasinski (PSJ), 330 total;169 pounds: 1. Aaron Paul (PSJ), 395 total; 2. Adam Strange (W), 330 total;183 pounds: 1. Jamie Whit eld (W), 440 total; 2. Devin Strickland (PSJ), 395 total;199 pounds: 1. Reggie Smith (PSJ), 560 total;219 pounds: 1. Umstead Sanders (PSJ), 450 total; 2. Hunter Ward (PSJ), 210 total;238 pounds: 1. Alvin Dempsey (PSJ), 420 total; 2. Traquan Tiller (W), 360 total;Page 7 See RUTHERFORD A8 See BRELOVE A8 PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.comThursday, April 10, 2014 ASection

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 201425 points, helped the West build a 65-55 lead three minutes into the second half. Spearmans 3-pointer six minutes later capped an East rally for an 82-80 lead. The East didnt trail again. We gave them a run for their money, said Carnley, who broke Jeremy Paynes West record of 27 points set in the inaugural year of 2005. I just wanted to do my best to help my team, but Im not gonna lie, it feels good to set the scoring record. Spearman agreed that the individual accolade was satisfying and the new basketball he received as MVP also would be a nice addition to his pickup games. But he said there was more to the honor and more to the victory. This is to show people that we put in the work and work hard at Rutherford, Spearman said. And we (the East) didnt want this (streak) to end. Chai Baker scored 15 points and Roderick Copeland 13 for the East, which connected on 19 3-pointers. Denzel Ware added 20 points, Lane Strickland scored 12 and Wyatt Kemper 11 for the West, which held seven rst-half leads. and her team have been focusing on as they try to build tourism during such shoulder seasons. The Welcome Center in Port St. Joe saw a jump in visitors of 31 percent and trafc to the agencys website has increased 169 percent. Last month alone, Jenkins and her team distributed some 15,000 visitors guides. The number of Facebook fans, with a goal of 10,000 this year, has already reached over 9,600. The numbers are really good, Jenkins said. And the visitors noticed the effort and focus of the TDC, indicated several advisory board members. Board chair David Warriner said he thought better communications and networking among visits was well-fostered by the TDC and Ronald Pickett noted an increase in available activities beyond two appreciation receptions. I think a lot of them were impressed with what we were doing as far as providing activities, Pickett said. The spring promotion on Instagram has gone well, Jenkins said, though the numbers are less than she had hoped. The quality of the photos posted to reect how folks think of Gulf County, however, have exceeded her hopes. I have to think more of the quality than the quantity, she said. The spring promotion is aimed at getting folks to snap their photos for upload to Instagram, the fastest-growing social media platform in the country, and tagging to #GulfCountynolter. The promotion, which closes at the end of the month, includes collaboration with several entities, a blogging network, the online presence of Field and Stream magazine, among others that include the non-prot Outdoor Nation whose mission is to connect the so-called Millennial generations to the outdoors. The spring promotion is going real well, Jenkins said. I am pleased with the results so far. The branding is good. People are liking it. We are getting pretty good exposure with it. The underlying hope for the promotion was to increase awareness about Gulf County in the nontraditional tourist months of shoulder season. That exposure grows exponentially when linking to social media and online platforms. And using that increased awareness of Gulf County as a springboard for additional promotions throughout the year. The increase in Google impressions during the pre-spring and spring promotions total nearly 7 million. The goal across all platforms is 13 million, Jenkins said, a reachable goal. The local partners benet, Jenkins said. For example, recent trafc indicates that during the early spring and spring period 46 percent of visitors were clicking through to visit the website of lodging, restaurant and outdoors partners. Handing off 50 percent of trafc is pretty good, Jenkins said.Sponsorship applicationsWith the deadline passed for applications to receive event sponsorship funding from the TDC, Jenkins said the process would begin of winnowing down the applications for presentation to the board. After advisory council approval the nal list of sponsorship funding must be approved by the Board of County Commissioners. Jenkins said she hoped to have that task completed by the middle of May in time for the crafting of county budgets. The application pool was broadened this year, but the link to collaboration with a lodging partner and heads in beds was tightened. The TDC received 18 applications compared to 21 last year, but the total funding being sought was $110,000 compared to $71,000 last year. TDC from page A1water and the timing, Nelson said. We are going to start putting things in place and get ready for it. Nelson said indications are a ood event similar to that in 2005. That year ood waters forced the closure of a number of roads in the north end and some residences were inundated with water. The ooding is likely to be most severe in the areas of Howard Creek, Red Bull Island and similarly low-lying areas on the north end, Nelson said. Folks in those areas are urged to take precautions.Beacon Hill varianceA prickly debate broke out about a variance requested by a property owner in the Beacon Hill area across U.S. 98 from Veterans Memorial Park and abutting park land on the beach side. The variance had been tabled for more information last meeting by Commissioner Warren Yeager, who along with the county attorney and county administrator was not present for the meeting. The parcel in question has been the subject of some controversy in the past as previous owners have sought concessions from the BOCC because of constraints on developing the parcel. In turn, county veterans and supporters of the park have consistently protested plans to develop the parcel as an infringement on the park and its land. Ellis Smith, a Georgia attorney and current landowner, was joined by his local attorney and engineer and protested several statements made during the previous meeting about the legality of the variance. Ive been singled out and treated differently than anybody in the county, Smith said. He said he was deeding over a quarter acre of the parcel for beach access from the park in order for his son to secure the variance, a variance which he said was legal. Commissioner Ward McDaniel agreed, saying Smith was entitled to divide his property and sell one parcel to his son and the son was entitled to further divide that property. You misled us two weeks ago, you have a history of that, Commissioner Carmen McLemore said to Commissioner Joanna Bryan, who asserted two weeks ago and again Tuesday that the variance is in violation of the countys land development regulation. She said the parent parcel in question had already been divided and further division by Smiths son was illegal. She offered the specic section in the LDRs pertaining to such actions. This is a direct violation of the LDR and you continue to do this, Bryan said. This lot was not big enough to be divided. This is wrong and it is bad for the community. I am appalled. She said Smith would have to undertake a subdivision plat to conform. While the BOCC could provide a variance based on hardship, she said any hardship was the result of Smiths actions. She said she was not surprised by McLemores comments in favor given Smiths nancial contributions to his previous election campaign. Bryan also asserted the public already had beach access and did not need Smiths donation and said the proposal was to build a structure that would impact views from the park, saying assertions to the contrary on the structure and beach access were false information. Resident Rodney Herring, current commander of VFW Post 10069, was one of several residents to speak against the variance. I want to go on record on behalf of the public that we oppose any variance that diminishes the enjoyment of that park in any way, Herring said. Commissioner Tan Smiley and McLemore said the county attorney is paid to research such issues and they had been provided the needed information that indicated the variance conformed to county rules. Throughout the lengthy debate, McDaniel gaveled speakers out of order and personal jibes were exchanged by commissioners. If you have a certain relationship with the board you get what you want, Bryan said at one point. This will open the board up to lawsuits. The variance was approved 3-1 with Bryan dissenting. Other business: After a complaint from resident Billy Traylor regarding a March 27 debate by the members of the Apalachee Regional Planning Council regarding a loan sought by Traylors company, commissioners voted unanimously to replace Bryan as the BOCC representative to the board and replace her with Commissioner Ward McDaniel. Bryan was also on the losing end of vote to approve a new model for economic development in the county. She sought to clarify some language in the proposal included in the BOCC meeting packet. McLemore accused her of not doing her homework and said he supported the county attorney who drafted the language. BRADLEYANDANGELINAare beautifulBorderColliesthatwere foundasstrays.Theyaresmart,gentle, obedientdogsandneedtostay togetherastheyareabondedpair. Sheisabout7-8yrsoldandheis5-6 yrsold.Sheishousetrainedandwell mannered.Heisalittlemoredicult ashewasneverhousetrainedand willmarkinside.Becauseofthis, thesetwoneedtogotoahomewith plentyofoutdoorspacetorunand behoused.Please,ifyouhavefenced acreageandarelookingfor 2greatdogs,pleasecomemeetthis specialpair! Volunteersaredesperatelyneededto socializeallofourdogsandcats. Wearealwayslookingforpeoplewillingtobringoneofouranimalsintotheir hometobefosteredforvariousneeds.Anytimeyoucansparewouldbegreatly appreciated. CallKarenat670-8417formoredetailsorvisittheFranklinCountyHumane Societyat244StateRoad65inEastpoint.Youmaylogontothewebsite atwww.forgottenpets.orgtoseemoreofouradoptablepets. FranklinCountyHumaneSociety SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday FLOODING from page A1 RUTHERFORD from page A7championship game this season. Any time you get this much talent together, its fun to coach. Choctawhatchee guard Brittany Washington, the Wests Most Valuable Player, led all scorers with 25 points. For the East, 11 players reached the scoring column, led by Breloves 24 and 15 from Sneads guard Tasherica McMillon. The East also enjoyed a 44-29 edge on the glass, an advantage it used to outscore the West 13-5 over the games nal three minutes. I thought their size was a big difference, said Paxton coach Steve Williams, who led his Lady Cats to the 1A state championship over Chipley. Our girls played hard and played together. I really enjoy coming over here to this game and seeing players get to play together that have been opponents all year. Its a great game. The East opened the game on a 9-0 scoring run and the West never fully recovered. The East led throughout, and the closest the West got was three points when Washington connected on a 3-pointer with three minutes left to cut the advantage to 6865. Brelove and company were too much down the stretch on the way to the eight-point win. I just wanted to come out and play my game, Brelove said. After that, I just let the game take care of itself. BRELOVE from page A7 By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Another rst for Florida. Last week the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association successfully deployed 59 news reefs off the coast of Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe, 10 of which were the aptly named super reefs. These super reefs, taller than any reef previously contracted by the MBARA, have 10 feet of exposed rebar at the top to draw in sh like amberjack, wahoo, king mackerel and red snapper that hunt higher in the water column. Though the growth on the reefs which establishes it as a habitat can take up to two years to form, bait sh will begin to visit within two days and the process can begin. Well watch how the structures perform for future construction purposes, said MBARA President Bob Cox. Well be diving them fairly often. Some of the reefs were grouped closely together while others were spread further apart. This will help the organization gather information and learn which type of reefs have the best performance and which arrays help to create a ourishing ecosystem. The deployment process took approximately ve hours. Reefs in last weeks deployment were placed in 18 new sites and two memorial reefs were expanded with private funds. The reefs were placed 1-15 miles offshore and coordinates will soon be published on the MBARA website for those who wish to dive, sh or visit the locations. The reefs, constructed by Walter Marine, in Orange Beach, AL, were built from Florida limestone to promote natural marine growth on the hard substrates of the structures. Four different designs were crafted, ranging from 6-25 feet tall and weighing 4,000 to 36,000 pounds each and sit in depths from 85-104 feet. Its great to see it complete, said Cox. You work, work, worktheres lots of planning and logistics that goes into it. Cox said he was excited for the benets it would provide for eco-tourism, whether its the divers who visit the area, the boaters, or the spear shermen who free-dive reefs for amberjack. The deployment, which had been in the planning stages since January 2013 was made possible by a $120,000 grant from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a $55,000 grant match from MBARA and $8,000 from private donors. The MBARA partnered with the City of Mexico Beach and the FWC to complete the $183,000 construction project. It was the largest project undertaken by MBARA to date. Its good to have long range planning, said Cox. If you have that plan then you can really make the most of the short-notice opportunities that come along.WEs S LOCh H ER | The StarThe Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association successfully deployed 59 news reefs off the coast of Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe.MBARA successfully deploys super reefs

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, April 10, 2014 BPage 1SectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The annual St. Joseph Bay Cleanup and Kayak Festival will be 1-5 p.m. ET April 27. This is the 10th year for the event, which has been moved from the fall to April to celebrate Earth Day and the National C.I.T.O. while the event is still registered with the National River Cleanup organization and its national River Cleanup Week, said Debbie VanFleet with Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost, one of the sponsors of the bay cleanup. Folks can enjoy a beautiful afternoon on St. Joseph Bay while helping to pick up trash that has accumulated in the shallow waters, VanFleet said. Kayaks rentals are being offered to responsible adults and families who wish to participate. Participants must have a valid credit card as security against loss of or damage to free rental equipment, and adults (18 and over) must sign a waiver of liability for themselves and their minor children. Minors must be supervised by an adult at all times. Launch your own kayak or make reservations at Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost, 229-1991; Scallop Cove Bait and Tackle, 227-1573; or Scallop Cove Park Concession, 229-1188. A limited supply of collection bags will be available, or bring your own bags. Water shoes and gloves are recommended. In addition, a third location, at Eagle Harbor, has been added to expand the cleanup. The Coastal Community Association once again is sponsoring two prizes worth $100 for a geo-cache hunt. The GPS coordinates for the hunt will be announced the day of the cleanup on April 27. DAWGS in Prison celebrates ve years, 32nd classBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Maybe they sound farfetched, but the numbers dont lie: Over the past ve years, 334 dogs have been adopted across 19 states thanks to DAWGS in Prison. The Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability program reached a milestone last week, celebrating its 32nd graduating class alongside its fth anniversary. The program, operated out of the Gulf Forestry Camp through collaboration between the Board of County Commissioners, the Florida Department of Corrections and the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, utilizes inmates who volunteer to spend eight weeks training dogs, teaching the basic commands, obedience and crate training, before they can be adopted into Forever Homes. More than 380 inmates have completing the elective program, which presents skills that can be utilized in life on the outside. The program works to bring in stray or abandoned dogs that will complete the training before, ideally, going to a new home, wherever it may be. Adopted dogs live as far away as California and Maine, though some stay close to home in Florida or Alabama. In her speech to the crowd of adopters, inmates and supporters of the program, co-director Sandi Christy told attendees she was moved by the joy the program brings to everyone involved. Most people wouldnt associate joy with a prison, Christy said. Here, we see joy in dogs who are relieved to be out of the shelter, and we see the joy in the inmate trainers because they realize that theyre making a difference. Take a moment today to experience some of that joy. With graduation over, pups from the class would readjust to their new homes in Florida, Alabama and Connecticut. Joey Roberts from Foley, Ala., made the trek to retrieve Grif n, a yellow lab. By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Juniors and seniors in Gulf County schools were reminded this week that drinking and driving dont mix. In a presentation Monday at Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe high schools, speaker Renee Napier of the Meagan Napier Foundation spoke to students about the dangers of drinking and driving. In 2000, Napiers daughter, Meagan, was killed in Pensacola when Eric Smallridge, driving drunk, crashed his car into Meagans, killing her and her best friend With proms on the horizon for both county high schools, Napier stressed the importance of making good decisions and said getting behind the wheel after drinking is never a good one. She also discussed how those decisions can have ripple effects that go across many families and affect many people. Its all about a choice, Napier told students. The choices you make are the ones that are the most important. In addition to living through the loss of a child, Napier spoke about the feelings she had toward Smallridge, who was sentenced to 22 years in prison for manslaughter, though he served less than half that. Since being released from prison, Smallridge travels with Napier to help students understand the impact 4 seconds can make on their life. Theres not a lot of good that comes from drinking, Smallridge said. One choice changed my life. Think about your life think about what it would mean to throw it all away. By signing a pledge not to drink, students received hot pink wristbands emblazoned with the words I promise. Napier encouraged the students to enter all conversations positively, warning that a person never knows when they might be speaking to someone for the last time. Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison brought Napier to the schools in hopes of deterring students from drinking and to educate them about the life changing consequences drinking and driving can have. Bay cleanup, kayak festival April 27SPECIAL TO THE STARPart of the St. Joseph Bay Cleanup will be a geo-cache hunt. Above are the winners of last years hunt. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Of these 1990s TV series which aired the most original episodes at 180? Northern Exposure, Mad About You, Nash Bridges, Seinfeld 2) Which future First Ladys rst marriage was to William Warren? Betty Ford, Rosalyn Carter, Eleanor Roosevelt, Jackie Kennedy 3) Statistically speaking on what day of the week do fewer people play golf? Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 4) Who was president when Nebraska was admitted to the Union? Fillmore, A. Johnson, Gar eld, Wilson 5) In biblical times a cab was approximately how much? 1 pint, 2 quarts, 1 gallon, 5 gallons 6) What does the pre x hydro mean? Before, Under, Water, Above 7) Whose of cial state tourism magazine runs a regular column called One of Our Fifty is Missing? Alaska, Oregon, Utah, N. Mexico 8) Which country initiated the method of house numbering, odd on one side, even on the other? England, France, USA, Spain 9) Where did Scotty Bowman become the rst coach to win 1,000 games? NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB 10) Who played Nacho in the 2006 movie Nacho Libre? Jack Black, Vin Diesel, Jim Dunk, George Lopez 11) Of these whose son Jacob died in a WWII prison camp? Churchill, Eisenhower, Stalin, Patton 12) An average human sheds how many pounds of skin each year? .5, 1, 1.5, 2 13) Which of these is the rst letter of any U.S. state? B, J, Q, T 14) What was the Indianapolis street gang led by John Dillinger in his youth? Dexter Lake, Dirty Dozen, Derbin Creek, Distant Cousins ANSWERS 1) Seinfeld. 2) Betty Ford. 3) Tuesday. 4) A. Johnson. 5) 2 quarts. 6) Water. 7) N. Mexico. 8) USA. 9) NHL. 10) Jack Black. 11) Stalin. 12) 1.5. 13) T. 14) Dirty Dozen. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Students learn perils of drinking and drivingPHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarGulf County juniors and seniors listen to Renee Napiers speech about the dangers of drinking and driving in a presentation this week. Napier, below, lost her daughter, Meagan, in a crash with a drunk driver and encouraged students to make good life choices. PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarDogs adopted from the 32nd class of the DAWGS in Prison program at the Gulf Forestry Camp found new homes in Florida, Alabama and Connecticut. Over the last ve years, 334 dogs have found Forever Homes in 19 states.Diamonds in the ruffSee RUFF B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 AMa A TEUR RaADIO LICENSE EXa AMSStar Staff Report Amateur radio license exams will be given at 10 a.m. ET Saturday, May 10 at the Gulf County EOC building in Port St. Joe. It is time to get on the air or upgrade an existing license. For registration and information contact C.H. Tillis AJ4XJ at 648-8251.AMERICaAN LLEGION POST 116 SpPECIaAL MEETINGSpecial to The Star There will be a special meeting of American Legion Post 116 at 4 p.m. ET Thursday, April 10. The meeting will be held at VFW Post 10069 on Trout Avenue in Highland View for the purpose of installing new ofcers for the ensuing year and to rm up details for the Legion annual Good Friday sh fry/chicken barbecue fundraiser at Veterans Memorial Park. New ofcers to be installed: Commander, Wanda Wawruck; Vice Commander, Brian Cahill; Adjutant, John Miick; Finance Ofcer, Kenny Wood; Chaplain, Ron Groleau; Sgt.-at-Arms, Phil Dodson; Service Ofcer, Bo Williams. Members are urged to attend to support their new ofcers and to be a part of the annual fundraiser. Eligibility for Membership and Benets can be found on the American Legion Website: www.legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. For God and Country.AMERICaAN LLEGION BENEFIT FISH FRY/CHICKEN DINNERStar Staff Report American Legion Post 116 of Port St. Joe will hold its annual benet sh fry/ chicken barbeque on Good Friday, April 18. The event will begin at 12 noon ET and last until the food is gone. The event will take place at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. Fish or BBQ chicken with sides of baked beans, coleslaw and hush puppies will be served. Soft drinks and water will be available. A $7 donation will be used by the Legion to support PSJHS NJROTC scholarship and other American Legion projects. Legion Post 116 will also have a representative there to assist any qualied veterans with information regarding joining our Post. Interested veterans can also go to www.legion. org. Thank you all for your support. For God and Country. Society BRIEFS KittenandPuppyseasonisupon usandwehaveanabundance. Pleaseconsideroneofourfully vettedpetsforyounextaddition toyourfurryfamily.Evenifyou cannotadopt,youcanhelpin otherways: Fosterhomesgiveourgreatpets theattentionandsocialization theycrave.Weprovideallsupplies needed.Weneedvolunteersto helpwithmaintenancearound theshelter.Towelsandbedding arealwayswelcome.Petcarriers andcrates. Donationsofkittylitterisingreat demandaswellaspuppytoys.Monetarydonationsarealwayswelcome. Anydonationnomatterhowsmallwillbegreatlyappreciated. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation.Allpetsadopted fromSJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemail townsend.hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumane Societyat850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Onlineapplicationsandpetphotosareavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.org OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm!Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneed ofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare!Thehoursfor thestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstore andourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouall theresoon! Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyor Shelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org BlueBuffaloand TasteoftheWild AvailableHere!DowntownPortSt.Joe850-229-6161 bowwowbeach.com301REIDAVENUE PORTST.JOEFLORIDA,32456 AutoInsuranceHannonInsurance227-1133ShopatHome! SocietyDespina Williams and Nathan Q. Parker were joyfully united in marriage at 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 22, 2014, at the Apalachicola Museum of Art. The ceremony was ofciated by the brides childhood priest, the Rev. Thomas C. Weller. A reception followed in the adjacent gallery rooms. The bride is the daughter of Jerry and Mary Williams, of Apalachicola. She is the granddaughter of the late Nick and Theodora (Lula) George, of Apalachicola, and the late Belon and Vicie Williams of Apalachicola. The groom is the son of Larry and Kristine Parker, of Matthews, North Carolina. He is the grandson of William and the late Janice Parker, of Dowling Park, and Frank and Freda Freeman, of Nacogdoches, Texas. The bride was attended by her Matron of Honor, Kelley Mason and bridesmaid Jessica Ward. The grooms father, Larry Parker, stood as his Best Man and his uncle, Bob Dees, served as groomsman. Music was provided by the brides cousin, Greg Fuentes. Original artwork, made by the couple, their families and friends, decorated the gallery walls. It was a beautiful day. The bride graduated summa cum laude from the University of Florida with a bachelor of arts in English, and currently works for the State University of New York in New Paltz. The groom was medically retired from the Marine Corps after 10 years of service, and is currently in the Honors Program at the State University of New York in Middletown The couple resides in Walden, N.Y. WeddingStar Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Elementary School SWAT Executive Board held a presentation ceremony last Friday recognizing the Port St. Joe CVS store, No. 5246, on the decision to discontinue the sale of tobacco products in an effort to improve the health of Gulf County. I want to congratulate CVS Caremark for todays bold decision that will lead to better health. Removing cigarettes from their more than 700 locations in Florida is welcome news for the families and communities of our state. I urge other retailers to follow suit and invest in the long term health of their customers and employees in Florida, said Dr. John Armstrong, State Surgeon General and Secretary of the Florida Department of Health. Sweet corn is a favorite among home gardeners. As long as the space is available, its not difcult to grow. Corn is a New World native crop, with archaeological evidence suggesting that it was rst domesticated in Mexico. This crop was the basis of the Mayan, Incan and Aztec civilizations, and by the time European explorers came to the New World in the 1500s, corn had become a staple for the native people. Corn is monoecious (monee-shuss), which means that there are both male and female owers on each corn plant. In some monoecious plants, male and female parts are in the same ower. In corn, male and female owers are in different locations, the male owers form a tassel which is at the top of the plant. The female ower is located at the junction of leaves and stem. It consists of collection of hairs (silks) enclosed in the husks of what will become the ears. There silks are pollen receiving tubes. Windblown pollen from the mole ower (tassel) falls on the silks below. Each silk leads to a kernel, and pollen must land on all silk for the ear to ll out completely with kernel. Corn comes in a variety of colors and sugar contents. Look for sugary enhanced varieties, with rm and sweet kernels, or the super sweet varieties, with tender and very sweet kernels. Some varieties of white and yellow corn that perform well in Florida are Silver Queen (white), How Sweet It Is (white), Sweet Ice (white), Merit (yellow), Kandy Korn (yellow), and Peaches and Cream (bicolor). Sweet corn thrives best in well-drained soils but will tolerate a wide range of soil types. Optimum pH ranges from 6.0 to 6.5. Till the soil to a depth of 68 inches using a spade, plow or rototiller. Avoid tilling the soil while it is too wet because clodding may occur. Sweet corn is a warmseason vegetable requiring soil temperature between 60-90 degrees F. Avoid planting seed in cool soils. Wait until after the last average dates of the last killing frost before planting. If planted too early, weak stands, stunted growth or frost-killed seedling may result. The newer, sweeter varieties are even more sensitive to cool, wet soils any may not perform well in these conditions. Plant corn in an area that receives at least six to eight hours of sunlight. It is benecial to plant near a water source for needed irrigation. Plant seed approximately 11-inch deep in rows three feet apart with 8-12 inches between each seed in the row. A hand pushed mechanical planter can make seeding much easier for larger stands of corn. A soil test through the local County Extension Ofce is always the best way to determine the lime and fertilizer needs. If lime is required, it can be tilled into the ground during soil preparation but is most effective when applied 2 to 3 months prior to planting. If a soil test is not done, a general guideline is to apply 3-4 pounds of 10-10-10 per 100 linear row feet before planting. Side dress two or three times during the growing season with ammonium sulfate (210-0-17) at the rate of 2 pounds per 100 feet of row space. More frequent side dressing may be required on sandy soils or when excessive ran occurs. Corn requires a minimum of 1 inch of water per week for normal development. The most critical period for water is during pollination and during nal ear lling. Sweet corn matures in 60 to 100 day, depending on the varieties. Sweet corn should be ready for harvest about 20 days after the appearance of the rst silk stands, sweet corn is picked during the milk stage when the kernels are fully formed but not completely mature. After picking, cook and eat corn that day or store it in cool temperatures, such as in a refrigerator, as soon as possible. It can then be canned, frozen or eaten fresh within few days. Keeping the corn cool is the key to better avor as high temperatures will convert the sugar in the kernels to starch, giving it a bland taste. For more information on growing sweet corn contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf.ifas.u.edu or edis.ifas.u. edu and see Publication SP 103 /VH 021. RROY LEE CaARTERCounty extension directorDDespina Williams, NNathan Parker wed SpSP ECIa A L TO TT HE SS Ta A RPort St. Joe Elementary School Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) President, MaLena Ramsey, presents certicate of Greatness in Public Health to CVS manager Donna Odom and staff.SWAT congratulates CVS on tobacco decision Tips for growing sweet corn in the backyard garden

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Special to The StarThe following students made the honor roll for the third nine weeks at Port St. Joe Elementary. Kindergarten, all As: Myles Acree, Hunter Ard, Cole Bailey, Joshua Baker, Maya Barnes, Zora Beauchamp, JaLeighya Becton, Christopher Bradley, Lauren Brant, Carson Brown, Corban Butts, ,Caitlin Cathey, Blake Childress, Christina Clayton, Brayden Dailey, Sumner Dickey, Logan Ellwood, Dominic Fitzgerald, Dru Flowers, Hailey Green, Fenix Grogan, Eli Harris, Cole Hart, Kenley Hatcher, Addison Hendricks, Easton Herring, Emma Hill, Anderson Hodges, Johnnie Hood, Chloe Jones, Bobby Landrum, Landon Layeld, Christopher Lee, Brody Lemieux, Stratton Levins, Nathan Lipford, Jacob Marshall, Reagan Mathews, Kymani Mcadoo, Hallie Mize, Brody Mock, Kari Moore, Colt Patterson, Colton Raker, Kaley Rhodes, Melina Ruiz, Reagan Thomas, James Ward, Lexi Webb, Paisley White, Keiara Wineld, ShaNara Woodruff, Callee Wray. Kindergarten, As and Bs: Juan Carlos Baxcajay, Christianna Causey, Harmony Dwight, Trinity Farmer, Jakwavian Gray, Jayvonta Harris, Shamyiah Hayes, Donell Henry, Dovud Kouljanov, Preston Magnussen, Kaleigh Mohr, Cameron Nicholsen, Nijah Quinn, Jamie Rapier, Leelyn Rollins, Jenna Shively, Emily Sudduth, Aaliyah Thompson, Jett Whicker, Lia Wood, 1st Grade, all As Mikey Allen,Whitney Butler, Gannon Buzzett, Sara Beasley Flowers, Carly Hatcher, Ava Kennedy, Peyton Knox, Boston McGhee, Bionca Rafeld, Bella Ray, Leila Smith, Kole Street, Emily Warner, Karis Whicker, Landon White. 1st Grade, As and Bs: TaNiyah Bryan, Camdon Buckley, Ashen Dady, Kate Fidler, James Foxworth, MacKenzie Freisleben, Zuri Garner, Colton Johnson, Kaelee Johnson, Makayan Jones, Lyriq Larry, Hailyn Levins, Chloe Harper, Jasper Hayes, Olivia Leonard, Sydney Kingsland-Lormand, Eileen Madrid, Kensley Mathews, Zoey Metcalf, Draven ONeal, Kiyleh Parker, Jackson Reatherford, Levi Sanders, Zachary Shively, Kellie Simmons, King Waters 2nd Grade, all As: Garrett Acree, Estevan Angel, Jenna Bareld, Zoey Burkett, Ashleigh Causey, Sam Childers, Sara Durham, Mary Margaret Farrell, Shauna Flowers, Tanner Fogle, Dawson Fisher, Wake Gifn, Brandon Heckenlively, Cassidy Lewis, Austin OBryan, Luke Pickels, Dakota Tousignant, Elyse Williams. 2nd Grade, As and Bs: JaMarrien Becton, Bella Cannington, Cody Combow, Juveryona Daniels, Devin Daves, Chase Dykes, Arlena Gleichner, Carson Hendricks, Thomas Hutchinson, T.J. Jenkins, Danica Kelly, Lance Larry, Mikhai Larry, Jamal Leslie, Kaylee Schweikert, Ardarien Shackleford, Miracle Smiley, Fisher Vandertulip, Diamond Warner, Brooke White 3rd Grade, all As: Eli Fidler, Luke Lentz, Gabriella Price, Hannah Riley. 3rd Grade, As and Bs: Sam Brown, Emma Grace Burke, Madison Burkett, Maelynn Butler, Walker Chumney, Skylar Clayton, Donovan Cumbie, Jaydon Gant, Payton Garland, Celeste Hamm, Prince Jones, Jacob Justice, Chase Lanford, Dane Mallon, Cole Moore, Jabara Pearson, Ricky Sherrill, ShaNecia Sims, Janasia Walker, Emigen Watkins, Halee Whicker, Britt White, Dane Wright. 4th Grade, all As: Trent Antley, Elliana Burkett, Ricky Forbes-Rosado, Halston Fulk, Zoe Gerlach, Ashton McGlamery, Donovan Miniat, Erica Ramsey, Ava Ryan, Lily Wockenfuss, Lauren Woosley, Caleb Zur Heiden. 4th Grade, As and Bs: Skylah Addison, Briana Biagini, Sammya Brown, Paloma Burgos-Harris, Ashton Burkett, Ace Cannon, Santana Causey, Kaleigh Clayton, Diamond Collier, Chasity Finch, Destiny Dykes, Julia Gainnie, Madelyn Gortemoller, Natalie Graziano, Shadavia Hudgins, Laura Beth Hill, Porter Hodges, Nic Jefferson, Emily Lacour, MiMi Larry, Aidan Lewis, Morgan Mills, Cliff Money, Amari Nickson, Rylee Reatherford, Gena Rocha, Megan Saleh, Alexandria Thomason, Sarah Beth Thompson. 5th Grade, all As: Leanna Baumgardner, Ali Godwin, Philip Riley, Caleb Wright. 5th Grade, As and Bs: Austin Ard, Henry Balogh, Cherokee Braun, Savannah Burkett, Lyndsey Butler, Parker Cornwell, Judson Grifes, Tyler Guthrie, Haley Harriman, Corbin Ingalls, Lauren Jenkins, Gavin Jones, Kevin Lacivita, Lanecia Larry, Evelyn Laue, Bryson Lee, Mattison Mills, Gabrielle Nicodemus, Jack Randall, Alex Strickland, Hannah Tomlinson, Analisa Treglown, Gabrielle Wood. 6th Grade, all As: Brandon Barnes, Jade Cothran, Sean Farnsley, Jireh Gant, Madeline Gingell, Greg Julius, Bailey Lake, Zach McFarland, Malena Ramsey, Caroline Sapp, Sara Whiteld. 6th Grade, As and Bs: Jaheim Ash, Justice Bareld, Adison Burkett, Brianna Butler, Wesley Chapman, Tristan Doran, Joseph Farrell, Micaela Fedd, John Austin Gee, Brittany Hanson, Lane Herring Rainey Nobles, Hagen Parrish, Jytrel Riley, Jacob Sander, Caleb Schweikert, Rachel Sherman, Hannah Smith. PUBLICNOTICEAPublicHearingwillbeheldatthePlanningandDevelopment ReviewBoard(PDRB)onApril21,2014at8:45a.m.EST,and attheBoardofCountyCommissioners(BOCC)meetingon Tuesday,April22,2014at9:00a.m.EST.Bothpublichearings willbeheldintheBOCCMeetingRoomattheRobertM.Moore AdministrationBuilding,1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,PortSt. Joe,Florida.epublichearingswillbetodiscussandacton thefollowing: 1.Variance-James&KatherineKoronaParcelID#04276-360RLocated inWindMarkBeachLot72onSignalLane-Roadsetbackfrom SingleLane. 2.MinorSubdivision-PentelFamilyPartnershipLDT-ParcelID #04243-000R-Section16,Township7South,Range11Westnext toWatermarkWayinSt.JosephShores-asix(6)unitsubdivision. 3.CountyDevelopmentRegulationsandPolicies 4.Sta,PublicandOpenDiscussion epublicisencouragedtoattendandbeheardonthesematters. InformationpriortothemeetingcanbeviewedatthePlanning Departmentat1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,Room311. 2077822 Gun ShowFebruary 23rd&24thFt.WaltonBeach FairgroundsFREE PARKINGConcealed WeaponsClassSat/Sun11amor2pmFloridagunshows.comSat9-5Sun10-4 PanamaCity FairgroundsAPRIL 12th&13th Tolearnhowyoucansupportour communitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat(850)770-2108 ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY PANAMACITYTHECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL AutoInsuranceHannonInsurance227-1133ShopatHome! School NewsThe Star| B3Thursday, April 10, 2014PORT ST. JOE EE LEMENTARY SCHOOLThis weeks Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Aydan Davis, Mary Margaret Farrell and Josh Baker Back row:  Farrah-Jade Watts, George Foxworth, Caleb Schweikert and Emigen Watkins. DAZZLING DOLpPHINsS Special to The StarFaith Christian School K4 students read! FCS students learn to read with an introduction to phonics. Developing a strong foundation with the FCS curriculum creates a bridge that helps students obtain a better understanding of written language. Phonics can help students break down words with certain sounds, and children that can sound out a word have an enormous advantage when reading. This skill branches into all academics, and gives students the tools to succeed. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a good reader. Open enrollment for new students has begun for the 2014-2015 school year. Class sizes are limited so early registration is recommended. Call 229-6707 or visit our website, www.FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. CCadets recognized for community supportSpecial to The StarSupporting the Gulf County community is a main goal of the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC program. Recently, ve cadets were recognized by Tupelo Free and Accepted Masonic Lodge No. 289 for their support of the Lodge and its members and as representatives of their company mates overall community support throughout the year. During the Lodges annual awards dinner at the Lodge in Wewahitchka, Cadets Megan Hubbard, Matthew Rocha, Kayla Willis, Claudia Gref and Alex Naus received certicates of appreciation recognizing their community service efforts. The cadets Presented the Colors to start the ceremony and performed an extremely poignant Flag Folding Ceremony depicting the meaning behind each fold of a correctly folded American Flag. The cadets wish to thank the Lodge for their recognition and support and are looking forward to further serving the Gulf County community. The Port St. Joe NJROTC is a citizenship and leadership training program cosponsored by Gulf County Schools and the United States Navy. Each year, more than 600 hours of community service are performed by the Cadets through active participation in community events. PSJ ELEMENTARY HONOR ROLL The Lions Tale

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SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org BruceHodge, Pastor 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week.Michael Jay Bouington, 49, of Sanford, Florida, passed away Monday, April 7 after an extended illness. He is survived by his wife, Patty, of Sanford; mother Betty, of Port St. Joe, one brother, Mitchell and wife, Angela, of Port St. Joe; one nephew, Kyle; three nieces, Mary Caitlin, Catherine and Kristen. Michael is also survived by his wonderful in-laws, Federico and Vicky Fuentes. Michael was a native of Port St. Joe and graduated from Port St. Joe High School, Gulf Coast Community College and the University of Central Florida. He was preceded in death by his father, J.W. Bouington. Funeral arrangements are pending.Michael Jay Bouington5/25/1957 3/3/2014After family and friends, the three favorite things in the life of Allen Cox were rooting for the FSU Seminoles, snapper shing from his boat and playing golf. Sadly, Allen has rooted for the Noles his last time, caught his last sh and swung his last club on this Earth. He passed away Sunday, March 30 at his home in Pascagoula, MS after a heroic, nearly four-year-long battle with cancer at the age of 56. He was born May 25, 1957 in Port St. Joe and was preceded in death by his brother, Randy Bailey. Survivors are his wife, Lisa Brannan Cox, son Jason (Lindsay) Cox and two grandchildren, Hayden and Madyson Cox, all of Pascagoula; his parents George and Faye Cox of Wewahitchka; sister Judy (Martin) Thibodeax of Monroe, LA; and brothers, Jody (Delynda) Bailey of Blountstown and Jim (Regena) Bailey of Lynn Haven. Other local survivors are his motherin-law, Nell Ellzey, of Moss Point and brother-in-law, Mark Brannan of Wade. He is survived by many other loving family members and countless devastated and adoring friends. Once someone met Big Al, they had a friend for life. Allen worked at Signet Maritime in Pascagoula for approximately 30 years and we would like to thank our Signet family for their generosity, love and compassion during this dif cult journey. We would also like to thank Dr. Clarkson, Crystal and staff and our beloved Amy at SRH Cancer Clinic, the doctors and staff at MD Anderson Hospital in Houston, TX, far too many to name. Special thanks go to Dr. Randy Buntyn and Dr. Raymond Weiss, both of Ocean Springs, MS and their staffs. Even though Allen is gone from our presence, he will remain forever in our hearts. Visitation for Allen was held on April 2, at OBryant-OKeefe Funeral home in Pascagoula, followed by a memorial by Dobbs Dennis and Gene Baugh, both of Moss Point. An online guestbook can be found online at www. obryantokeef.com.Allen CoxMildred Slaughter Owens, 78, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away at home surrounded by her loving family on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. She was born April 30, 1935, in Westville, Fla., to the late Sidney Slaughter and Mabelle Padgett. She graduated from Ponce de Leon High School in 1953. She then moved to Port St. Joe and married the late Everett Skull Owens in 1955 where they raised their family. Mildred had a successful career working with the Florida Power Corp. Her greatest joy was spending time with her grandchildren, cooking and baking, and being an active member of the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. She was known for her abundance of wisdom and will be remembered for being a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She will be deeply missed by those lives she has touched. Survivors include her two sons, Steven Owens and wife, Judy, of Port St. Joe, Fla., and John Owens and wife, Catherine, of Orlando, Fla., one brother, Lloyd Slaughter and wife, Gail, of Ponce de Leon, Fla., ve grandchildren, Stephanie Davis and husband, Allen, of Howard Creek, Fla., Mitchell Owens of Orlando, Fla., Sydney Owens of Port St. Joe, Fla., Michael and Olivia Owens both of Orlando, Fla.; three great-grandchildren, Charles Allen Davis Jr., Ava Marie Davis, and Abigail Davis, all of Howard Creek, Fla. Funeral services for Mrs. Owens were held on Saturday, April 5, 2014 at the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, Fla., with Brother Buddy Caswell of ciating. Interment followed in Pleasant Ridge Cemetery in Westville, FL. In lieu of owers, contributions can be made to Covenant Hospice or to the building fund at First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, FL Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Mildred Slaughter OwensMamie Dupree Harper, 80, of Port St. Joe, passed away on Wednesday, April 2, 2014 in Panama City, FL. Funeral services were at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, on Saturday, April 5, 2014 with Bro. Dave Fernandez and Bro. Buddy Caswell of ciating. Interment followed in Friendship Cemetery Donalsonville, Ga. Pallbearers were Corey Dupree, Sean Dupree, Ashley Stephens, Ryan Stephens, Zach Williams, Kevin Grif n, Adam Grif n, Chase Harper. Serving as honorary pallbearers were Cecil Pippin, James Young and Frank Williams. Mamie was born in Bascam to T.L. Bud and Creamer Atwell on Sept. 10, 1933. She married Ralph Dupree on Aug. 9, 1952, in Donalsonville, Ga., and together they had four children before his passing in March 1965. In 1971 she married C. D. Harper and together they had a son. Mamie is preceded in death by her spouse, her parents, her siblings, Doris Watford, Evelyn Perkins, Tom Atwell, James Atwell, Mary Lou Shelton, and Ellen Bass, brother-in-law, Darrell Cross and sister-inlaw, Gayla Atwell. Mamie is survived by her sons, Ron Dupree (Linda) of Tallahassee, Don Dupree of Port St. Joe, and Tommy Harper. Her daughters, Susan (Arden) Stephens of Tallahassee and Kim (Frankie) Williams of Port St. Joe. She will be missed by her grandchildren, Corey, Erin and Sean Dupree, Jessica Dupree, Ashley and Ryan Stephens, Zach and Lacey Williams, Brooke and Chase Harper, The pride and joy of Mamie were her great grandchildren, Claire Stephens, Easton and Grady Williams and Kylie and Mariah. She also survived by her sisters, Helen Hall, Linda (Gus) Grif n and Betty Cross and sister-in-law, Gloria Atwell. Mamie also is survived by many nieces and nephews whom she loved dearly including Kevin and Adam Grif n who held a special place in her heart. Mrs. Mamie, as she was affectionately known by so many of the children she helped raise during the 80s and 90s, loved working in her yard and sharing her plants and owers with anyone who asked. Every Thanksgiving she hosted her family and extended family for a wonderful meal and special family time. She spent the last several years being a chauffeur for many of her friends whenever called upon to drive them to the doctors visits in Panama City. She will be missed by many close friends and neighbors. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St. Panama City, FL 32405. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted at www. southerlandfamily.com.Mamie Dupree HarperMaggie Lewis Waters of Port St. Joe passed away Monday March 31, 2014. She was born in Altha, FL., and had been a resident of Gulf County for the past 62 years. She was Christian woman that loved her family and cherished all her friends. She was a member of Oak Grove Assembly of God Church. She was preceded in death by her son, Roy Waters, her daughter, Myra Byrd and daughter, Doris Tullis, granddaughter, Joann Covington, grandson, Roy Alan Waters, and sonin-law, Junior Harris. She is survived by her children, Myrtle Harris, John Henry Waters, Mildred Levins and husband Joe, Joyce Scully and husband Dennis, James Edward Waters and wife Martha; her son-in-law, Edward Tullis; 28 grandchildren; and numerous greatgrandchildren; and great-great-grandchildren. Graveside services were held 2 p.m. ET Friday April 4, 2014 at Holly Hill Cemetery, with the Rev. David Fernandez of ciating. Interment followed. The visitation was at Comforter Funeral Home from 5-7 p.m. ET on Thursday April 3, 2014. A special thank you to all the wonderful care givers for their loving care they gave to Ms. Maggie during her time of illness. Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Maggie Lewis WatersSpecial to The Star EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZAAll are invited to the Easter Eggstravaganza at First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe, Sunday, April 13, at 12:30 p.m. ET. There will be free food: hot dogs, chips, popcorn, snow-cones, and drinks. Come bring the whole family and join us for some Easter fun activities and an Easter Egg Hunt. FAITHThursday, April 10, 2014 Page B4 www.starfl.com OBITUARIES FAITH BRIEF

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Special to The StarDo you know how wide a sidewalk is? How about how wide and how long a parking space is? Have you ever considered how tall a re hydrant is or how wide a soda machine is? Dont worry. Its been taken care of. On April 2, the students in Mr. Browns class at Wewahitchka Elementary School took to the streets of Wewahitchka to see how the town measured up. The students were divided into teams of two and were supplied with their own measuring tape and clip board. During the three-hour walk, they took the time to observe many examples of natures beauty that most of us take for granted. From being serenaded by a few happy birds to speaking with some friendly neighbors about their beautiful house and yard, the students enjoyed the time away from the classroom. The mission of the eld trip was to measure a few common items around the community. In the classroom, talking about measurement concepts and then doing worksheets can get a little boring. Being able to use what you have learned is a better tool to judge a student than any worksheet will ever be. The last stop on the Community Math Trail was the local Subway. Are the Subway sandwiches really a foot long? To nd out this answer as well as answers to the earlier items that were measured, stop by Mr. Browns classroom and talk to his special group of children. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast 4516380850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Thereisplentyofroomwith4bedrooms,4.5baths and3deckstoenjoytheviewthegorgeoussunsets. Over2,000sqft.oflivingspacewithprivateelevator accesstoeachlevel.TileFloorsandcrownmolding inkitchen,diningandlivingareas.540sqft.ofdecks. Beautifullyfurnishedandreadyforyou. CapeSanBlas Gulffrontduplexunitwithstunningsunsetviewsfromopen decksandscreenedporch.Thisisagreatplacetorelaxat thebeach.Masterbedroomupstairswithlargedeckwithgreat viewsofthebeach.Masterbedroomalsohaswalkincloset. Nicescreeneddeckonthemainleveloffthelivingarea.Patio areaongroundlevelplusstorage.Thishomeisturnkeyand rentalready.Allfurniture,appliancesandfurnishingsstaywith thehome.Ownernancingpossible.Windowshave3Mtinting whichreducesenergybillsandlowersinsurancerates.PrestonRuss850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com SOLD LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, April 10, 2014Life in the Big AppleBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Some spring breakers head for warmer climates, but a group of Port St. Joe students took the opposite approach. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School art teacher Julie Hodges took 36 students to New York City during spring break to experience art and culture during a three-day trip. While some students never had left a ve-hour radius of Port St. Joe, Hodges was excited to have them thrust into a new environment and they stepped off the bus for the rst time on Fifth Avenue, New Yorks famous shopping mecca. It was neat to see the upper-end stores, Caitlin Godwin said. You dont think they really exist and then there they are! The group spent large amounts of time walking, talking, experiencing and eating throughout their trip, eager to take in all of the things not typically found in Gulf County. I went for the experience, Sophia Harrison said. I knew I couldnt do something like this on my own. I wanted to see things in person that Ive only seen on TV, added Morgan Butts. It was great to see the Statue of Liberty-something so historically signicant. I wanted to experience the culture, Bailey Amison said. There are so many nationalities and its crazy that things are so different just one street over. Fifteen adult chaperones accompanied the students on the adventure and a full-time security ofcer was provided. The group also made time to brave chilly northern weather to explore other famous destinations that included Little Italy, Chinatown and Wall Street. Additionally, students were treated to walking tours of Manhattan, a trip to the Empire State Building observatory, the 9/11 memorial, Times Square, Statue of Liberty, Central Park and a showing of The Phantom of the Opera on Broadway. For an extra dose of culture, students visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Butts said that the highlight of the Metropolitan Museum of Art was experiencing art from Greek and Chinese History, something she had studied in the eighth grade. I didnt expect to enjoy Broadway as much as I did, Amison said. Although the students admitted that the initial airplane ride was intimidating and that they assumed that everyone in New York City would be mean, they were pleasantly surprised by the experience and wished they could have stayed longer. The students agreed that while everyone seemed to be in a hurry, everyone they encountered was very nice and enjoyed hearing a range of southern accents. Ilianna Maestri, who previously has traveled to Mount Rushmore and the Grand Canyon, proclaimed that she was ready to live in a big city, Harrison thought it might be fun to spend a year or two in NYC while Alayna Godwin called the Big Apple a nice place to visit. How the small town kids navigated in that city would impress you, said Gulf County School Board Chairwoman Linda Wood, who also accompanied the group on the trip. Were a small town, but were not small time. Wood said the highlight for her was meeting up with Port St. Joe alumni Javarri Beachum on their rst night in town. Although Beachum intended to eat dinner with the students and then meet up with friends, he spent time with the students and even accompanied them on their climb to the top of the Empire State Building. Hodges said that because of the demand for a 2015 trip, she already had decided on next years destination: Boston.PHOTOS Sp P ECIAL TO TT HE SS TARAlthough the weather was chilly, the group took in the sites all over Manhattan Island during the threeday trip. More than 30 students from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School spent spring break in New York City and visited famous sites like Washington Square Park.PSJHS students spend spring break in NYC Special to The StarThe Gulf County Domestic Violence task force will host its annual Ladies Night Out from 5:308:30 p.m. EDT May 8 at the Gulf County Senior Citizen and Community Center. Admission to the event is free, and entertainment will be provided by Nashville singer and songwriter Jerry Arhelger and local performer Bill Small. Food will be provided and a silent auction and 50/50 drawing will round out the event. For early registration and/or more information, call Patricia at 769-7989, Cathi at 628-9049 or Charlie at 229-2901. Annual Ladies Night Out set for May 8 Community Math Trail has students measuring, learning WewahitchkaElementary School SCHOOLSCHOOL NEEWSS

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction 19Years of Service! GETYOURADINCALLTODAY451-6042/227-7847 Foley said his sister adopted a dog from a similar program in Tennessee, and after doing some research, he came across DAWGS and led an application. As a single dad, Roberts knew he wanted a family pet by April, and more importantly, wanted to ensure the new addition was going to be a loving animal. Ive had labs before, Roberts said. I know the breed, and I feel comfortable with them being around my son. He praised the DAWGS program for helping future pet owners get connected with an animal thats already trained and will adapt well to new situations. Taking dogs out of shelters is always a positive thing, Roberts said. Its so much more than getting a dog thats trained; its also about the rehab of the inmates and giving back to the community. After graduating, Maci, a lab/hound mix, would be making the trek to Daphne, Ala. with her new owner, Bob Ward. One night when Ward was watching television, he saw a feature on a similar program in California and knew it was something he wanted to be part of. In August, he lost his previous companion, and he wanted to get a dog he and his 3-year-old grandson could enjoy. I think the program is great for everyone involved, Ward said. Its win-win, especially for us who love animals. Two weeks before the graduation ceremony, Ward and his grandson made the drive to visit the camp, and he recognized an instant connection between the boy and Maci. He felt the timing was right and everything had fallen into place. The people need something, and the dogs need something, Ward said. I dont know why anyone wouldnt adopt from the program. You dont know what youre getting when you adopt from a shelterthis just makes sense. The guest speaker for the event was Sheri Logue from the Corrections Foundation in Tallahassee. The foundation is a nancial supporter of DAWGS in Prison as well as others across the state. Logue spoke to the inmates and adopters about the benets they have and will receive from participating in the program. She reminded the adopters that their pups will believe they are the most amazing humans around. It will change your life, Logue said. Try to be the person your dog thinks you are. Certicates were given to recognize the inmates who act as team leaders, assistant trainers, handlers and caretakers for the dogs in the program, and awards for Most Improved and the Top Dog were bestowed on canines that exceeded expectations during their training. Program Co-Director Judy Miick took a moment to recognize and thank Christy for all of her hard work over the past ve years. Christy received a standing ovation from the audience. Sandi makes the dogs feel good and the people feel good, Miick said. Everyone who works in this program is part of a pack. WES LOCHER | The StarDogs that enter the the DAWGS in Prison program at the Gulf Forestry Camp come from a partnership with the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society in Port St. Joe. RUFF from page B1 SS PECIAl L TO TT HE SS TARS S PECIAl L TO TT HE SS TARThe rst First FridayThe First Fridays Art and Music series kicked off last week at The Thirsty Goat. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School students who qualied to represent the Northwest region at the Odyssey of the Mind state nals in Orlando later this month performed skits for attendees to raise money for their travel expenses. Live music was performed by The Bo Spring Band. The series runs the rst Friday of each month, April through September.WES LOCHER | The Star WES LOCHER | The StarS S P ECIAl L TO TT HE SS TARMARCH 31AAPRIlL 6On Monday, March 31, Investigator L. Greenwood arrested Stephen J. Heathcock (19) after conducting an investigation into the transmission of harmful material to a minor. A complaint regarding pornographic images sent to a minor was received by Sgt. S. Strickland at Port St. Joe High School. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. The images were sent and received on an interactive smartphone application. Heathcock was arrested and charged with the Transmission of Harmful Material to a Minor. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) where he was later rst appeared and released on a conditional release. On March 31, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) traveled to the Leon County Jail to pick up Mark D. Tennison (54). Tennison was arrested in Leon County on a Gulf County warrant for Failure to Appear on his original charge of Giving False Name to a Law Enforcement Ofcer. He was transported to the GCDF where he remains in custody. On Tuesday, April 1, Deputy J. Brock arrested Gary L. Hudson (44) in the 7300 block of West Highway 98. Hudson was arrested on an active warrant for Harassing Phone Calls. He was transported to the GCDF where he remains in custody. On April 1, the GCSO transported Londel A. Smith (29) to the GCDF. Smith was arrested in Calhoun County on a Gulf County warrant for Failure to Appear. He remains in custody at the GCDF. On April 1, Deputy J. Brock took a report regarding the burglary of a vehicle in the 5900 block of Ganley Road in the Five Acre Farm area. The victim reported that approximately $400 in cash, an iPod Touch and medication were stolen out of the vehicle. The vehicle was not locked at the time of the offense. On April 1, Deputy K. Starnes served a warrant on Robert J. Price, Jr. (35) in the 100 block of North 2nd Street in Wewahitchka. On March 25, Sgt. Dixon conducted an investigation into the theft of electricity in which Price began a suspect in. Sgt. Dixon obtained a warrant for Price in that case which resulted in the arrest. Price was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On Wednesday, April 2, the GCSO transported Crystal M. Ratliff (50) to the GCDF. Ratliff was arrested in Franklin County on a warrant from Gulf County for Violation of Probation. Her original charge was Possession of a Controlled Substance. She was rst appeared and released on a $3,000 bond. On Thursday, April 3, Deputy J. Oquendo stopped a vehicle for a trafc violation in the area of State Road 22 and Past Time Drive in Wewahitchka. The driver, Cody L. Curti (20), was wanted out of Bay County. Curti was arrested, transported to the GCDF, and held for the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce. Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce lLAw W ENFORCEmMENT SUmmMMARY

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 10, 2014 The Star | B7 94574S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-124-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SHEBRETIA DANIELS MYERS A/K/A SHEBRETIA S. DANIELS A/K/A SHEBRETIA MYERS, EMIT DANIELS, VONCILE DANIELS A/K/A VONCILE J. DANIELS, and EARNEST MYERS, JR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 27, 2014, in Case No. 13-124-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and SHEBRETIA DANIELS MYERS A/K/A SHEBRETIA S. DANIELS A/K/A SHEBRETIA MYERS, EMIT DANIELS, VONCILE DANIELS A/K/A VONCILE J. DANIELS, and EARNEST MYERS, JR. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on May 1, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: A parcel of land in the Southwest quarter of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point of intersection of the North boundary line of the Southwest quarter of Section 18 with the Westerly right of way boundary line of State Road No. 71 (having a 66 foot wide right of way); thence go South 18 degrees 16 minutes 14 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary line (as monumented) for a distance of 271.31 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said point of beginning, continue South 18 degrees 16 minutes 14 seconds East along said right of way boundary line for a distance of 107.00 feet; thence departing said right of way boundary line, go South 86 degrees 26 minutes 09 seconds West for a distance of 210.00 feet; thence go North 18 degrees 16 minutes 14 seconds West for a distance of 107.00 feet; thence go North 86 degrees 26 minutes 09 seconds East for a distance of 210.00 feet to the point of beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: March 28, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr Tallahassee, FL 32308 April 3, 10, 2014 94294S FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner, vs. CLYDE J. MELVIN, Case #36048 Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLYDE J. MELVIN, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Program Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before May 20, 2014. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: March 20, 2014 Susan Benton -Chair CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS AND TRAINING COMMISSION By: -s-Ashley Hegler, Division Representative March 27, 2014 April 3, 10, 17, 2014 94620S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 6th day of May, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EDST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 505 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE 198; ESTABLISHING THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE AS THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE PORT ST. JOE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerks Office at (850) 229-8261, Ext. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: Charlotte M. Pierce Clerk April 10, 2014 94634S PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T Mobility Services, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of Highway 71 in Wewahitchka, Gulf County, Florida 32465 at latitude 29 59 14.07 north and longitude 85 10 5.02 west. The height of the tower will be 64 meters above ground level (70.7 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865/L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205)6293868. Any interested party may submit comments by May 16, 2014 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/ asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0896656. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCCs website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. April 10, 2014 94636S PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T Mobility Services, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of Willow Street in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida 32456 at latitude 29 53 36.94 north and longitude 85 21 23.39 west. The height of the tower will be 64 meters above ground level (67.2 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L865-/L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205) 629-3868. Any interested party may submit comments by May 16, 2014 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/ asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0896638. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCCs website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. April 10, 2014 94640S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014 CP 10 Division: Gay IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES DAVID PARHAM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JAMES DAVID PARHAM, deceased whose date of death was January 22, 2014, File Number 2014 CP 10 Division Gay, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Clerk of Courts, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 10, 2014. Personal R resentative: JAMES D. PARHAM, JR. Attorney for Personal Representative Jennifer Lee Bushnell, Esquire FL Bar No. 0617555 Jennifer Lee Bushnell, P.L. 1803 W. Garden Street Pensacola, FL 32502 P.O. Box 13221, Pensacola, FL 32591 850.433.5511 Phone 866.613.3645 Facsimile April 10, 17, 2014 98341S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-17 FPID NO. 435194-1-58-01 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: WARD STREET SCRAP PROJECT (PRI PROJECT #003.257) This project includes approximately 1,800 LF of roadway resurfacing and reclaimed asphalt along Ward Street located at St. Joe Beach in Gulf County, FL. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. All bidders shall be FDOT Qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction, latest edition in the following work classes: Grading, Drainage, Flexible Paving, and Hot Plant Mix-Bituminous Course. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day. Qualified bidders must submit the original and three (3) copies of the bid to the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 147, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 by the Response Deadline (April 25, 2014 at 4:30 P.M., E.T.). Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER and that this is a sealed bid for the Ward Street SCRAP Project. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, on April 25, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at this same location on April 28, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Gulf County. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman April 3, 10, 2014 98375S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 139 Application No. 2014-24 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00648-000R Description of Property: COMMENCING at the SW Corner of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North along the West line of said SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 to the North Right of Way line of Transfer Road for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence East along said North right of way line for 210 feet, thence North parallel with the West line of said SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 to the Southerly right of way line of Henry Circle; thence Westerly along said Southerly right of way line for 210 feet, more or less, to a point on said West line of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4; thence South along said West line to the POINT OF BEGINNING, being located in the SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being the East 1/2 of tract described in Official Records Book 76, Page 1091, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Earl Forehand & Kelly Forehand All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of May, 2014. Dated this 31st day of March, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98379S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1025 Application No. 2014-22 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03450-175R Description of Property: Lot 35, Wetappo Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, Pages 36-42, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Palm Breeze Development, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of May, 2014. Dated this 31st day of March, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98377S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 469 Application No. 2014-23 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 01847-000R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the Northeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line westerly along the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter for 571.0 feet; then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 730.0 feet for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left from the line last described above for 151.0 feet, then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes right for 75.0 feet, then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes right for 151.0 feet, to a point on the eastern right of way line of Refour Road; then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes right along said right of way line for 75.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land has an area of 0.26 acre. It is in the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, in the City of Wewahitchka, Florida. Name in which assessed: Ceaphous & Margretta Fisher All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of May, 2014. Dated this 31st day of March, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98405S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-12-PR 98385S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-18 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: LEASE, LEASE WITH THE OPTION TO PURCHASE OR PURCHASE THE FOLLOWING: BUILDING #1 MINIMUM 3,000 SF IN BUILDING #2 -MINIMUM 7,000 SF IN PORT ST. JOE List the building specifications, state the amount of parking available and price in your bid. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, April 11, 2014. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, 14, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WARD MCDANIEL CHAIRMAN ATTEST: REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK April 3, 10, 2014

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B8| The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4510161 1121336 1121337 AL#1481;GAL#2034;FL-AB#1488;NC#6397;TNAL#394510%BuyersPremium255Properties in 100 Offerings Detailed Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com Bid at the Auction or Online Bank Owned & Other Secured Parties AuctionAlabamaFloridaGeorgia N.CarolinaTennesseeWednesday, April 23 & Thursday,April24 11:00am Both DaysSaleSite: HolidayInn-AtlantaPerimeter/Dunwoody 4386ChambleeDunwoodyRd,Atlanta,GAPROPERTIESINCLUDE:ResidentialCommercial IndustrialAgricultural 1123837 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 4322 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MOwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com Managers Hostesses Bartenders Servers/Bussers Cooks Shuckers Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS!4518052 4518053The MainStay Suites is NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for a housekeeper. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. MainStay Suites 3951 E. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 Job AnnouncementNorth Florida Child Development is seeking Preschool and VPK teachers for our Centers located in Blountstown, Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe. Must have at least a FCCPC/CDA. NFCD offers an attractive benet package (health, dental, life, disability, sick leave, etc. Send resumes to smcgill@oridachildren. org, fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE 4516183 IN RE: ESTATE OF ALMA CLOTEAL BURKE Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of ALMA CLOTEAL BURKE, deceased, whose date of death was January 16, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2014. Personal Representative: Deborah Ann McLeod 253 Greenwood Sr. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Victoria F. Langford 280 Sunset Drive Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com April 10, 17, 2014 98469S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Hiers Seybold the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 801 Application No. 2014-27 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 R.E. No: 03391-017R Description of Property: LOT 4: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and run South along 40 line for 360 feet; for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence turn right and run West for 350 feet to County Road, thence turn left and run South for 120 feet, along right of way of County Road, thence run East for 350 feet to the West line of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, thence run North for 120 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING, all lying and being in Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West. Name in which assessed: Valerie Dodds c/o Christopher Dodds All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 98467S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Hiers Seybold the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 800 Application No. 2014-28 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 R.E. No: 03391-016R Description of Property: LOT 3: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and run West for 350 feet, thence run South for 240 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue to run South for 120 feet, thence run East for 350 feet to forty line; thence run North for 120 feet, thence run West for 350 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said lands lying and being in the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West. Name in which assessed: Valerie Dodds c/o Christopher Dodds All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 98473S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1146 Application No. 2014-25 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03801-245R Description of Property: Lot 3, Block B, Integras Rehabilitation Phase II, as per Plat recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 2, of the Plat Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Integras Therapy & Wellness Centers, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 98471S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1145 Application No. 2014-26 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03801-230R Description of Property: Lot 26, Block A, Integras Rehabilitation Phase II, as per Plat recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 2, of the Plat Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Integras Therapy & Wellness Centers, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com GUN SHOW PANAMACITY FAIRGROUNDSApril 12th and 13th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL84435 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34285183 EducationChild Care ProvidersThe Oak Grove Church Daycare will be expanding and offering a 3K program starting in June. With the expansion comes job openings for both full time and part time teachers. Pick up an application at 613 Madison. Web Id 34285778 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34285183 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required.PT InspectorsAttentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance TechThe St. George Plantation is looking to hire a full time maintenance employee. Position will report to the maintenance supervisor. The individual must be able to mow, trim, load and capable and willing to work in various conditions. Must have a current DL and transportation to St. George Island. This position includes a good benefit package that includes health, dental, life and matching IRA fund. Mail rsum to: Drew Robertson, Facilities Manager, 1712 Magnolia Rd, St. George Island, FL 32328; email: drew@sgpoa.com or phone (850)927-2312 for Drew. Web ID#: 34285431 PSJ Warehouse Space For Lease. 1000sf, Includes Office Space and Private Bathroom. $600 month. Up To 6000 sf Aval. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr 850-238-7080 Port St Joe Commercial or Residential Rental 2 Bd ,1 1/2 Ba W/D efficiancy, boat and RV Storage avail on site. Location, location! $2100 Month. Short or Long Term Lease. No Pets, Smoke Free Environment. 850-229-8030 or 478-457-7599 Cell Text FL84510 to 56654 Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Flooring Installation Carpentry Home Repairs Call Dave 850-323-2584 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 4518144A & A HomeCare, Inc. currently has an opening for a part time Registered Nurse to work Wednesday through Friday. A & A HomeCare, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer. Experience in HHC and with OASIS assessments is preferred. Apply in person at 211 N Hwy 71 in Wewahitchka, fax resume to 850-639-3337, or email resume to aahealth@gtcom.net.



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 27-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com All that rain had to go somewhere. According to Gulf County Emergency Management director Marshall Nelson, a lot of that water is heading into the Apalachicola and Chipola river basins in Gulf County. At the recommendation of Nelson, the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday declared a local state of emergency in anticipation of ooding in the north end of the county as soon as the weekend. There is already an issue on the north end with roads because of weeks and months of heavy rains. The timing of upcoming ooding, Nelson said, is unclear, but he asked commissioners to pass the emergency declaration in order to begin preparations. Primarily, that will be moving county assets and getting them in place, Nelson said. We know that it is coming. We have had a lot of rain in the river basin. As of Tuesday, the water at the Woodruff Dam in Blountstown was at 17.4 feet and due to crest at just under 22 feet on Friday. That means that level of water will begin arriving in Gulf County by the end of the week into the weekend. The water has built up and they have opened the gates on us, Nelson said. On the Apalachicola, Nelson said, ood stage is 15 feet but the concern arrives with water that reaches 2123 feet in depth. At that point, water begins to become an issue on roadways in low-lying areas and around boat landings. The issues are compounded, Nelson said, by the amount of water that is also entering the Chipola River basin. The Chipola is forecast to crest at near 21 feet by Wednesday. That is our problem, Nelson said. Nelson said his of ce was already working with Public Works on staging of equipment and preparations and said he thought ooding could begin as soon as Sunday or Monday. Right now we are trying to get a handle on how much By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Cape San Blas is making waves. In an online competition conducted by the website www.gopetfriendlyblog.com Cape San Blas was nominated as a Best City for Pet Travelers for the year 2014. Throughout several rounds of head-tohead voting by the public, the Cape has already beaten out Asheville, N.C., Ocean City, Md., Myrtle Beach, S.C. and Woodstock, Vt.. This week the peninsula went into the nal round against the dog-friendly public parks of Portland, OR. At press time, the Cape had received more than 57 percent of the vote and a winner was to be announced today. Check back next week for further details. The person responsible for nominating the winning city will receive a two-night stay in the Kimpton hotel of their choosing, a pet-friendly hotel chain, and a slew of pet travel gear and a medium Kalahari lounge dog bed. SPECIAL TO THE STAR The bald eagle nest just west of the Indian Pass Raw Bar was damaged during Mondays storms, but during the two days before the storm, Marie Romanelli of Indian Pass observed the adult eagles ferrying food back and forth from the nest. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe municipal election was over when it started. Candidate qualifying ended last week and Commissioners Rex Buzzett and Phil McCroan were the lone candidates to submit all paperwork. Without opposition Buzzett and McCroan were returned to their respective seats, representing Group IV and Group III. Buzzett and McCroan earned new two-year terms, Buzzetts fourth and McCroans second. Flooding a concern in coming days See FLOODING A8 Buzzett, McCroan re-elected By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com In baseball parlance, the Gulf County Tourist Development Council enters the regular season off an excellent spring training. With bed tax revenue continuing its climb in February, the TDC advisory council held its regular monthly meeting last week as a spring promotion gathered steam and peak of the season looms. The revenue numbers from February maintained a positive winter trend. February bed tax revenue grew 18 percent over the same month last year and follows monthly increases of 3.48 percent in January, 48 percent in December went some tax collectors were still reporting quarterly and 6.8 percent in November. Year to date, year over year, revenue has climbed 7.8 percent. The goal for this year is 20 percent over the prior scal year and the countys tourist season is only now starting to pick up in earnest. We are pacing well, said TDC executive director Jennifer Jenkins. We clearly have room for growth. We are reporting monthly so these are accurate. The switch from quarterly to uniform monthly reporting was critical to Jenkins for honing her marketing focus throughout the year. Bed tax revenue mirrors a busy period of the shoulder season, typically and traditionally a slower time for vacationers and visitors, but one Jenkins Numbers rising, TDC enters season See TDC A8 Eagle protecting her young SPECIAL TO THE STAR Cape San Blas was nominated as Best City for Pet Travelers 2014 by www. gopetfriendlyblog.com. Cape San Blas nominated as Best City for Pet Travelers 2014 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 YEAR 76, NUMBER 26 Thursday, APRIL 10, 2014 Bay cleanup B1

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 Auto Insurance Hannon Insur ance 227-1133 Sh o p a t H o m e! Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Joel Rosenbaum, DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients By TONY SIMMONS Halifax Media Group MEXICO BEACH Cousins from a family of Mexico Beach pioneers, Cathey Parker Hobbs and Al Cathey worked together to compile a new entry in the Images of America book series focusing on their hometown. The authors were raised by families that were among the rst to settle Mexico Beach, and they say their childhood days were lled with some lasting beach kid memo ries: shell hunting without worries, scooping buckets of blue crabs from the Gulf, and shing from the surf or the pier. They will celebrate the release of their new book, Images of America: Mex ico Beach, with a signing 4-6 p.m. April 12 at Graba Java Internet Caf, 2094 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach. Hobbs moved to Mex ico Beach in 1949 with her parents, Charlie and Inky Parker, and her sis ter, Sue. Her parents took over development of the area, which had been pur chased in 1946 by Charlies father, Gordon Parker, and two other investors, W.T. McGowan and J.W. Wain wright. Charlie Parker went on to become the citys rst mayor and a life long advocate of the familyfriendly community. Most of the pioneers that made Mexico Beach a reality are gone, said Hobbs, who still oper ates the family business, Parker Realty of Mexico Beach, alongside her hus band, Ralph. I hope this book will help preserve their memories as well as the history of our wonder ful town. I also hope it will bring pleasure to many by either introducing them to this paradise or by helping them remember wonderful moments they enjoyed in Mexico Beach. As described in the books introduction, very little is known of the area until the early 1900s, when businessman Felix du Pont purchased the land known today as Mexico Beach. Resin to make turpen tine was harvested from the native pine trees, and shermen could not resist the migratory sh passing through the areas waters. By the 1930s, the book explains, U.S. 98 was com pleted along the coast, and visitors nally could reach the sugar-soft sand beaches. In 1946, Parker, McGowan and Wainwright purchased 1,850 acres along the beach for $65,000. Chapters in their book categorize the 200 blackand-white photos into nos talgic looks back at the ori gins of the town, shing and boating, fun pastimes and entertainment, mom-andpop businesses, pioneer families, early beach cot tages, hurricane damage, the establishment of Bea con Hill and much more. Cathey moved to Mex ico Beach in 1953 at age 5, graduated from Port St. Joe High School and earned a degree in com munications from the Uni versity of Southern Missis sippi. He returned home to raise two sons with his wife, and still lives in Mex ico Beach, where he is the second-generation owner of Catheys Ace Hardware. Cathey said he hopes the book communicates the unique history of the town, and how special it is to call it home. He said he hopes the reader gains an appreciation of the pioneer spirit of the towns early families and the resolve they needed to establish such a community with the characteristics necessary to maintain a high qual ity of life for generations to come. Images of America: Mexico Beach is available through area bookstores, retailers and online at Arca diaPublishing.com The cover of the book about Mexico Beach by Al Cathey and Cathey Parker Hobbs. Pictorial history of Mexico Beach published IMAGES OF AMERICA: MEXICO BEACH Authors: Al Cathey and Cathey Parker Hobbs Book Signing: 4-6 p.m. CT April 12 at Graba Java Internet Caf, 2094, U.S. 98, Mexico Beach Details: Arcadia Publishing; 128 pages, paperback, 200 images; $21.99 On the Web: ArcadiaPublishing.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com No one ever said remov ing a historic house would be easy. During last weeks preagenda meeting, Brian Cathey of Cathey Con struction addressed the city council regarding an unforeseen issue following the demolition of the Park er House. Though the structure itself had been pulled down last week, Cathey reported that beneath the home a massive concrete footing roughly eight feet deep was discovered. Cathey sought authori zation from the council to remove the concrete; a step required by the Florida De partment of Environmental Protection permit, which he estimated would take 10-15 dump truck loads to remove after being broken up, and would come with a price tag of $5,000-$10,000. There was no way of knowing that (the concrete was there) when we put together a price for the de molition, said Cathey. Councilman Gary Wood ham asked Cathey if the concrete could be covered up but Cathey said that it would cause major prob lems were anyone else to excavate in the location in the future. The council decided to add it to the tab of ad ditional money they were seeking from the insurance company. At Tuesdays regular April meeting councilman Jack Mullen said that at torney Dion Moniz, whom the council consulted with, is still encouraging them to negotiate for additional funds. (Moniz) believes that there is more funding due to the city and hes still of that opinion, said Mullen. The insurance company has not provided a settle ment satisfactory to build a new city hall. Mullen said that a re quest had been made by the city to the insurance company asking for an ex tension to avoid hitting the Statue of Limitations which would render the claim moot in July. They are cur rently awaiting a response. City Hall Mayor Al Cathey report ed that the citys request to Peoples South Bank to stay in the current city hall building through Oc tober was denied. With an exit date of June 1 on the horizon the council made the call to move into the recently completed Public Works building and move those employees into a modular unit that would be rented and placed on site. Councilwoman Tanya Castro asked Cathey how it made sense to move Public Works employees out when theyd only just moved in. Cathey responded that if they chose to operate city hall from a modular unit, additional costs to ensure that the facility was acces sible to everyone would be incurred. Cathey said, We need to have a facility thats go ing to service our people the best. A modular unit will be rented for $7,000 for one year while the new city hall is constructed at the old Parker House site. City Administrator Last weeks pre-agen da meeting was the nal gathering for former city administrator Chris Hub bard who submitted his resignation the week prior. Hubbard requested that a reprimand that was placed in his personnel le for a 2012 incident concern ing a Facebook site be re moved prior to ending his employment. Upon delivery of the reprimand the council had voted to revisit it in a year, and Hubbard had waited a year and a half to bring it back up. During a special meeting the council voted to have it removed. Former city administra tor John McInnis was se lected to serve the city in the interim until Hubbards replacement is hired. Mc Innis started as a police of cer and spent 14 years as city administrator prior to retiring. McInnis said that while the job is not easy, he found it rewarding and he was doing his part to help the community. At Tuesdays regular meeting Councilman Bobby Pollock took the opportuni ty to respond to comments made by Castro the day af ter Hubbard announced his resignation. Chris Hubbard was a very loyal and dedicated employee, said Pollock. It was very wrong and deceit ful to have his character defamed. Once the meeting was opened to public comment, resident Mary Blackburn, who will run against Wood ham in this months elec tion, said she was offended that Pollock would say such things when another mem ber of the council, referring to Castro, could be regular ly slandered. Blackburn said, I dont think its right that another person who speaks their mind is crucied. Cathey asked all other comments to stick to city business.Gulf Coast Parkway Also during this weeks regular meeting, Greg Garrett, director of At kins Global spoke to the council about the planned Gulf Coast Parkway, in the works since 2009. The road would add another route connecting Panama City to U.S. 98 with a focus on freight transport. Gar rett said that the goal of the road was to ease con gestion along the Tyndall Parkway. An open house and pre sentation to discuss the project, projected to begin in 2015, will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 6 at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. The public is encour aged to attend the meet ing to learn more about the project and ask any questions. Police Carport In February a group of volunteers, Heavens Ham mers, volunteered to build a carport for the police sta tion that would allow the cruisers to stay out of the sun. Chief Glen Norris told the council that such a cover would extend the lifespan of the electronics inside the vehicles, keep ing them out of the sun. Project materials would need to be purchased for $2,600 but the labor would come at no cost to the city. In March some mem bers of the council were apprehensive about the project. Cathey didnt want to amend the citys budget for the materials, but would support if Norris could nd a way to raise the funds. Mullen didnt want the city to appear as a charity case and felt that the vol unteers should help others in Mexico Beach. By March the volun teers had left the area but Norris received a donation of $3,000 from a snowbird living in Pennsylvania. Norris plans to purchase the materials and told the council he will nd some one to provide the labor at a later date. Norris also took the opportunity to introduce three new police ofcers to replace those who have moved on to other oppor tunities. The council wel comed Sarah Powe-Butler, David Walker and George Record to Mexico Beach. Parker House problems continue for Mexico Beach W E S L OCHE R | The Star The Parker House was demolished last Wednesday but 8 feet of concrete was discovered beneath the structure.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, April 10, 2014 1126818 at Vincent Ivers MD Monday, April 28 5:30 7:30 pm A Beauty Event Especially for You! Please join us for an evening of unique and informative insight into the latest trends and advances in cosmetic enhancement. Dr. Ivers will demonstrate and discuss a variety of Anti-Aging Treatments. Special guest from Obagi Medical Products, Michelle Keese will be on site to discuss cosmetic procedures and much more.... Door prizes, Discounts Hors d' oeuvres and Drinks. FREE Giveaways! 301 Twentieth Street, Port St Joe, 32456 Dr. Vincent Ivers MD Now an Exclusive Provider of Arte ll in the Panhandle Ladies... You are Cordially Invited to Attend an Evening Of Beauty Limited Seating RSVP Bring a Friend 227-7070 Local The Star| A3 Thursday, April 10, 2014 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Last weeks informational workshop about the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA) was equal doses education and frustration. The aim of the workshop was to provide a history of the PSJRA to date. Mayor Mel Magidson suggested at last weeks meeting during which city commissioners began the process of dissolving the PSJRA board that fueling the debate over the agencys future was a lack of under standing of the facts sur rounding the history and operations of the redevelop ment agency. While the theme of the workshop was how the agency got here, it at times turned into a pitched discus sion about the path traveled the past month by a slim ma jority of commissioners. Those actions, one resi dent noted, had the commu nity in an uproar. PSJRA executive director Gail Alsobrook and Magid son, the lone commissioner to attend the workshop, tried to steer the discussion to broad strokes, but the tenor of the debate often echoed that on the commission the past three meetings. In sum, commissioners and some residents express frustration with the agencys operational model and board makeup. A lot of people dont un derstand what is going on, period, resident Nathan Peters Jr. said. There is also equal, if not more, frustration in sectors of the community over a lack of understanding about the goal of the majoritys actions to dissolve the board. What is the problem? resident Gina Vicari said. Why are we trying to get rid of these un-paid people and replace them with the same ve (city) commissioners? They have other issues on their plate. The bones of conten tion, as framed by residents Thursday night, could be placed under several large umbrellas.THE MAKEUP OF T HE BOARD There is a sense, resident Tim Nelson said, the PSJRA board is insular and com prised of some of the same people who serve on other boards. He questioned the extent to which the board would be open to new members and new ideas from others in the community. Thats why we feel left out of the loop, Nelson said. Alsobrook and Magidson repeatedly said the PSJRA board meetings are public, advertised in advance by statute. Any input from the public I think the board would be very receptive, Alsobrook said, noting that PSJRA board meetings are lightly attended. If the pub lic gets involved the board will listen. Debra Barnes said she thought the board should expand its numbers and suggested PSJRA board members go into the com munity to fully grasp feel ings of resistance reected by the three commission ers voting to dissolve the board. Board chair Boyd Pickett said he had done just that. I have been out in the community and I havent found anybody (who doesnt approve of what we are do ing) except the three com missioners and they wont even return my calls, Pick ett said. Further, several PSJRA board members said of the three commissioners, two, Commissioners Phil Mc Croan and William Thurs bay, had never attended a meeting. The board is also a reec tion of statutory-mandates concerning the makeup as well the goals set forth in the agencys master plan. The board vets ideas for the benet of the communi ty, said Alsobrook, who was noncommittal about her fu ture if the board is dissolved. They are helping the com munity, and they are profes sionals who are volunteers. It is working on more levels than you can imagine. It is work. It is like a sec ond job. O PERA T IONS, SPENDING, HIRING, FIRING Commissioners Thurs bay and Bo Patterson have said they did not approve of a board that operates be yond the reach of voters, yet spends tax money and has the ability to hire and re an executive director. Board member Michael McKenzie said suggestions that spending is done out side the scope of govern mental oversight is not fac tually accurate. Alsobrook, as executive director, has an annual bud get approved by the PSJRA board and city commission ers which she must operate the agency from. Once com missioners approve the bud get, spending must be done under the same constraints by which the city and coun ty spend their budgets, he said. All spending, as well as who the PSJRA board can hire or re, Magidson add ed, is subject to review and nal approval by city com missioners. Nothing is done without their nal knowl edge and say-so. Nothing the board does is done without our approv al, Magidson repeatedly said. Nelson questioned whether the PSJRA board conveys all pertinent infor mation to the commission, providing any and all op tions on any given issue or project.F UNDING Maybe the most confus ing aspect of the redevel opment agency, several residents said, was the Tax Increment Financing that funds operations. A base year for property values within the original agency boundaries rough ly, give or take some footage, First Street to the midline of State 71 to just beyond Gar rison Avenuewas estab lished in 1989. Of any increases in property values within the boundaries since, the rede velopment agency and as Magidson said, by turn the city recoups 95 percent of that increase while the city receives the remainder. No ones taxes increase resident Lorinda Gingell suggested taxes actually stay down because the rede velopment agency improves property values for all and its not an additional tax; the agency simply is getting a slice. The agency did not even draw funding until the early 2000s. That funding, much less since the decline of the real estate market, can only be spent within the agency boundaries, Alsobrook said. Further, it can only be spent on projects within the parameters of the agencys master plan. Property values in the expanded area nearly all of the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe established in 2009, have not rebounded yet to draw income. That has not prevented the agency, as noted by board member Patti Blay lock, from using dollars to le verage for grant funding for the expanded area, such as for new sidewalks on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and lights on David Langs ton Drive. State law allows the agen cy to use a small percentage of dollars from the original area for such purposes, Al sobrook said. Alsobrook summed up the workshop after 75 min utes by saying she hoped a solution other than throw ing the baby out with the bath water by dissolving the board. I dont understand why the city commission wants to take over and wants to stop you from doing a suc cessful job, resident Eddie Fields said. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com A group of 60 students and 20 adults from the Senior High Youth Group visited Port St. Joe last week to spend their spring break giving back to the community. The group, representing the Evangelical Free Church in in Gaylord, Michigan brought stu dents from grades nine to 12 to the area as they have for more than 30 years. The students were split be tween the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society and the Bay St. Joseph Care Clinic. Those stationed at the clinic helped with gardening, painting and power washing projects while those at the Humane Society walked and bathed dogs, social ized with cats and learned about the DAWGS in Prison program. We wanted to give back to the community, chaperone Brent Holmes said. Were called to serve. Its the little things showing the kids that they can serve any time, anywhere, no matter what. Holmes said that the focal point of the trip was to help the students become service-minded and develop good hearts to help ing others. Isaac Smith, a junior, was en joying his third trip to Port St. Joe. I wanted to do my part to give back, Smith said. I like learning to serve others and God has given us so much. Its really enjoyable. Smith said he looked forward to coming back next year and was happy to have a reprieve from the two feet of snow that awaited him in Michigan. The group spent a week camp ing at the St. Joseph Peninsula State Park and headed back to Gaylord last Friday. PSJRA workshop offers opportunities Michigan volunteers help out in Gulf County

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USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, April 10, 2014 A Section It was easiest to conceal in early April and October, because the weather was such that a boy could wear a long sleeve shirt to school in Alabama and not look too odd. Both of these times of year were best because it meant I could hide my equipment for Major League Baseballs Opening Day and the World Series. Many more games were played during the day back then there was no ESPN or Internet or all these fancy phones that you could watch a baseball game on. There was radio It was AM radio It was heaven My Papa (grandfather) not only sold televisions, radios and record players, but he also liked buying and making cool gadgets and that was good for a grandson. One of the best gadgets he ever gave me was a very small transistor radio he had picked up or put together. It could easily be hidden in a pocket or taped to a young boys hairless chest making him feel like an undercover agent. An earpiece could be plugged in the radio and the wire fed through a long sleeve shirt leaving the little white earpiece speaker sticking out of the cuff of a long sleeve shirt. While the teacher was telling the class something that I probably thought I already knew, I could put an elbow on my desk, rest my head in my hand and listen to the Atlanta Braves play (and look very interested at the chalkboard). Almost 40 years later, I do realize that wasnt a great use of my time in junior high school, but it is a good memory. I thought about it the other day when my son sent me a text message wanting to know a password so that he could watch the Braves play on his phone on opening day. I told him, You dont need to be watching baseball while you are at school. That makes me a bit of a hypocrite I guess. The Braves nished last in their division that year, Dale Murphy was 20 years old, Phil Niekro was 37 and still hanging on. In 1976, only the Montreal Expos lost more games in the National League than my Atlanta Braves. It didnt matter. On Opening Day, the Braves were in rst (along with every other team). The Cincinnati Reds would go on to win the World Series, beating the New York Yankees in four straight games. Life is good in the South when Yankees lose. Future Hall of Fame catcher, Johnny Bench, was the World Series Most Valuable Player. Where is Johnny now? Last time I saw him, he was on television pushing some sort of miracle salve made from emu oil that is good for arthritis, muscle aches, bug bites and sunburn. The emu is a large ightless fast running, high jumping bird originally from Australia. They are rather ugly. There was a time back in the s and s that folks were raising emus hoping to get rich. They did not. There has to be some sort of connection to these failed dreams of emu meat lling US kitchens and restaurants and the one fellow who gured out emu oil mixed into a salve could be pushed by an exmajor league catcher. Im willing to bet that Johnny makes more money pushing the miracle bird salve than he did playing baseball back in the mid-1970s. His salary that year was about half what the minimum salary is today for a rookie and about 1 percent of the highest paid catcher in the major leagues. I love baseball, but it seems that in the overall scheme of things, these fellows make way too much money these days than when I had a wire running between my sleeve and my arm to listen to games. Im not saying the players should give the money back, Im just saying that it seems a little much. Now were talking about paying college kids to play ball. Perhaps, just perhaps, the miracle salve that Johnny Bench pushes on television would help me gure it out if I just rubbed a little on my head. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com I stood for a moment and took a deep breath. I had never actually interviewed for a job in my life. I was 21, wouldnt graduate from college until the following week, had driven ve hundred miles for this meeting and somehow sensed the next few minutes could be life changing for me. My feet were out-racing my brain as I moved toward the big man watching a P.E. class run across the eld. He stood as I neared and extended a hand. You must be the young man Walter told me about. My goodness, his handshake was like a vise! But his smile moved across his whole face. We talked for over an hour as one class was dismissed and another hurried unto the eld. He asked very few questions, mostly about my life and family. But he leaned in just enough on the answers for me to realize he was not going through the motions here. He was interested in me. His sincerity was real. I didnt need that college education to know this guy was as genuine as they come. He was excited about the young men coming back for the 1969 football season. He thought his center and quarterback were of excellent character. The offensive line was going to be the best he had since returning to Port St. Joe. We had one very good defensive end and linebackers that would run to the ball. We have a chance to win a lot of football games this year. He said we like I was already on the team. Wayne Taylor was the rst person ever to call me Coach. I was particularly struck by his forthrightness, his passion for life and his obvious love for the young men under his charge. The pride he had in the school, the sports programs and the community itself came through in every sentence. He made it seem like more of a calling than a job. His eyes lit up when he walked me back to my carand realized Id driven down in a 1963 Corvair Monza. I felt like Id come in on a wing and a prayer. That car smoked and coughed most of the ve hundred miles. Coach Taylor was going over that thing like it was a Ferrari or something! Im not sure till this day if he hired me for my potential or he just liked my car. I was near bout back to Birmingham when it dawned on me. He didnt ask one question about football. He hadnt sought out my thoughts on the veer offense versus the power I. We didnt talk balanced attack or a split middle defensive set. He seemed more interested in young men than pass routes or blocking assignments. I could still feel the goodbye handshake and his direct gaze as he offered me the job and wished me well no matter what I decided. Halfway through the rst week of practice Coach Taylor became upset because the scout team fullback wouldnt give his linebackers the correct look by barreling into the off-tackle hole. He turned his hat around backwards, took the fullbacks place and blasted into the appropriate lane. You can bet the entire practice revved up a few notches! And I learned real football coaching wasnt as much about xs and os as some people imagined. We won the rst 10 games of the season. I contributed nothing. As a matter of fact, I was a detriment at times. Coach Taylor had to do his duties and then coach me up a little as to the speci c techniques he wanted me to instill with my group the next day. He never lost patience. He never quit teaching meor the team. I just thought I had a work ethic. We watched lms of opposing teams until my eyes bled! We stayed on the eld until he was satis ed. Wed spend hours going over the next days practice schedule. He was the most detailed man I ever met. He didnt want the right guard to simply run over and block the play side tackle on quick 30 trap. He demanded that guard take a carefully measured 45 degree step with his inside foot into the line of scrimmage, pick up the target immediately, cross over with his back foot, avoiding the center and gaining speed with the next two steps before sticking his head in front and unloading his right shoulder into the mid-section of the unsuspecting defensive man. The thing about the thing he would say is in the details. Coach, he always looked right at you when he spoke, weve got to get these young men to lead with their chins...pretty good advice whether you are tackling eet running backs.or life. Winning was important with him. I stood in awe sometimes as we beat teams that we shouldnt have even been on the eld with. He out-coached opponents. He could have so many times taken either team, practiced for a week and beat the other guys. But it was never about winning. There is a big difference! Even the undefeated season and state championship didnt overshadow the players. It was always about the young men. He demanded that each individual be the best he could beit went way beyond the football eld for Coach Taylor. He understood the ups and downs of life. He knew what lay ahead for many of his guys. He used those ExerGenies and two a day practices to getem ready for Wewa, Blountstown, Chipley.and the next fty years! In the later days, when the coaching was over, I never heard him one time refer to a score or beating someone. He was talking about the young men and how well so many of them turned out. If he had a clue that he might have helped in so many lives, including mine, he never relayed it to me. I think that is the way the great ones operate. I was so glad to see so many of the young men back for Coachs funeral. A few got up and spoke, rightly recognizing Coach Taylor for his mentorship, guidance and love for them. I guarantee you, a thousand more Sharks in all walks of life echoed those same sentiments when they learned of his passing. He didnt take the high road on honesty, integrity and moral principles when it was convenient or easy. He lived on it! The last time we went off to play golf I tried to thank him for all he had done for me, my family, my career. He waved it off as nothing and then, as that wonderful grin spread across his face, said, You know Coach, you are not like most politicians. High praise indeed from the man I respected above all others. Young Coach CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Page 4 What freedom really costs Dear Editor, With the recent shooting at the Naval Yard and Fort Hood, we are reminded once again of the disconnect between our citizens and our warriors who put their lives on the line to defend freedom. Much lip service is given to the slogan Freedom is not free, but very little thought is given to the cost. In the days and weeks following 9/11, we were indignant and outraged that our soil had been attacked for the rst time since the Japanese attacked American soil in Hawaii, Alaska and the coast of California. Flags ew from virtually every home in our great land. When I was a child, I can remember my mother talking about gas rationing; sugar and coffee rationing; investing in war bonds; and Victory gardens. Even on the home front, sacri ce was required. Nowadays, the ongoing war is a mere matter of inconvenience for most, certainly not for the families of those courageous young men and women in uniform. For my generation, there was no welcome home. We were portrayed by Hollywood and the press as baby killers and drug addicts, and the effects of PTSD were compounded by the publics disapproval. Another generation that suffered similar stings were the ne young lads and ladies who served in the Korean Con ict. Theirs has been oft characterized as the Forgotten War. It was largely swept under the rug in hopes that it would go away. Are we as a society going to continue to treat returning veterans as pariahs of society? Are we not going to insist that their wounds be treated, both the visible and those unseen? If so, we can expect to be plagued by further instances of inexplicable madness. About forty years ago, a Commander of Post #10069 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars wrote an article which was posted in The Star. In it, Commander Marvin Shimfessel described the public apathy of that time. Shimfessel is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and served during the Korean Con ict. Here are the Commanders words from four decades ago: Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 10069 of Port St. Joe this week urged that all citizens speak out in support of the President of the United States and the efforts of the United States government to stem the ow of Communism in South Vietnam. Speaking on behalf of Post No. 10069, Commander Marvin A. Shimfessel said: The delegates attending the V.F.W. National Convention in August in Philadelphia, Pa., unanimously urged that our government continue to seek victory in Vietnam and that all of our citizens lend their full support to the men on the ghting front. Frankly, we are sick and tired of listening to a very vocal minority undermining the bargaining position of our President and in so doing endangering the lives of our men on the ghting front. It is my belief that the time has come when the much talked about silent majority should speak out. We must let the men on the battle eld know that they have the support of the people at home and we must let Hanoi know that the President has the support of the people in this country. It is my hope that the people of this area will speak out on this issue and that other patriotic, civic and fraternal groups will join with us in this crusade. I am fully conf(v)inced, Commander Shimfessel concluded, that if we fail to speak out now, the vocal minority in this country will most certainly take over all that is meaningful in this land of ours. No one seeks peace more urgently than the Veterans of Foreign Wars, but we will not seek peace at any price which is what the vocal minority is calling for today. Here, almost half a century later, we may readily see how clearly Marvin Shimfessels words still ring true. The names and faces of the enemy have changed. The attitude of the government concerning an honorable peace has varied, and majority and minority voices within the publics demographics have shifted. But, the basic premise still holds as true today as it did then. We are more concerned about whether Auburn or Alabama has the better football team. We are stressed about the high prices for gasoline. We casually enjoy our avored and iced coffees with brand names we had never heard of twenty, thirty, or forty years ago. We go to the gym to burn calories and bask in relative luxury while our troops put their lives on the line against an invisible and fanatical enemy. Our young heroes in uniform must restrain themselves in their engagements and are not allowed to bring to bear the full force of American power. America, have we really become so soft and so sel sh? Soon, a group of wounded servicemen and women will visit our community. Will we, as Commander Shimfessel once implored, let those from the battle elds know that they have our full support? Will we take time from our busy days to show our respect, to line the streets in a show of encouragement? Will we volunteer, contribute? Readers of The Star, in this new century, how will future generations judge that we treated our returning Veterans, and how will our patriotism compare? Let us hope that observers will say that we rose to the occasion and were in our nest hour. Please continue to pray for our troops and especially for those in harms way from Gulf County. Respectfully, Rodney L. Herring Rodney L. Herring, Cdr. John C. Gainous Post #10069 Opening Day HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert He was the rst to call me coach

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LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, April 10, 2014 A Section Rural hospitals are the front line of care for millions of Americans who cant travel to big cities for medical treatment. Most are small, less than 25 beds, and many struggle to keep their doors open in the face of rising costs. A little-known prescription drug program called 340B helps these providers stay in businessand extend vital services to needy patients. More than 20 years ago, Congress created the 340B drug discount program with bipartisan support to help hospitals serving high numbers of economically vulnerable people. In 2010, Congress expanded the program to rural hospitals to help them in their efforts to treat uninsured, underinsured and other patients who have dif culty getting access to care. Under the program, eligible hospitals receive pharmaceuticals at discounted prices from drug companies. These savings are often passed on directly to outpatients. Healthcare providers also use the savings to fund dialysis, cancer and AIDS clinics as well as other services. The positive impact of the 340B program is tangible in small towns and rural communities across America. In Centerville, Tenn., St. Thomas Hickman Hospital reaches out to patients without cars, picks them up from home and brings them in for lunch and medical treatment. The hospital also provides free medications on a regular basis to outpatients who cant afford them. Cass County Hospital in Atlantic, Iowa, provides quali ed outpatients a full year of medications for free. And it gives its Emergency Room doctors vouchers to supply medicines at no cost to patients, based on need. At Regional Health System in the Black Hills of South Dakota, 340B savings fund patient treatment in a local detoxi cation clinic and a short-term crisis center. The bene ts of 340B ow far beyond the needy patients treated at Americas rural hospitals. Because savings are often passed on in low-cost or free prescriptions, people take their medications and return less to the hospital emergency room. That translates into lower costs for Medicare and Medicaid saving a bundle of taxpayer dollars. Millions of Americans receive care thanks to the 340B program, but it has powerful enemies in Washington. The pharmaceutical industry wants to restrict the program and some would like to kill it outright. Why? Because it cuts into drug company pro ts. Fact: The pharmaceutical industry turns a $7.5 billion per year pro t on sales through the 340B program to hospitals and related providers. We think thats plenty. If Big Pharma wins, hard-working Americans in the heartland of the country will lose as hospitals cut back on prescription discounts, treatment and services. Many of our hospitals and clinics would have to close altogether. That would be a travesty we cant let happen. Alan Morgan is Chief Executive Of cer of the National Rural Health Association based in Leawood, Kan. Dear Editor, First, I would like to commend Loren Siprell for his superb editorial in the April 3 edition of The Star. I, too, am an avid Facebook fan, always curious about what others are doing or the big stories ooding the web. I am also another of those that nd myself browsing the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce Facebook page to see, Who is in the news? Its all good you might say until it comes too close to home. One morning you go into work and by habit pick up the paper to your loved ones picture plastered across the page. Then you go to the GCSOs Facebook page to see people saying cruel things about him, making sarcastic remarks about how proud their mothers must be. My biggest argument with the immediate release of a story or alleged crime is whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty? The media and others are so quick to get a headline or their guy that they dont stop to think about how those key words will affect the family. What happened to getting to the truth before posting those glamorized headlines just to make it look like You are just doing your job? In the end, after all the dust has settled and the facts have come out that it just wasnt the case. After all is said and done, these people whether innocent or guilty are stereotyped. They are forever labeled, turned away from jobs, not to mention they will also be watched by law enforcement. They made, as Mr. Siprell stated, a poor decision that will undoubtedly affect them for a good portion of their lives. I feel as a Christian community we must forgive those that somehow, for one reason or another, took the wrong path. I would think very carefully about condemning someone because it might be someone close to you or even you that nds yourself in the news. Lisa Leon Port St. Joe PSJRA vote Dear Editor, We criticize and cuss the politicians in Washington for the backdoor deals they make. The city of Port St. Joe is no different. Whether we agree or not on an issue, an elected of cial should never be subjected to what three of our commissioners have been subjected to during this discussion of who controls the PSJRA. One of our commissioners had at least six of his customers cancel contracts because of his stand on this issue. Another commissioner lost a $4,000 dollar contract because of his stand on this issue. The third commissioner received a phone call reminding him of where he has gotten business in the past and it would not be there if he stayed on course with his support of this issue. It makes me ashamed to know that people in our town would resort to these lowly attempts to threaten a commissioner to change his mind on a vote. Sounds like a play out of a Ma a playbook. There is a group of people in our town that wants to control everything. If you go along they are your friends, and if not they turn on you and attempt to destroy you. I know this from my own personal experience as a commissioner. We need more elected of cials that stand on their principles regardless of personal loss. I do not always agree with the positions these three men take. However, I am proud they stood for their convictions. I also know that this post will generate some negative comments towards me. It will be okay. I have withstood the re in the kitchen. I was also proud of the way the two opposing men conducted themselves at the end of the meeting. John Reeves Port St. Joe Saying goodbye to friends Dear Editor: In the late afternoon last week, I said goodbye to two wonderful young people, my friends that were departing on a new and exciting adventure; their future spread before them to taste and see and explore. I was sad to see them leave but joyful that at last peace could become a part of their life. A letter posted previously stated that Chris Hubbard, Mexico Beachs City Manager, should have left long ago. I totally agree with Ms. Burgess. The unrealistic volume of tasks heaped upon one person was ridiculous! No human being should be treated in the manner that Mr. Hubbard endured. The position of city manager is one of the worst jobs, the most unthankful and demanding of any city employee; especially small towns that have very few employees. I am not making excuses but merely pointing out that there is no one to assist the Manager. And our city council, which insists there is no money to hire another city hall worker, ignored the reality of common sense and made Mr. Hubbard in charge of everything a few months ago. I voiced my opinion at that meeting stating that it was impossible for Mr. Hubbard to take on even more work. He is only one person! He cant do everything! Mr. Hubbard never was rude to the council and showed restraint when being bullied, at nearly every meeting, by a council member because he had not done something to the satisfaction of this member. Was it time for him to go? Yes, Candice it was; for his health, his future, for his time to enjoy life and not be constantly trying to please everybody. Farewell my friends, Chris and Debbie, and may God bless you with a happy life that had become impossible to achieve in Mexico Beach. Connie Risinger Mexico Beach Letter a travesty Dear Editor, It is with a sense of increasing disgust that I write to you today. Ive just nished writing yet another disgraceful article from Loren Siprell, this latest travesty titled On the Subject Of... Arrest Logs. This article is poorly written, lacks focus and direction, makes excuses for his own personal poor online behavior, and sidetracks off its chosen topic of whether arrest logs are pertinent, to sermonizing on the legality of prostitution. Mr. Siprell would have us follow the example of Europe, apparently forgetting that we shrugged off the European model of government over two centuries ago. Perhaps Mr. Siprell should read a history book or two, or read some studies on the health habits of prostitutes and those that frequent them. The arrest logs serve the purpose of educating the public on who the law-breakers are in the community that they occupy. I for one am interested in knowing who these law-breakers are, and where they live, so I can avoid these areas. Mr. Siprells articles consistently model poor writing and analogies, and consistently exhibit farleft Progressive memes. I must ask you: is this the model for editorial writing for your newspaper going forward? If so, you will have one less reader. Mr. Siprells politics and beliefs are one thing... being subjected to them serially on your editorial page, over and over, is something that I can do without. Steve Saunders Mexico Beach 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 THE T A H ILL ON C B EA 8 9 H WY 4 5 4 9 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA LIVE ON THE POOP DECK IN THE CRO W NEST UPCOMING EVENTS JIMMY GILLIS THURSD A Y PM FRID A Y & SA TURD A Y 9 PM SUND A Y 7 PM WEDNESD A Y 7 PM APRIL 1 6 TH APRIL 1 7 TH THE CURR Y S FOLL O W CD RELEASE P ART Y DE BI JO RD AN GIRLS NIGHT OUT WITH THE CHIPPEND ALES JR SERVICE LEA GUE CELEBRIT Y BARTENDERS ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES KAROKE FRID A Y & SA TURD A Y 9PM Auto Insurance Hannon Insur ance 227-1133 Sh o p a t H o m e! Page 5 Too close to home Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS A Critical Healthcare Program in Rural America THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on

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Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is here! S h o p o u r h u g e s e l e c t i o n o f b e a c h w a r e s, c h ai r s, a n d t o y s. N e w a r r i v a l s d ai l y o f k a y a k s, P a d d l e b o a r d s, a n d shi n g g e a r w w w .shopb w o .c om Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu A pr 10 69 57 0 % F ri, A pr 11 71 59 0 % S a t A pr 12 73 62 0 % Sun, A pr 13 72 67 0 % M on, A pr 14 73 63 30 % T ues A pr 15 68 59 30 % W ed A pr 16 68 62 0 % The king is back in town Silver speedsters due in Panhandle waters this month By FRANK SARGEANT Special to The Star The king sh are in at Tampa! Thats big news for Panhandle anglers, because it means the run of the big mackerel has nally started to move north, after stalling for some time off Fort Myers this year because of a wave of late cold fronts. Water temperatures in the Panhandle still are at about 65 degrees, and thats too cold for any signi cant number of kings, but all it will take is a week of warm, sunny weather to make things right. When the water hits 68 degrees, the bait will move, and with it will come the kings to say nothing of the Spanish, the cobia, the bonito and a bit of everything else. Scientists with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute have learned that most of the kings that summer in Northwest Florida spend winters off the Florida Keys and in the Atlantic as far north as Palm Beach, but as soon as the waters begin to warm in spring, the sh move back into the Gulf and head north. They usually arrive in strength in the Panhandle shortly after April 15, with May through October offering steady action. When the big schools of cigar minnows and herring arrive, the kings will be with them, anywhere from a half-mile off the beach to the wrecks 15 miles out and farther. A lot of sh also typically run the breaks offshore at 80 and at 160 feet. Kings are members of the tuna family, but are for the most part found on the coastal shelf; they are green water sh rather than the true pelagics of the open sea. Theyre caught with some regularity from Panhandle piers. School kings, aka snakes, are slender speedsters that average 7 to 10 pounds; they make up the bulk of the king sh schools. But there are also plenty of smokers in the mix, sh of 20 pounds and up, which literally are capable of making a misty smoke y from a reel as they scream line off at 30 miles an hour. Kings reach lengths approaching 6 feet and weights more than 90 pounds in a lifespan maxing out close to 20 years. The current IGFA all-tackle record is 93 pounds, caught in Puerto Rico in 1999. Fish of 50 pounds are caught occasionally in the northern Gulf of Mexico, but most of the line class records come in winter around the Florida Keys. Catching school kings is fairly straightforward; most anglers nd the sh by watching for diving birds or for other boats already on the school and proceed to troll a 5inch Clark or Drone spoon weighted with a trolling lead of a couple ounces around the outer edges of the school, or around arti cial or natural reefs and current breaks. Pulling the spoon behind a No. 2 or 3 planer also is highly effective, and during the dawn bite when the sh are often on top, they can be caught on unweighted spoons and jigs and even occasionally on a big topwater lure worked very fast. Kings can also be caught on a number of big lures including the Yo-Zuri Crystal Minnow Magnum, the Manns Stretch 25 and Stretch 30 and Mirrolure 113MR, which can be trolled at speeds to 9 knots without broaching its a great locator lure. Some also do well with a large chrome Rat-LTrap, a vibrating slab lure. Another Panhandle favorite for these schoolers is a cigar minnow on a feather-duster rig the tubular body of the cigar minnow trolls true while many at-sided bait species tend to spin. Trolling speed is typically 4 to 6 knots. You can catch a lot of kings by just pulling a rigged minnow at sunrise while everybody else is trying to catch live bait. Frozen cigar minnows are available at all Panhandle bait shops. For the larger kings, live bait is generally best bet; a large blue-runner or thread herring (aka greenback) on a stinger rig is the ticket. Most anglers use No. 6 copper-color wire as leader to prevent cutoffs on the razor-like teeth of the mackerels. One small triple-X strong treble goes through the nostrils, and a second dangles along the sides about 6 inches back. The rig prevents kings chomping off the bait sh tail without getting hooked, as they frequently do otherwise. The baits often can be caught around channel markers on a sabiki rig, a chain of small ies. These channel markers also often hold both kings and Spanish never pass one up if youre hunting sh. The live baits are eased along at walking speed, considerably slower than rigged baits or spoons. Some anglers like to lay down a scent trail by dragging a chum bag chopped bait sh, dog food and menhaden oil is a popular mix as they troll a circular pattern around a reef or hard bottom area, or simply circle bait sh schools. A favorite trick of tournament anglers is to sh a live bait down the color break line that makes up outside the larger inlets on strong outgoing tides on the outside of this line is clear water, pale green, while on the inside the water is black from the tanninstained bays. Theres usually a lot of grass oating down the line, and lots of crabs and other edibles in the eddies. The anglers slowly work the live baits down the green side of this line. Either way, once the migration arrives, the action is near certain. Catching school kings is fairly straightforward; most anglers nd the sh by watching for diving birds. These charter boats are docked in Destin. Photos special to The Star Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, April 10, 2014 OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Offshore action to the west is all abuzz as the 2014 gag grouper season opened in Franklin County on April 1. A few pompano were caught this past week on Cape san Blas, so we are getting back to normal for spring. Local area waters are warming up this week as the months are slowly changing. Good trout reports from St. Joe Bay this week have all anglers eager to fish! Spanish mackerel are still very plentiful and easy to find by slow trolling spoons or Christmas Tree rigs close to shore.

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By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Khaliel Spearman is aware of history in the Halifax All-Star Classic. Now hes aware of his place in it. The Rutherford senior set the overall scoring record with 37 points in leading the East to a 120-115 win over the West at the Billy Harrison Field House on Saturday. His achievement was nearly matched by the Wests Austin Carnley, who broke a long-standing team record with 30 points. The outcome also was the highest-scoring game in the 10-year history of the event. Spearman battled East teammate Alex Brown for scoring honors early in the second half and nished the nal 20 minutes with 28 points. He and Brown were instrumental in crafting a 12-2 run in 70 seconds that turned a ve-point lead into a 9984 East cushion with 8:42 to play. Spearman had 31 points, one more than previous East scoring record-holder Jon Wade, with a little more than two minutes to go. East coaches Travis Blanton and Thomas Register called timeout in the nal minutes and informed Spearman that he was nearing Taliah Moores overall mark of 33 set last year. Spearman tied Moore with a jumper and surpassed her with four free throws, the nal two capping the score. Spearman spoke fondly of Wade, who also played at Rutherford, during Media Day on Friday. Spearman joked Well, hes a good Jon Wade, but hes no Khaliel Spearman. No, indeed, as Spearman became the fourth Ram to earn MVP honors since the award was instituted in 2007. With all of these great teammates I have, I didnt expect this, Spearman said. Its a great accomplishment and it feels good to continue the tradition of Rudd (Rutherford) winning that MVP. The East also extended its winning streak to four games and secured the seventh win in the series. The triumph looked to be in doubt for 30 minutes, as Carnley of Paxton hit four of his nine 3-pointers in the rst half and the West trailed by only two points, 53-51. Carnley, who was the West MVP, and Ronnie Baylark, who scored Rutherfords Spearman sets scoring mark in East boys win By BRANDON WALKER Halifax Media Services PANAMA CITY In the fall, Malone High School senior Curteeona Brelove will take her talents to Virginia Commonwealth University. On Saturday, though, she put on one last show for local fans at the 10th Halifax All-Star Classic at Gulf Coast State College. Brelove, a 6-foot-3 forward, scored a team-high 24 points and grabbed 12 rebounds to help the East team earn an 81-73 win over the West in the game that pits seniors from The News Heralds eightcounty area against representatives from Okaloosa, Walton and Santa Rosa counties. I really like this team a lot, said Brelove, who scored 14 of her 24 points in the rst half. We had good chemistry, played well together. It means a lot to play well today. The victory for the East is the third in 10 years, and rst since 2012. For Chipley coach Kimberly Tuel, the win was satisfying. We had a lot of talent, said Tuel, who led her team to the Class 1A state Star Staff Report The Junior Service League of Port St. Joe hosted a new fundraiser over the weekend that invited visitors into the neighborhood of WindMark Beach for a healthy springtime event. The Breeze by the Bay, a 5K and 10K run, received 122 registrants, smashing the 100-runner goal. The event raised money for upcoming community-focused JSL events and runners enjoyed a morning run alongside the beach. On Friday evening, the night before the run, the JSL hosted a Movie on the Green to welcome participants, allowing them to pick up their packets and enjoy free entertainment. Food for the movie event was provided by Centennial Bank. Star Staff Report Ashley Price struck out four and gave up six hits while allowing a single unearned run as the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team slipped past Port St. Joe 3-2 on Tuesday. Price was also 1 for 3 at the plate and scored one of the Lady Gator runs. Tara Walding scored the other two while going 2 for 3 at the plate. Brianna Bailey drove in two and had two hits and Cecily Hale was also 2 for 3 and drove in a run. Jade McLemore had a single. Naomi Parker picked up the win and seven players scored a run, drove in a run or both as the Lady Gators pummeled visiting Graceville 19-1 last Friday. Parker faced 25 batters and allowed two hits, one unearned run and struck out 10. Shamario Cole had two hits and scored four runs for the Lady Gators while Ashleigh Price was 2 for 3 with a double and two runs scored. Tara Walding was 4 for 4 with a pair of triples and three RBIs, Cecily Hale had two hits and scored a run and Brianna Bailey was 3 for 5, scoring once and driving in a run. Jade McLemore scored four times after a double and three walks, Kayla Cody added a single and scored a run and Parker was 1 for 2 and scored twice. Tiger Sharks fall 5-3 to South Walton Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School baseball team lost a close district game at South Walton 5-3. Ethan Sander took the loss on the mound and Jarkeice Davis led the Port St. Joe attack with a pair of hits. The Tiger Sharks were at West Gadsden Tuesday and host Bay High tonight at 7 p.m. ET. Port St. Joe hosts Bozeman at 6 p.m. Friday. Prior to the game seniors Drew Lacour and Bryce Godwin will be recognized. Star Staff Report The weightlifting coaches at the two county public high schools tossed a new wrinkle into the season, promoting a Gulf County championship aimed at awarding not a team title, but individual titles. The teams squared off last week in advance of this weeks Region 11A weightlifting meet at Tallahassee Maclay. The Gators of Wewahitchka had four lifters qualify for the region meet; Port St. Joe had six Drew Jones, Carter Thacker, Zaccarro, Greg Smith, Umstead Sanders and Alvin Dempsey. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School baseball coach Tony Muina knew his sophomoreladen team would develop into a good team. Just not quite this soon. The Gators are 14-4 after last weeks victories over Sneads, Vernon and Franklin County and are pursuing an undefeated district record with just two district games remaining. The Gators are 10-0 in District 2-1A with contests against Cottondale and Blountstown on tap this week. Wewahitchka has already clinched the top seed in the district tournament which begins April 25 in Blountstown. Not bad for a team that has ve sophomores in the starting lineup, 11 sophomores total on the roster and just one senior. I knew that we had a chance to be good, but I didnt think wed in a position to be where we so quick, said Muina. We are a young team and the sophomores really had to step in and play. We have a pretty simple philosophy: play solid defense, pitch well and get the hits when we need them. I have told them I just want them to play well. If they do that the rest will take care of itself. Another characteristic of this team, Muina said, is that it is a team. He said there are no prima donnas, no superstars, just a cast that goes 14-15 deep with contributors across the board. Consider just one game last week, a 19-8 road win at Vernon. The lone senior, Isaac Madrid was 4 for 6 with four RBIs. Complimenting that was Tad Gaskin, Rashard Ranie, Peter Setterich, Chipper Gainie, Jonathan Palmer and Tanner Harden who all added at least two hits, combined to hit four doubles, a triple and a home run and drove in a combined seven runs. Ranie hit the home run, his sixth. The Gators pounded out 21 hits. That kind of production has been the norm for a team averaging just under 10 runs a game and has outscored district opponents 114-52. Almost every game we nd a way where 13 or 14 different guys help us with the game, Muina said. This is a team that plays as a team. We hit the ball decent. We score a lot of runs. Were not a superstar team. Up and down the lineup anybody can contribute. The pitching staff is paced by Gaskin, who struggled early in the season but is 5-0 in district play, along with Charlie Laird, who is 50 and came into an 8-8 game and through four hitless innings against Vernon. The goal now is to continue the improvement while pointing to the district and regional playoffs. This is, Muina said, as good a team as hes had in the past four years. The young Gators have put themselves in a spot to some postseason damage; they need to remember how they got there, Muina said. We are such a balanced team, we just try to stay consistent to who we are, Muina said. Weve gotten better as the year as gone by. We have played well at times and weve played well in the district obviously. But there is a still a lot of baseball left to play. Gators primed for district playoffs SPECIAL TO THE STAR Naomi Parker pitched a complete game and scored twice as Wewahitchka beat visiting Graceville. Lady Gators rout Graceville, edge Port St. Joe Brelove wins MVP as East girls top West SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Junior Service League welcomed more than 120 runners to the Breeze by the Bay 5K/10K run event over the weekend. Junior Service League hosts Breeze by the Bay run Gulf County weightlifting championships RESULTS 119 pounds: 1. Michael Hinsley (W), 325 total; 2. Drew Jones (PSJ), 190 total; 129 pounds: 1. Blake Kemp (W), 365 total; 2. Matt Simpson (PSJ), 285 total; 139 pounds: 1. Carter Thacker (PSJ), 445 total; 2. Cameron Laster (W), 350 total; 154 pounds: 1. River Sewell (W), 395 total; 2. Zac Jasinski (PSJ), 330 total; 169 pounds: 1. Aaron Paul (PSJ), 395 total; 2. Adam Strange (W), 330 total; 183 pounds: 1. Jamie Whit eld (W), 440 total; 2. Devin Strickland (PSJ), 395 total; 199 pounds: 1. Reggie Smith (PSJ), 560 total; 219 pounds: 1. Umstead Sanders (PSJ), 450 total; 2. Hunter Ward (PSJ), 210 total; 238 pounds: 1. Alvin Dempsey (PSJ), 420 total; 2. Traquan Tiller (W), 360 total; Page 7 See RUTHERFORD A8 See BRELOVE A8 PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, April 10, 2014 A Section

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 25 points, helped the West build a 65-55 lead three minutes into the second half. Spearmans 3-pointer six minutes later capped an East rally for an 82-80 lead. The East didnt trail again. We gave them a run for their money, said Carnley, who broke Jer emy Paynes West record of 27 points set in the inau gural year of 2005. I just wanted to do my best to help my team, but Im not gonna lie, it feels good to set the scoring record. Spearman agreed that the individual accolade was satisfying and the new basketball he received as MVP also would be a nice addition to his pickup games. But he said there was more to the honor and more to the victory. This is to show people that we put in the work and work hard at Ruth erford, Spearman said. And we (the East) didnt want this (streak) to end. Chai Baker scored 15 points and Roderick Co peland 13 for the East, which connected on 19 3-pointers. Denzel Ware added 20 points, Lane Strickland scored 12 and Wyatt Kemper 11 for the West, which held seven rst-half leads. and her team have been focusing on as they try to build tourism during such shoulder seasons. The Welcome Center in Port St. Joe saw a jump in visitors of 31 percent and trafc to the agencys website has increased 169 percent. Last month alone, Jen kins and her team distrib uted some 15,000 visitors guides. The number of Face book fans, with a goal of 10,000 this year, has al ready reached over 9,600. The numbers are re ally good, Jenkins said. And the visitors noticed the effort and focus of the TDC, indicated several advisory board members. Board chair David War riner said he thought bet ter communications and networking among visits was well-fostered by the TDC and Ronald Pickett noted an increase in avail able activities beyond two appreciation receptions. I think a lot of them were impressed with what we were doing as far as providing activities, Pick ett said. The spring promotion on Instagram has gone well, Jenkins said, though the numbers are less than she had hoped. The qual ity of the photos posted to reect how folks think of Gulf County, however, have exceeded her hopes. I have to think more of the quality than the quan tity, she said. The spring promotion is aimed at getting folks to snap their photos for upload to Instagram, the fastest-growing social media platform in the country, and tagging to #GulfCountynolter. The promotion, which closes at the end of the month, includes collabora tion with several entities, a blogging network, the online presence of Field and Stream magazine, among others that include the non-prot Outdoor Nation whose mission is to connect the so-called Millennial generations to the outdoors. The spring promotion is going real well, Jen kins said. I am pleased with the results so far. The branding is good. People are liking it. We are getting pretty good expo sure with it. The underlying hope for the promotion was to increase awareness about Gulf County in the nontraditional tourist months of shoulder season. That exposure grows expo nentially when linking to social media and online platforms. And using that in creased awareness of Gulf County as a springboard for additional promotions throughout the year. The increase in Google impressions during the pre-spring and spring promotions total nearly 7 million. The goal across all platforms is 13 million, Jenkins said, a reachable goal. The local partners ben et, Jenkins said. For example, recent trafc indicates that dur ing the early spring and spring period 46 percent of visitors were clicking through to visit the web site of lodging, restaurant and outdoors partners. Handing off 50 percent of trafc is pretty good, Jenkins said. Sponsorship applications With the deadline passed for applications to receive event sponsorship funding from the TDC, Jenkins said the process would begin of winnowing down the applications for presentation to the board. After advisory coun cil approval the nal list of sponsorship fund ing must be approved by the Board of County Commissioners. Jenkins said she hoped to have that task complet ed by the middle of May in time for the crafting of county budgets. The application pool was broadened this year, but the link to collabora tion with a lodging partner and heads in beds was tightened. The TDC received 18 applications compared to 21 last year, but the to tal funding being sought was $110,000 compared to $71,000 last year. TDC from page A1 water and the timing, Nel son said. We are going to start putting things in place and get ready for it. Nelson said indications are a ood event similar to that in 2005. That year ood waters forced the closure of a num ber of roads in the north end and some residences were inundated with water. The ooding is likely to be most severe in the areas of Howard Creek, Red Bull Island and similarly low-ly ing areas on the north end, Nelson said. Folks in those areas are urged to take precautions. Beacon Hill variance A prickly debate broke out about a variance requested by a property owner in the Beacon Hill area across U.S. 98 from Veterans Memorial Park and abutting park land on the beach side. The variance had been tabled for more information last meeting by Commis sioner Warren Yeager, who along with the county attor ney and county administra tor was not present for the meeting. The parcel in question has been the subject of some controversy in the past as previous owners have sought concessions from the BOCC because of constraints on developing the parcel. In turn, county veterans and supporters of the park have consistently protested plans to develop the parcel as an infringement on the park and its land. Ellis Smith, a Georgia attorney and current land owner, was joined by his lo cal attorney and engineer and protested several state ments made during the previous meeting about the legality of the variance. Ive been singled out and treated differently than anybody in the county, Smith said. He said he was deed ing over a quarter acre of the parcel for beach access from the park in order for his son to secure the vari ance, a variance which he said was legal. Commissioner Ward Mc Daniel agreed, saying Smith was entitled to divide his property and sell one parcel to his son and the son was entitled to further divide that property. You misled us two weeks ago, you have a his tory of that, Commissioner Carmen McLemore said to Commissioner Joanna Bry an, who asserted two weeks ago and again Tuesday that the variance is in violation of the countys land develop ment regulation. She said the parent par cel in question had already been divided and further division by Smiths son was illegal. She offered the spe cic section in the LDRs pertaining to such actions. This is a direct violation of the LDR and you continue to do this, Bryan said. This lot was not big enough to be divided. This is wrong and it is bad for the community. I am appalled. She said Smith would have to undertake a subdivi sion plat to conform. While the BOCC could provide a variance based on hardship, she said any hardship was the result of Smiths actions. She said she was not sur prised by McLemores com ments in favor given Smiths nancial contributions to his previous election campaign. Bryan also asserted the public already had beach access and did not need Smiths donation and said the proposal was to build a structure that would impact views from the park, say ing assertions to the con trary on the structure and beach access were false information. Resident Rodney Her ring, current commander of VFW Post 10069, was one of several residents to speak against the variance. I want to go on record on behalf of the public that we oppose any variance that diminishes the enjoyment of that park in any way, Her ring said. Commissioner Tan Smi ley and McLemore said the county attorney is paid to research such issues and they had been provided the needed information that indicated the variance con formed to county rules. Throughout the lengthy debate, McDaniel gaveled speakers out of order and personal jibes were ex changed by commissioners. If you have a certain relationship with the board you get what you want, Bryan said at one point. This will open the board up to lawsuits. The variance was ap proved 3-1 with Bryan dissenting. Other business: After a complaint from resident Billy Traylor re garding a March 27 debate by the members of the Apalachee Regional Plan ning Council regarding a loan sought by Traylors company, commissioners voted unanimously to re place Bryan as the BOCC representative to the board and replace her with Com missioner Ward McDaniel. Bryan was also on the losing end of vote to approve a new model for economic development in the county. She sought to clarify some language in the proposal included in the BOCC meet ing packet. McLemore accused her of not doing her homework and said he supported the county attorney who drafted the language. BR ADLE Y AND ANGELINA ar e beautiful B or der C ollies tha t w er e f ound as str a y s T hey ar e smar t gen tle obedien t dogs and need t o sta y t ogether as they ar e a bonded pair She is about 7-8 yrs old and he is 5-6 yrs old She is house tr ained and w ell manner ed He is a little mor e di cult as he w as nev er house tr ained and will mar k inside B ecause of this these t w o need t o go t o a home with plen t y of out door spac e t o run and be housed P lease if y ou ha v e f enc ed acr eage and ar e look ing f or 2 g r ea t dogs please c ome meet this special pair! V olun t eers ar e desper a t ely needed t o socializ e all of our dogs and ca ts W e ar e alw a y s look ing f or people willing t o bring one of our animals in t o their home t o be f ost er ed f or v arious needs A n ytime y ou can spar e w ould be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed C all K ar en a t 670-8417 f or mor e details or visit the F r ank lin C oun t y Humane S ociet y a t 244 S ta t e R oad 65 in Eastpoin t Y ou ma y logon t o the w ebsit e a t w w w .f or gott enpets .or g t o see mor e of our adoptable pets Franklin County Humane Society See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y FLOODING from page A1 RUTHERFORD from page A7 championship game this season. Any time you get this much talent together, its fun to coach. Choctawhatchee guard Brittany Washington, the Wests Most Valuable Play er, led all scorers with 25 points. For the East, 11 play ers reached the scoring column, led by Breloves 24 and 15 from Sneads guard Tasherica McMil lon. The East also enjoyed a 44-29 edge on the glass, an advantage it used to outscore the West 13-5 over the games nal three minutes. I thought their size was a big difference, said Pax ton coach Steve Williams, who led his Lady Cats to the 1A state championship over Chipley. Our girls played hard and played to gether. I really enjoy com ing over here to this game and seeing players get to play together that have been opponents all year. Its a great game. The East opened the game on a 9-0 scoring run and the West never fully recovered. The East led throughout, and the clos est the West got was three points when Washington connected on a 3-pointer with three minutes left to cut the advantage to 6865. Brelove and company were too much down the stretch on the way to the eight-point win. I just wanted to come out and play my game, Brelove said. After that, I just let the game take care of itself. BRELOVE from page A7 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Another rst for Florida. Last week the Mexico Beach Articial Reef As sociation successfully de ployed 59 news reefs off the coast of Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe, 10 of which were the aptly named super reefs. These super reefs, taller than any reef previously contracted by the MBARA, have 10 feet of exposed re bar at the top to draw in sh like amberjack, wahoo, king mackerel and red snapper that hunt higher in the wa ter column. Though the growth on the reefs which establishes it as a habitat can take up to two years to form, bait sh will begin to visit within two days and the process can begin. Well watch how the structures perform for fu ture construction purpos es, said MBARA President Bob Cox. Well be diving them fairly often. Some of the reefs were grouped closely together while others were spread further apart. This will help the organization gather in formation and learn which type of reefs have the best performance and which ar rays help to create a our ishing ecosystem. The de ployment process took ap proximately ve hours. Reefs in last weeks de ployment were placed in 18 new sites and two memo rial reefs were expanded with private funds. The reefs were placed 1-15 miles offshore and coordinates will soon be published on the MBARA website for those who wish to dive, sh or visit the locations. The reefs, constructed by Walter Marine, in Or ange Beach, AL, were built from Florida limestone to promote natural marine growth on the hard sub strates of the structures. Four different designs were crafted, ranging from 6-25 feet tall and weighing 4,000 to 36,000 pounds each and sit in depths from 85-104 feet. Its great to see it com plete, said Cox. You work, work, worktheres lots of planning and logistics that goes into it. Cox said he was excited for the benets it would provide for eco-tourism, whether its the divers who visit the area, the boaters, or the spear shermen who free-dive reefs for amberjack. The deployment, which had been in the planning stages since January 2013 was made possible by a $120,000 grant from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the U.S. Fish and Wild life Service, a $55,000 grant match from MBARA and $8,000 from private donors. The MBARA partnered with the City of Mexico Beach and the FWC to complete the $183,000 con struction project. It was the largest project undertaken by MBARA to date. Its good to have long range planning, said Cox. If you have that plan then you can really make the most of the short-notice opportunities that come along.WE S LOC H ER | The Star The Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association successfully deployed 59 news reefs off the coast of Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe. MBARA successfully deploys super reefs

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, April 10, 2014 B Page 1 Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The annual St. Joseph Bay Cleanup and Kayak Festival will be 1-5 p.m. ET April 27. This is the 10th year for the event, which has been moved from the fall to April to celebrate Earth Day and the National C.I.T.O. while the event is still registered with the National River Cleanup organization and its national River Cleanup Week, said Debbie VanFleet with Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost, one of the sponsors of the bay cleanup. Folks can enjoy a beautiful afternoon on St. Joseph Bay while helping to pick up trash that has accumulated in the shallow waters, VanFleet said. Kayaks rentals are being offered to responsible adults and families who wish to participate. Participants must have a valid credit card as security against loss of or damage to free rental equipment, and adults (18 and over) must sign a waiver of liability for themselves and their minor children. Minors must be supervised by an adult at all times. Launch your own kayak or make reservations at Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost, 229-1991; Scallop Cove Bait and Tackle, 227-1573; or Scallop Cove Park Concession, 229-1188. A limited supply of collection bags will be available, or bring your own bags. Water shoes and gloves are recommended. In addition, a third location, at Eagle Harbor, has been added to expand the cleanup. The Coastal Community Association once again is sponsoring two prizes worth $100 for a geo-cache hunt. The GPS coordinates for the hunt will be announced the day of the cleanup on April 27. DAWGS in Prison celebrates ve years, 32nd class By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Maybe they sound farfetched, but the numbers dont lie: Over the past ve years, 334 dogs have been adopted across 19 states thanks to DAWGS in Prison. The Developing Adoptable Dogs With Good Sociability program reached a milestone last week, celebrating its 32nd graduating class alongside its fth anniversary. The program, operated out of the Gulf Forestry Camp through collaboration between the Board of County Commissioners, the Florida Department of Corrections and the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, utilizes inmates who volunteer to spend eight weeks training dogs, teaching the basic commands, obedience and crate training, before they can be adopted into Forever Homes. More than 380 inmates have completing the elective program, which presents skills that can be utilized in life on the outside. The program works to bring in stray or abandoned dogs that will complete the training before, ideally, going to a new home, wherever it may be. Adopted dogs live as far away as California and Maine, though some stay close to home in Florida or Alabama. In her speech to the crowd of adopters, inmates and supporters of the program, co-director Sandi Christy told attendees she was moved by the joy the program brings to everyone involved. Most people wouldnt associate joy with a prison, Christy said. Here, we see joy in dogs who are relieved to be out of the shelter, and we see the joy in the inmate trainers because they realize that theyre making a difference. Take a moment today to experience some of that joy. With graduation over, pups from the class would readjust to their new homes in Florida, Alabama and Connecticut. Joey Roberts from Foley, Ala., made the trek to retrieve Grif n, a yellow lab. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Juniors and seniors in Gulf County schools were reminded this week that drinking and driving dont mix. In a presentation Monday at Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe high schools, speaker Renee Napier of the Meagan Napier Foundation spoke to students about the dangers of drinking and driving. In 2000, Napiers daughter, Meagan, was killed in Pensacola when Eric Smallridge, driving drunk, crashed his car into Meagans, killing her and her best friend With proms on the horizon for both county high schools, Napier stressed the importance of making good decisions and said getting behind the wheel after drinking is never a good one. She also discussed how those decisions can have ripple effects that go across many families and affect many people. Its all about a choice, Napier told students. The choices you make are the ones that are the most important. In addition to living through the loss of a child, Napier spoke about the feelings she had toward Smallridge, who was sentenced to 22 years in prison for manslaughter, though he served less than half that. Since being released from prison, Smallridge travels with Napier to help students understand the impact 4 seconds can make on their life. Theres not a lot of good that comes from drinking, Smallridge said. One choice changed my life. Think about your life think about what it would mean to throw it all away. By signing a pledge not to drink, students received hot pink wristbands emblazoned with the words I promise. Napier encouraged the students to enter all conversations positively, warning that a person never knows when they might be speaking to someone for the last time. Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison brought Napier to the schools in hopes of deterring students from drinking and to educate them about the life changing consequences drinking and driving can have. Bay cleanup, kayak festival April 27 SPECIAL TO THE STAR Part of the St. Joseph Bay Cleanup will be a geo-cache hunt. Above are the winners of last years hunt. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Of these 1990s TV series which aired the most original episodes at 180? Northern Exposure, Mad About You, Nash Bridges, Seinfeld 2) Which future First Ladys rst marriage was to William Warren? Betty Ford, Rosalyn Carter, Eleanor Roosevelt, Jackie Kennedy 3) Statistically speaking on what day of the week do fewer people play golf? Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 4) Who was president when Nebraska was admitted to the Union? Fillmore, A. Johnson, Gar eld, Wilson 5) In biblical times a cab was approximately how much? 1 pint, 2 quarts, 1 gallon, 5 gallons 6) What does the pre x hydro mean? Before, Under, Water, Above 7) Whose of cial state tourism magazine runs a regular column called One of Our Fifty is Missing? Alaska, Oregon, Utah, N. Mexico 8) Which country initiated the method of house numbering, odd on one side, even on the other? England, France, USA, Spain 9) Where did Scotty Bowman become the rst coach to win 1,000 games? NFL, NBA, NHL, MLB 10) Who played Nacho in the 2006 movie Nacho Libre? Jack Black, Vin Diesel, Jim Dunk, George Lopez 11) Of these whose son Jacob died in a WWII prison camp? Churchill, Eisenhower, Stalin, Patton 12) An average human sheds how many pounds of skin each year? .5, 1, 1.5, 2 13) Which of these is the rst letter of any U.S. state? B, J, Q, T 14) What was the Indianapolis street gang led by John Dillinger in his youth? Dexter Lake, Dirty Dozen, Derbin Creek, Distant Cousins ANSWERS 1) Seinfeld. 2) Betty Ford. 3) Tuesday. 4) A. Johnson. 5) 2 quarts. 6) Water. 7) N. Mexico. 8) USA. 9) NHL. 10) Jack Black. 11) Stalin. 12) 1.5. 13) T. 14) Dirty Dozen. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Students learn perils of drinking and driving PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Gulf County juniors and seniors listen to Renee Napiers speech about the dangers of drinking and driving in a presentation this week. Napier, below lost her daughter, Meagan, in a crash with a drunk driver and encouraged students to make good life choices. PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Dogs adopted from the 32nd class of the DAWGS in Prison program at the Gulf Forestry Camp found new homes in Florida, Alabama and Connecticut. Over the last ve years, 334 dogs have found Forever Homes in 19 states. Diamonds in the ruff See RUFF B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 AMA TEUR RADIO LICENSE EXAMS Star Staff Report Amateur radio license exams will be given at 10 a.m. ET Saturday, May 10 at the Gulf County EOC building in Port St. Joe. It is time to get on the air or upgrade an existing license. For registration and information contact C.H. Tillis AJ4XJ at 648-8251.AMERICAN LEGION POST 116 SPECIAL MEETING Special to The Star There will be a special meeting of American Legion Post 116 at 4 p.m. ET Thursday, April 10. The meeting will be held at VFW Post 10069 on Trout Avenue in Highland View for the purpose of installing new ofcers for the ensuing year and to rm up details for the Legion annual Good Friday sh fry/chicken barbecue fundraiser at Veterans Memorial Park. New ofcers to be installed: Commander, Wanda Wawruck; Vice Commander, Brian Cahill; Adjutant, John Miick; Finance Ofcer, Kenny Wood; Chaplain, Ron Groleau; Sgt.-at-Arms, Phil Dodson; Service Ofcer, Bo Williams. Members are urged to attend to support their new ofcers and to be a part of the annual fundraiser. Eligibility for Membership and Benets can be found on the American Legion Website: www.legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. For God and Country.AMERICAN LEGION BENEFIT FISH FRY/CHICKEN DINNER Star Staff Report American Legion Post 116 of Port St. Joe will hold its annual benet sh fry/ chicken barbeque on Good Friday, April 18. The event will begin at 12 noon ET and last until the food is gone. The event will take place at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. Fish or BBQ chicken with sides of baked beans, coleslaw and hush puppies will be served. Soft drinks and water will be available. A $7 donation will be used by the Legion to support PSJHS NJROTC scholarship and other American Legion projects. Legion Post 116 will also have a representative there to assist any qualied veterans with information regarding joining our Post. Interested veterans can also go to www.legion. org. Thank you all for your support. For God and Country. Society BRIEFS K itt en and P upp y season is upon us and w e ha v e an abundanc e P lease c onsider one of our fully v ett ed pets f or y ou ne x t addition t o y our furr y family E v en if y ou cannot adopt y ou can help in other w a y s: F ost er homes g iv e our g r ea t pets the a tt en tion and socializa tion they cr a v e W e pr o vide all supplies needed W e need v olun t eers t o help with main t enanc e ar ound the shelt er T o w els and bedding ar e alw a y s w elc ome P et carriers and cr a t es D ona tions of k itt y litt er is in g r ea t demand as w ell as pupp y t o y s M onetar y dona tions ar e alw a y s w elc ome A n y dona tion no ma tt er ho w small will be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850-227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! O nline applica tions and pet phot os ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith 's T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m is s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c ie t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h Ba y H u m a n e S o c ie t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g Blue Buffalo and T aste of the W ild A v ailab le Here! D o w n t o w n P o r t S t J o e 850-229-6161 bo ww o wbeach.com 301 REID A VENUE PO R T S T J O E FLO RID A, 32456 Auto Insurance Hannon Insur ance 227-1133 Sh o p a t H o m e! Society Despina Williams and Nathan Q. Parker were joyfully united in marriage at 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 22, 2014, at the Apalachicola Museum of Art. The ceremony was ofciated by the brides childhood priest, the Rev. Thomas C. Weller. A reception followed in the adjacent gallery rooms. The bride is the daughter of Jerry and Mary Williams, of Apalachicola. She is the granddaughter of the late Nick and Theodora (Lula) George, of Apalachicola, and the late Belon and Vicie Williams of Apalachicola. The groom is the son of Larry and Kristine Parker, of Matthews, North Carolina. He is the grandson of William and the late Janice Parker, of Dowling Park, and Frank and Freda Freeman, of Nacogdoches, Texas. The bride was attended by her Matron of Honor, Kelley Mason and bridesmaid Jessica Ward. The grooms father, Larry Parker, stood as his Best Man and his uncle, Bob Dees, served as groomsman. Music was provided by the brides cousin, Greg Fuentes. Original artwork, made by the couple, their families and friends, decorated the gallery walls. It was a beautiful day. The bride graduated summa cum laude from the University of Florida with a bachelor of arts in English, and currently works for the State University of New York in New Paltz. The groom was medically retired from the Marine Corps after 10 years of service, and is currently in the Honors Program at the State University of New York in Middletown The couple resides in Walden, N.Y. Wedding Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Elementary School SWAT Executive Board held a presentation ceremony last Friday recognizing the Port St. Joe CVS store, No. 5246, on the decision to discontinue the sale of tobacco products in an effort to improve the health of Gulf County. I want to congratulate CVS Caremark for todays bold decision that will lead to better health. Removing cigarettes from their more than 700 locations in Florida is welcome news for the families and communities of our state. I urge other retailers to follow suit and invest in the long term health of their customers and employees in Florida, said Dr. John Armstrong, State Surgeon General and Secretary of the Florida Department of Health. Sweet corn is a favorite among home gardeners. As long as the space is available, its not difcult to grow. Corn is a New World native crop, with archaeological evidence suggesting that it was rst domesticated in Mexico. This crop was the basis of the Mayan, Incan and Aztec civilizations, and by the time European explorers came to the New World in the 1500s, corn had become a staple for the native people. Corn is monoecious (monee-shuss), which means that there are both male and female owers on each corn plant. In some monoecious plants, male and female parts are in the same ower. In corn, male and female owers are in different locations, the male owers form a tassel which is at the top of the plant. The female ower is located at the junction of leaves and stem. It consists of collection of hairs (silks) enclosed in the husks of what will become the ears. There silks are pollen receiving tubes. Windblown pollen from the mole ower (tassel) falls on the silks below. Each silk leads to a kernel, and pollen must land on all silk for the ear to ll out completely with kernel. Corn comes in a variety of colors and sugar contents. Look for sugary enhanced varieties, with rm and sweet kernels, or the super sweet varieties, with tender and very sweet kernels. Some varieties of white and yellow corn that perform well in Florida are Silver Queen (white), How Sweet It Is (white), Sweet Ice (white), Merit (yellow), Kandy Korn (yellow), and Peaches and Cream (bicolor). Sweet corn thrives best in well-drained soils but will tolerate a wide range of soil types. Optimum pH ranges from 6.0 to 6.5. Till the soil to a depth of 68 inches using a spade, plow or rototiller. Avoid tilling the soil while it is too wet because clodding may occur. Sweet corn is a warmseason vegetable requiring soil temperature between 60-90 degrees F. Avoid planting seed in cool soils. Wait until after the last average dates of the last killing frost before planting. If planted too early, weak stands, stunted growth or frost-killed seedling may result. The newer, sweeter varieties are even more sensitive to cool, wet soils any may not perform well in these conditions. Plant corn in an area that receives at least six to eight hours of sunlight. It is benecial to plant near a water source for needed irrigation. Plant seed approximately 11-inch deep in rows three feet apart with 8-12 inches between each seed in the row. A hand pushed mechanical planter can make seeding much easier for larger stands of corn. A soil test through the local County Extension Ofce is always the best way to determine the lime and fertilizer needs. If lime is required, it can be tilled into the ground during soil preparation but is most effective when applied 2 to 3 months prior to planting. If a soil test is not done, a general guideline is to apply 3-4 pounds of 10-10-10 per 100 linear row feet before planting. Side dress two or three times during the growing season with ammonium sulfate (210-0-17) at the rate of 2 pounds per 100 feet of row space. More frequent side dressing may be required on sandy soils or when excessive ran occurs. Corn requires a minimum of 1 inch of water per week for normal development. The most critical period for water is during pollination and during nal ear lling. Sweet corn matures in 60 to 100 day, depending on the varieties. Sweet corn should be ready for harvest about 20 days after the appearance of the rst silk stands, sweet corn is picked during the milk stage when the kernels are fully formed but not completely mature. After picking, cook and eat corn that day or store it in cool temperatures, such as in a refrigerator, as soon as possible. It can then be canned, frozen or eaten fresh within few days. Keeping the corn cool is the key to better avor as high temperatures will convert the sugar in the kernels to starch, giving it a bland taste. For more information on growing sweet corn contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf.ifas.u.edu or edis.ifas.u. edu and see Publication SP 103 /VH 021. ROY LEE CARTER County extension directorDespina Williams, Nathan Parker wed SP ECI A L TO T HE S T A R Port St. Joe Elementary School Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) President, MaLena Ramsey, presents certicate of Greatness in Public Health to CVS manager Donna Odom and staff. SWAT congratulates CVS on tobacco decision Tips for growing sweet corn in the backyard garden

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Special to The Star The following students made the honor roll for the third nine weeks at Port St. Joe Elementary. Kindergarten, all As: Myles Acree, Hunter Ard, Cole Bailey, Joshua Baker, Maya Barnes, Zora Beauchamp, JaLeighya Becton, Christopher Bradley, Lauren Brant, Carson Brown, Corban Butts, ,Caitlin Cathey, Blake Childress, Christina Clayton, Brayden Dailey, Sumner Dickey, Logan Ellwood, Dominic Fitzgerald, Dru Flowers, Hailey Green, Fenix Grogan, Eli Harris, Cole Hart, Kenley Hatcher, Addison Hendricks, Easton Herring, Emma Hill, Anderson Hodges, Johnnie Hood, Chloe Jones, Bobby Landrum, Landon Layeld, Christopher Lee, Brody Lemieux, Stratton Levins, Nathan Lipford, Jacob Marshall, Reagan Mathews, Kymani Mcadoo, Hallie Mize, Brody Mock, Kari Moore, Colt Patterson, Colton Raker, Kaley Rhodes, Melina Ruiz, Reagan Thomas, James Ward, Lexi Webb, Paisley White, Keiara Wineld, ShaNara Woodruff, Callee Wray. Kindergarten, As and Bs: Juan Carlos Baxcajay, Christianna Causey, Harmony Dwight, Trinity Farmer, Jakwavian Gray, Jayvonta Harris, Shamyiah Hayes, Donell Henry, Dovud Kouljanov, Preston Magnussen, Kaleigh Mohr, Cameron Nicholsen, Nijah Quinn, Jamie Rapier, Leelyn Rollins, Jenna Shively, Emily Sudduth, Aaliyah Thompson, Jett Whicker, Lia Wood, 1st Grade, all As Mikey Allen,Whitney Butler, Gannon Buzzett, Sara Beasley Flowers, Carly Hatcher, Ava Kennedy, Peyton Knox, Boston McGhee, Bionca Rafeld, Bella Ray, Leila Smith, Kole Street, Emily Warner, Karis Whicker, Landon White. 1st Grade, As and Bs: TaNiyah Bryan, Camdon Buckley, Ashen Dady, Kate Fidler, James Foxworth, MacKenzie Freisleben, Zuri Garner, Colton Johnson, Kaelee Johnson, Makayan Jones, Lyriq Larry, Hailyn Levins, Chloe Harper, Jasper Hayes, Olivia Leonard, Sydney Kingsland-Lormand, Eileen Madrid, Kensley Mathews, Zoey Metcalf, Draven ONeal, Kiyleh Parker, Jackson Reatherford, Levi Sanders, Zachary Shively, Kellie Simmons, King Waters 2nd Grade, all As: Garrett Acree, Estevan Angel, Jenna Bareld, Zoey Burkett, Ashleigh Causey, Sam Childers, Sara Durham, Mary Margaret Farrell, Shauna Flowers, Tanner Fogle, Dawson Fisher, Wake Gifn, Brandon Heckenlively, Cassidy Lewis, Austin OBryan, Luke Pickels, Dakota Tousignant, Elyse Williams. 2nd Grade, As and Bs: JaMarrien Becton, Bella Cannington, Cody Combow, Juveryona Daniels, Devin Daves, Chase Dykes, Arlena Gleichner, Carson Hendricks, Thomas Hutchinson, T.J. Jenkins, Danica Kelly, Lance Larry, Mikhai Larry, Jamal Leslie, Kaylee Schweikert, Ardarien Shackleford, Miracle Smiley, Fisher Vandertulip, Diamond Warner, Brooke White 3rd Grade, all As: Eli Fidler, Luke Lentz, Gabriella Price, Hannah Riley. 3rd Grade, As and Bs: Sam Brown, Emma Grace Burke, Madison Burkett, Maelynn Butler, Walker Chumney, Skylar Clayton, Donovan Cumbie, Jaydon Gant, Payton Garland, Celeste Hamm, Prince Jones, Jacob Justice, Chase Lanford, Dane Mallon, Cole Moore, Jabara Pearson, Ricky Sherrill, ShaNecia Sims, Janasia Walker, Emigen Watkins, Halee Whicker, Britt White, Dane Wright. 4th Grade, all As: Trent Antley, Elliana Burkett, Ricky Forbes-Rosado, Halston Fulk, Zoe Gerlach, Ashton McGlamery, Donovan Miniat, Erica Ramsey, Ava Ryan, Lily Wockenfuss, Lauren Woosley, Caleb Zur Heiden. 4th Grade, As and Bs: Skylah Addison, Briana Biagini, Sammya Brown, Paloma Burgos-Harris, Ashton Burkett, Ace Cannon, Santana Causey, Kaleigh Clayton, Diamond Collier, Chasity Finch, Destiny Dykes, Julia Gainnie, Madelyn Gortemoller, Natalie Graziano, Shadavia Hudgins, Laura Beth Hill, Porter Hodges, Nic Jefferson, Emily Lacour, MiMi Larry, Aidan Lewis, Morgan Mills, Cliff Money, Amari Nickson, Rylee Reatherford, Gena Rocha, Megan Saleh, Alexandria Thomason, Sarah Beth Thompson. 5th Grade, all As: Leanna Baumgardner, Ali Godwin, Philip Riley, Caleb Wright. 5th Grade, As and Bs: Austin Ard, Henry Balogh, Cherokee Braun, Savannah Burkett, Lyndsey Butler, Parker Cornwell, Judson Grifes, Tyler Guthrie, Haley Harriman, Corbin Ingalls, Lauren Jenkins, Gavin Jones, Kevin Lacivita, Lanecia Larry, Evelyn Laue, Bryson Lee, Mattison Mills, Gabrielle Nicodemus, Jack Randall, Alex Strickland, Hannah Tomlinson, Analisa Treglown, Gabrielle Wood. 6th Grade, all As: Brandon Barnes, Jade Cothran, Sean Farnsley, Jireh Gant, Madeline Gingell, Greg Julius, Bailey Lake, Zach McFarland, Malena Ramsey, Caroline Sapp, Sara Whiteld. 6th Grade, As and Bs: Jaheim Ash, Justice Bareld, Adison Burkett, Brianna Butler, Wesley Chapman, Tristan Doran, Joseph Farrell, Micaela Fedd, John Austin Gee, Brittany Hanson, Lane Herring Rainey Nobles, Hagen Parrish, Jytrel Riley, Jacob Sander, Caleb Schweikert, Rachel Sherman, Hannah Smith. PUB LI C N O TI CE A Pu b li c H e a rin g w i l l b e he l d a t the P l a nnin g a nd D e v e l o p me n t R e v i e w B o a r d (P D RB) o n A p ri l 21, 2014 a t 8:45 a.m. ES T a nd a t the B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmiss i o ne rs (B O C C) me e t in g o n T u es d a y A p ri l 22, 2014 a t 9:00 a.m. ES T B o th p u b li c he a rin gs w i l l b e he l d in the B O C C M e e t in g R o o m a t the R o b e r t M. M o o r e A dminis t r a t i o n B ui l din g, 1000 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B lv d ., P o r t S t J o e F l o ri d a. e p u b li c he a rin gs w i l l b e t o dis c uss a nd ac t o n the f o l l o w in g: 1. V a ri a n ce J a m es & K a t h erin e K o r o na P a r ce l ID #04276-360R L o c at e d in W in dM a r k B e ac h L o t 72 o n S ig na l L a n e R o ad s e t b ac k f r o m S in g le L a n e 2. M in o r S u b di v is io n P en t e l F a mi l y P a r tn er s hi p LD T P a r ce l ID #04243-000R S e c tio n 16, T o w n s hi p 7 S o u t h, R a n g e 11 W es t n ext t o W a t erma r k W a y in S t. J os e p h S h o r es a s ix (6) uni t s u b di v is io n. 3. C o un ty D e v e lo p m en t R egu l a tio n s a n d P o licies 4. S t a P u b lic a n d O p en D is c us s io n e p u b li c is e nc o ur age d t o a t t e nd a nd b e he a r d o n thes e ma t t e rs. I nf o rma t i o n p ri o r t o the me e t in g c a n b e v i e w e d a t the P l a nnin g D e p a r t me n t a t 1000 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B lv d ., R o o m 311. 2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. W alton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE P ARKING Concealed W eapons Class Sat/Sun 1 1am or 2pm Floridagunshows.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 P anama C ity F airgr ounds APRIL 1 2th & 1 3th T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.f su.edu. FL ORIDA ST A TE UNIVERSI T Y P ANAMA CIT Y THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMM UNIT Y S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL Auto Insurance Hannon Insur ance 227-1133 Sh o p a t H o m e! School News The Star| B3 Thursday, April 10, 2014PORT ST. JOE E LEMENTARY SCHOOL This weeks Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Aydan Davis, Mary Margaret Farrell and Josh Baker. Back row: Farrah-Jade Watts, George Foxworth, Caleb Schweikert and Emigen Watkins. DAZZLING DOLPHINS Special to The Star Faith Christian School K4 students read! FCS students learn to read with an introduction to phonics. Developing a strong foundation with the FCS curriculum creates a bridge that helps students obtain a better understanding of written language. Phonics can help students break down words with certain sounds, and children that can sound out a word have an enormous advantage when reading. This skill branches into all academics, and gives students the tools to succeed. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a good reader. Open enrollment for new students has begun for the 2014-2015 school year. Class sizes are limited so early registration is recommended. Call 229-6707 or visit our website, www.FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. Cadets recognized for community support Special to The Star Supporting the Gulf County community is a main goal of the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC program. Recently, ve cadets were recognized by Tupelo Free and Accepted Masonic Lodge No. 289 for their support of the Lodge and its members and as representatives of their company mates overall community support throughout the year. During the Lodges annual awards dinner at the Lodge in Wewahitchka, Cadets Megan Hubbard, Matthew Rocha, Kayla Willis, Claudia Gref and Alex Naus received certicates of appreciation recognizing their community service efforts. The cadets Presented the Colors to start the ceremony and performed an extremely poignant Flag Folding Ceremony depicting the meaning behind each fold of a correctly folded American Flag. The cadets wish to thank the Lodge for their recognition and support and are looking forward to further serving the Gulf County community. The Port St. Joe NJROTC is a citizenship and leadership training program cosponsored by Gulf County Schools and the United States Navy. Each year, more than 600 hours of community service are performed by the Cadets through active participation in community events. PSJ ELEMENTARY HONOR ROLL The Lions Tale

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SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Bruce Hodge, P astor 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Michael Jay Bouington, 49, of Sanford, Florida, passed away Monday, April 7 after an extended illness. He is survived by his wife, Patty, of Sanford; mother Betty, of Port St. Joe, one brother, Mitchell and wife, Angela, of Port St. Joe; one nephew, Kyle; three nieces, Mary Caitlin, Catherine and Kristen. Michael is also survived by his wonderful in-laws, Federico and Vicky Fuentes. Michael was a native of Port St. Joe and graduated from Port St. Joe High School, Gulf Coast Community College and the University of Central Florida. He was preceded in death by his father, J.W. Bouington. Funeral arrangements are pending. Michael Jay Bouington 5/25/1957 3/3/2014 After family and friends, the three favorite things in the life of Allen Cox were rooting for the FSU Seminoles, snapper shing from his boat and playing golf. Sadly, Allen has rooted for the Noles his last time, caught his last sh and swung his last club on this Earth. He passed away Sunday, March 30 at his home in Pascagoula, MS after a heroic, nearly four-year-long battle with cancer at the age of 56. He was born May 25, 1957 in Port St. Joe and was preceded in death by his brother, Randy Bailey. Survivors are his wife, Lisa Brannan Cox, son Jason (Lindsay) Cox and two grandchildren, Hayden and Madyson Cox, all of Pascagoula; his parents George and Faye Cox of Wewahitchka; sister Judy (Martin) Thibodeax of Monroe, LA; and brothers, Jody (Delynda) Bailey of Blountstown and Jim (Regena) Bailey of Lynn Haven. Other local survivors are his motherin-law, Nell Ellzey, of Moss Point and brother-in-law, Mark Brannan of Wade. He is survived by many other loving family members and countless devastated and adoring friends. Once someone met Big Al, they had a friend for life. Allen worked at Signet Maritime in Pascagoula for approximately 30 years and we would like to thank our Signet family for their generosity, love and compassion during this dif cult journey. We would also like to thank Dr. Clarkson, Crystal and staff and our beloved Amy at SRH Cancer Clinic, the doctors and staff at MD Anderson Hospital in Houston, TX, far too many to name. Special thanks go to Dr. Randy Buntyn and Dr. Raymond Weiss, both of Ocean Springs, MS and their staffs. Even though Allen is gone from our presence, he will remain forever in our hearts. Visitation for Allen was held on April 2, at OBryant-OKeefe Funeral home in Pascagoula, followed by a memorial by Dobbs Dennis and Gene Baugh, both of Moss Point. An online guestbook can be found online at www. obryantokeef.com. Allen Cox Mildred Slaughter Owens, 78, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away at home surrounded by her loving family on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. She was born April 30, 1935, in Westville, Fla., to the late Sidney Slaughter and Mabelle Padgett. She graduated from Ponce de Leon High School in 1953. She then moved to Port St. Joe and married the late Everett Skull Owens in 1955 where they raised their family. Mildred had a successful career working with the Florida Power Corp. Her greatest joy was spending time with her grandchildren, cooking and baking, and being an active member of the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. She was known for her abundance of wisdom and will be remembered for being a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. She will be deeply missed by those lives she has touched. Survivors include her two sons, Steven Owens and wife, Judy, of Port St. Joe, Fla., and John Owens and wife, Catherine, of Orlando, Fla., one brother, Lloyd Slaughter and wife, Gail, of Ponce de Leon, Fla., ve grandchildren, Stephanie Davis and husband, Allen, of Howard Creek, Fla., Mitchell Owens of Orlando, Fla., Sydney Owens of Port St. Joe, Fla., Michael and Olivia Owens both of Orlando, Fla.; three great-grandchildren, Charles Allen Davis Jr., Ava Marie Davis, and Abigail Davis, all of Howard Creek, Fla. Funeral services for Mrs. Owens were held on Saturday, April 5, 2014 at the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, Fla., with Brother Buddy Caswell of ciating. Interment followed in Pleasant Ridge Cemetery in Westville, FL. In lieu of owers, contributions can be made to Covenant Hospice or to the building fund at First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, FL Expressions of sympathy may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Mildred Slaughter Owens Mamie Dupree Harper, 80, of Port St. Joe, passed away on Wednesday, April 2, 2014 in Panama City, FL. Funeral services were at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, on Saturday, April 5, 2014 with Bro. Dave Fernandez and Bro. Buddy Caswell of ciating. Interment followed in Friendship Cemetery Donalsonville, Ga. Pallbearers were Corey Dupree, Sean Dupree, Ashley Stephens, Ryan Stephens, Zach Williams, Kevin Grif n, Adam Grif n, Chase Harper. Serving as honorary pallbearers were Cecil Pippin, James Young and Frank Williams. Mamie was born in Bascam to T.L. Bud and Creamer Atwell on Sept. 10, 1933. She married Ralph Dupree on Aug. 9, 1952, in Donalsonville, Ga., and together they had four children before his passing in March 1965. In 1971 she married C. D. Harper and together they had a son. Mamie is preceded in death by her spouse, her parents, her siblings, Doris Watford, Evelyn Perkins, Tom Atwell, James Atwell, Mary Lou Shelton, and Ellen Bass, brother-in-law, Darrell Cross and sister-inlaw, Gayla Atwell. Mamie is survived by her sons, Ron Dupree (Linda) of Tallahassee, Don Dupree of Port St. Joe, and Tommy Harper. Her daughters, Susan (Arden) Stephens of Tallahassee and Kim (Frankie) Williams of Port St. Joe. She will be missed by her grandchildren, Corey, Erin and Sean Dupree, Jessica Dupree, Ashley and Ryan Stephens, Zach and Lacey Williams, Brooke and Chase Harper, The pride and joy of Mamie were her great grandchildren, Claire Stephens, Easton and Grady Williams and Kylie and Mariah. She also survived by her sisters, Helen Hall, Linda (Gus) Grif n and Betty Cross and sister-in-law, Gloria Atwell. Mamie also is survived by many nieces and nephews whom she loved dearly including Kevin and Adam Grif n who held a special place in her heart. Mrs. Mamie, as she was affectionately known by so many of the children she helped raise during the 80s and 90s, loved working in her yard and sharing her plants and owers with anyone who asked. Every Thanksgiving she hosted her family and extended family for a wonderful meal and special family time. She spent the last several years being a chauffeur for many of her friends whenever called upon to drive them to the doctors visits in Panama City. She will be missed by many close friends and neighbors. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St. Panama City, FL 32405. Expressions of sympathy may be submitted at www. southerlandfamily.com. Mamie Dupree Harper Maggie Lewis Waters of Port St. Joe passed away Monday March 31, 2014. She was born in Altha, FL., and had been a resident of Gulf County for the past 62 years. She was Christian woman that loved her family and cherished all her friends. She was a member of Oak Grove Assembly of God Church. She was preceded in death by her son, Roy Waters, her daughter, Myra Byrd and daughter, Doris Tullis, granddaughter, Joann Covington, grandson, Roy Alan Waters, and sonin-law, Junior Harris. She is survived by her children, Myrtle Harris, John Henry Waters, Mildred Levins and husband Joe, Joyce Scully and husband Dennis, James Edward Waters and wife Martha; her son-in-law, Edward Tullis; 28 grandchildren; and numerous greatgrandchildren; and great-great-grandchildren. Graveside services were held 2 p.m. ET Friday April 4, 2014 at Holly Hill Cemetery, with the Rev. David Fernandez of ciating. Interment followed. The visitation was at Comforter Funeral Home from 5-7 p.m. ET on Thursday April 3, 2014. A special thank you to all the wonderful care givers for their loving care they gave to Ms. Maggie during her time of illness. Services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Maggie Lewis Waters Special to The Star EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA All are invited to the Easter Eggstravaganza at First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe, Sunday, April 13, at 12:30 p.m. ET. There will be free food: hot dogs, chips, popcorn, snow-cones, and drinks. Come bring the whole family and join us for some Easter fun activities and an Easter Egg Hunt. FAITH Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page B4 www.starfl.com OBITUARIES FAITH BRIEF

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Special to The Star Do you know how wide a sidewalk is? How about how wide and how long a parking space is? Have you ever considered how tall a re hydrant is or how wide a soda machine is? Dont worry. Its been taken care of. On April 2, the students in Mr. Browns class at Wewahitchka Elementary School took to the streets of Wewahitchka to see how the town measured up. The students were divided into teams of two and were supplied with their own measuring tape and clip board. During the three-hour walk, they took the time to observe many examples of natures beauty that most of us take for granted. From being serenaded by a few happy birds to speaking with some friendly neighbors about their beautiful house and yard, the students enjoyed the time away from the classroom. The mission of the eld trip was to measure a few common items around the community. In the classroom, talking about measurement concepts and then doing worksheets can get a little boring. Being able to use what you have learned is a better tool to judge a student than any worksheet will ever be. The last stop on the Community Math Trail was the local Subway. Are the Subway sandwiches really a foot long? To nd out this answer as well as answers to the earlier items that were measured, stop by Mr. Browns classroom and talk to his special group of children. Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast 4516380 850-227-8890 / 850-227-7770 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m T h e r e i s p l e n t y o f r o o m w i t h 4 b e d r o o m s 4 5 b a t h s a n d 3 d e c k s t o e n j o y t h e v i e w t h e g o r g e o u s s u n s e t s O v e r 2 0 0 0 s q f t o f l i v i n g s p a c e w i t h p r i v a t e e l e v a t o r a c c e s s t o e a c h l e v e l T i l e F l o o r s a n d c r o w n m o l d i n g i n k i t c h e n d i n i n g a n d l i v i n g a r e a s 5 4 0 s q f t o f d e c k s B e a u ti f u l l y f u r n i s h e d a n d r e a d y f o r y o u C a p e S a n B l a s G u l f f r o n t d u p l e x u n i t w i t h s t u n n i n g s u n s e t v i e w s f r o m o p e n d e c k s a n d s c r e e n e d p o r c h T h i s i s a g r e a t p l a c e t o r e l a x a t t h e b e a c h M a s t e r b e d r o o m u p s t a i r s w i t h l a r g e d e c k w i t h g r e a t v i e w s o f t h e b e a c h M a s t e r b e d r o o m a l s o h a s wa l k i n c l o s e t N i c e s c r e e n e d d e c k o n t h e m a i n l e v e l o f f t h e l i v i n g a r e a P a t i o a r e a o n g r o u n d l e v e l p l u s s t o r a g e T h i s h o m e i s t u r n k e y a n d r e n t a l r e a d y A l l f u r n i t u r e a p p l i a n c e s a n d f u r n i s h i n g s s t ay w i t h t he ho m e O w ne r na n c i ng p o s s i b le W i n do w s ha v e 3 M t i n t i ng w h i c h r e d u c e s e n e r g y b i l l s a n d l o w e r s i n s u r a n c e r a t e s Pr eston Russ 850-227-8890 / 850-227-7770 www .coastalr ealtyinfo.com S O L D Local The Star| B5 Thursday, April 10, 2014 Life in the Big Apple By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Some spring breakers head for warmer climates, but a group of Port St. Joe students took the opposite approach. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School art teacher Julie Hodges took 36 students to New York City during spring break to experience art and culture during a three-day trip. While some students never had left a ve-hour ra dius of Port St. Joe, Hodges was excited to have them thrust into a new environ ment and they stepped off the bus for the rst time on Fifth Avenue, New Yorks famous shopping mecca. It was neat to see the upper-end stores, Caitlin Godwin said. You dont think they really exist and then there they are! The group spent large amounts of time walking, talking, experiencing and eating throughout their trip, eager to take in all of the things not typically found in Gulf County. I went for the experi ence, Sophia Harrison said. I knew I couldnt do something like this on my own. I wanted to see things in person that Ive only seen on TV, added Mor gan Butts. It was great to see the Statue of Liberty-something so historically signicant. I wanted to experience the culture, Bailey Amison said. There are so many nationalities and its crazy that things are so different just one street over. Fifteen adult chaper ones accompanied the stu dents on the adventure and a full-time security ofcer was provided. The group also made time to brave chilly northern weather to explore other famous desti nations that included Little Italy, Chinatown and Wall Street. Additionally, students were treated to walking tours of Manhattan, a trip to the Empire State Build ing observatory, the 9/11 memorial, Times Square, Statue of Liberty, Central Park and a showing of The Phantom of the Opera on Broadway. For an extra dose of culture, students visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Butts said that the high light of the Metropolitan Museum of Art was expe riencing art from Greek and Chinese History, some thing she had studied in the eighth grade. I didnt expect to enjoy Broadway as much as I did, Amison said. Although the students admitted that the initial air plane ride was intimidating and that they assumed that everyone in New York City would be mean, they were pleasantly surprised by the experience and wished they could have stayed longer. The students agreed that while everyone seemed to be in a hurry, everyone they encountered was very nice and enjoyed hearing a range of southern accents. Ilianna Maestri, who previously has traveled to Mount Rushmore and the Grand Canyon, proclaimed that she was ready to live in a big city, Harrison thought it might be fun to spend a year or two in NYC while Alayna Godwin called the Big Apple a nice place to visit. How the small town kids navigated in that city would impress you, said Gulf County School Board Chairwoman Linda Wood, who also accompanied the group on the trip. Were a small town, but were not small time. Wood said the highlight for her was meeting up with Port St. Joe alumni Javarri Beachum on their rst night in town. Al though Beachum intended to eat dinner with the stu dents and then meet up with friends, he spent time with the students and even accompanied them on their climb to the top of the Em pire State Building. Hodges said that be cause of the demand for a 2015 trip, she already had decided on next years des tination: Boston.PHOTOS S P ECIAL TO T HE S TAR Although the weather was chilly, the group took in the sites all over Manhattan Island during the threeday trip. More than 30 students from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School spent spring break in New York City and visited famous sites like Washington Square Park. PSJHS students spend spring break in NYC Special to The Star The Gulf County Domestic Violence task force will host its annual Ladies Night Out from 5:308:30 p.m. EDT May 8 at the Gulf County Senior Citizen and Community Center. Admission to the event is free, and entertainment will be provided by Nashville singer and songwriter Jerry Arhelger and local performer Bill Small. Food will be provided and a silent auction and 50/50 drawing will round out the event. For early registration and/or more information, call Patricia at 769-7989, Cathi at 628-9049 or Charlie at 229-2901. Annual Ladies Night Out set for May 8 Community Math Trail has students measuring, learning Wewahitchka Elementary School SCHOOL NEWS

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 1 9 Y e ar s of S e r vi ce GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y 451-6042 / 227-7847 Foley said his sister ad opted a dog from a similar program in Tennessee, and after doing some research, he came across DAWGS and led an application. As a single dad, Roberts knew he wanted a family pet by April, and more impor tantly, wanted to ensure the new addition was going to be a loving animal. Ive had labs before, Roberts said. I know the breed, and I feel comfortable with them being around my son. He praised the DAWGS program for helping future pet owners get connected with an animal thats already trained and will adapt well to new situations. Taking dogs out of shel ters is always a positive thing, Roberts said. Its so much more than getting a dog thats trained; its also about the rehab of the in mates and giving back to the community. After graduating, Maci, a lab/hound mix, would be making the trek to Daphne, Ala. with her new owner, Bob Ward. One night when Ward was watching television, he saw a feature on a similar program in California and knew it was something he wanted to be part of. In August, he lost his previous companion, and he wanted to get a dog he and his 3-year-old grandson could enjoy. I think the program is great for everyone involved, Ward said. Its win-win, especially for us who love animals. Two weeks before the graduation ceremony, Ward and his grandson made the drive to visit the camp, and he recognized an instant connection between the boy and Maci. He felt the timing was right and everything had fallen into place. The people need some thing, and the dogs need something, Ward said. I dont know why anyone wouldnt adopt from the program. You dont know what youre getting when you adopt from a shelterthis just makes sense. The guest speaker for the event was Sheri Logue from the Corrections Foundation in Tallahassee. The founda tion is a nancial supporter of DAWGS in Prison as well as others across the state. Logue spoke to the in mates and adopters about the benets they have and will receive from participat ing in the program. She re minded the adopters that their pups will believe they are the most amazing hu mans around. It will change your life, Logue said. Try to be the person your dog thinks you are. Certicates were given to recognize the inmates who act as team leaders, assis tant trainers, handlers and caretakers for the dogs in the program, and awards for Most Improved and the Top Dog were bestowed on ca nines that exceeded expec tations during their training. Program Co-Director Judy Miick took a moment to recognize and thank Christy for all of her hard work over the past ve years. Christy received a standing ovation from the audience. Sandi makes the dogs feel good and the people feel good, Miick said. Everyone who works in this program is part of a pack. WES LOCHER | The Star Dogs that enter the the DAWGS in Prison program at the Gulf Forestry Camp come from a partnership with the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society in Port St. Joe. RUFF from page B1 S PECIA L TO T HE S TAR S PECIA L TO T HE S TAR The rst First Friday The First Fridays Art and Music series kicked off last week at The Thirsty Goat. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School students who qualied to represent the Northwest region at the Odyssey of the Mind state nals in Orlando later this month performed skits for attendees to raise money for their travel expenses. Live music was performed by The Bo Spring Band. The series runs the rst Friday of each month, April through September. WES LOCHER | The Star WES LOCHER | The Star S PECIA L TO T HE S TARMARCH 31APRIL 6 On Monday, March 31, Investigator L. Greenwood arrested Stephen J. Heathcock (19) after conducting an investigation into the transmission of harmful material to a minor. A complaint regarding pornographic images sent to a minor was received by Sgt. S. Strickland at Port St. Joe High School. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. The images were sent and received on an interactive smartphone application. Heathcock was arrested and charged with the Transmission of Harmful Material to a Minor. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility (GCDF) where he was later rst appeared and released on a conditional release. On March 31, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) traveled to the Leon County Jail to pick up Mark D. Tennison (54). Tennison was arrested in Leon County on a Gulf County warrant for Failure to Appear on his original charge of Giving False Name to a Law Enforcement Ofcer. He was transported to the GCDF where he remains in custody. On Tuesday, April 1, Deputy J. Brock arrested Gary L. Hudson (44) in the 7300 block of West Highway 98. Hudson was arrested on an active warrant for Harassing Phone Calls. He was transported to the GCDF where he remains in custody. On April 1, the GCSO transported Londel A. Smith (29) to the GCDF. Smith was arrested in Calhoun County on a Gulf County warrant for Failure to Appear. He remains in custody at the GCDF. On April 1, Deputy J. Brock took a report regarding the burglary of a vehicle in the 5900 block of Ganley Road in the Five Acre Farm area. The victim reported that approximately $400 in cash, an iPod Touch and medication were stolen out of the vehicle. The vehicle was not locked at the time of the offense. On April 1, Deputy K. Starnes served a warrant on Robert J. Price, Jr. (35) in the 100 block of North 2nd Street in Wewahitchka. On March 25, Sgt. Dixon conducted an investigation into the theft of electricity in which Price began a suspect in. Sgt. Dixon obtained a warrant for Price in that case which resulted in the arrest. Price was transported to the GCDF where he was later rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On Wednesday, April 2, the GCSO transported Crystal M. Ratliff (50) to the GCDF. Ratliff was arrested in Franklin County on a warrant from Gulf County for Violation of Probation. Her original charge was Possession of a Controlled Substance. She was rst appeared and released on a $3,000 bond. On Thursday, April 3, Deputy J. Oquendo stopped a vehicle for a trafc violation in the area of State Road 22 and Past Time Drive in Wewahitchka. The driver, Cody L. Curti (20), was wanted out of Bay County. Curti was arrested, transported to the GCDF, and held for the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce. Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce LA W ENFORCEMENT SUMMARY

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, April 10, 2014 The Star | B7 94574S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-124-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SHEBRETIA DANIELS MYERS A/K/A SHEBRETIA S. DANIELS A/K/A SHEBRETIA MYERS, EMIT DANIELS, VONCILE DANIELS A/K/A VONCILE J. DANIELS, and EARNEST MYERS, JR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 27, 2014, in Case No. 13-124-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and SHEBRETIA DANIELS MYERS A/K/A SHEBRETIA S. DANIELS A/K/A SHEBRETIA MYERS, EMIT DANIELS, VONCILE DANIELS A/K/A VONCILE J. DANIELS, and EARNEST MYERS, JR. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on May 1, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: A parcel of land in the Southwest quarter of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a point of intersection of the North boundary line of the Southwest quarter of Section 18 with the Westerly right of way boundary line of State Road No. 71 (having a 66 foot wide right of way); thence go South 18 degrees 16 minutes 14 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary line (as monumented) for a distance of 271.31 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said point of beginning, continue South 18 degrees 16 minutes 14 seconds East along said right of way boundary line for a distance of 107.00 feet; thence departing said right of way boundary line, go South 86 degrees 26 minutes 09 seconds West for a distance of 210.00 feet; thence go North 18 degrees 16 minutes 14 seconds West for a distance of 107.00 feet; thence go North 86 degrees 26 minutes 09 seconds East for a distance of 210.00 feet to the point of beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: March 28, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr Tallahassee, FL 32308 April 3, 10, 2014 94294S FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner, vs. CLYDE J. MELVIN, Case #36048 Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CLYDE J. MELVIN, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Program Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before May 20, 2014. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: March 20, 2014 Susan Benton -Chair CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS AND TRAINING COMMISSION By: -s-Ashley Hegler, Division Representative March 27, 2014 April 3, 10, 17, 2014 94620S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 6th day of May, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EDST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 505 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE 198; ESTABLISHING THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE AS THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE PORT ST. JOE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 229-8261, Ext. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: Charlotte M. Pierce Clerk April 10, 2014 94634S PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T Mobility Services, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of Highway 71 in Wewahitchka, Gulf County, Florida 32465 at latitude 29 59’ 14.07” north and longitude 85 10’ 5.02” west. The height of the tower will be 64 meters above ground level (70.7 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L-865/L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205)6293868. Any interested party may submit comments by May 16, 2014 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/ asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0896656. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR § 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCC’s website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. April 10, 2014 94636S PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T Mobility Services, LLC is proposing to install a monopole telecommunications tower off of Willow Street in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida 32456 at latitude 29 53’ 36.94” north and longitude 85 21’ 23.39” west. The height of the tower will be 64 meters above ground level (67.2 meters above mean sea level). The tower is anticipated to have steady red lights, FAA Style E (L-864/L865-/L-810). Specific information regarding the project is available by calling Henry Fisher during normal business hours at (205) 629-3868. Any interested party may submit comments by May 16, 2014 with Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, AL 35120 for comments on the impact of the proposed action on any districts, sites, buildings, structures, or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under National Historic Preservation Act Section 106. Interested persons may review the application for this project at www.fcc.gov/ asr/applications by entering Antenna Structure Registration (Form 854) file no. A0896638. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns about the project under the National Environmental Policy Act rules of the Federal Communications Commission, 47 CFR § 1.1307, by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. Requests for Environmental Review must be filed within 30 days of the date that notice of the project is published on the FCC’s website and may only raise environmental concerns. The FCC strongly encourages interested parties to file Requests for Environmental Review online at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest, but they may be filed with a paper copy by mailing the Request to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. A copy of the Request should be provided to Environmental Engineers, Inc. at 1345 Blair Farms Road, Odenville, Alabama 35120. April 10, 2014 94640S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014 CP 10 Division: Gay IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES DAVID PARHAM Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JAMES DAVID PARHAM, deceased whose date of death was January 22, 2014, File Number 2014 CP 10 Division Gay, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Clerk of Courts, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 10, 2014. Personal R resentative: JAMES D. PARHAM, JR. Attorney for Personal Representative Jennifer Lee Bushnell, Esquire FL Bar No. 0617555 Jennifer Lee Bushnell, P.L. 1803 W. Garden Street Pensacola, FL 32502 P.O. Box 13221, Pensacola, FL 32591 850.433.5511 Phone 866.613.3645 Facsimile April 10, 17, 2014 98341S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-17 FPID NO. 435194-1-58-01 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: WARD STREET SCRAP PROJECT (PRI PROJECT #003.257) This project includes approximately 1,800 LF of roadway resurfacing and reclaimed asphalt along Ward Street located at St. Joe Beach in Gulf County, FL. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. All bidders shall be FDOT Qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction, latest edition in the following work classes: Grading, Drainage, Flexible Paving, and Hot Plant Mix-Bituminous Course. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day. Qualified bidders must submit the original and three (3) copies of the bid to the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 147, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 by the Response Deadline (April 25, 2014 at 4:30 P.M., E.T.). Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER and that this is a sealed bid for the “Ward Street SCRAP Project”. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, on April 25, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at this same location on April 28, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Gulf County. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman April 3, 10, 2014 98375S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 139 Application No. 2014-24 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00648-000R Description of Property: COMMENCING at the SW Corner of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North along the West line of said SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 to the North Right of Way line of Transfer Road for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence East along said North right of way line for 210 feet, thence North parallel with the West line of said SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 to the Southerly right of way line of Henry Circle; thence Westerly along said Southerly right of way line for 210 feet, more or less, to a point on said West line of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4; thence South along said West line to the POINT OF BEGINNING, being located in the SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida, and being the East 1/2 of tract described in Official Records Book 76, Page 1091, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Earl Forehand & Kelly Forehand All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of May, 2014. Dated this 31st day of March, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98379S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1025 Application No. 2014-22 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03450-175R Description of Property: Lot 35, Wetappo Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5, Pages 36-42, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Palm Breeze Development, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of May, 2014. Dated this 31st day of March, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98377S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 469 Application No. 2014-23 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 01847-000R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the Northeast Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line westerly along the North line of said Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter for 571.0 feet; then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 730.0 feet for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left from the line last described above for 151.0 feet, then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes right for 75.0 feet, then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes right for 151.0 feet, to a point on the eastern right of way line of Refour Road; then turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes right along said right of way line for 75.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land has an area of 0.26 acre. It is in the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, in the City of Wewahitchka, Florida. Name in which assessed: Ceaphous & Margretta Fisher All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 7th day of May, 2014. Dated this 31st day of March, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 3, 10, 17, 24, 2014 98405S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-12-PR 98385S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-18 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: LEASE, LEASE WITH THE OPTION TO PURCHASE OR PURCHASE THE FOLLOWING: BUILDING #1 MINIMUM 3,000 SF IN BUILDING #2 -MINIMUM 7,000 SF IN PORT ST. JOE List the building specifications, state the amount of parking available and price in your bid. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, April 11, 2014. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, 14, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: WARD MCDANIEL CHAIRMAN ATTEST: REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK April 3, 10, 2014

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B8| The Star Thursday, April 10, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4510161 1121336 1121337 AL#1481;GAL#2034;FL-AB#1488;NC#6397;TNAL#3945€10%BuyersPremium 255Properties in 100 Offerings Detailed Information 800.479.1763 johndixon.com Bid at the Auction or Online Bank Owned & Other Secured Parties AuctionAlabama€Florida€Georgia N.Carolina€TennesseeWednesday, April 23 & Thursday,April24 11:00am Both Days SaleSite: HolidayInn-AtlantaPerimeter/Dunwoody 4386ChambleeDunwoodyRd,Atlanta,GAPROPERTIESINCLUDE: Residential€Commercial Industrial€Agricultural 1123837 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 4322 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MOwww. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com € Managers € Hostesses € Bartenders € Servers/Bussers € Cooks € Shuckers € Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS!4518052 4518053The MainStay Suites is NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for a housekeeper. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. MainStay Suites 3951 E. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 Job AnnouncementNorth Florida Child Development is seeking Preschool and VPK teachers for our Centers located in Blountstown, Wewahitchka, and Port St. Joe. Must have at least a FCCPC/CDA. NFCD offers an attractive benet package (health, dental, life, disability, sick leave, etc. Send resumes to smcgill@oridachildren. org, fax (850) 639-6167. DFWP/M-F/7-5/EOE 4516183 IN RE: ESTATE OF ALMA CLOTEAL BURKE Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of ALMA CLOTEAL BURKE, deceased, whose date of death was January 16, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is April 10, 2014. Personal Representative: Deborah Ann McLeod 253 Greenwood Sr. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Victoria F. Langford 280 Sunset Drive Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com April 10, 17, 2014 98469S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Hiers Seybold the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 801 Application No. 2014-27 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 R.E. No: 03391-017R Description of Property: LOT 4: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and run South along 40 line for 360 feet; for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence turn right and run West for 350 feet to County Road, thence turn left and run South for 120 feet, along right of way of County Road, thence run East for 350 feet to the West line of the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, thence run North for 120 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING, all lying and being in Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West. Name in which assessed: Valerie Dodds c/o Christopher Dodds All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 98467S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicole Hiers Seybold the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 800 Application No. 2014-28 Date of Issuance: May 27, 2009 R.E. No: 03391-016R Description of Property: LOT 3: COMMENCE at the Northwest Corner of SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, and run West for 350 feet, thence run South for 240 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue to run South for 120 feet, thence run East for 350 feet to forty line; thence run North for 120 feet, thence run West for 350 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said lands lying and being in the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West. Name in which assessed: Valerie Dodds c/o Christopher Dodds All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 98473S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1146 Application No. 2014-25 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03801-245R Description of Property: Lot 3, Block B, Integras Rehabilitation Phase II, as per Plat recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 2, of the Plat Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Integras Therapy & Wellness Centers, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 98471S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1145 Application No. 2014-26 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03801-230R Description of Property: Lot 26, Block A, Integras Rehabilitation Phase II, as per Plat recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 2, of the Plat Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Integras Therapy & Wellness Centers, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 14th day of May, 2014. Dated this 7th day of April, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com GUN SHOW PANAMACITY FAIRGROUNDSApril 12th and 13th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL84435 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping InspectorPTweekend position. Apply in person Thurs -Mon 4693 Cape San Blas Rd Web Id 34285183 EducationChild Care ProvidersThe Oak Grove Church Daycare will be expanding and offering a 3K program starting in June. With the expansion comes job openings for both full time and part time teachers. Pick up an application at 613 Madison. Web Id 34285778 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Web Id 34285183 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required.PT InspectorsAttentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance TechThe St. George Plantation is looking to hire a full time maintenance employee. Position will report to the maintenance supervisor. The individual must be able to mow, trim, load and capable and willing to work in various conditions. Must have a current DL and transportation to St. George Island. This position includes a good benefit package that includes health, dental, life and matching IRA fund. Mail rsum to: Drew Robertson, Facilities Manager, 1712 Magnolia Rd, St. George Island, FL 32328; email: drew@sgpoa.com or phone (850)927-2312 for Drew. Web ID#: 34285431 PSJ Warehouse Space For Lease. 1000sf, Includes Office Space and Private Bathroom. $600 month. Up To 6000 sf Aval. Lctd.@ 228 Cessna Dr 850-238-7080 Port St Joe Commercial or Residential Rental 2 Bd ,1 1/2 Ba W/D efficiancy, boat and RV Storage avail on site. Location, location! $2100 Month. Short or Long Term Lease. No Pets, Smoke Free Environment. 850-229-8030 or 478-457-7599 Cell Text FL84510 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Flooring Installation Carpentry Home Repairs Call Dave 850-323-2584 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 4518144A & A HomeCare, Inc. currently has an opening for a part time Registered Nurse to work Wednesday through Friday. A & A HomeCare, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer. Experience in HHC and with OASIS assessments is preferred. Apply in person at 211 N Hwy 71 in Wewahitchka, fax resume to 850-639-3337, or email resume to aahealth@gtcom.net.