The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03934


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By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Given the success of the rst four years, most visitors and residents would likely say bring on 40 more. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf celebrated four years last Friday, March 15, with Roger Hall, president of Sacred Heart Health Systems, grilling up burgers and hot dogs for the staff and medical team. Reminded of the span of time, Hall recalled a trip taken by local elected of cials and business owners to the Sacred Heart facility in Destin. He remembered, coincidentally, that the visiting group had bumped from a meeting room a seminar led by Kathy Chastain, who now serves as COO at Sacred Heart on the Gulf. That trip, centered signi cantly on the community buy-in required to bring a hospital off the ground, buyin represented by the memorial plaques upon the hallway walls, was an initial step to bringing Sacred Heart to Gulf County. The buy-in from the community was hefty – donations of cash and land by the St. Joe Community; a community fundraising campaign that brought in more than $2 million and is re ected in the plaques that line the walls in the atrium and hallways at Sacred Heart on the Gulf. The Board of County Commissioners levied a one cent sales tax to offset the cost of care for the underinsured. The community has also provided volunteers in numbers that now exceed 300. Committees comprised of community volunteers oversee spending of sales tax receipts and provide input and guidance on hospital operations, liaisons between the hospital and community. And the hospital, which exceeded all odds by standing tall even after a recession and real estate collapse altered the business plan, continues to grow. The women’s center expanded its services in the past year and the hospital established the rst MRI diagnostic services in the county. In September, Sacred Heart opened a facility on the north end of the county and in December welcomed a plastic surgeon to the growing ranks of medical professionals seeing patients in the Medical Ofce Building on campus. Those ranks expanded again in January with the addition of an ear, nose and throat specialist, and the hospital opened an intermediate care center earlier this month. In the past year, the hospital also established a fund that helps provide free mammograms to women in need in Gulf and Franklin counties. The growth and outreach has not gone unnoticed. The hospital was named last year fourth in the nation in patient satisfaction/experience. Earlier this month the hospital earned 20 Excellence in Healthcare Awards given to facilities which rank in the top 10 percent in patient satisfaction as reported by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems, a national, standardized publicly reported survey. “This hospital has really been a blessing to this community,” said Father Phil Fortin of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, who, he noted, has been both a volunteer and a ER patient at Sacred Heart on the Gulf. Thursday, MARCH 20, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 23 Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 76, NUMBER 23 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR St. Vincent Open House B1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Tourist Development Council is seeking some Gulf County “sel es.” The TDC this week kicked off its spring promotion with a contest aimed at showcasing the county’s beauty through Instagram, the Twitter of photos and the fastest growing social media site. With the word “sel e” now part of the lexicon, the TDC is riding that social media wave to a campaign to broaden the brand. “It is a really good and simple promotion,” said TDC executive director Jennifer Jenkins. “It is about celebrating the natural beauty of Gulf County. It is a nice way for little Gulf County to say we are naturally beautiful and we don’t need, so to speak, to get our hair and nails done to look pretty.” The contest taps into Instragram, the app for which can be downloaded onto any mobile device. Simply snap a portrait of Gulf County — a wind-swept beach, a glowing sunset, a sh dancing on the end of a line, what Gulf County means to you — and post it to Instagram at #GCFLno lter. And provide information about the photo at @gulfcounty “Submit a photo, and you are automatically entered to win one of four vacation getaways,” Jenkins said. “Anyone can enter on Instagram, visitor or local. Every picture is an entry.” The four vacation getaways will offer a free three-night stay with a local lodging partner. TDC partners No Worries Vacation Rentals, Pristine Properties, Crewes Nest and the Haughty Heron/Heron’s Nest as well as Happy Ours and Sunset Coastal Grill have helped the TDC bring the promotion together, Jenkins noted. The contest started Tuesday and will continue through the end of April, with a group of eight travel industry writers arriving in the county toward the end of the promotion on a trip designed to showcase Gulf County in major media markets. The TDC is also partnering with the TDC launches spring promotion on Instagram See BEAUTY A2 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com One hurdle crossed and several high ones ahead for the Port of Port St. Joe. An application to secure a permit to dredge the shipping channel to federally authorized depths was submitted to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection the rst of the month as promised. The materials submitted — the target date for submittal was March 1, a Saturday, so the date of record is March 3 — constituted a partial application dealing exclusively with reports and data essential to assessing the task of actual dredging. Still to be submitted by Hatch Mott MacDonald, the Port Authority’s engineer of record, is data pertaining to disposal of dredged material: how, where, potential impacts, etc. The Port Authority was encouraged to submit at least a partial application by the target of March 1. That allows state and federal agencies to begin to weigh-in — analyzing, requesting additional information — on the major component of the dredging process; dredging material to bring the channel to the 35-37 feet authorized depth. “With the agencies we are nding favor that they can get notice out to all the agencies to begin work on it,” said Tommy Pitts, project manager for Hatch Mott MacDonald. “We are already responding to requests for additional information.” The “partial” application Port dredge application submitted Decision time soon for water solutions By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Answers to the vexing issues of discolored water are coming into focus for staff with the city of Port St. Joe. City commissioners will soon be asked to weigh-in on a path forward. A meeting this week with David Kozan from CDM Smith, the contractor which designed the city’s $21 million surface water treatment plant, continued to hone the dialogue on potential solutions for discolored water which have plagued the city since its new water plant came online more than three year ago. A foundation of consensus is built upon the belief that the ongoing replacement of aging pipes in the distribution system, particularly the cast iron pipes, will eliminate an estimated 90 percent of the iron present in the system by the end of this year or early 2015. Iron, or ferric (iron-containing compounds), has been identi ed as the likely source of “red water” complaints in the city. However, iron is not the sole issue, as was discovered during a pilot water study conducted by CDM, in partnership with Virginia Tech University. As Kozan noted, nearly half of complaints about the city’s water has described “dirty”, “ice tea” or “black” water conditions. The likely source of that, the pilot study found, was manganese. The CDM study, which is being nalized with city staff comments incorporated in the nal draft, identi es several potential solutions and recommends changing the corrosion control chemical used in the treatment while also increasing the strength of the solution. The corrosion control chemical’s impact on aging cast iron pipes has long been identi ed as the primary culprit for red water. “This is a small problem that we think will solve itself over time as the pipes are replaced,” said city manager Jim Anderson. “But we know the problem is there.” Lowering the levels of manganese See DREDGE A8 See WATER A8 4 MORE YEARS Sacred Heart celebrates rst 4 years in Gulf County COURTESY OF MARIE ROMANELLI | Special to The Star The TDC has launched a spring promotion aimed at capturing the wild natural beauty of Gulf County, such as this gorgeous sunset. TIM CROFT | The Star Sacred Heart Health Systems President Roger Hall grilled lunch for the staff last Friday in what has become a birthday tradition at the hospital. INSIDE Commission tables PSJRA vote, A8 50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, March 20, 2014 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Consider last Friday job training no one wants, but now, everyone needs. A series of active shoot er trainings was held for Gulf County Schools, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce, Gulf Coast State Col lege, Florida Department of Health, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and Gulf County Emergency Management. Educational sessions earlier in the week cul minated with a lockdown exercise at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School run by an evaluation team from Disasters, Strategies, and Ideas Group (DSI), the or ganization responsible for designing and managing the exercise. Teachers from Gulf County schools met Wednesday for an educa tional session presented by Terry Schenk, exercise di rector for DSI. Schenk and his team shared videos and statistics with the teach ers, mentally prepping them for how to handle a situation in which an active shooter enters the school, facility lockdown proce dures and the role of local law enforcement. “Hopefully this will never happen in your com munity,” Schenk said. “But let’s acknowledge that we have an active shooter problem in this country.” Focused on stats gen erated from school shoot ings over the past decade, Schenk said most shoot ings last fewer than 80 sec onds. The rate of school-re lated shootings rose from an average of ve per year before 2008 to 15 per year in subsequent years. As the number rose, the Federal Bureau of Investi gation put together an ac tive shooter team and of fers free training to more than 500 police depart ments across the country. That training has begun to incorporate military-style tactics including rst aid. Schenk also raised awareness on the aver age age of a shooter. In the tragedies across the U.S. in the past decade, the aver age shooter has been male aged 15-19, followed by those 10-14 years old. “These events happen so quickly, and 49 percent of the time, they end before law enforcement arrives,” said Cooper Maddox, a re searcher with DSI. “It’s im portant to have a plan.” Schenk shared warn ing signs that might help teachers to stop a problem before it ends in tragedy and the importance of be ing alert, aware of the sur roundings and being able to think critically. The DSI team encouraged teach ers to talk to students and listen to what’s happening within the student body. The motto of the train ing was “run, hide, ght,” which encompassed one of the three actions teachers should take during an ac tive shooter situation. Cer tied emergency manager and law enforcer Hayward Walker gave tips on how to escape a building quickly and quietly, how to success fully barricade classroom doors and how to ght if no other option is available. “You are the rst line of defense against active shooters,” Walker told teachers. “You are the he roes of this whole thing.” On Friday, students were released for spring break before a lockdown exercise for teachers be gan. School personnel demonstrated their lock down procedures, acting as though the circumstances were completely real. They were graded by members of the DSI team. Once the school had been completely locked down, members of the GCSO red blanks from handguns, ries and shot guns from various loca tions in the school so each teacher would be able to identify the sound were it ever to occur again. After the lockdown ex ercise, teachers met to discuss areas of opportu nity for their classrooms and made suggestions to help the process easier in the event of an actual emergency. “This was something we needed,” Assistant Superintendent for Busi ness, Duane McFarland told teachers after the ex ercise. “We’ve gained a lot of knowledge, and while we hope it never happens, we’re a step closer to being ready for it.” Once the teaching staff completed training, the GCSO staff ran through response scenarios around the school aimed to pre pare them to respond to an actual shooter with a top priority of stopping the threat. Student Resource Of cer for Wewahitchka schools Donna Huggins said active shooter training was important, especially for those ofcers without a military background who might not have the same experience when it comes to live combat. “I’d rather know how to react rather than be put on the spot,” Huggins said. “It’s good preparation.” Marshall Nelson, emer gency management direc tor for Gulf County, said he hopes to see another exer cise over the summer uti lizing student volunteers for added realism. “When actual students are involved, that’s when you get the butteries,” Nelson said. “This exercise isn’t meant to scare any one; it’s us trying to pre pare them.” Within 30 days of com pleting the training, DSI will send a full assessment to all departments involved with suggested improve ments to enhance the ex isting response protocols. “We take very seriously the safety and welfare of our students, faculty and staff,” said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. “It’s no simple task to put on an activity of this nature, but we’re glad that this is only an exercise and pray we never experience the real thing.” ¡ P ¢¦  ¢ Ž  J¢‚¨ G¦ Ž‚ I ¨” Ž¨ ¨ M”¦ Žˆ¢¦ Cove rin g: Me xi co B each al o n g with Gu lf and F rank lin Cou ntie s fšŽ ‚¨Ž ¨”  œŽ £  ¢¦ ‘Ž ¡ P ¢¦  ¢ Ž  J¢‚¨ G¦ Ž‚ I¨” Ž ¨¨ M”¦ Žˆ¢¦ ¢ †Ž ” ¨Ž¦ Ž‹ ” ¢ ‘Ž m‚¦ n ”œ Ž¨ G£ ¦”š ¡ x Ž¨ Sele ct y our Size : Stan dar d List ing (1.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . . . $55 A w ar enes s List ing (3” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . . . $90 Expo sur e List ing (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . . $200 PREM IUM POSI TION S Chec k One (Fir s t Come Fir s t Ser v ed) Insi de Fron t Co v er (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . $300 Insi de Bac k Co v er (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . . $250 Outs ide Bac k Co v er (7.5 ” tall b y 4.5” wide ) . . . . . $350 All ads ar e pr iced in Full Colo r Rese r v a tion Dead line Apr il 1, 2014 Name of Busi ness : ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ Cont act P er son: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Phon e: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ E-ma il: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ Addr ess: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ City : ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Sta te: ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ __ Zip: ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ Clas si c a tion (Cir cle One) : Anti ques Attr acti ons, Auto moti ve, Chur ch, Elec tron ics, Even t Coor dina tor Equi pmen t Rent al, Fina ncia l, Fish ing, Flor ists Gift s, Hair styl ist, Home Care Insu ranc e, Jewe lry Lawn Care Lock smit h, Mari ne, Nurs ery Phot ogra phy Plum bing Prop erty Mana geme nt, Real Esta te, Rent als Mana geme nt, Reta il, Rest aura nt, Stor age, Wine & Liqu or Not Lis ted? Wr ite in y our ca tego r y ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ n ¢ k Ž¨Ž¦ Ž x ¢ ¦ m£‚ˆŽ J¢  ‚ˆj W e use energy wisely T wo home impr ovementsmor e attic insulation and energy-ef cient windowscan make a big dif fer enct in your energy usage. Insulation with an R-38 value (about 12-15 inches) and energy-ef cient windows impr ove your home’ s energy performance and thermal comfort. Let us perform a home energy audit and nd ways to use energy wisely T ogether we power your life. TOGETHER NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 3-31-14 CODE: SJ00 Izea blogging network, eldandstream. com, Crisp mobile and, a critical compo nent, Outdoor Nation. Outdoor Nation is a nonprot whose goal is to introduce the so-called millenni al generations to the outdoors, to connect youngsters to the outdoors while they dis connect from their mobile devices. And for Jenkins, that means an oppor tunity to connect with the county’s next generation of visitors and connect with them long-term. Outdoor Nation is promoting the area throughout the contest on its website, and the TDC has pledged a $1 contribution match for every photo submitted during the spring promotion. The goal, Jenkins said, is 5,000 photos and $5,000 to a worthy cause. “We wanted to have a socially good component and a give-back to the pro motion,” Jenkins said. “They want to get youngsters outdoors, and we are an out door playground. They are really excited about this promotion.” Jenkins said the TDC does not have the promotional budgets of larger coun ties — Bay County’s TDC recently deter mined how it would spend more than $1 million in marketing money — which dic tates the need for strategic spending. The concept for the promotion came from no luggage, the TDC social media strategy agency. Where Jenkins gured she would see three ideas, no luggage of fered ve. “Narrowing it down was difcult,” she said. The spring push began in January with “Our Idea of a Wild Spring Break,” an ad campaign that poked a bit of fun at the counties to the west. The Instragram contest promotes the concept of “prompting visitors to come to Gulf County and get their hands dirty. Be real. Be natural. Be you,” Jenkins said, echoing the verbiage of the campaign. The TDC advisory council approved a $55,000 budget for the spring promotion, and the Instragram contest offers bang for relatively little buck, Jenkins said, as it will feed the social media elements — Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter — the TDC is already employing to marketing success. “These photos are going to be seen around the world,” Jenkins said. “We know targeted promotions work. This is a conversation starter. This is promoting the things we are naturally. It is a stra tegic alliance, a brand alliance. We are trying to align ourselves through a grass roots effort.” Jenkins said folks are encouraged to think creatively – maybe a suitable photo for a Birmingham, Ala., resident is to snap a photo sitting in their living room in the pouring rain dreaming about Gulf County. And, most of all; get a kick from their pics. “We want self-inspired photos,” Jenkins said. “My goal is to get to that 5,000 people. We’re going to have some fun with it.” BEAUTY from page A1 County hosts active shooter training PHOTOS SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR Staff of Gulf County schools and Gulf Coast State College last week attended seminars and practiced lockdown procedures in the case of an active shooter. Below, Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison makes his way through the halls of the high school during one of DSI’s exercises.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, March 20, 2014 Y OU’RE INVITED! HOPE TO SEE Y OU THERE! Come and chat with Gar y regarding the future of “Y OUR” city For: Gar y W oodham Place: Graba Java 2409 Hwy 98 Unit D Mexico Beach, FL Date: Saturday March 22, 2014 T ime: 3:00pm to 5:00 CST He is running for re-election to the City Council, Group 2 Mexico Beach April 22, 2014 On behalf of my staff and I, we w ould lik e to thank all our lo yal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple aw ar ds that we ha ve r eceived in the past; including voted most compassionate Dr and Patients’ Choice A w ar d. It is a g r eat honor and we will continue to strive for the ver y best medical car e for our patients. Cong r atulations to Vincent Ivers MD for 19 Y ears of Dedicated, Compassionate Ser vice in Port St Joe Dr Ivers and his family r elocated from the Orlando ar ea, wher e he w ork ed as a primar y car e ph ysician, to join the Port St Joe community in 1995. He then began pr acticing inter nal medicine family medicine in-patient car e and car dio v ascular medicine at Gulf Pine Medical. Dr Ivers g r aduated Cum Laude in his medical class. When he joined Gulf Pines Medical, he w as a member of the American College of Chest Ph ysicians, American Medical Association and the American College of Ph ysician. Dr Ivers w ould lik e to thank all our lo yal patients for being selected for the multiple aw ar ds, including voted most Compassionate Doctor and Patient Choice A w ar d. It is a g r eat honor and we will continue to strive for the ver y best medical car e for our Patients. Dr Ivers, his staff and family w ould lik e to thank you and look forw ar d to many YEARS to come ... VINCENT IVERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth Str eet Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www .iversmd.co m 4 C o mmi t me n t t o E x ce l l e nce f o r o v e r 23 Y e a rs Celebrating 19 Y ears of Service in Port St. Joe By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The hits just keep on coming. During last week’s regular meeting for the month of March, Mexico Beach city administrator Chris Hubbard told the city council that the cur rent city hall, an old bank building off of U.S. High way 98 is in danger of be ing sold. People’s South, a bank franchise based out of Georgia, will be opening three branches in Bay County, two of which will be located in the Panama City area and the third is targeted for Mexico Beach. A building inspector visited current city hall to ensure it was in good working order and Hub bard said that there was nothing wrong with the building that might cause delays if someone wanted to purchase the building and move in. The bank has 90 days to notify the council if they intend to purchase it. “We may be looking for a new home soon,” Hub bard told the council. It’s already been a game of musical chairs for various departments around the city. Public Works was re cently moved into a new maintenance building which gave the depart ment more space and the police department is in process of relocating to a modular unit, allowing it to escape the black mold that was identied three years earlier. “We could attempt to operate city hall out of the new modular, side-by-side with the police depart ment, but it would be very cramped,” said Hubbard. “The police department deals in issues of a crimi nal nature that non-police ofcers are prohibited from seeing.” Hubbard said that there are two vacant buildings in Mexico Beach that could be potential options, but one on 40th Street would raise rent costs signicantly while the other on U.S. Highway 98 is smaller than the cur rent city hall. “The city has limited options,” said Hubbard. “Moving into the Civic Center is one, but then we would have to gure out where we would hold our council meetings.” The size of the current city hall has been a regu lar point of conversation and the city has had plans to build a new city hall for several years, rst utiliz ing the historic Parker House. The house burned and was considered a loss, and while plans exist for a 3,200 square foot struc ture to be built elsewhere on the property, the battle with the insurance com pany over funds for the loss have only started to make headway after near ly three years of back and forth. The city has received $660,000 for the damages and been offered an ad ditional $174,000 as settle ment, but rent and upkeep on the current city hall has already begun to chip away at the total. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Betty Price is just trying to keep her head above water. Literally. The 32-year resident of St. Joseph Shores has found herself once again in a ood zone on Watermark Way, just outside WindMark Beach. Last summer’s torrential rains put Price’s yard, garage and utility room underwater and she couldn’t help but see the rain over the weekend as a bad omen of things to come. When Price woke up on Monday she was greeted by more than nine inches of water in her utility closet and garage. According to Price, it all started four years ago when a holding pond was installed for the WindMark Beach community. With no form of drainage on the county-owned land behind her prop erty, each time water levels rose, the pond spilled over into the only place it had to go: Price’s property. “I know I’m not the only one with problems, but nothing’s been done,” said Price. “We’ve been complaining for six years. “I want to see some progress in x ing the problem.” Price’s son, Stan, went before the Board of County Commissioners in September 2009 seeking drainage to be added to the area. Then-Commission er Bill Williams passed a motion for a feasibility study and cost estimate and commissioners recommended that in the meantime, the Price family invest in a water pump. In February 2010, the board showed interest in putting together a storm water committee and Williams re quested Stan to be on it, though Stan said he has yet to hear another word about it. Not wanting to pay for the electric ity to constantly run a pump, Price reached out to Commissioner Joanna Bryan but reported that the voicemail box was always full. Frustrated, she called Commis sioner Carmen McLemore who put her in touch with Public Works. When water levels got too high Price would call Public Works and a pump would be brought to clear the area, but this was only a temporary so lution to an ongoing problem. Price said that occasionally the county will leave a ve-gallon gas tank for her, but two gallons of gas runs the pump for just over two hours and after the gas is gone, the expense comes out of her pocket. Even then, Price must wade out to the pump, located on the far side of the property with the gas tank and then crank it by hand. She said that it’s not easy to walk out there, especially when carrying the gasoline. The Star reported on the problem in August last year – the third time this newspaper has spotlighted Price’s dilemma – and though the issue was brought up once by the BOCC in September, it hasn’t been brought up again and Price insists that none of the commissioners have taken the time to witness the problem rst-hand. Unhappy by the water’s return on Monday, Price called Commissioner Ward McDaniel who asked Stan to come to the BOCC’s next meeting, though Price was hesitant to do so since the last visit produced no posi tive results. “It’s a losing battle,” said Price. “We’re making fools of ourselves in front of them.” Bryan said she didn’t believe the problem was a county issue, but she would touch base with her fellow com missioners to see what had been done and what she could do to help. In addition to the standing water, Price contends with the mosquitos and snakes that the water attracts and said she has waded into the water dur ing a lightning storm to rell the gas tank. “There were times where I just couldn’t do it and it got to be too much,” said Price. “I was fed up and I was mad.” Stan said that he’s already had to replace the freezer, washing machine and dryer in the utility closet after the water got into the motors and with the water already over the 8-inch cinder blocks he’d set them up on, he feared for a repeat performance. Last year, Price paid for her dryer vent to be moved higher when the wa ter constantly ooded it. “I’ve lost all condence in our county commissioners,” said Price. “If nothing’s been attempted in the last six years to x the problem, what’s go ing to change in the next six years?” Mexico Beach might lose current city hall St. Joe Shores resident seeks bail-out from county Betty Price, a 32year resident of St. Joseph Shores has fought oodwaters for the last ve years due to lack of drainage in the area. After the weekend’s storms, Price’s utility closet was ooded with more than nine inches of water. Price has sought help from the Board of County Commissioners to no avail. WES LOCHER | The Star

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OPINION www.starfl.com A Section I squinted up at the big horse. Prince near bout blotted out the sun. He was a giant among stallions even if I hadnt abeen six years old. This horse was bigger than Trigger, Champion, Man o War and Hi Yo Silver combined! I admired the way Nicky Joe and Leon pulled him up to Nicks granddaddys big front porch to mount him. It was an early dream of mine to grab the mane and throw myself up on Prince. Course, I was whistling Dixie here. If my older brother and his best friend had to use the porch, I didnt have a chance. Later that summer I casually mentioned to Nicky Joe that Id like to ride his horse one da The sentence was cut off in mid air as Nick grabbed me and ung me over his head up on Princes broad back! Did I mention they never used a bridle or saddle? Good gracious, I almost bumped my head on the sky! And Im telling you, I hung on like Willie Shoemaker thundering down the home stretch. It was a trip for the ages I was riding the big horse. I dont remember a day in my life without Nicky Joe Stafford. He and Leon were ve years older than me. It doesnt sound like much now. But when they were twelve and Im tagging along at half their size, with one tenth of their knowledge and zero of their coolness and command, it was light years! Neither ever realized how much I looked up to them. I was, at times, a source of embarrassment to Leon. I would follow him to the baseball games. I was way too small to play, mostly just in the way. Theyd choose up sides and as the captains called out their picks the players would gravitate to their team. I would be left standing alone. Nicky Joe, even if he wasnt a captain, would speak up, Well take Kesley, he can bat last and play right eld. Nicky Joe Stafford got me in the game! He talked more than anyone on the eld. Shoot, he talked more than anyone I ever saw! He was always in motion. He laughed easy and freely. Everyone would be playing hard and enjoying the game. But Nick seemed to be having more fun than the rest of us. It was impossible not to like him. He was a whirlwind whether we were playing baseball, racing up Stonewall Street, shooting baskets in Paul David Campbells back yard or hanging out at the swimming pool. My goodness, Nicky Joe had a heart, a love, a zest for life that was even bigger than ole Prince! His grandparents lived a hundred yards or so up a fairly steep incline off of the Como Road. One day Nick was shooting a 22 ri e at some crows or something down toward the road. I was too young to say anything, but it didnt seem safe to me, Nick, arent you afraid youll hit a car? Naw, Im aiming between the cars! It was like he had everything under control. In a few minutes he had me shooting at the birds. It didnt matter to him that Id never held a gun in my hand. He was making sure I got in on the fun. He never, ever said a discouraging word to me. I can see him right now, riding that horse up the road toward the house. His hair blowing in the wind, the biggest smile you ever saw plastered across his face. He would steer Prince up our driveway and across the side yard, slowing just enough to let Leon jump off the porch and unto the back of the ying steed. Of course, they trampled right through the hedge Mom had carefully planted along the length of the porch. She would run out and fuss a mite at both of them. Nicky would immediately go to telling her how she made the best chocolate pie in the world. Mom would melt before such becoming compliments. She loved Nicky Joe as much as any of us! I was fourteen when he pulled into that same driveway in a brand new 1961 Corvette. It was redder than red! Nick, this is the best looking car Ive ever seen. The key is in it, he didnt hesitate, take her for a spin. Folks, Im fourteen! When he moved toward the house, I asked if he was going with me. Naw, Im heading for the refrigerator. I drove over to Pat Houstons Store and out the Gleason highway like I was the king of the road. It took me years out in the real world to realize God didnt make many people like Nicky Joe Stafford. Leon was crying when I talked to him on the phone. Neither of us was shocked. Nicky had had some medical issues. It didnt lessen the pain. I tried to think of some consoling words for my bother but I couldnt get anything out. I thought of Nicks wife. Diane is pretty special to all of us. Leon said Nicky Joe left us peacefully, in his sleep. We agreed it was, a wonderful way to go. Then I thought of the laughter I could feel holding on to him on the back of that old Cushman Eagle, the all night Rook games, his head stuck in Mothers oven; I thought of the smile, the up beat tempo, the joy he brought to every room he ever walked into. Maybe its not so much a wonderful way to go as it was a wonderful way to live! Respectfully, Kes A thing of beauty is a joy forever Page 4 Thursday, March 20, 2014 A friend of mine recently went to San Antonio, Texas for work. He evidently had an hour or two to spend one afternoon and he decided to stop by the Alamo. He brought me back a pamphlet with a little of the history, a map and the names of the heroes who died defending the fort. Having seen the original movie from 1960 and the latest one from 2004, I found it interesting. My Mama was an Alabama history teacher for over 40 years and she always made sure that we appreciated the folks who fought for our country. I think that it is important that we continue to teach our children to appreciate those who ght and sometimes die for our country. Having read books and watched the movies, I knew about Jim Bowie, Davy Crockett and William Travis who all died at the Alamo. Having a mother as a history teacher, I also knew the bad side of some of these famous Alamo ghters. Jim Bowie was apparently a bit of a con man according to many folks and William Travis was branded a coward after leaving Alabama as a failure who neglected many of his obligations, mainly his wife and children. Davy Crockett? Well, as we all know, Davy killed a lot of animals and was a good ole boy politician. The list noted correctly that William Travis was from South Carolina. This is important to note right after saying he didnt leave Alabama on good terms. You say, You know William Travis left a pregnant wife in Alabama you do remember he was from South Carolina. What should we remember? They were American heroes. I found another fellow from Alabama; his name was Galba Fuqua. Galba Fuqua was 16 years old when he died on March 6, 1836. In three more days, Galba would have been 17. What would you picture Galba to be like? Most folks would probably say a good ole boy from Alabama who was not quick to pick a ght, but not going to back down from one either. Im sure that Galba could probably be described in that way. However, Galba was not your typical good ole boy. Galba was born in Alabama to Silas and Sally Fuqua. It seems that Galba was of French Huguenot descent, along with probably being a little Mexican and a little Jewish. So our 16-yearold hero was a Mexican Jewish French Huguenot from Alabama. That probably explains why Galba was such a gallant ghter. He probably had the best of all those different types of folks in him. At 16, Galba enrolled in a group of volunteer rangers from Gonzales, Texas. The day he enrolled was Wednesday, Feb. 23, 1836. Seven days later, Galba arrived at the Alamo with the rest of the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers. It was March 1 st when he arrived; he would die on March 6. Galba was a hero. Galba Fuqua, at 16, in less than two weeks, joined a group of rangers, went to the Alamo and died defending it. There has to be more to this story, and there is. Being there for just a few days, Galba befriended a young woman by the name of Sue Dickinson. Mrs. Dickinson lost her husband and many friends at the Alamo. She was there and she survived to tell folks about it. It seems that during the worst part of the ghting, a young Mexican Jewish French Huguenot 16 year-old from Alabama came to her and tried to tell her something. He couldnt speak because his jaw was so badly broken or wounded from the ghting. Mrs. Dickinson couldnt gure out what he was trying to say. Frustrated, Galba Fuqua went back to the wall and continued ghting and eventually died. Folks have spent years trying to piece together this story, even questioning the validity. What was Galba Fuqua trying to say? Something about his mother, his girlfriend, his last wishes? We will never know and we dont need any proof from Galba Fuqua. He was a 16 year-old Mexican Jewish French Huguenot from Alabama. No, what Galba was, was a ne young man and an American Hero who gave two weeks and his life for our country. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard No proof needed USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert New mortgage rules will protect against risky loans Good news for people shopping for a mortgage and for current homeowners facing foreclosure because they can no longer afford their home loan: New mortgage regulations drafted by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently took effect and they provide a slew of new rights and protections for consumers. One of the cornerstones of the new mortgage rules is that lenders now are required to evaluate whether borrowers can afford to repay a mortgage over the long term that is, after the initial teaser rate has expired. Otherwise, the loan wont be considered whats now referred to as a quali ed mortgage. Quali ed mortgages are designed to help protect consumers from the kinds of risky loans that brought the housing market to its knees back in 2008. But obtaining that designation is also important to lenders because it will help protect them from lawsuits by borrowers who later prove unable to pay off their loans. Under the new abilityto-pay rules, lenders now must assess and document multiple components of the borrowers nancial state before offering a mortgage, including the borrowers income, savings and other assets, debt, employment status and credit history, as well as other anticipated mortgage-related costs. Quali ed mortgages must meet the following guidelines: The term can't be longer than 30 years. Interestonly, negative amortization and balloon-payment loans aren't allowed. Loans over $100,000 can't have upfront points and fees that exceed 3 percent of the total loan amount. If the loan has an adjustable interest rate, the lender must ensure that the borrower quali es at the fully indexed rate (the highest rate to which it might climb), versus the initial teaser rate. Generally, borrowers must have a total monthly debt-to-income ratio of 43 percent or less. Loans that are eligible to be bought, guaranteed or insured by government agencies like Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Housing Administration are considered quali ed mortgages until at least 2021, even if they don't meet all QM requirements. Lenders may still issue mortgages that arent quali ed, provided they reasonably believe borrowers can repay and have documentation to back up that assessment. New, tougher regulations also apply to mortgage servicers the companies responsible for collecting payments and managing customer service for the loan owners. For example, they now must: Send borrowers clear monthly statements that show how payments are being credited, including a breakdown of payments by principal, interest, fees and escrow. Fix mistakes and respond to borrower inquiries promptly. Credit payments on the date received. Provide early notice to borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages when their rate is about to change. Contact most borrowers by the time they are 36 days late with their payment. Inform borrowers who fall behind on mortgage payments of all available alternatives to foreclosure (e.g., payment deferment or loan modi cation). With limited exceptions, mortgage servicers now cannot: initiate foreclosures until borrowers are more than 120 days delinquent (allowing time to apply for a loan modi cation or other alternative); start foreclosure proceedings while also working with a homeowner who has already submitted a complete application for help; or hold a foreclosure sale until all other alternatives have been considered. For more details on the new mortgage rules, visit www.consumer nance. gov/mortgage. Bottom line: You should never enter into a mortgage (or other loan) you cant understand or afford. But its nice to know that stronger regulations are now in place to help prevent another housing meltdown. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 2, 2014, go to www.practicalmoneyskills. com/summit201 4 JASON ALDERMAN Quali ed mortgages are designed to help protect consumers from the kinds of risky loans that brought the housing market to its knees back in 2008. But obtaining that designation is also important to lenders because it will help protect them from lawsuits by borrowers who later prove unable to pay off their loans.

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www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 5 LETTERS Letters to the EDITOR By MARCUS STURDIVANT Special to The Star Opinions are like belly buttons, everyone has one. Having lived in Gulf County for a number of years and only just recently moving away we still keep in touch by subscribing to the Star. Its good to keep abreast of what is going on in good old Port St. Joe. One of the things I miss the most about Gulf County is the downto-earth goodness of most of the folks who live in Port St. Joe. In my years of living there I found most understood the difference between right and wrong, truth and falsehood, and most importantly Christian and nonChristian principles. As I was perusing through last weeks paper I noticed the article written by Loren Siprell. As I read through the piece I was impressed by the way the article was presented as it was well-written. I got the impression the writer is well-read and educated. However, having said that I also think the writer of the article is impressed with his or her own superior understanding. Much smarter people than me have articulated the creation point of view much clearer than I could ever hope to. Evolution does exist on a vertical plane. However, nowhere has it ever been proven to have leaped vertically from one species to another. Creation theory is just as valid if not more so than evolution could ever hope to be. In fact at one point in my young life I was agnostic but when I was confronted with the hypothesis of an in nite digress with respect to evolution I began to see the absurdity of such foolish thinking. The Bible, in my humble opinion, is Gods word! I cannot explain everything that is in the Bible nor can I answer all the questions raised by our author of this article. However, we all have to believe in something of someone, and I choose to believe in Jesus Christ. If I am wrong, what have I lost? The short answer is; nothing! However, if our friend denies Christ and I happen to be right what then? Its a win, win for Bible believing Christians! Admittedly, some of us might be a little overzealous and obviously in our friends view overreaching, but then so are many on the other side. It would be nice if everyone could all get along together but it will never happen. People have been killing each other in the name of religion throughout recorded history and it will continue until God brings the nal curtain down as predicted in the Bible; oops here I go again quoting an illegitimate source. Some advice to my friend; keep up your crusade to free society from the likes of folk like me! By the way Port St. Joe is full of them so just maybe you should consider a more liberal place to live. Prediction: one day you will discover that you are dead wrong but it will be too late and I feel sorry for you. However, right now, at this moment you can relish the thought that your superior intellect is worth the risk, so enjoy your moment and pat yourself on the back because you did write a very good article, even though you were all wet! Opinions are like belly buttons By MICHAEL W. GROCHOWSKI Social Security Regional Commissioner in Atlanta Spring is of cially here. Before you get started with your spring cleaning, perhaps another matter deserves some dusting off that longterm nancial plan. April is National Financial Literacy Monththe perfect time to spring into action when it comes to planning your nancial future. If you already have a plan, this is a great opportunity to take another look at it and make sure youre still on track to reach your nancial goals. According to a 2013 survey by the Employee Bene t Research Institute, the past few years have seen a sharp decline in Americans con dence about their retirement savings. Only 13 percent of workers feel very con dent about having enough for a comfortable retirement and 28 percent are not at all con dent. More than half of workers have less than $25,000 in total savings and investments. Twentyeight percent of workers have saved less than $1,000. If you havent begun saving for retirement, now is a good time to startno matter what your age. If retirement is near, youll want to jump into the fast lane right away. If youre younger and retirement seems a lifetime away, its still in your best interest to begin saving now. Heres how much the magic of compound interest will work to your advantage. For example, a 25-year old who begins saving $100 a month and earns a modest 5 percent interest will have more than $150,000 at age 65. Save $200 a month and youre looking at more than $300,000. Experts agree that saving when youre young will make a world of difference when the time comes to draw on your retirement savings. Dont just take our word for it. You can check out the numbers yourself. A great way to start guring out how much you will need for retirement is to use Social Securitys online Retirement Estimator, which offers an instant and personalized estimate of your future Social Security retirement bene ts based on your earnings record. Try it today at www. socialsecurity.gov/estimator. We encourage saving for retirement, but there are reasons to save for every stage of life. A great place to go for help is www. mymoney.gov (the of cial U.S. governments website dedicated to teaching Americans the basics of nances.) Whether you are looking for information about buying a home, balancing your checkbook, or investing in your 401(k) plan, the resources on www.mymoney.gov can help you. The Ballpark Estimator at www. choosetosave.org/ballpark is another excellent online tool. It makes complicated issues, like projected Social Security bene ts and earnings assumptions on savings, easy to understand. If you have to choose between scrubbing down the house or scrubbing your budget to get your nancial house in order, we recommend putting off the cleaning one more day. Get started on planning your future right now at www.socialsecurity.gov. Dust off your nancial plan MICHAEL GROCHOWSKI Christianity is tolerance Dear Editor: I am responding to the letter from Loren Siprell on The threat of fundamentalism Creationism in the March 6, 2014. edition of The Star. I need to ask Ms. Siprell: What is the threat of fundamentalism Creationism? Is that the same, or similar to the threat of fundamental, or radical Islam? Surely the risk is similar. With a threat statement there must be concern for bodily harm or at least nancial or environmental catastrophe. I really dont have any issue with Ms. Siprells beliefs because they are her beliefs, not facts, not rules, not requirements. Why does Ms. Siprell and others sharing her opinion nd it necessary to de ne others beliefs as a threat to anything? Christianity is a faith of tolerance, turn the other cheek, forgiveness, and salvation. Christianity formed the foundation for the creation of this nation where people have, historically had more opportunity to succeed than any other nation in the world. It has formed the basis of the thinking of people who are the most generous, and quickest to help any nation who has endured a natural or man created tragedy. The only threat that I see is with the overriding onslaught of government laws, rules, or orders which always abridge our God given rights, that opportunity may be severely reduced. Christianity is a faith that offers freely selected salvation, but does not demand it. Other, fundamental religions require adherence or submission, penalties or death. Science readily acknowledges that there are many undeniable holes, in Darwins theory of evolution. For example, Darwin readily admitted that he couldnt explain how the eye could be developed through a series of changes (i.e. all 40 muscles must form at the same time for the eye to focus). Random choice? I think not. I dont buy it, but if you do, its OK with me. Why am I a threat? Why would Ken Hams statement that no one is going to convince me that the word of God is untrue worry you? Further you state that in the face of insurmountable evidence he clings to his faith. Sounds kinda like the settled science of global warming (while we freeze our a off) to me. Ms. Spirell, what are you saving us from? Alternative choices? Other ideas? Independent thinking? Faith? You dont need to alert me. I have evaluated the alternatives and I am capable of forming my own opinion. You may form yours, as you wish. As the writer who de ned Voltaire said although I considerably disagree with what you say I will defend to the death your absolute right to say it! Although I dont agree down the line with Ken Hams interpretation of Genesis, I believe that the Bible is Gods Word as transcribed by man. Whether you are a person of faith or not matters not to me. Either way I dont view you as a threat. Why do you think it necessary to protect the youth of our country from various opinions? Are you afraid that with the totality of information that they might not come to the same opinion you have? Finally, you dont have to worry about blowback from me. Ill do worse Ill pray for you. James McKenzie St. Joe Beach Thanks for health fair Dear Editor, Many thanks to Sacred Heart Hospital for the recent health fair at their location in Port St. Joe on Wednesday, March 12. The personnel were most courteous and helpful. The tests for blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol, blood glucose level, balance-and-fall prevention were all done in a highly professional way. We were particularly impressed with the cholesterol measuring device that provided results immediately. We look forward to attending the next health fair and hope we see more public participation at that time. Frank and Brenda Healy St. Joe Beach Wheres the money? Dear Editor, At the city commission meeting Tuesday night, I posed the question again of where is the money coming from to move the lighthouse to the city to Mayor Mel. I could never get an answer no matter how many times I tried or how many red herrings Mel threw out to not answer the question. His answer over and over was it will be there. I questioned what was the big secret if he had the money but never got anywhere. At the last meeting, and I quote we need concrete numbers, when the Board was discussing the Gulf Pines building. Where are the concrete numbers for the lighthouse move? The city has $325,000 from a state grant and $25,000 from Duke Energy. The bid to move the lighthouse complex is around $500,000 without including moving the power lines. The cost to move the power lines one time is $170,000. It could be double that if FDOT will not allow the entire complex to move down the road at one time. The mayor requested that the governor intervene on behalf of the city of Port St. Joe to have Duke lower the cost of moving the lines. That is against the law. Duke Energy is the good guys having made a grant, one of the highest they have given to move the lighthouse. The moving of the lighthouse will essentially block SR 30-A for a full day from the Cape to St Joe. There are other costs that are not in the bid to move the lighthouse by the city that havent been revealed. I asked other commissioners if they knew the true cost. None could answer in the af rmative. The state grant will go away in June. The grant could be moved to the county for them to move the lighthouse to Salinas Park, but not if the city delays much longer. The county will need that grant to save the lighthouse. This continuous posturing by the mayor could result in the Cape San Blas lighthouse not being preserved at all! At the last meeting, the city commissioners spent a considerable amount of time discussing the $21,000 needed to repair the roof of the Centennial Building. After much discussion it was decided, and I quote I guess well just have to dip into the BP funds again. Is this what they are planning to do when it is revealed that the city does not have the funds to move the lighthouse? Dip into the BP funds? Is this where the mayor it will be there has the money? Is this where the citizens of Port St. Joe want that money spent? The county has personal pledges from Cape citizens to make up the difference in the cost to move it to Salinas Park. The County can move and have the lighthouse complex set up and operational for around $450,000. It can be placed-at Salinas in an X zone, 12-14 feet above sea level. The city is placing the complex in a ood zone, below sea level. The county would be moving it less than two miles. The city around 25 miles. The historic Cape San Blas lighthouse has been on the Cape for over 160 years. The mayor wants the lighthouse because he thinks they will make money off of it. And they wont. It will actually cost money both initially and ongoing. This is not about saving the lighthouse. The County will step up and do that. Because keeping the lighthouse on the Cape has the moral high ground, Mel decided to attack me personally stating that I had an alternate motive for keeping it on the Cape. That shocked me for a minute, but then I realized he was making it look like I would have personal gain. I pointed out that my company builds custom homes and does not move lighthouses. My motive is clear and has been for over two years. Keep the historic Cape San Blas Lighthouse on the cape. I am a volunteer, and like other volunteers in this county beat up by the politicians who want power and control. I will assure anyone that I will not make any personal gain from my efforts to keep the lighthouse on the Cape. Mels Folly of making money from the lighthouse without considering the citys cost is a different issue. Will the city commissioners ask the same question that I did? What is the total cost to the city to move the lighthouse complex and have it totally functional and what will be the future cost to city residents? Will city residents ask their commissioners to ask the question? Respectfully submitted Dr. Pat Hardman Cape San Blas Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A T ENT SALE! BW OFISH.com 121 W Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 POR T CITY SHOPPING CENTER Friday April 4th 6am-6pm Saturday April 5th 6am-5pm Large inventor y of shing items reduced up to 60% off retail Bring the whole Family! Fishing Seminars on Saturday with Rick Murphy and crew from Florida Fishing Insider W eekly (All T imes are Eastern) 6th Annual Our Biggest Sale of the Y ear! Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M ar 13 59 43 10 % F ri, M ar 14 59 49 10 % S a t M ar 15 64 54 0 % Sun, M ar .16 66 56 0 % M on, M ar 17 71 50 10 % T ues M ar 18 71 50 % W ed M ar 19 71 51 % SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Fishing conditions are starting to improve since we have started to dry out after months of constant rain. The ICW canal in St. Joe is full of small sheepshead and some redfish this week. Live shrimp drifted by the old pilings and the new sea wall will produce fish. Some Spanish Mackerel are still close to shore and are eager to bite this week. Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 6 By TOM BAIRD Special to the Star There is an animal in St. Joseph Bay that holds a Guinness World Record. It’s a sh. When most people think of a sh, what pops into their heads is something like a bass or a tuna or a gold sh or maybe a mullet. Usually one imagines a sort of tubular, streamlined animal with ns that moves seemingly without effort through the water. But sh come in many forms and with a myriad of adaptations. Sea Robins “walk” along the bottom on their pectoral ns and ounders are attened with the eyes on one side of the body as adults. Both are adaptations to life on the bottom. There are sh with poisonous spines and sh with lures on their heads. Yet, one of the most extremely adapted sh types are the seahorses for they hardly t our image of a sh at all. Seahorses are bony sh belonging to the Super Class Osteichthyes, as do most shes. Seahorses are also raynned sh having webbing between the spines of their ns, however they are not strong swimmers and are found in relatively calm and sheltered waters like grass ats, estuaries, and bays. As a group, they are also restricted in their distribution to tropical and temperate seas. If seahorses prefer seagrass beds in semitropical shallow bays, then it is no surprise that we have them in St. Joseph Bay. According to researchers, there are two species of seahorses found in St. Joseph Bay. They are the Lined Seahorse, Hippocampus erectus, and the Dwarf Seahorse, Hippocampus zosterae. Like their relatives the pipe sh, both are well camou aged in seagrasses. Like all seahorses, both species swim by undulations of their dorsal ns (the n on the top of most sh) and use their pectoral ns to steer. Seahorses lack a caudal or tail n. Instead the body tapers to a prehensile tail like a monkey. They use these tails to cling to the blades of turtle grass or to algae or soft corals. There they lie in wait and take in any small morsels of plankton or organic material that drift by on the current. Overall, seahorses do not attain a large size. One species grows to a little over a foot (the big-belly seahorse or pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis), but most are smaller at about a half inch to a few inches in length. There are even pygmy seahorse species that grow to no more than a half an inch and have only started to be described in the past fteen years. Our Dwarf Seahorse only grows to a length of an inch maximum. Our other common seahorse species, the Lined Seahorse, can grow up to nearly six inches, but is rarely found that large in the bay. Besides their shape and being well camou aged, the most unusual aspect of seahorses is that the males get pregnant. Well, sort of. After an elaborate courtship display, that includes swimming with their tails intertwined, like holding hands, a male and female seahorse will release from the sea grass and drift upward and face each other. Belly to belly, the female will transfer her eggs to a brood pouch on the male’s abdomen. The eggs become embedded in the tissues inside the brood pouch and the male even supplies them with hormones. The fertilized eggs then grow and develop into baby seahorses inside the brood pouch of the male. The female even comes to visit the male daily during this period. After two to four weeks, the eggs have developed into tiny seahorses. The male will then arch his back and forcibly expel them into the water column. Depending on the species and environmental conditions, on average a 100 to a 1000 little seahorses are produced with each pregnancy. Protecting the developing young inside a parent’s body obviously has survival advantages. The tiny seahorses immediately begin to feed and grow, yet their chances for long term survival are slim. Being weak swimmers, the can easily be carried away by currents to unfavorable habitats. Seahorses in general are far from immune to predation. Everything from sea turtles to larger sh, sea birds, crabs and humans consume seahorses. Prepared seahorses can be purchased on wooden skewers at Chinese street stalls. A great many seahorses are harvested for components in traditional Chinese remedies. Besides being taken for food by other sea creatures and humans, sea horses are also collected for the aquarium trade. Under the right conditions and with appropriate food, our little Dwarf Seahorse and Lined Seahorse do well in marine aquaria. Despite these threats, the biggest threat to seahorse populations comes from habitat destruction and pollution. Seahorse populations have declined in U.S. waters over the last ten years, and worldwide there is little data on the size of seahorse populations. The protection of the sea grass beds in St. Joseph Bay is critical to sustaining the seahorse populations there. You can easily nd seahorses in the bay by gently lifting out a large clump of drift algae and placing it in a bucket or plastic tub. Myriad creatures will come out including the occasional seahorse. They are also collected in seine nets and can be seen by careful observation of the grass blades while snorkeling. After observing, please gently and carefully return the little seahorses back into the bay. These are highly adapted and specialized sh and it would be a shame for them to disappear in our waters. So which sh found in St. Joseph Bay is a Guinness Record holder? The Dwarf Seahorse holds the record as the slowest swimming sh in the world. Makes you kind of proud doesn’t it? Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. COURTESY OF DOLORES QUIRK | Special to the Star This lion sh was caught by Charlie Quirk (son Charles Quirk is holding the sh) off a reef out of Apalachicola. It was 15 inches long and weighed 1 pounds. The catch was reported to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. According to Dolores Cassel Quirk, she was informed it the rst lion sh, an invasive predator, had been reported so far north in the Gulf of Mexico. The Quirks have a home in Eastpoint. The sh was returned to the water. LIONFISH SNAGGED Seahorse holds world record SPECIAL TO THE STAR A dwarf seahorse; the species is the slowest swimming sh in the world. Lined seahorses are one of the two species most commonly found in St. Joseph Bay. all seahorses, both species swim by undulations of their dorsal ns only grows to a length of an inch maximum. Our other common seahorse species, the Lined Seahorse, can grow up to nearly six inches, but is rarely found that large in the bay. the most unusual aspect of seahorses is that the males get pregnant. Well, sort of. After an elaborate courtship display, that includes swimming with their tails intertwined, like holding hands, a male and female seahorse will release from the sea grass and drift upward and face each other. Belly to belly, the female will transfer her eggs to a brood pouch on the male’s abdomen. The eggs become embedded in the tissues inside the brood pouch and the male even supplies them with hormones. The fertilized eggs then grow and develop into baby seahorses inside the brood pouch of the male. The female even comes to visit the male daily during this period. After two to four weeks, the eggs have developed into tiny seahorses. The male will then arch his back and forcibly expel them into the water column. Depending on the species and environmental conditions, on average a 100 to a 1000 little seahorses are produced with each pregnancy. Protecting the developing young inside a parent’s body obviously has survival advantages. Lined seahorses

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section TŠ zixm s l–Œ›Œ U¡Œ¡ izl N ix €…zzszp o{€ Es€k… sƒ E{…€ƒ P…lpm o{€ ƒqm J{…€ƒ mmzƒq P…lsks iv Es€k… sƒ ]qm J{…€ƒ mmzƒq P…lsks iv Es€k… s ƒ szkv…lm Piku{z, Eivq{… z, aiqs zpƒ{z, M{vxm, K…vo izl BiŠ k{…zƒsm ]qm ƒq€mm {ƒqm€ kizlsliƒ m €mslm sz BiŠ E{…zƒŠ N ix i k{…zƒ€ Š ps€v o€{x i xivv ƒ{ˆz zmi€ ƒqm \x{uŠ T{…zƒisz J{€ m‡m€iv pmzm€iƒs {z, xŠ }iƒm€zi v p€izloi ƒqm€—  oixsvŠ oi€x ml izl vij{€ ml sz i iˆx svv Ji€x szp izl €iss zp vs‡mƒ{k u ˆi ƒqm ˆiŠ {o vsom {o xŠ xiƒm€ ziv p€izloi ƒqm€—  oixsvŠ B{ƒq {o xŠ }i€mzƒ i€m lmkmzlizƒ {o qi€lˆ {€uszp }m{}vm ˆq{ m‰}mkƒml m‡m€Š{zm ƒ{ l{ ƒqms€ }i€ƒ aqmz xŠ }i€mzƒ xi€€ sml, xŠ oiƒqm€ ˆi i ƒmikq m€ sz i xivv €…€ iv kq{{v izl xŠ x{ƒqm€ ˆi i qis€ l€mm€ sz i jmi…ƒ Š q{} TŠ x{ƒqm€ ˆmzƒ ƒ{ k{vvmpm ƒmz Šmi€ ioƒm€ qm p€il… iƒml o€{x qspq kq{{v ?vƒq {…pq xŠ x{ƒqm€ qil ƒˆ{ Š{…zp kqsvl€ mz, qm ˆ{€uml ƒˆ{ t{j ƒ{ qmv} …}}{€ ƒ ƒqm oixsvŠ ˆqsvm iƒƒmzlszp k{vvmpm \qm ƒqmz jmkix m i ƒmikq m€ izl s k…€€ mzƒvŠ sz qm€ =ƒq Šmi€ sz ƒqm ml…kiƒ s{ziv Šƒmx ˆ{€us zp ˆsƒq kqsvl€ mz ˆsƒq lsijs vsƒsm TŠ oiƒqm€ €mƒs€ ml ioƒm€ = Šmi€ sz ml…kiƒ s{z aqsvm xŠ oiƒqm€ ƒi…pq ƒ, qm iv{ l€{‡m i kq{{v j… ƒ{ qmv} …}}vmx mzƒ ƒqm oixsvŠ — szk{xm ]qs xmizƒ ƒqiƒ qm # N ix ‡m€Š }€{…l {o xŠ oixsvŠ B{ƒq }i€mzƒ jŠ m‰ix} vm, ƒi…pq ƒ xŠ j€{ƒq m€ izl N ƒqm sx}{€ ƒizkm {o qi€l ˆ{€u izl €m}mkƒ o{€ {ƒqm€ N xmƒ xŠ q…j i zl sz viˆ kq{{v izl xi€€ Šszp qsx ˆi ƒqm mk{zl jmƒ lmkss{z {o xŠ vsom ]q m jmƒ lmkss{z ˆi ƒ{ jmk{xm i Eq€s ƒsiz 2 ?oƒm€ ˆm xi€€ s ml, ˆm €mƒ…€ zml ƒ{ qs q{xm sz Eivq{… z E{…zƒŠ ˆqm€ m qm s i s‰ƒq pmzm€iƒs {z Eivq{… z E{…zƒsi z Ms oixsvŠ jiku p€{…zl, ‡iv…m izl jmvsmo i€m sxsvi € ƒ{ xszm am qi‡m jmmz jvmml ˆsƒq ƒˆ{ ˆ{zlm€o… v {z ]qm {vlmƒ {z s ƒmz izl ƒqm Š{…zpmƒ s !# Wzm {o {…€ oi‡{€sƒm oixsvŠ ikƒs‡sƒ sm s ƒ{ iƒƒmzl ƒqms€ jimji vv pixm N qi‡m }€ikƒs kml viˆ o{€ ƒqm s m‰ƒmzs‡m izl szkv…lm k€sxs ziv viˆ, oixsvŠ viˆ, €miv mƒiƒm viˆ, vij{€ viˆ kim izl z…xm€{…  {ƒqm€ ƒŠ}m {o ks‡sv vsƒspiƒs {z J{€ ƒqm }iƒ ƒqs€ƒ mmz Šmi€ N qi‡m jmmz ƒqm E{…zƒŠ ?ƒƒ{€zmŠ o{€ ƒqm Rsjm€ ƒŠ E{…zƒŠ B{i€l {o E{…zƒŠ E{xxss {zm€ TŠ viˆ # # ƒ€mmƒ o€{x ƒqm Piku{z E{…zƒŠ E{…€ƒq {…m sz Ti€sizzi No N ix mvmkƒml, N ˆsvv i}}vŠ ƒqm ‡iv…m xŠ }i€mzƒ ƒi…pqƒ xm i i kqsvl N ˆsvv ˆ{€u qi€l izl jm ois€ N # o€smzlvŠ TŠ lmkss{z ˆsvv jm jiml {z ƒqm viˆ izl {z k{xx{z mzm d{…€ …}}{€ƒ izl ‡{ƒm o{€ Es€k… sƒ E{…€ƒ P…lpm {z JŽ£§ ¦ § ˆ{…vl jm szkm€mvŠ i}}€mks iƒml N kiz jm k{zƒikƒml iƒ 4œ 4¦œœ {€ iƒ ˆŒ†•T ˆ}Uj crPjS cjZpOUP sz¨ i¨ i¨ qis€l€ mm€¨ x{ƒqm€¨ ˆi¨ x{ƒqm€¨ ˆmzƒ¨ ¨T Š¨ Šmi€¨ N¨ qi‡m¨ jmmz¨ ƒqm¨ }iƒ¨ ƒqs€ƒ mmz¨ ƒqm¨ E{…zƒŠ¨ ?ƒƒ{€zmŠ ¨o {€¨ ƒqm¨ Rsjm€ ƒŠ¨ l–Œ›Œ U¡Œ¡ ¨i zl¨ N¨ ix¨ o{€¨ ƒqm¨ o{€¨ Es€k… sƒ¨ E{…€ƒ¨ P…lpm¨ €…zzszp¨ ]qm¨ J{…€ƒmmzƒq ¨ J{…€ƒmmzƒq ¨P …lsksiv¨ Es€k…sƒ¨ ƒ¨ szkv…lm¨ Piku{z,¨ Eivq{…z, ¨ P…lsksiv ¨E s€k…s BiŠ¨ M{vxm,¨ K…vo¨ izl¨ aiqszpƒ{z, ¨ k{…zƒsm ¨¨] qm¨ ƒq€mm¨ {ƒqm€¨ kizlsl iƒm¨ N¨ ix¨ i¨ k{…zƒ€Š ¨p s€v¨ o€{x¨ i¨ xivv¨ zmi€¨ ƒqm¨ \x{uŠ¨ T{…zƒisz J{€¨ m‡m€iv¨ pmzm€iƒs{z, ¨ xŠ¨ }iƒm€ziv¨ p€izloiƒq m€—¨ sz¨ i¨ €isszp¨ kq{{v¨ izl¨ xŠ¨ sz¨ i¨ i¨ qis€l€ mm€¨ x{ƒqm€¨ ˆi¨ kq{{v¨ izl zl¨ sz¨ viˆ¨ N¨ xmƒ¨ xŠ¨ q…j i jmƒ¨ {o¨ xŠ¨ vsom¨ ]qm¨ jmƒ¨ lmkss{z¨ ˆi¨ ƒqm¨ mk{zl¨ qs¨ ˆm¨ €mƒ…€ zml¨ ƒ{¨ ml,¨ xi€€ s ?oƒm€¨ ˆm¨ q{xm¨ sz¨ Eivq{…z¨ E{…zƒŠ, ¨ˆ qm€m¨ Eivq{…z¨ pmzm€iƒs{z¨ qm¨ s¨ i¨ s‰ƒq¨ E{…zƒsiz ¨M s¨ oixsvŠ¨ jikup€{…zl,¨ ‡iv…m, ¨i zl xszm {z ƒˆ{¨ ˆ{zlm€o…v¨ {z¨ s¨ ƒmz¨ izl¨ ƒqm¨ Š{…zpmƒ¨ s¨ !# jimji vv s¨ m‰ƒmzs‡m¨ izl¨ szkv…lm¨ k€sxs ziv¨ viˆ,¨ oixsvŠ ¨v iˆ,¨ €miv¨ mƒiƒm¨ viˆ,¨ viˆ¨ kim¨ izl¨ z…xm€{… ¨ vij{€¨ J{€¨ ks‡sv¨ vsƒspiƒs {z¨ {ƒqm€¨ ƒŠ}m¨ {o¨ Šmi€¨ N¨ qi‡m¨ jmmz¨ ƒqm¨ }iƒ¨ ƒqs€ƒ mmz¨ l–Œ›Œ U¡Œ¡ ¨i zl¨ N¨ ix¨ o{€¨ ƒqm¨ o{€¨ Es€k… sƒ¨ E{…€ƒ¨ P…lpm¨ €…zzszp¨ ]qm¨ J{…€ƒmmzƒq ¨ J{…€ƒmmzƒq ¨P …lsksiv¨ Es€k…sƒ¨ ƒ¨ szkv…lm¨ Piku{z,¨ Eivq{…z, ¨ P…lsksiv ¨E s€k…s BiŠ¨ M{vxm,¨ K…vo¨ izl¨ aiqszpƒ{z, ¨ k{…zƒsm ¨¨] qm¨ ƒq€mm¨ {ƒqm€¨ kizlsl iƒm¨ N¨ ix¨ i¨ k{…zƒ€Š ¨p s€v¨ o€{x¨ i¨ xivv¨ zmi€¨ ƒqm¨ \x{uŠ¨ T{…zƒisz J{€¨ m‡m€iv¨ pmzm€iƒs{z, ¨ xŠ¨ }iƒm€ziv¨ p€izloiƒq m€—¨ sz¨ i¨ sz¨ i¨ i¨ qis€l€ mm€¨ x{ƒqm€¨ ˆi¨ kq{{v¨ izl zl¨ sz¨ viˆ¨ N¨ xmƒ¨ xŠ¨ q…j i jmƒ¨ {o¨ xŠ¨ vsom¨ ]qm¨ jmƒ¨ lmkss{z¨ ˆi¨ ƒqm¨ mk{zl¨ jmk{xm¨ i¨ Eq€s ƒsiz2 ¨ ˆi¨ ƒ{¨ lmkss{z¨ qs¨ ˆm¨ €mƒ…€ zml¨ ƒ{¨ ml,¨ xi€€ s ?oƒm€¨ ˆm¨ q{xm¨ sz¨ Eivq{…z¨ E{…zƒŠ, ¨ˆ qm€m¨ Eivq{…z¨ pmzm€iƒs{z¨ qm¨ s¨ i¨ s‰ƒq¨ E{…zƒsiz ¨M s¨ oixsvŠ¨ jikup€{…zl,¨ ‡iv…m, ¨i zl xszm {z ƒˆ{¨ ˆ{zlm€o…v¨ {z¨ s¨ ƒmz¨ izl¨ ƒqm¨ Š{…zpmƒ¨ s¨ s¨ m‰ƒmzs‡m¨ izl¨ szkv…lm¨ k€sxs ziv¨ viˆ,¨ oixsvŠ ¨v iˆ,¨ €miv¨ mƒiƒm¨ viˆ,¨ viˆ¨ kim¨ izl¨ z…xm€{… ¨ vij{€¨ J{€¨ ks‡sv¨ vsƒspiƒs {z¨ {ƒqm€¨ ƒŠ}m¨ {o¨ Šmi€¨ N¨ qi‡m¨ jmmz¨ ƒqm¨ }iƒ¨ ƒqs€ƒ mmz¨ Star Staff Report Sophomore Kathleen Rish and senior Drew Lacour from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School were named to the District 11A all-district soccer rst teams as named by the districts coaches. Rish, a forward, has led the Lady Tiger Sharks in goals each of the past two seasons. She was the lone Port St. Joe selection on a rst team that included three players each from Rocky Bayou, Franklin County and Tallahassee Maclay. A pair of seniors, midelder Christian Laine and forward Lexie McGhee, were second-team selections from Port St. Joe. Senior defender Brittney Shoemaker and eighthgrade goalkeeper Celeste Chiles were honorable mention selections. Lacour was the lone Port St. Joe selection on either the boys’ rst or second teams. Maclay and Mayo Lafayette dominated the rst two teams, placing ve and six players, respectively. Port St. Joe sophomore Marcel Duarte, who was plagued by injuries much of the season while pursuing the school scoring marks, was an honorable mention selection. The Ladies Golf Association of St Joseph Bay Golf Club had its annual two-day Championship on March 13-14 in some unseasonably cold, wet and windy weather. The LGA members bundled up, came out and gave it their best. This year’s LGA St Joseph Bay Club Champion for 2014 is Penelope Evanoff of Eastpoint. The Net Champion is Barbara Leese, and Putting Champion is Sandra Frame. Trophies were awarded at the luncheon Friday at the club. Special to The Star The Easter Bunny Tournament at St Joseph Bay Golf Club was a huge success, raising more than 20 baskets and $780, which also will be used to purchase Easter baskets and stuffed Easter toys. The weather turned out nice after a cold snap, and players thoroughly enjoyed the day. The tournament was sponsored by Coastal Community Association, Gulf 2 Bay Construction and Penelope’s Pet Stop and was the kickoff for the Easter Basket and Food Drive for the Gulf County Sheriff’s Department. Deranged March Hares were brought in to run the tournament, with prizes on every hole and cash prizes for rst, second and third place. Because the tournament was individual play with handicap, anyone could win. In fact, the winner had one of the highest handicaps, while second place was taken by one of the lowest handicap. Players came from Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties. First-place winner was Debbie Ashbrook, second place was taken by Hershel Neal, and coming in third was David Strampe. Following are the prizes for the individual holes, which is what the March Hares were brought in to arrange. Closest to the Easter egg in the sand trap: Faye Chadbourne Longest drive for men: Andrew Rowell Closest to Easter egg near Penelope’s Sand Trap: Mike Harrison Closest to the hole: Hershel Neal Closest to Easter egg on the right — can be in the water: Sandra Frame Closest to Easter egg on hill to left of green: Sandra Frame Closest to the hole: Al Harrison Closest to Easter egg — can be in water: Denise Allen Closest to Easter egg in middle of fairway: Larry Mathes Closest to Easter egg on peninsula to right of green: Wendy Strampe Closest to Easter egg at corner left water — can be in water: Denise Allen Closest to the hole: Sandra Frame Closest to Easter egg at water on right — can be in water: Jake Jacobs Closest to Easter egg in sand trap — must be in sand: Jim Simmons Closest to the hole: Jake Jacobs Longest drive for women: Denise Allen Closest to Easter egg behind green — must be off green: John Bernal Closest to Easter egg — must be in the rough or woods: Al Harrison Prize donors for the individual holes were St Joe Shrimp Company, Sunset Coastal Grill, The Blue Parrot, St Joseph’s Bay Golf Club and Smiley’s Car Detailing. We appreciate all the community support to help less fortunate Gulf County residents have a great Easter. Star Staff Report With a pair of wins last week, the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team entered Spring Break on a roll and 12-2. The Lady Gators romped past North Bay Haven 14-0 and downed Vernon 9-6. Brianna Bailey started and earned the win against North Bay Haven, facing 15 batters over four no-hit innings, striking out eight. Tara Walding came on in relief and closed out the ve-inning mercy-rule game, facing three batters and fanning two. Savanna Lowery was 2 for 4 with two runs scored and two RBIs. Shelby Pitts was 2 for 4 with two runs scored and one RBI. Brianna Demunk was 3 for 3 and drove in two with a pair of doubles, and Alexis Bass was 1 for 2 and scored a run. Shamario Cole was 1 for 3 and scored three times. Naomi Parker started against Vernon, tossing ve innings and striking out four while allowing nine hits and four runs. Ashleigh Price came on in relief and struck out four of the 10 batters she faced. Price gave up two hits and two unearned runs. Cole was 3 for 3 and scored three runs. Price was 2 for 3 and scored twice and Walding was 2 for 4 with a double, driving in two. Parker was 2 for 3, drove in two and stole two bases, and Cecily Hale was 2 for 4. By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — The quest to enhance the experience for spectators and participants continues this year in the 10th annual Halifax All-Star Classic. The effort increased over the past few months in a drive for more sponsorship and donations to provide giveaways during the event, which takes place April 5 at Gulf Coast State College. The aim is to provide more atmosphere at the Panhandle senior basketball showcase in an ongoing move to set the games apart in the region and build on ever-growing attendance. The measure was aided by recent sponsorship pledges from Dairy Queen of Panama City Beach and Lynn Haven and Tyndall Federal Credit Union. Beef ‘O’ Brady’s of Bay County also has agreed to sponsor the event’s hospitality room for game of cials, support staff, participants and select guests. Domino’s Pizza of Bay County will be the Media Day sponsor. Amavida Coffee and Tea also is on board again to additionally stock the hospitality room. Halifax Media Group and its two Florida daily newspapers, The News Herald and the Northwest Florida Daily News, again are lead sponsors along with GCSC. Additional sponsorship is provided by the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau. This year’s event offers free admission to youth and prep basketball teams accompanied by coaches and active duty and retired military. However, only spectators who have purchased a ticket will be eligible for giveaways. Anyone admitted free will be entered in the drawing by purchasing a $5 ticket. Current giveaways include a new skateboard from Surfside Pawn in Panama City Beach. Tickets to Miracle Strip at Pier Park also will be given away. Tentative plans are in the works for additional gift cards from area businesses and some vendors are expected to be on site. Apparel decorating specialist Shelley Harvey is this year’s shirt supplier and has provided the more popular drit moisture wicking material. T-shirts will be given to players and coaches and also will be on sale in the Billy Harrison Field House lobby during the games starting prior to the girls contest at 11 a.m. Harvey will be on hand to do screen printing for event shirts with a range of options and fees. Any individual or business with a desire to sponsor the event may call GCSC Athletic Marketing Representative Teresa Beaver at 769-1551, ext. 2813. The Halifax Classic accepts any and all levels of sponsorships, from monetary support to inkind donations. Page 7 Enhancing the Classic experience COURTESY OF JUDITH HUSBAND | Special to The Star Ashleigh Price pitched three-plus innings of relief and was 2 for 3 and scored three runs as Wewahitchka beat Vernon. Lady Gators continue to roll SPECIAL TO THE STAR From left are Hershel Neal, Debbie Ashbrook and David Strampe. Easter Bunny Tournament raises funds for Easter baskets Thursday, March 20, 2014 PSJ soccer lands Rish, Lacour on all-district rst teams LADIES GOLF ASSOCIATION HAS ANNUAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENT SPECIAL TO THE STAR

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Special to The Star The most popular happening on St. Vincent Island will be this month. The annual Open House on St. Vincent Island will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Friday, March 28. This is your chance to experience the beauty of St. Vincent Island and learn more about what goes on at this wildlife refuge and other nearby natural areas. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided by the refuge barge. The barge will pick up visitors at the USFWS barge dock, which is a short distance northeast of the Indian Pass boat ramp. This year, there will be a limit of 250 visitors on the island for this event. There will be guided walks and tours, educational presentations and guided wagon tours. Visitors can sign up for the wagon tour and other guided events when they reach the island (visitors may only sign up for themselves), or they can explore the island on their own. Some of the guided activities include birding walks, beach walks, photography safaris and hiking tours. In the outdoor amphitheater, created by placing folding chairs under one of the island’s huge live oaks, there will be educational presentations about the history of St. Vincent Island and “The Plants Around Us.” The Supporters of St. Vincent Island will be providing hot dogs and drinks at a booth beside live musical entertainment provided by Neil Jones. There will be informational booths set up by the St. Marks Refuge, Panama City Fish and Wildlife, Riverkeepers, Florida Park Service, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol and the St. Vincent Supporters. Susan Richarson will be our visiting on-site artist. Come prepared to enjoy the day on St. Vincent Island – wear your walking shoes and a smile. Volunteers will be at the Indian Pass boat ramp to guide you to the barge that will take you to the island. Here is the schedule of events for the Open House: 9 a.m.: Music with Neil Jones 9:30 a.m.: Wagon Tour with John Inzetta & Denise Williams, Coastal Photo Walk with Paul Phelps 9:45 a.m.: Hiking Tour with Jeff Strickland, Beach Walk with Brad Smith 10:15 a.m.: Birds of St. Vincent Walk with Barry Kinzie 11 a.m.: Wagon Tour with Pete Burgher & Shelley Stiaes, History Talk with Carol Brown (amphitheater), Photographic Safari with Paul Phelps, Beach Walk with Trish Petrie 11:45 a.m.: Hiking Tour with Jeff Strickland Noon: Birds of St. Vincent Walk with ANEER’s Matthew Anderson, Beach Walk with Brad Smith 12:15 p.m.: Wagon Tour with John Inzetta & Carol Brown 1 p.m.: The Plants Around Us with Denise Williams (amphitheater), Beach Walk with Gloria Austin 1:15 p.m.: Hiking Tour with Jeff Strickland, Birds of St. Vincent Walk with Barry Kinzie 1:30 p.m.: Wagon Tour Thursday, March 20, 2014 JSL to present Breeze by the Bay in April By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com It’s time to dust off the running shoes. On April 5, the Junior Service League will host the Breeze by the Bay 5K and 10K running event at WindMark Beach in Port St. Joe. The event will take place along WindMark Beach’s waterside trails and will act as a fundraiser for the JSL to help with the projects and services they provide to Gulf County including winter clothing drives for students in need. Noticing the rise in popularity of 5K runs, event coordinator Michelle Perrin hoped bringing one to Port St. Joe would attract a larger crowd. “In order for the JSL to provide services in the community, we must fundraise,” Perrin said. “Why not do a fundraiser that will bene t the health of all participants and be a great spring event?” On April 4, runners and friends are invited to attend a free, family-friendly movie at WindMark Town Center. Runners can pick up their race packets as well beginning at 6:30 p.m. ET. Advanced tickets are being sold for $30 (10K) and $25 (5K) and will increase on the day of the race. Registration is now open and fees include an active-style T-shirt. For more information, visit the Facebook page for the event at www. facebook.com/breezebythebay. “People are itching to get outside after this cold winter, so we encourage everyone to get out and train for the 5K or 10K and then join us on to run, or walk, and of course have fun,” Perrin said. “Each registered participant will help impact another life in our community by enabling the JSL to help more people in need.” By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Out of the classroom and into the workforce. Last week, 13 students from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School’s High School High Tech program spent an afternoon job shadowing at various businesses. The HSHT program is focused on empowering special needs students ages 14-22 and preparing them for life after high school, whether that includes postsecondary education, employment or community involvement. Through the program, students experience real-world training to help them make the connection between academic learning and the workforce. Students were able to choose businesses to shadow that included Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar, the Port St. Joe Police Department, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Port St. Joe Marina, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce, the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve, Fairpoint and Cooper’s Cut and Style. At the police department, student Howard Townsend was spending the day with Of cer Vince Everett. Townsend said he chose to shadow at the police department to get a better understanding of what local law enforcement does in order to see if it’s a career he might be interested in pursuing. “I’m going to give him an idea of what we do,” Everett said. “We’re going to head out on patrol to see what’s going on and be seen in the community. “It’s a random patrol, but we’ll be ready if something jumps out.” It was a busy day for juniors John Keigans and Jak Riley, who spent the day shadowing dockhand Haleigh McDaniel at the Port St. Joe Marina. McDaniel said a dockhand needs to do whatever’s necessary to ensure the marina looks good, and the students had already emptied all trash containers on the property, swept restrooms and checked the breakers. Throughout the day, they performed general maintenance, St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge Come Experience A Pristine Nature Preserve! Open House March 28, 2014 9-3 p.m. St. Vincent Island Photography: Rae Ellen Syverson S a l t y o r i d a c o m Tourist Development Council Free transportation via the USFWS barge to and from the island starting at 9 a.m. from the Indian Pass Boat Ramp. Space limited to 250 persons on the island. Bring basics: bug spray, sunscreen, water, comfortable walking/hiking shoes. Island Events Free! Donations accepted. ‹.\PKLK;V\YZPZSHUK[V\YHJ[P]P[`ZPNU\WZVUPZSHUK ‹>PSKSPML,_OPIP[Z!9LK>VSM;\Y[SL:[\YNLVU ‹7OV[VNYHWO`/PZ[VY`)PYKPUN7YLZLU[H[PVUZ ‹(Y[HUKT\JOTVYL ‹-YLL:UHJRZOV[KVNZMY\P[^H[LY /VZ[LKI`[OL:\WWVY[LYZ of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge For more information, contact: www.stvincentfriends.com WES LOCHER | The Star High School High Tech student Howard Townsend spends the day with Port St. Joe police of cer Vince Everett. Tours of the island will take place during St. Vincent Island’s open house on March 28. SPECIAL TO THE STAR BIRD’S-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) What was the Secret Service code name for Ronald Reagan? Gunsmoke, Rawhide, Ri eman, McCloud 2) Which province was formerly named Lower Canada? Manitoba, Ontario, Alberta, Quebec 3) What did Henry J. Raymond and George Jones found? Sports Illustrated, NY Times, Reader’s Digest, Life magazine 4) Which “Operation”: was the Japanese code name for the Pearl Harbor attack during WWII? D, G, T, Z 5) What was the original name of Scrabble (game)? Letitia, Blockers, Lexico, Potter 6) Who is Gar eld’s owner in the comic strip? Dan Marshall, Ric Gibson, Jon Arbuckle, Sam Picco 7) What was the last name of Italian Renaissance poet “Dante”? Carpathia, Alighieri, Furcula, Levitch 8) In Superman comics what’s the nickname of Metropolis? Big Apricot, Toontown, Night City, Lite Side 9) What player restriction is in effect in both polo and jai alai, no “what”? Left-handers, One over 6’, Women, One over 175 lbs 10) Simethicone is the active ingredient in many ... ? Vitamins, Diet drinks, Ointment creams, Antacids 11) Who wrote the lyrics to “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”? Al Evans, Bert Shepard, Bobo Newsom, Jack Norworth 12) Upton Machine Company was the original name of what appliance manufacturer? Maytag, GE, Whirlpool, Kenmore 13) What did Frederick Walton invent in 1863? Linoleum, Repeating ri e, Igniter, Roller skates 14) Whose chemical name is sildena l citrate? Viagra, Aspirin, Rubbing Alcohol, Bubblegum ANSWERS 1) Rawhide. 2) Quebec. 3) NY Times. 4) Z. 5) Lexico. 6) Jon Arbuckle. 7) Alighieri. 8) Big Apricot. 9) Left-handers. 10) Antacids. 11) Jack Norworth. 12) Whirlpool. 13) Linoleum. 14) Viagra. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com High School High Tech students job shadow in Port St. Joe A DAY IN THE LIFE St. Vincent Island Open House to be March 28 See HIGH TECH B7 See OPEN HOUSE B7

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B2 | The Star Thursday, March 20, 2014 C allie is a beautiful full bodied T or t oiseshell lady She is 5 y ears old decla w ed spa y ed and will be up t o da t e on v ac cina tions T his big g ir l will do w ell in a senior home or with a family with older childr en. P lease c onsider this beautiful ca t f or y our ne x t pet I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! O nline applica tions and pet phot os ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith ’ s T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y ou ar e missing a pet or w an t t o adopt a new pet please check with y our local Humane S ociet y or Shelt er F ollo w us on F ac ebook : S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y T hank y ou f or w an ting t o sa v e a lif e Franklin County Humane Society Ser ving Flor ida’ s P et-Fr iendl y Beaches Along the F org otten Coast D o w n t o w n P o r t S t J o e 850-229-6161 bo ww o wbeach.com 301 REID A VENUE PO R T S T J O E FLO RID A, 32456 M o n-F ri d a y 10:30 5:30 S a t ur d a y 10:30-3:30 C l os e d S und a y O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast % %% "$ # S O L D !! 4516380 850-227-8890 / 850-227-7770 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m T h e r e i s p l e n t y o f r o o m w i t h 4 b e d r o o m s 4 5 b a t h s a n d 3 d e c k s t o e n j o y t h e v i e w t h e g o r g e o u s s u n s e t s O v e r 2 0 0 0 s q f t o f l i v i n g s p a c e w i t h p r i v a t e e l e v a t o r a c c e s s t o e a c h l e v e l T i l e F l o o r s a n d c r o w n m o l d i n g i n k i t c h e n d i n i n g a n d l i v i n g a r e a s 5 4 0 s q f t o f d e c k s B e a u ti f u l l y f u r n i s h e d a n d r e a d y f o r y o u Society When we think of ornamental vines, perhaps the rst picture that comes to mind is one of ivy clad walls of homes and institutions, especially universities. But, there are many other types of vines with a wide variety of practical and attractive uses. Actually, carefully selected vines can give character and contrast to other ornamental plantings and physical objects in the landscape. Vines are ideal choices for those narrow or conned areas of the landscape where it’s difcult to grow shrubs. Many types of vines are available to Florida gardeners, including woody and herbaceous vines, evergreen and deciduous vines, vines which produce owers of fruit. In fact, there are so many kinds, one must be careful to choose the proper vine for a particular use. Before you select vines for your landscape, there are several factors you need to consider. Let’s give some thought to a few of the basics. My information was provided by Dr. Robert J. Black retired Professor Emeritus, of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Actually, the word “vine” describes any plant that needs some kind of support to grow properly. But, as we said, before you select one type over another, you need to give the matter careful thought. For example, you should think about the ultimate size the vine will reach. A vine is an accent plant and shouldn’t be allowed to “take over.” So keep in mind that size and scale relationship between your home and landscape when choosing vines. Select those that will give a proportional appearance not ones that would overwhelm your property. The rst thing you should do when selecting a vine is to make sure it’s not on the invasive plant list for Florida. Next consider the texture of vining plant, the color of the plant foliage and owers it produces and the time of year it owers. Find out where it’s evergreen or deciduous. See what kind of care the plant is going to need. Also, check into any known insect or disease problem it is likely to have. A nal point on selection all vines has some faults. Try to choose those with the great display of foliage or owers, and the least number of problems. Temperature is an important consideration in growing vines. Some vines such as wisteria and ve-leaf akebia, require cooler cold weather and can’t be grown in the warmer parts of Florida. Other vines, such as Bougainvillea and Allamanda, are much less cold hardy, and are only recommended for warmer Central and South Florida. There are a few very tender vines that will only grow in the most Southern sections of our state. On the other hand, there are some vigorous, well adopted vines, such as Confederate Jasmine and Cope Honeysuckle that will do well throughout Florida. If you want to accent the architectural design of a building, choose vines that will cling close to walls and passageways. But, if you want to soften or obscure the lines of a structure, choose strong growing species. Vines also can be used to transform poles, posts, and even some shade trees into more interesting landscape features. The eye appeal of walls and fences also can be enhanced by a covering of vines. Vines are very useful for creating tropical effects in the landscape. They also provide interesting contrast for hall and passageways, where it’s often hard to grow shrubs or large plants. Vines do very well in conned spaces, providing interesting plant life where otherwise there might be none. For more information on vines for the home landscape contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website gulf.ifas.u.edu or edis. ifas.u.edu and see Publication HS 1068, Circular 866, Circular 860. ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Star Staff Report Diana Burkett, executive director of the Christian Community Development Fund recently accepted a check for $1,000 from David Yarbrough, representing the Men’s Club at First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe. The check represents the latest donation from the Men’s Club, long one of the CCDF’s staunchest supporters. “The Men’s Club wishes to help the CCDF with its mission in Gulf County to make a positive inuence in the lives of our local lowincome elderly and disabled homeowners,” Yarbrough said. “They do all this work through volunteer labor, discounted skilled labor and local materials. The CCDF supports area citizens in need, assuring residences are safe, secure and habitable. “They repair and replace deteriorated roong, ooring, ceiling, walls, plumbing, electrical wiring, doors and windows, kitchen cabinets, bathrooms as well as interior and exterior painting.” Since its inception a decade ago the CCDF has worked on over 600 projects in Gulf County. “Gulf County is extremely fortunate to have this group doing what they do and allow all of us to rest a little easier,” Yarbrough said, adding the Men’s Club was sure the CCDF could put the funds to good use.SPECIAL TO TT HE STAr R The St. Joseph Bay Chapter Board Members of NSDAR recently attended the Regional Council Meeting in Panama City. Those attending were Fran Walters, Shirley Kinsey, Virginia Harrison, Paula Boone, Colleen Burlingame and Sherrill Russ. The next St. Joseph Bay Chapter meeting is noon ET on Wednesday, March 26, at the Sunset Coastal Grill with Ann Roberts presenting the program on Heritage Education. Call Sherrill Russ at 229-8574 to attend. Gulf C C ounty Republican party holds food drive The Gulf County Republican Party is once again teaming up with the folks at the Piggly Wiggly to make sure no one in our community goes hungry this spring. The food drive is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET Saturday, March 29, at the Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe. The grocery donations will help ll the shelves at the Gulf County Senior Center, the Gulf Coast Hope Center and the Food Pantry in the WIG building. Pre-bagged groceries in the amounts of $5 and $10 will be available for your convenience. Or you make your own selections of nonperishable grocery items. Or you could make a cash donation to convert to gift cards for perishable items. Salon L L ux to hold C C ut-A A T T hon Salon Lux will host and sponsor a Cut-A-Thon to raise money for the upcoming Relay for Life of The Forgotten Coast. Salon Lux will donate its time and proceeds from all services purchased. Services will include haircuts for $20 and facial waxing for $10. The event is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET on Wednesday, March 26. Salon Lux is at 220 Reid Ave. in Port St. Joe. Haircuts will be by walkin appointment only. Your next haircut could change your style and a life! For more information, call 227-4582 or stop by. TT IM CrCR OFT | The Star Diana Burkett from the CCDF and David Yarbrough representing the Men’s Club at First United Methodist Church. FUMC Men’s Club donates to CCDF D AA R RE gG IONAL CC OUNCIL MEETIN gG Society B rR IEF sS Vines for the home landscape

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The Star| B3 Thursday, March 20, 2014 Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-336-1615 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 1/14. Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders 20144-4-T4 Single T ooth Implant inc luding Cr o wn st ar ting at $ 1 8 95 Dentur e Implants st ar ting at $ 1 5 95 L o w er Ar c h $ 1 9 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 Upper Ar c h 11 2 0 3 2 7 F l o r i d a S m a l l B u s i n e ss D e v e l o p m en t C en t e r L e a r n h o w o u r 3 0 0 p l u s y e a r s o f i n d u s t r y e x pe r i e n c e c a n be n e t y o u r b u s i n e s s O F F E R I N G CO N F I D E N T I A L N O CO S T CO N S U L T I N G V i s i t n o r t h o ri d a b i z. c o m or c a l l 8 5 0 7 47 3 2 0 4 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 THE T A H ILL ON C B EA 8 9 H WY 4 5 4 9 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA LIVE ON THE POOP DECK IN THE CRO W NEST KARA OKE-DJ-D ANCING UPCOMING EVENTS RANDY & ART B L A CKW A TER DEB I JORD AN DEB I JORD AN NO W THURSD A Y FRID A Y -SA TURD A Y -9PM ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES COMING WEDNESD A Y APRIL 16TH GIRLS NIGHT OUT WITH THE CHIPPEND ALES LIMITED AD V ANCE TICKETS ON SALE NO W ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES Y A COMING WEDNESD Y A COMING WEDNESD Y A COMING WEDNESD W ANCE TICKETS ON SALE NO V LIMITED AD By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School senior Laura Sinor scored her rst win in an art competition last month. Sinor entered two pieces in a contest held during the Feis Na Tara Celtic Dance event in Atlanta, Ga. The festival featured Gaelicinspired dancing, baking and art. Sinor’s watercolor paintings won her rst place in the 16-and-up category. Sinor’s sister, Erin, a seventh-grader in Port St. Joe, danced at the festival and Sinor found her own way to participate in the festivities. “It felt good to win,” Sinor said. “I felt pretty good about my chances.” Originally painted for her sister as a birthday present, Sinor’s paintings will be on display at the high school until May. The artist said that her sister was happy that they won and doesn’t mind waiting for them. Sinor said that she may enter the paintings in other competitions, but doesn’t see herself pursuing art as a career, citing interest in working as an adolescent psychologist. “You’re never going to know what other people think of your art if you don’t put it out there,” Sinor said. “To hear that people like it is awesome.” School News SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Front row: James Gleichner, Emma Hill, Andrew Sheppard, Jazmine Gathers Back row: Sara Durham, Lauren Woosley, Caroline Sapp, Jacob Hopper Special to The Star Mrs. Karen Odom’s third-grade reading class at Faith Christian School did book projects. The projects were to include a presentation of their choice of any animal book, like Misty, Black Beauty, Lassie, or Old Yella. Each student had a choice of presenting his or her book by a diorama, map, collage, poster, etc. The presentations included who, what, when, where, and why. The problem had to be identied in the story line, and how the problem was solved had to be provided in the presentation as well. Third-grade students “knocked it out of the park” showing off their beautiful projects and presentations. Congratulations to all on a job well done! The Lion’s Tale By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Students at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School are about to experience life in the big city. On March 15, art teach er Julie Hodges took 36 stu dents to New York City to experience art and culture during a three-day trip. Plans for the Big Apple began last year when Hodg es took a group of gifted art students to her old stomp ing grounds of Atlanta, Ga. They spent several days exploring museums and visiting the local branch of the Savannah College of Art and Design. Hodges said that the reason for the Atlanta trip was two-fold. She wanted to expose students to artis tic installations but also get them outside of their com fort zone. “There are students who haven’t left a ve-hour radius of Port St. Joe,” Hodges said. “During the Atlanta trip some students, who had never seen a city before, teared up. “I think they gained a lot from it.” Though the rst trip had just 20 students in at tendance, those students came back and shared the experience with their friends and demand for a second trip reached a boiling point. After deciding on the next destination, each stu dent had to apply for the trip and needed to acquire teacher recommendations. It took more than a year of planning and fundraising to make the impending ad venture a reality. Throughout the year, students participated in fundraisers that included donut sales, sh fries and selling school-themed merchandise. Since each student had to raise $1,700 for the trip, some even got their rst jobs in order to help pay a price tag that would cover all accommo dations, entertainment and travel. Hodges said the experi ence gave students the op portunity to set a goal and then work hard to attain it. While some students are passionate about art and others simply wanted to travel. Hodges noted that most of them are complete ly terried and excited about what’s coming. “It’s the chance of a lifetime,” said Hodges. “There’s so much diver sity in New York and it has the largest concentration of museums in the United States. “It’s something that most of them have only seen in the movies.” Students will be treated to a walking tour of Man hattan, a trip to the Empire State Building observatory, the 9/11 memorial, Times Square, Statue of Liberty, Central Park and a show ing of “The Phantom of the Opera” on Broadway. For a strong dose of cul ture, students will visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Fifteen adults and school board member Linda Wood will also make the trek to NYC. For added safety, the group will have its own se curity detail. For Hodges, who has made numerous trips to the Big Apple, her excite ment stems from sharing the experience with her students. “I’m more excited about seeing their reactions,” Hodges said. “That’s the perk of having been there a few times.” Hodges hopes that there will be another trip next year, but she’s unsure of the destination. She said that in a perfect world, she’d love to take students overseas. “I’m a hands-on teach er,” Hodges said. “If I can drop a bunch of kids from a small town into a big city and expose them to art, cul ture and theatre, I will. “I want them to see what’s out there.” SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Art teacher Julie Hodges took 20 students to Atlanta last year to immerse them in art in culture. This month she’ll take more than 30 to New York City. PSJ students NYC bound PSJHS art teacher exposes students to a city of cultureSPECIAL TO TT HE STAR PSJHS Senior Laura Sinor won rst place in the Feis Na Tara art competition held in Atlanta. Sinor nabs rst place in art competition DAZZLING DOLPHIN sS

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Bruce Hodge, P astor SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Special to The Star The North Port St. Joe community choir will host its annual choir workshop at Church of God in Christ. Practices will be held at 7 p.m. ET from March 31 through April 4. A nal concert will be held on April 5. Church of God in Christ is at 163 Avenue D in Port St. Joe. For more information, contact Minister Johnny Bullock at 227-5842. Edwena Howell Lawrence, age 81, of Rome, Ga., passed away Saturday, March 15, after a veyear battle with Alzheimers disease. The funeral service was held 11 a.m. ET Tuesday, March 18, at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, Fla., followed by internment at the Holly Hill Cemetery. Edwena grew up in Port St. Joe, the daughter of William and Calla Howell. She graduated from Port St. Joe High School in the class of 1950. She was married to Raymond Lawrence, also of Port St. Joe for 40 years. Both Edwena and Raymond retired from the Florida Department of Corrections in 1994. They moved to Rome, Ga., to be closer to family in 2006. The rst thing people noticed about Edwena was she loved life and she loved her Lord. She was a talented musician and played both the piano and organ. She was a church pianist from age 14 to age 73! She was also a talented artist and enjoyed painting and photography. She was a devoted wife and mother and, together with Raymond, raised ve healthy boys. She spent most of her career as an administrator for various businesses and nally with the Department of Corrections. Edwena is survived by her husband, Raymond Lawrence, ve sons, 11 grandchildren, and ve great-grandchildren. Her family included Steve and Pam Lawrence, Ron and Joanne Cox, Ray and Judy Lawrence, David and Alisa Lawrence, and Rusty and Amanda Cox. Funeral services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Edwena Lawrence EDWENA LAWRENCE Manley Siler (Reuben Manley Siler, Jr.) went to be with God on Friday, March 14, 2014. Manley was born in Mercer, Tenn., to Opal Irene and Reuben M. Siler, Sr. and was a talented athlete throughout his school years playing varsity basketball and baseball. He earned an Electrical Engineering degree from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and went on to work on the Saturn booster that made it possible for our manned moon landing, which earned his designation as a rocket scientist with NASA in Huntsville AL. He later joined the Hewlett Packard Co. and worked in sales, marketing and management in Huntsville, Atlanta Ga., and Ft. Collins, Colo. Upon retirement in 1997, Manley moved to St. George Island and became a full-time resident. Retirement became as busy as his full-time job had been. His love of golf led to his help in creating the St. George Island Mens Golf Association and playing at least three times a week; he chaired the Civic Clubs Seafood Festival booth for many years; he was a board member of the St. Geo. Plantation and served on and chaired many committees there; he was a docent for the Lighthouse Museum and served on the nance committee at Trinity Church. He and his wife shared a love of travel, and he had visited every continent on our planet as well as most of its countries. He was a loving husband to his wife, Glen, and devoted father to his daughter, Magan (husband William Flynn) and son, Gregory (wife Caitlin Foxley). His grandchildren were the joy of his life and included: Andrew Gregory Flynn (Baylor, Waco, Texas); Christopher Manley Flynn (San Francisco Calif.); Molly Flynn (Ann Arbor, Mich. also a rocket scientist); Nathaniel Manley Siler and Benjamin Siler of Memphis, Tenn.; Molli Foxley (UT, Martin, Tenn.) and Betsy Foxley (Omaha, Neb.). Manley also leaves his brother William (Bill) Siler (wife Bonnie) of Memphis, Tenn. To all who knew and loved Manley, he was the embodiment of wit, love and wisdom a man of integrity. A celebration of his life (a life well lived) will be announced for May. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Trinity Church, 79 6th St., Post Of ce Box 667, Apalachicola FL 32329. Services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Manley Siler MANLEY SILER Lukewarm Wont Get It Done The world needs to see a likeness of Jesus, in Christians everywhere. In our daily life and service, let our life show that we care. More boldness is needed in the ght against. Its time for Christians to be heard and not let satan win. Liquor is still digging graves, Ive been there and seen it my friend. Yet, some want another day to sell it, and I still say that greed is a sin. Christian if you still drink, youre helping someone sin. It also says in Romans 14, youre a stumbling block my friend. Jesus said youre either for me or against me. Youre gathering with me or scattering them all. Im a born again sinner thats for him, And Ill help gather till I hear His call. Now the choice is up to you, for you He gave us His Son. Remember, He wants you hot or cold, lukewarm wont get it done. Billy Johnson Special to The Star Remaining hopeful while facing dif culties will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT Monday, March 24 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Why Do Bad Things Keep Happening? Finding Hope... Against All Odds, features a screening of the short lm My Last Days. The lm chronicles the experiences of Ryan and Amy Green and their young son Joel as he faces repeated health challenges. Its hard each time, but theres still hope each time, says Amy Green of her sons life-threatening issues. Participants in the Lifetree program will experience an hour of encouragement and hope. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. OBITUARIES Finding hope during dif cult times explored at Lifetree Caf Thursday, March 20, 2014 North PSJ community choir workshop

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, March 20, 2014 Special to The Star Kerigan Marketing As sociates was awarded 10 Silver ADDY’s and 6 Gold ADDY’s in the annual com petition of the American Advertising Federation. The event was held March 7 at the new Gulf Coast State College Ad vanced Technology Center. Before the evening ended Kerigan had taken home more honors than all other competitors in cluding the “Best of Show” awarded for cinematogra phy by Eric Schrotenboer for KMA’s Florida State University Panama City “The FSU That Fits YOU” 30-second TV spot. Kerigan Marketing serves as agency of re cord for the University and also won Gold for its “Be a Seminole Closer to Home” billboard and Pandora in ternet radio ad. Additional Gold ADDY’s included the Gulf County Tourism Visitors Guide, an airport brochure for URE TEK USA of Houston, TX and the company’s own website, KeriganMarket ing.com. Silver ADDY’s were re ceived for the “Save Your Assets”  print ad for URE TEK USA, the “PRIDE” and “Xtreme Checking” billboard designs for Tyn dall Federal Credit Union as well as their “Holiday Unspending Spree” direct mail piece. Kerigan also won Silver for three websites includ ing  Poma Retail Devel opment, Jackson County Tourism and the Bone & Joint Clinic of Baton Rouge. Two additional Silvers were awarded for Florida State University’s online banner ad and the “Ghosts on the Coast” event poster for the Gulf County Cham ber of Commerce. “Our gold ADDY’s ranged from website devel opment to logo design, TV, radio, brochure and bill board,” said Jack Kerigan. “I believe that’s the unique value we bring to clients— that even while the shift in our work is toward digital, our graphic design exper tise and integrated mar keting experience results in websites that build busi ness through a more pro fessional image.” Kerigan Marketing As sociates, Inc., founded in 2000, is a ve-person team of professionals dedicated to client results. Their work has received hun dreds of ADDY and indus try awards. This year’s winning entries can be viewed at www.keriganmar keting.co m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reat Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Joel Rosenbaum, DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ I€ :qq €… 3€ˆ‹ As I€ Nqn €Žq…“ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The weather outside is delight ful, and spring break has arrived. The Tourist Development Council worked hard over the past year to spread the word of the area and bring more visitors to Gulf County to relax on the beaches or enjoy the local avor. Area vacation rentals are up for spring break both in returning guests and new blood. “Since 2011 there’s been a 20 percent increase in reservations each year,” said Adam White, marketing director at Gulf Coast Vacation Rentals. “We’re going to have a really killer spring break and lead in to summer.” White said he’s seen a rise in the number of returning guests, currently making up 55 percent of rentals through the agency. The anticipation of trafc over March and April follows a busy winter where White said that GCVR properties were “booked solid.” Alyson Gerlach, owner of Pristine Properties said that bookings for spring break were slow to start due to the bad win ter weather conditions in other regions. Some school districts chose to make up snow days over spring break leading to many families making their plans at the last minute. Of their current book ings, 35 percent were returning guests. In the past three years alone, Gerlach said she has seen dou ble-digit growth in the spring break months. Property bookings through Pristine Properties rose 30 per cent from 2011-12 and another 17 percent into 2013. She said that she hoped to see the number con tinue to rise. She said that most of their properties with pools were quickly booked. “Last year was a banner year for us,” said Gerlach. “Spring break is a chance for families to get away from all the craziness and relax at the beach, but it’s a busy time for us.” White said that most visitors to Gulf County are still coming from Georgia, Tennessee and Kentucky, though he noted that Alabama, a new target of the TDC’s marketing efforts, is also on the rise. White has also seen increased web trafc from Iowa and Ohio. He said that top search queries that turn into Gulf County guests include “Forgotten Coast” and “pet friendly.” “What our guests love about the area is the family and petfriendly atmosphere,” said White. “They like that they’re not inun dated with the larger crowds of Panama City. “It’s isolated and has that old Florida feel.” Gerlach also reported popu larity with residents from Geor gia, Tennessee and Kentucky but added that she had seen a large rise in interest from guests who call Indiana home. White attributes the increase in visitors and web trafc to high er use of social media by guests and the work that the TDC has been doing online to build aware ness for Gulf County. As spring break continues and new faces arrive in Gulf County, do your part to show them why it’s always great to wake up in paradise. Gulf County rentals ready for spring break Kerigan Marketing wins 16 ADDY awards Star Staff Report The Duke Energy Foun dation recently awarded Junior Achievement of Northwest Florida $1,000 to sponsor curriculum for classes in Gulf and Franklin counties. Junior Achievement of Northwest Florida is a partnership of business people, educa tors and others who volun teer their time in our local schools. Using nationally developed curriculum and hands-on experience, they help young people under stand the economics of life. “This award continues Duke Energy’s support of Junior Achievement and helps them maintain a presence in the communi ties we serve,” said Bobby Pickels, community rela tions manager for Duke Energy. Junior Achievement initially began offering classes in Gulf and Frank lin counties about four years ago. “Duke Energy stepped up early on and provided funding that enabled us to get these classes started and now we are pleased to have their continued support,” said Marlene Paige, executive director of JA of Northwest Flori da’s Eastern Region. Junior Achievement reached more than 2,500 students in Bay, Wash ington, Gulf and Frank lin counties during the prior school year. About 100 volunteers taught students in 35 classes in elementary, middle and high school grade levels. These results are up from past years, as the com munity realizes the need for financial literacy and inspiring programs for our youth to understand the economics of life. In 2008, JA celebrated our 50th anniversary and the impact it has made with over 117,000 young people in Northwest Florida. Duke Energy Corpora tion is an energy company headquartered in Char lotte, N.C. Its regulated utility operations serve 7.2 million electric retail customers located in six states in the Southeast and Midwest, represent ing a population of ap proximately 22 million people; 1.7 million of those consumers are located in the Northwest of Florida. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Students at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School take a personal nance class taught by Carol Cathey as part of JA’s curriculum in Gulf County Schools. Duke Energy grant benets JA

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B6 | The Star Thursday, March 20, 2014 2014 EL E CTI O N N O TI C E N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t t h e Ci t y o f P o r t S t. J o e ’ s P r im a r y E le c t io n w i l l b e h e ld T ues d a y M a y 13, 2014, in t h e Fir e S t a t io n. P o l l s o p en a t 7:00 A.M., E T a n d c los e 7:00 P .M., E T R eg i s t ra t io n b o o ks a r e n o w o p en a t t h e o ce o f J o hn H a n lo n, G u lf C o un t y S u p er v i s o r o f E le c t io n s a n d w i l l r em a in o p en t hr u M o n d a y A p r i l 14, 2014, a t 5:00 P .M., E T C a n did a t e q u a lif y in g b eg in s W e dn es d a y M a r c h 26, 2014, a t 12:00 N o o n E a s t er n T im e a n d en d s o n W e dn es d a y A p r i l 2, 2014, a t N o o n E a s t er n T im e e f o l lo w in g o ces w i l l b e u p f o r e le c t io n: C o mmi s sio n er G r o u p III a n d C o mmi s sio n er G r o u p IV B eg innin g M a y 3, 2014 – M a y 10, 2014, (in c l udes Sa t ur d a ys o f M a y 3r d a n d M a y 10t h). E a r l y V o t in g w i l l b e h e ld a t t h e S u p er v i s o r o f E le c t io n s o ce lo c a t e d a t 401 L o n g A v en ue f r o m 9:00 A.M., E T t o 5:00 P .M., E T er e w i l l b e n o S un d a y v o t in g o n M a y 4, 2014. A l s o A bs en t e e B a l lo ts m a y b e r e q ues t e d n o w b u t w i l l b e m a i le d a er r e cei v e d f r o m p r in t er e Ci t y o f P o r t S t. J o e C h a r lo t t e M. P ier ce Ci t y C ler k The Gulf County T ourist Development Council (GCTDC) will accept applications for their 2014 – 2015 SPONSORSHIP & SPECIAL FUNDING PROGRAM: Applications are av ailable beginning March 13, 2014 at the Gulf County W elcome Center 150 Captain Fred’ s Place, P ort St. Joe, Florida 32456 or online at www .visitgulf.com /partners. Applications will be accepted at the GCTDC of ces in the Gulf County W elcome Center between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p .m., ET until March 28, 2014. DEADLINE IS MARCH 28, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. ET NO EXCEPTIONS Special to The Star MOBILE, Ala. — A Coast Guard boatcrew rescued four people approximately 30 miles south of Cape San Blas Friday. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Station Panama City received a report of a 55-foot shing vessel, the CBS, taking on water 30 miles South of Cape San Blas with four people aboard. The vessel opera tor originally made a dis tress phone call to his wife using his satellite phone, who then subsequently relayed the information to the Coast Guard. Coast Guard Sector Mo bile issued an urgent ma rine information broadcast and launched a 45-foot re sponse boat out of Station Panama City and an HC144 Ocean Sentry xedwing aircraft from Coast Guard Aviation Training Center Mobile. Two Good Samaritan vessels heard the UMIB and began transiting to offer assistance. An E-9 xed-wing aircraft out of Tyndall Air Force Base was rst on-scene and shortly after, the HC-144 aircrew arrived and air-dropped a handheld radio to the ves sel to establish reliable communications. All four donned their lifejackets, got inside their life raft and took their emergency position indi cator radio beacons with them. Fifteen minutes af ter abandoning ship into the life raft, the Jean Marie arrived on scene and re moved all four from the life raft. All were transferred to the Coast Guard vessel and taken back to Station Panama City. “The Coast Guard’s persistent presence on waterways enables fast, exible response to crises like these,” said Capt. Joe Snowden. “Since the sh ermen had all the neces sary safety gear on board like life jackets, a life raft, an EPIRB and a satellite phone, we were able to con duct this case quickly and efciently, and ultimately, returned four people to their families today.” Star Staff Report A Port St. Joe woman was arrested last week on drug charges after she was stopped for a traffic violation. Melissa M. Waters, 33, was stopped in the 500 block of W. U.S. 98 in Port St. Joe. Sgt. Matt Herring and In vestigator Greg Skipper identified the driver as Waters during the stop and Herring developed rea son to believe Waters could be in possession of illegal narcotics after discovering she was in possession of a pipe used to ingest drugs. Port St. Joe Police De partment K-9 Sergeant Jake Richards assisted and de ployed K-9 Don to sniff the air around the exterior of the vehicle. The dog alerted to the odor of illegal narcotics. A search of the vehicle yielded less than 20 grams of marijuana, six crack co caine “rocks”, and a pipe used to ingest crack cocaine. Waters was placed under ar rest and charged with possession of crack cocaine, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility and was released on $3,000 bond after first appearance. March 10-16 On Monday, March 10, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce (GCSO) received a call regarding a theft in the 9100 block of County Road 386 in the Overstreet area. Deputy B. Smith responded to the call and took the report. The victim in the case reported the theft of approximately $200. On March 10, Deputy P. Williams was dispatched to the 200 block of Seagrass Circle on Cape San Blas regarding a theft. The victim reported the theft of a pool pump valued at $450. Deputy Williams continues to investigate. On Wednesday, March 12, K-9 Deputy J. Oquendo and his partner Marco were on patrol and stopped a vehicle at 14th Street and Monument Avenue in Port St. Joe. The vehicle displayed a tag which was not assigned to it. Contact was made with the driver, John W. Hurst (44) of White City. After developing a reasonable suspicion, Deputy Oquendo deployed K-9 Marco to sniff the air around the exterior of the vehicle. K-9 Marco alerted to the presence of illegal narcotics inside the vehicle. A search of the vehicle yielded less than twenty grams of marijuana, a small amount of hashish and drug paraphernalia. Hurst was arrested and charged with Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Attaching a Tag not Assigned to Vehicle. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was rst appeared and conditionally released the following day. On March 12, the GCSO received the report of a theft from the 300 block of Vann Drive in the area of Douglas Landing. The victims reported the theft of air conditioner handlers, a cabinet, and a pump motor which were taken out of the yard. The total lost was estimated at $848. The GCSO continues to investigate. On March 12, the GCSO received the report of a theft from the 400 block of East Creekview Drive. The victim reported the theft of a box trailer that was taken from the property. The trailer was valued at $2,000. The GCSO continues to investigate. On March 12, Sgt. J. Williams arrested Charles F. Shefeld, Jr. in the 200 block of Sailsh Street in Highland View. Shefeld was charged with Battery on a Law Enforcement Ofcer, Resisting with Violence, and Obstructing Justice. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was rst appeared and released on his own recognizance. On Thursday, March 13, Sgt. J. Murnan responded to the Family Dollar Store in Wewahitchka regarding a complaint of criminal mischief. The store manager reported that when she arrived to open the store she discovered the glass in the front door was busted. Sgt. Murnan located two objects believed to be used to attempt to gain entry into the building. Access to the store was not gained. The GCSO continues to investigate. On March 13, the GCSO traveled to the Bay County Jail to pick up Rex A. Buitte (23). Buitte was arrested in Bay County on a warrant in Gulf County for Violation of Probation with the original charge being Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. Buitte was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Friday, March 14, Deputy B. Smith responded to the 300 block of Oak Avenue in Wewahitchka regarding a domestic disturbance. At the conclusion of the investigation, Deputy Smith arrested James C. Milton (22) and charged him with Domestic Battery. Milton was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was later rst appeared and conditionally released. On March 14, Deputy S. Ferrell arrested Brandy L. Pyne (30) in the 300 block of Woodward Avenue in Port St. Joe. Pyne was arrested for Violation of Probation with her original charges of Uttering a Forged Instrument, Grand Theft, and Burglary of an Unoccupied Structure. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 14, Deputy S. Ferrell arrested Harley B. Roberts (26) in the 200 block of Pompano Street in Highland View. Roberts was wanted for Violation of Probation with his original charges of Driving While License Suspended or Revoked and Reckless Driving. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Pag On Saturday, March 15, Sgt. C. Dixon responded to the park at Land’s Landing in reference to criminal mischief. The bathroom at the park was vandalized. The toilet lid was busted and removed from the oor. Anyone with information regarding this case is encouraged to contact the GCSO, or call CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS. On Sunday, March 16, the GCSO received a call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 900 block of Highway 71 North in Wewahitchka. Deputy P. Williams responded to the call. After his investigation he arrested Daniel E. Fisher (19) and charged him with two counts of Domestic Battery. Fisher was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 16, Deputy M. Layeld responded to assist a probation ofcer in the 1700 block of Cobia Avenue in Highland View. Contact was made with Janet N. Barefoot (26) who was wanted out of Bay County for Violation of Probation. Barefoot was arrested and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. From March 10-16 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 48 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 43 calls for EMS, 36 calls for other departments/ agencies and 13 calls for Animal Control. From March 10th through March 16th the GCSO logged the following department activity: Trafc Stop, 40; Civil Paper Service, 37; Field Contact, 20; Information, 10; Trafc Accident, 7; Arrest Warrant, 6; Theft/Shoplifting, 5; Domestic Disturbance, 4; Unknown Disturbance, 4; Reckless Driver, 4; Request for Security Checks, 4; Special Detail, 4; Suspicious Activity, 4; Abandoned Vehicle, 3; Noise Disturbance, 3; Welfare Check, 3; Alarm, 2; Criminal Mischief, 2; Deceased Person, 2; Disabled Vehicle, 2; Recovered Property, 2; Street Obstruction, 2; Attempted Suicide, 2; Agency Assist, 1; Citizens Assistance, 1; Contact Message, 1; Verbal Disturbance, 1; Fraud, 1; Mentally Ill, 1; Missing Person, 1; Sexual Offender Reregistration, 1; Stolen Tag, 1; and Suspicious Vehicle, 1. Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce la LA W eE NF oO RC emeEME NT SU mmaMMA RY M eliELI SS aA Wa WA T eE RS SS P e E C ial IAL T o O TT H e E SS T a A R Melissa Waters was found with a small amount of marijuana, crack cocaine and a pipe following a trafc stop. Drug charges follow trafc stop Coast Guard rescues 4 30 miles south of Cape San Blas Law Enforcement

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Local The Star| B7 Thursday, March 20, 2014 T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOW A/C W ASHERS/DR YERS ST OV ES /R EF RI GE RA TO RS FREEZER/MICROW A VES LA WN MOWERS SCRAP MET AL, ETC... 1 9 Y e ar s of S e r vi ce CALL T OD A Y! GET Y O UR A D IN 451-6042 / 227-7847 assisted marina patrons and learned how to tie up a boat and the protocols for proper fueling. “I came here last year because I wanted to try something new,” Keigans said. “All of the people are really nice, and I enjoy seeing the marine animals.” Keigans got a good look at some marine life when he spotted a deceased sh in the basin and did what any dockhand must do: he shed it out and disposed of it. “I hope it gives (the students) insight and shows them what’s out there in the way of jobs,” McDaniel said. “It’s an opportunity for them to consider what they want to do.” Marina manager Clara Landry applauded the HSHT program. She said that when Keigan shadowed last year, he was quiet and reserved, but by the end of the experience, he had come out of his shell and seemed thrilled to be back this year. “It’s fun for the students and it’s something different,” Landry said. “They get to communicate with people outside of their regular social circle.” Landry encouraged all local businesses to get involved in order to give more opportunities to the HSHT students and expose them to something new. “It’s good for them, but it’s also good for us,” Landry said, thankful for the additional help during a busy spring day. “The students are proud of the work they do.” After a hard day on the job, students were treated to lunch at Sunset Coastal Grill. The High School High Tech program, founded in 1986, was developed by business professionals and community leaders to work with special needs students to reduce high school dropout rates and improved employment rates in technology-related elds. HSHT operates from an Able Trust grant and the Florida Department of Vocational Rehabilitation program. “The day was just amazing,” program coordinator Melissa Behee said. “The mentors were pleasantly surprised by the intelligence and aptitude of these students.” with Dave Francisco & Landy Luther Turtle nesting season will be here soon, and you can help support the turtle program on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge by participating in our “Adopt-a-Nest” program. For a fee of $25, you will be able to name the turtle whose nest you adopt and you will receive the following: • adoption certicate • photo of adopted nest • activity/hatchling report • recognition in the Supporters’ newsletter Proceeds from nest adoptions help offset refuge costs for the turtle monitoring program. These costs include fuel for the survey vehicles and materials to construct cages to protect nests from predators. Turtle adoptions make a wonderful gift for people of any age who care about turtles and wildlife preservation. With so many turtles choosing to nest on St. Vincent Island last year, we are hoping for another active year. That means we will certainly need an increase in turtle adoptions. To adopt a nest or learn more about the program, email us at supportstvin@hotmail.com or leave a message at 229-6735, and thank you for your support! There are only two more monthly island tours before the summer heat and bugs arrive, and the tours are discontinued until the fall: April 9 and May 14. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on “Island Tour Sign Up.” The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation at www. stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rstcome, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive. Bring everything you need, including drinking water — and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. For more information, visit www. stvincentfriends.com. OPEN H oO USE from page B1 HH IGH TECH from page B1 High School High Tech students Jak Riley and John Keigans job shadow dockhand Haleigh McDaniel at the Port St. Joe Marina. WES LOCHER | The Star CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, March 20, 2014 The Star | B7 98217 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1314-14 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any person, company, or corporation interested in providing the following: A NEW FORD F-250 OR EQUIVALENT Please place YOUR COMPANY NAME, SEALED BID, and the BID NUMBER on the outside of your envelope, and provide three copies of your proposal. Specifications may be obtained from the Clerk’s Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Bids must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 by 4:30 p.m., E.T. on Friday, March 28, 2014. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, March 31, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to Emergency Management Director Marshall Nelson at (850) 229-9110. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY., FLORIDA /s/Ward McDaniel, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk March 20, 27, 2014 94300S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2013 CA 000042 Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Belita C. Moreton; Unknown Spouse of Belita C. Moreton; Lantana By The Sea Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 4, 2014 entered in Case No. 2013 CA 000042 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Belita C. Moreton; Unknown Spouse of Belita C. Moreton; Lantana By The Sea Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front lobby of the Courthouse at 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 AM ET on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, LANTANA BY THE SEA SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 47. Dated this 6th day of March, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. March 13, 20, 2014 94370S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO:09000250CA DIVISION: CIVIL NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. LEAH M. HEYSER N/K/A LEAH M. CARTER; CAPITAL CITY BANK; CAPITAL CITY BANK; CAPITAL CITY BANK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEAH M. HEYSER N/K/A LEAH M. CARTER N/K/A SCOTT CARTER; UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of Court of GULF County, will on the 3rd day of April, 2014, at 11:00 am pm, ET offer for sale and sell at The Gulf County Courthouse lobby, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situate in GULF, Florida: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF GULF AND STATE OF FLORIDA, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 7, GARRISON PLANTATION, AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 9. pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Case No. 09000250CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, the style of which is indicated above. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on March 5, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk ** See Americans with Disabilities Act** In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the Court ADA Coordinator at 407-836-2303 or 1-800-955-8771 (T.D.D.), no later than (7) seven days prior to the proceeding. March 20, 27, 2014 94392S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-204-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. THE PORT ST. JOE PORT AUTHORITY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida created by Special Act of Florida Legislature; and, GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, a political subdivision of the State of Florida; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment dated March 6, 2014 and entered in Case No. 2012-204-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and THE PORT ST. JOE PORT AUTHORITY and GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS are the Defendants, the Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m., E.T., on Thursday, the 10th day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Property A. All of the land in Gulf County, State of Florida, described on Exhibit “A” attached hereto and by reference made a part hereof, to have and to hold the same, together with each and every building, structure, tenement, hereditament, open parking area improvement, easement, right, power, privilege, immunity and appurtenance thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining and the reversion and reversions, remainder and remainders, and also the estate, right, title, interest, homestead, right of dower, separate estate, property, possession and claim whatsoever in law as well as in equity of the Authority of, in and to the same in every part and parcel thereof unto the Bank in fee simple. B. Fixtures now or hereafter affixed to or located on the property described in paragraph A hereof which is deemed to be fixtures and a part of the real property under applicable law. C. All rents, leases, sublease, lettings, licenses, issues, profits, revenue, royalties, income, proceeds, and other benefits flowing or derived from the property described in paragraphs A and B hereof. D. All unearned premiums, accrued, accruing or to accrue under all insurance policies now or hereafter obtained by the Authority, and all insurance policies and proceeds, both cash and non-cash, thereof and all condemnation proceeds, awards, damages and claims relating to or derived from the property described in paragraphs A, B and C hereof. Exhibit “A” Commence at the Northwest corner of Government Lot 6, Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Thence North 89 degrees 57 minutes 02 seconds East along the North line of said Government Lot 6 for 560.62 feet to the Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 382, which is a curve concave to the South and having a radius of 1181.29 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curving right of way line for an arc distance of 107.36 feet, said arc having a chord of 107.33 feet bearing North 67 degrees 40 minutes 31 seconds East to the Point of Beginning. Thence North 00 degrees 08 minutes 36 seconds West along the East boundary of the McClellan and Dickens Subdivision for 289.32 feet to the center of Alma Avenue, thence South 89 degrees 57 minutes 02 seconds West along said center of Alma avenue for 330.00 feet to the center of Jefferson Street, thence North 26 degrees 18 minutes 18

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B8 | The Star Thursday, March 20, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 1121336 1121337 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 4322 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED: Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com € Managers € Hostesses € Bartenders € Servers/Bussers € Cooks € Shuckers € Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS!4516145 seconds West for 699.33 feet, thence South 63 degrees 41 minutes 42 seconds West for 924.47 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30, thence North 26 degrees 18 minutes 18 seconds west along said Easterly right of way line for 253.10 feet, thence North 63 degrees 43 minutes 18 seconds East along said Easterly right of way line for 15.04 feet, thence North 26 degrees 17 minutes 49 seconds West along said Easterly right of way line for 356.25 feet; thence North 63 degrees 42 minutes 45 seconds East along said Easterly right of way line for 24.99 feet; thence North 26 degrees 18 minutes 18 seconds West along said Easterly right of way line for 371.80 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of the Gulf County Canal, thence Northeasterly along the edge of said canal for 1450 feet, more or less, to the center of Chicken House Branch, thence Southeasterly along said center for 2408 feet, more or less, to the Northerly right of way line of state road No. 382, which is a curve concave to the South and having a radius of 1181.29 feet, thence Westerly along said curving right of way line for an arc distance of 530.77 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. AND Commence at the Northwest corner of Government Lot 6, Section 35, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence North 89 degrees 57 minutes 02 seconds East along the North line of said Government Lot 6 for 330.00 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue North 89 degrees 57 minutes 02 seconds East, along said North line of Government Lot 6 for 230.62 feet to the Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 382, which is a curve concave to the Southeast and having a radius of 1181.29 feet; thence Southwesterly along Said curving right of way line for an arc distance of 30.69 feet, said arc having a chord of 30.69 feet bearing South 64 degrees 19 minutes 38 seconds West; thence South 63 degrees 34 minutes 58 seconds West along said Northerly right of way line for 199.25 feet to the beginning of a curve in said right of way line concave to the North and having a radius of 2829.92 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curving right of way line for an arc distance of 622.33 feet, said arc having a chord of 621.08 feet baring South 69 degrees 52 minutes 58 seconds West; thence South 76 degrees 10 minutes 58 seconds West along said Northerly right of Way line for 141.75 feet to the Easterly right of Way line of State Road No. 30; thence North 26 degrees 18 minutes 18 seconds West along said Easterly right of way line for 1000.00 feet; thence North 63 degrees 41 minutes 42 seconds East for 924.47 feet; thence South 26 degrees 18 minutes l8 seconds East, for 699.33 feet to the intersection of the centerline of Jefferson Street with the centerline of Alma Avenue, according to McClellan and Dickens Subdivision; thence South 00 degrees 08 minutes 36 seconds East along the centerline of said Jefferson Street for 330.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on March 12, 2014. RECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk KENNETH R. HART, Fla. Bar No. 192580 GERALD C. THOMAS, Fla. Bar No. 0185884 Ausley & McMullen, P.A. Post Office Box 391 Tallahassee, Florida 32302 (850) 224-9115 Attorneys for Plaintiff, Capital City Bank March 20, 27, 2014 94412S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AMERICA’S MINI STORAGE AND OFFICE, INC., INTENDS TO DISPOSE OF OR OFFER FOR SALE THE PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT STATUTES SECTION 83.801-83.89. AMERICA’S MINI STORAGE AND OFFICE, INC., WILL DISPOSE OF SAID PROPERTY NO LATER THAN THE DATE OF FRIDAY, APRIL 04, 2014. PROPERTY IS LOCATED AT 141 COMMERCE DRIVE, PORT ST. JOE, FL. GULF COUNTY. SALE DATE: April 4, 2014 Stacey Ryan Garrison 1903 Juniper Avenue Port St Joe, FL 32456 #B-6, 5x15 unit Bid on Unit -HIGHEST BID TAKES ALL. Sale Time Starts @ 9:30 am to register. March 20, 27, 2014 94416S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 1st day of April, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EDST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE NO. 505 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE 198; ESTABLISHING THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE AS THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE PORT ST. JOE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 229-8261, Ext. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: Charlotte M. Pierce Clerk March 20, 2014 94414S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Commission of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, at its meeting on the 1st day of April, 2014, at 6:00 P.M., EDST, in the regular Commission meeting room at the Municipal Building, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, will have the 2nd reading and consider for final adoption an Ordinance with the following title: ORDINANCE 504 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AMENDING ARTICLE VI OF THE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE; PROVIDING FOR REGULATION OF CERTAIN NON-CONFORMING SIGNS; PROVIDING FOR DEFINITION AND REGULATION OF ROOF SIGNS; PROVIDING FOR LOCATIONS; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Copies of the Ordinance are available for public inspection at City of Port St. Joe City Hall, located at 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public hearing or provide comments in writing to the City Commissioners, City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. Transactions of the public hearing will not be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 229-8261, Ext. 114. CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA BY: MEL MAGIDSON, JR. Mayor-Commissioner Attest: Charlotte M. Pierce Clerk March 20, 2014 97981S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1480 Application No. 2014-15 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06291-115R Description of Property: LOT 23: Commence at the intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Christopher L Johnson & Ana D. Johnson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 94442S NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Coastal Towing and Roadside Service, Inc. gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these vehicles on March 31, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. ET at 4258 County Road 386, Port Saint Joe, FL 32456, pursuant to subsection 713.78 of the Florida Statutes, Coastal Towing and Roadside Service, Inc. reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. 1994 Mitsubishi JA3AM54JXRY016728 1996 Chevrolet 1GBEC19MXTE175425 March 20, 2014 97979S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1511 Application No. 2014-16 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06317-075R Description of Property: Lot 2 Marnie’s Reserve Plat Book 3 page 65, public records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Coastal Land Company LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98045S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2014-01 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for a 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday March 28, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday March 28, 2014 at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and RFP number for “2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Bid shall be for the purchase and delivery of a 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 which shall include pricing for the standard and optional equipment listed in the Base Bid. For questions concerning this Bid, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. Complete Bids Specs are available at http://www. cityofportstjoe.com The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer. March 6, 20, 2014 97983S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1441 Application No. 2014-14 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06269-955R Description of Property: Lot 6 Turtle Dunes according to the plat thereof recorded in the public records of Gulf County at Plat Book 5 page 7. Name in which assessed: Jerry D. Semprevio All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97985S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1030 Application No. 2014-13 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03671-000R Description of Property: Lot 16, Block 14, Beacon Hill Subdivision according to the plat recorded at Plat Book 1 page 2. Name in which assessed: Gary & Gloria Freeman All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98115S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2013-CA-000026 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 10, 2014 and entered in Case No. 23-2013-CA000026 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ST. JOE GOLF VILLAS OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. (DISSOLVED CORPORATION); are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT C: A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR 1265.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID SECTION LINE FOR 1010.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 434.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 1124.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 520.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 619.66 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 127.44 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 75.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 551.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 560.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 283.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1292.44 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 168.85 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 22.43 FEET ALONG THE CHORD OF A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 6442.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 59 SECONDS; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST, 168.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, 22.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 724 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on March 5, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F13000564 March 13, 20, 2014 98223S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 14-14 PR In Re: Estate of: GREGORY SANFORD GRICE, a/k/a GREGORY S. GRICE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The ancillary administration of the Estate of Gregory Sanford Grice, a/k/a Gregory S. Grice, deceased, whose date of death was May 9, 2012, and whose Social Security Number is xxx-xx-7753 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 14-14 PR, the address of which is Rebecca L. Norris, Gulf County Clerk of Court, Attention: Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the ancillary personal representative and the ancillary personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 20, 2014. Ancillary Personal Representative: s/Russell Taylor Grice 702 Cedar Street Fairhope, AL 36532 Attorney for Ancillary Personal Representative: s/Frank E. Bondurant FRANK E. BONDURANT FL Bar No: 0520330 BONDURANT & FUQUA, P.A. 4450 Lafayette Street Post Office Box 1508 Marianna, FL 32447 (850) 526-2263 Email: fbondurant@ bfflorida law.com March 20, 27, 2014 98193S PUBLIC NOTICE The Port St Joe Redevelopment Agency, in accordance with Chapter 163, Florida Statutes, has filed with the Port St Joe City Commission a report of its activities for Fiscal Year 2012-2013. This report is available for review by the general public during regular business hours at the Port St Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe FL, 32456, the Port St Joe Redevelopment Agency, 406 Marina Drive, Port St Joe FL, 32456, and online at www.PSJRA.com March 20, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j At-Home-Mom, Financial Security, LOVE awaits baby!j Lisa & Kenny j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. Highland View 238 Marlin St. Fri & Sat March 21st/22nd 28th /29th and 8a-4p Huge Indoor Garage Sale Lots of New Items! Fishing Gear, Sporting Goods, Housewares, Clothes. Text FL83682 to 56654 Port St. Joe : 506 8th St. Friday and Saturday March 21 & 22 from 9am til 4pm Garage Sale Old rope bed, bistro patio set, shelving units, dishes, etc. Text FL83046 to 56654 PSJ 200 Plantation Dr (Jones Homestead by Airport) Saturday March 22 9a-12p Multi-Family Sale Framed Art, Mirrors, Full Size Headboard, Household, Junior and Kids Clothes. To Much To List. Text FL83764 to 56654 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofers Hiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to apply Web ID#: 34282096 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required. PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 RV for Rent $135/week. + $135/dep. Great for 1-2 people. Includes water, sewage, electric & WIFI 850-639-5721 Text FL82785 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.