The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03933


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, MARCH 13, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 22 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Tourism is spreading. Bed tax numbers for January show that tourism revenue is marching into non-traditional months and the aggressive goals set out by Tourist Development Council executive director Jennifer Jenkins and her team hardly constitute piein-the-sky ideals. Bed tax collection for January was up 3.48 percent compared to the prior year, numbers that take on a greater pro le when considering that spike was on top of a blistering 24.43 percent increase in 2013. That puts tax collections for the scal year 4.97 percent year over year. Jenkins’ stated goal is a 20 percent increase year over year, and the real tourist season has yet to even begin. “We are pacing ahead of last year,” Jenkins told the TDC advisory council last week during its regular monthly meeting. “This is also the rst month that the Tax Collector has required all collectors to report monthly.” That some collectors reported monthly and others quarterly has been seen as a hurdle to accurately gauge seasonal marketing efforts and outreach by the TDC staff. In terms of sheer dollars, revenue is up more than $8,000 for the year compared to this time last year. While celebrating continued good news on the revenue side, the TDC advisory board and Jenkins mapped out future improvements. One is to the TDC sponsorship program. To clear the decks for the current scal year, the advisory board followed the recommendation of the marketing committee to disburse the last of the sponsorship dollars for this year. With no real temperature present to move additional dollars into the fund, the council approved $500 to an effort to create a cultural arts center in Port St. Joe and the remaining $2,100 to the upcoming Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend. The TDC board had ve events or efforts pursuing funding, but board members noted they had already sent funding to three of the events. Jenkins outlined a series Bed tax revenue continues march in January By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners will again hit rewind on a model to promote economic development. Following the recommendation of the current board of the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. (EDA) and the advisory committee appointed by commissioners as liaison to the EDA, the BOCC approved bringing the EDA back under its umbrella. A detailed proposal outlining the model will be brought to commissioners in two weeks, but, in broad strokes, county attorney Jeremy Novak said the proposal would be for operations similar to the Tourist Development Council, with a director and advisory council. The director, Novak said, would be a county employee or under county supervision, though speci cs were unclear during Tuesday’s regular bi-monthly meeting. Special to The Star Brooke Wooten announced his candidacy for Gulf County School Board Member District 2, a position currently held by George Cox. Cox’s term expires November 2014, and he has elected not to run again. Wooten, 45, is a lifelong resident of Wewahitchka. He has been married to his wife Kristin for 18 years, and they have two children, Aleah, 12, and Caden, 9. He is the son of Clayton and Sara Joe Wooten, who are both educators and longtime residents of Wewahitchka. Wooten attended Gulf County schools and graduated from Wewahitchka High School in 1986. After high school, he attended college while working the summers at St. Joe Paper Company, Southern Earth Sciences, and during the school year at the Florida Department of Education. He attended Florida State University, where he earned a bachelor of science Wooten seeks School Board District 2 seat EDA headed back under county umbrella See TDC A5 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Sure signs of spring in Gulf County: sunshine, warm weather and student volunteers from Auburn University helping around the community. Now in its seventh year, the joint effort by the Christian Community Development Fund and college students from First Baptist Church in Opelika, Ala., aims to complete community improvement projects in Port St. Joe, Apalachicola and Mexico Beach. Students spend their spring breaks helping with projects that include painting, gardening, construction and inside cleaning. “The students allow a lot of projects to get done in a short period of time,” said Diana Burkett, executive director of the CCDF. More than 300 students made the trek to the Forgotten Coast, 200 of which are stationed across North Port St. Joe, St. Joe Beach, Highland View, Oak Grove and in town. Materials are purchased by homeowners who need work completed or purchased by CCDF through grants, donations and church partnerships. During their four days students, are assigned to a large job, where they work for the duration of their visit, or a small job that requires them to bounce from project to project. Some also work with street ministry initiatives. Even with all the manual labor, the students wrap up their days by 3:30 p.m. and have plenty of time to enjoy the beaches. “The students have such a loyalty By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com With three seats up for reelection on the Mexico Beach City Council next month, the council’s decisions on the historic Parker House might weigh heavily into the public’s choices. Despite feelings about the project’s history, all incumbents agree progress needs to be made; they just have different views on how to go about it. The city purchased the Parker House and property in July 2011 for $429,000 with plans to use it as a new city hall. On July 29, the property caught re because of an electrical issue and was considered a loss. Shortly thereafter, the insurer paid $322,622 for damages, and the council bid out redesigns on the city hall with hopes of utilizing the existing structure. With just two bids submitted, the project was awarded to Cathey Construction out of Mexico Beach. Toward the end of 2011, designs were drafted for the new city hall, and Cathey Construction began demolition of the building in March 2012 but uncovered issues with the foundation that could hamper rebuilding. Councilman Jack Mullen brought the issues to the insurance company over several visits to its Lake Mary of ce, even taking Cathey Construction owner Brian Cathey with him on one occasion. In November, an insurance representative visited the Parker House but decided that the slab was ne to rebuild on. The council, not convinced, hired Nova Engineering out of Panama City for a second opinion. After conducting a foundation analysis and soil borings Nova agreed with Cathey Construction that the slab should not be used. The council decided to build the new city hall on Parker House property, but in a different location and began designs on the plans. Rather than rebid the project, which had changed in size and scope, it stayed with Cathey Construction, which has been an ethical sticking point among citizens. “Brian Cathey is the one person who’s gone over there and knew what he’s talking about,” Councilman Gary Woodham said. “He’s totally responsible for all the insurance money we’ve made. “He should receive gratitude, not condemnation.” Though the insurance company had paid the city $660,000 for damages, more than $140,000 was spent in rent and upkeep costs on the damaged building over SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Mexico Beach city council has received a settlement offer on the historic Parker House and must decide how to proceed. Parker House decision looms over election BROOKE WOOTEN See PARKER A8 See EDA A5 See WOOTEN A5 WES LOCHER | The Star Volunteers take a break from working to pose with homeowner Era Buie. AU volunteers help improve community See STUDENTS A5 Bowers wins Shine Award B1 CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT “The students have such a loyalty and dedication to do this. They develop a bond with the community and stay in touch throughout the year.” Diana Burkett executive director of the CCDF Opinion ................................. A4 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 Society .................................... B2 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 $$ $ $ $ W ed n e s d a y M a r c h 1 9 2 0 1 4 2 : 00 5 : 00 P M E ST W a s h i n g t o n I m p r o v e m en t G r o u p ( W I G ) C en t er 4 0 1 P et e r s S t r eet P o r t S t Jo e F L 3 2 4 5 6 C O M E A N D D I S C O V E R W H Y Y O U R H E A L T H I S Y O U R G R E A TE S T W E A L TH F R EE H E A L T H S C R EEN IN G S S p o n s o r e d B y : F l o r i d a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h i n G u l f C o u n t y C l o s i n g t h e G a p P r o g r a m F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n p l e a s e c o n t a ct : T a l i t h a R o b i n s o n a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 1 1 1 e x t 1 0 2 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Port St. Joe city commission ers questioned investment to at tract a cruise for folks who want ed to experience Apalachicola. Tourist Development Coun cil executive director Jennifer Jenkins offered a bit of clarica tion during last week’s regular meeting. In short strokes, Jenkins said the investment in city’s “low docks” and Jetty Park would be wise given the potential longterm impact of a cruise company making Port St. Joe an annual port-of-call. “We want to ensure their time here is memorable and they want to come back,” Jenkins said. “Right now it is a one-day experi ence. My goal is to get that one day multiple times. It is a great opportunity for us, I believe.” The eld with Travel Dynam ics International was rst plowed with Tommy Pitts in his former role as director of the Port of Port St. Joe. Two years ago Travel Dynam ics was looking at Port St. Joe as a potential port-of-call on a Gulf of Mexico “cultural events” tour, Jenkins said. Upon a site visit, however, the area was found to lack the events to fuel such a stop and the com pany looked elsewhere. This winter Jenkins visited the company headquarters in New York and pitched Port St. Joe as a stop for an eco-tourism cruise. Travel Dynamics agreed, she said, and will next month begin marketing a cruise which would come to Port St. Joe in April 2015. The ship would bring 135 pas sengers, Jenkins said. The cruise line markets to travelers from such companies and universities as Stanford, Smithsonian and the Rhodes scholarship foundation. “These are avid travelers and these cruises are not cheap,” Jenkins said. “We are being pitched as providing a day of eco-excursions.” After marketing the cruise to its list of clients, Travel Dy namics would open the cruise to others. If sold out the company would book a second and so on if reservations warranted. The cruise would originate in New Orleans and stop at Mobile, AL, Pensacola, Panama City, Port St. Joe and end in Tampa. Jenkins and a TDC committee examining the cruise industry and potential for Port St. Joe also have looked at two other compa nies, Jenkins said, and she will continue to market the area to those companies. While in Port St. Joe for the day, cruisers will be offered sev eral “eco-trips” with St. Joseph Bay, the Dead Lakes and Lake Wimico among considered des tinations along with a shopping/ eating excursion in Port St. Joe. Where Port St. Joe commis sioners have been hung up is investing in repairs to the low docks – Jenkins said she had an estimate from Pitts of $17,000 for such repairs – when a main at traction would be a boat trip to Apalachicola. “My concern is we don’t want to invest city dollars and have them come in and go to Apalachicola,” said Mayor Mel Magidson. Jenkins said that trip was a primary focus for marketing the cruise, but that the trip to Apala chicola was one component on a busy day of activities and for those who undertook it would only be in Apalachicola part of the day. “They want to go to Apala chicola, but they are not going to spend the day in Apalachicola,” Jenkins said. “And not everybody will go to Apalachicola. “We will need to showcase what allures about Gulf County. This is a great opportunity. We need to give them a good expe rience. That will take the entire community.” Jenkins added that the TDC would be coordinating the itiner ary and handle logistics when the ship is in Port St. Joe, expend ing her marketing dollars in the effort. Outside of rehab of the low docks, she said, the primary need for the ship in port would be 4,000 gallons of water. The ship would not make a waste dump in Port St. Joe. The Port St. Joe Redevelop ment Agency has been examin ing potential grant dollars for the improvements to the low docks, though last week’s action by commissioners to dissolve the PSJRA board could leave that ef fort in limbo. “I think it’s a great opportu nity if we don’t have to spend a lot of money and see some return on those dollars,” Magidson said. Special to The Star The number of active shooter incidents has been escalating, with more than fteen major incidents just in the last ve years. These incidents occur unexpect edly, and leave in their wake broken lives and devastat ed communities, especially when the shooting takes place at a school. Nation wide, schools are ramping up security measures and law enforcement is train ing rst-arriving ofcers to efciently handle active shooter incident response. These critical actions are currently being taken in Gulf County. Friday, March 14, Gulf County Emergency Man agement is hosting a func tional active shooter exer cise at the Port St. Joe High School, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. ET. The exercise is sched uled on a half-day, with students being released before the simulated inci dent will take place. Teach ers and administrative per sonnel will participate in a training session a few days before the exercise, focus ing on active shooter case studies and best practices for response. On the morn ing of the exercise, school personnel will demonstrate their lockdown procedures, playing as though the cir cumstances are completely real. “We are testing the school’s lockdown mea sures and the teachers’ actions,” said Marshall Nelson, Emergency Man agement Director for Gulf County and the coordina tor for the exercise. “The school administrators’ want to see honest, unre hearsed reactions to know where the school security measures really stand in an event of this magnitude.” Law enforcement per sonnel will participate in a “refresher” course prior to active shooter evolutions, and discuss approaches, actions, and procedures for an active shooter inci dent. Ofcers in two-man teams will be staged on school grounds and will run through multiple evo lutions of response. These rounds will fo cus on response tactics and neutralization of the shooter, a role played by a trained professional as signed by the exercise planning team. After the initial run of each team, instructors will assess that team’s strengths and areas for improvement, explain any corrections needed, and suggest certain techniques to enhance their actions. That team will then run another evolution to al low those changes to be put into immediate action. This kind of training has proved invaluable in the past and looks to be a sig nicant benet during this exercise. The Gulf County Active Shooter Exercise is pro viding the opportunity to test a wide range of skills, response tactics, and secu rity measures. While all of the participants are being evaluated on their response capabilities, specic areas will also be assessed and evaluated. The goal is to evaluate current methods and prac tices, and nd areas for im provement. An evaluation team from Disasters, Strat egies, and Ideas Group (DSI), the organization re sponsible for designing and managing the exercise, will assess the response with the goal of developing an “after action report and improvement plan” to be used by the participants in enhancing their response capabilities. Terry Schenk, the Ex ercise Director for DSI, explained that the purpose of bringing in an evaluation team is to nd strengths and weaknesses, and use these ndings as a learning tool for improvement. “Without a doubt, the entire community would be impacted by an incident like this,” Schenk said, “and it makes a tremendous dif ference when everyone involved has worked and trained with one another. These exercises lay the groundwork for the kind of teamwork that can ul timately save lives during real incidents.” Schenk commended Gulf County for once again being proactive on the front-end of potential emergencies. “As we’ve seen from other incidents around the country, you just never know when it’s going to hap pen or what’s going to trig ger it. But we refuse to just wait and let it unfold we’re going to prepare now,” Nel son said, summing up the exercise, “We’re training for a reality that we hope never happens. But, we will be ready if it does.” For further information on the exercise, please con tact Marshall Nelson, Gulf County Emergency Manage ment Director, at 229-9110. Cruise ship proposal brought into focus for commissioners Emergency management to conduct active shooter exercise

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, March 13, 2014 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The one constant in the saga of the former Gulf Pines Hospital is the steady decay of the facility since the hospital closed a decade ago. With neighbors again noting the general state of disrepair and poten tial for wildlife – twoand four-footed – haunting the years-vacant hospital, Port St. Joe commissioners have dusted off the play book they had been looking at last year. And not much has changed save the extent of the decay. The nancial pieces re main largely intact, city at torney Tom Gibson said. The IRS maintains a lien on the building. The IRS has indicated in the past a willingness to work with the city on re ducing the lien, however an obstacle in that path is the presence of at least two tax deeds/certicates and one additional year of outstand ing property taxes, a por tion of which would actually be owed the city. The amount of the tax certicates/deeds is $40,000; the outstanding taxes owed the county — and city –amount to $90,000, Gibson said. Only the Board of Coun ty Commissioners has ex pressed a willingness to work with the city on those costs, that willingness stemming from a desire to return the property to the tax rolls. “We are back to explor ing bringing (the building) down and selling lots to cover costs,” Gibson said. The Commission last year changed the zoning to residential, single fam ily, in keeping with the neighborhood. As originally platted, the land on which the hospital sits would yield ve likesized lots. The gap between selling prices on the open market and costs to demolish the building — estimated at $100,000 including asbestos abatement — and settle claims proved too wide at the time for commission ers, though Gibson noted the costs on demolition were informal and the proj ect never formally bid. Gulf Pines is back on the radar after resident Ann White told commissioners the past two meetings that the building was in rough shape. Wild animals, particu larly rodents and cats as well as an early report of a coyote, have been seen around the building and teenagers had recently been found skateboarding in the old hospital. Port St. Joe police fur ther secured the building after that incident. But with the building in receivership for several years, there has been little to no upkeep of the build ing and grounds save city staff trimming several trees. “It’s bad,” White said, “particularly in the area where the ambulance would come in the building and there it’s a disaster.” Commissioner Rex Buzzett requested the item be added to the Commis sion agenda until further action can be taken. “Any clean-up would help,” he said. BOAT LAUNCH FEES Commissioner William Thursbay revisited an ear lier initiative to implement launch fees at the city’s boat ramp in Frank Pate Park. Commissioners held a workshop several months ago and found a general consensus in favor of fees to fund upkeep of the boat ramp, but with a lack of consensus on components to a plan. Thursbay’s reiterated the motive last week but remained without a con sensus on direction. “This would be for main tenance down there and only maintenance,” Thurs bay said. He provided several op tions, including a fee scale under which citizen resi dents would pay nothing while county and out-ofstate users would pay set daily fees or be eligible to purchase weekly or sea sonal passes. The collecting, Thurs bay said, would initially be based on the honor system, using a wooden or metal box with or without a writ ten decal or ticket. “I am all for user fees, but how are we going to en force this?” said Mayor Mel Magidson. “(The honor sys tem) is the worst way, but I like the pass deal.” Magidson said govern ments need to look at im plementing user fees for a host of maintenance issues that can no longer be ad dressed in the general fund budget. Resident Mark Howze said while he fundamen tally agreed that a launch fee was preferable, he won dered about the balance struck between how much the city might actually re alize in revenue compared to the cost of implementing the system. Thursbay said he would further examine the issue and come back with addi tional recommendations. CC ENTENNIAL BUILDING Commissioners ap proved spending over $21,000 for repairs to leaks on the roof of the Centen nial Building. Commissioners will at least in part dip into BP settlement funds for the repairs, which are aimed at sealing leaks ahead of more substantive repairs to the ceiling and acoustics in the city’s largest gather ing place. On behalf of my staff and I, we w ould lik e to thank all our lo yal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple aw ar ds that we ha ve r eceived in the past; including voted most compassionate Dr and Patients’ Choice A w ar d. It is a g r eat honor and we will continue to strive for the ver y best medical car e for our patients. Cong r atulations to Vincent Ivers MD for 19 Y ears of Dedicated, Compassionate Ser vice in Port St Joe Dr Ivers and his family r elocated from the Orlando ar ea, wher e he w ork ed as a primar y car e ph ysician, to join the Port St Joe community in 1995. He then began pr acticing inter nal medicine family medicine in-patient car e and car dio v ascular medicine at Gulf Pine Medical. Dr Ivers g r aduated Cum Laude in his medical class. When he joined Gulf Pines Medical, he w as a member of the American College of Chest Ph ysicians, American Medical Association and the American College of Ph ysician. Dr Ivers w ould lik e to thank all our lo yal patients for being selected for the multiple aw ar ds, including voted most Compassionate Doctor and Patient Choice A w ar d. It is a g r eat honor and we will continue to strive for the ver y best medical car e for our Patients. Dr Ivers, his staff and family w ould lik e to thank you and look forw ar d to many YEARS to come ... VINCENT IVERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth Str eet Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www .iversmd.co m 4 C o mmi t me n t t o E x ce l l e nce f o r o v e r 23 Y e a rs Celebrating 18 Y ears of Service in Port St. Joe dZDO@S dGDgbOen FO d @BOSOen dg^^SGUGWe @S d GDgbOen OWDZUG dd O 8{|€tŠv„ l„t 4t’€ I€ :qq €… 3€ˆ‹ As I€ Nqn €Žq…“ L @ nSG d ^GGF b OW L Z @ eeZ b WGn @ e S @ l 4‡l€ls{ |s…€l9 ?K  ƒ6 ; , ; 6, 0  ƒ6 ; , ; ; ?4 \ yŠ€l”pv€€…’{ 0„v  A helping hand Star Staff Report The Board of County Commissioners recently completed a number of housing rehabs/rebuilds. The county leveraged a $700,000 Community Development Block Grant with $300,000 in county State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP) funds to assist 12 families. In ve cases, the money funded housing rehabs and in seven cases the dollars were used for demolition/rebuild projects. Ten of the families are represented in the photo. Projects were begun by the end of October 2013 and completed by Feb. 1. The homes were located in Jones Homestead (1), Oak Grove (2), White City (2), Dalkeith (2), Stonemill Creek (1), Old Panama Highway area (3) and Overstreet (1). Gulf Pines disrepair renews demolition discussion SS PECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR

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O PINION www.starfl.com A Section I didn’t watch the Academy Awards last Sunday. Something about a bunch of actors handing out awards to each other just doesn’t ring true to me. How do you know if they are sincere … or just acting? My disenchantment with the Oscar presentations started back in 1968, when Paul Newman didn’t win best actor for his role in “Cool Hand Luke.” He ate fty eggs in that movie at one sitting. Fifty! You tell me any other actor who got nominated that year could have come close to that! My stomach went to spinning as I watched him cram those last few in. People around me were gagging on their popcorn and Milk Duds. I think about it now, forty-seven years later, and I still get a little nauseous. Now that, folks, is some more powerful acting! Ole Luke showed us a lot of grit in the face of con nement and adversity. He didn’t bow, he didn’t bend, he didn’t break … and when things looked the worst, he gave us that “you can’t beat me” grin that made everyone in the theater proud to be an independent, free thinking American. Shoot, I thought about rushing out and joining the nearest chain gang! When he didn’t win, I knew the x was in. Some of this “Best Picture”, “Best Actor,” “Best Animated Short Subject” electing might have been more about politics than ability. Big studio money, egos, behindthe-scenes shuf ing and warped Hollywood thinking has won more Academy Awards than any real acting. Let me tell you how crazy the movie industry can be, the very same year “Cool Hand Luke” came out Paul Newman also delivered up an absolutely award winning performance in another lm … he should have won rst and second if the voting had been on the up and up. And he didn’t even get nominated for his role as John Russell in “Hombre”! Remember when the self-appointed aristocrat, as the stagecoach was abandoned in the middle of nowhere, was screaming at Newman, “Why do we have to follow you? Who put you in charge? Why do we all have to listen to you?” He turned to her with no malice and no grin, narrowed his eyes a mite and uttered, “Cause I can cut it, lady.” No one doubted that he couldn’t! But it didn’t seem to impress the academy voters. Movies haven’t had quite the same appeal to me since Paul left the business and my Captain Midnight Decoder Ring quit working. That’s why I couldn’t tell you one person this year who won an Oscar … or who was even nominated. I don’t know who dazzled or who zzled walking down that red carpet. I don’t know which acceptance speech ran on and on or which actress was rst to blotch the simple cue cards. And I’m fairly certain the emcee didn’t keep the audience rolling like Bob Hope used to do it. The only actor I ever thought was in the same category as Paul Newman was my older brother. Leon could look the most innocent or the most menacing of anyone I ever saw … depending on the “occasion.” Daddy would send us down to clean the fence row and Leon, of course, would sit down the minute we were out of sight of the house. David and I were too small to make much of a dent in the weeds. Leon had that built in timer. He’d jump up, grab the sling blade out of my hand, and go to ailing away two seconds before Dad came around the corner to check on us. Dad would be angry that we “hadn’t even made a good start.” Tears would dwell up in Leon’s eyes. “We’re doing the best we can. Kesley got sick. David almost stepped on a rattlesnake. It’s just hard to do all the work myself and look after two little brothers.” I felt sorry for Leon even as Daddy chastised me for not having a “working tool” in my hand. Leon, I think, was the screaming monster from the Black Lagoon in those deep woods behind the swimming pool. We all thought it was him … but we couldn’t be for dead certain positive. Terry Kennon allowed it didn’t sound human enough to be Leon. The acting here, if is was acting, was exquisite. Whatever or whoever, be it of this world or some other, was loud, blood curdling and nasty. It sure sent me ying out of those woods on more than one occasion! The aging milk cow up on the second oor of the high school might have been Leon’s “Academy Moment.” When confronted with both parents, a stunned principal and the chief of police, my brother looked as surprised as Miss Polly Rucker when she encountered the bovine trying to get into her English class. Leon, with the innocence of a new born babe, allowed our old cow “had taken to wandering off.” And she would “sometimes follow us up Stonewall Street.” But he had “no idea” how the cow actually got into the school. He was “completely puzzled” by “the animal’s sudden interest in higher learning.” He convinced me! And I was holding the side door open when he shoved Bessie into the auditorium. You talk about acting! Respectfully, Kes My Grandmama passed away during my rst year of college, more than 30 years ago. She was a sweet lady who I loved dearly. She was the perfect grandmother. Why? She owned a ten cent store with a candy counter and she always made sure she was selling some of my favorite sweet things. Grandmama wasn’t much at “giving” you anything, but if you would push a broom, stack boxes or organize magazines, then she would pay you in candy or comic books. I’m not sure how tall my Grandmama wasn’t tall at all. As a matter of fact, when she was sitting down behind the counter where the cash register was, you couldn’t see her. Having a grandparent, parent or somebody to count on and teach us some of the basics about life, is very important to children. Children need to know what to expect and understand that pushing a broom means getting candy or a comic book. When I think of my Grandmama, I think of her ten cent store in rural Alabama, Mason jars full of water to take shing and the wonderful daffodils that come back each spring in her yard. The daffodils seem to say, “Hey, we’re back, we’re going to keep coming back, we haven’t quit and we never will.” Those good things and the one time I heard her utter a bad word under her breath when we were in the car on the way to church. My Papa had made her pretty angry about something and she turned loose of a not-so-nice word. I ducked down in the backseat of the car. Things calmed down and that was the only time I heard Grandmama say a bad word. It wasn’t even an “ear-covering” word, but to hear Grandmama say it was kind of shocking. The bottom line is that I knew what to expect from my Grandmama. She was a constant. Being a math fellow and more importantly a parent, I know how important constants are not only in children’s lives, but in everyone’s lives. We want and need something that is unchanging. A lot of folks say “Change is good.” It might be good for some folks, but I would like to think that “Constants are even better.” In other words, it’s nice to know as a little boy that you have somebody who loves you enough to ll a Mason jar with ice water before you start a long walk to catch a sh. It’s also nice to know if Grandmama gets one on her line before you do — she’s going to hand you the pole. She’s got to do it. It’s expected of her. So when my brother sent me a picture of Grandmama’s daffodils still coming up after all of these years, I knew what he was saying. He was saying, “We still have our constants. Our grandparents and parents are gone, but we will continue to remember what an important part of our lives they were.” Grandmama’s daffodils keep coming back each spring saying, “Change might be good, but it sure is nice to be able to depend on constants.” I know some things have to change sooner or later, but I just don’t see the point in changing things that work just ne, maybe even “better than ne.” What is my point? Am I telling you that you should go plant daffodils? No, not unless you just like daffodils. How about a Mason jar of ice water? No, but I will tell you that there are not many things that are better than ice water or sweet tea out of a Mason jar. What I’m trying to say is that we should all appreciate the constants we have in our lives — the things, the people, the places … For goodness sakes — our dogs, if we are dog people. I know my dogs are going to open the door and meet me in the driveway before I have the chance to even stop the car. I guess the other thing is that we need to try to be constants to some people, in particular our children. If I feel like I need a little change, I might consider planting a few tulips. However, you can count the daffodils staying put. What did Grandmama say that was so bad? Oh, now that I think about it, she was probably referring to something to throw out on those daffodils to make them keep coming back each spring. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor.com. HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert No ‘failure to communicate’ here! CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Grandmama’s Daffodils #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Letters to the EDITOR Page A4 Thursday, March 13, 2014 A power play? (Editor’s note: the following was sent to all ve members of the Port St. Joe City Commission). Gentlemen, I just read the paper and the issue regarding the PSJRA and the dissolution of the board of directors. Unfortunately I was not able to attend this meeting and have the paper as the only source of information until the minutes are available for the public to read. First let me say that I have been a resident since 2005. Prior to that we would vacation a couple of times a year for 10 years prior to moving here. We have seen so many changes in our ne city over these last 19 years and have kept up on them and who is responsible for this. It seems to me that if the PSJRA is able to accomplish all that they have accomplished over the years, why change things now? Most of you have full-time jobs then your Commissioner duties and now you want to add more to your list? You already have a say/vote on what the PSJRA is working on, why do you have to change it? Seems like if there are a few issues then x those and move on. Commissioners Thursbay and Patterson, seems like you stated that you are speaking for the majority of citizens that are concerned regarding the use of their tax money? Did you really speak to the majority of 2,521 registered city voters? You didn’t speak to me and you both know me. I think you have other matters that need more attention than this. Seems like a power play to me to give you the power you need to then release Gail Alsobrook of her position so that you can put someone else in position that might align more with your agenda. Mr. Mayor and Commissioner Buzzett I copied you on this so you would know how other residents in this city feel about this issue and that we agree with you to leave it alone. Thank you for your time if you read this. Other emails I have previously sent to Thursbay and McCroan have gone unanswered. Those were sent from my work email so decided to try my personal one. Elaine Lerch Port St. Joe A decision in need of correction Dear Editor, As we go through life, we are faced with many decisions. Some decisions we make are good and some, upon further re ection, are bad. Often times we cannot go back and change our bad decisions. However, the decision by our the Port St Joe City Council to dissolve the Port St Joe Downtown Redevelopment Agency made last Tuesday night, March 4, was a bad decision and they can correct that bad decision at the next city council meeting. The PSJDRA is composed of city residents, volunteers, people who care about our city, people appointed by our city council, people who are stake holders in the progress of our city. Their mission statement reads as follows: The Mission of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is to serve the community by guiding redevelopment activities to create a vibrant downtown core and revitalized neighborhood, to commemorate local history and culture, to improve quality of life, and to stimulate economic growth within the Agency’s District. That mission over the last several years has been successfully accomplished. The process is not broken. Last Tuesday night the city council by its vote broke the effective functioning of that process. I would urge all of the Port St Joe voters to contact our commissioners to rescind the vote to dissolve the PSJDRA. Contact information for the commissioners are: Bo Patterson — Commissioner, Group II (850) 340-0260 | bpatterson@psj.fl.go v Phil McCroan — Commissioner, Group III (850) 229-6907 | pmccroan@psj.fl.go v William Thursbay — Commissioner, Group I No information posted on city website. Better yet I would urge the voters to attend the next city meeting and call upon these council members to rethink their vote. It is your community. The city council is your elected representative. Let your voice be heard. Urge your elected of cials to rescind their vote. Respectfully John Parker Port St. Joe An open letter Dear Editor, My mother and father taught my sister, brothers and I to always work for the things we want and to never steal anything from anyone, unlike the person who went on my property and stole my radio and speakers out of my classic Mustang. It is sad you broke one of God’s Ten Commandments, “Thou shalt not steal.” I can see that you do not care for God or others, just yourself and your wants. There are so many people walking on God’s Earth that do not need to be free, you just haven’t caught up yet. God knows and sees everything. He is a fair judge. Annie Sue Fields Port St. Joe Thanks Sacred Heart Dear Editor, Recently I found myself facing oral surgery and was dealing with local physicians af liated with the Sacred Heart Hospital. During the time prior to my surgery, I had many well-wishing people advise me to consider other, larger, more specialized hospitals. I decided to stay with our local facility and I couldn’t be happier with the end results. Surgery is never a pleasant experience but the people at Sacred Heart went out of their way to make it manageable. Thomas in the intake room, Drs. Brunner and Oenbrink who performed the surgery, and all the many others who assisted with the intake, in the operating room, and in the recovery room were absolutely phenomenal. They provided a level of care and attention that I don’t think could be matched at another hospital. I am completely satis ed with my experience at Sacred Heart and would highly recommend them to anyone who might ask. Thank you Sacred Heart, you did good! Samuel G. Cessna Port St. Joe

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and dedication to do this,” Burkett said. “They develop a bond with the community and stay in touch throughout the year.” While the CCDF bud gets to improve around 65 houses each year, the assis tance of the students allows the group to work on closer to 85. In the last three years alone, the Auburn students have made signicant resto rations and repairs to more than 50 houses in North Port St. Joe. In addition to helping the community, the economic ef fects can’t be ignored. The students stay in rentals on Cape San Blas and spend ve days pur chasing food and gas. Ac cording to Burkett, last year the students spent more than $34,000 locally over the course of one week. “They’re not only giving their time, but there’s rev enue coming in here,” Bur kett said. “It’s a win-win for the city, the community and the students.” degree in civil engineering. Wooten began his work ing career as a CEI and Geotechnical Engineer, which specializes in road way, bridge and foundation design. He worked and su pervised Engineers and eld crews on multimillion dollar FDOT roadway and bridge design projects. After eight years of employment as an engineer, he became self-employed as a general/ underground utility con tractor and worked seven years as a local Gulf County business owner. During the time as a contractor, he was responsible for preparing contracts, project estimat ing, scheduling, subcon tracting and construction of residential/commercial and infrastructure projects. The past four years he has been employed at Tyndall Air Force Base working with Civil Engineering & Opera tions/SABER contractors. In addition to his bach elor degree in civil engi neering, Wooten is a statecertied general contractor and a state-certied under ground utility and excava tion contractor. During the past 18 years in the engi neering and construction business, he has completed required continuing educa tion courses for his profes sion. He has also attended numerous seminars to keep up with the ever changing technologies in business and industry. Brooke and his family are active members of First United Methodist Church. He is currently serving on the board of trustees. He was a founding member of the present Dixie Youth Girls’ Softball League as well as a coach for the past ve years. He is currently president of the Dixie Youth Baseball League and a head coach. He has been a member of the Gator Boost ers and Quarterback Club. He is currently vice presi dent of the Wewa Warrior Football League and a head coach. Wooten will continue Cox’s commitment to aca demic and vocational pro grams while also promoting extra-curricular activities. He understands and will protect the integrity and professionalism required of a board member. With two children and a niece attend ing Gulf County Schools, Brooke has a vested interest in making sure our schools are the best we can provide for our children. Brooke feels his education, pro fessional and community experience have prepared him to bring knowledge to the board that will better our schools. “My diverse engineer ing and construction ca reer coupled with a hard work ethic makes me the best choice for Gulf County School Board Member for District 2. I am prepared to listen, work hard and be a voice for our children. I will serve the citizens of Gulf County with honesty, dignity and respect,” Wooten said. Contact Wooten at 2278242 for questions or con cerns about his campaign. .. ( ,( % 9 4%02 '$ #22 2. 92 4= <9 1.$20 1 72 9. < 99 0 8.2 1< 22 22 1 82 2. 2 9 4 82 <9 1. !.8. 1<2 4 2 = 8 4.=9 < ( 2. =( .1 8.2 2: 21 ;9 7 .< 7912 .<< 22 2 4 82 2 02 .9< <1 /2 822 2 .2 1. 98 .= 9 9 7 1. ( .;9 7 4 82< 72 82 /.<< 89 2= /2 ".<9 497 4 72 9 =2 897 8.2 0== 9 21 .<. 1 8 78 82 0.1 91. 2 29 9 02 12 .< 94 4 82 '$ 72 9. < 99 0 2. ( 0.1 91. 2 = /=9 <2. 6(6 29 9 <1 /2 7. 24< 94 <1 97 29 9 <.0 2 = .=2 82 /.<< 8. =. 0 92 %78 4 .< 2 9 .9 0.9 .< + #$$ $&# & ) &#( ## $$ & & ( + $ !&& !<2. 2 =.9 < 89 0= <2 21 29 9 9 ,3 .2 ( <9 1. 666 98 .= 27.1 ( !<9 90.< .12 92=2 .91 4 .1 .2 1 / $22 $82 <.1 4 72( 990 '92 1 $. 2 #22 2. 92 1 99 0( <9 1. L‚ £  }Œt } WB[DB= ]LVU † †›  — \] 9[ =VQ QL\LVU =BU][ B… # # # # # # # !! # # ! # # # # # # # Š ^“n  A‹„„{‘ {‹Š AsŠ“ s GG J›Ÿ P Z ‹ “ ^“ O ‹s U FR ŠKKP^_ <] GKG2 # # # # $ ! #" $ Local The Star| A5 Thursday, March 13, 2014 TDC from page A1 of “enhancements” she and her team hoped to imple ment, with board approval, for the upcoming grant cycle. The grant program will be opened to for-prot or ganizations – through this year only non-prots could applyand the TDC will cat egorize events and requests based on the size, level of participation from out of the county and a demonstrated partnership between the event and lodging partners. The goal, Jenkins said, is creating self-sustaining events in the next ve years and a substantial shift in philosophy for TDC partici pation in special events. “We want to move from a funding source to a promo tional arm,” Jenkins said. “We need to get into the mind-set of packages.” Jenkins added that the TDC would also be exam ining event organizers or sponsors providing funds to match the TDC dollars and no applications would be ac cepted outside of the appli cation window. The TDC, she said, would also state a preference away from funding events between Memorial Day and Labor Day, though at board urging she said that could be determined on a case-bycase basis. “People see us as the bank and we want them to see us for the marketing,” said board member and marketing committee chair Alyson Gerlach. “If we do our job right, they will be more successful.” The move, board mem ber Tony Whiteld said, would also be more eco nomically responsible, with the TDC applying its skill set instead of just handing out dollars. “Most of these events don’t have marketing ex pertise and we are kind of throwing money at them and hoping it sticks and a lot of it doesn’t,” Whiteld said. “This way we would take more of the money in-house.” A second major area of tweaking concerned the beach ambassador program being launched as a pilot this summer. Jenkins and attorney Jeremy Novak are under taking a consolidation of all ordinances pertaining to the beaches corridor and sought TDC board input on areas of concern. The goal is to have one comprehensive ordinance to address issues ranging from leash laws and beach driving to bonres on the beach. “We do need to try to con solidate these,” said board member Ronald Pickett. That consolidated ordi nance would be the back bone resource for the beach ambassadors. “We are not law enforce ment, we are not code en forcement,” Jenkins said of the ambassador program, which will operate out to the TDC while coordinat ing with the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce and South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department. “We are brand ambassa dors. We are welcoming peo ple and educating them.” The hope is to enhance enforcement of county ordi nances with a hospitality ap proach while adding to the presence on the beaches and the ability to reach visi tors to enhance stays. It is, in part at least, a county attempt to move closer to a Leave No Trace philosophy while not multi plying enforcement efforts. “It is a pilot program and we’ll see where we go next year,” said County Commis sioner Warren Yeager, who is the Board of County Com missioners representative to the TDC board. Gerlach added, “The presence itself will make a difference.” SOP The board also approved changes to the TDC staff, at the recommendation of Jenkins. The move would add one full-time “brand ambas sador” who would largely oversee the beach ambas sador program and enhance the marketing output from the TDC. The TDC had already ordered new vehicles for the beach ambassador program. Commissioners ap proved the tentative rec ommendation 4-1 with Commissioner Joanna Bryan dissenting. The EDA, a private con tractor with the BOCC, was created just over a year ago after the BOCC had voted to bring what was then the Economic Development Council, and its executive director Barry Sellers, un der the BOCC. The EDA has an allvolunteer board and after Sellers became ill and was forced to leave his posi tion last summer, the EDA has operated without an executive director, in part relying on informal assis tance from the Bay County Economic Development Alliance. The BOCC suspended its quarterly payments to the EDA in the amount of $20,000 in January. Bryan said she under stood the bumps encoun tered after Sellers’ illness and departure, but argued the BOCC should be seek ing to bolster an indepen dent agency for economic development rather than putting the work under the county. “Businesses will be hesitant to deal with the county,” Bryan said. “I am against the county being in control of the EDA. I am against the director being a county employee.” She said the county had a stake in creating jobs, justifying funding the agency, but said that fund ing should be aimed at put ting the EDA in a position to be self-sustaining as a private/public partnership. Bryan also expressed concern about the Sun shine Law and potential impacts on condentiality requirements that would be part of luring business es to the county if those acting as point of contact were county employees. Commissioner Warren Yeager said he would wait and see. “I understand all the concerns, but we have to nd out what kind of model they are bringing to us,” Yeager said. “When a com pany wants to come to Gulf County it will come to Gulf County.” Commissioner Tan Smiley voiced frustration at the BOCC starting again in economic development, the third time in his three years on the board – and at least sixth time in 12 years – the BOCC has changed direction, he said. He noted that the dis cussions about economic development transpire among those who have jobs and benets. The people who work to pay the taxes to support government, he added, can’t support the same level of taxes any more and jobs are scarce. Starting over again and again, he said, was like be ginning construction of a home and then tearing it down and starting again. “I don’t know what the issue is but our biggest problem is people who can’t get along with each other,” Smiley said. “Something is wrong and the majority of the problem is people who can’t get along and before they will get along they’d rather leave it a mess. “We (aren’t any) further along than we were three years ago. We need to take personal feelings and put them aside. We need to quit worrying about ‘I’. We need to get some jobs in here.” RECYCLING Commissioners voted to suspend a pilot project that introduced a recycling center at Salinas Park due to high costs and the in creasing incidents of folks dropping off other garbage at the site. The project began last spring and was initially well-received, said a rep resentative from Waste Management, but over the summer months became an “eyesore” as other garbage, “contaminants”, were dropped at the site. The additional costs of more frequent pulls due to the volume of trash dropped at the site also pushed the budget well beyond projections for the rst year of the pilot project. Yeager moved to sus pend the program, a mo tion unanimously passed. “This pilot program has shown us we need to do something with recycling curbside,” Yeager said. “It’s just not working.” EDA from page A1 WOOTEN from page A1 STUDENTS from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com www.starfl.com Section Section A By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net It might not feel like cobia season, with night temps still in the 40s, but the calendar and the sunrise times both say it is. Each year, cobia begin prowling Panhandle beaches sometime soon after March 1, and the parade continues through late April. Beach water temperature has been wavering around 68, and that de nitely is in the zone for cobia—the sh start showing at around 65 most years, and the prime run continues until around the time it passes 72. The “brown bombers” can be spotted anywhere from 30 yards off the beach to several miles out. Just beyond the “green reef,” the secondary bar along much of the Panhandle shoreline is always a good place to start searching. They often travel in pods of two to six sh, and cruise along just a foot or two below the surface, making it easy to spot them for those who know what to look for. In fact, they look much like small sharks to an inexpert eye, swimming with the same slow, steady tail beat. Beach cobia typically weigh anywhere from 20 to 60 pounds, but far larger ones have been caught in waters of the northern Gulf, including several over 100 pounds taken from the Alabama shoreline, just beyond Florida’s Panhandle — the same sh that pass through Sunshine State waters wind up off Dauphin Island a few days later. The Florida record, caught near Destin, weighed 130 pounds, 1 ounce. The all-tackle IGFA record is 135 pounds, 9 ounces, for a sh taken off Australia. Cobia is one of the few species that is exactly the same throughout all the world’s temperate oceans, biologists say. Although the Panhandle cobia shery primarily targets sh cruising off the beaches, the species can be caught throughout the warmer months and into November most years around area wrecks, reefs, buoys, piers and other structures anywhere from depths of 10 feet on out to several hundred feet. Cobia are also noted for following large sea creatures closely — manta rays and whale sharks sometimes attract large schools, so anytime anglers spot one of these denizens it’s worth checking to see if there are cobia hanging under them. Even temporary structures may attract cobia — they sometimes stack up under shrimp boats at anchor, or beneath tankers moored offshore, waiting to come in and unload. Cobia also sometimes join king sh and mackerel in following bait sh schools. They’re typically found on the outer edges of bait balls, while the mackerel clan will be inside slicing and dicing. Cobia look much like oversized remora’s, except that they lack the suction cup on the head. Biologists say they are not closely related, but everything from color to skin texture is similar, plus they share the tendency to hang with larger sea creatures. However, remora’s never attain larger sizes. Cobia tactics Classic cobia shing is sight shing, and there’s no where it’s practiced so frequently as in Panhandle waters from Apalachicola westward all the way to the barrier islands of Louisiana. The sh here show themselves, making it relatively easy to get in front of them and put a bait on their nose. Most area charterboat skippers who regularly chase cobia have their boats rigged with ying bridges or tuna towers, which gives them a much better view down into the water to spot the sh. Add a pair of polarized glasses and a few decades of experience and it’s no problem at all for the average skipper to locate sh frequently. For those who like to chase the sh out of their own boats, it’s smart to set up so that you’re traveling with the sun at your back. It’s easier to see the sh from about 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is high, though sh seen at mid-day have often already had several baits ung at them and may be cautious. If you can spot a sh shortly after sunrise and be the rst to put a bait or lure on it, that sh will often become cobia llets. Those which have been hammered on by a half-dozen boats, on the other hand, totally might ignore your offerings. Cobia eat about anything which will t down their gullets, but they do have some favorite foods. Eels are near the top, and many Destin area skippers rely on these slippery critters to lure cobia in season. Eels are hard to handle and hard to put on the hook, and they don’t cast all that well, but if you can get a lively one in front of a cobia, you rarely will get a turn-down. A tip: put the eels on dry newspaper for a moment to remove some of the slime and you will nd them much easier to get on the hook. Almost as good, and much easier to handle and cast, are large soft plastic eel imitations — those with swimming tails and multiple hooks are often best. Cobia are also known as “crab-eaters,” and that name gives you a clue as to another favorite food; small crabs, about 3 inches across, make excellent baits. Hook them through the outer points of the shell on a 3/0 extra strong short-shank live bait hook. Soft crab imitations like the avored models from GULP! also do the job at times. All sorts of bait sh catch cobia; pin sh are easy to get, durable and easy to cast. Blue runners are another favorite — very durable and active. Large scaled sardines also are excellent, though they’re pretty much a do-it-yourself bait since they don’t live well in bait tanks. Ditto for thread ns, which have a very short lifespan but are good baits just after being sabikied aboard. Baits about 4 to 5 inches long are best for cobia 20 pounds and up. Cobia can also readily be caught on all sorts of arti cial lures, particularly when they rst show up and have not been hammered on; a ounce jig with a 5 to 7 inch shad tail often does the job, as do shad-imitating swimbaits like the 1-ounce Tsunami Swimshad. Big topwaters like the Super Spook also can fool them at times. T ENT SALE! BW OFISH.com 121 W Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 POR T CITY SHOPPING CENTER Friday April 4th 6am-6pm Saturday April 5th 6am-5pm Large inventor y of shing items reduced up to 60% off retail Bring the whole Family! Fishing Seminars on Saturday with Rick Murphy and crew from Florida Fishing Insider W eekly (All T imes are Eastern) 6th Annual Our Biggest Sale of the Y ear! Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M ar 13 59 43 10 % F ri, M ar 14 59 49 10 % S a t M ar 15 64 54 0 % Sun, M ar .16 66 56 0 % M on, M ar 17 71 50 10 % T ues M ar 18 71 50 % W ed M ar 19 71 51 % SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay O UTDOORS Page 6 Thursday, March 13, 2014 FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The Star The annual cobia run into Panhandle waters typically gets underway when water temperatures along the beach exceed 65 degrees, and it’s already at 68. Cobia just around the corner Star Staff Report The staff of the Port St. Joe Marina held a clean marina designation ceremony last Saturday. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Of ce of Sustainable Initiatives recognized the marina as part of the clean marina community. To be designated as a clean marina, facilities must implement a series of measures designed to protect Florida’s waterways which include protecting sensitive habitats, waste management, storm water control, spill prevention and emergency preparedness. Port St. Joe Marina has been designated as the 276th Clean Marina in Florida and is the second facility to be designated in Gulf County. The ceremony was held in conjunction with the marina’s Customer Appreciation Day. SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Port St. Joe Marina was designated as a “clean marina” by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Of ce. Port St. Joe marina designated as ‘clean’ Local area waters are starting to come back alive with the springtime weather. After rain water runoffs of last week, most backwaters and freshwater areas are still muddy, but producing sh. Trout and red sh catches are on the rise in the ICW canal, and a few anglers are starting to catch ounder again as well. Small Spanish mackerel are holding close to shore and schooling up near the mouth of the St. Joe Marina and running the beaches already with a few sh over 18 inches.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section u d ^ o … W w 0 0 E k k Ž l 8 ‡ T 8 – ‡ Q 8 Z 8 j E E O 0 „ E E ‡ T 8 3 Ž ‡ i l ” – Z 8 e Ž Ÿ ‘ N E E E „ E E E ‘ ‡ Q 8 ‘ – Ž Ž Ÿ r 8 Ž ‘ Œ Ž g E E 0 „ E E E – ” r 8 ‘ – ” – Z 8 Œ Ž Ž Ž Ÿ r 8 ‘ g 8 Ž Ÿ ‘ N 8 ‡ ‹ – Ž ¢ N E E 0 „ E E E ‡ Ÿ ‹ – Q 8  Ž ‡ x 8 Ÿ Ÿ Ž ” Q E E „ E E E Š ¢ T 8 Ÿ Ž Ž p 8 Œ N 8 Œ p 8 – n 8 Ž n E E E „ E E E # ¤ ¡ … ¨ ¡ § „ m „ W w 0 [ b d ¡ ¨ ¡ ‡ „ ¨ ¡ ¨ „ Page 7 Thursday, March 13, 2014 Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School softball team notched a pair of district wins during an undefeated week. Bozeman came to town last Tuesday, and Stephanie Brinkmeier notched her seventh victory on the mound in a 7-2 triumph. Brinkmeier pitched seven innings, striking out ve, walking three and allowing three hits. Brittany King was 2 for 2 with a pair of doubles, and Christian Laine was 2 for 4. Haley Wood, Kesley Miles, Hal Leigh Keels, Brinkmeier and Addison Rice each had a hit. Two days later, the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted Franklin County on a cold, misty night. Down 4-0, Port St. Joe rallied to take a 6-5 win. Brinkmeier picked up her eighth win on the year and the Lady Tiger Sharks remained unbeaten, 5-0, in district play. Brinkmeier pitched seven innings giving up four hits, striking out three and walking four. She surrendered just two earned runs. Miles was 3 for 4 at the plate, and Shannon Pridgeon, Brinkmeier, Callie Fleshren and Rice had two hits each. Keels and Pridgeon each drove in two runs. Port St. Joe hosts South Walton 7 p.m. ET Friday and will compete in a Spring Break Classic on March 22. Star Staff Report The Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team traveled to Tallahassee to compete in a tournament at Chiles High School last Saturday. The Lady Gators (10-2) won their rst two games before falling to Tallahassee Lincoln High School, a Class 7A juggernaut. Wewahitchka opened with a 2-0 win over Class 5A Wakulla, as Naomi Parker pitched a complete-game no-hitter. Parker struck out ve and was also 2 for 2 at the plate, driving in one of the two Lady Gator runs. Brianna Bailey, Shamario Cole, Jade McLemore and Tara Walding each had a hit. Wewahitchka returned to action with a 7-3 win over Class 7A Tallahassee Leon. Ashleigh Price allowed two hits and struck out one to earn the win for the Lady Gators. Price was also 2 for 2 at the plate and scored a run. Walding led the Wewahitchka offense with two hits and four RBIs, and Parker was 3 for 3, scored twice and drove in a run. Cole was 1 for 4 and scored three runs, and Bailey had a hit. Bailey pitched seven innings in a 12-0 loss to Lincoln. Parker was 2 for 3, and Cole contributed a hit. Wewahitchka played North Bay Haven Tuesday and will host Vernon tonight. The Lady Gators travel to Altha Friday and host a doubleheader against Franklin County at 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. CT Monday. The team will be selling barbecue sandwiches for the Monday doubleheader, and don’t forget to wear green. Star Staff Reports Thacker, Smith stand out at weightlifting meet Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School athletes Carter Thacker and Reggie Smith traveled to Pensacola last weekend to compete in the second annual Trent Richardson Invitational Weightlifting Meet at Escambia High School. The competition was in the Emmitt Smith Weight Room. Richardson also played football at Escambia before playing at the University of Alabama and later the Cleveland Browns. He is now playing for the Indianapolis Colts. Thacker took rst in the 139-pound class with a personal best of 480 total pounds. He lifted 265 on the bench and lifted 215 in the clean-and-jerk. Smith took the title in the 199-pound class, also notching a personal best total of 570 pounds. Smith lifted 325 pounds on the bench and hoisted 245 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. Every lifter had a chance to meet Richardson and have a photo taken with him. Courtney McMillion Memorial Scholarship tourney The Courtney McMillion Memorial Scholarship Tournament will begin at 8 a.m. CT May 3 at the Honeyville Sports Complex in Wewahitchka. This is a co-ed softball tournament. Each team can have up to 15 players, but at least three women must be on the eld and batting at all times. All players must be 16 or older. Each team is guaranteed at least three games: pool play of at least two games and then a round robin single-elimination tournament. Teams will use bats and balls provided by the tournament committee. Entry fee is $150 per team, and teams will split $30 per game for umpires. Trophies and T-shirts will be awarded to the rstand second-place teams. Pork plates, concessions and T-shirts will be sold at the complex. For more information, call event managers Luke Taunton at 628-1814 or Kimberly McMillion at 819-8433. All proceeds from the tournament go to the Courtney McMillion Memorial Scholarship Fund to aid local Wewahitchka High School graduates. Cheerleading tryouts next month Cheerleading tryouts for anyone who will be enrolled in Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School or Port St. Joe Middle School during the 2014-15 school year will be April 7-11. A mandatory parent meeting will be at 5:30 p.m. ET March 25 in the high school cafeteria. All students interested in trying out must be present along with a parent or guardian. Informational packets are available at the high school and elementary school of ces and at Faith Christian School. Special to The Star Coastal Community Association and South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department are joining forces to raise donations for Easter baskets and food for needy families in Gulf County for the Gulf County Sheriff’s Department. They have engaged the services of the wildest March hares they could nd in Gulf County to kick off the drive with a crazy Bunny Rabbit Tournament at 1 p.m. ET Saturday, March 15, at St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. These demented hares choose to hold the tournament on St. Patrick’s Day just to spice things up and encourage all our gol ng snowbirds to join the locals for a day of gol ng fun. The game will be individual play with handicaps, so anyone can win. There will be cash prizes for rst, second and third place. There is a prize on every hole and fun with every stroke. Hole prizes have been donated by Sunset Coastal Grill, The St. Joe Shrimp Company, St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, the Blue Parrot and Smiley’s Car Detailing among others. Sponsors are Penelope’s Pet Stop, Gulf 2 Bay Construction and Coastal Community Association. Cost is $45 for club members and $55 for nonmembers. Bring an Easter basket or Easter stuffed toy and take $10 off. All proceeds will go for Easter baskets and food. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 2271751 for more information or to register. If you don’t have a team, no problem, the club will hook you up with some fun folks. Don’t play golf? No problem. Coastal Community Association and South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department (both nonpro ts) have arranged with Dollar General Market in Port St. Joe to have a discount on food and Easter items from donations they collect just before Easter. So we can multiply what we can make available for the needy in Gulf County with even a small donation. You can make donations or drop off Easter baskets, stuffed animals and nonperishable food items at the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department on Cape San Blas Road, St Joseph Bay Golf Club, Sunset Coastal Grill or Gulf 2 Bay Construction (Simmons Bayou). By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Jon Mason and Kimberly Tuel are newcomers to area coaching and the Halifax All-Star Classic. They will lead the East girls basketball team together in the 10th annual game April 5 at Gulf Coast State College’s Billy Harrison Field House. The contest tips off at 11 a.m. and is followed by the boys at 1 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and students ages 6-17, and children 5 and younger get in free. Both coaches took rst-year positions at their respective schools this season, Mason at Mosley and Tuel with Chipley. Mason is the second Mosley coach to sit on the bench for the East and rst since Steve Can eld in 2012. Tuel is the fourth coach from Chipley to head the East, which is selected from a pool of senior players in The Panama City News Herald’s eight-county coverage area. Tuel led Chipley on a return trip to the Class 1A state championship game. The Tigers nished as runners-up for the second straight season after falling to Paxton 39-34 in the title game. Tuel led Chipley to the deep run and a 25-6 record with a team featuring only one senior. That was the same number as Mason’s team, with sophomores and juniors logging the majority of the minutes. Mosley nished 17-9 and fell to Rutherford in the District 1-5A semi nal. With two district wins last week, Stephanie Brinkmeier has eight victories on the season. COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTON | Special to The Star Lady Tiger Sharks continue winning ways Lady Gators go 2-1 in Tallahassee tournament COURTESY OF ANNE PARKER | Special to The Star Naomi Parker tossed a no-hitter to beat Wakulla, adding two hits and an RBI as the Lady Gators went 2-1 in a Tallahassee tournament. Mason, Tuel to lead East girls Sports SHORTS Easter basket/food drive kicks off Saturday with golf tourney

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 two years, leaving the coun cil just $485,000 to construct the new city hall. Finally, the city received a settlement offer from the insurance company in Feb ruary for $174,000 on the remaining damages and a new foundation. Shortly thereafter, an executive session was held to discuss ofcial numbers on the project and at Feb ruary’s regular meeting Woodham told the council he wanted to confer with a lawyer to explore the possi bility of getting more money from the insurance compa ny through litigation. After the visit, Woodham told the council according to the lawyer, the city might be able to receive more money, though an ofcial number has not been released. Woodham said if more funds are received from the insurance company, the city won’t have to lean on tax payer money for the con struction of city hall. “There’s more money on the table,” Woodham said. “I want a city hall that we can all be proud of. “I’m part of the com munity, and I want it to be beautiful for future generations.” During last month’s meeting Councilwoman Tanya Castro was vocal about not litigating with the insurance company. When asked, she said though she didn’t know if the settlement was fair, she favored progress over litigation. “The only information to say that the settlement is unfair is coming from the contractor,” said Cas tro. “Let’s settle and move forward.” Castro has encouraged the council to consider whether the cost of litiga tion could outweigh the costs of the new city hall. Castro said her main concern was the current bid price from Cathey Con struction is more than the city can afford after two years of upkeep. “We need to stop and ask if it makes sense to spend what appears to be a mil lion dollars on a city hall for six employees that most citizens will never go to,” Castro said. “Is that what our taxpayers need?” Castro said she was con cerned that the new city hall wouldn’t have public space available. She ex pressed that Mexico Beach is already in need of a build ing for special events. During a workshop last month citizens expressed confusion on why a 3,200square-foot city hall was even needed. “It’s a lot of money to build a house that size on land we own,” said Mullen, commiserating with the statements. The members of the council agreed progress must be made, but they must decide which direc tion to go. Demolition will begin soon on the Parker House and citizens will be looking for something to take its place. “I just want to see us move in a positive direc tion,” Woodham said. “Dur ing this campaign, I’ve learned that a lot of people don’t know the true facts. “I want to give them those facts to help them make a decision.” Despite which way the council decides to go, it seems that everything has a price. “Look at the indirect costs of negative publicity,” said Castro. “The price the city has paid…it’s beyond measure.”TUESDAY’S REGULAR MEEt T ING At Tuesday’s regular meeting, Woodham shared a letter he received from attorney Dion Moniz, who looked over some of the in surance documents. According to the let ter, the settlement being offered was “insufcient” because it implied that the Parker House was a com mercial-use building at the time of the re. The building should have been, said Woodham, considered a city hall as soon as it was insured by the city. Moniz’s letter also sug gested the settlement does not cover the costs for re designs that the city com pleted after the structural analysis or site work that had been completed so far. A specic amount the city could pursue wasn’t given without the lawyer having access to a list of unreimbursed funds, but if hired, he would attempt to get them without litigation and only sue the insurance company if necessary. The lawyer recommend ed the council hold an exec utive session at the end of the month to meet with him and Brian Cathey of Cathey Construction to discuss the specics. Castro disagreed the Parker House could be con sidered a city hall because it was empty at the time of the re and expressed concern that paying the litigation costs could use up money that the city doesn’t have. “This could take a long time,” city attorney Paul Ko marek said. “This process typically takes longer than people would like and costs more than they expect.” Komarek encouraged the council to hold an exec utive session to get as much information as possible before making a decision. He reminded the council because of Florida law, a lawsuit must be led within ve years from the day of loss and that while there’s no time frame for accept ing the settlement offer, the insurance company could withdraw it at any time. Demolition on the Park er House was slowed down by rainy weather but is ex pected to be complete by next week. 2014 EL E CTI O N N O TI C E N o t ice i s h er e b y g i v en t h a t t h e Ci t y o f P o r t S t. J o e ’ s P r im a r y E le c t io n w i l l b e h e ld T ues d a y M a y 13, 2014, in t h e Fir e S t a t io n. P o l l s o p en a t 7:00 A.M., E T a n d c los e 7:00 P .M., E T R eg i s t ra t io n b o o ks a r e n o w o p en a t t h e o ce o f J o hn H a n lo n, G u lf C o un t y S u p er v i s o r o f E le c t io n s a n d w i l l r em a in o p en t hr u M o n d a y A p r i l 14, 2014, a t 5:00 P .M., E T C a n did a t e q u a lif y in g b eg in s W e dn es d a y M a r c h 26, 2014, a t 12:00 N o o n E a s t er n T im e a n d en d s o n W e dn es d a y A p r i l 2, 2014, a t N o o n E a s t er n T im e e f o l lo w in g o ces w i l l b e u p f o r e le c t io n: C o mmi s sio n er G r o u p III a n d C o mmi s sio n er G r o u p IV B eg innin g M a y 3, 2014 – M a y 10, 2014, (in c l udes Sa t ur d a ys o f M a y 3r d a n d M a y 10t h). E a r l y V o t in g w i l l b e h e ld a t t h e S u p er v i s o r o f E le c t io n s o ce lo c a t e d a t 401 L o n g A v en ue f r o m 9:00 A.M., E T t o 5:00 P .M., E T er e w i l l b e n o S un d a y v o t in g o n M a y 4, 2014. A l s o A bs en t e e B a l lo ts m a y b e r e q ues t e d n o w b u t w i l l b e m a i le d a er r e cei v e d f r o m p r in t er e Ci t y o f P o r t S t. J o e C h a r lo t t e M. P ier ce Ci t y C ler k C E L E B R A T I N G 1 8 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E I N P O RT S T JO E 2 2 7 70 70 W W W I V E R S M D C O M M A N A G I N G A L L Y O U R F A M I L Y N E E D S F R O M : NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 3-31-14 CODE: SJ00 B e c au se y o u r f ut u r e d oe sn ’ t re t i re T h e r a t e s a p p l y t o c e r t i c a t e s i s s u e d i n M a r c h T h e i n i t i a l i n t e r e s t r a t e o f 4 5 0 % i s g u a r a n t e e d f o r t h e r s t c e r t i c a t e y e a r a n d i n c l u d e s a r s t y e a r o n l y i n t e r e s t b o n u s o f 3 0 0 % T h i s i n i t i a l r a t e i s p a y a b l e o n a c e r t i c a t e w i t h an n ui t y v al u e s of $ 1 0 0 0 0 $ 2 4 9 9 9 T h e i n i t ial i n t e r e s t r a t e o f 4 7 5 % i s g u a r a n t e e d f o r t h e r s t c e r t i c a t e y e a r a n d i n c l u d e s a r s t y e a r o n l y i n t e r e s t b o n u s o f 3 0 0 % T h i s i n i t i a l r a t e i s p a y a b l e o n a c e r t i c a t e w i t h a n n u i t y v a l u e s o f $ 2 5 0 0 0 $ 9 9 9 9 9 T h e i n i t i a l i n t e r e s t r a t e o f 4 9 5 % i s g u a r a n t e e d f o r t h e r s t c e r t i c a t e y e a r a n d i n c l u d e s a r s t y e a r o n l y i n t e r e s t b o n u s o f 3 0 0 % T h i s i n i t i a l r a t e i s p a y a b l e o n a c e r t i c a t e w i t h a n n u i t y v a l u e s o f $ 1 0 0 0 0 0 $ 4 9 9 9 9 9 A f t e r t h e r s t c e r t i c a t e y e a r a s e c o n d a r y i n t e r e s t r a t e o f 1 0 % i s g u a r a n t e e d u n t i l t h e e n d o f t h e s u r r e n d e r c h ar g e p e r i o d, an d a mi n i mum i n t e re s t r a t e of 1 0 0 % i s g uar an t e e d t h e re a f t e r R e ne w al i n t e r e s t r a t e s a r e s e t m o n t h l y b y W o o d m e n o f t h e W o r l d a n d w i l l n e v e r b e l o w e r t h a n t h o s e g u a r a n t e e d C a l l f o r c u r r e n t r a t e s o n c e r t i c a t e s w i t h h i g h e r a n n u i t y v a l u e s P r o d u c t m a y n o t b e a v a i l a b l e i n a l l s t a t e s C o n t a c t a W o o d m e n o f t h e W o r l d F i e l d R e p r e s e n t a t i v e t o n d o u t i f t h i s p r o d u c t i s r i g h t f o r y o u M e m b e r s h i p i s p a r t o f e li g i bi li t y C e r t i c a t e 7 9 6 1 -X X 07 07 M ar c h i ni ti a l g u ar a n t e e d i n t e r es t r a t es ar e : I n s t ea d o f C e r t i c a t e s o f D e p o s i t a s k a b o u t a S i n g l e Pr e m i u m D e f e r r e d A n n u i t y w i t h a F i r s t Y ea r I n t e r e s t B o n u s f r o m W o o d m e n o f t h e W o r l d S e c o n d a r y g u a r a n t e e d i n t e r e s t r a t e t h r o u g h s u r r e n d e r c h a r g e p e r i o d i s 1 10 % M i n i m u m g u a r a n t e e d i n t e r e s t r a t e i s 1. 0 0 % C D 1 0 7 3 WOW 3 / 1 4 P a y a b l e o n a c e r t i c a t e w i t h a n n u i t y v a l u e s o f $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 $ 99 999 4 75 % 4 50 % P a y a b l e o n a c e r t i c a t e w i t h a n n u i t y v a l u e s o f $ 1 0,0 0 0 $ 2 4 999 P a y a b l e o n a c e r t i c a t e w i t h a n n u i t y v a l u e s o f $ 1 0 0,0 0 0 $ 4 99 999 4 95 % Nlv9 :v|y„l|…„ U|€v 4ttŠv  8|9 Tlv9 `FP ;;;;; ;;;;; C a r ol D i x on F i e l d R e p r e s e n t at i v e 8 5 0 6 2 5 5 53 0 PARKER from page A1

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com His writing skills earned Port St. Joe seventh-grader Josh Butts four years of college. Turned out, his proofreading skills didn’t hurt. Butts was awarded a 2+2 Florida scholarship last week, entitling him to four years college tuition courtesy of the Florida Prepaid College Foundation. And given the circumstances that paved the way to recognition in front of the Gulf County School Board, it was a celebration that might not have happened. Butts was one of two seventh-graders in Ruby Kox’s English class who undertook writing an essay concerning a Florida governor who had swayed the state in signi cant ways. The essays for the contest sponsored by Florida Prepaid College Foundation were due last October. Knox knew at least two of her students would have an interest and the talent – Butts and Chance Pittman. When winners were announced in January, Pittman learned he had won the 2+2 scholarship, which entitles a student to two years at a Florida junior college followed by two years at a Florida university. When Pittman’s plaque arrived at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, however, Butts and others noticed the name imprinted. “Josh Butts.” Knox and Principal Jeremy Knapp did some investigating in Tallahassee with the foundation. Turns out the essays by Pittman and Butts were sent to different judges for scoring. The judges sent them back with identical scores – a tie. “We would never have known if not for the plaque,” Butts said. When the results came back to the folks in charge of the contest, selecting one as the scholarship winner seemed tacky, so the decision was made to award two scholarship packages. Somehow in preparing the plaques and distributing awards to the various counties in the region, the SPECIAL TO THE STAR Josh Butts received his of cial plaque bestowing a 2 + 2 scholarship at last week’s meeting of the Gulf County School Board. Josh is pictured with his parents, Karen and Chris, and a representative from the Florida Prepaid College Foundation. Turning a ‘screw up’ into college See COLLEGE B7 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Students at Port St. Joe Elementary School got their Monday started jumpin’ or shootin’. The physical activities were part of the annual Jump Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart fundraisers. Each year students collect money to donate to the American Heart Association to raise awareness for the health related effects of heart disease. Students collected donations from friends and family or by going door-to-door in their neighborhoods. Teachers Sandy Quinn and Jewell Hopper coordinate the program and work to motivate the students and keep them active each day. “Our goal this year was set at $6,000 and our kids did a great job trying to reach it,” said Quinn. “We’re very proud of them.” Students raised $5,000 over a two-week period while they learned how to ght heart disease by staying physically active and eating healthy. The Hoops/Jump Rope for Heart program has been active in Port St. Joe for more than 10 years and shows no signs of slowing down. “We all have had someone we know that might have had heart problems,” said Quinn. “Heart disease affects young and old and we believe this is what motivates our students to work hard for American Heart Association.” WES LOCHER | The Star The next Salt Air Farmer’s Market will be held on Saturday, March 15 at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmer’s Market promotes a sustainable food system on Florida’s Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. ET to 1 p.m. SALT AIR FARMER’S MARKET THIS SATURDAY Special to The Star On March 6, a very special lady from Gulf County attended a ceremony with Florida’s top governmental leader. Ms. Tracy Bowers, a fourth-grade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School who also was named Gulf County Teacher of the Year, was recognized at the state capital by Gov. Rick Scott. Awarded one of the Governor’s Shine awards, Bower’s outstanding contributions in the eld of education were acknowledged by an esteemed group which included Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Florida’s Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. Bowers was further honored at the ceremony when she was chosen to address four of her fellow Shine award winners from surrounding panhandle counties. “We are lucky to have a teacher of Ms. Tracy Bower’s caliber here at Wewahitchka Elementary,” said Principal Jay Bidwell. “Now other people around the state are beginning to realize what we have known for some time that Ms. Tracy Bowers is one of the most phenomenal educators in our area.” The next opportunity for Ms. Bowers to “shine” will be at the Florida State Teacher of the Year selection ceremony to be held in Orlando on July 9-11. Hopefully the secret is out about Ms. Tracy’s special abilities and she will bring home the award as Florida’s top teacher. “If the selection committee could see what we at Wewahitchka Elementary observe on a daily basis, then I am sure that Ms. Tracy Bowers would win the Florida Teacher of the Year Award in a landslide,” Bidwell said. “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Reportedly how many U.K. publishers turned down the 1st Harry Potter manuscript before small Bloomsbury (at the time) accepted it? 2, 6, 10, 12 2) What’s the name of the white-colored dog appearing in Scooby Doo cartoons? Ralph, Scooby Dum, Hercules, Mergertroid 3) How much did 1903’s rst 8-count box of Crayola crayons sell for? Nickel, Dime, Quarter, Dollar 4) Carl Sagan was a famed astronomer at what university? Cornell, Notre Dame, Stanford, MIT 5) Which of these is not a Canadian province? New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Yukon, Manitoba 6) How many NFL teams have “bird” nicknames? 1, 3, 5, 7 7) Along with relish, ketchup and mayo are basically the main items of which salad dressing? Thousand Island, Ranch, Italian, French 8) “Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades” got its start in a fuller quote from? Mining, Baseball, Golf, Quilting 9) Of these comedians who was born in Harlem, Georgia? Sinbad, Oliver Hardy, Jeff Foxworthy, Cable Guy 10) What’s the total amount of money in a standard U.S. Monopoly game? $15,140; $20,000; $27,260; $30,000 11) How many times did Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard ght against each other? 1, 2, 3, 4 12) Where did a dance called “the jig” originate? Southern USA, NYC, British Isles, Australia 13) How many knuckles are in a human hand? 8, 10, 14, 15 14) Which is an advanced, sealed tobacco curing barn with a system of ductworks? Candela, Calfrisa, Cantero, Carotene ANSWERS 1) 12. 2) Scooby Dum. 3) Nickel. 4) Cornell. 5) Yukon. 6) 5. 7) Thousand Island. 8) Baseball. 9) Oliver Hardy. 10) $15,140. 11) 3. 12) British Isles. 13) 14. 14) Calfrisa. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com SPECIAL TO THE STAR Tracy Bowers was honored at the Florida Shine Awards ceremony at the state capital in Tallahassee. (From left) Attorney General Pam Bondi, Governor Rick Scott, Tracy Bowers, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Florida’s Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. Bowers garners Shine award from Scott PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star First grade students jumped rope to stay active in order to ght heart disease. learned how to ght heart disease by staying physically active and eating The Hoops/Jump Rope for Heart program has been active in Port St. Joe for more than 10 years and shows no signs of slowing “We all have had someone we know that might have had heart problems,” said Quinn. “Heart disease affects young and old and we believe this is what motivates our students to work hard for American Heart cial lady from Gulf County attended a ceremony with Florida’s top governmental leader. fourth-grade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School who also was named Gulf County Teacher of the Year, was recognized at the state capital by Gov. Rick Scott. Governor’s Shine awards, Bower’s outstanding contributions in the eld of education were acknowledged by an esteemed group which included Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Florida’s Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. honored at the ceremony when she was chosen to Bondi, Governor Rick Scott, Tracy Bowers, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Florida’s Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. Bowers garners Shine PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star First grade students jumped rope to stay active in order to ght heart disease. Hoops for Heart at PSJE INSIDE See more photos on Page B7 Thursday, March 13, 2014

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B2 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 Cla yt on is a 29lb 7mo V izsla/M ix. He is learning t o w alk on his leash as w ell as other basic c ommands Cla yt on came in with hes siblings and is a w aiting his saf e f or ev er home with us F ost er homes g iv e our g r ea t pets the a tt en tion and socializa tion they cr a v e W e pr o vide all supplies needed W e need v olun t eers t o help with main t enanc e ar ound the shelt er T o w els and bedding ar e alw a y s w elc ome P et carriers and cr a t es D ona tions of k itt y litt er is in g r ea t demand as w ell as pupp y t o y s M onetar y dona tions ar e alw a y s w elc ome A n y dona tion no ma tt er ho w small will be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850-227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! O nline applica tions and pet phot os ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith ’ s T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y ou ar e missing a pet or w an t t o adopt a new pet please check with y our local Humane S ociet y or Shelt er F ollo w us on F ac ebook : S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y Franklin County Humane Society Ser ving Flor ida’ s P et-Fr iendl y Beaches Along the F org otten Coast D o w n t o w n P o r t S t J o e 850-229-6161 bo ww o wbeach.com 301 REID A VENUE PO R T S T J O E FLO RID A, 32456 M o n-F ri d a y 10:30 5:30 S a t ur d a y 10:30-3:30 C l os e d S und a y O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast % %% "$ # S O L D Diane Peevy 850-527-2580 / 850-227-7770 www .coastalr ealtyinfo.com H o r s e l o v e r s t h i s H o r s e F a r m i s f o r y o u 6 A c r e s w i t h 8 0 ’ x 1 6 0 ’ w h i t e f e n c e d A r e n a s t e e l R o u n d p e n f o r e x e r c i s e 2 a c r e f e n c e d f r o n t p a s t u r e & 1 a c r e f e n c e d r e a r p a s t u r e b o t h e l e c t r i e d w i t h w a t e r H o m e i s 2 BR / 2 B A v e r y sp a ci o u s w / Lg r o om s Lg cl o s ets & l o t s o f w i n d o w s t o a d d n a t u r a l l i g h t K i t c h e n h a s l o t s o f c a b i ne t s w / b l ac k g r a n i t e c ou n t e r t op s Society Organic vegetable gardening What is growing organically? It depends upon who you talk to. The simple answer is that organic gardeners only use animal or vegetable fertilizers rather than synthetics. It also means natural, pest control devoid of industrial insecticides. In other words, using natural substances and bene cial insects to ward off pests instead of spraying with the backyard equivalent of Malithon. My information on organic vegetable gardening was provided by Jim Stephen IFAS Vegetable Garden Specialist. Why garden organically? Since the “organic law” does not apply to home garden, why would any gardener give up all synthetic fertilizers? And why not use synthetic pesticides, when just one application could eliminate even the most devastating ravages of a crop insect or disease? Why work, so hard handling large quantities or organic soil amendments and manures when synthetic fertilizer of every description and purpose are so quickly available and easy to use? Early gardeners did it to preserve a way of life that reduced pollution and environment decay, thus creating a more ecological society. Organic enthusiasts are extremely healthconscious, and hope that working vigorously outdoors and eating foods free from pesticides just might lead to better nutrition and health. The biggest differences between organic and conventional gardening are in the area of fertilization and pest control. The organic gardener prefers organic materials and natural methods of dealing with insect problems and fertilizer requirements. The conventional gardener uses a combination of chemically prepared materials and scienti c methods in approaching the vegetable garden. Whichever method you choose, you need to select a plot of good, well-drained soil for planting vegetables. And you need to choose vegetable varieties suited to Florida growing conditions. After these points, the direction for organic and conventional gardening begin to differ somewhat. Soil preparation is an important step. Since organic fertilizers and soil conditioning materials work rather slowly, they need to be mixed into the soil at least three weeks ahead of planting time. To have a successful organic garden, you need to use abundant quantities of organic material, usually in the form of animal manures, cover crops, compost or mixed organic fertilizer. These materials improve the tilth, condition, and structure of the soil. They help the soil hold water and nutrients better. In addition, organic matter supports microbiological activity in the soil, and contributes major and minor plant nutrients. Another bene t is that as these organic matters decompose, they release acid which help to convert insoluble natural additives, such as ground rock, into forms plants can use. For more information on organic vegetable gardening contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit our website, http://gulf.ifas.ufl.ed u or edis.ifas.ufl.ed u and see publication HS 1215. Special to The Star D.A.W.G.S. in Prison would like to thank the Tony Stewart Foundation for its generous grant in the amount of $5,000. This grant will help us in continuing to change the lives of both man and his best friend. D.A.W.G.S. mission is to provide training and education for both inmate and dog, resulting in permanent homes for the dogs, viable job skills for the inmate, and productive jobs and a law-abiding life upon release. The D.A.W.G.S. in Prison program is a joint effort between St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, Gulf Correctional Institution and Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Since the conception of D.A.W.G.S. more than 4 years ago, over 320 dogs and inmates have been given a second chance at life. For the dogs, they receive the rehabilitation and training needed for a chance at adoption. For the inmates, they gain the skills and experience vital in living a productive law-abiding life upon release. The mission of the Tony Stewart Foundation is to raise and donate funds to help care for children diagnosed with critical or chronic illness, animals which are at-risk or endangered, and for drivers injured in the sport of motor racing. D.A.W.G.S. graciously thanks the Tony Stewart Foundation for acknowledging our program as a grant award recipient and looks forward to another successful year in 2014. If you are interested in adopting one of our graduates or want more information on our D.A.W.G.S. in Prison program, please visit our website at dawgsinprison.com You can also like us on Facebook or contact the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103. For more information about the Tony Steward Foundation, you can visit their website at tonystewartfoundation.org Special to The Star This year Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe, and Franklin County will come together for one amazing night to celebrate, remember, and ght back at the Relay for Life of the Forgotten Coast. The event will take place at 6 p.m. ET on April 11 at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Shark Stadium. This Relay will be 12 hours versus the previous 24hour event. The message of the event is that no one ghts cancer alone. All cancer survivors, meaning anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer, will join together on the track and walk or wheelchair the rst lap, uni ed in victory and hope. This emotional lap honors the courage of all who have defeated cancer. The atmosphere of Relay for Life is one of camaraderie and celebration, and this event provides an opportunity for cancer survivors to pass the torch of hope on to those still battling cancer or those that might be touched by cancer in the future. Because no one ghts cancer alone, friends, family members, and caregivers are encouraged to attend the Survivors Lap and join their loved ones as they walk around the track. If you are a survivor who would like to register for the survivor ceremony/ dinner please contact Kim Kurnitsky at 227-4093. For more information on cancer, call the American Cancer Society at 1-800ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org ALDERMAN FAMILY SAYS THANKS A great big thank you to everyone that came and showed so much love and support for Rhonda Alderman and her family at a bene t held in Wewahitchka. Rhonda was recently diagnosed with stage IV melanoma and all the support will help towards travel expense to and from Mof tt Cancer Center. We’d like to once again thank all of the donors who contributed time, money and gifts to make the bene t a success. Words can never express all the things we would like to say for the help, love, and support from Southern Sauced owners Cleatha and Buddy Simmons and our community of Wewahitchka and surrounding areas. Proceeds bene t Relay for Life Star Staff Report The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 10069 will be serving up its annual St. Patrick’s Day dinner at 5 p.m. ET Saturday, March 15 at the Post in Highland View. The dinner will include Corned Beef and Cabbage, including potatoes, carrots, onions, bread and scrumptious desserts prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. The evening’s festivities will include Karaoke by Wanda, a special St. Patty’s Day Basket Raf e and other surprises! Donation for dinner is $10. Remember the dinner service starts at 5 p.m. EDT and will continue until the food is gone. Take outs will be available. All proceeds of the entire event will be donated to the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. Wear your green and join the Ladies Auxiliary for this worthwhile cause. ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Call for cancer survivors at Relay for Life D.A.W.G.S. in Prison receives grant from Tony Stewart Foundation Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR VFW to host St. Patty’s Day dinner

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The Star| B3 Thursday, March 13, 2014 Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Joel Rosenbaum, DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients S A V E 1 5 % ON P AINTING SUP P LIES Bring this c oup on in and sav e! S A V E 3 0 % ON P AINT S & ST AINS V a l i d o n r e t a i l s a l e s o f r e t a i l p r o d u c t s o n l y D i s c o u n t t a k e n o o f o u r l i s t p r i c e S a l e p r i c i n g o r o t h e r o f f e r s t h a t r e s u l t i n g r e a t e r s a v i n g s w i l l s u p e r s e d e t h i s o f f e r M u s t s u r r e n d e r c o u p o n a t t i m e o f r e d e m p t i o n C a s h va l u e : 1 / 1 0 0 o f 1 ¢ O e r e x c l u d e s p r e v i o u s p u r c h a s e s a n d p u r c h a s e s o f g i f t c a r d s M u l t i P u r p o s e p r i m e r s M i n w a x W o o d F i n i s h q u a r t s l add e r s s pr a y e q u i pm e n t a n d a c c e s sor i e s O t h e r e x c l u s i o n s m a y a p p l y s e e s t o r e f o r d e t a i l s V o i d i f t r a n s f e r r e d p u r c h a s e d s o l d a l t e r e d o r d u p l i c a t e d o r w h e r e p r o h i b i t e d b y l a w V a li d a t Sh e r w i n W i lli a m s a n d Sh e r w i n W i lli a ms o p e r a t e d r e t a i l p a i n t s t o r e s o n l y W e r e s e r v e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t r e f u s e o r l i m i t t h e u s e o f a n y c o u p o n O f f e r v a l i d 3 / 9 / 1 4 – 3 / 3 1 / 1 4 2 0 1 4 T h e S h e r w i n W i l l i a m s C o m p a n y 3 0 % O F F ( wit h c o u p o n ) P A I N T S & S T A I N S Y OU R L U CK Y C O L O R M A R C H 9 – 3 1 T o lo c at e a Sher winW illiams st or e near y ou visit sher win-williams .c om or c all 1 -800-4SHERWIN. MO N F R I: 7 A M TO 7 P M S AT : S U N: 10 A M TO 6 P M S t o r e h o u r s m a y v a r y S e e s t o r e f o r d e t a i ls S T ORE H O U R S : Join us on 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 THE T A H ILL ON C B EA 8 9 H WY 4 5 4 9 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA LIVE ON THE POOP DECK IN THE CRO W NEST KARA OKE-DJ-D ANCING UPCOMING EVENTS RANDY WITH ART ON SA X K ONKRETE SOUL RANDY ST ARK DEB I JORD AN NO W THURSD A Y FRID A Y -SA TURD A Y -9PM ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES COMING WEDNESD A Y APRIL 16TH GIRLS NIGHT OUT WITH THE CHIPPEND ALES LIMITED AD V ANCE TICKETS ON SALE NO W ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES Y A COMING WEDNESD Y A COMING WEDNESD Y A COMING WEDNESD W ANCE TICKETS ON SALE NO V LIMITED AD ZUMBA CLASS SCHEDULE EVER Y O THER MOND A Y’S & WEDNESD A Y’S (5:30 PM UNTIL 6:30 PM NIGHTL Y) MOND A Y : 03/03/14, 03/17/14 & 03/31/14 WEDNESD A Y : 03/12/14 & 03/26/14 MOND A Y : 04/14/14 & 04/28/14 WEDNESD A Y : 04/09/14 & 04/23/14 PLACE: W ASHINGTON RECREA TION CTR. CER TIFIED INSTR UCTOR: IRIS (BOLDEN) GA THERS School News Special to The Star Wewahitchka Elementary School students participated in a TOP SCHOOL ASSEMBLY on Feb. 21. The assembly team is made up of professional athletes that travel all over the world captivating the attention of students by performing amazing feats of strength while sharing a powerful message for today’s youth. These athletes come from all different backgrounds including professional football, college football, bodybuilding, power lifting, Strongman competitions, baseball and many other athletic elds. The curriculum they shared with students included: • Bullying and the power of words • Goals and dreams • Anti-tobacco, drugs and alcohol • Making right choices • Character building • Technology (texting, internet and computer safety) •Health issues (diet, exercise, obesity and diabetes) • Prepare for the state testing Thanks to SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) and the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce for funding this event. Special to The Star On Feb. 28, the Port St. Joe community enjoyed a beautiful night of food, fellowship and fundraising at the 15th annual Italian Dinner and Auction sponsored by Faith Christian School. Many local businesses and individuals generously donated items for the silent and live auctions while more than 700 FCS supporters came to enjoy a lovely, Italian-inspired meal. Faith Christian School would like to offer our sincerest thanks to Long Avenue Baptist Church and First Baptist Church for the delicious lasagna, Oak Grove Church for the scrumptious spaghetti, First United Methodist Church for the use of their tables and chairs, and Carol Dow and the Fish House Restaurant for the donation of the salads, bread and condiments. Another big thank you goes to the parents of the PTO for the organization of this event, and all the parents, volunteers and supporters of FCS who gave of their time and resources. The biggest praise of all goes to our Savior, Jesus Christ, for His blessing on the evening. The windows of Heaven were open wide, and He generously poured out His favor on the ministry of FCS. The support of our community means so much to the ministry of Faith Christian School, and we are touched by the overwhelming display of it. Thank you for an amazing night! The Lion’s Tale STUDENT ARTIsS T OF THE MONTH PHOTOs S S p P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A R The Student Artist of the Month at Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School is Jacobi Jones. Jones said ever since he could remember, he’s always enjoyed creating art. In elementary school is was his favorite subject, aside from P.E. His favorite thing to draw is people, and he enjoys drawing faces from his imagination or portraits or celebrities. He also enjoys drawing animals. In additional to art, Jones enjoys listening to music, lifting weights and playing video games. He hopes to have a career in graphic design and has received plenty of encouragement from his mother. A GILDED GLIDER DaDA ZZLING DD OL pP HIN sS S p P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A R A double swing glider constructed by students in Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School’s carpentry class was auctioned off on Feb. 14. The winner was Tunnie Miller from Wewahitchka. The students raised $1,200 that will go toward funding end-of-year carpentry projects.S p P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A R This week’s Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Kellie Simmons and Ja’Leighya Becton. Back row: Diamond Warner, Noah Bareld, Micaela Fedd, Brianna Biagini and Jayquan Walker. PHOTOs S spSP ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A R WES students enjoy TOP assembly

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Bruce Hodge, P astor SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net Thursday, March 13, 2014 Special to The Star The state of public education will be examined at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, March 17 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Pass or Fail? The State of Education, features lmed stories from Nikhil Goyal, TED talk speaker and author of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Students Assessment of School, and Sajan George, the founder of Matchbook Learning, a school-turnaround organization. Thirteen years of being in the system annihilated my creative potential, said Goyal, a recent high school graduate. School stunted my creative prowess. I came to the realization that I was seen not as a human being, but as a test score. He now advocates a number of changes for the educational system. Participants in the Lifetree program will discuss the current state of public education and what changes might improve the system for schools, parents, and students. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. 10th annual Irish dinner Special to The Star St. Joseph Catholic Church will hold its 10th Annual St. Patricks Irish Dinner on Saturday, March 15. The dinner will take place in the Church Hall, 202 20th Street, Port St. Joe. The dinner is $10 a ticket and will include Corned Beef, New Potatoes, Cabbage, Carrots, Onions, Homemade Soda Bread or rolls, dessert, and tea, coffee or lemonade. There will be two seatings that evening, at 5 p.m. EST and the second at 6:30 p.m. EST. Tickets for the rst seating usually sells out, so please get you tickets early for your preferred seating. Back by popular demand, we are selling the Whole Cooked Corned Beef Briskets. The Brisket will be 331/2 pounds cooked weight for $20. We need these to be pre-ordered so we know how many to cook. You can pick them up the day before the dinner from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Friday, March 1 Take outs will be available again this year and you can pick them up at the front door ticket sales during either seating. Just look for the signs. Entertainment again this year will be Toni Minichello on the accordion and Marty Jarosz will be our MC. Come and sing Irish songs, eat good food and have an enjoyable evening. You can purchase tickets after each mass Saturday evening or Sunday morning or the Church Of ce will have them available on Monday and Thursday. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Phone number 227-1417. Also you can get tickets at the No Name Caf Books and More or The Laundry Basket. For more information or to buy tickets call Barb or Dan Van Treese 227-9837. Special to the Star Highland View Assembly of God will welcome visiting minister Perry Dissmore at 10:35 a.m. ET on Sunday, March 16. Dissmore is an Assemblies of God minister and the current holder of the Guinness World Record for basketball free throws in an hour. Everyone in the community is invited to hear him preach. William Joseph Luberto Sr., 84, passed away on March 2, 2014, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City, Fla. Willie was born March 26, 1929, in Bergen eld, New Jersey to the late John and Rose Luberto. He was the youngest of 10 brothers and sisters. Willie resided most of his life in Little Ferry, New Jersey and moved to Eastpoint, Florida in 1993 where he spent the remainder of his life. He is preceded in death by his wife, Beatrice Luberto Survived by his son, William J. Luberto Jr., (late Paula Luberto) of Eastpoint and daughter, Catherine Bomzer (Hal) of Ridge eld Park, NJ; ve grandchildren, William G. Luberto, (Misty) Lauren Luberto, and Michael Luberto, of Eastpoint and Kelly Bomzer and Phllip Bomzer of New Jersey; and two great-grandchildren, Jadyn Luberto and Will Luberto of Eastpoint along with a number of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held 2 p.m. ET Wednesday, March 5 at St. Patricks Catholic Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Eastpoint Cemetery All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. William Joseph Luberto, Sr. Frank J. Pierce, 81, of Panama City, Florida passed away Thursday March 6, 2014, at Covenant Hospice In-Patient Care Center. He was born in Fountain, Fla., to Jessie Frank and Hattie Gainnie Pierce on March 10, 1932 and has been a resident of Bay County since 1991, moving here from Port St. Joe, Fla. Mr. Pierce was a member of the Port St. Joe High School Class of 1952. Frank enlisted in the United States Army and served his country through the 11th and 101st Airborne Divisions, receiving an Honorable Discharge in 1955. After returning to Port St. Joe, he began his 45 year telecommunications career as a lineman for St. Joseph Telephone & Telegraph Company. Mr. Pierce also worked with Continental Telephone Company and retired from the Engineering Department of GT Com in Port St. Joe. Frank was an active member of East Bay Baptist Church. An avid hunter and sherman, he enjoyed pursuing game in numerous panhandle counties. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Lucille B. Pierce, and his son and daughter-in-law, Gregg and Cathy Pierce; his grandchildren Chelsea (Dan) Hitt, Cori (Zach) Wood and Jesse Pierce; his great-grandchildren Lexi and Lincoln Hitt, Wyatt and Elijah Pierce, Autumn Hitt, Joel and Noah Wood all of Bay County. Frank is also survived by his brothers Floyd (Marilea) Pierce of Panama City and Paul (Charlotte) Pierce of Port St. Joe; his nephews Joe (Terri) Pierce of Panama City, Frank (Donna) Ritch and Jonathan Pierce all of Port St. Joe, Fla. In addition to his parents, Mr. Pierce was predeceased by his sister, Evelyn Watkins, and a greatgrandson, Hunter Hitt. In celebration of his life, a funeral service was held on Monday, March 10, 2014, at Southerland Family Funeral Home beginning at 10:00 a.m., with the Reverends Craig Hodges and Mike Stroud of ciating. A time of visitation was held on Sunday, March 9, 2014, from 6-8 p.m. at Southerland Family Funeral Home. In lieu of oral contributions, the family has requested that contributions be made in Mr. Pierces name to Covenant Hospice or the charity of your choice. Frank J. Pierce Our sorrow in the loss of our daughter/ granddaughter was easier to bear because of your help in the time of our need, was a great comfort to us. Thank you for your unfailing sympathy and kind assistance. The Martins, Von and Adam Bryants, Foxworth family OBITUARIES LETTER OF THANKS Guest minister at Highland View Assembly of God Public education graded at Lifetree Caf

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, March 13, 2014 P U B L I C N O T I C E A P u b l i c H e a r i n g w i l l b e h e l d a t t h e P l a n n i n g a n d D e v e l o p m e n t R e v i e w B o a rd ( P D R B ) o n M a r c h 1 7 2 0 1 4 a t 8 : 4 5 a m E S T a n d a t t h e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s ( B O C C ) m e e t i n g o n T u e s d a y M a r c h 2 5 2 0 1 4 a t 9 : 0 0 a m E S T B o t h p u b l i c h e a r i n g s w i l l b e h e l d i n t h e B O C C M e e t i n g R o o m a t t h e R o b e r t M. M o o r e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n B ui l d i n g 1 0 0 0 C ec i l G C os t i n S r B l v d P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a T h e p u b l i c h e a r i n g s w i l l b e t o d i s c u s s a n d a c t o n t h e f o l l o w i n g : 1 V a r i a n ce E l l i s C S m i t h P a r ce l I D # 0 3 8 0 6 0 8 0 R L o c a t e d n e x t t o V e t e r a n s P a r k ( B e a c o n H i l l ) G u l f S i d e U S 9 8 B ui l d i n g s e t b a c k n e x t t o P a r k 2 V a r i a n ce C a r o l i n e A R a n k i n P a r ce l I D # 0 6 3 5 1 0 0 5 R L o c a t e d o n Wi n d w a rd S t ( C a p e S a n B l a s ) R o a d s e t b a c k t o m e e t D E P CCC L l a n d w a r d s e tb a c k 3 C o u nt y D e v e l o p m e nt R eg u l a t i o n s a nd P o l i c ie s 4 S t a f f P u b l i c a n d O p e n D isc u s s i o n T he p ub l i c i s e nc o u r a ge d t o a t t e n d a n d b e h e a rd o n t h es e m a t t e r s I n f o r m a t i o n p r i o r t o t h e m e e t i n g c a n b e v i e w e d a t t h e P l an ni n g D e p a r t m e n t a t 1 0 0 0 C ec i l G C os t i n S r B l v d R o o m 31 1 V a r i a n c e E l l i s C S m i t h V a r i a n c e C a r o l i n e A R a n k i n ( # ! ' # # ( ( # # & ( ( 8 # + # ( # ! ) ( ( ( # ) ' ( # $ ( ( # & & ( &' $ & # & # & / 0 5 6 3 ( 2 4 6 6 # 7 # $ 8 8 0 0 ( # ( & ) & # ! ' # ( & # # ( ( ) $ ) 0 9 6 2 8 # ( 0 & 8 8 0 # & ( ( 8 # 0 # & 8 ( # ( ( # $ & # # & + # ( # $ ( ( # & & ( &' $ $ & # & 0 ) $ ( # ( # $ # + # & 0 ( # $ 0 ' ( ( # & 0 ) & 0 ( 8 0 " ( ! &' # ( # ! ) ( ( # ( # # & # ) $ & # ( ( ( 8 ( & ( $ &' # ( ( " & ( ( $ ) & # & $ & # # ! ( + & ( ( # ( ( # ! ' # &' 0 ( # # & ( ( 8 # ( 0 9 6 2 8 # ( 0 ( 8 0 8 0 # & ( ( 8 # 0 # & 8 & ( # # ( $ ) & + # ( & # & 8 &' # + ( # $ $ # ) & ( & + & # & # ( $ & # " # ) ) & & ( & # & 0 ) ( ( ( # # + ( $ $ ' 8 $ &' # & % ) & $ # ! # ( # ( ( & ) # ( # & $ $ & ( # ) # ( ( ( & ( ( & 8 ( ( (4 & # ( ( 8 & ( & ) 4 & 9 0 5 6 3 4 8 # 0 & 8 # & 1 #! ' #" & 8 0 Special to The Star A special writing workshop, “Turning Your Memories into Memoirs,” will be held from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. ET on Thursday, March 6 at The Artery. Instructor Pat Van West will show attendees how to turn their personal experiences into in teresting stories that can be shared with fam ily and friends. Discussions will include what is worth writing about and what’s not and writing about what you know. The fee for the class is $35. No supplies are re quired and registration can be completed online at www.arterystudio.com/register.html. The Artery is at 214 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Port St. Joe Elementary School teamed up with the Port St. Joe Police Depart ment to keep kids safe. Last week, police do nated a reective vest and hand-held stop sign to the safety patrol to ensure addi tional visibility for crossing guards. Police Chief David Barnes and Deputy Chief David Garner presented the equipment to Principal Sue Gannon and the school’s preeminent crossing guard, sixth-grader Cheyenne Cole. Last September, the school started the safety pa trol programs that allowed students to volunteer to help walkers and bike rid ers across a busy Long Av enue before and after school hours. Each morning, Cole arrives to school several minutes early, and she stays late all for the benet and safety of her peers. “A bunch of my friends ride bikes to school, and I like to help keep them safe,” said Cole, proudly brandish ing her new equipment. “It’s fun, and it taught me to al ways help others.” The vest and sign were purchased with money from a trust fund that receives money from forfeitures and drug busts. Earlier in the year, police made a drugrelated arrest and as per policy, sold the criminal’s vehicle. The $160 for the safety equipment came out of the funds collected from the car. “We’re grateful and ap preciative of the support we get from the police,” Gan non said. In order to help with the safety patrol students must be responsible, be respect ed by the teachers and have a good relationship with the student body. “The safety patrol teach es responsibility,” Barnes said. “I have a history of helping with crosswalks and I’ve learned that safety is important, especially when kids are involved.” Special to The Star To better serve patients in Gulf and Franklin counties, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf has opened an Intermediate Care Unit, which can ac commodate very sick patients with a higher level of care than previously available at SHHG. The additional unit required adding cardiac monitors, extra oxygen lines for ventilation or Bipap, and closed circuit TVs for continuous monitoring. These new services will allow SHHG to offer a higher level of care or “intermediate care servic es” due to the full-time hospitalists and current nursing staff with critical care experience. Ex pected benets include increased patient satis faction as fewer patients will require transfer to other larger hospitals for atrial b or chest pain (when ruled out for heart attack). It will also al low Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf to provide services to patients who need more complex surgeries, including those who need to be on a ventilator following their procedure. Kathy Chastain, Chief Nursing Ofcer said, “These services will be benecial not only to patients but also to their family members who live in the community. They can visit their fam ily members far easier, as we are far closer than traveling to neighboring Bay County. “As always, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf strives to meet the needs of our local community while providing excellent care.” By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com For the 11th year, the Mexico Beach visitors marked the end of winter with the annual snowbird luncheon held at the El Governor Motel. The weather, it seemed, had a sense of humor. Despite cooler tempera tures, visitors enjoyed a free barbecue lunch from Sharon’s Caf, entertain ment from Randy and Ju nior Stark and received door prizes that featured loads of beach gear. Dressed in shorts and sandals, guests were bound and determined to relax around the pool one last time before heading home. “It was such a great way to send the visitors back up north with a heartfelt thank you,” Community Develop ment Council executive di rector Kimberly Shoaf said. Fortunately, the weather held off, and Shoaf and her team of volunteers were able to feed more than 325 winter residents. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf opens new intermediate care unit Creative writing workshop at The Artery WES LOCHER | The Star Port St. Joe chief of police David Barnes (left), and Deputy David Garner (right) donated a vest and stop sign to crossing guard program at PSJE. Principal Susan Gannon and safety patroller Cheyenne Cole accepted. P SS J police donate gear to crossing guard at PSS J EE WES LOCHER | The Star More than 325 winter residents turn out for the 11th annual snowbird luncheon in Mexico Beach. Visitors enjoyed free food and entertainment on the pool deck of the El Governor Motel. Visitors took the opportunity to spend one more afternoon at the beach before heading out of town for the summer. Snowbirds ock to El Governor for luncheon

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B6 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 MARCH 3-9 On Monday, March 3, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce (GCSO) executed two transport orders. The GCSO traveled to the Okaloosa County Jail and the Walton Correctional Institution to transport Devin M. Leavell and Johntavious S. Tiller. Both were due to appear in court on Tuesday, March 4th. They were transported back to their respective facilities on Wednesday, March 5. On March 3, the GCSO received a complaint regarding criminal mischief in the 100 block of Narvaez Street in St. Joe Beach. Deputy J. Brock took the report. The victim reported that their vehicle was keyed. It is believed this is an isolated incident and Deputy Brock continues to investigate. On Tuesday, March 4, Julius A Gathers (42) was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility on a Bay County warrant for Child Support. On March 4, the GCSO received a call regarding the theft of two handguns. Sgt. J. Murnan responded to the call in the 5400 block of Cape San Blas Road. One of the handguns was described as a stainless steel .32 caliber H&R and the other a Taurus 45 caliber handgun. There was no forced entry into the home. The GCSO continues to investigate. On March 4, Deputy G. Desrosier responded to the Creek Stop Food and Deli at 3050 North Highway 71 regarding a gas drive off. A white male who drove a gold colored Toyota truck pumped $20.01 of fuel and drove off without paying. On March 5, Deputy B. Smith was dispatched to the Dixie Dandy in Wewahitchka in reference to shoplifting. The defendant, Jayla L. Long (23), was captured on video surveillance stealing merchandise from the business. Long was arrested by Deputy P. Williams the following day and charged with Retail Theft. On March 5, Deputy M. Ward served a Writ of Attachment on Johnny P. Greer, Jr. (48) for Child Support. Greer was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility and paid the $1,000 purge amount for the Writ. He was released. On Thursday, March 6, at approximately 2:43 a.m. Deputy S. Ferrell responded to Pine Ridge Apartments in reference to a possible prowler. The caller advised that someone was walking around knocking on windows and doors. When Deputy Ferrell arrived he was unable to locate anyone. A second call was received at approximately 3:33 a.m. Deputy S. Ferrell placed Karen A. Mancham under arrest for Disorderly Conduct and transported her to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 6, the GCSO executed a transport order by traveling to the Gadsden Correctional Facility in Quincy. Taylor M. Green was transported to appear in court Tuesday Morning. She was returned to Gadsden Correctional Facility on the same day. On March 6, Sherry A. Robinson (46) turned herself into the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce. Robinson was wanted for Violation of Probation with the original being Harassing Phone Calls. She was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility and released on a $500 bond. On March 6, Deputy M. Layeld served Gary L. Husdon (44) with a warrant for Failure to Appear with the original charges being Harassing Phone Calls. Hudson was transported and booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was released the following day on his own recognizance. On Friday, March 7, Paula R. Pitts (29) turned herself over to Deputy S. Ferrell. Pitts was wanted for Violation of Probation with the original charge being Driving Under the Inuence. She was rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On March 7, Richard L. Mullinax (61) turned himself in at the Gulf County Detention Facility. Deputy K. Starnes served Mullinax with an arrest warrant for Failure to Appear with the original charge being Domestic Battery. Mullinax was rst appeared and released on a $250 bond. On March 7, Sgt. J. Murnan responded to a report of a telephone scam. The victim was contacted over the phone and advised that they had won a sweepstakes and needed to pay taxes on the winnings before the funds could be released. The victim provided personal information to the caller to comply with the instructions given. The phony company was able to withdraw $1,500 from the victims account. Investigator L. Dickey continues to investigate the case. On March 7, Deputy J. Brock conducted a trafc stop on US Highway 98 near Twine Road in Port St. Joe. Deputy Brock knew the driver did not have a valid driver’s license. Roderick L. Robinson (46) was placed under arrest for Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. Robinson was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was rst appeared and released on March 9 on a $500 bond. On March 7, Sgt. J. Williams conducted a trafc stop on State Road 71 and Jehu Road in Wewahitchka for a trafc violation. Contact was made with the driver, Adam J. Brobeck (22), who admitted to not having a valid driver’s license. When directed to exit the vehicle Brobeck drew attention to himself as he attempted to discard a small baggie of meth. When handcuffed and searched he was found in possession of an item commonly used to ingest methamphetamine. A search of the vehicle was conducted and additional drug evidence was discovered which included small plastic baggies and scales. Brobeck and the passenger, Lakin A. Leavins (22), were both placed under arrest. Brobeck was charged with Driving While License Suspended or Revoked, Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, Possession of Meth, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Leavins was charged with Possession of Meth, Possession of Meth with the Intent to Distribute, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Approximately $430 was sized for evidence in the case. Leavins was also served with two warrants for the Sale of Methamphetamine by the GCSO Narcotics Unit. Brobeck and Leavins were transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 7, Deputy G. Desrosier arrested Colton L. Mullinax (18) in the 400 block of Jehu Road in Wewahitchka. Mullinax was wanted for Failure to Appear on his original charge of Domestic Battery. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was later rst appeared and released the following day on a $2,500 bond. &"& ) ,& &# & $! ) ( ( $ #$& ) !#& !,+ & !+ &# & ,& & & $& % &# $ # & & $& +! &, !$ !# &$ !& % # *,!& !+ ) $ $ & + % !' & + % $ !$ ( & % $ # &$ & # & & $& & ,! !$ #,! $ $ -' + ', &'% %' + '% -' ) % '' % -' ' % ''% ' -' + + # -', !% '% # !$ '% -' + ', &'% %' ( -"+ !%' "( '' %', '' % %' '' % '"-, T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.f su.edu. FL ORIDA ST A TE UNIVERSI T Y P ANAMA CIT Y THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMM UNIT Y ’S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL ! ! The Gulf County T ourist Development Council (GCTDC) will accept applications for their 2014 – 2015 SPONSORSHIP & SPECIAL FUNDING PROGRAM: Applications are av ailable beginning March 13, 2014 at the Gulf County W elcome Center 150 Captain Fred’ s Place, P ort St. Joe, Florida 32456 or online at www .visitgulf.com /partners. Applications will be accepted at the GCTDC of ces in the Gulf County W elcome Center between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p .m., ET until March 28, 2014. DEADLINE IS MARCH 28, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. ET NO EXCEPTIONS JWGG ;ww‚ ‡q hk }t @ h ‡t ;n Š K th }Š { L€‰ ‹‡h €n t G €‡‚ }} ~t €Š Yt ~| €h ‡ ‰ [{ ‹‡‰ q hŽ C O h‡ n { I Š { h Š „ ~ h Š tt ~‰ K‚‰ „| Š h} nhw t Š t‡| h J ‡| q hŽ C O h ‡n { 6 ‰ Š hŠ 66 h ~ h Š t t ~‰ O t q | nh} @t € Š t‡ G h ‰Š |€ @h ‡‡h k t}} t Mt h ‡€ hk ‚‹ Š K th }Š{ L€‰ ‹‡ h€ n t ‹€q t‡ Š { t ;w w ‚ ‡qh k}t @ h‡ t ; nŠ  Wtnt |Œ t Yh ~t DhŽ ; ‰‰ | ‰Šh €n t |Š { Kth }Š { L €‰ ‹‡h €n t G€ ‡‚ }} ~t €Š  D ‹‡| €z Š { t ~‚ € Š { ‚w O h ‡n { C t t ~‰ J }‚ ‡| q h Kt h}Š { @‚€ € tnŠ ‚ ‡ | }} n‚€ Š | €‹t Š ‚ ‚ wwt ‡ w ‡tt h ‰‰ | ‰ Š h €nt | Š { { t h}Š { | €‰ ‹‡ h€ nt t €‡ ‚ }} ~t € Š Wt~ t ~k t‡ R„ t € G€‡ ‚ }} ~t €Š G€ q ‰ O h‡ n { 6 ‰Š  Xw p †p zx} d „ † x} † ˆ„ d } j p p } „ y y zp } ‡ † p †† x } † d „ p s sp „ p m g Œ Jy „ x md Lp d y ‡w A} } p j‡ „ D d y jdy d vp} ‡ s „ J y „ x md >y ˆp < J „ z „ p x} s „ zd ‡ x } D  y p d †p jdy y D || D p ‹ ‡< 4 I 4 < ŠŠ Š< Špp z† zp z „ x d y
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Local The Star| B7 Thursday, March 13, 2014 paperwork for Butts end ed up buried in a pile on a secretary’s desk, and the plaque emerged as the only indication Butts had a win ning essay. “It was a screw-up, but it was a wonderful screwup,” Knox said. “It turned out fabulous. Josh is a good writer and a good student. So is Chance. I knew those two would do a great job.” And, so, two months af ter Pittman had his day in the spotlight, it was Butts’ turn. Butts wrote about for mer Gov. Jeb Bush and his education initiatives. Speak to Butts for a few moments, and it is under standable that Bush would resonate with a young man who enjoys his studies. “I chose him because of his education plan,” Butts said. “I like school. I want good grades. “We were one of the bot tom states in education and he brought it to the top. He had a six-part plan. It’s im portant to be at the top. I can say I live here and in Florida I am part of one of the top education systems.” Butts said he loves to write, tapping into what he called his “creative mind” and soaking in research and building a “narrative”, two key parts of the essay process. And that he turned that love of writing into a schol arship and lessening the fu ture nancial burden on his parents Karen and Chris, who after all, have ve other children sprouting through Gulf County Schools, is pure gravy. “It feels great,” Butts said. “I know I can go to col lege. I can have the experi ence of going to college and it helps out my mom and dad.” In college, the love of writing may have to take second place. Butts said he hopes to be a high school math teacher – if his dream of professional baseball doesn’t pan out, which Butts freely admits is a long-shot at best. “I really like writing, reading and language,” Butts said. “But I really love math.” CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, March 13, 2014 The Star | B7 94300S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2013 CA 000042 Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Belita C. Moreton; Unknown Spouse of Belita C. Moreton; Lantana By The Sea Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 4, 2014 entered in Case No. 2013 CA 000042 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Belita C. Moreton; Unknown Spouse of Belita C. Moreton; Lantana By The Sea Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front lobby of the Courthouse at 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 AM ET on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, LANTANA BY THE SEA SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 47. Dated this 6th day of March, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. March 13, 20, 2014 94316S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Cool Breeze Pool Cleaning located at 253 Canal St., in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 6th day of March, 2014. George Hieber & Dawn Hallinan March 13, 2014 97979S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1511 Application No. 2014-16 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06317-075R Description of Property: Lot 2 Marnie’s Reserve Plat Book 3 page 65, public records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Coastal Land Company LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97981S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1480 Application No. 2014-15 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06291-115R Description of Property: LOT 23: Commence at the intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Christopher L Johnson & Ana D. Johnson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOW A/C W ASHERS/DR YERS ST OV ES /R EF RI GE RA TO RS FREEZER/MICROW A VES LA WN MOWERS SCRAP MET AL, ETC... 1 9 Y e ar s of S e r vi ce CALL T OD A Y! GET Y O UR A D IN 451-6042 / 227-7847 COLLEGE from page B1 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Students at Port St. Joe who raised money for the American Heart Association participated in Hoops for Heart. They raised more than $5,000 to donate to the American Heart Association. B1 Hoops5 – The Hoops/Jump Rope for Heart program has been active in Port St. Joe for more than 10 years. During P.E. class, students had the choice of jumping rope or shooting hoops as a reward. HOO pP S FOR HEART AT pP SJE

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B8 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 1121336 1121337 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED: Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com € Managers € Hostesses € Bartenders € Servers/Bussers € Cooks € Shuckers € Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS!4516145 4516142 EXPERIENCED MAINTENANCE PERSON to do grounds and maintenance on a 51 unit apartment community. Must have experience in painting, general carpentry, basic plumbing, electrical and appliance repair. HVAC preferred, but not required. Knowledge in ground keeping. Must be able to pass a background check, have their own tools, and valid driver’s license. Pick up application at: 125 Venus Dr, Port St. Joe or call 850-227-7451Oce Hours: Mon. 1-5, Tues, Wed, Thurs. 9-5, Closed on Fridays.This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. NOW HIRING PINE RIDGE APARTMENTS 4516135First UMC of PSJ is seeking a Director of Children's Ministry Job description can be viewed at psjumc.org. Please mail resumes to PSJ UMC PO Box 266 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or email to fumcpsj@gtcom.net Attention Children's Ministry 1123213ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY: The primary functions of this faculty position is to teach courses in Microsoft computer applications, Business Administration and Management program, Technology Management, and Entrepreneurship and to develop and ensure the curriculum meets local industry standards, and advise technology students for these programs. Minimum Quali cations: Master’s degree in Business Administration, Marketing, or Management with Microsoft O ce Certi cations in Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point, or a Master’s degree in Computer Science or Management Information Systems, or other related computer eld. Deadline to apply: 3/27/2014Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGER The Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Accepting applications until March 15, 2014 Web ID#: 34281510 Text FL81510 to 56654 County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98015S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on March 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N0004’21”E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S2325’11”E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 0208’33” for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S2429’28”E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S2533’44”E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N6426’16”E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S2533’44”E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 0147’15”, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S2440’07”E, 359.21 feet) to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 0029’52”, for an arc length of 100.03 feet (chord to said curve bears S2331’33”E, 100.03 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N6758’01”E, 218.05 feet; thence N2331’35”W, 100.03 feet to a point on a line that bears N6758’01”E of the Point of Beginning; thence S6758’01”W, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Parcel B: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N0004’21”E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S2325’11”E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 0208’33” for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S2429’28”E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S2533’44”E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N6426’16”E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S2533’44”E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 0147’15”, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S2440’07”E, 359.21 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line N6758’01”E, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence S2331’35”E, 100.03 feet; thence N6758’01”E, 527.95 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay; thence along said mean high water line, N3128’01”W, 101.32 feet, more or less, to a point on a line that bears N6758’01”E of the Point of Beginning; thence S6758’01”W, 513.95 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR J. RICCARD and JANET S. RICCARD, Defendants and the docket number of which is: 2013-CA-000163. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 97983S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1441 Application No. 2014-14 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06269-955R Description of Property: Lot 6 Turtle Dunes according to the plat thereof recorded in the public records of Gulf County at Plat Book 5 page 7. Name in which assessed: Jerry D. Semprevio All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97985S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1030 Application No. 2014-13 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03671-000R Description of Property: Lot 16, Block 14, Beacon Hill Subdivision according to the plat recorded at Plat Book 1 page 2. Name in which assessed: Gary & Gloria Freeman All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98115S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2013-CA-000026 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 10, 2014 and entered in Case No. 23-2013-CA000026 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ST. JOE GOLF VILLAS OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. (DISSOLVED CORPORATION); are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT C: A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR 1265.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID SECTION LINE FOR 1010.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 434.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 1124.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 520.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 619.66 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 127.44 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 75.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 551.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 560.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 283.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1292.44 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 168.85 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 22.43 FEET ALONG THE CHORD OF A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 6442.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 59 SECONDS; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST, 168.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, 22.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 724 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on March 5, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F13000564 March 13, 20, 2014 98027S In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Bay County, Florida Case No.:13-690CA Prosperity Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Paul G. Francis, Tenant #1 and Tenant #2 representing any unknown tenants who may be in possession, any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants, and The United States of America, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Bay and Gulf County, Florida, described as: Commence at the Northern most corner of Lot 13, Block 11, Mexico Beach Unit No. 1, according to the official plat thereof filed in Plat Book 7, at Page 5, Public Records, Bay County, Florida; thence run in a Southwesterly direction along the Northwestern boundary line of Lots 13, 12 and 11, in said Block 11, for a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 900 right for a distance of 50 feet; thence turn 90 right and run a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 90 right for a distance of 50 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel lying and being in Fractional Section 25, Township 6 South, Range 12 West, Mexico Beach, Bay County, Florida. and Lot 18 & 20, Block 19, Beacon Hill Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www. bay.realforeclose.com, beginning at 11:00 AM CST on April 10, 2014. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus finds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 24th day of February, 2014 Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF COURT By: Virginia Starling Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 98123S PUBLIC NOTICE The March regular meeting of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Board of Directors will be held on Wednesday, March 26, at 10 AM, at 406 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida. All persons are invited to attend and participate. Anyone want to appeal an official decision made on any subject at the meeting must have a verbatim record of the meeting that includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is based. March 13, 2014 j j ADOPTION: j j At-Home-Mom, Financial Security, LOVE awaits baby!j Lisa & Kenny j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Cue’s Quality Used Furniture and Thrift Store Introducing a new line of mattresses-made in USAby Golden Mattress Company. Twins starting at $69. Fulls starting at $88. Queens starting at $108. 1425 Hwy 71 South Wewa. Open 9a-5pm Mon-Sat and Sunday, 11a-5pm 850-639-2343/628-1358 Text FL80338 to 56654 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. PSJ 8949 Auger Ave(Off Hwy 98 North of Beacon Hill Park) Fri-Sat March 14th and 15th from 9a-3p (No Early Birds) Estate Sale 30+Years Of Accumulation Bass Boat, Books, Upright Freezer, Glass Ware, Housewares, Jewlery, Small Appliances, Tools, And Much More. Text FL83015 to 56654 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofers Hiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to apply Web ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Food Svs/Hosp. Experienced Line Cooks Start your new year out right! Toucans in Mexico Beach is now hiring exper. line cooks and the following positions: Š Š Exp. Servers Š Š Bartenders Apply in person between 2:00pm4:00pm. 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach 850-648-8207 Web ID#: 34282386 Install/Maint/Repair Diesel MechanicWith own tools, full time position. Extensive light, medium, and heavy equipment experience required. For immediate interview send resumes to Blind Box 3399 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34282890 For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 Long term rental. St. Joe Beach. 3/2, fully furnished. Private inground pool. $1600/mo. includes all utilities. No pets. Call 850-348-0262 lv msg. RV for Rent $135/week. + $135/dep. Great for 1-2 people. Includes water, sewage, electric & WIFI 850-639-5721 Text FL82785 to 56654 GULF COUNTY WATERFRONT LOTBeautiful lot 100+ feet on deepwater side of Wettapo Creek. 800’ deep with existing driveway the length of the lot. We are advised there are two wells (one deep and one shallow). Underground power. Offers are solicited. Call 850-763-7311 for more info. Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Thursday, MARCH 13, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 22 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Tourism is spreading. Bed tax numbers for January show that tourism revenue is marching into non-traditional months and the aggressive goals set out by Tourist Development Council executive director Jennifer Jenkins and her team hardly constitute piein-the-sky ideals. Bed tax collection for January was up 3.48 percent compared to the prior year, numbers that take on a greater pro le when considering that spike was on top of a blistering 24.43 percent increase in 2013. That puts tax collections for the scal year 4.97 percent year over year. Jenkins stated goal is a 20 percent increase year over year, and the real tourist season has yet to even begin. We are pacing ahead of last year, Jenkins told the TDC advisory council last week during its regular monthly meeting. This is also the rst month that the Tax Collector has required all collectors to report monthly. That some collectors reported monthly and others quarterly has been seen as a hurdle to accurately gauge seasonal marketing efforts and outreach by the TDC staff. In terms of sheer dollars, revenue is up more than $8,000 for the year compared to this time last year. While celebrating continued good news on the revenue side, the TDC advisory board and Jenkins mapped out future improvements. One is to the TDC sponsorship program. To clear the decks for the current scal year, the advisory board followed the recommendation of the marketing committee to disburse the last of the sponsorship dollars for this year. With no real temperature present to move additional dollars into the fund, the council approved $500 to an effort to create a cultural arts center in Port St. Joe and the remaining $2,100 to the upcoming Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend. The TDC board had ve events or efforts pursuing funding, but board members noted they had already sent funding to three of the events. Jenkins outlined a series Bed tax revenue continues march in JanuaryBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners will again hit rewind on a model to promote economic development. Following the recommendation of the current board of the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. (EDA) and the advisory committee appointed by commissioners as liaison to the EDA, the BOCC approved bringing the EDA back under its umbrella. A detailed proposal outlining the model will be brought to commissioners in two weeks, but, in broad strokes, county attorney Jeremy Novak said the proposal would be for operations similar to the Tourist Development Council, with a director and advisory council. The director, Novak said, would be a county employee or under county supervision, though speci cs were unclear during Tuesdays regular bi-monthly meeting.Special to The StarBrooke Wooten announced his candidacy for Gulf County School Board Member District 2, a position currently held by George Cox. Coxs term expires November 2014, and he has elected not to run again. Wooten, 45, is a lifelong resident of Wewahitchka. He has been married to his wife Kristin for 18 years, and they have two children, Aleah, 12, and Caden, 9. He is the son of Clayton and Sara Joe Wooten, who are both educators and longtime residents of Wewahitchka. Wooten attended Gulf County schools and graduated from Wewahitchka High School in 1986. After high school, he attended college while working the summers at St. Joe Paper Company, Southern Earth Sciences, and during the school year at the Florida Department of Education. He attended Florida State University, where he earned a bachelor of science Wooten seeks School Board District 2 seatEDA headed back under county umbrellaSee TDC A5By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Sure signs of spring in Gulf County: sunshine, warm weather and student volunteers from Auburn University helping around the community. Now in its seventh year, the joint effort by the Christian Community Development Fund and college students from First Baptist Church in Opelika, Ala., aims to complete community improvement projects in Port St. Joe, Apalachicola and Mexico Beach. Students spend their spring breaks helping with projects that include painting, gardening, construction and inside cleaning. The students allow a lot of projects to get done in a short period of time, said Diana Burkett, executive director of the CCDF. More than 300 students made the trek to the Forgotten Coast, 200 of which are stationed across North Port St. Joe, St. Joe Beach, Highland View, Oak Grove and in town. Materials are purchased by homeowners who need work completed or purchased by CCDF through grants, donations and church partnerships. During their four days students, are assigned to a large job, where they work for the duration of their visit, or a small job that requires them to bounce from project to project. Some also work with street ministry initiatives. Even with all the manual labor, the students wrap up their days by 3:30 p.m. and have plenty of time to enjoy the beaches. The students have such a loyalty By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com With three seats up for reelection on the Mexico Beach City Council next month, the councils decisions on the historic Parker House might weigh heavily into the publics choices. Despite feelings about the projects history, all incumbents agree progress needs to be made; they just have different views on how to go about it. The city purchased the Parker House and property in July 2011 for $429,000 with plans to use it as a new city hall. On July 29, the property caught re because of an electrical issue and was considered a loss. Shortly thereafter, the insurer paid $322,622 for damages, and the council bid out redesigns on the city hall with hopes of utilizing the existing structure. With just two bids submitted, the project was awarded to Cathey Construction out of Mexico Beach. Toward the end of 2011, designs were drafted for the new city hall, and Cathey Construction began demolition of the building in March 2012 but uncovered issues with the foundation that could hamper rebuilding. Councilman Jack Mullen brought the issues to the insurance company over several visits to its Lake Mary of ce, even taking Cathey Construction owner Brian Cathey with him on one occasion. In November, an insurance representative visited the Parker House but decided that the slab was ne to rebuild on. The council, not convinced, hired Nova Engineering out of Panama City for a second opinion. After conducting a foundation analysis and soil borings Nova agreed with Cathey Construction that the slab should not be used. The council decided to build the new city hall on Parker House property, but in a different location and began designs on the plans. Rather than rebid the project, which had changed in size and scope, it stayed with Cathey Construction, which has been an ethical sticking point among citizens. Brian Cathey is the one person whos gone over there and knew what hes talking about, Councilman Gary Woodham said. Hes totally responsible for all the insurance money weve made. He should receive gratitude, not condemnation. Though the insurance company had paid the city $660,000 for damages, more than $140,000 was spent in rent and upkeep costs on the damaged building over SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Mexico Beach city council has received a settlement offer on the historic Parker House and must decide how to proceed.Parker House decision looms over election BROOKE WOOTENSee PARKER A8 See EDA A5 See WOOTEN A5 WES LOCHER | The StarVolunteers take a break from working to pose with homeowner Era Buie. AU volunteers help improve community See STUDENTS A5 Bowers wins Shine Award, B1 CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTThe students have such a loyalty and dedication to do this. They develop a bond with the community and stay in touch throughout the year.Diana Burkett executive director of the CCDF Opinion .................................A4Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports.....................................A7Society ....................................B2 School News ...........................B3Faith ........................................B4 Obituaries ...............................B4Classi eds ........................B7-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 Wednesday,March19,2014 2:00-5:00PMEST WashingtonImprovementGroup(WIG)Center 401PetersStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456COMEANDDISCOVERWHYYOURHEALTHIS YOURGREATESTWEALTH! FREEHEALTHSCREENINGSSponsoredBy:FloridaDepartmentofHealthinGulfCounty ClosingtheGapProgram Formoreinformationpleasecontact: TalithaRobinsonat(850)653-2111ext.102 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Port St. Joe city commissioners questioned investment to attract a cruise for folks who wanted to experience Apalachicola. Tourist Development Council executive director Jennifer Jenkins offered a bit of clarication during last weeks regular meeting. In short strokes, Jenkins said the investment in citys low docks and Jetty Park would be wise given the potential longterm impact of a cruise company making Port St. Joe an annual port-of-call. We want to ensure their time here is memorable and they want to come back, Jenkins said. Right now it is a one-day experience. My goal is to get that one day multiple times. It is a great opportunity for us, I believe. The eld with Travel Dynamics International was rst plowed with Tommy Pitts in his former role as director of the Port of Port St. Joe. Two years ago Travel Dynamics was looking at Port St. Joe as a potential port-of-call on a Gulf of Mexico cultural events tour, Jenkins said. Upon a site visit, however, the area was found to lack the events to fuel such a stop and the company looked elsewhere. This winter Jenkins visited the company headquarters in New York and pitched Port St. Joe as a stop for an eco-tourism cruise. Travel Dynamics agreed, she said, and will next month begin marketing a cruise which would come to Port St. Joe in April 2015. The ship would bring 135 passengers, Jenkins said. The cruise line markets to travelers from such companies and universities as Stanford, Smithsonian and the Rhodes scholarship foundation. These are avid travelers and these cruises are not cheap, Jenkins said. We are being pitched as providing a day of eco-excursions. After marketing the cruise to its list of clients, Travel Dynamics would open the cruise to others. If sold out the company would book a second and so on if reservations warranted. The cruise would originate in New Orleans and stop at Mobile, AL, Pensacola, Panama City, Port St. Joe and end in Tampa. Jenkins and a TDC committee examining the cruise industry and potential for Port St. Joe also have looked at two other companies, Jenkins said, and she will continue to market the area to those companies. While in Port St. Joe for the day, cruisers will be offered several eco-trips with St. Joseph Bay, the Dead Lakes and Lake Wimico among considered destinations along with a shopping/ eating excursion in Port St. Joe. Where Port St. Joe commissioners have been hung up is investing in repairs to the low docks Jenkins said she had an estimate from Pitts of $17,000 for such repairs when a main attraction would be a boat trip to Apalachicola. My concern is we dont want to invest city dollars and have them come in and go to Apalachicola, said Mayor Mel Magidson. Jenkins said that trip was a primary focus for marketing the cruise, but that the trip to Apalachicola was one component on a busy day of activities and for those who undertook it would only be in Apalachicola part of the day. They want to go to Apalachicola, but they are not going to spend the day in Apalachicola, Jenkins said. And not everybody will go to Apalachicola. We will need to showcase what allures about Gulf County. This is a great opportunity. We need to give them a good experience. That will take the entire community. Jenkins added that the TDC would be coordinating the itinerary and handle logistics when the ship is in Port St. Joe, expending her marketing dollars in the effort. Outside of rehab of the low docks, she said, the primary need for the ship in port would be 4,000 gallons of water. The ship would not make a waste dump in Port St. Joe. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency has been examining potential grant dollars for the improvements to the low docks, though last weeks action by commissioners to dissolve the PSJRA board could leave that effort in limbo. I think its a great opportunity if we dont have to spend a lot of money and see some return on those dollars, Magidson said. Special to The StarThe number of active shooter incidents has been escalating, with more than fteen major incidents just in the last ve years. These incidents occur unexpectedly, and leave in their wake broken lives and devastated communities, especially when the shooting takes place at a school. Nationwide, schools are ramping up security measures and law enforcement is training rst-arriving ofcers to efciently handle active shooter incident response. These critical actions are currently being taken in Gulf County. Friday, March 14, Gulf County Emergency Management is hosting a functional active shooter exercise at the Port St. Joe High School, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. ET. The exercise is scheduled on a half-day, with students being released before the simulated incident will take place. Teachers and administrative personnel will participate in a training session a few days before the exercise, focusing on active shooter case studies and best practices for response. On the morning of the exercise, school personnel will demonstrate their lockdown procedures, playing as though the circumstances are completely real. We are testing the schools lockdown measures and the teachers actions, said Marshall Nelson, Emergency Management Director for Gulf County and the coordinator for the exercise. The school administrators want to see honest, unrehearsed reactions to know where the school security measures really stand in an event of this magnitude. Law enforcement personnel will participate in a refresher course prior to active shooter evolutions, and discuss approaches, actions, and procedures for an active shooter incident. Ofcers in two-man teams will be staged on school grounds and will run through multiple evolutions of response. These rounds will focus on response tactics and neutralization of the shooter, a role played by a trained professional assigned by the exercise planning team. After the initial run of each team, instructors will assess that teams strengths and areas for improvement, explain any corrections needed, and suggest certain techniques to enhance their actions. That team will then run another evolution to allow those changes to be put into immediate action. This kind of training has proved invaluable in the past and looks to be a signicant benet during this exercise. The Gulf County Active Shooter Exercise is providing the opportunity to test a wide range of skills, response tactics, and security measures. While all of the participants are being evaluated on their response capabilities, specic areas will also be assessed and evaluated. The goal is to evaluate current methods and practices, and nd areas for improvement. An evaluation team from Disasters, Strategies, and Ideas Group (DSI), the organization responsible for designing and managing the exercise, will assess the response with the goal of developing an after action report and improvement plan to be used by the participants in enhancing their response capabilities. Terry Schenk, the Exercise Director for DSI, explained that the purpose of bringing in an evaluation team is to nd strengths and weaknesses, and use these ndings as a learning tool for improvement. Without a doubt, the entire community would be impacted by an incident like this, Schenk said, and it makes a tremendous difference when everyone involved has worked and trained with one another. These exercises lay the groundwork for the kind of teamwork that can ultimately save lives during real incidents. Schenk commended Gulf County for once again being proactive on the front-end of potential emergencies. As weve seen from other incidents around the country, you just never know when its going to happen or whats going to trigger it. But we refuse to just wait and let it unfold were going to prepare now, Nelson said, summing up the exercise, Were training for a reality that we hope never happens. But, we will be ready if it does. For further information on the exercise, please contact Marshall Nelson, Gulf County Emergency Management Director, at 229-9110.Cruise ship proposal brought into focus for commissioners Emergency management to conduct active shooter exercise

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, March 13, 2014By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The one constant in the saga of the former Gulf Pines Hospital is the steady decay of the facility since the hospital closed a decade ago. With neighbors again noting the general state of disrepair and potential for wildlife twoand four-footed haunting the years-vacant hospital, Port St. Joe commissioners have dusted off the playbook they had been looking at last year. And not much has changed save the extent of the decay. The nancial pieces remain largely intact, city attorney Tom Gibson said. The IRS maintains a lien on the building. The IRS has indicated in the past a willingness to work with the city on reducing the lien, however an obstacle in that path is the presence of at least two tax deeds/certicates and one additional year of outstanding property taxes, a portion of which would actually be owed the city. The amount of the tax certicates/deeds is $40,000; the outstanding taxes owed the county and city amount to $90,000, Gibson said. Only the Board of County Commissioners has expressed a willingness to work with the city on those costs, that willingness stemming from a desire to return the property to the tax rolls. We are back to exploring bringing (the building) down and selling lots to cover costs, Gibson said. The Commission last year changed the zoning to residential, single family, in keeping with the neighborhood. As originally platted, the land on which the hospital sits would yield ve likesized lots. The gap between selling prices on the open market and costs to demolish the building estimated at $100,000 including asbestos abatement and settle claims proved too wide at the time for commissioners, though Gibson noted the costs on demolition were informal and the project never formally bid. Gulf Pines is back on the radar after resident Ann White told commissioners the past two meetings that the building was in rough shape. Wild animals, particularly rodents and cats as well as an early report of a coyote, have been seen around the building and teenagers had recently been found skateboarding in the old hospital. Port St. Joe police further secured the building after that incident. But with the building in receivership for several years, there has been little to no upkeep of the building and grounds save city staff trimming several trees. Its bad, White said, particularly in the area where the ambulance would come in the building and there its a disaster. Commissioner Rex Buzzett requested the item be added to the Commission agenda until further action can be taken. Any clean-up would help, he said.BOAT LAUNCH FEESCommissioner William Thursbay revisited an earlier initiative to implement launch fees at the citys boat ramp in Frank Pate Park. Commissioners held a workshop several months ago and found a general consensus in favor of fees to fund upkeep of the boat ramp, but with a lack of consensus on components to a plan. Thursbays reiterated the motive last week but remained without a consensus on direction. This would be for maintenance down there and only maintenance, Thursbay said. He provided several options, including a fee scale under which citizen residents would pay nothing while county and out-ofstate users would pay set daily fees or be eligible to purchase weekly or seasonal passes. The collecting, Thursbay said, would initially be based on the honor system, using a wooden or metal box with or without a written decal or ticket. I am all for user fees, but how are we going to enforce this? said Mayor Mel Magidson. (The honor system) is the worst way, but I like the pass deal. Magidson said governments need to look at implementing user fees for a host of maintenance issues that can no longer be addressed in the general fund budget. Resident Mark Howze said while he fundamentally agreed that a launch fee was preferable, he wondered about the balance struck between how much the city might actually realize in revenue compared to the cost of implementing the system. Thursbay said he would further examine the issue and come back with additional recommendations.CCENTENNIAL BUILDINGCommissioners approved spending over $21,000 for repairs to leaks on the roof of the Centennial Building. Commissioners will at least in part dip into BP settlement funds for the repairs, which are aimed at sealing leaks ahead of more substantive repairs to the ceiling and acoustics in the citys largest gathering place. OnbehalfofmystaffandI,wewouldliketothankallourloyalpatientsforthehonorof beingselectedforthemultipleawardsthatwehavereceivedinthepast;includingvoted mostcompassionateDr.andPatientsChoiceAward.Itisagreathonorandwewill continuetostrivefortheverybestmedicalcareforourpatients. CongratulationstoVincentIversMDfor19YearsofDedicated,CompassionateServicein PortStJoe. DrIversandhisfamilyrelocatedfromtheOrlandoarea,whereheworkedasaprimary carephysician,tojointhePortStJoecommunityin1995.Hethenbeganpracticing internalmedicine,familymedicine,in-patientcareandcardiovascularmedicineatGulf PineMedical. DrIversgraduatedCumLaudeinhismedicalclass.WhenhejoinedGulfPinesMedical,he wasamemberoftheAmericanCollegeofChestPhysicians,AmericanMedicalAssociation andtheAmericanCollegeofPhysician. DrIverswouldliketothankallourloyalpatientsforbeingselectedforthemultiple awards,includingvotedmostCompassionateDoctorandPatientChoiceAward.Itisa greathonorandwewillcontinuetostrivefortheverybestmedicalcareforourPatients. DrIvers,hisstaffandfamilywouldliketothankyouandlookforwardtomanyYEARSto come...VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070www.iversmd.com 4 CommitmenttoExcellenceforover23Years Celebrating18Years ofService inPortSt.Joe A helping handStar Staff ReportThe Board of County Commissioners recently completed a number of housing rehabs/rebuilds. The county leveraged a $700,000 Community Development Block Grant with $300,000 in county State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP) funds to assist 12 families. In ve cases, the money funded housing rehabs and in seven cases the dollars were used for demolition/rebuild projects. Ten of the families are represented in the photo. Projects were begun by the end of October 2013 and completed by Feb. 1. The homes were located in Jones Homestead (1), Oak Grove (2), White City (2), Dalkeith (2), Stonemill Creek (1), Old Panama Highway area (3) and Overstreet (1). Gulf Pines disrepair renews demolition discussionSS PECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionI didnt watch the Academy Awards last Sunday. Something about a bunch of actors handing out awards to each other just doesnt ring true to me. How do you know if they are sincere or just acting? My disenchantment with the Oscar presentations started back in 1968, when Paul Newman didnt win best actor for his role in Cool Hand Luke. He ate fty eggs in that movie at one sitting. Fifty! You tell me any other actor who got nominated that year could have come close to that! My stomach went to spinning as I watched him cram those last few in. People around me were gagging on their popcorn and Milk Duds. I think about it now, forty-seven years later, and I still get a little nauseous. Now that, folks, is some more powerful acting! Ole Luke showed us a lot of grit in the face of con nement and adversity. He didnt bow, he didnt bend, he didnt break and when things looked the worst, he gave us that you cant beat me grin that made everyone in the theater proud to be an independent, free thinking American. Shoot, I thought about rushing out and joining the nearest chain gang! When he didnt win, I knew the x was in. Some of this Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Animated Short Subject electing might have been more about politics than ability. Big studio money, egos, behindthe-scenes shuf ing and warped Hollywood thinking has won more Academy Awards than any real acting. Let me tell you how crazy the movie industry can be, the very same year Cool Hand Luke came out Paul Newman also delivered up an absolutely award winning performance in another lm he should have won rst and second if the voting had been on the up and up. And he didnt even get nominated for his role as John Russell in Hombre! Remember when the self-appointed aristocrat, as the stagecoach was abandoned in the middle of nowhere, was screaming at Newman, Why do we have to follow you? Who put you in charge? Why do we all have to listen to you? He turned to her with no malice and no grin, narrowed his eyes a mite and uttered, Cause I can cut it, lady. No one doubted that he couldnt! But it didnt seem to impress the academy voters. Movies havent had quite the same appeal to me since Paul left the business and my Captain Midnight Decoder Ring quit working. Thats why I couldnt tell you one person this year who won an Oscar or who was even nominated. I dont know who dazzled or who zzled walking down that red carpet. I dont know which acceptance speech ran on and on or which actress was rst to blotch the simple cue cards. And Im fairly certain the emcee didnt keep the audience rolling like Bob Hope used to do it. The only actor I ever thought was in the same category as Paul Newman was my older brother. Leon could look the most innocent or the most menacing of anyone I ever saw depending on the occasion. Daddy would send us down to clean the fence row and Leon, of course, would sit down the minute we were out of sight of the house. David and I were too small to make much of a dent in the weeds. Leon had that built in timer. Hed jump up, grab the sling blade out of my hand, and go to ailing away two seconds before Dad came around the corner to check on us. Dad would be angry that we hadnt even made a good start. Tears would dwell up in Leons eyes. Were doing the best we can. Kesley got sick. David almost stepped on a rattlesnake. Its just hard to do all the work myself and look after two little brothers. I felt sorry for Leon even as Daddy chastised me for not having a working tool in my hand. Leon, I think, was the screaming monster from the Black Lagoon in those deep woods behind the swimming pool. We all thought it was him but we couldnt be for dead certain positive. Terry Kennon allowed it didnt sound human enough to be Leon. The acting here, if is was acting, was exquisite. Whatever or whoever, be it of this world or some other, was loud, blood curdling and nasty. It sure sent me ying out of those woods on more than one occasion! The aging milk cow up on the second oor of the high school might have been Leons Academy Moment. When confronted with both parents, a stunned principal and the chief of police, my brother looked as surprised as Miss Polly Rucker when she encountered the bovine trying to get into her English class. Leon, with the innocence of a new born babe, allowed our old cow had taken to wandering off. And she would sometimes follow us up Stonewall Street. But he had no idea how the cow actually got into the school. He was completely puzzled by the animals sudden interest in higher learning. He convinced me! And I was holding the side door open when he shoved Bessie into the auditorium. You talk about acting! Respectfully, Kes My Grandmama passed away during my rst year of college, more than 30 years ago. She was a sweet lady who I loved dearly. She was the perfect grandmother. Why? She owned a ten cent store with a candy counter and she always made sure she was selling some of my favorite sweet things. Grandmama wasnt much at giving you anything, but if you would push a broom, stack boxes or organize magazines, then she would pay you in candy or comic books. Im not sure how tall my Grandmama wasnt tall at all. As a matter of fact, when she was sitting down behind the counter where the cash register was, you couldnt see her. Having a grandparent, parent or somebody to count on and teach us some of the basics about life, is very important to children. Children need to know what to expect and understand that pushing a broom means getting candy or a comic book. When I think of my Grandmama, I think of her ten cent store in rural Alabama, Mason jars full of water to take shing and the wonderful daffodils that come back each spring in her yard. The daffodils seem to say, Hey, were back, were going to keep coming back, we havent quit and we never will. Those good things and the one time I heard her utter a bad word under her breath when we were in the car on the way to church. My Papa had made her pretty angry about something and she turned loose of a not-so-nice word. I ducked down in the backseat of the car. Things calmed down and that was the only time I heard Grandmama say a bad word. It wasnt even an ear-covering word, but to hear Grandmama say it was kind of shocking. The bottom line is that I knew what to expect from my Grandmama. She was a constant. Being a math fellow and more importantly a parent, I know how important constants are not only in childrens lives, but in everyones lives. We want and need something that is unchanging. A lot of folks say Change is good. It might be good for some folks, but I would like to think that Constants are even better. In other words, its nice to know as a little boy that you have somebody who loves you enough to ll a Mason jar with ice water before you start a long walk to catch a sh. Its also nice to know if Grandmama gets one on her line before you do shes going to hand you the pole. Shes got to do it. Its expected of her. So when my brother sent me a picture of Grandmamas daffodils still coming up after all of these years, I knew what he was saying. He was saying, We still have our constants. Our grandparents and parents are gone, but we will continue to remember what an important part of our lives they were. Grandmamas daffodils keep coming back each spring saying, Change might be good, but it sure is nice to be able to depend on constants. I know some things have to change sooner or later, but I just dont see the point in changing things that work just ne, maybe even better than ne. What is my point? Am I telling you that you should go plant daffodils? No, not unless you just like daffodils. How about a Mason jar of ice water? No, but I will tell you that there are not many things that are better than ice water or sweet tea out of a Mason jar. What Im trying to say is that we should all appreciate the constants we have in our lives the things, the people, the places For goodness sakes our dogs, if we are dog people. I know my dogs are going to open the door and meet me in the driveway before I have the chance to even stop the car. I guess the other thing is that we need to try to be constants to some people, in particular our children. If I feel like I need a little change, I might consider planting a few tulips. However, you can count the daffodils staying put. What did Grandmama say that was so bad? Oh, now that I think about it, she was probably referring to something to throw out on those daffodils to make them keep coming back each spring. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor.com. HUNKER DOWNKesley ColbertNo failure to communicate here! CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardGrandmamas Daffodils USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Letters to the EDITORPage A4 Thursday, March 13, 2014A power play?(Editors note: the following was sent to all ve members of the Port St. Joe City Commission). Gentlemen, I just read the paper and the issue regarding the PSJRA and the dissolution of the board of directors. Unfortunately I was not able to attend this meeting and have the paper as the only source of information until the minutes are available for the public to read. First let me say that I have been a resident since 2005. Prior to that we would vacation a couple of times a year for 10 years prior to moving here. We have seen so many changes in our ne city over these last 19 years and have kept up on them and who is responsible for this. It seems to me that if the PSJRA is able to accomplish all that they have accomplished over the years, why change things now? Most of you have full-time jobs then your Commissioner duties and now you want to add more to your list? You already have a say/vote on what the PSJRA is working on, why do you have to change it? Seems like if there are a few issues then x those and move on. Commissioners Thursbay and Patterson, seems like you stated that you are speaking for the majority of citizens that are concerned regarding the use of their tax money? Did you really speak to the majority of 2,521 registered city voters? You didnt speak to me and you both know me. I think you have other matters that need more attention than this. Seems like a power play to me to give you the power you need to then release Gail Alsobrook of her position so that you can put someone else in position that might align more with your agenda. Mr. Mayor and Commissioner Buzzett I copied you on this so you would know how other residents in this city feel about this issue and that we agree with you to leave it alone. Thank you for your time if you read this. Other emails I have previously sent to Thursbay and McCroan have gone unanswered. Those were sent from my work email so decided to try my personal one.Elaine LerchPort St. Joe A decision in need of correctionDear Editor, As we go through life, we are faced with many decisions. Some decisions we make are good and some, upon further re ection, are bad. Often times we cannot go back and change our bad decisions. However, the decision by our the Port St Joe City Council to dissolve the Port St Joe Downtown Redevelopment Agency made last Tuesday night, March 4, was a bad decision and they can correct that bad decision at the next city council meeting. The PSJDRA is composed of city residents, volunteers, people who care about our city, people appointed by our city council, people who are stake holders in the progress of our city. Their mission statement reads as follows: The Mission of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is to serve the community by guiding redevelopment activities to create a vibrant downtown core and revitalized neighborhood, to commemorate local history and culture, to improve quality of life, and to stimulate economic growth within the Agencys District. That mission over the last several years has been successfully accomplished. The process is not broken. Last Tuesday night the city council by its vote broke the effective functioning of that process. I would urge all of the Port St Joe voters to contact our commissioners to rescind the vote to dissolve the PSJDRA. Contact information for the commissioners are: Bo Patterson Commissioner, Group II (850) 340-0260 | bpatterson@psj.fl.gov Phil McCroan Commissioner, Group III (850) 229-6907 | pmccroan@psj.fl.gov William Thursbay Commissioner, Group I No information posted on city website. Better yet I would urge the voters to attend the next city meeting and call upon these council members to rethink their vote. It is your community. The city council is your elected representative. Let your voice be heard. Urge your elected of cials to rescind their vote. RespectfullyJohn Parker Port St. JoeAn open letterDear Editor, My mother and father taught my sister, brothers and I to always work for the things we want and to never steal anything from anyone, unlike the person who went on my property and stole my radio and speakers out of my classic Mustang. It is sad you broke one of Gods Ten Commandments, Thou shalt not steal. I can see that you do not care for God or others, just yourself and your wants. There are so many people walking on Gods Earth that do not need to be free, you just havent caught up yet. God knows and sees everything. He is a fair judge.Annie Sue FieldsPort St. JoeThanks Sacred HeartDear Editor, Recently I found myself facing oral surgery and was dealing with local physicians af liated with the Sacred Heart Hospital. During the time prior to my surgery, I had many well-wishing people advise me to consider other, larger, more specialized hospitals. I decided to stay with our local facility and I couldnt be happier with the end results. Surgery is never a pleasant experience but the people at Sacred Heart went out of their way to make it manageable. Thomas in the intake room, Drs. Brunner and Oenbrink who performed the surgery, and all the many others who assisted with the intake, in the operating room, and in the recovery room were absolutely phenomenal. They provided a level of care and attention that I dont think could be matched at another hospital. I am completely satis ed with my experience at Sacred Heart and would highly recommend them to anyone who might ask. Thank you Sacred Heart, you did good!Samuel G. CessnaPort St. Joe

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and dedication to do this, Burkett said. They develop a bond with the community and stay in touch throughout the year. While the CCDF budgets to improve around 65 houses each year, the assistance of the students allows the group to work on closer to 85. In the last three years alone, the Auburn students have made signicant restorations and repairs to more than 50 houses in North Port St. Joe. In addition to helping the community, the economic effects cant be ignored. The students stay in rentals on Cape San Blas and spend ve days purchasing food and gas. According to Burkett, last year the students spent more than $34,000 locally over the course of one week. Theyre not only giving their time, but theres revenue coming in here, Burkett said. Its a win-win for the city, the community and the students. degree in civil engineering. Wooten began his working career as a CEI and Geotechnical Engineer, which specializes in roadway, bridge and foundation design. He worked and supervised Engineers and eld crews on multimillion dollar FDOT roadway and bridge design projects. After eight years of employment as an engineer, he became self-employed as a general/ underground utility contractor and worked seven years as a local Gulf County business owner. During the time as a contractor, he was responsible for preparing contracts, project estimating, scheduling, subcontracting and construction of residential/commercial and infrastructure projects. The past four years he has been employed at Tyndall Air Force Base working with Civil Engineering & Operations/SABER contractors. In addition to his bachelor degree in civil engineering, Wooten is a statecertied general contractor and a state-certied underground utility and excavation contractor. During the past 18 years in the engineering and construction business, he has completed required continuing education courses for his profession. He has also attended numerous seminars to keep up with the ever changing technologies in business and industry. Brooke and his family are active members of First United Methodist Church. He is currently serving on the board of trustees. He was a founding member of the present Dixie Youth Girls Softball League as well as a coach for the past ve years. He is currently president of the Dixie Youth Baseball League and a head coach. He has been a member of the Gator Boosters and Quarterback Club. He is currently vice president of the Wewa Warrior Football League and a head coach. Wooten will continue Coxs commitment to academic and vocational programs while also promoting extra-curricular activities. He understands and will protect the integrity and professionalism required of a board member. With two children and a niece attending Gulf County Schools, Brooke has a vested interest in making sure our schools are the best we can provide for our children. Brooke feels his education, professional and community experience have prepared him to bring knowledge to the board that will better our schools. My diverse engineering and construction career coupled with a hard work ethic makes me the best choice for Gulf County School Board Member for District 2. I am prepared to listen, work hard and be a voice for our children. I will serve the citizens of Gulf County with honesty, dignity and respect, Wooten said. Contact Wooten at 2278242 for questions or concerns about his campaign. LocalThe Star| A5Thursday, March 13, 2014 TDC from page A1of enhancements she and her team hoped to implement, with board approval, for the upcoming grant cycle. The grant program will be opened to for-prot organizations through this year only non-prots could applyand the TDC will categorize events and requests based on the size, level of participation from out of the county and a demonstrated partnership between the event and lodging partners. The goal, Jenkins said, is creating self-sustaining events in the next ve years and a substantial shift in philosophy for TDC participation in special events. We want to move from a funding source to a promotional arm, Jenkins said. We need to get into the mind-set of packages. Jenkins added that the TDC would also be examining event organizers or sponsors providing funds to match the TDC dollars and no applications would be accepted outside of the application window. The TDC, she said, would also state a preference away from funding events between Memorial Day and Labor Day, though at board urging she said that could be determined on a case-bycase basis. People see us as the bank and we want them to see us for the marketing, said board member and marketing committee chair Alyson Gerlach. If we do our job right, they will be more successful. The move, board member Tony Whiteld said, would also be more economically responsible, with the TDC applying its skill set instead of just handing out dollars. Most of these events dont have marketing expertise and we are kind of throwing money at them and hoping it sticks and a lot of it doesnt, Whiteld said. This way we would take more of the money in-house. A second major area of tweaking concerned the beach ambassador program being launched as a pilot this summer. Jenkins and attorney Jeremy Novak are undertaking a consolidation of all ordinances pertaining to the beaches corridor and sought TDC board input on areas of concern. The goal is to have one comprehensive ordinance to address issues ranging from leash laws and beach driving to bonres on the beach. We do need to try to consolidate these, said board member Ronald Pickett. That consolidated ordinance would be the backbone resource for the beach ambassadors. We are not law enforcement, we are not code enforcement, Jenkins said of the ambassador program, which will operate out to the TDC while coordinating with the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce and South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department. We are brand ambassadors. We are welcoming people and educating them. The hope is to enhance enforcement of county ordinances with a hospitality approach while adding to the presence on the beaches and the ability to reach visitors to enhance stays. It is, in part at least, a county attempt to move closer to a Leave No Trace philosophy while not multiplying enforcement efforts. It is a pilot program and well see where we go next year, said County Commissioner Warren Yeager, who is the Board of County Commissioners representative to the TDC board. Gerlach added, The presence itself will make a difference.SOPThe board also approved changes to the TDC staff, at the recommendation of Jenkins. The move would add one full-time brand ambassador who would largely oversee the beach ambassador program and enhance the marketing output from the TDC. The TDC had already ordered new vehicles for the beach ambassador program. Commissioners approved the tentative recommendation 4-1 with Commissioner Joanna Bryan dissenting. The EDA, a private contractor with the BOCC, was created just over a year ago after the BOCC had voted to bring what was then the Economic Development Council, and its executive director Barry Sellers, under the BOCC. The EDA has an allvolunteer board and after Sellers became ill and was forced to leave his position last summer, the EDA has operated without an executive director, in part relying on informal assistance from the Bay County Economic Development Alliance. The BOCC suspended its quarterly payments to the EDA in the amount of $20,000 in January. Bryan said she understood the bumps encountered after Sellers illness and departure, but argued the BOCC should be seeking to bolster an independent agency for economic development rather than putting the work under the county. Businesses will be hesitant to deal with the county, Bryan said. I am against the county being in control of the EDA. I am against the director being a county employee. She said the county had a stake in creating jobs, justifying funding the agency, but said that funding should be aimed at putting the EDA in a position to be self-sustaining as a private/public partnership. Bryan also expressed concern about the Sunshine Law and potential impacts on condentiality requirements that would be part of luring businesses to the county if those acting as point of contact were county employees. Commissioner Warren Yeager said he would wait and see. I understand all the concerns, but we have to nd out what kind of model they are bringing to us, Yeager said. When a company wants to come to Gulf County it will come to Gulf County. Commissioner Tan Smiley voiced frustration at the BOCC starting again in economic development, the third time in his three years on the board and at least sixth time in 12 years the BOCC has changed direction, he said. He noted that the discussions about economic development transpire among those who have jobs and benets. The people who work to pay the taxes to support government, he added, cant support the same level of taxes anymore and jobs are scarce. Starting over again and again, he said, was like beginning construction of a home and then tearing it down and starting again. I dont know what the issue is but our biggest problem is people who cant get along with each other, Smiley said. Something is wrong and the majority of the problem is people who cant get along and before they will get along theyd rather leave it a mess. We (arent any) further along than we were three years ago. We need to take personal feelings and put them aside. We need to quit worrying about I. We need to get some jobs in here.RECYCLINGCommissioners voted to suspend a pilot project that introduced a recycling center at Salinas Park due to high costs and the increasing incidents of folks dropping off other garbage at the site. The project began last spring and was initially well-received, said a representative from Waste Management, but over the summer months became an eyesore as other garbage, contaminants, were dropped at the site. The additional costs of more frequent pulls due to the volume of trash dropped at the site also pushed the budget well beyond projections for the rst year of the pilot project. Yeager moved to suspend the program, a motion unanimously passed. This pilot program has shown us we need to do something with recycling curbside, Yeager said. Its just not working. EDA from page A1 WOOTEN from page A1 STUDENTS from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .comwww.starfl.comSection Section A By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net It might not feel like cobia season, with night temps still in the 40s, but the calendar and the sunrise times both say it is. Each year, cobia begin prowling Panhandle beaches sometime soon after March 1, and the parade continues through late April. Beach water temperature has been wavering around 68, and that de nitely is in the zone for cobiathe sh start showing at around 65 most years, and the prime run continues until around the time it passes 72. The brown bombers can be spotted anywhere from 30 yards off the beach to several miles out. Just beyond the green reef, the secondary bar along much of the Panhandle shoreline is always a good place to start searching. They often travel in pods of two to six sh, and cruise along just a foot or two below the surface, making it easy to spot them for those who know what to look for. In fact, they look much like small sharks to an inexpert eye, swimming with the same slow, steady tail beat. Beach cobia typically weigh anywhere from 20 to 60 pounds, but far larger ones have been caught in waters of the northern Gulf, including several over 100 pounds taken from the Alabama shoreline, just beyond Floridas Panhandle the same sh that pass through Sunshine State waters wind up off Dauphin Island a few days later. The Florida record, caught near Destin, weighed 130 pounds, 1 ounce. The all-tackle IGFA record is 135 pounds, 9 ounces, for a sh taken off Australia. Cobia is one of the few species that is exactly the same throughout all the worlds temperate oceans, biologists say. Although the Panhandle cobia shery primarily targets sh cruising off the beaches, the species can be caught throughout the warmer months and into November most years around area wrecks, reefs, buoys, piers and other structures anywhere from depths of 10 feet on out to several hundred feet. Cobia are also noted for following large sea creatures closely manta rays and whale sharks sometimes attract large schools, so anytime anglers spot one of these denizens its worth checking to see if there are cobia hanging under them. Even temporary structures may attract cobia they sometimes stack up under shrimp boats at anchor, or beneath tankers moored offshore, waiting to come in and unload. Cobia also sometimes join king sh and mackerel in following bait sh schools. Theyre typically found on the outer edges of bait balls, while the mackerel clan will be inside slicing and dicing. Cobia look much like oversized remoras, except that they lack the suction cup on the head. Biologists say they are not closely related, but everything from color to skin texture is similar, plus they share the tendency to hang with larger sea creatures. However, remoras never attain larger sizes. Cobia tacticsClassic cobia shing is sight shing, and theres no where its practiced so frequently as in Panhandle waters from Apalachicola westward all the way to the barrier islands of Louisiana. The sh here show themselves, making it relatively easy to get in front of them and put a bait on their nose. Most area charterboat skippers who regularly chase cobia have their boats rigged with ying bridges or tuna towers, which gives them a much better view down into the water to spot the sh. Add a pair of polarized glasses and a few decades of experience and its no problem at all for the average skipper to locate sh frequently. For those who like to chase the sh out of their own boats, its smart to set up so that youre traveling with the sun at your back. Its easier to see the sh from about 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is high, though sh seen at mid-day have often already had several baits ung at them and may be cautious. If you can spot a sh shortly after sunrise and be the rst to put a bait or lure on it, that sh will often become cobia llets. Those which have been hammered on by a half-dozen boats, on the other hand, totally might ignore your offerings. Cobia eat about anything which will t down their gullets, but they do have some favorite foods. Eels are near the top, and many Destin area skippers rely on these slippery critters to lure cobia in season. Eels are hard to handle and hard to put on the hook, and they dont cast all that well, but if you can get a lively one in front of a cobia, you rarely will get a turn-down. A tip: put the eels on dry newspaper for a moment to remove some of the slime and you will nd them much easier to get on the hook. Almost as good, and much easier to handle and cast, are large soft plastic eel imitations those with swimming tails and multiple hooks are often best. Cobia are also known as crab-eaters, and that name gives you a clue as to another favorite food; small crabs, about 3 inches across, make excellent baits. Hook them through the outer points of the shell on a 3/0 extra strong short-shank live bait hook. Soft crab imitations like the avored models from GULP! also do the job at times. All sorts of bait sh catch cobia; pin sh are easy to get, durable and easy to cast. Blue runners are another favorite very durable and active. Large scaled sardines also are excellent, though theyre pretty much a do-it-yourself bait since they dont live well in bait tanks. Ditto for thread ns, which have a very short lifespan but are good baits just after being sabikied aboard. Baits about 4 to 5 inches long are best for cobia 20 pounds and up. Cobia can also readily be caught on all sorts of arti cial lures, particularly when they rst show up and have not been hammered on; a ounce jig with a 5 to 7 inch shad tail often does the job, as do shad-imitating swimbaits like the 1-ounce Tsunami Swimshad. Big topwaters like the Super Spook also can fool them at times. TENTSALE!BWOFISH.com121WHwy98,PortSt.Joe,FL32456 PORTCITYSHOPPINGCENTERFriday,April4th6am-6pm Saturday,April5th6am-5pmLargeinventoryofshingitems reducedupto60%offretail BringthewholeFamily! FishingSeminarsonSaturdaywith RickMurphyandcrewfrom FloridaFishingInsiderWeekly(AllTimesareEastern) 6thAnnual OurBiggest Saleofthe Year! SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Mar.1359 4310% Fri,Mar.1459 4910% Sat,Mar.1564 54 0% Sun,Mar.1666 56 0% Mon,Mar.1771 5010% Tues,Mar.1871 50 -% Wed,Mar.1971 51 -% SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay OUTDOORSPage 6 Thursday, March 13, 2014 FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The StarThe annual cobia run into Panhandle waters typically gets underway when water temperatures along the beach exceed 65 degrees, and its already at 68. Cobia just around the corner Star Staff ReportThe staff of the Port St. Joe Marina held a clean marina designation ceremony last Saturday. The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Of ce of Sustainable Initiatives recognized the marina as part of the clean marina community. To be designated as a clean marina, facilities must implement a series of measures designed to protect Floridas waterways which include protecting sensitive habitats, waste management, storm water control, spill prevention and emergency preparedness. Port St. Joe Marina has been designated as the 276th Clean Marina in Florida and is the second facility to be designated in Gulf County. The ceremony was held in conjunction with the marinas Customer Appreciation Day. SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Port St. Joe Marina was designated as a clean marina by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Of ce.Port St. Joe marina designated as clean Local area waters are starting to come back alive with the springtime weather. After rain water runoffs of last week, most backwaters and freshwater areas are still muddy, but producing sh. Trout and red sh catches are on the rise in the ICW canal, and a few anglers are starting to catch ounder again as well. Small Spanish mackerel are holding close to shore and schooling up near the mouth of the St. Joe Marina and running the beaches already with a few sh over 18 inches.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection Page 7 Thursday, March 13, 2014Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School softball team notched a pair of district wins during an undefeated week. Bozeman came to town last Tuesday, and Stephanie Brinkmeier notched her seventh victory on the mound in a 7-2 triumph. Brinkmeier pitched seven innings, striking out ve, walking three and allowing three hits. Brittany King was 2 for 2 with a pair of doubles, and Christian Laine was 2 for 4. Haley Wood, Kesley Miles, Hal Leigh Keels, Brinkmeier and Addison Rice each had a hit. Two days later, the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted Franklin County on a cold, misty night. Down 4-0, Port St. Joe rallied to take a 6-5 win. Brinkmeier picked up her eighth win on the year and the Lady Tiger Sharks remained unbeaten, 5-0, in district play. Brinkmeier pitched seven innings giving up four hits, striking out three and walking four. She surrendered just two earned runs. Miles was 3 for 4 at the plate, and Shannon Pridgeon, Brinkmeier, Callie Fleshren and Rice had two hits each. Keels and Pridgeon each drove in two runs. Port St. Joe hosts South Walton 7 p.m. ET Friday and will compete in a Spring Break Classic on March 22. Star Staff ReportThe Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team traveled to Tallahassee to compete in a tournament at Chiles High School last Saturday. The Lady Gators (10-2) won their rst two games before falling to Tallahassee Lincoln High School, a Class 7A juggernaut. Wewahitchka opened with a 2-0 win over Class 5A Wakulla, as Naomi Parker pitched a complete-game no-hitter. Parker struck out ve and was also 2 for 2 at the plate, driving in one of the two Lady Gator runs. Brianna Bailey, Shamario Cole, Jade McLemore and Tara Walding each had a hit. Wewahitchka returned to action with a 7-3 win over Class 7A Tallahassee Leon. Ashleigh Price allowed two hits and struck out one to earn the win for the Lady Gators. Price was also 2 for 2 at the plate and scored a run. Walding led the Wewahitchka offense with two hits and four RBIs, and Parker was 3 for 3, scored twice and drove in a run. Cole was 1 for 4 and scored three runs, and Bailey had a hit. Bailey pitched seven innings in a 12-0 loss to Lincoln. Parker was 2 for 3, and Cole contributed a hit. Wewahitchka played North Bay Haven Tuesday and will host Vernon tonight. The Lady Gators travel to Altha Friday and host a doubleheader against Franklin County at 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. CT Monday. The team will be selling barbecue sandwiches for the Monday doubleheader, and dont forget to wear green. Star Staff ReportsThacker, Smith stand out at weightlifting meetPort St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School athletes Carter Thacker and Reggie Smith traveled to Pensacola last weekend to compete in the second annual Trent Richardson Invitational Weightlifting Meet at Escambia High School. The competition was in the Emmitt Smith Weight Room. Richardson also played football at Escambia before playing at the University of Alabama and later the Cleveland Browns. He is now playing for the Indianapolis Colts. Thacker took rst in the 139-pound class with a personal best of 480 total pounds. He lifted 265 on the bench and lifted 215 in the clean-and-jerk. Smith took the title in the 199-pound class, also notching a personal best total of 570 pounds. Smith lifted 325 pounds on the bench and hoisted 245 pounds in the clean-and-jerk. Every lifter had a chance to meet Richardson and have a photo taken with him. Courtney McMillion Memorial Scholarship tourneyThe Courtney McMillion Memorial Scholarship Tournament will begin at 8 a.m. CT May 3 at the Honeyville Sports Complex in Wewahitchka. This is a co-ed softball tournament. Each team can have up to 15 players, but at least three women must be on the eld and batting at all times. All players must be 16 or older. Each team is guaranteed at least three games: pool play of at least two games and then a round robin single-elimination tournament. Teams will use bats and balls provided by the tournament committee. Entry fee is $150 per team, and teams will split $30 per game for umpires. Trophies and T-shirts will be awarded to the rstand second-place teams. Pork plates, concessions and T-shirts will be sold at the complex. For more information, call event managers Luke Taunton at 628-1814 or Kimberly McMillion at 819-8433. All proceeds from the tournament go to the Courtney McMillion Memorial Scholarship Fund to aid local Wewahitchka High School graduates.Cheerleading tryouts next monthCheerleading tryouts for anyone who will be enrolled in Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School or Port St. Joe Middle School during the 2014-15 school year will be April 7-11. A mandatory parent meeting will be at 5:30 p.m. ET March 25 in the high school cafeteria. All students interested in trying out must be present along with a parent or guardian. Informational packets are available at the high school and elementary school of ces and at Faith Christian School.Special to The StarCoastal Community Association and South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department are joining forces to raise donations for Easter baskets and food for needy families in Gulf County for the Gulf County Sheriffs Department. They have engaged the services of the wildest March hares they could nd in Gulf County to kick off the drive with a crazy Bunny Rabbit Tournament at 1 p.m. ET Saturday, March 15, at St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. These demented hares choose to hold the tournament on St. Patricks Day just to spice things up and encourage all our gol ng snowbirds to join the locals for a day of gol ng fun. The game will be individual play with handicaps, so anyone can win. There will be cash prizes for rst, second and third place. There is a prize on every hole and fun with every stroke. Hole prizes have been donated by Sunset Coastal Grill, The St. Joe Shrimp Company, St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, the Blue Parrot and Smileys Car Detailing among others. Sponsors are Penelopes Pet Stop, Gulf 2 Bay Construction and Coastal Community Association. Cost is $45 for club members and $55 for nonmembers. Bring an Easter basket or Easter stuffed toy and take $10 off. All proceeds will go for Easter baskets and food. Call St. Joseph Bay Golf Club at 2271751 for more information or to register. If you dont have a team, no problem, the club will hook you up with some fun folks. Dont play golf? No problem. Coastal Community Association and South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department (both nonpro ts) have arranged with Dollar General Market in Port St. Joe to have a discount on food and Easter items from donations they collect just before Easter. So we can multiply what we can make available for the needy in Gulf County with even a small donation. You can make donations or drop off Easter baskets, stuffed animals and nonperishable food items at the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department on Cape San Blas Road, St Joseph Bay Golf Club, Sunset Coastal Grill or Gulf 2 Bay Construction (Simmons Bayou). By BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Jon Mason and Kimberly Tuel are newcomers to area coaching and the Halifax All-Star Classic. They will lead the East girls basketball team together in the 10th annual game April 5 at Gulf Coast State Colleges Billy Harrison Field House. The contest tips off at 11 a.m. and is followed by the boys at 1 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and students ages 6-17, and children 5 and younger get in free. Both coaches took rst-year positions at their respective schools this season, Mason at Mosley and Tuel with Chipley. Mason is the second Mosley coach to sit on the bench for the East and rst since Steve Can eld in 2012. Tuel is the fourth coach from Chipley to head the East, which is selected from a pool of senior players in The Panama City News Heralds eight-county coverage area. Tuel led Chipley on a return trip to the Class 1A state championship game. The Tigers nished as runners-up for the second straight season after falling to Paxton 39-34 in the title game. Tuel led Chipley to the deep run and a 25-6 record with a team featuring only one senior. That was the same number as Masons team, with sophomores and juniors logging the majority of the minutes. Mosley nished 17-9 and fell to Rutherford in the District 1-5A semi nal. With two district wins last week, Stephanie Brinkmeier has eight victories on the season.COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTON | Special to The StarLady Tiger Sharks continue winning ways Lady Gators go 2-1 in Tallahassee tournament COURTESY OF ANNE PARKER | Special to The StarNaomi Parker tossed a no-hitter to beat Wakulla, adding two hits and an RBI as the Lady Gators went 2-1 in a Tallahassee tournament.Mason, Tuel to lead East girls Sports SHORTSEaster basket/food drive kicks off Saturday with golf tourney

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014two years, leaving the council just $485,000 to construct the new city hall. Finally, the city received a settlement offer from the insurance company in February for $174,000 on the remaining damages and a new foundation. Shortly thereafter, an executive session was held to discuss ofcial numbers on the project and at Februarys regular meeting Woodham told the council he wanted to confer with a lawyer to explore the possibility of getting more money from the insurance company through litigation. After the visit, Woodham told the council according to the lawyer, the city might be able to receive more money, though an ofcial number has not been released. Woodham said if more funds are received from the insurance company, the city wont have to lean on taxpayer money for the construction of city hall. Theres more money on the table, Woodham said. I want a city hall that we can all be proud of. Im part of the community, and I want it to be beautiful for future generations. During last months meeting Councilwoman Tanya Castro was vocal about not litigating with the insurance company. When asked, she said though she didnt know if the settlement was fair, she favored progress over litigation. The only information to say that the settlement is unfair is coming from the contractor, said Castro. Lets settle and move forward. Castro has encouraged the council to consider whether the cost of litigation could outweigh the costs of the new city hall. Castro said her main concern was the current bid price from Cathey Construction is more than the city can afford after two years of upkeep. We need to stop and ask if it makes sense to spend what appears to be a million dollars on a city hall for six employees that most citizens will never go to, Castro said. Is that what our taxpayers need? Castro said she was concerned that the new city hall wouldnt have public space available. She expressed that Mexico Beach is already in need of a building for special events. During a workshop last month citizens expressed confusion on why a 3,200square-foot city hall was even needed. Its a lot of money to build a house that size on land we own, said Mullen, commiserating with the statements. The members of the council agreed progress must be made, but they must decide which direction to go. Demolition will begin soon on the Parker House and citizens will be looking for something to take its place. I just want to see us move in a positive direction, Woodham said. During this campaign, Ive learned that a lot of people dont know the true facts. I want to give them those facts to help them make a decision. Despite which way the council decides to go, it seems that everything has a price. Look at the indirect costs of negative publicity, said Castro. The price the city has paidits beyond measure.TUESDAYS REGULAR MEEt T INGAt Tuesdays regular meeting, Woodham shared a letter he received from attorney Dion Moniz, who looked over some of the insurance documents. According to the letter, the settlement being offered was insufcient because it implied that the Parker House was a commercial-use building at the time of the re. The building should have been, said Woodham, considered a city hall as soon as it was insured by the city. Monizs letter also suggested the settlement does not cover the costs for redesigns that the city completed after the structural analysis or site work that had been completed so far. A specic amount the city could pursue wasnt given without the lawyer having access to a list of unreimbursed funds, but if hired, he would attempt to get them without litigation and only sue the insurance company if necessary. The lawyer recommended the council hold an executive session at the end of the month to meet with him and Brian Cathey of Cathey Construction to discuss the specics. Castro disagreed the Parker House could be considered a city hall because it was empty at the time of the re and expressed concern that paying the litigation costs could use up money that the city doesnt have. This could take a long time, city attorney Paul Komarek said. This process typically takes longer than people would like and costs more than they expect. Komarek encouraged the council to hold an executive session to get as much information as possible before making a decision. He reminded the council because of Florida law, a lawsuit must be led within ve years from the day of loss and that while theres no time frame for accepting the settlement offer, the insurance company could withdraw it at any time. Demolition on the Parker House was slowed down by rainy weather but is expected to be complete by next week. 2014 ELECTIONNOTICENoticeisherebygiventhattheCityofPortSt. JoesPrimaryElectionwillbeheldTuesday, May13,2014,intheFireStation.Pollsopenat 7:00A.M.,ET,andclose7:00P.M.,ET. Registrationbooksarenowopenattheoce ofJohnHanlon,GulfCountySupervisorof ElectionsandwillremainopenthruMonday April14,2014,at5:00P.M.,ET. CandidatequalifyingbeginsWednesday, March26,2014,at12:00NoonEasternTime andendsonWednesday,April2,2014,atNoon EasternTime.efollowingoceswillbeup forelection:CommissionerGroupIIIand CommissionerGroupIV. BeginningMay3,2014May10,2014, (includesSaturdaysofMay3rdandMay10th). EarlyVotingwillbeheldattheSupervisorof Electionsocelocatedat401LongAvenue from9:00A.M.,ETto5:00P.M.,ET.ere willbenoSundayvotingonMay4,2014.Also, AbsenteeBallotsmayberequestednowbutwill bemailedaerreceivedfromprinter. eCityofPortSt.Joe CharlotteM.Pierce CityClerk CELEBRATING18YEARSOFSERVICEINPORTST.JOE227-7070WWW.IVERSMD.COM MANAGINGALLYOURFAMILYNEEDSFROM: NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:3-31-14CODE:SJ00 Because yourfuture doesnt retire. TheratesapplytocerticatesissuedinMarch. Theinitialinterestrateof4.50%isguaranteed fortherstcerticateyearandincludesa rst-year-onlyinterestbonusof3.00%.This initialrateispayableonacerticatewith annuityvaluesof$10,000-$24,999.Theinitial interestrateof4.75%isguaranteedforthe rstcerticateyearandincludesarst-yearonlyinterestbonusof3.00%.Thisinitial rateispayableonacerticatewithannuity valuesof$25,000-$99,999.Theinitialinterest rateof4.95%isguaranteedfortherst certicateyearandincludesarst-year-only interestbonusof3.00%.Thisinitialrateis payableonacerticatewithannuityvaluesof $100,000-$499,999.Aftertherstcerticate year,asecondaryinterestrateof1. 0%is guaranteeduntiltheendofthesurrender chargeperiod,andaminimuminterestrate of1.00%isguaranteedthereafter.Renewal interestratesaresetmonthlybyWoodmenof theWorldandwillneverbelowerthanthose guaranteed.Callforcurrentratesoncerticates withhigherannuityvalues.Productmaynotbe availableinallstates.ContactaWoodmenof theWorldFieldRepresentativetondoutifthis productisrightforyou.Membershipispartof eligibility. 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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com His writing skills earned Port St. Joe seventh-grader Josh Butts four years of college. Turned out, his proofreading skills didnt hurt. Butts was awarded a 2+2 Florida scholarship last week, entitling him to four years college tuition courtesy of the Florida Prepaid College Foundation. And given the circumstances that paved the way to recognition in front of the Gulf County School Board, it was a celebration that might not have happened. Butts was one of two seventh-graders in Ruby Koxs English class who undertook writing an essay concerning a Florida governor who had swayed the state in signi cant ways. The essays for the contest sponsored by Florida Prepaid College Foundation were due last October. Knox knew at least two of her students would have an interest and the talent Butts and Chance Pittman. When winners were announced in January, Pittman learned he had won the 2+2 scholarship, which entitles a student to two years at a Florida junior college followed by two years at a Florida university. When Pittmans plaque arrived at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, however, Butts and others noticed the name imprinted. Josh Butts. Knox and Principal Jeremy Knapp did some investigating in Tallahassee with the foundation. Turns out the essays by Pittman and Butts were sent to different judges for scoring. The judges sent them back with identical scores a tie. We would never have known if not for the plaque, Butts said. When the results came back to the folks in charge of the contest, selecting one as the scholarship winner seemed tacky, so the decision was made to award two scholarship packages. Somehow in preparing the plaques and distributing awards to the various counties in the region, the SPECIAL TO THE STARJosh Butts received his of cial plaque bestowing a 2 + 2 scholarship at last weeks meeting of the Gulf County School Board. Josh is pictured with his parents, Karen and Chris, and a representative from the Florida Prepaid College Foundation.Turning a screw up into collegeSee COLLEGE B7 By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Students at Port St. Joe Elementary School got their Monday started jumpin or shootin. The physical activities were part of the annual Jump Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart fundraisers. Each year students collect money to donate to the American Heart Association to raise awareness for the health related effects of heart disease. Students collected donations from friends and family or by going door-to-door in their neighborhoods. Teachers Sandy Quinn and Jewell Hopper coordinate the program and work to motivate the students and keep them active each day. Our goal this year was set at $6,000 and our kids did a great job trying to reach it, said Quinn. Were very proud of them. Students raised $5,000 over a two-week period while they learned how to ght heart disease by staying physically active and eating healthy. The Hoops/Jump Rope for Heart program has been active in Port St. Joe for more than 10 years and shows no signs of slowing down. We all have had someone we know that might have had heart problems, said Quinn. Heart disease affects young and old and we believe this is what motivates our students to work hard for American Heart Association. WES LOCHER | The StarThe next Salt Air Farmers Market will be held on Saturday, March 15 at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmers Market promotes a sustainable food system on Floridas Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. ET to 1 p.m. SALT AIR FARMERS MARKET THIS SATURDAYSpecial to The StarOn March 6, a very special lady from Gulf County attended a ceremony with Floridas top governmental leader. Ms. Tracy Bowers, a fourth-grade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School who also was named Gulf County Teacher of the Year, was recognized at the state capital by Gov. Rick Scott. Awarded one of the Governors Shine awards, Bowers outstanding contributions in the eld of education were acknowledged by an esteemed group which included Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Floridas Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. Bowers was further honored at the ceremony when she was chosen to address four of her fellow Shine award winners from surrounding panhandle counties. We are lucky to have a teacher of Ms. Tracy Bowers caliber here at Wewahitchka Elementary, said Principal Jay Bidwell. Now other people around the state are beginning to realize what we have known for some time that Ms. Tracy Bowers is one of the most phenomenal educators in our area. The next opportunity for Ms. Bowers to shine will be at the Florida State Teacher of the Year selection ceremony to be held in Orlando on July 9-11. Hopefully the secret is out about Ms. Tracys special abilities and she will bring home the award as Floridas top teacher. If the selection committee could see what we at Wewahitchka Elementary observe on a daily basis, then I am sure that Ms. Tracy Bowers would win the Florida Teacher of the Year Award in a landslide, Bidwell said. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Reportedly how many U.K. publishers turned down the 1st Harry Potter manuscript before small Bloomsbury (at the time) accepted it? 2, 6, 10, 12 2) Whats the name of the white-colored dog appearing in Scooby Doo cartoons? Ralph, Scooby Dum, Hercules, Mergertroid 3) How much did 1903s rst 8-count box of Crayola crayons sell for? Nickel, Dime, Quarter, Dollar 4) Carl Sagan was a famed astronomer at what university? Cornell, Notre Dame, Stanford, MIT 5) Which of these is not a Canadian province? New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Yukon, Manitoba 6) How many NFL teams have bird nicknames? 1, 3, 5, 7 7) Along with relish, ketchup and mayo are basically the main items of which salad dressing? Thousand Island, Ranch, Italian, French 8) Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades got its start in a fuller quote from? Mining, Baseball, Golf, Quilting 9) Of these comedians who was born in Harlem, Georgia? Sinbad, Oliver Hardy, Jeff Foxworthy, Cable Guy 10) Whats the total amount of money in a standard U.S. Monopoly game? $15,140; $20,000; $27,260; $30,000 11) How many times did Roberto Duran and Sugar Ray Leonard ght against each other? 1, 2, 3, 4 12) Where did a dance called the jig originate? Southern USA, NYC, British Isles, Australia 13) How many knuckles are in a human hand? 8, 10, 14, 15 14) Which is an advanced, sealed tobacco curing barn with a system of ductworks? Candela, Calfrisa, Cantero, Carotene ANSWERS 1) 12. 2) Scooby Dum. 3) Nickel. 4) Cornell. 5) Yukon. 6) 5. 7) Thousand Island. 8) Baseball. 9) Oliver Hardy. 10) $15,140. 11) 3. 12) British Isles. 13) 14. 14) Calfrisa. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com SPECIAL TO THE STARTracy Bowers was honored at the Florida Shine Awards ceremony at the state capital in Tallahassee. (From left) Attorney General Pam Bondi, Governor Rick Scott, Tracy Bowers, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Floridas Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater.Bowers garners Shine award from Scott PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarFirst grade students jumped rope to stay active in order to ght heart disease. learned how to ght heart disease by staying physically active and eating The Hoops/Jump Rope for Heart program has been active in Port St. Joe for more than 10 years and shows no signs of slowing We all have had someone we know that might have had heart problems, said Quinn. Heart disease affects young and old and we believe this is what motivates our students to work hard for American Heart cial lady from Gulf County attended a ceremony with Floridas top governmental leader. fourth-grade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School who also was named Gulf County Teacher of the Year, was recognized at the state capital by Gov. Rick Scott. Governors Shine awards, Bowers outstanding contributions in the eld of education were acknowledged by an esteemed group which included Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Floridas Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. honored at the ceremony when she was chosen to Bondi, Governor Rick Scott, Tracy Bowers, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam and Floridas Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater. Bowers garners Shine PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star First grade students jumped rope to stay active in order to ght heart disease. Hoops for Heart at PSJEINSIDESee more photos on Page B7 Thursday, March 13, 2014

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B2 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 Claytonisa29lb7moVizsla/Mix.Heis learningtowalkonhisleashaswellas otherbasiccommands.Claytoncame inwithhessiblingsandisawaitinghis safe,foreverhomewithus. Fosterhomesgiveourgreatpetsthe attentionandsocializationtheycrave. Weprovideallsuppliesneeded. Weneedvolunteerstohelpwith maintenancearoundtheshelter. Towelsandbeddingarealways welcome. Petcarriersandcrates. Donationsofkittylitterisingreat demandaswellaspuppytoys. Monetarydonationsarealways welcome. Anydonationnomatterhowsmall willbegreatlyappreciated. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthis time,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation.AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbe currentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend. hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumane Societyat850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Onlineapplicationsandpet photosareavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm!FaithsThriftHutis alwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimals inourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007 TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon! Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumane SocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety FranklinCountyHumaneSociety ServingFloridas Pet-Friendly BeachesAlongthe ForgottenCoastDowntownPortSt.Joe850-229-6161 bowwowbeach.com301REIDAVENUE PORTST.JOEFLORIDA,32456Mon-Friday10:30-5:30 Saturday10:30-3:30 ClosedSunday Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,Port St.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast SOLD DianePeevy850-527-2580/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Horselovers,thisHorseFarmisforyou!6Acreswith 80x160whitefencedArena,steelRoundpenfor exercise,2acrefencedfrontpasture&1acrefenced rearpasture,bothelectriedwithwater.Homeis 2BR/2BA,veryspaciousw/Lgrooms,Lgclosets& lotsofwindowstoaddnaturallight.Kitchenhaslots ofcabinetsw/blackgranitecountertops. SocietyOrganic vegetable gardeningWhat is growing organically? It depends upon who you talk to. The simple answer is that organic gardeners only use animal or vegetable fertilizers rather than synthetics. It also means natural, pest control devoid of industrial insecticides. In other words, using natural substances and bene cial insects to ward off pests instead of spraying with the backyard equivalent of Malithon. My information on organic vegetable gardening was provided by Jim Stephen IFAS Vegetable Garden Specialist. Why garden organically? Since the organic law does not apply to home garden, why would any gardener give up all synthetic fertilizers? And why not use synthetic pesticides, when just one application could eliminate even the most devastating ravages of a crop insect or disease? Why work, so hard handling large quantities or organic soil amendments and manures when synthetic fertilizer of every description and purpose are so quickly available and easy to use? Early gardeners did it to preserve a way of life that reduced pollution and environment decay, thus creating a more ecological society. Organic enthusiasts are extremely healthconscious, and hope that working vigorously outdoors and eating foods free from pesticides just might lead to better nutrition and health. The biggest differences between organic and conventional gardening are in the area of fertilization and pest control. The organic gardener prefers organic materials and natural methods of dealing with insect problems and fertilizer requirements. The conventional gardener uses a combination of chemically prepared materials and scienti c methods in approaching the vegetable garden. Whichever method you choose, you need to select a plot of good, well-drained soil for planting vegetables. And you need to choose vegetable varieties suited to Florida growing conditions. After these points, the direction for organic and conventional gardening begin to differ somewhat. Soil preparation is an important step. Since organic fertilizers and soil conditioning materials work rather slowly, they need to be mixed into the soil at least three weeks ahead of planting time. To have a successful organic garden, you need to use abundant quantities of organic material, usually in the form of animal manures, cover crops, compost or mixed organic fertilizer. These materials improve the tilth, condition, and structure of the soil. They help the soil hold water and nutrients better. In addition, organic matter supports microbiological activity in the soil, and contributes major and minor plant nutrients. Another bene t is that as these organic matters decompose, they release acid which help to convert insoluble natural additives, such as ground rock, into forms plants can use. For more information on organic vegetable gardening contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit our website, http://gulf.ifas.ufl.edu oredis.ifas.ufl.edu and see publication HS 1215.Special to The StarD.A.W.G.S. in Prison would like to thank the Tony Stewart Foundation for its generous grant in the amount of $5,000. This grant will help us in continuing to change the lives of both man and his best friend. D.A.W.G.S. mission is to provide training and education for both inmate and dog, resulting in permanent homes for the dogs, viable job skills for the inmate, and productive jobs and a law-abiding life upon release. The D.A.W.G.S. in Prison program is a joint effort between St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, Gulf Correctional Institution and Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Since the conception of D.A.W.G.S. more than 4 years ago, over 320 dogs and inmates have been given a second chance at life. For the dogs, they receive the rehabilitation and training needed for a chance at adoption. For the inmates, they gain the skills and experience vital in living a productive law-abiding life upon release. The mission of the Tony Stewart Foundation is to raise and donate funds to help care for children diagnosed with critical or chronic illness, animals which are at-risk or endangered, and for drivers injured in the sport of motor racing. D.A.W.G.S. graciously thanks the Tony Stewart Foundation for acknowledging our program as a grant award recipient and looks forward to another successful year in 2014. If you are interested in adopting one of our graduates or want more information on our D.A.W.G.S. in Prison program, please visit our website at dawgsinprison.com You can also like us on Facebook or contact the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103. For more information about the Tony Steward Foundation, you can visit their website at tonystewartfoundation.org .Special to The StarThis year Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe, and Franklin County will come together for one amazing night to celebrate, remember, and ght back at the Relay for Life of the Forgotten Coast. The event will take place at 6 p.m. ET on April 11 at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Shark Stadium. This Relay will be 12 hours versus the previous 24hour event. The message of the event is that no one ghts cancer alone. All cancer survivors, meaning anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer, will join together on the track and walk or wheelchair the rst lap, uni ed in victory and hope. This emotional lap honors the courage of all who have defeated cancer. The atmosphere of Relay for Life is one of camaraderie and celebration, and this event provides an opportunity for cancer survivors to pass the torch of hope on to those still battling cancer or those that might be touched by cancer in the future. Because no one ghts cancer alone, friends, family members, and caregivers are encouraged to attend the Survivors Lap and join their loved ones as they walk around the track. If you are a survivor who would like to register for the survivor ceremony/ dinner please contact Kim Kurnitsky at 227-4093. For more information on cancer, call the American Cancer Society at 1-800ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org. ALDERMAN FAMILY SAYS THANKSA great big thank you to everyone that came and showed so much love and support for Rhonda Alderman and her family at a bene t held in Wewahitchka. Rhonda was recently diagnosed with stage IV melanoma and all the support will help towards travel expense to and from Mof tt Cancer Center. Wed like to once again thank all of the donors who contributed time, money and gifts to make the bene t a success. Words can never express all the things we would like to say for the help, love, and support from Southern Sauced owners Cleatha and Buddy Simmons and our community of Wewahitchka and surrounding areas.Proceeds bene t Relay for LifeStar Staff ReportThe Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 10069 will be serving up its annual St. Patricks Day dinner at 5 p.m. ET Saturday, March 15 at the Post in Highland View. The dinner will include Corned Beef and Cabbage, including potatoes, carrots, onions, bread and scrumptious desserts prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. The evenings festivities will include Karaoke by Wanda, a special St. Pattys Day Basket Raf e and other surprises! Donation for dinner is $10. Remember the dinner service starts at 5 p.m. EDT and will continue until the food is gone. Take outs will be available. All proceeds of the entire event will be donated to the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. Wear your green and join the Ladies Auxiliary for this worthwhile cause. ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension director Call for cancer survivors at Relay for Life D.A.W.G.S. in Prison receives grant from Tony Stewart Foundation Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR VFW to host St. Pattys Day dinner

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The Star| B3Thursday, March 13, 2014 GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM JoelRosenbaum,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients SAVE15%ONPAINTINGSUPPLIESBringthiscouponinandsave!SAVE30%ONPAINTS&STAINS *Validonretailsalesofretailproductsonly.Discounttakenoofourlistprice.Sale pricingorotheroffersthatresultingreatersavingswillsupersedethisoffer. Mustsurrendercouponattimeofredemption.Cashvalue:1/100of1.Oer excludespreviouspurchases,andpurchasesofgiftcards,Multi-Purposeprimers, MinwaxWoodFinishquarts,ladders,sprayequipmentandaccessories.Other exclusionsmayapply,seestorefordetails.Voidiftransferred,purchased,sold,alteredor duplicated,orwhereprohibitedbylaw.ValidatSherwin-WilliamsandSherwin-Williams operatedretailpaintstoresonly.Wereservetherighttoaccept,refuseorlimittheuseof anycoupon.Offervalid3/9/143/31/14.2014TheSherwin-WilliamsCompany. 30%OFF*(withcoupon)PAINTS&STAINSYOURLUCKYCOLORMARCH931 TolocateaSherwin-Williamsstore nearyou,visitsherwin-williams.com orcall1-800-4-SHERWIN. MONFRI: 7AMTO7PM SAT: SUN: 10AMTO6PMStorehoursmayvary.Seestorefordetails.STOREHOURS:Joinuson 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 THE T A HILLONC BEA89 HWY4549 0138746 058 S LIMITY CITCH BEAOMEXIC GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS 0138746 058 S LIMITY CITCH BEAOMEXIC S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA LIVEONTHEPOOPDECKINTHECROWNESTKARAOKE-DJ-DANCING UPCOMINGEVENTSRANDYWITHARTONSAXKONKRETESOULRANDYSTARKDEBIJORDAN NOWTHURSDAYFRIDAY-SATURDAY-9PMALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMESCOMINGWEDNESDAYAPRIL16TH-GIRLSNIGHTOUTWITH THECHIPPENDALES LIMITEDADVANCETICKETSONSALENOW ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES YA COMING WEDNESD YA COMING WEDNESD YA COMING WEDNESD W ANCE TICKETS ON SALE NO VLIMITED AD ZUMBACLASSSCHEDULEEVERYOTHERMONDAYS&WEDNESDAYS (5:30PMUNTIL6:30PMNIGHTLY)MONDAY:03/03/14,03/17/14&03/31/14 WEDNESDAY:03/12/14&03/26/14 MONDAY:04/14/14&04/28/14 WEDNESDAY:04/09/14&04/23/14PLACE:WASHINGTONRECREATIONCTR.CERTIFIEDINSTRUCTOR:IRIS(BOLDEN)GATHERS School NewsSpecial to The StarWewahitchka Elementary School students participated in a TOP SCHOOL ASSEMBLY on Feb. 21. The assembly team is made up of professional athletes that travel all over the world captivating the attention of students by performing amazing feats of strength while sharing a powerful message for todays youth. These athletes come from all different backgrounds including professional football, college football, bodybuilding, power lifting, Strongman competitions, baseball and many other athletic elds. The curriculum they shared with students included: Bullying and the power of words Goals and dreams Anti-tobacco, drugs and alcohol Making right choices Character building Technology (texting, internet and computer safety) Health issues (diet, exercise, obesity and diabetes) Prepare for the state testing Thanks to SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) and the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce for funding this event. Special to The StarOn Feb. 28, the Port St. Joe community enjoyed a beautiful night of food, fellowship and fundraising at the 15th annual Italian Dinner and Auction sponsored by Faith Christian School. Many local businesses and individuals generously donated items for the silent and live auctions while more than 700 FCS supporters came to enjoy a lovely, Italian-inspired meal. Faith Christian School would like to offer our sincerest thanks to Long Avenue Baptist Church and First Baptist Church for the delicious lasagna, Oak Grove Church for the scrumptious spaghetti, First United Methodist Church for the use of their tables and chairs, and Carol Dow and the Fish House Restaurant for the donation of the salads, bread and condiments. Another big thank you goes to the parents of the PTO for the organization of this event, and all the parents, volunteers and supporters of FCS who gave of their time and resources. The biggest praise of all goes to our Savior, Jesus Christ, for His blessing on the evening. The windows of Heaven were open wide, and He generously poured out His favor on the ministry of FCS. The support of our community means so much to the ministry of Faith Christian School, and we are touched by the overwhelming display of it. Thank you for an amazing night! The Lions Tale STUDENT ARTIsST OF THE MONTHPHOTOs S Sp P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A RThe Student Artist of the Month at Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School is Jacobi Jones. Jones said ever since he could remember, hes always enjoyed creating art. In elementary school is was his favorite subject, aside from P.E. His favorite thing to draw is people, and he enjoys drawing faces from his imagination or portraits or celebrities. He also enjoys drawing animals. In additional to art, Jones enjoys listening to music, lifting weights and playing video games. He hopes to have a career in graphic design and has received plenty of encouragement from his mother. A GILDED GLIDER DaDAZZLING DDOLpPHINsSSp P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A RA double swing glider constructed by students in Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High Schools carpentry class was auctioned off on Feb. 14. The winner was Tunnie Miller from Wewahitchka. The students raised $1,200 that will go toward funding end-of-year carpentry projects.Sp P ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A RThis weeks Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Kellie Simmons and JaLeighya Becton. Back row: Diamond Warner, Noah Bareld, Micaela Fedd, Brianna Biagini and Jayquan Walker. PHOTOs S spSP ECIa A L TO TT HE STa A RWES students enjoy TOP assembly

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org BruceHodge, Pastor SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net Thursday, March 13, 2014Special to The Star The state of public education will be examined at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, March 17 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Pass or Fail? The State of Education, features lmed stories from Nikhil Goyal, TED talk speaker and author of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Students Assessment of School, and Sajan George, the founder of Matchbook Learning, a school-turnaround organization. Thirteen years of being in the system annihilated my creative potential, said Goyal, a recent high school graduate. School stunted my creative prowess. I came to the realization that I was seen not as a human being, but as a test score. He now advocates a number of changes for the educational system. Participants in the Lifetree program will discuss the current state of public education and what changes might improve the system for schools, parents, and students. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net.10th annual Irish dinnerSpecial to The StarSt. Joseph Catholic Church will hold its 10th Annual St. Patricks Irish Dinner on Saturday, March 15. The dinner will take place in the Church Hall, 202 20th Street, Port St. Joe. The dinner is $10 a ticket and will include Corned Beef, New Potatoes, Cabbage, Carrots, Onions, Homemade Soda Bread or rolls, dessert, and tea, coffee or lemonade. There will be two seatings that evening, at 5 p.m. EST and the second at 6:30 p.m. EST. Tickets for the rst seating usually sells out, so please get you tickets early for your preferred seating. Back by popular demand, we are selling the Whole Cooked Corned Beef Briskets. The Brisket will be 331/2 pounds cooked weight for $20. We need these to be pre-ordered so we know how many to cook. You can pick them up the day before the dinner from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Friday, March 1 Take outs will be available again this year and you can pick them up at the front door ticket sales during either seating. Just look for the signs. Entertainment again this year will be Toni Minichello on the accordion and Marty Jarosz will be our MC. Come and sing Irish songs, eat good food and have an enjoyable evening. You can purchase tickets after each mass Saturday evening or Sunday morning or the Church Of ce will have them available on Monday and Thursday. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Phone number 227-1417. Also you can get tickets at the No Name Caf Books and More or The Laundry Basket. For more information or to buy tickets call Barb or Dan Van Treese 227-9837.Special to the StarHighland View Assembly of God will welcome visiting minister Perry Dissmore at 10:35 a.m. ET on Sunday, March 16. Dissmore is an Assemblies of God minister and the current holder of the Guinness World Record for basketball free throws in an hour. Everyone in the community is invited to hear him preach. William Joseph Luberto Sr., 84, passed away on March 2, 2014, at Bay Medical Center in Panama City, Fla. Willie was born March 26, 1929, in Bergen eld, New Jersey to the late John and Rose Luberto. He was the youngest of 10 brothers and sisters. Willie resided most of his life in Little Ferry, New Jersey and moved to Eastpoint, Florida in 1993 where he spent the remainder of his life. He is preceded in death by his wife, Beatrice Luberto Survived by his son, William J. Luberto Jr., (late Paula Luberto) of Eastpoint and daughter, Catherine Bomzer (Hal) of Ridge eld Park, NJ; ve grandchildren, William G. Luberto, (Misty) Lauren Luberto, and Michael Luberto, of Eastpoint and Kelly Bomzer and Phllip Bomzer of New Jersey; and two great-grandchildren, Jadyn Luberto and Will Luberto of Eastpoint along with a number of nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held 2 p.m. ET Wednesday, March 5 at St. Patricks Catholic Church in Apalachicola. Interment followed in Eastpoint Cemetery All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.William Joseph Luberto, Sr.Frank J. Pierce, 81, of Panama City, Florida passed away Thursday March 6, 2014, at Covenant Hospice In-Patient Care Center. He was born in Fountain, Fla., to Jessie Frank and Hattie Gainnie Pierce on March 10, 1932 and has been a resident of Bay County since 1991, moving here from Port St. Joe, Fla. Mr. Pierce was a member of the Port St. Joe High School Class of 1952. Frank enlisted in the United States Army and served his country through the 11th and 101st Airborne Divisions, receiving an Honorable Discharge in 1955. After returning to Port St. Joe, he began his 45 year telecommunications career as a lineman for St. Joseph Telephone & Telegraph Company. Mr. Pierce also worked with Continental Telephone Company and retired from the Engineering Department of GT Com in Port St. Joe. Frank was an active member of East Bay Baptist Church. An avid hunter and sherman, he enjoyed pursuing game in numerous panhandle counties. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Lucille B. Pierce, and his son and daughter-in-law, Gregg and Cathy Pierce; his grandchildren Chelsea (Dan) Hitt, Cori (Zach) Wood and Jesse Pierce; his great-grandchildren Lexi and Lincoln Hitt, Wyatt and Elijah Pierce, Autumn Hitt, Joel and Noah Wood all of Bay County. Frank is also survived by his brothers Floyd (Marilea) Pierce of Panama City and Paul (Charlotte) Pierce of Port St. Joe; his nephews Joe (Terri) Pierce of Panama City, Frank (Donna) Ritch and Jonathan Pierce all of Port St. Joe, Fla. In addition to his parents, Mr. Pierce was predeceased by his sister, Evelyn Watkins, and a greatgrandson, Hunter Hitt. In celebration of his life, a funeral service was held on Monday, March 10, 2014, at Southerland Family Funeral Home beginning at 10:00 a.m., with the Reverends Craig Hodges and Mike Stroud of ciating. A time of visitation was held on Sunday, March 9, 2014, from 6-8 p.m. at Southerland Family Funeral Home. In lieu of oral contributions, the family has requested that contributions be made in Mr. Pierces name to Covenant Hospice or the charity of your choice.Frank J. PierceOur sorrow in the loss of our daughter/ granddaughter was easier to bear because of your help in the time of our need, was a great comfort to us. Thank you for your unfailing sympathy and kind assistance.The Martins, Von and Adam Bryants, Foxworth family OBITUARIES LETTER OF THANKSGuest minister at Highland View Assembly of GodPublic education graded at Lifetree Caf

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, March 13, 2014 PUBLICNOTICEAPublicHearingwillbeheldatthePlanningandDevelopment ReviewBoard(PDRB)onMarch17,2014at8:45a.m.EST,andat theBoardofCountyCommissioners(BOCC)meetingonTuesday, March25,2014at9:00a.m.EST.Bothpublichearingswillbeheld intheBOCCMeetingRoomattheRobertM.MooreAdministration Building,1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,PortSt.Joe,Florida.The publichearingswillbetodiscussandactonthefollowing: 1.Variance-EllisC.Smith-ParcelID#03806-080R-Locatednext toVeteransPark(BeaconHill),GulfSideUS98-Buildingsetback nexttoPark. 2.Variance-CarolineA. Rankin-ParcelID#06351005R-LocatedonWindwardSt.(CapeSanBlas) -RoadsetbacktomeetDEP CCCLlandwardsetback. 3.CountyDevelopment RegulationsandPolicies 4.Staff,PublicandOpen Discussion Thepublicisencouraged toattendandbeheardon thesematters. Informationpriortothe meetingcanbeviewedat thePlanning Departmentat1000Cecil G.CostinSr.Blvd.,Room 311. Variance-EllisC.Smith Variance-CarolineA.Rankin Special to The StarA special writing workshop, Turning Your Memories into Memoirs, will be held from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. ET on Thursday, March 6 at The Artery. Instructor Pat Van West will show attendees how to turn their personal experiences into interesting stories that can be shared with family and friends. Discussions will include what is worth writing about and whats not and writing about what you know. The fee for the class is $35. No supplies are required and registration can be completed online at www.arterystudio.com/register.html. The Artery is at 214 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Port St. Joe Elementary School teamed up with the Port St. Joe Police Department to keep kids safe. Last week, police donated a reective vest and hand-held stop sign to the safety patrol to ensure additional visibility for crossing guards. Police Chief David Barnes and Deputy Chief David Garner presented the equipment to Principal Sue Gannon and the schools preeminent crossing guard, sixth-grader Cheyenne Cole. Last September, the school started the safety patrol programs that allowed students to volunteer to help walkers and bike riders across a busy Long Avenue before and after school hours. Each morning, Cole arrives to school several minutes early, and she stays late all for the benet and safety of her peers. A bunch of my friends ride bikes to school, and I like to help keep them safe, said Cole, proudly brandishing her new equipment. Its fun, and it taught me to always help others. The vest and sign were purchased with money from a trust fund that receives money from forfeitures and drug busts. Earlier in the year, police made a drugrelated arrest and as per policy, sold the criminals vehicle. The $160 for the safety equipment came out of the funds collected from the car. Were grateful and appreciative of the support we get from the police, Gannon said. In order to help with the safety patrol students must be responsible, be respected by the teachers and have a good relationship with the student body. The safety patrol teaches responsibility, Barnes said. I have a history of helping with crosswalks and Ive learned that safety is important, especially when kids are involved.Special to The StarTo better serve patients in Gulf and Franklin counties, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf has opened an Intermediate Care Unit, which can accommodate very sick patients with a higher level of care than previously available at SHHG. The additional unit required adding cardiac monitors, extra oxygen lines for ventilation or Bipap, and closed circuit TVs for continuous monitoring. These new services will allow SHHG to offer a higher level of care or intermediate care services due to the full-time hospitalists and current nursing staff with critical care experience. Expected benets include increased patient satisfaction as fewer patients will require transfer to other larger hospitals for atrial b or chest pain (when ruled out for heart attack). It will also allow Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf to provide services to patients who need more complex surgeries, including those who need to be on a ventilator following their procedure. Kathy Chastain, Chief Nursing Ofcer said, These services will be benecial not only to patients but also to their family members who live in the community. They can visit their family members far easier, as we are far closer than traveling to neighboring Bay County. As always, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf strives to meet the needs of our local community while providing excellent care. By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com For the 11th year, the Mexico Beach visitors marked the end of winter with the annual snowbird luncheon held at the El Governor Motel. The weather, it seemed, had a sense of humor. Despite cooler temperatures, visitors enjoyed a free barbecue lunch from Sharons Caf, entertainment from Randy and Junior Stark and received door prizes that featured loads of beach gear. Dressed in shorts and sandals, guests were bound and determined to relax around the pool one last time before heading home. It was such a great way to send the visitors back up north with a heartfelt thank you, Community Development Council executive director Kimberly Shoaf said. Fortunately, the weather held off, and Shoaf and her team of volunteers were able to feed more than 325 winter residents. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf opens new intermediate care unitCreative writing workshop at The Artery WES LOCHER | The StarPort St. Joe chief of police David Barnes (left), and Deputy David Garner (right) donated a vest and stop sign to crossing guard program at PSJE. Principal Susan Gannon and safety patroller Cheyenne Cole accepted.PSSJ police donate gear to crossing guard at PSSJEEWES LOCHER | The StarMore than 325 winter residents turn out for the 11th annual snowbird luncheon in Mexico Beach. Visitors enjoyed free food and entertainment on the pool deck of the El Governor Motel. Visitors took the opportunity to spend one more afternoon at the beach before heading out of town for the summer.Snowbirds ock to El Governor for luncheon

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B6 | The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 MARCH 3-9On Monday, March 3, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) executed two transport orders. The GCSO traveled to the Okaloosa County Jail and the Walton Correctional Institution to transport Devin M. Leavell and Johntavious S. Tiller. Both were due to appear in court on Tuesday, March 4th. They were transported back to their respective facilities on Wednesday, March 5. On March 3, the GCSO received a complaint regarding criminal mischief in the 100 block of Narvaez Street in St. Joe Beach. Deputy J. Brock took the report. The victim reported that their vehicle was keyed. It is believed this is an isolated incident and Deputy Brock continues to investigate. On Tuesday, March 4, Julius A Gathers (42) was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility on a Bay County warrant for Child Support. On March 4, the GCSO received a call regarding the theft of two handguns. Sgt. J. Murnan responded to the call in the 5400 block of Cape San Blas Road. One of the handguns was described as a stainless steel .32 caliber H&R and the other a Taurus 45 caliber handgun. There was no forced entry into the home. The GCSO continues to investigate. On March 4, Deputy G. Desrosier responded to the Creek Stop Food and Deli at 3050 North Highway 71 regarding a gas drive off. A white male who drove a gold colored Toyota truck pumped $20.01 of fuel and drove off without paying. On March 5, Deputy B. Smith was dispatched to the Dixie Dandy in Wewahitchka in reference to shoplifting. The defendant, Jayla L. Long (23), was captured on video surveillance stealing merchandise from the business. Long was arrested by Deputy P. Williams the following day and charged with Retail Theft. On March 5, Deputy M. Ward served a Writ of Attachment on Johnny P. Greer, Jr. (48) for Child Support. Greer was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility and paid the $1,000 purge amount for the Writ. He was released. On Thursday, March 6, at approximately 2:43 a.m. Deputy S. Ferrell responded to Pine Ridge Apartments in reference to a possible prowler. The caller advised that someone was walking around knocking on windows and doors. When Deputy Ferrell arrived he was unable to locate anyone. A second call was received at approximately 3:33 a.m. Deputy S. Ferrell placed Karen A. Mancham under arrest for Disorderly Conduct and transported her to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 6, the GCSO executed a transport order by traveling to the Gadsden Correctional Facility in Quincy. Taylor M. Green was transported to appear in court Tuesday Morning. She was returned to Gadsden Correctional Facility on the same day. On March 6, Sherry A. Robinson (46) turned herself into the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce. Robinson was wanted for Violation of Probation with the original being Harassing Phone Calls. She was booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility and released on a $500 bond. On March 6, Deputy M. Layeld served Gary L. Husdon (44) with a warrant for Failure to Appear with the original charges being Harassing Phone Calls. Hudson was transported and booked into the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was released the following day on his own recognizance. On Friday, March 7, Paula R. Pitts (29) turned herself over to Deputy S. Ferrell. Pitts was wanted for Violation of Probation with the original charge being Driving Under the Inuence. She was rst appeared and released on a $500 bond. On March 7, Richard L. Mullinax (61) turned himself in at the Gulf County Detention Facility. Deputy K. Starnes served Mullinax with an arrest warrant for Failure to Appear with the original charge being Domestic Battery. Mullinax was rst appeared and released on a $250 bond. On March 7, Sgt. J. Murnan responded to a report of a telephone scam. The victim was contacted over the phone and advised that they had won a sweepstakes and needed to pay taxes on the winnings before the funds could be released. The victim provided personal information to the caller to comply with the instructions given. The phony company was able to withdraw $1,500 from the victims account. Investigator L. Dickey continues to investigate the case. On March 7, Deputy J. Brock conducted a trafc stop on US Highway 98 near Twine Road in Port St. Joe. Deputy Brock knew the driver did not have a valid drivers license. Roderick L. Robinson (46) was placed under arrest for Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. Robinson was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was rst appeared and released on March 9 on a $500 bond. On March 7, Sgt. J. Williams conducted a trafc stop on State Road 71 and Jehu Road in Wewahitchka for a trafc violation. Contact was made with the driver, Adam J. Brobeck (22), who admitted to not having a valid drivers license. When directed to exit the vehicle Brobeck drew attention to himself as he attempted to discard a small baggie of meth. When handcuffed and searched he was found in possession of an item commonly used to ingest methamphetamine. A search of the vehicle was conducted and additional drug evidence was discovered which included small plastic baggies and scales. Brobeck and the passenger, Lakin A. Leavins (22), were both placed under arrest. Brobeck was charged with Driving While License Suspended or Revoked, Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, Possession of Meth, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Leavins was charged with Possession of Meth, Possession of Meth with the Intent to Distribute, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Approximately $430 was sized for evidence in the case. Leavins was also served with two warrants for the Sale of Methamphetamine by the GCSO Narcotics Unit. Brobeck and Leavins were transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 7, Deputy G. Desrosier arrested Colton L. Mullinax (18) in the 400 block of Jehu Road in Wewahitchka. Mullinax was wanted for Failure to Appear on his original charge of Domestic Battery. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was later rst appeared and released the following day on a $2,500 bond. Tolearnhowyoucansupportour communitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat(850)770-2108 ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY PANAMACITYTHECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL TheGulfCountyTouristDevelopmentCouncil (GCTDC)willacceptapplicationsfortheir20142015SPONSORSHIP &SPECIALFUNDINGPROGRAM:ApplicationsareavailablebeginningMarch13, 2014attheGulfCountyWelcomeCenter, 150CaptainFredsPlace,PortSt.Joe,Florida 32456oronlineatwww.visitgulf.com/partners. ApplicationswillbeacceptedattheGCTDCofces intheGulfCountyWelcomeCenterbetweenthe hoursof9:00a.m.and4:00p.m., ETuntilMarch28,2014.DEADLINEISMARCH28,2014at4:00p.m.ET. NOEXCEPTIONS Law EnforcementStar Staff ReportA Panama City man was arrested last week by deputies from the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce on drug charges. Jahwar Anwar Harris, 38, was arrested last Wednesday on local drug charges and on a Bay County warrant for violation of probation, with the original charges of cocaine possession and possession of meth. Investigator Greg Skipper came in contact with Harris in the 200 block of Osceola Avenue in Wewahitchka. Harris ed on foot after he dropped a glass pipe on the ground and was observed attempting to hide a small black plastic baggie. Deputy B. Smith assisted in the search for Harris and located him in an abandoned shed approximately 100 yards away through a wooded area. Investigator Skipper determined the plastic baggie Harris attempted to hide contained approximately 13 grams of methamphetamine. Harris was arrested and charged with Possession of Methamphetamine with the Intent to Distribute, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Resisting a Law Enforcement Ofcer. Harris was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility where he was later rst appeared by Judge McFarland and given a $67,000 bond. Harris is held without bond for the Bay County Sheriffs Ofce. Panama City man arrested on drug charges JAHWAR AA. H HARRIS GULF CCOUNTY SSHERIFFS OOFFICE LLAW EENFORCEmMENT SSUmmMMARY

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LocalThe Star| B7Thursday, March 13, 2014paperwork for Butts ended up buried in a pile on a secretarys desk, and the plaque emerged as the only indication Butts had a winning essay. It was a screw-up, but it was a wonderful screwup, Knox said. It turned out fabulous. Josh is a good writer and a good student. So is Chance. I knew those two would do a great job. And, so, two months after Pittman had his day in the spotlight, it was Butts turn. Butts wrote about former Gov. Jeb Bush and his education initiatives. Speak to Butts for a few moments, and it is understandable that Bush would resonate with a young man who enjoys his studies. I chose him because of his education plan, Butts said. I like school. I want good grades. We were one of the bottom states in education and he brought it to the top. He had a six-part plan. Its important to be at the top. I can say I live here and in Florida I am part of one of the top education systems. Butts said he loves to write, tapping into what he called his creative mind and soaking in research and building a narrative, two key parts of the essay process. And that he turned that love of writing into a scholarship and lessening the future nancial burden on his parents Karen and Chris, who after all, have ve other children sprouting through Gulf County Schools, is pure gravy. It feels great, Butts said. I know I can go to college. I can have the experience of going to college and it helps out my mom and dad. In college, the love of writing may have to take second place. Butts said he hopes to be a high school math teacher if his dream of professional baseball doesnt pan out, which Butts freely admits is a long-shot at best. I really like writing, reading and language, Butts said. But I really love math. CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 13, 2014 The Star | B7 94300S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2013 CA 000042 Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Belita C. Moreton; Unknown Spouse of Belita C. Moreton; Lantana By The Sea Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 4, 2014 entered in Case No. 2013 CA 000042 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Belita C. Moreton; Unknown Spouse of Belita C. Moreton; Lantana By The Sea Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front lobby of the Courthouse at 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, beginning at 11:00 AM ET on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, LANTANA BY THE SEA SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 47. Dated this 6th day of March, 2014. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. March 13, 20, 2014 94316S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Cool Breeze Pool Cleaning located at 253 Canal St., in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 6th day of March, 2014. George Hieber & Dawn Hallinan March 13, 2014 97979S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1511 Application No. 2014-16 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06317-075R Description of Property: Lot 2 Marnies Reserve Plat Book 3 page 65, public records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Coastal Land Company LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97981S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1480 Application No. 2014-15 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06291-115R Description of Property: LOT 23: Commence at the intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Christopher L Johnson & Ana D. Johnson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction J&MSCRAPPINGCARS/TRUCKS MOBILEHOMES CAMPERTRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOWA/C WASHERS/DRYERS STOVES/REFRIGERATORS FREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWNMOWERS SCRAPMETAL,ETC... 19Years of Service! CALLTODAY!GETYOURADIN451-6042/227-7847 COLLEGE from page B1 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarStudents at Port St. Joe who raised money for the American Heart Association participated in Hoops for Heart. They raised more than $5,000 to donate to the American Heart Association. B1 Hoops5 The Hoops/Jump Rope for Heart program has been active in Port St. Joe for more than 10 years. During P.E. class, students had the choice of jumping rope or shooting hoops as a reward. HOOpPS FOR HEART AT pPSJE

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B8| The Star Thursday, March 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 1121336 1121337 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com Managers Hostesses Bartenders Servers/Bussers Cooks Shuckers Maintenance APPLY 3:00PM 5:00PM ONLY MON. THUR FRI TOP PAY! SUMMER BONUS!4516145 4516142EXPERIENCED MAINTENANCE PERSON to do grounds and maintenance on a 51 unit apartment community. Must have experience in painting, general carpentry, basic plumbing, electrical and appliance repair. HVAC preferred, but not required. Knowledge in ground keeping. Must be able to pass a background check, have their own tools, and valid drivers license. Pick up application at: 125 Venus Dr, Port St. Joe or call 850-227-7451Oce Hours: Mon. 1-5, Tues, Wed, Thurs. 9-5, Closed on Fridays.This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. NOW HIRING PINE RIDGE APARTMENTS 4516135First UMC of PSJ is seeking a Director of Children's Ministry Job description can be viewed at psjumc.org. Please mail resumes to PSJ UMC PO Box 266 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or email to fumcpsj@gtcom.net Attention Children's Ministry 1123213ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY: The primary functions of this faculty position is to teach courses in Microsoft computer applications, Business Administration and Management program, Technology Management, and Entrepreneurship and to develop and ensure the curriculum meets local industry standards, and advise technology students for these programs. Minimum Quali cations: Masters degree in Business Administration, Marketing, or Management with Microsoft O ce Certi cations in Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point, or a Masters degree in Computer Science or Management Information Systems, or other related computer eld. Deadline to apply: 3/27/2014Applicants may apply in person at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98, via fax at (850) 913-3292, or e-mail your application to bcollins2@gulfcoast.edu Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hrGulf Coast State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, national origin, ethnicity, sex, age, marital status, or disability in its programs, activities or employment. Roberta Mackey, Executive Director of Human Resources, 850-872-3866, has been designated as the person to handle all inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Accepting applications until March 15, 2014 Web ID#: 34281510 Text FL81510 to 56654 County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98015S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on March 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N00E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S23E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S25E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N64E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S25E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 01, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 359.21 feet) to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 00, for an arc length of 100.03 feet (chord to said curve bears S23E, 100.03 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N67E, 218.05 feet; thence N23W, 100.03 feet to a point on a line that bears N67E of the Point of Beginning; thence S67W, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Parcel B: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N00E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S23E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S25E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N64E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S25E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 01, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 359.21 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line N67E, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence S23E, 100.03 feet; thence N67E, 527.95 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay; thence along said mean high water line, N31W, 101.32 feet, more or less, to a point on a line that bears N67E of the Point of Beginning; thence S67W, 513.95 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR J. RICCARD and JANET S. RICCARD, Defendants and the docket number of which is: 2013-CA-000163. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 97983S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1441 Application No. 2014-14 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06269-955R Description of Property: Lot 6 Turtle Dunes according to the plat thereof recorded in the public records of Gulf County at Plat Book 5 page 7. Name in which assessed: Jerry D. Semprevio All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97985S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1030 Application No. 2014-13 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03671-000R Description of Property: Lot 16, Block 14, Beacon Hill Subdivision according to the plat recorded at Plat Book 1 page 2. Name in which assessed: Gary & Gloria Freeman All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98115S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2013-CA-000026 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 10, 2014 and entered in Case No. 23-2013-CA000026 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and DOROTHEA GALE PITTS A/K/A DOROTHEA G. PITTS A/K/A DORTHEA G. PITTS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; ST. JOE GOLF VILLAS OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. (DISSOLVED CORPORATION); are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: UNIT C: A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR 1265.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID SECTION LINE FOR 1010.0 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 434.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 1124.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 520.68 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 619.66 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 127.44 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 75.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 551.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 560.24 FEET; THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 283.56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1292.44 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 168.85 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 22.43 FEET ALONG THE CHORD OF A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 6442.24 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 59 SECONDS; THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST, 168.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST, 22.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 724 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on March 5, 2014. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F13000564 March 13, 20, 2014 98027S In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Bay County, Florida Case No.:13-690CA Prosperity Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Paul G. Francis, Tenant #1 and Tenant #2 representing any unknown tenants who may be in possession, any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants, and The United States of America, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Bay and Gulf County, Florida, described as: Commence at the Northern most corner of Lot 13, Block 11, Mexico Beach Unit No. 1, according to the official plat thereof filed in Plat Book 7, at Page 5, Public Records, Bay County, Florida; thence run in a Southwesterly direction along the Northwestern boundary line of Lots 13, 12 and 11, in said Block 11, for a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 900 right for a distance of 50 feet; thence turn 90 right and run a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 90 right for a distance of 50 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel lying and being in Fractional Section 25, Township 6 South, Range 12 West, Mexico Beach, Bay County, Florida. and Lot 18 & 20, Block 19, Beacon Hill Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www. bay.realforeclose.com, beginning at 11:00 AM CST on April 10, 2014. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus finds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 24th day of February, 2014 Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF COURT By: Virginia Starling Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 98123S PUBLIC NOTICE The March regular meeting of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Board of Directors will be held on Wednesday, March 26, at 10 AM, at 406 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida. All persons are invited to attend and participate. Anyone want to appeal an official decision made on any subject at the meeting must have a verbatim record of the meeting that includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is based. March 13, 2014 ADOPTION: At-Home-Mom, Financial Security, LOVE awaits baby!Lisa & Kenny 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Cues Quality Used Furniture and Thrift Store Introducing a new line of mattresses-made in USAby Golden Mattress Company. Twins starting at $69. Fulls starting at $88. Queens starting at $108. 1425 Hwy 71 South Wewa. Open 9a-5pm Mon-Sat and Sunday, 11a-5pm 850-639-2343/628-1358 Text FL80338 to 56654 For Sale By Owner: 506 8th St. 4br/2ba; gas log and heat pump. 706-646-3990 or 706-648-8413. PSJ 8949 Auger Ave(Off Hwy 98 North of Beacon Hill Park) Fri-Sat March 14th and 15th from 9a-3p (No Early Birds)Estate Sale 30+Years Of AccumulationBass Boat, Books, Upright Freezer, Glass Ware, Housewares, Jewlery, Small Appliances, Tools, And Much More. Text FL83015 to 56654 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofersHiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to applyWeb ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Food Svs/Hosp.Experienced Line CooksStart your new year out right! Toucans in Mexico Beach is now hiring exper. line cooks and the following positions: Exp. Servers BartendersApply in person between 2:00pm4:00pm. 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach 850-648-8207Web ID#: 34282386 Install/Maint/RepairDiesel MechanicWith own tools, full time position. Extensive light, medium, and heavy equipment experience required. For immediate interview send resumes to Blind Box 3399 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34282890 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office, sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 Long term rental. St. Joe Beach. 3/2, fully furnished. Private inground pool. $1600/mo. includes all utilities. No pets. Call 850-348-0262 lv msg. RV for Rent$135/week. + $135/dep. Great for 1-2 people. Includes water, sewage, electric & WIFI 850-639-5721 Text FL82785 to 56654 GULF COUNTY WATERFRONT LOTBeautiful lot 100+ feet on deepwater side of Wettapo Creek. 800 deep with existing driveway the length of the lot. We are advised there are two wells (one deep and one shallow). Underground power. Offers are solicited. Call 850-763-7311 for more info. Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers. Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.