The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03932


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com George Cox has been a Gulf County education institution for 50 years. As of November, his role will become strictly voluntary. Cox announced at Tuesday’s regular monthly meeting of the Gulf County School Board that he would be retiring from his District 2 seat effective with the 2014 elections in November. Cox, rst voted to the seat in a special election when Sharon Gaskin mounted a campaign for Superintendent of Schools, was returned to of ce for two full terms, never facing opposition. “I would like to thank the voters of District 2,” Cox said. “I have spent all of my adult life working with the Gulf County School System. It has been most rewarding, and I will continue to support it in any way I can.” Which effectively means Cox is not retiring from the system, just retiring from receiving a paycheck for this work. Cox has counted money for school events, contributed to efforts of various clubs and organizations — not to mention individual students — and has volunteered to count the proceeds from the vending machines at Wewahitchka High School for years. And in addition to his time on the School Board, Cox also has served the past eight years as a director for the Florida School Board Association, serving on a host of committees. “He brings such institutional knowledge to this board,” Superintendent Jim Norton said. “He has gone from the classroom to the board room.” Cox spent 40 years as an instructor and club sponsor at Wewahitchka High School. Primarily an instructor of various business-related courses —from economics to civics to typing to business education — Cox long has been a xture in the schools at the north end. Those decades in the classroom provided the instructional personnel in Gulf County Schools with one of their strongest advocates on the School Board, a man consistently questioning and praising teachers and staff to ensure students were getting the education he provided. “He is a blessing to this board,” board member Billy Quinn Jr said. “He brings a tremendous amount of Thursday, MARCH 6, 2014 District to conduct school shooter exercise By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com There is no immunity, no free passes for Gulf County Schools. No matter how small-town the feel of the district, no matter how many students and families are familiar to those working in the schools, there is no immunity from school violence and the potential for a shooter stalking the hallways. Columbine, Newtown — enough said for any school district in the country. “We feel like we are immune from this type of behavior, but we are not,” said Deputy Superintendent for Gulf County Schools Duane McFarland. “We are going to be prepared for anything that may happen. “It is our responsibility to not only assure students are achieving in the classroom, but that they are also safe in the classroom.” By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Glen Silva said his role will be “facilitator.” Another description might be reality check. Marine Staff Sgt. Glen Silva will attend May’s Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend in Port St. Joe as something of a mentor, a man with a passionate understanding and empathy for the wounded service men and women who will spend several days basking and shing in a place not a medical ward. Silva, who attended the Wounded Warrior Weekend in 2011 as one of the warriors of focus, comes this year to lend a hand, and an ear, to organizers and soldiers alike. He will assist warriors during the weekend, to provide maybe a dash of cold water to those, Silva acknowledges, that might be suffering through the “woe is me, no one understands” stage of serious injury. “The key for me is getting into their faces and treating them as service men and women,” Silva said. “You are still a member of the military, and you are bringing them back to the brotherhood. “Research shows that units that maintain contact with each other heal better. Units with good family support systems heal better.” MEXICO BEACH CITY COUNCIL PREPARES FOR ELECTION Star Staff Report Three seats will be up for vote next month on the Mexico Beach city council. Quali ed candidates have been announced. Group 2, currently occupied by Gary Woodham, who was appointed after Lanny Howell resigned in January, will face opposition from Mary Blackburn. In Group 4, incumbent Tanya Castro will face Tom Bailey and Bill McGlothlin, and Jeff Tendler will face off for the Group 5 seat that will be left vacant by Bobby Pollock. Tendler and Blackburn ran last year on a platform for change but lost to incumbents Mullen and Howell. 2014 GEORGE COX Cox announces retirement from School Board “We feel like we are immune from this type of behavior, but we are not. It is our responsibility to not only assure students are achieving in the classroom, but that they are also safe in the classroom.” Duane McFarland Deputy Superintendent for Gulf County Schools FILE PHOTOS The touchstone events at each Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend are an evening banquet to honor warriors in attendance and a day of shing in the Gulf of Mexico. Commission votes to dissolve PSJRA board By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners are preparing to don new hats. A deeply divided board, voting 3-2 along familiar fault lines, on Tuesday approved dissolving the board of directors of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency. The result, after an ordinance to make the change is approved for advertisement and read twice, would be commissioners becoming the PSJRA board, operating “separately” as a body “independent” from their roles as city commissioners, said city attorney Tom Gibson. The item, which had not been previously discussed by this board, was not listed on the agenda publicly distributed last Friday. The item, listed at the request of Commissioner William Thursbay, was included in an amended agenda posted shortly before 11 a.m. ET Monday. The issue was taken up while PSJRA executive director Gail Alsobrook, who attends almost every regular and special meeting, was not in town. “That was a cowardly act to vote when she is not here,” said resident and active civic volunteer John Parker. Dissolution of the PSJRA board, Thursbay said, was not to get rid of Alsobrook, but the board. Thursbay brought the motion that was seconded for discussion by Commissioner Phil McCroan. During the lengthy, often heated debate, Commissioner Bo Patterson approved the move for reasons similar to Thursbay. When asked if his second of the motion stood, McCroan said he wanted to hear from all commissioners and then provided no insight as to his own views as he voted to dissolve the PSJRA board. Commissioner Rex Buzzett and Mayor Mel Magidson strongly disagreed with the move. “We have a great board; we are doing the wrong thing here,” Buzzett said. Buzzett noted he was chairman of the board of what was then the Downtown Redevelopment Agency for a decade. The group, without funds, mostly gathered to discuss ideas without the wherewithal to get much done. That changed, he said, when the agency hired an executive director and pursued statutorily Leaving it better than when found WOUNDED WARRIORS WEEKEND See WARRIORS A2 See SHOOTER A8 See COX A8 See PSJRA A2 Spring forward! Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. Sunday Opinion ........................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ............. A5 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 YEAR 76, NUMBER 21

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 $$ $ $ $ W ed n e s d a y M a r c h 1 9 2 0 1 4 2 : 00 5 : 00 P M E ST W a s h i n g t o n I m p r o v e m en t G r o u p ( W I G ) C en t er 4 0 1 P et e r s S t r eet P o r t S t Jo e F L 3 2 4 5 6 C O M E A N D D I S C O V E R W H Y Y O U R H E A L T H I S Y O U R G R E A TE S T W E A L TH F R EE H E A L T H S C R EEN IN G S S p o n s o r e d B y : F l o r i d a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h i n G u l f C o u n t y C l o s i n g t h e G a p P r o g r a m F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n p l e a s e c o n t a ct : T a l i t h a R o b i n s o n a t ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 1 1 1 e x t 1 0 2 WARRIORS from page A1 And Silva bears scars from the battleeld that lend him hard-earned bona des with his fellow soldier. Silva was wounded Oct. 12, 2010 — as with so many wounded veterans, his “Alive Day” is seared in his mind. To say Silva suffered wounds is to characterize a St. Bernard a mere dog. He lost a leg, shattered ear drums, lost ngernails, broke ribs, suffered a catastrophic brain injury, collapsed lungs, severe wounds to his stomach and genitalia and had, in effect, his abdomen splayed open. In an earlier time, during an earlier war, he would have died. “Now you have their atten tion,” Silva said of the dialogue after he explains to others his injuries. “They can start be coming productive members of the society. “I am going to ask them how are they moving forward? I will challenge them. What are they doing to make it bet ter than they found it? That is good for society as a whole. It is such a simple concept. It’s not about what you donate or anything like that. It is what are you doing in your daily life to make society better?” Silva brings a far deeper well of understanding than most regarding the impact of catastrophic wounds, what must be overcome to move ahead, to regain footing and a sense of self and purpose. “Everybody is different,” Silva said by phone from Quantico, Va., where he is an instructor in combat leader ship among other courses. “It’s a wake-up call and every body wants there to be cookiecutter answers, cookie-cutter solutions, but there are not. “My faith and my intestinal fortitude were important, but so were my life experiences and my age (42 today). I just kept thinking let’s get going through this and get out.” The swirling emotions ac companying such serious wounds, Silva said, are often compounded by the reception from home. The “thank you for your service” the characterization of a “hero” was at times, well, overwhelming. “That was initially very hard for me,” Silva said. “To have people thank you for your service, I understand that is more for them, and that is OK. Because of my ability and skills, that is why I was over there. “You don’t think of thanking the guy who pumps your gas for his service. These were just my skills, my abilities.” And as he traversed the vast network of organizations, non prot and otherwise, across the country dedicated to as sisting returning veterans, re turning warriors, Silva arrived at cognizance and something approaching a peace about the effort and the goals. “I think it is so important to have the best interests of the servicemen at heart,” Silva said. “I am always excited to come down to Port St. Joe and see the people I have made friendships with because over the years this event has devel oped into something more im portant to the service people than the community. “They get it there. They have listened and understand that they need to do what is right and what is best for the service people.” His role, he said, would be to provide some of the same sense of leadership he brought to the battleeld and lend it to service men and women seek ing guidance in the next tenta tive steps in life, a life dramati cally altered. “A good leader understands the people he is in charge of and adapts his leadership to those people,” Silva said. “You have to still be a mentor, a good leader. You have to be uid, and you have to adapt. “I am still the same lead er; I just have a different perspective.” In spite of his injuries, de spite his ordeal of survival to walk out of a hospital within three months of wounding, despite the impacts, long and short term, on his life, Silva re grets little. He went off to war due to his belief system and skills. Neither has been shaken by his experiences since an Octo ber day in 2010. “In today’s day and age, the only guarantee in war is men and women are going to get in jured,” Silva said. “I would be the rst to go back. I don’t want to have my daughter experi ence anything that I have, and if I can do that for my daughter, I would. “War is always going to come and go. It doesn’t change the basic essence of who we are. You can’t let the politics and emotions get involved. You just have to do something each day to make things better. “Why wouldn’t we con tinue to try to strengthen ourselves?” mandated Tax Increment Funds — a small percentage of property value increases in the designated area compared to a base year — from the county and city. Since then, the agency had lev eraged those funds to make major changes to the downtown and the business area. “Everything that has been done in the city to improve the city has been the work of the PSJRA, all of it,” Buzzett said. “You are not going to be able to do what these people, volunteers all of them, do.” Thursbay brought the motion to dissolve the PSJRA board, stating a fundamental objection to a nonelected board spending taxpayer money. He said he thought the PSJRA does a good job, but cited a “lack of communication” among the agen cy, city staff and commissioners. He added that he believed he spoke for the “majority of voters” in the city in moving to dissolve the board. “I am a steward of tax money,” he said. “The majority of city vot ers believe we should become the board.” Patterson said he too spoke for the majority of voters, qualifying it later saying he was speaking for those who contacted him. He continued that there was a socioeconomic gap between those who would contact him and Thurs bay and those who would commu nicate with Buzzett and Magidson on issues. “I think the board has a done a great job, but I do have a problem with our not being the board,” Pat terson said. Thursbay emphasized he want ed to dissolve the board, not “get rid of Gail,” though he later said he objected to Alsobrook’s salary, comparing her pay as a hourly con tract worker to the county grant writer’s salary and benets pack age, as well as the PSJRA budget. Magidson said it seemed the “sore point” for Thursbay was Al sobrook’s salary. Buzzett said the Gulf County Tourist Development Council was a non-elected body with a budget several times that of the PSJRA. Magidson and board member Aaron Farnsley said the agency has been able to leverage its funding into millions of dollars to improve the aesthetics and infra structure downtown. Farnsley said two major items on the night’s agenda, including the badly needed sidewalk project along Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and lights for Langston Drive, were happening through the ef forts of the PSJRA. “I think we do a great job,” Farnsley said. “I am speaking as an individual. We have really tried to communicate with you. We are not an elected board, and I think we take the politics out of it. “We have all worked to the bet terment of the city, and that is evi dent by our accomplishments.” Magidson and Buzzett said commissioners already have nal say over PSJRA actions, noting the Commission has vetoed two recent proposals, including an ob servation tower at Billy Joe Rish Memorial Parking Lot. Commissioners approve board members and the budget and all projects come to commissioners for approval. All spending is done according to Florida statutes, Gib son said. “If you have a problem with the board, look in the mirror,” Buzzett said. Patrick Jones, a former PSJRA board member, said the board rep resents an opportunity for talented people in the community to be in volved. The board, he said, brings “skill sets” and “community as sets” to bear in ways government can not. Though a vote to dissolve the PSJRA board might silence some critics, it would tell those volun teers “you do not count.” “The best use of civic resources is to involve them not get rid of them,” Jones said. Resident Mark Howze said the effect of the Commission’s action was to replace one board with another, adding another layer of bureaucracy, and playing “semantics.” Howze and Thursbay, as with the commissioner and Magidson and Farnsley earlier, engaged in pointed words, Howze criticizing Thursbay for “snide comments” interrupting his presentation. PSJ RARA from page A1 WOUNDED WARRIORS WEEKEND The fourth Forgotten Coast Wounded Warriors Weekend will be May 14-18. At this year’s event, 20 warriors, 20 caretakers and three mentor warriors will be honored over a ve-day period. The organizing committee is seeking volunteers to make monetary donations or provide transportation, merchandise for rafe, servers for meals and boat captains for the tournament. Please email psj.fcww@gmail.com with any questions and donations. Donations are tax-deductible.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, March 6, 2014 J o i n U s f o r Y o u r A n n u a l M e e t i n g T h e e n t i re c re d i t u n i o n b e n e t s w h e n m e m b e r s p a r t i c i p a t e T h a t ’ s w h y w e i n v i t e e v e r y m e m b e r t o a t t e n d o u r – y o u r – a n n u a l m e e t i n g A l l m e m b e r s a re e q u a l o w n e r s o f t h e c re d i t u n i o n O u r a n n u a l m e e t i n g i s a n oc ca s i o n f o r m an a ge m e n t an d e l e c t ed o f c i a l s to re po r t t o y o u t h e o w n e r s. A n d i t ’ s a n o p po r t u n i t y f o r y o u t o l e a r n a bo u t t h e c re d i t u n i o n ’ s n a n c i a l po s i t i o n p r od u c t s a n d s e r v i c e s c u r re n t b u s i n e s s i s s u e s a n d g o a l s. Y o u ’ l l m e e t f a c e t o f a c e w i t h t h e p e o p l e w h o r u n y o u r c re d i t u n i o n W i t h o u t y o u r i n p u t l e a d e r s ca n o n l y g u e s s w h a t y o u a n d o t h e r o w n e r s w a n t f r o m y o u r c re d i t u n i o n A l l m e m b e r s a t t e n d i n g w i l l re c e i v e a g i f t a t t h e d oo r O n c e t h e b u s i n e s s m e e t i n g i s c o n c l u d e d w e w i l l h a v e d r a w i n g s f o r s e v e r a l ca s h p r i z e s g i v e n b y t h e c re d i t u n i o n W e h o p e t o s e e y o u t h e re No t a m e m b e r o f E m e r a l d C o a s t F e d e r a l C re d i t U n i o n y e t ? T h e n w e i n v i t e y o u t o j o i n W e a re a c o m m u n i t y c re d i t u n i o n T h a t m e a n s i f y o u l i v e w o r k w o r s h i p o r a t t e n d s c h oo l i n G u l f C o u n t y F r a n k l i n C o u n t y o r t h e C i t y o f M e xi c o B e a c h y o u a re e l i g i b l e f o r m e m b e r s h i p S o p l e a s e s t o p b y t o m e e t o u r f r i e n d l y s t a f f a n d t a k e a d v a n t a g e o f a l l t h e s e r v i c e s w e o f f e r A t E m e r a l d C o a s t F e d e r a l C re d i t U n i o n y o u a re m o re t h a n j u s t a n u m b e r y o u a re p a r t o f o u r f a m i l y E v en t : C r ed i t U ni o n A n n u al M e e t i n g W h e n: M o n d a y M a r c h 1 0 2 0 1 4 a t 7 : 0 0 p m E S T W h e r e : P o r t S t J o e E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l A u d i t o r i u m 5 0 2 W oo d w a r d A v en u e P o r t S a i n t Jo e F l o ri d a 3 2 4 5 6 1 0 1 E a s t R i v er R o a d W e w a h i t c h k a F l o ri d a 3 2 4 6 5 2 4 8 U S H i g h w a y 9 8 E a s t p o i n t F l o ri d a 3 2 3 2 8 P h : ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 1 1 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 3 9 5 0 2 4 ( 8 5 0 ) 6 7 0 1 1 9 9 T o l l f re e : 1 87 7 87 40 0 07 E m ail: e m e r al d c o a s t @ f ai r p o i n t n e t w w w .e m e r al d c o a s t f c u .c o m The Junior Service League of Port St. Joe would like to express a heart lled thank you to all the businesses listed above as well as all those who attended and supported the return of the Mardi Gras Gala. All monies raised from the 2014 Mardi Gras Gala will go to support our community service projects. Events by Chellsey --Surf Slingen’ Bartenders --Designs by Dorann --Mexico Beach Marina --Emerald Coast Dance Academy --BreakA-W ay Charters --Spa Pur --W alter Green Apparel, Swimwear & Accessories --Duren’ s Piggly W iggly --The Fuss --Plum Delightful Antiques & Jewelry --Off the Map Expeditions --Bayside Florist --Mango Marley’ s --Provisions Restaurant --Fish House Restaurant ---T oucan’ s Restaurant --The Thirsty Goat --Graba Java Caf --Sunset Coastal Grill --Mason Dixon ---Dockside Seafood & Raw Bar --Golden Nugget Casino HotelBiloxi --Ashely McGlothren Photography ---T ightline Charters --Kim Stone Photography --Morgan BurkettD’Salon --Black Swan Interiors --Club Sun --Ripley’ s Believe It or NotPanama City Beach --One-W ay Fitness --Jessica BrockMary Kay Consultant --Salon Lux --Polished Nail Boutique --SunKissed: Mobile T anning by Michelle --Persnickety --Boutique by the Bay --Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild --A Day A way Spa --St. Joe Bar & Package. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Beautiful art met an equally beautiful day. The third annual Art Walk, hosted by the Society of Expressive Artists (SEA) was held at the Beach Walk shopping area in Mexico Beach and ran simultaneously with the annual Gumbo Cook-off last month. The event showcased 23 artists from Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe and along the Forgotten Coast as they displayed their talents and sold their art, sculptures, jewelry or crafts. “The weather was perfect, the sidewalks were full and there were tons of people,” said Dolores Lowery, president of SEA and the coordinator for the event. “We couldn’t have had a better day.” In addition to participating artists, the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society held a fundraiser complete with rafe tickets and adoptable animals. Lowery auctioned off a prize to create an encaustic painting of the winner’s pet which brought in $120 for the humane society and an additional $300 were collected in donations. One lucky chocolate lab-mix puppy named Kevin went home with a visiting family from Mississippi. The humane society also put out a special donation jar for Slugger, a big black and white tom in need of an expensive eye surgery. The jar was stuffed by the end of the day. “It was an awesome day for the shelter,” said Gena Wich, who serves on the Board of Directors as secretary. “Many people stopped to play with the animals and ask questions about the shelter, which is what we were hoping for.” Entertainment for the event was provided by Slim Fatz, whose mellow blues were a perfect t for the sunny day. In previous years the artists were spread out along Highway 98 but Lowery said that the event benetted from being concentrated in a central area and planned to take the same approach in the future. In looking toward next year’s event Lowery also planned to offer a longer registration period for artists in order to get more interest from surrounding regions. “The humane society was a really nice addition,” said Lowery. “Between the Art Walk and the Gumbo Cook-off, it was a great day for Mexico Beach.” By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m After a two-year hiatus the Junior Service League Mardi Gras gala returned and the community was ready for it. More than 150 elegantly-dressed patrons attended the charity event, held at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. They helped raise more than $6,500 for upcoming JSL projects. Those projects include the group’s annual Christmas clothing drive, Easter egg hunt, and mentoring programs. Live music for the event was provided by Konkrete Soul and silent auctions were held for ne jewelry, charter shing trips, gift certicate trees and countless other items. Mardi Gras themed food was provided by various JSL members, created from recipes in the JSL cookbook and 60 pounds of shrimp was donated for the event by Wood’s Fishery in Port St. Joe. It was a night of suits, dresses, beads and music as attendees toasted and danced the night away. Casino-style games including black jack and roulette gave attendees a chance to try their luck while using fun money, but the big winners were the members of the JSL. “We haven’t had the even in three years and we were excited to bring it back,” said event coordinator Kimberly Shoaf. It was a ton of fun and we have the support behind us to continue it on in the future.” Art Walk showcases artsy side of Forgotten Coast COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.com Art lovers perused paintings, crafts and jewelry during the third annual art walk. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.com During the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce annual awards ceremony last week, First United Methodist Care Closet was named as the Volunteer Organization of The Year. The award was accepted by Vic LeFerle and Phyllis Alsteatter. Business Partner of the Year went to Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Campus. Dr. Jim Kerley, GCSC President accepted. This year’s speaker was Lewis Jordan, CEO of GratitudeAmerica and the Chamber welcomed new board members Mark Haddock, Steve Wich and Stacey Price. C hH AMBER ANNUAL dD INNER Mardi Gras Gala returns in styleWES LL O ch CH ER | The Star Attendees enjoyed food and drinks during the “adult prom.”Music for the event was provided by Konkrete Soul.

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O PINION www.starfl.com A Section The other day I started thinking about trash, trash cans and the possibility of being a hypocrite. I do not want to be considered a hypocrite, it’s not good. I want to be a good example for my children. What got me started thinking about trash? Well, I’ll tell you. Leaving for work the other day, I stopped in my driveway to study the “direction” of my trash bin or trash container or whatever you call the thing you pull to the side of the road for the newfangled garbage trucks to pick up with something that resembles the robotic arm NASA used on space shuttle missions. It is actually a thing of beauty to watch. I lead a pretty boring life – I realize that I do. However, it is entertaining to watch the robotic arm come out from the garbage truck, pick up my big rolling bin and dump it into the truck. No, I don’t get out much. I read all of the literature the waste disposal company sent me on how to use the big plastic rolling bin. There were precise directions on how far it needed to be from your mailbox, your dog, your children, etc. Also, there was a precise direction or orientation for the bin to be pointing so that the robotic arm could grab it. There are big arrows on the top of the lid with instructions, “This Side to the Street,” or “Point these arrows at your neighbor,” or something like that – I understand what they mean. The fellow next door to me is some kind of surgeon or doctor who cuts on people and xes things. He never points his rolling plastic trash vehicle in the correct direction. He is a nice fellow and all, but would you want him cutting on you if he can’t get his trash bin in the right direction? I would not. If he xed something in me, I would always have this feeling that he didn’t hook my insides up quite right. Can you blame me? There are rumors that my neighbors call me “Mr. Wilson” as in the “Mr. Wilson” from the Dennis the Menace cartoon strip and television series from the late 50’s and early 60’s. Mr. Wilson had to know what was going on in the neighborhood at all times and was always worrying about Dennis’ antics. I’m not that bad. I just worry about trash cans, suspicious looking cars and children riding wheeled vehicles without helmets. I’m a good neighbor. As I was pulling out of the driveway, I noticed my 16 year-old son had positioned our rolling trash container in the incorrect position. The arrows were pointing toward our house. It worried me, but I wrote it off as either him being in hurry or him checking the direction of the surgeon’s trash can next door and copying it. Perhaps my son wants to be a doctor. So I thought about trash on my drive to work. I thought about what “Trash tells us and what trash means to me.” It brought back many good memories for me. Before I was a scientist/ mathematician type, I was a janitor. Sometimes I like to tell folks that the movie, “Good Will Hunting” was based on my life. To set the record straight, I’m not telling the truth on that one. In the movie, Matt Damon plays a Yankee fellow who was a janitor at MIT and had a gift for mathematics. He ended up being a genius with some serious psychological issues. I’m from the South; I was a janitor at the newspaper where my Daddy worked. I liked math because my Daddy taught me with a deck of cards and pair of dice. I’m an average mathematician who has only mild psychological issues associated with raising teenagers and trying to gure out how to pay for college. Still on the road to work, I also remembered the dump where my Mama would take me growing up. Yes, my Mama took me to the dump. She was the best! You see, through a little research, I found out the company in our county that made sporting goods would throw away all of the skateboard wheels they made that weren’t “perfect.” I found their secret disposal location at the dump. After cleaning the wheels, I repackaged them in brown paper and took them to school to sell to folks who needed new wheels for their skateboards or roller skates. It was good business for a 14 year-old while it lasted. Now that I think about it, I didn’t even give my Mama a cut of the pro ts. That bothers me just a little. Somewhere in heaven, Mama is laughing. Trash tells us a lot about a lot of things; it even holds memories for some of us. I do lead a pretty boring life, but it is important to point out that more than likely my son is going to be a doctor, probably even some sort of surgeon. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. What trash tells us CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard “Does it look alright?” “It’s pretty clear.” “I don’t see anything swimming in it.” We did our own “water testing” back home. The clarity of the water, the vessel containing it and its drinkability often depended on how thirsty we were. If we had been chasing pirates, ghosts and each other up and down the big ditch all day, we weren’t so choosy. We didn’t wade out into the pond like the cows. We weren’t stupid! We’d lay on our bellies where the small stream in the ditch poured over a natural levy into the pond. It looked almost clean there. And it was just deep enough to stick your mouth in without hitting the bottom. There was certainly an art to drinking the moving water without it running up your nose. We’d usually cradle a hand in the stream to divert it up and over the ngers; shoot, we near ’bout had a fountain! It helped that at close quarters you couldn’t drink and see any foreign substances at the same time. But remember now, if we were really thirty, we did a lot more drinking than we did inspecting. It was pretty simple if we were up town. Some thoughtful city fathers had put a water fountain right close to the middle of our little square. The water was cold in the winter and hot in the summer. Ricky Hale pointed out how much better it would be if they could reverse that someway. But it still came in pretty handy. We “ lled up” after the long walk to town. We hit it pretty hard if we’d been playing “hide and go seek” while our mothers shopped for groceries. And we “made do” with it if we didn’t have the ten cents for a cherry coke over at John Motheral’s Drugstore. Water was a snap when we had a ball game roaring in the back yard. The water hose was just behind home plate or piled up right past the south end zone depending on what time of year it was. It had a distinct “rubbery” taste but we didn’t have time to run into the house. We had to get to the next inning, or kickoff. We always called it the “water hose”. It was never just a hose. That seems silly now. But I reckon we were hoping one day to have a NuGrape hose and a Pepsi hose or, maybe, a lemonade hose…..now that would have been a living the life of Riley! We never carried any water with us. You’d have been laughed out of town! We didn’t even use those Boy Scout canteens. Water was just too plentiful. Every house had a faucet or two attached. And nobody ever minded “thirsty boys” helping themselves to the liquid refreshment. We shed, swam, took a bath and drank out of Sugar Creek. Our cousin J. C. gured if it was “alright for the sh, it ought to be alright for us.” The creek was much clearer than the pond. You could use your hands to sorta move any “ oaters” away before you took a drink. It had to be puri ed, sparkling and mineralized, nobody I know of ever got sick drinking it. Football practice necessitated a whole new look at this water question. Back in 1963, it was considered a sign of weakness to “need a drink” during practice. You had to be tough! I’m not sure I’ve gured out to this day the connection between “toughness” and “waterless” but that is for another article. By some ill-conceived and diabolical plan, football practice started in August. We lined up, as aspiring gladiators, and put on a hundred pounds of gear, covered it with a heavy practice jersey, and went out and sprinted across an endless eld from “can to can’t”. The relentless sun beat down on us like a runaway re in a cotton warehouse. My throat was as dry as the Mojave Desert. I saw dancing elephants and shimmering mirages in the distance. My tongue felt like the Seventh Cavalry had camped out on it. When we did get a “few seconds” break for the “sissies” we would catch the water in our helmets to make it last. We’d suck on a damp towel. We’d soak our grass and blood stained sleeves to hopefully get a moist lick later on. “You know”, Kenny Butler could barely get the words out of his dry mouth, “someone could make a fortune selling water out here.” The ones who had the energy fell out laughing. “You dummy, no one is ever going to pay for water! It is too plentiful.” “And it don’t taste like nothing. You tell me what idiot would plop down real money for a drink that has no taste. No zz. No color. And you can’t even mix peanuts in with it!” “Folks wouldn’t buy water if the world ran out of Coca Cola tomorrow!” “Selling water would be like selling air, or sunshine. It might be a thought right here, right now; but it makes no practical sense in the real world. It will never work. Something like that would have our forefathers turning over in their graves.” It didn’t take us long to put that silly notion to rest! Respectfully, Kes Kenny spoke before he thought HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert We all love a good bargain, no matter what our age. But if you’re a senior citizen on a xed income, nding discounted goods and services can mean the difference between making ends meet and going without. The good news is that tons of senior discounts are available – often for people as young as 50. One caveat right up front: Although many senior discounts are substantial, you sometimes can nd better bargains – especially on travel-related expenses like airfare, hotels and rental cars. So always do your research rst before requesting the senior rate. Here’s a roundup of some of the best senior discounts I’ve found: An AARP membership costs only $16 a year for anyone over age 50, including free membership for spouses or partners ( www.aarp.or g ). AARP’s discounts website features discounts on dozens of products and services including rental cars, hotels, restaurants, clothing and department store chains. AARP also offers an inexpensive driver safety course for drivers over 50 (members and nonmembers alike) that can lower auto insurance premiums by up to 10 percent or more. Popular AARP discounts include: • 20 percent discount on installation or upgrades to ADT home security systems. • 45 percent off membership to Angie's List. • 20 percent off purchases from 1-800-FLOWERS.com • Up to 25 percent off car rentals from Avis and Budget. • Up to 20 percent discount at many hotel chains including Hyatt, Hilton, Wyndham, Best Western, Days Inn and Ramada, among others. • 10 to 20 percent off at many restaurant chains, including Claim Jumper, Denny's and Outback Steakhouse. • 15 percent off many Geek Squad services from Best Buy. • A free 45-minute consultation with an Allstate Legal Services Network attorney, as well as 20 percent off member attorneys' fees. A quick Google search will uncover numerous other senior discount resources. One popular site is SeniorDiscounts.com an online directory of more than 220,000 U.S. business locations that offer discounts to people over 50. Registration is free, although they also offer a $12.95/year premium that offers members-only discounts and other perks. Other good sites include Brad’s Deals, Sciddy.com and Savvy Senior. Other commonly available senior discounts include: • A 15 percent discount on the lowest available rail fare on most Amtrak trains for travelers over age 62. • Greyhound offers a 5 percent discount on unrestricted fares (over 62). • Southwest Airlines offers senior fares (over 65). Although not necessarily their lowest available rates, Southwest's senior fares are fully refundable. • The U.S. Geologic Survey senior pass (over 62) provides free lifetime access to more than 2,000 government-managed recreational sites (including national parks), as well as discounts on camping and other amenities. Senior passes cost $10 in person or $20 by mail ( http://store. usgs.gov/pass/senior.htm l ). • Verizon Wireless offers discounted mobile phone service for subscribers over 65. • Both Walgreens and Rite Aid offer monthly senior discount days for members of their rewards programs when most nonprescription items are 15 to 20 percent off. Ask your neighborhood pharmacy if they offer similar programs. In addition, many restaurants, department stores, movie theaters, museums, theme parks, banks, credit card issuers, utilities (including gas and electric, water, garbage, telephone and cable) and other businesses offer special discounts or promotions for seniors. Always ask before your purchase is rung up. Bottom line: Abundant resources are available to help seniors save money on purchases large and small. You just have to do a little research – and ask whether senior discounts are available. Remember, 10 percent here and 20 percent there can really add up. Jason Alderman directs Visa’s nancial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 2, 2014, go to www. practicalmoneyskills. com/summit201 4 Money-saving tips for seniors Page 4 Thursday, March 6, 2014 JASON ALDERMAN #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688

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www.starfl.com A Section LETTERS Thursday, March 6, 2014 Page 5 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS The Port St. Joe Port Authority recently launched its 2014 Capital Campaign to raise funds to cover its necessary operating expenses for the coming year. Letters and pledge forms were sent to various businesses and individuals in the area. The Port Authority is progressing on a Fast Track to be operational by early to mid-2015. This is exciting news in that an operational port will bring needed jobs and increased business activity in Gulf County and the surrounding region. For this to happen, we desperately need your nancial support to keep the Port Authority active until such time as we have a revenue source from the leasing of Port Authority property and/or collection of fees from port users. Those of you who received pledge notices, we ask that you please return them with your contribution. To those who did not receive letters, your contribution, in any amount, would be deeply appreciated. Send contributions to: The Port St. Joe Port Authority Post Of ce Box 745 Port St. Joe, FL 32457. The Port is our greatest asset and will be for generations to come. Please lend your support now! Sincerely, Chairman Leonard Costin, Secretary Jason Shoaf, Past Chairwoman Joanna White, Vice Chairman Eugene Raffield, Treasurer Jessica Rish The Port St. Joe Port Authority would like to thank the following for their generous donations to the Port Authority during its 2013 Capital Campaign: 2013 HONOR ROLL Platinum ($10,000) City of Port St. Joe The St. Joe Company Silver ($1,000) Gulf County Economic Development Alliance Mr. & Mrs. Michael Wellman Anonymous Shoreline Medical Group-Dr. Tom Curry & Dr. Betty Curry Kerigan Marketing Associates, Inc. Bronze ($500) Bluewater Outrigger, Inc. Durens Piggly Wiggly Mr. Frank Pate Supporter ($10$499) iFix Computers PSJ, LLC Centennial Bank Coast2Coast Printing & Promotions, Inc. Also, many thanks to those who have already given generously in 2014 and who will be recognized in the 2014 Honor Roll. Open letter to the Citizens of Gulf County Dear Editor, For those of you who know who I am I hope this nds you well. For those who dont, I am Javarri Beachum, a graduate of Port St. Joe High School Class of 2013. I was class president and captain of the soccer team and participated in various other activities in school including NJROTC. I am currently nishing the Naval Academy Preparatory School in Newport, R.I., and I am receiving an appointment from here to the United States Naval Academy for the Class of 2018. But, enough about me. I write to you concerning one of the best coaches and mentors I have ever had, Coach Gary J. Hindley Coach Hindley was a vital part of my development as a soccer player, student, American citizen, young adult, and now college student and military professional. I played under Coach Hindley all four years of my high school career. My freshman year was his rst year at Port St. Joe High School and it was my rst year ever playing soccer. I knew nothing about the game; not even that the real word for soccer was Futbol. In my four years under coach Hindley, I went from not knowing anything about soccer to being one of the most crucial players in our success as a team and one of the best soccer players in our class and region. He not only taught me how to play soccer, but he taught me how to love the game passionately, which in my opinion is the mark of a true teacher; one who doesnt pass on knowledge, but passion for knowledge. I was always working to make myself better underneath him because he urged everyone to make improvements. He not only encouraged us in our athletics, although that was his main concern because it was his job, but he demanded that we be good citizens; to lend a helping hand when needed, to obey the laws set before us. He didnt tolerate misconduct on or off the eld. If soccer player got into any trouble, we were benched for at least a game and wed have to earn Coaches Hindleys respect all over again. That is the way it should be; Countless times I had to apologize to my teammates for letting them down. In the military, people get killed for letting others down. Coach Hindley was concerned about our classes and how we were doing in them. There were many times that I went to him about problems that I had with teachers. He also encouraged me to use the material we learned in the classroom on the eld such as Newtons 2nd Law of Motion when refereeing a game. He kicked me out of practice once for not wearing the proper shirt, and at the time, I thought it was just a shirt. Where I am now if I am wearing the wrong color socks, I can get adjudicated and punished for improper wear or not following regulation; Thats just one instance from my four years with Coach Hindley that prepared me for the real world. He helped me develop into a professional; because Port St. Joe doesnt even scratch the surface although it is a great town, it just does its own thing and enforces bad habits and mindsets. He was certainly a mis t for our little bubble of a town in these aspects, but it turns out that we who live or lived there were mis ts for the rest of the world and ignorant to the way the world actually works. One thing he hated was people wanting to take a day off of practice for their birthday or that of a loved one or their relative is having a baby, my job now as a military professional could care less about whos birthday it is, and I have met men who were in Afghanistan when their own child was born and there have been plenty who never got to see their children born. As a coach, he taught me so well that his coaching has put me in a position where I can walk on the Division I team at the Academy and be successful as a player. I was also recruited as a soccer player by several other colleges such as Monroe College of New York City, West Virginia Tech, and various other schools. That was more scholarship offers than many players of other teams who had played their sports their whole lives, not to mention the other players who have gotten offers under Coach Hindleys guidance. I am glad to have had the pleasure of calling Coach Hindley my soccer coach and now since Ive become an adult, Im glad that I can call him my friend. Its remarkable that he came, and in one year, the entire culture of the town changed. People were excited about soccer, and the best thing is that he turned the program around. He took a player like myself, pushed me to give my heart to the game, and a boy whod never played soccer before helped his team win district titles and make regional nal appearances. I didnt realize it at the time, but Coach Hindley is a great asset to Port St. Joe High School and the community. He will always be one of the men who I look back at and say, Wow! Im glad he was in my life because he helped me see many of things in life, that I would have not seen otherwise. Javarri D. Beachum Midshipman Candidate Naval Academy Preparatory School A happy new resident Dear Editor, I wish to thank three outstanding business women in Gulf County Carol Erwin of Forgotten Coast Realty in Mexico Beach, and Amber Lowry and Ashley Baird from Centennial Banks Port St. Joe branch. I recently moved from a long distance away and they were so helpful and professional in helping me nd and purchase my perfect home. I highly recommend Carol for real estate needs and Amber and Ashley for banking. Once again, thank you very much for helping me move to beautiful Gulf County. Denita McCarty Wewahitchka On the subject of 2/17/14 The threat of fundamentalism: Creationism By LOREN SIPRELL Special to The Star I was rst published in the Star when I wrote a Letter to the editor in which I shared another letter I wrote to the Mayor of Port Saint Joe asking him to show his support for marriage equality; not surprisingly I never heard back from Mayor Magidson on that matter. After which I was given the opportunity to write a weekly op-ed, my rst being on the removal of the nativity scene on the lawn of City Hall in Chipley. Ive decided to revisit the topic of religious overreach in a series I will call The threat of Fundamentalism. Im going to go out on a limb and risk some blowback by sharing what I believe to be an unpopular opinion around these parts: That the biggest threat to individual liberty and this nation as a whole is religious fundamentalism, Christian fundamentalism to be exact. Fundamentalism of any kind is dangerous; I believe few Americans would argue the oppression that is taking place in the Middle East under the theocratic regimes of Saudi Arabia, Eqypt or Iran. We have sat back and watched the suppression of womens rights, the acceptance of genocide and terrorism across the globe all in the name of Allah; and now I see a much more subversive but very calculated form of terrorism taking place on my own soil, by my fellow Americans, all in the name of Jesus Christ. A couple of weeks ago I watched the much anticipated debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham, the evolution vs. creationism debate. For those of you who are not familiar with Ken Ham he is a young earth creationist who believes the Bible, the book of Genesis speci cally, is the literal infallible truth of God; he is also the founder of the Creationist Museum in Kentucky. As I listened to Ken Hams rationale for believing such lunacy as the earth is only 6,000 years old and the great ood literally took place only 4,000 years ago I found myself awe struck at how powerful the movement had become; here we are, in 2014, arguing a truth that even Pat Robertson himself calls crazy. Now that is saying something. The fundamentalist battles against the reliable and factually based theories that make up evolution as a valid origin of man are understandable. If I was devoutly religious I too would have a dif cult time reconciling my belief in the God of Christianity, but I wouldnt condone reshaping the facts to t my narrative. My issue isnt with the Christians who are happy to allow anyone to worship God as they so choose, and who are con dent enough in their faith to leave a relationship with God outside of the classroom. What I take issue with are those that wish to legitimize their fanciful, and lets face it, absurd notions of origin by creating a pseudoscience and then ask the rest of us to allow them to teach such nonsense alongside genuine science. Men like Ken Ham, and evangelical Christians all over the country, have unjustly turned Charles Darwin into some type of menace, an anti-Christ if you will, simply for bringing to light several mechanisms at play within the beautiful scheme of nature. They have oversimpli ed his ndings to I aint come from no monkey! To them, teaching evolution is a direct threat to their core system of belief: man is made in the image of God so he cant possibly be reduced to the likes of an animal. Oh how our interpretations of God are encased in such ego. What upsets me the most about the teaching of creationism is its absolutes; there is no wiggle room in fundamental Christianity. A very telling moment happened during the Ham/Nye debate, when the moderator asked both men what, if anything, would change their minds Bill Nye answered simply, Evidence. Show me evidence of the great ood. If you can do that you would change the world. And Hams response, No one is going to convince me that the word of God is untrue. That worries me, an unwavering con dence even in the face of insurmountable evidence to the contrary. Under different circumstances that con dence may be admirable, but when telling the youth of our country to stop asking questions and just settle for what this one book says is, as a patriot, unacceptable. For the religious out there, lets look at it from a different perspective: If this were Tom Cruise asking for the public schools to teach Scientologys origin of man alongside evolution how would you feel? Sounds ludicrous, right? Well, that is how I feel when my children are threatened with the possibility of being taught that Noah was a real man who stuffed every species of animal onto one boat 4,000 years ago. When you support teaching creationism in the school you are denying mine, and my children, the freedom to nd God on our terms. Darwin belongs in the classroom. Noah belongs in Sunday school. If you cant t the theory of evolution into the framework built by your religious convictions then that is your journey to undertake, but dont make the future of this country give up wondering and asking questions simply because you think you have it all gured out. I will close with a quote from Darwin himself: In my most extreme uctuations I have never been an atheist, in the sense of denying the existence of God. I feel very deeply that the whole subject is too profound for the human intellect. A dog might just as well speculate on the mind of Newton. Loren Siprell is a resident of Port St. Joe. Thank you Coach Hindley

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com www.starfl.com Section Section A By Tom Baird Special to The Star Imagine an organism that spends its adult life lying on its back and kicking food into its mouth. Now imagine an organism that glues its head to the oor when it grows up. Imagine an organism that secretes a glue so strong that it cannot be dissolved by any acid or alkali. Imagine an organism so powerful in can create enough drag to slow down a supertanker to the point that its fuel consumption is increased by forty percent. Imagine an organism whose life cycle and classi cation has confounded some of the greatest naturalists in history. Now imagine all of those characteristics belong to a single organism, and that organism lives in St. Joseph Bay. Wouldn’t you want to see that super creature? You can see that strange creature right now by going down to any seawall or boat ramp on the bay. All those extraordinary characteristics belong to the acorn barnacle, one of several species of the genus Balanus. They are those little white, volcanoshaped encrusting forms growing on wooden pilings, boat hulls, and shells. They can be found attached to any hard surface regularly washed by the tide. On an extremely cold day a few weeks back, I was fortunate to witness teams from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the University of Florida, and volunteers rescuing cold-stunned green turtles from the bay near Pig Island. I couldn’t help but notice some of the turtles had large living acorn barnacles hitching a ride on their shells. Some species of barnacles will also attach to whales. Because the adult barnacles encase themselves in a hard calcareous shell, barnacles were once thought to be a form of Mollusk, like clams and oysters, and they do super cially resemble limpets. However, inside that protective shell is a little joint-footed animal, hence they are Arthropods and more closely related to shrimp and crabs. While they are glued to one spot as adults, they begin life as a free-roaming, one-eyed, planktonic larva, called a nauplius, which has a head and a telson, like the tail of a horseshoe crab. Looking at a sample of plankton under a microscope you will almost always nd a barnacle nauplius larva or two. They will remain in this stage for about six months while feeding and growing. The next stage of development is the cyprid larva and its job is to nd a place to attach. The cyprid stage does not eat. Drifting about the cyprid will use its antennules to investigate various surfaces it encounters. Once a suitable surface is found, cement glands in the antennules produce an extremely strong glue that fastens the organism to that surface. The barnacle is then home and will go through a metamorphosis into a tiny adult barnacle. Since acorn barnacles do not move once cemented in place, the sea must bring food to their doorstep. Lying upside down the barnacle will extend its feathery legs, called cirri, and rhythmically sweep planktonic organisms and detritus from the water. If you have never watched barnacles feed, it is something to see. Most people just see barnacles looking dry and dead on a piling above the waterline, but watch them when submerged, and you will get an entertaining show as the little cirri hungrily sweep the water. To prevent drying out when exposed, barnacles close the opening with two plates. The legs are withdrawn behind the tightly closing plates as the tide recedes. This will keep the barnacle moist for several hours. If the barnacle is not wetted by the returning tide or wave spray, the barnacle will die. On a vertical piling or sea wall, different species of barnacles will settle based on their ability to withstand drying. Generally, the most common barnacle at the highest levels belongs to the genus Chthamalus. As adults, barnacles have few senses; they can detect light and dark and the cirri have the ability to sense touch. When in the larval form, barnacles can be preyed upon by any lter feeders in the water, such as clams, oysters, sponges, etc. As adults, enclosed in their hard calcareous cones, they are feed upon by whelks, which can grind through the outer covering, and by some species of star sh. While small and insigni cant as individuals, barnacles are nevertheless formidable in mass. They prefer to attach near other barnacles in order to swamp the environment and prevent other organisms from attaching and thus competing for food. This massive build-up on ships not only adds weight, but also creates drag, disrupting the smooth, laminar ow of water over a ship’s hull, thus slowing it down. Barnacles, as well as other fouling organisms, must periodically be removed from vessels by scraping, which is an additional cost of operating commercial vessels. Besides our common acorn barnacles, there are goose-necked barnacles or goose barnacles that attach to the substrate by a muscular stalk with the shell-covered body at the top of the stalk. Species of goose-necked barnacles inhabit the Gulf in deeper waters over the continental shelf or adrift far at sea. They attach to pieces of driftwood or oats made of glass or styrofoam. You are unlikely to see goosenecked barnacles unless they are washed ashore attached to driftwood. In an amazing bit of adaptation, there are even parasitic barnacles, which are nothing like the barnacles we know. So, on a warm day as you are scraping barnacles off your boat and cursing their existence, keep in mind that within that tiny, volcano-looking shell is an organism that is highly successful with some amazing powers of survival. Now if dentists can determine the properties that explain the adhesive power of barnacle glue, we might all celebrate the little barnacle. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) | F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) Lets go! Spring time is almost here! S h o p o u r h u g e s e l e c t i o n o f b e a c h w a r e s, c h ai r s, a n d t o y s. N e w a r r i v a l s d ai l y o f k a y a k s, P a d d l e b o a r d s, a n d shi n g g e a r Spring time is almost here! Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M ar 6 60 50 50 % F ri, M ar 7 62 53 10 % S a t M ar 8 66 57 0 % Sun, M ar 9 70 49 % M on, M ar 10 70 49 % T ues M ar 11 70 49 % W ed M ar 12 70 49 % O UTDOORS Page 6 Thursday, March 6, 2014 Star Staff Report The seventh annual Sportsman’s Banquet rolls in Thursday, March 13, with plenty of good food, a heaping helping of fun, prizes and, for one lucky, a bucketful of cash to take home. Over the past decade, the Lions Club of Port St. Joe has poured some $25,000 into the community through a host of efforts. The Sportsman’s Banquet, to be held at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe with social hour and appetizers at 5 p.m. and dinner beginning at 6:30 p.m. ET, has allowed the club to broaden its community outreach. The last Sportsman’s Banquet raised nearly $20,000 for Lions Club projects in the community. The Sportsman’s Banquet originated from what was an annual event to support Ducks Unlimited. But what Lions Club members envisioned was an event that would bring money directly into the community, not only in the costs of putting the night on, but also in handling proceeds from the banquet. After enjoying Chef Charlie Norton’s “famous, no-man-left-hungry” ribeye steaks, joined on dinner plates by salad, potato and rolls. Over $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through live auctions and raf es. One winner could win up to $8,000, the amount linked to the number of tickets sold. The items include over 30 shotguns, hunting ri es and pistols, along with numerous other outdoor products. There will also be items available for women and children. Tickets for the event are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. “Last year we had the biggest event we’ve ever had and sales have been brisk to far,” said Willie Ramsey of the Port St. Joe Lions Club. “We do have a limited number of tickets, so it might be best to get your ticket in advance. If tickets are sold out, they will not be available at the door.” They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramsey’s Printing and Of ce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. “This is a lot of fun and bene cial to the community,” Ramsey said. “Every dime is spent here and this is about helping in the community and that is what the Lions Club is about.” Lions Club to hold Sportsman’s Banquet on Thursday Something is lurking in St. Joe Bay COURTESY OF TOM BAIRD Acorn barnacles stick to the shell of a cold-stunned turtle that was rescued last month near Pig Island. Another cold snap will affect us on the Forgotten Coast as we enter the rst week of March. Spring break traf c will ll most of the local beach spots this month, so hit the beaches early to sh. Good whiting catches are being reported at Windmark Beach to Mexico Beach. Some ounder are coming to the docks from last week’s warming trend, but we haven’t seen the great migration back to shallow water yet. SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA www.starfl.com A Section By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Three years ago last week, Calvin Pryor was starring on the hardwood of the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. Last week Pryor was among a host of collegiate football prospects on display at the NFL Combine. Pryor was interviewed by the NFL Network and was the focus of a long camera shot as an ESPN talk show previewed a discussion on the Combine. All pretty heady stuff for the small-town multi-sport athlete who just three years ago was leading the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks to a second consecutive region basketball title and state nal four berth. The other star of that team was Roman Quinn, who was a second-round selection of the Philadelphia Phillies in the Major League Amateur Draft that spring. Last week was an opportunity for Pryor to stamp his ticket as a projected rst round pick in the NFL draft and according to the prognosticators, he generally succeeded. As Greg Davenport, a columnist for bleacherreport.com, wrote, Pryor did not have a “great” workout at the Combine, but he did nothing to dissuade scouts from the belief that he is one of the top safeties and defensive backs in the draft. Pryor ran under 4.6 in the 40-yard dash, placing eighth among safeties. Most importantly, he ran an identical time to Ha Ha Clinton-Dix out of Alabama, with whom Pryor is locked in a contest for top safety, at least according to the experts. He hoisted 18 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press, which was fourth among safeties. Pryor did not participate in shuttle runs or cone drills and his vertical jump and broad jump, Davenport wrote, ranked in the lower end of the safety class. Bleacher Report’s B.J. Kissel wrote those weren’t the drills where Pryor gured to win or lose with scouts anyway. “When it comes to physicality at the safety position,” he wrote, “most draft enthusiasts already know about Louisville’s Calvin Pryor.” Kissel said Pryor most needed to show scouts “he can be trusted to play in space.” According to Omar Kelly with the South Florida SunSentinel, Pryor “killed” the position drills. “Solid work.” The surprise of the Combine was that while Pryor weighed 207 pounds, his listed weight, he measured 5-foot-11, three inches under the height listed in the University of Louisville program. For those who watched Pryor on the basketball court in high school, and the two marches to the state nal four his nal two seasons, his stat-line lling performances take on a greater stature considering he was less than six feet tall. And the competitive streak so on display during his time in Port St. Joe was also part of the impression Pryor left behind at the Combine. “I’m a playmaker,” he succinctly told the NFL Network in an interview before he ran the 40-yard dash. According to most experts, safety is a two-horse race between the cover skills of Clinton-Dix and the physical playmaking of Pryor. “Guys know that I can play football,” Pryor said in a podcast with Davenport on Kellogg’s Komments earlier this month. “They know that I’m physical, that I have the strength to play. They just want to see how fast I can run.” The 40-yard dash, he added, was critical and his time at the Combine was a bit faster than some projected. Most importantly, it was even with Clinton-Dix. Coming out of the Combine, Davenport wrote, the two-horse race remains and likely will until the May draft. A mock draft by si.com, the web site for Sports Illustrated, continues to list Pryor as likely to go rst to either the Green Bay Packers or the Philadelphia Eagles. Reviewing a host of projections, Pryor is generally considered to go to one of several teams in need of secondary help who draft in the teens to early 20s in May. That list also includes the Baltimore Ravens and Dallas Cowboys. And that this, literally, national attention is focused on a hometown son is amazing considering what Calvin Pryor was doing, right here in Port St. Joe, just three years ago last week. u d ^ o … W w 0 0 E k k Ž l 8 ‡ T 8 – ‡ Q 8 Z 8 j E E O 0 „ E E ‡ T 8 3 Ž ‡ i l ” – Z 8 e Ž Ÿ ‘ N E E E „ E E E ‘ ‡ Q 8 ‘ – Ž Ž Ÿ r 8 Ž ‘ Œ Ž g E E 0 „ E E E – ” r 8 ‘ – ” – Z 8 Œ Ž Ž Ž Ÿ r 8 ‘ g 8 Ž Ÿ ‘ N 8 ‡ ‹ – Ž ¢ N E E 0 „ E E E ‡ Ÿ ‹ – Q 8  Ž ‡ x 8 Ÿ Ÿ Ž ” Q E E „ E E E Š ¢ T 8 Ÿ Ž Ž p 8 Œ N 8 Œ p 8 – n 8 Ž n E E E „ E E E # ¤ ¡ … ¨ ¡ § „ m „ W w 0 [ b d ¡ ¨ ¡ ‡ „ ¨ ¡ ¨ „ Thursday, March 6, 2014 Page 7 PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA www.starfl.com S PORTS CALVIN PRYOR PSJ’s Pryor spotlighted at combine Star Staff Report After a tough outing in the Florida/Alabama Line Tournament, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School softball team (6-4) bounced back with four consecutive wins. The Lady Tiger Sharks opened last week with a 16-7 win over Liberty County, a district triumph. Stephanie Brinkmeier pitched seven innings, allowing seven runs, four earned, on nine hits while striking out ve and walking seven. Brittany King was 3 for 3 with a pair of doubles and drove in ve runs. Brinkmeier was 3 for 4 and drove in six. Kelsey Miles was 3 for 4. Port St. Joe came back a day later with an 8-2 win at Bozeman, posting another district win. Brinkmeier went seven innings on the mound, striking out nine, walking none and allowing two runs on ve hits. Haley Wood was 2 for 4 and scored twice. Shannon Pridgeon, King, and Addison Rice singled and Christian Laine had a triple. The Lady Tiger Sharks Marianna came to town for the rst home game last Thursday. Port St. Joe won 3-1 behind Brinkmeier, who Coach Jim Belin said pitched her best game of the year, allowing two runs on two hits and walking none. Game three was against Marianna as again coming away with a 3-1 win. Brittany King with had a pair of hits, Wood, Pridgeon and Callie Fleshren each had a hit and Fleshren and King drove in runs. The Lady Tiger Sharks completed the week with a 16-1 mercy rule win over North Bay Haven. Savannah Miles got the win, pitching three innings and allowing one run on one hit and striking out one. Pridgeon, Rice and Shaye McGuf n each had two hits. Port St. Joe played Liberty County and play South Walton Friday. Lady Tiger Sharks on hot streak Special to The Star On the weekend of Feb. 14, Dave Warriner of Port St. Joe competed in the NCISAA State wrestling tournament as a member of the Christ School team. Warriner nished the double-elimination tournament with a bye in the rst round and a 1-2 record. He was ousted on the last day in the semi nals of the consolation round. Warriner, a junior at Christ School in Asheville, NC, was a varsity starter for the season at both 160 and 152 pounds. “For Dave to have just started wrestling in December it was quite a season of success for him” said Coach Ken Kiser. “Dave proved to be virtually ‘pin proof’” As a newcomer to the team, Warriner had to defeat three wrestlers to obtain the starting position for the season. He had was 11-12 for the year in a competitive conference. He went 2-0 at the conference tournament. His second win at conference proved to be the key win to force a team tie in the conference dual match. His performance earned him a coach’s nomination for all-conference. The team had a 20-9 dual match record and tied for 8th in the North Carolina Independent Athletic Association Tournament. Senior teammate Stephen Bridges won a state title at 222 lbs., a rst in the 12 years of Christ School. “David was a very important role player on this year’s team” Kiser said. “We had great team chemistry, effort and determination this year. Our senior leadership was the key to our success. I am looking toward Dave to step up and ll that role next year for our young team” Warriner is son of David and Trish Warriner of Port St. Joe. Warriner earns trip to state wrestling tourney Star Staff Report The Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team downed Vernon and Cottondale the past week. Brianna Bailey pitched six innings for the win, striking out 12 while giving up three hits and one earned run as the Lady Gators beat Vernon 8-3. Tara Walding was 3 for 3 with two triples and a double, driving in three runs. Shamario Cole was 1 for 2 with a triple and RBI and Mariah Brown had a double and RBI. The Lady Gators beat Cottondale 13-1 Tuesday. Bailey pitched six innings, striking out 12 and allowing one unearned run on two hits. She was 2 for 4 with a triple, two runs scored and two runs driven in at the plate. Walding was 4 for 4 with a triple, two runs scored and three RBI’s. Cole was 3 for 4 with two runs scored. Naomi Parker was 1 for 3 with a triple and three RBI’s. Anna Setterich was 2 for 4, scored a run and drove in one. The Lady Gators play Cottondale and Blountstown before traveling to Tallahassee for the Chiles Tournament. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School weightlifting team downed Wewahitchka last week in a dual meet. The team competition nished Port St. Joe 54, Wewahitchka 33. Individual results as follows (bench press, clean and jerk, total): 119 lb.: J. Hensley (W) 200190-390, N. Campbell (PSJ) 14090-330, D. Jones (PSJ) 95-90-185; 129 lb.: B. Kemp (W) 185-160345, M. Hensley (W) 175-150-325, J. Renfro (PSJ) 135-85-220, M. Simpson (PSJ) 160-xxx-160; 139 lb.: C. Thacker (PSJ) 250185-435, C. Laster (W) 185-170355, R. Dykes (PSJ) 155-115-270, T. Nunnery (W) 165-xxx-165; 154 lb.: R. Sewell (W) 185-185370, A. Paul (PSJ) 210-145-355, J. Simpson (PSJ) 185--xxx-185; 169 lb.: M. Bailey (PSJ) 170120-290, J. Browning (PSJ) 12090-210, D. Chance (W) 95-105-200; 183 lb.: J. Whit eld (W) 230175-405, D. Strickland (PSJ) 230-160-390, K. Zaccaro (PSJ) 205-145-350; 199 lb.: R. Smith (PSJ) 305225-530, A. Dempsey (PSJ) 225-185-410; 219 lb.: N. Lee (PSJ) 300-205505, U. Sanders (PSJ) 240-205445, C. Quick (W) 225-165-390, H. Ward (PSJ) 85-90175; 238 lb.: K. Wadleigh (PSJ) 200155-355, T. Tiller (W) 170-165-335, R. Jones (PSJ) xxx-135-135; Heavyweight: J. Melvin (W) 290-225-515, T. Davis (PSJ) 225135-360, J. Cummings (PSJ) 220-120-340. WHS girls beat Vernon, Cottondale PSJ tops Wewa in weightlifting SPECIAL TO THE STAR Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School baseball team lost a close 6-5 district decision at Liberty County last week. The Tiger Sharks rebounded two nights later with a 14-1 win over Franklin County to improve to 5-3 overall and 2-2 in District 4-1A. Will Ramsey was 4 for 5 with four RBIs, and Bryce Godwin was 2 for 4 with a pair of doubles and four runs driven in to lead the attack against Franklin County. Cole Cryderman went the distance on the mound to raise his record to 2-1. The Tiger Sharks are at Wewahitchka on Friday and host Myrtle, Miss., on Tuesday, with the junior varsity starting at 2:30 p.m. followed by a varsity doubleheader. Port St. Joe splits district games on diamond COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTON | Special to The Star Brittany King drove in ve runs with a pair of doubles in a win over Liberty County.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 In order to assess district policies and procedures in the event that an “active shooter” enters Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, the district, along with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, the Gulf/Franklin Center of Gulf Coast State College, the Gulf County Health Department and Gulf County Emergency Management will con duct an exercise March 14. That is the Friday before Spring Break, a half-day for Gulf County Schools. The exercise will begin after stu dents leave the high school at 11:30 a.m. ET and continue until 4 p.m. There will be no live ammuni tion or weapons used, but a number of emergency vehicles, in response mode, will be on the school campus. No member of the public will be permitted on the grounds. “We want to emphasize that no students will be participating in this activity,” McFarland said. “We will have training for approximately 100 staff and teachers on Wednesday, and we are going to conduct the activity after students leave. “Again, I want to emphasize — no students will be involved.” The aim of the exercise, which is being funded through a state emer gency management grant secured by county Emergency Manager Mar shall Nelson, is to assess the efcacy of district policies in place for such emergencies. “For this functional exercise, we have really keyed in on two areas,” Nelson said. “One is the response of school staff, and the other is the re sponse of law enforcement.” In addition, the exercise aims to highlight areas where district poli cies might be lacking and provide insight into questions and issues that policies might not anticipate. “This is really to look at the big picture,” McFarland said. “What hap pens when something like this comes into the school? They are going to give us recommendations to update our policies. “The main focus, in fact, is for Gulf District Schools to review its cur rent policies and practice a live sce nario to be better prepared for such an adverse situation. The exercise will identify vulnerabilities and how quickly rst responders are equipped to assist our schools.” The charge for the school site when a shooter enters is to lock down the school before the arrival of emer gency management, McFarland said, noting the crucial minutes between a shooter’s presence and the arrival of assistance. How do teachers and staff secure the students? What are procedures for silencing phones and other tech nological devices that might mark the presence of potential targets for the shooter? In addition, McFarland said, the exercise will provide a learning expe rience for such aspects of the event as where to place media responding to the event and what would be the procedure for securing bodies and potential victims. “This is to better prepare us in case something like this happens,” McFarland said. “That is our respon sibility, to assure student safety. “We also want parents to know this is a school shooting activity. An im portant one. One I’ve been trying to get here for several years. We thank Marshall for securing this grant.” The training that will take place for two hours on the Wednesday be fore the activity will involve faculty, staff and administrators from the Port St. Joe schools as well as front ofce personnel from the Wewahitch ka schools, McFarland said. Before Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School is locked down for the exer cise at 11:45 a.m. ET March 14, the Gulf/Franklin Center will be locked down for the same purpose at 10 a.m. ET in order to review its procedures for such an event. (! ) ) ( & & & & *B O ARD CER TIFIE D CIVIL TRI AL L A WYER O F CO UNS EL "!" 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M o o r e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n B ui l d i n g 1 0 0 0 C ec i l G C os t i n S r B l v d P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a T h e p u b l i c h e a r i n g s w i l l b e t o d i s c u s s a n d a c t o n t h e f o l l o w i n g : 1 V a r i a n ce E l l i s C S m i t h P a r ce l I D # 0 3 8 0 6 0 8 0 R L o c a t e d n e x t t o V e t e r a n s P a r k ( B e a c o n H i l l ) G u l f S i d e U S 9 8 B ui l d i n g s e t b a c k n e x t t o P a r k 2 V a r i a n ce C a r o l i n e A R a n k i n P a r ce l I D # 0 6 3 5 1 0 0 5 R L o c a t e d o n Wi n d w a rd S t ( C a p e S a n B l a s ) R o a d s e t b a c k t o m e e t D E P CCC L l a n d w a r d s e tb a c k 3 C o u nt y D e v e l o p m e nt R eg u l a t i o n s a nd P o l i c ie s 4 S t a f f P u b l i c a n d O p e n D isc u s s i o n T he p ub l i c i s e nc o u r a ge d t o a t t e n d a n d b e h e a rd o n t h es e m a t t e r s I n f o r m a t i o n p r i o r t o t h e m e e t i n g c a n b e v i e w e d a t t h e P l an ni n g D e p a r t m e n t a t 1 0 0 0 C ec i l G C os t i n S r B l v d R o o m 31 1 V a r i a n c e E l l i s C S m i t h V a r i a n c e C a r o l i n e A R a n k i n S– D F šx   „ œ d x ‡ ‰   –   ‡ „ l – – ‚ ‘ „ ” –…   ‡ „ l – š ‚ K W i t h C e r t i c a t e s o f D e p o s i t t h e i n t e r e s t r a t e m a y b e l o w y o u r e ta x e d e v e r y y e a r o n t h e g a i n a n d y o u m a y n o t h a v e m u c h co n d e nce i n b a n k s W i t h a W o o d m e n o f t h e W o r l d a n n u i t y y o u c a n: C a l l t o d a y t o n d o u t m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n C a r o l D i xo n F i el d R e p r e s e n t a t i v e 8 5 0 6 2 5 -55 3 0 1 0 1 R e i d A v e P o r t S t Jo e F L 3 2 4 5 6 p h o n e 8 5 0 6 2 5 5 5 3 0 experience.” For Cox, who will turn 77 this year, the time in the schools and on the School Board was becom ing, as he put it, a “bit of chore.” He said he had two back surgeries — mark ing three such surger ies since 2003 — in the past two years. He has also had heart issues re quiring bypass surgery and implantation of a pacemaker. He once drove off State 22 after losing con sciousness while driving several years ago — es caping with no injuries — and had a similar re cent scare that sent him to the hospital for several days and carried a diag nosis of very high blood pressure. He said, simply, it was time to step aside. “I am tired,” Cox said. “My term ends Nov. 17, and if I can make it that long, I don’t want to do it anymore. It is time for someone younger to come in. “I have thoroughly enjoyed my time on the board. It has been very rewarding.” COX from page A1 SH ooOO TER from page A1

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Who’s been the only major leaguer whose 3,000th career hit was a triple? Pete Rose, Ty Cobb, Paul Molitor, Eddie Murray 2) Which sport has been pictured on the cover of “Sports Illustrated” more than any other? Football, Baseball, Basketball, Golf 3) Who coined, “Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker”? Ogden Nash, Andy Warhol, George Carlin, Robert Frost 4) Daguerreotype was an early process to perform what? Crop dusting, Irrigation, Refrigeration, Photography 5) In blackjack, how many total cards in a deck are worth 10 points each? 8, 10, 12, 16 6) What was the rst name of Grandma Walton in the older TV series (“The Waltons”)? Eula, Lillie, Esther, Mabel 7) From the nursery rhyme what did Tom, Tom the piper’s son steal? Pear, Peach, Pony, Pig 8) About what percent of the world’s water is in the Atlantic Ocean? 12.4, 23.9, 30.2, 39.5 9) Where was Joan of Arc burned at the stake in 1431? Rouen, Reims, Rochester, Rundam 10) Of these which is played with the smallest ball? Pool, Ping Pong, Golf, Squash 11) What is silver sh a type of? Dolphin, Kerosene, Insect, Metal 12) Of these movies beginning with “M” which did not star Cher? “Mask,” “Mermaids,” “Misery,” “Moonstruck” 13) Which is an ancient Russian musical instrument that’s a kind of harp? Gusli, Doge, Duvet, Tauter 14) Where is one’s stirrup bone? Thumb, Nose, Knee, Ear ANSWERS 1) Paul Molitor. 2) Football. 3) Ogden Nash. 4) Photography. 5) 16. 6) Esther. 7) Pig. 8) 23.9. 9) Rouen. 10) Ping Pong. 11) Insect. 12) “Misery.” 13) Gusli. 14) Ear. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The gymnasium at Port St. Joe Elementary School has reopened for business. During Christmas break, construction began on new wood oors to replace the old gymnasium and lunch room oors in the school. The repairs were completed by RAM Enterprises for a bid of $114,657. According to Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, the money for the project didn’t come from taxpayers but rather a “pot of money” made up of tag renewal funds that nets the board approximately $15,000 each year. The money must be used every ve years or lost. “Due to water issues in the last decade, the oor buckled and had become unsafe,” Norton said. “The state gave us permission to tap into that money in the name of safety.” Projects eligible for the funds must also have been listed on both a ve-year work plan and a project priority list. The funds could not be used for landscaping or competition-based facilities. Concern about the oors began when RAM performed an analysis and discovered the gym By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com According to Brooklyn Sheppard, a fth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary School, the secret to making the world a better place is simple: end racism. That’s the poignant thought that steered Sheppard’s winning entry in the 2014 Black History Month essay contest. Sheppard was the winner of the fourthand fth-grade division in the statewide contest. For her win, Sheppard was awarded a trip to the governor’s mansion in Tallahassee, where she, her mother Heather, her father and grandmother had hors d’oeuvres with Gov. Rick Scott and the rst lady at a reception to celebrate the contributions AfricanAmerican community leaders, educators and students make to Florida’s communities, culture, and history. She also earned a fouryear scholarship to a Florida college or university. “We took photos with the governor and his wife and he congratulated me,” Sheppard said. “It was pretty exciting.” Sheppard was originally told about the contest by teacher Anne Johnson. She had several days to write the essay before Scott announced the winners on Feb. 25. “When I heard that I won, I jumped up and down and screamed,” Sheppard said. Entering the contest was optional, but Sheppard knew there was a four-year Florida College Plan scholarship on the line. The scholarship was provided by the Florida Prepaid College Foundation. Sheppard said she didn’t know if her parents could pay for college and saw the contest as an opportunity to make her dreams of becoming a lawyer come true. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Brooklyn Sheppard, a fth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary, was a statewide winner in the 2014 Black History Month essay contest and was congratulated during a reception by Gov. Rick Scott. PSJ student wins statewide Black History Month essay contest Thursday, March 6, 2014 INSIDE Read Sheppard’s essay on Page B5 See ESSAY B5 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The professional liars were out in force last weekend. Hot off of the Liar’s Challenge held the prior week at the Thirsty Goat, a wine and cheese event focused on “grown up stories” was held on Friday at Gulf Coast State College. More than 100 people turned out to see professional storytellers Bob Patterson from St. Augustine, Pat Nease from Panama City and Robyn Rennick from Tallahassee. Fourth-grader Chasity Finch, winner of the storytelling competition at Port St. Joe Elementary School, opened the show and told her original story to get the crowd warmed up. In short strokes, Finch’s story, her own creation, was a lesson on mice and not sleeping in a toilet. Don’t ask. “We have a lot of outside visitors,” Coastal Community Association President Pat Hardman said. “It gives the winter visitors an event that they can come to and enjoy.” Hardman pointed out visitors had come from Panama City and Tallahassee for the event. A weekend of stories WES LOCHER | The Star The previous gym oor was damaged by moisture and warped by warm temperatures. PSJE receives new gym oor See GYM B5 See SHELLS B5 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The professional liars were out in force last weekend. Hot off of the Liar’s Challenge held the prior week at the Thirsty Goat, a wine and cheese event focused on “grown up stories” was held on Friday at Gulf Coast State College. More than 100 people turned out to see professional storytellers Bob Patterson from St. Augustine, Pat Nease from Panama City and Robyn Rennick from Tallahassee. Fourth-grader Chasity Finch, PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Chasity Finch a fourth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary School told a story before a packed house at the Wine and Cheese event on Friday night. At left Tallahassee storyteller Robyn Rennick regaled the crowd with “grown up stories.” Shells and Tales rounds out fest with grown up stories and workshops

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B2 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast % %% "$ # S O L D !! 4516302 850-227-8890 / 850-227-7770 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m G u l f f r o n t t o p o o r 2 B D / 2 B A c o n d o w i t h p a n o r a m i c v i e w s o f t h e g u l f L a r g e o p e n k i t c h e n l i v i n g a n d di n i n g a r e a w i t h g r e a t v i e w s T h i s s p a c i o u s c o n d o m i n i u m f e a t ur e s go r g e o u s h e a r t o f p i n e o o r s g r a n i t e c oun t e r t op s t h r ou ghou t s t a i n le s s k i t c h e n a p p l i a n c e s a n d 1 0 f o o t c e i l i n g s F u r n i s h e d a n d r e a d y f o r y o u A ida is a sw eet y oung ca t tha t lo v es t o cuddle and purr She is v er y friendly and out going A ida lo v es t o be held and pett ed She did not ha v e the best star t in lif e and came fr om the str eets T his sw eet g ir l deser v es a saf e lo ving f or ev er home She k eeps her k ennel clean and tidy and pr omises t o do so a t her new home K itt en and P upp y season is upon us and w e ha v e an abundanc e P lease c onsider one of our fully v ett ed pets f or y ou ne x t addition t o y our furr y family E v en if y ou cannot adopt y ou can help in other w a y s: F ost er homes g iv e our g r ea t pets the a tt en tion and socializa tion they cr a v e W e pr o vide all supplies needed W e need v olun t eers t o help with main t enanc e ar ound the shelt er T o w els and bedding ar e alw a y s w elc ome P et carriers and cr a t es D ona tions of k itt y litt er is in g r ea t demand as w ell as pupp y t o y s M onetar y dona tions ar e alw a y s w elc ome A n y dona tion no ma tt er ho w small will be g r ea tly appr ecia t ed I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/ neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! O nline applica tions and pet phot os ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith ’ s T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s j bh u ma n e s o c i e t y o r g See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y Whether you are beginning a landscape or adding to an existing one, your major expenses will probably be in purchasing trees and shrubs. It’s important that you know how to take care of new shrubbery from the day you bring it home from the nursery. First and foremost, this means correct planting methods. In fact, the way you plant new trees and shrubs has a lot to do with the way they’ll look for many years to come. A common question about planting trees and shrubs is when is the best time to plant? Generally speaking, late fall and winter are the recommended time for adding new plants to the landscape. If you’re thinking about getting some new shrubs into your landscape, now’s the time to do it. There are a few exceptions to this general rule. Some evergreens, for example, are best planted in August or early September, and the best time to transplant palms is during the summer months when we are getting high rainfall. Planting time and procedure can also vary depending on how the plant is grown and packaged at the nursery. Plants are usually prepared for shipping in one of four ways: They may be bare-root, which is when the root and bare of all soil. They may be balled and burlapped, where most of the root and soil mass is dug intact and wrapped in burlap. The plant may come as a package bare-root, in which case, all the soil is removed from the root, and the roots are then wrapped in sawdust, bark, or peat moss. The fourth variation is the container-grown plant, where the root system is not disturbed until planting time. Container grown plants can successfully be transplanted any time of year. A plant may be prepared in any of these four ways. The exact method of packaging will depend on the characteristics of each particular plant, as well as production and shipping consideration. For the most part, bareroot, packaged bare-root, and balled and burlapped plants will have a higher survival rate if they are planted during the winter months. You should prepare the site well in advance so it will be ready for the new plant as soon as you bring it home. You’ll want to get the plant in the ground as soon as possible. One important step in preparation is digging the hole. Make sure you dig the hole deep enough. It should be at least 6 inches deeper and wider on all sides than the root mass of the plant. Keep the sides of the hole going straight up and down, rather than sloped. At the bottom, loosen several inches of soil to allow for root development. Before you can plant, you’ll probably need to add some amendments, things like compost, peat moss or pine bark. In Florida’s sandy soils, they are added to help the soil hold water and nutrients better. About one part soil amendment should be thoroughly mixed with every two parts of soil that go back into the hole with the plant. Remember that the hole was dug about 6 inches deeper and wider that the roots mass of the plant. So start by putting about 6 inches of the mended soil in the bottom of the hole. Pack it down well so the plant won’t settle after you’re nished Stand the plant upright in the center of the hole, and turn it so that its best side is most prominent. Make sure the roots are naturally spread, with no cramping or twisting. If you’re working with a bare-root plant, make a cone-shaped mound of soil in the hole and arrange the roots around it. For balled and burlapped or containergrown plants, handle the soil ball carefully so that it doesn’t break. An important step now is to make sure the plant is all right growing level. Planting too shallow can cause the roots to dry out. On the other hand, planting too deeply can suffocate roots and cause the base of the trunk to rot. Bare-root plants usually show the right soil level by a color change at the base of the trunk. With balled and burlapped or container-grown plants, line up the top of the soil ball with the soil surface. Now you can ll up the hole with amended soil. If you have a balled and burlapped plant, untie the burlap, but don’t try to remove it. It will soon decay on its own. You only need to roll it down away from the soil ball. Fill up the hole about three-fourths of the way, keeping the plant in an upright position. Get rid of all air pockets, and water thoroughly. Let the water settle and ll the remainder of the hole with more soil, water again. Finally, make a rim of soil a few inches high in a 2or 3-foot circle around the plant. This saucer shaped basin will hold water and direct it to the roots of the plant. For more information on garden fertilization, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u.edu or http://edis.ifas.u.edu and see Publication ENH 856 & ENH 1129. Special to The Star Gulf Amateur Radio Society monthly meeting Are you interested in becoming a radio amateur, commonly called a “Ham”? The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will have its next meeting at 7 p.m. ET today, March 6, at the Gulf County Operations Center building in Port St. Joe. Come on out to meet some local Hams and see what’s going on. For more information, call Howard Johnson at 229-1789 or Norman Bixler at 832-1388. Woman’s Club thanks fundraiser helpers The GFWC Wewahitchka Woman’s Club recent pulled pork sandwich plate fundraiser was a huge success. The club would like to thank everyone who purchased a plate(s) and/or donated to this event. Special thanks go to Brad Bailey, Brother Joey Smith and Shane Semmes for helping make this event as wonderful as it was. We are always thankful to the public’s participation when we raise money for scholarships and community projects. Last, but not least, thanks goes to Tim Croft, who always ensures that our articles are published in The Star. VFW St. Patty’s Day dinner to benet Relay for Life The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 10069 will serve up its annual St. Patrick’s Day dinner at 5 p.m. ET March 15 at the Post in Highland View. The dinner will include corned beef and cabbage, including potatoes, carrots, onions, bread and scrumptious desserts prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. The evening’s festivities will include karaoke by Wanda, a special St. Patty’s Day Basket Rafe and other surprises. Dinner is $10. The dinner service starts at 5 p.m. ET and will continue until the food is gone. Take-outs will be available. All proceeds will be donated to the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. Wear your green and join the Ladies Auxiliary for this worthwhile cause. Alzheimer’s support group Alzheimer’s Project Inc. announces an active support group of Port St. Joe. The support group meets from 1-2:30 p.m. fourth Tuesdays in the Social Hall at First United Methodist Church, 1001 Constitution Drive in Port St. Joe. This is a free service for the community of Port St. Joe. Alzheimer’s Project is a nonprot organization based in Tallahassee. The organization extends a warm supportive welcome to all caregivers, but this caregiver support group is not just for caregivers of persons with dementia. It is for anyone who is caring for a loved one. The support group empowers caregivers with knowledge and information through resources, fellowship and sharing of life experiences with like-minded individuals who are caring for a loved one. Questions or comments can be directed to Recie Culpepper at 5662553, or visit www.alzheimersproject. org. Special to The Star Godwin announced as essay winner The Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators’ Association, an afliate of the Florida Retired Educators’ Association, is happy to announce the winner of the 2014 essay contest. Each year, fth-grade students are invited to participate by writing an essay about their relationship with a grandparent or grandparent gure. Our winner this year is Allie Godwin, a student in Ms. Cindy Phillips’ class at Port St. Joe Elementary School, for her essay, “A Happy Memory.” In her essay, Godwin relates experiences with her Gan-Gan. Godwin was awarded a $25 cash prize, and her essay will be forwarded to the next level for judging and possibly compete at state level. John-Patrick Floyd receives degree from Georgia Tech John-Patrick Floyd of Port St. Joe has earned a Master of Science in international affairs from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Floyd was among about 2,700 undergraduate and graduate students who received degrees during Georgia Tech’s 246th commencement exercises. The Georgia Institute of Technology is one of the nation’s leading research universities, providing a focused, technologically based education to more than 21,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Georgia Tech has many nationally recognized programs and is ranked in the nation’s top ten public universities by “U.S. News and World Report.” For more information, visit www. gatech.edu. When and how to plant trees and shrubs ROY lL EE cart CARTE rR County extension director Congratulations Society Society B rR IE fsFS

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The Star| B3 Thursday, March 6, 2014 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 THE T A H ILL ON C B EA 8 9 H WY 4 5 4 9 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S 0 1 3 8 7 4 6 0 5 8 S L IMIT Y C IT CH B EA O MEXIC S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA LIVE ON THE POOP DECK IN THE CRO W NEST KARA OKE-DJ-D ANCING NO W THURSD A Y FRID A Y -SA TURD A Y -9PM ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIMES UPCOMING EVENTS RANDY WITH ART ON SA X FL AB B ERG ASTED BAND RANDY ST ARK DEB I JORD AN Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Joel Rosenbaum, DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients F ea tu r i ng L o c a l A r t i s a n s L a n ar k V i l l a g e B o a t C l u b Sp r i ng Ma r c h 8 t h 2 0 14 9 a m ~ 1 p m LU N C H # & #) # ) ( + ( $ ) ng i r Sp DAZZLING DOLPHINS Special to The Star SS enior news: Interested seniors are encouraged to sign up for the eld trip to Gulf Coast State College’s Gulf Franklin Center on Friday, March 7. Students attending will receive an in-depth brieng on courses and services available at our local college. S S pring break: The spring holiday for all Gulf County Schools will commence on March 14 with a halfday session and continue through March 21. Classes will resume Monday, March 24.P P rom permission slips: A permission slip is required for prom guests who do not attend our school. Prom is scheduled for April 26. Guests must be in at least the ninth grade and under the age of 21. Forms may be picked up from Deputy Strickland and are due back to him no later than April 11. N N JRO O TC salute: On April 2, the Port St Joe NJROTC will conduct a salute to those graduating and recently graduated seniors of Gulf County who have enlisted into the Armed Forces of the United States and are awaiting their initial training. A ceremonial swearing in and recognition will be conducted. Any personnel enlisted in the Delayed Entry Programs of any service may call LCDR Jarosz at 229-8251 to be included in this ceremony. All veterans and interested individuals are invited to attend. The ceremony will commence at 9 a.m. ET and last about 45 minutes. WAcC KY WE dD NES dD AY rR EA dD ING A t T W ESES 4IBSL 5BML Special to The Star Florida’s top performing STEM students recently were recognized as Sunshine State Scholars and given the opportunity to attend a two-day event in Orlando, Feb. 13-14. Each school district in Florida selected its top 11th-grade student based on their academic achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher chosen by each student, were invited to participate in the annual Sunshine State Scholars program. Among those being honored this year was Wewahitchka High’s Justin Barrier. The program let students meet directly with successful professionals from STEM-related industries in Florida, and with recruiters from Florida’s nest colleges and universities. The students heard about special programs of study and industry internship opportunities, learned about some of the latest innovations and discoveries in STEM-related research, heard personal success stories from leaders in Florida’s STEM industry and were recruited to become part of Florida’s future workforce. The scholars also met with students who had similar interests in STEM programs. SS PEc C IAL tT O THE StST A r R Justin Barrier with Florida Education Commissioner Pam Stewart. Wewa STEM student named Sunshine State ScholarSS PEc C IAL tT O THE StST A r R Mrs. Bailey, Mrs. Taunton and Mrs. McMillian’s kindergarten classes at Wewahitchka Elementary School celebrated Dr. Suess’ love to read last week with “Wacky Wednesday.” This rainy day was perfect for teachers and students to enjoy a wonderful and wacky day of reading! SS PEc C IAL tT O THE StST A r R This week’s Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Kooper Jeness, Madison Othic, Leland Whitlock and Jett Whicker. Back row: Morgan Mills, Bradley Lewis, Joe Becton and Cameron Brown. The Lion’s Tale Special to The Star Second quarter honor roll at Faith Christian School. StrSTR AIGH tT AA ’S KK indergarten: Tucker Ashcraft, Cade Costin, Annie Cullin, Jacob Medina, Elli Newman (not pictured), Mary Austin Sapp, Farrah Spring, Celie White and Ruby Williams. First grade: Austin Ramsey, Toren SmithS S econd grade: Taylor Burkett, Carter Costin, Mazie Hodges, Riley McGufn, Alex Taylor Third grade: Karys Linton (not pictured) Fourth grade: Kristen Bouington AA LL AA ’S AN dD B’S KK indergarten: Mary Beth McGufn, Jakob Prine First grade: Hali Thomas (not pictured), Lilli WilliamsS S econd grade: John Cullin Third grade: Jae Lenox, Magnolia Sarmiento (not pictured) Fourth grade: Theron Smith AA HONO rR rR OLL, fF I rR S tT SS EMES tT E rR A A HONO rR rR OLL, SE cC ON dD QUA rtRTE rR ALL AA ’S AN dD B’S, fF I rR S tT SEMES tT E rR A A ’S AN dD B’S, SE cC ON dD QUA rtRTE rR School News

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Bruce Hodge, P astor SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mary Earl Helms Smith made her transition to her heavenly life on February 24, 2014 at The Bridge at Bay St Joe Nursing Facility where she resided. She was born on November 20, 1924 to H. E. Hubby and Hazel Helms in Milton, FL. She was a graduate of Port St. Joe High School, a resident of White City and a member of the White City Baptist Church, where she was a Sunday school teacher for many years. She married her husband, Robert Big Bob Smith on February 17, 1945 in Gulf County, FL which is where they raised their family. Ms. Mary is survived by her sons Herbert Smitty Smith, Murry Smith and wife Eudora; her grandchildren Lauren Hanley and her husband Keith of White City, Herbert Stephen Smith and his wife Amy of Panama City, and Jesse Smith of White City; ve great-grandchildren, Josie Latshaw and her husband Jon, Joshua Sundie, and Codi Sundie all of White City, Seth and Danyel Smith of Panama City. Ms. Mary was preceded in death by her husband, Robert Big Bob Smith, her daughter, Anita Smith, her daughter-in-law Charlene Smith, and her granddaughter, Savanna Smith all of White City. Funeral services were held February, 28, 2014 at White City Baptist Church. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Mary Earl Helms Smith Mother Gracie M. Ranie was born in Scott Ferry on July 23, 1933. She was one of ten children born to the late Robert T. Keith, Sr. and Cora (Rouse) Keith. Mother Ranie was called home to be with the Lord on Feb. 16. She was preceded in death by her sister, Sara Keith and Brothers Robert T. Keith, Jr., William E. Keith and Cornelius Keith. At an early age, Mother Ranie was a member of St. James A.M.E. In 1986 she moved to St. Petersburg and became an active member of Prayer Tower Church of God in Christ. In 1995 she returned to Wewahitchka and became a member of Carter Temple First Born Church. She was one of the Mothers of Carter Temple until the Lord called her home. Mother Ranie leaves to cherish her memories seven children: Linda Gant (Paul) of Port St. Joe, Jerry Ranie, Anna (Merle) Nickerson and Benjamin (Ben) Ranie (Carolyn) of Wewahitchka, Dale Ranie of St. Petersburg, Sylvia Ranie of Brandon, Carol (Ranie) Fletcher (James) of Hawthorne, CA., and godson Kenneth Gray (Bobbi) of Lynn Haven. She leaves behind eight grandchildren and ve sisters; Ada Dozier, Lillian Russ and Nervene Colvin (John) of Wewahitchka; Stella Scott and Annie Granberry of Tacoma, WA., one sister-in-law, Denise Keith of Wewahitchka and a host of nieces, nephews, relatives and many special friends. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. Revelations 21:4 Gracie M. Ranie Frances Maud Maw Maw Segers, 96, of St. Joe Beach passed away at home peacefully in her sleep Tuesday, February 26, 2014. She was born in Guntersville, AL., and had been a resident of Lynn Haven and Gulf County most of her life. Known as Maw Maw, she was a member of Beach Baptist Chapel and was greatly loved by family and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, Joseph and Anna Spivey; her adoptive parents, Charles and Julia Dunn; her husband Cecil Segers; and her sons, Cecil Segers, Jr., Charles Segers, Thomas Segers, and Jerry Segers. She is survived by her daughters, Wanda Forehand (Chester); Dianne Sanders (ONeal); her son, Michael Segers (Laveria); 10 grandchildren; numerous greatgrandchildren. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. ET Monday, March 3, 2014 at Beach Baptist Chapel at St. Joe Beach with the Rev. David Nichols of ciating. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery. There was a visitation for an hour prior to the service at the church. Services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Frances Maud Maw Maw Segers FRANCES MAUD MAW MAW SEGERS Obituaries Long Avenue Baptist Church calls new senior pastor During a special called business meeting on Feb. 23, the membership of Long Avenue Baptist Church voted to call the Rev. Israel Eli Prine as their new senior pastor. For the past 2 years, the Rev. Prine has served as the student pastor of LABC. Before his relocation to Port St. Joe, the Rev. Prine served as minister of students and education at Faith Baptist Church in Durham, N.C. The Rev. Prine grew up in Crawfordville, Fla., and was a graduate of Wakulla High School. He received his bachelor of arts in theology from the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville. The Rev. Prine earned his master of divinity in Christian ministry from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forrest, N.C. The Rev. Prine has been married to his wife, Shanna, for eight years. Together, they have three children: Jakob Micah, and Caleb. The Prine family, along with the Pastor Search Committee of LABC, will host an open house from 4-6 p.m. ET on March 8 at the Prine residence, 2006 Juniper Ave. in Port St. Joe. Presbyterian churches to worship together Port St. Joe meets Wewahitchka this Sunday, when the First Presbyterian Churches of PSJ and Wewa worship together at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET) at the Wewa Presbyterian Church, 336 State 71. PSJ members and friends will meet in the PSJ church parking lot (16th Street and Woodward Avenue) by 10:15 a.m. ET to carpool. A pot luck lunch will follow worship. Everyone is encouraged to bring a favorite dish to share. All times are adjusted for DST. Call 227-1756 for a place in the carpool or leave a message with questions. First Presbyterian Wewahitchka sanctuary is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Wewa, built in 1894 by Episcopalians. At that time, the Presbyterians had property and shared programs across the street with First Methodist (now First United Methodist). The Presbyterian Church purchased the unused Episcopalian property in 1943. In the 1970s, Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Roman Catholics all worshipped at different times in the Presbyterian buildings. Special to The Star The impact of posttraumatic stress disorder will be explored at 7 p.m. CT Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Wounded Warriors: When War Comes Home, will explore post-traumatic stress disorder in the lives of military veterans and provide helpful resources and strategies for coping with PTSD. This program will focus on men and women returning from military service, but post-traumatic stress disorder also affects civilians, Lifetree representative Craig Cable said. This program will be helpful for anyone who has experienced trauma. The program features the lmed story of a veteran who saw his buddy killed in combat. His return to civilian life was disrupted by lingering mental distress, violent tendencies and relationship problems. He eventually found hope and stability. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. PTSD discussed at Lifetree Caf Faith BRIEFS Thursday, March 6, 2014

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, March 6, 2014 -' + ', &'% %' + '% -' ) % '' % -' ' % ''% ' -' + + # -', !% '% # !$ '% -' + ', &'% %' ( -"+ !%' "( '' %', '' % %' '' % '"-, T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.f su.edu. FL ORIDA ST A TE UNIVERSI T Y P ANAMA CIT Y THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMM UNIT Y ’S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs " ! $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 3-15-14 CODE: SJ00 “Miss Johnson tells us to try and follow our dreams,” Sheppard said. Sheppard read the es say for her peers and said she received a lot of posi tive feedback from her teacher and classmates, which helped her feel condent in her essay. She encouraged her classmates to participate in future opportunities that may better their futures. I Have a Dream for 2014 By Brooklyn Sheppard I dream of a world lled with love. To love one another is the key for world peace. Even though this sounds easy, we have never been able to achieve it. Hate is taught by the shallow mindset of others. We are all born into this world as innocent babies, but our upbringing can change our future in many ways. I want to live in a world where children are taught to respect others, regard less of gender or race and in a world that is blind to color. This world that I dream of will not judge me by my brown skin but by my talents, kindness, and compassion. Each human is des tined to do great things. Everyone has the right to become anything they want. We all hold great ness inside of us. If we all put forth an effort, we can break the racial barriers that have kept so many in bondage. No one should be judged by the color of their skin, for we are all created equal and equal we should be. Peace, love, and equal ity are three words that hold so much power. There is enough power in these words to move mountains for us all and to change the world. One act of kindness can change a person’s life. Every act of love goes far. If people would volunteer to help the homeless, or maybe spend time helping a child to read, we could greatly improve our nation, and our world as a whole. When we see a child, we should give a smile. When we see someone down on their luck, we should of fer a kind word. Anything that we can do that is pos itive has a lasting effect. We should always treat others the way that you want to be treated, and choose our words wisely. We need to remember to do our part each day to make the world a better place. If we carry on the work of so many amazing men and women before us, such as Dr. Martin Lu ther King, Jr., we can con tinue to honor them. I was able to grow up and live in a land where I can be anything that I de sire to be. I have the drive to succeed and to do great things. We have come a long way, but there was a time when a woman had no voice, and if you were black, you could only ride in the back of the bus. Progress has denitely been made, but we still have much more to do. To each and every man, woman, and child, I encourage and chal lenge everyone to go on this journey with me. We together can change the world not only for us but for the generations after we are gone. Life is short, and it is time that we come together and make these changes. Give a hug, and lend a hand. Do not discriminate, but ap preciate life. Change your heart for the better. ESSAY from page B1 oor needed to be replaced. Moisture issues had caused the old ooring to warp after stagnant air made its way between the sub-oor and maple oor and disintegrat ed the vapor barrier. The school board voted to proceed with the repairs in December. The renovations bring the gymnasium oor up to date with current standards. During construction, the maintenance team installed several fans in the crawl space under the oors to circulate air when tempera tures increased. “We have multiple ath letic sports teams and only one gym oor,” Norton said. “Now, it will be able to ac commodate our high school sports overow needs. “We may have old build ings, but we plan on them lasting us another 60 years.”WES LOCh H ER | The Star The new gymnasium oor at Port St. Joe Elementary School was replaced and upgraded by RAM Enterprises. GYM from page B1 “Attendees are getting to hear theater,” Hardman said. “It’s a more cultural event, and the professional storytellers are bringing quality entertainment.” The following morning, storytell ers Nease and Rennick held a story telling workshop for those interested in improving their skills. Those in attendance began by sharing the stories behind their names and worked their way up to stories they could share at home or at work. The storytellers provided tips and tricks when it came to presenting the story for an audience and making it visually interesting to watch. “The opportunities for stories are endless,” Nease said. “There’s a dif ference between sitting at the din ner table and bringing a story to the stage.” “It’s great to get the community involved alongside the profession als,” Rennick said. “It’s all about get ting local stories out there.” The event was sponsored by the CCA and the Port St. Joe Lion’s Club. Artwork crafted by students at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School also was on display. CCA Treasurer Brooks Jones co ordinated the event and was proud to say with four days’ worth of events, Shells and Tales had ofcially become a festival in 2014. Jones said storytelling is some thing that’s important to him, and he enjoys sharing it with the community. He said as a child, it was a tradi tion in his family for his father to tell stories on the weekend and children from around the neighborhood would visit the Jones house to listen. The stories always ended on a cliffhanger to keep people coming back. Jones said he and his siblings car ried on the tradition with their own children. “I’m happy to make this contribu tion to the community,” Jones said. “It was a good crowd, and you could feel that they were enjoying. “It was great to have locals and snowbirds attend and everyone made new friends.” SHELLS from page B1 WES LOCh H ER | The Star More than 100 attendees enjoyed the wine and cheese event at Gulf Coast State College.

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 227-7847 451-6042 CALL T OD A Y! T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOW A/C W ASHERS/DR YERS ST OV ES /R EF RI GE RA TO RS FREEZER/MICROW A VES LA WN MOWERS SCRAP MET AL, ETC... 1 9 Y e ar s of S e r vi ce GET Y O UR A D IN The Lives of Children during the American Revolution By Kate McLemore Grade eight Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Hello, my name is Molly Andrews and it is the year 1777. I live in Concord, Massachusetts which is about twentyve miles from Boston. My dad left for Boston three weeks ago for what we thought was a business trip concerning Andrews Boat Company, our family company. However, we have received word that instead of coming home he is headed to Valley Forge in Pennsylvania to help General Washington. Everyone has heard by now how cold all the soldiers are; we have all been gathering socks and shoes to send to our loved ones. I worry everyday about my dad, but I know that since I am the oldest of the three kids that I have to step up and start helping my mom with our company. Today I am going to see if I can get former workers wives to help. Most of the men who worked for us have left to become patriots for the Continental Army. That leaves my mother, my six year old brother, my eight year old sister, me, and a few wives of former workers to do the work of the men. I am very fortunate my dad has always let my mother and me help, so we know how to get everything done. Today we rigged a pulley system to life the heavy boards for placement on the boats. Orders for new boats have greatly decreased. Instead, we are mostly repairing the boats which belong to the privateers. It has now been four months, and we were ecstatic to see my father’s face for the rst time in months. He was terribly malnourished and had lost two ngers to frostbite, but other than that he was in much better shape than many others. I was very worried I was never going to see him again, but I never voiced this to my mother or siblings. We have since found out from my dad that when he went to Boston for his meeting a few months ago that he heard that peoples one year enlistments were ending and people were leaving General Washington because of the conditions at Valley Forge. When my dad heard this, he knew he had to go and help his old time friend, General Washington. When he arrived at Valley Forge he found out everything everyone had said about the conditions were true. Many of the soldiers that had stayed were sick and staying in huts that offered no warmth. He told us a story about a soldier desperately trying to cook a pumpkin for nourishment. However, my dad said that Washington and his soldiers had, indeed made it through the winter and they were now ready to resume the battle. Our business has been busier than ever before. It is so helpful to have my father and few other men back to help with the business. We have had boats coming in to be repairs that the British have nearly destroyed with musket balls. My dad is getting angrier and angrier with every tattered boat that comes in to be repaired. It is now November of 1779 and my dad has decided that he would like to continue serving and it would be best for him to join The Continental Navy. He heard about the Battle of Flamborough Head which took place in the North Sea near Yorkshire. John Paul Jones was commanding the American ship, Bonhomme Richard, and was ghting against the British ship, Serpias. Although both ships were shattered and nearly destroyed, John Paul Jones would not give up and actually said, “I have not yet begun to ght!” This courageousness has inspired my dad to join The Navy and ght for the independence of America against the British. My father will leave tomorrow and I pray that he will come back alive. Winners named in DAR essay contest Special to The Star The rst-place winners of the Daughters of the American Revolution history month essay were Hailey Harriman for fth grade, Mary-Kate Wood for sixth and Kate McLemore for eighth. This year’s topic was “The lives of children during the American Revolution.” The DAR congratulates these winners and all 37 students who participated in this year’s contest. The rst place winners were pinned with a beautiful bronze medal for their win and received a booklet including a copy of the Constitution and other important historical documents, a copy of the Bill of Rights, George Mason’s essay on the Bill, and Patrick Henry’s famous “Give me liberty, or give me death” speech. WES LOCHER | The Star Daughters of the American Revolution history month essay contest winners were Hailey Harriman, Mary-Kate Wood and Kate McLemore. The Lives of Children during the American Revolution By Hailey Harriman Grade ve Port St. Joe Elementary School On April 19, 1975 in Lexington, Massachusetts is when our lives changed. It was the American Revolutionary War and my mom Betsy Ross, born January 1, 1752 in Philadelphia, did something great for our country. My dad John Ross and my three brothers Blayze Ross, Jett Ross and Breeze Ross were soldiers in the Lexington war. This is how it happened. My dad and brothers, who were already a part of the local militia, volunteered to ght for our country. My dad and brothers came home from a meeting with George Washington and we ate dinner. After dinner, my mom said she wanted me to help her make something during the war, I wondered what it was. One week and six days later the war began. I was so worried about my dad and brothers in the war. My mom told me it was time to start the “surprise”. She asked me to go get the red, white, and blue thread and so I did. I wandered why red, white, and blue and so I asked her what we were with those colors. She said, “We are going to make an American ag.” We worked on it all day and then mom went to lie down and rest. While she was resting, George Washington came to the door. I answered the door and he said that my dad and two of my brothers, Blayze and Jett, had been shot and passed away. Tears were streaming down my face, I was so sad and didn’t know how I was going to tell my mom. I went to bed and tried to sleep but all I could think about was losing my dad and my brothers. It was the longest night of my life. That morning, mom and I sat down to freedom tea. After we drank our tea, I gave her the bad news, she started crying and I did too. I tried to be strong and brave, I told her that we would be okay, but I was really sad and scared. We started working on the ag to try to get things off our minds. We were half way done with the ag and it was time for dinner. So hard to believe that Breeze was the only family member we had left. Our lives would never be the same again. It is time for bed again, I can hear cannons and guns going off, and it makes me even more afraid and sad. How many more people were going to die? The next morning, my mom said that she had some good news. When we nish the ag, our country will display it for all Americans to see. I was so proud of my mom’s hard work. Then my mom said the war was almost over, we were beating the British and that my brother Breeze would soon be home. I was so happy to hear that the war was ending soon. To celebrate we had homemade bread and coffee, and then it was time for bed. When I woke up the next morning, my brother was home. I couldn’t believe the war was nally over. That afternoon, my mom and I nished the ag. It was beautiful, red and white strips, with a circle of thirteen white stars in a blue square at the top left corner of the ag. The Lives of Children during the American Revolution By Mary-Kate Wood Grade six Faith Christian School I am going to tell you about Sybil Ludington, also known as the “Female Paul Revere”. Syb, as we called her, is my sister. I am Rebecca Ludington, and we are two of twelve children. Our father, Colonel Henry Ludington, was part of the Seventh Militia of the Continental Army that patrolled a section in Connecticut and New York. Syb and I would spy for him and made up special signals that were also used by another secret agent of my father’s. Syb would deliver secret messages from father to his secret agents. During our younger years, my father was a miller and the justice of the peace. Then in June of 1776, my father took the position of Colonel of the Seventh Militia. The area that he was in charge of had a large population of Tories and informers. One day, Daddy learned that the British had placed a bounty on his life. This news did not discourage the Colonel from his duties no Sybil’s plight to help her father. Sybil served many nights on Sentry duty and many times saved our father’s life. On April 5, 1777, Sybil turned 16 years old. Twentyone days later, on the night of April 26, 1777, Sybil heard talking outside of our window. Our parents were talking to a man who had ridden up very quickly to our home. The rider and horse were wet with sweat and exhausted. He told them that about 2,000 British soldiers were in Danbury, and they were searching stores for the Continental Army’s ammunition, guns, and supplies. The British marked with chalk the properties of those that were loyal to the British and to be unharmed. Sybil wanted to know what was happening. Father told her the British were attacking Danbury. Syb said that she could ride and warn the neighbors and to muster his troops. Sybil pleaded with our parents, when nally they gave in. Bent low over her horse, Syb rode hard and fast from Carmel to Cold Spring. She avoided known paths which made the journey even more dangerous because of the risk to her horse, but the most treacherous part of the journey was the informers that hid in the darkness of the secret trails throughout the woods. Her deep commitment to the cause of freedom at such a young age drove her every mile. House to house she went, yelling as she passed, “Danbury’s burning! Soldiers are coming! Muster at Ludington’s Home!” Seeing a light come on, she knew she had been heard; so she continued on to the next house. Forty miles she rode. “By daybreak, thanks to her daring, nearly the whole regiment was mustered before her father’s house at Fredericksburg, and an hour or two later was on the march for vengeance on the raiders.” About 400 troops marched to Danbury, but they were too late to save the town, it was burning. However they did ght many of the British as the British left the area. Because of Sybil’s brave actions, George Washington came to our house in person and thanked her and my dad for their bravery. Just think, the commanding general of the colonial forces was at our house! What a wonderful and exciting moment for my family! Looking back on my younger years, remembering the hard times we suffered to gain our freedom, I feel so proud of my sister. I am not trying to compare her ride with that of Paul Revere’s and its midnight message, but my sister was only a child. Both rides were true acts of true Patriots, and in my mind, neither were more important than the other. A few years later, Sybil married Edgar Ogden who had served in the Revolutionary War with the Navy under the Connecticut Continentals. Sybil had one child, a son that she named Henry. Thankfully, the rest of her life was calm and lled with love and laughter. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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The Star| B7 Thursday, March 6, 2014 FEB. 24-MARCH 2 On Monday, Feb. 24, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce (GCSO) executed an Order of Transport by traveling to Walton County Correctional Institution to pick up Johntavious M. Tiller. Tiller was due to appear in Circuit Court in Gulf County on Tuesday, Feb. 25. He was returned to Walton County on Wednesday. On Feb. 24, School Resource Deputy D. Huggins reported vandalism at Wewahitchka Elementary School. School staff discovered damage and marks on the sidewalks caused by a four-wheeler. Walls were scuffed by tires and some major damage was caused to a set of gates. The four-wheeler was located on school grounds abandoned. If you have any information regarding this offense, please contact Deputy D. Huggins at the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School or contact the GCSO. On Tuesday, Feb. 25, Sgt. C. Dixon received a report of a stolen tag at the Wewahitchka Substation. The tag was taken from a vehicle in the 100 block of Our Town Road, north of Wewahitchka. The report indicated the offense occurred back on Jan. 15. On Feb. 25, the GCSO received a call regarding a domestic disturbance which occurred at the Honeyville Park. Deputy P. Williams investigated the complaint. The case was prepared and forwarded to the State’s Attorney Ofce to be reviewed for possible criminal charges. On Wednesday, Feb. 26, Sgt. M. Herring arrested Brandon L. Burkett (27) in the 200 block of West Creekview Drive, in Stone Mill Creek. Burkett was wanted for Violation of Probation – Grand Theft. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Feb. 26, a warrant for Violation of Probation was served to Courtney N. Ward (24). Ward turned herself into the Gulf County Detention Facility. Wards original charges were Possession of Cocaine, Resisting an LEO without Violence, Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. On Feb. 26, the GCSO received a call regarding residential burglary in the 1700 block of Grouper Avenue in Highland View. Deputy J. Brock responded to the call. Approximately $500 in jewelry was reported stolen. Deputy Brock continues to investigate. On Thursday, Feb. 27, a 911 call was received regarding a subject possibly stealing items out of a neighbor’s yard. The call was from the 500 block of Byrd Parker Drive in Wewahitchka. The caller was able to provide the operator with a vehicle description the subject drove away in. Deputy G. Desrosier responded to the call and was able to locate the described vehicle traveling on Lake Grove Road. The vehicle was stopped for investigative purposes. At the conclusion of the investigation, it was determined that a fuel tank for an outboard motor was stolen from the residence. The tank was recovered as a result of the trafc stop. Anthony Bryan McDaniel (30) was arrested and charged with Burglary. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Feb. 27, Deputy K. Starnes arrested Mandy D. Vickery (31) in the 200 block of Our Town Road in the Wewahitchka area. Vickery had an outstanding warrant for Violation of Probation – Filing a False Police Report. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Feb. 27, Deputy K. Starnes responded to Rich’s IGA in Wewahitchka in reference to shoplifting. Approximately $60 in plants were stolen from the business. Deputy Starnes continues to investigate. On Friday, Feb. 28, Sgt. J. Williams received a tip on the whereabouts of Cresta D. Morrison (36). Morrison was arrested in the 300 block of Jeffery Drive in Port St. Joe. The GCSO held two active warrants for Morrison’s arrest. She was placed under arrest for Theft and Violation of Probation – Trespass. On Feb. 28, Deputy S. Ferrell was dispatched to the 300 block of Michael Street in the Stone Mill Creek area in reference to a stolen vehicle. Prior the GCSO receiving the call, Deputy Ferrell attempted to stop the vehicle at the intersection of South Diana Street and Creekview Drive for a trafc violation. The driver of the vehicle ed on foot. The vehicle was recovered, processed and returned to the owner. On Feb. 28 at about 11:58 p.m. Sgt. R. Burkett clocked a black motorcycle on radar traveling north on State Road 71 near the Honeyville Methodist Church. The driver of the motorcycle was traveling 127 mph in a posted 55 mph zone. The driver attempted to elude Sgt. Burkett and Deputy S. Ferrell by abruptly turning onto a side street in Wewahithcka. He driver stopped after approximately 3.1 miles. Jared C. Sasnett (22) was placed under arrest at the corner of 2nd Street and Magnolia Street in Wewahitcka. He was charged with Fleeing and Attempting to Elude and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Sgt. Burkett issued a speeding citation which requires a mandatory court appearance. On Saturday, March 1, Deputy J. Oquendo conducted a trafc stop on US Highway 98 and 4th Street in Port St. Joe. The vehicle was stopped for a trafc violation. Consent to search the vehicle was obtained. As a result of the search, Deputy Oquendo located approximately four grams of crack cocaine, several empty bags containing residual amounts of marijuana, a bag of marijuana, and drug paraphernalia. The driver, John G. Hermsdorfer (44), and the passenger, Walter F. Bowers (21), were both placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Crack Cocaine, Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Hermsdorfer and Bowers were transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 1, Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the 7000 block of Doc Whiteld Road in Howard Creek regarding an unknown disturbance. The 911 caller stated that a female was walking in the area screaming, cursing, and talking strange. Once Deputy Ferrell arrived he observed a female lying in the middle of Doc Whiteld Road. After investigating the complaint, Carrie K. Strain (27) was arrested and charged with Disorderly Conduct. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 1, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 6900 block of Blossom Hill Road in Howard Creek. Sgt. R. Burkett responded to the call. The investigation resulted in the arrest of Charles G. Dean (37). Dean was charged with Domestic Battery and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Sunday, March 2, Deputy J. Oquendo stopped a vehicle in the area of US Highway 98 and Porpoise Avenue in Highland View. The tag displayed on the vehicle was not registered to it. The driver, Melvin L. Brown, Jr. (30), was operating the vehicle on a suspended license. Brown, a habitual trafc offender, was arrested and charged with one felony count of Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. The owner of the vehicle was cited and issued a court date for attaching a tag not assigned to the vehicle. From Feb. 24-March 2 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 58 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 44 calls for EMS, 18 calls for other departments/ agencies and 13 calls for Animal Control. From Feb. 24-March 2 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Trafc Stop, 48; Civil Paper Service, 38; Field Contact, 21; Domestic Disturbance, 7; Abandoned Vehicle, 6; Reckless Driver, 7; Suspicious Vehicle, 5; Information, 4; Sexual Offender Reregistration, 4; Warrant Arrest, 4; Animal Call, 3; Noise Disturbance, 3; Disturbance, 3; Prisoner Transport, 3; Security Check Request, 3; Suspicious Activity, 3; Welfare Check, 4; Alarm, 2; Animal Bite, 2; Agency Assist, 2; Residential Burglary, 2; Criminal Mischief, 2; Trafc Accident, 2; Aggravated Battery, 1; Contact Message, 1; Physical Disturbance, 1; Verbal Disturbance, 1; Drunk Pedestrian, 1; Funeral Escort, 1; Lost Items, 1; Prowler/Trespass, 1; Recovered Property, 1; Sexual Offender Address Verication, 1; Stolen Tag, 1; Stolen Vehicle, 1; Suspicious Person, 1; and Theft/ Shoplifting, 1. GUL fF CC OUNTY SHERI ffFF ’ sS OffOFF ICE LL AW EE N fF ORCE mM ENT SU mmMM ARY CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, March 6, 2014 The Star | B7 93974S PUBLIC NOTICE Ajax Building Corporation (1080 Commerce Blvd, Midway, FL 32343) as Construction Manager on the St. Joe Peninsula State Park Boardwalks & Parking Improvements Project will, in the near future, accept bids (from prequalified bidders only) for the following work; Site work, concrete, Boardwalks/ Carpentry, misc. metals/ handrails. Interested Bidders should contact James Penrod (Ph: 850-5900871, Fax: 850-2242496, jpenrod@ajax building.com) for additional information. Pub: March 6, 2014 94126S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2009-CA000668 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE, PLAINTIFF, vs. PAUL ROPELIS, ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 18, 2014, and entered in Case No. 23-2009CA-000668 in the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE was the Plaintiff and PAUL ROPELIS, ET AL. the Defendant(s). I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe, FL 32456 on the 27th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 16, BLOCK 4, OF WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT TWO, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 4, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Rebecca Norris Clerk, Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Depuyt Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days o receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-71 0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-9558771; Email: ADARequest@jud14.flco urts.org. File No. 10-13751 Feb 27, March 6, 2014 97651S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PNC, C/O Tampa 1 LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 258 Application No. 2014-06 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01399-000R Description of Property: Lot 4, Block 3, of Riverside Estates Addition to lola recording to the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Eleanor Rosemarie Conley All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 19th day of March, 2014. Dated this 10th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 27, March 6, 2014 97977S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PNC, C/O Tampa 1 LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 655 Application No. 2014-18 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 02861-000R Description of Property: Lot Thirty (30), in Block “A” of Beaty Subdivision of White City, Florida, according to the Official Plat in Plat Book 1, Page 23, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Leon C. Dees All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97979S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1511 Application No. 2014-16 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06317-075R Description of Property: Lot 2 Marnie’s Reserve Plat Book 3 page 65, public records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Coastal Land Company LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97981S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. Law Enforcement

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B8 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1121337 1121336 4510161 4510160 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED: Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4516080 € Hostesses € Bartenders € Servers/Bussers € Cooks € Shuckers 4516048 EXPERIENCED MAINTENANCE PERSON to do grounds and maintenance on a 51 unit apartment community. Must have experience in painting, general carpentry, basic plumbing, electrical and appliance repair. HVAC preferred, but not required. Knowledge in ground keeping. Must be able to pass a background check, have their own tools, and valid driver’s license. Pick up application at: 125 Venus Dr, Port St. Joe or call 850-227-7451Oce Hours: Mon. 1-5, Tues, Wed, Thurs. 9-5, Closed on Fridays.This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. NOW HIRING PINE RIDGE APARTMENTS 4516040JOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for a GIS Coordinator. This is a salaried position with benets. Salary TBD based on experience. Applications and a complete job description are available in our HR ofce or at www.gulfcounty-.gov. Application deadline is Thursday, March 13th at 5:00 p.m. E.T. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at 850-229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at 850-227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Afrmative Action Employer. Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGER The Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Accepting applications until March 15, 2014 Web ID#: 34281510 Text FL81510 to 56654 1480 Application No. 2014-15 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06291-115R Description of Property: LOT 23: Commence at the intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Christopher L Johnson & Ana D. Johnson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97985S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1030 Application No. 2014-13 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03671-000R Description of Property: Lot 16, Block 14, Beacon Hill Subdivision according to the plat recorded at Plat Book 1 page 2. Name in which assessed: Gary & Gloria Freeman All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97983S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1441 Application No. 2014-14 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06269-955R Description of Property: Lot 6 Turtle Dunes according to the plat thereof recorded in the public records of Gulf County at Plat Book 5 page 7. Name in which assessed: Jerry D. Semprevio All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98015S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on March 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N0004’21”E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S2325’11”E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 0208’33” for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S2429’28”E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S2533’44”E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N6426’16”E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S2533’44”E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 0147’15”, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S2440’07”E, 359.21 feet) to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 0029’52”, for an arc length of 100.03 feet (chord to said curve bears S2331’33”E, 100.03 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N6758’01”E, 218.05 feet; thence N2331’35”W, 100.03 feet to a point on a line that bears N6758’01”E of the Point of Beginning; thence S6758’01”W, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Parcel B: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N0004’21”E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S2325’11”E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 0208’33” for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S2429’28”E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S2533’44”E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N6426’16”E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S2533’44”E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 0147’15”, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S2440’07”E, 359.21 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line N6758’01”E, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence S2331’35”E, 100.03 feet; thence N6758’01”E, 527.95 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay; thence along said mean high water line, N3128’01”W, 101.32 feet, more or less, to a point on a line that bears N6758’01”E of the Point of Beginning; thence S6758’01”W, 513.95 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR J. RICCARD and JANET S. RICCARD, Defendants and the docket number of which is: 2013-CA-000163. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 97995S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-11-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF FLORA H. LONG Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of FLORA H. LONG, deceased, whose date of death was February 8, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2014. Personal Representative: Billy M. Johnson, Sr. 1407 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 2014 98027S In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Bay County, Florida Case No.:13-690CA Prosperity Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Paul G. Francis, Tenant #1 and Tenant #2 representing any unknown tenants who may be in possession, any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants, and The United States of America, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Bay and Gulf County, Florida, described as: Commence at the Northern most corner of Lot 13, Block 11, Mexico Beach Unit No. 1, according to the official plat thereof filed in Plat Book 7, at Page 5, Public Records, Bay County, Florida; thence run in a Southwesterly direction along the Northwestern boundary line of Lots 13, 12 and 11, in said Block 11, for a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 900 right for a distance of 50 feet; thence turn 90 right and run a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 90 right for a distance of 50 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel lying and being in Fractional Section 25, Township 6 South, Range 12 West, Mexico Beach, Bay County, Florida. and Lot 18 & 20, Block 19, Beacon Hill Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www. bay.realforeclose.com, beginning at 11:00 AM CST on April 10, 2014. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus finds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 24th day of February, 2014 Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF COURT By: Virginia Starling Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 98045S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2014-01 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for a 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday March 28, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday March 28, 2014 at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and RFP number for “2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Bid shall be for the purchase and delivery of a 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 which shall include pricing for the standard and optional equipment listed in the Base Bid. For questions concerning this Bid, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. Complete Bids Specs are available at http://www. cityofportstjoe.com The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer. March 6, 20, 2014 Lost Mens Gold Wedding Band. on 2/14/14 Near 3rd and Reid. REWARD 850-648-4671 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Cue’s Quality Used Furniture and Thrift Store Introducing a new line of mattresses-made in USAby Golden Mattress Company. Twins starting at $69. Fulls starting at $88. Queens starting at $108. 1425 Hwy 71 South Wewa. Open 9a-5pm Mon-Sat and Sunday, 11a-5pm 850-639-2343/628-1358 Text FL80338 to 56654 Mexico Bch 1701 Hwy 98 El Govnr Motel Sat 3/8 9am-1pmCRAFT SHOW shells, quilts,crochet, Dinosour Bones, jewelry and much more. Port St. Joe: 1011 Woodward Ave Fri/Sat, 7am-Sunset Huge Sale 6 wheeler ATV, tons of collectibles, nic-nacs, vintage, antiques, lots of kit & HH items, sm appls, Home & Holiday Decor, Gift Items, Linens, Books, Toys, Red Hats, Formal,Nice clothes & shoes. Way too much to list!!!!   Cash Only   Text FL82145 to 56654 GUN SHOW Tallahassee NORTH FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDSMarch 8th and 9th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL81511 to 56654 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofers Hiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to apply Web ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and Housekeepers Experience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Admin/Clerical Receptionist Very busy medical practice is adding an additional position to our front office in Panama City. Ideal candidate will be fast paced, able to multitask and have a great personality to interact with our patients. Previous medical experience preferred but not required. If you are energetic, a quick learner and ready to join a great team with a company that offers competitive pay and benefits please send us your resume to: Gabby Robertson at grobertson@eyecent ersouth.net Web ID: 34282428 Education Early Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will work collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and org. skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281148 Text FL81148 to 56654 Education Infant/Toddler Caregivers are needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281149 Text FL81149 to 56654 Food Svs/Hosp. Experienced Line Cooks Start your new year out right! Toucans in Mexico Beach is now hiring exper. line cooks and the following positions: Š Š Exp. Servers Š Š Bartenders Apply in person between 2:00pm4:00pm. 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach 850-648-8207 Web ID#: 34282386 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required. PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 Security Now Hiring Security Officers and Supervisors for new account start up. Starting at $9.50/hr. All positions are permanent. 1-888-948-2738 or 850-563-1022 Web ID#: 34282341 For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 Long term rental. St. Joe Beach. 3/2, fully furnished. Private inground pool. $1600/mo. includes all utilities. No pets. Call 850-348-0262 lv msg. White City corner lot, 3 br, 2 ba, kitchen/ dine-in combo, carport, $650 mo. Call (850) 899-3283 or 227-5272 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com George Cox has been a Gulf County education institution for 50 years. As of November, his role will become strictly voluntary. Cox announced at Tuesdays regular monthly meeting of the Gulf County School Board that he would be retiring from his District 2 seat effective with the 2014 elections in November. Cox, rst voted to the seat in a special election when Sharon Gaskin mounted a campaign for Superintendent of Schools, was returned to of ce for two full terms, never facing opposition. I would like to thank the voters of District 2, Cox said. I have spent all of my adult life working with the Gulf County School System. It has been most rewarding, and I will continue to support it in any way I can. Which effectively means Cox is not retiring from the system, just retiring from receiving a paycheck for this work. Cox has counted money for school events, contributed to efforts of various clubs and organizations not to mention individual students and has volunteered to count the proceeds from the vending machines at Wewahitchka High School for years. And in addition to his time on the School Board, Cox also has served the past eight years as a director for the Florida School Board Association, serving on a host of committees. He brings such institutional knowledge to this board, Superintendent Jim Norton said. He has gone from the classroom to the board room. Cox spent 40 years as an instructor and club sponsor at Wewahitchka High School. Primarily an instructor of various business-related courses from economics to civics to typing to business education Cox long has been a xture in the schools at the north end. Those decades in the classroom provided the instructional personnel in Gulf County Schools with one of their strongest advocates on the School Board, a man consistently questioning and praising teachers and staff to ensure students were getting the education he provided. He is a blessing to this board, board member Billy Quinn Jr said. He brings a tremendous amount of Thursday, MARCH 6, 2014District to conduct school shooter exerciseBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com There is no immunity, no free passes for Gulf County Schools. No matter how small-town the feel of the district, no matter how many students and families are familiar to those working in the schools, there is no immunity from school violence and the potential for a shooter stalking the hallways. Columbine, Newtown enough said for any school district in the country. We feel like we are immune from this type of behavior, but we are not, said Deputy Superintendent for Gulf County Schools Duane McFarland. We are going to be prepared for anything that may happen. It is our responsibility to not only assure students are achieving in the classroom, but that they are also safe in the classroom.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Glen Silva said his role will be facilitator. Another description might be reality check. Marine Staff Sgt. Glen Silva will attend Mays Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend in Port St. Joe as something of a mentor, a man with a passionate understanding and empathy for the wounded service men and women who will spend several days basking and shing in a place not a medical ward. Silva, who attended the Wounded Warrior Weekend in 2011 as one of the warriors of focus, comes this year to lend a hand, and an ear, to organizers and soldiers alike. He will assist warriors during the weekend, to provide maybe a dash of cold water to those, Silva acknowledges, that might be suffering through the woe is me, no one understands stage of serious injury. The key for me is getting into their faces and treating them as service men and women, Silva said. You are still a member of the military, and you are bringing them back to the brotherhood. Research shows that units that maintain contact with each other heal better. Units with good family support systems heal better. MEXICO BEACH CITY COUNCIL PREPARES FOR ELECTIONStar Staff ReportThree seats will be up for vote next month on the Mexico Beach city council. Quali ed candidates have been announced. Group 2, currently occupied by Gary Woodham, who was appointed after Lanny Howell resigned in January, will face opposition from Mary Blackburn. In Group 4, incumbent Tanya Castro will face Tom Bailey and Bill McGlothlin, and Jeff Tendler will face off for the Group 5 seat that will be left vacant by Bobby Pollock. Tendler and Blackburn ran last year on a platform for change but lost to incumbents Mullen and Howell. 2014 GEORGE COXCox announces retirement from School Board We feel like we are immune from this type of behavior, but we are not. It is our responsibility to not only assure students are achieving in the classroom, but that they are also safe in the classroom.Duane McFarland Deputy Superintendent for Gulf County SchoolsFILE PHOTOSThe touchstone events at each Forgotten Coast Wounded Warrior Weekend are an evening banquet to honor warriors in attendance and a day of shing in the Gulf of Mexico. Commission votes to dissolve PSJRA boardBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners are preparing to don new hats. A deeply divided board, voting 3-2 along familiar fault lines, on Tuesday approved dissolving the board of directors of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency. The result, after an ordinance to make the change is approved for advertisement and read twice, would be commissioners becoming the PSJRA board, operating separately as a body independent from their roles as city commissioners, said city attorney Tom Gibson. The item, which had not been previously discussed by this board, was not listed on the agenda publicly distributed last Friday. The item, listed at the request of Commissioner William Thursbay, was included in an amended agenda posted shortly before 11 a.m. ET Monday. The issue was taken up while PSJRA executive director Gail Alsobrook, who attends almost every regular and special meeting, was not in town. That was a cowardly act to vote when she is not here, said resident and active civic volunteer John Parker. Dissolution of the PSJRA board, Thursbay said, was not to get rid of Alsobrook, but the board. Thursbay brought the motion that was seconded for discussion by Commissioner Phil McCroan. During the lengthy, often heated debate, Commissioner Bo Patterson approved the move for reasons similar to Thursbay. When asked if his second of the motion stood, McCroan said he wanted to hear from all commissioners and then provided no insight as to his own views as he voted to dissolve the PSJRA board. Commissioner Rex Buzzett and Mayor Mel Magidson strongly disagreed with the move. We have a great board; we are doing the wrong thing here, Buzzett said. Buzzett noted he was chairman of the board of what was then the Downtown Redevelopment Agency for a decade. The group, without funds, mostly gathered to discuss ideas without the wherewithal to get much done. That changed, he said, when the agency hired an executive director and pursued statutorily Leaving it better than when found WOUNDED WARRIORS WEEKEND See WARRIORS A2 See SHOOTER A8 See COX A8 See PSJRA A2 Spring forward!Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. SundayOpinion ...........................A4-A5Letters to the Editor .............A5Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports.....................................A7School News ...........................B3Faith ........................................B4 Obituaries ...............................B4Classi eds ........................B7-B8YEAR 76, NUMBER 21

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 Wednesday,March19,2014 2:00-5:00PMEST WashingtonImprovementGroup(WIG)Center 401PetersStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456COMEANDDISCOVERWHYYOURHEALTHIS YOURGREATESTWEALTH! FREEHEALTHSCREENINGSSponsoredBy:FloridaDepartmentofHealthinGulfCounty ClosingtheGapProgram Formoreinformationpleasecontact: TalithaRobinsonat(850)653-2111ext.102 WARRIORS from page A1And Silva bears scars from the battleeld that lend him hard-earned bona des with his fellow soldier. Silva was wounded Oct. 12, 2010 as with so many wounded veterans, his Alive Day is seared in his mind. To say Silva suffered wounds is to characterize a St. Bernard a mere dog. He lost a leg, shattered ear drums, lost ngernails, broke ribs, suffered a catastrophic brain injury, collapsed lungs, severe wounds to his stomach and genitalia and had, in effect, his abdomen splayed open. In an earlier time, during an earlier war, he would have died. Now you have their attention, Silva said of the dialogue after he explains to others his injuries. They can start becoming productive members of the society. I am going to ask them how are they moving forward? I will challenge them. What are they doing to make it better than they found it? That is good for society as a whole. It is such a simple concept. Its not about what you donate or anything like that. It is what are you doing in your daily life to make society better? Silva brings a far deeper well of understanding than most regarding the impact of catastrophic wounds, what must be overcome to move ahead, to regain footing and a sense of self and purpose. Everybody is different, Silva said by phone from Quantico, Va., where he is an instructor in combat leadership among other courses. Its a wake-up call and everybody wants there to be cookiecutter answers, cookie-cutter solutions, but there are not. My faith and my intestinal fortitude were important, but so were my life experiences and my age (42 today). I just kept thinking lets get going through this and get out. The swirling emotions accompanying such serious wounds, Silva said, are often compounded by the reception from home. The thank you for your service the characterization of a hero was at times, well, overwhelming. That was initially very hard for me, Silva said. To have people thank you for your service, I understand that is more for them, and that is OK. Because of my ability and skills, that is why I was over there. You dont think of thanking the guy who pumps your gas for his service. These were just my skills, my abilities. And as he traversed the vast network of organizations, nonprot and otherwise, across the country dedicated to assisting returning veterans, returning warriors, Silva arrived at cognizance and something approaching a peace about the effort and the goals. I think it is so important to have the best interests of the servicemen at heart, Silva said. I am always excited to come down to Port St. Joe and see the people I have made friendships with because over the years this event has developed into something more important to the service people than the community. They get it there. They have listened and understand that they need to do what is right and what is best for the service people. His role, he said, would be to provide some of the same sense of leadership he brought to the battleeld and lend it to service men and women seeking guidance in the next tentative steps in life, a life dramatically altered. A good leader understands the people he is in charge of and adapts his leadership to those people, Silva said. You have to still be a mentor, a good leader. You have to be uid, and you have to adapt. I am still the same leader; I just have a different perspective. In spite of his injuries, despite his ordeal of survival to walk out of a hospital within three months of wounding, despite the impacts, long and short term, on his life, Silva regrets little. He went off to war due to his belief system and skills. Neither has been shaken by his experiences since an October day in 2010. In todays day and age, the only guarantee in war is men and women are going to get injured, Silva said. I would be the rst to go back. I dont want to have my daughter experience anything that I have, and if I can do that for my daughter, I would. War is always going to come and go. It doesnt change the basic essence of who we are. You cant let the politics and emotions get involved. You just have to do something each day to make things better. Why wouldnt we continue to try to strengthen ourselves? mandated Tax Increment Funds a small percentage of property value increases in the designated area compared to a base year from the county and city. Since then, the agency had leveraged those funds to make major changes to the downtown and the business area. Everything that has been done in the city to improve the city has been the work of the PSJRA, all of it, Buzzett said. You are not going to be able to do what these people, volunteers all of them, do. Thursbay brought the motion to dissolve the PSJRA board, stating a fundamental objection to a nonelected board spending taxpayer money. He said he thought the PSJRA does a good job, but cited a lack of communication among the agency, city staff and commissioners. He added that he believed he spoke for the majority of voters in the city in moving to dissolve the board. I am a steward of tax money, he said. The majority of city voters believe we should become the board. Patterson said he too spoke for the majority of voters, qualifying it later saying he was speaking for those who contacted him. He continued that there was a socioeconomic gap between those who would contact him and Thursbay and those who would communicate with Buzzett and Magidson on issues. I think the board has a done a great job, but I do have a problem with our not being the board, Patterson said. Thursbay emphasized he wanted to dissolve the board, not get rid of Gail, though he later said he objected to Alsobrooks salary, comparing her pay as a hourly contract worker to the county grant writers salary and benets package, as well as the PSJRA budget. Magidson said it seemed the sore point for Thursbay was Alsobrooks salary. Buzzett said the Gulf County Tourist Development Council was a non-elected body with a budget several times that of the PSJRA. Magidson and board member Aaron Farnsley said the agency has been able to leverage its funding into millions of dollars to improve the aesthetics and infrastructure downtown. Farnsley said two major items on the nights agenda, including the badly needed sidewalk project along Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and lights for Langston Drive, were happening through the efforts of the PSJRA. I think we do a great job, Farnsley said. I am speaking as an individual. We have really tried to communicate with you. We are not an elected board, and I think we take the politics out of it. We have all worked to the betterment of the city, and that is evident by our accomplishments. Magidson and Buzzett said commissioners already have nal say over PSJRA actions, noting the Commission has vetoed two recent proposals, including an observation tower at Billy Joe Rish Memorial Parking Lot. Commissioners approve board members and the budget and all projects come to commissioners for approval. All spending is done according to Florida statutes, Gibson said. If you have a problem with the board, look in the mirror, Buzzett said. Patrick Jones, a former PSJRA board member, said the board represents an opportunity for talented people in the community to be involved. The board, he said, brings skill sets and community assets to bear in ways government can not. Though a vote to dissolve the PSJRA board might silence some critics, it would tell those volunteers you do not count. The best use of civic resources is to involve them not get rid of them, Jones said. Resident Mark Howze said the effect of the Commissions action was to replace one board with another, adding another layer of bureaucracy, and playing semantics. Howze and Thursbay, as with the commissioner and Magidson and Farnsley earlier, engaged in pointed words, Howze criticizing Thursbay for snide comments interrupting his presentation. PSJRARA from page A1 WOUNDED WARRIORS WEEKENDThe fourth Forgotten Coast Wounded Warriors Weekend will be May 14-18. At this years event, 20 warriors, 20 caretakers and three mentor warriors will be honored over a ve-day period. The organizing committee is seeking volunteers to make monetary donations or provide transportation, merchandise for rafe, servers for meals and boat captains for the tournament. Please email psj.fcww@gmail.com with any questions and donations. Donations are tax-deductible.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, March 6, 2014 JoinUsforYourAnnualMeeting Theentirecreditunionbenetswhen membersparticipate.Thatswhywe inviteeverymembertoattendour yourannualmeeting.Allmembers areequalownersofthecreditunion. Ourannualmeetingisanoccasionfor managementandelectedofcialsto reporttoyou,theowners.And,itsanopportunityforyoutolearnabout thecreditunionsnancialposition,productsandservices,currentbusinessissues,andgoals.Youllmeetface-to-facewiththepeoplewhorun yourcreditunion.Withoutyourinput,leaderscanonlyguesswhatyouand otherownerswantfromyourcreditunion. Allmembersattendingwillreceiveagiftatthedoor.Oncethebusiness meetingisconcluded,wewillhavedrawingsforseveralcashprizesgiven bythecreditunion.Wehopetoseeyouthere! NotamemberofEmeraldCoastFederalCreditUnionyet?Thenweinvite youtojoin!Weareacommunitycreditunion.Thatmeansifyoulive, work,worship,orattendschoolinGulfCounty,FranklinCounty,ortheCity ofMexicoBeach,youareeligibleformembership!Sopleasestopbyto meetourfriendlystaffandtakeadvantageofalltheservicesweoffer.At EmeraldCoastFederalCreditUnionyouaremorethanjustanumber,you arepartofourfamily!Event:CreditUnionAnnualMeeting When:MondayMarch10,2014at7:00pm,EST Where:PortSt.JoeElementarySchoolAuditorium502WoodwardAvenue,PortSaintJoe,Florida32456 101EastRiverRoad,Wewahitchka,Florida32465 248USHighway98,Eastpoint,Florida32328 Ph:(850)227-1156(850)639-5024(850)670-1199 Toll-free:1-877-874-0007 Email:emeraldcoast@fairpoint.net www.emeraldcoastfcu.com TheJuniorServiceLeagueofPortSt.Joewouldlike toexpressaheartlledthankyoutoallthebusinesses listedaboveaswellasallthosewhoattendedand supportedthereturnoftheMardiGrasGala.Allmonies raisedfromthe2014MardiGrasGalawillgotosupport ourcommunityserviceprojects.EventsbyChellsey---SurfSlingenBartenders ---DesignsbyDorann---MexicoBeachMarina ---EmeraldCoastDanceAcademy---BreakA-WayCharters---SpaPur---WalterGreen Apparel,Swimwear&Accessories---Durens PigglyWiggly---TheFuss---PlumDelightful Antiques&Jewelry---OfftheMapExpeditions ---BaysideFlorist---MangoMarleys--ProvisionsRestaurant---FishHouseRestaurant ---ToucansRestaurant---TheThirstyGoat ---GrabaJavaCaf---SunsetCoastalGrill--MasonDixon---DocksideSeafood&RawBar ---GoldenNuggetCasinoHotel-Biloxi---Ashely McGlothrenPhotography---TightlineCharters ---KimStonePhotography---MorganBurkettDSalon---BlackSwanInteriors---ClubSun ---RipleysBelieveItorNot-PanamaCity Beach---One-WayFitness---JessicaBrockMaryKayConsultant---SalonLux---Polished NailBoutique---SunKissed:MobileTanningby Michelle---Persnickety---BoutiquebytheBay ---SacredHeartHospitalontheGulfGuild--ADayAwaySpa---St.JoeBar&Package. By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Beautiful art met an equally beautiful day. The third annual Art Walk, hosted by the Society of Expressive Artists (SEA) was held at the Beach Walk shopping area in Mexico Beach and ran simultaneously with the annual Gumbo Cook-off last month. The event showcased 23 artists from Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe and along the Forgotten Coast as they displayed their talents and sold their art, sculptures, jewelry or crafts. The weather was perfect, the sidewalks were full and there were tons of people, said Dolores Lowery, president of SEA and the coordinator for the event. We couldnt have had a better day. In addition to participating artists, the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society held a fundraiser complete with rafe tickets and adoptable animals. Lowery auctioned off a prize to create an encaustic painting of the winners pet which brought in $120 for the humane society and an additional $300 were collected in donations. One lucky chocolate lab-mix puppy named Kevin went home with a visiting family from Mississippi. The humane society also put out a special donation jar for Slugger, a big black and white tom in need of an expensive eye surgery. The jar was stuffed by the end of the day. It was an awesome day for the shelter, said Gena Wich, who serves on the Board of Directors as secretary. Many people stopped to play with the animals and ask questions about the shelter, which is what we were hoping for. Entertainment for the event was provided by Slim Fatz, whose mellow blues were a perfect t for the sunny day. In previous years the artists were spread out along Highway 98 but Lowery said that the event benetted from being concentrated in a central area and planned to take the same approach in the future. In looking toward next years event Lowery also planned to offer a longer registration period for artists in order to get more interest from surrounding regions. The humane society was a really nice addition, said Lowery. Between the Art Walk and the Gumbo Cook-off, it was a great day for Mexico Beach.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com After a two-year hiatus the Junior Service League Mardi Gras gala returned and the community was ready for it. More than 150 elegantly-dressed patrons attended the charity event, held at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. They helped raise more than $6,500 for upcoming JSL projects. Those projects include the groups annual Christmas clothing drive, Easter egg hunt, and mentoring programs. Live music for the event was provided by Konkrete Soul and silent auctions were held for ne jewelry, charter shing trips, gift certicate trees and countless other items. Mardi Gras themed food was provided by various JSL members, created from recipes in the JSL cookbook and 60 pounds of shrimp was donated for the event by Woods Fishery in Port St. Joe. It was a night of suits, dresses, beads and music as attendees toasted and danced the night away. Casino-style games including black jack and roulette gave attendees a chance to try their luck while using fun money, but the big winners were the members of the JSL. We havent had the even in three years and we were excited to bring it back, said event coordinator Kimberly Shoaf. It was a ton of fun and we have the support behind us to continue it on in the future.Art Walk showcases artsy side of Forgotten CoastCOURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.comArt lovers perused paintings, crafts and jewelry during the third annual art walk. COURTESY OF DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.comDuring the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce annual awards ceremony last week, First United Methodist Care Closet was named as the Volunteer Organization of The Year. The award was accepted by Vic LeFerle and Phyllis Alsteatter. Business Partner of the Year went to Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Campus. Dr. Jim Kerley, GCSC President accepted. This years speaker was Lewis Jordan, CEO of GratitudeAmerica and the Chamber welcomed new board members Mark Haddock, Steve Wich and Stacey Price. ChHAMBER ANNUAL dDINNER Mardi Gras Gala returns in styleWES LL Och CH ER | The StarAttendees enjoyed food and drinks during the adult prom.Music for the event was provided by Konkrete Soul.

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionThe other day I started thinking about trash, trash cans and the possibility of being a hypocrite. I do not want to be considered a hypocrite, its not good. I want to be a good example for my children. What got me started thinking about trash? Well, Ill tell you. Leaving for work the other day, I stopped in my driveway to study the direction of my trash bin or trash container or whatever you call the thing you pull to the side of the road for the newfangled garbage trucks to pick up with something that resembles the robotic arm NASA used on space shuttle missions. It is actually a thing of beauty to watch. I lead a pretty boring life I realize that I do. However, it is entertaining to watch the robotic arm come out from the garbage truck, pick up my big rolling bin and dump it into the truck. No, I dont get out much. I read all of the literature the waste disposal company sent me on how to use the big plastic rolling bin. There were precise directions on how far it needed to be from your mailbox, your dog, your children, etc. Also, there was a precise direction or orientation for the bin to be pointing so that the robotic arm could grab it. There are big arrows on the top of the lid with instructions, This Side to the Street, or Point these arrows at your neighbor, or something like that I understand what they mean. The fellow next door to me is some kind of surgeon or doctor who cuts on people and xes things. He never points his rolling plastic trash vehicle in the correct direction. He is a nice fellow and all, but would you want him cutting on you if he cant get his trash bin in the right direction? I would not. If he xed something in me, I would always have this feeling that he didnt hook my insides up quite right. Can you blame me? There are rumors that my neighbors call me Mr. Wilson as in the Mr. Wilson from the Dennis the Menace cartoon strip and television series from the late 50s and early 60s. Mr. Wilson had to know what was going on in the neighborhood at all times and was always worrying about Dennis antics. Im not that bad. I just worry about trash cans, suspicious looking cars and children riding wheeled vehicles without helmets. Im a good neighbor. As I was pulling out of the driveway, I noticed my 16 year-old son had positioned our rolling trash container in the incorrect position. The arrows were pointing toward our house. It worried me, but I wrote it off as either him being in hurry or him checking the direction of the surgeons trash can next door and copying it. Perhaps my son wants to be a doctor. So I thought about trash on my drive to work. I thought about what Trash tells us and what trash means to me. It brought back many good memories for me. Before I was a scientist/ mathematician type, I was a janitor. Sometimes I like to tell folks that the movie, Good Will Hunting was based on my life. To set the record straight, Im not telling the truth on that one. In the movie, Matt Damon plays a Yankee fellow who was a janitor at MIT and had a gift for mathematics. He ended up being a genius with some serious psychological issues. Im from the South; I was a janitor at the newspaper where my Daddy worked. I liked math because my Daddy taught me with a deck of cards and pair of dice. Im an average mathematician who has only mild psychological issues associated with raising teenagers and trying to gure out how to pay for college. Still on the road to work, I also remembered the dump where my Mama would take me growing up. Yes, my Mama took me to the dump. She was the best! You see, through a little research, I found out the company in our county that made sporting goods would throw away all of the skateboard wheels they made that werent perfect. I found their secret disposal location at the dump. After cleaning the wheels, I repackaged them in brown paper and took them to school to sell to folks who needed new wheels for their skateboards or roller skates. It was good business for a 14 year-old while it lasted. Now that I think about it, I didnt even give my Mama a cut of the pro ts. That bothers me just a little. Somewhere in heaven, Mama is laughing. Trash tells us a lot about a lot of things; it even holds memories for some of us. I do lead a pretty boring life, but it is important to point out that more than likely my son is going to be a doctor, probably even some sort of surgeon. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com.What trash tells us CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard Does it look alright? Its pretty clear. I dont see anything swimming in it. We did our own water testing back home. The clarity of the water, the vessel containing it and its drinkability often depended on how thirsty we were. If we had been chasing pirates, ghosts and each other up and down the big ditch all day, we werent so choosy. We didnt wade out into the pond like the cows. We werent stupid! Wed lay on our bellies where the small stream in the ditch poured over a natural levy into the pond. It looked almost clean there. And it was just deep enough to stick your mouth in without hitting the bottom. There was certainly an art to drinking the moving water without it running up your nose. Wed usually cradle a hand in the stream to divert it up and over the ngers; shoot, we near bout had a fountain! It helped that at close quarters you couldnt drink and see any foreign substances at the same time. But remember now, if we were really thirty, we did a lot more drinking than we did inspecting. It was pretty simple if we were up town. Some thoughtful city fathers had put a water fountain right close to the middle of our little square. The water was cold in the winter and hot in the summer. Ricky Hale pointed out how much better it would be if they could reverse that someway. But it still came in pretty handy. We lled up after the long walk to town. We hit it pretty hard if wed been playing hide and go seek while our mothers shopped for groceries. And we made do with it if we didnt have the ten cents for a cherry coke over at John Motherals Drugstore. Water was a snap when we had a ball game roaring in the back yard. The water hose was just behind home plate or piled up right past the south end zone depending on what time of year it was. It had a distinct rubbery taste but we didnt have time to run into the house. We had to get to the next inning, or kickoff. We always called it the water hose. It was never just a hose. That seems silly now. But I reckon we were hoping one day to have a NuGrape hose and a Pepsi hose or, maybe, a lemonade hose..now that would have been a living the life of Riley! We never carried any water with us. Youd have been laughed out of town! We didnt even use those Boy Scout canteens. Water was just too plentiful. Every house had a faucet or two attached. And nobody ever minded thirsty boys helping themselves to the liquid refreshment. We shed, swam, took a bath and drank out of Sugar Creek. Our cousin J. C. gured if it was alright for the sh, it ought to be alright for us. The creek was much clearer than the pond. You could use your hands to sorta move any oaters away before you took a drink. It had to be puri ed, sparkling and mineralized, nobody I know of ever got sick drinking it. Football practice necessitated a whole new look at this water question. Back in 1963, it was considered a sign of weakness to need a drink during practice. You had to be tough! Im not sure Ive gured out to this day the connection between toughness and waterless but that is for another article. By some ill-conceived and diabolical plan, football practice started in August. We lined up, as aspiring gladiators, and put on a hundred pounds of gear, covered it with a heavy practice jersey, and went out and sprinted across an endless eld from can to cant. The relentless sun beat down on us like a runaway re in a cotton warehouse. My throat was as dry as the Mojave Desert. I saw dancing elephants and shimmering mirages in the distance. My tongue felt like the Seventh Cavalry had camped out on it. When we did get a few seconds break for the sissies we would catch the water in our helmets to make it last. Wed suck on a damp towel. Wed soak our grass and blood stained sleeves to hopefully get a moist lick later on. You know, Kenny Butler could barely get the words out of his dry mouth, someone could make a fortune selling water out here. The ones who had the energy fell out laughing. You dummy, no one is ever going to pay for water! It is too plentiful. And it dont taste like nothing. You tell me what idiot would plop down real money for a drink that has no taste. No zz. No color. And you cant even mix peanuts in with it! Folks wouldnt buy water if the world ran out of Coca Cola tomorrow! Selling water would be like selling air, or sunshine. It might be a thought right here, right now; but it makes no practical sense in the real world. It will never work. Something like that would have our forefathers turning over in their graves. It didnt take us long to put that silly notion to rest! Respectfully,KesKenny spoke before he thought HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert We all love a good bargain, no matter what our age. But if youre a senior citizen on a xed income, nding discounted goods and services can mean the difference between making ends meet and going without. The good news is that tons of senior discounts are available often for people as young as 50. One caveat right up front: Although many senior discounts are substantial, you sometimes can nd better bargains especially on travel-related expenses like airfare, hotels and rental cars. So always do your research rst before requesting the senior rate. Heres a roundup of some of the best senior discounts Ive found: An AARP membership costs only $16 a year for anyone over age 50, including free membership for spouses or partners (www.aarp.org). AARPs discounts website features discounts on dozens of products and services including rental cars, hotels, restaurants, clothing and department store chains. AARP also offers an inexpensive driver safety course for drivers over 50 (members and nonmembers alike) that can lower auto insurance premiums by up to 10 percent or more. Popular AARP discounts include: 20 percent discount on installation or upgrades to ADT home security systems. 45 percent off membership to Angie's List. 20 percent off purchases from 1-800-FLOWERS.com. Up to 25 percent off car rentals from Avis and Budget. Up to 20 percent discount at many hotel chains including Hyatt, Hilton, Wyndham, Best Western, Days Inn and Ramada, among others. 10 to 20 percent off at many restaurant chains, including Claim Jumper, Denny's and Outback Steakhouse. 15 percent off many Geek Squad services from Best Buy. A free 45-minute consultation with an Allstate Legal Services Network attorney, as well as 20 percent off member attorneys' fees. A quick Google search will uncover numerous other senior discount resources. One popular site is SeniorDiscounts.com, an online directory of more than 220,000 U.S. business locations that offer discounts to people over 50. Registration is free, although they also offer a $12.95/year premium that offers members-only discounts and other perks. Other good sites include Brads Deals, Sciddy.com and Savvy Senior. Other commonly available senior discounts include: A 15 percent discount on the lowest available rail fare on most Amtrak trains for travelers over age 62. Greyhound offers a 5 percent discount on unrestricted fares (over 62). Southwest Airlines offers senior fares (over 65). Although not necessarily their lowest available rates, Southwest's senior fares are fully refundable. The U.S. Geologic Survey senior pass (over 62) provides free lifetime access to more than 2,000 government-managed recreational sites (including national parks), as well as discounts on camping and other amenities. Senior passes cost $10 in person or $20 by mail (http://store. usgs.gov/pass/senior.html). Verizon Wireless offers discounted mobile phone service for subscribers over 65. Both Walgreens and Rite Aid offer monthly senior discount days for members of their rewards programs when most nonprescription items are 15 to 20 percent off. Ask your neighborhood pharmacy if they offer similar programs. In addition, many restaurants, department stores, movie theaters, museums, theme parks, banks, credit card issuers, utilities (including gas and electric, water, garbage, telephone and cable) and other businesses offer special discounts or promotions for seniors. Always ask before your purchase is rung up. Bottom line: Abundant resources are available to help seniors save money on purchases large and small. You just have to do a little research and ask whether senior discounts are available. Remember, 10 percent here and 20 percent there can really add up. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To participate in a free, online Financial Literacy and Education Summit on April 2, 2014, go to www. practicalmoneyskills. com/summit2014.Money-saving tips for seniors Page 4 Thursday, March 6, 2014 JASON ALDERMAN USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688

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www.starfl.com ASection LETTERSThursday, March 6, 2014 Page 5 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS The Port St. Joe Port Authority recently launched its 2014 Capital Campaign to raise funds to cover its necessary operating expenses for the coming year. Letters and pledge forms were sent to various businesses and individuals in the area. The Port Authority is progressing on a Fast Track to be operational by early to mid-2015. This is exciting news in that an operational port will bring needed jobs and increased business activity in Gulf County and the surrounding region. For this to happen, we desperately need your nancial support to keep the Port Authority active until such time as we have a revenue source from the leasing of Port Authority property and/or collection of fees from port users. Those of you who received pledge notices, we ask that you please return them with your contribution. To those who did not receive letters, your contribution, in any amount, would be deeply appreciated. Send contributions to: The Port St. Joe Port Authority Post Of ce Box 745 Port St. Joe, FL 32457. The Port is our greatest asset and will be for generations to come. Please lend your support now!Sincerely,Chairman Leonard Costin, Secretary Jason Shoaf, Past Chairwoman Joanna White, Vice Chairman Eugene Raffield, Treasurer Jessica Rish The Port St. Joe Port Authority would like to thank the following for their generous donations to the Port Authority during its 2013 Capital Campaign:2013 HONOR ROLLPlatinum ($10,000) City of Port St. Joe The St. Joe Company Silver ($1,000) Gulf County Economic Development Alliance Mr. & Mrs. Michael Wellman Anonymous Shoreline Medical Group-Dr. Tom Curry & Dr. Betty Curry Kerigan Marketing Associates, Inc.Bronze ($500) Bluewater Outrigger, Inc. Durens Piggly Wiggly Mr. Frank PateSupporter ($10$499) iFix Computers PSJ, LLC Centennial Bank Coast2Coast Printing & Promotions, Inc.Also, many thanks to those who have already given generously in 2014 and who will be recognized in the 2014 Honor Roll.Open letter to the Citizens of Gulf CountyDear Editor, For those of you who know who I am I hope this nds you well. For those who dont, I am Javarri Beachum, a graduate of Port St. Joe High School Class of 2013. I was class president and captain of the soccer team and participated in various other activities in school including NJROTC. I am currently nishing the Naval Academy Preparatory School in Newport, R.I., and I am receiving an appointment from here to the United States Naval Academy for the Class of 2018. But, enough about me. I write to you concerning one of the best coaches and mentors I have ever had, Coach Gary J. Hindley Coach Hindley was a vital part of my development as a soccer player, student, American citizen, young adult, and now college student and military professional. I played under Coach Hindley all four years of my high school career. My freshman year was his rst year at Port St. Joe High School and it was my rst year ever playing soccer. I knew nothing about the game; not even that the real word for soccer was Futbol. In my four years under coach Hindley, I went from not knowing anything about soccer to being one of the most crucial players in our success as a team and one of the best soccer players in our class and region. He not only taught me how to play soccer, but he taught me how to love the game passionately, which in my opinion is the mark of a true teacher; one who doesnt pass on knowledge, but passion for knowledge. I was always working to make myself better underneath him because he urged everyone to make improvements. He not only encouraged us in our athletics, although that was his main concern because it was his job, but he demanded that we be good citizens; to lend a helping hand when needed, to obey the laws set before us. He didnt tolerate misconduct on or off the eld. If soccer player got into any trouble, we were benched for at least a game and wed have to earn Coaches Hindleys respect all over again. That is the way it should be; Countless times I had to apologize to my teammates for letting them down. In the military, people get killed for letting others down. Coach Hindley was concerned about our classes and how we were doing in them. There were many times that I went to him about problems that I had with teachers. He also encouraged me to use the material we learned in the classroom on the eld such as Newtons 2nd Law of Motion when refereeing a game. He kicked me out of practice once for not wearing the proper shirt, and at the time, I thought it was just a shirt. Where I am now if I am wearing the wrong color socks, I can get adjudicated and punished for improper wear or not following regulation; Thats just one instance from my four years with Coach Hindley that prepared me for the real world. He helped me develop into a professional; because Port St. Joe doesnt even scratch the surface although it is a great town, it just does its own thing and enforces bad habits and mindsets. He was certainly a mis t for our little bubble of a town in these aspects, but it turns out that we who live or lived there were mis ts for the rest of the world and ignorant to the way the world actually works. One thing he hated was people wanting to take a day off of practice for their birthday or that of a loved one or their relative is having a baby, my job now as a military professional could care less about whos birthday it is, and I have met men who were in Afghanistan when their own child was born and there have been plenty who never got to see their children born. As a coach, he taught me so well that his coaching has put me in a position where I can walk on the Division I team at the Academy and be successful as a player. I was also recruited as a soccer player by several other colleges such as Monroe College of New York City, West Virginia Tech, and various other schools. That was more scholarship offers than many players of other teams who had played their sports their whole lives, not to mention the other players who have gotten offers under Coach Hindleys guidance. I am glad to have had the pleasure of calling Coach Hindley my soccer coach and now since Ive become an adult, Im glad that I can call him my friend. Its remarkable that he came, and in one year, the entire culture of the town changed. People were excited about soccer, and the best thing is that he turned the program around. He took a player like myself, pushed me to give my heart to the game, and a boy whod never played soccer before helped his team win district titles and make regional nal appearances. I didnt realize it at the time, but Coach Hindley is a great asset to Port St. Joe High School and the community. He will always be one of the men who I look back at and say, Wow! Im glad he was in my life because he helped me see many of things in life, that I would have not seen otherwise.Javarri D. BeachumMidshipman Candidate Naval Academy Preparatory SchoolA happy new residentDear Editor, I wish to thank three outstanding business women in Gulf County Carol Erwin of Forgotten Coast Realty in Mexico Beach, and Amber Lowry and Ashley Baird from Centennial Banks Port St. Joe branch. I recently moved from a long distance away and they were so helpful and professional in helping me nd and purchase my perfect home. I highly recommend Carol for real estate needs and Amber and Ashley for banking. Once again, thank you very much for helping me move to beautiful Gulf County.Denita McCartyWewahitchka On the subject of 2/17/14The threat of fundamentalism: CreationismBy LOREN SIPRELLSpecial to The Star I was rst published in the Star when I wrote a Letter to the editor in which I shared another letter I wrote to the Mayor of Port Saint Joe asking him to show his support for marriage equality; not surprisingly I never heard back from Mayor Magidson on that matter. After which I was given the opportunity to write a weekly op-ed, my rst being on the removal of the nativity scene on the lawn of City Hall in Chipley. Ive decided to revisit the topic of religious overreach in a series I will call The threat of Fundamentalism. Im going to go out on a limb and risk some blowback by sharing what I believe to be an unpopular opinion around these parts: That the biggest threat to individual liberty and this nation as a whole is religious fundamentalism, Christian fundamentalism to be exact. Fundamentalism of any kind is dangerous; I believe few Americans would argue the oppression that is taking place in the Middle East under the theocratic regimes of Saudi Arabia, Eqypt or Iran. We have sat back and watched the suppression of womens rights, the acceptance of genocide and terrorism across the globe all in the name of Allah; and now I see a much more subversive but very calculated form of terrorism taking place on my own soil, by my fellow Americans, all in the name of Jesus Christ. A couple of weeks ago I watched the much anticipated debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham, the evolution vs. creationism debate. For those of you who are not familiar with Ken Ham he is a young earth creationist who believes the Bible, the book of Genesis speci cally, is the literal infallible truth of God; he is also the founder of the Creationist Museum in Kentucky. As I listened to Ken Hams rationale for believing such lunacy as the earth is only 6,000 years old and the great ood literally took place only 4,000 years ago I found myself awe struck at how powerful the movement had become; here we are, in 2014, arguing a truth that even Pat Robertson himself calls crazy. Now that is saying something. The fundamentalist battles against the reliable and factually based theories that make up evolution as a valid origin of man are understandable. If I was devoutly religious I too would have a dif cult time reconciling my belief in the God of Christianity, but I wouldnt condone reshaping the facts to t my narrative. My issue isnt with the Christians who are happy to allow anyone to worship God as they so choose, and who are con dent enough in their faith to leave a relationship with God outside of the classroom. What I take issue with are those that wish to legitimize their fanciful, and lets face it, absurd notions of origin by creating a pseudoscience and then ask the rest of us to allow them to teach such nonsense alongside genuine science. Men like Ken Ham, and evangelical Christians all over the country, have unjustly turned Charles Darwin into some type of menace, an anti-Christ if you will, simply for bringing to light several mechanisms at play within the beautiful scheme of nature. They have oversimpli ed his ndings to I aint come from no monkey! To them, teaching evolution is a direct threat to their core system of belief: man is made in the image of God so he cant possibly be reduced to the likes of an animal. Oh how our interpretations of God are encased in such ego. What upsets me the most about the teaching of creationism is its absolutes; there is no wiggle room in fundamental Christianity. A very telling moment happened during the Ham/Nye debate, when the moderator asked both men what, if anything, would change their minds Bill Nye answered simply, Evidence. Show me evidence of the great ood. If you can do that you would change the world. And Hams response, No one is going to convince me that the word of God is untrue. That worries me, an unwavering con dence even in the face of insurmountable evidence to the contrary. Under different circumstances that con dence may be admirable, but when telling the youth of our country to stop asking questions and just settle for what this one book says is, as a patriot, unacceptable. For the religious out there, lets look at it from a different perspective: If this were Tom Cruise asking for the public schools to teach Scientologys origin of man alongside evolution how would you feel? Sounds ludicrous, right? Well, that is how I feel when my children are threatened with the possibility of being taught that Noah was a real man who stuffed every species of animal onto one boat 4,000 years ago. When you support teaching creationism in the school you are denying mine, and my children, the freedom to nd God on our terms. Darwin belongs in the classroom. Noah belongs in Sunday school. If you cant t the theory of evolution into the framework built by your religious convictions then that is your journey to undertake, but dont make the future of this country give up wondering and asking questions simply because you think you have it all gured out. I will close with a quote from Darwin himself: In my most extreme uctuations I have never been an atheist, in the sense of denying the existence of God. I feel very deeply that the whole subject is too profound for the human intellect. A dog might just as well speculate on the mind of Newton. Loren Siprell is a resident of Port St. Joe.Thank you Coach Hindley

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .comwww.starfl.comSection Section A By Tom BairdSpecial to The Star Imagine an organism that spends its adult life lying on its back and kicking food into its mouth. Now imagine an organism that glues its head to the oor when it grows up. Imagine an organism that secretes a glue so strong that it cannot be dissolved by any acid or alkali. Imagine an organism so powerful in can create enough drag to slow down a supertanker to the point that its fuel consumption is increased by forty percent. Imagine an organism whose life cycle and classi cation has confounded some of the greatest naturalists in history. Now imagine all of those characteristics belong to a single organism, and that organism lives in St. Joseph Bay. Wouldnt you want to see that super creature? You can see that strange creature right now by going down to any seawall or boat ramp on the bay. All those extraordinary characteristics belong to the acorn barnacle, one of several species of the genus Balanus. They are those little white, volcanoshaped encrusting forms growing on wooden pilings, boat hulls, and shells. They can be found attached to any hard surface regularly washed by the tide. On an extremely cold day a few weeks back, I was fortunate to witness teams from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the University of Florida, and volunteers rescuing cold-stunned green turtles from the bay near Pig Island. I couldnt help but notice some of the turtles had large living acorn barnacles hitching a ride on their shells. Some species of barnacles will also attach to whales. Because the adult barnacles encase themselves in a hard calcareous shell, barnacles were once thought to be a form of Mollusk, like clams and oysters, and they do super cially resemble limpets. However, inside that protective shell is a little joint-footed animal, hence they are Arthropods and more closely related to shrimp and crabs. While they are glued to one spot as adults, they begin life as a free-roaming, one-eyed, planktonic larva, called a nauplius, which has a head and a telson, like the tail of a horseshoe crab. Looking at a sample of plankton under a microscope you will almost always nd a barnacle nauplius larva or two. They will remain in this stage for about six months while feeding and growing. The next stage of development is the cyprid larva and its job is to nd a place to attach. The cyprid stage does not eat. Drifting about the cyprid will use its antennules to investigate various surfaces it encounters. Once a suitable surface is found, cement glands in the antennules produce an extremely strong glue that fastens the organism to that surface. The barnacle is then home and will go through a metamorphosis into a tiny adult barnacle. Since acorn barnacles do not move once cemented in place, the sea must bring food to their doorstep. Lying upside down the barnacle will extend its feathery legs, called cirri, and rhythmically sweep planktonic organisms and detritus from the water. If you have never watched barnacles feed, it is something to see. Most people just see barnacles looking dry and dead on a piling above the waterline, but watch them when submerged, and you will get an entertaining show as the little cirri hungrily sweep the water. To prevent drying out when exposed, barnacles close the opening with two plates. The legs are withdrawn behind the tightly closing plates as the tide recedes. This will keep the barnacle moist for several hours. If the barnacle is not wetted by the returning tide or wave spray, the barnacle will die. On a vertical piling or sea wall, different species of barnacles will settle based on their ability to withstand drying. Generally, the most common barnacle at the highest levels belongs to the genus Chthamalus. As adults, barnacles have few senses; they can detect light and dark and the cirri have the ability to sense touch. When in the larval form, barnacles can be preyed upon by any lter feeders in the water, such as clams, oysters, sponges, etc. As adults, enclosed in their hard calcareous cones, they are feed upon by whelks, which can grind through the outer covering, and by some species of star sh. While small and insigni cant as individuals, barnacles are nevertheless formidable in mass. They prefer to attach near other barnacles in order to swamp the environment and prevent other organisms from attaching and thus competing for food. This massive build-up on ships not only adds weight, but also creates drag, disrupting the smooth, laminar ow of water over a ships hull, thus slowing it down. Barnacles, as well as other fouling organisms, must periodically be removed from vessels by scraping, which is an additional cost of operating commercial vessels. Besides our common acorn barnacles, there are goose-necked barnacles or goose barnacles that attach to the substrate by a muscular stalk with the shell-covered body at the top of the stalk. Species of goose-necked barnacles inhabit the Gulf in deeper waters over the continental shelf or adrift far at sea. They attach to pieces of driftwood or oats made of glass or styrofoam. You are unlikely to see goosenecked barnacles unless they are washed ashore attached to driftwood. In an amazing bit of adaptation, there are even parasitic barnacles, which are nothing like the barnacles we know. So, on a warm day as you are scraping barnacles off your boat and cursing their existence, keep in mind that within that tiny, volcano-looking shell is an organism that is highly successful with some amazing powers of survival. Now if dentists can determine the properties that explain the adhesive power of barnacle glue, we might all celebrate the little barnacle. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST)|Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST)Letsgo!Springtimeisalmosthere! Shopourhugeselectionofbeachwares, chairs,andtoys. Newarrivalsdailyofkayaks, Paddleboards,andshinggear. Spring time is almost here! SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Mar.660 5050% Fri,Mar.762 5310% Sat,Mar.866 57 0% Sun,Mar.970 49 -% Mon,Mar.1070 49 -% Tues,Mar.1170 49 -% Wed,Mar.1270 49 -% OUTDOORSPage 6 Thursday, March 6, 2014Star Staff ReportThe seventh annual Sportsmans Banquet rolls in Thursday, March 13, with plenty of good food, a heaping helping of fun, prizes and, for one lucky, a bucketful of cash to take home. Over the past decade, the Lions Club of Port St. Joe has poured some $25,000 into the community through a host of efforts. The Sportsmans Banquet, to be held at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe with social hour and appetizers at 5 p.m. and dinner beginning at 6:30 p.m. ET, has allowed the club to broaden its community outreach. The last Sportsmans Banquet raised nearly $20,000 for Lions Club projects in the community. The Sportsmans Banquet originated from what was an annual event to support Ducks Unlimited. But what Lions Club members envisioned was an event that would bring money directly into the community, not only in the costs of putting the night on, but also in handling proceeds from the banquet. After enjoying Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left-hungry ribeye steaks, joined on dinner plates by salad, potato and rolls. Over $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through live auctions and raf es. One winner could win up to $8,000, the amount linked to the number of tickets sold. The items include over 30 shotguns, hunting ri es and pistols, along with numerous other outdoor products. There will also be items available for women and children. Tickets for the event are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. Last year we had the biggest event weve ever had and sales have been brisk to far, said Willie Ramsey of the Port St. Joe Lions Club. We do have a limited number of tickets, so it might be best to get your ticket in advance. If tickets are sold out, they will not be available at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Of ce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. This is a lot of fun and bene cial to the community, Ramsey said. Every dime is spent here and this is about helping in the community and that is what the Lions Club is about.Lions Club to hold Sportsmans Banquet on Thursday Something is lurking in St. Joe Bay COURTESY OF TOM BAIRDAcorn barnacles stick to the shell of a cold-stunned turtle that was rescued last month near Pig Island.Another cold snap will affect us on the Forgotten Coast as we enter the rst week of March. Spring break traf c will ll most of the local beach spots this month, so hit the beaches early to sh. Good whiting catches are being reported at Windmark Beach to Mexico Beach. Some ounder are coming to the docks from last weeks warming trend, but we havent seen the great migration back to shallow water yet. SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA www.starfl.com ASectionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Three years ago last week, Calvin Pryor was starring on the hardwood of the R. Marion Craig Coliseum. Last week Pryor was among a host of collegiate football prospects on display at the NFL Combine. Pryor was interviewed by the NFL Network and was the focus of a long camera shot as an ESPN talk show previewed a discussion on the Combine. All pretty heady stuff for the small-town multi-sport athlete who just three years ago was leading the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks to a second consecutive region basketball title and state nal four berth. The other star of that team was Roman Quinn, who was a second-round selection of the Philadelphia Phillies in the Major League Amateur Draft that spring. Last week was an opportunity for Pryor to stamp his ticket as a projected rst round pick in the NFL draft and according to the prognosticators, he generally succeeded. As Greg Davenport, a columnist for bleacherreport.com, wrote, Pryor did not have a great workout at the Combine, but he did nothing to dissuade scouts from the belief that he is one of the top safeties and defensive backs in the draft. Pryor ran under 4.6 in the 40-yard dash, placing eighth among safeties. Most importantly, he ran an identical time to Ha Ha Clinton-Dix out of Alabama, with whom Pryor is locked in a contest for top safety, at least according to the experts. He hoisted 18 reps of 225 pounds in the bench press, which was fourth among safeties. Pryor did not participate in shuttle runs or cone drills and his vertical jump and broad jump, Davenport wrote, ranked in the lower end of the safety class. Bleacher Reports B.J. Kissel wrote those werent the drills where Pryor gured to win or lose with scouts anyway. When it comes to physicality at the safety position, he wrote, most draft enthusiasts already know about Louisvilles Calvin Pryor. Kissel said Pryor most needed to show scouts he can be trusted to play in space. According to Omar Kelly with the South Florida SunSentinel, Pryor killed the position drills. Solid work. The surprise of the Combine was that while Pryor weighed 207 pounds, his listed weight, he measured 5-foot-11, three inches under the height listed in the University of Louisville program. For those who watched Pryor on the basketball court in high school, and the two marches to the state nal four his nal two seasons, his stat-line lling performances take on a greater stature considering he was less than six feet tall. And the competitive streak so on display during his time in Port St. Joe was also part of the impression Pryor left behind at the Combine. Im a playmaker, he succinctly told the NFL Network in an interview before he ran the 40-yard dash. According to most experts, safety is a two-horse race between the cover skills of Clinton-Dix and the physical playmaking of Pryor. Guys know that I can play football, Pryor said in a podcast with Davenport on Kelloggs Komments earlier this month. They know that Im physical, that I have the strength to play. They just want to see how fast I can run. The 40-yard dash, he added, was critical and his time at the Combine was a bit faster than some projected. Most importantly, it was even with Clinton-Dix. Coming out of the Combine, Davenport wrote, the two-horse race remains and likely will until the May draft. A mock draft by si.com, the web site for Sports Illustrated, continues to list Pryor as likely to go rst to either the Green Bay Packers or the Philadelphia Eagles. Reviewing a host of projections, Pryor is generally considered to go to one of several teams in need of secondary help who draft in the teens to early 20s in May. That list also includes the Baltimore Ravens and Dallas Cowboys. And that this, literally, national attention is focused on a hometown son is amazing considering what Calvin Pryor was doing, right here in Port St. Joe, just three years ago last week. Thursday, March 6, 2014 Page 7 PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA www.starfl.com SPORTS CALVIN PRYOR PSJs Pryor spotlighted at combineStar Staff ReportAfter a tough outing in the Florida/Alabama Line Tournament, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School softball team (6-4) bounced back with four consecutive wins. The Lady Tiger Sharks opened last week with a 16-7 win over Liberty County, a district triumph. Stephanie Brinkmeier pitched seven innings, allowing seven runs, four earned, on nine hits while striking out ve and walking seven. Brittany King was 3 for 3 with a pair of doubles and drove in ve runs. Brinkmeier was 3 for 4 and drove in six. Kelsey Miles was 3 for 4. Port St. Joe came back a day later with an 8-2 win at Bozeman, posting another district win. Brinkmeier went seven innings on the mound, striking out nine, walking none and allowing two runs on ve hits. Haley Wood was 2 for 4 and scored twice. Shannon Pridgeon, King, and Addison Rice singled and Christian Laine had a triple. The Lady Tiger Sharks Marianna came to town for the rst home game last Thursday. Port St. Joe won 3-1 behind Brinkmeier, who Coach Jim Belin said pitched her best game of the year, allowing two runs on two hits and walking none. Game three was against Marianna as again coming away with a 3-1 win. Brittany King with had a pair of hits, Wood, Pridgeon and Callie Fleshren each had a hit and Fleshren and King drove in runs. The Lady Tiger Sharks completed the week with a 16-1 mercy rule win over North Bay Haven. Savannah Miles got the win, pitching three innings and allowing one run on one hit and striking out one. Pridgeon, Rice and Shaye McGuf n each had two hits. Port St. Joe played Liberty County and play South Walton Friday.Lady Tiger Sharks on hot streakSpecial to The StarOn the weekend of Feb. 14, Dave Warriner of Port St. Joe competed in the NCISAA State wrestling tournament as a member of the Christ School team. Warriner nished the double-elimination tournament with a bye in the rst round and a 1-2 record. He was ousted on the last day in the semi nals of the consolation round. Warriner, a junior at Christ School in Asheville, NC, was a varsity starter for the season at both 160 and 152 pounds. For Dave to have just started wrestling in December it was quite a season of success for him said Coach Ken Kiser. Dave proved to be virtually pin proof As a newcomer to the team, Warriner had to defeat three wrestlers to obtain the starting position for the season. He had was 11-12 for the year in a competitive conference. He went 2-0 at the conference tournament. His second win at conference proved to be the key win to force a team tie in the conference dual match. His performance earned him a coachs nomination for all-conference. The team had a 20-9 dual match record and tied for 8th in the North Carolina Independent Athletic Association Tournament. Senior teammate Stephen Bridges won a state title at 222 lbs., a rst in the 12 years of Christ School. David was a very important role player on this years team Kiser said. We had great team chemistry, effort and determination this year. Our senior leadership was the key to our success. I am looking toward Dave to step up and ll that role next year for our young team Warriner is son of David and Trish Warriner of Port St. Joe.Warriner earns trip to state wrestling tourneyStar Staff ReportThe Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School softball team downed Vernon and Cottondale the past week. Brianna Bailey pitched six innings for the win, striking out 12 while giving up three hits and one earned run as the Lady Gators beat Vernon 8-3. Tara Walding was 3 for 3 with two triples and a double, driving in three runs. Shamario Cole was 1 for 2 with a triple and RBI and Mariah Brown had a double and RBI. The Lady Gators beat Cottondale 13-1 Tuesday. Bailey pitched six innings, striking out 12 and allowing one unearned run on two hits. She was 2 for 4 with a triple, two runs scored and two runs driven in at the plate. Walding was 4 for 4 with a triple, two runs scored and three RBIs. Cole was 3 for 4 with two runs scored. Naomi Parker was 1 for 3 with a triple and three RBIs. Anna Setterich was 2 for 4, scored a run and drove in one. The Lady Gators play Cottondale and Blountstown before traveling to Tallahassee for the Chiles Tournament. Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School weightlifting team downed Wewahitchka last week in a dual meet. The team competition nished Port St. Joe 54, Wewahitchka 33. Individual results as follows (bench press, clean and jerk, total): 119 lb.: J. Hensley (W) 200190-390, N. Campbell (PSJ) 14090-330, D. Jones (PSJ) 95-90-185; 129 lb.: B. Kemp (W) 185-160345, M. Hensley (W) 175-150-325, J. Renfro (PSJ) 135-85-220, M. Simpson (PSJ) 160-xxx-160; 139 lb.: C. Thacker (PSJ) 250185-435, C. Laster (W) 185-170355, R. Dykes (PSJ) 155-115-270, T. Nunnery (W) 165-xxx-165; 154 lb.: R. Sewell (W) 185-185370, A. Paul (PSJ) 210-145-355, J. Simpson (PSJ) 185--xxx-185; 169 lb.: M. Bailey (PSJ) 170120-290, J. Browning (PSJ) 12090-210, D. Chance (W) 95-105-200; 183 lb.: J. Whit eld (W) 230175-405, D. Strickland (PSJ) 230-160-390, K. Zaccaro (PSJ) 205-145-350; 199 lb.: R. Smith (PSJ) 305225-530, A. Dempsey (PSJ) 225-185-410; 219 lb.: N. Lee (PSJ) 300-205505, U. Sanders (PSJ) 240-205445, C. Quick (W) 225-165-390, H. Ward (PSJ) 85-90175; 238 lb.: K. Wadleigh (PSJ) 200155-355, T. Tiller (W) 170-165-335, R. Jones (PSJ) xxx-135-135; Heavyweight: J. Melvin (W) 290-225-515, T. Davis (PSJ) 225135-360, J. Cummings (PSJ) 220-120-340.WHS girls beat Vernon, CottondalePSJ tops Wewa in weightlifting SPECIAL TO THE STARStar Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School baseball team lost a close 6-5 district decision at Liberty County last week. The Tiger Sharks rebounded two nights later with a 14-1 win over Franklin County to improve to 5-3 overall and 2-2 in District 4-1A. Will Ramsey was 4 for 5 with four RBIs, and Bryce Godwin was 2 for 4 with a pair of doubles and four runs driven in to lead the attack against Franklin County. Cole Cryderman went the distance on the mound to raise his record to 2-1. The Tiger Sharks are at Wewahitchka on Friday and host Myrtle, Miss., on Tuesday, with the junior varsity starting at 2:30 p.m. followed by a varsity doubleheader. Port St. Joe splits district games on diamond COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTON | Special to The StarBrittany King drove in ve runs with a pair of doubles in a win over Liberty County.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014In order to assess district policies and procedures in the event that an active shooter enters Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, the district, along with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, the Gulf/Franklin Center of Gulf Coast State College, the Gulf County Health Department and Gulf County Emergency Management will conduct an exercise March 14. That is the Friday before Spring Break, a half-day for Gulf County Schools. The exercise will begin after students leave the high school at 11:30 a.m. ET and continue until 4 p.m. There will be no live ammunition or weapons used, but a number of emergency vehicles, in response mode, will be on the school campus. No member of the public will be permitted on the grounds. We want to emphasize that no students will be participating in this activity, McFarland said. We will have training for approximately 100 staff and teachers on Wednesday, and we are going to conduct the activity after students leave. Again, I want to emphasize no students will be involved. The aim of the exercise, which is being funded through a state emergency management grant secured by county Emergency Manager Marshall Nelson, is to assess the efcacy of district policies in place for such emergencies. For this functional exercise, we have really keyed in on two areas, Nelson said. One is the response of school staff, and the other is the response of law enforcement. In addition, the exercise aims to highlight areas where district policies might be lacking and provide insight into questions and issues that policies might not anticipate. This is really to look at the big picture, McFarland said. What happens when something like this comes into the school? They are going to give us recommendations to update our policies. The main focus, in fact, is for Gulf District Schools to review its current policies and practice a live scenario to be better prepared for such an adverse situation. The exercise will identify vulnerabilities and how quickly rst responders are equipped to assist our schools. The charge for the school site when a shooter enters is to lock down the school before the arrival of emergency management, McFarland said, noting the crucial minutes between a shooters presence and the arrival of assistance. How do teachers and staff secure the students? What are procedures for silencing phones and other technological devices that might mark the presence of potential targets for the shooter? In addition, McFarland said, the exercise will provide a learning experience for such aspects of the event as where to place media responding to the event and what would be the procedure for securing bodies and potential victims. This is to better prepare us in case something like this happens, McFarland said. That is our responsibility, to assure student safety. We also want parents to know this is a school shooting activity. An important one. One Ive been trying to get here for several years. We thank Marshall for securing this grant. The training that will take place for two hours on the Wednesday before the activity will involve faculty, staff and administrators from the Port St. Joe schools as well as front ofce personnel from the Wewahitchka schools, McFarland said. Before Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School is locked down for the exercise at 11:45 a.m. ET March 14, the Gulf/Franklin Center will be locked down for the same purpose at 10 a.m. ET in order to review its procedures for such an event. *BOARDCERTIFIEDCIVILTRIALLAWYER, OFCOUNSEL PUBLICNOTICEAPublicHearingwillbeheldatthePlanningandDevelopment ReviewBoard(PDRB)onMarch17,2014at8:45a.m.EST,andat theBoardofCountyCommissioners(BOCC)meetingonTuesday, March25,2014at9:00a.m.EST.Bothpublichearingswillbeheld intheBOCCMeetingRoomattheRobertM.MooreAdministration Building,1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,PortSt.Joe,Florida.The publichearingswillbetodiscussandactonthefollowing: 1.Variance-EllisC.Smith-ParcelID#03806-080R-Locatednext toVeteransPark(BeaconHill),GulfSideUS98-Buildingsetback nexttoPark. 2.Variance-CarolineA. Rankin-ParcelID#06351005R-LocatedonWindwardSt.(CapeSanBlas) -RoadsetbacktomeetDEP CCCLlandwardsetback. 3.CountyDevelopment RegulationsandPolicies 4.Staff,PublicandOpen Discussion Thepublicisencouraged toattendandbeheardon thesematters. Informationpriortothe meetingcanbeviewedat thePlanning Departmentat1000Cecil G.CostinSr.Blvd.,Room 311. Variance-EllisC.Smith Variance-CarolineA.Rankin WithCerticatesofDeposit,theinterest ratemaybelow,you'retaxedevery yearonthegainandyoumaynothave muchcondenceinbanks. WithaWoodmenoftheWorldannuity, youcan: Calltodaytondoutmoreinformation. CarolDixon FieldRepresentative 850-625-5530 101ReidAve,PortStJoeFL32456phone850-625-5530 experience. For Cox, who will turn 77 this year, the time in the schools and on the School Board was becoming, as he put it, a bit of chore. He said he had two back surgeries marking three such surgeries since 2003 in the past two years. He has also had heart issues requiring bypass surgery and implantation of a pacemaker. He once drove off State 22 after losing consciousness while driving several years ago escaping with no injuries and had a similar recent scare that sent him to the hospital for several days and carried a diagnosis of very high blood pressure. He said, simply, it was time to step aside. I am tired, Cox said. My term ends Nov. 17, and if I can make it that long, I dont want to do it anymore. It is time for someone younger to come in. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time on the board. It has been very rewarding. COX from page A1 SHooOOTER from page A1

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Whos been the only major leaguer whose 3,000th career hit was a triple? Pete Rose, Ty Cobb, Paul Molitor, Eddie Murray 2) Which sport has been pictured on the cover of Sports Illustrated more than any other? Football, Baseball, Basketball, Golf 3) Who coined, Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker? Ogden Nash, Andy Warhol, George Carlin, Robert Frost 4) Daguerreotype was an early process to perform what? Crop dusting, Irrigation, Refrigeration, Photography 5) In blackjack, how many total cards in a deck are worth 10 points each? 8, 10, 12, 16 6) What was the rst name of Grandma Walton in the older TV series (The Waltons)? Eula, Lillie, Esther, Mabel 7) From the nursery rhyme what did Tom, Tom the pipers son steal? Pear, Peach, Pony, Pig 8) About what percent of the worlds water is in the Atlantic Ocean? 12.4, 23.9, 30.2, 39.5 9) Where was Joan of Arc burned at the stake in 1431? Rouen, Reims, Rochester, Rundam 10) Of these which is played with the smallest ball? Pool, Ping Pong, Golf, Squash 11) What is silver sh a type of? Dolphin, Kerosene, Insect, Metal 12) Of these movies beginning with M which did not star Cher? Mask, Mermaids, Misery, Moonstruck 13) Which is an ancient Russian musical instrument thats a kind of harp? Gusli, Doge, Duvet, Tauter 14) Where is ones stirrup bone? Thumb, Nose, Knee, Ear ANSWERS 1) Paul Molitor. 2) Football. 3) Ogden Nash. 4) Photography. 5) 16. 6) Esther. 7) Pig. 8) 23.9. 9) Rouen. 10) Ping Pong. 11) Insect. 12) Misery. 13) Gusli. 14) Ear. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The gymnasium at Port St. Joe Elementary School has reopened for business. During Christmas break, construction began on new wood oors to replace the old gymnasium and lunch room oors in the school. The repairs were completed by RAM Enterprises for a bid of $114,657. According to Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton, the money for the project didnt come from taxpayers but rather a pot of money made up of tag renewal funds that nets the board approximately $15,000 each year. The money must be used every ve years or lost. Due to water issues in the last decade, the oor buckled and had become unsafe, Norton said. The state gave us permission to tap into that money in the name of safety. Projects eligible for the funds must also have been listed on both a ve-year work plan and a project priority list. The funds could not be used for landscaping or competition-based facilities. Concern about the oors began when RAM performed an analysis and discovered the gym By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com According to Brooklyn Sheppard, a fth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary School, the secret to making the world a better place is simple: end racism. Thats the poignant thought that steered Sheppards winning entry in the 2014 Black History Month essay contest. Sheppard was the winner of the fourthand fth-grade division in the statewide contest. For her win, Sheppard was awarded a trip to the governors mansion in Tallahassee, where she, her mother Heather, her father and grandmother had hors doeuvres with Gov. Rick Scott and the rst lady at a reception to celebrate the contributions AfricanAmerican community leaders, educators and students make to Floridas communities, culture, and history. She also earned a fouryear scholarship to a Florida college or university. We took photos with the governor and his wife and he congratulated me, Sheppard said. It was pretty exciting. Sheppard was originally told about the contest by teacher Anne Johnson. She had several days to write the essay before Scott announced the winners on Feb. 25. When I heard that I won, I jumped up and down and screamed, Sheppard said. Entering the contest was optional, but Sheppard knew there was a four-year Florida College Plan scholarship on the line. The scholarship was provided by the Florida Prepaid College Foundation. Sheppard said she didnt know if her parents could pay for college and saw the contest as an opportunity to make her dreams of becoming a lawyer come true.SPECIAL TO THE STARBrooklyn Sheppard, a fth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary, was a statewide winner in the 2014 Black History Month essay contest and was congratulated during a reception by Gov. Rick Scott. PSJ student wins statewide Black History Month essay contestThursday, March 6, 2014 INSIDERead Sheppards essay on Page B5 See ESSAY B5 By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The professional liars were out in force last weekend. Hot off of the Liars Challenge held the prior week at the Thirsty Goat, a wine and cheese event focused on grown up stories was held on Friday at Gulf Coast State College. More than 100 people turned out to see professional storytellers Bob Patterson from St. Augustine, Pat Nease from Panama City and Robyn Rennick from Tallahassee. Fourth-grader Chasity Finch, winner of the storytelling competition at Port St. Joe Elementary School, opened the show and told her original story to get the crowd warmed up. In short strokes, Finchs story, her own creation, was a lesson on mice and not sleeping in a toilet. Dont ask. We have a lot of outside visitors, Coastal Community Association President Pat Hardman said. It gives the winter visitors an event that they can come to and enjoy. Hardman pointed out visitors had come from Panama City and Tallahassee for the event. A weekend of stories WES LOCHER | The StarThe previous gym oor was damaged by moisture and warped by warm temperatures.PSJE receives new gym oorSee GYM B5 See SHELLS B5 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The professional liars were out in force last weekend. Hot off of the Liars Challenge held the prior week at the Thirsty Goat, a wine and cheese event focused on grown up stories was held on Friday at Gulf Coast State College. More than 100 people turned out to see professional storytellers Bob Patterson from St. Augustine, Pat Nease from Panama City and Robyn Rennick from Tallahassee. Fourth-grader Chasity Finch, PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarChasity Finch a fourth-grader at Port St. Joe Elementary School told a story before a packed house at the Wine and Cheese event on Friday night. At left, Tallahassee storyteller Robyn Rennick regaled the crowd with grown up stories. Shells and Tales rounds out fest with grown up stories and workshops

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B2 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,Port St.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast SOLD 4516302850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.comGulffronttopoor2BD/2BAcondowithpanoramic viewsofthegulf.Largeopenkitchen,living anddiningareawithgreatviews.Thisspacious condominiumfeaturesgorgeousheartofpine oors,granitecountertopsthroughout,stainless kitchenappliancesand10footceilings.Furnished andreadyforyou. Aidaisasweetyoungcatthatlovestocuddle andpurr.Sheisveryfriendlyandoutgoing.Aida lovestobeheldandpetted.Shedidnothavethe beststartinlifeandcamefromthestreets.This sweetgirldeservesasafe,loving,foreverhome.She keepsherkennelcleanandtidyandpromisestodo soathernewhome. KittenandPuppyseasonisuponusandwe haveanabundance.Pleaseconsideroneofourfully vettedpetsforyounextadditiontoyourfurryfamily. Evenifyoucannotadopt,youcanhelpinotherways: Fosterhomesgiveourgreatpetstheattention andsocializationtheycrave.Weprovideallsuppliesneeded. Weneedvolunteerstohelpwithmaintenancearoundtheshelter.Towelsand beddingarealwayswelcome.Petcarriersandcrates.Donationsofkittylitterisin greatdemandaswellaspuppytoys.Monetarydonationsarealwayswelcome. Anydonationnomatterhowsmallwillbegreatlyappreciated. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakea Donation.AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/ neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.comor adoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Onlineapplicationsandpetphotosare availableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm!FaithsThrift Hutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupport theanimalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3 pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreand shelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet, pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday Whether you are beginning a landscape or adding to an existing one, your major expenses will probably be in purchasing trees and shrubs. Its important that you know how to take care of new shrubbery from the day you bring it home from the nursery. First and foremost, this means correct planting methods. In fact, the way you plant new trees and shrubs has a lot to do with the way theyll look for many years to come. A common question about planting trees and shrubs is when is the best time to plant? Generally speaking, late fall and winter are the recommended time for adding new plants to the landscape. If youre thinking about getting some new shrubs into your landscape, nows the time to do it. There are a few exceptions to this general rule. Some evergreens, for example, are best planted in August or early September, and the best time to transplant palms is during the summer months when we are getting high rainfall. Planting time and procedure can also vary depending on how the plant is grown and packaged at the nursery. Plants are usually prepared for shipping in one of four ways: They may be bare-root, which is when the root and bare of all soil. They may be balled and burlapped, where most of the root and soil mass is dug intact and wrapped in burlap. The plant may come as a package bare-root, in which case, all the soil is removed from the root, and the roots are then wrapped in sawdust, bark, or peat moss. The fourth variation is the container-grown plant, where the root system is not disturbed until planting time. Container grown plants can successfully be transplanted any time of year. A plant may be prepared in any of these four ways. The exact method of packaging will depend on the characteristics of each particular plant, as well as production and shipping consideration. For the most part, bareroot, packaged bare-root, and balled and burlapped plants will have a higher survival rate if they are planted during the winter months. You should prepare the site well in advance so it will be ready for the new plant as soon as you bring it home. Youll want to get the plant in the ground as soon as possible. One important step in preparation is digging the hole. Make sure you dig the hole deep enough. It should be at least 6 inches deeper and wider on all sides than the root mass of the plant. Keep the sides of the hole going straight up and down, rather than sloped. At the bottom, loosen several inches of soil to allow for root development. Before you can plant, youll probably need to add some amendments, things like compost, peat moss or pine bark. In Floridas sandy soils, they are added to help the soil hold water and nutrients better. About one part soil amendment should be thoroughly mixed with every two parts of soil that go back into the hole with the plant. Remember that the hole was dug about 6 inches deeper and wider that the roots mass of the plant. So start by putting about 6 inches of the mended soil in the bottom of the hole. Pack it down well so the plant wont settle after youre nished Stand the plant upright in the center of the hole, and turn it so that its best side is most prominent. Make sure the roots are naturally spread, with no cramping or twisting. If youre working with a bare-root plant, make a cone-shaped mound of soil in the hole and arrange the roots around it. For balled and burlapped or containergrown plants, handle the soil ball carefully so that it doesnt break. An important step now is to make sure the plant is all right growing level. Planting too shallow can cause the roots to dry out. On the other hand, planting too deeply can suffocate roots and cause the base of the trunk to rot. Bare-root plants usually show the right soil level by a color change at the base of the trunk. With balled and burlapped or container-grown plants, line up the top of the soil ball with the soil surface. Now you can ll up the hole with amended soil. If you have a balled and burlapped plant, untie the burlap, but dont try to remove it. It will soon decay on its own. You only need to roll it down away from the soil ball. Fill up the hole about three-fourths of the way, keeping the plant in an upright position. Get rid of all air pockets, and water thoroughly. Let the water settle and ll the remainder of the hole with more soil, water again. Finally, make a rim of soil a few inches high in a 2or 3-foot circle around the plant. This saucer shaped basin will hold water and direct it to the roots of the plant. For more information on garden fertilization, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u.edu or http://edis.ifas.u.edu and see Publication ENH 856 & ENH 1129.Special to The StarGulf Amateur Radio Society monthly meetingAre you interested in becoming a radio amateur, commonly called a Ham? The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will have its next meeting at 7 p.m. ET today, March 6, at the Gulf County Operations Center building in Port St. Joe. Come on out to meet some local Hams and see whats going on. For more information, call Howard Johnson at 229-1789 or Norman Bixler at 832-1388.Womans Club thanks fundraiser helpersThe GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club recent pulled pork sandwich plate fundraiser was a huge success. The club would like to thank everyone who purchased a plate(s) and/or donated to this event. Special thanks go to Brad Bailey, Brother Joey Smith and Shane Semmes for helping make this event as wonderful as it was. We are always thankful to the publics participation when we raise money for scholarships and community projects. Last, but not least, thanks goes to Tim Croft, who always ensures that our articles are published in The Star. VFW St. Pattys Day dinner to benet Relay for LifeThe Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 10069 will serve up its annual St. Patricks Day dinner at 5 p.m. ET March 15 at the Post in Highland View. The dinner will include corned beef and cabbage, including potatoes, carrots, onions, bread and scrumptious desserts prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. The evenings festivities will include karaoke by Wanda, a special St. Pattys Day Basket Rafe and other surprises. Dinner is $10. The dinner service starts at 5 p.m. ET and will continue until the food is gone. Take-outs will be available. All proceeds will be donated to the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. Wear your green and join the Ladies Auxiliary for this worthwhile cause.Alzheimers support groupAlzheimers Project Inc. announces an active support group of Port St. Joe. The support group meets from 1-2:30 p.m. fourth Tuesdays in the Social Hall at First United Methodist Church, 1001 Constitution Drive in Port St. Joe. This is a free service for the community of Port St. Joe. Alzheimers Project is a nonprot organization based in Tallahassee. The organization extends a warm supportive welcome to all caregivers, but this caregiver support group is not just for caregivers of persons with dementia. It is for anyone who is caring for a loved one. The support group empowers caregivers with knowledge and information through resources, fellowship and sharing of life experiences with like-minded individuals who are caring for a loved one. Questions or comments can be directed to Recie Culpepper at 5662553, or visit www.alzheimersproject. org.Special to The StarGodwin announced as essay winnerThe Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association, an afliate of the Florida Retired Educators Association, is happy to announce the winner of the 2014 essay contest. Each year, fth-grade students are invited to participate by writing an essay about their relationship with a grandparent or grandparent gure. Our winner this year is Allie Godwin, a student in Ms. Cindy Phillips class at Port St. Joe Elementary School, for her essay, A Happy Memory. In her essay, Godwin relates experiences with her Gan-Gan. Godwin was awarded a $25 cash prize, and her essay will be forwarded to the next level for judging and possibly compete at state level.John-Patrick Floyd receives degree from Georgia TechJohn-Patrick Floyd of Port St. Joe has earned a Master of Science in international affairs from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Floyd was among about 2,700 undergraduate and graduate students who received degrees during Georgia Techs 246th commencement exercises. The Georgia Institute of Technology is one of the nations leading research universities, providing a focused, technologically based education to more than 21,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Georgia Tech has many nationally recognized programs and is ranked in the nations top ten public universities by U.S. News and World Report. For more information, visit www. gatech.edu. When and how to plant trees and shrubs ROY lLEE cart CARTErRCounty extension director Congratulations Society Society BrRIEfsFS

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The Star| B3Thursday, March 6, 2014 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 THE T A HILLONC BEA89 HWY4549 0138746 058 S LIMITY CITCH BEAOMEXIC GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS 0138746 058 S LIMITY CITCH BEAOMEXIC S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA LIVEONTHEPOOPDECKINTHECROWNESTKARAOKE-DJ-DANCINGNOWTHURSDAYFRIDAY-SATURDAY-9PMALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMES UPCOMINGEVENTSRANDYWITHARTONSAXFLABBERGASTEDBANDRANDYSTARKDEBIJORDAN GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM JoelRosenbaum,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients FeaturingLocalArtisans LanarkVillage BoatClubSpringMarch8th,20149am~1pmLUNCH ngirSp DAZZLING DOLPHINSSpecial to The StarSS enior news: Interested seniors are encouraged to sign up for the eld trip to Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf Franklin Center on Friday, March 7. Students attending will receive an in-depth brieng on courses and services available at our local college. S S p ring break: The spring holiday for all Gulf County Schools will commence on March 14 with a halfday session and continue through March 21. Classes will resume Monday, March 24.P P r om permission slips: A permission slip is required for prom guests who do not attend our school. Prom is scheduled for April 26. Guests must be in at least the ninth grade and under the age of 21. Forms may be picked up from Deputy Strickland and are due back to him no later than April 11. N N J RO O TC salute: On April 2, the Port St Joe NJROTC will conduct a salute to those graduating and recently graduated seniors of Gulf County who have enlisted into the Armed Forces of the United States and are awaiting their initial training. A ceremonial swearing in and recognition will be conducted. Any personnel enlisted in the Delayed Entry Programs of any service may call LCDR Jarosz at 229-8251 to be included in this ceremony. All veterans and interested individuals are invited to attend. The ceremony will commence at 9 a.m. ET and last about 45 minutes. WAcCKY WEdDNESdDAY rREAdDING At T WESES Special to The StarFloridas top performing STEM students recently were recognized as Sunshine State Scholars and given the opportunity to attend a two-day event in Orlando, Feb. 13-14. Each school district in Florida selected its top 11th-grade student based on their academic achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher chosen by each student, were invited to participate in the annual Sunshine State Scholars program. Among those being honored this year was Wewahitchka Highs Justin Barrier. The program let students meet directly with successful professionals from STEM-related industries in Florida, and with recruiters from Floridas nest colleges and universities. The students heard about special programs of study and industry internship opportunities, learned about some of the latest innovations and discoveries in STEM-related research, heard personal success stories from leaders in Floridas STEM industry and were recruited to become part of Floridas future workforce. The scholars also met with students who had similar interests in STEM programs. SS PEc C IAL tT O THE StST Ar RJustin Barrier with Florida Education Commissioner Pam Stewart.Wewa STEM student named Sunshine State ScholarSS PEc C IAL tT O THE StST Ar RMrs. Bailey, Mrs. Taunton and Mrs. McMillians kindergarten classes at Wewahitchka Elementary School celebrated Dr. Suess love to read last week with Wacky Wednesday. This rainy day was perfect for teachers and students to enjoy a wonderful and wacky day of reading! SS PEc C IAL tT O THE StST Ar RThis weeks Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Kooper Jeness, Madison Othic, Leland Whitlock and Jett Whicker. Back row: Morgan Mills, Bradley Lewis, Joe Becton and Cameron Brown. The Lions TaleSpecial to The StarSecond quarter honor roll at Faith Christian School.StrSTRAIGHtT AA SKKindergarten: Tucker Ashcraft, Cade Costin, Annie Cullin, Jacob Medina, Elli Newman (not pictured), Mary Austin Sapp, Farrah Spring, Celie White and Ruby Williams. First grade: Austin Ramsey, Toren SmithS S econd grade: Taylor Burkett, Carter Costin, Mazie Hodges, Riley McGufn, Alex Taylor Third grade: Karys Linton (not pictured) Fourth grade: Kristen BouingtonAALL AA S ANdD BSKKindergarten: Mary Beth McGufn, Jakob Prine First grade: Hali Thomas (not pictured), Lilli WilliamsS S econd grade: John Cullin Third grade: Jae Lenox, Magnolia Sarmiento (not pictured) Fourth grade: Theron SmithAA HONOrR rROLL, fFIrRStT SSEMEStTErRA A HONOrR rROLL, SEcCONdD QUArtRTErR ALL AA S ANdD BS, fFIrRStT SEMEStTErRA A S ANdD BS, SEcCONdD QUArtRTErR School News

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org BruceHodge, Pastor SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) Mary Earl Helms Smith made her transition to her heavenly life on February 24, 2014 at The Bridge at Bay St Joe Nursing Facility where she resided. She was born on November 20, 1924 to H. E. Hubby and Hazel Helms in Milton, FL. She was a graduate of Port St. Joe High School, a resident of White City and a member of the White City Baptist Church, where she was a Sunday school teacher for many years. She married her husband, Robert Big Bob Smith on February 17, 1945 in Gulf County, FL which is where they raised their family. Ms. Mary is survived by her sons Herbert Smitty Smith, Murry Smith and wife Eudora; her grandchildren Lauren Hanley and her husband Keith of White City, Herbert Stephen Smith and his wife Amy of Panama City, and Jesse Smith of White City; ve great-grandchildren, Josie Latshaw and her husband Jon, Joshua Sundie, and Codi Sundie all of White City, Seth and Danyel Smith of Panama City. Ms. Mary was preceded in death by her husband, Robert Big Bob Smith, her daughter, Anita Smith, her daughter-in-law Charlene Smith, and her granddaughter, Savanna Smith all of White City. Funeral services were held February, 28, 2014 at White City Baptist Church. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Mary Earl Helms SmithMother Gracie M. Ranie was born in Scott Ferry on July 23, 1933. She was one of ten children born to the late Robert T. Keith, Sr. and Cora (Rouse) Keith. Mother Ranie was called home to be with the Lord on Feb. 16. She was preceded in death by her sister, Sara Keith and Brothers Robert T. Keith, Jr., William E. Keith and Cornelius Keith. At an early age, Mother Ranie was a member of St. James A.M.E. In 1986 she moved to St. Petersburg and became an active member of Prayer Tower Church of God in Christ. In 1995 she returned to Wewahitchka and became a member of Carter Temple First Born Church. She was one of the Mothers of Carter Temple until the Lord called her home. Mother Ranie leaves to cherish her memories seven children: Linda Gant (Paul) of Port St. Joe, Jerry Ranie, Anna (Merle) Nickerson and Benjamin (Ben) Ranie (Carolyn) of Wewahitchka, Dale Ranie of St. Petersburg, Sylvia Ranie of Brandon, Carol (Ranie) Fletcher (James) of Hawthorne, CA., and godson Kenneth Gray (Bobbi) of Lynn Haven. She leaves behind eight grandchildren and ve sisters; Ada Dozier, Lillian Russ and Nervene Colvin (John) of Wewahitchka; Stella Scott and Annie Granberry of Tacoma, WA., one sister-in-law, Denise Keith of Wewahitchka and a host of nieces, nephews, relatives and many special friends. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. Revelations 21:4Gracie M. RanieFrances Maud Maw Maw Segers, 96, of St. Joe Beach passed away at home peacefully in her sleep Tuesday, February 26, 2014. She was born in Guntersville, AL., and had been a resident of Lynn Haven and Gulf County most of her life. Known as Maw Maw, she was a member of Beach Baptist Chapel and was greatly loved by family and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, Joseph and Anna Spivey; her adoptive parents, Charles and Julia Dunn; her husband Cecil Segers; and her sons, Cecil Segers, Jr., Charles Segers, Thomas Segers, and Jerry Segers. She is survived by her daughters, Wanda Forehand (Chester); Dianne Sanders (ONeal); her son, Michael Segers (Laveria); 10 grandchildren; numerous greatgrandchildren. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. ET Monday, March 3, 2014 at Beach Baptist Chapel at St. Joe Beach with the Rev. David Nichols of ciating. Interment followed in Holly Hill Cemetery. There was a visitation for an hour prior to the service at the church. Services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Frances Maud Maw Maw Segers FRANCES MAUD MAW MAW SEGERS ObituariesLong Avenue Baptist Church calls new senior pastorDuring a special called business meeting on Feb. 23, the membership of Long Avenue Baptist Church voted to call the Rev. Israel Eli Prine as their new senior pastor. For the past 2 years, the Rev. Prine has served as the student pastor of LABC. Before his relocation to Port St. Joe, the Rev. Prine served as minister of students and education at Faith Baptist Church in Durham, N.C. The Rev. Prine grew up in Crawfordville, Fla., and was a graduate of Wakulla High School. He received his bachelor of arts in theology from the Baptist College of Florida in Graceville. The Rev. Prine earned his master of divinity in Christian ministry from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forrest, N.C. The Rev. Prine has been married to his wife, Shanna, for eight years. Together, they have three children: Jakob Micah, and Caleb. The Prine family, along with the Pastor Search Committee of LABC, will host an open house from 4-6 p.m. ET on March 8 at the Prine residence, 2006 Juniper Ave. in Port St. Joe. Presbyterian churches to worship togetherPort St. Joe meets Wewahitchka this Sunday, when the First Presbyterian Churches of PSJ and Wewa worship together at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET) at the Wewa Presbyterian Church, 336 State 71. PSJ members and friends will meet in the PSJ church parking lot (16th Street and Woodward Avenue) by 10:15 a.m. ET to carpool. A pot luck lunch will follow worship. Everyone is encouraged to bring a favorite dish to share. All times are adjusted for DST. Call 227-1756 for a place in the carpool or leave a message with questions. First Presbyterian Wewahitchka sanctuary is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Wewa, built in 1894 by Episcopalians. At that time, the Presbyterians had property and shared programs across the street with First Methodist (now First United Methodist). The Presbyterian Church purchased the unused Episcopalian property in 1943. In the 1970s, Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Roman Catholics all worshipped at different times in the Presbyterian buildings. Special to The StarThe impact of posttraumatic stress disorder will be explored at 7 p.m. CT Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Wounded Warriors: When War Comes Home, will explore post-traumatic stress disorder in the lives of military veterans and provide helpful resources and strategies for coping with PTSD. This program will focus on men and women returning from military service, but post-traumatic stress disorder also affects civilians, Lifetree representative Craig Cable said. This program will be helpful for anyone who has experienced trauma. The program features the lmed story of a veteran who saw his buddy killed in combat. His return to civilian life was disrupted by lingering mental distress, violent tendencies and relationship problems. He eventually found hope and stability. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree can be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. PTSD discussed at Lifetree Caf Faith BRIEFS Thursday, March 6, 2014

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, March 6, 2014 Tolearnhowyoucansupportour communitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat(850)770-2108 ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY PANAMACITYTHECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:3-15-14CODE:SJ00 Miss Johnson tells us to try and follow our dreams, Sheppard said. Sheppard read the essay for her peers and said she received a lot of positive feedback from her teacher and classmates, which helped her feel condent in her essay. She encouraged her classmates to participate in future opportunities that may better their futures.I Have a Dream for 2014By Brooklyn SheppardI dream of a world lled with love. To love one another is the key for world peace. Even though this sounds easy, we have never been able to achieve it. Hate is taught by the shallow mindset of others. We are all born into this world as innocent babies, but our upbringing can change our future in many ways. I want to live in a world where children are taught to respect others, regardless of gender or race and in a world that is blind to color. This world that I dream of will not judge me by my brown skin but by my talents, kindness, and compassion. Each human is destined to do great things. Everyone has the right to become anything they want. We all hold greatness inside of us. If we all put forth an effort, we can break the racial barriers that have kept so many in bondage. No one should be judged by the color of their skin, for we are all created equal and equal we should be. Peace, love, and equality are three words that hold so much power. There is enough power in these words to move mountains for us all and to change the world. One act of kindness can change a persons life. Every act of love goes far. If people would volunteer to help the homeless, or maybe spend time helping a child to read, we could greatly improve our nation, and our world as a whole. When we see a child, we should give a smile. When we see someone down on their luck, we should offer a kind word. Anything that we can do that is positive has a lasting effect. We should always treat others the way that you want to be treated, and choose our words wisely. We need to remember to do our part each day to make the world a better place. If we carry on the work of so many amazing men and women before us, such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., we can continue to honor them. I was able to grow up and live in a land where I can be anything that I desire to be. I have the drive to succeed and to do great things. We have come a long way, but there was a time when a woman had no voice, and if you were black, you could only ride in the back of the bus. Progress has denitely been made, but we still have much more to do. To each and every man, woman, and child, I encourage and challenge everyone to go on this journey with me. We together can change the world not only for us but for the generations after we are gone. Life is short, and it is time that we come together and make these changes. Give a hug, and lend a hand. Do not discriminate, but appreciate life. Change your heart for the better. ESSAY from page B1 oor needed to be replaced. Moisture issues had caused the old ooring to warp after stagnant air made its way between the sub-oor and maple oor and disintegrated the vapor barrier. The school board voted to proceed with the repairs in December. The renovations bring the gymnasium oor up to date with current standards. During construction, the maintenance team installed several fans in the crawlspace under the oors to circulate air when temperatures increased. We have multiple athletic sports teams and only one gym oor, Norton said. Now, it will be able to accommodate our high school sports overow needs. We may have old buildings, but we plan on them lasting us another 60 years.WES LOCh H ER | The StarThe new gymnasium oor at Port St. Joe Elementary School was replaced and upgraded by RAM Enterprises. GYM from page B1Attendees are getting to hear theater, Hardman said. Its a more cultural event, and the professional storytellers are bringing quality entertainment. The following morning, storytellers Nease and Rennick held a storytelling workshop for those interested in improving their skills. Those in attendance began by sharing the stories behind their names and worked their way up to stories they could share at home or at work. The storytellers provided tips and tricks when it came to presenting the story for an audience and making it visually interesting to watch. The opportunities for stories are endless, Nease said. Theres a difference between sitting at the dinner table and bringing a story to the stage. Its great to get the community involved alongside the professionals, Rennick said. Its all about getting local stories out there. The event was sponsored by the CCA and the Port St. Joe Lions Club. Artwork crafted by students at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School also was on display. CCA Treasurer Brooks Jones coordinated the event and was proud to say with four days worth of events, Shells and Tales had ofcially become a festival in 2014. Jones said storytelling is something thats important to him, and he enjoys sharing it with the community. He said as a child, it was a tradition in his family for his father to tell stories on the weekend and children from around the neighborhood would visit the Jones house to listen. The stories always ended on a cliffhanger to keep people coming back. Jones said he and his siblings carried on the tradition with their own children. Im happy to make this contribution to the community, Jones said. It was a good crowd, and you could feel that they were enjoying. It was great to have locals and snowbirds attend and everyone made new friends. SHELLS from page B1 WES LOCh H ER | The StarMore than 100 attendees enjoyed the wine and cheese event at Gulf Coast State College.

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 227-7847 451-6042CALLTODAY! Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction J&MSCRAPPINGCARS/TRUCKS MOBILEHOMES CAMPERTRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOWA/C WASHERS/DRYERS STOVES/REFRIGERATORS FREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWNMOWERS SCRAPMETAL,ETC... 19Years of Service! GETYOURADIN The Lives of Children during the American RevolutionBy Kate McLemoreGrade eight Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Hello, my name is Molly Andrews and it is the year 1777. I live in Concord, Massachusetts which is about twentyve miles from Boston. My dad left for Boston three weeks ago for what we thought was a business trip concerning Andrews Boat Company, our family company. However, we have received word that instead of coming home he is headed to Valley Forge in Pennsylvania to help General Washington. Everyone has heard by now how cold all the soldiers are; we have all been gathering socks and shoes to send to our loved ones. I worry everyday about my dad, but I know that since I am the oldest of the three kids that I have to step up and start helping my mom with our company. Today I am going to see if I can get former workers wives to help. Most of the men who worked for us have left to become patriots for the Continental Army. That leaves my mother, my six year old brother, my eight year old sister, me, and a few wives of former workers to do the work of the men. I am very fortunate my dad has always let my mother and me help, so we know how to get everything done. Today we rigged a pulley system to life the heavy boards for placement on the boats. Orders for new boats have greatly decreased. Instead, we are mostly repairing the boats which belong to the privateers. It has now been four months, and we were ecstatic to see my fathers face for the rst time in months. He was terribly malnourished and had lost two ngers to frostbite, but other than that he was in much better shape than many others. I was very worried I was never going to see him again, but I never voiced this to my mother or siblings. We have since found out from my dad that when he went to Boston for his meeting a few months ago that he heard that peoples one year enlistments were ending and people were leaving General Washington because of the conditions at Valley Forge. When my dad heard this, he knew he had to go and help his old time friend, General Washington. When he arrived at Valley Forge he found out everything everyone had said about the conditions were true. Many of the soldiers that had stayed were sick and staying in huts that offered no warmth. He told us a story about a soldier desperately trying to cook a pumpkin for nourishment. However, my dad said that Washington and his soldiers had, indeed made it through the winter and they were now ready to resume the battle. Our business has been busier than ever before. It is so helpful to have my father and few other men back to help with the business. We have had boats coming in to be repairs that the British have nearly destroyed with musket balls. My dad is getting angrier and angrier with every tattered boat that comes in to be repaired. It is now November of 1779 and my dad has decided that he would like to continue serving and it would be best for him to join The Continental Navy. He heard about the Battle of Flamborough Head which took place in the North Sea near Yorkshire. John Paul Jones was commanding the American ship, Bonhomme Richard, and was ghting against the British ship, Serpias. Although both ships were shattered and nearly destroyed, John Paul Jones would not give up and actually said, I have not yet begun to ght! This courageousness has inspired my dad to join The Navy and ght for the independence of America against the British. My father will leave tomorrow and I pray that he will come back alive.Winners named in DAR essay contestSpecial to The StarThe rst-place winners of the Daughters of the American Revolution history month essay were Hailey Harriman for fth grade, Mary-Kate Wood for sixth and Kate McLemore for eighth. This years topic was The lives of children during the American Revolution. The DAR congratulates these winners and all 37 students who participated in this years contest. The rst place winners were pinned with a beautiful bronze medal for their win and received a booklet including a copy of the Constitution and other important historical documents, a copy of the Bill of Rights, George Masons essay on the Bill, and Patrick Henrys famous Give me liberty, or give me death speech.WES LOCHER | The StarDaughters of the American Revolution history month essay contest winners were Hailey Harriman, Mary-Kate Wood and Kate McLemore. The Lives of Children during the American RevolutionBy Hailey HarrimanGrade ve Port St. Joe Elementary School On April 19, 1975 in Lexington, Massachusetts is when our lives changed. It was the American Revolutionary War and my mom Betsy Ross, born January 1, 1752 in Philadelphia, did something great for our country. My dad John Ross and my three brothers Blayze Ross, Jett Ross and Breeze Ross were soldiers in the Lexington war. This is how it happened. My dad and brothers, who were already a part of the local militia, volunteered to ght for our country. My dad and brothers came home from a meeting with George Washington and we ate dinner. After dinner, my mom said she wanted me to help her make something during the war, I wondered what it was. One week and six days later the war began. I was so worried about my dad and brothers in the war. My mom told me it was time to start the surprise. She asked me to go get the red, white, and blue thread and so I did. I wandered why red, white, and blue and so I asked her what we were with those colors. She said, We are going to make an American ag. We worked on it all day and then mom went to lie down and rest. While she was resting, George Washington came to the door. I answered the door and he said that my dad and two of my brothers, Blayze and Jett, had been shot and passed away. Tears were streaming down my face, I was so sad and didnt know how I was going to tell my mom. I went to bed and tried to sleep but all I could think about was losing my dad and my brothers. It was the longest night of my life. That morning, mom and I sat down to freedom tea. After we drank our tea, I gave her the bad news, she started crying and I did too. I tried to be strong and brave, I told her that we would be okay, but I was really sad and scared. We started working on the ag to try to get things off our minds. We were half way done with the ag and it was time for dinner. So hard to believe that Breeze was the only family member we had left. Our lives would never be the same again. It is time for bed again, I can hear cannons and guns going off, and it makes me even more afraid and sad. How many more people were going to die? The next morning, my mom said that she had some good news. When we nish the ag, our country will display it for all Americans to see. I was so proud of my moms hard work. Then my mom said the war was almost over, we were beating the British and that my brother Breeze would soon be home. I was so happy to hear that the war was ending soon. To celebrate we had homemade bread and coffee, and then it was time for bed. When I woke up the next morning, my brother was home. I couldnt believe the war was nally over. That afternoon, my mom and I nished the ag. It was beautiful, red and white strips, with a circle of thirteen white stars in a blue square at the top left corner of the ag. The Lives of Children during the American RevolutionBy Mary-Kate WoodGrade six Faith Christian School I am going to tell you about Sybil Ludington, also known as the Female Paul Revere. Syb, as we called her, is my sister. I am Rebecca Ludington, and we are two of twelve children. Our father, Colonel Henry Ludington, was part of the Seventh Militia of the Continental Army that patrolled a section in Connecticut and New York. Syb and I would spy for him and made up special signals that were also used by another secret agent of my fathers. Syb would deliver secret messages from father to his secret agents. During our younger years, my father was a miller and the justice of the peace. Then in June of 1776, my father took the position of Colonel of the Seventh Militia. The area that he was in charge of had a large population of Tories and informers. One day, Daddy learned that the British had placed a bounty on his life. This news did not discourage the Colonel from his duties no Sybils plight to help her father. Sybil served many nights on Sentry duty and many times saved our fathers life. On April 5, 1777, Sybil turned 16 years old. Twentyone days later, on the night of April 26, 1777, Sybil heard talking outside of our window. Our parents were talking to a man who had ridden up very quickly to our home. The rider and horse were wet with sweat and exhausted. He told them that about 2,000 British soldiers were in Danbury, and they were searching stores for the Continental Armys ammunition, guns, and supplies. The British marked with chalk the properties of those that were loyal to the British and to be unharmed. Sybil wanted to know what was happening. Father told her the British were attacking Danbury. Syb said that she could ride and warn the neighbors and to muster his troops. Sybil pleaded with our parents, when nally they gave in. Bent low over her horse, Syb rode hard and fast from Carmel to Cold Spring. She avoided known paths which made the journey even more dangerous because of the risk to her horse, but the most treacherous part of the journey was the informers that hid in the darkness of the secret trails throughout the woods. Her deep commitment to the cause of freedom at such a young age drove her every mile. House to house she went, yelling as she passed, Danburys burning! Soldiers are coming! Muster at Ludingtons Home! Seeing a light come on, she knew she had been heard; so she continued on to the next house. Forty miles she rode. By daybreak, thanks to her daring, nearly the whole regiment was mustered before her fathers house at Fredericksburg, and an hour or two later was on the march for vengeance on the raiders. About 400 troops marched to Danbury, but they were too late to save the town, it was burning. However they did ght many of the British as the British left the area. Because of Sybils brave actions, George Washington came to our house in person and thanked her and my dad for their bravery. Just think, the commanding general of the colonial forces was at our house! What a wonderful and exciting moment for my family! Looking back on my younger years, remembering the hard times we suffered to gain our freedom, I feel so proud of my sister. I am not trying to compare her ride with that of Paul Reveres and its midnight message, but my sister was only a child. Both rides were true acts of true Patriots, and in my mind, neither were more important than the other. A few years later, Sybil married Edgar Ogden who had served in the Revolutionary War with the Navy under the Connecticut Continentals. Sybil had one child, a son that she named Henry. Thankfully, the rest of her life was calm and lled with love and laughter. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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The Star| B7Thursday, March 6, 2014 FEB. 24-MARCH 2On Monday, Feb. 24, the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce (GCSO) executed an Order of Transport by traveling to Walton County Correctional Institution to pick up Johntavious M. Tiller. Tiller was due to appear in Circuit Court in Gulf County on Tuesday, Feb. 25. He was returned to Walton County on Wednesday. On Feb. 24, School Resource Deputy D. Huggins reported vandalism at Wewahitchka Elementary School. School staff discovered damage and marks on the sidewalks caused by a four-wheeler. Walls were scuffed by tires and some major damage was caused to a set of gates. The four-wheeler was located on school grounds abandoned. If you have any information regarding this offense, please contact Deputy D. Huggins at the Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School or contact the GCSO. On Tuesday, Feb. 25, Sgt. C. Dixon received a report of a stolen tag at the Wewahitchka Substation. The tag was taken from a vehicle in the 100 block of Our Town Road, north of Wewahitchka. The report indicated the offense occurred back on Jan. 15. On Feb. 25, the GCSO received a call regarding a domestic disturbance which occurred at the Honeyville Park. Deputy P. Williams investigated the complaint. The case was prepared and forwarded to the States Attorney Ofce to be reviewed for possible criminal charges. On Wednesday, Feb. 26, Sgt. M. Herring arrested Brandon L. Burkett (27) in the 200 block of West Creekview Drive, in Stone Mill Creek. Burkett was wanted for Violation of Probation Grand Theft. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Feb. 26, a warrant for Violation of Probation was served to Courtney N. Ward (24). Ward turned herself into the Gulf County Detention Facility. Wards original charges were Possession of Cocaine, Resisting an LEO without Violence, Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. On Feb. 26, the GCSO received a call regarding residential burglary in the 1700 block of Grouper Avenue in Highland View. Deputy J. Brock responded to the call. Approximately $500 in jewelry was reported stolen. Deputy Brock continues to investigate. On Thursday, Feb. 27, a 911 call was received regarding a subject possibly stealing items out of a neighbors yard. The call was from the 500 block of Byrd Parker Drive in Wewahitchka. The caller was able to provide the operator with a vehicle description the subject drove away in. Deputy G. Desrosier responded to the call and was able to locate the described vehicle traveling on Lake Grove Road. The vehicle was stopped for investigative purposes. At the conclusion of the investigation, it was determined that a fuel tank for an outboard motor was stolen from the residence. The tank was recovered as a result of the trafc stop. Anthony Bryan McDaniel (30) was arrested and charged with Burglary. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Feb. 27, Deputy K. Starnes arrested Mandy D. Vickery (31) in the 200 block of Our Town Road in the Wewahitchka area. Vickery had an outstanding warrant for Violation of Probation Filing a False Police Report. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Feb. 27, Deputy K. Starnes responded to Richs IGA in Wewahitchka in reference to shoplifting. Approximately $60 in plants were stolen from the business. Deputy Starnes continues to investigate. On Friday, Feb. 28, Sgt. J. Williams received a tip on the whereabouts of Cresta D. Morrison (36). Morrison was arrested in the 300 block of Jeffery Drive in Port St. Joe. The GCSO held two active warrants for Morrisons arrest. She was placed under arrest for Theft and Violation of Probation Trespass. On Feb. 28, Deputy S. Ferrell was dispatched to the 300 block of Michael Street in the Stone Mill Creek area in reference to a stolen vehicle. Prior the GCSO receiving the call, Deputy Ferrell attempted to stop the vehicle at the intersection of South Diana Street and Creekview Drive for a trafc violation. The driver of the vehicle ed on foot. The vehicle was recovered, processed and returned to the owner. On Feb. 28 at about 11:58 p.m. Sgt. R. Burkett clocked a black motorcycle on radar traveling north on State Road 71 near the Honeyville Methodist Church. The driver of the motorcycle was traveling 127 mph in a posted 55 mph zone. The driver attempted to elude Sgt. Burkett and Deputy S. Ferrell by abruptly turning onto a side street in Wewahithcka. He driver stopped after approximately 3.1 miles. Jared C. Sasnett (22) was placed under arrest at the corner of 2nd Street and Magnolia Street in Wewahitcka. He was charged with Fleeing and Attempting to Elude and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Sgt. Burkett issued a speeding citation which requires a mandatory court appearance. On Saturday, March 1, Deputy J. Oquendo conducted a trafc stop on US Highway 98 and 4th Street in Port St. Joe. The vehicle was stopped for a trafc violation. Consent to search the vehicle was obtained. As a result of the search, Deputy Oquendo located approximately four grams of crack cocaine, several empty bags containing residual amounts of marijuana, a bag of marijuana, and drug paraphernalia. The driver, John G. Hermsdorfer (44), and the passenger, Walter F. Bowers (21), were both placed under arrest and charged with Possession of Crack Cocaine, Possession of Less than Twenty Grams of Marijuana, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Hermsdorfer and Bowers were transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 1, Deputy S. Ferrell responded to the 7000 block of Doc Whiteld Road in Howard Creek regarding an unknown disturbance. The 911 caller stated that a female was walking in the area screaming, cursing, and talking strange. Once Deputy Ferrell arrived he observed a female lying in the middle of Doc Whiteld Road. After investigating the complaint, Carrie K. Strain (27) was arrested and charged with Disorderly Conduct. She was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On March 1, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 6900 block of Blossom Hill Road in Howard Creek. Sgt. R. Burkett responded to the call. The investigation resulted in the arrest of Charles G. Dean (37). Dean was charged with Domestic Battery and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Sunday, March 2, Deputy J. Oquendo stopped a vehicle in the area of US Highway 98 and Porpoise Avenue in Highland View. The tag displayed on the vehicle was not registered to it. The driver, Melvin L. Brown, Jr. (30), was operating the vehicle on a suspended license. Brown, a habitual trafc offender, was arrested and charged with one felony count of Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. The owner of the vehicle was cited and issued a court date for attaching a tag not assigned to the vehicle. From Feb. 24-March 2 the Communications Division at the GCSO logged a total of 58 calls for the Port St. Joe Police Department, 44 calls for EMS, 18 calls for other departments/ agencies and 13 calls for Animal Control. From Feb. 24-March 2 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Trafc Stop, 48; Civil Paper Service, 38; Field Contact, 21; Domestic Disturbance, 7; Abandoned Vehicle, 6; Reckless Driver, 7; Suspicious Vehicle, 5; Information, 4; Sexual Offender Reregistration, 4; Warrant Arrest, 4; Animal Call, 3; Noise Disturbance, 3; Disturbance, 3; Prisoner Transport, 3; Security Check Request, 3; Suspicious Activity, 3; Welfare Check, 4; Alarm, 2; Animal Bite, 2; Agency Assist, 2; Residential Burglary, 2; Criminal Mischief, 2; Trafc Accident, 2; Aggravated Battery, 1; Contact Message, 1; Physical Disturbance, 1; Verbal Disturbance, 1; Drunk Pedestrian, 1; Funeral Escort, 1; Lost Items, 1; Prowler/Trespass, 1; Recovered Property, 1; Sexual Offender Address Verication, 1; Stolen Tag, 1; Stolen Vehicle, 1; Suspicious Person, 1; and Theft/ Shoplifting, 1. GULfF CCOUNTY SHERIffFFsS OffOFFICE LLAW EENfFORCEmMENT SUmmMMARY CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 6, 2014 The Star | B7 93974S PUBLIC NOTICE Ajax Building Corporation (1080 Commerce Blvd, Midway, FL 32343) as Construction Manager on the St. Joe Peninsula State Park Boardwalks & Parking Improvements Project will, in the near future, accept bids (from prequalified bidders only) for the following work; Site work, concrete, Boardwalks/ Carpentry, misc. metals/ handrails. Interested Bidders should contact James Penrod (Ph: 850-5900871, Fax: 850-2242496, jpenrod@ajax building.com) for additional information. Pub: March 6, 2014 94126S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2009-CA000668 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE, PLAINTIFF, vs. PAUL ROPELIS, ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 18, 2014, and entered in Case No. 23-2009CA-000668 in the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE was the Plaintiff and PAUL ROPELIS, ET AL. the Defendant(s). I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe, FL 32456 on the 27th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 16, BLOCK 4, OF WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT TWO, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 4, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Rebecca Norris Clerk, Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Depuyt Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days o receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-71 0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-9558771; E mail: ADARequest@jud14.flco urts.org. File No. 10-13751 Feb 27, March 6, 2014 97651S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PNC, C/O Tampa 1 LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 258 Application No. 2014-06 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01399-000R Description of Property: Lot 4, Block 3, of Riverside Estates Addition to lola recording to the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Eleanor Rosemarie Conley All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 19th day of March, 2014. Dated this 10th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 27, March 6, 2014 97977S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PNC, C/O Tampa 1 LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 655 Application No. 2014-18 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 02861-000R Description of Property: Lot Thirty (30), in Block A of Beaty Subdivision of White City, Florida, according to the Official Plat in Plat Book 1, Page 23, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Leon C. Dees All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97979S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1511 Application No. 2014-16 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06317-075R Description of Property: Lot 2 Marnies Reserve Plat Book 3 page 65, public records of Gulf County, Florida Name in which assessed: Coastal Land Company LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97981S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. Law Enforcement

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B8| The Star Thursday, March 6, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1121337 1121336 4510161 4510160 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 5. 211 COLLINS, LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BDRM 1 BATH. 375.00/MO 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVERVIEW.VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO.WATER INCLUDED. 4516279 DocksideSeafood &RawBar @PSJMarinaNOWHIRING EXPERIENCED:Hostesses Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY3:00PM-5:00PMONLYMON.THRUFRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4516080 Hostesses Bartenders Servers/Bussers Cooks Shuckers 4516048EXPERIENCED MAINTENANCE PERSON to do grounds and maintenance on a 51 unit apartment community. Must have experience in painting, general carpentry, basic plumbing, electrical and appliance repair. HVAC preferred, but not required. Knowledge in ground keeping. Must be able to pass a background check, have their own tools, and valid drivers license. Pick up application at: 125 Venus Dr, Port St. Joe or call 850-227-7451Oce Hours: Mon. 1-5, Tues, Wed, Thurs. 9-5, Closed on Fridays.This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. NOW HIRING PINE RIDGE APARTMENTS 4516040JOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is currently accepting applications for a GIS Coordinator. This is a salaried position with benets. Salary TBD based on experience. Applications and a complete job description are available in our HR ofce or at www.gulfcounty-.gov. Application deadline is Thursday, March 13th at 5:00 p.m. E.T. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at 850-229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at 850-227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Afrmative Action Employer. Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Accepting applications until March 15, 2014 Web ID#: 34281510 Text FL81510 to 56654 1480 Application No. 2014-15 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06291-115R Description of Property: LOT 23: Commence at the intersection of the South right of way line of County Road No. 30-E (having a 100 ft. right of way) and the West right of way line of Beach Avenue (having a 60 ft. right of way); thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West along said South right of way line for 386.74 feet; thence leaving said south right of way line South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 449.75 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds West for 89.95 feet; thence South 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds West for 122.08 feet to the East right of way line of Moonrise Avenue, thence North 00 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East along said East right of way line for 89.95 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line North 83 degrees 30 minutes 17 seconds East for 122.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. ALSO being described as Lot 23, as shown on that certain Plat of Surfside Estates, Phase II as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 46, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Christopher L Johnson & Ana D. Johnson All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97985S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1030 Application No. 2014-13 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03671-000R Description of Property: Lot 16, Block 14, Beacon Hill Subdivision according to the plat recorded at Plat Book 1 page 2. Name in which assessed: Gary & Gloria Freeman All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 97983S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1441 Application No. 2014-14 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06269-955R Description of Property: Lot 6 Turtle Dunes according to the plat thereof recorded in the public records of Gulf County at Plat Book 5 page 7. Name in which assessed: Jerry D. Semprevio All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 2nd day of April, 2014. Dated this 24th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk February 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2014 98015S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on March 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: Parcel A: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N00E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S23E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S25E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N64E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S25E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 01, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 359.21 feet) to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 00, for an arc length of 100.03 feet (chord to said curve bears S23E, 100.03 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N67E, 218.05 feet; thence N23W, 100.03 feet to a point on a line that bears N67E of the Point of Beginning; thence S67W, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Parcel B: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and thence run N00E along the Westerly boundary line of Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, for a distance of 1341.09 feet to the Westerly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Westerly right of way line, S23E, 1,642.44 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Southeasterly along said right of way line, along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,426.79 feet, a central angle of 02 for an arc length of 427.29 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 427.26 feet) to the point of tangency; thence continue along said right of way line S25E, 1300.21 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, N64E for 100.00 feet to the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence along said Easterly right of way line, S25E, 411.48 feet to the point of curvature of a curve concave to the Southwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, Southeasterly along the arc of said curve, having a radius of 11,515.15 feet, a central angle of 01, for an arc length of 359.23 feet (chord to said curve bears S24E, 359.21 feet); thence leaving said Easterly right of way line N67E, 218.10 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence S23E, 100.03 feet; thence N67E, 527.95 feet, more or less, to the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay; thence along said mean high water line, N31W, 101.32 feet, more or less, to a point on a line that bears N67E of the Point of Beginning; thence S67W, 513.95 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said lands lying in and being in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ARTHUR J. RICCARD and JANET S. RICCARD, Defendants and the docket number of which is: 2013-CA-000163. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of February, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 97995S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 14-11-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF FLORA H. LONG Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of FLORA H. LONG, deceased, whose date of death was February 8, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is February 27, 2014. Personal Representative: Billy M. Johnson, Sr. 1407 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Tel: (850)-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 2014 98027S In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Bay County, Florida Case No.:13-690CA Prosperity Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Paul G. Francis, Tenant #1 and Tenant #2 representing any unknown tenants who may be in possession, any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants, and The United States of America, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Bay and Gulf County, Florida, described as: Commence at the Northern most corner of Lot 13, Block 11, Mexico Beach Unit No. 1, according to the official plat thereof filed in Plat Book 7, at Page 5, Public Records, Bay County, Florida; thence run in a Southwesterly direction along the Northwestern boundary line of Lots 13, 12 and 11, in said Block 11, for a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 900 right for a distance of 50 feet; thence turn 90 right and run a distance of 150 feet; thence turn 90 right for a distance of 50 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel lying and being in Fractional Section 25, Township 6 South, Range 12 West, Mexico Beach, Bay County, Florida. and Lot 18 & 20, Block 19, Beacon Hill Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale at www. bay.realforeclose.com, beginning at 11:00 AM CST on April 10, 2014. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus finds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 24th day of February, 2014 Bill Kinsaul CLERK OF COURT By: Virginia Starling Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 2014 98045S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2014-01 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for a 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday March 28, 2014. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday March 28, 2014 at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidders name, address, date and time of opening, and RFP number for ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Bid shall be for the purchase and delivery of a 2014 ton Ford F-150 Pickup Truck 4X2 which shall include pricing for the standard and optional equipment listed in the Base Bid. For questions concerning this Bid, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. Complete Bids Specs are available at http://www. cityofportstjoe.com The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the Citys purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer. March 6, 20, 2014 Lost Mens Gold Wedding Band. on 2/14/14 Near 3rd and Reid. REWARD 850-648-4671 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 Cues Quality Used Furniture and Thrift Store Introducing a new line of mattresses-made in USAby Golden Mattress Company. Twins starting at $69. Fulls starting at $88. Queens starting at $108. 1425 Hwy 71 South Wewa. Open 9a-5pm Mon-Sat and Sunday, 11a-5pm 850-639-2343/628-1358 Text FL80338 to 56654 Mexico Bch 1701 Hwy 98 El Govnr Motel Sat 3/8 9am-1pmCRAFT SHOWshells, quilts,crochet, Dinosour Bones, jewelry and much more. Port St. Joe: 1011 Woodward Ave Fri/Sat, 7am-SunsetHuge Sale6 wheeler ATV, tons of collectibles, nic-nacs, vintage, antiques, lots of kit & HH items, sm appls, Home & Holiday Decor, Gift Items, Linens, Books, Toys, Red Hats, Formal,Nice clothes & shoes. Way too much to list!!!! Cash Only Text FL82145 to 56654 GUN SHOW Tallahassee NORTH FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDSMarch 8th and 9th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL81511 to 56654 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsRoofersHiring another crew. Exp. needed. Call 850-229-6859 to applyWeb ID#: 34282096 Food Service/Hosp.Best WesternNeeds Front Desk and HousekeepersExperience Required. Come in person to 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. from 9am-3pm No phone calls!!! Web ID 34281069 Text FL81069 to 56654 Admin/ClericalReceptionistVery busy medical practice is adding an additional position to our front office in Panama City. Ideal candidate will be fast paced, able to multitask and have a great personality to interact with our patients. Previous medical experience preferred but not required. If you are energetic, a quick learner and ready to join a great team with a company that offers competitive pay and benefits please send us your resume to: Gabby Robertson at grobertson@eyecent ersouth.net Web ID: 34282428 EducationEarly Head Start Family AdvocateThis position will work collaboratively with our Early Head Start program in a social services capacity. Qualified applicants must possess a BA/BS degree in human or social services field. Excellent communication and org. skills, as well as the ability to work with families from diverse backgrounds are required. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281148 Text FL81148 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler Caregiversare needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc., 162 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34281149 Text FL81149 to 56654 Food Svs/Hosp.Experienced Line CooksStart your new year out right! Toucans in Mexico Beach is now hiring exper. line cooks and the following positions: Exp. Servers BartendersApply in person between 2:00pm4:00pm. 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach 850-648-8207Web ID#: 34282386 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for dependable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required.PT InspectorsAttentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Must have reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34281710 SecurityNow HiringSecurity Officers and Supervisors for new account start up. Starting at $9.50/hr. All positions are permanent. 1-888-948-2738 or 850-563-1022 Web ID#: 34282341 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool, elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. 3/4 br, 1 ba, den, office, sunny, bright, and super clean! Bayview, very convenient, available now! Only $895 monthly + deposit terms negotiable w/ long term lease, call or text 850-258-6874 or 206-799-9167 Long term rental. St. Joe Beach. 3/2, fully furnished. Private inground pool. $1600/mo. includes all utilities. No pets. Call 850-348-0262 lv msg. White City corner lot, 3 br, 2 ba, kitchen/ dine-in combo, carport, $650 mo. Call (850) 899-3283 or 227-5272 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.