The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03928


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, JANUARY 30, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 16 quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 76, NUMBER 16 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion ................................. A4 Outdoors ............................... A6 Sports ..................................... A7 Community ............................ B1 School News ........................... B3 Faith ........................................ B4 Obituaries ............................... B4 Classi eds ........................ B7-B8 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The school district has a winner. Tracy Bowers, a fourthgrade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School, was chosen as this year’s recipient of the Teacher of the Year award for Gulf County. Bowers’ class ground to a halt as school Principal Jay Bidwell, Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton and other members of the school board brie y interrupted to bestow the honor and presented her with a bouquet of owers. “There are so many deserving teachers,” said Bowers. “I see so many teachers of the year every day at the school.” Teachers up for the award are nominated by their peers and evaluated by an out-of-county group. Bowers’ gave a shy smile as she accepted the good news from the superintendent. “You’re very humble, and very deserving,” said Norton. WES LOCHER | The Star Tracy Bowers, a fourth grade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School, was named Gulf County’s Teacher of the Year. School district names 4th-grade teacher Tracy Bowers Teacher of the year ‘A God-given gift’ See TEACHER A3 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Each year awards are handed out to recognize the hard work of both teachers and employees throughout the Gulf County school system. These awards are extra special because all winners were nominated on their performance by their peers. The Gulf County Employee of the Year went to Julie Carr at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. Carr is a paraprofessional educator who assists with the Bridges students, two-way interactive classes between Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe, even Spanish classes when needed. “We are so honored to have you represent the whole district,” said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton as he handed WES LOCHER | The Star Employee – Paraprofessional Julie Carr was chosen as Employee of the Year for the Gulf County district. Carr is employee of the year for Gulf County schools By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A consultant told the Port St. Joe Port Authority board last week that the case for state investment in dredging the Port of Port St. Joe shipping channel was “positive.” Rod Lewis, working with the Washington Economic Group, said a Return On Investment study commissioned by the Port Authority had resulted in numbers even more positive than he had estimated before undertaking the study. The ROI study is considered critical for the second path —permitting is the rst — the Port Authority is pursuing for dredging. The ROI, once nalized after input from board members, would be offered in Tallahassee as state lawmakers consider this spring making the estimated $25 million investment in dredging. “Is there some return on investment? That is what the state is interested in,” Lewis said. At the bottom line, the study estimates the modernization and expansion of the Port of Port St. Joe would carry nearly $941 million in economic impacts over a decade, a return of $4.66 for every $1 of state investment. Lewis noted that the study only factored in the two energy companies, Green Circle and Enova Energy, with signed Letters of Intent with the St. Joe Company to ship wood pellets through the port for overseas markets. “It’s a positive number,” Lewis said of the ROI estimates. “This is actually a very positive number. The state is looking at about $5 for every $1 of investment, so this is right there.” The ROI aimed to quantify the output and revenue from an operational port and to do so, Lewis said, researchers looked Port dredge case ‘positive’ See EMPLOYEE A3 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity believes the community that plans will be the more competitive community when it comes to economic development. Last week, representatives of the DEO and the city of Port St. Joe began that planning process as part of a pilot project called Competitive Florida. The city is one of four areas — three other Florida cities as well as DeSoto County — to be included in the pilot project, which aims to provide local of cials with a foundation for assessing community assets and, tailored to those assets, a plan for future economic development. The DEO is providing technical assistance and $40,000 in grant funds to boost the planning process, a central goal to begin to build a statewide repository of case studies in economic development from which other communities can learn. “You are the pilots for us,” said Julie Dennis, DEO coordinator for Competitive Florida. “We want to know what has worked and what hasn’t. This is Economic development pilot gets underway See PORT A5 See PILOT A5 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com After talking about it for months, county commissioners nally acted to address chronic problems with the Americus Ditch in St. Joe Beach. Commissioners, by a 3-1 vote, approved a memorandum of understanding with Preble Rish Engineers to undertake repairs in selected areas to create a methodology for xing the entire length of the project. Commissioner Warren Yeager, an employee of Preble Rish abstained, and Commissioner Joanna Bryan, saying she would like to see public input on the MOU and raising questions about xing only select sections, voted no. The Americus Ditch has been a headache for the county almost since installation of the $1 million project more than ve years ago. County employees — and, Bryan noted, county taxpayers — have completed more than 120 xes of the pipe since installation and there are at least 25 remaining areas that require attention, Bryan said. Preble Rish is agreeing to address ve of those areas almost as a pilot project to understand what will be needed to x the entire project. A section of a letter from Rish that was codied as the MOU, which would have released the engineering rm of record from future responsibility, was removed, Rish noted. “We have no problem with that,” Rish said. “We BOCC approves MOU for Americus Ditch repairs See DITCH A5 Bay Day promotes preserves B1 TAR TAR TAR TAR

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity b y helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COM MUN IT Y ’S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs SUP POR T OU R C OM MU NIT Y ’ S UNI VER SIT Y By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m There is always a starting line. Last week progress began on the Cape San Blas Lighthouse relocation project with the removal of the large lens at the top of the tower. Professional Lampist Joe Cocking, the only certied lampist in Florida, set up a pulley system last Wednesday and successfully removed the lens by Thursday afternoon. Special air-tight boxes were constructed for the lens. They were fabricated with materials provided by the city and there was a slight delay in operations when another box had to be constructed at the last minute. Cocking dismantled the lens and packed each piece of glass into the boxes, wrapping them in a copper paper to keep any moisture out. Cocking pointed out that a major obstacle to the removal process was that the lighthouse lacked a center well. Common procedure is to lower the boxes down the middle of the interior. “You always need to be exible,” said Cocking. “There’s always something unexpected. “You have to be Gumby.” According to the lampist, the danger of using the pulley system, or “old school physics,” as he called it, was that the boxes stood a greater chance of being blown around by winds coming off the water. Luckily, the wind was busy elsewhere and the lens made a safe journey to ground level. Arlyn Danielson, curator for the U.S. Coast Guard was on hand to oversee the process. “The Coast Guard owns all lighthouse lenses,” said Danielson. “For preservation reasons decommissioned lenses often go to a museum or are borrowed by lighthouse groups to interpret maritime history.” The lens will be restored and ready to reinstall if and when the lighthouse is relocated to Port St. Joe. While the additional box was being crafted down below, up in the lighthouse tower Kathleen McCormick, the director of collections in St. Augustine, was hard at work dismantling the clockwork mechanism which regulates the weights which ascend and descend, rotating the tower’s lens, and controlling the rate at which it ashes. McCormick has a museum conservation background and has been visiting lighthouses with Cocking for more than eight years, helping with adjustments, repairs, dismantling or even just appreciating the technology. “I have a fascination with 19th Century machinery,” said McCormick. “Railroad technology, music machines, clockwork gears and lighthouses…it’s all very similar.” McCormick pointed out that a unique feature of the lighthouse is that it’s constructed of steel. Most lighthouses constructed around the same time were made of brick, stone, wood or iron. When lighthouses were built at the turn of the 21st Century, they were constructed with whatever materials were most readily available and designed to t the local geographic and climatic conditions. Cocking said that the hardest part of the job wasn’t lowering the lens, but rather clearing out the wasps that had made the lighthouse their home. During their rst visit several weeks ago, Cocking and McCormick had to ascend through more than 100 stairs of stinging terror. Bids have been received for the relocation of the lighthouse though they have not been presented to the public. Bids for moving the keepers’ quarters and oil house were due this week. Cape San Blas Lighthouse lens removed The lens parts, packed in airtight boxes were lowered to the ground using a pulley system. Lampist Joe Cocking disassembles the clockwork mechanism which rotates the lighthouse’s lenses. WES LOCHER | The Star The lens and parts is property of the United States Coast Guard and will be restored.

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The Star| A3 Thursday, January 30, 2014 Were so proud of you. Bowers win comes with some added perks that include a monetary bonus and dinner with Florida Governor Rick Scott in Tallahassee. Bowers has been at Wewahitchka Elementary for 21 years. She graduated from Wewahitchka High School in 1987. Although I have been the principal at Wewahitchka Elementary for only a couple of weeks, I have long known about the almost legendary status of Ms. Tracy Bowers, Bidwell said. She taught my youngest two sons and even though they are 18 and 14 now, they still speak fondly of their time with Ms. Tracy. After seeing Ms. Bowers in action rsthand, I can honestly say that her true abilities as a teacher outweigh even her lofty reputation. Melissa Ramsey, district supervisor for curriculum and testing, gave Bowers a big hug and told her that she had a God-given gift. Its always a surprise because the other people here work as hard as you do, Bowers said. Its such an honor to be nominated and thats what touched me the most. Im grateful, thankful and humbled. District 2 school board member George Cox said that Bowers had once been a student of his, and in his 23 years of teaching, he had always remembered her. As a student, she knocked my socks off, said Cox. Even back then I knew that I was in the presence of super talent. In order for a teacher to be eligible for the award, they must demonstrate a superior ability to foster excellence in education, contribute to the continuous improvement of student learning and the school environment. They must utilizes original and innovative instructional materials, methods, curriculum or tools, maintain a record of superior teaching performance, actively engage in collaborative and sustained professional development and demonstrate leadership in educational activities at the school and district. The rst lesson I observed in Tracys class absolutely knocked my socks off and I have continued to be impressed every time I visit her classroom, Bidwell said. I have seen many teachers during my 24 years in education and I can honestly say that Ms. Tracy Bowers is that rare instructor who I place in the category of Teaching Royalty. We are both lucky and honored to have such a wonderful lady and incredible teacher here at Wewahitchka Elementary School and we hope to be blessed with her gifts for many years to come. At Port St. Joe Elementary, the Teacher of the Year award nominee was Cindy Phillips, who teaches science and reading at the fth-grade level. Phillips has more than 24 years of teaching experience; seven of those have been in Port St. Joe. Cindy has taught various grade levels throughout her career but I believe her true passion is teaching science, said elementary Principal Sue Gannon. She comes early and stays late and even comes on weekends to take care of the snakes! At Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School, Julie Hodges, who teaches art education for grades 8-12, was the nominee. Hodges has worked at the high school for just under two years I was in complete shock, said Hodges. I love what I do and I hope that my students leave my room with a sense of pride and enjoyment from being in a visual art class. The quality of art that the students are creating is only possible because of the support from the faculty here at PSJHS and the county ofce. At Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School the award was delivered to guidance counselor Karen Turner, who has served in the role for eight years. I am truly humbled, said Turner. As a guidance counselor I never expected to be voted on for this great honor. I love working at Wewahitchka High School and want to thank all for the opportunity to serve as their Teacher of the Year. Turner was the rst and last guidance counselor at Wewahitchka Middle School before moving to the high school. I M P OR T A N T I N F OR M A T I ON A B OU T Y OU R D R IN K IN G W A T E R T e s t s S ho w e d C o l if o r m Bac t e r ia i n L ig h t hou s e Ut i l i t ie s W at e r O u r w a t e r s y s t e m r e c e n t l y v i o l a t e d a d ri n ki n g w a t e r s t a n d a r d A l t h o u g h t h i s i n c i d e n t w a s n o t a n e m e r g e n c y a s o u r c u s t o m e r s y o u h a v e a ri g h t t o k n o w w h a t h a p p e n e d a n d w h a t w e d i d t o c o r r e c t t h i s si t ua t i on W e r o u t i n e l y m o n i t o r t h e w a t e r w e p r o d u c e f o r d ri n ki n g w a t e r co n t a m i n a n t s a n d t a k e v e ( 5 ) d i s t ri b u t i o n s a m p l e s p e r m o n t h t o t e s t f o r t h e p r e s e n c e o f co l i f o r m b a c t e ri a T h e s t a n d a r d i s t h a t n o m o r e t h a n o n e ( I ) d i s t ri b u t i o n s a m p l e p e r m o n t h m a y t e s t p o s i t i v e f o r t o t a l co l i f o r m s D u ri n g De c e m b e r 2 0 1 3 t w o ( 2 ) d i s t ri b u t i o n s a m p l e s s h o w e d t h e p r e s e n c e o f t h e s e b a c t e ri a s o o u r s y s t e m e x c e e d e d o u r m a x i m u m co n t a m i n a n t l e v e l ( M C L ) W h a t S h o u l d I D o ? Y o u d o n o t n e e d t o b o i l y o u r w a t e r o r t a k e o t h e r co r r e c t i v e a c t i o n s H o w e v e r i f y o u h a v e s p e c i c h e a l t h co n c e r n s co n s u l t y o u r d o c t o r I f y o u h a v e a s e v e r e l y co m p r o m i s e d i m m u n e s y s t e m h a v e a n i n f a n t a r e p r e g n a n t o r a r e e l d e rl y y o u m a y b e a t i n c r e a s e d ri s k a n d s h o u l d s e e k a d v i c e f r o m y o u r h e a l t h ca r e p r o v i d e r s a b o u t d ri n ki n g t h i s w a t e r G e n e r a l g u i d e l i n e s o n w a y s t o l e s s e n t h e ri s k o f i n f e c t i o n b y m i c r o b e s a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m E P A s S a f e D ri n ki n g W a t e r H o t l i n e a t 1 8 0 0 4 2 6 4 7 9 1 W h a t D o e s t h i s M e a n ? T h i s i s n o t a n e m e r g e n c y I f i t h a d b e e n y o u w o u l d h a v e b e e n no t i e d w i t h i n 2 4 hou r s T o t a l c o l if o nn bac t e r ia a r e g e ne r a l l y no t h a r m f u l t h e m s e l v e s C o l i f o r m s a r e b a c t e ri a w h i c h a r e n a t u r a l l y p r e s e n t i n t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a n d a r e u s e d a s a n i n d i ca t o r t h a t o t h e r p o t e n t i a l l y h a r m f u l b a c t e ri a m a y b e p r e s e n t C o l i f o r m s w e r e f o u n d i n m o r e s a m p l e s t h a n a l l o w e d a n d t h i s w a s a w a r n i n g o f p o t e n t i a l p r o b l e m s U s u a l l y co l i f o r m s a r e a s i g n t h a t t h e r e co u l d b e a p r o b l e m w i t h t h e t r e a t m e n t o r d i s t ri b u t i o n s y s t e m ( p i p e s ) W h e n e v e r w e d e t e c t co l i f o r m b a c t e ri a i n a n y s a m p l e w e d o f o l l o w u p t e s t i n g t o s e e i f o t h e r b a c t e ri a o f g r e a t e r co n c e r n s u c h a s f e ca l co l i f o r m o r E co l i a r e p r e s e n t W e d i d n o t n d a n y o f t h e s e b a c t e ri a i n o u r s u b s e q u e n t t e s t i n g l f w e had w e w ou l d ha v e no t i e d y ou i m m e d iat e l y A l s o f u r t he r f o l l o w u p t e s t r e s u l t s w e r e a b s e n t f o r t o t a l co l i f o r m b a c t e ri a ( n o n e w e re p re s e nt ) W h a t i s B e i n g D o n e ? F u r t h e r t e s t i n g s h o w e d n o co l i f o r m s p r e s e n t F o r i n f o r m at io n p le a s e c o n t ac t : L a r r y M c A r d l e a t ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 3 5 0 1 o r P O B o x 4 2 8 P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 7 P l e a s e s h a r e t h i s i n f o r m a t i o n w i t h a l l t h e o t h e r p e o p l e w h o d ri n k t h i s w a t e r e s p e c i a l l y t h o s e w h o m a y n o t h a v e r e c e i v e d t h i s N o t i c e d i r e c t l y ( f o r e x a m p l e p e o p l e i n a p a r t m e n t s n u r s i n g h om e s s c h o o l s a nd bu si n e s s e s ) Y o u ca n d o t h i s b y p o s t i n g t h i s N o t i c e i n a p u b l i c p l a c e o r d i s t ri b u t i n g co p i e s b y h a n d o r m a i l T h i s N o t i c e i s p r o v i d e d b y : L i g h t h o u s e U t i l it i es W a t e r S y s t e m F l o r i d a P W S I D # 1 2 3 0 8 4 8 D a t e d i s t r i b u t e d : J a n u a r y 2 7 2 0 1 4 *B O ARD CER TIFIE D CIVIL TRI AL L A WYER O F CO UNS EL 2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. W alton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE P ARKING Concealed W eapons Class Sat/Sun 1 1am or 2pm Floridagunshow s.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 F ebr uar y 8th & 9th P anama C ity F airgr ounds Local TEACHER from page A1 a bouquet of owers to the winner. Carr was surprised in the middle of class by Norton, Principal Lori Price, members of the school board and Carrs husband, Bill. I work with the best team, said Carr as her colleagues and students clapped. Its nice to be recognized. Im very proudThis is an honor. Norton called Carr the schools utility player, and praised her work ethic and for saving the taxpayers money. Shes the most solid and versatile person I know, Price said. The award is well deserved. Julie never says, I cant. Other employees of the year included Jewell Hopper at Port St. Joe El ementary; Karen Taylor at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School; Mary Ann Peak at Wewahitchka Elemen tary; Susie White at the district office; and Mary Lou Cookie White with maintenance/transporta tion. EMPLOYEE from page A1

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O PINION www.starfl.com A Section On the subject of legalizing marijuana Listen, if life was fair Brussel sprouts would taste like a Snickers bar. Rain would fall only at night. The guy in the lane in front of you would never need a price check. Kidney stones would dissipate before they got stuck. And we’d all been born rich. I’ve been hearing this discussion since way before the Pope became a Catholic. They used to kick it around right regularly in the front room up at Bill Argo’s Gulf Station. Mostly it dealt with hog prices and weather. The former were perennially low and the latter was always too wet, too cold, too dry or too unpredictable. Some declared it fate. A few gured luck played a hand. One or two cussed it. Most shook their heads and accepted it as just a part of being here. The unfairness of life has touched us all. In the early spring of 1958 I proudly shoved my hard earned quarter through the ticket window out front of the Park Theatre. I waited impatiently for my change. The lady that Mr. Clericuzio had hired to handle the money pointed to a freshly painted sign advertising the increased admission price of twentyve cents. You’ve got to be kidding me! It had been fteen cents all my life! I needed a dime back for the popcorn and drink. Where was “right, justice and the American way” here? I was going to have to enjoy “Old Yeller” on an empty stomach. I got as close as I could to the front and settled in. I don’t remember the cartoon, the newsreel or any of the coming attractions. But I knew something was dreadfully wrong right after that lion roared and the Eiffel Tower ashed across the screen. Old Yeller wasn’t a city dog! This picture show was about some skinny necked girl name “Gigi” looking for the right man. Every time she got remotely close to nding him, someone would break out with a song! Half of it was in French! You talk about unfair! I was out a whole quarter. I didn’t get nothing to eat. Someone had lied to me about what picture show was playing. And I don’t know to this day how Old Yeller died. Nobody has to tell me about the twist and turns of life. But there is another side, some think possibly providentially provided, to this bouncing coin. Me and Leon were playing “pitch” in the back yard. We were backing up and throwing an old baseball further and higher with each toss. Daddy warned us about the car. We were more intent on the roar from the Yankee Stadium crowd. I was almost under the black walnut tree in the Boaz’s yard when I let go with a mighty heave. It was errant from the get-go. And I couldn’t pull it back! Leon raced over to the driver’s side of the car but I’m not sure Willie Mays would have had a chance. That ball crashed into the front windshield of our faithful ’51 Chevrolet with a glass shattering bang that reverberates to this day. My heart skipped ten beats. And then stopped completely when I realized Daddy was standing on the back porch! He had witnessed the whole thing. He bolted down the steps, grabbed Leon up, and whipped him “for a while”. He never said a word or laid a hand on me. I reckon life was not good forLeon that day. But it let me off scot-free. You see, sometimes life can be unfair IN YOUR FAVOR! People have had trouble pronouncing my name since I’ve been old enough to remember. It has been misspoken, mutilated and tangled by teachers on the rst day of school, by college professors, by store clerks, candle stick makers and by friend and foe alike. It was a great source of embarrassment, most especially when I was in those self conscious early teenage years. I was sixteen when I met Mary Hadley Hayden. You should have heard how “Kesley” rolled off those beautiful lips. She could make it sing! I’ve been kinda proud of that special name ever since. A lot of this fairness business deals from the angle you’re viewing it. I married my rst wife for two reasons. She was even better looking than Mary Hadley and I thought she had money. It turned out she was poorer than I was! And let me tell you, that was a feat in itself! Before I could kick myself for getting into this deal under false pretenses, she loved me and cared for me and gave me children, respected me, put my concerns above hers on a daily basis, took care of our household, washed and cleaned up after me with a light heart and smile on her face ... and she is one person on earth who is completely void of any guile. She has given so much more to this relationship than I have. That is why my rst wife is still my rst wife. I’ve known lots of guys who married above themselves. But I excellest them all! I do wonder from time to time if SHE ever thinks life is unfair! Bemused, Kes That gate can swing both ways Could you please be more felici c? We live in a time where we are always learning about new ways to do things and new technologies that supposedly make life easier. To be honest, I sometimes have a hard time operating a cell phone and I’m supposed to be some sort of scientist. It’s just that things often move so fast that we can’t keep up. Having teenagers in the house is a nice way to learn how to operate your cell phone or about how to x your computer. I’m still needed though. It’s a nice feeling. I gave one of children a yoyo for Christmas and I had to show them how to operate it. I’m not kidding. It seems like some things move so fast that we take for granted the things that we already had that we didn’t even use. Perhaps we didn’t “need” them. Think about the stuff in the back of the kitchen cabinets and hidden in the pantry, attic or garage – I bet you have things that you are “saving” to use later. What about a word? We all run across words that we either have never heard of or think we would never use. I found a word the other day that was much better than the plastic thing in the back of the cabinet that was supposed to remove the skin, seeds and muck from tomatoes so that I could make all kinds of scrumptious tomato sauces, salsa and soups. The word is “felici c.” Webster gives the de nition as “causing or intended to cause happiness.” Don’t we all need a little more happiness? Doesn’t our country and the world need a little more happiness? It is not a common word; some spell-checking software doesn’t even know it exists. To be honest, I’m not even sure how to use it. I do know this. I know people who I would consider to be “felici c.” They “cause happiness.” Some don’t even know it. I’ve thought about calling them on it. When the guy at the fast food place or the lady at the gas station smiles and thanks me, I could say, “Thank you for being so felici c.” They would either pretend to know what it means or ask me. If they asked, I could explain that it simply means to “cause happiness.” That is a nice compliment. One fellow noted, “Don’t worry about using this word (felici c) it is very obscure. I have never seen it or heard it before, and I think that would be true for almost all native speakers. A couple of related words are more common -felicity, felicitous, felicitate -but even these are very rarely used in ordinary conversation. As long as you know that they are all related to “happiness,” you will understand them about as well as most native speakers do.” One my girls had a baby doll named “Felicity” who made her pretty happy. I never really thought about it that much. When I studied the word a little more, I got about waist deep into some wordy ideological quicksand. This fellow named Bentham (1748-8132) came up with something he called “felici c calculus.” I’m a math guy, but I just have a real issue with quantifying happiness. I know when I’m really happy, kind of happy or a little happy. I don’t need to put a number on it. It seemed to me that this fellow was all for “everybody being happy” and not doing things to anybody or anything that caused unhappiness. Of course, I’m kind of paraphrasing here. I’m also starting to understand that this word I found may cause more problems than I can handle. Maybe my new word is kind of like that plastic gizmo that is supposed to squash tomatoes and get rid of the peel and seeds. I just know this. I can “use” a yoyo. It makes me happy. I have trouble getting messages off of my cell phone sometimes – that gets me a little frustrated. If we only did what made us happy, some things would never get done. We would be in a x depending on others to do things for us (assuming we could nd folks who were happy to do all of the things that made them happy and do everything for us also). This explains why I’m not so good at crossword puzzles, but I do have a lot of folks around me who make me happy. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard By LOREN SIPRELL Special to The Star I’ve been thinking about marijuana … legalization, that is. I would imagine most readers have seen all the headlines from the President’s recent interview with the New Yorker in which his views on marijuana “evolved”; I wouldn’t personally use that term, instead I would say he is in a much more comfortable place politically to tell us how he really feels about certain things. Not surprisingly I have no qualms about the legalization of marijuana, to echo the President I believe its impact on the individual user is less harmful than alcohol, and this estimation isn’t coming from some Ivy League liberal who smoked some dope in college. My history with drugs is, admittedly, vast and sordid; as of this year I’ve had roughly two years “clean and sober”, hold the applause. Would it shock you to read that I don’t actually remember the first time I smoked weed. (note: we will be referring to marijuana in its various slang forms from here on out) I realize it’s incredibly clich to be a forgetful pot user but I was indeed that guy. Unlike many users I’ve spoken to, my introduction to drugs didn’t coincide with high school. I didn’t hang in cliques that drank, or smoked weed but on occasion we would end up at parties where joints were being passed and I always shied away. In my teens I didn’t see the point quite honestly, I was a relatively happy kid who didn’t feel the need to get messed up and everything was already pretty damn funny sober. Though I forget the initial toke I know it was taken sometime in 2002, at the age of 20. That same year I found myself experiencing with ecstasy, cocaine, and what would ultimately lead to my downward spiral into addiction, pills; I, of course, topped all that off with copious amounts of alcohol. Now my history would lead some people to the conclusion that weed led the charge on my own personal “million little pieces”, and maybe rightly so but it could easily be argued, as many addiction specialist do, that I was well on my way before I took that first hit of that dreaded leaf. I won’t get into the science of addiction here but suffice it say, Mary Jane wasn’t the catalyst. In fact, I never really cared for weed; it made what was already a neurotic, overly self-conscious weirdo like me into an even more neurotic, selfconscious weirdo. I only smoked dope because, at the time, I hadn’t been introduced to the “good stuff” yet. Which brings me to this point: Because marijuana is illegal it was dealt with by the kinda folks who deal in, well, other illegal stuff, e.g. cocaine, ecstacy, lortabs, the list goes on. It could be argued that weed is simply a gateway drug because the legality forces it into the black market where the user is introduced to harder, more illicit and dangerous drugs. Would I have ever tried cocaine had my pot dealer not offered? I don’t know, but it’s a valid question nonetheless. Arguing that the legalization of marijuana is a slippery slope is the same lifeless argument as allowing “gay” marriage, or as we secularist call it marriage, will someone open the flood gates to people marrying goats ... or whatever. To make this assessment is to miss the bigger picture, and take it from someone who spent 10 years in the trenches; America has a much bigger drug problem on their hands than some black youth slinging dime bags to the yuppie, collar popping white kids. According to some estimates America spends roughly $20 billion a year on “fighting” marijuana, meanwhile pill mills flourish down south, methadone clinics have lines half way around the block, crystal meth is ravaging the country yet countless numbers of harmless potheads are clogging the prison system. Keeping marijuana illegal doesn’t hinder drug use, just like denying contraceptives will not curb premarital sex and no more than stripping away food stamps or unemployment motivates someone to find a job that isn’t there. Has alcohol prohibition taught us nothing? Has no one drawn the parallel between Chicago gang violence of the 1920s and Chicago gang violence now? Let me make this clear, I am not advocating some Ron Paul stance on drugs; I’m simply saying, let’s focus our attention where it needs to be. Cocaine, crackcocaine, heroin, crystal meth, these drugs are dangerous and will rip society apart; marijuana … let’s be real, not so much. Marijuana, like all things, can become addictive in the broadest sense of the term, in that it ranks higher on the priority scale than it should. At my core I know I’m a libertarian with the bleeding-heart of a liberal; so I feel that empathetic need to shake my finger at people and tell them, “No, that’s bad for you!” but at the same time, I know that isn’t my place. Individual rights, when not used to deny other’s their rights, should always be the priority; everyone should have a chance to create their own moral compass through their own trials and tribulations, and if selling a quarter sack behind the counter next to a pack of cigarettes will help stretch the idea of liberty in the beautiful experiment that is America then so be it. Loren Siprell is a resident of Port St. Joe. Page 4 #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Thursday, January 30, 2014

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y o O U r R OPINIONs S your chance to tell your story.” All work under the grant must be completed by the end of the scal year June 30 with a community case study the nal docu ment to be produced. The key, Dennis said, was more than just putting an action plan for econom ic development on paper. Those actions plans must result in action. “This all leads to the development of an action plan,” Dennis said. “Getting things on paper helps us get organized, but we are more interested in the actual do ing of things than putting things on paper.” To craft that plan, a ma jor step is an inventory of community assets. Those assets can be organizations, natural re sources, individuals, histor ical, cultural or infrastruc ture, for examples. By assessing a commu nity’s strengths and craft ing plans to tap those as sets, organic and achievable economic goals can emerge, according to Com petitive Florida’s mission statement. “Are we putting our best foot forward in promoting those assets to the out side world?” asked Port St. Joe City Manager Jim Anderson. A signicant aspect of the pilot project is the shar ing of information. Economic develop ment and elected ofcials from the four communi ties will meet as a nal part of the process, sharing experiences. That begins what the DEO hopes will be a longterm project to create a kind of central clearing house for economic de velopment efforts around the state, leading to a template of sorts for com munities to enhance their competitiveness. The disparate spots on the spectrum occupied by communities, Dennis said, were apparent during the introductory meetings with local ofcials at the four participating communities. Whereas the city of Port St. Joe can offer written strategic documents from the Port of Port St. Joe, Gulf Coast State College and the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance Inc. as well as a comp plan el ement pertaining to eco nomic development, Den nis said other communities have nothing on paper and no real organized plans. The city of Port St. Joe applied to be included in the pilot program, modeled after a similar program in Mississippi, while drafting the economic development element to the city’s com prehensive plan. The comp plan effort served as a sort of introduc tory to the community for the DEO, which continued that introduction process last week. In addition to a tour of the community, local and DEO staff worked on a scope of work for the pilot project and a timeline, with dollars attached to deliver ables at each step, and local stakeholders needed to pro vide input and help craft the nal case study. A nal scope of work is to be submitted to the DEO before the end of the week. ALL TIMES EASTERN FUN TIME RANDY ST ARK 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 IN THE CR O W’S NEST LIVE ON THE POOP DECK W’S NEST O THE CR IN W’S NEST O THE CR IN LIVE ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS FIRST SUND A Y CELEBA TION Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Joel Rosenbaum, DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients Local Thursday, January 30, 2014 The Star| A5 at similar scenarios at other ports. Specically, it focused on the economic impacts of a $25 million dredging project combined with $5 million in state-fund ed improvements to the Genesee-Wyoming rail line; the impacts from the cargo loads shipped through the port from Green Circle and Enova; and additional indirect impacts of new port op erations and rail employ ment to haul the wood pellets. The team examined operations and nancial impacts at ports such as Panama City, Canav eral, Jacksonville, Olym pia, Wash., all the ports of Georgia, Everglades, Wilmington, Del., as well as averages for all ports in the U.S. Researchers quanti ed the impacts per 1,000 shipping ton; examining direct jobs generated, to tal jobs, user jobs as well as tax revenue and cargo loads. Direct jobs, Lewis ex plained, are those jobs dependent on an opera tional port and which would relocate if the port was not operational. User jobs are those created by factory op erations tied to shipping through an operational port, such as at Green Circle and Enova. According to the study, the port dredg ing would create 319 construction jobs — short-term employment — as soon as 2015, with 707 permanent jobs in place each year of the ensuing decade. The labor income over that decade would top $216 million with total economic im pacts, local, regional and statewide, of over $552 million. “The impacts in year one are less than the impacts over 10 years,” Lewis said. “That is the meat of where this hap pens. You get a lot more of your impacts in the out years.” Combined with the railway investment and factory (user) jobs, the numbers grow exponentially. The total impacts of rail and port expan sion, the increase in factory activity, all of it sustained over 10 years, would equate to 803 jobs, $334 million in wages/ payroll, $491 million in gross domestic product and a total economic im pact of $940.5 million. “I did not expect go ing into this to see the numbers play out so positively,” Lewis said. Eugene Raffield noted the port’s case is also bolstered by the fact that just 40 percent of the shipping channel will have to be dredged, meaning a project of lesser scope than is typical, and that there has already been over the past decade consid erable investment in in frastructure at the port. “That only makes the story that much stron ger,” Lewis agreed. “You should capitalize on investments already made.” And, Lewis noted, the ROI only quantifies the impacts of just two iden tified potential clients. Those two companies, however, are not the only parties showing inter est in the port, just the two that have formally signed agreements. The Holland M. Ware Charitable Foundation has offered a letter of interest to ship aggre gate and sand through the port, which would effectively double the volume estimated from Green Circle Energy and Ernova. In addition, the Port Authority has seen a re cent uptick in inquiries, with at least two poten tial clients to visit in the next few weeks, said Board Chairman Leon ard Costin. “You have a great case even with the worst case,” Lewis said. The key, Costin said, is making that case successfully to the Florida Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott, who has repeatedly told port of ficials that state invest ment hinges in large measure on a return. Costin said the re port showed the re turn was potentially game-changing. “I am really encour aged,” he said. “We are moving in the right di rection I think. We need to get this (study) to the powers that be. This is a very important step. This is one of the first hoops we have to jump through.” The dredge permit application work contin ues apace of the original timetable, Costin said. The goal is to have the application submit ted by March with a permit hopefully in Port Authority hands by ear ly summer. The hope is that state funding will be put in place for the com ing fiscal year leading to dredging by the end of 2014 or early 2015. PILOT from page AA 1 PORT from page AA 1 are going to look at the ve locations to provide a methodology for xing the other areas. We need to get a cross section of what is going on. “I know there are prob lems there, big problems.” Preble Rish has agreed to provide dollars for mate rials needed to x all areas of the pipe and to come back to the county with a nal report on the best method for addressing the problems. Left unresolved is who picks up the tab for x ing the remainder of the project. That led to some tense exchanges. Rish said he believed the issue was less about Preble Rish and more about him. “This is a Ralph Rish is sue for four or ve people in this county,” he told the board, adding that Bryan was “carrying the water” for those individuals. He said his company had a limited inspection re sponsibility for the project, reected in the reduced costs for engineering and inspection service offered on the project. Rish also noted that while Preble Rish had been subject to the ongo ing BOCC discussions per taining to Americus Ditch, there had been little talk about the contractor on the job. Bryan disagreed with several points, particular ly about the responsibility of the county’s engineer for the project. “Preble Rish was re sponsible for the engi neering and inspection of the project,” Bryan said, adding that no language in the contract indicates the responsibility for inspec tions was “limited.” “They represented the county. Every taxpayer in the county is footing the bill for this project.” Bryan attempted to continue the discussion but was ruled out of order by Commission Chairman Ward McDaniel. Before relinquishing the oor, she noted she had still not received an swers to a series of ques tions about the project which had been placed in the public information packet months back only to be pulled by vote of the full board. Commissioners Tan Smiley and Carmen McLemore said they were ready to move ahead with the MOU, McLemore add ing that it would not be a surprise if Preble Rish pulled its offer. “He is under no obli gation,” McDaniel said of Rish. “He’s offered to as sist the county. He doesn’t have to do anything.” Resident Tom Graney said the xes of the pipe were only part of the so lution to the “asco” that Americus Ditch has come to represent for many. While expressing ap preciation to Preble Rish, while asserting its respon sibility to assist, and prais ing the MOU as an excel lent plan moving forward, Graney said commission ers had yet to address sys temic problems with the county process for bidding and awarding contracts. Saying the contractor was unqualied from the outset — the contractor allegedly lacked required documents and bonding and has since gone out of business — he said com missioners could not de ect responsibility because it was a previous board that made the decisions. “Taxpayers are pay ing for this,” Graney said. “Your bid policy violated Florida law. No one is talk ing about who is respon sible for this. I want some body held responsible for the bid process, for this asco. As a taxpayer, you are obligated to do that. “This was poor work by the county commis sion and by county staff. That comes back to you. The commission has to hold somebody account able for this project that was screwed up from the beginning.” McLemore, the lone commissioner on the board at the time the proj ect was awarded, noted he opposed the project, say ing it was a “bad project” and “would never work.” Economic development On two fronts, com missioners received posi tive news on economic development. Tourism Development Council Executive Director Jennifer Jenkins said dur ing a recent trip to New York she spoke with of cials of a boutique cruise line about dockage in Port St. Joe. The company, Travel Dynamics, had been inter ested in stopping in Port St. Joe for cultural/arts themed cruises, but found the conditions along Jetty Park and the so-called “low docks” — which fall in the city of Port St. Joe but are also part of the Port of Port St. Joe master plan — lacking as well as an absence of activities for cruise-goers. Jenkins said she pitched the concept of an eco-excursion and the company agreed to tar get April 2015 to arrive in Port St. Joe on a trip out of New Orleans and stop ping at other north Gulf locations. “I told them we are committed to this,” Jen kins said, adding there was work to do — deter mining dockage rates, improvements to the low docks, etc. — but that she hoped to be in line to begin marketing the cruises this April. She said the company was also looking at other cruise stops in the future. The BOCC also heard from Alex Mouton of M3 Services, which is looking to establish a base of oper ations in Gulf County, cre ating as many as 100 jobs over the rst three years. Mouton is close to lin ing up nancing, the last hurdle for M3, which has been in talks with the Gulf County Economic Devel opment Alliance and Port of Port St. Joe for over a year. The company would work in government de fense industries, speci cally aerospace, Mouton said. DITCH from page AA 1 Preble Rish has agreed to provide dollars for materials needed to x all areas of the pipe and to come back to the county with a nal report on the best method for addressing the problems. Left unresolved is who picks up the tab for xing the remainder of the project.

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By Lois Swoboda Halifax Media Group A total of 130 species were spotted during this year’s Christmas Bird Count (CBC). “Not bad for a rainy day,” said organizer Donna Wells. On Dec. 26, volunteers spotted 10,200 individual birds representing 130 species. The bald eagle population continues to ourish. This year 23 were seen. Rod Gasche wrote this stirring description of a bald eagle encounter, “We headed back to the West Pass to reenter the bay on the eastern shoreline of St. Vincent near what is known as dry bar. It is one of the main oyster bars in the winter harvesting area for the bay. As we crossed the pass, one of the members shouted, ‘Look at the eagles!’ “Here we saw eventually six ying with soaring seabirds and swooping down to the water. The water was lled with cormorants and a pod of porpoises that were feeding on a bait sh ball! That activity was causing the bait sh to come to the top of the water and the eagles were swooping down and catching sh from the waters! We watched enthralled for a while as none of us had ever expected see something like this! Only one of them was an adult eagle, the rest were immature birds but learning their craft!” The most commonly observed bird was the American robin with 1,622 individuals counted. Migratory robins were observed in every region of the county. According to the Audubon website, the CBC helps inform conservationists about local trends in bird populations and plan strategies to protect birds and their habitat. The Environmental Protection Agency included Audubon’s climate change work from CBC data as one of 26 indicators of climate change in their 2012 report. Great Backyard Bird Count coming up The CBC is over, but now it’s time to gear up for the 16th annual Great Backyard Bird (GBBC) Count Feb. 14-17. The GBBC is a four-day event that engages bird watchers in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are across the U.S. and Canada. The count is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society to learn more about how birds are doing. Last year, participants turned in more than 104,285 checklists online, creating the continent’s largest instantaneous snapshot of bird populations ever recorded. Watchers reported observing 623 species and 17,382,831 individual birds. Anyone can take part in the GBBC, from novice bird watchers to experts. Participants count birds for 15 minutes or more on one or more days of the event and report their sightings online at www.birdcount.org. On the web site, participants can explore real-time maps and charts that show what others are reporting during the count. The site has tips to help identify birds and special materials for educators. Participants may also enter the GBBC photo contest by uploading images taken during the count. Many images will be featured in the GBBC website’s photo gallery. All participants are entered in a drawing for prizes that include bird feeders, binoculars, books, CDs, and many other great birding products. For more information about the GBBC, visit www. birdcount.org or contact the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at (800) 843-2473. Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu J an. 30 47 28 0 % F ri, J an. 31 54 47 0 % S a t F eb 1 60 52 0 % Sun, F eb 2 62 54 10 % M on, F eb 3 65 43 % T ues F eb 4 65 43 % W ed F eb 5 65 43 % Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) S unda y 7A M 2PM (EST ) ] \IL []\ R^G \ I9 ]\ Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, January 30, 2014 O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Local area lakes, rivers, and streams will all be affected by this week’s onset of cold, near freezing water. Our best bet is going to be crappie fishing the deeper holes on the Big River and into the larger lakes. Trout fishing should be decent in deeper holes in the ICW canal, but live shrimp will be hard to find, so go for a grub and jig! O UTDOORS Species numbers up for Christmas Bird Count ROD GASCHE | Special to the Star Even this majestic bald eagle looked wet and bedraggled on the day of the Christmas Bird Count. Special to The Star George Duren, owner of Blue Water Outrigger and Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe, recently worked with the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association to build his fth arti cial reef in the Gulf of Mexico. Mr. Duren has been a longtime supporter of the MBARA and has built reefs for the past ve years. The reefs are named BWO for the Blue Water Outrigger Store in Port St. Joe that was originally started in the Piggly Wiggly shopping center back in 2005. The store caters to persons who love the outdoors and enjoy shing and hunting. Mr. Duren moved to Port St. Joe when he was two years old where he went to school after which he went to FSU. He then joined the US Army and served a tour in Vietnam. After serving his country he began to work in the grocery business. Three arti cial reefs are out in the LAARS B Site about 24 miles off shore, one is in the Tower Site out by the old Air Force Tower around 5 miles off shore, and the other one is in the South Site out around 24 miles offshore. The reefs use Reef Maker concrete pyramids with limestone inserts, Ecosystems for smaller sh, and Grouper Reefs built to simulate a cave. Bob Cox, President of the MBARA, said, “We are so thankful for all that Mr. Duren has done over the past 17 years to build marine habitat to enhance diving and shing off of Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. What he has built has greatly enhanced the red snapper and grouper shery for recreational anglers in our area.” Ron Childs, Director of the MBARA King sh Tournament, said, “Mr. Duren does a lot for the community in so many ways, and this is just one of his contributions to the local area.” Childs added, “I go in to the Piggly Wiggly grocery store and look up on the wall at the names of over l00 local organizations he supports, and we are just thankful that he has chosen to support our effort to build arti cial reefs for our shermen and divers. We have been very successful because of people like Mr. Duren.” All of the BWO sites are listed on the MBARA website (www.mbara.org) with the GPS numbers in latitude and longitude for all persons to access. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR A host of sh swarm around a diver at a BWO reef. A diver inspects a BWO reef. Duren builds fth arti cial reef

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section 719 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach (850) 648-8207 OPEN 7 DA YS A WEEK 11AM-CLOSE BUFF ALO WINGS SLIDERS AND MORE FOOD SPECIALS! FREE BUFFET A T HALF TIME! SUPER BOWL XL VIII P AR TY SUNDA Y FEBRUAR Y 2 ND DISCOUNTED PITCHERS OF BUDLIGHT RE-OPENING JAN 30 TH THURSDA Y! By BRAD MILNER Special to The Star PANAMA CITY — The Halifax All-Star Classic will celebrate a decade of prep basketball excellence on April 5. The 10th annual event returns to Gulf Coast State College’s Billy Harrison Field House for the games pitting some of the best senior talent in the Panhandle. The girls game begins at 11 a.m. on the rst Saturday in April followed by the boys at 1 p.m., continuing a series featuring some highly competitive basketball games. Halifax Media Group and two of its Florida daily newspapers, The Panama City News Herald and the Northwest Florida Daily News, again are lead sponsors along with GCSC. Additional sponsorship is provided by the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau. The East teams are selected by the sports department at The News Herald, the publication stationed in Panama City that covers eight counties of Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington. The East boys team has won three consecutive meetings and leads the overall series 6-3. The West teams are chosen by the sports department at the Northwest Florida Daily News, which is headquartered in Fort Walton Beach and covers Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton counties. The West girls lead 7-2 with a serieshigh streak of four straight wins from 2008 to 2011. The Halifax Classic features some area athletes who have decided on college destinations as high as the Division I level. The event also gives additional players a nal opportunity to be seen by regional scouts at junior colleges and smaller universities. It’s not uncommon for athletes to be offered scholarships after the Halifax Classic. The games are played under collegiate rules to help the athletes prepare for the next step in their careers. The differences include 20-minute halves, which extend the games eight minutes longer than traditional four-quarter prep encounters to place increased emphasis on stamina and deeper rosters. Other rules variations include extended 3-point lines and a shot clock. Player nominations are being accepted. Area coaches in the East coverage area are asked to send player name, position, height, statistics and other pertinent information to Brad Milner at The News Herald via email at bmilner@pcnh. com or by calling 747-5065. The rst round of selections will be announced in the coming weeks, and the complete 12-player rosters for the four teams will be released in early March. Any individual or business with a desire to sponsor the event may contact Milner, News Herald writer Jason Shoot (jshoot@pcnh. com, 747-5067) or Executive Sports Editor Pat McCann (pmccann@pcnh. com, 747-5068). The event accepts any and all levels of sponsorships, from monetary support to in-kind donations. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Jeremy Dixon grew up on a steady diet of sports. His high school years in Port St. Joe (Class of 1998) were spent on the baseball diamond and basketball hardwood. And, so, Dixon recently arrived on an idea to celebrate all things athletic in Gulf County – a new magazine. Dixon’s “Sidelines” premiered early this month, a full-color slick periodical to be published six times a year and focused on what happens on and off the eld among the county’s athletes, from youth leagues to an alumni section for former high school athletes. “The magazine is hitting on two things,” Dixon said. “What is happening on the eld and what is going on outside the eld.” The magazine, which carries a newsstand price of $2, is available at several local outlets. Dixon plans to have web presence and mobile app in the coming months, aiming in part at parents of athletes. Dixon played baseball and basketball as a teenager and matriculated to CarsonNewman College before transferring to Florida State University. Having studies economics at FSU and with a sales background, Dixon said, “He hit the ground running” in promoting his magazine. “The county has such a rich history of sports,” Dixon said. “I grew up playing sports. The rst thought I had about the magazine was pictures.” Dixon wanted to provide a format for “full-colored, vibrant” pictures that “athletes would want to keep.” Those photos, he added, would also attract parents seeking to secure memories of their child’s exploits on the elds of play. “I wanted something that puts athletes on the front cover,” Dixon said. The magazine will pro le players and teams competing in county athletes and will also include a section celebrating those athletes who have advanced beyond high school and became standouts in college or even the professional ranks. “Putting it all together, making it concise, that will be the learning curve,” Dixon said. “As with anything new it will take time. But a year from now I’d like it to be something that readers look forward to it and for it to have enough notoriety that people want to be in it.” Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School baseball program began practice for the upcoming season on Jan. 15. Port St. Joe is joined in District 4-1A by Bozeman, Liberty County, South Walton, Franklin County and West Gadsden. In addition to 10 district games, the Tiger Sharks will also play games against teams from Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama. The season begins Feb. 6 when the Tiger Sharks host Liberty County and Wewahitchka. Liberty County and Wewahitchka will play the opening game of the day at 3 p.m. ET followed at 5:30 p.m. ET by Liberty County versus Port St. Joe. The Tiger Sharks face Wewahitchka at 8 p.m. All ticket prices during the regular season at $5 as set by the Florida High School Athletics Association. The Tiger Sharks are currently selling banners to be hung on the home eld fences and are also raising money for the annual 100 inning game. The 100 inning game is at 9:30 a.m. until noon ET on Saturday. The Alumni Game is at 2 p.m. ET on Saturday. Anyone interested in participating in the Alumni Game should call Bobby Nobles at 527-3707. The game will be played at Centennial Field. The concession stand will be open Saturday. PSJ boys’ soccer season ends Star Staff Report The end arrived quickly this year for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School boys’ soccer team. Breaking a streak of four straight playoff appearances, the Tiger Sharks allowed a goal in the opening minute and went on to lose 4-1 to District 1-1A second-seeded and tournament host Tallahassee Maclay in the district semi nals. The loss ends Port St. Joe’s season. The Tiger Sharks nished 6-9-1. Maclay faced top-seeded Mayo Lafayette in the title game. Maclay put a goal up with just 59 seconds gone in the game and went on to outshoot the Tiger Sharks by a 25-6 margin. Maclay added a goal in the 32nd minute to go into halftime up 2-0. The Tiger whittled the lead when Marcel Duarte scored, on assists by Drew and Jacob Lacour, in the 50th minute. It was only the third goal of an injury-plagued season for Duarte, who came into the season just 12 goals shy of the school career leader, JMason Ray, who had 72 goals from 2008-2011. Tyler Alford was in goal for Port St. Joe and made 12 saves while allowing all four Maclay goals. PSJ girls fall in soccer playoffs Star Staff Report Running into the defending state champions proved a bad draw for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls’ soccer team last Thursday. The Lady Tiger Sharks opened the Region 1-1A playoff at Orange Park and a matchup with St. John’s Country Day, which won the state title last year. Country Day made short work of Port St. Joe, winning 8-0. The Lady Tiger Sharks nish 9-5-3. “St. John’s was the most complete high school level team that I have seen in my ve years here,” said Port St. Joe coach Gary Hindley. “It was easy to see why they are the reigning state champions and why they have won ve overall state championships. Their technical ability was fantastic and it allowed them to play at a speed that you rarely see at the high school level. “It was a great experience for our girls and gave them the vision of where a high level program operates and plays at.” St. John’s scored in the second minute of play and added goals at the 29th and 31st minutes to take a 3-0 rst half lead. In the second half, the offensive barrage continued with goals in the 43rd, 59th, 64th, 69th and 72nd minutes. Port St. Joe was outshot 33-2. Starting goalkeeper Celeste Chiles, an eighth-grader, recorded 13 saves on the night (a season high). “Celeste actually played quite well to keep the score at eight,” Hindley said. “She was especially solid in the second half, in spite of the goals allowed. “It was quite an experience for our girls to compete against such a high quality squad. Our program will be better in the future for the experience. St John’s has a great chance to repeat as state champions and with only two seniors they should be strong for years to come.” Hindley went on to praise the Lady Tiger Sharks. “In spite of the regional loss, the coaching staff is very proud of this group and how they progressed during the year,” Hindley said. “We had great success within our district (3-1-2 and runners-up in the district tournament) and had a ninegame unbeaten streak during the middle portion of the schedule.” PSJ SOCCER PSJHS Tiger Sharks prepare for baseball season 10th Halifax All-Star Classic set for April 5 Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page A7 County sports focus for new magazine

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 Special to The Star Dr. Frank D. May, of Port St. Joe, has a unique Valentine’s Day present for the needy of this area. For the last 13 years, Dr. May has provided free dental treatment for Valentine’s Day at his ofce. This year, his ofce will provide this valuable service on Wednesday, Feb. 19. This year the ofce will schedule appoint ments with those in need of treatment. To schedule an appointment you will need to send or bring by a letter to Dr. May’s of ce giving a brief description of your dental needs, and please describe your situation that makes you a good candidate for this benet. Send the letter to Dr. May’s ofce at 319 Williams Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please no phone calls. Be sure to include your telephone number so we can contact you to schedule an appointment. Dr. May will see 20 patients in need of dental treatment, and the hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda Wright will see eight to 10 patients each who wish to have their teeth cleaned. The ofce hopes to serve as many as 40 patients. Patients must be at least 12 years of age, and accompanied by a parent or guardian if under the age of 18. Treat ments provided will include cleaning, x-rays, llings, extractions, diagnostics, and pain control. Dr. May and his staff participate in “Dentist With a Heart because they wish to impact people who otherwise could not af ford to see a dentist, and help those people save their teeth, as well as relieve them of any discomfort they may be having. Our of ce cares about this community and would like to give those in need of our services, their smiles back! PR O P E R T Y TA X E X E M P T I O N D E A D LI N E F O R 2 0 1 4 D e a r G u l f C o u n t y C i t i z e n s I w o u l d l i k e t o t a k e t h i s o p p o r t u n i t y t o e n c o u ra g e n e w h o m e o w n e r s o r t h o s e o f y o u w h o h a v e n e v e r l e d f o r H o m e ste a d E x e m p t i o n t o d o s o o n o r b e f o r e M a r c h 3 2 0 1 4 I n o r de r t o r e c e i v e d t h i s e x e m p t i o n y o u m u st b e a Fl o r i d a r e s i de n t a n d p r o v i de p r o o f o f o w n e r sh i p a n d p h y s i c a l ly o c c u p y y o u r h o m e o n o r b e f o r e J a n u a r y 1 2 0 1 4 P l e a s e be a d v i s e d t h a t t h e H o m e s te a d E x e m p t i o n d o e s N O T t r a n s f e r o m t h e p r e v i o u s o w n e r t o t h e n e w o w n e r e H o m e ste a d E x e m p t i o n p r o v i de s u p t o a $ 5 0 0 0 0 r e d u c t i o n i n t h e a s s e s s e d v a l u e o f y o u r h o m e I n a d d i t i o n t h e H o m e ste a d E x e m p t i o n l i m i t s t h e i n c r e a s e o f t h e a s s e s s e d v a l u e i n y e a r t w o n o t t o e x c e e d 3 % p e r y e a r o r t h e v a l u e o f t h e C o n s u m e r P r i c e I n de x f o r t h e p r e v i o u s D e c e m b e r w h i c h e v e r i s l e s s I n o r de r t o r e c e i v e t h i s e x e m p t i o n o n e m u st h a v e s u p p o r t i n g d o c u m e n t s o f r e s i de n c y i e d r i v e r ’ s l i c e n s e v e h i c l e r e g i st r at i o n ( s ) Fl o r i d a v o te r ’ s r e g i st r at i o n n u m b e r ( s ) p r o o f o f l o c a l u t i l i t y p a y m e n t s at s a i d a d d r e s s s o c i a l s e c u r i t y n u m b e r ( s ) d ate o f b i r t h ( s ) n a m e a n d a d d r e s s o f c u r r e n t e m p l o y e r i f e m p l o y e d b a n k st ate m e n t a n d c h e c k i n g a c c o u n t a d d r e s s a n d i f p r o p e r t y i s i n a t r u st t h e n a c o p y o f t r u st i s n e e de d Y o u m a y a l s o r e v i e w t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s o n o u r w e b s i te at www g u l f p a c o m i s i s a l s o t h e t i m e t o a p p ly f o r o t h e r e x e m p t i o n s f o r w h i c h y o u m a y q u a l i f y : $ # 4 : 4 = : 9 4 9 < 2 : 1 = 4 1 < 2 4 1 4 4 2 &3 3 8 6 & $ # 4 : 7 % 4 = 4 : 24 1 4 = : : < < 4 4 = : 4 < 9 4 a s s e s s e d v a l u e o f t h e h o m e ste a d p r o p e r t y w h e n t h e j u st v a l u e i s l e s s t h a n $2 5 0 0 0 0 e o w n e r i s r e q u i r e d t o b e 6 5 y e a r s o f a g e o r o l de r a n d m a i n t a i n a p e r m a n e n t r e s i de n c e o n 9 4 4 6 = : : = = 6 4 9 4 9 < 2 : 1 = 4 1 < 2 4 1 4 4 2 &3 3 8 f o r 2 0 13 ). P l e a s e n o t e : e B o a rd o f C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r s o r M u n i c i p a l i t y g o v e r n i n g a u t h o r i t y m u s t v o te t o a p p r o v e b y a d o p t i o n o f o rd i n a n c e n o l a te r t h a n D e c e m be r 1 o f t h e y e a r p r i o r t o t h e y e a r t h e e x e m p t i o n w i l l t a k e e e c t i s e x e m p t i o n d o e s n o t i n c l u d e S c h o o l B o a rd o r No r t h W e s t F l o r i d a W a te r M a n a g e m e n t D i s t r i c t t a x e s $ ( : 2 ( : 2 4 4 = : $ 4 4 : / : < : 4 4 4 1 4 7 4 4 = : 0 4 < 4 2 : < : 4 = : $ : : < : : / : < : + < : 2 4 = : $ % < 2 4 = 4 : / : < : & 4 : 1 4 1 4 1 4 2 9 4 9 < 2 : 1 = 4 1 < 2 4 1 4 4 2 &3 3 8 6 $ % < 2 4 = 4 4 4 : / : < : $ 7 : 1 < < 4 = : W e a l s o e n c o u r a g e b u s i n e s s o w n e r s to l e t h e i r T a n g i b l e P e r s o n a l P r o p e r t y T a x r e t u r n b y A p r i l 1 s t B u s i n e s s e s w i t h $ 2 5 0 0 0 o r l e s s o f p e r s o n a l p r o p e r t y a r e e x e m p t b y s t a t u t e o m p e r s o n a l p r o p e r t y B U T t h e y M U S T l e a r e t u r n i n o r d e r to r e c e i v e th e e x e m pt i o n I f y o u sh o u l d h a v e a n y q u e st i o n s p l e a s e c a l l o r v i s i t o u r w e b s i te at g u l f p a c o m # : 1 4 4 < & : 1 9 ; 4 & < 6 4 : 4 1[TvyRv ’x_ Zx_ RmX „x_ Rx x_[ 1avwx Kmax[X ?[x_pXawx -_yvV_ Gpvx Ix 8p[ /[w[vx J_[Rx[v † 1[TvyRv …x_ Šx_ RmX $x_ Rx x_[ Ix 2[pv][ 5wgRmX 1av[_pyw[ JaVd[x GvaV [ Š ’x_ RmX Zx_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rx ’† sj „x_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rx †† sj …x_ RmX Šx_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rw ’† sj $x_ G[v\pvjRmV [ Rx †† sj JaVd[xw jR T[ syvV_Rw[X Rx /p{m xp{m +ppdw am )sRgRV_aVpgR J_[ +yxg[v )][mV am 0Rwxsp amx -RvvRT[gg[ 8ymVxapm Bp BRj[ -R\[ +ppdw 6 ?pv[ am Gpvx Ix 8p[ RmX -RvaTT[Rm -p\\[[ am ?[}aVp +[RV_ J_aw [z[mx aw \ymX[X am sRvx T x_[ 1vRmdgam -pymx Jpyvawx /[z[gpsj[mx -pymVag Dentist with a heartPHOTOS COURTESY OF CLARENc C E MONETTE The St. Joseph Historical Society, rst organized in 1959, held its annual meeting last week during a dinner at Sunset Coastal Grill. President Charlotte Pierce summarized the past year as one marked by less business and more preparation for the future as the Society works on the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The organization has focused on saving the historic lighthouse for well over a decade. Ofcers for 2014 are Pierce, president; Lynda Bordelon is vice president; Linda Wood is the recording secretary; treasurer is Pauline Pendarvis; and Paula Boone is the parliamentarian. They were sworn by Clerk of Courts Becky Norris. The guest speaker was Joseph S. Cocking, president of Lighthouse Lamp Shop, Inc. of Fleming Island, FL. Cocking and his team removed the lens from the Cape San Blas Lighthouse last week. (see related article, Page B1 ). HH ISTORI cC AL SS O cC IETY ANNUAL mM EETING

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, January 30, 2014 B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) President Reagan survived an assassination attempt outside what Washington hotel in 1981? Hilton, Sheraton, Marriot, Holiday Inn 2) What year marked the death of former Soviet head of state, Leonid Brezhnev? 1978, 1982, 2006, Still living 3) What team besides the Yankees did Joe DiMaggio play for? No other, Red Sox, Braves, Twins 4) Which river does the Brooklyn Bridge (NY) cross? Delaware, Hudson, East, St. Lawrence 5) What state has the most publicly owned land? New York, Texas, California, Alaska 6) Whose moving screen debut was 1950’s “The Men”? Bogart, Wayne, Gable, Brando 7) Who’s been the only woman to ever appear on U.S. paper money? None, Martha Washington, Molly Brown, Ida Tarbell 8) What is writing an email message in all capital letters called? Tenting, Cooking, Shouting, Lurking 9) Two of the world’s top 3 highest waterfalls are located in what country? Venezuela, S. Africa, Canada, New Zealand 10) Of the six men who made up the “Three Stooges,” how many were real-life brothers? 2, 3, 4, 5 11) When were TV’s rst Emmy Awards? 1949, 1954, 1961, 1966 12) Whose career homerun Major League record did Babe Ruth break? Kenesaw Landis, Roger Connor, Bobby Hofman, Hal Griggs 13) What’s the home of cartoon superhero Mighty Mouse? Tinseltown, Smallville, Terrytown, Mouseville 14) Which “Charles” invented the pop-up toaster patented in 1919? Strite, Little eld, Harmon, Jackson ANSWERS 1) Hilton. 2) 1982. 3) No other. 4) East. 5) Alaska. 6) Brando. 7) Martha Washington. 8) Shouting. 9) Venezuela. 10) 3. 11) 1949. 12) Roger Connor. 13) Terrytown. 14) Strite. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com After holding its rst meeting in December, the Port Theatre Foundation has welcomed its latest member and the board is already solidifying plans for the future. The founding members, who include Jimbo Collins, Dolores Windolf, Anna Duren and Phillip Croton, have welcomed Tom Goldsmith to the board of directors. Goldsmith, Port St. Joe High School Class of 1987, will join the discussions that will ultimately lead to the historic Port Theatre building becoming a central location for movies, live theatre, weddings and graduation ceremonies. Goldsmith worked at the St. Joe Paper Mill and Raf eld Fisheries and spent seven years as a telecom technician in the U.S. military, serving in Saudi Arabia and Iraq during Operation Desert Storm and the Gulf War. Upon returning to Port St. Joe, Goldsmith opened Beachy Keen custom framing and gallery on Reid Avenue next to the Port Theatre. Also a photographer, Goldsmith will soon open a portrait studio. “I couldn’t think of a more beautiful and diverse location to live and be able to shoot my pictures,” said Goldsmith. “We are thrilled to have something happening with the theatre and look forward to being involved with its community endeavors.” Port Theatre Foundation kicks into high gear Star Staff Report Are you ready to cook the rice, peel the shrimp, stew the veggies and bask in the aroma of roux? If so, then tie on that apron and enter to be one of the 30 chefs competing for the title of Gumbo King in the 16th Annual Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-Off! The event takes place at Sunset Park on Feb. 15, beginning at 10 a.m. and lasting until all the gumbo and Brunswick stew runs out. This event is free to enter and tickets will be available for purchase to sample the competing gumbos and Brunswick stews. Also available will be barbecue sandwiches, hot dogs and drinks, as well as live music and free Mardi Gras beads. “This event is one of the highlights for Mexico Beach,” said Kimberly Shoaf, president of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council. “We draw in record-breaking crowds every year. “The Gumbo Cook-Off allows families to come spend the day at the beach with live music and all the gumbo you can eat.” Awards will be given in both amateur and restaurant categories for gumbo and an overall category for Brunswick stew. Judges will be looking at entries for the best overall taste and presentation. Applications for the cookoff are available online at www.MexicoBeach.com/ Pages/News-Events/Calendar-of-Events and are due no later than Feb. 7. The competition is free to enter. All proceeds raised at the cook-off will help fund the Special Events for Mexico Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-off and Art Walk By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com From its creation in 2003, the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves has performed to a succinct motto. “People must be stakeholders in the land,” founding members said as a mission statement. To promote the Preserves, create more stakeholders and increase membership the Friends will hold Bay Day this Saturday, with tours of the preserve and its natural beauty, music and food. The rst trip begins with a Bird Walk through the Deal Tract on Cape San Blas. Led by Matt Anderson with the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, the walking tour begins at the Preserve Lodge. A Low Country Boil will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET and the menu includes boiled shrimp, sausage, potatoes, corn on the cob, Cole slaw, garlic bread and beverages. A $10 donation is asked per meal. During last year’s February Bay Day 458 plates of shrimp boil were sold, representing a major fundraiser for the Friends. Other tours include “Deal Tract Adventure” with Kim Wren, aquatic preserve coordinator, who will feature the history of the land and the importance of the uplands in protecting the quality and natural resources of the bay. This tour includes a moderate one-mile hike and participants are urged to dress appropriately and bring bug spray and water, as well as proper footwear. SATURDAY TOURS AND TRIPS OF THE PRESERVES: 9:3011 a.m.; 10-11:30 a.m.; 12-1:30 p.m.; 2-3:30 p.m. ET Enjoy a bird walk on the Deal Tract; a tram riding tour through the backwoods; a Deal Tract adventure; or explore the shore of St. Joseph Bay. Schedule and information at www. stjosephbay preserves.org Call 229-1787 to register. All trips are weather permitting Bay Day promotes preserves WES LOCHER | The Star The Salt-Air Farmer’s Market will take place from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on Saturday, Feb. 1 at City Commons Park next to city hall in Port St. Joe. Vendors will be selling homemade goods and fresh produce. SALT-AIR FARMER’S MARKET FILE PHOTO The 16th annual Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-off will be held at Sunset Park on Feb. 15. TOM GOLDSMITH See GUMBO B6 See THEATRE B6 See BAY DAY B6 FRIENDS OF ST. JOSEPH BAY PRESERVES BAY DAY FILE PHOTO The Low Country Boil is a highlight of the annual Bay Day in support of the St. Joseph Bay Preserves.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 This week we will enlighten you on some of the important plant nutrients necessary for healthy woody ornamentals in the Florida landscape. We’ve had information about why the nutrient elements are needed and some of the problems caused when plants don’t get enough of them. But plants can almost always get enough of the element we’re discussing today, calcium. In fact, when calcium is a problem for landscape ornamentals it’s usually because there’s too much of it in the soil, not too little. Today you will nd out why. My information was provided by Extension Emeritus Professor of Horticulture, Dr. Robert Black of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences (IFAS). Scientists have not found calcium deciency to be a problem on woody ornamental plants growing in Florida landscapes. Several factors account for his, including the presence of calcium and calcium compounds in much of our water and in commercial fertilizers. Calcium is important to plants for several reasons. It functions as a plant nutrient and it also indirectly affects soil fertility. For one thing, calcium helps maintain the right pH or acid level in the soil around your home. This is important because it reduces leaching of ammonia, phosphorus and several other nutrient elements. In addition, keeping the right pH range in the soil encourages the growth of benecial soil organisms, makes it easier for plants to utilize an element called molybdenum and reduces plant injury from toxic elements such as aluminum and excess copper. In spite of all its benecial effects, calcium can cause serious trouble for you or landscape plants if you have too much of it in your soil. High calcium levels increase soil pH beyond the desirable range, make it too sweet, or alkaline. This makes it harder for ornamental plants to take up several other important nutrient elements including iron, manganese, zinc, copper, boron, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous. Fortunately, the amount of available calcium in most Florida soil is fairly low although there is usually enough for normal growth of landscape ornamentals. In very acid soils, it is occasionally necessary to add calcium by liming. As a rule you’d only lime an area you were planning to landscape if you had soil test results showing that the pH was too low. You might remember from some of our previous articles about soil pH that the lower the pH numbers the higher the soil acid level. Anytime you have a soil pH below 5.5 or so, the soil acid level is higher than most landscape plants like. To raise the pH into the desirable range between 5.5 and 6.5 you need to add calcium to the soil. Materials commonly used for this purpose are agricultural limestone, hydrated lime and dolomite. Dolomite contains calcium and another important element, magnesium. If you just need to change the pH level for your soil, agricultural limestone is probably the best material to use. However, many acid sandy soils in Florida re low in magnesium, so dolomite can be sued to raise the pH and supply magnesium at the same time. As we said, the decision to use these materials should be based on soil test results. The amount you need depends on the soil pH you have, the soil type and the amount of organic matter in the soil. For more information on calcium contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit our website at gulf.ifas.u. edu or edis.ifas.u.edu. M yr on is a handsome y oung B eagle/Hound mix. He w alks w ell on a leash and is learning basic c ommands He gets along with other dogs and ev en seems t o lik e k itties I f y ou cannot adopt per haps y ou can f ost er M yr on. V olun t eers Needed: ADOPTION E VENT S ,' '% ) ' % $ % ' % #, ) .' .' ' ) .' % % ) SHEL TER & ., & % #, %, #, # % & %.' #' % % .' '# ( ', ', ) # # ') % ) "' % & # % ) ' $ % '% fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850-227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! O nline applica tions and pet phot os ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions . ) .' .' ' '% ( % ) (+ .) ''% ) % & % .' # ''% % '# .' # .' ) .' st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r Fo l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Mar cia Knapk e 227 -7847 Call T oda y O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast % %% "$ # S O L D 850-227-8890 / 850-227-7770 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m O v e r l o o k i n g S t J o s e p h B a y t h i s 2 b e d r o o m h o m e g i v e s y o u g r e a t s u n r i s e v i e w s E n j o y b e a u t i f u l v i e w s a n d s u n r i s e s w h i l e o v e r l o o k i n g t h e b a y T h e p o r c h o n t h e u p p e r l e v e l i s s c r e e n e d i n a n d i s o n t h e g u l f s i d e o f t h e h o u s e T h e r e i s 8 0 f e e t o f b a y f r o n t a g e a n d a b o a t d o c k w h i c h i s j o i n t l y o w n e d w i t h t h e h o u s e n e x t d o o r f o r s h i n g k a y a k i n g o r a b o a t Society ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Star Staff Report The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio exams 10 a.m. ET on Saturday, Feb. 8 at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe. Take the exam for an initial license or upgrade a present license. Get on the air and become part of the community disaster response. “When all else fails, there’s amateur radio.” The Gulf Amateur Radio Society meets at 7 p.m. ET the rst Thursday of each month at the EOC Building. Guests and prospective members are welcome to attend. For registration and information concerning license exams call C.H. Tillis, AJ4XJ, at 648-8251. Special to The Star Gulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe and 314 E. Third St. in Wewahitchka, provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and older. Transportation might be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities is asked to call Debbie at 229-8466. Star Staff Report A German Food Night to be held at VFW Post 10069 in Highland View will benet the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. The event will begin 5 p.m. ET on Feb. 8 and will continue until the food is gone. Friends of the Humane Society will be serving up brats, sauerkraut, potato salad, Wisconsin cheese soup and homemade desserts. The cost is a $6 donation to the Humane Society. John Miick will be on hand with his guitar to entertain for the evening. All proceeds of the evening will benet the St. Josephs Bay Humane Society. All VFW members and their guests are invited to attend. There will be a donation box for old towels, sheets, leashes, collars and treats for the shelter. Special to The Star The staff at MyGulfCare has launched a new program, K.N.E.W. You! From 1-3 p.m. ET on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month well-checks and a K.N.E.W. You! lesson will be available at the WIG Center on Peters Street in Port St. Joe. Stop by, and see what you can do to improve your health. Amateur radio license examsSenior C C itizens meal program VFW German Food Night to benet SJBHS K.N.E.W You! WANT TO GO? WHAT: VFW German Food Night WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 starting at 5 p.m. ET WHERE: VFW Post 10069 in Highland View The trouble with calcium In spite of all its benecial effects, calcium can cause serious trouble for you or landscape plants if you have too much of it in your soil. High calcium levels increase soil pH beyond the desirable range, make it too sweet, or alkaline. This makes it harder for ornamental plants to take up several other important nutrient elements including iron, manganese, zinc, copper, boron, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous. Special to The Star For more than 30 years, the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association has sponsored the Miss Gulf County Valentine’s Pageant. This event is an evening of absolute fun for the entire family and is centered around our beautiful young ladies in age categories from infants through high school seniors. There is a category for every age group. There are some very nice prizes given away. First, about 25 door prizes will be given away throughout the evening. Each contestant will receive a memento for participation and a college scholarship is given away to Miss Gulf County. One of the more popular prizes in the past has been a complete beauty makeover and cosmetic consultation by award winning professional beauty consultant and artist, Ms. Dee Dee Morris of Dothan, Ala. (Facebook: Dee Dee Morris, Dothan Al). According to Mrs. Barbara Mannon, president of the Gulf County Senior Citizens Board of Director, this event is used to raise funds for Gulf County Seniors. “We have had excellent community support in the past, but we are looking for increased sponsorship this year. The change in Florida Medicaid has dramatically impacted our funding and we need the community’s assistance more than ever.” The funds will be used to provide meals, companionship, social activities, personal care, housekeeping, and other vital services needed so our elderly can stay active and in their homes. Call the Senior Center at 229-8466 for sponsorship information or send donation checks to 120 Library Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Your donation is tax deductible. The event will be held at the Wewahitchka Elementary School Auditorium at 6 p.m. CT Saturday, Feb. 8. Applications to participate as a contestant are available from the Center or through your school ofce. Applications must be turned in no later than Feb. 3 in order to participate. This event is not held in conjunction with any other nationally sponsored contest, but is strictly for the young ladies and families of Gulf County. GCSCA to hold Miss Gulf County Valentine’s pageant

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The Star| B3 Thursday, January 30, 2014 Sa ving ener gy can be easy Whether y ou use ceiling fans t o cool y our home clean or change y our A C lt ers monthly or k eep y our ther mostat set at 78 in the summer/68 in the wint er e v er y lo wcost ener gy change adds up t o mak e a big di er ence W e ’ r e in the business of using ener gy wisely T ogether w e po w er y our lif e our home o cool y ou use ceiling fans t Whether y gy can be easy ving ener Sa W e use ener gy wisely A l o n z o ( T o n y ) a n d S h a w a n a D a vi s a r e p l e a s e d t o a n n o u n c e t h e p a r t i c i p a t i o n o f t h e i r d a u g h t e r S h a ’ N a i y a A d d i s o n i n t h e 2 0 1 3 2 0 1 4 D e b u t a n t e C o t i l l i o n a n d S c h o l a r s h i p P r o g r a m s po n s o r e d b y t h e U p s i l o n A l p h a O m e g a C h a p t e r o f A l p h a K ap pa A l p h a S or or i t y I n c or p or a t e d a n d b y G w i n n e t t P e a r l s o f S e r vi c e F o u n d a t i o n I n c o r po r a t e d T h e D e b u t a n t e C o t i l l i o n a n d S c h o l a r s h i p B a l l i s a r g u a b l y t h e p r e m i e r e v e n t f o r h i g h s c h oo l j u n i o r a n d s e n i o r g i r l s i n t h e M e t r o A t l a n t a a r e a. T h e p r o g r a m p r o vi d e s o p po r t u n i t i e s f o r t h e d e b u t a n t e s t o e a r n s c h o l a r s h i ps f o r h i g her e d u cat i o n I n 2 0 1 2 d e b u t a n t e s w e r e a w a r d e d m o r e t h a n $ 3 0 0 0 0 i n s c h o l a r s h i p m o n e y S h a ’ N a i y a i s c u r r e n t l y a j u n i o r a t S p r a y b e r r y H i g h S c h oo l i n M a r i e t t a G A S h e i s a n h o n o r r o l l s t u d e n t v a r s i t y c h e e r l e ad e r m e m b e r o f t h e B l a c k S t u d e n t U n i o n j o u r n a l i s m a n d m e n t o r s h i p c l u b S h a ’ N a i y a ’ s f a t h e r A l o n z o T o n y D a vi s i s a 1 9 9 4 g r ad u a t e o f A p a l a c h i c o l a H i g h a n d h e r m o t h e r S h a w a n a C a r t e r D a vi s i s a 1 9 9 5 g r ad u a t e o f P o r t S t J o e H i g h S c h oo l S h e i s t h e g r a n d d a u g h t e r o f E m i l y C a r t e r J e f f e r s o n o f P a n a ma C i t y F L a n d S h i r l e y A d d i s o n o f W ew a h i t c h k a F L I f y o u w o u l d l i k e t o h e l p S h a ’ N a i y a e a r n t h e t i t l e o f 2 0 1 4 M i s s D e b u t a n t e d o n a t i o n s c a n b e mad e n o l a t e r t h a n F e b r u a r y 1 5 2 0 1 4 t o h t t p :/ / w w w r s t g i v i n g c o m /f u n d r a is e r / s h a n i a y a a d d iso n / c ot i l l i o n School NewsPORT ST. JOE EE LEMENTARY SCHOOL Front row: Dru Flowers, Bryce Forston, Karma Olson-Morgan, Sydney Kingsland-Lormand. Back row: Amari Nickson, Adison Burkett, Judson Grifes, Jacob Justice. DAZZLING DOL pP HIN sS February through May are busy months for FCS students. Here are some dates and events that parents and students should be aware of: Progress Reports go home Feb. 3. No School on Feb. 17, in honor of Presidents’ Day. Spring pictures are scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 20; this will also include K5 graduation pictures. The Learning Fair will take place in the auditorium on Friday, Feb, 21. This is a half day for Godfrey Hall students. Friday, Feb. 28, is the Annual Spring Auction and Italian Dinner. This is an early dismissal day with no lunch and no extended care. Spirit Week is March 10 14 (a yer will be sent home Friday to explain the events of the week.) Friday, March 14, is Field Day. The Marvin Wing will be dismissed at 11:15 a.m. and Godfrey Hall students will be dismissed at 11:30 a.m. There will be no lunch and no extended care on March 14. March 17 – 21, is Spring Break. Students return Monday, March 24. Report Cards go home Monday, March 31. April 17, is Terric Thursday. There will be no school on April 18, in observance of Good Friday. Achievement test will be given to all students on April 21 25. Progress Reports go ho Monday, April 28. Thursday, May 1, is the National Day of Prayer. Last day of school for K3 through K5 is Thursday, May 15. Preschool program is on May 16. Elementary program is on May 23, at 9 a.m. The following students made the honor roll for the 2nd nine weeks at Port St. Joe Elementary. Kindergarten all A A ’s: Hunter Ard, Joshua Baker, Maya Barnes, Lauren Brant, Carson Brown, Corban Butts, Caitlin Cathey, Blake Childress, Christina Clayton, Brayden Dailey, Sumner Dickey, Logan Ellwood, Trinity Farmer, Dru Flowers, Jakwavian Gray, Hailey Green, Fenix Grogan, Shamyiah Hayes, Addison Hendricks, Cole Hart, Kenley Hatcher, Easton Herring, Emma Hill, Anderson Hodges, Bobby Landrum, Landon Layeld, Christopher Lee, Brody Lemieux, Stratton Levins, Jacob Marshall, Reagan Mathews, Krissy Maxwell, Kymani Mcadoo, Hallie Mize, Brody Mock, Kari Moore, Colt Patterson, Kaley Rhodes, Leelyn Rollins, Melina Ruiz, Reed Scott, Emily Sudduth, Reagan Thomas, James Ward, Paisley White, Keiara Wineld, Sha’Nara Woodruff, Callee Wray. Kindergarten, A A ’s and B’s: Cole Bailey, Zora Beauchamp, Christianna Causey, Harmony Dwight, Korbin Ellwood, Scarlett Fofanov, Dominic Fitzgerald, Jayvonta Harris, Chloe Jones, Dovud Kouljanov, Nathan Lipford, Costin Marshall, Ryder Mohr, Cameron Nicholsen, Nijah Quinn, Colton Raker, Jamie Rapier, Jenna Shively, Aaliyah Thompson, Lexi Webb, Jett Whicker, Ryder Mohr, Amirah Yarrell. 1st G G rade all A A ’s: Whitney Butler, Gannon Buzzett, Sara Beasley Flowers, Elizabeth Hopkins, Thomas Hopkins, Makayan Jones, Peyton Knox, Boston McGhee, Leila Smith, Lincoln Tomberlin, Emily Warner. 1st G G rade A A ’s and B’s: Mikey Allen, Ian Beck, Ta’Niyah Bryan, Kate Fidler, MacKenzie Freisleben, Jamicia Glenn, Amonta Harris, Kaelee Johnson, Lyriq Larry, Hailyn Levins, Chloe Harper, Carly Hatcher, Ava Kennedy, Sydney KingslandLormand, Olivia Leonard, Eileen Madrid, Kensley Mathews, Draven O’Neal, Kiyleh Parker, Handley Pitts, Bionca Rafeld, Bella Ray, Jackson Reatherford, Levi Sanders, Jasmine Sandoval, Sunny Shearer, Lisa Southerland, King Waters, Karis Whicker, Landon White. 2nd G G rade all A A ’s: Garrett Acree, Estevan Angel, Jenna Bareld, Desirae Causey, Sam Childers, Sara Durham, Dawson Fisher, Arlena Gleichner, Brandon Heckenlively, Cassidy Lewis, Dakota Tousignant, Elyse Williams. 2nd G G rade A A ’s and B’s: Bella Cannington, Ashleigh Causey, Cody Combow, Juveryona Daniels, Chase Dykes, Mary Margaret Farrell, Shauna Flowers, Tanner Fogle, Branden Givens, Lauren Givens, Owen Grantland, Kylie Ingalls, Braden Jackson, T.J. Jenkins, Danica Kelly, Lance Larry, Jamal Leslie, Chasity Moore, Austin O’Bryan, Luke Pickels, Alivia Randall, Kylie Sapp, Kaylee Schweikert, Ardarien Shackleford, Fisher Vandertulip, Diamond Warner. 3rd G G rade all A A ’s: Maelynn Butler, Eli Fidler, Celeste Hamm, Luke Lentz, Dane Mallon, Gabriella Price, Jasslyn Rafeld, Hannah Riley. 3rd G G rade A A ’s and B’s: Cheon Beachum, Sam Brown, Emma Grace Burke, Madison Burkett, Emily Butler, Alexis Causey, Walker Chumney, Skylar Clayton, AJ Davis, Nathan Duong, Lexi Fountain, Jaydon Gant, Payton Garland, Alexis Gathers, Raelynn Hardy, Prince Jones, Jacob Justice, Chase Lanford, Gavin Lee, Cole Moore, Ricky Sherrill, Damien VanDyke, Emigen Watkins, Addi Watts, Halee Whicker, Britt White, Dane Wright. 4th G G rade all A A ’s: Trent Antley, Elliana Burkett, Santana Causey, Ricky Forbes-Rosado, Halston Fulk, Zoe Gerlach, Natalie Graziano, Ashton McGlamery, Donovan Miniat, Erica Ramsey, Ava Ryan, Megan Saleh, Sarah Beth Thompson, Lily Wockenfuss, Lauren Woosley. 4th G G rade A A ’s and B’s: Skylah Addison, Sammya Brown, Paloma BurgosHarris, Destiny Dykes, Madelyn Gortemoller, Jayden Hayes, Shadavia Hudgins, Laura Beth Hill, Porter Hodges, Emily Lacour, MiMi Larry, Sarah Metcalf, Morgan Mills, Amari Nickson, Rylee Reatherford, Alexandria Thomason, Caleb ZurHeiden. 5th G G rade all A A ’s: Ali Godwin, Hailey Harriman, Alex Strickland, Caleb Wright. 5th G G rade A A ’s and B’s: Austin Ard, Henry Balogh, Noah Bareld, Leanna Baumgardner, Savannah Burkett, Lyndsey Butler, Parker Cornwell, Jacob Davis, Allie Evans, Judson Grifes, Tyler Guthrie, Corbin Ingalls, Lauren Jenkins, Reese Johnston, Chloe Jones, Gavin Jones, Lanecia Larry, Evelyn Laue, Bryson Lee, Mattison Mills, Kevin Lacivita, Clint Moore, Gabrielle Nicodemus, Terri Rae Phillips, Jack Randall, Philip Riley, Hannah Tomlinson, Analisa Treglown, Davis Varnes, Gabrielle Wood. 6th G G rade all A A ’s: Jade Cothran, Sean Farnsley, Madeline Gingell, Bailey Lake, Zach McFarland, Malena Ramsey, Sara Whiteld. 6th G G rade A A ’s and B’s: Brandon Barnes, Miranda Brown, Adison Burkett, Wesley Chapman, Cheyenne Cole, Tristan Doran, Joseph Farrell, Micaela Fedd, Jireh Gant, John Austin Gee, Kelvin Grifn, Brittany Hanson, Madison Jasinski, Greg Julius, Rainey Nobles, Jytrel Riley, Caroline Sapp, Rachel Sherman, Hannah Smith. College Goal Saturday at Wewa High School Special to The Star College Goal Saturday will take place from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. CT this Saturday, Feb. 1 at Wewahitchka High School. The event, located in Room 7, is open to 2014 seniors and anyone wanting help with FAFSA, Pell Grants, or Gulf Coast State College Foundation Scholarships. Be sure to bring your 2013 tax information. Honor R R OLL FCS students to have busy months The Lion’s Tale WEw W AHITCHk K A E E LEMENTARY SCHOOL LOVEs S TO REAd D S p P ECIAL TO THE STAR Ms. Aimee Walsh’s secondgrade class enjoyed reading from their personally designed shirts.  Each student designed their own shirt with their favorite movie, favorite food, something they do well, and even what they want to be when they grow up.   The students enjoyed creating the shirts and loved reading their classmates’ shirts to nd similarities.  A colorful, meaningful and super culmination to Literacy Week! Happy Reading! Don’t bother me Tyler Stark relaxes and takes advantage of some leisurely reading time associated with the many activities going on recently at Wewahitchka Elementary School during the 6th Annual Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida. WES contributed 27, 090 minutes toward Florida’s Million Minute Reading Marathon. Tyler is a third grade student in Mr. Brown’s class.

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 10:00 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation WEDNESD A Y 10:00 A M 2:00 P M O pen House C o e e & C on v ersation THURSD A Y 6:30 P M M ix ed Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Bruce Hodge, P astor Jim passed peacefully from this life the morning of Jan. 22, 2014. Jim was born in Grif n, GA but has been a resident of Port St. Joe for over 25 years. Jim is survived by his spouse and children: Belinda Parham (wife); Jeniffer and Matt Ward (daughter and sonin-law), Jamey and Stephanie Parham (son and daughter-in-law), Toni and Shawn Bidinger (step-daughter and sonin-law), Tommy and Vonda Worley (step-son and daughter-in-law), Terry and Heather Worley (stepson and daughter-in-Iaws; three grandchildren: Brent Walker, Megan and Matthew Nazor, Nataleigh Parham; and seven greatgrandchildren. Jim is also survived by his brother Jerry Parham. He was preceded in death by his father, John Parham, his mother Betty Parham and brother. John Parham III. A memorial service was held 10 a.m. EST on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2014, at Beach Baptist Chapel, 311 Columbus St., St. Joe Beach, FL with interment following in Holly Hill Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to National Ri e Association. Services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. James Parham On Jan. 22, 2014, Kathleen Blackman, 89, rejoined her husband who preceded her in death, the late Rev. Woodrow Blackman, whom she married on Nov. 31, 1948. A resident of Wewahitchka, Fla., for almost 60 years, she is survived by her two sons, Billy Blackman of Havana, Fla., (his wife Susan and children: Justin Blackman of Bakers eld, Calif., and Jillian Crymes and her husband, Justin, of Live Oak, Fla.) and Stevie (Tammy Nelson) Blackmon of Wewahitchka, Fla., (children: Stephanie Bailey and husband, Chip, and their daughter, Aubry, of Wewahitchka, Brad Blackmon and his wife, Gabbie, and their daughter, Whitley of Wewahitchka, and Beth Blackmon of Port St. Joe); two brothers, the Rev. Tommy Martin of Dothan, Ala., and Ed Martin of Panama City, Fla.; a host of nieces, nephews and too many friends to count. Services will be held 11 a.m. CST on Thursday, Jan. 30, in Wewahitchka at Glad Tidings Assembly Of God. Family will receive friends and family 30 minutes prior to the service. She will be laid to rest next to her husband at Roberts Cemetery in Honeyville. The family requests that no owers be sent but instead the money be donated to the Glad Tidings Building Fund, Box 128, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. Services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Kathleen Blackman A host of angels outstretched their arms to greet Cloteal Burke as she lost her ght to cancer on Jan. 16, 2014, in her home in Wewahitchka. Cloteal was born on Sept. 2, 1937, in Southport, Fla. She was a wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, beautician, nurse, gardener, animal lover, painter, poet and so much more. She will continue to be an inspiration to those who knew and loved her. She is preceded in death by her husband of 48 years, Victor Jewel Burke; sister, Teresa; brothers, Bronzel, Clyde; and granddaughter, Jessica Whit eld. Cloteal is survived by her four children, Deborah Burke McLeod and Mike, Steven Victor Burke, Victoria Burke Langford and Lonnie, Michael Eugene Burke; eight grandchildren, Jason Kretzer and Heather, Alison Martin Buckner and Frank, Wesley Burke Wilson, Melissa Martin Evans and Dustin, Chris Burke, Erica Burke, Maxwell Burke; greatgrandchildren, Jackson, Brianna, Isabelle, Jayce; sisters, Glenda, Lois, Leta; brother, WD; her two cherished pets, GiGi, Lady; many loving friends and a host of nephews and nieces. Cloteal will be laid to rest beside her husband at Live Oak Baptist Church Cemetery/Miller Cemetery in New Hope, Fla. Special thanks to Southerland Funeral Home for handling the cremation. Cloteal Burke CLOTEAL BURKE Mother Mandie Davis was born on July 16, 1922, in Leon County, Fla., to George and Mattie Green. Mother Davis was educated in the public schools of Leon County. She made a living working as a custodian for many years. Mother Davis confessed Christ early in her life and was a member of Mount Carmel Missionary Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, Fla. Mother Davis was preceded in death by her parents, George and Mattie Green and her brother Joe Green. She is survived by her sister, Alice Green of Port St. Joe, Fla.; three close cousins, Carlos Cunningham (Dawn) of Zellwood, Fla., Donald Cunningham and wife of Rochester, N.Y., Kelly Campbell and wife of Gainesville, Fla., and a host of relatives and friends. Her service was held at 11 a.m. E.S.T. on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church with interment following in Forest Hill Cemetery. Services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Mandie Davis Obituaries Special to The Star The trends that will affect how we live in the future will be explored 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 3 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled News From the Future: A Futurist Gives a Sneak Peek, features a lmed interview with Thomas Frey, senior futurist at the DaVinci Institute. Theres an ongoing fear about the future, says Frey, who encourages people to be aware of developments shaping their futures. The future will happen, so lets be engaged so we can take advantage of the opportunities. This is a wonderful time to be alive. Participants in the Lifetree program will hear about key developments that Frey predicts will signi cantly change daily life in the coming decades. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. Thursday, January 30, 2014 On Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014, Bobby Gene Pelt fell asleep in death at the age of 76. He will be missed very much by all of his many family members and friends. Gene is survived by his loving wife, Rita. They were wed on June 22, 1959. They have been married 54 years. Gene Pelt is also survived by his sons, Mitchell Wayne Pelt (wife Kim) and Douglas Lynn Pelt and his daughter Tammy Ware (husband Lashay) and his brothers Steve Buster Pelt, Robert Pelt and Tim Pelt, ve grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Gene was one of Jehovahs Witnesses. He enjoyed very much discussing what he learned from the Bible to help us develop and strengthen our faith. This Saturday Feb. 1, 2014, at 3 p.m. ET there will be a memorial service held at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses at 335 Selma St. in St Joe Beach. A comforting biblical talk will be given highlighting the resurrection as a solid hope for the future. Bobby Gene Pelt WANT TO GO? WHAT : News From the Future: A Futurist Gives a Sneak Peek WHEN: 7 p.m. CT Monday WHERE: 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach The future considered at Lifetree Caf

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The Star| B5 Thursday, January 30, 2014 Jan. 20-Jan. 26 On Monday, Jan. 20, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce (GCSO) received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 1100 block of West River Road in Wewahitchka. Deputy Ken Starnes investigated the complaint and arrested Leonard Harold Britt (52) of Wewahitchka for Domestic Battery and Domestic Felony Battery by Strangulation. Britt was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. An active warrant was served on Rex Aaron Veasey, Jr., (22), of Wewahitchka. Deputy Ken Starnes arrested Veasey at his residence. Veasey was wanted for Violation of Probation – Battery out of Calhoun County. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. The GCSO executed ve transport orders by local judges. Deputies traveled to Walton County Correctional Institution and Cross City Correctional Institution to transport inmates for circuit court proceedings in Gulf County on Tuesday, Jan. 21. Transports were also for inmates at Gulf Correctional Institution and the Bay County Jail. On Wednesday, Jan. 22, Deputy Paul Williams served a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support on Clyde Randall McDaniel (50), of Wewahitchka. McDaniel turned himself in at the GCSO. On Thursday, Jan. 23, a complaint was received from the 200 block of Abby Drive in Wewahitchka, regarding a possible domestic disturbance. Once Deputy Paul Williams arrived he made contact with the parties and determined that domestic violence did occur. As a result of the investigation Colton Lee Mullinax (18) and a female juvenile were arrested. Both were charged with Domestic Battery and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Jan. 23, the GCSO received a complaint of theft from the 100 block of Ling Street, in Highland View. The victim discovered four large truck type rims with recapped tires and an ignition system on an engine missing. The total property stolen was valued at approximately $500. Inv. Greg Skipper continues to investigate the case. If you have any information that would assist the GCSO in recovering the property and/or lead to the arrest the suspect(s) please contact the GCSO at 2271115, or remain anonymous by calling CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS (8477). On Friday, Jan. 24, a report was led with the GCSO for Failure to Return Rented Property. The total value of the unreturned rented property is $350, which constitutes a third degree felony. Deputy Chip Bailey continues to investigate the case. On Jan. 24, Deputy Ken Starnes responded to a physical disturbance in the 6200 block of Ganley Road, in the Five-Acre Farms area. Eugene Phillip Allen (27) was arrested and charged with Domestic Battery. Allen was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Jan. 24, the GCSO received a report of the burglary of a vehicle in the area of Iola Landing. The complainant was hunting in the area and later returned to nd the vehicle burglarized. Approximately $1,800 in hunting related items was stolen from the vehicle. Deputy Desrosier continues to investigate this case. On Saturday, Jan. 25, another report of the burglary of a vehicle was received at Iola Landing. Approximately $230 of property was stolen from the vehicle. If you have any information on this, or the burglary on Jan. 24, that would assist the GCSO in recovering the property and/or lead to the arrest the suspect(s) please contact the GCSO at 2271115, or remain anonymous by calling CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS (8477). On Jan. 25, Kenneth Devon Fain (36) was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility after he was arrested in Calhoun County on an arrest order out of Gulf County. Fain was served the arrest order for Contempt of Court – Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. On Jan. 25, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a physical disturbance in the 9200 block of Cockles Ave, in the Beacon Hill area. At the conclusion of the investigation, Deputy Ken Starnes arrested and charged Jackie F. Grable (59) with Domestic Battery. Grable was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. From Jan. 20-26 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Traf c Stops, 33; Civil Process Services, 10; Field Contacts, 13; Abandoned Vehicles, 8; Warrant Arrests, 3; Requests for Security Checks, 1; Trespass/ Prowler Complaints, 1; Alarms, 1; Traf c Accidents, 4; Suspicious Person, 3; Suspicious Vehicle, 3; Welfare Check, 2; Funeral Escort/Parade, 6; Domestic Disturbance, 5; Auto Burglary, 2; Death Investigations, 1; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 2; Verbal Disturbance, 2; Field/Grass Fire, 2; Vehicle Fire, 1; Prisoner Transport for Court, 4; Obscene/Harassing Phone calls, 2; Reckless Driver, 2; Criminal Mischief, 1; Music/Noise, 4; Physical Disturbance, 1; Drunk Pedestrian, 1; Hit & Run, 1; Sexual Battery, 1; and Theft, 1. N O T I C E T O R E C E I V E S E A L ED B I D S C I T Y O F W E W A H I T C H K A T h e C i t y o f W e w a h i t c h k a h a s d e c l a r e d t h e f o l l o w i n g i t e m s a s s u r p l us a n d w i l l a c ce p t s e al e d b i d s f o r t h e p u r c h a s e o f t h e s e i t e m s Minim u m b i d f o r a n y v e hi c l e i s $ 1 5 0 0 0 1 1 9 9 7 D od g e R a m V a n V I N : 2 B 5 W B3 5 Z 7 V K 5 8 5 3 1 6 2 1 9 9 9 F o r d C l u b W a g o n V a n V I N : 1 F B SS 3 1 S 2 X H A 1 3 0 7 6 B i d s m us t be m a r k e d “ S E A L E D B I D – S U RP L U S E QU I P M E N T ” a n d m us t be r e ce i v e d b y t h e C i t y C l e r k pr i o r t o 1 2 n oo n ( C T ) T h u r s d a y F e br u a r y 2 0 2 0 1 4 a t t h e C i t y A n n e x 3 1 8 So u t h 7 S t r e e t W e w a h i t c h k a F L 3 2 4 6 5 I t e m s m a y be i n s pe c t e d a t t h e C i t y d u r i n g r e g u l a r b us i n e s s h o u r s M o n d a y t h r o u g h F r i d a y be t w e e n 8 : 0 0 A M a n d 3 : 0 0 P M ( C T ) b y a p po i n t m e n t P l e a s e c al l 8 5 0 6 39 2 6 0 5 B i d s w i l l be o pe n e d d u r i n g t h e r e g u l a r C i t y C o m m i s s i o n m e e t i n g o n M o n d a y F e br u a r y 2 4 2 0 1 4 a t 6 : 3 0 P M ( C T ) T h e C i t y C o m m i s s i o n r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o r e j e c t a n y o r al l b i d s r ec e i v ed T h e C i t y o f W e w a h i t c h k a i s a n e q u al o p po r t u n i t y pr o v i d e r a n d e m p l o ye r C o nn i e P a r r is h Ci t y Cl e r k I n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h F e d e r a l l a w a n d U S D e p a r t m e n t o f A g r i c u l t u r e p o l i c y t h i s i n s t i t u t i o n i s p r o h i b i t e d f r o m d i s c r i m i n a t i n g o n t he ba s i s o f r ac e c olo r na t io na l o r ig i n ag e d i s a b i l i t y r e l ig io n s e x f a m i l ia l s t at u s s e x u a l o r ie n t at io n a n d r e p r i s a l N o t a l l p r o h i b i t e d b a s e s a p p l y t o a l l p r o g r a m s F r i e n d s o f S t J o s e p h B a y P r e s e r v e s P r o u d ly P r e s e n t W i n t er Ba y Da y Fi n d u s o n F a c e b o o k : F r i e n d s o f S t J o s e p h B a y P r e s e r v e s T o u r t h e P r es e r v es : E n j o y a t o u r t h r o u g h t h e b a c k w o od s t r a i l s o f t h e B u f f e r P rese r v e T r i p s a b o u t s h o r e b i rd s o r l i f e a l o n g t h e s h o r e l i n e C h e c k t h e s c h e d u l e a t s t j o s e p h b a y o r g f o r B i r d i n g D e a l T r a c t E x p l o r a t i o n s T r i p s st j o s ep h b a y p r es e r v es o r g 2 0 1 4 B a y & Bu f f e r P r e ser v e C e le b r a t i o n Fe b rua r y 1 2 0 1 4 S t J os e p h B a y S t a t e B uf f e r Pr e s e r v e 1 1 a m 2 p m Lo w Co u n t r y S hr i m p B o i l $ 1 0 D on a ti on ( 55 + ( 5 2 , 2 0 2 ,( . 2 2 ( 5 # + ( , 1, 5 ( + !, ( + , 1 ,( ( , ( (2 (5 2 , 5 6 2 5 6 2 , 5 6 2 5 1 2 5 !* 1 5 5 5 # ( 2 5 , ,( 1 ( 1 ( 2 0 2 , ( 6 1 2 . 2 4 ( 2 , 2 & ( 2 6 5 ( , 2 0 G u est s US Rep S o uther land Fla Senator Montford Fla Rep Beshears Gulf County Elected Officials & TDC, Port Authority, SGCFD ( 55 + ( 5 2 , 2 0 2 ,( . 2 2 ( 5 # + ( , 1, 5 ( + !, ( + , 1 ,( ( , ( ( 2 ( 5 2 , 5 6 2 5 6 2 , 5 6 2 5 1 2 5 !* 1 5 5 5 # ( 2 5 , ,( 1 ( 1 ( 2 0 2 , ( 6 1 2 . 2 4 ( 2 , 2 & 2 01 1 2 5 6 6 ( 1 ) 2 5 2 1 % % ( + Law Enforcement Star Staff Report A Bay County jury last week convicted a Panama City man of breaking into a Mexico Beach hotel room and battering two occupants in April 2011. Ronald Deon Lee, 34, entered a hotel room occupied by Scott Webb, Trent Webb and Janice Williamson, all from Eufaula, AL, early on April 15, 2011. Assistant State Attorney Robert Sale told jurors that Williamson awoke to find Lee naked and on top of her trying to rape her. She screamed, awakening Scott Webb, who suffered four broken toes and was bitten twice while detaining Lee until police arrived. The evidence, Sale said, showed Lee had entered the room twice that morning, first taking the couple’s cell phones and car keys back to his adjoining room. He returned to attempt the rape of Williamson, even though she was sleeping in the same bed as Scott Webb while Trent Webb, 11 at the time, was in the other bed. Lee probably entered the victims’ room the first time by climbing across the balconies, Sale said. Lee was found guilty of burglary of an occupied dwelling with a battery. He faces a maximum of life in prison when Circuit Judge Michael Overstreet sentences him Feb. 4. Panama City man convicted in MB hotel burglary GCSO BRIEFS THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 T r a d e s & S e rv i c e s 227-7847 CALL T OD A Y! GET Y OUR AD IN! T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 2-15-14 CODE: SJ00 Special to The Star The Florida Department of Health announced the rollout of a new resource providing the rst comprehensive prole regard ing healthiest weight for each Florida County. The County-Lev el Healthiest Weight Snapshots tool is a part of the Community Health Assessment Resource Tool Set (CHARTS) and features information designed to assist families, health care profession als, policy makers and whole communities to help Floridians achieve a healthy weight. “This new tool provides an important view of the progress in each of our counties as we work to become the healthiest state in the nation,” said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator of the Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin counties. The tool includes demo graphic, behavioral and built en vironment measures relating to the community’s healthy weight status, and may be used to sup port community health assess ments, provide data for health and weight related research, and encourage communities to continue their efforts to improve nutrition and increase physical activity. Healthiest Weight Florida is a public-private collaboration bringing together state agen cies, not for prot organizations, businesses, and entire commu nities to help Florida’s children and adults make consistent, informed choices about healthy eating and active living. To learn more about the CHARTS County-Level Healthi est Weight Snapshots, please visit the Healthiest Weight Flori da County Prole page. The De partment also encourages you to learn more about our Healthiest Weight Florida initiative at www. HealthiestWeightFL.com. The Department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Follow us on Twitter at @ HealthyFla and on Facebook. For more information about the Florida Department of Health please visit www.FloridaHealth. gov. FDOH offers new, county-level healthiest weight snapshots Special to The Star Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is proud to announce the addition of two employees to its staff and the promotion of one of its employees. The Cooperative is also hosting a student intern. Kelsie Buccellato is new to the Cooperative’s accounting department. She holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Florida State University. Luke Vickers is a Line Technician. He is a graduate of Liberty County High School. Also, Josh Pitts was recently promoted to from the title of Line Technician Trainee IV to the title of Line Technician. The Cooperative is also proud to host Eric Balcazar as an intern. Eric is a student at Margaret K. Lewis School. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of the Touchstone Energy national alliance of local, consumer-owned electric cooperatives providing high standards of service to customers large and small. More than 70 employees serve more than 20,000 meters and 2,500 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, Lynn Haven, White City, Fountain and Southport. GCEC employee NEWS EE RIC BALCAZAR JOSH PITTS LL UKE VICKERS KK ELSI BUCCELLATO GUMBO from page B1 Beach’s Best Blast on the Beach July Fourth reworks celebration. “The cook-off has become one of the must attend events here in Mexico Beach,” said Shoaf. “This is one event you will not want to miss or taste!” Happening simultaneously on the opposite side of Highway 98, will be the third annual Society of Expres sive Artists (SEA) Art Walk, which will showcase artists from all along the Forgotten Coast. The cost to showcase is $5 for SEA members, $25 for nonmembers and $35 for those who want to showcase and join the organization. The appli cation deadline has been extended to Feb. 3. Interested artists may download the application from the SEA Face book page at www.facebook.com/sea. artists. SEA is a group of local artists that reside in coastal communities along the Florida panhandle. The goal of the group is to provide a forum for local artists to promote their work, share ideas and opportunities, to network with other artist organiza tions and to identify and create art exhibit venues.FILE pP HOTO All proceeds raised will help fund the Best Blast on the Beach reworks display on July 4. WW ES LL OCHER | The Star Unofcial historian Tom Parker, director Jimbo Collins and videographer Rick Ott took a tour of the theatre last week. Collins, who is under contract to be the next owner of the theater, met with Rick Ott last week regard ing the lming of live music perfor mances at the venue. Ott is owner of “From the Heart of Sopchoppy Music Hour”, a show televised on WFSU which is the equivalent of Austin City Limits and features artists from the North Florida area. “I’ve looked at the Port Theatre for several years,” said Ott. “I love Port St. Joe and Gulf County.” Once Ott heard Collins’ plans to open the venue back up to live per formances, he got in touch to see how soon he could begin recording. Ott has recorded many music performances in his career includ ing shows at the Monticello Opera House in Jefferson County and a month’s worth of performances in Ireland. He’s previously recorded in Gulf County and said that he looks forward to returning. Collins said he hopes that Ott would be able to record three shows a year to be broadcast on WFSU to bring additional awareness to the area. “The goal is to (reeducate) the people in the community with this wonderful old historic asset,” said Collins. He went on to say that a town hall meeting would soon take place so that the board of directors could better understand what the com munity wants the Port Theatre to be. Collins is also focused on pre serving the history of the build ing and will soon put out a call for anyone who frequented the theatre during its movie heyday from the 1940s and beyond. “I want to preserve recollections that the citizens have,” said Collins. “Especially those who are in the au tumn of their lives. “If we don’t get them now, they may be lost forever.” Port St. Joe native Tom Parker, considered by Collins to be the “un ofcial historian” of the theatre, was an employee from 1943 until 1945 and has shared many memories and stories about the building. “I think people will be interest ed in the theatre reopening,” said Parker. “People would reach out to any type of activity going on here.” Parker said he was present in 1938 when the theatre opened its doors for its inaugural showing of the lm “Gold Diggers in Paris” and began working as a projectionist at the age of 12 with his best friend Billy Howell. Parker said that he left his job at a drugstore to work at the theatre, where he worked four hours a day, seven days a week. His take was $25 per week. “That was big money at the time!” said Parker with a laugh. “I enjoyed it so much.” He also recalled the kids who came to the theatre and said there was always lot of smooching going on. Those who may have early mem ories of the theatre can share them by calling the Port Theatre Founda tion at 227-8122. THEATRE from page B1 Jason Garwood will lead “Explore the Shore of St. Jo seph Bay” which will begin at Eagle Harbor at St. Joseph Pen insula State Park, with wading and hands-on activities. Be prepared to get wet and bring bug spray, sunscreen, a change of clothes, towel, eld glasses, camera and hat. Preserve manager Dylan Shoemaker will lead a back woods tour of the buffer pre serve. This is a riding trip into the 5,000 acre preserve with short walking intervals. Eleven years after its cre ation the Friends group remains a vibrant and active group work ing with the preserve staff to keep St. Joseph Bay, one of Flor ida’s 41 aquatic preserves, pris tine while assisting with work on the uplands when called. “If you are not familiar with the Buffer Preserve or the Aquatic Preserve stop in for a visit at the Preserve Welcome Center and learn how the Buf fer Preserve helps to protect the bay through a natural ltra tion of the water as it descends to the bay via the watershed,” said Sandra Chan, preserve secretary. “St. Joseph Bay is one of the most pristine bays on the Gulf of Mexico and the goal is to keep it that way.” The Preserves Center is also a mecca for scientists and researchers. In the past year, more than 20 groups of students and pro fessors have stayed at the Pre serve. They have come from South Dakota, Wayne State Col lege in Nebraska, Creighton Uni versity in Omaha and colleges from Missouri, Illinois to those close to home such as Florida, Louisiana and Tennessee. “A student from Puerto Rico and one from Nova Scotia have called the Buffer Preserve home in 2013,” Chan noted. The Friends group, a nonprot supporting the missions of the Preserves, has exploded since its creation. Membership is now over 200 and still growing, Chan said. “The Friends need your help and support in order to continue working to make the Preserves the best they can be and provide a place of enjoyment and learn ing for the public,” Chan said. “Dylan arrived last year and has made a substantial impact at the Buffer Preserve.” St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve is located on State Road 30-A at Simmons Bayou. St. Joseph Bay Aquatic Pre serve encompasses 73,000 sub merged acres in the bay and gulf. The Friends group work to help both hence they are Friends of the Preserves while each of the preserve are a sepa rate entity. The Aquatic Preserve has not been funded through the state so a group of dedicated volunteers sample the water and use a transect to observe the sea grass to ensure the pris tine condition of the water and sea grass for all living in the bay. Plants are a major area of study on the Buffer Preserve. The preserve’s crop of Chap man’s rhododendrons is the largest population of its kind on public lands. Other federally or state threatened or endangered plant populations are observed and conditions created that en courage their growth. BAY DAY from page B1 FILE pP HOTO Tram tours in search of wildowers and butteries will be led by Dylan Shoemaker, presever manager.

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, January 30, 2014 The Star | B7 93732S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-140-CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JENNIFER M. BURKE and BETTY G. OWENS, Defendants TO: Jennifer M. Burke 14809 Heronglen Drive Lithia, Florida 33547 NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to reform a mortgage has been filed against you on the following described property: Commence at a inch iron rod and cap (LB 732) marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 355 at Pages 102 and 103 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, said point being the intersection of the Northerly right of way boundary of Chipola Avenue with the Westerly right of way boundary of Second Street and run thence North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary, a distance of 404.84 feet to a inch iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 266 at pages 427-429 (Parcel 5) of said Public Records; thence Continue North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary, a distance of 111.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning thence continue North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary, a distance of 113.34 feet to the Southerly right of way boundary of East Church Avenue; thence North 89 degrees 47 minutes 19 seconds West along said Southerly right of way boundary, a distance of 172.78 feet to the Easterly boundary of lands described in Deed Book 34 at page 610 of said Public Records; thence South 03 degrees 12 minutes 26 seconds West along said Easterly boundary, a distance of 226.73 feet; thence North 89 degrees 26 minutes 53 seconds East, a distance of 23.46 feet to the Southwest corner of the aforesaid lands described in Official Records Book 266 at pages 427-429; thence along the Westerly and Northerly boundary of said lands as follows: thence North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East, a distance of 111.00 feet; thence North 89 degrees 30 minutes 49 seconds East, a distance of 155.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.51 acre, more or less. Commonly known at 511 S. Second Street, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Charles S. Isler, III, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 430, Panama City, Florida 32402, within thirty (30) days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 7th day of the January, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court By: Wyvonne Pickett Deputy Clerk January 23, 30, 2014 February 6, 13, 2014 93746S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2009CA-000301 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. EICHER, BRUCE, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-209-CA000301 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, EICHER, BRUCE, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GLILF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 a.m. ET on the 13th day of February, 2014, the following described property: LOT 57 OF WINDMARK BEACH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 1 THROUGH 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Iis-pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 9th day of January, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33309 954-491-1120 20851.0130/RBerkman IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate In this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY FL 32402, 850-747-5338 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice Impaired, call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 93782S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 13-CP-65 IN RE: ESTATE OF ROY M. LILLY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of ROY M. LILLY, deceased, whose date of death was June 29, 2012, File Number 13-CP-65 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which. is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 732.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 23, 2014. Personal Representative: Mary Frances B. Lilly 118 S. Pastime Dr. Thomasville, GA 31792 Attorney for Personal Representative: Robert S. Hightower FL Bar No. 199801 P.O. Box 4165 Tallahassee, FL 32315 Phone: (850)222-3363 January 23, 30, 2014 93786S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA000350 Division No. Section. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff(s), vs. GILDA G. BRANCH, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 16th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA000350of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and or GULF County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LARRY W. BRANCH AND GILDA G. BRANCH are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Main Lobby of Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. ET on the 20th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at a re-bar marking the Northwest corner of Tract 18 of Gulfside and Bayside Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 24-B; of the official records office of Gulf County, Florida also being a point lying on the Westerly right of way of County Road Number 30-E; thence run along said right of way South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East 101.49 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run along said right of way South 20 Degrees 14 minutes 55 Seconds East 91.49 feet to a road and cap; thence North 69 degrees 42 minutes 54 seconds East 238.06 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds West 91.51 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 69 degrees 43 minutes 58 seconds West 238.06 feet to the point of Beginning, containing 0.50 acres more or less. and commonly known as: LOT A TRACK 17 CAPE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING Al-lER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at GULF County, Florida, this 17th day of January, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk, Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq./FL Bar# 549452 Laura L. Walker, Esq./FL Bar# 509434 Daniel F. Martinez, II, Esq./FL Bar# 438405 Kalei McElroy Blair, Esq./FL Bar# 44613 Jennifer Lima Smith/FL Bar # 984183 GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, FL 33607 (813)443-5087 972233.10184/tavias January 23, 30, 2014 97255S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 2014-02PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES WILLIAM TUTTLE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of James William Tuttle Deceased, File Number 2014-02PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 23, 2014. Sandra J. Tuttle 76 Peach Tree Road Byhalia, MS 38611 Personal Representative of the Estate of James William Tuttle, Deceased J. Patrick Floyd Law Offices J. Patrick Floyd, Chtd. 408 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32546 (850) 227-7413 FL Bar No. 257001 Attorney for Petitioner January 23, 30, 2014 97295S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDAFOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No.: 2012-CA 236 WINDMARK INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company Plaintiff, vs. RIVERFRONTPROPERTIES, INC. a Georgia corporation, GARY R. RHINEHEART, and HARRYA. SCHULTZ, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 20th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on the steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32546, the undersigned Clerk will offer for sale the following real property more particularly described as follows: Lot 30 of WINDMARK BEACH, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 1-5, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Together with the following described parcel: Begin at the most Easterly Corner of Lot 30, Windmark Beach, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 1-5, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence N7502’39”W along the Northerly line of said Lot 30 for 15.03 feet to the Westerly line of Parcel V, said Windrnark Beach; thence N1842’14”E along said Westerly line for 88.42 feet to the Southerly right of way line of Windmark Way which is a curve concave to the North having a radius of 510.00 feet; thence Easterly along said curving right of way line for an arc distance of 15.16 feet, the chord of said arc bearing S7941’20”E for 15.16 feet; thence S1842’14”W for 89.65 feet to the point of beginning. The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Gulf County Circuit Court Case No.: 2012 CA000236; Windmark Investments LLC, v. Riverfront Properties, Inc., Gary R. Rhineheart, and Harry A. Schultz, now pending in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a Claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of January, 2014 REBECCANORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 97303S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDAFOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No.: 2012-CA-234 WINDMARK INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company Plaintiff, vs. RIVERFRONTPROPERTIES, INC. a Georgia corporation, GARY R. RHINEHEART, HARRYA. SCHULTZ, and GEORGIACOMMERCE BANK, a Georgia banking corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN than on the 20th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on the steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32546, the undersigned Clerk will offer for sale the following real property more particularly described as follows: Lot 77 of WINDMARK BEACH, according to the Plat on file in Plat Book 4, Pages 1 through 5, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Gulf County Circuit Court Case No.: 2012 CA000234; Windmark Investments LLC, v. Riverfront Properties, Inc., Gary R. Rhineheart, Harry A. Schultz, and Georgia Commerce Bank, now pending in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a Claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of January, 2014 REBECCANORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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B8 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1120413 4510160 1120011 Why work for Dicks Sporting Goods?ARE YOU DRIVEN, COMMITTED, SKILLED AND PASSIONATE? Do you love sports and want a career with a rapidly growing company? If so, then DICKS Sporting Goods is the company for you. Were looking for friendly faces to provide great service to our customers. Applicants must be at least 18 years old.Full and Part-Time Positions AvailableNOW HIRINGPlease apply online at: DicksSportingGoods.jobs/newstores GRAND OPENING IN THE PIER PARK NORTH SHOPPING CENTER IN PANAMA CITY BEACH (LOCATED ON U.S. 98 AND STATE ROAD 79)€ Competitive Pay € Excellent Bene“ ts € Associate Discount € Full and Part time Schedules € Sales Leaders/Supervisors € Sales Associates Apparel, Footwear, Freight Flow, Team Sports, Golf, Lodge (Hunting/ Camping/Fishing) € Cashiers € Bike Technicians € Running Specialist € Lacrosse Specialist € Fitness Trainer € Golf Club Technician € Maintenance/Operations € Temporary Associates € Administrative AssistantWe are an Equal Opportunity Employer. 4516266Aline's Beauty Salon taking applications for Licensed Cosmetologist and/or Nail Technician. Apply in person at 315 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe. 850-229-6600. 4516279 Dockside Seafood & Raw Bar @ PSJ Marina NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: € Hostesses € Line Cooks € Handyman € Bartenders € Servers/BussersAPPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3.PICKET'S LANDING CONDO E7. 4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH 2000.00/MO. 4. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 5. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 6. NORTH CRAWFORDVILLE. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. FENCE YARD 750.00/MO. 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM,1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO 60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4.DUPLEX. 3BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 9 7 8 6. NORTH CRAWFORDVILLE.3 BEDROOM,2 BATH. FENCE YARD 750.00/MO. order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 97359S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000096 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. James Monroe Freeman a/k/a James Freeman; Unknown Spouse of James Monroe Freeman a/k/a James Freeman; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 16, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000096 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James Monroe Freeman a/k/a James Freeman are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Rebecca L. Norris, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DESK OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. ET on February 20, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK 1, WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT ONE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Rebecca L. Norris CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 13-260760 FC02 CHE January 23, 30, 2014 97395S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000459 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. EARLENE E. ASHBAUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 25, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2010-CA000459 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and EARLENE E ASHBAUGH; CRAIG NOAH ASHBAUGH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM ET, on the 20th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 134, WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 134 WETAPPO CREEK ROAD, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 22, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F10073015 Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 2014 97361S PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for the removal of 3 pair of storefront doors and there replacement with hurricane impact storefront systems. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850229-8369. January 23, 30, 2014 97425S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-12 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: LAND’S LANDING BOAT RAMP & DOCK IMPROVEMENTS (PRI PROJECT #003.238) This project includes construction of a temporary coffer dam, concrete repairs to the existing boat ramp, approximately 500 SF of 5’ wide timber boardwalk, and 320 SF of floating docks at Land’s Landing in Gulf County, Florida. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER and that this is a sealed bid for “Land’s Landing Boat Ramp & Dock Improvements” project. Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on February 14, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Bids will be opened and read aloud at this same location on February 17, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners has implemented a Local Bidders Preference Policy for all RFP/BIDS. Anyone interested in bidding as a local bidder must follow the requirements of Resolution 2009-02 which may be obtained from the Clerk’s Office at the above address. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of the County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 GE Washer and Dryer. Large Capacity. Good condition. $125 for the set. 850-227-1189 Wanted -M1 Grand & WWII Rifles. M1 Grand Parts and 30.6 military ammo. 850-227-1189 Highland View 238 Marlin St. Fri-Sat Jan 24th and 25th. from 8a-4p Huge Indoor Garage Sale Fishing Gear, Sporting Goods, Housewares, Clothes. Text FL77695 to 56654 GUN SHOW PENSACOLA FAIRGROUNDSFebruary 1st and 2nd SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL77473 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL February 15th & 16th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572) General Admission $6 850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Acct/Finance JOB NOTICE Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court is accepting applications for Full-Time, Entry Level Finance Clerk with benefits. Applicants must have a High School Diploma, or equivalent, and be proficient in MS Excel and Word. Job Description and Application can be obtained by emailing ebland@gulfclerk.com or can be picked up in person. Return completed applications to the Clerk’s Human Resource Office, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Room 138, Port St. Joe, FL between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., E.T. Monday through Friday. Applications will be accepted until Friday, February 7, 2014. Gulf County Clerk’s Office enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Web Id 34278891 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES is looking for reliable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required.FT Maint TechGeneral maintenance experience, good driving history. Great benefits.PT Inspectors Attentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34278481 Install/Maint/RepairStockerWould you like to make $10-$12/hour working 3 days/week? We are looking for an inventory specialist to perform stocking & auditing duties. We offer commissions & flexible schedules. If you are active & outgoing, we can train. Must be 18, physically fit, & HSD/GED. Drug Free. NO criminal background, Valid FL DL. Check us out at dansp awn.com and apply in person at 1314 Bayview Ave, Mon-Fri, 10am to 4pm or call for an appt (850) 481-1115 Web ID#: 34277424 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City Beach Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Terri McAfee at tmcafee @pcnh.com OR 850-747-5054 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34278490 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in SOUTHPORT Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Rita Miller at rmiller @pcnh.com OR 850-348-7956 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34278492 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOME Are you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in BAYOU GEORGE, YOUNGSTOWN, & FOUNTAIN Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jennifer Greene at jgreene @pcnh.com OR 850-768-9761 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34278494 Medical/Health RN’s Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! You’ll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at Gulf Correctional Facility in Wewahitchka, FL. We are currently looking for Full Time, and PRN RN’s. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more! For more info, contact: Tracy Mazuranic 1-800-222-8215 x9553 tracy .mazuranic@cori zonhealth.com or Quick Apply online (under the job opportunities link). www .corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR Web Id 34278731 For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool,elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. For Sale: 2001 Holiday Rambler Vactioner Motorhome. 38Ft, Double Slide, 10cyl gasoline engine. 11,000K Miles. Like New. Loaded w/ Extras. Selling for Health Reasons. $40,000 Price Is Neg. (850)639-2608. Text FL76837 to 56654 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! AL #1481; GAL #2034; FL-AB #1488; NC #6397; Joe Bilbro, Lic. MS R.E. Broker; Thomas J. Tarpley, MSAL #565 10% Buyers Premium 400 125 OfferingsProperties inAUCTION* Feb. 18, 19 & 20 AL€FL€GA€MS€NCOnline Bidding AvailableB S O L U T E No Minimums, No Reserves... Sells Regardless of Price!800.479.1763 www.johndixon .com JOHN DIXON & A SSOCIATESA UCTIONS € M ARKETING Tues, Feb. 18, 11amSale Site: Marroitt Orlando Airport 7499 Augusta National Dr, Orlando, FL 41 Sell with Reserve 50 FL PropertiesIndustrialWarehouse€StorageBuildings €OfceCondos€CarWashFacility& Land€ResidentialLots&Land €Homes€CommercialLots&Land& Much, Much More Through Out Florida!!2099086 4510161



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, JANUARY 30, 2014 YEAR 76, NUMBER 16 quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 76, NUMBER 16 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion .................................A4Outdoors ...............................A6 Sports.....................................A7Community ............................B1School News ...........................B3Faith ........................................B4 Obituaries ...............................B4Classi eds ........................B7-B8 By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The school district has a winner. Tracy Bowers, a fourthgrade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School, was chosen as this years recipient of the Teacher of the Year award for Gulf County. Bowers class ground to a halt as school Principal Jay Bidwell, Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton and other members of the school board brie y interrupted to bestow the honor and presented her with a bouquet of owers. There are so many deserving teachers, said Bowers. I see so many teachers of the year every day at the school. Teachers up for the award are nominated by their peers and evaluated by an out-of-county group. Bowers gave a shy smile as she accepted the good news from the superintendent. Youre very humble, and very deserving, said Norton. WES LOCHER | The StarTracy Bowers, a fourth grade teacher at Wewahitchka Elementary School, was named Gulf Countys Teacher of the Year.School district names 4th-grade teacher Tracy Bowers Teacher of the yearA God-given giftSee TEACHER A3By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Each year awards are handed out to recognize the hard work of both teachers and employees throughout the Gulf County school system. These awards are extra special because all winners were nominated on their performance by their peers. The Gulf County Employee of the Year went to Julie Carr at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. Carr is a paraprofessional educator who assists with the Bridges students, two-way interactive classes between Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe, even Spanish classes when needed. We are so honored to have you represent the whole district, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton as he handed WES LOCHER | The StarEmployee Paraprofessional Julie Carr was chosen as Employee of the Year for the Gulf County district.Carr is employee of the year for Gulf County schoolsBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A consultant told the Port St. Joe Port Authority board last week that the case for state investment in dredging the Port of Port St. Joe shipping channel was positive. Rod Lewis, working with the Washington Economic Group, said a Return On Investment study commissioned by the Port Authority had resulted in numbers even more positive than he had estimated before undertaking the study. The ROI study is considered critical for the second path permitting is the rst the Port Authority is pursuing for dredging. The ROI, once nalized after input from board members, would be offered in Tallahassee as state lawmakers consider this spring making the estimated $25 million investment in dredging. Is there some return on investment? That is what the state is interested in, Lewis said. At the bottom line, the study estimates the modernization and expansion of the Port of Port St. Joe would carry nearly $941 million in economic impacts over a decade, a return of $4.66 for every $1 of state investment. Lewis noted that the study only factored in the two energy companies, Green Circle and Enova Energy, with signed Letters of Intent with the St. Joe Company to ship wood pellets through the port for overseas markets. Its a positive number, Lewis said of the ROI estimates. This is actually a very positive number. The state is looking at about $5 for every $1 of investment, so this is right there. The ROI aimed to quantify the output and revenue from an operational port and to do so, Lewis said, researchers looked Port dredge case positiveSee EMPLOYEE A3By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity believes the community that plans will be the more competitive community when it comes to economic development. Last week, representatives of the DEO and the city of Port St. Joe began that planning process as part of a pilot project called Competitive Florida. The city is one of four areas three other Florida cities as well as DeSoto County to be included in the pilot project, which aims to provide local of cials with a foundation for assessing community assets and, tailored to those assets, a plan for future economic development. The DEO is providing technical assistance and $40,000 in grant funds to boost the planning process, a central goal to begin to build a statewide repository of case studies in economic development from which other communities can learn. You are the pilots for us, said Julie Dennis, DEO coordinator for Competitive Florida. We want to know what has worked and what hasnt. This is Economic development pilot gets underwaySee PORT A5 See PILOT A5By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com After talking about it for months, county commissioners nally acted to address chronic problems with the Americus Ditch in St. Joe Beach. Commissioners, by a 3-1 vote, approved a memorandum of understanding with Preble Rish Engineers to undertake repairs in selected areas to create a methodology for xing the entire length of the project. Commissioner Warren Yeager, an employee of Preble Rish abstained, and Commissioner Joanna Bryan, saying she would like to see public input on the MOU and raising questions about xing only select sections, voted no. The Americus Ditch has been a headache for the county almost since installation of the $1 million project more than ve years ago. County employees and, Bryan noted, county taxpayers have completed more than 120 xes of the pipe since installation and there are at least 25 remaining areas that require attention, Bryan said. Preble Rish is agreeing to address ve of those areas almost as a pilot project to understand what will be needed to x the entire project. A section of a letter from Rish that was codied as the MOU, which would have released the engineering rm of record from future responsibility, was removed, Rish noted. We have no problem with that, Rish said. We BOCC approves MOU for Americus Ditch repairsSee DITCH A5Bay Day promotes preserves, B1 TAR TAR TAR TAR

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedby theFSUBoardofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomore easilyrespondtoworkforceneedsinourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversitybyhelpingusbuildan endowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallow FSUPanamaCitytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnew degreeprogramsandprovidenewequipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMary BethLovingoodat(850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SUPPORTOUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com There is always a starting line. Last week progress began on the Cape San Blas Lighthouse relocation project with the removal of the large lens at the top of the tower. Professional Lampist Joe Cocking, the only certied lampist in Florida, set up a pulley system last Wednesday and successfully removed the lens by Thursday afternoon. Special air-tight boxes were constructed for the lens. They were fabricated with materials provided by the city and there was a slight delay in operations when another box had to be constructed at the last minute. Cocking dismantled the lens and packed each piece of glass into the boxes, wrapping them in a copper paper to keep any moisture out. Cocking pointed out that a major obstacle to the removal process was that the lighthouse lacked a center well. Common procedure is to lower the boxes down the middle of the interior. You always need to be exible, said Cocking. Theres always something unexpected. You have to be Gumby. According to the lampist, the danger of using the pulley system, or old school physics, as he called it, was that the boxes stood a greater chance of being blown around by winds coming off the water. Luckily, the wind was busy elsewhere and the lens made a safe journey to ground level. Arlyn Danielson, curator for the U.S. Coast Guard was on hand to oversee the process. The Coast Guard owns all lighthouse lenses, said Danielson. For preservation reasons decommissioned lenses often go to a museum or are borrowed by lighthouse groups to interpret maritime history. The lens will be restored and ready to reinstall if and when the lighthouse is relocated to Port St. Joe. While the additional box was being crafted down below, up in the lighthouse tower Kathleen McCormick, the director of collections in St. Augustine, was hard at work dismantling the clockwork mechanism which regulates the weights which ascend and descend, rotating the towers lens, and controlling the rate at which it ashes. McCormick has a museum conservation background and has been visiting lighthouses with Cocking for more than eight years, helping with adjustments, repairs, dismantling or even just appreciating the technology. I have a fascination with 19th Century machinery, said McCormick. Railroad technology, music machines, clockwork gears and lighthousesits all very similar. McCormick pointed out that a unique feature of the lighthouse is that its constructed of steel. Most lighthouses constructed around the same time were made of brick, stone, wood or iron. When lighthouses were built at the turn of the 21st Century, they were constructed with whatever materials were most readily available and designed to t the local geographic and climatic conditions. Cocking said that the hardest part of the job wasnt lowering the lens, but rather clearing out the wasps that had made the lighthouse their home. During their rst visit several weeks ago, Cocking and McCormick had to ascend through more than 100 stairs of stinging terror. Bids have been received for the relocation of the lighthouse though they have not been presented to the public. Bids for moving the keepers quarters and oil house were due this week. Cape San Blas Lighthouse lens removed The lens parts, packed in airtight boxes were lowered to the ground using a pulley system. Lampist Joe Cocking disassembles the clockwork mechanism which rotates the lighthouses lenses.WES LOCHER | The Star The lens and parts is property of the United States Coast Guard and will be restored.

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The Star| A3Thursday, January 30, 2014Were so proud of you. Bowers win comes with some added perks that include a monetary bonus and dinner with Florida Governor Rick Scott in Tallahassee. Bowers has been at Wewahitchka Elementary for 21 years. She graduated from Wewahitchka High School in 1987. Although I have been the principal at Wewahitchka Elementary for only a couple of weeks, I have long known about the almost legendary status of Ms. Tracy Bowers, Bidwell said. She taught my youngest two sons and even though they are 18 and 14 now, they still speak fondly of their time with Ms. Tracy. After seeing Ms. Bowers in action rsthand, I can honestly say that her true abilities as a teacher outweigh even her lofty reputation. Melissa Ramsey, district supervisor for curriculum and testing, gave Bowers a big hug and told her that she had a God-given gift. Its always a surprise because the other people here work as hard as you do, Bowers said. Its such an honor to be nominated and thats what touched me the most. Im grateful, thankful and humbled. District 2 school board member George Cox said that Bowers had once been a student of his, and in his 23 years of teaching, he had always remembered her. As a student, she knocked my socks off, said Cox. Even back then I knew that I was in the presence of super talent. In order for a teacher to be eligible for the award, they must demonstrate a superior ability to foster excellence in education, contribute to the continuous improvement of student learning and the school environment. They must utilizes original and innovative instructional materials, methods, curriculum or tools, maintain a record of superior teaching performance, actively engage in collaborative and sustained professional development and demonstrate leadership in educational activities at the school and district. The rst lesson I observed in Tracys class absolutely knocked my socks off and I have continued to be impressed every time I visit her classroom, Bidwell said. I have seen many teachers during my 24 years in education and I can honestly say that Ms. Tracy Bowers is that rare instructor who I place in the category of Teaching Royalty. We are both lucky and honored to have such a wonderful lady and incredible teacher here at Wewahitchka Elementary School and we hope to be blessed with her gifts for many years to come. At Port St. Joe Elementary, the Teacher of the Year award nominee was Cindy Phillips, who teaches science and reading at the fth-grade level. Phillips has more than 24 years of teaching experience; seven of those have been in Port St. Joe. Cindy has taught various grade levels throughout her career but I believe her true passion is teaching science, said elementary Principal Sue Gannon. She comes early and stays late and even comes on weekends to take care of the snakes! At Port St. Joe Jr./ Sr. High School, Julie Hodges, who teaches art education for grades 8-12, was the nominee. Hodges has worked at the high school for just under two years I was in complete shock, said Hodges. I love what I do and I hope that my students leave my room with a sense of pride and enjoyment from being in a visual art class. The quality of art that the students are creating is only possible because of the support from the faculty here at PSJHS and the county ofce. At Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School the award was delivered to guidance counselor Karen Turner, who has served in the role for eight years. I am truly humbled, said Turner. As a guidance counselor I never expected to be voted on for this great honor. I love working at Wewahitchka High School and want to thank all for the opportunity to serve as their Teacher of the Year. Turner was the rst and last guidance counselor at Wewahitchka Middle School before moving to the high school. IMPORTANTINFORMATION ABOUTYOUR DRINKINGWATERTestsShowedColiformBacteriainLighthouseUtilitiesWater Ourwatersystemrecentlyviolatedadrinkingwaterstandard. Althoughthisincidentwasnotanemergency,asourcustomers, youhavearighttoknowwhathappenedandwhatwedidto correctthissituation. Weroutinelymonitorthewaterweproducefordrinkingwater contaminantsandtakeve(5)distributionsamplespermonthto testforthepresenceofcoliformbacteria.Thestandardisthat nomorethanone(I)distributionsamplepermonthmaytest positivefortotalcoliforms.DuringDecember2013,two(2)distributionsamplesshowedthepresenceofthesebacteria,soour systemexceededourmaximumcontaminantlevel(MCL).WhatShouldIDo?Youdonotneedtoboilyourwaterortakeothercorrectiveactions.However,ifyouhavespecichealthconcerns,consultyour doctor.Ifyouhaveaseverelycompromisedimmunesystem, haveaninfant,arepregnant,orareelderly,youmaybeatincreasedriskandshouldseekadvicefromyourhealthcareprovidersaboutdrinkingthiswater.Generalguidelinesonwaysto lessentheriskofinfectionbymicrobesareavailablefromEPA's SafeDrinkingWaterHotlineat1-800-426-4791.WhatDoesthisMean?Thisisnotanemergency,Ifithadbeenyouwouldhavebeen notiedwithin24hours.Totalcolifonnbacteriaaregenerallynot harmfulthemselves.Coliformsarebacteriawhicharenaturally presentintheenvironmentandareusedasanindicatorthat other,potentially-harmful,bacteriamaybepresent.Coliforms werefoundinmoresamplesthanallowedandthiswasa warningofpotentialproblems.Usually,coliformsareasignthat therecouldbeaproblemwiththetreatmentordistribution system(pipes).Wheneverwedetectcoliformbacteriainany sample,wedofollow-uptestingtoseeifotherbacteriaofgreaterconcern,suchasfecalcoliformorE.coli,arepresent.Wedid notndanyofthesebacteriainoursubsequenttesting.lfwe had,wewouldhavenotiedyouimmediately.Also,further follow-uptestresultswereabsentfortotalcoliformbacteria (nonewerepresent).WhatisBeingDone?Furthertestingshowednocoliformspresent. Forinformation,pleasecontact:LarryMcArdleat(850)227-3501or POBox428PortSt.Joe,FL32457.Pleasesharethisinformationwithalltheotherpeoplewhodrink thiswater,especiallythosewhomaynothavereceivedthis Noticedirectly(forexample,peopleinapartments,nursing homes,schools,andbusinesses). Youcandothisbypostingthis Noticeinapublicplaceordistributingcopiesbyhandormail. ThisNoticeisprovidedby:LighthouseUtilitiesWaterSystem-Florida PWSID#1230848 Datedistributed:January27,2014 *BOARDCERTIFIEDCIVILTRIALLAWYER, OFCOUNSEL 2077822 Gun ShowFebruary 23rd&24thFt.WaltonBeach FairgroundsFREE PARKINGConcealed WeaponsClassSat/Sun11amor2pmFloridagunshows.comSat9-5Sun10-4 February 8th&9thPanamaCityFairgrounds Local TEACHER from page A1a bouquet of owers to the winner. Carr was surprised in the middle of class by Norton, Principal Lori Price, members of the school board and Carrs husband, Bill. I work with the best team, said Carr as her colleagues and students clapped. Its nice to be recognized. Im very proudThis is an honor. Norton called Carr the schools utility player, and praised her work ethic and for saving the taxpayers money. Shes the most solid and versatile person I know, Price said. The award is well deserved. Julie never says, I cant. Other employees of the year included Jewell Hopper at Port St. Joe Elementary; Karen Taylor at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School; Mary Ann Peak at Wewahitchka Elementary; Susie White at the district office; and Mary Lou Cookie White with maintenance/transportation. EMPLOYEE from page A1

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionOn the subject of legalizing marijuanaListen, if life was fair Brussel sprouts would taste like a Snickers bar. Rain would fall only at night. The guy in the lane in front of you would never need a price check. Kidney stones would dissipate before they got stuck. And wed all been born rich. Ive been hearing this discussion since way before the Pope became a Catholic. They used to kick it around right regularly in the front room up at Bill Argos Gulf Station. Mostly it dealt with hog prices and weather. The former were perennially low and the latter was always too wet, too cold, too dry or too unpredictable. Some declared it fate. A few gured luck played a hand. One or two cussed it. Most shook their heads and accepted it as just a part of being here. The unfairness of life has touched us all. In the early spring of 1958 I proudly shoved my hard earned quarter through the ticket window out front of the Park Theatre. I waited impatiently for my change. The lady that Mr. Clericuzio had hired to handle the money pointed to a freshly painted sign advertising the increased admission price of twentyve cents. Youve got to be kidding me! It had been fteen cents all my life! I needed a dime back for the popcorn and drink. Where was right, justice and the American way here? I was going to have to enjoy Old Yeller on an empty stomach. I got as close as I could to the front and settled in. I dont remember the cartoon, the newsreel or any of the coming attractions. But I knew something was dreadfully wrong right after that lion roared and the Eiffel Tower ashed across the screen. Old Yeller wasnt a city dog! This picture show was about some skinny necked girl name Gigi looking for the right man. Every time she got remotely close to nding him, someone would break out with a song! Half of it was in French! You talk about unfair! I was out a whole quarter. I didnt get nothing to eat. Someone had lied to me about what picture show was playing. And I dont know to this day how Old Yeller died. Nobody has to tell me about the twist and turns of life. But there is another side, some think possibly providentially provided, to this bouncing coin. Me and Leon were playing pitch in the back yard. We were backing up and throwing an old baseball further and higher with each toss. Daddy warned us about the car. We were more intent on the roar from the Yankee Stadium crowd. I was almost under the black walnut tree in the Boazs yard when I let go with a mighty heave. It was errant from the get-go. And I couldnt pull it back! Leon raced over to the drivers side of the car but Im not sure Willie Mays would have had a chance. That ball crashed into the front windshield of our faithful 51 Chevrolet with a glass shattering bang that reverberates to this day. My heart skipped ten beats. And then stopped completely when I realized Daddy was standing on the back porch! He had witnessed the whole thing. He bolted down the steps, grabbed Leon up, and whipped him for a while. He never said a word or laid a hand on me. I reckon life was not good forLeon that day. But it let me off scot-free. You see, sometimes life can be unfair IN YOUR FAVOR! People have had trouble pronouncing my name since Ive been old enough to remember. It has been misspoken, mutilated and tangled by teachers on the rst day of school, by college professors, by store clerks, candle stick makers and by friend and foe alike. It was a great source of embarrassment, most especially when I was in those self conscious early teenage years. I was sixteen when I met Mary Hadley Hayden. You should have heard how Kesley rolled off those beautiful lips. She could make it sing! Ive been kinda proud of that special name ever since. A lot of this fairness business deals from the angle youre viewing it. I married my rst wife for two reasons. She was even better looking than Mary Hadley and I thought she had money. It turned out she was poorer than I was! And let me tell you, that was a feat in itself! Before I could kick myself for getting into this deal under false pretenses, she loved me and cared for me and gave me children, respected me, put my concerns above hers on a daily basis, took care of our household, washed and cleaned up after me with a light heart and smile on her face ... and she is one person on earth who is completely void of any guile. She has given so much more to this relationship than I have. That is why my rst wife is still my rst wife. Ive known lots of guys who married above themselves. But I excellest them all! I do wonder from time to time if SHE ever thinks life is unfair! Bemused,KesThat gate can swing both waysCould you please be more felici c?We live in a time where we are always learning about new ways to do things and new technologies that supposedly make life easier. To be honest, I sometimes have a hard time operating a cell phone and Im supposed to be some sort of scientist. Its just that things often move so fast that we cant keep up. Having teenagers in the house is a nice way to learn how to operate your cell phone or about how to x your computer. Im still needed though. Its a nice feeling. I gave one of children a yoyo for Christmas and I had to show them how to operate it. Im not kidding. It seems like some things move so fast that we take for granted the things that we already had that we didnt even use. Perhaps we didnt need them. Think about the stuff in the back of the kitchen cabinets and hidden in the pantry, attic or garage I bet you have things that you are saving to use later. What about a word? We all run across words that we either have never heard of or think we would never use. I found a word the other day that was much better than the plastic thing in the back of the cabinet that was supposed to remove the skin, seeds and muck from tomatoes so that I could make all kinds of scrumptious tomato sauces, salsa and soups. The word is felici c. Webster gives the de nition as causing or intended to cause happiness. Dont we all need a little more happiness? Doesnt our country and the world need a little more happiness? It is not a common word; some spell-checking software doesnt even know it exists. To be honest, Im not even sure how to use it. I do know this. I know people who I would consider to be felici c. They cause happiness. Some dont even know it. Ive thought about calling them on it. When the guy at the fast food place or the lady at the gas station smiles and thanks me, I could say, Thank you for being so felici c. They would either pretend to know what it means or ask me. If they asked, I could explain that it simply means to cause happiness. That is a nice compliment. One fellow noted, Dont worry about using this word (felici c) it is very obscure. I have never seen it or heard it before, and I think that would be true for almost all native speakers. A couple of related words are more common -felicity, felicitous, felicitate -but even these are very rarely used in ordinary conversation. As long as you know that they are all related to happiness, you will understand them about as well as most native speakers do. One my girls had a baby doll named Felicity who made her pretty happy. I never really thought about it that much. When I studied the word a little more, I got about waist deep into some wordy ideological quicksand. This fellow named Bentham (1748-8132) came up with something he called felici c calculus. Im a math guy, but I just have a real issue with quantifying happiness. I know when Im really happy, kind of happy or a little happy. I dont need to put a number on it. It seemed to me that this fellow was all for everybody being happy and not doing things to anybody or anything that caused unhappiness. Of course, Im kind of paraphrasing here. Im also starting to understand that this word I found may cause more problems than I can handle. Maybe my new word is kind of like that plastic gizmo that is supposed to squash tomatoes and get rid of the peel and seeds. I just know this. I can use a yoyo. It makes me happy. I have trouble getting messages off of my cell phone sometimes that gets me a little frustrated. If we only did what made us happy, some things would never get done. We would be in a x depending on others to do things for us (assuming we could nd folks who were happy to do all of the things that made them happy and do everything for us also). This explains why Im not so good at crossword puzzles, but I do have a lot of folks around me who make me happy. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardBy LOREN SIPRELLSpecial to The Star Ive been thinking about marijuana legalization, that is. I would imagine most readers have seen all the headlines from the Presidents recent interview with the New Yorker in which his views on marijuana evolved; I wouldnt personally use that term, instead I would say he is in a much more comfortable place politically to tell us how he really feels about certain things. Not surprisingly I have no qualms about the legalization of marijuana, to echo the President I believe its impact on the individual user is less harmful than alcohol, and this estimation isnt coming from some Ivy League liberal who smoked some dope in college. My history with drugs is, admittedly, vast and sordid; as of this year Ive had roughly two years clean and sober, hold the applause. Would it shock you to read that I dont actually remember the first time I smoked weed. (note: we will be referring to marijuana in its various slang forms from here on out) I realize its incredibly clich to be a forgetful pot user but I was indeed that guy. Unlike many users Ive spoken to, my introduction to drugs didnt coincide with high school. I didnt hang in cliques that drank, or smoked weed but on occasion we would end up at parties where joints were being passed and I always shied away. In my teens I didnt see the point quite honestly, I was a relatively happy kid who didnt feel the need to get messed up and everything was already pretty damn funny sober. Though I forget the initial toke I know it was taken sometime in 2002, at the age of 20. That same year I found myself experiencing with ecstasy, cocaine, and what would ultimately lead to my downward spiral into addiction, pills; I, of course, topped all that off with copious amounts of alcohol. Now my history would lead some people to the conclusion that weed led the charge on my own personal million little pieces, and maybe rightly so but it could easily be argued, as many addiction specialist do, that I was well on my way before I took that first hit of that dreaded leaf. I wont get into the science of addiction here but suffice it say, Mary Jane wasnt the catalyst. In fact, I never really cared for weed; it made what was already a neurotic, overly self-conscious weirdo like me into an even more neurotic, selfconscious weirdo. I only smoked dope because, at the time, I hadnt been introduced to the good stuff yet. Which brings me to this point: Because marijuana is illegal it was dealt with by the kinda folks who deal in, well, other illegal stuff, e.g. cocaine, ecstacy, lortabs, the list goes on. It could be argued that weed is simply a gateway drug because the legality forces it into the black market where the user is introduced to harder, more illicit and dangerous drugs. Would I have ever tried cocaine had my pot dealer not offered? I dont know, but its a valid question nonetheless. Arguing that the legalization of marijuana is a slippery slope is the same lifeless argument as allowing gay marriage, or as we secularist call it marriage, will someone open the flood gates to people marrying goats ... or whatever. To make this assessment is to miss the bigger picture, and take it from someone who spent 10 years in the trenches; America has a much bigger drug problem on their hands than some black youth slinging dime bags to the yuppie, collar popping white kids. According to some estimates America spends roughly $20 billion a year on fighting marijuana, meanwhile pill mills flourish down south, methadone clinics have lines half way around the block, crystal meth is ravaging the country yet countless numbers of harmless potheads are clogging the prison system. Keeping marijuana illegal doesnt hinder drug use, just like denying contraceptives will not curb premarital sex and no more than stripping away food stamps or unemployment motivates someone to find a job that isnt there. Has alcohol prohibition taught us nothing? Has no one drawn the parallel between Chicago gang violence of the 1920s and Chicago gang violence now? Let me make this clear, I am not advocating some Ron Paul stance on drugs; Im simply saying, lets focus our attention where it needs to be. Cocaine, crackcocaine, heroin, crystal meth, these drugs are dangerous and will rip society apart; marijuana lets be real, not so much. Marijuana, like all things, can become addictive in the broadest sense of the term, in that it ranks higher on the priority scale than it should. At my core I know Im a libertarian with the bleeding-heart of a liberal; so I feel that empathetic need to shake my finger at people and tell them, No, thats bad for you! but at the same time, I know that isnt my place. Individual rights, when not used to deny others their rights, should always be the priority; everyone should have a chance to create their own moral compass through their own trials and tribulations, and if selling a quarter sack behind the counter next to a pack of cigarettes will help stretch the idea of liberty in the beautiful experiment that is America then so be it. Loren Siprell is a resident of Port St. Joe.Page 4 USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Thursday, January 30, 2014

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs Syour chance to tell your story. All work under the grant must be completed by the end of the scal year June 30 with a community case study the nal document to be produced. The key, Dennis said, was more than just putting an action plan for economic development on paper. Those actions plans must result in action. This all leads to the development of an action plan, Dennis said. Getting things on paper helps us get organized, but we are more interested in the actual doing of things than putting things on paper. To craft that plan, a major step is an inventory of community assets. Those assets can be organizations, natural resources, individuals, historical, cultural or infrastructure, for examples. By assessing a communitys strengths and crafting plans to tap those assets, organic and achievable economic goals can emerge, according to Competitive Floridas mission statement. Are we putting our best foot forward in promoting those assets to the outside world? asked Port St. Joe City Manager Jim Anderson. A signicant aspect of the pilot project is the sharing of information. Economic development and elected ofcials from the four communities will meet as a nal part of the process, sharing experiences. That begins what the DEO hopes will be a longterm project to create a kind of central clearinghouse for economic development efforts around the state, leading to a template of sorts for communities to enhance their competitiveness. The disparate spots on the spectrum occupied by communities, Dennis said, were apparent during the introductory meetings with local ofcials at the four participating communities. Whereas the city of Port St. Joe can offer written strategic documents from the Port of Port St. Joe, Gulf Coast State College and the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance Inc. as well as a comp plan element pertaining to economic development, Dennis said other communities have nothing on paper and no real organized plans. The city of Port St. Joe applied to be included in the pilot program, modeled after a similar program in Mississippi, while drafting the economic development element to the citys comprehensive plan. The comp plan effort served as a sort of introductory to the community for the DEO, which continued that introduction process last week. In addition to a tour of the community, local and DEO staff worked on a scope of work for the pilot project and a timeline, with dollars attached to deliverables at each step, and local stakeholders needed to provide input and help craft the nal case study. A nal scope of work is to be submitted to the DEO before the end of the week. ALLTIMESEASTERNFUNTIMERANDYSTARK 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 -INTHECROWSNESTLIVEONTHEPOOPDECK WS NEST OTHE CR IN WS NEST OTHE CR IN LIVE ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMINGEVENTSFIRSTSUNDAYCELEBATION GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM JoelRosenbaum,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients LocalThursday, January 30, 2014 The Star| A5at similar scenarios at other ports. Specically, it focused on the economic impacts of a $25 million dredging project combined with $5 million in state-funded improvements to the Genesee-Wyoming rail line; the impacts from the cargo loads shipped through the port from Green Circle and Enova; and additional indirect impacts of new port operations and rail employment to haul the wood pellets. The team examined operations and nancial impacts at ports such as Panama City, Canaveral, Jacksonville, Olympia, Wash., all the ports of Georgia, Everglades, Wilmington, Del., as well as averages for all ports in the U.S. Researchers quantied the impacts per 1,000 shipping ton; examining direct jobs generated, total jobs, user jobs as well as tax revenue and cargo loads. Direct jobs, Lewis explained, are those jobs dependent on an operational port and which would relocate if the port was not operational. User jobs are those created by factory operations tied to shipping through an operational port, such as at Green Circle and Enova. According to the study, the port dredging would create 319 construction jobs short-term employment as soon as 2015, with 707 permanent jobs in place each year of the ensuing decade. The labor income over that decade would top $216 million with total economic impacts, local, regional and statewide, of over $552 million. The impacts in year one are less than the impacts over 10 years, Lewis said. That is the meat of where this happens. You get a lot more of your impacts in the out years. Combined with the railway investment and factory (user) jobs, the numbers grow exponentially. The total impacts of rail and port expansion, the increase in factory activity, all of it sustained over 10 years, would equate to 803 jobs, $334 million in wages/ payroll, $491 million in gross domestic product and a total economic impact of $940.5 million. I did not expect going into this to see the numbers play out so positively, Lewis said. Eugene Raffield noted the ports case is also bolstered by the fact that just 40 percent of the shipping channel will have to be dredged, meaning a project of lesser scope than is typical, and that there has already been over the past decade considerable investment in infrastructure at the port. That only makes the story that much stronger, Lewis agreed. You should capitalize on investments already made. And, Lewis noted, the ROI only quantifies the impacts of just two identified potential clients. Those two companies, however, are not the only parties showing interest in the port, just the two that have formally signed agreements. The Holland M. Ware Charitable Foundation has offered a letter of interest to ship aggregate and sand through the port, which would effectively double the volume estimated from Green Circle Energy and Ernova. In addition, the Port Authority has seen a recent uptick in inquiries, with at least two potential clients to visit in the next few weeks, said Board Chairman Leonard Costin. You have a great case even with the worst case, Lewis said. The key, Costin said, is making that case successfully to the Florida Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott, who has repeatedly told port officials that state investment hinges in large measure on a return. Costin said the report showed the return was potentially game-changing. I am really encouraged, he said. We are moving in the right direction I think. We need to get this (study) to the powers that be. This is a very important step. This is one of the first hoops we have to jump through. The dredge permit application work continues apace of the original timetable, Costin said. The goal is to have the application submitted by March with a permit hopefully in Port Authority hands by early summer. The hope is that state funding will be put in place for the coming fiscal year leading to dredging by the end of 2014 or early 2015. PILOT from page AA1 PORT from page AA1 are going to look at the ve locations to provide a methodology for xing the other areas. We need to get a cross section of what is going on. I know there are problems there, big problems. Preble Rish has agreed to provide dollars for materials needed to x all areas of the pipe and to come back to the county with a nal report on the best method for addressing the problems. Left unresolved is who picks up the tab for xing the remainder of the project. That led to some tense exchanges. Rish said he believed the issue was less about Preble Rish and more about him. This is a Ralph Rish issue for four or ve people in this county, he told the board, adding that Bryan was carrying the water for those individuals. He said his company had a limited inspection responsibility for the project, reected in the reduced costs for engineering and inspection service offered on the project. Rish also noted that while Preble Rish had been subject to the ongoing BOCC discussions pertaining to Americus Ditch, there had been little talk about the contractor on the job. Bryan disagreed with several points, particularly about the responsibility of the countys engineer for the project. Preble Rish was responsible for the engineering and inspection of the project, Bryan said, adding that no language in the contract indicates the responsibility for inspections was limited. They represented the county. Every taxpayer in the county is footing the bill for this project. Bryan attempted to continue the discussion but was ruled out of order by Commission Chairman Ward McDaniel. Before relinquishing the oor, she noted she had still not received answers to a series of questions about the project which had been placed in the public information packet months back only to be pulled by vote of the full board. Commissioners Tan Smiley and Carmen McLemore said they were ready to move ahead with the MOU, McLemore adding that it would not be a surprise if Preble Rish pulled its offer. He is under no obligation, McDaniel said of Rish. Hes offered to assist the county. He doesnt have to do anything. Resident Tom Graney said the xes of the pipe were only part of the solution to the asco that Americus Ditch has come to represent for many. While expressing appreciation to Preble Rish, while asserting its responsibility to assist, and praising the MOU as an excellent plan moving forward, Graney said commissioners had yet to address systemic problems with the county process for bidding and awarding contracts. Saying the contractor was unqualied from the outset the contractor allegedly lacked required documents and bonding and has since gone out of business he said commissioners could not deect responsibility because it was a previous board that made the decisions. Taxpayers are paying for this, Graney said. Your bid policy violated Florida law. No one is talking about who is responsible for this. I want somebody held responsible for the bid process, for this asco. As a taxpayer, you are obligated to do that. This was poor work by the county commission and by county staff. That comes back to you. The commission has to hold somebody accountable for this project that was screwed up from the beginning. McLemore, the lone commissioner on the board at the time the project was awarded, noted he opposed the project, saying it was a bad project and would never work.Economic developmentOn two fronts, commissioners received positive news on economic development. Tourism Development Council Executive Director Jennifer Jenkins said during a recent trip to New York she spoke with ofcials of a boutique cruise line about dockage in Port St. Joe. The company, Travel Dynamics, had been interested in stopping in Port St. Joe for cultural/arts themed cruises, but found the conditions along Jetty Park and the so-called low docks which fall in the city of Port St. Joe but are also part of the Port of Port St. Joe master plan lacking as well as an absence of activities for cruise-goers. Jenkins said she pitched the concept of an eco-excursion and the company agreed to target April 2015 to arrive in Port St. Joe on a trip out of New Orleans and stopping at other north Gulf locations. I told them we are committed to this, Jenkins said, adding there was work to do determining dockage rates, improvements to the low docks, etc. but that she hoped to be in line to begin marketing the cruises this April. She said the company was also looking at other cruise stops in the future. The BOCC also heard from Alex Mouton of M3 Services, which is looking to establish a base of operations in Gulf County, creating as many as 100 jobs over the rst three years. Mouton is close to lining up nancing, the last hurdle for M3, which has been in talks with the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance and Port of Port St. Joe for over a year. The company would work in government defense industries, specically aerospace, Mouton said. DITCH from page AA1Preble Rish has agreed to provide dollars for materials needed to x all areas of the pipe and to come back to the county with a nal report on the best method for addressing the problems. Left unresolved is who picks up the tab for xing the remainder of the project.

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By Lois SwobodaHalifax Media Group A total of 130 species were spotted during this years Christmas Bird Count (CBC). Not bad for a rainy day, said organizer Donna Wells. On Dec. 26, volunteers spotted 10,200 individual birds representing 130 species. The bald eagle population continues to ourish. This year 23 were seen. Rod Gasche wrote this stirring description of a bald eagle encounter, We headed back to the West Pass to reenter the bay on the eastern shoreline of St. Vincent near what is known as dry bar. It is one of the main oyster bars in the winter harvesting area for the bay. As we crossed the pass, one of the members shouted, Look at the eagles! Here we saw eventually six ying with soaring seabirds and swooping down to the water. The water was lled with cormorants and a pod of porpoises that were feeding on a bait sh ball! That activity was causing the bait sh to come to the top of the water and the eagles were swooping down and catching sh from the waters! We watched enthralled for a while as none of us had ever expected see something like this! Only one of them was an adult eagle, the rest were immature birds but learning their craft! The most commonly observed bird was the American robin with 1,622 individuals counted. Migratory robins were observed in every region of the county. According to the Audubon website, the CBC helps inform conservationists about local trends in bird populations and plan strategies to protect birds and their habitat. The Environmental Protection Agency included Audubons climate change work from CBC data as one of 26 indicators of climate change in their 2012 report.Great Backyard Bird Count coming upThe CBC is over, but now its time to gear up for the 16th annual Great Backyard Bird (GBBC) Count Feb. 14-17. The GBBC is a four-day event that engages bird watchers in counting birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are across the U.S. and Canada. The count is a joint project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society to learn more about how birds are doing. Last year, participants turned in more than 104,285 checklists online, creating the continents largest instantaneous snapshot of bird populations ever recorded. Watchers reported observing 623 species and 17,382,831 individual birds. Anyone can take part in the GBBC, from novice bird watchers to experts. Participants count birds for 15 minutes or more on one or more days of the event and report their sightings online at www.birdcount.org. On the web site, participants can explore real-time maps and charts that show what others are reporting during the count. The site has tips to help identify birds and special materials for educators. Participants may also enter the GBBC photo contest by uploading images taken during the count. Many images will be featured in the GBBC websites photo gallery. All participants are entered in a drawing for prizes that include bird feeders, binoculars, books, CDs, and many other great birding products. For more information about the GBBC, visit www. birdcount.org or contact the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at (800) 843-2473. SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Jan.3047 28 0% Fri,Jan.3154 47 0% Sat,Feb.160 52 0% Sun,Feb.262 5410% Mon,Feb.365 43 -% Tues,Feb.465 43 -% Wed,Feb.565 43 -% Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST) Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) Sunday7AM-2PM(EST) Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, January 30, 2014 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore/BayLocal area lakes, rivers, and streams will all be affected by this weeks onset of cold, near freezing water. Our best bet is going to be crappie fishing the deeper holes on the Big River and into the larger lakes. Trout fishing should be decent in deeper holes in the ICW canal, but live shrimp will be hard to find, so go for a grub and jig! OUTDOORS Species numbers up for Christmas Bird Count ROD GASCHE | Special to the StarEven this majestic bald eagle looked wet and bedraggled on the day of the Christmas Bird Count.Special to The StarGeorge Duren, owner of Blue Water Outrigger and Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe, recently worked with the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association to build his fth arti cial reef in the Gulf of Mexico. Mr. Duren has been a longtime supporter of the MBARA and has built reefs for the past ve years. The reefs are named BWO for the Blue Water Outrigger Store in Port St. Joe that was originally started in the Piggly Wiggly shopping center back in 2005. The store caters to persons who love the outdoors and enjoy shing and hunting. Mr. Duren moved to Port St. Joe when he was two years old where he went to school after which he went to FSU. He then joined the US Army and served a tour in Vietnam. After serving his country he began to work in the grocery business. Three arti cial reefs are out in the LAARS B Site about 24 miles off shore, one is in the Tower Site out by the old Air Force Tower around 5 miles off shore, and the other one is in the South Site out around 24 miles offshore. The reefs use Reef Maker concrete pyramids with limestone inserts, Ecosystems for smaller sh, and Grouper Reefs built to simulate a cave. Bob Cox, President of the MBARA, said, We are so thankful for all that Mr. Duren has done over the past 17 years to build marine habitat to enhance diving and shing off of Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. What he has built has greatly enhanced the red snapper and grouper shery for recreational anglers in our area. Ron Childs, Director of the MBARA King sh Tournament, said, Mr. Duren does a lot for the community in so many ways, and this is just one of his contributions to the local area. Childs added, I go in to the Piggly Wiggly grocery store and look up on the wall at the names of over l00 local organizations he supports, and we are just thankful that he has chosen to support our effort to build arti cial reefs for our shermen and divers. We have been very successful because of people like Mr. Duren. All of the BWO sites are listed on the MBARA website (www.mbara.org) with the GPS numbers in latitude and longitude for all persons to access. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARA host of sh swarm around a diver at a BWO reef. A diver inspects a BWO reef. Duren builds fth arti cial reef

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection 719Hwy98,MexicoBeach(850)648-8207 OPEN7DAYSAWEEK11AM-CLOSE BUFFALOWINGS SLIDERS ANDMORE FOODSPECIALS! FREEBUFFET ATHALF TIME! SUPERBOWL XL VIII PARTY SUNDAY,FEBRUARY2 ND DISCOUNTEDPITCHERS OF BUDLIGHT RE-OPENING JAN30 TH THURSDAY! By BRAD MILNERSpecial to The Star PANAMA CITY The Halifax All-Star Classic will celebrate a decade of prep basketball excellence on April 5. The 10th annual event returns to Gulf Coast State Colleges Billy Harrison Field House for the games pitting some of the best senior talent in the Panhandle. The girls game begins at 11 a.m. on the rst Saturday in April followed by the boys at 1 p.m., continuing a series featuring some highly competitive basketball games. Halifax Media Group and two of its Florida daily newspapers, The Panama City News Herald and the Northwest Florida Daily News, again are lead sponsors along with GCSC. Additional sponsorship is provided by the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau. The East teams are selected by the sports department at The News Herald, the publication stationed in Panama City that covers eight counties of Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington. The East boys team has won three consecutive meetings and leads the overall series 6-3. The West teams are chosen by the sports department at the Northwest Florida Daily News, which is headquartered in Fort Walton Beach and covers Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton counties. The West girls lead 7-2 with a serieshigh streak of four straight wins from 2008 to 2011. The Halifax Classic features some area athletes who have decided on college destinations as high as the Division I level. The event also gives additional players a nal opportunity to be seen by regional scouts at junior colleges and smaller universities. Its not uncommon for athletes to be offered scholarships after the Halifax Classic. The games are played under collegiate rules to help the athletes prepare for the next step in their careers. The differences include 20-minute halves, which extend the games eight minutes longer than traditional four-quarter prep encounters to place increased emphasis on stamina and deeper rosters. Other rules variations include extended 3-point lines and a shot clock. Player nominations are being accepted. Area coaches in the East coverage area are asked to send player name, position, height, statistics and other pertinent information to Brad Milner at The News Herald via email at bmilner@pcnh. com or by calling 747-5065. The rst round of selections will be announced in the coming weeks, and the complete 12-player rosters for the four teams will be released in early March. Any individual or business with a desire to sponsor the event may contact Milner, News Herald writer Jason Shoot (jshoot@pcnh. com, 747-5067) or Executive Sports Editor Pat McCann (pmccann@pcnh. com, 747-5068). The event accepts any and all levels of sponsorships, from monetary support to in-kind donations.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Jeremy Dixon grew up on a steady diet of sports. His high school years in Port St. Joe (Class of 1998) were spent on the baseball diamond and basketball hardwood. And, so, Dixon recently arrived on an idea to celebrate all things athletic in Gulf County a new magazine. Dixons Sidelines premiered early this month, a full-color slick periodical to be published six times a year and focused on what happens on and off the eld among the countys athletes, from youth leagues to an alumni section for former high school athletes. The magazine is hitting on two things, Dixon said. What is happening on the eld and what is going on outside the eld. The magazine, which carries a newsstand price of $2, is available at several local outlets. Dixon plans to have web presence and mobile app in the coming months, aiming in part at parents of athletes. Dixon played baseball and basketball as a teenager and matriculated to CarsonNewman College before transferring to Florida State University. Having studies economics at FSU and with a sales background, Dixon said, He hit the ground running in promoting his magazine. The county has such a rich history of sports, Dixon said. I grew up playing sports. The rst thought I had about the magazine was pictures. Dixon wanted to provide a format for full-colored, vibrant pictures that athletes would want to keep. Those photos, he added, would also attract parents seeking to secure memories of their childs exploits on the elds of play. I wanted something that puts athletes on the front cover, Dixon said. The magazine will pro le players and teams competing in county athletes and will also include a section celebrating those athletes who have advanced beyond high school and became standouts in college or even the professional ranks. Putting it all together, making it concise, that will be the learning curve, Dixon said. As with anything new it will take time. But a year from now Id like it to be something that readers look forward to it and for it to have enough notoriety that people want to be in it.Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School baseball program began practice for the upcoming season on Jan. 15. Port St. Joe is joined in District 4-1A by Bozeman, Liberty County, South Walton, Franklin County and West Gadsden. In addition to 10 district games, the Tiger Sharks will also play games against teams from Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama. The season begins Feb. 6 when the Tiger Sharks host Liberty County and Wewahitchka. Liberty County and Wewahitchka will play the opening game of the day at 3 p.m. ET followed at 5:30 p.m. ET by Liberty County versus Port St. Joe. The Tiger Sharks face Wewahitchka at 8 p.m. All ticket prices during the regular season at $5 as set by the Florida High School Athletics Association. The Tiger Sharks are currently selling banners to be hung on the home eld fences and are also raising money for the annual 100 inning game. The 100 inning game is at 9:30 a.m. until noon ET on Saturday. The Alumni Game is at 2 p.m. ET on Saturday. Anyone interested in participating in the Alumni Game should call Bobby Nobles at 527-3707. The game will be played at Centennial Field. The concession stand will be open Saturday. PSJ boys soccer season endsStar Staff ReportThe end arrived quickly this year for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School boys soccer team. Breaking a streak of four straight playoff appearances, the Tiger Sharks allowed a goal in the opening minute and went on to lose 4-1 to District 1-1A second-seeded and tournament host Tallahassee Maclay in the district semi nals. The loss ends Port St. Joes season. The Tiger Sharks nished 6-9-1. Maclay faced top-seeded Mayo Lafayette in the title game. Maclay put a goal up with just 59 seconds gone in the game and went on to outshoot the Tiger Sharks by a 25-6 margin. Maclay added a goal in the 32nd minute to go into halftime up 2-0. The Tiger whittled the lead when Marcel Duarte scored, on assists by Drew and Jacob Lacour, in the 50th minute. It was only the third goal of an injury-plagued season for Duarte, who came into the season just 12 goals shy of the school career leader, JMason Ray, who had 72 goals from 2008-2011. Tyler Alford was in goal for Port St. Joe and made 12 saves while allowing all four Maclay goals.PSJ girls fall in soccer playoffsStar Staff ReportRunning into the defending state champions proved a bad draw for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls soccer team last Thursday. The Lady Tiger Sharks opened the Region 1-1A playoff at Orange Park and a matchup with St. Johns Country Day, which won the state title last year. Country Day made short work of Port St. Joe, winning 8-0. The Lady Tiger Sharks nish 9-5-3. St. Johns was the most complete high school level team that I have seen in my ve years here, said Port St. Joe coach Gary Hindley. It was easy to see why they are the reigning state champions and why they have won ve overall state championships. Their technical ability was fantastic and it allowed them to play at a speed that you rarely see at the high school level. It was a great experience for our girls and gave them the vision of where a high level program operates and plays at. St. Johns scored in the second minute of play and added goals at the 29th and 31st minutes to take a 3-0 rst half lead. In the second half, the offensive barrage continued with goals in the 43rd, 59th, 64th, 69th and 72nd minutes. Port St. Joe was outshot 33-2. Starting goalkeeper Celeste Chiles, an eighth-grader, recorded 13 saves on the night (a season high). Celeste actually played quite well to keep the score at eight, Hindley said. She was especially solid in the second half, in spite of the goals allowed. It was quite an experience for our girls to compete against such a high quality squad. Our program will be better in the future for the experience. St Johns has a great chance to repeat as state champions and with only two seniors they should be strong for years to come. Hindley went on to praise the Lady Tiger Sharks. In spite of the regional loss, the coaching staff is very proud of this group and how they progressed during the year, Hindley said. We had great success within our district (3-1-2 and runners-up in the district tournament) and had a ninegame unbeaten streak during the middle portion of the schedule. PSJ SOCCERPSJHS Tiger Sharks prepare for baseball season 10th Halifax All-Star Classic set for April 5Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page A7County sports focus for new magazine

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014Special to The StarDr. Frank D. May, of Port St. Joe, has a unique Valentines Day present for the needy of this area. For the last 13 years, Dr. May has provided free dental treatment for Valentines Day at his ofce. This year, his ofce will provide this valuable service on Wednesday, Feb. 19. This year the ofce will schedule appointments with those in need of treatment. To schedule an appointment you will need to send or bring by a letter to Dr. Mays ofce giving a brief description of your dental needs, and please describe your situation that makes you a good candidate for this benet. Send the letter to Dr. Mays ofce at 319 Williams Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please no phone calls. Be sure to include your telephone number so we can contact you to schedule an appointment. Dr. May will see 20 patients in need of dental treatment, and the hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda Wright will see eight to 10 patients each who wish to have their teeth cleaned. The ofce hopes to serve as many as 40 patients. Patients must be at least 12 years of age, and accompanied by a parent or guardian if under the age of 18. Treatments provided will include cleaning, x-rays, llings, extractions, diagnostics, and pain control. Dr. May and his staff participate in Dentist With a Heart because they wish to impact people who otherwise could not afford to see a dentist, and help those people save their teeth, as well as relieve them of any discomfort they may be having. Our ofce cares about this community and would like to give those in need of our services, their smiles back! PROPERTYTAXEXEMPTION DEADLINEFOR2014DearGulfCountyCitizens, Iwouldliketotakethisopportunitytoencouragenewhomeowners,orthoseofyou whohaveneverledforHomesteadExemption,todosoonorbeforeMarch3,2014. InordertoreceivedthisexemptionyoumustbeaFloridaresidentandprovideproofof ownershipandphysicallyoccupyyourhomeonorbeforeJanuary1.2014. PleasebeadvisedthattheHomesteadExemptiondoesNOTtransferomthepreviousownertothenewowner. eHomesteadExemptionprovidesuptoa$50,000reductionintheassessedvalueof yourhome.Inaddition,theHomesteadExemptionlimitstheincreaseoftheassessed valueinyeartwonottoexceed3%peryearorthevalueoftheConsumerPriceIndexfor thepreviousDecember,whicheverisless.Inordertoreceivethisexemptiononemust havesupportingdocumentsofresidency,i.e.driverslicense,vehicleregistration(s),Floridavotersregistrationnumber(s),proofoflocalutilitypaymentsatsaidaddress,social securitynumber(s),dateofbirth(s),nameandaddressofcurrentemployerifemployed, bankstatementandcheckingaccountaddress,andifpropertyisinatrustthenacopyof trustisneeded.Youmayalsoreviewtherequirementsonourwebsiteat www.gulfpa.com. isisalsothetimetoapplyforotherexemptionsforwhichyoumayqualify: assessedvalueofthehomesteadpropertywhenthejustvalueislessthan$250,000.e ownerisrequiredtobe65yearsofageorolderandmaintainapermanentresidenceon for2013). Pleasenote:eBoardofCountyCommissionersorMunicipalitygoverningauthoritymustvotetoapprovebyadoptionofordinancenolaterthanDecember 1oftheyearpriortotheyeartheexemptionwilltakeeect.isexemptiondoesnot includeSchoolBoardorNorthWestFloridaWaterManagementDistricttaxes. WealsoencouragebusinessownerstoletheirTangiblePersonalPropertyTaxreturnbyApril1st.Businesseswith$25,000orlessofpersonalpropertyareexempt bystatuteompersonalproperty,BUT,theyMUSTleareturninordertoreceive theexemption. Ifyoushouldhaveanyquestions,pleasecallorvisitourwebsiteatgulfpa.com. Dentist with a heartPHOTOS COURTESY OF CLARENc C E MONETTEThe St. Joseph Historical Society, rst organized in 1959, held its annual meeting last week during a dinner at Sunset Coastal Grill. President Charlotte Pierce summarized the past year as one marked by less business and more preparation for the future as the Society works on the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The organization has focused on saving the historic lighthouse for well over a decade. Ofcers for 2014 are Pierce, president; Lynda Bordelon is vice president; Linda Wood is the recording secretary; treasurer is Pauline Pendarvis; and Paula Boone is the parliamentarian. They were sworn by Clerk of Courts Becky Norris. The guest speaker was Joseph S. Cocking, president of Lighthouse Lamp Shop, Inc. of Fleming Island, FL. Cocking and his team removed the lens from the Cape San Blas Lighthouse last week. (see related article, Page B1). HHISTORIcCAL SSOcCIETY ANNUAL mMEETING

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, January 30, 2014 BPage 1SectionTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) President Reagan survived an assassination attempt outside what Washington hotel in 1981? Hilton, Sheraton, Marriot, Holiday Inn 2) What year marked the death of former Soviet head of state, Leonid Brezhnev? 1978, 1982, 2006, Still living 3) What team besides the Yankees did Joe DiMaggio play for? No other, Red Sox, Braves, Twins 4) Which river does the Brooklyn Bridge (NY) cross? Delaware, Hudson, East, St. Lawrence 5) What state has the most publicly owned land? New York, Texas, California, Alaska 6) Whose moving screen debut was 1950s The Men? Bogart, Wayne, Gable, Brando 7) Whos been the only woman to ever appear on U.S. paper money? None, Martha Washington, Molly Brown, Ida Tarbell 8) What is writing an email message in all capital letters called? Tenting, Cooking, Shouting, Lurking 9) Two of the worlds top 3 highest waterfalls are located in what country? Venezuela, S. Africa, Canada, New Zealand 10) Of the six men who made up the Three Stooges, how many were real-life brothers? 2, 3, 4, 5 11) When were TVs rst Emmy Awards? 1949, 1954, 1961, 1966 12) Whose career homerun Major League record did Babe Ruth break? Kenesaw Landis, Roger Connor, Bobby Hofman, Hal Griggs 13) Whats the home of cartoon superhero Mighty Mouse? Tinseltown, Smallville, Terrytown, Mouseville 14) Which Charles invented the pop-up toaster patented in 1919? Strite, Little eld, Harmon, Jackson ANSWERS 1) Hilton. 2) 1982. 3) No other. 4) East. 5) Alaska. 6) Brando. 7) Martha Washington. 8) Shouting. 9) Venezuela. 10) 3. 11) 1949. 12) Roger Connor. 13) Terrytown. 14) Strite.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com After holding its rst meeting in December, the Port Theatre Foundation has welcomed its latest member and the board is already solidifying plans for the future. The founding members, who include Jimbo Collins, Dolores Windolf, Anna Duren and Phillip Croton, have welcomed Tom Goldsmith to the board of directors. Goldsmith, Port St. Joe High School Class of 1987, will join the discussions that will ultimately lead to the historic Port Theatre building becoming a central location for movies, live theatre, weddings and graduation ceremonies. Goldsmith worked at the St. Joe Paper Mill and Raf eld Fisheries and spent seven years as a telecom technician in the U.S. military, serving in Saudi Arabia and Iraq during Operation Desert Storm and the Gulf War. Upon returning to Port St. Joe, Goldsmith opened Beachy Keen custom framing and gallery on Reid Avenue next to the Port Theatre. Also a photographer, Goldsmith will soon open a portrait studio. I couldnt think of a more beautiful and diverse location to live and be able to shoot my pictures, said Goldsmith. We are thrilled to have something happening with the theatre and look forward to being involved with its community endeavors.Port Theatre Foundation kicks into high gearStar Staff ReportAre you ready to cook the rice, peel the shrimp, stew the veggies and bask in the aroma of roux? If so, then tie on that apron and enter to be one of the 30 chefs competing for the title of Gumbo King in the 16th Annual Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-Off! The event takes place at Sunset Park on Feb. 15, beginning at 10 a.m. and lasting until all the gumbo and Brunswick stew runs out. This event is free to enter and tickets will be available for purchase to sample the competing gumbos and Brunswick stews. Also available will be barbecue sandwiches, hot dogs and drinks, as well as live music and free Mardi Gras beads. This event is one of the highlights for Mexico Beach, said Kimberly Shoaf, president of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council. We draw in record-breaking crowds every year. The Gumbo Cook-Off allows families to come spend the day at the beach with live music and all the gumbo you can eat. Awards will be given in both amateur and restaurant categories for gumbo and an overall category for Brunswick stew. Judges will be looking at entries for the best overall taste and presentation. Applications for the cookoff are available online at www.MexicoBeach.com/ Pages/News-Events/Calendar-of-Events and are due no later than Feb. 7. The competition is free to enter. All proceeds raised at the cook-off will help fund the Special Events for Mexico Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-off and Art WalkBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com From its creation in 2003, the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves has performed to a succinct motto. People must be stakeholders in the land, founding members said as a mission statement. To promote the Preserves, create more stakeholders and increase membership the Friends will hold Bay Day this Saturday, with tours of the preserve and its natural beauty, music and food. The rst trip begins with a Bird Walk through the Deal Tract on Cape San Blas. Led by Matt Anderson with the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, the walking tour begins at the Preserve Lodge. A Low Country Boil will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET and the menu includes boiled shrimp, sausage, potatoes, corn on the cob, Cole slaw, garlic bread and beverages. A $10 donation is asked per meal. During last years February Bay Day 458 plates of shrimp boil were sold, representing a major fundraiser for the Friends. Other tours include Deal Tract Adventure with Kim Wren, aquatic preserve coordinator, who will feature the history of the land and the importance of the uplands in protecting the quality and natural resources of the bay. This tour includes a moderate one-mile hike and participants are urged to dress appropriately and bring bug spray and water, as well as proper footwear. SATURDAYTOURS AND TRIPS OF THE PRESERVES: 9:3011 a.m.; 10-11:30 a.m.; 12-1:30 p.m.; 2-3:30 p.m. ET Enjoy a bird walk on the Deal Tract; a tram riding tour through the backwoods; a Deal Tract adventure; or explore the shore of St. Joseph Bay. Schedule and information at www. stjosephbay preserves.org. Call 229-1787 to register. All trips are weather permittingBay Day promotes preserves WES LOCHER | The StarThe Salt-Air Farmers Market will take place from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on Saturday, Feb. 1 at City Commons Park next to city hall in Port St. Joe. Vendors will be selling homemade goods and fresh produce. SALT-AIR FARMERS MARKETFILE PHOTOThe 16th annual Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-off will be held at Sunset Park on Feb. 15. TOM GOLDSMITHSee GUMBO B6 See THEATRE B6 See BAY DAY B6 FRIENDS OF ST. JOSEPH BAY PRESERVES BAY DAYFILE PHOTOThe Low Country Boil is a highlight of the annual Bay Day in support of the St. Joseph Bay Preserves.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014This week we will enlighten you on some of the important plant nutrients necessary for healthy woody ornamentals in the Florida landscape. Weve had information about why the nutrient elements are needed and some of the problems caused when plants dont get enough of them. But plants can almost always get enough of the element were discussing today, calcium. In fact, when calcium is a problem for landscape ornamentals its usually because theres too much of it in the soil, not too little. Today you will nd out why. My information was provided by Extension Emeritus Professor of Horticulture, Dr. Robert Black of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences (IFAS). Scientists have not found calcium deciency to be a problem on woody ornamental plants growing in Florida landscapes. Several factors account for his, including the presence of calcium and calcium compounds in much of our water and in commercial fertilizers. Calcium is important to plants for several reasons. It functions as a plant nutrient and it also indirectly affects soil fertility. For one thing, calcium helps maintain the right pH or acid level in the soil around your home. This is important because it reduces leaching of ammonia, phosphorus and several other nutrient elements. In addition, keeping the right pH range in the soil encourages the growth of benecial soil organisms, makes it easier for plants to utilize an element called molybdenum and reduces plant injury from toxic elements such as aluminum and excess copper. In spite of all its benecial effects, calcium can cause serious trouble for you or landscape plants if you have too much of it in your soil. High calcium levels increase soil pH beyond the desirable range, make it too sweet, or alkaline. This makes it harder for ornamental plants to take up several other important nutrient elements including iron, manganese, zinc, copper, boron, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous. Fortunately, the amount of available calcium in most Florida soil is fairly low although there is usually enough for normal growth of landscape ornamentals. In very acid soils, it is occasionally necessary to add calcium by liming. As a rule youd only lime an area you were planning to landscape if you had soil test results showing that the pH was too low. You might remember from some of our previous articles about soil pH that the lower the pH numbers the higher the soil acid level. Anytime you have a soil pH below 5.5 or so, the soil acid level is higher than most landscape plants like. To raise the pH into the desirable range between 5.5 and 6.5 you need to add calcium to the soil. Materials commonly used for this purpose are agricultural limestone, hydrated lime and dolomite. Dolomite contains calcium and another important element, magnesium. If you just need to change the pH level for your soil, agricultural limestone is probably the best material to use. However, many acid sandy soils in Florida re low in magnesium, so dolomite can be sued to raise the pH and supply magnesium at the same time. As we said, the decision to use these materials should be based on soil test results. The amount you need depends on the soil pH you have, the soil type and the amount of organic matter in the soil. For more information on calcium contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit our website at gulf.ifas.u. edu or edis.ifas.u.edu. MyronisahandsomeyoungBeagle/Houndmix. Hewalkswellonaleashandislearningbasic commands.Hegetsalongwithotherdogsand evenseemstolikekitties. IfyoucannotadoptperhapsyoucanfosterMyron. VolunteersNeeded: ADOPTIONEVENTSSHELTERfromSJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemail townsend.hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumane Societyat850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Onlineapplicationsandpetphotosareavailable atwww.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. storeareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandour shelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyor Shelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHereforONLY$15perweek $60permonthMarciaKnapke227-7847CallToday Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,Port St.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast SOLD 850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.comOverlookingSt.JosephBaythis2bedroomhome givesyougreatsunriseviews.Enjoybeautiful viewsandsunriseswhileoverlookingthebay.The porchontheupperlevelisscreenedinandison thegulfsideofthehouse.Thereis80feetofbay frontageandaboatdockwhichisjointlyowned withthehousenextdoorforshing,kayakingor aboat. Society ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorStar Staff ReportThe Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio exams 10 a.m. ET on Saturday, Feb. 8 at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe. Take the exam for an initial license or upgrade a present license. Get on the air and become part of the community disaster response. When all else fails, theres amateur radio. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society meets at 7 p.m. ET the rst Thursday of each month at the EOC Building. Guests and prospective members are welcome to attend. For registration and information concerning license exams call C.H. Tillis, AJ4XJ, at 648-8251.Special to The StarGulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe and 314 E. Third St. in Wewahitchka, provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and older. Transportation might be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities is asked to call Debbie at 229-8466.Star Staff ReportA German Food Night to be held at VFW Post 10069 in Highland View will benet the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. The event will begin 5 p.m. ET on Feb. 8 and will continue until the food is gone. Friends of the Humane Society will be serving up brats, sauerkraut, potato salad, Wisconsin cheese soup and homemade desserts. The cost is a $6 donation to the Humane Society. John Miick will be on hand with his guitar to entertain for the evening. All proceeds of the evening will benet the St. Josephs Bay Humane Society. All VFW members and their guests are invited to attend. There will be a donation box for old towels, sheets, leashes, collars and treats for the shelter. Special to The StarThe staff at MyGulfCare has launched a new program, K.N.E.W. You! From 1-3 p.m. ET on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month well-checks and a K.N.E.W. You! lesson will be available at the WIG Center on Peters Street in Port St. Joe. Stop by, and see what you can do to improve your health. Amateur radio license examsSenior C Citizens meal programVFW German Food Night to benet SJBHSK.N.E.W You! WANT TO GO?WHAT: VFW German Food Night WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 starting at 5 p.m. ET WHERE: VFW Post 10069 in Highland ViewThe trouble with calciumIn spite of all its benecial effects, calcium can cause serious trouble for you or landscape plants if you have too much of it in your soil. High calcium levels increase soil pH beyond the desirable range, make it too sweet, or alkaline. This makes it harder for ornamental plants to take up several other important nutrient elements including iron, manganese, zinc, copper, boron, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous. Special to The StarFor more than 30 years, the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association has sponsored the Miss Gulf County Valentines Pageant. This event is an evening of absolute fun for the entire family and is centered around our beautiful young ladies in age categories from infants through high school seniors. There is a category for every age group. There are some very nice prizes given away. First, about 25 door prizes will be given away throughout the evening. Each contestant will receive a memento for participation and a college scholarship is given away to Miss Gulf County. One of the more popular prizes in the past has been a complete beauty makeover and cosmetic consultation by award winning professional beauty consultant and artist, Ms. Dee Dee Morris of Dothan, Ala. (Facebook: Dee Dee Morris, Dothan Al). According to Mrs. Barbara Mannon, president of the Gulf County Senior Citizens Board of Director, this event is used to raise funds for Gulf County Seniors. We have had excellent community support in the past, but we are looking for increased sponsorship this year. The change in Florida Medicaid has dramatically impacted our funding and we need the communitys assistance more than ever. The funds will be used to provide meals, companionship, social activities, personal care, housekeeping, and other vital services needed so our elderly can stay active and in their homes. Call the Senior Center at 229-8466 for sponsorship information or send donation checks to 120 Library Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Your donation is tax deductible. The event will be held at the Wewahitchka Elementary School Auditorium at 6 p.m. CT Saturday, Feb. 8. Applications to participate as a contestant are available from the Center or through your school ofce. Applications must be turned in no later than Feb. 3 in order to participate. This event is not held in conjunction with any other nationally sponsored contest, but is strictly for the young ladies and families of Gulf County. GCSCA to hold Miss Gulf County Valentines pageant

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The Star| B3Thursday, January 30, 2014 Savingenergycanbeeasy.Whetheryouuseceilingfanstocoolyourhome, cleanorchangeyourACltersmonthlyorkeepyourthermostatsetat 78inthesummer/68inthewinter,everylow-costenergychangeaddsupto makeabigdierence.Wereinthebusinessofusingenergywisely.Together wepoweryourlife. our home o cool y ou use ceiling fans t Whether y. gy can be easy ving enerSa Weuseenergywisely. Alonzo(Tony)andShawanaDavisare pleasedtoannouncetheparticipationof theirdaughter,ShaNaiyaAddison,in the2013-2014DebutanteCotillionand ScholarshipProgram,sponsoredbythe UpsilonAlphaOmegaChapterofAlpha KappaAlphaSorority,Incorporatedand byGwinnettPearlsofServiceFoundation, Incorporated.TheDebutanteCotillionand ScholarshipBallisarguablythepremier eventforhighschooljuniorandseniorgirls intheMetroAtlantaarea.Theprogram providesopportunitiesforthedebutantesto earnscholarshipsforhighereducation.In 2012,debutanteswereawardedmorethan $30,000inscholarshipmoney. ShaNaiyaiscurrentlyajuniorat SprayberryHighSchoolinMarietta,GA.Sheisanhonorrollstudent, varsitycheerleader,memberoftheBlackStudentUnion,journalism, andmentorshipclub.ShaNaiyasfather,AlonzoTonyDavis,isa1994 graduateofApalachicolaHighandhermother,ShawanaCarterDavis, isa1995graduateofPortSt.JoeHighSchool.Sheisthegranddaughter ofEmilyCarterJeffersonofPanamaCity,FL.andShirleyAddisonof Wewahitchka,FL. IfyouwouldliketohelpShaNaiyaearnthetitleof2014MissDebutante, donationscanbemadenolaterthanFebruary15,2014to http://www.rstgiving.com/fundraiser/shaniayaaddison/cotillion School NewsPORT ST. JOE EE LEMENTARY SCHOOLFront row: Dru Flowers, Bryce Forston, Karma Olson-Morgan, Sydney Kingsland-Lormand. Back row: Amari Nickson, Adison Burkett, Judson Grifes, Jacob Justice. DAZZLING DOLpPHINsS February through May are busy months for FCS students. Here are some dates and events that parents and students should be aware of: Progress Reports go home Feb. 3. No School on Feb. 17, in honor of Presidents Day. Spring pictures are scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 20; this will also include K5 graduation pictures. The Learning Fair will take place in the auditorium on Friday, Feb, 21. This is a half day for Godfrey Hall students. Friday, Feb. 28, is the Annual Spring Auction and Italian Dinner. This is an early dismissal day with no lunch and no extended care. Spirit Week is March 10 14 (a yer will be sent home Friday to explain the events of the week.) Friday, March 14, is Field Day. The Marvin Wing will be dismissed at 11:15 a.m. and Godfrey Hall students will be dismissed at 11:30 a.m. There will be no lunch and no extended care on March 14. March 17 21, is Spring Break. Students return Monday, March 24. Report Cards go home Monday, March 31. April 17, is Terric Thursday. There will be no school on April 18, in observance of Good Friday. Achievement test will be given to all students on April 21 25. Progress Reports go ho Monday, April 28. Thursday, May 1, is the National Day of Prayer. Last day of school for K3 through K5 is Thursday, May 15. Preschool program is on May 16. Elementary program is on May 23, at 9 a.m. The following students made the honor roll for the 2nd nine weeks at Port St. Joe Elementary. K indergarten all A A s: Hunter Ard, Joshua Baker, Maya Barnes, Lauren Brant, Carson Brown, Corban Butts, Caitlin Cathey, Blake Childress, Christina Clayton, Brayden Dailey, Sumner Dickey, Logan Ellwood, Trinity Farmer, Dru Flowers, Jakwavian Gray, Hailey Green, Fenix Grogan, Shamyiah Hayes, Addison Hendricks, Cole Hart, Kenley Hatcher, Easton Herring, Emma Hill, Anderson Hodges, Bobby Landrum, Landon Layeld, Christopher Lee, Brody Lemieux, Stratton Levins, Jacob Marshall, Reagan Mathews, Krissy Maxwell, Kymani Mcadoo, Hallie Mize, Brody Mock, Kari Moore, Colt Patterson, Kaley Rhodes, Leelyn Rollins, Melina Ruiz, Reed Scott, Emily Sudduth, Reagan Thomas, James Ward, Paisley White, Keiara Wineld, ShaNara Woodruff, Callee Wray. K indergarten, A A s and Bs: Cole Bailey, Zora Beauchamp, Christianna Causey, Harmony Dwight, Korbin Ellwood, Scarlett Fofanov, Dominic Fitzgerald, Jayvonta Harris, Chloe Jones, Dovud Kouljanov, Nathan Lipford, Costin Marshall, Ryder Mohr, Cameron Nicholsen, Nijah Quinn, Colton Raker, Jamie Rapier, Jenna Shively, Aaliyah Thompson, Lexi Webb, Jett Whicker, Ryder Mohr, Amirah Yarrell. 1 st G G rade all A A s: Whitney Butler, Gannon Buzzett, Sara Beasley Flowers, Elizabeth Hopkins, Thomas Hopkins, Makayan Jones, Peyton Knox, Boston McGhee, Leila Smith, Lincoln Tomberlin, Emily Warner. 1 st G G rade A A s and Bs: Mikey Allen, Ian Beck, TaNiyah Bryan, Kate Fidler, MacKenzie Freisleben, Jamicia Glenn, Amonta Harris, Kaelee Johnson, Lyriq Larry, Hailyn Levins, Chloe Harper, Carly Hatcher, Ava Kennedy, Sydney KingslandLormand, Olivia Leonard, Eileen Madrid, Kensley Mathews, Draven ONeal, Kiyleh Parker, Handley Pitts, Bionca Rafeld, Bella Ray, Jackson Reatherford, Levi Sanders, Jasmine Sandoval, Sunny Shearer, Lisa Southerland, King Waters, Karis Whicker, Landon White. 2 nd G G rade all A A s: Garrett Acree, Estevan Angel, Jenna Bareld, Desirae Causey, Sam Childers, Sara Durham, Dawson Fisher, Arlena Gleichner, Brandon Heckenlively, Cassidy Lewis, Dakota Tousignant, Elyse Williams. 2 nd G G rade A A s and Bs: Bella Cannington, Ashleigh Causey, Cody Combow, Juveryona Daniels, Chase Dykes, Mary Margaret Farrell, Shauna Flowers, Tanner Fogle, Branden Givens, Lauren Givens, Owen Grantland, Kylie Ingalls, Braden Jackson, T.J. Jenkins, Danica Kelly, Lance Larry, Jamal Leslie, Chasity Moore, Austin OBryan, Luke Pickels, Alivia Randall, Kylie Sapp, Kaylee Schweikert, Ardarien Shackleford, Fisher Vandertulip, Diamond Warner. 3 rd G G rade all A A s: Maelynn Butler, Eli Fidler, Celeste Hamm, Luke Lentz, Dane Mallon, Gabriella Price, Jasslyn Rafeld, Hannah Riley. 3 rd G G rade A A s and Bs: Cheon Beachum, Sam Brown, Emma Grace Burke, Madison Burkett, Emily Butler, Alexis Causey, Walker Chumney, Skylar Clayton, AJ Davis, Nathan Duong, Lexi Fountain, Jaydon Gant, Payton Garland, Alexis Gathers, Raelynn Hardy, Prince Jones, Jacob Justice, Chase Lanford, Gavin Lee, Cole Moore, Ricky Sherrill, Damien VanDyke, Emigen Watkins, Addi Watts, Halee Whicker, Britt White, Dane Wright. 4 th G G rade all A A s: Trent Antley, Elliana Burkett, Santana Causey, Ricky Forbes-Rosado, Halston Fulk, Zoe Gerlach, Natalie Graziano, Ashton McGlamery, Donovan Miniat, Erica Ramsey, Ava Ryan, Megan Saleh, Sarah Beth Thompson, Lily Wockenfuss, Lauren Woosley. 4 th G G rade A A s and Bs: Skylah Addison, Sammya Brown, Paloma BurgosHarris, Destiny Dykes, Madelyn Gortemoller, Jayden Hayes, Shadavia Hudgins, Laura Beth Hill, Porter Hodges, Emily Lacour, MiMi Larry, Sarah Metcalf, Morgan Mills, Amari Nickson, Rylee Reatherford, Alexandria Thomason, Caleb ZurHeiden. 5 th G G rade all A A s: Ali Godwin, Hailey Harriman, Alex Strickland, Caleb Wright. 5 th G G rade A A s and Bs: Austin Ard, Henry Balogh, Noah Bareld, Leanna Baumgardner, Savannah Burkett, Lyndsey Butler, Parker Cornwell, Jacob Davis, Allie Evans, Judson Grifes, Tyler Guthrie, Corbin Ingalls, Lauren Jenkins, Reese Johnston, Chloe Jones, Gavin Jones, Lanecia Larry, Evelyn Laue, Bryson Lee, Mattison Mills, Kevin Lacivita, Clint Moore, Gabrielle Nicodemus, Terri Rae Phillips, Jack Randall, Philip Riley, Hannah Tomlinson, Analisa Treglown, Davis Varnes, Gabrielle Wood. 6 th G G rade all A A s: Jade Cothran, Sean Farnsley, Madeline Gingell, Bailey Lake, Zach McFarland, Malena Ramsey, Sara Whiteld. 6 th G G rade A A s and Bs: Brandon Barnes, Miranda Brown, Adison Burkett, Wesley Chapman, Cheyenne Cole, Tristan Doran, Joseph Farrell, Micaela Fedd, Jireh Gant, John Austin Gee, Kelvin Grifn, Brittany Hanson, Madison Jasinski, Greg Julius, Rainey Nobles, Jytrel Riley, Caroline Sapp, Rachel Sherman, Hannah Smith.College Goal Saturday at Wewa High SchoolSpecial to The StarCollege Goal Saturday will take place from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. CT this Saturday, Feb. 1 at Wewahitchka High School. The event, located in Room 7, is open to 2014 seniors and anyone wanting help with FAFSA, Pell Grants, or Gulf Coast State College Foundation Scholarships. Be sure to bring your 2013 tax information. Honor RROLL FCS students to have busy months The Lions Tale WEw W AHITCHk K A E E LEMENTARY SCHOOL LOVEs S TO REAd DSp P ECIAL TO THE STARMs. Aimee Walshs secondgrade class enjoyed reading from their personally designed shirts.  Each student designed their own shirt with their favorite movie, favorite food, something they do well, and even what they want to be when they grow up.  The students enjoyed creating the shirts and loved reading their classmates shirts to nd similarities.  A colorful, meaningful and super culmination to Literacy Week! Happy Reading! Dont bother meTyler Stark relaxes and takes advantage of some leisurely reading time associated with the many activities going on recently at Wewahitchka Elementary School during the 6th Annual Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida. WES contributed 27, 090 minutes toward Floridas Million Minute Reading Marathon. Tyler is a third grade student in Mr. Browns class.

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 10:00AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation WEDNESDAY -10:00AM-2:00PM-OpenHouse Coee&ConversationTHURSDAY 6:30PMMixedBibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org BruceHodge, Pastor Jim passed peacefully from this life the morning of Jan. 22, 2014. Jim was born in Grif n, GA but has been a resident of Port St. Joe for over 25 years. Jim is survived by his spouse and children: Belinda Parham (wife); Jeniffer and Matt Ward (daughter and sonin-law), Jamey and Stephanie Parham (son and daughter-in-law), Toni and Shawn Bidinger (step-daughter and sonin-law), Tommy and Vonda Worley (step-son and daughter-in-law), Terry and Heather Worley (stepson and daughter-in-Iaws; three grandchildren: Brent Walker, Megan and Matthew Nazor, Nataleigh Parham; and seven greatgrandchildren. Jim is also survived by his brother Jerry Parham. He was preceded in death by his father, John Parham, his mother Betty Parham and brother. John Parham III. A memorial service was held 10 a.m. EST on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2014, at Beach Baptist Chapel, 311 Columbus St., St. Joe Beach, FL with interment following in Holly Hill Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to National Ri e Association. Services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. James ParhamOn Jan. 22, 2014, Kathleen Blackman, 89, rejoined her husband who preceded her in death, the late Rev. Woodrow Blackman, whom she married on Nov. 31, 1948. A resident of Wewahitchka, Fla., for almost 60 years, she is survived by her two sons, Billy Blackman of Havana, Fla., (his wife Susan and children: Justin Blackman of Bakers eld, Calif., and Jillian Crymes and her husband, Justin, of Live Oak, Fla.) and Stevie (Tammy Nelson) Blackmon of Wewahitchka, Fla., (children: Stephanie Bailey and husband, Chip, and their daughter, Aubry, of Wewahitchka, Brad Blackmon and his wife, Gabbie, and their daughter, Whitley of Wewahitchka, and Beth Blackmon of Port St. Joe); two brothers, the Rev. Tommy Martin of Dothan, Ala., and Ed Martin of Panama City, Fla.; a host of nieces, nephews and too many friends to count. Services will be held 11 a.m. CST on Thursday, Jan. 30, in Wewahitchka at Glad Tidings Assembly Of God. Family will receive friends and family 30 minutes prior to the service. She will be laid to rest next to her husband at Roberts Cemetery in Honeyville. The family requests that no owers be sent but instead the money be donated to the Glad Tidings Building Fund, Box 128, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. Services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Kathleen BlackmanA host of angels outstretched their arms to greet Cloteal Burke as she lost her ght to cancer on Jan. 16, 2014, in her home in Wewahitchka. Cloteal was born on Sept. 2, 1937, in Southport, Fla. She was a wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, beautician, nurse, gardener, animal lover, painter, poet and so much more. She will continue to be an inspiration to those who knew and loved her. She is preceded in death by her husband of 48 years, Victor Jewel Burke; sister, Teresa; brothers, Bronzel, Clyde; and granddaughter, Jessica Whit eld. Cloteal is survived by her four children, Deborah Burke McLeod and Mike, Steven Victor Burke, Victoria Burke Langford and Lonnie, Michael Eugene Burke; eight grandchildren, Jason Kretzer and Heather, Alison Martin Buckner and Frank, Wesley Burke Wilson, Melissa Martin Evans and Dustin, Chris Burke, Erica Burke, Maxwell Burke; greatgrandchildren, Jackson, Brianna, Isabelle, Jayce; sisters, Glenda, Lois, Leta; brother, WD; her two cherished pets, GiGi, Lady; many loving friends and a host of nephews and nieces. Cloteal will be laid to rest beside her husband at Live Oak Baptist Church Cemetery/Miller Cemetery in New Hope, Fla. Special thanks to Southerland Funeral Home for handling the cremation.Cloteal Burke CLOTEAL BURKEMother Mandie Davis was born on July 16, 1922, in Leon County, Fla., to George and Mattie Green. Mother Davis was educated in the public schools of Leon County. She made a living working as a custodian for many years. Mother Davis confessed Christ early in her life and was a member of Mount Carmel Missionary Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, Fla. Mother Davis was preceded in death by her parents, George and Mattie Green and her brother Joe Green. She is survived by her sister, Alice Green of Port St. Joe, Fla.; three close cousins, Carlos Cunningham (Dawn) of Zellwood, Fla., Donald Cunningham and wife of Rochester, N.Y., Kelly Campbell and wife of Gainesville, Fla., and a host of relatives and friends. Her service was held at 11 a.m. E.S.T. on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, at New Bethel Missionary Baptist Church with interment following in Forest Hill Cemetery. Services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Mandie Davis ObituariesSpecial to The Star The trends that will affect how we live in the future will be explored 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 3 at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled News From the Future: A Futurist Gives a Sneak Peek, features a lmed interview with Thomas Frey, senior futurist at the DaVinci Institute. Theres an ongoing fear about the future, says Frey, who encourages people to be aware of developments shaping their futures. The future will happen, so lets be engaged so we can take advantage of the opportunities. This is a wonderful time to be alive. Participants in the Lifetree program will hear about key developments that Frey predicts will signi cantly change daily life in the coming decades. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net.Thursday, January 30, 2014On Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014, Bobby Gene Pelt fell asleep in death at the age of 76. He will be missed very much by all of his many family members and friends. Gene is survived by his loving wife, Rita. They were wed on June 22, 1959. They have been married 54 years. Gene Pelt is also survived by his sons, Mitchell Wayne Pelt (wife Kim) and Douglas Lynn Pelt and his daughter Tammy Ware (husband Lashay) and his brothers Steve Buster Pelt, Robert Pelt and Tim Pelt, ve grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Gene was one of Jehovahs Witnesses. He enjoyed very much discussing what he learned from the Bible to help us develop and strengthen our faith. This Saturday Feb. 1, 2014, at 3 p.m. ET there will be a memorial service held at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses at 335 Selma St. in St Joe Beach. A comforting biblical talk will be given highlighting the resurrection as a solid hope for the future.Bobby Gene Pelt WANT TO GO?WHAT: News From the Future: A Futurist Gives a Sneak Peek WHEN: 7 p.m. CT Monday WHERE: 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico BeachThe future considered at Lifetree Caf

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The Star| B5Thursday, January 30, 2014Jan. 20-Jan. 26On Monday, Jan. 20, the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce (GCSO) received a 911 call regarding a domestic disturbance in the 1100 block of West River Road in Wewahitchka. Deputy Ken Starnes investigated the complaint and arrested Leonard Harold Britt (52) of Wewahitchka for Domestic Battery and Domestic Felony Battery by Strangulation. Britt was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. An active warrant was served on Rex Aaron Veasey, Jr., (22), of Wewahitchka. Deputy Ken Starnes arrested Veasey at his residence. Veasey was wanted for Violation of Probation Battery out of Calhoun County. He was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. The GCSO executed ve transport orders by local judges. Deputies traveled to Walton County Correctional Institution and Cross City Correctional Institution to transport inmates for circuit court proceedings in Gulf County on Tuesday, Jan. 21. Transports were also for inmates at Gulf Correctional Institution and the Bay County Jail. On Wednesday, Jan. 22, Deputy Paul Williams served a Writ of Bodily Attachment for Child Support on Clyde Randall McDaniel (50), of Wewahitchka. McDaniel turned himself in at the GCSO. On Thursday, Jan. 23, a complaint was received from the 200 block of Abby Drive in Wewahitchka, regarding a possible domestic disturbance. Once Deputy Paul Williams arrived he made contact with the parties and determined that domestic violence did occur. As a result of the investigation Colton Lee Mullinax (18) and a female juvenile were arrested. Both were charged with Domestic Battery and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Jan. 23, the GCSO received a complaint of theft from the 100 block of Ling Street, in Highland View. The victim discovered four large truck type rims with recapped tires and an ignition system on an engine missing. The total property stolen was valued at approximately $500. Inv. Greg Skipper continues to investigate the case. If you have any information that would assist the GCSO in recovering the property and/or lead to the arrest the suspect(s) please contact the GCSO at 2271115, or remain anonymous by calling CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS (8477). On Friday, Jan. 24, a report was led with the GCSO for Failure to Return Rented Property. The total value of the unreturned rented property is $350, which constitutes a third degree felony. Deputy Chip Bailey continues to investigate the case. On Jan. 24, Deputy Ken Starnes responded to a physical disturbance in the 6200 block of Ganley Road, in the Five-Acre Farms area. Eugene Phillip Allen (27) was arrested and charged with Domestic Battery. Allen was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. On Jan. 24, the GCSO received a report of the burglary of a vehicle in the area of Iola Landing. The complainant was hunting in the area and later returned to nd the vehicle burglarized. Approximately $1,800 in hunting related items was stolen from the vehicle. Deputy Desrosier continues to investigate this case. On Saturday, Jan. 25, another report of the burglary of a vehicle was received at Iola Landing. Approximately $230 of property was stolen from the vehicle. If you have any information on this, or the burglary on Jan. 24, that would assist the GCSO in recovering the property and/or lead to the arrest the suspect(s) please contact the GCSO at 2271115, or remain anonymous by calling CrimeStoppers at 785-TIPS (8477). On Jan. 25, Kenneth Devon Fain (36) was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility after he was arrested in Calhoun County on an arrest order out of Gulf County. Fain was served the arrest order for Contempt of Court Driving While License Suspended or Revoked. On Jan. 25, the GCSO received a 911 call regarding a physical disturbance in the 9200 block of Cockles Ave, in the Beacon Hill area. At the conclusion of the investigation, Deputy Ken Starnes arrested and charged Jackie F. Grable (59) with Domestic Battery. Grable was transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. From Jan. 20-26 the GCSO logged the following department activity: Traf c Stops, 33; Civil Process Services, 10; Field Contacts, 13; Abandoned Vehicles, 8; Warrant Arrests, 3; Requests for Security Checks, 1; Trespass/ Prowler Complaints, 1; Alarms, 1; Traf c Accidents, 4; Suspicious Person, 3; Suspicious Vehicle, 3; Welfare Check, 2; Funeral Escort/Parade, 6; Domestic Disturbance, 5; Auto Burglary, 2; Death Investigations, 1; Disabled Motor Vehicle, 2; Verbal Disturbance, 2; Field/Grass Fire, 2; Vehicle Fire, 1; Prisoner Transport for Court, 4; Obscene/Harassing Phone calls, 2; Reckless Driver, 2; Criminal Mischief, 1; Music/Noise, 4; Physical Disturbance, 1; Drunk Pedestrian, 1; Hit & Run, 1; Sexual Battery, 1; and Theft, 1. NOTICETORECEIVESEALEDBIDS CITYOFWEWAHITCHKATheCityofWewahitchkahasdeclaredthefollowingitemsassurplusandwillacceptsealedbidsforthepurchaseoftheseitems. Minimumbidforanyvehicleis$150.00. 1.1997DodgeRamVanVIN:2B5WB35Z7VK585316 2.1999FordClubWagonVanVIN:1FBSS31S2XHA13076 BidsmustbemarkedSEALEDBIDSURPLUSEQUIPMENT andmustbereceivedbytheCityClerkpriorto12noon(CT) Thursday,February20,2014,attheCityAnnex,318South7 Street,Wewahitchka,FL32465.Itemsmaybeinspectedatthe CityduringregularbusinesshoursMondaythroughFridaybetween8:00AMand3:00PM(CT)byappointment.Pleasecall 850-639-2605.BidswillbeopenedduringtheregularCityCommissionmeetingonMonday,February24,2014,at6:30PM(CT). TheCityCommissionreservestherighttorejectanyorallbids received. TheCityofWewahitchkaisanequalopportunityproviderand employer. ConnieParrish CityClerk InaccordancewithFederallawandU.S.DepartmentofAgriculturepolicy,thisinstitutionisprohibitedfromdiscriminatingon thebasisofrace,color,nationalorigin,age,disability,religion,sex,familialstatus,sexualorientation,andreprisal." Notallprohibitedbasesapplytoallprograms. FriendsofSt.JosephBayPreservesProudlyPresentWinterBayDayFindusonFacebook:FriendsofSt.JosephBayPreservesTourthePreserves: Enjoyatourthroughthebackwoodstrailsof theBufferPreserve!Tripsaboutshorebirdsorlifealongtheshoreline!Checkthescheduleatstjosephbay.orgfor Birding,DealTract,ExplorationsTripsstjosephbaypreserves.org 2014Bay&Buffer PreserveCelebrationFebruary1,2014St.JosephBayState BufferPreserve11am-2pm LowCountry ShrimpBoil$10Donation GuestsUSRepSoutherland FlaSenatorMontford FlaRepBeshears GulfCountyElectedOfficials &TDC,PortAuthority,SGCFD Law EnforcementStar Staff ReportA Bay County jury last week convicted a Panama City man of breaking into a Mexico Beach hotel room and battering two occupants in April 2011. Ronald Deon Lee, 34, entered a hotel room occupied by Scott Webb, Trent Webb and Janice Williamson, all from Eufaula, AL, early on April 15, 2011. Assistant State Attorney Robert Sale told jurors that Williamson awoke to find Lee naked and on top of her trying to rape her. She screamed, awakening Scott Webb, who suffered four broken toes and was bitten twice while detaining Lee until police arrived. The evidence, Sale said, showed Lee had entered the room twice that morning, first taking the couples cell phones and car keys back to his adjoining room. He returned to attempt the rape of Williamson, even though she was sleeping in the same bed as Scott Webb while Trent Webb, 11 at the time, was in the other bed. Lee probably entered the victims room the first time by climbing across the balconies, Sale said. Lee was found guilty of burglary of an occupied dwelling with a battery. He faces a maximum of life in prison when Circuit Judge Michael Overstreet sentences him Feb. 4.Panama City man convicted in MB hotel burglary GCSO BRIEFS THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Like us on

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 Trades&Services227-7847CALLTODAY! GETYOURADIN! Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:2-15-14CODE:SJ00 Special to The StarThe Florida Department of Health announced the rollout of a new resource providing the rst comprehensive prole regarding healthiest weight for each Florida County. The County-Level Healthiest Weight Snapshots tool is a part of the Community Health Assessment Resource Tool Set (CHARTS) and features information designed to assist families, health care professionals, policy makers and whole communities to help Floridians achieve a healthy weight. This new tool provides an important view of the progress in each of our counties as we work to become the healthiest state in the nation, said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator of the Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin counties. The tool includes demographic, behavioral and built environment measures relating to the communitys healthy weight status, and may be used to support community health assessments, provide data for health and weight related research, and encourage communities to continue their efforts to improve nutrition and increase physical activity. Healthiest Weight Florida is a public-private collaboration bringing together state agencies, not for prot organizations, businesses, and entire communities to help Floridas children and adults make consistent, informed choices about healthy eating and active living. To learn more about the CHARTS County-Level Healthiest Weight Snapshots, please visit the Healthiest Weight Florida County Prole page. The Department also encourages you to learn more about our Healthiest Weight Florida initiative at www. HealthiestWeightFL.com. The Department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. Follow us on Twitter at @ HealthyFla and on Facebook. For more information about the Florida Department of Health please visit www.FloridaHealth. gov.FDOH offers new, county-level healthiest weight snapshotsSpecial to The StarGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is proud to announce the addition of two employees to its staff and the promotion of one of its employees. The Cooperative is also hosting a student intern. Kelsie Buccellato is new to the Cooperatives accounting department. She holds a bachelors degree in accounting from Florida State University. Luke Vickers is a Line Technician. He is a graduate of Liberty County High School. Also, Josh Pitts was recently promoted to from the title of Line Technician Trainee IV to the title of Line Technician. The Cooperative is also proud to host Eric Balcazar as an intern. Eric is a student at Margaret K. Lewis School. Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is part of the Touchstone Energy national alliance of local, consumer-owned electric cooperatives providing high standards of service to customers large and small. More than 70 employees serve more than 20,000 meters and 2,500 miles of line in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton and Washington counties and in the municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, Lynn Haven, White City, Fountain and Southport. GCEC employee NEWS EERIC BALCAZAR JOSH PITTS LLUKE VICKERS KKELSI BUCCELLATO GUMBO from page B1Beachs Best Blast on the Beach July Fourth reworks celebration. The cook-off has become one of the must attend events here in Mexico Beach, said Shoaf. This is one event you will not want to miss or taste! Happening simultaneously on the opposite side of Highway 98, will be the third annual Society of Expressive Artists (SEA) Art Walk, which will showcase artists from all along the Forgotten Coast. The cost to showcase is $5 for SEA members, $25 for nonmembers and $35 for those who want to showcase and join the organization. The application deadline has been extended to Feb. 3. Interested artists may download the application from the SEA Facebook page at www.facebook.com/sea. artists. SEA is a group of local artists that reside in coastal communities along the Florida panhandle. The goal of the group is to provide a forum for local artists to promote their work, share ideas and opportunities, to network with other artist organizations and to identify and create art exhibit venues.FILE pP HOTOAll proceeds raised will help fund the Best Blast on the Beach reworks display on July 4. WW ES LL OCHER | The StarUnofcial historian Tom Parker, director Jimbo Collins and videographer Rick Ott took a tour of the theatre last week.Collins, who is under contract to be the next owner of the theater, met with Rick Ott last week regarding the lming of live music performances at the venue. Ott is owner of From the Heart of Sopchoppy Music Hour, a show televised on WFSU which is the equivalent of Austin City Limits and features artists from the North Florida area. Ive looked at the Port Theatre for several years, said Ott. I love Port St. Joe and Gulf County. Once Ott heard Collins plans to open the venue back up to live performances, he got in touch to see how soon he could begin recording. Ott has recorded many music performances in his career including shows at the Monticello Opera House in Jefferson County and a months worth of performances in Ireland. Hes previously recorded in Gulf County and said that he looks forward to returning. Collins said he hopes that Ott would be able to record three shows a year to be broadcast on WFSU to bring additional awareness to the area. The goal is to (reeducate) the people in the community with this wonderful old historic asset, said Collins. He went on to say that a town hall meeting would soon take place so that the board of directors could better understand what the community wants the Port Theatre to be. Collins is also focused on preserving the history of the building and will soon put out a call for anyone who frequented the theatre during its movie heyday from the 1940s and beyond. I want to preserve recollections that the citizens have, said Collins. Especially those who are in the autumn of their lives. If we dont get them now, they may be lost forever. Port St. Joe native Tom Parker, considered by Collins to be the unofcial historian of the theatre, was an employee from 1943 until 1945 and has shared many memories and stories about the building. I think people will be interested in the theatre reopening, said Parker. People would reach out to any type of activity going on here. Parker said he was present in 1938 when the theatre opened its doors for its inaugural showing of the lm Gold Diggers in Paris and began working as a projectionist at the age of 12 with his best friend Billy Howell. Parker said that he left his job at a drugstore to work at the theatre, where he worked four hours a day, seven days a week. His take was $25 per week. That was big money at the time! said Parker with a laugh. I enjoyed it so much. He also recalled the kids who came to the theatre and said there was always lot of smooching going on. Those who may have early memories of the theatre can share them by calling the Port Theatre Foundation at 227-8122. THEATRE from page B1Jason Garwood will lead Explore the Shore of St. Joseph Bay which will begin at Eagle Harbor at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, with wading and hands-on activities. Be prepared to get wet and bring bug spray, sunscreen, a change of clothes, towel, eld glasses, camera and hat. Preserve manager Dylan Shoemaker will lead a backwoods tour of the buffer preserve. This is a riding trip into the 5,000 acre preserve with short walking intervals. Eleven years after its creation the Friends group remains a vibrant and active group working with the preserve staff to keep St. Joseph Bay, one of Floridas 41 aquatic preserves, pristine while assisting with work on the uplands when called. If you are not familiar with the Buffer Preserve or the Aquatic Preserve stop in for a visit at the Preserve Welcome Center and learn how the Buffer Preserve helps to protect the bay through a natural ltration of the water as it descends to the bay via the watershed, said Sandra Chan, preserve secretary. St. Joseph Bay is one of the most pristine bays on the Gulf of Mexico and the goal is to keep it that way. The Preserves Center is also a mecca for scientists and researchers. In the past year, more than 20 groups of students and professors have stayed at the Preserve. They have come from South Dakota, Wayne State College in Nebraska, Creighton University in Omaha and colleges from Missouri, Illinois to those close to home such as Florida, Louisiana and Tennessee. A student from Puerto Rico and one from Nova Scotia have called the Buffer Preserve home in 2013, Chan noted. The Friends group, a nonprot supporting the missions of the Preserves, has exploded since its creation. Membership is now over 200 and still growing, Chan said. The Friends need your help and support in order to continue working to make the Preserves the best they can be and provide a place of enjoyment and learning for the public, Chan said. Dylan arrived last year and has made a substantial impact at the Buffer Preserve. St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve is located on State Road 30-A at Simmons Bayou. St. Joseph Bay Aquatic Preserve encompasses 73,000 submerged acres in the bay and gulf. The Friends group work to help both hence they are Friends of the Preserves while each of the preserve are a separate entity. The Aquatic Preserve has not been funded through the state so a group of dedicated volunteers sample the water and use a transect to observe the sea grass to ensure the pristine condition of the water and sea grass for all living in the bay. Plants are a major area of study on the Buffer Preserve. The preserves crop of Chapmans rhododendrons is the largest population of its kind on public lands. Other federally or state threatened or endangered plant populations are observed and conditions created that encourage their growth. BAY DAY from page B1FILE pP HOTOTram tours in search of wildowers and butteries will be led by Dylan Shoemaker, presever manager.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 30, 2014 The Star | B7 93732S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-140-CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JENNIFER M. BURKE and BETTY G. OWENS, Defendants TO: Jennifer M. Burke 14809 Heronglen Drive Lithia, Florida 33547 NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to reform a mortgage has been filed against you on the following described property: Commence at a inch iron rod and cap (LB 732) marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 355 at Pages 102 and 103 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, said point being the intersection of the Northerly right of way boundary of Chipola Avenue with the Westerly right of way boundary of Second Street and run thence North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary, a distance of 404.84 feet to a inch iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 266 at pages 427-429 (Parcel 5) of said Public Records; thence Continue North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary, a distance of 111.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning thence continue North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East along said Westerly right of way boundary, a distance of 113.34 feet to the Southerly right of way boundary of East Church Avenue; thence North 89 degrees 47 minutes 19 seconds West along said Southerly right of way boundary, a distance of 172.78 feet to the Easterly boundary of lands described in Deed Book 34 at page 610 of said Public Records; thence South 03 degrees 12 minutes 26 seconds West along said Easterly boundary, a distance of 226.73 feet; thence North 89 degrees 26 minutes 53 seconds East, a distance of 23.46 feet to the Southwest corner of the aforesaid lands described in Official Records Book 266 at pages 427-429; thence along the Westerly and Northerly boundary of said lands as follows: thence North 01 degree 47 minutes 33 seconds East, a distance of 111.00 feet; thence North 89 degrees 30 minutes 49 seconds East, a distance of 155.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 0.51 acre, more or less. Commonly known at 511 S. Second Street, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Charles S. Isler, III, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 430, Panama City, Florida 32402, within thirty (30) days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 7th day of the January, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court By: Wyvonne Pickett Deputy Clerk January 23, 30, 2014 February 6, 13, 2014 93746S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 23-2009CA-000301 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. EICHER, BRUCE, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 23-209-CA000301 of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, EICHER, BRUCE, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GLILF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, at the hour of 11:00 a.m. ET on the 13th day of February, 2014, the following described property: LOT 57 OF WINDMARK BEACH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 1 THROUGH 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Iis-pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 9th day of January, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A., 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Trade Centre South, Suite 700 Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33309 954-491-1120 20851.0130/RBerkman IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate In this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY FL 32402, 850-747-5338 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice Impaired, call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 93782S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 13-CP-65 IN RE: ESTATE OF ROY M. LILLY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of ROY M. LILLY, deceased, whose date of death was June 29, 2012, File Number 13-CP-65 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which. is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 732.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is January 23, 2014. Personal Representative: Mary Frances B. Lilly 118 S. Pastime Dr. Thomasville, GA 31792 Attorney for Personal Representative: Robert S. Hightower FL Bar No. 199801 P.O. Box 4165 Tallahassee, FL 32315 Phone: (850)222-3363 January 23, 30, 2014 93786S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA000350 Division No. Section. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff(s), vs. GILDA G. BRANCH, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 16th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA000350of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and or GULF County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LARRY W. BRANCH AND GILDA G. BRANCH are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Main Lobby of Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. ET on the 20th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at a re-bar marking the Northwest corner of Tract 18 of Gulfside and Bayside Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 24-B; of the official records office of Gulf County, Florida also being a point lying on the Westerly right of way of County Road Number 30-E; thence run along said right of way South 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds East 101.49 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run along said right of way South 20 Degrees 14 minutes 55 Seconds East 91.49 feet to a road and cap; thence North 69 degrees 42 minutes 54 seconds East 238.06 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 20 degrees 14 minutes 55 seconds West 91.51 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 69 degrees 43 minutes 58 seconds West 238.06 feet to the point of Beginning, containing 0.50 acres more or less. and commonly known as: LOT A TRACK 17 CAPE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING Al-lER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at GULF County, Florida, this 17th day of January, 2014. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk, Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq./FL Bar# 549452 Laura L. Walker, Esq./FL Bar# 509434 Daniel F. Martinez, II, Esq./FL Bar# 438405 Kalei McElroy Blair, Esq./FL Bar# 44613 Jennifer Lima Smith/FL Bar # 984183 GILBERT GARCIA GROUP, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, FL 33607 (813)443-5087 972233.10184/tavias January 23, 30, 2014 97255S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 2014-02PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JAMES WILLIAM TUTTLE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of James William Tuttle Deceased, File Number 2014-02PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 23, 2014. Sandra J. Tuttle 76 Peach Tree Road Byhalia, MS 38611 Personal Representative of the Estate of James William Tuttle, Deceased J. Patrick Floyd Law Offices J. Patrick Floyd, Chtd. 408 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32546 (850) 227-7413 FL Bar No. 257001 Attorney for Petitioner January 23, 30, 2014 97295S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDAFOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No.: 2012-CA 236 WINDMARK INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company Plaintiff, vs. RIVERFRONTPROPERTIES, INC. a Georgia corporation, GARY R. RHINEHEART, and HARRYA. SCHULTZ, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 20th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on the steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32546, the undersigned Clerk will offer for sale the following real property more particularly described as follows: Lot 30 of WINDMARK BEACH, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 1-5, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Together with the following described parcel: Begin at the most Easterly Corner of Lot 30, Windmark Beach, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 1-5, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida; thence N75W along the Northerly line of said Lot 30 for 15.03 feet to the Westerly line of Parcel V, said Windrnark Beach; thence N18E along said Westerly line for 88.42 feet to the Southerly right of way line of Windmark Way which is a curve concave to the North having a radius of 510.00 feet; thence Easterly along said curving right of way line for an arc distance of 15.16 feet, the chord of said arc bearing S79E for 15.16 feet; thence S18W for 89.65 feet to the point of beginning. The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Gulf County Circuit Court Case No.: 2012 CA000236; Windmark Investments LLC, v. Riverfront Properties, Inc., Gary R. Rhineheart, and Harry A. Schultz, now pending in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a Claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of January, 2014 REBECCANORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 97303S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTIN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDAFOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No.: 2012-CA-234 WINDMARK INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Georgia limited liability company Plaintiff, vs. RIVERFRONTPROPERTIES, INC. a Georgia corporation, GARY R. RHINEHEART, HARRYA. SCHULTZ, and GEORGIACOMMERCE BANK, a Georgia banking corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN than on the 20th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time on the steps of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32546, the undersigned Clerk will offer for sale the following real property more particularly described as follows: Lot 77 of WINDMARK BEACH, according to the Plat on file in Plat Book 4, Pages 1 through 5, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. The aforesaid sale will be made pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Gulf County Circuit Court Case No.: 2012 CA000234; Windmark Investments LLC, v. Riverfront Properties, Inc., Gary R. Rhineheart, Harry A. Schultz, and Georgia Commerce Bank, now pending in the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a Claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of January, 2014 REBECCANORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BABaxter Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 If you didnt advertise here, youre missing out on potential customers.

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B8| The Star Thursday, January 30, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS 1120413 4510160 1120011 Why work for Dicks Sporting Goods?ARE YOU DRIVEN, COMMITTED, SKILLED AND PASSIONATE? Do you love sports and want a career with a rapidly growing company? If so, then DICKS Sporting Goods is the company for you. Were looking for friendly faces to provide great service to our customers. Applicants must be at least 18 years old.Full and Part-Time Positions AvailableNOW HIRINGPlease apply online at: DicksSportingGoods.jobs/newstores GRAND OPENING IN THE PIER PARK NORTH SHOPPING CENTER IN PANAMA CITY BEACH (LOCATED ON U.S. 98 AND STATE ROAD 79) Competitive Pay Excellent Bene ts Associate Discount Full and Part time Schedules Sales Leaders/Supervisors Sales Associates Apparel, Footwear, Freight Flow, Team Sports, Golf, Lodge (Hunting/ Camping/Fishing) Cashiers Bike Technicians Running Specialist Lacrosse Specialist Fitness Trainer Golf Club Technician Maintenance/Operations Temporary Associates Administrative AssistantWe are an Equal Opportunity Employer. 4516266Aline's Beauty Salon taking applications for Licensed Cosmetologist and/or Nail Technician. Apply in person at 315 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe. 850-229-6600. 4516279 Dockside Seafood & Raw Bar @ PSJ MarinaNOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: Hostesses Line Cooks Handyman Bartenders Servers/BussersAPPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com SalesSales RepsHalifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience.Territories Available In: Panama City Chipley Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 4516978RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Aaron Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.mysandybeach.comThe Forgotten Coast 1. 422 CARLTON, LANARK VILLAGE. 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. 550.00/MO 2. 103 PINE ST. LANARK VILLAGE. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATER INCLUDED UP TO 60.00/MO. 3.PICKET'S LANDING CONDO E7. 4 BEDROOM, 3 BATH 2000.00/MO. 4. DUPLEX. 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 5. OFFICE BUILDING. RIVER VIEW. VERY NICE BUILDING IN GOOD LOCATION. CAN SUBLEASE OFFICE SPACES. 1000.00/MO. WATER INCLUDED. 6. NORTH CRAWFORDVILLE. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH. FENCE YARD 750.00/MO. 2.103 PINE ST. LANARKVILLAGE.1 BEDROOM,1 BATH. SCREENED PORCH. 425.00/MO. SCREENED PORCH. WATERINCLUDEDUP TO 60.00/MO.www. rst tness.com/carrabelle 4.DUPLEX. 3BEDROOM, 1 BATH. NEWLY REMODELED. 700.00/MO. 9 7 8 6. NORTH CRAWFORDVILLE.3 BEDROOM,2 BATH. FENCE YARD 750.00/MO. order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. January 23, 30, 2014 97359S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2013-CA-000096 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. James Monroe Freeman a/k/a James Freeman; Unknown Spouse of James Monroe Freeman a/k/a James Freeman; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 16, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000096 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and James Monroe Freeman a/k/a James Freeman are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Rebecca L. Norris, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DESK OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. ET on February 20, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK 1, WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT ONE, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Rebecca L. Norris CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 13-260760 FC02 CHE January 23, 30, 2014 97395S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000459 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. EARLENE E. ASHBAUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated September 25, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2010-CA000459 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and EARLENE E ASHBAUGH; CRAIG NOAH ASHBAUGH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM ET, on the 20th day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 134, WETAPPO SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 36-42 IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 134 WETAPPO CREEK ROAD, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 22, 2014. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F10073015 Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 2014 97361S PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for the removal of 3 pair of storefront doors and there replacement with hurricane impact storefront systems. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850229-8369. January 23, 30, 2014 97425S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-12 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: LANDS LANDING BOAT RAMP & DOCK IMPROVEMENTS (PRI PROJECT #003.238) This project includes construction of a temporary coffer dam, concrete repairs to the existing boat ramp, approximately 500 SF of 5 wide timber boardwalk, and 320 SF of floating docks at Lands Landing in Gulf County, Florida. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER and that this is a sealed bid for Lands Landing Boat Ramp & Dock Improvements project. Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on February 14, 2014 at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Bids will be opened and read aloud at this same location on February 17, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners has implemented a Local Bidders Preference Policy for all RFP/BIDS. Anyone interested in bidding as a local bidder must follow the requirements of Resolution 2009-02 which may be obtained from the Clerks Office at the above address. The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of the County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Ward McDaniel, Chairman Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 2014 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460 GE Washer and Dryer. Large Capacity. Good condition. $125 for the set. 850-227-1189 Wanted-M1 Grand & WWII Rifles. M1 Grand Parts and 30.6 military ammo. 850-227-1189 Highland View 238 Marlin St. Fri-Sat Jan 24th and 25th. from 8a-4pHuge Indoor Garage SaleFishing Gear, Sporting Goods, Housewares, Clothes. Text FL77695 to 56654 GUN SHOW PENSACOLA FAIRGROUNDSFebruary 1st and 2nd SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL77473 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLFebruary 15th & 16th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons Classes10am & 2pm Daily Call: 850-602-6572)General Admission $6850-957-4952 or 850-261-8407 Acct/FinanceJOB NOTICEGulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court is accepting applications forFull-Time, Entry Level Finance Clerkwith benefits. Applicants must have a High School Diploma, or equivalent, and be proficient in MS Excel and Word. Job Description and Application can be obtained by emailing ebland@gulfclerk.com or can be picked up in person. Return completed applications to the Clerks Human Resource Office, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. Room 138, Port St. Joe, FL between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., E.T. Monday through Friday. Applications will be accepted until Friday, February 7, 2014. Gulf County Clerks Office enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Web Id 34278891 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESis looking for reliable employees with good customer service & teamwork skills. Weekends required.FT Maint TechGeneral maintenance experience, good driving history. Great benefits.PT InspectorsAttentive to detail, hardworking, able to climb multiple stairs. Reliable vehicle. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island Web ID#: 34278481 Install/Maint/RepairStockerWould you like to make $10-$12/hour working 3 days/week? We are looking for an inventory specialist to perform stocking & auditing duties. We offer commissions & flexible schedules. If you are active & outgoing, we can train. Must be 18, physically fit, & HSD/GED. Drug Free. NO criminal background, Valid FL DL. Check us out at dansp awn.com and apply in person at 1314 Bayview Ave, Mon-Fri, 10am to 4pm or call for an appt (850) 481-1115 Web ID#: 34277424 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in Panama City Beach Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Terri McAfee at tmcafee@pcnh.comOR 850-747-5054 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34278490 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in SOUTHPORT Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Rita Miller at rmiller@pcnh.comOR 850-348-7956 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34278492 Logistics/TransportEARN EXTRA INCOMEAre you looking to make extra money? Home delivery carriers needed in BAYOU GEORGE, YOUNGSTOWN, & FOUNTAIN Great opportunity to own your own BUSINESS For more information please contact Jennifer Greene at jgreene@pcnh.comOR 850-768-9761 Apply in person at: 501 W 11th St. and ask for a carrier application Web ID#: 34278494 Medical/HealthRNsJoin the rewarding field of correctional nursing! Youll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at Gulf Correctional Facility in Wewahitchka, FL. We are currently looking for Full Time, and PRN RNs. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more! For more info, contact: Tracy Mazuranic 1-800-222-8215 x9553 tracy .mazuranic@cori zonhealth.com or Quick Apply online (under the job opportunities link).www .corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR Web Id 34278731 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Swimming Pool,elevator. Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 1 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. For Sale: 2001 Holiday Rambler Vactioner Motorhome. 38Ft, Double Slide, 10cyl gasoline engine. 11,000K Miles. Like New. Loaded w/ Extras. Selling for Health Reasons. $40,000 Price Is Neg. (850)639-2608. Text FL76837 to 56654 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! AL #1481; GAL #2034; FL-AB #1488; NC #6397; Joe Bilbro, Lic. MS R.E. Broker; Thomas J. Tarpley, MSAL #565 10% Buyers Premium 400 125 OfferingsProperties inAUCTION* Feb. 18, 19 & 20ALFLGAMSNCOnline Bidding AvailableB S O L U T ENo Minimums, No Reserves... Sells Regardless of Price!800.479.1763www.johndixon.com JOHN DIXON & ASSOCIATESAUCTIONS MARKETINGTues, Feb. 18, 11amSale Site: Marroitt Orlando Airport 7499 Augusta National Dr, Orlando, FL* 41 Sell with Reserve50 FL PropertiesIndustrialWarehouseStorageBuildings OfceCondosCarWashFacility& LandResidentialLots&Land HomesCommercialLots&Land& Much, Much More Through Out Florida!!2099086 4510161