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The star ( 07-11-2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03864

Material Information

Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 07-11-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03900

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03864

Material Information

Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 07-11-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03900


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR CSI: High School By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A study aimed at identifying the source for discolored water experienced by a large swath of Port St. Joe water customers will be longer, broader and more complex than originally expected. David Kozan with CDM Smith, the company that designed the $21 million surface water treatment plant that went online some three years ago and has been plagued with issues of water quality since, said initial sampling had shown a wider range of potential problem sources and potential solutions. What was initially expected to be a study completed in the fall is now 8-12 weeks away from the intensive pilot testing, Kozan said. Two months ago, the hope was that intensive testing would not be needed. For city commissioners, it was not the news they had hoped for while awaiting a report on the initial testing undertaken by researchers at Virginia Tech University. Kozan said he would not have the report completed for another two weeks. Commissioners, city staff and city engineers Preble Rish variously have expressed frustration with the ow of information from CDM Smith. “We are moving slower than we thought,” Kozan said. “The testing data was more complex. The pilot testing will be more extensive than we originally thought. “We cast a broad net, and we caught more than we thought we would. We don’t want to do it and not do it right.” The initial testing involved taking existing small sections of pipe from 10-12 locations from water plant to households/businesses. The hope was that the testing would show the primary culprit to be corroded iron breaking away from aging pipes — some dating to the Great Depression — because of the caustic nature of the surface water and the new treatment protocol required. That likely would have required little more than a tweaking of the chemical treatment protocol to address. However, Kozan said the initial testing showed a more varied array of issues. “We found there are multiple sources of iron and also sources for manganese,” Kozan said, City water study grows in scope, issues Plant designer: Investigation ‘more extensive than we originally thought’ Thursday, JULY 11, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners joined the lobbying effort for maintenance dredging of the shipping channel at the Port of Port St. Joe. If County Commissioner Warren Yeager has his way, several more counties in the region also will board the ship. Yeager brought forth for approval a resolution Tuesday that in broad strokes expresses support for the collaboration agreement between the Port Authority and the St. Joe Company and their combined efforts to bring about maintenance dredging of the shipping channel. The dredging is the key to two recent Letters of Intent that St. Joe has entered into with energy companies to ship as many as 1.25 million metric tons of wooden pellets through the Port of Port St. Joe annually. Both agreements are contingent on the dredging of the shipping channel to its authorized depth within the next two to three years. The Port Authority and St. Joe are working on securing permitting and funding for the dredging. Yeager said St. Joe Senior Vice President Jorge Gonzalez suggested a formal resolution of support from the county and other counties would be helpful. “I intend to take this to other counties in the region who also believe that the port is important for economic development,” Yeager said. “This is a regional project.” The resolution passed unanimously. The BOCC also accepted a letter from Port Authority attorney Tom Gibson regarding a $199,000 loan from the county to the Port Authority. The BOCC has been exploring ways to further collateralize that loan in the past two months. Gibson’s letter lays out the Port Authority’s position that it wants to pay the money back in full but revenue is lacking at TDC mulls bed tax addition By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Gulf County Tourist Development Council advisory board on Monday engaged in a spirited and educational discussion about the potential for adding to the county’s bed tax. The consensus that emerged was that the TDC and Board of County Commissioners must collaborate on how best to address issues of beach driving, trash on the beach, animals not on a leash and moving to a “leave no trace” policy for county beaches. A proposal to add a fth cent to the county’s bed tax was discussed at the previous TDC board meeting and a county budget committee meeting as a method to increase the presence of of cers on the beaches, speci cally Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce deputies. Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison said given his budget constraints, he could not fund additional patrols on the beach to increase enforcement of existing county ordinances. County attorney Jeremy Novak said Monday that state law governing such agencies provides the TDC an opportunity to assist by creating a “beach safety program.” He said once a plan was in place, it would provide opportunities for the TDC to act. The framework of that plan, said TDC executive director Jennifer Jenkins, would be to purchase equipment and fund training, including water rescue, for of cers to create a combination code enforcement/law enforcement/”brand” ambassador of cer, while the GCSO would fund the two additional full-time of cers to patrol the beaches. Tourism is up in Gulf County and trending ahead of neighboring counties of Bay and Walton, Jenkins said. Through June, bed tax collections are up 13 percent, and every month in the scal year has nished in the black save for November 2012. But, Jenkins said, the condition of the beaches is a nagging problem, with trash, tents, grills and other County resolution supports port dredging efforts YEAR 75, NUMBER 39 CS By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Blood spatter. DNA. Fibers. Murder. Mystery. It might sound like the description of a primetime television show, but it’s actually the curriculum for the Crime Scene Investigation Camp held last week at the Gulf/ Franklin campus of Gulf Coast State College. The 35 students from Gulf, Franklin and Calhoun counties came together for a four-day crash course in forensic science where they had to solve a faux murder by utilizing a scienti c approach to decoding the evidence. They looked at DNA under microscopes and learned how to trace blood spatter to determine where the attack occurred and how to differentiate bite marks. The class culminated with a mock trial at the Gulf County Courthouse on July 4 where the students attempted to put the correct “suspect” behind bars. Students played various roles from prosecutors to defense lawyers to witnesses to suspects. The class presented its evidence before a jury, and the case was presided over by LOCAL STUDENTS CRACK THE CASE AT CSI CAMP PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR Above, science teacher Scott Lamberson helps students examine loose hair and bers. The camp for gifted or talented science and math students took place at Gulf Coast State College. See WATER A5 See CSI A5 See TDC A8 See PORT A5 Centennial Days B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Community . . . . . . . . . . B1 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B7-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Panhan dle counties must work to gether to get the maximum BP money for their envi ronmental projects, repre sentatives from Bay, Gulf and Walton counties met in Panama City were told Monday. The meeting facilitated by the nonprot group The Nature Conservancy fo cused on the St. Andrew, St. Joe and Choctawhatchee bays and the problems fac ing each system. The meeting was long on discussion but short on solutions, focusing on the necessity of teamwork and noting ecological prob lems don’t end with county boundaries. “What are the issues and challenges facing these watersheds?” asked Anne Birch, the conservan cy’s marine conservation director, who led the dis cussion, adding, “Is there a way we could come togeth er and agree on a suite of projects?” The counties need to take a “comprehensive ap proach,” Birch said. The major issues are fairly similar for all the bays. These included dam age to sea grass, increas es in sedimentation and water quality. Sea grass often is dam aged by boat propellers, which signicantly harm these ecosystems, ofcials said at the meeting. The route between Pan ama City Beach and Shell Island, in particular, is a problem as tourists rent boats but aren’t aware, or don’t care, about the grass as they rush across the bay to visit the popular destina tion, ofcials said. An increase in silt, and shifting of silt, in the bays was also a concern. More and more dirt accumu lating in the bay is also a problem. In light of the discus sion, a Bay County ofcial offered a project idea that likely would cut down on the amount of sediment en tering the bay. Of the county’s more than 200 miles of dirt roads, 95 percent of them wash into the bay when it rains, said Ken Schnell, county public works director. He recommended using BP money to pave those dirt roads. Walton County Commis sioner Sara Comander also noted a large portion of residents in her county are still on septic tanks. She added that treated wastewater can enter the bay systems and harm wa ter quality. Walton County has dis cussed using BP money to tie residents into the mu nicipal sewer system, help ing move them off septic tanks, Comander said. Bay County is wrestling with the same issue. It has about 30,000 resi dential and commercial septic tanks. East Pass Bay County Commis sioner Bill Dozier, who at tended the meeting, said after the meeting all these issues were on his mind, but one idea, largely un mentioned during the en tire meeting, occupied his attention. Dozier said he wants to spend BP money to reopen the old “East Pass” out of St. Andrew Bay. “I certainly feel strongly, of course, about opening the East Pass. I think that is one thing that should be a high priority,” he said in an interview. Dozier also mentioned creating articial reefs off the county’s coast and added paving dirt roads was a “high priority.” He spoke of unity, too, saying the counties have greater power and a better shot at portions of the BP money if they work as a team. “It all works together,” he said. C all f or inf or mation about our r ot ating specialists: W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COM MUN IT Y ’S UNIVE RSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m A federal judge has denied mo tions to dismiss a lawsuit brought against the Board of County Com missioners and several current and former commissioners indi vidually by a local political action committee. U.S. District Judge Richard Smoak denied the motions – in cluding one from a private citizen – in an order just prior to the Inde pendence Day holidays. Smoak’s one-page order de creed that the motions to dismiss were moot given an amended complaint led by the attorney for Citizens Improving Gulf County and its president Jim Garth. The defendants, the BOCC, Commissioners Warren Yeager and Carmen McLemore, former County Commissioner Bill Wil liams and Port St. Joe resident Lois, a.k.a. Christine or Christy McElroy, have until July 26 to respond to the amended PAC lawsuit. The attorneys representing the former and current commission ers have already done so, repeat ing an earlier motion to dismiss for “failure to make a claim.” Those were the grounds on which the prior motions to dis miss were based. PAC attorney Marie Mattox was permitted time to amend the complaint and the grounds for the lawsuit remain unchanged. The amended motion primarily re vised technical language. “We are pleased with the re cent federal decision denying the defendants’ request to dismiss the lawsuit and view it as a posi tive step in the struggle to show the public the real truth regard ing the actions and behavior of these individuals,” read a written statement from Citizens Improv ing Gulf County. “Through the efforts of dis covery including depositions it is our goal to have this trial very transparent and open to the pub lic. Anything less would be an in justice to the good people of Gulf County. They deserve better than what they have been given in the past and we are determined to correct that.” County attorney Jeremy No vak said the actions of the previ ous two weeks were largely proce dural in a federal court. It is typical, he added, for the plaintiffs’ attorney to be provided an opportunity to amend the com plaint in response to an order to dismiss but that there is a limited number of bites at the apple. Novak said he expected the judge to rule on motions to dis miss the amended complaint sometime in mid-August and from there the case would be dismissed or proceed through the pretrial process. The suit alleges that the BOCC, Yeager, McLemore and Williams abused their power and illegally retaliated against the PAC and Garth for exercising protected First Amendment rights. The lawsuit alleges McElroy coordinated with the BOCC in the attacks. The suit further levels a count of defamation toward McElroy. The suit asks for a jury trial and for unspecied “punitive and compensatory” damages. The allegations center on three 2012 BOCC meetings — spanning April to October — during which Citizens Improving Gulf County, Garth and other members were, according to the complaint, “at tacked” and “humiliated” for ex ercising their rights to free speech and questioning government. The lawsuit alleges the BOCC “choreographed” McElroy’s ap pearance and comments at each meeting, and “were motivated to retaliate for Garth’s exercise, on his own behalf and on behalf of the PAC, of First Amendment rights.” The lawsuit details that in a matter unrelated to the BOCC meetings, the State Attorney be gan an investigation based on a complaint by Yeager. The lawsuit alleges the investigation was “ini tiated and conducted” in retalia tion for Garth’s and the PAC’s le gal and protected statements. The nal meeting noted in the lawsuit included comments centered in part on the State At torney’s investigation, which at the time of the meeting had been closed with no charges led. It would ultimately be closed again with no charges led – the most signicant difference in the two documents closing the case being a reference to a 40-yearold alleged felony conviction of Garth, the evidence of which has never been made public, though the SAO suggested Garth’s civil rights had not been restored. When the Gulf County Super visor of Elections moved ahead to remove Garth from the voters rolls, the SAO failed to provide evidence of a crime and suggest ed the removal of Garth from the voting rolls should not progress. The result, the lawsuit alleges, was “retaliatory humiliation” for Garth and the PAC. “There is some irony in this (federal judge’s) decision com ing forth as we just celebrated Independence Day which repre sents our freedoms that we feel were violated,” Garth said in a statement. “I am personally anx ious to have these people under oath as soon as possible. In these days of government bullying, who wouldn’t want to have their elect ed ofcial under oath? “Lying under oath in a federal setting is a serious crime so the incentive to be truthful is stron ger and usually leads to the truth discovering everyone involved.” Judge denies motion to dismiss PAC lawsuitN e E WS He E R a A LD Fi I L e E phPH O t T O Beachgoers enjoy Shell Island. The route between Panama City Beach and Shell Island is a problem as tourists rent boats but aren’t aware, or don’t care, about the grass as they rush across the bay to visit the popular destination, ofcials said during a meeting Monday that focused on the St. Andrew, St. Joe and Choctawhatchee bays and the problems facing each watershed. Bay, Gulf, Walton told to work as a team to pursue BP money

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, July 11, 2013 4514931 NOTICE OF ANNU AL MEETING The Boar d of Commissioners of the Northw est Florida R egional Housing A uthority will hold its Ann ual Meeting on J ul y 18, 2013, a t the Holida y Inn & Suites 2725 Gr a v es R oad, T allahassee Florida. Meeting will begin a t 1:00 p .m. E.D .S .T The meeting will be open to the pub lic. PUBLIC NO TICE The Gulf County Ent er pr ise Zone De v elopment A g enc y will meet Thur sda y J ul y 1 8, 20 1 3, at 1 2:0 0 noon, E.T ., 1 0 0 0 Cecil G. Costin Sr ., Blvd., in the R ober t M. Moor e A dministr ation Building, Gulf County Cour thouse Comple x in R oom 307 The pub lic is w elcome t o at t end. (20 1 3.86) ?t†‹£ Q {… ?† • \’ {†t‹ VW BU ?t£ uu5• • 9R u•5 •• WR B ] ••Ž IŸ £ ‰ Ž \› ‰ M ; t{…> DQ 3 Ž •< 3 3 u3 2091547 Star Staff Report The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will host a public informa tion meeting for proposed improvements to State Road 30E (Cape San Blas Road)from 5-9 p.m. ET on Tuesday at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30A, Port St. Joe. FDOT is planning to resurface Cape San Blas Road from S.R. 30A to the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve. Additional improve ments include paved shoul ders and minor drainage modications. Construction is currently scheduled to begin fall 2015. The meeting will provide an opportunity to preview the proposed project, ask ques tions, and/or submit com ments concerning the pro posed project. Public participation is so licited with regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require spe cial accommodations under the Americans with Dis abilities Act, or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should con tact John S. Glenn, P.E., tollfree at (888) 638-0250, exten sion 1459 at least seven days prior to the meeting. For more Florida De partment of Transportation District Three informa tion follow us on Twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. FDOT to host meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvements WANT TO GO? FDOT public information meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvements When: 5-9 p.m. Tuesday Where: St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30A, Port St. Joe By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com A hearing scheduled to consider a motion to dismiss the charges against accused killer Walt Butler has been continued and rescheduled for September. Butler is charged with shoot ing and killing Everett Gant last July in Port St. Joe. Butler’s attorneys led a mo tion May 21 for the dismissal of criminal charges in the death of Gant and cited Florida’s “Stand Your Ground Law,” which jus ties the use of deadly force if someone believes force is necessary to prevent death or harm to themselves or another. The motion stated Butler feared retaliation for the use of racial slurs and that Gant showed “aggressive behavior” when he approached Butler’s apartment the fatal night. Butler was charged with one count of second-degree mur der with a rearm, evidencing prejudice based on race, but contended that deadly force was his last resort and that he is entitled to immunity from ar rest and prosecution. The hearing is scheduled for 9 a.m. ET Sept. 9-10 at the Gulf County Courthouse. Gant approached Butler’s Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of us ing racial slurs directed at chil dren in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 rie and left him bleeding on the doorstep be fore calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconvenience at being arrested for shooting a “(racial epithet),” according to the arresting afdavit. Six weeks after the shooting, Gant died from the injuries. Butler motion hearing continued to September W A A L T T BU TT LER

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OPINION www.starfl.com A Section Im a mathematician who enjoys writing, but I rarely combine the two outside of the workplace. Some folks want to talk about work at breakfast, lunch, dinner and on the weekend. I do not. The separation is necessary for me to remain functional in both places (at work and away from work). However, sometimes I will bring math into my thought process for fun and entertainment. Have you ever heard of a book being written on a subject that no one can really agree on a de nition? In mathematics, chaos is not chaos as you often think of it. As a matter of fact, in mathematics it is easier to de ne something being chaotic than to de ne chaos itself. To put it simply (which you cant really do), with chaos, we can get random results from things that seem very straightforward which are very sensitive to where they start. Again, do not write me telling me my de nition is wrong; you de ne it as simple or as dif cult as you wish. From my view on chaos we will jump to the present state of things, or the present place we think we are. This place is different for everyone, but similar in some ways. Folks are worried about what others can see or nd out about them the type of things that are private or that they want to be private. Honestly, I understand that. If you check my closet, things will fall out on you. Things other than skeletons and probably a lot of things will fall directly on your head. It happens to me all the time (with my own closet). Have you ever heard the Jeannie C. Riley song, Harper Valley PTA? It was written by Tom T. Hall who is one of the best country music storytellers ever to put his thoughts on paper. The song was released in 1968 and soared to number one on both the Billboard Pop and Country charts. In this time of what seems to be mathematical chaos and trying to gure out how all this started about people wanting to know what others are doing, saying and where they are going, I say use the Harper Valley Defense. In the song, Jeannie C. Riley plays the part of Mrs. Johnsons daughter who brings home a letter from the Harper Valley PTA noting that Mrs. Johnson is un t to be a mother. The PTA was particularly concerned with Mrs. Johnsons preference for miniskirts, running around with men, etc. I will stop here to note that if anyone is putting children in danger, I will be the rst to come to the aid of the child. Back to the miniskirts What happened next in the song was really chaos. Mrs. Johnson marched into the Harper Valley PTA meeting and started pointing ngers and naming names. Oh goodness gracious did she ever start naming names. The bottom line was what she was doing was not as bad as what some of the esteemed members of the Harper Valley PTA were doing on a much larger scale. As the song notes, The day my Mama socked it to the Harper Valley PTA. So there are at least a couple of lessons here. From the standpoint of mathematical chaos, the starting point was the Harper Valley PTA putting Mrs. Johnson under the magnifying glass and getting results that werent so straightforward. They opened up a Mason jar of something they werent prepared to drink. Another lesson was having the ability and taking the time to be prepared. Mrs. Johnson may have seemed to be running around and going wild. However, in the process, she saw a lot of other people and things going on that she was willing to keep to herself until folks turned on her. So, be like Mrs. Johnson and take a lot of notes you never can tell when youll need to address the Harper Valley PTA. I know most folks are asking, What if the Harper Valley PTA is much bigger and more dif cult to handle? My two cents is probably worth two cents, but my approach is to get out in the open where they can see me really well. Also, I will make sure that the sun is at my back. That way when they hold the magnifying glass up to look at me, it will blind them with re (ants on a summer day). Think about that Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Harper Valley Defense We called em cokes. Or soft drinks. Never would we have said soda. Or pop. I reckon it was a regional thing. And we used the word coke in a generic sense. Coca Colas were so popular in our area of the south we just referred to any soft drink as a coke. I remember when getting your hands on one was such a special treat! The real thing only came in the small, green tinted 6 and ounce glass bottles. And if you werent careful, you could drain the entire contents in two seconds! We developed the ice pick procedure out of necessity. To stretch out our cola treat me and Leon and David Mark would jab a whole in the cap with an ice pick. You couldnt get much drink out like that. But if you nursed it along, that coke would last for an hour! Mother was big on milk. She believed it developed strong bones and good teeth, promoted growth and warded off evil bacteria trying to invade our bodies. Plus, as I look back on it now, I realize Mom was thankful the cow didnt charge much to deliver. She considered an ice cold Coca Cola a luxury. We grew up in a day and an age when luxury took a way back seat to necessity. But every once in a while when the moon was right or the stars lined up or she found an extra fifteen cents, shed bring home three refreshing bottles of that extraordinary liquid. It seems so silly now, how wildly excited three little boys could get over a drink! Maybe it spoke to the simplicity of the times; to a period before television, long range intercontinental ballistic missiles, mini skirts, drive though restaurants, bottled water, high speed internet and phones that attached to your ear. Lost in the 50s wasnt the worst place to grow up. As Uncle F. D. would often say, We were as nave as flies on a frogs back, and we were proud of it. I never let my coke out of my sight. I said we were nave. Nobody said nothing about being stupid! Listen, I knew better than to sit that coke down and go to the bathroom. One of my brothers would take a swallow or twoor three the second I turned my back. Ive seen world class melees break out over a missing gulp! As we got a little older you cant imagine the prestige of sitting up on the front porch of Woodrow Kennons store and downing one with the grownups. We knew better than to say anything. But wed turn a Royal Crown Cola case up edgeways for a seat, lean back against the wall and listen to Mr. Willard Brush tell about the time Charlie Barton ran his Farmall Tractor into the Big Sandy River. Wed take a sip of a NuGrape and slowly nod along with the story ... just like we had been there! You talk about shinning times! When cotton was in and we could make a little spending money wed gather up in front of Pat Houstons Grocery and carefully pour a package of Toms Peanuts down the neck of a cold Dr. Pepper. There was an art to cupping your hand around the top of that bottle and funneling the peanuts carefully in so as not to spill a single one. Wed munch on the soaked peanuts and talk about the future. Of course, the future for us was the ballgame we were working on for the afternoon. Or school the next day. And we had lots of meaningful discussions over whether a Sun Drop tastes more like an Upper 10 or a Seven Up. We were just starting out in high school when we discovered the soda fountain in John Motherals Drugstore. Hed drop a couple scoops of ice cream into your coke and make a oat. We spent a happy hour or two, or a hundred, on those old red bar stools talking about football practice, girls, Mr. Arlie Chuck Berrys science class and maybe letting our hair grow out long like that new singing group in England. My rst date with Mary Hadley we ended up at Franks Dairy Bar starring at each other over a Coca Cola. It was the rst time in my life I didnt notice the taste. It could have been a Grape, Orange Crush, Dr. Pepper or any of the aforementioned green colas. I was more interested in her eyes. And her hair. And that incredible smile! I wasnt thinking about football practice, Coach Smith, a baseball game or the price of eggs in China. I was trying to think of something really intelligent to say... Mary Hadley laughed so easily. And before the moment was gone forever she hinted that she liked me a little too. It was the best coke I ever had! I can hear Mom to this day reminding me that milk is better for me than all those soft drinks. My wife worries that I drink way too many. My health conscious son is always on me about the caffeine and the carbonation and the phosphoric acids and the artificial flavors. I know theyre right but I cant help myself. A good Coke today seems to slow my pace. It takes me back to some great pre-television melees. It transports me to Woodrow Kennons delightful front porch; I can feel the red bar stools of Motherals Drugstore, taste the excitement and wonder lust of our youth ... and appreciate a time that I so flippantly took for granted as I passed through... I think we all did. Respectfully, Kes The pause that refreshes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Page 4 USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Fundraiser for Samantha Ambrose Dear editor, Samantha Ambrose is the typical home town girl. Born and raised in Port St. Joe, she had the opportunity to be an integral part of the 1998 Lady Sharks softball district champions. Samantha played the key position of catcher. She is best known for her beautiful smile and competitive spirit. On November 15, 1998, Samanthas life and the life of this who love her were forever changed. Samantha was involved in an automobile accident and suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It was doubtful that Samantha would recover and if she did, she would never be the same vivacious, quick-witted individual we had known. With the prayers and support of her family and her community, Samantha not only survived her accident, but has gone on to far exceed everyones expectations. She astounded everyone with her will and determination by walking the stage with her graduating class and little help from her friends. Fast forward 15 years later. As is true for most TBI survivors, the outward manifestation of her accident is almost nonexistent; however, the day-to-day struggle of integrating into life is constant. TBI survivors suffer with multiple symptoms. Memory loss, debilitating headaches, personality changes, inability to control inhibitions/anger, lack of social skills, not to mention any physical disability that may go along with the initial injury. The CDC reports that every year, at least 1.7 million TBIs occur in the United States. TBI is a contributing factor to 30.5 percent of all injury-related deaths in the United States, and about 75 percent of the TBIs that occur each year are concussion or other forms of mild TBI that studies are not linking to Alzheimers and/or dementia in later years. Funding for the intensive reintegration and life-long care many of these survivors need is almost nonexistent. Few private insurances cover life-long care. Government-funded insurance is rare and private pay options are only afforded to the af uent. Currently, Michigan is the only state to provide no-fault auto insurance that covers unlimited medical rehabilitation bene ts. This added coverage is set aside for Michigan residents for pennies per day for each insured driver in the state. We, the family and friends of Samantha Ambrose, are asking for your help. Our aim is to raise awareness of the long-long commitment and nancial burden that often befalls the families and caregivers of those who have suffered a TBI. We seek to inform the public that through our efforts, TBI survivors can receive the car and attention they need to return to society as productive individuals. As a start, we encourage you to contact your state representatives to request the same automobile no-fault coverage be afforded to the citizens of Florida. We humbly ask that as you are able to contribute to the account set up at Tyndall Federal Credit Union to continue Samanthas recovery. To donate, call TFCU at 850-769-9999 and ask for Account for Samantha Ambrose. You may contact Susie Ambrose at 580-819-1513 or email LSA@knology.net for further details on how you can help. A Fish Fry fundraiser will take place on July 12 at Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe. Fish, coleslaw, baked beans and bread will be served for $7 a plate and the event will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. The Ambrose Family Port St. Joe Humane Society says thanks Dear editor, The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society would like to say thank you to Brian Bowen for his enjoyable Porch Pickin at Indian Pass Raw Bar! A sincere thank you for donating your time and raising money to help the animals! For all who missed it, it was a blast. Hope to see you next time! For information on additional Humane Society events, please visit our website SJBHumaneSociety.org or like us on Facebook! Melody Townsend Shelter director Letters to the EDITOR The Centers for Disease Control reports that every year, at least 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries occur in the United States. TBI is a contributing factor to 30.5 percent of all injury-related deaths in the United States, and about 75 percent of the TBIs that occur each year are concussion or other forms of mild TBI that studies are not linking to Alzheimers and/or dementia in later years.

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In addition, a Circuit Court hearing next week will go a long way toward determining whether the Port Authority has the ability to mortgage public lands, which in effect the county is requesting. Any further discussion on the county’s position will come after that court hearing. Wewahitchka medical services Given the changes occurring at the Gulf County Health De partment facility in Wewahitch ka, a public meeting will be held at 6 p.m. CT on Tuesday, July 30, at the Honeyville Community Center south of Wewahitchka. Representatives from the health department and Sa cred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will be present to provide information. The health department ceased providing primary medi cal services at the end of June because of statewide budget cuts. Sacred Heart on the Gulf is to take over those services — the health department will continue to provide basic public health services — sometime this month, expanding the offerings of the health department, SHH President Roger Hall has told commissioners. Communications Several testy exchanges con cerning telephone communica tions with commissioners took place during Tuesday’s meeting, with Commissioner Joanna Bry an the receiving the brunt of it. Commissioner Carmen McLemore and later citizen Bill Williams Jr. pressed Bryan about whether her county phone worked and complaints about not returning phone calls. McLemore said he had “sev eral” people from Bryan’s Dis trict 3 contact him saying they could not contact Bryan and she did not return phone calls. McLemore said he had sent “his” work crew on a job in Dis trict 3. McLemore provided one name, and Bryan requested a list of complaining callers. Bryan added it was her un derstanding work crews were “county” work crews and there fore could be deployed anywhere in the county. Yeager said he had received some calls, but any he had for warded to Bryan. Commissioner Ward McDaniel said he had also received one call. “I think it is clear what is go ing on here,” Bryan said without elaborating. “I have received calls from (District 1). I will be willing to talk to anyone in the county. “I’ll be waiting for your list and appreciate any commissioners helping out in District 3.” When Williams later raised the issue during public comment, Commission chair Tan Smiley had enough. He said the issue had been addressed, he was sure Bryan would deal with any problems and “some phone calls get returned and some don’t, that is the way it is” given a commissioner holding down a full-time job or business. Beacon Hill sign Former Commissioner Bill Williams III appeared to discuss the situation with the sign that formerly promoted his business at Beacon Hill. The sign is on the U.S. High way 98 right-of-way and is in disrepair. The county has cited it as out of compliance with the sign or dinance, but Williams asked for time to get it in shape and won dered if it could not be useful as a way to advertise Veterans Memo rial Park at Beacon Hill and Gulf County. Bryan, who succeeded Wil liams in the District 3 seat, said feedback from constituents and the new owner of the assisted liv ing facility indicated people did not want the sign to remain. “The sign is a bit of an eye sore,” Bryan said. “It is a large sign in that area.” McDaniel also noted it was in need of repairs. County attorney Jeremy No vak said the agreement that al lowed the sign to be placed in the right-of-way is expired, an issue that would have to be cleared up before any work on the sign could take place. Tourist Development Council director Jennifer Jenkins said she would take another look at the sign to determine if it suited the branding campaign she has implemented this year. Bryan said before the BOCC should consider extending the right-of-way agreement, which would place the burden on Wil liams to x the sign, county staff and Jenkins should assess its po tential usefulness. “Does it t with the aesthet ics and branding Jennifer has worked so hard to bring about?” Bryan said. noting both iron and manganese could be causing the discoloration and would account for the various hues and intensity of discoloration experienced throughout the distri bution system. “The discoloration could be performed by a variety of factors. We have so much variation in the data.” Kozan said the manganese is not coming from water entering the plant. Whether the source is rainfall or from the distribu tion system — the city is near ing phase two of a three-phased project to replace some 20 miles of aged pipe — or other factors is unknown. “We were a little surprised to see as much manganese,” Kozan said. “(Identifying the source) is a very complicated problem to solve.” City manager Jim Anderson said manganese also had been a signicant problem with city of cials in Dalton, Ga., the site of a water plant and microltration system that most closely mir rors the Port St. Joe plant and system. Kozan said he was unaware of that and asked Anderson for ad ditional information. Kozan said the study was also somewhat hamstrung by the lack of historical data. The plans for the pilot study have now changed, Kozan added. The company will now likely har vest just one existing pipe section to send to Virginia Tech. Beyond that, the university will use “met al blanks” or unused pipe as com parison for a variety of chemical tests. Kozan said he was looking to take a section of 2-inch galvanized iron pipe from the area of Avenue A-Avenue B. Publics Works director John Grantland wondered about that selection. He noted the area’s pipe would soon be replaced as the nal component of the rst phase of pipe replacement and wondered why a section of newer PVC pipe would not be used as PVC was replacing the old iron pipe throughout the city. “We suspect a fair amount of water (problems) in (PVC) areas is manganese from the plant or a disturbance in the system,” Ko zan said, such as a re hydrant open. The pipe from Avenue A or B would be representative of the system, Kozan added. “We need to look at taking care of the manganese and look at tak ing care of iron breaking off and potential future sources,” Kozan said. “This is a multi-pronged effort.” Commissioner Rex Buzzett said he was not trying to be con frontational but wondered about the end game. A pilot study that appeared headed in one direction and with an estimated window of comple tion was taking on the look of a much longer process with the potential xes more complex and potentially more costly. “There has to be an end point,” Buzzett said. Kozan said CDM Smith would have to change the scope of the work “completely.” Broadband lease The city approved a lease agreement with a company that will mean more broadband capa bilities in the county. The move is specically aimed at the Port of Port St. Joe, said Jim Brook of the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance LLC. The port has a potential cus tomer that has interest in broad band capabilities. “Companies looking to relo cate here are going to look at broadband capacity,” Mayor Mel Magidson said. “If we don’t have that, they will look elsewhere.” The Broadband Alliance is not a retailer of broadband service — it provides a “larger pipe,” Brook said, for broadband capac ity and provides the services free to schools and libraries who wish to connect. The lease would allow the al liance to erect towers on the Shark Tank and Highland View water towers. The estimated value would be applied to the lo cal match of a federal grant to in crease broadband access to rural communities. The city could begin realizing revenue from the lease in four or ve years, Brook said. There is no cost to the city. PORT from page A1 WATER from page A1 County Judge Tim McFarland. The class was developed by the Panhandle Area Education Consortium’s Science, Tech nology, Engineering and Math ematics group to provide op portunities to gifted or talented students in rural areas that they might not receive in the classroom. This is the second year of a three-year project among PAEC, Heartland Educational Consor tium and the Northwest Florida Education Consortium. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to expose students to things they may not have knowledge of,” said Brenda Crouch, project manager for PAEC. The former Marianna science teacher sees STEM careers as vital to the economy, and she aided in the creation of seven programs around the state to bring alternative careers to the forefront of rural youths. The programs rotate each year, and in addition to the crime scene investigation class, they’ve also developed curricu lums for robotics, nano, ecologi cal and emerging technology challenges. “These classes give the stu dents an understanding of real scientic work,” Crouch said. “We’re working with districts to up the number of rigorous STEM courses offered so that students can compete at the secondary level.” The program serves 998 stu dents in Florida, and the goal was to build a prototype of a program that could potentially become a staple of education in rural areas like Gulf County. Students were nominated for the program by their teach ers or guidance counselors with special consideration given to those who had excelled in math and the sciences. “Some kids showed extreme interest in the class,” said Kim McFarland, geometry teacher at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and an assistant in the CSI classrooms. “We would take the students to the next level dur ing school if only we had more time.” McFarland applauded the program for not only the handson experience the class offered, but the role it played in recog nizing students and their gifts. “When we heard about the program, we thought of stu dents who would eat that stuff up,” she said. “You recognize the kids in class who are inter ested. They’re the ones asking deep questions.” McFarland, along with Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School sci ence teacher Scott Lamberson and Blountstown math and sci ence teacher Amanda McGhee, also helped out in the class rooms as mentor teachers. Students in the program also have access to STEM-centric counselors and meet with repre sentatives four times a year. These counselors keep stu dents informed on new and ex citing science-related jobs and help them gure out the best route toward achieving their ca reer goals. In the classroom, the students have an opportunity to gain additional knowledge while working and collaborating with other gifted students who share their interests. Haley Anderson, who will start her junior year at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School in the fall, enjoyed the class but is still trying to decide on her career plans. She’s torn between ma rine biology and criminal inves tigative services. Even if she wasn’t able to crack the case on her career aspirations, she was happy to make new friends in her class mates, who also found the camp to be a lot of fun. “I barely knew anyone on Monday, but now we’re all friends,” Anderson said. “It’s an amazing opportunity, and I’m happy to be a part of it.” Crouch said jobs in STEM-re lated elds are recession-proof, and it’s a good time to explore careers in the worlds of science, math and engineering. “Florida has an unlled STEM pipeline,” Crouch said. “The available jobs outnumber the qualied applicants.” CSI from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : 4514932 i s h e r e f o r yo u r boa t i n g n e e d s! MARIN A FO RK LIFT/R A CKS T O R A GE CAN O P IED B O A T S T O R A GE & B O A S T RENT AL D IES EL & GA SO LINE CAPT AIN SAL T Y B AIT S & I CE GA TED S ELF S T O R A GE, TR AILERED B O A T S & R V'S (850)-227-3357 1617 GR O UP ER A VENUE, PO R T S T J O E, FL WWW .CAPT AINSC O VEFL.C O M WEEKL Y ALM ANA C ST JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W ES T P ASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 227-7847 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 11 86 78 30 % F ri, July 12 85 76 60 % S a t July 13 85 77 30 % Sun, July 14 87 78 40 % M on, July 15 87 78 30 % T ues July 16 86 78 30 % W ed July 17 86 78 60 % SPONSORED BY Inshore Freshwater Offshore Offshore anglers will have the chance one more time to catch state-water snapper this week, ending on Sunday at midnight. Many good-sized fish can be caught near shore, and with all the weather from last week, these fish should bite very aggressively. Watch and know your state water boundaries. After a near record rainfall this past week, most area lakes and streams are near flood stage, and some still rising as waters from north of us reach the Forgotten Coast this week. Good reports from The Brothers and the Big River of sheepshead and channel cats are the only thing we hear right now. Most of the inshore attention is now focused on scallop season. We are seeing good numbers of shells coming to the docks, and the shells are strong and large for this time of summer. Keep your dive flags up, and watch for boaters! THE PORT ST. JOE STAR FIND US ON FACEBOOK @ PSJ_Star FOLLOW US ON TWITTER By TOM BAIRD Special to The Star Slow moving, chocolate brown horseshoe crabs are well known to our residents. Whether snorkeling or wading in the shallows of St. Joe Bay or along our beaches, horseshoe crabs are a common sight for visitors and locals alike. Elsewhere in Florida, tourists with little experience of the marine environment often react to horseshoe crabs nearby with fear. Often assuming the tail has a stinger, there is a lot of general misinformation shared around. In truth, although few creatures are uglier, few are less harmful. The horseshoe crab has been around a long time, at least 450 million years. Although their clan was once more numerous in past seas, and even in recent times, their distribution is now restricted to the northwestern Atlantic coast from southern Canada around the Gulf of Mexico to Yucatan. All other members of the group are found along Asian coasts from Japan and Korea south through the East Indies and the Philippines. The horseshoe crab is not actually a true crab. They are more closely related to spiders and share many characteristics with spiders. If you have picked one up, you have noticed that the crab has four eyes: two tiny ones on the forward part of the “shield” and one large compound eye on each side of the shield. Its scienti c name is Limulus polyphemus. The name “Limulus” means side-glance or look. The hard body armor or exoskeleton is made of chitin, the same tough, resistant material that forms the body of insects, shrimps, blue crabs, etc. Chitin is heavy, so only in the buoyant sea could the horseshoe crab reach such a large size. The spiny tail is attached to the rest of the body in ball and socket fashion. The tail is used for righting the crab when overturned and possibly as a deterrent to being eaten. There is no poison gland in the tail, although it would hurt to step on a horseshoe crab barefooted. If you see a horseshoe crab near the shore, do not be afraid to pick it up or touch it. The pincer claws are very weak and can do no harm. The mouth is in the center underside and looks erce but is also very weak. The last pair of legs tipped with spikes act like “ski poles” in locomotion over the bottom. Bristles at the base of the legs grind food (worms and soft shelled clams) as the crab moves. Spawning occurs at high tides during May and June, so you have likely seen many horseshoe crabs moving in tandem in shallow water in the last weeks. The female crawls up on a calm beach or sandy marsh edge between high and low tide marks to lay eggs in shallow depressions that she makes by her burrowing movements. The male crab hitches a ride on the female and fertilizes the eggs as they are deposited in each nest. Often one or more of the pair is stranded by the receding tide and the beachcomber nds the large shell the next day. Tiny crabs are hatched within two to four weeks. The waves of the next full moon tide (spring tide) wash the eggs into the bay or Gulf, and the eggs break as they are tumbled against the sand. By the third year of life the horseshoe crab has shed its hard outer shell 11 times and is about 6 inches long. Horseshoe crabs migrate to deeper water until they reach the adult stage. Between ages 9 and 11, the horseshoe crab matures and travels back to shallow water for the remainder of its life. Once it reaches the adult stage it does not shed. Females can grow to a length of 30 inches. Males are smaller. Horseshoe crabs have been used by humans in many, and sometimes surprising, ways. The tail was once used by Native Americans for spear tips and awls to punch leather. In the 19th century, horseshoe crabs were dried and ground for use as fertilizer or poultry feed supplement. In 1856, 1,200,000 horseshoe crabs were harvested on just a one mile stretch of Delaware beach. As late as the 1920’s and early 1930’s, 4-5 million crabs were harvested annually. Harvesting horseshoe crabs became unpro table with the use of arti cial fertilizer and the reduced crab population. The horseshoe crab has new value however. The creature has pale blue blood that contains an agent valuable to medicine. The active agent is called Limulus amoebocyte lysate. It can be used to detect extremely small amounts of endotoxins, which are poisons found in a major class of bacteria that cause serious infections in humans. The value of the Limulus lysate test is that it detects smaller amounts of endotoxins quickly and reliably. If you have ever received an injection of a drug or vaccine, the batches were tested with Limulus lysate to ensure no bacterial contamination. To obtain the lysate, horseshoe crabs are bled by inserting a needle into the heart chamber. The donor crabs are released afterwards. Additionally, chitin from horseshoe crabs is used to create a suture material. Chitin-coated suture material reduces healing time by 35 to 50 percent. Horseshoe crabs contribute formidable weapons to medicine’s arsenal against infectious disease. Meanwhile, the horseshoe crab continues its silent shuf e across warm shallow seas as it has done for millions of years, and with care for our bays and estuaries, it will continue to do so. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. COURTESY OF RALPH ROBERSON Chris Roberson snagged this 85-inch Sail sh near the Cape Tower on July 3 with an assist from his son Carter. Chris, from Port St. Joe, was shing aboard the Blue Heron with his father, Ralph. Chris is visiting from Raleigh, NC. NOW, THAT’S A FISH Horseshoe crab a familiar sight Thursday, July 11, 2013 Page 6

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section WEEKEND SPE CIALS FOR L OC ALS WITH A FL ORID A I D 40% O F F on S a tur da y and Sunda y only D AIL Y SHOW S FEA TURING : D olphins S ea Lions Reptiles Bir ds D o gs and O ther A nimal Surprises w w w .G ulfW or ldM arineP ar k .c om C ALL FOR MORE INFORM A TION 850-234-5271 OR VISIT O p en R ain or S hine! It’ s A ppr ec ia t ion T ime a t… Local s P ASSES OFFER EXPIRES 8 / 3 1 / 2 0 1 3 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Page 7 By Josh Dailey Special to The Star On behalf of the Port St Joe High School Football team we want thank the more than 60 runners who braved the rain to come and make the 5K Fun Run a great success. We also want to thank the numerous volunteers and sponsors who all contributed to a successful event. Thanks so much to Mike Lacour and the Centennial Celebration committee for letting us administer the 5K run. They were very helpful with the advertising by posting our race information to the event website. Also special thanks to Don Butler and Mark Cothran for setting up the ashing sign with our event information. The Gulf County Chamber and The Star also helped us with advertise for the race. Tracy Browning also assisted in advertising by passing out banners. Wayne Taylor made the yers and also posted information about the race on the school website. The Gulf County TDC provided the goodie bags, water proof cases, lip balm and visitor guides. Police Chief David Barnes and his department were very helpful in assisting with traf c control at the start of the race. The rehouse was also generous enough to let us use their facilities for registration. The Salvation Army also showed their support by showing up to distribute waters. We want to thank student volunteers: Tyler Worley, Joel Cummings, Bryce Godwin, Austin Nobles, Rainee Nobles, Brayden Dailey and Caleb Odum. I really appreciate their great attitudes and commitment despite having to wake up so early on a stormy day to help prepare for the 5K. They helped out with various tasks and worked hard keeping the runners hydrated at the refreshment stations set up along the race path. I’m very proud of these students and their hard work and dedication shows a lot about their strong character. Our adult volunteers were Kayla Dailey, Sissy Worley, Courtney Cummings, Bobby Nobles, Terri Browning, Chuck Gannon, Jo Heimbuch and Sherry Thacker. They helped out with registration, preparing the food and monitoring at intersections. Their willingness to help out with whatever we asked of them was so very much appreciated. I would also like to give a special thanks to my father-in-law, Brian Heimbuch, who helped coordinate the race and was instrumental in its success. We are already looking forward to planning another race. I would like to acknowledge all of our sponsors who helped support the event: Raf eld Fisheries, Inc., Joe Mama’s Wood Fired Pizza, Hannon Insurance Agency, Gaddis Construction, Wood’s Fisheries, Inc., St. Joe Rent all, Inc., Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union, Bell Foundation Company and Dodson Appraisals. The Piggly Wiggly of Apalachicola provided all of the drinks, bananas and oranges for after the race. Thanks to Bobby Pickels and Duke Energy for providing mini rst aid kits. Mainstay Suites provided T-shirts for the race. Greg Lay eld and Jim Norton provided tables, orange vest for our volunteers working intersections, and cups for the race. It was a pleasure to work with Joey Browning at Columbus Trophy & Screen Printing who helped us design the technical shirts for our runners. A large portion of the shirt cost was also donated and greatly appreciated. I truly believe we have a great community and it shows by the willingness of it citizens to volunteer their time and money for a great cause. The runners provided many comments about the great treatment they received and the hospitality shown by the volunteers. This was a proud day for the city of Port St. Joe. Special to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will offer free athletic screenings to high school and junior high students in Gulf County on July 23 and Aug. 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. ET. Florida regulations require athletic screenings for all students participating in practice and competitive sports. The free screenings will be administered at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf’s Medical Of ce Building by specialists including Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic staff and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf physical therapists, nurses and physicians. Screenings include blood pressure, heart rate, posture, range of motion, exibility and balance. Students should check with their coach to learn which date they should attend. Additionally, students and their parents must complete medical history and permission forms prior to participating in the athletic screening. These forms are available through school coaches or Sacred Heart’s Rehabilitation program in the Medical Of ce Building. Student athletes should wear shorts, t-shirts, and athletic shoes for their visit. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf’s Medical Of ce Building is located on the hospital’s campus at 3801 U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. REVISED 2013 PORT ST. JOE VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE Date Opponent Home/Away EasternTime 26-Aug Rutherford Away 6/7pm 27-Aug West Gadsden Home 6/pm 3-Sep Bay Haven Away 6/7pm 5-Sep Bay High Home 6/7pm 9-Sep Wewahitchka Away 6/7pm 10-Sep South Walton Home 6/7pm 12-Sep Bozeman Home 6/7pm 14-Sep Chipley Tourney Away All Day 17-Sep Franklin Co. Away 6/7pm 19-Sep Bozeman Away 6/7pm 23-Sep Liberty County Home 6/7pm 24-Sep West Gadsden Away 6/pm 26-Sep Bay Haven Home 6/7pm 3-Oct South Walton Away 6/7pm 7-Oct Liberty County Away 6/7pm 8-Oct Franklin Co. Home 6/7 pm 10-Oct Bay High Away 6/7 pm 15-Oct Rutherford Home 6/7 pm 17-Oct Wewahitchka Home 6/7 pm 21-Oct Quarter-Finals Franklin 5/7 pm 22-Oct Semi-Finals Franklin 5/7 pm 24-Oct District Finals Franklin 7:00 PM 5-Nov Reg. Semi-Finals TBA 7:00 PM 9-Nov Regional Finals TBA 2:00 PM 12-16 Nov FHSAA Finals Kissimmee Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf offers free school athlete screenings Centennial Celebration 5K fun run results SPECIAL TO THE STAR The top female and male nishers were Kathy Wolski and Christian Carlson.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 & & # $ % & & # $ h¡Š h ¡Šm {”Š‘ _ _Œ ¨ pFFF Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Stephen Collier DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients gulfcoastderm.com POR T ST JOE | P ANAMA CITY T ricia Berry ARNP | Advanced Register ed Nurse Practitioner What does this mean for you? Access to the r egion’ s widest range of advanced skin cancer tr eatments, including painless Super cial Radiation Therapy and Mohs micr ographic sur gery Same-week appointments Our physician-supervised spa, of fering pr oven tr eatments for total skin r evitalization and r ejuvenation T o make an appointment or schedule a complimentary cosmetic consultation, please call 1 877 -231 DERM (3376). MEDICAL | SURGICAL | COSMETIC TOT AL ACCESS TOT AL CONFIDENCE. T O T AL CA R E FOR YOUR SKIN. items left behind. Dogs are off leashes as the county promotes pet-friendly beaches, and the ability for even safety vehicles to reach portions of the beach is compromised. Sgt. Chris Buchanan of the GCSO also noted the beach area continues to experience car and home break-ins, with more than a dozen over the holiday weekend alone. “If we don’t get ahead of this, it could get out of control very quickly,” Jenkins said. “We relaunched a brand in February, and all indications are that it is resonating. We need to manage the brand.” How to do that was where the board lacked a consensus. Ronald Pickett and Alyson Gerlach each expressed a reluc tance or outright opposition to any increase in the bed tax. For Gerlach, the issue was simply the costs to bed tax collec tors and their guests. “We are a price-sensitive mar ket,” Gerlach said. “When we talk about raising bed taxes, we are going to lose customers.” Pickett added, “We’ve lost revenue the past seven years be cause the economy sucked. We are starting to see that change. We are a thrift brand.” County Commissioner War ren Yeager said as an elected of cial, he must look at the broader picture. Given the county’s own budget straightjacket, the BOCC was forced to look at options other than property taxes to fund services. “We have to look at alternative sources of revenue to x the prob lems we need to x,” Yeager said. “I can’t justify spending (property taxes) when most of the problems are caused by tourists. “We all agree there is a prob lem. We need to x the problem. At the end of the day, we do need to protect our brand.” Yeager said the county could not continue to provide required services at its current funding level, and property taxes were al most certain to rise. But he added the county also was looking at user fees, ser vice fees and other sources of income. Pickett said citizens and visi tors did not want to be “user-feed to death,” and he opposed the county asking the TDC to pro vide services the county should be funding. The suggestion also was made that though the county had ordi nances on the books for issues such as beach driving and main taining a pet on a leash, the nes should be more substantial. Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Asso ciation, said the county adver tises pristine beaches that are not currently so pristine after a busy holiday weekend. She also noted tourists create most of the problems and should foot the bill. “Our visitors are leaving a mess,” Hardman said. “Why should my (property taxes) go for that? I think it is totally justi ed to put it on the backs not of our property owners but on the backs of tourists.” She said it was not logical that one additional penny in bed tax es would lead to fewer visitors. Pickett agreed he would like to ultimately see “leave no trace” as county policy, but he was against the TDC subsidizing a portion of the county’s budget by adding to the bed tax. He said he supported a shortterm solution — a fee for guests during the summer aimed at bringing about leave no trace, for example, but not funding year round — and wondered if the TDC had the revenue or sav ings to address the problem in the short-term. “I am against an increase across the board,” Pickett said, adding he does not believe the county’s tourist corridor re ceives the services commen surate to the amount of its tax base, which represents roughly 38 percent of the entire county’s property tax collections. “I’m against a long-term com mitment via a tax.” Board member Patty Fisher said the TDC budget committee should look at the TDC budget and examine if there was money to be moved toward the beach safety program. TDC board chair David War riner asked for the TDC budget committee to meet next week with the full advisory board meeting after the rst county budget meeting next week. “We have had a growing bud get,” Warriner said. “Maybe it is time to reprioritize. Maybe we don’t need the extra penny. If it is a short-term deal, maybe we can dip into savings. Adding a new program at this time of austerity may not be a good idea. “We aren’t the only source of funds. It’s smart to look at other sources, such as (a state agen cy) grant. We have to be very focused on what (state law) says we can use the money on. Do we have a bad enough problem that it will impact our image?” TDC from page A1 “We have to look at alternative sources of revenue to fix the problems we need to fix. I can’t justify spending (property taxes) when most of the problems are caused by tourists.” County Commissioner Warren Yeager

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“Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) American “what” was the title of a TV series set in the 1960s with Meg, Helen, Jack, and JJ? Idol, Gladiators, Dreams, Life 2) About what percent of America’s teens get an optimal amount (9+ hrs) of sleep? 9, 20, 31, 42 3) Who was the rst U.S. president to appear on a postage stamp? Lincoln, Jefferson, Washington, Madison 4) What country in the news media is often called the “Hermit Kingdom”? Libya, Nigeria, Laos, N. Korea 5) Of these which is not in Europe? Israel, Albania, Germany, Sweden 6) Where was the rst commercial espresso machine manufactured in 1906? San Francisco, Italy, NYC, France 7) Approximately three out of how many American teens drink a caffeinated beverage daily? 4, 6, 8, 10 8) Who was the only former U.S. president to die in the 1700s? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 9) What philosopher reportedly drank fty cups of coffee a day? Confucius, Descartes, Voltaire, Jung 10) Though cancelled due to WWI, where were the 1916 Olympics scheduled to be held? Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Warsaw 11) Of these industrialists who was a surgeon during the Civil War? Ford, Rockefeller, Goodrich, Firestone 12) Where was Elvis Presley scheduled to perform next when he died? Florida, Oregon, Michigan, Maine 13) What averages out to about 512 of them per pound? Paperclips, Potato chips, Popcorn kernels, Plain M & Ms 14) How many coffee beans does it ordinarily take to make an espresso? 20, 42, 100, 180 ANSWERS 1) Dreams. 2) 20. 3) Washington. 4) N. Korea. 5) Israel. 6) Italy. 7) 4. 8) Washington. 9) Voltaire. 10) Berlin. 11) Goodrich. 12) Maine. 13) Plain M & Ms. 14) 42. C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, July 11, 2013 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Port St. Joe completes centennial celebration By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Port St. Joe’s centennial and birthday celebration came to a close July 5 after a week’s worth of events. With more than 30 celebratory events scheduled across eight days, there was no shortage of family fun to be had. The centennial committee, which was appointed by Mayor Mel Magidson in October, included Patti Blaylock, Dana Boyer, Jennifer Jenkins, Clarence Monette, John Parker, Charlotte Pierce, Tim Nelson, Paula Pickett and Steve Kerigan. The group brainstormed events and did their best to see them through to completion while competing against Mother Nature. “The event was well-received,” Pickett said. The celebration, which began the last Friday in June, started with a bang as more than 300 members of the community showed up to a sh fry at city commons that raised more than $2,000 for celebration expenses. A parade down Reid Avenue followed that highlighted founding members of the community and graduates of Port St. Joe High School over many generations. June 30 was a 5K run, SaltAir Farmer’s Market and the rst display of the static light show that ran nightly at George Core Park. The July 1 family fun day brought out the kids for the rst annual kite ying competition and PSJ soccer fundraiser. “It was cool seeing people use the park like that,” Pickett said. July 2, the of cial birthday of the city, was celebrated by the burial of a Scallop festival just around the corner By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Centennial Celebration has come and gone, but if there’s one thing the ne folks of Gulf County know how to do, it’s how to throw a party. The 17th annual Scallop Festival is just around the corner and will take place on two separate weekends: July 27-28 and Aug. 2-4 at George Core Park and around Gulf County. Celebrate Gulf County’s favorite mollusk by grabbing a plate of scallops on-site or frozen scallops to take home. Vendors will be serving up the tasty morsels almost any way that can be imagined. Kids clean beach, serve community By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Department of Juvenile Justice teamed up this week with the Teen Outreach Program and Students Working Against Tobacco to clean up area beaches. The cleanup crews, made up of students ages 10-18, walk a six-mile strip of beach usually starting from the canal in St. Joe Beach and going as far as the Lookout Lounge or Toucan’s in Mexico Beach. Four of the students took part in Monday’s post-Fourth of July cleanup to clear the beach of used reworks, trash and cigarette butts. Kids are provided with trash bags, gloves and bottled water and spend four hours combing the beach for the debris to keep the area beautiful. Shoes are optional. TOP and SWAT are part of the Gulf County Department of Health and provide volunteer opportunities in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka. The Department of Juvenile Justice brings youth who have been in legal trouble, are on probation and required to complete community service hours. FILE PHOTO Celebrate the scallop and order up a basket in your favorite style. Port St. Joe completes centennial celebration 10 0 in June, started with a bang as more than 300 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star FROM TOP: A time capsule was buried beneath the whistle downtown and will be opened in 50 years. It was buried by the of cial centennial committee. The adult winners of the kite ying contest proudly accept awards. Essays written by elementary high school students discussed how Port St. Joe has changed over the last 100 years. Crowds participate in celebrating the city’s birthday. See 100 B5 See SCALLOP B5 See CLEAN B5

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 Special to the Star MyGULFCare is a program, offered at no cost to help low in come residents of Gulf County receive the right health care ser vices at the right time. Offered by Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in partnership with the Flor ida Department of Health in Gulf County, MyGULFCare strives to improve the health of Gulf Coun ty residents by addressing the need for coordination of care be tween primary care physicians, the emergency department, the department of health, and spe cialty care providers. A variety of services are available. How do you qualify for MyGULFCare? To qualify for MyGULFCare free services, you must meet the following qualications: U.S. citizen or legal resident Gulf County resident Have Medicaid insurance or are uninsured Low income What is Care Management? MyGULFCare Care Manage ment Program is for people with a chronic health condition who need personalized, one-on-one assistance to understand their condition and how to control it. Care Management currently is offered to individuals with one or more of the following: diabe tes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. Care Management does not take the place of fol lowing your physicians orders, it improves your ability to follow those directions and understand the expected outcomes. By learn ing how to better manage your chronic condition, you will be better equipped to maintain a healthy lifestyle. MyGULFCare Care Manager will meet with you one-on-one to discuss your present health con dition then help you set short and long-term health goals. The Care Manager will provide you with the tools you need to better con trol your chronic condition and will work with you to make sure you are making progress. What is Diabetes? Most of the food you eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, so your body can use it for energy. When you have Diabetes, your body either doesnt make enough insulin, cant use its own insulin as well as it should, or both. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. There are two main forms of Diabetes, Type I and Type II. Type I generally starts early in life and results from the body not producing enough insulin. Com monly called Insulin-dependent, or Juvenile Diabetes, it requires an insulin injection daily. Type II Diabetes develops when the body doesnt make enough insu lin and doesnt efciently use the insulin it makes. There are many lifestyle changes and healthy habits that will help to reduce or even reverse the symptoms of Diabetes. What is Hypertension? Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure. About 1 of every 3 Americans Adults has hypertension. Children can also have it. Having hypertension in creases your risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and heart disease. High blood pressure can affect anyone! It is sometimes called the silent killer because many people never know they have it. 90% of the cases of high blood pressure have no specic cause. There are many factors that can lead to hypertension, and the good news is, with life-style changes and healthy choices, hypertension can be controlled. Many medications are available as well. With early detection and treatment, many of the complica tions associated with high blood pressure can be avoided. What is Hyperlipidemia? More than just high choles terol, hyperlipidemia means that there are high levels of fat (or Lipids) in the blood. The choles terol and the triglycerides are essential to our bodies, yet too much of either can place us at risk of stroke or heart disease. Our bodies make enough choles terol to maintain healthy circula tion, and triglycerides are pres ent at or just below the normal amount when our bodies produce new cells. Too much cholesterol can cause a sticky substance called plaque to build up in our arter ies and block circulation caus ing heart attacks or strokes. A combination of medication, exercise, and healthy dietary choices is essential to controlling hyperlipidemia. To learn more about how you can manage your Diabetes, Hy pertension or Hyperlipidemia, contact the Care Manager at (850)227-1276 ext. 132. You may qualify for MyGULFCare, a pro gram designed to help Gulf Coun tys low income households, and to provide Care Management to those who are uninsured, under insured, and dealing with one or more of these chronic conditions. MyGULFCare helps those dealing with chronic health conditions T o n t o a n d R a n g er a r e tw o sw e et r es c ue k i t t en s t h a t w o u ld lo v e a f o r e v er h o m e B o t h h a v e le a r n e d t o t r us t a n d lo v e p e o p le es e li t t le gu ys w o u ld m a k e a g r e a t addi t io n t o a n y fa mi l y I f y o u c a n g i v e ei t h er o n e o f t h em a f o r e v er h o m e do n o t h esi t a t e t o co n t ac t us. I f y o u a r e u n a b l e t o a d o p t a t t h i s t i m e p e r h a p s y o u c o u l d f o s t e r o r m a k e a D o n a t i o n A l l p e t s a d o p t e d f r o m S J B H S w i l l b e c u r r e n t o n v a c c i n a t i o n s a n d s p a y e d / n e u t e r e d Pl e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n s e n d hsd i r ec t o r @ g m a i l c o m o r a d o pt b a y s t jo e @ g m a i l c o m o r c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e A p p l i c a t i o n s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j bh u m a ne s o c i e t y o r g W e r e q u i r e a l l p o t e n t i a l a d o p t e r s t o c o m p l e t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r m A d o p t i o n f e e s i n c lu d e o u r c o s t o f s p a y / n e u t e r a n d c u r r e n t v a c c i n a t i o n s O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 4 p m F a i t h s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o lu n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n P o r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t h e r e s o o n w w w s j bh u m a ne s o c i e t y o r g I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n f a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y 4514866 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Call T oda y 4515176 ON THE POOP DECK IN THE CR O WS NEST WEDNESD A Y FRID A Y SA TURD A Y K ARA OKE D J D ANCING *All Times Easter n Fun Time* 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 WWW .LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM THURSD A Y 7PM Luk e & Mand y SA TURD A Y 9PM DeeJ a Div a WEDNESD A Y 7PM Br ian Bo w en & Melissa Bo wman SUND A Y 7PM Rand y & Ar t FRID A Y 9PM Na v ajo Sky T he M agic of C ape S an Blas and the S urr ounding Ar ea B ooks a v ailable a t: N o Name B ookst or e B luew a t er O utriggers A r ea B ookst or es Maddo x H ouse **A v ailable O nline** w w w .marlene w omack.com *B O ARD CER TIFIED CIVIL TRI AL L A WYER O F CO UNS EL Society HAPPY BIRTHDAY 1 Love ... 2 BirthdaysJuly 5. Happy Birthday to Mr. Billy and Cheryl Quinn. We Love You. We Celebrate You! The Quinn and Granger Family Music, martinis and mammos Sacred heart to hold membership drive Star Staff Report The Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild will hold a membership drive from 5-7 p.m. ET on Tuesday, July 16 at the Haughty Heron. Become a new member for $20 and receive a free mar tini from the Haughty Heron. The event will include live music, light food and a local breast cancer survivor who will speak on the importance of early detection. Support the drive for breast cancer screenings and other health initiatives by becoming a member of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. The Guild pro vides helping hands of support and fundraising activities to bring new health care programs and services to the community. Funds raised will be contributed in part to the devel opment of a fund to assist uninsured and underinsured residents receive breast cancer screenings. COURTESY OF D EBBIE H OOPER AT JOEBAY. COM Adam, Jenna, Noah and Kiera Price enjoyed some relaxing time in a really big beach chair during a recent evening. Adam, Jenna and Noah are siblings, Kiera is their cousin. BEACH FUN ON A SUMMER AFTERNOON

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The Star| B3 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Implants & Cr o wns Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P A W illiam C Knapk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P anama City Squar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P anama City FL Call F or Inf or mation 1-888-336-1615 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Additional f ees ma y be incurr ed depending on individual cases Same-da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailable in cer t ain cases Af f or dable Dentur es P anama City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. Gr eat v s other Dent al pr o viders Single T ooth Implant $ 1 7 95 Dentur e Implants $ 1 495 $ 1 8 95 Same Da y Cr o wns $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upper Ar c h 20144-4-T4 111 6 6 2 4 By DR. SANDRA M. COOK Teacher, Port St. Joe High School Special to The Star As a teenager, eight days can seem like an eternity, but three Gulf County stu dents Allen Davis, Cordale Green and Samantha Hoover had an experience of a life time while participating in a STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathemat ics) camp hosted by Tyndall Air Force Base and sponsored by FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project through the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium in Chipley. For eight days, these stu dents were introduced to the world of work in a way they never dreamed possible. The focus was on STEM-related jobs and careers through the efforts of the Tyndall research site commander, Lt. Col. Don na Pilson; Capt. Kurt Silsby, who provided numerous ad ventures for the students; and Sandra Cook, Ph.D., a Port St. Joe High School math teach er who served as the teacher liaison for the experience. The students were ex posed to areas of research centered on re protection of our military personnel and ways to create alternate means of energy. Some of the areas the students par ticipated in were to design, build and test a protective shield for precious cargo; to feed algae that is being de veloped to provide an alter native energy source; and to learn about various ways re search is being developed to protect our soldiers from re through repellants for their uniforms to protection while ghting aircraft fuel res. Another major source of fun was driving several military vehicles which was de nitely a highlight of their day remotely driving a mine sweeper, participating in the F-15 simulator and driving a bomb loader. With each and every as pect of their investigations, the students were exposed to information about vari ous jobs, not only from the military aspect, but with ci vilian possibilities in mind, as well. The information shared came from ofcers, enlisted service personnel, contractors and civil service employees. Some of the jobs and careers shared were civil, mechanical and elec trical engineers, chemists, physicists, many areas of the F-22 maintenance, numer ous medical elds, plus many other possibilities. For these eight days, the students were immersed into a world that created interest, questions and wonder. There is no doubt this was an expe rience of a lifetime for these three students that will not soon be forgotten. There will always be a new level of re spect for the men and women who serve our country for Al len, Cordale and Samantha. Special to The Star With summer just beginning, three cadets from the Port St Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC made a commitment to themselves and their company by accepting the challenge of attending the NJROTC Area Seven Leadership Academy at Admiral Farragut Academy in St. Petersburg on June 15-22. Meeting the rigorous physical and academic requirements, Cadets Zachory Jasinski, Marquez Johnson and Claudia Gref successfully completed this weeklong Advanced Leadership Training Course and will assume greater leadership roles in the NJROTC when classes resume in August. Rising at 5:30 a.m. each day, the cadets, along with more than 200 others, selected from 8,000 statewide, completed a grueling regimen of physical tness, leadership studies, survival swimming and sailing. More importantly, they were able to work with cadets from around the state, sharing their NJROTC experiences, and bring a wealth of information back with them to share with the cadets of Port St Joe. Military drill, uniform preparation and inspection, barracks organization and team building were all parts of this exceptional training experience. Jasinski, Johnson and Gref performed in an outstanding manner and warrant a pat on the back for a job exceptionally well done. These cadets will join Cadets Robert Dykes and Megan Hubbard, who completed Leadership Academy last summer, as the cornerstone of leadership for the NJROTC Company this school year. A special thanks to our local American Legion Post 116 for their generous donation of the $180 tuition for each cadet to attend Leadership Academy. Their understanding of the importance of this training is a key to its success. Thank you for your outstanding support of the NJROTC Program. Both the American Legion and VFW Post 10069 have been instrumental in supporting ongoing activities for NJROTC, and for that we are truly grateful. Navy Junior Reserve Ofcer Training Corps is a citizenship and leadership training program co-sponsored by the Gulf County School District and the United States Navy. It is open to all interested students in the ninth through 12th grades. GCSC to hold Educator Preparation Institute forum Special to The Star If you ever wanted to become a teacher in your second career, your chance is now, and you can learn all about the Educator Preparation Institute program at July 16 at Gulf Coast State College. The program has an exceptional track record: Since Gulf Coast began the program in 2005, all of the completers who have sat for the certication exam have passed. Last year, 25 percent of the teachers chosen to compete as Bay Countys Teacher of the Year were graduates of Gulf Coasts EPI program. Five of the GCSC EPI graduates were selected as a 2012 Teacher of the Year in the Bay District School System. Gulf Coast is hosting a free community forum to explain this program for those who already hold a bachelors degree and want to become teachers in the K-12 system. In six to eight months, the EPI program prepares completers to take the Florida Teacher Certication Exams. Students from varied backgrounds and all kinds of previous careers have found tre mendous success in the classroom. Those interested in this alternative route to teacher certication are encour aged to attend the forum from 5:30-7 p.m. CT July 16 in Room 113 of the social sci ences building on the colleges Panama City campus. For more information, visit www.gulfcoast.edu or call Teresa Salter, 769-1551, ext. 3393. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Cadets Marquez Johnson, Claudia Gref and Zachory Jasinski show off their new Silver Cords earned at the NJROTC Area 7 Leadership Academy in St Petersburg. 4 PSJHS cadets attend leadership camp A bove, Gulf County students Cordale Green, Samantha Hoover and Allen Davis use Solid Works, a 3D drafting software, as they design, build and test a roll cage to protect cargo in a remotely controlled car while on site at Tyndall Air Force Base. A t left, Samantha Hoover learns rsthand about gear that must be worn to protect Air Force personnel from biohazardous material.SPECIAL TO T HE STAR STEM scholars spend 8 days at Tyndall AFB School News

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 9:30 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation TUESD A Y 5:00 P M W omen s Bible S tudy 6:30 P M Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Special to The Star The possible existence of extraterrestrial life will be examined at 7 p.m. CT on Monday at Lifetree Caf. This Lifetree event features a lmed interview with Stan Romanek, who has reported more than 100 extraterrestrial encounters. The Lifetree lm explores his personal stories of alien abduction. Romanek authored Messages: The Worlds Most Documented Extraterrestrial Contact Stories. His video of an alien-looking gure peeking in his window has attracted the attention of UFO enthusiasts as well as skeptics. According to Lifetree Caf representative Craig Cable, the Lifetree event will invite accounts from local people who believe theyve seen unidenti ed ying objects. He said, Thoughts of life on other planets have implications that fascinate some people and scare others. The Lifetree lm also includes an interview with a former Washington attorney who explains a 2009 Vatican announcement about the possibility of life on other planets. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. Mildred W. Montgomery, 87, formerly of York Springs, Pa., and Port St. Joe, died Wednesday morning, July 3, 2013, at the Brethren Home Community, New Oxford. Born July 31, 1925, in Ozark, Ala., she was the daughter of the late John P. and Sarah Lee (Bullard) Watkins. She was the wife of William A. Montgomery, of York Springs, Pa., and formerly of Port St. Joe, to whom she was married to for 64 years. She is survived by her daughter, Cynthia Lee Sanderson and her husband, Stephen, of York Springs, Pa.; two grandsons, Joshua Sanderson and his wife, Jill, of Bellefonte, Pa., Travis Sanderson and his wife, Beckie, of Thomasville, Pa.; two great-grandchildren, Kergan Sanderson and Quinn Sanderson, both of Bellefonte, Pa.; three siblings, Rena Cha n, of Mobile, Ala., John Watkins and his wife, Betty, of Eatonton, Ga., Thelma Cook and her husband, Carlos, of Alabama; and a half brother, Charles Watkins and his, wife Mary Ann, of Jacksonville. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Monday, July 8, 2013, at the Monahan Funeral Home, 125 Carlisle St., Gettysburg, with Rev. John Alford of ciating. Burial was in the Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens, Gettysburg. The family received friends from 1 p.m. until the time of the service Monday at the funeral home. Online condolences may be made at monahanfuneralhome. com. Mildred W. Montgomery MILDRED W. MONTGOMERY Revival at Philadelphia Primitive Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will be in its annual revival services beginning Monday evening, July 15. The evangelist for the week is the Elder Louis Anderson of Tallahassee. Pastor Jessie Hawkins and his congregation cordially invites the public to come out each night at 7:30 p.m. and be a part of great week of re-dedication. The church is on Avenue D. First United Methodist Church Fundraiser A fundraiser is from 3:30-7 p.m. CT Friday at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach. There will be pulled pork sandwich, chips, drink and brownie for $6. Eat in or take out. Proceeds will bene t the FUMC disaster team. Faith BRIEFS Star Staff Report A bene t for Theresa Purswell Lucas, including a gospel sing, bake sale and garage sale, is Saturday at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church, 138 East Orange Ave. in Wewahitchka. The bake sale and garage sale will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. CT. The gospel music sing, featuring The Drummonds will begin at 6 p.m. CT. There will also be lots of crafts, clothes, food (hot dogs, chili dogs, drinks, cakes and pies) available for purchase. An account has been set up at Emerald Coast Bank in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka for anyone wishing to make a donation. The bene t is hosted by Glad Tidings Assembly of God and New Harvest Fellowship churches. Thursday, July 11, 2013 UFO abductions examined at Lifetree Caf Card of THANKS The Wahl family would like to thank all of the family and friends for their support during the loss of their wife and mother, Carolyn Wahl. A special thanks to Linda Hamilton, Janie Turner, Robert Hagsburg, Dee Dixon, Covenant Hospice, Long Avenue Baptist Church, Father Louie Little, Matthew White, Ann Six, Marlon Taylor and Richard Davis. The Wahl family Event to bene t Theresa Lucas Obituary No one can measure the degree of Gods love. This love comes only from the heaven above. It is so great there is no way to measure. But if you have it, its such a treasure. Are you exercising your rights to Gods awesome power? Are you close enough to feel it, hour after hour? The word says ask and ye shall receive. Is your faith strong enough? Do you believe? Gods power is unlimited to His people, who ask, but to many folks this is too hard a task. Too many Christians want to straddle the fence, to these His power Hell not dispense. To the obedient children of His who believe, His power is there, just ask and youll receive. Billy Johnson Ask and you will receive

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, July 11, 2013 NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. ww w .m ulli se y e.c om Medical Ey e Exam with f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases 850-7 63-6666 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar d Cer tified and Catar act Sur g eon Boar d Cer tified and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: SJ00 Kelly Faircloth, juvenile probation of cer for Gulf County, is on his third year of the program and has seen the bene ts to getting kids out and getting them active in the community. There are limited opportunities for community service in the area, he said. The goal is to have the youth around positive role models within the community. For Faircloth, his reward is getting to spend the time walking the beach and working alongside the kids. He realized sometimes they just need someone to speak with or someone to listen as they speak freely. During some of the activities, kids need a friendly ear, but other times theyre happy to get out on the beach for a footrace between litter pickups. Its not a punitive job, Faircloth said. We have fun while we do it. Jessie Hayes, senior human services program specialist and TOP facilitator for the Department of Health, has worked with TOP for two years. She also teaches a health and physical education class at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Her class requires 20 hours of community service, and the students actively look for ways to improve the community. TOP has a goal of decreasing adolescent pregnancy and increasing school success using a positive youth development curriculum that encourages healthy behavior, life skills and a sense of purpose. The best part is seeing kids change and learn through community service, Hayes said. Hayes and Faircloth enjoy doing their part in encouraging the youth of Gulf County to grow up making positive choices and have seen the effects rst-hand. Faircloth said during the last beach walk cleanup, some community partners out of Wewahitchka joined the activity, and after speaking with one of the young men, they were so impressed with his attitude and the interaction they had with him, they offered him a paid position. Good things come from it, Faircloth said. For some, it can change lives. The next project for the group will take place July 18 at Peters Park in Port St. Joe. Volunteers and kids in the juvenile program will construct a concession stand from the ground up. Theyll install a kitchen with sink and refrigerator and hope it will be the rst step toward solidifying a T-ball league for the area. TOP will purchase paint and supplies for the restoration and county employee Patrick Carpenter will donate his time teaching kids basic carpentry skills. Roads leading into the park also will be painted, and plans have been made to refurbish on-site dugouts and gazebos. Though the beach cleanup crew might not have been quite awake at the 9 a.m. call time, as they traversed the sandy terrain onto St. Joe Beach, a nearby resident appeared on their porch and thanked the group for their service. Faircloth encourages local agencies to give him a call at 258-7345 to get their youth involved in projects that will keep the community looking great. Come out and lets clean the beach together, Faircloth said. 100 from page A1 The festival begins July 27 with an afternoon Race for the Scallops with a 5K and 10K run through historic Port St. Joe. The event begins at Frank Pate Park. Pre-registration is required. On July 28, the race continues with a 25K and 100K bike ride through Gulf County. The following week, on Aug. 2, the festival will spotlight local merchants during an all-day sidewalk sale. Local artists and vendors will showcase their best work. Live music will take place starting at 5 p.m. ET at the George Core Park stage, featuring The Curry Brothers, Flabbergasted and Jim Morris. On Saturday, the festival kicks into high gear and will feature arts and crafts vendors, educational exhibits, a Kidz Zone, rafes, more than 50 food vendors and plenty of live music. Other events throughout the day will include a classic car show from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. Plaques will be awarded to the winners in the categories of best antique car, classic car, muscle, modi ed and modern along with peoples choice, best of show and a mystery judges award. Plaques will also be presented to the rst 50 entries. The day will also feature a Duck Derby Race, where little ones can adopt a plastic duck and watch as the wind blows it across the George Core Lagoon. The winner will take home prizes galore. Music on Saturday begins at 11 a.m. ET and will feature Bowen and Bowman, Reed Weddle, King Cotton, Cadillac Willy, the Kevin Jacobs Band and the Sauce Boss, who cooks gumbo on stage while playing blues tunes. Sunday will wrap up the festival with the nal Race for the Scallops, this time a paddle board and kayak race around St. Joseph Bay. At George Core Park, the music starts at 1 p.m. ET and will feature local Christian rockers Thirty-Three, followed by Diane Peevy. Admission for the event is $5 for Friday events and $5 on Saturday. Children 6 and younger get in free. Admission is also waived for military personnel with valid ID. To register for the running or biking events, visit www.scallopfest.com/run%20app%20and %20waiver.pdf. Alice Martin will take applications for the car show by calling 227-4027. SCALLOP from page A1 time capsule to be opened in 50 years along with a speech by the mayor, essay readings from high school students and a the release of 100 lanterns. It gave those in attendance a chance to become interactive with the celebration and guests smiled as lanterns began lling the sky over downtown. We really had a great birthday party that night, Magidson said. The timeline was also open for display all week in the Event Welcome Center on Reid Avenue. The timeline displayed 100 years worth of photos and newspaper clippings that showed the evolution of the city and its major events leading up to the present. It started great conversations, Pickett said. Visitors to the timeline were able to help identify former residents who appeared in the photographs and shared stories from the past. The timeline is meant to be expanded upon each year, and the committee plans for it to be on display each Independence Day for many years to come. Though rain prevented a celebration of independence on July 4, residents and visitors alike braved the rain the next day and lined the coast of St. Joseph Bay as reworks lit up the night sky in a spectacle tting of a 100th birthday. Committee member Boyer praised the event for allowing the celebration to showcase the citys small-town charm, which she considers to be part of Port St. Joes appeal. So many small towns lose their sense of identity, Boyer said. Tourists love the smalltown feeling we have here. The committee members reported that former residents returned to town speci cally for the celebration, and Pickett said the events created an interesting platform for connections that may not have otherwise been made. On several occasions, organizers witnessed centennial attendees coming together who hadnt seen one another in over 20 years. In a week dedicated to recalling the history of the town, the mission appeared to be accomplished. Tourist destinations tend to whitewash their communities, Pickett said. Were authentic. Committee member Charlotte Pierce reminded everyone that commemorative centennial coins and T-shirts are going fast, and anyone still in need should get theirs while the supply lasts. They are available for purchase at City Hall. WES LOCHER | The Star Jessie Hayes, Kelly Faircloth and four kids take to St. Joe Beach to clean up leftover litter from the Fourth of July. CLEAN from page A1 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star FROM LEFT: A kite ying contest was held during Family Fun Day. Residents and visitors line Reid Avenue for the parade that marked the beginning of the Centennial Celebration. Mayor Mel Magidson shows off items put into a time capsule including photographs, prints of the centennial timeline, the new street banners and even a copy of The Star

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 GET Y OUR AD IN! 227-7847 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4515031 J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOW A/C W ASHERS/DR YERS ST OV ES /R EF RI GE RA TO RS FREEZER/MICROW A VES LA WN MOWERS SCRAP MET AL, ETC... Special to The Star Gulf Coast jobseekers and employers now have a more enhanced tool at their disposal to assist them in nding suitable jobs, lo cating training opportuni ties and identifying skilled candidates. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board, which provides workforce servic es to Bay, Franklin and Gulf Counties, recently launched a new website, bringing nu merous enhancements to individuals seeking jobs and employers seeking employ ees. All of the services con tinue to be provided at no charge to job seekers and employers. The website, developed by Kerigan Mar keting Associates, is www. workforcecenter.org. Users will notice a differ ent look and feel when they visit the site. The upgrade focused on better organiza tion of vast amounts of work force information, coupled with a cleaner and more streamlined experience to assist job seekers and em ployers in nding what they need quickly, Gulf Coast Workforce Board Executive Director Kim Bodine said. The site features a new layout structure, important information highlighted by a revolving image carousel, a prominent navigation bar, portals for Job Seekers and Employers, easy-to-under stand content, easy-to-lo cate contact information for all of the regions Workforce locations, and interactive features. Key interactive features for employers include: AN ONLINE JOB ORDER FORM : This feature will allow employers to quickly sub mit their open positions for posting on the states larg est job bank, www.employ orida.com. This feature alone can save businesses hundreds to thousands of dollars in help wanted ads each year. I NTEGR A TION WITH SOCI A L MEDI A : Employers can sign up for the Workforce Cen ters monthly e-newsletter, join Linked In, Twitter or Facebook and become part of the conversation about the local workforce, employ ment services, and human resources. AN EMPLOYER S A TISF A C TION SURVEY: Employers can give condential feedback on the performance of our staff and programs in or der to help us improve our service. T HE W ORKFORCE C ENTER H ELPED M Y C OMP A NY : This feedback form can help staff identify success stories for use in future publications or videos, which is a great way to showcase your company and how the partnership with the Workforce Center has helped you. Key features for job seek ers include: H OT J OBS: The Hot Jobs section of the Work force Centers new website will now be updated daily! These selections of jobs are ones local employers are in a rush to ll. CA LEND A R OF E VENTS : With the new calendar feature, job seekers will never miss an opportunity to sharpen their skills and enhance their job search with free employment workshops and mini-job fairs held at the Workforce Center. I NTEGR A TION WITH SOCI A L MEDI A : Job seekers can sign up for the Workforce Cen ters monthly e-newsletter, join Linked In, Twitter or Facebook to receive daily job listings and other helpful labor market information. J OBSEEKER S A TISF A CTION SURVEY: Jobseekers can give condential feedback on the performance of workforce staff and programs. I F OUND A J OB : This feed back form can help staff identify success stories for use in future publications or videos and is another way the Workforce Center can celebrate your success with you. Workforce Board launches new website Convenient features added for employers and job seeker By DONNA HOLMES Special to The Star Mexico Beach business woman Sally Childs made quite an impression when she took home four over all wins recently at the Millennium Dancesport Championship. The Marriott Waterside in downtown Tampa hosted the event, with the most tal ented dancers from around the world attending to par ticipate in the WDC World Professional Latin Show dance Championships. When she was about 50years-old, Childs discovered her love of dance and has spent the last 12 years pur suing her new passion with various studios. The last few years she has been training for competition in Panama City at Dance Life Dance Studio on Harrison Avenue. Her hard work and dedi cation has paid off as she readily secured rst-place awards in dances such as Cha Cha, East Coast Swing, Rumba, Bolero, Mambo, Foxtrot, Viennese Waltz, Tango and Waltz. With such impressive results, her dancing earned her the First Place Trophies for Three Dance Rhythm Championship, Five Dance Rhythm Championship, Three Dance Smooth and Five Dance Smooth. She also received call backs and nished as a Top 10 seminalist in the Nine Dance Championship, which is open to all levels of danc ers and all ages, putting her competing against the very best ProAm Dancers in the country. The Millennium Danc esport Championship is one of the largest competitions in the country and this year it hosted the WDC World of Professional Latin Show dance Championships, a competition which brings together the best dancers from countries all over the world in what can only be described as a spectacular showcase of talent. First place was awarded to the amazing performance of Maxim Kozhevnikov and Anastasia Grigoreva, rep resenting the United States (NY). The weekend marked the end of the events with a ballroom dance congress instructed by Dancing with The Stars celebrities Tony Dovolani and Maksim Chmerkovskiy and So You Think You Can Dance ce lebrity Mary Murphy. The congress was attend ed by Childs, her instructor Jay Holmes, Panama City resident and dance students Vivian Sammons, and Daria Gorghakova and Dance Life instructors Mike Wallace and Nia Naumann. Childs is a realtor with SunDance Realty in Mexico Beach. Dance Life Dance Stu dio is at 415 Harrison Ave in Panama City where they ac tively serve the community with dance parties, dance instruction, venue rental, t ness instruction, community charity fund raisers and spe cial events. For more information, call 215-4453. B ILL FA UTH | Special to The Star Above: Mexico Beach businesswoman Sally Childs competed at the recent Millennium Dancesport Championship in Tampa. Right: Childs won four overall rst-place trophies and reached the seminals of the Nine Dance Championship. Area dancer dominates Millennium Dancesport Championship FAC 2013 Presidential Advocacy Award winners were Sue Birge, Hardee County; Kathy Bryant, Marion County; Barbara Sharief, Broward County; John Hall, Polk County; Fred Hawkins, Osceola County; Chip LaMarca, Broward County; Les Miller, Hillsborough County; Peter OBryan, Indian River County; Nora Patterson, Sarasota County; Grover Robinson, Escambia County; Karson Turner, Hendry County; Warren Yeager, Gulf County.S PECI A L TO T HE S T A R Special to The Star The Florida Association of Counties presented Gulf County Commissioner War ren Yeager with the Presi dential Advocacy Award during the 2013 FAC Annual Conference and Exposition in Hillsborough County. It was an honor for me to receive this award from the Florida Association of Counties, Yeager said. Lo cal involvement in the legis lative process is essential in protecting our Counties interest and insuring home rule. Yeager was an invalu able asset to FAC during the Legislative Session and showed exceptional commitment to advancing public policy. Yeager took time to educate legislators on FACs priority issues, specically the state-county cost share of Medicaid. It is public servants like Commissioner Yeager that ensure our local com munities have the author ity to respond to the de mands of their citizens, FAC Executive Director Chris Holley said. Commissioner Yeagers support in our efforts to cre ate and equitable and fair solution to Medicaid cost share was essential in get ting rid of the cumbersome and erroneous billing sys tem that has been in place for years. The Presidential Ad vocacy Award is given annually to those county commissioners from around the state who have shown exceptional leadership in partnering with FAC to ad vance the counties legisla tive agenda. For 80 years, the Flor ida Association of Coun ties (FAC) has repre sented the diverse inter ests of Floridas counties, emphasizing the impor tance of protecting home rule the concept that gov ernment closest to the peo ple governs best. The Flor ida Association of Counties helps counties effectively serve and represent Florid ians by strengthening and preserving county home rule through advocacy, edu cation and collaboration. FAC awards Yeager with the Presidential Advocacy Award

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, July 11, 2013 The Star | B7 94317 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1213-16 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing turnout gear with a minimum of 25 sets to be ordered: Turnout gear should equal or exceed Globe G-Xcel Turnout Gear. 7.0 Oz Advance (Gold) Outer Shell, Defender M SL2 Thermal Liner and Stedair 3000 Moisture Barrier. Coat -NFPA Basic 3” Lime-Yellow Triple Trim, Self Cuff Reinforcement, Zipper/ Velcro Closure, Radio Pocket (Left Chest), Nomex Hand and Wrist Guards w/Thumb Holes, BRD Device, 3” Lime-Yellow Lettering on Upper Back “G C B”. Pant -3” Lime-Yellow Triple Trim Around Cuffs, Zipper /Velcro Fly, Kevlar Belt and Loops, Dragonhide Cuff and Knee Reinforcement, Silizone Padded Knees, Reverse Boot Cut. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this a SEALD BID and include the BID NUMBER and what the bid is for. Bids will be received until Thursday, August 16, 2013, at 4:30 p.m., E.T. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, August 19, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. E.T. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSINERS /S/ Tynalin Smiley, Chairman Attest: Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 91604S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 23-2012-CA000209CAAXMX CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2006-5 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-5 Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH A. WADE, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: JUDITH A. WADE and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH A. WADE whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: UNIT 199, BARRIER DUNES, AS DESCRIBED IN PROTECTIVE COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS OF BARRIER DUNES, AND AMENDMENTS THERETO, DATED JULY 25, 1985, RECORDED AUGUST 06, 1985 IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107, PAGE 227 AND 1ST AMENDMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 110, PAGE 809, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on TRIPP SCOTT, P.A., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 110 S. E. 6th Street, 15th Floor, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301, on or before July 15th, 2013, (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this Notice of Action) and file this original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Gulf County, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: In Bay County Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850747-5327. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771. Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts.o rg. In Calhoun, Gulf, Homes, Jackson, and Washington County -Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Phone: 850718-0026. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771. Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. File#: 11-008954 July 11, 18, 2013

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B8 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 4515185 North Florida Child Development, Inc. Is seeking VPK/Preschool Teachers for our 3-5 year old classrooms at our Calhoun and Gulf County Centers Prefer a minimum of an Associate degree in Early Childhood Education or related field Closing Date: July 15, 2013 Pickup Applications at the Centers Or send resumes to smcgill@floridachildren.org (850) 639-5080 ext 10 fax (850) 639-6167 DFWP/M-F/6-6/EOE C14GU0134 C14GU0624 North Florida Child Development, Inc. 1110029 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: ShipfitterS € pipefitterS €pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS € Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS € painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the: chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations: 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace 1115178 $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCING BORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $ 386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation € Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 Creamer’s Tree Service Licensed & Insured. Free estimates. (850) 832-9343 Coastal Catering Gourmet meals cooked in your own home! We cook & do the dishes. 850-447-4751 Spot Advertising works! 94097SA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-17-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, MELODY POWELL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I, and UNKNOWN TENANT (S) II, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure dated May 29, 2013, in Case No. 13-17-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on July 18th, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: June 17, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 June 27, July 11, 2013 93899SA NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 686 Application No. 2013-26 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03057-003R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block 3, Ward Ridge, Unit One, as found recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Katherine Ford All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 17th day of July, 2013. Dated this 11th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 27, July 11, 2013 94095SA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000390 DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. BENJAMIN C. SHERRILL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 06, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA000390 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and BENJAMIN C. SHERRILL; JANE ANN SHERRILL; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 20 AND THE SOUTH 1/3 OF LOT 21, BLOCK 76, CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1018 MCCLELLAND AVENUE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 17, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F11002088 June 27, July 11, 2013 94127S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 375 Application No. 2013-28 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01713-000R Description of Property: PARCEL NO. I: BEGINNING at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence Northeasterly on a Magnetic Bearing of North 1 Degree 30 Minutes East, for a distance of 245.82 feet to a point; thence turn an angle 19 Degrees 3 Minutes Left and continue Line on a Magnetic Bearing of North 17 Degrees 33 Minutes West, a distance of 131.70 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING, said point being at right angles to and 33 feet Easterly from the C/L of State Highway No. 71; from the POINT OF BEGINNING, project a line on a Magnetic Bearing North 49 Degrees 32 Minutes East for a distance of 250.00 feet, more or less, to a point on the West edge of the West ARM of Dead Lakes Swamp, said Point along being a Point on the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida; thence Northwesterly on a Meandering line along the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida, to a point on the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71, formerly No. 6, said point being the Point of Intersection of the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71 and the channel of the West Arm of Dead Lakes Swamp; thence Southeasterly on the East boundary of State Road 71 (33 feet East of C/L of State Road 71) a distance of 734 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING; being in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, all said land lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line East along the South line of said Section 13, for 232.65 feet, then turn 44 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 672.48 feet to a point of intersection of the C/L of State Road 71 and Jehu Road; then extend a line North 51 Degrees 00 Minutes West along the Centerline of said State Road 71 for 938.0 feet; then turn 92 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 37.39 feet to a concrete monument on the East R/W line of said State Road 71; then turn left along said R/W line for 89.98 feet to a concrete monument; then turn right and extend a line North 46 Degrees 24 Minutes East for 266 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the channel of a Slough for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, extend a line South 46 Degrees 24 Minutes West for 266 feet, more or less, to a concrete monument on the East Right of Way line of State Road 71; then turn right along said R/W line for 80.0 feet; then turn right and extend a line North 45 Degrees 58 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for 234 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the Slough; then turn right along said Slough to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land is in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: James E. Lester, Sr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of July, 2013. Dated this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2013 94201S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on July 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: REAL PROPERTY Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence N8939’58”W, along the Southerly line of said Section 35, 228.08 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71 and to a point on a curve; thence run Northeasterly along said Easterly right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the Northwest having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a delta of 0530’18”, a chord bearing and distance of N1128’31”E 421.06 feet, an arc length of 421.22 feet to the point of tangency; thence N0843’22”E along said Easterly right of way, 969.90 feet; thence N8937’56”E, 7.09 feet to the Easterly maintained right of way of said State Road No. 71 and the Point of Beginning; thence N0843’22”E, along said Easterly maintained right of way, 396.05 feet to the point of curvature, thence run Northerly along said Easterly maintained right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the West having a radius of 3097.04 feet, a delta of 0748’08”, a chord bearing and distance of N0449’18”E 421.41 feet, an arc length of 421.73 feet; thence N9000’00”E, 494.61 feet; thence S0002’20”E, 807.59 feet; thence S8937’56”W, 590.66 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Lot 4, Block C, St. John’s Village as per plat recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 7, Page 21. Also Less and Except: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N8939’58”W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 0530’18”, a chord bearing and distance of N1128’31”E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N0843’22”E, along said Easterly right of way line 969.90 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N8937’56”E, 231.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N0002’20”W, 155.31 feet along said East right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said East right of way line, N0002’20”W, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, N9000’00”E, 92.00 feet; thence S0002’20”E, 50.00 feet; thence N9000’00”W, 92.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands also known as Lot 3, Block B of St. John’s Village, Unit 1 (Proposed) Together with an easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property to-wit: Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N8939’58”W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 0530’18”, a chord bearing and distance of N1128’31”E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N0843’22”E, along said Easterly right of way line 936.48 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N8937’56”E, 7.09 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N8937’56”E, 229.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N0002’20”W, 238.31 feet along said East right of way line; thence leaving said East right of way line, N9000’00”W, 50 feet; thence S0002’20”E, 172.63 feet; thence S8937’56”W, 168.84 feet; thence S0843’22”W, 66.84 feet to the Point of Beginning. PERSONAL PROPERTY Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoir, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Amended Motion for Summary Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ST. JOHN’S VILLAGE OF GULF COUNTY, INC., a Florida corporation; JERRY HUFT; JAMES TOWNSEND; and ALAN MCNAIR, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-00210. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 4349200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 94313S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE WATER SYSTEM PHASE II IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT #019.193 RFP 2013-03 NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Port St. Joe will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: WATER SYSTEM PHASE II IMPROVEMENTS The project consists of replacing approximately 16,250 LF of existing 3” thru 8” watermain, 19 fire hydrants, and associated appurentences as shown in the construction plans to provide water service for 143 existing residences in the Port St. Joe community. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $150.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. The completion date for this project will be 180 days for Substantial Completion and 210 days for Final Completion from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the “Water System Phase II Improvements”. Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on August 8, 2013 at the City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at 3:15 p.m. Eastern Time. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer/ Handicapped Accessible/ Fair Housing Jurisdiction. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in their best interest. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at the office of Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida (850) 227-7200 at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time, July 18, 2013. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. July 11, 2013 Tots Family Daycare Home Has 2 childcare slots available at 314 Ave. F, PSJ, FL. 850-229-6430 Text FL58194 to 56654 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. j Kelly & Josh j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Cue’s Furniture in Wewa, Quality Used Furniture, and NEW mattresses. Open Mon-Sun, 10am-6pm (850) 639-2343 or (850) 639-3512. Needed: Electric Typewriter. URGENT! Please call 850-227-9496 Text FL58070 to 56654 Education Early Education and Care, Inc. Center Director position available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. 3BR/2BA 1850 sq home on quiet dead end street about mile from the beach in Mexico Beach. Home was built in 2000 and is undergoing significant remodeling including new floors, paint, granite countertops, and stainless appliances. Move in ready by July 15th. $1,300/month 1 Year Lease/Credit Check Required $1,500 Deposit Call Zach Childs Broker/Owner 850-819-0833. Quality Long Term Rentals2 & 3br Avalible, Port St Joe, Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach. Call for more info 348-0262 WEWA Efficiency $390/mo plus $390 security deposit. Also have RV’s for rent by the week. Call (850) 639-5721 121 Hunter Circle 3br/2.5ba with bonus room; Completely remodeled 6.5 years ago. 24x40 pole barn with 24x20 closed-in with electricity. In ground sprinkler system, fenced in backyard. Located close to schools and town. $224,700. For more information, call 850-227-5713 or 850-527-5685 Realtors are welcome Cadillac DTS -Luxury 1, 2006 ; Only 1 owner! 49,600 miles, White in color. Blue Book is $15,500, asking $13,500 850-340-0889 or 850-340-0890 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR CSI: High School By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A study aimed at identifying the source for discolored water experienced by a large swath of Port St. Joe water customers will be longer, broader and more complex than originally expected. David Kozan with CDM Smith, the company that designed the $21 million surface water treatment plant that went online some three years ago and has been plagued with issues of water quality since, said initial sampling had shown a wider range of potential problem sources and potential solutions. What was initially expected to be a study completed in the fall is now 8-12 weeks away from the intensive pilot testing, Kozan said. Two months ago, the hope was that intensive testing would not be needed. For city commissioners, it was not the news they had hoped for while awaiting a report on the initial testing undertaken by researchers at Virginia Tech University. Kozan said he would not have the report completed for another two weeks. Commissioners, city staff and city engineers Preble Rish variously have expressed frustration with the ow of information from CDM Smith. We are moving slower than we thought, Kozan said. The testing data was more complex. The pilot testing will be more extensive than we originally thought. We cast a broad net, and we caught more than we thought we would. We dont want to do it and not do it right. The initial testing involved taking existing small sections of pipe from 10-12 locations from water plant to households/businesses. The hope was that the testing would show the primary culprit to be corroded iron breaking away from aging pipes some dating to the Great Depression because of the caustic nature of the surface water and the new treatment protocol required. That likely would have required little more than a tweaking of the chemical treatment protocol to address. However, Kozan said the initial testing showed a more varied array of issues. We found there are multiple sources of iron and also sources for manganese, Kozan said, City water study grows in scope, issuesPlant designer: Investigation more extensive than we originally thought Thursday, JULY 11, 2013 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners joined the lobbying effort for maintenance dredging of the shipping channel at the Port of Port St. Joe. If County Commissioner Warren Yeager has his way, several more counties in the region also will board the ship. Yeager brought forth for approval a resolution Tuesday that in broad strokes expresses support for the collaboration agreement between the Port Authority and the St. Joe Company and their combined efforts to bring about maintenance dredging of the shipping channel. The dredging is the key to two recent Letters of Intent that St. Joe has entered into with energy companies to ship as many as 1.25 million metric tons of wooden pellets through the Port of Port St. Joe annually. Both agreements are contingent on the dredging of the shipping channel to its authorized depth within the next two to three years. The Port Authority and St. Joe are working on securing permitting and funding for the dredging. Yeager said St. Joe Senior Vice President Jorge Gonzalez suggested a formal resolution of support from the county and other counties would be helpful. I intend to take this to other counties in the region who also believe that the port is important for economic development, Yeager said. This is a regional project. The resolution passed unanimously. The BOCC also accepted a letter from Port Authority attorney Tom Gibson regarding a $199,000 loan from the county to the Port Authority. The BOCC has been exploring ways to further collateralize that loan in the past two months. Gibsons letter lays out the Port Authoritys position that it wants to pay the money back in full but revenue is lacking at TDC mulls bed tax additionBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Gulf County Tourist Development Council advisory board on Monday engaged in a spirited and educational discussion about the potential for adding to the countys bed tax. The consensus that emerged was that the TDC and Board of County Commissioners must collaborate on how best to address issues of beach driving, trash on the beach, animals not on a leash and moving to a leave no trace policy for county beaches. A proposal to add a fth cent to the countys bed tax was discussed at the previous TDC board meeting and a county budget committee meeting as a method to increase the presence of of cers on the beaches, speci cally Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce deputies. Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison said given his budget constraints, he could not fund additional patrols on the beach to increase enforcement of existing county ordinances. County attorney Jeremy Novak said Monday that state law governing such agencies provides the TDC an opportunity to assist by creating a beach safety program. He said once a plan was in place, it would provide opportunities for the TDC to act. The framework of that plan, said TDC executive director Jennifer Jenkins, would be to purchase equipment and fund training, including water rescue, for of cers to create a combination code enforcement/law enforcement/brand ambassador of cer, while the GCSO would fund the two additional full-time of cers to patrol the beaches. Tourism is up in Gulf County and trending ahead of neighboring counties of Bay and Walton, Jenkins said. Through June, bed tax collections are up 13 percent, and every month in the scal year has nished in the black save for November 2012. But, Jenkins said, the condition of the beaches is a nagging problem, with trash, tents, grills and other County resolution supports port dredging efforts YEAR 75, NUMBER 39 CSBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Blood spatter. DNA. Fibers. Murder. Mystery. It might sound like the description of a primetime television show, but its actually the curriculum for the Crime Scene Investigation Camp held last week at the Gulf/ Franklin campus of Gulf Coast State College. The 35 students from Gulf, Franklin and Calhoun counties came together for a four-day crash course in forensic science where they had to solve a faux murder by utilizing a scienti c approach to decoding the evidence. They looked at DNA under microscopes and learned how to trace blood spatter to determine where the attack occurred and how to differentiate bite marks. The class culminated with a mock trial at the Gulf County Courthouse on July 4 where the students attempted to put the correct suspect behind bars. Students played various roles from prosecutors to defense lawyers to witnesses to suspects. The class presented its evidence before a jury, and the case was presided over by LOCAL STUDENTS CRACK THE CASE AT CSI CAMPPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARAbove, science teacher Scott Lamberson helps students examine loose hair and bers. The camp for gifted or talented science and math students took place at Gulf Coast State College. See WATER A5 See CSI A5 See TDC A8 See PORT A5Centennial Days, B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7Community . . . . . . . . . . B1School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013By MATTHEW BEATON522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY Panhandle counties must work together to get the maximum BP money for their environmental projects, representatives from Bay, Gulf and Walton counties met in Panama City were told Monday. The meeting facilitated by the nonprot group The Nature Conservancy focused on the St. Andrew, St. Joe and Choctawhatchee bays and the problems facing each system. The meeting was long on discussion but short on solutions, focusing on the necessity of teamwork and noting ecological problems dont end with county boundaries. What are the issues and challenges facing these watersheds? asked Anne Birch, the conservancys marine conservation director, who led the discussion, adding, Is there a way we could come together and agree on a suite of projects? The counties need to take a comprehensive approach, Birch said. The major issues are fairly similar for all the bays. These included damage to sea grass, increases in sedimentation and water quality. Sea grass often is damaged by boat propellers, which signicantly harm these ecosystems, ofcials said at the meeting. The route between Panama City Beach and Shell Island, in particular, is a problem as tourists rent boats but arent aware, or dont care, about the grass as they rush across the bay to visit the popular destination, ofcials said. An increase in silt, and shifting of silt, in the bays was also a concern. More and more dirt accumulating in the bay is also a problem. In light of the discussion, a Bay County ofcial offered a project idea that likely would cut down on the amount of sediment entering the bay. Of the countys more than 200 miles of dirt roads, 95 percent of them wash into the bay when it rains, said Ken Schnell, county public works director. He recommended using BP money to pave those dirt roads. Walton County Commissioner Sara Comander also noted a large portion of residents in her county are still on septic tanks. She added that treated wastewater can enter the bay systems and harm water quality. Walton County has discussed using BP money to tie residents into the municipal sewer system, helping move them off septic tanks, Comander said. Bay County is wrestling with the same issue. It has about 30,000 residential and commercial septic tanks. East PassBay County Commissioner Bill Dozier, who attended the meeting, said after the meeting all these issues were on his mind, but one idea, largely unmentioned during the entire meeting, occupied his attention. Dozier said he wants to spend BP money to reopen the old East Pass out of St. Andrew Bay. I certainly feel strongly, of course, about opening the East Pass. I think that is one thing that should be a high priority, he said in an interview. Dozier also mentioned creating articial reefs off the countys coast and added paving dirt roads was a high priority. He spoke of unity, too, saying the counties have greater power and a better shot at portions of the BP money if they work as a team. It all works together, he said. Callforinformationaboutour rotatingspecialists: WeemsMedicalCenterEastMonday(extendedhours)8:00am-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-4:30pm Wednesday8:00-4:30pm Thursday8:00-4:30pm Friday(extendedhours)8:00-6:00pm Saturday8:00-4:00pm Note:appointmentswillbescheduledupto30min.priorto close(walk-insstillwelcomeupuntilclose) WeemsMedicalCenterWestMonday8:00-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-6:00pm Wednesday8:00-6:00pm Thursday8:00-6:00pm FAMILYANDSPECIALTYCARE850-653-8853,ext.118 Apalachicola 850-697-2345 Carrabelle $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com A federal judge has denied motions to dismiss a lawsuit brought against the Board of County Commissioners and several current and former commissioners individually by a local political action committee. U.S. District Judge Richard Smoak denied the motions including one from a private citizen in an order just prior to the Independence Day holidays. Smoaks one-page order decreed that the motions to dismiss were moot given an amended complaint led by the attorney for Citizens Improving Gulf County and its president Jim Garth. The defendants, the BOCC, Commissioners Warren Yeager and Carmen McLemore, former County Commissioner Bill Williams and Port St. Joe resident Lois, a.k.a. Christine or Christy McElroy, have until July 26 to respond to the amended PAC lawsuit. The attorneys representing the former and current commissioners have already done so, repeating an earlier motion to dismiss for failure to make a claim. Those were the grounds on which the prior motions to dismiss were based. PAC attorney Marie Mattox was permitted time to amend the complaint and the grounds for the lawsuit remain unchanged. The amended motion primarily revised technical language. We are pleased with the recent federal decision denying the defendants request to dismiss the lawsuit and view it as a positive step in the struggle to show the public the real truth regarding the actions and behavior of these individuals, read a written statement from Citizens Improving Gulf County. Through the efforts of discovery including depositions it is our goal to have this trial very transparent and open to the public. Anything less would be an injustice to the good people of Gulf County. They deserve better than what they have been given in the past and we are determined to correct that. County attorney Jeremy Novak said the actions of the previous two weeks were largely procedural in a federal court. It is typical, he added, for the plaintiffs attorney to be provided an opportunity to amend the complaint in response to an order to dismiss but that there is a limited number of bites at the apple. Novak said he expected the judge to rule on motions to dismiss the amended complaint sometime in mid-August and from there the case would be dismissed or proceed through the pretrial process. The suit alleges that the BOCC, Yeager, McLemore and Williams abused their power and illegally retaliated against the PAC and Garth for exercising protected First Amendment rights. The lawsuit alleges McElroy coordinated with the BOCC in the attacks. The suit further levels a count of defamation toward McElroy. The suit asks for a jury trial and for unspecied punitive and compensatory damages. The allegations center on three 2012 BOCC meetings spanning April to October during which Citizens Improving Gulf County, Garth and other members were, according to the complaint, attacked and humiliated for exercising their rights to free speech and questioning government. The lawsuit alleges the BOCC choreographed McElroys appearance and comments at each meeting, and were motivated to retaliate for Garths exercise, on his own behalf and on behalf of the PAC, of First Amendment rights. The lawsuit details that in a matter unrelated to the BOCC meetings, the State Attorney began an investigation based on a complaint by Yeager. The lawsuit alleges the investigation was initiated and conducted in retaliation for Garths and the PACs legal and protected statements. The nal meeting noted in the lawsuit included comments centered in part on the State Attorneys investigation, which at the time of the meeting had been closed with no charges led. It would ultimately be closed again with no charges led the most signicant difference in the two documents closing the case being a reference to a 40-yearold alleged felony conviction of Garth, the evidence of which has never been made public, though the SAO suggested Garths civil rights had not been restored. When the Gulf County Supervisor of Elections moved ahead to remove Garth from the voters rolls, the SAO failed to provide evidence of a crime and suggested the removal of Garth from the voting rolls should not progress. The result, the lawsuit alleges, was retaliatory humiliation for Garth and the PAC. There is some irony in this (federal judges) decision coming forth as we just celebrated Independence Day which represents our freedoms that we feel were violated, Garth said in a statement. I am personally anxious to have these people under oath as soon as possible. In these days of government bullying, who wouldnt want to have their elected ofcial under oath? Lying under oath in a federal setting is a serious crime so the incentive to be truthful is stronger and usually leads to the truth discovering everyone involved.Judge denies motion to dismiss PAC lawsuitNe E WS He E Ra A LD Fi I Le E phPH Ot T OBeachgoers enjoy Shell Island. The route between Panama City Beach and Shell Island is a problem as tourists rent boats but arent aware, or dont care, about the grass as they rush across the bay to visit the popular destination, ofcials said during a meeting Monday that focused on the St. Andrew, St. Joe and Choctawhatchee bays and the problems facing each watershed.Bay, Gulf, Walton told to work as a team to pursue BP money

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, July 11, 2013 4514931NOTICEOF ANNUALMEETINGTheBoardofCommissionersof theNorthwestFloridaRegional HousingAuthoritywillholdits AnnualMeetingonJuly18,2013, attheHolidayInn&Suites,2725 GravesRoad,Tallahassee,Florida. Meetingwillbeginat1:00p.m. E.D.S.T.Themeetingwillbeopen tothepublic. PUBLICNOTICETheGulfCountyEnterprise ZoneDevelopmentAgency willmeetThursday,July18, 2013,at12:00noon,E.T., 1000CecilG.CostinSr., Blvd.,intheRobertM.Moore AdministrationBuilding, GulfCountyCourthouse ComplexinRoom307. Thepubliciswelcome toattend.(2013.86) 2091547 Star Staff ReportThe Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will host a public information meeting for proposed improvements to State Road 30E (Cape San Blas Road)from 5-9 p.m. ET on Tuesday at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30A, Port St. Joe. FDOT is planning to resurface Cape San Blas Road from S.R. 30A to the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve. Additional improvements include paved shoulders and minor drainage modications. Construction is currently scheduled to begin fall 2015. The meeting will provide an opportunity to preview the proposed project, ask questions, and/or submit comments concerning the proposed project. Public participation is solicited with regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact John S. Glenn, P.E., tollfree at (888) 638-0250, extension 1459 at least seven days prior to the meeting. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on Twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. FDOT to host meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvements WANT TO GO?FDOT public information meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvementsWhen: 5-9 p.m. TuesdayWhere: St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30A, Port St. JoeBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com A hearing scheduled to consider a motion to dismiss the charges against accused killer Walt Butler has been continued and rescheduled for September. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Everett Gant last July in Port St. Joe. Butlers attorneys led a motion May 21 for the dismissal of criminal charges in the death of Gant and cited Floridas Stand Your Ground Law, which justies the use of deadly force if someone believes force is necessary to prevent death or harm to themselves or another. The motion stated Butler feared retaliation for the use of racial slurs and that Gant showed aggressive behavior when he approached Butlers apartment the fatal night. Butler was charged with one count of second-degree murder with a rearm, evidencing prejudice based on race, but contended that deadly force was his last resort and that he is entitled to immunity from arrest and prosecution. The hearing is scheduled for 9 a.m. ET Sept. 9-10 at the Gulf County Courthouse. Gant approached Butlers Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 rie and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconvenience at being arrested for shooting a (racial epithet), according to the arresting afdavit. Six weeks after the shooting, Gant died from the injuries.Butler motion hearing continued to September WA ALT T BUT TLER

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionIm a mathematician who enjoys writing, but I rarely combine the two outside of the workplace. Some folks want to talk about work at breakfast, lunch, dinner and on the weekend. I do not. The separation is necessary for me to remain functional in both places (at work and away from work). However, sometimes I will bring math into my thought process for fun and entertainment. Have you ever heard of a book being written on a subject that no one can really agree on a de nition? In mathematics, chaos is not chaos as you often think of it. As a matter of fact, in mathematics it is easier to de ne something being chaotic than to de ne chaos itself. To put it simply (which you cant really do), with chaos, we can get random results from things that seem very straightforward which are very sensitive to where they start. Again, do not write me telling me my de nition is wrong; you de ne it as simple or as dif cult as you wish. From my view on chaos we will jump to the present state of things, or the present place we think we are. This place is different for everyone, but similar in some ways. Folks are worried about what others can see or nd out about them the type of things that are private or that they want to be private. Honestly, I understand that. If you check my closet, things will fall out on you. Things other than skeletons and probably a lot of things will fall directly on your head. It happens to me all the time (with my own closet). Have you ever heard the Jeannie C. Riley song, Harper Valley PTA? It was written by Tom T. Hall who is one of the best country music storytellers ever to put his thoughts on paper. The song was released in 1968 and soared to number one on both the Billboard Pop and Country charts. In this time of what seems to be mathematical chaos and trying to gure out how all this started about people wanting to know what others are doing, saying and where they are going, I say use the Harper Valley Defense. In the song, Jeannie C. Riley plays the part of Mrs. Johnsons daughter who brings home a letter from the Harper Valley PTA noting that Mrs. Johnson is un t to be a mother. The PTA was particularly concerned with Mrs. Johnsons preference for miniskirts, running around with men, etc. I will stop here to note that if anyone is putting children in danger, I will be the rst to come to the aid of the child. Back to the miniskirts What happened next in the song was really chaos. Mrs. Johnson marched into the Harper Valley PTA meeting and started pointing ngers and naming names. Oh goodness gracious did she ever start naming names. The bottom line was what she was doing was not as bad as what some of the esteemed members of the Harper Valley PTA were doing on a much larger scale. As the song notes, The day my Mama socked it to the Harper Valley PTA. So there are at least a couple of lessons here. From the standpoint of mathematical chaos, the starting point was the Harper Valley PTA putting Mrs. Johnson under the magnifying glass and getting results that werent so straightforward. They opened up a Mason jar of something they werent prepared to drink. Another lesson was having the ability and taking the time to be prepared. Mrs. Johnson may have seemed to be running around and going wild. However, in the process, she saw a lot of other people and things going on that she was willing to keep to herself until folks turned on her. So, be like Mrs. Johnson and take a lot of notes you never can tell when youll need to address the Harper Valley PTA. I know most folks are asking, What if the Harper Valley PTA is much bigger and more dif cult to handle? My two cents is probably worth two cents, but my approach is to get out in the open where they can see me really well. Also, I will make sure that the sun is at my back. That way when they hold the magnifying glass up to look at me, it will blind them with re (ants on a summer day). Think about that Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com.Harper Valley DefenseWe called em cokes. Or soft drinks. Never would we have said soda. Or pop. I reckon it was a regional thing. And we used the word coke in a generic sense. Coca Colas were so popular in our area of the south we just referred to any soft drink as a coke. I remember when getting your hands on one was such a special treat! The real thing only came in the small, green tinted 6 and ounce glass bottles. And if you werent careful, you could drain the entire contents in two seconds! We developed the ice pick procedure out of necessity. To stretch out our cola treat me and Leon and David Mark would jab a whole in the cap with an ice pick. You couldnt get much drink out like that. But if you nursed it along, that coke would last for an hour! Mother was big on milk. She believed it developed strong bones and good teeth, promoted growth and warded off evil bacteria trying to invade our bodies. Plus, as I look back on it now, I realize Mom was thankful the cow didnt charge much to deliver. She considered an ice cold Coca Cola a luxury. We grew up in a day and an age when luxury took a way back seat to necessity. But every once in a while when the moon was right or the stars lined up or she found an extra fifteen cents, shed bring home three refreshing bottles of that extraordinary liquid. It seems so silly now, how wildly excited three little boys could get over a drink! Maybe it spoke to the simplicity of the times; to a period before television, long range intercontinental ballistic missiles, mini skirts, drive though restaurants, bottled water, high speed internet and phones that attached to your ear. Lost in the 50s wasnt the worst place to grow up. As Uncle F. D. would often say, We were as nave as flies on a frogs back, and we were proud of it. I never let my coke out of my sight. I said we were nave. Nobody said nothing about being stupid! Listen, I knew better than to sit that coke down and go to the bathroom. One of my brothers would take a swallow or twoor three the second I turned my back. Ive seen world class melees break out over a missing gulp! As we got a little older you cant imagine the prestige of sitting up on the front porch of Woodrow Kennons store and downing one with the grownups. We knew better than to say anything. But wed turn a Royal Crown Cola case up edgeways for a seat, lean back against the wall and listen to Mr. Willard Brush tell about the time Charlie Barton ran his Farmall Tractor into the Big Sandy River. Wed take a sip of a NuGrape and slowly nod along with the story ... just like we had been there! You talk about shinning times! When cotton was in and we could make a little spending money wed gather up in front of Pat Houstons Grocery and carefully pour a package of Toms Peanuts down the neck of a cold Dr. Pepper. There was an art to cupping your hand around the top of that bottle and funneling the peanuts carefully in so as not to spill a single one. Wed munch on the soaked peanuts and talk about the future. Of course, the future for us was the ballgame we were working on for the afternoon. Or school the next day. And we had lots of meaningful discussions over whether a Sun Drop tastes more like an Upper 10 or a Seven Up. We were just starting out in high school when we discovered the soda fountain in John Motherals Drugstore. Hed drop a couple scoops of ice cream into your coke and make a oat. We spent a happy hour or two, or a hundred, on those old red bar stools talking about football practice, girls, Mr. Arlie Chuck Berrys science class and maybe letting our hair grow out long like that new singing group in England. My rst date with Mary Hadley we ended up at Franks Dairy Bar starring at each other over a Coca Cola. It was the rst time in my life I didnt notice the taste. It could have been a Grape, Orange Crush, Dr. Pepper or any of the aforementioned green colas. I was more interested in her eyes. And her hair. And that incredible smile! I wasnt thinking about football practice, Coach Smith, a baseball game or the price of eggs in China. I was trying to think of something really intelligent to say... Mary Hadley laughed so easily. And before the moment was gone forever she hinted that she liked me a little too. It was the best coke I ever had! I can hear Mom to this day reminding me that milk is better for me than all those soft drinks. My wife worries that I drink way too many. My health conscious son is always on me about the caffeine and the carbonation and the phosphoric acids and the artificial flavors. I know theyre right but I cant help myself. A good Coke today seems to slow my pace. It takes me back to some great pre-television melees. It transports me to Woodrow Kennons delightful front porch; I can feel the red bar stools of Motherals Drugstore, taste the excitement and wonder lust of our youth ... and appreciate a time that I so flippantly took for granted as I passed through... I think we all did. Respectfully,Kes The pause that refreshes HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardPage 4 USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Fundraiser for Samantha AmbroseDear editor, Samantha Ambrose is the typical home town girl. Born and raised in Port St. Joe, she had the opportunity to be an integral part of the 1998 Lady Sharks softball district champions. Samantha played the key position of catcher. She is best known for her beautiful smile and competitive spirit. On November 15, 1998, Samanthas life and the life of this who love her were forever changed. Samantha was involved in an automobile accident and suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). It was doubtful that Samantha would recover and if she did, she would never be the same vivacious, quick-witted individual we had known. With the prayers and support of her family and her community, Samantha not only survived her accident, but has gone on to far exceed everyones expectations. She astounded everyone with her will and determination by walking the stage with her graduating class and little help from her friends. Fast forward 15 years later. As is true for most TBI survivors, the outward manifestation of her accident is almost nonexistent; however, the day-to-day struggle of integrating into life is constant. TBI survivors suffer with multiple symptoms. Memory loss, debilitating headaches, personality changes, inability to control inhibitions/anger, lack of social skills, not to mention any physical disability that may go along with the initial injury. The CDC reports that every year, at least 1.7 million TBIs occur in the United States. TBI is a contributing factor to 30.5 percent of all injury-related deaths in the United States, and about 75 percent of the TBIs that occur each year are concussion or other forms of mild TBI that studies are not linking to Alzheimers and/or dementia in later years. Funding for the intensive reintegration and life-long care many of these survivors need is almost nonexistent. Few private insurances cover life-long care. Government-funded insurance is rare and private pay options are only afforded to the af uent. Currently, Michigan is the only state to provide no-fault auto insurance that covers unlimited medical rehabilitation bene ts. This added coverage is set aside for Michigan residents for pennies per day for each insured driver in the state. We, the family and friends of Samantha Ambrose, are asking for your help. Our aim is to raise awareness of the long-long commitment and nancial burden that often befalls the families and caregivers of those who have suffered a TBI. We seek to inform the public that through our efforts, TBI survivors can receive the car and attention they need to return to society as productive individuals. As a start, we encourage you to contact your state representatives to request the same automobile no-fault coverage be afforded to the citizens of Florida. We humbly ask that as you are able to contribute to the account set up at Tyndall Federal Credit Union to continue Samanthas recovery. To donate, call TFCU at 850-769-9999 and ask for Account for Samantha Ambrose. You may contact Susie Ambrose at 580-819-1513 or email LSA@knology.net for further details on how you can help. A Fish Fry fundraiser will take place on July 12 at Frank Pate Park in Port St. Joe. Fish, coleslaw, baked beans and bread will be served for $7 a plate and the event will run from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET.The Ambrose FamilyPort St. JoeHumane Society says thanksDear editor, The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society would like to say thank you to Brian Bowen for his enjoyable Porch Pickin at Indian Pass Raw Bar! A sincere thank you for donating your time and raising money to help the animals! For all who missed it, it was a blast. Hope to see you next time! For information on additional Humane Society events, please visit our website SJBHumaneSociety.org or like us on Facebook!Melody TownsendShelter director Letters to the EDITORThe Centers for Disease Control reports that every year, at least 1.7 million traumatic brain injuries occur in the United States. TBI is a contributing factor to 30.5 percent of all injury-related deaths in the United States, and about 75 percent of the TBIs that occur each year are concussion or other forms of mild TBI that studies are not linking to Alzheimers and/or dementia in later years.

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LocalThe Star| A5Thursday, July 11, 2013 Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentied whattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandare oeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks! (Inthissection),Discoverthebestrealestatevalues inMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola, CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelle andsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast 4515172 SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD present. In addition, a Circuit Court hearing next week will go a long way toward determining whether the Port Authority has the ability to mortgage public lands, which in effect the county is requesting. Any further discussion on the countys position will come after that court hearing.Wewahitchka medical servicesGiven the changes occurring at the Gulf County Health Department facility in Wewahitchka, a public meeting will be held at 6 p.m. CT on Tuesday, July 30, at the Honeyville Community Center south of Wewahitchka. Representatives from the health department and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will be present to provide information. The health department ceased providing primary medical services at the end of June because of statewide budget cuts. Sacred Heart on the Gulf is to take over those services the health department will continue to provide basic public health services sometime this month, expanding the offerings of the health department, SHH President Roger Hall has told commissioners.CommunicationsSeveral testy exchanges concerning telephone communications with commissioners took place during Tuesdays meeting, with Commissioner Joanna Bryan the receiving the brunt of it. Commissioner Carmen McLemore and later citizen Bill Williams Jr. pressed Bryan about whether her county phone worked and complaints about not returning phone calls. McLemore said he had several people from Bryans District 3 contact him saying they could not contact Bryan and she did not return phone calls. McLemore said he had sent his work crew on a job in District 3. McLemore provided one name, and Bryan requested a list of complaining callers. Bryan added it was her understanding work crews were county work crews and therefore could be deployed anywhere in the county. Yeager said he had received some calls, but any he had forwarded to Bryan. Commissioner Ward McDaniel said he had also received one call. I think it is clear what is going on here, Bryan said without elaborating. I have received calls from (District 1). I will be willing to talk to anyone in the county. Ill be waiting for your list and appreciate any commissioners helping out in District 3. When Williams later raised the issue during public comment, Commission chair Tan Smiley had enough. He said the issue had been addressed, he was sure Bryan would deal with any problems and some phone calls get returned and some dont, that is the way it is given a commissioner holding down a full-time job or business.Beacon Hill signFormer Commissioner Bill Williams III appeared to discuss the situation with the sign that formerly promoted his business at Beacon Hill. The sign is on the U.S. Highway 98 right-of-way and is in disrepair. The county has cited it as out of compliance with the sign ordinance, but Williams asked for time to get it in shape and wondered if it could not be useful as a way to advertise Veterans Memorial Park at Beacon Hill and Gulf County. Bryan, who succeeded Williams in the District 3 seat, said feedback from constituents and the new owner of the assisted living facility indicated people did not want the sign to remain. The sign is a bit of an eyesore, Bryan said. It is a large sign in that area. McDaniel also noted it was in need of repairs. County attorney Jeremy Novak said the agreement that allowed the sign to be placed in the right-of-way is expired, an issue that would have to be cleared up before any work on the sign could take place. Tourist Development Council director Jennifer Jenkins said she would take another look at the sign to determine if it suited the branding campaign she has implemented this year. Bryan said before the BOCC should consider extending the right-of-way agreement, which would place the burden on Williams to x the sign, county staff and Jenkins should assess its potential usefulness. Does it t with the aesthetics and branding Jennifer has worked so hard to bring about? Bryan said. n oting both iron and manganese could be causing the discoloration and would account for the various hues and intensity of discoloration experienced throughout the distribution system. The discoloration could be performed by a variety of factors. We have so much variation in the data. Kozan said the manganese is not coming from water entering the plant. Whether the source is rainfall or from the distribution system the city is nearing phase two of a three-phased project to replace some 20 miles of aged pipe or other factors is unknown. We were a little surprised to see as much manganese, Kozan said. (Identifying the source) is a very complicated problem to solve. City manager Jim Anderson said manganese also had been a signicant problem with city ofcials in Dalton, Ga., the site of a water plant and microltration system that most closely mirrors the Port St. Joe plant and system. Kozan said he was unaware of that and asked Anderson for additional information. Kozan said the study was also somewhat hamstrung by the lack of historical data. The plans for the pilot study have now changed, Kozan added. The company will now likely harvest just one existing pipe section to send to Virginia Tech. Beyond that, the university will use metal blanks or unused pipe as comparison for a variety of chemical tests. Kozan said he was looking to take a section of 2-inch galvanized iron pipe from the area of Avenue A-Avenue B. Publics Works director John Grantland wondered about that selection. He noted the areas pipe would soon be replaced as the nal component of the rst phase of pipe replacement and wondered why a section of newer PVC pipe would not be used as PVC was replacing the old iron pipe throughout the city. We suspect a fair amount of water (problems) in (PVC) areas is manganese from the plant or a disturbance in the system, Kozan said, such as a re hydrant open. The pipe from Avenue A or B would be representative of the system, Kozan added. We need to look at taking care of the manganese and look at taking care of iron breaking off and potential future sources, Kozan said. This is a multi-pronged effort. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said he was not trying to be confrontational but wondered about the end game. A pilot study that appeared headed in one direction and with an estimated window of completion was taking on the look of a much longer process with the potential xes more complex and potentially more costly. There has to be an end point, Buzzett said. Kozan said CDM Smith would have to change the scope of the work completely. Broadband leaseThe city approved a lease agreement with a company that will mean more broadband capabilities in the county. The move is specically aimed at the Port of Port St. Joe, said Jim Brook of the Florida Rural Broadband Alliance LLC. The port has a potential customer that has interest in broadband capabilities. Companies looking to relocate here are going to look at broadband capacity, Mayor Mel Magidson said. If we dont have that, they will look elsewhere. The Broadband Alliance is not a retailer of broadband service it provides a larger pipe, Brook said, for broadband capacity and provides the services free to schools and libraries who wish to connect. The lease would allow the alliance to erect towers on the Shark Tank and Highland View water towers. The estimated value would be applied to the local match of a federal grant to increase broadband access to rural communities. The city could begin realizing revenue from the lease in four or ve years, Brook said. There is no cost to the city. PORT from page A1 WATER from page A1County Judge Tim McFarland. The class was developed by the Panhandle Area Education Consortiums Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics group to provide opportunities to gifted or talented students in rural areas that they might not receive in the classroom. This is the second year of a three-year project among PAEC, Heartland Educational Consortium and the Northwest Florida Education Consortium. Its a wonderful opportunity to expose students to things they may not have knowledge of, said Brenda Crouch, project manager for PAEC. The former Marianna science teacher sees STEM careers as vital to the economy, and she aided in the creation of seven programs around the state to bring alternative careers to the forefront of rural youths. The programs rotate each year, and in addition to the crime scene investigation class, theyve also developed curriculums for robotics, nano, ecological and emerging technology challenges. These classes give the students an understanding of real scientic work, Crouch said. Were working with districts to up the number of rigorous STEM courses offered so that students can compete at the secondary level. The program serves 998 students in Florida, and the goal was to build a prototype of a program that could potentially become a staple of education in rural areas like Gulf County. Students were nominated for the program by their teachers or guidance counselors with special consideration given to those who had excelled in math and the sciences. Some kids showed extreme interest in the class, said Kim McFarland, geometry teacher at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and an assistant in the CSI classrooms. We would take the students to the next level during school if only we had more time. McFarland applauded the program for not only the handson experience the class offered, but the role it played in recognizing students and their gifts. When we heard about the program, we thought of students who would eat that stuff up, she said. You recognize the kids in class who are interested. Theyre the ones asking deep questions. McFarland, along with Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School science teacher Scott Lamberson and Blountstown math and science teacher Amanda McGhee, also helped out in the classrooms as mentor teachers. Students in the program also have access to STEM-centric counselors and meet with representatives four times a year. These counselors keep students informed on new and exciting science-related jobs and help them gure out the best route toward achieving their career goals. In the classroom, the students have an opportunity to gain additional knowledge while working and collaborating with other gifted students who share their interests. Haley Anderson, who will start her junior year at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School in the fall, enjoyed the class but is still trying to decide on her career plans. Shes torn between marine biology and criminal investigative services. Even if she wasnt able to crack the case on her career aspirations, she was happy to make new friends in her classmates, who also found the camp to be a lot of fun. I barely knew anyone on Monday, but now were all friends, Anderson said. Its an amazing opportunity, and Im happy to be a part of it. Crouch said jobs in STEM-related elds are recession-proof, and its a good time to explore careers in the worlds of science, math and engineering. Florida has an unlled STEM pipeline, Crouch said. The available jobs outnumber the qualied applicants. CSI from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Monday-Saturday:7:00AM-7:00PMEST Sunday:7:00AM-5:00PMEST FishingHeadquarters: 4514932ishereforyourboatingneeds! MARINAFORKLIFT/RACKSTORAGE CANOPIEDBOATSTORAGE&BOASTRENTAL DIESEL&GASOLINE CAPTAINSALTYBAITS&ICE GATEDSELFSTORAGE,TRAILEREDBOATS&RV'S(850)-227-33571617GROUPERAVENUE,PORTST.JOE,FLWWW.CAPTAINSCOVEFL.COM WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,July1186 7830% Fri,July1285 7660% Sat,July1385 7730% Sun,July1487 7840% Mon,July1587 7830% Tues,July1686 7830% Wed,July1786 7860% SPONSORED BY Inshore Freshwater OffshoreOffshore anglers will have the chance one more time to catch state-water snapper this week, ending on Sunday at midnight. Many good-sized fish can be caught near shore, and with all the weather from last week, these fish should bite very aggressively. Watch and know your state water boundaries. After a near record rainfall this past week, most area lakes and streams are near flood stage, and some still rising as waters from north of us reach the Forgotten Coast this week. Good reports from The Brothers and the Big River of sheepshead and channel cats are the only thing we hear right now. Most of the inshore attention is now focused on scallop season. We are seeing good numbers of shells coming to the docks, and the shells are strong and large for this time of summer. Keep your dive flags up, and watch for boaters! THE PORT ST. JOE STARFIND US ON FACEBOOK@PSJ_StarFOLLOW US ON TWITTERBy TOM BAIRDSpecial to The Star Slow moving, chocolate brown horseshoe crabs are well known to our residents. Whether snorkeling or wading in the shallows of St. Joe Bay or along our beaches, horseshoe crabs are a common sight for visitors and locals alike. Elsewhere in Florida, tourists with little experience of the marine environment often react to horseshoe crabs nearby with fear. Often assuming the tail has a stinger, there is a lot of general misinformation shared around. In truth, although few creatures are uglier, few are less harmful. The horseshoe crab has been around a long time, at least 450 million years. Although their clan was once more numerous in past seas, and even in recent times, their distribution is now restricted to the northwestern Atlantic coast from southern Canada around the Gulf of Mexico to Yucatan. All other members of the group are found along Asian coasts from Japan and Korea south through the East Indies and the Philippines. The horseshoe crab is not actually a true crab. They are more closely related to spiders and share many characteristics with spiders. If you have picked one up, you have noticed that the crab has four eyes: two tiny ones on the forward part of the shield and one large compound eye on each side of the shield. Its scienti c name is Limulus polyphemus. The name Limulus means side-glance or look. The hard body armor or exoskeleton is made of chitin, the same tough, resistant material that forms the body of insects, shrimps, blue crabs, etc. Chitin is heavy, so only in the buoyant sea could the horseshoe crab reach such a large size. The spiny tail is attached to the rest of the body in ball and socket fashion. The tail is used for righting the crab when overturned and possibly as a deterrent to being eaten. There is no poison gland in the tail, although it would hurt to step on a horseshoe crab barefooted. If you see a horseshoe crab near the shore, do not be afraid to pick it up or touch it. The pincer claws are very weak and can do no harm. The mouth is in the center underside and looks erce but is also very weak. The last pair of legs tipped with spikes act like ski poles in locomotion over the bottom. Bristles at the base of the legs grind food (worms and soft shelled clams) as the crab moves. Spawning occurs at high tides during May and June, so you have likely seen many horseshoe crabs moving in tandem in shallow water in the last weeks. The female crawls up on a calm beach or sandy marsh edge between high and low tide marks to lay eggs in shallow depressions that she makes by her burrowing movements. The male crab hitches a ride on the female and fertilizes the eggs as they are deposited in each nest. Often one or more of the pair is stranded by the receding tide and the beachcomber nds the large shell the next day. Tiny crabs are hatched within two to four weeks. The waves of the next full moon tide (spring tide) wash the eggs into the bay or Gulf, and the eggs break as they are tumbled against the sand. By the third year of life the horseshoe crab has shed its hard outer shell 11 times and is about 6 inches long. Horseshoe crabs migrate to deeper water until they reach the adult stage. Between ages 9 and 11, the horseshoe crab matures and travels back to shallow water for the remainder of its life. Once it reaches the adult stage it does not shed. Females can grow to a length of 30 inches. Males are smaller. Horseshoe crabs have been used by humans in many, and sometimes surprising, ways. The tail was once used by Native Americans for spear tips and awls to punch leather. In the 19th century, horseshoe crabs were dried and ground for use as fertilizer or poultry feed supplement. In 1856, 1,200,000 horseshoe crabs were harvested on just a one mile stretch of Delaware beach. As late as the 1920s and early 1930s, 4-5 million crabs were harvested annually. Harvesting horseshoe crabs became unpro table with the use of arti cial fertilizer and the reduced crab population. The horseshoe crab has new value however. The creature has pale blue blood that contains an agent valuable to medicine. The active agent is called Limulus amoebocyte lysate. It can be used to detect extremely small amounts of endotoxins, which are poisons found in a major class of bacteria that cause serious infections in humans. The value of the Limulus lysate test is that it detects smaller amounts of endotoxins quickly and reliably. If you have ever received an injection of a drug or vaccine, the batches were tested with Limulus lysate to ensure no bacterial contamination. To obtain the lysate, horseshoe crabs are bled by inserting a needle into the heart chamber. The donor crabs are released afterwards. Additionally, chitin from horseshoe crabs is used to create a suture material. Chitin-coated suture material reduces healing time by 35 to 50 percent. Horseshoe crabs contribute formidable weapons to medicines arsenal against infectious disease. Meanwhile, the horseshoe crab continues its silent shuf e across warm shallow seas as it has done for millions of years, and with care for our bays and estuaries, it will continue to do so. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. COURTESY OF RALPH ROBERSONChris Roberson snagged this 85-inch Sail sh near the Cape Tower on July 3 with an assist from his son Carter. Chris, from Port St. Joe, was shing aboard the Blue Heron with his father, Ralph. Chris is visiting from Raleigh, NC. NOW, THATS A FISH Horseshoe crab a familiar sightThursday, July 11, 2013 Page 6

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection WEEKENDSPECIALSFORLOCALSWITHAFLORIDAI.D.40%OFFonSaturdayandSundayonlyDAILYSHOWSFEATURING: Dolphins,SeaLions,Reptiles,Birds,DogsandOtherAnimalSurprises www.GulfWorldMarinePark.comCALLFORMOREINFORMATION850-234-5271ORVISITOpenRainorShine! ItsAppreciationTimeat Locals PASSESOFFEREXPIRES8/31/2013 Thursday, July 11, 2013 Page 7By Josh DaileySpecial to The Star On behalf of the Port St Joe High School Football team we want thank the more than 60 runners who braved the rain to come and make the 5K Fun Run a great success. We also want to thank the numerous volunteers and sponsors who all contributed to a successful event. Thanks so much to Mike Lacour and the Centennial Celebration committee for letting us administer the 5K run. They were very helpful with the advertising by posting our race information to the event website. Also special thanks to Don Butler and Mark Cothran for setting up the ashing sign with our event information. The Gulf County Chamber and The Star also helped us with advertise for the race. Tracy Browning also assisted in advertising by passing out banners. Wayne Taylor made the yers and also posted information about the race on the school website. The Gulf County TDC provided the goodie bags, water proof cases, lip balm and visitor guides. Police Chief David Barnes and his department were very helpful in assisting with traf c control at the start of the race. The rehouse was also generous enough to let us use their facilities for registration. The Salvation Army also showed their support by showing up to distribute waters. We want to thank student volunteers: Tyler Worley, Joel Cummings, Bryce Godwin, Austin Nobles, Rainee Nobles, Brayden Dailey and Caleb Odum. I really appreciate their great attitudes and commitment despite having to wake up so early on a stormy day to help prepare for the 5K. They helped out with various tasks and worked hard keeping the runners hydrated at the refreshment stations set up along the race path. Im very proud of these students and their hard work and dedication shows a lot about their strong character. Our adult volunteers were Kayla Dailey, Sissy Worley, Courtney Cummings, Bobby Nobles, Terri Browning, Chuck Gannon, Jo Heimbuch and Sherry Thacker. They helped out with registration, preparing the food and monitoring at intersections. Their willingness to help out with whatever we asked of them was so very much appreciated. I would also like to give a special thanks to my father-in-law, Brian Heimbuch, who helped coordinate the race and was instrumental in its success. We are already looking forward to planning another race. I would like to acknowledge all of our sponsors who helped support the event: Raf eld Fisheries, Inc., Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza, Hannon Insurance Agency, Gaddis Construction, Woods Fisheries, Inc., St. Joe Rent all, Inc., Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union, Bell Foundation Company and Dodson Appraisals. The Piggly Wiggly of Apalachicola provided all of the drinks, bananas and oranges for after the race. Thanks to Bobby Pickels and Duke Energy for providing mini rst aid kits. Mainstay Suites provided T-shirts for the race. Greg Lay eld and Jim Norton provided tables, orange vest for our volunteers working intersections, and cups for the race. It was a pleasure to work with Joey Browning at Columbus Trophy & Screen Printing who helped us design the technical shirts for our runners. A large portion of the shirt cost was also donated and greatly appreciated. I truly believe we have a great community and it shows by the willingness of it citizens to volunteer their time and money for a great cause. The runners provided many comments about the great treatment they received and the hospitality shown by the volunteers. This was a proud day for the city of Port St. Joe.Special to The StarSacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will offer free athletic screenings to high school and junior high students in Gulf County on July 23 and Aug. 1 from 5 to 8 p.m. ET. Florida regulations require athletic screenings for all students participating in practice and competitive sports. The free screenings will be administered at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulfs Medical Of ce Building by specialists including Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic staff and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf physical therapists, nurses and physicians. Screenings include blood pressure, heart rate, posture, range of motion, exibility and balance. Students should check with their coach to learn which date they should attend. Additionally, students and their parents must complete medical history and permission forms prior to participating in the athletic screening. These forms are available through school coaches or Sacred Hearts Rehabilitation program in the Medical Of ce Building. Student athletes should wear shorts, t-shirts, and athletic shoes for their visit. Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulfs Medical Of ce Building is located on the hospitals campus at 3801 U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. REVISED 2013 PORT ST. JOE VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULEDate Opponent Home/Away EasternTime 26-Aug Rutherford Away 6/7pm 27-Aug West Gadsden Home 6/pm 3-Sep Bay Haven Away 6/7pm 5-Sep Bay High Home 6/7pm 9-Sep Wewahitchka Away 6/7pm 10-Sep South Walton Home 6/7pm 12-Sep Bozeman Home 6/7pm 14-Sep Chipley Tourney Away All Day 17-Sep Franklin Co. Away 6/7pm 19-Sep Bozeman Away 6/7pm 23-Sep Liberty County Home 6/7pm 24-Sep West Gadsden Away 6/pm 26-Sep Bay Haven Home 6/7pm 3-Oct South Walton Away 6/7pm 7-Oct Liberty County Away 6/7pm 8-Oct Franklin Co. Home 6/7 pm 10-Oct Bay High Away 6/7 pm 15-Oct Rutherford Home 6/7 pm 17-Oct Wewahitchka Home 6/7 pm 21-Oct Quarter-Finals Franklin 5/7 pm 22-Oct Semi-Finals Franklin 5/7 pm 24-Oct District Finals Franklin 7:00 PM 5-Nov Reg. Semi-Finals TBA 7:00 PM 9-Nov Regional Finals TBA 2:00 PM 12-16 Nov FHSAA Finals Kissimmee Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf offers free school athlete screenings Centennial Celebration 5K fun run resultsSPECIAL TO THE STARThe top female and male nishers were Kathy Wolski and Christian Carlson.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM StephenCollier,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients gulfcoastderm.com PORTST.JOE|PANAMACITY TriciaBerry,ARNP| AdvancedRegisteredNursePractitionerWhatdoesthismeanforyou? Accesstotheregionswidestrangeof advancedskincancertreatments,including painlessSupercialRadiationTherapyand Mohsmicrographicsurgery Same-weekappointments Ourphysician-supervisedspa,offering proventreatmentsfortotalskin revitalizationandrejuvenation Tomakeanappointmentorschedulea complimentarycosmeticconsultation, pleasecall 1-877-231-DERM(3376). MEDICAL|SURGICAL|COSMETICTOTALACCESS.TOTALCONFIDENCE.TOTALCAREFORYOURSKIN. items left behind. Dogs are off leashes as the county promotes pet-friendly beaches, and the ability for even safety vehicles to reach portions of the beach is compromised. Sgt. Chris Buchanan of the GCSO also noted the beach area continues to experience car and home break-ins, with more than a dozen over the holiday weekend alone. If we dont get ahead of this, it could get out of control very quickly, Jenkins said. We relaunched a brand in February, and all indications are that it is resonating. We need to manage the brand. How to do that was where the board lacked a consensus. Ronald Pickett and Alyson Gerlach each expressed a reluctance or outright opposition to any increase in the bed tax. For Gerlach, the issue was simply the costs to bed tax collectors and their guests. We are a price-sensitive market, Gerlach said. When we talk about raising bed taxes, we are going to lose customers. Pickett added, Weve lost revenue the past seven years because the economy sucked. We are starting to see that change. We are a thrift brand. County Commissioner Warren Yeager said as an elected ofcial, he must look at the broader picture. Given the countys own budget straightjacket, the BOCC was forced to look at options other than property taxes to fund services. We have to look at alternative sources of revenue to x the problems we need to x, Yeager said. I cant justify spending (property taxes) when most of the problems are caused by tourists. We all agree there is a problem. We need to x the problem. At the end of the day, we do need to protect our brand. Yeager said the county could not continue to provide required services at its current funding level, and property taxes were almost certain to rise. But he added the county also was looking at user fees, service fees and other sources of income. Pickett said citizens and visitors did not want to be user-feed to death, and he opposed the county asking the TDC to provide services the county should be funding. The suggestion also was made that though the county had ordinances on the books for issues such as beach driving and maintaining a pet on a leash, the nes should be more substantial. Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Association, said the county advertises pristine beaches that are not currently so pristine after a busy holiday weekend. She also noted tourists create most of the problems and should foot the bill. Our visitors are leaving a mess, Hardman said. Why should my (property taxes) go for that? I think it is totally justied to put it on the backs not of our property owners but on the backs of tourists. She said it was not logical that one additional penny in bed taxes would lead to fewer visitors. Pickett agreed he would like to ultimately see leave no trace as county policy, but he was against the TDC subsidizing a portion of the countys budget by adding to the bed tax. He said he supported a shortterm solution a fee for guests during the summer aimed at bringing about leave no trace, for example, but not funding year round and wondered if the TDC had the revenue or savings to address the problem in the short-term. I am against an increase across the board, Pickett said, adding he does not believe the countys tourist corridor receives the services commensurate to the amount of its tax base, which represents roughly 38 percent of the entire countys property tax collections. Im against a long-term commitment via a tax. Board member Patty Fisher said the TDC budget committee should look at the TDC budget and examine if there was money to be moved toward the beach safety program. TDC board chair David Warriner asked for the TDC budget committee to meet next week with the full advisory board meeting after the rst county budget meeting next week. We have had a growing budget, Warriner said. Maybe it is time to reprioritize. Maybe we dont need the extra penny. If it is a short-term deal, maybe we can dip into savings. Adding a new program at this time of austerity may not be a good idea. We arent the only source of funds. Its smart to look at other sources, such as (a state agency) grant. We have to be very focused on what (state law) says we can use the money on. Do we have a bad enough problem that it will impact our image? TDC from page A1We have to look at alternative sources of revenue to fix the problems we need to fix. I cant justify spending (property taxes) when most of the problems are caused by tourists.County Commissioner Warren Yeager

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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) American what was the title of a TV series set in the 1960s with Meg, Helen, Jack, and JJ? Idol, Gladiators, Dreams, Life 2) About what percent of Americas teens get an optimal amount (9+ hrs) of sleep? 9, 20, 31, 42 3) Who was the rst U.S. president to appear on a postage stamp? Lincoln, Jefferson, Washington, Madison 4) What country in the news media is often called the Hermit Kingdom? Libya, Nigeria, Laos, N. Korea 5) Of these which is not in Europe? Israel, Albania, Germany, Sweden 6) Where was the rst commercial espresso machine manufactured in 1906? San Francisco, Italy, NYC, France 7) Approximately three out of how many American teens drink a caffeinated beverage daily? 4, 6, 8, 10 8) Who was the only former U.S. president to die in the 1700s? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 9) What philosopher reportedly drank fty cups of coffee a day? Confucius, Descartes, Voltaire, Jung 10) Though cancelled due to WWI, where were the 1916 Olympics scheduled to be held? Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Warsaw 11) Of these industrialists who was a surgeon during the Civil War? Ford, Rockefeller, Goodrich, Firestone 12) Where was Elvis Presley scheduled to perform next when he died? Florida, Oregon, Michigan, Maine 13) What averages out to about 512 of them per pound? Paperclips, Potato chips, Popcorn kernels, Plain M & Ms 14) How many coffee beans does it ordinarily take to make an espresso? 20, 42, 100, 180 ANSWERS 1) Dreams. 2) 20. 3) Washington. 4) N. Korea. 5) Israel. 6) Italy. 7) 4. 8) Washington. 9) Voltaire. 10) Berlin. 11) Goodrich. 12) Maine. 13) Plain M & Ms. 14) 42. COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, July 11, 2013 BPage 1SectionTrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Port St. Joe completes centennial celebrationBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Port St. Joes centennial and birthday celebration came to a close July 5 after a weeks worth of events. With more than 30 celebratory events scheduled across eight days, there was no shortage of family fun to be had. The centennial committee, which was appointed by Mayor Mel Magidson in October, included Patti Blaylock, Dana Boyer, Jennifer Jenkins, Clarence Monette, John Parker, Charlotte Pierce, Tim Nelson, Paula Pickett and Steve Kerigan. The group brainstormed events and did their best to see them through to completion while competing against Mother Nature. The event was well-received, Pickett said. The celebration, which began the last Friday in June, started with a bang as more than 300 members of the community showed up to a sh fry at city commons that raised more than $2,000 for celebration expenses. A parade down Reid Avenue followed that highlighted founding members of the community and graduates of Port St. Joe High School over many generations. June 30 was a 5K run, SaltAir Farmers Market and the rst display of the static light show that ran nightly at George Core Park. The July 1 family fun day brought out the kids for the rst annual kite ying competition and PSJ soccer fundraiser. It was cool seeing people use the park like that, Pickett said. July 2, the of cial birthday of the city, was celebrated by the burial of a Scallop festival just around the cornerBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Centennial Celebration has come and gone, but if theres one thing the ne folks of Gulf County know how to do, its how to throw a party. The 17th annual Scallop Festival is just around the corner and will take place on two separate weekends: July 27-28 and Aug. 2-4 at George Core Park and around Gulf County. Celebrate Gulf Countys favorite mollusk by grabbing a plate of scallops on-site or frozen scallops to take home. Vendors will be serving up the tasty morsels almost any way that can be imagined.Kids clean beach, serve communityBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Department of Juvenile Justice teamed up this week with the Teen Outreach Program and Students Working Against Tobacco to clean up area beaches. The cleanup crews, made up of students ages 10-18, walk a six-mile strip of beach usually starting from the canal in St. Joe Beach and going as far as the Lookout Lounge or Toucans in Mexico Beach. Four of the students took part in Mondays post-Fourth of July cleanup to clear the beach of used reworks, trash and cigarette butts. Kids are provided with trash bags, gloves and bottled water and spend four hours combing the beach for the debris to keep the area beautiful. Shoes are optional. TOP and SWAT are part of the Gulf County Department of Health and provide volunteer opportunities in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka. The Department of Juvenile Justice brings youth who have been in legal trouble, are on probation and required to complete community service hours. FILE PHOTOCelebrate the scallop and order up a basket in your favorite style. Port St. Joe completes centennial celebration 10 0 in June, started with a bang as more than 300 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarFROM TOP: A time capsule was buried beneath the whistle downtown and will be opened in 50 years. It was buried by the of cial centennial committee. The adult winners of the kite ying contest proudly accept awards. Essays written by elementary high school students discussed how Port St. Joe has changed over the last 100 years. Crowds participate in celebrating the citys birthday.See 100 B5 See SCALLOP B5 See CLEAN B5

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013Special to the Star MyGULFCare is a program, offered at no cost to help low income residents of Gulf County receive the right health care services at the right time. Offered by Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in partnership with the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County, MyGULFCare strives to improve the health of Gulf County residents by addressing the need for coordination of care between primary care physicians, the emergency department, the department of health, and specialty care providers. A variety of services are available. How do you qualify for MyGULFCare? To qualify for MyGULFCare free services, you must meet the following qualications: U.S. citizen or legal resident Gulf County resident Have Medicaid insurance or are uninsured Low income What is Care Management? MyGULFCare Care Management Program is for people with a chronic health condition who need personalized, one-on-one assistance to understand their condition and how to control it. Care Management currently is offered to individuals with one or more of the following: diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. Care Management does not take the place of following your physicians orders, it improves your ability to follow those directions and understand the expected outcomes. By learning how to better manage your chronic condition, you will be better equipped to maintain a healthy lifestyle. MyGULFCare Care Manager will meet with you one-on-one to discuss your present health condition then help you set short and long-term health goals. The Care Manager will provide you with the tools you need to better control your chronic condition and will work with you to make sure you are making progress. What is Diabetes? Most of the food you eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, so your body can use it for energy. When you have Diabetes, your body either doesnt make enough insulin, cant use its own insulin as well as it should, or both. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. There are two main forms of Diabetes, Type I and Type II. Type I generally starts early in life and results from the body not producing enough insulin. Commonly called Insulin-dependent, or Juvenile Diabetes, it requires an insulin injection daily. Type II Diabetes develops when the body doesnt make enough insulin and doesnt efciently use the insulin it makes. There are many lifestyle changes and healthy habits that will help to reduce or even reverse the symptoms of Diabetes. What is Hypertension? Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure. About 1 of every 3 Americans Adults has hypertension. Children can also have it. Having hypertension increases your risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and heart disease. High blood pressure can affect anyone! It is sometimes called the silent killer because many people never know they have it. 90% of the cases of high blood pressure have no specic cause. There are many factors that can lead to hypertension, and the good news is, with life-style changes and healthy choices, hypertension can be controlled. Many medications are available as well. With early detection and treatment, many of the complications associated with high blood pressure can be avoided. What is Hyperlipidemia? More than just high cholesterol, hyperlipidemia means that there are high levels of fat (or Lipids) in the blood. The cholesterol and the triglycerides are essential to our bodies, yet too much of either can place us at risk of stroke or heart disease. Our bodies make enough cholesterol to maintain healthy circulation, and triglycerides are present at or just below the normal amount when our bodies produce new cells. Too much cholesterol can cause a sticky substance called plaque to build up in our arteries and block circulation causing heart attacks or strokes. A combination of medication, exercise, and healthy dietary choices is essential to controlling hyperlipidemia. To learn more about how you can manage your Diabetes, Hypertension or Hyperlipidemia, contact the Care Manager at (850)227-1276 ext. 132. You may qualify for MyGULFCare, a program designed to help Gulf Countys low income households, and to provide Care Management to those who are uninsured, underinsured, and dealing with one or more of these chronic conditions. MyGULFCare helps those dealing with chronic health conditions TontoandRangeraretwosweetrescuekittensthatwouldloveaforeverhome. Bothhavelearnedtotrustandlovepeople.eselittleguyswouldmakeagreat additiontoanyfamily.Ifyoucangiveeitheroneofthemaforeverhome,donot hesitatetocontactus.Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation.Allpets adoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitate toemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.Joseph BayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103andask forMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailable atwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWerequireall potentialadopterstocompleteanapplicationform. Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterand currentvaccinations.Ourhoursfortheshelterare Tuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! FaithsThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupportthe animalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteers arealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007Tenth StreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon!www.sjbhumanesociety.org Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet, pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. Followusonfacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety 4514866SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 CallToday 4515176 ONTHEPOOPDECK -INTHECROWSNEST-WEDNESDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY KARAOKE DJ DANCING *AllTimesEasternFunTime*9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM THURSDAY-7PMLuke&Mandy SATURDAY-9PMDeeJaDiva WEDNESDAY-7PMBrianBowen &MelissaBowman SUNDAY-7PMRandy&Art FRIDAY-9PMNavajoSky TheMagicofCapeSanBlas andtheSurroundingAreaBooksavailableat: NoNameBookstore, BluewaterOutriggers, AreaBookstores,MaddoxHouse**AvailableOnline**www.marlenewomack.com *BOARDCERTIFIEDCIVILTRIALLAWYER OFCOUNSEL Society HAPPY BIRTHDAY1 Love ... 2 BirthdaysJuly 5. Happy Birthday to Mr. Billy and Cheryl Quinn. We Love You. We Celebrate You! The Quinn and Granger Family Music, martinis and mammosSacred heart to hold membership driveStar Staff ReportThe Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild will hold a membership drive from 5-7 p.m. ET on Tuesday, July 16 at the Haughty Heron. Become a new member for $20 and receive a free martini from the Haughty Heron. The event will include live music, light food and a local breast cancer survivor who will speak on the importance of early detection. Support the drive for breast cancer screenings and other health initiatives by becoming a member of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. The Guild provides helping hands of support and fundraising activities to bring new health care programs and services to the community. Funds raised will be contributed in part to the development of a fund to assist uninsured and underinsured residents receive breast cancer screenings. COURTESY OF DD EBBIE HH OOPER AT JOEBAY.c COMAdam, Jenna, Noah and Kiera Price enjoyed some relaxing time in a really big beach chair during a recent evening. Adam, Jenna and Noah are siblings, Kiera is their cousin. BBEAcCH FUN ON A SUMMER AFTERNOON

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The Star| B3Thursday, July 11, 2013 Implants&CrownsAffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.WilliamC.Knapke,DDS,GeneralDentistPanamaCitySquare617West23rdStreet,PanamaCityFL CallForInformation1-888-336-1615 Feeseffectivethrough11/22/13.Additionalfeesmaybeincurred dependingonindividualcases.Same-dayCrownservicemaynot beavailableincertaincases.AffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.Ofce#:(850)872-6155. Great vs.other Dental providersSingleToothImplant$1,795Denture Implants$1,495$1,895 Same-DayCrowns$695LowerArch UpperArch20144-4-T4 1116624 By DR. SANdDRA M. COOK Teacher, Port St. Joe High School Special to The Star As a teenager, eight days can seem like an eternity, but three Gulf County students Allen Davis, Cordale Green and Samantha Hoover had an experience of a lifetime while participating in a STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) camp hosted by Tyndall Air Force Base and sponsored by FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project through the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium in Chipley. For eight days, these students were introduced to the world of work in a way they never dreamed possible. The focus was on STEM-related jobs and careers through the efforts of the Tyndall research site commander, Lt. Col. Donna Pilson; Capt. Kurt Silsby, who provided numerous adventures for the students; and Sandra Cook, Ph.D., a Port St. Joe High School math teacher who served as the teacher liaison for the experience. The students were exposed to areas of research centered on re protection of our military personnel and ways to create alternate means of energy. Some of the areas the students participated in were to design, build and test a protective shield for precious cargo; to feed algae that is being developed to provide an alternative energy source; and to learn about various ways research is being developed to protect our soldiers from re through repellants for their uniforms to protection while ghting aircraft fuel res. Another major source of fun was driving several military vehicles which was denitely a highlight of their day remotely driving a mine sweeper, participating in the F-15 simulator and driving a bomb loader. With each and every aspect of their investigations, the students were exposed to information about various jobs, not only from the military aspect, but with civilian possibilities in mind, as well. The information shared came from ofcers, enlisted service personnel, contractors and civil service employees. Some of the jobs and careers shared were civil, mechanical and electrical engineers, chemists, physicists, many areas of the F-22 maintenance, numerous medical elds, plus many other possibilities. For these eight days, the students were immersed into a world that created interest, questions and wonder. There is no doubt this was an experience of a lifetime for these three students that will not soon be forgotten. There will always be a new level of respect for the men and women who serve our country for Allen, Cordale and Samantha.Special to The StarWith summer just beginning, three cadets from the Port St Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC made a commitment to themselves and their company by accepting the challenge of attending the NJROTC Area Seven Leadership Academy at Admiral Farragut Academy in St. Petersburg on June 15-22. Meeting the rigorous physical and academic requirements, Cadets Zachory Jasinski, Marquez Johnson and Claudia Gref successfully completed this weeklong Advanced Leadership Training Course and will assume greater leadership roles in the NJROTC when classes resume in August. Rising at 5:30 a.m. each day, the cadets, along with more than 200 others, selected from 8,000 statewide, completed a grueling regimen of physical tness, leadership studies, survival swimming and sailing. More importantly, they were able to work with cadets from around the state, sharing their NJROTC experiences, and bring a wealth of information back with them to share with the cadets of Port St Joe. Military drill, uniform preparation and inspection, barracks organization and team building were all parts of this exceptional training experience. Jasinski, Johnson and Gref performed in an outstanding manner and warrant a pat on the back for a job exceptionally well done. These cadets will join Cadets Robert Dykes and Megan Hubbard, who completed Leadership Academy last summer, as the cornerstone of leadership for the NJROTC Company this school year. A special thanks to our local American Legion Post 116 for their generous donation of the $180 tuition for each cadet to attend Leadership Academy. Their understanding of the importance of this training is a key to its success. Thank you for your outstanding support of the NJROTC Program. Both the American Legion and VFW Post 10069 have been instrumental in supporting ongoing activities for NJROTC, and for that we are truly grateful. Navy Junior Reserve Ofcer Training Corps is a citizenship and leadership training program co-sponsored by the Gulf County School District and the United States Navy. It is open to all interested students in the ninth through 12th grades. GCSC to hold Educator Preparation Institute forumSpecial to The StarIf you ever wanted to become a teacher in your second career, your chance is now, and you can learn all about the Educator Preparation Institute program at July 16 at Gulf Coast State College. The program has an exceptional track record: Since Gulf Coast began the program in 2005, all of the completers who have sat for the certication exam have passed. Last year, 25 percent of the teachers chosen to compete as Bay Countys Teacher of the Year were graduates of Gulf Coasts EPI program. Five of the GCSC EPI graduates were selected as a 2012 Teacher of the Year in the Bay District School System. Gulf Coast is hosting a free community forum to explain this program for those who already hold a bachelors degree and want to become teachers in the K-12 system. In six to eight months, the EPI program prepares completers to take the Florida Teacher Certication Exams. Students from varied backgrounds and all kinds of previous careers have found tremendous success in the classroom. Those interested in this alternative route to teacher certication are encouraged to attend the forum from 5:30-7 p.m. CT July 16 in Room 113 of the social sciences building on the colleges Panama City campus. For more information, visit www.gulfcoast.edu or call Teresa Salter, 769-1551, ext. 3393. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARCadets Marquez Johnson, Claudia Gref and Zachory Jasinski show off their new Silver Cords earned at the NJROTC Area 7 Leadership Academy in St Petersburg.4 PSJHS cadets attend leadership camp AA bove, Gulf County students Cordale Green, Samantha Hoover and Allen Davis use Solid Works, a 3D drafting software, as they design, build and test a roll cage to protect cargo in a remotely controlled car while on site at Tyndall Air Force Base. AA t left, Samantha Hoover learns rsthand about gear that must be worn to protect Air Force personnel from biohazardous material.SPECIAL TO TT HE STARSTEM scholars spend 8 days at Tyndall A AFB School News

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 9:30AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation TUESDAY -5:00PM-WomensBibleStudy 6:30PM-BibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org Special to The StarThe possible existence of extraterrestrial life will be examined at 7 p.m. CT on Monday at Lifetree Caf. This Lifetree event features a lmed interview with Stan Romanek, who has reported more than 100 extraterrestrial encounters. The Lifetree lm explores his personal stories of alien abduction. Romanek authored Messages: The Worlds Most Documented Extraterrestrial Contact Stories. His video of an alien-looking gure peeking in his window has attracted the attention of UFO enthusiasts as well as skeptics. According to Lifetree Caf representative Craig Cable, the Lifetree event will invite accounts from local people who believe theyve seen unidenti ed ying objects. He said, Thoughts of life on other planets have implications that fascinate some people and scare others. The Lifetree lm also includes an interview with a former Washington attorney who explains a 2009 Vatican announcement about the possibility of life on other planets. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. Mildred W. Montgomery, 87, formerly of York Springs, Pa., and Port St. Joe, died Wednesday morning, July 3, 2013, at the Brethren Home Community, New Oxford. Born July 31, 1925, in Ozark, Ala., she was the daughter of the late John P. and Sarah Lee (Bullard) Watkins. She was the wife of William A. Montgomery, of York Springs, Pa., and formerly of Port St. Joe, to whom she was married to for 64 years. She is survived by her daughter, Cynthia Lee Sanderson and her husband, Stephen, of York Springs, Pa.; two grandsons, Joshua Sanderson and his wife, Jill, of Bellefonte, Pa., Travis Sanderson and his wife, Beckie, of Thomasville, Pa.; two great-grandchildren, Kergan Sanderson and Quinn Sanderson, both of Bellefonte, Pa.; three siblings, Rena Cha n, of Mobile, Ala., John Watkins and his wife, Betty, of Eatonton, Ga., Thelma Cook and her husband, Carlos, of Alabama; and a half brother, Charles Watkins and his, wife Mary Ann, of Jacksonville. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m., Monday, July 8, 2013, at the Monahan Funeral Home, 125 Carlisle St., Gettysburg, with Rev. John Alford of ciating. Burial was in the Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens, Gettysburg. The family received friends from 1 p.m. until the time of the service Monday at the funeral home. Online condolences may be made at monahanfuneralhome. com. Mildred W. Montgomery MILDRED W. MONTGOMERYRevival at Philadelphia Primitive Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will be in its annual revival services beginning Monday evening, July 15. The evangelist for the week is the Elder Louis Anderson of Tallahassee. Pastor Jessie Hawkins and his congregation cordially invites the public to come out each night at 7:30 p.m. and be a part of great week of re-dedication. The church is on Avenue D.First United Methodist Church FundraiserA fundraiser is from 3:30-7 p.m. CT Friday at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach. There will be pulled pork sandwich, chips, drink and brownie for $6. Eat in or take out. Proceeds will bene t the FUMC disaster team. Faith BRIEFSStar Staff ReportA bene t for Theresa Purswell Lucas, including a gospel sing, bake sale and garage sale, is Saturday at Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church, 138 East Orange Ave. in Wewahitchka. The bake sale and garage sale will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. CT. The gospel music sing, featuring The Drummonds will begin at 6 p.m. CT. There will also be lots of crafts, clothes, food (hot dogs, chili dogs, drinks, cakes and pies) available for purchase. An account has been set up at Emerald Coast Bank in Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka for anyone wishing to make a donation. The bene t is hosted by Glad Tidings Assembly of God and New Harvest Fellowship churches.Thursday, July 11, 2013UFO abductions examined at Lifetree Caf Card of THANKSThe Wahl family would like to thank all of the family and friends for their support during the loss of their wife and mother, Carolyn Wahl. A special thanks to Linda Hamilton, Janie Turner, Robert Hagsburg, Dee Dixon, Covenant Hospice, Long Avenue Baptist Church, Father Louie Little, Matthew White, Ann Six, Marlon Taylor and Richard Davis.The Wahl familyEvent to bene t Theresa Lucas Obituary No one can measure the degree of Gods love. This love comes only from the heaven above. It is so great there is no way to measure. But if you have it, its such a treasure. Are you exercising your rights to Gods awesome power? Are you close enough to feel it, hour after hour? The word says ask and ye shall receive. Is your faith strong enough? Do you believe? Gods power is unlimited to His people, who ask, but to many folks this is too hard a task. Too many Christians want to straddle the fence, to these His power Hell not dispense. To the obedient children of His who believe, His power is there, just ask and youll receive.Billy Johnson Ask and you will receive

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, July 11, 2013 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:7-31-13CODE:SJ00 Kelly Faircloth, juvenile probation of cer for Gulf County, is on his third year of the program and has seen the bene ts to getting kids out and getting them active in the community. There are limited opportunities for community service in the area, he said. The goal is to have the youth around positive role models within the community. For Faircloth, his reward is getting to spend the time walking the beach and working alongside the kids. He realized sometimes they just need someone to speak with or someone to listen as they speak freely. During some of the activities, kids need a friendly ear, but other times theyre happy to get out on the beach for a footrace between litter pickups. Its not a punitive job, Faircloth said. We have fun while we do it. Jessie Hayes, senior human services program specialist and TOP facilitator for the Department of Health, has worked with TOP for two years. She also teaches a health and physical education class at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Her class requires 20 hours of community service, and the students actively look for ways to improve the community. TOP has a goal of decreasing adolescent pregnancy and increasing school success using a positive youth development curriculum that encourages healthy behavior, life skills and a sense of purpose. The best part is seeing kids change and learn through community service, Hayes said. Hayes and Faircloth enjoy doing their part in encouraging the youth of Gulf County to grow up making positive choices and have seen the effects rst-hand. Faircloth said during the last beach walk cleanup, some community partners out of Wewahitchka joined the activity, and after speaking with one of the young men, they were so impressed with his attitude and the interaction they had with him, they offered him a paid position. Good things come from it, Faircloth said. For some, it can change lives. The next project for the group will take place July 18 at Peters Park in Port St. Joe. Volunteers and kids in the juvenile program will construct a concession stand from the ground up. Theyll install a kitchen with sink and refrigerator and hope it will be the rst step toward solidifying a T-ball league for the area. TOP will purchase paint and supplies for the restoration and county employee Patrick Carpenter will donate his time teaching kids basic carpentry skills. Roads leading into the park also will be painted, and plans have been made to refurbish on-site dugouts and gazebos. Though the beach cleanup crew might not have been quite awake at the 9 a.m. call time, as they traversed the sandy terrain onto St. Joe Beach, a nearby resident appeared on their porch and thanked the group for their service. Faircloth encourages local agencies to give him a call at 258-7345 to get their youth involved in projects that will keep the community looking great. Come out and lets clean the beach together, Faircloth said. 100 from page A1The festival begins July 27 with an afternoon Race for the Scallops with a 5K and 10K run through historic Port St. Joe. The event begins at Frank Pate Park. Pre-registration is required. On July 28, the race continues with a 25K and 100K bike ride through Gulf County. The following week, on Aug. 2, the festival will spotlight local merchants during an all-day sidewalk sale. Local artists and vendors will showcase their best work. Live music will take place starting at 5 p.m. ET at the George Core Park stage, featuring The Curry Brothers, Flabbergasted and Jim Morris. On Saturday, the festival kicks into high gear and will feature arts and crafts vendors, educational exhibits, a Kidz Zone, rafes, more than 50 food vendors and plenty of live music. Other events throughout the day will include a classic car show from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. Plaques will be awarded to the winners in the categories of best antique car, classic car, muscle, modi ed and modern along with peoples choice, best of show and a mystery judges award. Plaques will also be presented to the rst 50 entries. The day will also feature a Duck Derby Race, where little ones can adopt a plastic duck and watch as the wind blows it across the George Core Lagoon. The winner will take home prizes galore. Music on Saturday begins at 11 a.m. ET and will feature Bowen and Bowman, Reed Weddle, King Cotton, Cadillac Willy, the Kevin Jacobs Band and the Sauce Boss, who cooks gumbo on stage while playing blues tunes. Sunday will wrap up the festival with the nal Race for the Scallops, this time a paddle board and kayak race around St. Joseph Bay. At George Core Park, the music starts at 1 p.m. ET and will feature local Christian rockers Thirty-Three, followed by Diane Peevy. Admission for the event is $5 for Friday events and $5 on Saturday. Children 6 and younger get in free. Admission is also waived for military personnel with valid ID. To register for the running or biking events, visit www.scallopfest.com/run%20app%20and %20waiver.pdf. Alice Martin will take applications for the car show by calling 227-4027. SCALLOP from page A1time capsule to be opened in 50 years along with a speech by the mayor, essay readings from high school students and a the release of 100 lanterns. It gave those in attendance a chance to become interactive with the celebration and guests smiled as lanterns began lling the sky over downtown. We really had a great birthday party that night, Magidson said. The timeline was also open for display all week in the Event Welcome Center on Reid Avenue. The timeline displayed 100 years worth of photos and newspaper clippings that showed the evolution of the city and its major events leading up to the present. It started great conversations, Pickett said. Visitors to the timeline were able to help identify former residents who appeared in the photographs and shared stories from the past. The timeline is meant to be expanded upon each year, and the committee plans for it to be on display each Independence Day for many years to come. Though rain prevented a celebration of independence on July 4, residents and visitors alike braved the rain the next day and lined the coast of St. Joseph Bay as reworks lit up the night sky in a spectacle tting of a 100th birthday. Committee member Boyer praised the event for allowing the celebration to showcase the citys small-town charm, which she considers to be part of Port St. Joes appeal. So many small towns lose their sense of identity, Boyer said. Tourists love the smalltown feeling we have here. The committee members reported that former residents returned to town speci cally for the celebration, and Pickett said the events created an interesting platform for connections that may not have otherwise been made. On several occasions, organizers witnessed centennial attendees coming together who hadnt seen one another in over 20 years. In a week dedicated to recalling the history of the town, the mission appeared to be accomplished. Tourist destinations tend to whitewash their communities, Pickett said. Were authentic. Committee member Charlotte Pierce reminded everyone that commemorative centennial coins and T-shirts are going fast, and anyone still in need should get theirs while the supply lasts. They are available for purchase at City Hall. WES LOCHER | The StarJessie Hayes, Kelly Faircloth and four kids take to St. Joe Beach to clean up leftover litter from the Fourth of July. CLEAN from page A1 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarFROM LEFT: A kite ying contest was held during Family Fun Day. Residents and visitors line Reid Avenue for the parade that marked the beginning of the Centennial Celebration. Mayor Mel Magidson shows off items put into a time capsule including photographs, prints of the centennial timeline, the new street banners and even a copy of The Star

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 GETYOURADIN! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction 4515031 J&MSCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILEHOMES CAMPERTRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOWA/C WASHERS/DRYERS STOVES/REFRIGERATORS FREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWNMOWERS SCRAPMETAL,ETC... Special to The Star Gulf Coast jobseekers and employers now have a more enhanced tool at their disposal to assist them in nding suitable jobs, locating training opportunities and identifying skilled candidates. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board, which provides workforce services to Bay, Franklin and Gulf Counties, recently launched a new website, bringing numerous enhancements to individuals seeking jobs and employers seeking employees. All of the services continue to be provided at no charge to job seekers and employers. The website, developed by Kerigan Marketing Associates, is www. workforcecenter.org. Users will notice a different look and feel when they visit the site. The upgrade focused on better organization of vast amounts of workforce information, coupled with a cleaner and more streamlined experience to assist job seekers and employers in nding what they need quickly, Gulf Coast Workforce Board Executive Director Kim Bodine said. The site features a new layout structure, important information highlighted by a revolving image carousel, a prominent navigation bar, portals for Job Seekers and Employers, easy-to-understand content, easy-to-locate contact information for all of the regions Workforce locations, and interactive features. Key interactive features for employers include: AN ONLINE JOB ORDER FORM: This feature will allow employers to quickly submit their open positions for posting on the states largest job bank, www.employorida.com. This feature alone can save businesses hundreds to thousands of dollars in help wanted ads each year. I I NTEGRa A TION WITH SOCIa A L MEDIa A : Employers can sign up for the Workforce Centers monthly e-newsletter, join Linked In, Twitter or Facebook and become part of the conversation about the local workforce, employment services, and human resources. AN EMPLOYER Sa A TISFa A CTION SURVEY: Employers can give condential feedback on the performance of our staff and programs in order to help us improve our service. T T HE W W ORKFORCE C C ENTER H H ELPED M M Y C C OMPa A NY : This feedback form can help staff identify success stories for use in future publications or videos, which is a great way to showcase your company and how the partnership with the Workforce Center has helped you. Key features for job seekers include: H H OT J J OBS: The Hot Jobs section of the Workforce Centers new website will now be updated daily! These selections of jobs are ones local employers are in a rush to ll. Ca CA LENDa A R OF E E VENTS: With the new calendar feature, job seekers will never miss an opportunity to sharpen their skills and enhance their job search with free employment workshops and mini-job fairs held at the Workforce Center. I I NTEGRa A TION WITH SOCIa A L MEDIa A : Job seekers can sign up for the Workforce Centers monthly e-newsletter, join Linked In, Twitter or Facebook to receive daily job listings and other helpful labor market information. J J OBSEEKER Sa A TISFa A CTION SURVEY: Jobseekers can give condential feedback on the performance of workforce staff and programs. I I F F OUND a A J J OB: This feedback form can help staff identify success stories for use in future publications or videos and is another way the Workforce Center can celebrate your success with you.Workforce Board launches new websiteConvenient features added for employers and job seekerBy DONNA HOLMEsSSpecial to The Star Mexico Beach businesswoman Sally Childs made quite an impression when she took home four overall wins recently at the Millennium Dancesport Championship. The Marriott Waterside in downtown Tampa hosted the event, with the most talented dancers from around the world attending to participate in the WDC World Professional Latin Showdance Championships. When she was about 50years-old, Childs discovered her love of dance and has spent the last 12 years pursuing her new passion with various studios. The last few years she has been training for competition in Panama City at Dance Life Dance Studio on Harrison Avenue. Her hard work and dedication has paid off as she readily secured rst-place awards in dances such as Cha Cha, East Coast Swing, Rumba, Bolero, Mambo, Foxtrot, Viennese Waltz, Tango and Waltz. With such impressive results, her dancing earned her the First Place Trophies for Three Dance Rhythm Championship, Five Dance Rhythm Championship, Three Dance Smooth and Five Dance Smooth. She also received call backs and nished as a Top 10 seminalist in the Nine Dance Championship, which is open to all levels of dancers and all ages, putting her competing against the very best ProAm Dancers in the country. The Millennium Dancesport Championship is one of the largest competitions in the country and this year it hosted the WDC World of Professional Latin Showdance Championships, a competition which brings together the best dancers from countries all over the world in what can only be described as a spectacular showcase of talent. First place was awarded to the amazing performance of Maxim Kozhevnikov and Anastasia Grigoreva, representing the United States (NY). The weekend marked the end of the events with a ballroom dance congress instructed by Dancing with The Stars celebrities Tony Dovolani and Maksim Chmerkovskiy and So You Think You Can Dance celebrity Mary Murphy. The congress was attended by Childs, her instructor Jay Holmes, Panama City resident and dance students Vivian Sammons, and Daria Gorghakova and Dance Life instructors Mike Wallace and Nia Naumann. Childs is a realtor with SunDance Realty in Mexico Beach. Dance Life Dance Studio is at 415 Harrison Ave in Panama City where they actively serve the community with dance parties, dance instruction, venue rental, tness instruction, community charity fund raisers and special events. For more information, call 215-4453. BB ILL FaFA UTH | Special to The StarAbove: Mexico Beach businesswoman Sally Childs competed at the recent Millennium Dancesport Championship in Tampa. RRight: Childs won four overall rst-place trophies and reached the seminals of the Nine Dance Championship.Area dancer dominates Millennium Dancesport Championship FAC 2013 Presidential Advocacy Award winners were Sue Birge, Hardee County; Kathy Bryant, Marion County; Barbara Sharief, Broward County; John Hall, Polk County; Fred Hawkins, Osceola County; Chip LaMarca, Broward County; Les Miller, Hillsborough County; Peter OBryan, Indian River County; Nora Patterson, Sarasota County; Grover Robinson, Escambia County; Karson Turner, Hendry County; Warren Yeager, Gulf County.SS PECIa A L TO TT HE SS Ta A R Special to The Star The Florida Association of Counties presented Gulf County Commissioner Warren Yeager with the Presidential Advocacy Award during the 2013 FAC Annual Conference and Exposition in Hillsborough County. It was an honor for me to receive this award from the Florida Association of Counties, Yeager said. Local involvement in the legislative process is essential in protecting our Counties interest and insuring home rule. Yeager was an invaluable asset to FAC during the Legislative Session and showed exceptional commitment to advancing public policy. Yeager took time to educate legislators on FACs priority issues, specically the state-county cost share of Medicaid. It is public servants like Commissioner Yeager that ensure our local communities have the authority to respond to the demands of their citizens, FAC Executive Director Chris Holley said. Commissioner Yeagers support in our efforts to create and equitable and fair solution to Medicaid cost share was essential in getting rid of the cumbersome and erroneous billing system that has been in place for years. The Presidential Advocacy Award is given annually to those county commissioners from around the state who have shown exceptional leadership in partnering with FAC to advance the counties legislative agenda. For 80 years, the Florida Association of Counties (FAC) has represented the diverse interests of Floridas counties, emphasizing the importance of protecting home rule the concept that government closest to the people governs best. The Florida Association of Counties helps counties effectively serve and represent Floridians by strengthening and preserving county home rule through advocacy, education and collaboration. FAC awards Yeager with the Presidential Advocacy Award

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 11, 2013 The Star | B7 94317 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1213-16 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing turnout gear with a minimum of 25 sets to be ordered: Turnout gear should equal or exceed Globe G-Xcel Turnout Gear. 7.0 Oz Advance (Gold) Outer Shell, Defender M SL2 Thermal Liner and Stedair 3000 Moisture Barrier. Coat -NFPA Basic 3 Lime-Yellow Triple Trim, Self Cuff Reinforcement, Zipper/ Velcro Closure, Radio Pocket (Left Chest), Nomex Hand and Wrist Guards w/Thumb Holes, BRD Device, 3 Lime-Yellow Lettering on Upper Back G C B. Pant -3 Lime-Yellow Triple Trim Around Cuffs, Zipper /Velcro Fly, Kevlar Belt and Loops, Dragonhide Cuff and Knee Reinforcement, Silizone Padded Knees, Reverse Boot Cut. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this a SEALD BID and include the BID NUMBER and what the bid is for. Bids will be received until Thursday, August 16, 2013, at 4:30 p.m., E.T. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, August 19, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. E.T. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSINERS /S/ Tynalin Smiley, Chairman Attest: Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk July 11, 18, 2013 91604S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 23-2012-CA000209CAAXMX CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2006-5 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-5 Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH A. WADE, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: JUDITH A. WADE and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH A. WADE whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in GULF County, Florida: UNIT 199, BARRIER DUNES, AS DESCRIBED IN PROTECTIVE COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS OF BARRIER DUNES, AND AMENDMENTS THERETO, DATED JULY 25, 1985, RECORDED AUGUST 06, 1985 IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107, PAGE 227 AND 1ST AMENDMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 110, PAGE 809, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on TRIPP SCOTT, P.A., the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 110 S. E. 6th Street, 15th Floor, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301, on or before July 15th, 2013, (no later than 30 days from the date of the first publication of this Notice of Action) and file this original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Gulf County, Florida, this 5th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: In Bay County Court Administration, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850747-5327. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771. Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts.o rg. In Calhoun, Gulf, Homes, Jackson, and Washington County -Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447, Phone: 850718-0026. Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771. Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcour ts.org. File#: 11-008954 July 11, 18, 2013

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B8| The Star Thursday, July 11, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ................................. $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 4515185North Florida Child Development, Inc. Is seeking VPK/Preschool Teachers for our 3-5 year old classrooms at our Calhoun and Gulf County Centers Prefer a minimum of an Associate degree in Early Childhood Education or related field Closing Date: July 15, 2013 Pickup Applications at the Centers Or send resumes to smcgill@floridachildren.org (850) 639-5080 ext 10 fax (850) 639-6167DFWP/M-F/6-6/EOE C14GU0134 C14GU0624 North Florida Child Development, Inc. 1110029 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:ShipfitterS pipefitterS pipe WelderS X-ray WelderS Qa inSpectorS outSide MachiniStS painterS/SandblaSterS induStrial Marine electricianS cherry picker operatorWe offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Qualied applicants can apply in person at the:chaMber of coMMerce on tueSdayS or at either of our Panama City Locations:13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 or 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401EOE/Drug Free Workplace 1115178 $ $ $ $ $ LOW INTEREST FINANCINGBORROW UP TO $20K, PAY $ 386/ MONTH. 8% INTEREST 6 YEAR TERM. Personal and Small Business Loans Debt Consolidation Bad Credit OK CALL 855-331-5322 Creamers Tree ServiceLicensed & Insured. Free estimates. (850) 832-9343 Coastal CateringGourmet meals cooked in your own home! We cook & do the dishes.850-447-4751 Spot Advertising works! 94097SA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-17-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, MELODY POWELL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I, and UNKNOWN TENANT (S) II, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure dated May 29, 2013, in Case No. 13-17-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on July 18th, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: June 17, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 June 27, July 11, 2013 93899SA NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 686 Application No. 2013-26 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 03057-003R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block 3, Ward Ridge, Unit One, as found recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Katherine Ford All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 17th day of July, 2013. Dated this 11th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 13, 20, 27, July 11, 2013 94095SA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000390 DIVISION: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. BENJAMIN C. SHERRILL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 06, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA000390 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and BENJAMIN C. SHERRILL; JANE ANN SHERRILL; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 20 AND THE SOUTH 1/3 OF LOT 21, BLOCK 76, CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1018 MCCLELLAND AVENUE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 17, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F11002088 June 27, July 11, 2013 94127S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 375 Application No. 2013-28 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01713-000R Description of Property: PARCEL NO. I: BEGINNING at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence Northeasterly on a Magnetic Bearing of North 1 Degree 30 Minutes East, for a distance of 245.82 feet to a point; thence turn an angle 19 Degrees 3 Minutes Left and continue Line on a Magnetic Bearing of North 17 Degrees 33 Minutes West, a distance of 131.70 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING, said point being at right angles to and 33 feet Easterly from the C/L of State Highway No. 71; from the POINT OF BEGINNING, project a line on a Magnetic Bearing North 49 Degrees 32 Minutes East for a distance of 250.00 feet, more or less, to a point on the West edge of the West ARM of Dead Lakes Swamp, said Point along being a Point on the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida; thence Northwesterly on a Meandering line along the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida, to a point on the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71, formerly No. 6, said point being the Point of Intersection of the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71 and the channel of the West Arm of Dead Lakes Swamp; thence Southeasterly on the East boundary of State Road 71 (33 feet East of C/L of State Road 71) a distance of 734 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING; being in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, all said land lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line East along the South line of said Section 13, for 232.65 feet, then turn 44 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 672.48 feet to a point of intersection of the C/L of State Road 71 and Jehu Road; then extend a line North 51 Degrees 00 Minutes West along the Centerline of said State Road 71 for 938.0 feet; then turn 92 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 37.39 feet to a concrete monument on the East R/W line of said State Road 71; then turn left along said R/W line for 89.98 feet to a concrete monument; then turn right and extend a line North 46 Degrees 24 Minutes East for 266 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the channel of a Slough for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, extend a line South 46 Degrees 24 Minutes West for 266 feet, more or less, to a concrete monument on the East Right of Way line of State Road 71; then turn right along said R/W line for 80.0 feet; then turn right and extend a line North 45 Degrees 58 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for 234 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the Slough; then turn right along said Slough to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land is in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: James E. Lester, Sr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of July, 2013. Dated this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2013 94201S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on July 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: REAL PROPERTY Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence N89W, along the Southerly line of said Section 35, 228.08 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71 and to a point on a curve; thence run Northeasterly along said Easterly right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the Northwest having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a delta of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E 421.06 feet, an arc length of 421.22 feet to the point of tangency; thence N08E along said Easterly right of way, 969.90 feet; thence N89E, 7.09 feet to the Easterly maintained right of way of said State Road No. 71 and the Point of Beginning; thence N08E, along said Easterly maintained right of way, 396.05 feet to the point of curvature, thence run Northerly along said Easterly maintained right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the West having a radius of 3097.04 feet, a delta of 07, a chord bearing and distance of N04E 421.41 feet, an arc length of 421.73 feet; thence N90E, 494.61 feet; thence S00E, 807.59 feet; thence S89W, 590.66 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Lot 4, Block C, St. Johns Village as per plat recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 7, Page 21. Also Less and Except: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N89W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N08E, along said Easterly right of way line 969.90 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N89E, 231.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N00W, 155.31 feet along said East right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said East right of way line, N00W, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, N90E, 92.00 feet; thence S00E, 50.00 feet; thence N90W, 92.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands also known as Lot 3, Block B of St. Johns Village, Unit 1 (Proposed) Together with an easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property to-wit: Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N89W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N08E, along said Easterly right of way line 936.48 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N89E, 7.09 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N89E, 229.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N00W, 238.31 feet along said East right of way line; thence leaving said East right of way line, N90W, 50 feet; thence S00E, 172.63 feet; thence S89W, 168.84 feet; thence S08W, 66.84 feet to the Point of Beginning. PERSONAL PROPERTY Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoir, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Amended Motion for Summary Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ST. JOHNS VILLAGE OF GULF COUNTY, INC., a Florida corporation; JERRY HUFT; JAMES TOWNSEND; and ALAN MCNAIR, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-00210. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 4349200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 94313S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE WATER SYSTEM PHASE II IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT #019.193 RFP 2013-03 NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Port St. Joe will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing: WATER SYSTEM PHASE II IMPROVEMENTS The project consists of replacing approximately 16,250 LF of existing 3 thru 8 watermain, 19 fire hydrants, and associated appurentences as shown in the construction plans to provide water service for 143 existing residences in the Port St. Joe community. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $150.00 per set and is non-refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC. The completion date for this project will be 180 days for Substantial Completion and 210 days for Final Completion from the date of the Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $250.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the Water System Phase II Improvements. Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on August 8, 2013 at the City of Port St. Joe City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at 3:15 p.m. Eastern Time. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer/ Handicapped Accessible/ Fair Housing Jurisdiction. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in their best interest. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days after the opening. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be held at the office of Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida (850) 227-7200 at 10:00 a.m. Eastern Time, July 18, 2013. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. July 11, 2013 Tots Family Daycare HomeHas 2 childcare slots available at 314 Ave. F, PSJ, FL. 850-229-6430 Text FL58194 to 56654 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. Kelly & Josh 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Cues Furniture in Wewa, Quality Used Furniture, and NEW mattresses. Open Mon-Sun, 10am-6pm (850) 639-2343 or (850) 639-3512. Needed: Electric Typewriter. URGENT! Please call 850-227-9496 Text FL58070 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. 3BR/2BA 1850 sq home on quiet dead end street about mile from the beach in Mexico Beach. Home was built in 2000 and is undergoing significant remodeling including new floors, paint, granite countertops, and stainless appliances. Move in ready by July 15th. $1,300/month 1 Year Lease/Credit Check Required $1,500 Deposit Call Zach Childs Broker/Owner 850-819-0833. Quality Long Term Rentals2 & 3br Avalible, Port St Joe, Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach. Call for more info 348-0262 WEWA Efficiency $390/mo plus $390 security deposit. Also have RVs for rent by the week. Call (850) 639-5721 121 Hunter Circle 3br/2.5ba with bonus room; Completely remodeled 6.5 years ago. 24x40 pole barn with 24x20 closed-in with electricity. In ground sprinkler system, fenced in backyard. Located close to schools and town. $224,700. For more information, call 850-227-5713 or 850-527-5685 Realtors are welcome Cadillac DTS -Luxury 1, 2006; Only 1 owner! 49,600 miles, White in color. Blue Book is $15,500, asking $13,500 850-340-0889 or 850-340-0890 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.