The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date:
June 6, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:03899


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion . . . . . A4-A5Letters to the Editor . . . .A5Outdoors . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . .A7School News . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . B8 YEAR 75, NUMBER 38 Thursday, JULY 4, 2013Property values generally hold steadyBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The gloomy budget forecasts emanating from the Board of County Commissioners meeting room may have been a bit premature. Gulf County Property Appraiser Mitch Burke transmitted a preliminary property roll to the state by the July 1 deadline and that roll shows that while taxable tangible property values will dip for a seventh-straight year, this years decline represents less than 1 percent. That is a far cry from even the 7 percent decline of last year and far below the double-digit dips in property value from three and four years ago. Even though the real estate market continues to improve, Gulf Countys overall tax base dropped this year, Burke said. However, the decrease in value was minimal compared to previous years reductions. According to the preliminary numbers transmitted to the Florida Department of Revenue, the countys combined taxable value, including both real and personal, will drop from $1.352 billion to $1.347 billion, a decrease of threetenths of 1 percent. Burke said values were almost exactly where they were in 2003, before the roiling of the real estate market, up and then down. We are seeing new construction taking place, which is great news, Burke said. However, we dont get to realize the true increase in value due mainly to the statewide cap approved in 2008 which caps annual increases on value of non-homestead properties at no more than 10 percent annually. The news for the city of Port St. Joe stood out. The city was the only taxing district to show an increase in its tax base, from $276 million to $279 million, an increase of just over 1 percent. Burke said the increase was primarily the result of the sale of the newly-constructed Dollar General Market store on U.S. Highway 98 and valuations of some commercial lots owned by the St. Joe Company where values needed to be adjusted consistent with current market conditions, Burke said. Weve kind of busted our humps looking at different areas and changing values to where they should be, Burke said. There were some St. Joe properties that had not been adjusted in 10 years or more and we readjusted some of those values. For the Gulf County School See PROPERTY A8 Fun on the FourthStar Staff ReportIndependence Day is upon us, and the night sky will lit up Thursday with the glittering explosions of area rework displays. Its an annual event everyone looks forward to, so heres where you can get your x for the Fourth.PORT ST. JOEMidway through the citys 100th birthday and Centennial Celebration on Thursday, Port St. Joe will launch its annual reworks show over St. Joseph Bay at dark. Grab a seat on the shore at dark for the $15,000 display. The Port St. Joe boat ramp will close early that day to accommodate the reworks.WEWAHITCHKAThe City of Wewahitchka will begin its annual reworks display at dark. The celebratory display will be launched from T.L. James Park.MEXICO BEACHOn Thursday, Mexico Beach will host the Best Blast on the Beach. The celebration begins with the annual Sandy Shoes 5K Fun Run, which starts at Under the Palms Park at 7 a.m. CT. Register in advance for the event at the Tourist Information Center. The race is limited to 325 runners. There will be no registration the day of the race. A kids shing tournament will also take place at Canal Park from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. CT. Free hot dogs, snacks and beverages will be provided for shermen and their parents. At 8:30 p.m. CT the reworks will light up from the pier for this years annual display. St. Joe, Port Authority to partner on initial dredging workBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The Port Authority took a huge rst step in the dredging of the shipping channel last week. The board can thank the St. Joe Company for the assist. Port Authority chair Leonard Costin said he had received a pledge from St. Joe Company ofcials to provide the local match to a Florida Department of Transportation grant that would begin the work toward dredging the Port of Port St. Joe shipping channel. The FDOT grant is for $750,000, said port director Tommy Pitts, with a local match of $250,000. Costin said St. Joe had graciously agreed to provide the quarter million dollars. They stepped up to the plate, Costin said. That is the rst big hurdle. Well be moving ahead from there. The Port Authority See PORT A2CENTENNIALPhotos by WES LOCHER | The StarA parade down Reid Avenue marked the start of the centennial celebration.Celebration in full swing By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The Centennial Celebration to honor the 100th birthday of Port St. Joe began last Friday evening with a parade down Reid Avenue. The ceremony celebrated founding members of the city and featured graduates from Port St. Joe High School dating back to 1941. Also making the journey were the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC, cub scouts, The Alley Catz band, and local emergency Some parade participants tossed beads to the onlookers that lined Reid Avenue. Kids of all ages headed to George Core Park on Sunday for the kite ying contest. Founding members of Port St. Joe cruised down Reid Avenue in classic cars. See CENTENNIAL A8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013board approved a joint participation agreement with the FDOT and St. Joe to move ahead on a study of the dredging, with Pitts noting a sense of urgency in encumbering the grant dollars before the end of the scal year. The money will be used for study and permitting as well as some initial engineering en route to a dredging plan, Pitts said. The Port Authority has received qualications to undertake the work from the two engineering rms under continuing contract with the port, but said the Port Authority should hold off until receiving clarication on several issues. Pitts said a meeting with the countys state legislative delegation as well as Congressman Steve Southerland would be helpful to establish how to proceed. There are a lot of questions to be answered before the process begins, Pitts said. Those questions are linked to the parallel paths the port is working on for the dredging, one on permitting, the other funding. It will be a major effort, Pitts said. The shipping channel has not be dredged since 1980, Pitts said. Pitts said the shortest course to the dredging would likely be securing funding from outside the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which ultimately would have to perform the dredging. The most time-conducive option would be to seek funding from a variety of sources, the Florida Legislature, RESTORE Act funds coming to the county, federal funds and the State Infrastructure Bank. If the funds can be raised, and the amount would be well into the millions of dollars, those dollars could be provided to the Corps under an agreement by which the Corps, once dredging is completed under its permit, would pledge reimbursement in the future. The other alternative would be working directly with the Corps, which would likely require far more time, Pitts said. Im also concerned the dredging will require an Environmental Impact Statement, which would take at least two years, Pitts said. We may only need an Environmental Assessment a far less time-consuming, intensive process. Time is of the essence for the dredging. In the past two months the St. Joe Company has entered into Letters of Intent that would, among other aspects, mean the shipping of some 1.125 million metric tons of wood pellets through the port by way of the AN Railway. Both LOIs contemplate lead time for dredging to take place. An LOI with Green Circle Bio Energy contemplates a window of roughly two years for dredging to be completed before the shipping through the Port of Port St. Joe. A second LOI, with Enova Energy Group, indicates the company would not be ready to begin shipping pellets until the latter half of 2014 at the earliest. But both LOIs are contingent on the completion of the dredging. As Pitts noted those two LOIs also provide the economic justication for the maintenance dredging and would also likely impact a proposed FDOT grant for improvements to the AN Railway. A FDOT grant of $5 million was announced earlier this year, but Pitts said the grant dollars were now stalled and Costin said the state is, in a sense, linking the rail grant to the dredging. I dont see how they can stall it much longer, Costin said, alluding to the announcement of the LOI with Enova.Revenue and staffWith the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity grant dollars for the update of the port master plan expended, the Port Authority, faced with the prospect of nishing the scal year in September in the red, asked Pitts to return to a salary of $1 per month. It is important we get through the scal year and have some money, Costin said. If we continue with Tommy as director we would have a decit. Weve been here before, well probably be back here again. We need him desperately. Its obvious we can not continue after June with a directors salary. Pitts agreed to return to the $1 per month he made prior to the FDEO grant. I understand the situation, Pitts said. I will continue at $1 per month. Nadine Lee, assistant to Pitts, will also remain onboard as a contract employee. Ill work with you anyway I can, Lee said. My heart is in this, too. Costin said he was working on several things to address the lack of revenue for maintaining a presence at the Port Authority and expressed optimism the Port Authority could get to September with money left in the bank. I think well have a solution to our cash ow by September, Costin said. No guarantees, but Im hopeful. Loretta Costin with the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. applauded Pitts decision to continue to work for the port. As a member of the community and a member of the EDA, I want to thank Tommy for staying on for $1 a month, Loretta Costin said. He does so much and we ask so much of him. I just appreciate it. Callforinformationaboutour rotatingspecialists: WeemsMedicalCenterEastMonday(extendedhours)8:00am-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-4:30pm Wednesday8:00-4:30pm Thursday8:00-4:30pm Friday(extendedhours)8:00-6:00pm Saturday8:00-4:00pm Note:appointmentswillbescheduledupto30min.priorto close(walk-insstillwelcomeupuntilclose) WeemsMedicalCenterWestMonday8:00-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-6:00pm Wednesday8:00-6:00pm Thursday8:00-6:00pm FAMILYANDSPECIALTYCARE850-653-8853,ext.118 Apalachicola 850-697-2345 Carrabelle NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:7-31-13CODE:SJ00 enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL PORT from page A1By TIM CROFT@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com An Overstreet man was arrested last week on charges of aggravated battery and leaving the scene of accident involving property damage after he chased and crashed a vehicle he believed was driven by his ex-wife, Gulf County Sheriffs Office investigators said. Kenneth Norris Rogers, 43, was initially taken into custody on Tuesday afternoon. A 9-1-1 caller reported that a van had collided with her vehicle on State 71 and Fleming Curve and had ed the scene. Shortly thereafter, Sgt. John Murnan located the suspect vehicle and identied Rogers, who said he thought the other vehicle was his ex-wifes van. Rogers told Murnan he had stopped to check on the driver. Rogers was taken back to the scene of the crash, where he was arrested by the Florida Highway Patrol on charges of leaving the scene of a crash involving damage to vehicle or property, a second-degree misdemeanor. He was transported to the Gulf County Jail. During a follow-up investigation, investigators discovered Rogers had tailgated the victim from the Gulf and Calhoun County line into Wewahitchka, according to the GCSO. When the victim arrived in Wewahitchka, she stopped briey to conduct work-related business off State 71. Once back on State 71 she noticed Rogers was again behind her. Rogers continued to tailgate her vehicle south on State 71, at speeds estimated at roughly 60 mph, before reaching Fleming Curve at which time Rogers drove his van into the rear end of her van. Rogers pulled along the drivers side and collided again with the victims vehicle, forcing her from the road. Once he opened the victims door and discovered it was not his ex-wife he ed, according to the GCSO. Investigators determined Rogers actions were intentional, believing it was his ex-wife. Rogers was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony. He was released on $5,000 bond.Overstreet man arrested after crashing wrong vehicle KENNETH N N Orr RR IS ROGEr R SSgt. John Murnan located the suspect vehicle and identied Rogers, who said he thought the other vehicle was his ex-wifes van. Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas |

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, July 4, 2013 Startaheatpump waterheaterrevolutionHeatpumpwaterheatersprovideasmuchas$300 inenergysavingsperyearcomparedtoatraditional electricwaterheater,andyougettwiceasmuchhot waterfromeachkilowatt-hourofelectricityconsumed. www.gcec.com or (850)639.2216 1.800.333.9392 vide as much as $300 oers pr er heat Heat pump wat y consumed icittr -hour of elec wattiloom each k er frwat WorkingTogether... ToBuildTheFuture GulfCountyRepublicanParty MemberCommunicationsCommitteeGulfcountyrepublicans@gmail.comWemeetmonthlyeverythirdMonday7PM EST(upstairs)atCapitalCityBankNextMeeting:July15,2013 IT'SINDEPENDENCEDAY! TODAYWECOMMEMORATETHEACTIONSOF OURNATION'SFOUNDERS JULY4TH1776 AMONGYOURMANYACTIVITIESTODAYPLEASE TAKEA MOMENTANDREVIEWOUR DECLARATIONOFINDEPENDENCE WHENITTHECOURSEOFHUMANEVENTS,.WEHOLD THESETRUTHSTOBESELFEVIDENT,.ANDFORTHE SUPPORTOFTHISDECLARATION,WEMUTUALLYPLEDGE TOEACHOTHEROURLIVES,OURFORTUNESAND OURSACREDHONOR. THISWASDAYONEOFTHE UNITEDSTATESOFAMERICA NOW237YEARSLATERREMEMBERTHE56COURAGEOUS SIGNERSANDTHENEWAMERICANCITIZENSWHO GAVETHISNATIONITSBEGINNINGANDALLOFUSTHE OPPORTUNITYOFAMERICANS! 719Hwy98,MexicoBeach www.toucansmexicobeach.com ALLYOUCANEATBREAKFAST Sat.&Sun.MorningStartingat8AM-AllCentralTimesTHUR. NIGHTTrueSoul -UpstairsBarDJattheTikiBarwithLightShow LadiesNight FRI. NIGHTLocalMotion -UpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar WED. NIGHTBarryHenson -UpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar SAT. NIGHTLocalMotion -UpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar SUN. NIGHTTrueSoulUpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar **COMEWATCHTHEFIREWORKS** ALLFIREWORKSCANBESEENFROMHERE! By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County School Board last week took possession of Lamar Faison Fields, including the soccer complex and tennis courts, from the city of Port St. Joe, including the soccer complex and tennis courts. The city and School Board have been discussing the exchange for several months, but there were several issues requiring resolution. One was receiving an OK from the St. Joe Company, which had donated the land to the city for the recreational complex. Second, the school district had to ensure that the complex remained available for public use as state parks and recreation grant funds had been used to build the complex. From the citys standpoint, deeding over the complex was about cost-savings. The city will save more than $100,000 required annually for upkeep and maintenance to the elds and tennis courts. The city and district staff agreed the district was better suited to maintain the soccer elds at the Lamar Faison complex as part of its upkeep of other sports elds. For the school district, it was an opportunity to expand the Port St. Joe Elementary School campus to take more control over parking and also maintenance of land between the school and Lamar Faison Fields. The school board effectively owns all land surrounding the complex. Im very excited about it, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. This gives us a chance to further beautify our campus on the south end (closest to Madison Avenue) and on the north end it allows us to control and add to the parking. This lets us control more property that is all part of one campus. The city and district will share a lawnmower the city has used to maintain the elds. The district takes on no additional insurance liability. The community and especially the soccer community should be pleased, Norton said. Soccer is part of the now and part of the future.FEMALE PHYSICAL ED TEACHER IN WEw W AHITCHKAAt the request of the principal, Wewahitchka Jr./ Sr. High School will advertise for a female physical education teacher. The school has not had a female instructor in several years, and Debbie Baxley requested the new hire to ensure safety for girls in the school. Norton noted the district hoped to tick off several needs for female coaches for softball and girls basketball with the hire.VOLUNTARY P P RE-K KDeborah Crosby, director of Special Services, said registration for voluntary pre-K for the coming school year was open on a rstcome, rst-served basis. She said the district had 40 slots in the south end of the county and 20 in the north end. A child must be 4 years old by Sept. 1 and have proof of Florida residence to register. For more information contact Crosby at 229-6940.LL IONS C C LUB DONATIONSThe Lions Club donated $500 to each of the countys two football programs, with Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon and Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah on hand to receive the donations. District takes deed to Lamar Faison FieldsThe community and especially the soccer community should be pleased. Soccer is part of the now and part of the future.Jim NNorton Superintendent of schools Special to The StarRecently, the newly elected ofcers of the John C. Gainous Post No. 10069 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars were sworn in by the District 17 Commander, Roger LaChance. The Veterans of Foreign Wars is an organization of veterans who served directly in a eld of combat defending America. Locally, the VFW supports the community along a broad spectrum of needs and interests. These ofcers will serve the John C. Gainous Post for the coming year. SS PECIAL TO TT HE SS TARFrom left are Elmer Green, Adjutant; Rick Armstrong, Junior Vice Commander; Mike Lowry, Senior Vice Commander; Rodney Herring, Commander; Phillip Dodson, Quartermaster; and Richard Maupin, Trustee.New ofcers sworn in at VFW Post 10069

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I wish I could spend this Fourth of July on Bunker Hill. From there you can see Breeds Hill where most of the ghting actually took place back in 1775. It was the rst sustained, pitched battle of the American Revolution. We lost that day. But we didnt run. A group of rag tag New England colonist stood up to the best equipped and most feared army in the world at that time and didnt blink. When the day was over the British occupied both hills. But they lost almost one-third of their ghting men in the taking. And the young American soldiers didnt slink away. They retreated like an organized ghting unit. Both sides learned a valuable lesson that day. Ive gotten so caught up in the comfort of my own living these days that I dont dwell much on how I got here. In my near sighted egotistical mind, I probably think I did it with my own power and might. The Continental Army was of cially three days old when the ght for Bunker Hill took place. Those Bunker Hill defenders hadnt had time to be sworn in. They were ghting for the most basic things on earth; freedom, liberty, independence.the right to make their own way! Ive enjoyed those attributes of this great nation all my life. Ive done piddling little to obtain them. Maybe if I could stand on that hill on this Independence Day I could catch a glimpse of the spirit of those men. I wonder about the thoughts racing through their heads as they dug in. I wonder how each individual defender came to be on that hill on that particular day. I wonder about their age. (The minimum age to enlist in the Continental Army was 16; 15 with parental consent.) I wonder if they were as afraid as I would have been when the Red Coats formed up below. I wonder if they had any inkling of the nation they were laying the foundation for when they raised those muskets to their shoulders. I do not wonder about their courage. When I was 16 years old I was playing American Legion Baseball and dating Billie Jean Barham. I would love this Fourth of July to stand silently over in one corner of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. I believe I could hear the 2nd Continental Congress as they convened there on May, 10, 1775. All thirteen colonies were represented. The small battles of Lexington and Concord had taken place. It was time to make amends with the British or ght. Can you imagine among John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Hancock, Patrick Henry and Benjamin Franklin who listened to whom! It was about as impressive a list of founding fathers as any nation has ever put together under one roof. And they didnt do too badly in that room. They had the good sense to pick George Washington as the commanding General of the Army. An army, of course, which they didnt exactly have at the moment. It was where the Declaration of Independence was born. When in the course of human events.. you talk about a great opening line. And how about, We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And after enumerating all the injustices heaped on them by King George and the Crown they closed brilliantly, with a rm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. Man, if I could write like that, Id be a millionaire! Ben Franklin, off the record, put it a little more succinctly, If we dont all hang together, well all hang separately. If I had a time machine, Id warp back to Valley Forge this Fourth of July. Of course, I couldnt catch the essence of the place in July. The snow would be gone. It would be 90 degrees instead of 10 below freezing. You wouldnt have to scrounge up re wood. If wouldnt matter that you had no shoes. Its hard to imagine hunger on a full belly. The winter of 1777-78 was brutal. Cold descended on the little valley like you aint never seen! Disease ran rampant in the camps. Life was worse than miserable. You have to ask yourself, What could possibly cause a band of men in such conditions to hang on like they did. And you might even consider what you might have done under like circumstances. Or you might pause and utter up a prayer of thanks for them on this Independence Day. History well records what those men did. They got up off the cold ground, wrapped some rags around their bleeding feet and marched out to meet the enemy. They fought like the fate of a nation rested in their hands. I wish this Fourth of July I could transport back to the little town square of my youth in McKenzie, Tennessee. I stood beside my ram rod straight Father as the ag passed by and waited impatiently until I could move again. He had his hand over his heart and tears in his eyes. I just wanted the parade to get over with so I could get to the barbeque and baked beans. Dad understood those men at Bunker Hill. And at Valley Forge. Hed seen the re from the enemy. Hed stood in the gap for this nation. I would love to tell him, Ive got it now, Dad. Its high time we all did!Respectfully,Kes A good friend is always advising me to read Flannery OConnor. I never tell him, but I already do. Im from the South; Im supposed to read Flannery OConnor. However, I sometimes read her same stories over and over again. A Good Man is Hard to Find is my favorite. It is violent and strange, but still so funny. Ive read it many times simply looking for something new to think about. Her short stories are the subject of many books whose authors try to interpret what Flannery OConnor wanted to convey. Honestly, I think this is an important beauty of her work it can be interpreted in so many ways. In the middle of the outrageous, often disturbing tales, I nd a wonderful sense of southern bespectacled woman humor. Flannery makes me smile, laugh and scratch my head. Spending time with her is something that I enjoy. The other day while sitting in the back of my college classroom reading one of Flannerys stories, my right eye started watering, throbbing and feeling like it was going to fall out of my head. My nose was dripping, then running like a sieve. My students were taking a test, so I went to the restroom to get something to wipe my eye and nose. Coming back into the classroom, I turned on the oscillating fan in the back of the room and sat down to continue reading Flannerys Revelation. Again, I do not nd sadness in her stories; I nd Flannerys big smile, bookish glasses and sharp southern Catholic wit. I had gotten to the part in the story where a lady (Mrs. Turpin) sitting in the waiting room of a doctors of ce gets hit in the head by a book thrown by a young lady named Mary Grace. Perhaps one of my students had hit me, without me realizing it. That is exactly what it felt like. We have a pretty big textbook and my right eye felt as though someone had hit me, hurling it from somewhere in the front of the room. That was not the case. Going back and forth to the hall of the building for relief, I started to gure out something in my classroom was causing my right eye to explode and my nose to cry. The oscillating fan had only made it worse. Then it hit me like a book thrown from across the classroom. I knew what it was Growing up I spent a lot of Saturdays and summer days in my Grandmamas ten cent store in Wedowee, Alabama. Grandmama sold candy, magazines, kitchen stuff, toys and everything else you would imagine in a rural Alabama ten cent store. She even sold perfume. I distinctly remember my Mama warning me never to open the little bottles with the red lids. I would ask her, Why not? She wouldnt explain. Some children are going to do what you tell them they shouldnt do; it is even more probable when you do not give them an explanation of why not to do it. So one hot summer afternoon, I decided to open one of the little bottles with the red lids. My eyes watered, my nose ran, and for a very long time, everyone who came in uttered the same phrase as soon as they came in Grandmamas ten cent store with the wooden screen door and oscillating fans blowing left and right around the cash register where Grandmama would sit and wait to do business with the folks that would wander in. They would say, Somebody opened a bottle of Atom Bomb. Atom Bomb was cheap perfume; as a matter of fact, it was the cheapest perfume Grandmama sold. What on earth would cause someone to want to put something like that on their body puzzled me. Just thinking about the smell makes my eyes pour water my right eye in particular. I still dont know how to best describe the aroma or stench. Perhaps being drowned in vanilla avoring, while someone poured gasoline on your sunburn, while another fellow squirted vinegar based hot pepper sauce in your eyes (particularly your right one). Mama explained to me that the type of folks who used Atom Bomb perfume usually did so to cover up the fact that they didnt take a bath. Mama taught school in Alabama for 42 years, she was good at explaining things like this. She also probably knew that if she had explained it to me before I opened one of the little bottles with the red lids, I would have opened it anyway. Flannery OConnor could have gotten away with a much more straightforward explanation of the reason and type of folks that might need to use Atom Bomb perfume. Someone would have probably died in the process, but there would have been humor involved and the underlying message could have been taken (or appreciated) in a variety of scents. The smell in my classroom was not going away; it was just being oscillated back and forth so as to continue to hit me on the left, right, top and bottom of my right eye. I couldnt continue reading Flannerys Revelation because I was using various combinations of my hands and ngers to hold my right eye in my head and going back and forth to the hallway for air. On deaths door and reading this particular story, I started thinking about the Book of Revelation in the Bible. I remember somewhere the angels burning perfume or incense and it smoking and people praying. There was thunder, rumblings, lightning ashing and earthquakes. My right eye was de nitely going to fall out if I didnt hold it in. I had gured out the best way to keep it in was to jab my right thumb into it, Ron PollackExecutive Director, Families USA At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiums? A: When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security bene t each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also re ect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income bene ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can nd out if you qualify and apply online at www.socialsecurity. gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www.familiesusa. org/resources/programlocator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a xed incomeand thats most peoplethis is encouraging news. Families USA is the national organization for health care consumers. We have advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. Ron Pollack is the Executive Director of Families USA.Revelation and the Atom BombUnderstanding Medicare PremiumsOh, Say, Can You See... HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, July 4, 2013 APage 4SectionSee CRANKS A5

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CRANKS from page A4palm up and hold it there by hanging on to my right ear with the other four ngers. Finally, the class was over. The headache and the smell of the Atom Bomb stayed with me for the rest of the evening. Mamas and Flannerys words will stay with me forever. Flannery OConnor died in August of 1964, at the age of 39, of complications from lupus. I write because I dont know what I think until I read what I say. ~ Flannery OConnor Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Lyons, NE As Congress argues over farm subsidies and food stamps, Rural Americans complain that elected of cials ignore small communities and fail to invest in their future. So found a unique, comprehensive poll of Rural Americans on the role of federal policy in creating economic opportunity for rural people and a future for their communities. The poll was conducted by the nationally respected bipartisan polling team of Celinda Lake of Lake Research and Ed Goeas of The Tarrance Group and released today by the Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons, NE. It surveyed rural voters in the Great Plains, Midwest and Southeast. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http://www.cfra.org/ news/130625/rural-pollreleased-today. The poll found Rural Americans united in their commitment to their way of life. Nearly 9 in 10 believe the rural and small-town way of life is worth ghting for. But they sadly believe the rural way of life may be fading and they want to stop it, reverse it, and revitalize rural America, said pollsters Lake and Goeas, and they believe they are being ignored by politicians and government and blame them for the state of the rural economy. Nevertheless, the poll found divided views about the role of government and populist views about the economy and big institutions. Three fourths agree that Americas future is weakened by a widening gap between the rich and families struggling to make ends meet. But they split evenly on whether its time for government to play a stronger role in strengthening rural communities and making the economy work for the average person in rural and small-town America; or whether turning to big government to solve our problems will do more harm than good. Neither the conservative nor progressive ideological perspective has it right, said Lake. On the one hand, the language around lower taxes, smaller government, and fewer regulations is one of the highest testing messages. On the other, they support policies that call for more job training, increased infrastructure investments, more technology, and better preschools all requiring a role for government in making things better. Goeas said, It is too simplistic to believe rural America is antigovernment and that there is nothing for progressives to say, nor is it possible to say that rural America wants bigger government and more spending. They want tax breaks but they also support increased loans and grants to help people gain skills and open small businesses. They want more ef cient and effective government and view much of public policy as a fairness issue in which rural America has not received fair treatment. Among the results: Over half said that owning my own business or farm is a big part of the American dream for me and most agreed with helping small business through less government (cutting taxes, spending and regulation) and strengthened government (loans, tax credits, training and antitrust enforcement). Three fourths agree that too much of federal farm subsidies go to the largest farms, hurting smaller family farms. Three fourths support tax credits and investment in new transmission lines for development of wind, solar and other renewable electric generation in rural areas. Eight in ten support grants and loans to revitalize small towns through upgrades to water and sewer systems and investments in roads and bridges. Six in ten say government has some or a lot of responsibility to help the working poor advance economically (versus a little or none). Eight in ten support job training to improve earnings, Medicaid for health coverage and helping the working poor afford necessities through payroll tax refunds like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Eighty ve percent favor preschool programs to prepare lower-income children to succeed in school. Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years ago, said Lake. But rural Americans are somewhat optimistic that things will get better, said Goeas, and younger rural Americans are most optimistic. Center for Rural Affairs Executive Director Chuck Hassebrook said the optimism of the upcoming generation re ects the new entrepreneurial opportunities in rural America and growing appreciation for the rural way of life. They get it, said Hassebrook, and that gives them the capacity to lead their communities to a better future. Politically, said Hassebrook, the poll reveals openings for candidates of either party willing to ght for federal policy that supports genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their communities. He pointed to the question asking voters whether they would nd it convincing if a US Senate candidate made certain statements. Eighty seven percent said they would nd it convincing for a Senate candidate to say: Small-town America is a big and important part of what makes America go. We are hard working, patriotic, faithful, and skilled. Making sure our families, our small business owners, and our workers have the same chance as everyone else is fair and smart. That means supporting policies like investing more in helping our small businesses get started and bringing technology to our areas so we can be connected to the new economy. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http:// www.cfra.org/news/130625/ rural-poll-released-today Established in 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs is a private, non-pro t organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, July 4, 2013 APage 5SectionMemories of my ride on a muleDear Editor, I always wanted to go horseback riding but since we didnt own a horse, I never got the opportunity. But whats the difference between riding a horse or a mule? I soon found out when I decided to go for a ride on the mule that belonged to the young man who farmed our play place and had left his mule tied to our fence. Oh, I thought, this is my golden opportunity. With no former experience at horseback riding, I crawled on the mules back and took off down the road for my first ride. The mule did not want to be taking anyone for a ride during his time in the shade, so he tried to turn around and go back to the cool shade. I kept making him go forward until he carried me over to a ditch. I could tell what he had in mind, so I pulled the right reign and turned him around and let him go back to his place under the shade of the large oak tree. I have not tried to ride a mule again.Audrey ParrishPort St. JoeEmployees make a differenceDear Editor, I would like to commend the man merchants as well as their employees in Port St. Joe for their courtesy and helpfulness to the shopper. It makes shopping more enjoyable.Sincerely,Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe Letters to the EDITORHave you ever ordered something online that was delivered damaged or never arrived at all? Or been double-billed by a merchant? Or spotted a charge on your credit card statement you didnt make? Most of us have. Fortunately, the 1975 Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects your rights during such credit card billing disputes. It also outlines the process for contesting charges made to your account. Heres how it works First, FCBA protection applies only to openend credit account transactions those involving credit cards or revolving charges (e.g., department store accounts). It doesnt cover installment contracts you repay on a fixed schedule, such as car loans. Billing errors that are covered by the FCBA include: Fraudulent or unauthorized use of your credit card, whether it was stolen or merchants charged unapproved items to your account. Charges that list the wrong date or amount. Charges for goods or services you either did not accept or that werent delivered as agreed. Math errors, such as being charged twice for a transaction. Failure to post payments or other credits. (Note: Report suspected fraud immediately. By law, youre only liable for the first $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.) Review all billing statements carefully upon receipt because in order to be covered under FCBA rules, most disputed transactions must be reported within 60 days of the statement date on which the error appeared. First, contact the merchant and try to resolve the dispute directly with them. If this good-faith resolution attempt doesnt work, you can escalate the process by filing a written report with your credit card issuer within the 60-day window. The card issuer is then obligated to investigate the dispute on your behalf. They must acknowledge your complaint, in writing, within 30 days of receipt and resolve the dispute with the merchant within two billing cycles but not more than 90 days. Send your letter via certified mail to the card issuers billing inquiry address, not the payment address. Include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error. Include copies of sales slips or other documents that support your position. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), you may withhold payment of the disputed amount and related charges during the investigation. In fact, many card issuers may voluntarily remove the charge until the matter is resolved since they are representing you, their client, in the dispute. If it turns out your bill contains a mistake, the creditor must explain, in writing, the corrections that will be made. In addition to crediting your account, they must remove all finance charges, late fees, or other charges related to the error. However, if the card issuers investigation determines that you owe part or all of the disputed amount, they must promptly provide you with a written explanation. If you disagree with the investigations results, you may further dispute your claim with the creditor, as outlined by the FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov/ articles/0219-fair-creditbilling. (That site also contains a sample dispute letter and other helpful FCBA information.) If you believe a creditor has violated the FCBA, you may file a complaint with the FTC or sue them in court. Hopefully, youll never have a billing dispute that goes to these extremes. But its good to know how consumer laws protect you, just in case. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney.How to dispute a credit card chargeNew poll suggests more nuanced attitude towards federal role JASON ALDERMAN Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years agoCelinda Lake Lake ResearchReport suspected fraud immediately. By law, youre only liable for the rst $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.

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COMEJOINUSFORTHE... 4 TH OFJULY SIDEWALKSALE! JULY3RD&4TH Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, July 4, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore OffshoreRed snapper is still in season in state waters, 9 miles from land, but the fish will be harder to land in shallow water. Try using lighter line and smaller hooks with cut bait fished half way to the bottom. Gag grouper is open again in our region this week with no new changes in the bag limits or sizes. Good sized fish are in 150ft of water due south of the Cape. Our regions lakes, rivers, and creeks are close to full with so much rain lately and the fish have responded well to the cooler rain water. Big bream and catfish are being caught in the Brother and Howard creek. Try using a 5-6ft light fly rod and a chartruse or glow popper for great action under low hanging trees and limbs.By Tom BairdSpecial to The Star Florida has over 1,000 miles of coastline, more than any state in the continental U.S. Here physical forces have shaped barrier islands and offshore keys with abundant shallow bays that are perfect habitats for the luxuriant growth of submerged plants. Along the northern Gulf coast a broad shallow continental shelf absorbs wave energy produced by storms far at sea. Here the shallow, quiet waters and rm limestone substrate offer ideal conditions for the growth of seagrasses. The angler and weekend scalloper are well aware of the submerged seagrasses in St. Joseph Bay. Anyone swimming or snorkeling at Eagle Harbor in St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has seen or felt these grasses underfoot. You might have seen windrows of decaying grasses after a storm as you walk the beach looking for shells, or you have seen the long propeller scars cut through grass ats when they are exposed at very low tides. In the bay, one can observe the wading herons and egrets dining on trapped shes and crustaceans on low tides. These vast submerged meadows are teeming with marine life. Many scuba divers and snorkelers feel that the offshore beds of seagrasses are just as impressive as any coral reef. Despite the name, seagrasses are not true grasses at all. The plants in our bay and offshore belong to usually one to ve or so species of plants that produce owers and seeds underwater in tropical seas. One of these, turtle grass, has been reported to ower as far north as Tarpon Springs, and occasionally around Panama City. However, most of our local seagrasses reproduce vegetatively with long runners. Seagrass beds form extensive animal spawning grounds and habitats, with some fishes becoming so adapted to this environment that they can mimic the waving grass blades as camouflage. The grass blades also offer a site for smaller plants and animals to colonize. The seagrasses are fed upon directly by manatees, sea turtles, sea urchins and some fishes. At one time large herds of sea turtles fed on these grasses and St. Joseph Bay remains a vital feeding ground for sea turtles. Seagrasses are important indirectly as food. The decaying leaves are decomposed by an array of small worms, crustaceans and fishes that are in turn feed upon by larger forms of life. An example of this abundant productivity is provided by the results of a study of common turtle grass in Boca Ciega Bay in Pinellas County, which found the grass can produce up to 3000 pounds per acre in dry weight of leaves. There was even a study that found that cattle and sheep grow better on turtle grass than any other forage. However, the grass beds do not stand up well to harvesting, so it is best to harvest the seagrasses indirectly as seafood on the table. Like all plants, seagrasses need a suitable substrate on which to grow, but the location of seagrass beds is also determined by salinity, depth and the clarity of the water. Each species of seagrass has its own preference in each category. Turtle grass, our most common grass in the bay, prefers relatively high salinities and cannot stand being uncovered at low tide. Since St. Joseph Bay is often as salty as the gulf, turtle grass thrives. Growing closest to the edge is shoal grass. It can stand some occasional drying at low tide and lowered salinity from rainfall runoff. Since all green plants need sunlight to make food, the seagrasses are very much affected by any action that makes the water muddy or turbid. Turtle grass can be seen growing at 100 foot depths in the Florida Keys, but in more turbid waters grows to depths of about 8 or 9 feet. Dredging operations to deepen channels or past practices to make land for housing not only smother the grasses and other bottom life, but also make the water too turbid for light to penetrate to sufficient depths. The different species of seagrasses are easy to identify. Turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum), our most common seagrass in the bay, has a long strap-shaped leaf blade (2-12 inches) that is about one-half inch wide. This wide blade sets it apart from the other grasses. The stem is connected to a tough root or rhizome that parallels the surface of the mud or sand with leaves arising in clusters of two to five blades. Turtle grass is often considered a plant of the tropics as it occurs extensively throughout the Caribbean and West Indies. However, it ranges throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico as well. Boat propellers can damage this grass severely. Boaters should take care not to damage these grass beds, especially in the shallow south end of the bay, because it is very slow to grow back. Shoal grass or Shoalweed (Halodule wrightii) has a very thin, narrow leaf that is only about one-eighth inch wide. The leaves can be 1 to 18 inches long and often have a blunt tip. Youll find shoal grass in the narrow intertidal shallows of the bay. Since large areas of seagrass beds have been destroyed throughout the state by past dredging for buildings, finger-fill canals, island hopping for road construction and pollution, the care of the remaining seagrass beds is critical. Because their elaborate rhizome and root systems trap and stabilize sediments, they ensure better water clarity. Their role as nursery and feeding ground for young fish, shrimp, crabs, scallops and turtles makes them critical to the success of sport and commercial fisheries. Take care not to damage our submerged seagrasses. Tom Baird has been a fisheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas.The seagrass beds of St. Joseph Bay are the places to look for scallops this season. WEEKLYALMANACDate HighLow%Precip Thu,July0484 7880% Fri,July0587 7870% Sat,July0688 8040% Sun,July0789 7930% Mon,July0889 7910% Tues,July0989 7860% Wed,July1089 7960% ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS 4514932ishereforyourboatingneeds! MARINAFORKLIFT/RACKSTORAGE CANOPIEDBOATSTORAGE&BOASTRENTAL DIESEL&GASOLINE CAPTAINSALTYBAITS&ICE GATEDSELFSTORAGE,TRAILEREDBOATS&RV'S(850)-227-33571617GROUPERAVENUE,PORTST.JOE,FLWWW.CAPTAINSCOVEFL.COM SPONSORTHEWEEKLYALMANAC227-7847 CALLTODAY! Page 6 Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.starfl.com By Tom Baird swimming or snorkeling The seagrass beds of St. Joseph Bay are the places to look for scallops this season. SeagrassesSPECIAL TO THE STAR A green sea turtle resting in seagrass. SCALLOPING SEASONSPECIAL TO THE STARSeveral groups of people were out searching for scallops earlier this week.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASectionThursday, July 4, 2013 Page 7Noah Wich, Braden Baumgartner, Jacob Curcie and Michael Sherrill participated in the free golf lessons in June. SJBGC nishes free junior golf lessonsSpecial to The StarThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club completed a series of free golf lessons for junior golfers on Friday, June 28. Each year, the club offers these free lessons on each Friday in June. Twenty-three juniors took advantage of this free offering. The sessions were led by Certi ed Golf Instructor, Ethel Bardsley. Ethel was assisted by Penelope Evanoff, Russell Bardsley and other members of the club. In addition to learning the game of golf, the students were allowed to enjoy the club swimming pool following each lesson. The club is open to the public and is an important community asset year around.SPECIAL TO THE STAR Penelope Evanoff teaches the ner points of putting to Leanne Baumgartner, Ryanne Wich and Ellie Wich. Star Staff ReportFor the rst time, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls basketball team joined the boys in spending a portion of the summer playing and attending camps. The Lady Tiger Sharks nished their summer 8-14, a respectable record for a team that will have no seniors or juniors this coming season. The team is comprised of three sophomores, Callie Fleshner, Morgan Gant, and Jamarion Larry, three freshmen, Hallie Jasnski, Khaliayah Johnson and Maliayah McNair and four 8th-graders, Teiyahna Hutchinson, Brooklynn Quinn, Aliayah Johnson, and Java Patterson. The month of June began with a trip to Freeport where the Lady Tiger Sharks went 1-2, playing Freeport, Paxton and South Walton. Next up was a trip to Poplar Springs, for a camp known as the Border War during which Florida schools compete against schools from Alabama. The Lady Tiger Sharks played six games in two days, going 1-5. Port St. Joe boarded a bus again for a four-hour drive to Columbus, GA to compete at the Columbus State University team camp. The Lady Tiger Sharks played schools Class 3A and larger and came away 2-5. The last stop was this past weekend at the University of Florida where 82 high school girls teams came to enjoy the Gator campus. The Lady Tiger Sharks went 4-2, the two losses coming by a combined ve points. The team would like to thank the following people for making this summer a success: Mrs. Brenda Fisher, Coach Kenny Parker, George Durens Piggly Wiggly, Greg Williams of Williams Gunn and Pawn, and Joey Browning of Columbus Trophy and Screen Printing. Lady Tiger Sharks hone skills during summer LADY TIGER SHARKS 2013 SCHEDULE DATE Day Opponent Home/Away Time(ET) 26 Aug Mon Rutherford Away 6:00/7:00 27 Aug Tue West Gadsden Home 6:00 3 Sep Tue Bay Haven Away 6:00/7:00 5 Sep Thu Bay High Home 6:00/7:00 9 Sep Mon Wewahitchka Away 6:00/7:00 10 Sep Tue South Walton Away 6:00/7:00 12 Sep Thu Bozeman Home 6:00/7:00 14 Sep Sat Chipley Tour. Away All Day 17 Sep Tue Franklin County Away 6:00/7:00 19 Sep Thu Bozeman Away 6:00/7:00 23 Sep Mon Liberty County Home 6:00/7:00 24 Sep Tue West Gadsden Away 6:00 26 Sep Thu Bay Haven Home 6:00/7:00 3 Oct Thu South Walton Away 6:00/7:00 7 Oct Mon Liberty County Away 6:00/7:00 8 Oct Tue Franklin County Home 6:00/7:00 10 Oct Thur Bay High Away 6:00/7:00 15 Oct Tue Rutherford Home 6:00/7:00 17 Oct Thu Wewahitchka Home 6:00/7:00 21 Oct Mon Quarter Finals Franklin 5:00/7:00 22 Oct Tue Semi-Finals Franklin 5:00/7:00 24 Oct Thu Finals Franklin 7:00 5 Nov Tue Reg. Semi-Finals TBA 7:00 9 Nov Sat Reg. Finals TBA 2:00 12-16 Nov FHSAA Finals Kissimmee Star Staff ReportVolleyball conditioning for Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School began at 8 a.m. ET on Monday, July 1. All upcoming 7th through 12th grade girls that are interested in volleyball are encouraged to attend. All participants must have a current (within one calendar year) FHSAA sports physical. Players must also ll out new consent forms. All three FHSAA forms, EL2, EL3 and EL3CH, can be found on our volleyball web page. The upcoming fall schedule is also posted there. The website is http:// psjhs-gcs.schoolloop.com/volleybal l.Volleyball conditioning begins at PSJHS Star Staff ReportFree physicals for those who will participate in football this fall at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will be provided from 5-8 p.m. ET on July 23 at the Medical Of ce Building on the campus of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Athletes must have a Florida High School Athletics Association physical form, which can be picked up at the high school of ce. 2013 TIGER SHARK VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULEDate Team Where Time 23 Aug Blountstown Away 8:00 PM 30 Aug Wewa. Jr. Sr. HS Away 8:00 PM 6 Sep Bay High Home 7:30 PM 13 Sep Bozeman Home 8:00 PM 20 Sep Jefferson County Away 7:30 PM 27 Sep Chipley Away 8:00 PM 4 Oct Franklin County Home 7:30 PM11 Oct Open 18 Oct Florida A&M HS Away 7:30 PM 25 Oct West Gadsden HS Home 7:30 PM 1 Nov Liberty County HS Home 7:30 PM 8 Nov Arnold High School Away 8:00 PMPort St. Joe football physicals By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Kites lled the sky above George Core Park during the kite ying competition. After some quality time spent waiting for Mother Nature to supply the wind, more than 20 participants across three age groups had kites soaring through the air. Children and adults alike enjoyed that hung above the park during the afternoon festivities. Though twisted lines and temperamental kites threatened to ground some of the competitors, teamwork prevailed and the dragons, butter ies, sharks, planes and sh were in the air. In the 10 and under group, rst place went to Genavieve Rocha; second place, Taylor Burkett; third place, Brayden Dailey. Winners for the 10-14 group; Wilson Turner, rst place; Brian Burkett, second; Joel Bogaert, third. In the 14 and older category; Ian Williams, rst place; Brian Burkett, second place; and Richard Aarons, third place. It was a successful event, said host Mike Lacour. We look forward to doing it again next year. The event was a joint fundraiser between the Gulf County Soccer Boosters, Port St. Joe Youth Soccer and Port St. Joe Elementary School Parent Teacher Organization (PTO). Dana Boyer and Steve Kerigan were of cial judges for the competition.Kite ying competition erce at family fun dayPhotos by WES LOCHER | The StarWilson Turner, Brian Burkett and Joel Bogaert took home trophies for the 10-14 age group. Joel Bogaert stayed focused on keeping his kite in the sky. During Sundays family fun day, kites lled the sky over George Core Park.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013Board, which is not subject to the 10 percent cap on annual increases, the drop in the tax base will represent two-tenths of 1 percent, falling from $1.405 billion to $1.402 billion. The largest decline came in the city of Wewahitchka, which saw property values fall 7 percent, from $61.6 million to $57.3 million. Burke said the primary reason for the decline was two larger personal property accounts declining in value. The Northwest Florida Water Management District will realize a drop of one-third of 1 percent, Burke said. In addition, each Fire District in the county saw a drop in taxable value. The Tupelo Fire Zone dropped 1.7 percent; the St. Joe Fire Zone one-tenth of 1 percent; Howard Creek Fire Zone fell 1.5 percent and the Overstreet Fire Zone took the biggest hit at 3.5 percent. Going back to at least 1982, county property values had not dropped in any single year until 2007, two years after the height of the real estate bubble when property values exploded past $2 billion with a 55 percent increase in 2005. However, after dropping by more than 20 percent in both 2009 and 2010, the decline steadied. The two Municipal Services Taxing Units (MSTUs) that fund the local share of the bond for beach renourishment have expired. The property roll is essentially a historical marker, establishing what the market reects based on sales of like properties in the county as of Jan. 1, 2013. When prices are moving up, as was historically the case for decades, that system works to the advantage of the property owner who can, over those six months, see the value of property move higher on the market than the county assessment. When the market declines, however, property owners can be in retreat on value compared to assessment for a given year. The BOCC and Coastal Community Association lobbied state lawmakers to allow the use of bank and short sales, which were accounted for the rst time in 2012. The Property Appraisers Ofce assesses 17,527 properties in the county; 1,211, or just 6.9 percent, are not taxable and the vast majority of those properties are owned by government, local, state and federal. ASEAistheonly patentedproduct intheworldthat providesyourbody withRedoxSignaling molecules,thenative moleculesessentialto yourcellsabilityto protect,repair,and replacethemselves.WhatisASEA? TyRobinson www.TY.TEAMASEA.com(850)229.2679 4514931NOTICEOF ANNUALMEETINGTheBoardofCommissionersof theNorthwestFloridaRegional HousingAuthoritywillholdits AnnualMeetingonJuly18,2013, attheHolidayInn&Suites,2725 GravesRoad,Tallahassee,Florida. Meetingwillbeginat1:00p.m. E.D.S.T.Themeetingwillbeopen tothepublic. FORMERLYMINNIELEES CLOSEDMONDAY SAMELOCATION 674-4323HONEY BEES DINER DAILYLUNCH &DINNERSPECIALS AnnualMembership MeetingandElectionTuesdayEveningJuly9,2013at6:00RancyHouseCarriageHouse Apalachicola,FloridaePanhandlePlayersinvitesyoutojoinusforour annualmeetingsandfortheelectionofBoardmembers andocers.Hearaboutourplansforthecomingseason andabouthowyoucanbecomeinvolved.Formoreinformationortoexpressaninterest inrunningfortheBoardofDirectors, pleasecallElaineKozlowskyat850-670-1671 orBobInguagiatoat850-370-5281. TheMagicofCapeSanBlas andtheSurroundingAreaBooksavailableat: NoNameBookstore, BluewaterOutriggers, AreaBookstores,MaddoxHouse**AvailableOnline**www.marlenewomack.com PROPERTY from page A1response vehicles. Sunday was family fun day, and once the wind picked up, dozens of colorful kites soared into the sky during the kite ying contest. Children, teens and adults competed against Mother Nature and one another to take home a trophy for effort. The event was sponsored by the Gulf County Soccer Boosters. Theres still plenty of celebrating to be done. Stop by the Event Welcome Center at 234 Reid Avenue to see the timeline display, sign the ofcial guestbook and enjoy student art. The nal static light show display will be presented on Wednesday night at dark at George Core Park and the annual street dance will be taking place on Martin Luther King Boulevard starting at 8 p.m. EST with food, vendors and live performances. Before the reworks go off on Thursday night, an interactive glow stick exhibit and lantern release will light up Frank Pate Park. After the reworks show, head to The Thirsty Goat at The Port Inn for the 10-year reunion of the Buddy Hamm Band. Friday will close out the celebration with an alumni basketball game at the Washington Gym, and it will be your last opportunity to visit the event welcome center. Dont miss out the remaining centennial events. Remember that its going to be a long wait until the next one.Kites of all shapes, sizes and colors lled the sky above George Core Park. Trophies were handed out to the strongest competitors in the kids, teens and adult age groups. CENTENNIAL from page A1

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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Surveys say Roman candles are the most favorite type of reworks for the 4th with what the least favorite? Firecrackers, Smokeballs, Pinwheels, Snaps 2) Where is Rebildfest billed as the largest celebration of American independence held outside the U.S.? Germany, Denmark, Mexico, Australia 3) On July 4, 1848, President Polk laid the cornerstone of what famous structure? Lincoln Memorial, Library of Congress, Capitol building, Washington Monument 4) Thomas Jefferson and which other former president died July 4, 1826? George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson 5) On that same date of July 4, 1826, what noted American was born? Robert E. Lee, Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau 6) Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776; one was Hancock, who was the other? Henry, Franklin, Pinckney, Thomson 7) What famous American patriot was hung as a spy in 1776 by the British? Paul Revere, Nathan Hale, Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne 8) Whos been the only future President of the United States to be born on a July 4th? Jackson, Van Buren, Taft, Coolidge 9) Where did the Continental Congress sign the Declaration of Independence? Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Mount Vernon 10) Who was the rst President of the Continental Congress? Peyton Randolph, Roger Sherman, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin 11) At signing time the colonies were under which English King? George I, George III, Charles I, Charles III 12) Which colony had the most signers at 9? Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts 13) On July 4, 1960 Mickey Mantle hit which career-number homerun? 300, 400, 500, 600 14) Which former president died July 4, 1831? Madison, Monroe, Tyler, Polk ANSWERS 1) Smokeballs. 2) Denmark. 3) Washington Monument. 4) John Adams. 5) Stephen Foster. 6) Thomson. 7) Nathan Hale. 8) Coolidge. 9) Philadelphia. 10) Peyton Randolph. 11) George III. 12) Pennsylvania. 13) 300. 14) Monroe. COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, July 4, 2013 BPage 1SectionTrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com In an area where most emergency preparations focus on hurricanes, the Gulf County Health Department added an active shooter program to its schedule in an effort to be ready for anything. The exercise, held last Thursday at the Gulf County Emergency Operations Center, was designed to test the knowledge, skills and abilities of multi-agency coordination during a shooting-related incident. The program was funded and hosted by the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County and brought together Gulf County Emergency Management, Franklin County Department of Health, Gulf County EMS, the Gulf County Sherriffs Office, Gulf County School District, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and Gulf Coast State College to align on policies and procedures. Using a map of the health department, the active shooter scenario played out in real time throughout the day and the group went step-bystep to share best practices for such a situation from initial contact, to a weapon being fired, to injured employees and hostage situations. Also explained in detail were police team entry and extraction procedures. The program stresses the importance of what everyone is doing to take care of the situation and what to expect from the EOC, said county Emergency Operations director Marshall Nelson. The training detailed the process of alerting the necessary emergency departments and creating a funnel for information. In an active shooter situation, the EOC will set up a phone number to handle all emergencies, freeing up law enforcement to report to the scene and work toward taking the shooter into custody. Shooter situations often end up on the six oclock news and Health Education Manager and Public Information Officer Sarah Hinds is responsible for controlling the release of information to the media. The public will focus on what they hear first and last and will always accept the negative over the positive, said Hinds. Equally important to what is happening outside the building; the training covered the accountability of employees who find themselves inside during a shooting. Employees were reminded to take care of themselves first and to not be a hero, or take any actions that may interfere with police operations. Attendees were also provided vital information about police tactics and were told that in the scenario, law enforcers would look at hands. If employees were able to escape, they should keep their arms visible and not to carry anything that could be misinterpreted as a weapon. Communication is critically important, said Terry Schenk, exercise director for Disaster Strategies and Ideas, the group that created the scenario. Throughout the presentation, a representative from DSI took detailed notes, including the answers to any questions that arose and the answers. Several days after the exercise, a full report is provided that allows companies to update their policies, procedures and can be utilized in future trainings. It can make a huge difference if people preplan, said Schenk. If this scenario happens, this training will give people awareness that could be the difference between life and death. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County had an all-hazards plan but an active shooter procedure was missing. We didnt have a structured plan, said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator of the Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin Counties. We train often for weather situations, but there are other threats in this day and age, She stressed the importance of such a program for healthcare providers, schools and businesses that are wide open to Gulf County health department hosts active shooter training program ACTIVE SHOOTER TRAININGAttendees from Gulf Coast Emergency Management, School Districts, Sheriffs Of ce and Sacred Heart Hospital attended the Active Shooter training.See SHOOTER B2By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Theres a new face at The Artery in the form of intern Leanna Knapp. Though Knapp was raised in Macon, Georgia, she found her way to Gulf County when her mother recently relocated to Mexico Beach. Once Knapp had nished up her studies at the University of Georgia in September, she faced the task of guring out what was next. Determined to nd a job she loved, she moved in with her mother at the beach for some relaxation and inspiration. On a trip to Port St. Joe, she visited The Artery where she met owner and operator Leslie Wentzell. The recent recipient of a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in sculpture, Knapp felt right at home in the studio and eagerly showed Wentzell her art portfolio. Wentzell liked what she saw and mentioned to Knapp that she needed some extra help around the studio and was looking for a face to help her business appeal to a younger crowd. As it happened, Knapp was looking for some experience working in an art-based environment. The meeting led to Knapp starting an internship with The Artery in February and its been a dream come true for the young sculptor. Everything fell into place, said Knapp. Ill work here until Leslie kicks me out! Knapp admits that she never saw herself as the type to work an of ce job. She was drawn to more creative roles spurred by a love of photography that hit during her high school days. In college, she bounced around majors, starting in art history and toeing the waters of experimental art before nding her The Artery gains prize-winning internBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com What started as a sixweek project to get kids performing together in a band and learning three cover songs turned into a 10-month project that birthed the local music sensation known as Thirty-Three. After playing only spiritual cover songs, the Christian rock band celebrated the release of its rst original single, Jesus Loves You and I Love You Too last Tuesday. The group is made up of 11and 12-year-olds with a passion for music and a strong belief in their faith. Vocalist Brianna Butler, guitarist Zack McFarland, bassist Cole Haddock and drummer Joel Bogaert were thrilled to release their rst original song. Im very excited, said Bogaert, who has played the drums for three years. The St. Joe Music and Performance Program, founded in August 2012, was developed by Tom McEniry, operator of St. Joe Music and RSR Recording Studios, and area musician and choir director, Phil Densmore. Tom was looking for a vocal and bass coach, said Densmore. It was a great opportunity that Ive really enjoyed. Added McEniry, Im constantly surprised by their professionalism. McEniry thought that the students would come together, have some fun and then go their separate ways, but was proud when the group took shape and started playing shows in Port St. Joe and Panama City. Prior to Haddock joining the group on bass guitar, Densmore lled in on the instrument. It was great when Cole joined on bass. I wasnt doing a very good Local band celebrates release of rst single SPECIAL TO THE STARLeanna Knapp won second place out of 400 contestants for her life-size wedding dress sculpture at the 2013 Art Fields show.WES LOCHER | The StarAbove: The band practices for two hours a week at RSR Recording Studio. Top: Christian rock group Thirty-Three celebrated the release of their rst single, Jesus Loves You and I Love You TooSPECIAL TO THE STARSee RELEASE B2 See INTERN B2

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 MeetScar,brothertoMufasaandAlex.Heisveryoutgoingandplayful.Scarisfullyvettedandreadyfor hisforeverhome.Ifyoucangiveanyoneofoursweetkittiesahomeorfoster1or2,donothesitateto comebytheshelterandmeetthem. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation.Allpetsadoptedfrom SJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend. hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comor calltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103 andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailable atwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWerequireallpotential adopterstocompleteanapplicationform.Adoptionfees includeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10 am-4pm! FaithsThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupportthe animalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetin PortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon!www.sjbhumanesociety.org Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet, pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety 4514866SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 CallToday PSYCHICREADINGS850-319-3711BayCounty's#1PsychicDoyouwanttoknowwhatthefuturehasinstore? Havequestionsaboutlove,businessormarriage? Ann'sanswerstellthepast,present&future.Allreadingsarecondential-SeHablaEspaol THISWEEKONLYTAROTCARD READING$10byMissAnnCalltodayforabettertomorrow... SocietyCameron Gage Cherry turned two on May 6. He celebrated with family and had a Thomas the Trainthemed party. Camerons parents are Kevin and Stephanie Cherry. Grandparents are Terry and Debra Watson, Carol and Eric Mann and Ronnie Cherry. Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Garden last month hosted the 11 garden clubs in the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs District II for its spring meeting. The meeting was held at the Centennial Building, and more than 80 club members from around Northwest Florida attended. District II is comprised of clubs from Port St. Joe, Chipley, Bonifay, Vernon, Wausau, Panama City, Panama City Beach, Graceville, Lynn Haven, Marianna Friendship and Marianna. The theme was Party at the Beach, and club president Barbara Conway and club members did an excellent job of working together the showcase into a shelly day for attendees. We may be a small club, but garden clubbers know how to get things done, Conway said. She thanked the Panama City Garden ClubAmaryllis Circle for its assistance and Sylvia Holley of Gulf Beach Garden Club for beautiful oral designs made for the event. The group was welcomed to the city by Mayor Mel Magidson and invited to tour historic Port St. Joe by County Commissioner Tan Smiley. After spring reports, Linda and Jim Brunner of the Gulf Coast Shell Club presented an entertaining and educational program on shells that can be found on local beaches and waters. They also displayed their collection of shells. Chipley Garden Club was named the 2013 Garden Club of the Year during the FFGC Spring Convention in Fort Myers. This is the number one award in FFGC, said Jane Brewer, past district director. The award recognizes the Florida garden club that best excels in all of the following categories: membership increase, service to membership, club programs and projects, members attending club, district and state meetings and/or sponsored programs. Chipley Garden Club truly shares the joys of gardening with their community and each other. This is an awesome accomplishment not only for Chipley, but for District II because when one wins, we all win. The Chipley club also claimed the 2013 Nell Coe (Grow) Ward, the Civic Beautication Award and National Garden Club/Deep South Region third-place Youth Horticulture Award. Other FFGC awards included Wausau Garden Club members Judy Solgers two Digital Photography awards, Marianna Garden Clubs Garden Therapy (Geriatric) Award and District IIs Best Newsletter (District) Award. Pam Cates, President of Vernon Garden Club, discussed a $100,000 highway beautication grant from the Florida Department of Transportation her club was granted in March and the extensive application process involved. We are the rst garden club to ever apply for this kind of grant, Cates said. And we got it now the fun begins. The club received a Certicate of Excellence for 2011-2013 from district President Jan Sillik and a Presidents FFGC Award for its efforts. Louise Michaels from Chipley, the chairperson for District II Wetlands and Waterways, discussed clean water shortage, desalination technology, water conservation and the lack of concern for maintaining the fresh water supply. She also discussed the disheartening condition of Little Blue in Washington County. We are working towards rescuing and reclaiming the spring, Michaels said. Due to pollution, abuse by recreational vehicles and dumping, the spring has receded over 15 feet and is polluted. It was once beautiful, pristine and able to supply an abundance of clean water. We want it to be that way again. Following the meetings, plants made by the Port St. Joe Garden Club were available for purchase. If you are interested in joining the Port St. Joe Garden Club or would like more information, please contact the Port St. Joe Garden Club on its Facebook page. Happy Birthday to Mr. Billy and Cheryl Quinn. We love you. We celebrate you! The Quinn and Granger Family BirthdaysStar Staff ReportThe Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild will hold a membership drive from 57 p.m. ET July 16 at the Haughty Heron. Become a new member for $20 and receive a free martini from the Haughty Heron. The event will include live music, light food and a local breast cancer survivor who will speak on the importance of early detection. Support the drive for breast cancer screenings and other health initiatives by becoming a member of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. The Guild provides helping hands of support and fundraising activities to bring new health care programs and services to the community. Funds raised will be contributed in part to the development of a fund to assist uninsured and underinsured residents receive breast cancer screenings.PSJ Garden Club hosts district spring meeting Join Sacred Heart for music, martinis and mammos 1 love, 2 birthdays July 5Cam Cam turns 2 SPEc C IAL TO TT HE STARPort St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson (left) and County Commissioner Tan Smiley (right) spoke during the meeting.

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The Star| B3Thursday, July 4, 2013 Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentied whattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandare oeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks! (Inthissection),Discoverthebestrealestatevalues inMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola, CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelle andsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast 4515151 SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD 4515158 ONTHEPOOPDECK -INTHECROWSNEST-WEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY KARAOKE DJ DANCING *AllTimesEasternFunTime*9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM THURSDAY-AfterFireworksKonkreteSoul RandyStarkwithArtLongWed.July10th SATURDAY-9PMPublicAddress FRIDAY-9PMDJ SUNDAY-7PMTheCurrys WEDNESDAY-7PMAllenDykes -1STSUNDAYCELEBRATIONALLDAYANDNIGHTLIVEMUSICWITHTHECURRYS7PM GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM StephenCollier,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients School NewsHigh School High Tech  named Program of the YearSpecial to The StarWe are small but we are mighty.  Because of our Program Coordinator, Lynn Hauck, the students participating in High School High Tech program at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and the many business partners in Port St. Joe, the PSJHS program is No. 1 in the State of Florida.  This is the programs seventh year in Gulf County and there are 36 programs around the state, some much larger and much better funded, but not with the heart that fuels the program in Gulf County .  Here is what The ABLE Trust had to say when delivering the award. Dyslexia Research Institute serves approximately 20 students with disabilities in Gulf County for The ABLE Trusts Florida High School/High Tech (HS/HT) program on an annual basis. Under the leadership of Dr. Patricia Hardman and Robyn Rennick, and through the talented work of Program Coordinator, Lynn Hauck, the team ensures that students experience the depth and breadth of career and youth development, which is the core intent of the HS/HT program.  Their program structure of building upon career and workbased experiences throughout the school year, culminating in a coveted summer internship can be considered a statewide model for the Florida HS/HT program.  Gulf County HS/HT has outstanding community and employer support, which is evidenced through its Business Advisory Council.  In the last ve years, 100 percent of their seniors have graduated from high school all of whom are going directly to college or employment.  This summer, nearly half of their students will participate in paid summer internship experiences as a result of community business partnerships and fundraising on the part of the program leadership and students.  The ABLE Trust commends Dyslexia Research Institute with the HS/HT Program of the Year Award for creating and sustaining a highly successful HS/HT program in Gulf County. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARCongratulations to the following Faith Christian School students for maintaining a straight A average for the 2012-2013 academic year: Left to right: Kristen Bouington, Alex Taylor, Magnolia Sarmiento, Taylor Burkett and Carter Costin. SLOAN EARNs S NACA NACA DA A s S CHOLARs S HIPMiranda M. Sloan, Graduate Academic Advisor, College of Education at University of South Florida, has been selected to receive a Wesley R. Habley NACADA Summer Institute Scholarship. The Institute Is sponsored by the National Academic Advising Association. Sloan will attend the Institute this summer in either Jacksonville or Scottsdale, Ariz., for a week-long, intensive program that helps advising administrators, faculty, professional advisors, and advising program directors develop specic strategies for improvement of advising at institutions of higher learning. Sloan is one of 10 individuals honored with this scholarship award in the nation-wide competition this year. Various professionals from the United States as well as international members participate in general sessions, workshops and topical sessions at each Institute to increase their understanding of the important role advising plays on campuses. Individuals are also assigned to small group discussions sessions in which individual action plans are developed which focus on the enhancement or implementation of quality programs on their campuses. Miranda is the daughter of Maxine Leslie Hammons and the late Joel E. Sloan of Port St. Joe. She is the granddaughter of the late Rev. Walter and Mrs. Mable Leslie of Port St. Joe. MIRANDA M. SLOAN The Lions Tale

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 9:30AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation TUESDAY -5:00PM-WomensBibleStudy 6:30PM-BibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org WestonDear Friends and Family, Thank you so very much for your expressions of sympathy during the loss of my wife, Eva Weston. Our family was really touched by your calls, cards, visits and prayers. We especially thank our friends of White City First Baptist Church and the entire White City community for their enormous outpouring of support and caringly providing for our family immediately following our loss. And a very special thank you to Rev. Nick Davis and Mary Lou Cumbie for leading a touching memorial service. May God bless you all, Claude R. Weston Special to The StarWays to cope with grief and nd peace after loss will be discussed at Lifetree Caf at 7 a.m. CT on Monday, July 8. The program, titled Coping with Grief: Find Your Path to Peace, features a lmed interview with Ken Doka, author of more than 20 books, including Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Woman Mourn. Its a common misunderstanding that grief follows a fairly predictable pattern, says Doka. But each of us has our own pathway; each of us takes our own journey as we grieve. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net.Lewis FamilyThe Lewis Family would like to thank everyone for their support, prayers and love for their son, Christopher L. Anderson. God put us here for a reason, He said He would supply our need. Hell guide our every footstep, If we read His Word and heed. Jesus gave us a choice, When He went to the cross. Accept His love or suffer the loss. Ive had a few problems down through the years, Had some heartaches, and shed a few tears. Most of these problems were brought on by greed. I wanted to do things my way, I just wouldnt heed. He loved me all this time, It took me a while to see. No matter what I did, He still provided for me. Im not a nished product yet, Hes still working on me, But I thank God every day, That Im not what I used to be.Billy JohnsonCora Sue Robinson, 75, of Port St. Joe, FL peacefully passed away on June 26, 2013, at her home with her loving family at her side. Cora Sue was born on Feb 25, 1938, in Port St. Joe to Charles and Margaret Smith. Cora Sue was a lifetime resident of Gulf County, and after her retirement in 2001 she enjoyed cookouts with her family and her grandchildren and spending time in her oasis she grew in her yard. To say she had a green thumb would be an understatement. Cora Sue enjoyed each day tending to her trees, owers, and roses. It was not unusual for her to have hundreds of owers and roses blooming on any given day. She also enjoyed her birds each morning with a cup of coffee. For the longest time she would get upset at the squirrels for getting into her bird feeders, but they too nally won her over and she said I think the squirrels and the birds worked well together. Cora Sue was a dedicated red, white, and blue American. One of her favorite pictures was her standing with the Olympic Torch and the American Flag. She served as a public servant for Gulf County for more than 35 years. She served for the Gulf County School Board as the Payroll Manager for over 15 years until she was elected as Supervisor of Elections for Gulf County. As Supervisor of Elections she excelled in her job. In 1984, Gulf County was recognized as the number one county for having the highest percentage of registered voters in the state with 7,555 out of an estimated 7,561 people of voting age residing in Gulf County, for a percentage of 99.93 percent. Cora Sue accomplished this by conducting voting registration drives throughout the county and she brought the books into the schools in the county to register those who quali ed and acquainting the students nearing voting age with their responsibilities. Cora Sue is predeceased by her four sisters and one brother; Margaret Smith, Pauline Miller, Carolyn Hill, Joan Wise, and C. R. Smith; she is survived by her sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Chuck Baumgart, and her brother and sister-inlaw, Thomas and Pat Smith; three daughters and two sons-in-law, Cindy Medlin, Deb and Tim Harvey, Kim and Ronnie Terry; one son Thomas Medlin; her nine grandchildren; James Taunton, Jocelyn Williams, Kristin Medlin, Charles Medlin, Tara Goss, Craig Medlin, Jason Mathes, Brooke Harrell, and Alyson Harvey; seven greatgrandchildren, many nieces and nephews, numerous relatives, and several close lifelong friends. A visitation was held for family and friends from 5-7 p.m. Monday, July 1, at the Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe. Her funeral service was held at 3 p.m. EDT Tuesday, July 2 at the First United Methodist Church with Dr. Geoffrey Lenz of ciating. Immediately following the service, a graveside service will be held at Holy Hill Cemetery. To show respect for Cora Sues public service and all past and present public servants of Gulf County, the family asks that you y your American Flag on Tuesday, July 2, 2013. In lieu of owers the family asks that you make a contribution to the Taunton Family Childrens Home, P.O. Box 870, Wewahitchka, Fl 32465. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Cora Sue Robinson CORA SUE ROBINSON Obituary Cards of THANKSThursday, July 4, 2013How to cope with grief explored at Lifetree Caf First United Methodist Church FundraiserA fundraiser will be held 3:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. CT on Friday, July 12, at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach. There will be pulled pork sandwich, chips, drink and brownie for $6. Eat in or take out. Proceeds to bene t FUMC disaster team.Aint God good

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.cityportstjoe.comPostOceBox278305CecilG.Costin,Sr.Blvd.Phone(850)229-8261Fax(850)227-7522 PortSt.Joe,Florida32457"AnEqualOpportunityEmployer" PUBLICNOTICEREDUCEDHOURSFORCLERKOFCOURTANNEXOFFICEINWEWAHITCHKA Duetobudgetconstraints,theGulfCountyClerkofCourtmustreducethehoursofoperation oftheClerksAnnexOceinWewahitchka.EectiveJuly1,2013,theannexocewillonlybe openfrom8am-4pmC.T.onMondayandFriday. RebeccaL.(Becky)Norris GulfCountyClerkoftheCircuitCourt 2091547 Advertorial by WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Mary Ann Conroy loves to cook, but the restaurant business wasnt for her. After working in the banking industry for 30 years and experiencing the economic downturn, she decided to use the opportunity to explore her passions and reinvent herself as a personal chef, founding the local culinary experience known as Gourmet Chef Now. I wanted to do something that I was passionate about, said Conroy, who quickly acquired her catering license to get the ball rolling. After attending several cooking classes in the Panama City area, she thought that something similar might work in Port St. Joe. Not interested in opening a restaurant and devoting all her time to running it, she saw herself doing something more intimate and decided to host classes for a small group of audience members. Her mission was to prepare gourmet food simply through an interactive experience that would end in a restaurant-quality meal. I love good food with bold avors, lots of courses and rich sauces, she said. In October of last year, Gourmet Chef Now launched in the Appliance Showroom kitchen in Port St. Joe. Classes started small with friends and family in attendance but news of the class quickly spread through word of mouth. Soon enough, the weekly, $35 classes began to ll up and Conroy was able to tweak the experience to be as interactive as the guests wanted. Some help cook, taste or plate, while others simply come to watch, take notes and get tips, techniques and new recipes for their kitchens. At the end of the class, the audience enjoys a gourmet meal and a glass of wine. Conroy has hosted many classes centered on seafood keeping in mind the amount of delicious food located just offshore in Gulf Countys waters. I try to make something you can easily recreate at home with things you can buy locally, she said. Classes vary in size and her guests have ranged in age from 20 all the way to 91 years old. She also offers occasional classes for kids during which they create their own pizzas and also hosts special date nights for couples. Before long, Conroy had hosted enough classes shed used up her favorite recipes from her collection of 50 cookbooks. She took suggestions from her audience on food theyd like to see made, which led to classes featuring Thai food and sushi. It pushed Conroy to try new and exciting dishes at home before bringing them to the classroom. She admits that her husband, Steve, is the guinea pig for the gourmet meals. Steve smiled and added sarcastically, Its a tough job, but someone has to do it. As the classes continued and regulars began coming each week, Conroy realized that shed accomplished exactly what she set out to do, earning a living off of something shes passionate about. In addition, Conroy cooks the meals each Wednesday for the First United Methodist Church and has fed over 100 people each week for the last four years. Her pastor, knowing her passion for the culinary arts invited her to replace the previous cook who had retired. Conroy is inspired by many cooks but said you cant go wrong with Julia Child. She credits a rising interest in televised cooking shows for bringing awareness to creating great food at home. Its all about eating good food, and having fun, she said. For class schedules and registration info visit Gourmet Chef Now online at www. gourmetchefnow.com.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com In May, artist Dolores Lowery realized a longtime dream when she opened the Seagrass Art Gallery in Mexico Beachs The Grove. Teaching since 2009, the full-time, self-taught artist has spent time in Gulf and Franklin County schools hosting workshops and using art to teach special needs students. After taking note at the lack of local galleries or art classes in Mexico Beach, Lowery set out to be the rst. After securing a lease at The Grove she set up shop and has received support from the locals and tourists over the last month. Its been great, said Lowery. Weve had lots of trafc through since opening. She aims to be hosting art classes by the summer and has plans for a three-hour acrylic class where she delivers a theme, but and allows the artist to make it their own. Lowery plans for the classes to be accessible to artists of all levels and will package all materials into the cost. It doesnt matter what your experience level is, she said, youre going to learn something new every time you paint. In her never-ending mission to support local arts, Lowery founded and is President of the Society of Expressive Artists. Formed in 2011, the group meets once a month to network, share techniques and raise awareness for local artbased opportunities. Each year the SEA group hosts an art walk in Mexico Beach immediately following the Gumbo Cook-off. Tents line highway 98 and beneath them, local artist showcase their wares. This year the group plans to hold a second event, which is currently in the works. SEA is open to local artists across the coast and can visit Lowery at her gallery for more information. Lowery is also a staple of the Art Happens initiative, a new group that will host small, art-centric events across the Forgotten Coast. Each event will feature a different medium in one of the areas most picturesque locations. Its all about promoting the arts throughout the area, said Lowery. Art opens peoples minds and creative spirit. It stimulates critical thinking and unies people. Along with Lowerys homemade jewelry, photography, acrylic and encaustic pieces, the gallery features sea foam art and ceramics from Pat Van West, caulk-based works from Dixie Hester, clay pieces from Leslie Wentzell and glass art by Gretchen Mayes. Never one to miss an opportunity to shine the light on area talent, Lowery also stocks locally-made soaps, Tupelo honey candles and music by local artists. Lowerys art is also featured at the Sea Oates Gallery on St. George Island, Studio Gallery in Grayton Beach and the 621 Gallery in Tallahassee. As a full time artist Lowery is given the exibility to keep the gallery fresh. She enjoys the thrill of completing a piece at night and having it in the gallery the following morning. For more information on classes or how to get involved with the SEA or Art Happens initiatives, call 814-2826.WES LOCHER | The StarSeagrass Art Gallery recently opened within The Grove in Mexico Beach. Mexico Beach artist opens gallery for showcases and classesPHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarMary Ann Conroy teaches gourmet made simply.Local cook invites all to become a gourmet chef

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Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction 4515031 J&MSCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILEHOMES CAMPERTRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOWA/C WASHERS/DRYERS STOVES/REFRIGERATORS FREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWNMOWERS SCRAPMETAL,ETC... Local6 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013the public. Lindeman herself had been in a scenario with an active shooter before, and noted that from time to time, companies receive threats and its vital that the staff knows how to respond. Im excited to have had such a collaborative exercise, she said. It created a great dialogue between agencies.The program walked attendees through a real time scenario shooter scenario and explained how all local response services will work together toward a positive outcome. SHOOTER from page B1niche with sculpture. It was when she took a trip to study abroad in Italy and saw the historic sculptures that adorned buildings, streets and parks that her true passion was ignited. They knocked me off my feet, she said. Though she started school at the Savannah College of Art and Design, she transferred to University of Georgia and it was there she said she ourished and made friends. Knapp revealed that she had a love affair with pottery and clay from a young age and she received her rst potters wheel as a gift at age seven. I love working with my hands and throwing on the wheel, said Knapp. It allows me to put emotion into something. Though shes recently enjoyed some watercolor classes taken through The Artery, Knapp doesnt nd much inspiration in paints and said that a blank white canvas scares her. She feels that her art is best created and represented on a three-dimensional plane. In April of this year, Knapp was accepted to showcase a life-sized sculpture of a wedding dress at the Art Fields show in Lake City, South Carolina. The event is the largest art show in the Southeast with over 800 applicants and only 400 invited to exhibit. On her rst time out, Knapp snagged a secondplace victory and a prize of $25,000. The win validated Knapps talent, especially since the sculpture had been created under the duress of a relationship-gone-wrong. Sometimes you want something so bad, you dont see what its doing to you, she said. Both the sculpture and the positive feedback from the piece helped her get through a very emotional time. Though Knapp is proud of her success to-date, she also understands that the bar has been set and her future works need to meet or exceed her wedding dress piece. In the meantime, shell continue learning from Wentzell and creating art with her hands. She enjoys meeting the artistic people that Gulf County attracts and is attered when visitors to the studio nd out about her background and ask her opinion of their art. A strong art community can positively impact everyone, she said. Art is a great way to express love, joy, sadness all range of emotions. She reported that she was happy to have found a community of supportive and encouraging people and wants aspiring artists to know that a career doing what you love is possible. I take pride in what I create, said Knapp. I love my life, and I love my job. 11-year-old impression, Densmore joked. Since nalizing the lineup, the group has played numerous churches in the area and said that their favorite gig to-date was at the Port St. Joe Relay for Life event in April. I liked it because we played for a good cause, said McFarland. As the group continued to get booking requests, McEniry viewed it as the perfect opportunity for the band members to learn the business side of the music world. Joels father, David Bogaert, who has a background in sales, became the groups agent, setting up the groups shows and coordinating practices. David was surprised when his son rst mentioned wanting to play the drums. David took him to RSR Studio for an evaluation. After 10 minutes on the kit, McEniry, who was thoroughly impressed with what he heard, pulled David aside and asked how long his son had been playing. Drum lessons started immediately. I have no idea where he got the talent, said David. Its been fantastic and rewarding watching them grow. When it was time for the band to learn some original tunes, local songwriter Doug Roberts was brought it to aid the band. He had written a few Christian-based songs that he taught to the group and was pleasantly surprised with how quick they picked up the structures and progressions. Roberts only had vocals, rhythm guitar and bass written for the bands rst single and encouraged Bogaert to get creative in adding drum parts. It was frustrating, said the drummer. It took time to nd what t the song. While creating music is a challenge for some, it came naturally for others. McFarland said that his whole family is musical and noted local performer Buddy Hamm as an inuence. Haddock knew he wanted to play the bass when his step-father played him the song Higher Ground by the Red Hot Chili Peppers. When it came time to record the single, the band wasnt sure what to expect. They were used to playing as a group, but in the studio, songs are constructed differently with each musician recording their instrument separately. It was weird, said McFarland. We felt really separated. The members of ThirtyThree came to enjoy the recording process and are excited to do it again for their second single. Hearing the nished product made all the difference. Its awesome when you rst record the song, but then hearing it mixed together makes it, like, whoa! McFarland said. The group members said the experience of being in a band together also brought them closer as friends. The members had attended school together but didnt run in the same social circles. It connected us, said Bogaert. It turns out that the rock and roll lifestyle isnt always glamorous. The band admits that theyve had their share of on-stage problems. McFarland was once stung in the leg by a wasp mid-song, but kept his cool and turned the inch into a cool rock pose. Haddock has had his instrument go out of tune during songs and Bogaert has battled with his drum stool slowly lowering itself throughout the course of one of their sets. The bands favorite part of playing live shows? Shattering the crowds expectations of what 11 and 12-year-olds can do. People dont think we can actually play, said McFarland. At the last church we played, I saw mouths drop. Densmore, the vocal and bass coach added, Its gratifying to watch them perform and seeing peoples reactions. It makes you feel proud. Haddock encouraged everyone in Gulf County to see the band perform live. Itll be a great experience, he said. You might feel God touch your heart. With the rst single in the can, the group is focused on the future. Im anxious to learn new original songs, said Haddock. Within ve years, McFarland and Haddock would like to see the band get big and play stadiums, while drummer Bogaert is content with where they are right now. For McEniry and Densmore, theyll help the group get wherever they can and dont set lofty expectations for the youngsters. If you dont have fun, you wont be successful, said Densmore. We give them our full support. Music is all teamwork and thats what we try to instill in them. Its about getting everyone in sync and into a groove. said McEniry. Ive never had a more rewarding experience. Thirty-Three will play the Panama City Shriners Festival on July 20 and the Port St. Joe Scallop Festival on August 4. A concert to celebrate the release of their rst single is also in the works. Kids looking to be involved in the St. Joe Music and Performance program can contact Tom at St. Joe Music for more information. Visit the Thirty-Three band online at www.33band. com. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARThe group made up of, Zack McFarland, Brianna Butler, Joel Bogaert and Cole Haddock received plaques commemorating the release of their rst single. RELEASE from page B1Knapp was awarded a $25,000 prize for her sculpture. INTERN from page B1

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LocalThe Star| B7Thursday, July 4, 2013 A10| The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST A S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF F RANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO Js TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS Sacred Heart announces MRI servicesSpecial to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf initiated the rst MRI diagnostic test in Gulf County on June 3. A new, state-of-the-art mobile GE Signal 1.5 Tesla unit will be providing Magnetic Resonance Imaging from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Mondays. MRI is an advanced diagnostic test that uses computers and magnetic elds, rather than radiation, to capture images of the human body. Although MRI is a very advanced medical technique, the MRI is probably one of the easiest and most comfortable exams you may ever experience. The technologist will simply ask you to lie down on a cushioned table which will automatically move into the magnet after you have been comfortably positioned for scanning. For certain studies, a contrast injection may be required. However, unlike many other contrast agents, MRI contrast does not contain iodine and therefore rarely cause allergic responses. The average scan takes 20-60 minutes dependent upon the specic test ordered. Appointments are required. To schedule a MRI at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, call 229-5802. Star Staff ReportClasses in pet rst aid and CPR/AED will be July 16 at the Cape San Blas Fire Station next to Salinas Park. The Pet First Aid class will be 9:30-11:30 a.m. ET, and the CPR/AED class will be 12:304:30 p.m. Pet First Aid is a two-hour class teaching how to be prepared to save an animals life. Participants will have the chance to learn basic rst aid such as rescue breathing and anti-choking techniques for dogs and cats. The goals of the class are to teach participants how to be prepared for emergencies that involve a cat or a dog and how to protect themselves and the animal from further harm, injury or suffering during emergencies by teaching prompt, effective rst aid actions and care. Do not bring your pet. Everyone is asked to bring a stuffed animal to bandage. The four-hour CPR/AED course incorporates the latest science and teaches students how to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies for victims 12 and older. Students who successfully complete the course will receive a certicate for Adult CPR/AED valid for two years. Combining lecture, video demonstrations and hands-on mannequin training, this course teaches participants to: call and work with EMS, preform CPR and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies, avoid bloodborne pathogens exposure, know the role of automated external debrillators (AEDs) in Cardiac Chain of Survival and more. If participants need a certication card from the American Red Cross there will be $12 charge per person. Those interested must register for this course as space is limited. For registration and information, call Natalie Shoaf at 227-4355 or email natalieshoaf@ gmail.com. FDOT will host public meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvementsStar Staff ReportThe Florida Department of Transportation will host a public information meeting for proposed improvements to State Road 30-E (Cape San Blas Road) from 5-9 p.m. ET July 16 at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30-A, Port St. Joe. FDOT is planning to resurface Cape San Blas Road from State 30-A to the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve. Additional improvements include paved shoulders and minor drainage modications. Construction is scheduled to begin fall 2015. The meeting will provide an opportunity to preview the proposed project, ask questions and/or submit comments concerning the proposed project. Public participation is solicited with regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact John S. Glenn, P.E., toll-free at 888-638-0250, ext. 1459 at least seven days before the meeting. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @ MyFDOT_NWFL. Florida is well known for its beautiful pine trees, many of which provide decorative shade for home grounds, not to mention signicant revenue for timber and pulpwood growers. We usually think of pines as being relatively troublefree. Unfortunately, several species of bark beetles are destroying pines throughout the south, including those in suburban landscapes. Southern pine beetle is one of the most serious pests of pines in the United States, but normally is a scavenger of dying pines. It becomes a pest when its populations increase. Dendroctonous beetles are distinguished by round posterious, in contrast to IPS beetles, the abdomens of which are concave posteriorly and have spines on the wing covers. Adult beetles, active throughout the year whenever temperatures are above 58F, disperse widely to infest injured weakened of stressed trees. When abundant, they can attack and overwhelm trees. The presence of pitch masses on the tree trunk may indicate and attack. Adults tunnel beneath the bark constructing frass-packed egg galleries in patterns resembling the letter S. The tunneling quickly destroys the phloem and kills the tree. My information on these destructive insects was provided by Extension Entomologist and Nematologist Dr. Eillen A. Buss with IFAS of the University of Florida. Normally, these beetles inhabit forest areas. But, they often migrate to home grounds. If your landscape includes one or more pines, you need to learn how to recognize and cope with bark beetle infections. Mature bark beetles are about the side of a grain of rice. They range in color from reddish-brown to solid black. Within the inner bark of most pines, the insect go through four life stages egg, larva, pupa and adult. The eggs are glistening white dots. Larvae, or grubs as theyre commonly called are white and crescent shaped with glossy reddishbrown heads and no legs. Pupae, which also are white, closely resemble the adult beetle shape. Bark beetles mature in about month; and three to eight generations are born each year. The adults have wings. After, they kill the tree in which they developed. They fly off to other trees and start the life cycle again. The first sign of bark beetle infestation are popcorn-sized lumps of pitch, called pitch tubes. These occur at heights up to 16 feet. Although pitch tubes do not appear during dry weather, a dust, which looks something like red sawdust collects in the bark crevices and at the base of trees that are suffering from beetle attack. In the later stages of infestation, small feeding cuts, resembling tiny tunnels, appear on the inside of the bark. The final sign, a sure mark of death for a tree, is change in the color of its needles, which turn from green, to yellow, to red and finally, to brown. For more information on pine bark beetles contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas.ufl. edu or edis.ifas.ufl.edu and see Publication ENY-327. ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorPine bark beetles a danger to pine treesCPR, pet rst aid classes to be offered

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B8| The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ................................. $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1112685This individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. NURSING FACULTY RN TO BSN PROGRAMSalary commensurate with education and experience. Position open until lled. Apply at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98. 1112668 CHAIR, DIVISION PUBLIC SAFETYResponsible for directing the overall Public Safety program to include; coordinating faculty, maintain budget, resolve complaints from students, insure facilities are maintained properly, coordinate class schedules ensuring classes have qualied instructors, maintain & submit curriculum & catalog revisions, schedules, etc. Assist in writing grants; attend meetings as needed & other related duties. Requires: Bachelors degree in Criminology, Criminal Justice or related eld. Masters preferred. Salary Range starts at $52,020 Deadline to apply: 7/18/2013 at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4510161 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Check our cars and trucks in todays classified section! Creamers Tree ServiceLicensed & Insured. Free estimates. (850) 832-9343 Coastal CateringGourmet meals cooked in your own home! We cook & do the dishes.850-447-4751 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on July 18th, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: June 17, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 June 27, July 4, 2013 94127S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 375 Application No. 2013-28 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01713-000R Description of Property: PARCEL NO. I: BEGINNING at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence Northeasterly on a Magnetic Bearing of North 1 Degree 30 Minutes East, for a distance of 245.82 feet to a point; thence turn an angle 19 Degrees 3 Minutes Left and continue Line on a Magnetic Bearing of North 17 Degrees 33 Minutes West, a distance of 131.70 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING, said point being at right angles to and 33 feet Easterly from the C/L of State Highway No. 71; from the POINT OF BEGINNING, project a line on a Magnetic Bearing North 49 Degrees 32 Minutes East for a distance of 250.00 feet, more or less, to a point on the West edge of the West ARM of Dead Lakes Swamp, said Point along being a Point on the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida; thence Northwesterly on a Meandering line along the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida, to a point on the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71, formerly No. 6, said point being the Point of Intersection of the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71 and the channel of the West Arm of Dead Lakes Swamp; thence Southeasterly on the East boundary of State Road 71 (33 feet East of C/L of State Road 71) a distance of 734 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING; being in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, all said land lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line East along the South line of said Section 13, for 232.65 feet, then turn 44 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 672.48 feet to a point of intersection of the C/L of State Road 71 and Jehu Road; then extend a line North 51 Degrees 00 Minutes West along the Centerline of said State Road 71 for 938.0 feet; then turn 92 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 37.39 feet to a concrete monument on the East R/W line of said State Road 71; then turn left along said R/W line for 89.98 feet to a concrete monument; then turn right and extend a line North 46 Degrees 24 Minutes East for 266 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the channel of a Slough for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, extend a line South 46 Degrees 24 Minutes West for 266 feet, more or less, to a concrete monument on the East Right of Way line of State Road 71; then turn right along said R/W line for 80.0 feet; then turn right and extend a line North 45 Degrees 58 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for 234 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the Slough; then turn right along said Slough to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land is in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: James E. Lester, Sr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of July, 2013. Dated this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2013 94167S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 13-37PR IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN ELAINE DURANT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Helen Elaine Durant, deceased, whose date of death was March 18, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 27, 2013. Personal Representative: Sue Recknagel 2728 Via Baya Jacksonville, FL 32223 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for Sue Recknagel FL Bar No.: 261629 P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227-7800 Fax: (850) 227-7878 E-Mail: mmagidson@ gtcom.net June 27, July 4, 2013 94201S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on July 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: REAL PROPERTY Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence N89W, along the Southerly line of said Section 35, 228.08 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71 and to a point on a curve; thence run Northeasterly along said Easterly right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the Northwest having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a delta of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E 421.06 feet, an arc length of 421.22 feet to the point of tangency; thence N08E along said Easterly right of way, 969.90 feet; thence N89E, 7.09 feet to the Easterly maintained right of way of said State Road No. 71 and the Point of Beginning; thence N08E, along said Easterly maintained right of way, 396.05 feet to the point of curvature, thence run Northerly along said Easterly maintained right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the West having a radius of 3097.04 feet, a delta of 07, a chord bearing and distance of N04E 421.41 feet, an arc length of 421.73 feet; thence N90E, 494.61 feet; thence S00E, 807.59 feet; thence S89W, 590.66 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Lot 4, Block C, St. Johns Village as per plat recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 7, Page 21. Also Less and Except: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N89W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N08E, along said Easterly right of way line 969.90 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N89E, 231.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N00W, 155.31 feet along said East right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said East right of way line, N00W, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, N90E, 92.00 feet; thence S00E, 50.00 feet; thence N90W, 92.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands also known as Lot 3, Block B of St. Johns Village, Unit 1 (Proposed) Together with an easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property to-wit: Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N89W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N08E, along said Easterly right of way line 936.48 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N89E, 7.09 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N89E, 229.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N00W, 238.31 feet along said East right of way line; thence leaving said East right of way line, N90W, 50 feet; thence S00E, 172.63 feet; thence S89W, 168.84 feet; thence S08W, 66.84 feet to the Point of Beginning. PERSONAL PROPERTY Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoir, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Amended Motion for Summary Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ST. JOHNS VILLAGE OF GULF COUNTY, INC., a Florida corporation; JERRY HUFT; JAMES TOWNSEND; and ALAN MCNAIR, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-00210. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 4349200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. Kelly & Josh 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Mexico Bch, 111 N 38th St, 7/5 and 7/6, 8:30am-1:30pm ESTMulti-Family Yard Sale GUN SHOWJuly 6th & 7th Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 OtherPart Time Activities DirectorFor High School High Tech Career Mentoring Program35 hours per month, flexible hours during school time. Working with PSJHS students and community employers. Must have experience working with teenage students. Approx: $412.00 per month. High energy, organized, want to make a difference in kids lives. Email drills@talstar.com for info or call Pat Hardman 229-7799. Web ID#: 34256596 Text FL56596 to 56654 Sales/Retail/Bus DevSales ClerkPart time experienced help needed to work afternoons in Marine Store at Bay Bity Lodge. Must enjoy working with people and fishing. Call for interview. 653-9294 Web ID# 34257403 2 bedroom apt.; close to town; Dogwood Terrace Apartments; 808 Woodward Ave, Port St. Joe; (850) 227-7800 Text FL57640 to 56654 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Mexico Bch: 2BD & 2.5BA, furn townhome, beachside, CH&A, DW, W/D, fans throughout, reserved parking. $1000/mo + first/last. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 or Gil 201-895-4255Text FL53889 to 56654 3BR/2BA 1850 sq home on quiet dead end street about mile from the beach in Mexico Beach. Home was built in 2000 and is undergoing significant remodeling including new floors, paint, granite countertops, and stainless appliances. Move in ready by July 15th. $1,300/month 1 Year Lease/Credit Check Required $1,500 Deposit Call Zach Childs Broker/Owner 850-819-0833. Quality Long Term Rentals2 & 3br Avalible, Port St Joe, Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach. Call for more info 348-0262 WEWA Efficiency $390/mo plus $390 security deposit. Also have RVs for rent by the week. Call (850) 639-5721 121 Hunter Circle 3br/2.5ba with bonus room; Completely remodeled 6.5 years ago. 24x40 pole barn with 24x20 closed-in with electricity. In ground sprinkler system, fenced in backyard. Located close to schools and town. $224,700. For more information, call 850-227-5713 or 850-527-5685 Realtors are welcome Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Turn to classifieds Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion . . . . . A4-A5 Letters to the Editor . . . A5 Outdoors . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . A7 School News . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . B8 YEAR 75, NUMBER 38 Thursday, JULY 4, 2013 Property values generally hold steady By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The gloomy budget forecasts emanating from the Board of County Commissioners meeting room may have been a bit premature. Gulf County Property Appraiser Mitch Burke transmitted a preliminary property roll to the state by the July 1 deadline and that roll shows that while taxable tangible property values will dip for a seventh-straight year, this years decline represents less than 1 percent. That is a far cry from even the 7 percent decline of last year and far below the double-digit dips in property value from three and four years ago. Even though the real estate market continues to improve, Gulf Countys overall tax base dropped this year, Burke said. However, the decrease in value was minimal compared to previous years reductions. According to the preliminary numbers transmitted to the Florida Department of Revenue, the countys combined taxable value, including both real and personal, will drop from $1.352 billion to $1.347 billion, a decrease of threetenths of 1 percent. Burke said values were almost exactly where they were in 2003, before the roiling of the real estate market, up and then down. We are seeing new construction taking place, which is great news, Burke said. However, we dont get to realize the true increase in value due mainly to the statewide cap approved in 2008 which caps annual increases on value of non-homestead properties at no more than 10 percent annually. The news for the city of Port St. Joe stood out. The city was the only taxing district to show an increase in its tax base, from $276 million to $279 million, an increase of just over 1 percent. Burke said the increase was primarily the result of the sale of the newly-constructed Dollar General Market store on U.S. Highway 98 and valuations of some commercial lots owned by the St. Joe Company where values needed to be adjusted consistent with current market conditions, Burke said. Weve kind of busted our humps looking at different areas and changing values to where they should be, Burke said. There were some St. Joe properties that had not been adjusted in 10 years or more and we readjusted some of those values. For the Gulf County School See PROPERTY A8 Fun on the Fourth Star Staff Report Independence Day is upon us, and the night sky will lit up Thursday with the glittering explosions of area rework displays. Its an annual event everyone looks forward to, so heres where you can get your x for the Fourth. PORT ST. JOE Midway through the citys 100th birthday and Centennial Celebration on Thursday, Port St. Joe will launch its annual reworks show over St. Joseph Bay at dark. Grab a seat on the shore at dark for the $15,000 display. The Port St. Joe boat ramp will close early that day to accommodate the reworks. WEWAHITCHKA The City of Wewahitchka will begin its annual reworks display at dark. The celebratory display will be launched from T.L. James Park. MEXICO BEACH On Thursday, Mexico Beach will host the Best Blast on the Beach. The celebration begins with the annual Sandy Shoes 5K Fun Run, which starts at Under the Palms Park at 7 a.m. CT. Register in advance for the event at the Tourist Information Center. The race is limited to 325 runners. There will be no registration the day of the race. A kids shing tournament will also take place at Canal Park from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. CT. Free hot dogs, snacks and beverages will be provided for shermen and their parents. At 8:30 p.m. CT the reworks will light up from the pier for this years annual display. St. Joe, Port Authority to partner on initial dredging work By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The Port Authority took a huge rst step in the dredging of the shipping channel last week. The board can thank the St. Joe Company for the assist. Port Authority chair Leonard Costin said he had received a pledge from St. Joe Company ofcials to provide the local match to a Florida Department of Transportation grant that would begin the work toward dredging the Port of Port St. Joe shipping channel. The FDOT grant is for $750,000, said port director Tommy Pitts, with a local match of $250,000. Costin said St. Joe had graciously agreed to provide the quarter million dollars. They stepped up to the plate, Costin said. That is the rst big hurdle. Well be moving ahead from there. The Port Authority See PORT A2 CENTENNIAL P hotos by WES LOCHER | The Star A parade down Reid Avenue marked the start of the centennial celebration. Celebration in full swing By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The Centennial Celebration to honor the 100th birthday of Port St. Joe began last Friday evening with a parade down Reid Avenue. The ceremony celebrated founding members of the city and featured graduates from Port St. Joe High School dating back to 1941. Also making the journey were the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC, cub scouts, The Alley Catz band, and local emergency Some parade participants tossed beads to the onlookers that lined Reid Avenue. Kids of all ages headed to George Core Park on Sunday for the kite ying contest. Founding members of Port St. Joe cruised down Reid Avenue in classic cars. See CENTENNIAL A8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 board approved a joint par ticipation agreement with the FDOT and St. Joe to move ahead on a study of the dredging, with Pitts noting a sense of urgency in encumbering the grant dollars before the end of the scal year. The money will be used for study and permitting as well as some initial engineering en route to a dredging plan, Pitts said. The Port Authority has received qualications to undertake the work from the two engineering rms under continuing contract with the port, but said the Port Authority should hold off until receiving clari cation on several issues. Pitts said a meeting with the countys state legislative delegation as well as Congressman Steve Southerland would be helpful to establish how to proceed. There are a lot of ques tions to be answered be fore the process begins, Pitts said. Those questions are linked to the parallel paths the port is working on for the dredging, one on per mitting, the other funding. It will be a major ef fort, Pitts said. The shipping channel has not be dredged since 1980, Pitts said. Pitts said the shortest course to the dredging would likely be securing funding from outside the U.S. Army Corps of Engi neers, which ultimately would have to perform the dredging. The most time-condu cive option would be to seek funding from a vari ety of sources, the Florida Legislature, RESTORE Act funds coming to the county, federal funds and the State Infrastructure Bank. If the funds can be raised, and the amount would be well into the mil lions of dollars, those dol lars could be provided to the Corps under an agree ment by which the Corps, once dredging is complet ed under its permit, would pledge reimbursement in the future. The other alternative would be working directly with the Corps, which would likely require far more time, Pitts said. Im also concerned the dredging will require an Environmental Impact Statement, which would take at least two years, Pitts said. We may only need an Environmental Assessment a far less time-consuming, intensive process. Time is of the essence for the dredging. In the past two months the St. Joe Company has entered into Letters of Intent that would, among other aspects, mean the shipping of some 1.125 mil lion metric tons of wood pellets through the port by way of the AN Railway. Both LOIs contemplate lead time for dredging to take place. An LOI with Green Circle Bio Energy contem plates a window of roughly two years for dredging to be completed before the shipping through the Port of Port St. Joe. A second LOI, with Enova Energy Group, indi cates the company would not be ready to begin ship ping pellets until the latter half of 2014 at the earliest. But both LOIs are con tingent on the completion of the dredging. As Pitts noted those two LOIs also provide the economic justica tion for the maintenance dredging and would also likely impact a proposed FDOT grant for improve ments to the AN Railway. A FDOT grant of $5 mil lion was announced earli er this year, but Pitts said the grant dollars were now stalled and Costin said the state is, in a sense, link ing the rail grant to the dredging. I dont see how they can stall it much longer, Costin said, alluding to the announcement of the LOI with Enova. Revenue and staff With the Florida De partment of Economic Opportunity grant dollars for the update of the port master plan expended, the Port Authority, faced with the prospect of nishing the scal year in Septem ber in the red, asked Pitts to return to a salary of $1 per month. It is important we get through the scal year and have some money, Costin said. If we continue with Tommy as director we would have a decit. Weve been here before, well probably be back here again. We need him desper ately. Its obvious we can not continue after June with a directors salary. Pitts agreed to return to the $1 per month he made prior to the FDEO grant. I understand the situ ation, Pitts said. I will continue at $1 per month. Nadine Lee, assistant to Pitts, will also remain onboard as a contract employee. Ill work with you any way I can, Lee said. My heart is in this, too. Costin said he was working on several things to address the lack of reve nue for maintaining a pres ence at the Port Authority and expressed optimism the Port Authority could get to September with money left in the bank. I think well have a so lution to our cash ow by September, Costin said. No guarantees, but Im hopeful. Loretta Costin with the Gulf County Economic De velopment Alliance, Inc. applauded Pitts decision to continue to work for the port. As a member of the community and a member of the EDA, I want to thank Tommy for staying on for $1 a month, Loretta Cos tin said. He does so much and we ask so much of him. I just appreciate it. C all f or inf or mation about our r ot ating specialists: W eems Medical Cent er East Monda y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00am-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-4:30pm W ednesda y 8:00-4:30pm Thur sda y 8:00-4:30pm F r ida y (e xt ended hour s) 8:00-6:00pm S atur da y 8:00-4:00pm Not e: appointments will be scheduled up t o 30min. pr ior t o close (w alk-ins still w elcome up until close) W eems Medical Cent er W est Monda y 8:00-6:00pm T uesda y 8:00-6:00pm W ednesda y 8:00-6:00pm Thur sda y 8:00-6:00pm F AMIL Y AND SPECIAL TY CARE 850-653-8853, e xt. 1 1 8 Apalac hicola 850-697 -2345 Car r abelle NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. ww w .m ulli se y e.c om Medical Ey e Exam with f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases 850-7 63-6666 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances Boar d Cer tified and Catar act Sur g eon Boar d Cer tified and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 7-31-13 CODE: SJ00 e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community s U niv ersity by helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR C OMMUNIT Y S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w s J obs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL PORT from page A1 By TIM CROFT @PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m An Overstreet man was arrested last week on charges of aggravated battery and leaving the scene of accident involv ing property damage after he chased and crashed a vehicle he believed was driven by his ex-wife, Gulf County Sheriffs Office in vestigators said. Kenneth Norris Rog ers, 43, was initially taken into custody on Tuesday afternoon. A 9-1-1 caller reported that a van had collided with her vehicle on State 71 and Flem ing Curve and had ed the scene. Shortly there after, Sgt. John Murnan located the suspect vehicle and identied Rogers, who said he thought the other vehicle was his ex-wifes van. Rogers told Murnan he had stopped to check on the driver. Rogers was taken back to the scene of the crash, where he was ar rested by the Flor ida Highway Pa trol on charges of leaving the scene of a crash involv ing damage to ve hicle or property, a second-degree misdemeanor. He was transported to the Gulf County Jail. During a follow-up in vestigation, investigators discovered Rogers had tail gated the victim from the Gulf and Calhoun County line into Wewahitchka, ac cording to the GCSO. When the victim ar rived in Wewahitchka, she stopped briey to conduct work-related business off State 71. Once back on State 71 she noticed Rog ers was again behind her. Rogers continued to tailgate her vehicle south on State 71, at speeds es timated at roughly 60 mph, before reaching Fleming Curve at which time Rog ers drove his van into the rear end of her van. Rogers pulled along the drivers side and collided again with the victims ve hicle, forcing her from the road. Once he opened the vic tims door and discovered it was not his ex-wife he ed, according to the GCSO. Investigators deter mined Rogers actions were intentional, believing it was his ex-wife. Rogers was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony. He was released on $5,000 bond. Overstreet man arrested after crashing wrong vehicle KENNETH N O RR IS ROGE R S Sgt. John Murnan located the suspect vehicle and identied Rogers, who said he thought the other vehicle was his ex-wifes van. Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas |

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, July 4, 2013 S tar t a hea t pump w a t er hea t er r ev olution Heat pump wat er heat ers pr o vide as much as $300 in ener gy sa vings per y ear compar ed t o a traditional elec tr ic wat er heat er and y ou get t wice as much hot wat er fr om each k ilo watt -hour of elec tr icit y consumed w w w .gc ec .c om or (850) 639.2216 1.800.333.9392 vide as much as $300 o ers pr er heat Heat pump wat y consumed icit tr -hour of elec watt ilo om each k er fr wat W o rk in g T o ge the r ... T o B ui l d The F u t ur e G u lf C o un t y R e p u b li c a n P a r t y M e m b e r C o mm uni c a t i o ns C o mmi t t e e G u lf c o un t y r e p u b li c a ns@g ma i l .c o m W e me e t mo n th ly e v e r y thir d M o nd a y 7 PM ES T (u ps ta irs) a t C a p i ta l C i t y Ba n k N e xt M e e t in g: J u ly 15, 2013 IT'S INDEPENDENCE D A Y! T OD A Y WE COMMEMORA TE THE A CTIONS OF OUR NA TION'S FOUNDERS JUL Y 4TH 1776 AMONG Y OUR MANY A CTIVITIES T OD A Y PLEASE T AKE A MOMENT AND REVIEW OUR DECLARA TION OF INDEPENDENCE WHEN IT THE COURSE OF HUMAN EVENTS WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS T O BE SELF EVIDENT ,. AND FOR THE SUPPOR T OF THIS DECLARA TION WE MUTUALL Y PLEDGE T O EA CH O THER OUR LIVES OUR FOR TUNES AND OUR SA CRED HONOR. THIS W AS D A Y ONE OF THE UNITED ST A TES OF AMERICA NOW 237 YEARS LA TER REMEMBER THE 56 COURA GEOUS SIGNERS AND THE NEW AMERICAN CITIZENS WHO GA VE THIS NA TION ITS BEGINNING AND ALL OF US THE OPPOR TUNITY OF AMERICANS 719 H w y 98, Me xico Beach w w w .t ouc ansme xicobeach .com ALL Y OU C AN EA T BREAKF AST S a t & S un. Morning S tar ting a t 8AM A ll C entr al T imes THUR. NIGHT T r ue S oul Upstairs Bar DJ a t the T ik i B ar with Ligh t S ho w L adies N igh t FRI. NIGHT L o c al M otion Upstairs Bar DJ T ik i Bar WED NIGHT B arr y H enson Upstairs Bar DJ T ik i Bar S A T. NIGHT L o c al M otion Upstairs Bar DJ T ik i Bar SUN. NIGHT T r ue S oul Upstairs Bar DJ T ik i Bar C OME W A T CH THE FIRE W ORKS ALL FIRE W ORKS C AN BE SEEN FR OM HERE By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County School Board last week took pos session of Lamar Faison Fields, including the soccer complex and tennis courts, from the city of Port St. Joe, including the soccer com plex and tennis courts. The city and School Board have been discuss ing the exchange for sev eral months, but there were several issues requiring resolution. One was receiving an OK from the St. Joe Com pany, which had donated the land to the city for the recreational complex. Second, the school dis trict had to ensure that the complex remained available for public use as state parks and recreation grant funds had been used to build the complex. From the citys stand point, deeding over the com plex was about cost-savings. The city will save more than $100,000 required annu ally for upkeep and mainte nance to the elds and ten nis courts. The city and district staff agreed the district was bet ter suited to maintain the soccer elds at the Lamar Faison complex as part of its upkeep of other sports elds. For the school district, it was an opportunity to expand the Port St. Joe El ementary School campus to take more control over park ing and also maintenance of land between the school and Lamar Faison Fields. The school board ef fectively owns all land sur rounding the complex. Im very excited about it, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. This gives us a chance to fur ther beautify our campus on the south end (closest to Madison Avenue) and on the north end it allows us to control and add to the parking. This lets us control more property that is all part of one campus. The city and district will share a lawnmower the city has used to maintain the elds. The district takes on no additional insurance liability. The community and especially the soccer com munity should be pleased, Norton said. Soccer is part of the now and part of the future. FEMALE PHYSICAL ED TEACHER IN WE W AHITCHKA At the request of the principal, Wewahitchka Jr./ Sr. High School will adver tise for a female physical education teacher. The school has not had a female instructor in several years, and Debbie Baxley requested the new hire to ensure safety for girls in the school. Norton noted the district hoped to tick off several needs for female coaches for softball and girls bas ketball with the hire.VOLUNTARY P REK Deborah Crosby, direc tor of Special Services, said registration for voluntary pre-K for the coming school year was open on a rstcome, rst-served basis. She said the district had 40 slots in the south end of the county and 20 in the north end. A child must be 4 years old by Sept. 1 and have proof of Florida residence to register. For more information contact Crosby at 229-6940.L IONS C LUB DONATIONS The Lions Club donated $500 to each of the coun tys two football programs, with Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon and Wewa hitchka coach Dennis Kiz ziah on hand to receive the donations. District takes deed to Lamar Faison Fields The community and especially the soccer community should be pleased. Soccer is part of the now and part of the future.Jim Norton Superintendent of schools Special to The Star Recently, the newly elected ofcers of the John C. Gainous Post No. 10069 of the Veter ans of Foreign Wars were sworn in by the District 17 Commander, Roger LaChance. The Veterans of Foreign Wars is an orga nization of veterans who served directly in a eld of combat defending America. Locally, the VFW supports the commu nity along a broad spectrum of needs and interests. These ofcers will serve the John C. Gainous Post for the coming year. S PECIAL TO T HE S TAR From left are Elmer Green, Adjutant; Rick Armstrong, Junior Vice Commander; Mike Lowry, Senior Vice Commander; Rodney Herring, Commander; Phillip Dodson, Quartermaster; and Richard Maupin, Trustee. New ofcers sworn in at VFW Post 10069

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I wish I could spend this Fourth of July on Bunker Hill. From there you can see Breeds Hill where most of the ghting actually took place back in 1775. It was the rst sustained, pitched battle of the American Revolution. We lost that day. But we didnt run. A group of rag tag New England colonist stood up to the best equipped and most feared army in the world at that time and didnt blink. When the day was over the British occupied both hills. But they lost almost one-third of their ghting men in the taking. And the young American soldiers didnt slink away. They retreated like an organized ghting unit. Both sides learned a valuable lesson that day. Ive gotten so caught up in the comfort of my own living these days that I dont dwell much on how I got here. In my near sighted egotistical mind, I probably think I did it with my own power and might. The Continental Army was of cially three days old when the ght for Bunker Hill took place. Those Bunker Hill defenders hadnt had time to be sworn in. They were ghting for the most basic things on earth; freedom, liberty, independence.the right to make their own way! Ive enjoyed those attributes of this great nation all my life. Ive done piddling little to obtain them. Maybe if I could stand on that hill on this Independence Day I could catch a glimpse of the spirit of those men. I wonder about the thoughts racing through their heads as they dug in. I wonder how each individual defender came to be on that hill on that particular day. I wonder about their age. (The minimum age to enlist in the Continental Army was 16; 15 with parental consent.) I wonder if they were as afraid as I would have been when the Red Coats formed up below. I wonder if they had any inkling of the nation they were laying the foundation for when they raised those muskets to their shoulders. I do not wonder about their courage. When I was 16 years old I was playing American Legion Baseball and dating Billie Jean Barham. I would love this Fourth of July to stand silently over in one corner of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. I believe I could hear the 2nd Continental Congress as they convened there on May, 10, 1775. All thirteen colonies were represented. The small battles of Lexington and Concord had taken place. It was time to make amends with the British or ght. Can you imagine among John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Hancock, Patrick Henry and Benjamin Franklin who listened to whom! It was about as impressive a list of founding fathers as any nation has ever put together under one roof. And they didnt do too badly in that room. They had the good sense to pick George Washington as the commanding General of the Army. An army, of course, which they didnt exactly have at the moment. It was where the Declaration of Independence was born. When in the course of human events.. you talk about a great opening line. And how about, We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And after enumerating all the injustices heaped on them by King George and the Crown they closed brilliantly, with a rm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. Man, if I could write like that, Id be a millionaire! Ben Franklin, off the record, put it a little more succinctly, If we dont all hang together, well all hang separately. If I had a time machine, Id warp back to Valley Forge this Fourth of July. Of course, I couldnt catch the essence of the place in July. The snow would be gone. It would be 90 degrees instead of 10 below freezing. You wouldnt have to scrounge up re wood. If wouldnt matter that you had no shoes. Its hard to imagine hunger on a full belly. The winter of 1777-78 was brutal. Cold descended on the little valley like you aint never seen! Disease ran rampant in the camps. Life was worse than miserable. You have to ask yourself, What could possibly cause a band of men in such conditions to hang on like they did. And you might even consider what you might have done under like circumstances. Or you might pause and utter up a prayer of thanks for them on this Independence Day. History well records what those men did. They got up off the cold ground, wrapped some rags around their bleeding feet and marched out to meet the enemy. They fought like the fate of a nation rested in their hands. I wish this Fourth of July I could transport back to the little town square of my youth in McKenzie, Tennessee. I stood beside my ram rod straight Father as the ag passed by and waited impatiently until I could move again. He had his hand over his heart and tears in his eyes. I just wanted the parade to get over with so I could get to the barbeque and baked beans. Dad understood those men at Bunker Hill. And at Valley Forge. Hed seen the re from the enemy. Hed stood in the gap for this nation. I would love to tell him, Ive got it now, Dad. Its high time we all did! Respectfully, Kes A good friend is always advising me to read Flannery OConnor. I never tell him, but I already do. Im from the South; Im supposed to read Flannery OConnor. However, I sometimes read her same stories over and over again. A Good Man is Hard to Find is my favorite. It is violent and strange, but still so funny. Ive read it many times simply looking for something new to think about. Her short stories are the subject of many books whose authors try to interpret what Flannery OConnor wanted to convey. Honestly, I think this is an important beauty of her work it can be interpreted in so many ways. In the middle of the outrageous, often disturbing tales, I nd a wonderful sense of southern bespectacled woman humor. Flannery makes me smile, laugh and scratch my head. Spending time with her is something that I enjoy. The other day while sitting in the back of my college classroom reading one of Flannerys stories, my right eye started watering, throbbing and feeling like it was going to fall out of my head. My nose was dripping, then running like a sieve. My students were taking a test, so I went to the restroom to get something to wipe my eye and nose. Coming back into the classroom, I turned on the oscillating fan in the back of the room and sat down to continue reading Flannerys Revelation. Again, I do not nd sadness in her stories; I nd Flannerys big smile, bookish glasses and sharp southern Catholic wit. I had gotten to the part in the story where a lady (Mrs. Turpin) sitting in the waiting room of a doctors of ce gets hit in the head by a book thrown by a young lady named Mary Grace. Perhaps one of my students had hit me, without me realizing it. That is exactly what it felt like. We have a pretty big textbook and my right eye felt as though someone had hit me, hurling it from somewhere in the front of the room. That was not the case. Going back and forth to the hall of the building for relief, I started to gure out something in my classroom was causing my right eye to explode and my nose to cry. The oscillating fan had only made it worse. Then it hit me like a book thrown from across the classroom. I knew what it was Growing up I spent a lot of Saturdays and summer days in my Grandmamas ten cent store in Wedowee, Alabama. Grandmama sold candy, magazines, kitchen stuff, toys and everything else you would imagine in a rural Alabama ten cent store. She even sold perfume. I distinctly remember my Mama warning me never to open the little bottles with the red lids. I would ask her, Why not? She wouldnt explain. Some children are going to do what you tell them they shouldnt do; it is even more probable when you do not give them an explanation of why not to do it. So one hot summer afternoon, I decided to open one of the little bottles with the red lids. My eyes watered, my nose ran, and for a very long time, everyone who came in uttered the same phrase as soon as they came in Grandmamas ten cent store with the wooden screen door and oscillating fans blowing left and right around the cash register where Grandmama would sit and wait to do business with the folks that would wander in. They would say, Somebody opened a bottle of Atom Bomb. Atom Bomb was cheap perfume; as a matter of fact, it was the cheapest perfume Grandmama sold. What on earth would cause someone to want to put something like that on their body puzzled me. Just thinking about the smell makes my eyes pour water my right eye in particular. I still dont know how to best describe the aroma or stench. Perhaps being drowned in vanilla avoring, while someone poured gasoline on your sunburn, while another fellow squirted vinegar based hot pepper sauce in your eyes (particularly your right one). Mama explained to me that the type of folks who used Atom Bomb perfume usually did so to cover up the fact that they didnt take a bath. Mama taught school in Alabama for 42 years, she was good at explaining things like this. She also probably knew that if she had explained it to me before I opened one of the little bottles with the red lids, I would have opened it anyway. Flannery OConnor could have gotten away with a much more straightforward explanation of the reason and type of folks that might need to use Atom Bomb perfume. Someone would have probably died in the process, but there would have been humor involved and the underlying message could have been taken (or appreciated) in a variety of scents. The smell in my classroom was not going away; it was just being oscillated back and forth so as to continue to hit me on the left, right, top and bottom of my right eye. I couldnt continue reading Flannerys Revelation because I was using various combinations of my hands and ngers to hold my right eye in my head and going back and forth to the hallway for air. On deaths door and reading this particular story, I started thinking about the Book of Revelation in the Bible. I remember somewhere the angels burning perfume or incense and it smoking and people praying. There was thunder, rumblings, lightning ashing and earthquakes. My right eye was de nitely going to fall out if I didnt hold it in. I had gured out the best way to keep it in was to jab my right thumb into it, Ron Pollack Executive Director, Families USA At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiums? A: When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security bene t each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also re ect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income bene ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can nd out if you qualify and apply online at www.socialsecurity. gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www.familiesusa. org/resources/programlocator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a xed incomeand thats most peoplethis is encouraging news. Families USA is the national organization for health care consumers. We have advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. Ron Pollack is the Executive Director of Families USA. Revelation and the Atom Bomb Understanding Medicare Premiums Oh, Say, Can You See... HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, July 4, 2013 A Page 4 Section See CRANKS A5

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CRANKS from page A4 palm up and hold it there by hanging on to my right ear with the other four ngers. Finally, the class was over. The headache and the smell of the Atom Bomb stayed with me for the rest of the evening. Mamas and Flannerys words will stay with me forever. Flannery OConnor died in August of 1964, at the age of 39, of complications from lupus. I write because I dont know what I think until I read what I say. ~ Flannery OConnor Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Lyons, NE As Congress argues over farm subsidies and food stamps, Rural Americans complain that elected of cials ignore small communities and fail to invest in their future. So found a unique, comprehensive poll of Rural Americans on the role of federal policy in creating economic opportunity for rural people and a future for their communities. The poll was conducted by the nationally respected bipartisan polling team of Celinda Lake of Lake Research and Ed Goeas of The Tarrance Group and released today by the Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons, NE. It surveyed rural voters in the Great Plains, Midwest and Southeast. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http://www.cfra.org/ news/130625/rural-pollreleased-today. The poll found Rural Americans united in their commitment to their way of life. Nearly 9 in 10 believe the rural and small-town way of life is worth ghting for. But they sadly believe the rural way of life may be fading and they want to stop it, reverse it, and revitalize rural America, said pollsters Lake and Goeas, and they believe they are being ignored by politicians and government and blame them for the state of the rural economy. Nevertheless, the poll found divided views about the role of government and populist views about the economy and big institutions. Three fourths agree that Americas future is weakened by a widening gap between the rich and families struggling to make ends meet. But they split evenly on whether its time for government to play a stronger role in strengthening rural communities and making the economy work for the average person in rural and small-town America; or whether turning to big government to solve our problems will do more harm than good. Neither the conservative nor progressive ideological perspective has it right, said Lake. On the one hand, the language around lower taxes, smaller government, and fewer regulations is one of the highest testing messages. On the other, they support policies that call for more job training, increased infrastructure investments, more technology, and better preschools all requiring a role for government in making things better. Goeas said, It is too simplistic to believe rural America is antigovernment and that there is nothing for progressives to say, nor is it possible to say that rural America wants bigger government and more spending. They want tax breaks but they also support increased loans and grants to help people gain skills and open small businesses. They want more ef cient and effective government and view much of public policy as a fairness issue in which rural America has not received fair treatment. Among the results: Over half said that owning my own business or farm is a big part of the American dream for me and most agreed with helping small business through less government (cutting taxes, spending and regulation) and strengthened government (loans, tax credits, training and antitrust enforcement). Three fourths agree that too much of federal farm subsidies go to the largest farms, hurting smaller family farms. Three fourths support tax credits and investment in new transmission lines for development of wind, solar and other renewable electric generation in rural areas. Eight in ten support grants and loans to revitalize small towns through upgrades to water and sewer systems and investments in roads and bridges. Six in ten say government has some or a lot of responsibility to help the working poor advance economically (versus a little or none). Eight in ten support job training to improve earnings, Medicaid for health coverage and helping the working poor afford necessities through payroll tax refunds like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Eighty ve percent favor preschool programs to prepare lower-income children to succeed in school. Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years ago, said Lake. But rural Americans are somewhat optimistic that things will get better, said Goeas, and younger rural Americans are most optimistic. Center for Rural Affairs Executive Director Chuck Hassebrook said the optimism of the upcoming generation re ects the new entrepreneurial opportunities in rural America and growing appreciation for the rural way of life. They get it, said Hassebrook, and that gives them the capacity to lead their communities to a better future. Politically, said Hassebrook, the poll reveals openings for candidates of either party willing to ght for federal policy that supports genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their communities. He pointed to the question asking voters whether they would nd it convincing if a US Senate candidate made certain statements. Eighty seven percent said they would nd it convincing for a Senate candidate to say: Small-town America is a big and important part of what makes America go. We are hard working, patriotic, faithful, and skilled. Making sure our families, our small business owners, and our workers have the same chance as everyone else is fair and smart. That means supporting policies like investing more in helping our small businesses get started and bringing technology to our areas so we can be connected to the new economy. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http:// www.cfra.org/news/130625/ rural-poll-released-today Established in 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs is a private, non-pro t organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, July 4, 2013 A Page 5 Section Memories of my ride on a mule Dear Editor, I always wanted to go horseback riding but since we didnt own a horse, I never got the opportunity. But whats the difference between riding a horse or a mule? I soon found out when I decided to go for a ride on the mule that belonged to the young man who farmed our play place and had left his mule tied to our fence. Oh, I thought, this is my golden opportunity. With no former experience at horseback riding, I crawled on the mules back and took off down the road for my first ride. The mule did not want to be taking anyone for a ride during his time in the shade, so he tried to turn around and go back to the cool shade. I kept making him go forward until he carried me over to a ditch. I could tell what he had in mind, so I pulled the right reign and turned him around and let him go back to his place under the shade of the large oak tree. I have not tried to ride a mule again. Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe Employees make a difference Dear Editor, I would like to commend the man merchants as well as their employees in Port St. Joe for their courtesy and helpfulness to the shopper. It makes shopping more enjoyable. Sincerely, Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe Letters to the EDITOR Have you ever ordered something online that was delivered damaged or never arrived at all? Or been double-billed by a merchant? Or spotted a charge on your credit card statement you didnt make? Most of us have. Fortunately, the 1975 Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects your rights during such credit card billing disputes. It also outlines the process for contesting charges made to your account. Heres how it works First, FCBA protection applies only to openend credit account transactions those involving credit cards or revolving charges (e.g., department store accounts). It doesnt cover installment contracts you repay on a fixed schedule, such as car loans. Billing errors that are covered by the FCBA include: Fraudulent or unauthorized use of your credit card, whether it was stolen or merchants charged unapproved items to your account. Charges that list the wrong date or amount. Charges for goods or services you either did not accept or that werent delivered as agreed. Math errors, such as being charged twice for a transaction. Failure to post payments or other credits. (Note: Report suspected fraud immediately. By law, youre only liable for the first $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.) Review all billing statements carefully upon receipt because in order to be covered under FCBA rules, most disputed transactions must be reported within 60 days of the statement date on which the error appeared. First, contact the merchant and try to resolve the dispute directly with them. If this good-faith resolution attempt doesnt work, you can escalate the process by filing a written report with your credit card issuer within the 60-day window. The card issuer is then obligated to investigate the dispute on your behalf. They must acknowledge your complaint, in writing, within 30 days of receipt and resolve the dispute with the merchant within two billing cycles but not more than 90 days. Send your letter via certified mail to the card issuers billing inquiry address, not the payment address. Include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error. Include copies of sales slips or other documents that support your position. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), you may withhold payment of the disputed amount and related charges during the investigation. In fact, many card issuers may voluntarily remove the charge until the matter is resolved since they are representing you, their client, in the dispute. If it turns out your bill contains a mistake, the creditor must explain, in writing, the corrections that will be made. In addition to crediting your account, they must remove all finance charges, late fees, or other charges related to the error. However, if the card issuers investigation determines that you owe part or all of the disputed amount, they must promptly provide you with a written explanation. If you disagree with the investigations results, you may further dispute your claim with the creditor, as outlined by the FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov/ articles/0219-fair-creditbilling. (That site also contains a sample dispute letter and other helpful FCBA information.) If you believe a creditor has violated the FCBA, you may file a complaint with the FTC or sue them in court. Hopefully, youll never have a billing dispute that goes to these extremes. But its good to know how consumer laws protect you, just in case. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. How to dispute a credit card charge New poll suggests more nuanced attitude towards federal role JASON ALDERMAN Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years ago Celinda Lake Lake Research Report suspected fraud immediately. By law, youre only liable for the rst $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.

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COME JOIN US FOR THE 4 TH OF JUL Y SIDEW ALK SALE! JUL Y 3RD & 4TH Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, July 4, 2013 OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore Offshore Red snapper is still in season in state waters, 9 miles from land, but the fish will be harder to land in shallow water. Try using lighter line and smaller hooks with cut bait fished half way to the bottom. Gag grouper is open again in our region this week with no new changes in the bag limits or sizes. Good sized fish are in 150ft of water due south of the Cape. Our regions lakes, rivers, and creeks are close to full with so much rain lately and the fish have responded well to the cooler rain water. Big bream and catfish are being caught in the Brother and Howard creek. Try using a 5-6ft light fly rod and a chartruse or glow popper for great action under low hanging trees and limbs. By Tom Baird Special to The Star Florida has over 1,000 miles of coastline, more than any state in the continental U.S. Here physical forces have shaped barrier islands and offshore keys with abundant shallow bays that are perfect habitats for the luxuriant growth of submerged plants. Along the northern Gulf coast a broad shallow continental shelf absorbs wave energy produced by storms far at sea. Here the shallow, quiet waters and rm limestone substrate offer ideal conditions for the growth of seagrasses. The angler and weekend scalloper are well aware of the submerged seagrasses in St. Joseph Bay. Anyone swimming or snorkeling at Eagle Harbor in St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has seen or felt these grasses underfoot. You might have seen windrows of decaying grasses after a storm as you walk the beach looking for shells, or you have seen the long propeller scars cut through grass ats when they are exposed at very low tides. In the bay, one can observe the wading herons and egrets dining on trapped shes and crustaceans on low tides. These vast submerged meadows are teeming with marine life. Many scuba divers and snorkelers feel that the offshore beds of seagrasses are just as impressive as any coral reef. Despite the name, seagrasses are not true grasses at all. The plants in our bay and offshore belong to usually one to ve or so species of plants that produce owers and seeds underwater in tropical seas. One of these, turtle grass, has been reported to ower as far north as Tarpon Springs, and occasionally around Panama City. However, most of our local seagrasses reproduce vegetatively with long runners. Seagrass beds form extensive animal spawning grounds and habitats, with some fishes becoming so adapted to this environment that they can mimic the waving grass blades as camouflage. The grass blades also offer a site for smaller plants and animals to colonize. The seagrasses are fed upon directly by manatees, sea turtles, sea urchins and some fishes. At one time large herds of sea turtles fed on these grasses and St. Joseph Bay remains a vital feeding ground for sea turtles. Seagrasses are important indirectly as food. The decaying leaves are decomposed by an array of small worms, crustaceans and fishes that are in turn feed upon by larger forms of life. An example of this abundant productivity is provided by the results of a study of common turtle grass in Boca Ciega Bay in Pinellas County, which found the grass can produce up to 3000 pounds per acre in dry weight of leaves. There was even a study that found that cattle and sheep grow better on turtle grass than any other forage. However, the grass beds do not stand up well to harvesting, so it is best to harvest the seagrasses indirectly as seafood on the table. Like all plants, seagrasses need a suitable substrate on which to grow, but the location of seagrass beds is also determined by salinity, depth and the clarity of the water. Each species of seagrass has its own preference in each category. Turtle grass, our most common grass in the bay, prefers relatively high salinities and cannot stand being uncovered at low tide. Since St. Joseph Bay is often as salty as the gulf, turtle grass thrives. Growing closest to the edge is shoal grass. It can stand some occasional drying at low tide and lowered salinity from rainfall runoff. Since all green plants need sunlight to make food, the seagrasses are very much affected by any action that makes the water muddy or turbid. Turtle grass can be seen growing at 100 foot depths in the Florida Keys, but in more turbid waters grows to depths of about 8 or 9 feet. Dredging operations to deepen channels or past practices to make land for housing not only smother the grasses and other bottom life, but also make the water too turbid for light to penetrate to sufficient depths. The different species of seagrasses are easy to identify. Turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum), our most common seagrass in the bay, has a long strap-shaped leaf blade (2-12 inches) that is about one-half inch wide. This wide blade sets it apart from the other grasses. The stem is connected to a tough root or rhizome that parallels the surface of the mud or sand with leaves arising in clusters of two to five blades. Turtle grass is often considered a plant of the tropics as it occurs extensively throughout the Caribbean and West Indies. However, it ranges throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico as well. Boat propellers can damage this grass severely. Boaters should take care not to damage these grass beds, especially in the shallow south end of the bay, because it is very slow to grow back. Shoal grass or Shoalweed (Halodule wrightii) has a very thin, narrow leaf that is only about one-eighth inch wide. The leaves can be 1 to 18 inches long and often have a blunt tip. Youll find shoal grass in the narrow intertidal shallows of the bay. Since large areas of seagrass beds have been destroyed throughout the state by past dredging for buildings, finger-fill canals, island hopping for road construction and pollution, the care of the remaining seagrass beds is critical. Because their elaborate rhizome and root systems trap and stabilize sediments, they ensure better water clarity. Their role as nursery and feeding ground for young fish, shrimp, crabs, scallops and turtles makes them critical to the success of sport and commercial fisheries. Take care not to damage our submerged seagrasses. Tom Baird has been a fisheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. The seagrass beds of St. Joseph Bay are the places to look for scallops this season. WEEKL Y ALM ANA C Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu July 04 84 78 80 % F ri, July 05 87 78 70 % S a t July 06 88 80 40 % Sun, July 07 89 79 30 % M on, July 08 89 79 10 % T ues July 09 89 78 60 % W ed July 10 89 79 60 % S T JO SEPH B A Y A P AL A CH I C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS 4514932 i s h e r e f o r yo u r boa t i n g n e e d s! MARIN A FO RK LIFT/R A CKS T O R A GE CAN O P IED B O A T S T O R A GE & B O A S T RENT AL D IES EL & GA SO LINE CAPT AIN SAL T Y B AIT S & I CE GA TED S ELF S T O R A GE, TR AILERED B O A T S & R V'S (850)-227-3357 1617 GR O UP ER A VENUE, PO R T S T J O E, FL WWW .CAPT AINSC O VEFL.C O M S P O NS OR THE WEEKL Y ALM ANA C 227-7847 C ALL T O D A Y! Page 6 Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.starfl.com By Tom Baird swimming or snorkeling The seagrass beds of St. Joseph Bay are the places to look for scallops this season. Seagrasses SPECIAL TO THE STAR A green sea turtle resting in seagrass. SCALLOPING SEASON SPECIAL TO THE STAR Several groups of people were out searching for scallops earlier this week.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, July 4, 2013 Page 7 Noah Wich, Braden Baumgartner, Jacob Curcie and Michael Sherrill participated in the free golf lessons in June. SJBGC nishes free junior golf lessons Special to The Star The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club completed a series of free golf lessons for junior golfers on Friday, June 28. Each year, the club offers these free lessons on each Friday in June. Twenty-three juniors took advantage of this free offering. The sessions were led by Certi ed Golf Instructor, Ethel Bardsley. Ethel was assisted by Penelope Evanoff, Russell Bardsley and other members of the club. In addition to learning the game of golf, the students were allowed to enjoy the club swimming pool following each lesson. The club is open to the public and is an important community asset year around. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Penelope Evanoff teaches the ner points of putting to Leanne Baumgartner, Ryanne Wich and Ellie Wich. Star Staff Report For the rst time, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls basketball team joined the boys in spending a portion of the summer playing and attending camps. The Lady Tiger Sharks nished their summer 8-14, a respectable record for a team that will have no seniors or juniors this coming season. The team is comprised of three sophomores, Callie Fleshner, Morgan Gant, and Jamarion Larry, three freshmen, Hallie Jasnski, Khaliayah Johnson and Maliayah McNair and four 8 th -graders, Teiyahna Hutchinson, Brooklynn Quinn, Aliayah Johnson, and Java Patterson. The month of June began with a trip to Freeport where the Lady Tiger Sharks went 1-2, playing Freeport, Paxton and South Walton. Next up was a trip to Poplar Springs, for a camp known as the Border War during which Florida schools compete against schools from Alabama. The Lady Tiger Sharks played six games in two days, going 1-5. Port St. Joe boarded a bus again for a four-hour drive to Columbus, GA to compete at the Columbus State University team camp. The Lady Tiger Sharks played schools Class 3A and larger and came away 2-5. The last stop was this past weekend at the University of Florida where 82 high school girls teams came to enjoy the Gator campus. The Lady Tiger Sharks went 4-2, the two losses coming by a combined ve points. The team would like to thank the following people for making this summer a success: Mrs. Brenda Fisher, Coach Kenny Parker, George Durens Piggly Wiggly, Greg Williams of Williams Gunn and Pawn, and Joey Browning of Columbus Trophy and Screen Printing. Lady Tiger Sharks hone skills during summer LADY TIGER SHARKS 2013 SCHEDULE DATE Day Opponent Home/Away Time(ET) 26 Aug Mon Rutherford Away 6:00/7:00 27 Aug Tue West Gadsden Home 6:00 3 Sep Tue Bay Haven Away 6:00/7:00 5 Sep Thu Bay High Home 6:00/7:00 9 Sep Mon Wewahitchka Away 6:00/7:00 10 Sep Tue South Walton Away 6:00/7:00 12 Sep Thu Bozeman Home 6:00/7:00 14 Sep Sat Chipley Tour. Away All Day 17 Sep Tue Franklin County Away 6:00/7:00 19 Sep Thu Bozeman Away 6:00/7:00 23 Sep Mon Liberty County Home 6:00/7:00 24 Sep Tue West Gadsden Away 6:00 26 Sep Thu Bay Haven Home 6:00/7:00 3 Oct Thu South Walton Away 6:00/7:00 7 Oct Mon Liberty County Away 6:00/7:00 8 Oct Tue Franklin County Home 6:00/7:00 10 Oct Thur Bay High Away 6:00/7:00 15 Oct Tue Rutherford Home 6:00/7:00 17 Oct Thu Wewahitchka Home 6:00/7:00 21 Oct Mon Quarter Finals Franklin 5:00/7:00 22 Oct Tue Semi-Finals Franklin 5:00/7:00 24 Oct Thu Finals Franklin 7:00 5 Nov Tue Reg. Semi-Finals TBA 7:00 9 Nov Sat Reg. Finals TBA 2:00 12-16 Nov FHSAA Finals Kissimmee Star Staff Report Volleyball conditioning for Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School began at 8 a.m. ET on Monday, July 1. All upcoming 7th through 12th grade girls that are interested in volleyball are encouraged to attend. All participants must have a current (within one calendar year) FHSAA sports physical. Players must also ll out new consent forms. All three FHSAA forms, EL2, EL3 and EL3CH, can be found on our volleyball web page. The upcoming fall schedule is also posted there. The website is http:// psjhs-gcs.schoolloop.com/volleybal l Volleyball conditioning begins at PSJHS Star Staff Report Free physicals for those who will participate in football this fall at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will be provided from 5-8 p.m. ET on July 23 at the Medical Of ce Building on the campus of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Athletes must have a Florida High School Athletics Association physical form, which can be picked up at the high school of ce. 2013 TIGER SHARK VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Date Team Where Time 23 Aug Blountstown Away 8:00 PM 30 Aug Wewa. Jr. Sr. HS Away 8:00 PM 6 Sep Bay High Home 7:30 PM 13 Sep Bozeman Home 8:00 PM 20 Sep Jefferson County Away 7:30 PM 27 Sep Chipley Away 8:00 PM 4 Oct Franklin County Home 7:30 PM 11 Oct Open 18 Oct Florida A&M HS Away 7:30 PM 25 Oct West Gadsden HS Home 7:30 PM 1 Nov Liberty County HS Home 7:30 PM 8 Nov Arnold High School Away 8:00 PM Port St. Joe football physicals By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Kites lled the sky above George Core Park during the kite ying competition. After some quality time spent waiting for Mother Nature to supply the wind, more than 20 participants across three age groups had kites soaring through the air. Children and adults alike enjoyed that hung above the park during the afternoon festivities. Though twisted lines and temperamental kites threatened to ground some of the competitors, teamwork prevailed and the dragons, butter ies, sharks, planes and sh were in the air. In the 10 and under group, rst place went to Genavieve Rocha; second place, Taylor Burkett; third place, Brayden Dailey. Winners for the 10-14 group; Wilson Turner, rst place; Brian Burkett, second; Joel Bogaert, third. In the 14 and older category; Ian Williams, rst place; Brian Burkett, second place; and Richard Aarons, third place. It was a successful event, said host Mike Lacour. We look forward to doing it again next year. The event was a joint fundraiser between the Gulf County Soccer Boosters, Port St. Joe Youth Soccer and Port St. Joe Elementary School Parent Teacher Organization (PTO). Dana Boyer and Steve Kerigan were of cial judges for the competition. Kite ying competition erce at family fun day P hotos by WES LOCHER | The Star Wilson Turner, Brian Burkett and Joel Bogaert took home trophies for the 10-14 age group. Joel Bogaert stayed focused on keeping his kite in the sky. During Sundays family fun day, kites lled the sky over George Core Park.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 Board, which is not subject to the 10 percent cap on annual increases, the drop in the tax base will repre sent two-tenths of 1 percent, falling from $1.405 billion to $1.402 billion. The largest decline came in the city of Wewahitch ka, which saw property values fall 7 percent, from $61.6 million to $57.3 million. Burke said the primary reason for the decline was two larger personal property accounts declining in value. The Northwest Florida Water Management Dis trict will realize a drop of one-third of 1 percent, Burke said. In addition, each Fire District in the county saw a drop in taxable value. The Tupelo Fire Zone dropped 1.7 percent; the St. Joe Fire Zone one-tenth of 1 percent; Howard Creek Fire Zone fell 1.5 percent and the Overstreet Fire Zone took the biggest hit at 3.5 percent. Going back to at least 1982, county property values had not dropped in any single year until 2007, two years after the height of the real estate bubble when prop erty values exploded past $2 billion with a 55 percent increase in 2005. However, after dropping by more than 20 percent in both 2009 and 2010, the decline steadied. The two Municipal Services Taxing Units (MSTUs) that fund the local share of the bond for beach renour ishment have expired. The property roll is essentially a historical marker, establishing what the market reects based on sales of like properties in the county as of Jan. 1, 2013. When prices are moving up, as was historically the case for decades, that system works to the advantage of the property owner who can, over those six months, see the value of property move higher on the market than the county assessment. When the market declines, however, property own ers can be in retreat on value compared to assessment for a given year. The BOCC and Coastal Community Association lob bied state lawmakers to allow the use of bank and short sales, which were accounted for the rst time in 2012. The Property Appraisers Ofce assesses 17,527 properties in the county; 1,211, or just 6.9 percent, are not taxable and the vast majority of those properties are owned by government, local, state and federal. ASEA is the only patented product in the world that provides your body with Redox Signaling molecules, the native molecules essential to your cells ability to protect, repair and replace themselves. What is ASEA? T y Robinson www .TY .TEAMASEA.com (850) 229.2679 4514931 NOTICE OF ANNU AL MEETING The Boar d of Commissioners of the Northw est Florida R egional Housing A uthority will hold its Ann ual Meeting on J ul y 18, 2013, a t the Holida y Inn & Suites 2725 Gr a v es R oad, T allahassee Florida. Meeting will begin a t 1:00 p .m. E.D .S .T The meeting will be open to the pub lic. FORMERL Y MINNIE LEES CLOSED MONDA Y SAME LOCA TION 674-4323 HONEY BEES DINER DAIL Y LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS A nn u a l M e m b e rs hi p M e etin g a nd E l e c ti o n T ues d a y E v enin g J u ly 9, 2013 a t 6:00 Ra n c y H o u s e C a r r ia ge H o u s e A pa la c h ic o la, F lo r ida e P a n h a n d le Pla ye rs i n v i t es yo u t o j o i n u s f o r o u r a n n ua l m e eti n g s a n d f o r t h e e le c tio n o f B oa r d m e m be rs a n d o c e rs. H e a r a bo u t o u r p la n s f o r t h e c o m i n g s e a s o n a n d a bo u t h o w yo u c a n be c o m e i n vo l ve d. F o r mo r e inf o rma t i o n o r t o e xp r ess a n in t e r es t in r unnin g f o r the B o a r d o f Dir e c t o rs, p l e as e c a l l E l a ine K ozl o w s ky a t 850-670-1671 o r B o b I n g u ag i a t o a t 850-370-5281. T he M agic of C ape S an Blas and the S urr ounding Ar ea B ooks a v ailable a t: N o Name B ookst or e B luew a t er O utriggers A r ea B ookst or es Maddo x H ouse **A v ailable O nline** w w w .marlene w omack.com PROPERTY from page A1 response vehicles. Sunday was family fun day, and once the wind picked up, dozens of colorful kites soared into the sky during the kite ying contest. Children, teens and adults competed against Mother Nature and one another to take home a trophy for effort. The event was sponsored by the Gulf County Soccer Boosters. Theres still plenty of celebrating to be done. Stop by the Event Welcome Center at 234 Reid Avenue to see the timeline display, sign the ofcial guestbook and enjoy student art. The nal static light show display will be presented on Wednesday night at dark at George Core Park and the annual street dance will be taking place on Martin Luther King Boulevard starting at 8 p.m. EST with food, vendors and live performances. Before the reworks go off on Thursday night, an interactive glow stick exhibit and lantern release will light up Frank Pate Park. After the reworks show, head to The Thirsty Goat at The Port Inn for the 10-year reunion of the Buddy Hamm Band. Friday will close out the celebration with an alumni basketball game at the Washington Gym, and it will be your last opportunity to visit the event welcome center. Dont miss out the remaining centennial events. Remember that its going to be a long wait until the next one. Kites of all shapes, sizes and colors lled the sky above George Core Park. Trophies were handed out to the strongest competitors in the kids, teens and adult age groups. CENTENNIAL from page A1

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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Surveys say Roman candles are the most favorite type of reworks for the 4th with what the least favorite? Firecrackers, Smokeballs, Pinwheels, Snaps 2) Where is Rebildfest billed as the largest celebration of American independence held outside the U.S.? Germany, Denmark, Mexico, Australia 3) On July 4, 1848, President Polk laid the cornerstone of what famous structure? Lincoln Memorial, Library of Congress, Capitol building, Washington Monument 4) Thomas Jefferson and which other former president died July 4, 1826? George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson 5) On that same date of July 4, 1826, what noted American was born? Robert E. Lee, Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau 6) Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776; one was Hancock, who was the other? Henry, Franklin, Pinckney, Thomson 7) What famous American patriot was hung as a spy in 1776 by the British? Paul Revere, Nathan Hale, Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne 8) Whos been the only future President of the United States to be born on a July 4th? Jackson, Van Buren, Taft, Coolidge 9) Where did the Continental Congress sign the Declaration of Independence? Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Mount Vernon 10) Who was the rst President of the Continental Congress? Peyton Randolph, Roger Sherman, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin 11) At signing time the colonies were under which English King? George I, George III, Charles I, Charles III 12) Which colony had the most signers at 9? Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts 13) On July 4, 1960 Mickey Mantle hit which career-number homerun? 300, 400, 500, 600 14) Which former president died July 4, 1831? Madison, Monroe, Tyler, Polk ANSWERS 1) Smokeballs. 2) Denmark. 3) Washington Monument. 4) John Adams. 5) Stephen Foster. 6) Thomson. 7) Nathan Hale. 8) Coolidge. 9) Philadelphia. 10) Peyton Randolph. 11) George III. 12) Pennsylvania. 13) 300. 14) Monroe. COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, July 4, 2013 B Page 1 Section Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com In an area where most emergency preparations focus on hurricanes, the Gulf County Health Department added an active shooter program to its schedule in an effort to be ready for anything. The exercise, held last Thursday at the Gulf County Emergency Operations Center, was designed to test the knowledge, skills and abilities of multi-agency coordination during a shooting-related incident. The program was funded and hosted by the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County and brought together Gulf County Emergency Management, Franklin County Department of Health, Gulf County EMS, the Gulf County Sherriffs Office, Gulf County School District, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and Gulf Coast State College to align on policies and procedures. Using a map of the health department, the active shooter scenario played out in real time throughout the day and the group went step-bystep to share best practices for such a situation from initial contact, to a weapon being fired, to injured employees and hostage situations. Also explained in detail were police team entry and extraction procedures. The program stresses the importance of what everyone is doing to take care of the situation and what to expect from the EOC, said county Emergency Operations director Marshall Nelson. The training detailed the process of alerting the necessary emergency departments and creating a funnel for information. In an active shooter situation, the EOC will set up a phone number to handle all emergencies, freeing up law enforcement to report to the scene and work toward taking the shooter into custody. Shooter situations often end up on the six oclock news and Health Education Manager and Public Information Officer Sarah Hinds is responsible for controlling the release of information to the media. The public will focus on what they hear first and last and will always accept the negative over the positive, said Hinds. Equally important to what is happening outside the building; the training covered the accountability of employees who find themselves inside during a shooting. Employees were reminded to take care of themselves first and to not be a hero, or take any actions that may interfere with police operations. Attendees were also provided vital information about police tactics and were told that in the scenario, law enforcers would look at hands. If employees were able to escape, they should keep their arms visible and not to carry anything that could be misinterpreted as a weapon. Communication is critically important, said Terry Schenk, exercise director for Disaster Strategies and Ideas, the group that created the scenario. Throughout the presentation, a representative from DSI took detailed notes, including the answers to any questions that arose and the answers. Several days after the exercise, a full report is provided that allows companies to update their policies, procedures and can be utilized in future trainings. It can make a huge difference if people preplan, said Schenk. If this scenario happens, this training will give people awareness that could be the difference between life and death. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County had an all-hazards plan but an active shooter procedure was missing. We didnt have a structured plan, said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator of the Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin Counties. We train often for weather situations, but there are other threats in this day and age, She stressed the importance of such a program for healthcare providers, schools and businesses that are wide open to Gulf County health department hosts active shooter training program ACTIVE SHOOTER TRAINING Attendees from Gulf Coast Emergency Management, School Districts, Sheriffs Of ce and Sacred Heart Hospital attended the Active Shooter training. See SHOOTER B2 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Theres a new face at The Artery in the form of intern Leanna Knapp. Though Knapp was raised in Macon, Georgia, she found her way to Gulf County when her mother recently relocated to Mexico Beach. Once Knapp had nished up her studies at the University of Georgia in September, she faced the task of guring out what was next. Determined to nd a job she loved, she moved in with her mother at the beach for some relaxation and inspiration. On a trip to Port St. Joe, she visited The Artery where she met owner and operator Leslie Wentzell. The recent recipient of a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in sculpture, Knapp felt right at home in the studio and eagerly showed Wentzell her art portfolio. Wentzell liked what she saw and mentioned to Knapp that she needed some extra help around the studio and was looking for a face to help her business appeal to a younger crowd. As it happened, Knapp was looking for some experience working in an art-based environment. The meeting led to Knapp starting an internship with The Artery in February and its been a dream come true for the young sculptor. Everything fell into place, said Knapp. Ill work here until Leslie kicks me out! Knapp admits that she never saw herself as the type to work an of ce job. She was drawn to more creative roles spurred by a love of photography that hit during her high school days. In college, she bounced around majors, starting in art history and toeing the waters of experimental art before nding her The Artery gains prize-winning intern By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com What started as a sixweek project to get kids performing together in a band and learning three cover songs turned into a 10-month project that birthed the local music sensation known as Thirty-Three. After playing only spiritual cover songs, the Christian rock band celebrated the release of its rst original single, Jesus Loves You and I Love You Too last Tuesday. The group is made up of 11and 12-year-olds with a passion for music and a strong belief in their faith. Vocalist Brianna Butler, guitarist Zack McFarland, bassist Cole Haddock and drummer Joel Bogaert were thrilled to release their rst original song. Im very excited, said Bogaert, who has played the drums for three years. The St. Joe Music and Performance Program, founded in August 2012, was developed by Tom McEniry, operator of St. Joe Music and RSR Recording Studios, and area musician and choir director, Phil Densmore. Tom was looking for a vocal and bass coach, said Densmore. It was a great opportunity that Ive really enjoyed. Added McEniry, Im constantly surprised by their professionalism. McEniry thought that the students would come together, have some fun and then go their separate ways, but was proud when the group took shape and started playing shows in Port St. Joe and Panama City. Prior to Haddock joining the group on bass guitar, Densmore lled in on the instrument. It was great when Cole joined on bass. I wasnt doing a very good Local band celebrates release of rst single SPECIAL TO THE STAR Leanna Knapp won second place out of 400 contestants for her life-size wedding dress sculpture at the 2013 Art Fields show. WES LOCHER | The Star Above: The band practices for two hours a week at RSR Recording Studio. Top: Christian rock group Thirty-Three celebrated the release of their rst single, Jesus Loves You and I Love You Too SPECIAL TO THE STAR See RELEASE B2 See INTERN B2

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 M e e t S c a r b r o t h e r t o M u f a s a a n d A l e x H e i s ve r y o u t g o i n g a n d p l a y f u l. S c a r i s f u l l y ve t t e d a n d r e a d y f o r h i s f o r e ve r h o m e I f y o u c a n g i ve a n y o n e o f o u r s w e e t k i t t i e s a h o m e o r f o s t e r 1 o r 2 d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o c o m e b y t h e s h e l t e r a n d m e e t t h e m I f y o u a r e u n a b l e t o a d o p t a t t h i s t i m e p e r h a p s y o u c o u l d f o s t e r o r m a k e a D o n a t i o n A l l p e t s a d o p t e d f r o m S J B HS w i l l b e c u r r e n t o n v a c c i n a t i o n s a n d s p a y e d / n e u t e r e d P l e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n se n d h s d i r e c t o r @ gm a i l c om o r a do pt b a y s t j o e @ gm a i l c om or c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e A p p l i c a t i o n s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j b h u m a n e soci et y o r g W e r e q u i r e a l l p o t e n t i a l a d o p t e r s t o c o m p l e t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r m Ad o p t i o n f e e s i n c l u de o ur c o s t of s p a y / ne u t e r a n d c ur r e n t va c c i n a t i on s. O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m -4 p m F a i t h s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o l u n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n P o r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t h e r e s o o n w w w s j b h u m a n esoci et y o r g I f y o u a r e m i s si n g a p e t o r w an t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m an e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y 4514866 Sponsor the P et of the W eek! f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month J oel R eed 81 4.7377 or K ar i F or t une 227 .7847 Call T oda y PSYCHIC READINGS 850-319-3711 Bay County's #1 Psychic Do you want to kno w wha t the future has in store? Ha ve questions about love, business or marria ge? Ann's ans wers tell the past, present & future. All readings are con dential Se Habla Espaol THIS WEEK ONL Y T AROT CARD READING $ 10 by Miss Ann Call today for a better tomorrow... Society Cameron Gage Cherry turned two on May 6. He celebrated with family and had a Thomas the Trainthemed party. Camerons parents are Kevin and Stephanie Cherry. Grandparents are Terry and Debra Watson, Carol and Eric Mann and Ronnie Cherry. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Garden last month hosted the 11 garden clubs in the Florida Federation of Gar den Clubs District II for its spring meeting. The meeting was held at the Centennial Building, and more than 80 club members from around Northwest Florida attended. District II is comprised of clubs from Port St. Joe, Chipley, Bonifay, Vernon, Wausau, Panama City, Panama City Beach, Graceville, Lynn Haven, Marianna Friendship and Marianna. The theme was Party at the Beach, and club president Barba ra Conway and club members did an excellent job of working togeth er the showcase into a shelly day for attendees. We may be a small club, but garden clubbers know how to get things done, Conway said. She thanked the Panama City Garden ClubAmaryllis Circle for its assistance and Sylvia Holley of Gulf Beach Garden Club for beau tiful oral designs made for the event. The group was welcomed to the city by Mayor Mel Magidson and invited to tour historic Port St. Joe by County Commissioner Tan Smiley. After spring reports, Linda and Jim Brunner of the Gulf Coast Shell Club presented an entertain ing and educational program on shells that can be found on local beaches and waters. They also dis played their collection of shells. Chipley Garden Club was named the 2013 Garden Club of the Year during the FFGC Spring Convention in Fort Myers. This is the number one award in FFGC, said Jane Brewer, past district director. The award rec ognizes the Florida garden club that best excels in all of the fol lowing categories: membership increase, service to membership, club programs and projects, mem bers attending club, district and state meetings and/or sponsored programs. Chipley Garden Club truly shares the joys of gardening with their community and each other. This is an awesome accomplish ment not only for Chipley, but for District II because when one wins, we all win. The Chipley club also claimed the 2013 Nell Coe (Grow) Ward, the Civic Beautication Award and National Garden Club/Deep South Region third-place Youth Horticul ture Award. Other FFGC awards included Wausau Garden Club members Judy Solgers two Digital Photog raphy awards, Marianna Garden Clubs Garden Therapy (Geriatric) Award and District IIs Best News letter (District) Award. Pam Cates, President of Vernon Garden Club, discussed a $100,000 highway beautication grant from the Florida Department of Trans portation her club was granted in March and the extensive applica tion process involved. We are the rst garden club to ever apply for this kind of grant, Cates said. And we got it now the fun begins. The club received a Certicate of Excellence for 2011-2013 from district President Jan Sillik and a Presidents FFGC Award for its efforts. Louise Michaels from Chipley, the chairperson for District II Wet lands and Waterways, discussed clean water shortage, desalination technology, water conservation and the lack of concern for main taining the fresh water supply. She also discussed the dis heartening condition of Little Blue in Washington County. We are working towards res cuing and reclaiming the spring, Michaels said. Due to pollution, abuse by recreational vehicles and dumping, the spring has receded over 15 feet and is polluted. It was once beautiful, pristine and able to supply an abundance of clean water. We want it to be that way again. Following the meetings, plants made by the Port St. Joe Garden Club were available for purchase. If you are interested in join ing the Port St. Joe Garden Club or would like more information, please contact the Port St. Joe Gar den Club on its Facebook page. Happy Birthday to Mr. Billy and Cheryl Quinn. We love you. We celebrate you! The Quinn and Granger Family Birthdays Star Staff Report The Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild will hold a membership drive from 57 p.m. ET July 16 at the Haughty Heron. Become a new member for $20 and receive a free martini from the Haughty Heron. The event will include live music, light food and a local breast cancer survivor who will speak on the importance of early detection. Support the drive for breast cancer screenings and other health initiatives by becoming a member of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. The Guild pro vides helping hands of support and fund raising activities to bring new health care programs and services to the community. Funds raised will be contributed in part to the development of a fund to assist unin sured and underinsured residents receive breast cancer screenings. PSJ Garden Club hosts district spring meeting Join Sacred Heart for music, martinis and mammos 1 love, 2 birthdays July 5 Cam Cam turns 2 SPE C IAL TO T HE STAR Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson (left) and County Commissioner Tan Smiley (right) spoke during the meeting.

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The Star| B3 Thursday, July 4, 2013 O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! (In this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast 4515151 SELL YOU R LI S TI N G S HE RE (8 50 )8 1 4 -7 37 7 (8 50 )2 2 7 -7 84 7 S O L D 4515158 ON THE POOP DECK IN THE CR O WS NEST WEDNESD A Y THURSD A Y FRID A Y SA TURD A Y K ARA OKE D J D ANCING *All Times Easter n Fun Time* 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 WWW .LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM THURSD A Y After Fireworks K onkrete Soul Randy Stark with Art Long W ed. J ul y 10th SA TURD A Y 9PM Pub lic Ad dress FRID A Y 9PM DJ SUND A Y 7PM The Cur r ys WEDNESD A Y 7PM Allen Dyk es 1ST SUND A Y CELEBRA TION ALL D A Y AND NIGHT LIVE MUSIC WITH THE CURRY S 7 PM Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Stephen Collier DVM 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 M onda y -F rida y 8:00 AM 5:30 P M ANIMAL HOSPIT AL of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients School NewsHigh School High Tech named Program of the Year Special to The StarWe are small but we are mighty. Because of our Program Coor dinator, Lynn Hauck, the students participating in High School High Tech program at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and the many business partners in Port St. Joe, the PSJHS program is No. 1 in the State of Florida. This is the programs seventh year in Gulf County and there are 36 programs around the state, some much larger and much bet ter funded, but not with the heart that fuels the program in Gulf County. Here is what The ABLE Trust had to say when delivering the award. Dyslexia Research Institute serves approximately 20 students with disabilities in Gulf County for The ABLE Trusts Florida High School/High Tech (HS/HT) program on an annual basis. Under the leadership of Dr. Patricia Hardman and Robyn Rennick, and through the tal ented work of Program Coordi nator, Lynn Hauck, the team en sures that students experience the depth and breadth of career and youth development, which is the core intent of the HS/HT program. Their program structure of building upon career and workbased experiences throughout the school year, culminating in a coveted summer internship can be considered a statewide model for the Florida HS/HT program. Gulf County HS/HT has out standing community and employ er support, which is evidenced through its Business Advisory Council. In the last ve years, 100 percent of their seniors have graduated from high school all of whom are going directly to col lege or employment. This summer, nearly half of their students will participate in paid summer internship experi ences as a result of community business partnerships and fund raising on the part of the program leadership and students. The ABLE Trust commends Dyslexia Research Institute with the HS/HT Program of the Year Award for creating and sustain ing a highly successful HS/HT program in Gulf County. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR Congratulations to the following Faith Christian School students for maintaining a straight A average for the 2012-2013 academic year: Left to right: Kristen Bouington, Alex Taylor, Magnolia Sarmiento, Taylor Burkett and Carter Costin. SLOAN EARN S NACA D A S CHOLAR S HIP Miranda M. Sloan, Graduate Academic Advisor, College of Education at University of South Florida, has been selected to receive a Wesley R. Habley NACADA Summer Institute Scholarship. The Institute Is sponsored by the National Academic Advising Association. Sloan will attend the Institute this summer in either Jacksonville or Scottsdale, Ariz., for a week-long, intensive program that helps advising administrators, faculty, professional advisors, and advising program directors develop specic strategies for improvement of advising at institutions of higher learning. Sloan is one of 10 individuals honored with this scholarship award in the nation-wide competition this year. Various professionals from the United States as well as international members participate in general sessions, workshops and topical sessions at each Institute to increase their understanding of the important role advising plays on campuses. Individuals are also assigned to small group discussions sessions in which individual action plans are developed which focus on the enhancement or implementation of quality programs on their campuses. Miranda is the daughter of Maxine Leslie Hammons and the late Joel E. Sloan of Port St. Joe. She is the granddaughter of the late Rev. Walter and Mrs. Mable Leslie of Port St. Joe. MIRANDA M. SLOAN The Lions Tale

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Dr Geof fre y Lentz P astor Bobbi Lassiter Minister to F amilies Ann Comforter Dir ector of Music 1001 Constitution Dr 850.227.1724 www .psjumc.or g Sunday Schedule 9:00AM EST W orship on the W ater under the sails on St. Joseph Bay 11:00AM EST Sanctuary Service with Special Children s time. SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com WEEKL Y SCHEDULE SUND A Y 8:00 A M W orship a t Sunset P ark ( on the sa nd) 9:30 A M Bible S tudy a t 1602 H igh w a y 98 MOND A Y 7:00 P M Lif etr ee C af Join the C on v ersation TUESD A Y 5:00 P M W omen s Bible S tudy 6:30 P M Bible S tudy T o c ontac t w orship leader : (850) 648.1151 or l w cpast or@f a irp oint .net www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Weston Dear Friends and Family, Thank you so very much for your expressions of sympathy during the loss of my wife, Eva Weston. Our family was really touched by your calls, cards, visits and prayers. We especially thank our friends of White City First Baptist Church and the entire White City community for their enormous outpouring of support and caringly providing for our family immediately following our loss. And a very special thank you to Rev. Nick Davis and Mary Lou Cumbie for leading a touching memorial service. May God bless you all, Claude R. Weston Special to The Star Ways to cope with grief and nd peace after loss will be discussed at Lifetree Caf at 7 a.m. CT on Monday, July 8. The program, titled Coping with Grief: Find Your Path to Peace, features a lmed interview with Ken Doka, author of more than 20 books, including Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Woman Mourn. Its a common misunderstanding that grief follows a fairly predictable pattern, says Doka. But each of us has our own pathway; each of us takes our own journey as we grieve. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Lewis Family The Lewis Family would like to thank everyone for their support, prayers and love for their son, Christopher L. Anderson. God put us here for a reason, He said He would supply our need. Hell guide our every footstep, If we read His Word and heed. Jesus gave us a choice, When He went to the cross. Accept His love or suffer the loss. Ive had a few problems down through the years, Had some heartaches, and shed a few tears. Most of these problems were brought on by greed. I wanted to do things my way, I just wouldnt heed. He loved me all this time, It took me a while to see. No matter what I did, He still provided for me. Im not a nished product yet, Hes still working on me, But I thank God every day, That Im not what I used to be. Billy Johnson Cora Sue Robinson, 75, of Port St. Joe, FL peacefully passed away on June 26, 2013, at her home with her loving family at her side. Cora Sue was born on Feb 25, 1938, in Port St. Joe to Charles and Margaret Smith. Cora Sue was a lifetime resident of Gulf County, and after her retirement in 2001 she enjoyed cookouts with her family and her grandchildren and spending time in her oasis she grew in her yard. To say she had a green thumb would be an understatement. Cora Sue enjoyed each day tending to her trees, owers, and roses. It was not unusual for her to have hundreds of owers and roses blooming on any given day. She also enjoyed her birds each morning with a cup of coffee. For the longest time she would get upset at the squirrels for getting into her bird feeders, but they too nally won her over and she said I think the squirrels and the birds worked well together. Cora Sue was a dedicated red, white, and blue American. One of her favorite pictures was her standing with the Olympic Torch and the American Flag. She served as a public servant for Gulf County for more than 35 years. She served for the Gulf County School Board as the Payroll Manager for over 15 years until she was elected as Supervisor of Elections for Gulf County. As Supervisor of Elections she excelled in her job. In 1984, Gulf County was recognized as the number one county for having the highest percentage of registered voters in the state with 7,555 out of an estimated 7,561 people of voting age residing in Gulf County, for a percentage of 99.93 percent. Cora Sue accomplished this by conducting voting registration drives throughout the county and she brought the books into the schools in the county to register those who quali ed and acquainting the students nearing voting age with their responsibilities. Cora Sue is predeceased by her four sisters and one brother; Margaret Smith, Pauline Miller, Carolyn Hill, Joan Wise, and C. R. Smith; she is survived by her sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Chuck Baumgart, and her brother and sister-inlaw, Thomas and Pat Smith; three daughters and two sons-in-law, Cindy Medlin, Deb and Tim Harvey, Kim and Ronnie Terry; one son Thomas Medlin; her nine grandchildren; James Taunton, Jocelyn Williams, Kristin Medlin, Charles Medlin, Tara Goss, Craig Medlin, Jason Mathes, Brooke Harrell, and Alyson Harvey; seven greatgrandchildren, many nieces and nephews, numerous relatives, and several close lifelong friends. A visitation was held for family and friends from 5-7 p.m. Monday, July 1, at the Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe. Her funeral service was held at 3 p.m. EDT Tuesday, July 2 at the First United Methodist Church with Dr. Geoffrey Lenz of ciating. Immediately following the service, a graveside service will be held at Holy Hill Cemetery. To show respect for Cora Sues public service and all past and present public servants of Gulf County, the family asks that you y your American Flag on Tuesday, July 2, 2013. In lieu of owers the family asks that you make a contribution to the Taunton Family Childrens Home, P.O. Box 870, Wewahitchka, Fl 32465. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Cora Sue Robinson CORA SUE ROBINSON Obituary Cards of THANKS Thursday, July 4, 2013 How to cope with grief explored at Lifetree Caf First United Methodist Church Fundraiser A fundraiser will be held 3:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. CT on Friday, July 12, at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach. There will be pulled pork sandwich, chips, drink and brownie for $6. Eat in or take out. Proceeds to bene t FUMC disaster team. Aint God good

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, July 4, 2013 w w w .cit ypor tstjoe .c om P ost O c e B o x 278 305 C ecil G. C ostin, Sr Blv d P hone (850) 229-8261 F ax (850) 227-7522 P or t S t Joe F lor ida 32457 A n E qu al O pp or tunit y Emplo y er" PUB LI C N O TI CE RED UCED H O URS FO R CLERK O F C O UR T ANNEX O FFI CE IN WEW AHIT CHK A D ue t o b udg et co n s t ra in ts, t h e G u lf C o un t y C ler k o f C o ur t m u s t r e d uce t h e h o ur s o f o p era t io n o f t h e C ler k s A nn ex Oce in W e wa hi t c h ka. E e c t i v e J u l y 1, 2013, t h e a nn ex o ce w i l l o n l y b e o p en f r o m 8a m 4p m C.T o n M o n d a y a n d F r id a y R e b e cc a L. (B e c k y) N o r r i s G u lf C o un t y C ler k o f t h e Cir c ui t C o ur t 2091547 Advertorial by WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Mary Ann Conroy loves to cook, but the restaurant business wasnt for her. After working in the banking industry for 30 years and experiencing the economic downturn, she decided to use the opportunity to explore her passions and reinvent herself as a personal chef, founding the local culinary experience known as Gourmet Chef Now. I wanted to do something that I was passionate about, said Conroy, who quickly acquired her catering license to get the ball rolling. After attending several cooking classes in the Panama City area, she thought that something similar might work in Port St. Joe. Not interested in opening a restaurant and devoting all her time to running it, she saw herself doing something more intimate and decided to host classes for a small group of audience members. Her mission was to prepare gourmet food simply through an interactive experience that would end in a restaurant-quality meal. I love good food with bold avors, lots of courses and rich sauces, she said. In October of last year, Gourmet Chef Now launched in the Appliance Showroom kitchen in Port St. Joe. Classes started small with friends and family in attendance but news of the class quickly spread through word of mouth. Soon enough, the weekly, $35 classes began to ll up and Conroy was able to tweak the experience to be as interactive as the guests wanted. Some help cook, taste or plate, while others simply come to watch, take notes and get tips, techniques and new recipes for their kitchens. At the end of the class, the audience enjoys a gourmet meal and a glass of wine. Conroy has hosted many classes centered on seafood keeping in mind the amount of delicious food located just offshore in Gulf Countys waters. I try to make something you can easily recreate at home with things you can buy locally, she said. Classes vary in size and her guests have ranged in age from 20 all the way to 91 years old. She also offers occasional classes for kids during which they create their own pizzas and also hosts special date nights for couples. Before long, Conroy had hosted enough classes shed used up her favorite recipes from her collection of 50 cookbooks. She took suggestions from her audience on food theyd like to see made, which led to classes featuring Thai food and sushi. It pushed Conroy to try new and exciting dishes at home before bringing them to the classroom. She admits that her husband, Steve, is the guinea pig for the gourmet meals. Steve smiled and added sarcastically, Its a tough job, but someone has to do it. As the classes continued and regulars began coming each week, Conroy realized that shed accomplished exactly what she set out to do, earning a living off of something shes passionate about. In addition, Conroy cooks the meals each Wednesday for the First United Methodist Church and has fed over 100 people each week for the last four years. Her pastor, knowing her passion for the culinary arts invited her to replace the previous cook who had retired. Conroy is inspired by many cooks but said you cant go wrong with Julia Child. She credits a rising interest in televised cooking shows for bringing awareness to creating great food at home. Its all about eating good food, and having fun, she said. For class schedules and registration info visit Gourmet Chef Now online at www. gourmetchefnow.com. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com In May, artist Dolores Lowery realized a longtime dream when she opened the Seagrass Art Gallery in Mexico Beachs The Grove. Teaching since 2009, the full-time, self-taught art ist has spent time in Gulf and Franklin County schools hosting workshops and using art to teach special needs students. After taking note at the lack of local galleries or art classes in Mexico Beach, Lowery set out to be the rst. After securing a lease at The Grove she set up shop and has received support from the locals and tourists over the last month. Its been great, said Lowery. Weve had lots of traf c through since opening. She aims to be hosting art classes by the summer and has plans for a three-hour acrylic class where she deliv ers a theme, but and allows the artist to make it their own. Lowery plans for the classes to be accessible to artists of all levels and will package all materials into the cost. It doesnt matter what your experience level is, she said, youre going to learn something new every time you paint. In her never-ending mission to support local arts, Lowery founded and is President of the Society of Ex pressive Artists. Formed in 2011, the group meets once a month to net work, share techniques and raise awareness for local artbased opportunities. Each year the SEA group hosts an art walk in Mexico Beach immediately following the Gumbo Cook-off. Tents line highway 98 and beneath them, local artist showcase their wares. This year the group plans to hold a second event, which is currently in the works. SEA is open to local artists across the coast and can visit Lowery at her gallery for more information. Lowery is also a staple of the Art Happens initiative, a new group that will host small, art-centric events across the Forgotten Coast. Each event will feature a different medium in one of the areas most picturesque locations. Its all about promoting the arts throughout the area, said Lowery. Art opens peoples minds and creative spir it. It stimulates critical thinking and unies people. Along with Lowerys homemade jewelry, photography, acrylic and encaustic pieces, the gallery features sea foam art and ceramics from Pat Van West, caulk-based works from Dixie Hester, clay pieces from Leslie Went zell and glass art by Gretchen Mayes. Never one to miss an opportunity to shine the light on area talent, Lowery also stocks locally-made soaps, Tu pelo honey candles and music by local artists. Lowerys art is also featured at the Sea Oates Gallery on St. George Island, Studio Gallery in Grayton Beach and the 621 Gallery in Tallahassee. As a full time artist Lowery is given the exibility to keep the gallery fresh. She enjoys the thrill of completing a piece at night and having it in the gallery the following morning. For more information on classes or how to get involved with the SEA or Art Happens initiatives, call 814-2826. WES LOCHER | The Star Seagrass Art Gallery recently opened within The Grove in Mexico Beach. Mexico Beach artist opens gallery for showcases and classes PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Mary Ann Conroy teaches gourmet made simply. Local cook invites all to become a gourmet chef

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T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4515031 J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOW A/C W ASHERS/DR YERS ST OV ES /R EF RI GE RA TO RS FREEZER/MICROW A VES LA WN MOWERS SCRAP MET AL, ETC... Local 6 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 the public. Lindeman herself had been in a scenario with an active shooter before, and noted that from time to time, companies re ceive threats and its vital that the staff knows how to respond. Im excited to have had such a collaborative exercise, she said. It created a great dialogue between agencies. The program walked attendees through a real time scenario shooter scenario and explained how all local response services will work together toward a positive outcome. SHOOTER from page B1 niche with sculpture. It was when she took a trip to study abroad in Italy and saw the historic sculptures that adorned buildings, streets and parks that her true passion was ignited. They knocked me off my feet, she said. Though she started school at the Savannah College of Art and Design, she transferred to Univer sity of Georgia and it was there she said she our ished and made friends. Knapp revealed that she had a love affair with pot tery and clay from a young age and she received her rst potters wheel as a gift at age seven. I love working with my hands and throwing on the wheel, said Knapp. It al lows me to put emotion into something. Though shes recently enjoyed some watercolor classes taken through The Artery, Knapp doesnt nd much inspiration in paints and said that a blank white canvas scares her. She feels that her art is best created and repre sented on a three-dimen sional plane. In April of this year, Knapp was accepted to showcase a life-sized sculp ture of a wedding dress at the Art Fields show in Lake City, South Carolina. The event is the largest art show in the Southeast with over 800 applicants and only 400 invited to ex hibit. On her rst time out, Knapp snagged a secondplace victory and a prize of $25,000. The win validated Knapps talent, especially since the sculpture had been created under the duress of a relationship-gone-wrong. Sometimes you want something so bad, you dont see what its doing to you, she said. Both the sculpture and the positive feedback from the piece helped her get through a very emotional time. Though Knapp is proud of her success to-date, she also understands that the bar has been set and her fu ture works need to meet or exceed her wedding dress piece. In the meantime, shell continue learning from Wentzell and creating art with her hands. She enjoys meeting the artistic people that Gulf County attracts and is at tered when visitors to the studio nd out about her background and ask her opinion of their art. A strong art communi ty can positively impact ev eryone, she said. Art is a great way to express love, joy, sadness all range of emotions. She reported that she was happy to have found a community of supportive and encouraging people and wants aspiring artists to know that a career doing what you love is possible. I take pride in what I create, said Knapp. I love my life, and I love my job. 11-year-old impression, Densmore joked. Since nalizing the line up, the group has played numerous churches in the area and said that their favorite gig to-date was at the Port St. Joe Relay for Life event in April. I liked it because we played for a good cause, said McFarland. As the group continued to get booking requests, McEniry viewed it as the perfect opportunity for the band members to learn the business side of the music world. Joels father, David Bogaert, who has a back ground in sales, became the groups agent, setting up the groups shows and coordinating practices. David was surprised when his son rst men tioned wanting to play the drums. David took him to RSR Studio for an evaluation. After 10 minutes on the kit, McEniry, who was thor oughly impressed with what he heard, pulled Da vid aside and asked how long his son had been playing. Drum lessons started immediately. I have no idea where he got the talent, said Da vid. Its been fantastic and rewarding watching them grow. When it was time for the band to learn some original tunes, local song writer Doug Roberts was brought it to aid the band. He had written a few Chris tian-based songs that he taught to the group and was pleasantly surprised with how quick they picked up the structures and progressions. Roberts only had vo cals, rhythm guitar and bass written for the bands rst single and encouraged Bogaert to get creative in adding drum parts. It was frustrating, said the drummer. It took time to nd what t the song. While creating music is a challenge for some, it came naturally for others. McFarland said that his whole family is musical and noted local performer Bud dy Hamm as an inuence. Haddock knew he wanted to play the bass when his step-father played him the song Higher Ground by the Red Hot Chili Peppers. When it came time to record the single, the band wasnt sure what to expect. They were used to playing as a group, but in the stu dio, songs are constructed differently with each musi cian recording their instru ment separately. It was weird, said McFarland. We felt really separated. The members of ThirtyThree came to enjoy the recording process and are excited to do it again for their second single. Hear ing the nished product made all the difference. Its awesome when you rst record the song, but then hearing it mixed together makes it, like, whoa! McFarland said. The group members said the experience of be ing in a band together also brought them closer as friends. The members had attended school together but didnt run in the same social circles. It connected us, said Bogaert. It turns out that the rock and roll lifestyle isnt always glamorous. The band admits that theyve had their share of on-stage problems. McFarland was once stung in the leg by a wasp mid-song, but kept his cool and turned the inch into a cool rock pose. Haddock has had his instrument go out of tune during songs and Bogaert has battled with his drum stool slowly lowering itself throughout the course of one of their sets. The bands favorite part of playing live shows? Shattering the crowds ex pectations of what 11 and 12-year-olds can do. People dont think we can actually play, said Mc Farland. At the last church we played, I saw mouths drop. Densmore, the vocal and bass coach added, Its gratifying to watch them perform and seeing peo ples reactions. It makes you feel proud. Haddock encouraged everyone in Gulf County to see the band perform live. Itll be a great ex perience, he said. You might feel God touch your heart. With the rst single in the can, the group is fo cused on the future. Im anxious to learn new original songs, said Haddock. Within ve years, Mc Farland and Haddock would like to see the band get big and play stadiums, while drummer Bogaert is content with where they are right now. For McEniry and Dens more, theyll help the group get wherever they can and dont set lofty expectations for the youngsters. If you dont have fun, you wont be successful, said Densmore. We give them our full support. Music is all teamwork and thats what we try to in still in them. Its about get ting everyone in sync and into a groove. said McE niry. Ive never had a more rewarding experience. Thirty-Three will play the Panama City Shriners Festival on July 20 and the Port St. Joe Scallop Festi val on August 4. A concert to celebrate the release of their rst single is also in the works. Kids looking to be in volved in the St. Joe Music and Performance program can contact Tom at St. Joe Music for more informa tion. Visit the Thirty-Three band online at www.33band. com. SPECIAL TO T HE STAR The group made up of, Zack McFarland, Brianna Butler, Joel Bogaert and Cole Haddock received plaques commemorating the release of their rst single. RELEASE from page B1 Knapp was awarded a $25,000 prize for her sculpture. INTERN from page B1

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Local The Star| B7 Thursday, July 4, 2013 A10 | The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO Js TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS Sacred Heart announces MRI services Special to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf initiated the rst MRI diagnostic test in Gulf County on June 3. A new, state-of-the-art mobile GE Signal 1.5 Tesla unit will be providing Magnetic Resonance Imaging from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Mondays. MRI is an advanced diagnostic test that uses computers and magnetic elds, rather than ra diation, to capture images of the human body. Al though MRI is a very advanced medical technique, the MRI is probably one of the easiest and most comfortable exams you may ever experience. The technologist will simply ask you to lie down on a cushioned table which will automatically move into the magnet after you have been com fortably positioned for scanning. For certain studies, a contrast injection may be required. However, unlike many other contrast agents, MRI contrast does not contain iodine and therefore rarely cause allergic responses. The av erage scan takes 20-60 minutes dependent upon the specic test ordered. Appointments are required. To schedule a MRI at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, call 229-5802. Star Staff Report Classes in pet rst aid and CPR/AED will be July 16 at the Cape San Blas Fire Station next to Salinas Park. The Pet First Aid class will be 9:30-11:30 a.m. ET, and the CPR/AED class will be 12:304:30 p.m. Pet First Aid is a two-hour class teaching how to be pre pared to save an animals life. Participants will have the chance to learn basic rst aid such as rescue breathing and anti-chok ing techniques for dogs and cats. The goals of the class are to teach participants how to be prepared for emergencies that involve a cat or a dog and how to protect themselves and the animal from further harm, injury or suffering during emergencies by teaching prompt, effective rst aid actions and care. Do not bring your pet. Everyone is asked to bring a stuffed animal to bandage. The four-hour CPR/AED course incorporates the latest science and teaches students how to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies for victims 12 and older. Students who successfully complete the course will receive a certicate for Adult CPR/AED valid for two years. Combining lecture, video demonstrations and hands-on mannequin training, this course teaches participants to: call and work with EMS, preform CPR and care for breathing and car diac emergencies, avoid bloodborne pathogens exposure, know the role of automated external debrillators (AEDs) in Cardiac Chain of Survival and more. If participants need a certi cation card from the Ameri can Red Cross there will be $12 charge per person. Those in terested must register for this course as space is limited. For registration and infor mation, call Natalie Shoaf at 227-4355 or email natalieshoaf@ gmail.com. FDOT will host public meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvements Star Staff Report The Florida Department of Transportation will host a public information meeting for proposed improvements to State Road 30-E (Cape San Blas Road) from 5-9 p.m. ET July 16 at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30-A, Port St. Joe. FDOT is planning to resurface Cape San Blas Road from State 30-A to the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve. Additional improvements include paved shoulders and minor drainage modica tions. Construction is scheduled to begin fall 2015. The meeting will provide an opportunity to preview the proposed project, ask questions and/or submit comments concerning the proposed project. Public participation is solicited with regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, dis ability or family status. Persons who require spe cial accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, or persons who require transla tion services (free of charge) should contact John S. Glenn, P.E., toll-free at 888-638-0250, ext. 1459 at least seven days before the meeting. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @ MyFDOT_NWFL. Florida is well known for its beautiful pine trees, many of which provide decorative shade for home grounds, not to mention signicant revenue for timber and pulpwood growers. We usually think of pines as being relatively troublefree. Unfortunately, several species of bark beetles are destroying pines throughout the south, including those in suburban landscapes. Southern pine beetle is one of the most serious pests of pines in the United States, but normally is a scavenger of dying pines. It becomes a pest when its populations increase. Dendroctonous beetles are distinguished by round posterious, in contrast to IPS beetles, the abdomens of which are concave posteriorly and have spines on the wing covers. Adult beetles, active throughout the year whenever temperatures are above 58F, disperse widely to infest injured weakened of stressed trees. When abundant, they can attack and overwhelm trees. The presence of pitch masses on the tree trunk may indicate and attack. Adults tunnel beneath the bark constructing frass-packed egg galleries in patterns resembling the letter S. The tunneling quickly destroys the phloem and kills the tree. My information on these destructive insects was provided by Extension Entomologist and Nematologist Dr. Eillen A. Buss with IFAS of the University of Florida. Normally, these beetles inhabit forest areas. But, they often migrate to home grounds. If your landscape includes one or more pines, you need to learn how to recognize and cope with bark beetle infections. Mature bark beetles are about the side of a grain of rice. They range in color from reddish-brown to solid black. Within the inner bark of most pines, the insect go through four life stages egg, larva, pupa and adult. The eggs are glistening white dots. Larvae, or grubs as theyre commonly called are white and crescent shaped with glossy reddishbrown heads and no legs. Pupae, which also are white, closely resemble the adult beetle shape. Bark beetles mature in about month; and three to eight generations are born each year. The adults have wings. After, they kill the tree in which they developed. They fly off to other trees and start the life cycle again. The first sign of bark beetle infestation are popcorn-sized lumps of pitch, called pitch tubes. These occur at heights up to 16 feet. Although pitch tubes do not appear during dry weather, a dust, which looks something like red sawdust collects in the bark crevices and at the base of trees that are suffering from beetle attack. In the later stages of infestation, small feeding cuts, resembling tiny tunnels, appear on the inside of the bark. The final sign, a sure mark of death for a tree, is change in the color of its needles, which turn from green, to yellow, to red and finally, to brown. For more information on pine bark beetles contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas.ufl. edu or edis.ifas.ufl.edu and see Publication ENY-327. ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director Pine bark beetles a danger to pine trees CPR, pet rst aid classes to be offered

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B8| The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ....................... ............... ................ $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ..... ............................ $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1112685This individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. NURSING FACULTY RN TO BSN PROGRAMSalary commensurate with education and experience. Position open until lled. Apply at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98. 1112668 CHAIR, DIVISION PUBLIC SAFETYResponsible for directing the overall Public Safety program to include; coordinating faculty, maintain budget, resolve complaints from students, insure facilities are maintained properly, coordinate class schedules ensuring classes have qualied instructors, maintain & submit curriculum & catalog revisions, schedules, etc. Assist in writing grants; attend meetings as needed & other related duties. Requires: Bachelors degree in Criminology, Criminal Justice or related eld. Masters preferred. Salary Range starts at $52,020 Deadline to apply: 7/18/2013 at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4510161 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Check our cars and trucks in today’s classified section! Creamer’s Tree ServiceLicensed & Insured. Free estimates. (850) 832-9343 Coastal CateringGourmet meals cooked in your own home! We cook & do the dishes.850-447-4751 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on July 18th, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: June 17, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 June 27, July 4, 2013 94127S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 375 Application No. 2013-28 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01713-000R Description of Property: PARCEL NO. I: BEGINNING at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence Northeasterly on a Magnetic Bearing of North 1 Degree 30 Minutes East, for a distance of 245.82 feet to a point; thence turn an angle 19 Degrees 3 Minutes Left and continue Line on a Magnetic Bearing of North 17 Degrees 33 Minutes West, a distance of 131.70 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING, said point being at right angles to and 33 feet Easterly from the C/L of State Highway No. 71; from the POINT OF BEGINNING, project a line on a Magnetic Bearing North 49 Degrees 32 Minutes East for a distance of 250.00 feet, more or less, to a point on the West edge of the West ARM of Dead Lakes Swamp, said Point along being a Point on the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida; thence Northwesterly on a Meandering line along the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida, to a point on the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71, formerly No. 6, said point being the Point of Intersection of the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71 and the channel of the West Arm of Dead Lakes Swamp; thence Southeasterly on the East boundary of State Road 71 (33 feet East of C/L of State Road 71) a distance of 734 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING; being in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, all said land lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line East along the South line of said Section 13, for 232.65 feet, then turn 44 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 672.48 feet to a point of intersection of the C/L of State Road 71 and Jehu Road; then extend a line North 51 Degrees 00 Minutes West along the Centerline of said State Road 71 for 938.0 feet; then turn 92 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 37.39 feet to a concrete monument on the East R/W line of said State Road 71; then turn left along said R/W line for 89.98 feet to a concrete monument; then turn right and extend a line North 46 Degrees 24 Minutes East for 266 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the channel of a Slough for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, extend a line South 46 Degrees 24 Minutes West for 266 feet, more or less, to a concrete monument on the East Right of Way line of State Road 71; then turn right along said R/W line for 80.0 feet; then turn right and extend a line North 45 Degrees 58 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for 234 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the Slough; then turn right along said Slough to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land is in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: James E. Lester, Sr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of July, 2013. Dated this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2013 94167S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 13-37PR IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN ELAINE DURANT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Helen Elaine Durant, deceased, whose date of death was March 18, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 27, 2013. Personal Representative: Sue Recknagel 2728 Via Baya Jacksonville, FL 32223 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for Sue Recknagel FL Bar No.: 261629 P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227-7800 Fax: (850) 227-7878 E-Mail: mmagidson@ gtcom.net June 27, July 4, 2013 94201S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on July 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: REAL PROPERTY Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence N8939’58”W, along the Southerly line of said Section 35, 228.08 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71 and to a point on a curve; thence run Northeasterly along said Easterly right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the Northwest having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a delta of 0530’18”, a chord bearing and distance of N1128’31”E 421.06 feet, an arc length of 421.22 feet to the point of tangency; thence N0843’22”E along said Easterly right of way, 969.90 feet; thence N8937’56”E, 7.09 feet to the Easterly maintained right of way of said State Road No. 71 and the Point of Beginning; thence N0843’22”E, along said Easterly maintained right of way, 396.05 feet to the point of curvature, thence run Northerly along said Easterly maintained right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the West having a radius of 3097.04 feet, a delta of 0748’08”, a chord bearing and distance of N0449’18”E 421.41 feet, an arc length of 421.73 feet; thence N9000’00”E, 494.61 feet; thence S0002’20”E, 807.59 feet; thence S8937’56”W, 590.66 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Lot 4, Block C, St. John’s Village as per plat recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 7, Page 21. Also Less and Except: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N8939’58”W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 0530’18”, a chord bearing and distance of N1128’31”E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N0843’22”E, along said Easterly right of way line 969.90 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N8937’56”E, 231.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N0002’20”W, 155.31 feet along said East right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said East right of way line, N0002’20”W, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, N9000’00”E, 92.00 feet; thence S0002’20”E, 50.00 feet; thence N9000’00”W, 92.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands also known as Lot 3, Block B of St. John’s Village, Unit 1 (Proposed) Together with an easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property to-wit: Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N8939’58”W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 0530’18”, a chord bearing and distance of N1128’31”E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N0843’22”E, along said Easterly right of way line 936.48 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N8937’56”E, 7.09 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N8937’56”E, 229.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N0002’20”W, 238.31 feet along said East right of way line; thence leaving said East right of way line, N9000’00”W, 50 feet; thence S0002’20”E, 172.63 feet; thence S8937’56”W, 168.84 feet; thence S0843’22”W, 66.84 feet to the Point of Beginning. PERSONAL PROPERTY Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoir, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Amended Motion for Summary Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ST. JOHN’S VILLAGE OF GULF COUNTY, INC., a Florida corporation; JERRY HUFT; JAMES TOWNSEND; and ALAN MCNAIR, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-00210. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 4349200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. Kelly & Josh 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Mexico Bch 111 N 38th St, 7/5 and 7/6, 8:30am-1:30pm ESTMulti-Family Yard Sale GUN SHOWJuly 6th & 7th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 OtherPart Time Activities DirectorFor High School High Tech Career Mentoring Program35 hours per month, flexible hours during school time. Working with PSJHS students and community employers. Must have experience working with teenage students. Approx: $412.00 per month. High energy, organized, want to make a difference in kids’ lives. Email drills@talstar.com for info or call Pat Hardman 229-7799. Web ID#: 34256596 Text FL56596 to 56654 Sales/Retail/Bus DevSales ClerkPart time experienced help needed to work afternoons in Marine Store at Bay Bity Lodge. Must enjoy working with people and fishing. Call for interview. 653-9294 Web ID# 34257403 2 bedroom apt .; close to town; Dogwood Terrace Apartments; 808 Woodward Ave, Port St. Joe; (850) 227-7800 Text FL57640 to 56654 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Mexico Bch: 2BD & 2.5BA, furn townhome, beachside, CH&A, DW, W/D, fans throughout, reserved parking. $1000/mo + first/last. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 or Gil 201-895-4255Text FL53889 to 56654 3BR/2BA 1850 sq home on quiet dead end street about mile from the beach in Mexico Beach. Home was built in 2000 and is undergoing significant remodeling including new floors, paint, granite countertops, and stainless appliances. Move in ready by July 15th. $1,300/month 1 Year Lease/Credit Check Required $1,500 Deposit Call Zach Childs Broker/Owner 850-819-0833. Quality Long Term Rentals2 & 3br Avalible, Port St Joe, Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach. Call for more info 348-0262 WEWA Efficiency $390/mo plus $390 security deposit. Also have RV’s for rent by the week. Call (850) 639-5721 121 Hunter Circle 3br/2.5ba with bonus room; Completely remodeled 6.5 years ago. 24x40 pole barn with 24x20 closed-in with electricity. In ground sprinkler system, fenced in backyard. Located close to schools and town. $224,700. For more information, call 850-227-5713 or 850-527-5685 Realtors are welcome Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion . . . . . A4-A5Letters to the Editor . . . .A5Outdoors . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . .A7School News . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . B8 YEAR 75, NUMBER 38 Thursday, JULY 4, 2013Property values generally hold steadyBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The gloomy budget forecasts emanating from the Board of County Commissioners meeting room may have been a bit premature. Gulf County Property Appraiser Mitch Burke transmitted a preliminary property roll to the state by the July 1 deadline and that roll shows that while taxable tangible property values will dip for a seventh-straight year, this years decline represents less than 1 percent. That is a far cry from even the 7 percent decline of last year and far below the double-digit dips in property value from three and four years ago. Even though the real estate market continues to improve, Gulf Countys overall tax base dropped this year, Burke said. However, the decrease in value was minimal compared to previous years reductions. According to the preliminary numbers transmitted to the Florida Department of Revenue, the countys combined taxable value, including both real and personal, will drop from $1.352 billion to $1.347 billion, a decrease of threetenths of 1 percent. Burke said values were almost exactly where they were in 2003, before the roiling of the real estate market, up and then down. We are seeing new construction taking place, which is great news, Burke said. However, we dont get to realize the true increase in value due mainly to the statewide cap approved in 2008 which caps annual increases on value of non-homestead properties at no more than 10 percent annually. The news for the city of Port St. Joe stood out. The city was the only taxing district to show an increase in its tax base, from $276 million to $279 million, an increase of just over 1 percent. Burke said the increase was primarily the result of the sale of the newly-constructed Dollar General Market store on U.S. Highway 98 and valuations of some commercial lots owned by the St. Joe Company where values needed to be adjusted consistent with current market conditions, Burke said. Weve kind of busted our humps looking at different areas and changing values to where they should be, Burke said. There were some St. Joe properties that had not been adjusted in 10 years or more and we readjusted some of those values. For the Gulf County School See PROPERTY A8 Fun on the FourthStar Staff ReportIndependence Day is upon us, and the night sky will lit up Thursday with the glittering explosions of area rework displays. Its an annual event everyone looks forward to, so heres where you can get your x for the Fourth.PORT ST. JOEMidway through the citys 100th birthday and Centennial Celebration on Thursday, Port St. Joe will launch its annual reworks show over St. Joseph Bay at dark. Grab a seat on the shore at dark for the $15,000 display. The Port St. Joe boat ramp will close early that day to accommodate the reworks.WEWAHITCHKAThe City of Wewahitchka will begin its annual reworks display at dark. The celebratory display will be launched from T.L. James Park.MEXICO BEACHOn Thursday, Mexico Beach will host the Best Blast on the Beach. The celebration begins with the annual Sandy Shoes 5K Fun Run, which starts at Under the Palms Park at 7 a.m. CT. Register in advance for the event at the Tourist Information Center. The race is limited to 325 runners. There will be no registration the day of the race. A kids shing tournament will also take place at Canal Park from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. CT. Free hot dogs, snacks and beverages will be provided for shermen and their parents. At 8:30 p.m. CT the reworks will light up from the pier for this years annual display. St. Joe, Port Authority to partner on initial dredging workBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The Port Authority took a huge rst step in the dredging of the shipping channel last week. The board can thank the St. Joe Company for the assist. Port Authority chair Leonard Costin said he had received a pledge from St. Joe Company ofcials to provide the local match to a Florida Department of Transportation grant that would begin the work toward dredging the Port of Port St. Joe shipping channel. The FDOT grant is for $750,000, said port director Tommy Pitts, with a local match of $250,000. Costin said St. Joe had graciously agreed to provide the quarter million dollars. They stepped up to the plate, Costin said. That is the rst big hurdle. Well be moving ahead from there. The Port Authority See PORT A2CENTENNIALPhotos by WES LOCHER | The StarA parade down Reid Avenue marked the start of the centennial celebration.Celebration in full swing By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The Centennial Celebration to honor the 100th birthday of Port St. Joe began last Friday evening with a parade down Reid Avenue. The ceremony celebrated founding members of the city and featured graduates from Port St. Joe High School dating back to 1941. Also making the journey were the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School NJROTC, cub scouts, The Alley Catz band, and local emergency Some parade participants tossed beads to the onlookers that lined Reid Avenue. Kids of all ages headed to George Core Park on Sunday for the kite ying contest. Founding members of Port St. Joe cruised down Reid Avenue in classic cars. See CENTENNIAL A8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013board approved a joint participation agreement with the FDOT and St. Joe to move ahead on a study of the dredging, with Pitts noting a sense of urgency in encumbering the grant dollars before the end of the scal year. The money will be used for study and permitting as well as some initial engineering en route to a dredging plan, Pitts said. The Port Authority has received qualications to undertake the work from the two engineering rms under continuing contract with the port, but said the Port Authority should hold off until receiving clarication on several issues. Pitts said a meeting with the countys state legislative delegation as well as Congressman Steve Southerland would be helpful to establish how to proceed. There are a lot of questions to be answered before the process begins, Pitts said. Those questions are linked to the parallel paths the port is working on for the dredging, one on permitting, the other funding. It will be a major effort, Pitts said. The shipping channel has not be dredged since 1980, Pitts said. Pitts said the shortest course to the dredging would likely be securing funding from outside the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which ultimately would have to perform the dredging. The most time-conducive option would be to seek funding from a variety of sources, the Florida Legislature, RESTORE Act funds coming to the county, federal funds and the State Infrastructure Bank. If the funds can be raised, and the amount would be well into the millions of dollars, those dollars could be provided to the Corps under an agreement by which the Corps, once dredging is completed under its permit, would pledge reimbursement in the future. The other alternative would be working directly with the Corps, which would likely require far more time, Pitts said. Im also concerned the dredging will require an Environmental Impact Statement, which would take at least two years, Pitts said. We may only need an Environmental Assessment a far less time-consuming, intensive process. Time is of the essence for the dredging. In the past two months the St. Joe Company has entered into Letters of Intent that would, among other aspects, mean the shipping of some 1.125 million metric tons of wood pellets through the port by way of the AN Railway. Both LOIs contemplate lead time for dredging to take place. An LOI with Green Circle Bio Energy contemplates a window of roughly two years for dredging to be completed before the shipping through the Port of Port St. Joe. A second LOI, with Enova Energy Group, indicates the company would not be ready to begin shipping pellets until the latter half of 2014 at the earliest. But both LOIs are contingent on the completion of the dredging. As Pitts noted those two LOIs also provide the economic justication for the maintenance dredging and would also likely impact a proposed FDOT grant for improvements to the AN Railway. A FDOT grant of $5 million was announced earlier this year, but Pitts said the grant dollars were now stalled and Costin said the state is, in a sense, linking the rail grant to the dredging. I dont see how they can stall it much longer, Costin said, alluding to the announcement of the LOI with Enova.Revenue and staffWith the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity grant dollars for the update of the port master plan expended, the Port Authority, faced with the prospect of nishing the scal year in September in the red, asked Pitts to return to a salary of $1 per month. It is important we get through the scal year and have some money, Costin said. If we continue with Tommy as director we would have a decit. Weve been here before, well probably be back here again. We need him desperately. Its obvious we can not continue after June with a directors salary. Pitts agreed to return to the $1 per month he made prior to the FDEO grant. I understand the situation, Pitts said. I will continue at $1 per month. Nadine Lee, assistant to Pitts, will also remain onboard as a contract employee. Ill work with you anyway I can, Lee said. My heart is in this, too. Costin said he was working on several things to address the lack of revenue for maintaining a presence at the Port Authority and expressed optimism the Port Authority could get to September with money left in the bank. I think well have a solution to our cash ow by September, Costin said. No guarantees, but Im hopeful. Loretta Costin with the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. applauded Pitts decision to continue to work for the port. As a member of the community and a member of the EDA, I want to thank Tommy for staying on for $1 a month, Loretta Costin said. He does so much and we ask so much of him. I just appreciate it. Callforinformationaboutour rotatingspecialists: WeemsMedicalCenterEastMonday(extendedhours)8:00am-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-4:30pm Wednesday8:00-4:30pm Thursday8:00-4:30pm Friday(extendedhours)8:00-6:00pm Saturday8:00-4:00pm Note:appointmentswillbescheduledupto30min.priorto close(walk-insstillwelcomeupuntilclose) WeemsMedicalCenterWestMonday8:00-6:00pm Tuesday8:00-6:00pm Wednesday8:00-6:00pm Thursday8:00-6:00pm FAMILYANDSPECIALTYCARE850-653-8853,ext.118 Apalachicola 850-697-2345 Carrabelle NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:7-31-13CODE:SJ00 enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedbytheFSUBoard ofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomoreeasilyrespondtoworkforceneeds inourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversityby helpingusbuildanendowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallowFSUPanama Citytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnewdegreeprogramsandprovidenew equipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMaryBethLovingoodat (850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu.THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL PORT from page A1By TIM CROFT@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com An Overstreet man was arrested last week on charges of aggravated battery and leaving the scene of accident involving property damage after he chased and crashed a vehicle he believed was driven by his ex-wife, Gulf County Sheriffs Office investigators said. Kenneth Norris Rogers, 43, was initially taken into custody on Tuesday afternoon. A 9-1-1 caller reported that a van had collided with her vehicle on State 71 and Fleming Curve and had ed the scene. Shortly thereafter, Sgt. John Murnan located the suspect vehicle and identied Rogers, who said he thought the other vehicle was his ex-wifes van. Rogers told Murnan he had stopped to check on the driver. Rogers was taken back to the scene of the crash, where he was arrested by the Florida Highway Patrol on charges of leaving the scene of a crash involving damage to vehicle or property, a second-degree misdemeanor. He was transported to the Gulf County Jail. During a follow-up investigation, investigators discovered Rogers had tailgated the victim from the Gulf and Calhoun County line into Wewahitchka, according to the GCSO. When the victim arrived in Wewahitchka, she stopped briey to conduct work-related business off State 71. Once back on State 71 she noticed Rogers was again behind her. Rogers continued to tailgate her vehicle south on State 71, at speeds estimated at roughly 60 mph, before reaching Fleming Curve at which time Rogers drove his van into the rear end of her van. Rogers pulled along the drivers side and collided again with the victims vehicle, forcing her from the road. Once he opened the victims door and discovered it was not his ex-wife he ed, according to the GCSO. Investigators determined Rogers actions were intentional, believing it was his ex-wife. Rogers was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, a second-degree felony. He was released on $5,000 bond.Overstreet man arrested after crashing wrong vehicle KENNETH N N Orr RR IS ROGEr R SSgt. John Murnan located the suspect vehicle and identied Rogers, who said he thought the other vehicle was his ex-wifes van. Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas |

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, July 4, 2013 Startaheatpump waterheaterrevolutionHeatpumpwaterheatersprovideasmuchas$300 inenergysavingsperyearcomparedtoatraditional electricwaterheater,andyougettwiceasmuchhot waterfromeachkilowatt-hourofelectricityconsumed. www.gcec.com or (850)639.2216 1.800.333.9392 vide as much as $300 oers pr er heat Heat pump wat y consumed icittr -hour of elec wattiloom each k er frwat WorkingTogether... ToBuildTheFuture GulfCountyRepublicanParty MemberCommunicationsCommitteeGulfcountyrepublicans@gmail.comWemeetmonthlyeverythirdMonday7PM EST(upstairs)atCapitalCityBankNextMeeting:July15,2013 IT'SINDEPENDENCEDAY! TODAYWECOMMEMORATETHEACTIONSOF OURNATION'SFOUNDERS JULY4TH1776 AMONGYOURMANYACTIVITIESTODAYPLEASE TAKEA MOMENTANDREVIEWOUR DECLARATIONOFINDEPENDENCE WHENITTHECOURSEOFHUMANEVENTS,.WEHOLD THESETRUTHSTOBESELFEVIDENT,.ANDFORTHE SUPPORTOFTHISDECLARATION,WEMUTUALLYPLEDGE TOEACHOTHEROURLIVES,OURFORTUNESAND OURSACREDHONOR. THISWASDAYONEOFTHE UNITEDSTATESOFAMERICA NOW237YEARSLATERREMEMBERTHE56COURAGEOUS SIGNERSANDTHENEWAMERICANCITIZENSWHO GAVETHISNATIONITSBEGINNINGANDALLOFUSTHE OPPORTUNITYOFAMERICANS! 719Hwy98,MexicoBeach www.toucansmexicobeach.com ALLYOUCANEATBREAKFAST Sat.&Sun.MorningStartingat8AM-AllCentralTimesTHUR. NIGHTTrueSoul -UpstairsBarDJattheTikiBarwithLightShow LadiesNight FRI. NIGHTLocalMotion -UpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar WED. NIGHTBarryHenson -UpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar SAT. NIGHTLocalMotion -UpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar SUN. NIGHTTrueSoulUpstairsBar DJ -TikiBar **COMEWATCHTHEFIREWORKS** ALLFIREWORKSCANBESEENFROMHERE! By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Gulf County School Board last week took possession of Lamar Faison Fields, including the soccer complex and tennis courts, from the city of Port St. Joe, including the soccer complex and tennis courts. The city and School Board have been discussing the exchange for several months, but there were several issues requiring resolution. One was receiving an OK from the St. Joe Company, which had donated the land to the city for the recreational complex. Second, the school district had to ensure that the complex remained available for public use as state parks and recreation grant funds had been used to build the complex. From the citys standpoint, deeding over the complex was about cost-savings. The city will save more than $100,000 required annually for upkeep and maintenance to the elds and tennis courts. The city and district staff agreed the district was better suited to maintain the soccer elds at the Lamar Faison complex as part of its upkeep of other sports elds. For the school district, it was an opportunity to expand the Port St. Joe Elementary School campus to take more control over parking and also maintenance of land between the school and Lamar Faison Fields. The school board effectively owns all land surrounding the complex. Im very excited about it, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. This gives us a chance to further beautify our campus on the south end (closest to Madison Avenue) and on the north end it allows us to control and add to the parking. This lets us control more property that is all part of one campus. The city and district will share a lawnmower the city has used to maintain the elds. The district takes on no additional insurance liability. The community and especially the soccer community should be pleased, Norton said. Soccer is part of the now and part of the future.FEMALE PHYSICAL ED TEACHER IN WEw W AHITCHKAAt the request of the principal, Wewahitchka Jr./ Sr. High School will advertise for a female physical education teacher. The school has not had a female instructor in several years, and Debbie Baxley requested the new hire to ensure safety for girls in the school. Norton noted the district hoped to tick off several needs for female coaches for softball and girls basketball with the hire.VOLUNTARY P P RE-K KDeborah Crosby, director of Special Services, said registration for voluntary pre-K for the coming school year was open on a rstcome, rst-served basis. She said the district had 40 slots in the south end of the county and 20 in the north end. A child must be 4 years old by Sept. 1 and have proof of Florida residence to register. For more information contact Crosby at 229-6940.LL IONS C C LUB DONATIONSThe Lions Club donated $500 to each of the countys two football programs, with Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon and Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah on hand to receive the donations. District takes deed to Lamar Faison FieldsThe community and especially the soccer community should be pleased. Soccer is part of the now and part of the future.Jim NNorton Superintendent of schools Special to The StarRecently, the newly elected ofcers of the John C. Gainous Post No. 10069 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars were sworn in by the District 17 Commander, Roger LaChance. The Veterans of Foreign Wars is an organization of veterans who served directly in a eld of combat defending America. Locally, the VFW supports the community along a broad spectrum of needs and interests. These ofcers will serve the John C. Gainous Post for the coming year. SS PECIAL TO TT HE SS TARFrom left are Elmer Green, Adjutant; Rick Armstrong, Junior Vice Commander; Mike Lowry, Senior Vice Commander; Rodney Herring, Commander; Phillip Dodson, Quartermaster; and Richard Maupin, Trustee.New ofcers sworn in at VFW Post 10069

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I wish I could spend this Fourth of July on Bunker Hill. From there you can see Breeds Hill where most of the ghting actually took place back in 1775. It was the rst sustained, pitched battle of the American Revolution. We lost that day. But we didnt run. A group of rag tag New England colonist stood up to the best equipped and most feared army in the world at that time and didnt blink. When the day was over the British occupied both hills. But they lost almost one-third of their ghting men in the taking. And the young American soldiers didnt slink away. They retreated like an organized ghting unit. Both sides learned a valuable lesson that day. Ive gotten so caught up in the comfort of my own living these days that I dont dwell much on how I got here. In my near sighted egotistical mind, I probably think I did it with my own power and might. The Continental Army was of cially three days old when the ght for Bunker Hill took place. Those Bunker Hill defenders hadnt had time to be sworn in. They were ghting for the most basic things on earth; freedom, liberty, independence.the right to make their own way! Ive enjoyed those attributes of this great nation all my life. Ive done piddling little to obtain them. Maybe if I could stand on that hill on this Independence Day I could catch a glimpse of the spirit of those men. I wonder about the thoughts racing through their heads as they dug in. I wonder how each individual defender came to be on that hill on that particular day. I wonder about their age. (The minimum age to enlist in the Continental Army was 16; 15 with parental consent.) I wonder if they were as afraid as I would have been when the Red Coats formed up below. I wonder if they had any inkling of the nation they were laying the foundation for when they raised those muskets to their shoulders. I do not wonder about their courage. When I was 16 years old I was playing American Legion Baseball and dating Billie Jean Barham. I would love this Fourth of July to stand silently over in one corner of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. I believe I could hear the 2nd Continental Congress as they convened there on May, 10, 1775. All thirteen colonies were represented. The small battles of Lexington and Concord had taken place. It was time to make amends with the British or ght. Can you imagine among John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Hancock, Patrick Henry and Benjamin Franklin who listened to whom! It was about as impressive a list of founding fathers as any nation has ever put together under one roof. And they didnt do too badly in that room. They had the good sense to pick George Washington as the commanding General of the Army. An army, of course, which they didnt exactly have at the moment. It was where the Declaration of Independence was born. When in the course of human events.. you talk about a great opening line. And how about, We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And after enumerating all the injustices heaped on them by King George and the Crown they closed brilliantly, with a rm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. Man, if I could write like that, Id be a millionaire! Ben Franklin, off the record, put it a little more succinctly, If we dont all hang together, well all hang separately. If I had a time machine, Id warp back to Valley Forge this Fourth of July. Of course, I couldnt catch the essence of the place in July. The snow would be gone. It would be 90 degrees instead of 10 below freezing. You wouldnt have to scrounge up re wood. If wouldnt matter that you had no shoes. Its hard to imagine hunger on a full belly. The winter of 1777-78 was brutal. Cold descended on the little valley like you aint never seen! Disease ran rampant in the camps. Life was worse than miserable. You have to ask yourself, What could possibly cause a band of men in such conditions to hang on like they did. And you might even consider what you might have done under like circumstances. Or you might pause and utter up a prayer of thanks for them on this Independence Day. History well records what those men did. They got up off the cold ground, wrapped some rags around their bleeding feet and marched out to meet the enemy. They fought like the fate of a nation rested in their hands. I wish this Fourth of July I could transport back to the little town square of my youth in McKenzie, Tennessee. I stood beside my ram rod straight Father as the ag passed by and waited impatiently until I could move again. He had his hand over his heart and tears in his eyes. I just wanted the parade to get over with so I could get to the barbeque and baked beans. Dad understood those men at Bunker Hill. And at Valley Forge. Hed seen the re from the enemy. Hed stood in the gap for this nation. I would love to tell him, Ive got it now, Dad. Its high time we all did!Respectfully,Kes A good friend is always advising me to read Flannery OConnor. I never tell him, but I already do. Im from the South; Im supposed to read Flannery OConnor. However, I sometimes read her same stories over and over again. A Good Man is Hard to Find is my favorite. It is violent and strange, but still so funny. Ive read it many times simply looking for something new to think about. Her short stories are the subject of many books whose authors try to interpret what Flannery OConnor wanted to convey. Honestly, I think this is an important beauty of her work it can be interpreted in so many ways. In the middle of the outrageous, often disturbing tales, I nd a wonderful sense of southern bespectacled woman humor. Flannery makes me smile, laugh and scratch my head. Spending time with her is something that I enjoy. The other day while sitting in the back of my college classroom reading one of Flannerys stories, my right eye started watering, throbbing and feeling like it was going to fall out of my head. My nose was dripping, then running like a sieve. My students were taking a test, so I went to the restroom to get something to wipe my eye and nose. Coming back into the classroom, I turned on the oscillating fan in the back of the room and sat down to continue reading Flannerys Revelation. Again, I do not nd sadness in her stories; I nd Flannerys big smile, bookish glasses and sharp southern Catholic wit. I had gotten to the part in the story where a lady (Mrs. Turpin) sitting in the waiting room of a doctors of ce gets hit in the head by a book thrown by a young lady named Mary Grace. Perhaps one of my students had hit me, without me realizing it. That is exactly what it felt like. We have a pretty big textbook and my right eye felt as though someone had hit me, hurling it from somewhere in the front of the room. That was not the case. Going back and forth to the hall of the building for relief, I started to gure out something in my classroom was causing my right eye to explode and my nose to cry. The oscillating fan had only made it worse. Then it hit me like a book thrown from across the classroom. I knew what it was Growing up I spent a lot of Saturdays and summer days in my Grandmamas ten cent store in Wedowee, Alabama. Grandmama sold candy, magazines, kitchen stuff, toys and everything else you would imagine in a rural Alabama ten cent store. She even sold perfume. I distinctly remember my Mama warning me never to open the little bottles with the red lids. I would ask her, Why not? She wouldnt explain. Some children are going to do what you tell them they shouldnt do; it is even more probable when you do not give them an explanation of why not to do it. So one hot summer afternoon, I decided to open one of the little bottles with the red lids. My eyes watered, my nose ran, and for a very long time, everyone who came in uttered the same phrase as soon as they came in Grandmamas ten cent store with the wooden screen door and oscillating fans blowing left and right around the cash register where Grandmama would sit and wait to do business with the folks that would wander in. They would say, Somebody opened a bottle of Atom Bomb. Atom Bomb was cheap perfume; as a matter of fact, it was the cheapest perfume Grandmama sold. What on earth would cause someone to want to put something like that on their body puzzled me. Just thinking about the smell makes my eyes pour water my right eye in particular. I still dont know how to best describe the aroma or stench. Perhaps being drowned in vanilla avoring, while someone poured gasoline on your sunburn, while another fellow squirted vinegar based hot pepper sauce in your eyes (particularly your right one). Mama explained to me that the type of folks who used Atom Bomb perfume usually did so to cover up the fact that they didnt take a bath. Mama taught school in Alabama for 42 years, she was good at explaining things like this. She also probably knew that if she had explained it to me before I opened one of the little bottles with the red lids, I would have opened it anyway. Flannery OConnor could have gotten away with a much more straightforward explanation of the reason and type of folks that might need to use Atom Bomb perfume. Someone would have probably died in the process, but there would have been humor involved and the underlying message could have been taken (or appreciated) in a variety of scents. The smell in my classroom was not going away; it was just being oscillated back and forth so as to continue to hit me on the left, right, top and bottom of my right eye. I couldnt continue reading Flannerys Revelation because I was using various combinations of my hands and ngers to hold my right eye in my head and going back and forth to the hallway for air. On deaths door and reading this particular story, I started thinking about the Book of Revelation in the Bible. I remember somewhere the angels burning perfume or incense and it smoking and people praying. There was thunder, rumblings, lightning ashing and earthquakes. My right eye was de nitely going to fall out if I didnt hold it in. I had gured out the best way to keep it in was to jab my right thumb into it, Ron PollackExecutive Director, Families USA At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiums? A: When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security bene t each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also re ect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income bene ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can nd out if you qualify and apply online at www.socialsecurity. gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www.familiesusa. org/resources/programlocator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a xed incomeand thats most peoplethis is encouraging news. Families USA is the national organization for health care consumers. We have advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. Ron Pollack is the Executive Director of Families USA.Revelation and the Atom BombUnderstanding Medicare PremiumsOh, Say, Can You See... HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, July 4, 2013 APage 4SectionSee CRANKS A5

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CRANKS from page A4palm up and hold it there by hanging on to my right ear with the other four ngers. Finally, the class was over. The headache and the smell of the Atom Bomb stayed with me for the rest of the evening. Mamas and Flannerys words will stay with me forever. Flannery OConnor died in August of 1964, at the age of 39, of complications from lupus. I write because I dont know what I think until I read what I say. ~ Flannery OConnor Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Lyons, NE As Congress argues over farm subsidies and food stamps, Rural Americans complain that elected of cials ignore small communities and fail to invest in their future. So found a unique, comprehensive poll of Rural Americans on the role of federal policy in creating economic opportunity for rural people and a future for their communities. The poll was conducted by the nationally respected bipartisan polling team of Celinda Lake of Lake Research and Ed Goeas of The Tarrance Group and released today by the Center for Rural Affairs of Lyons, NE. It surveyed rural voters in the Great Plains, Midwest and Southeast. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http://www.cfra.org/ news/130625/rural-pollreleased-today. The poll found Rural Americans united in their commitment to their way of life. Nearly 9 in 10 believe the rural and small-town way of life is worth ghting for. But they sadly believe the rural way of life may be fading and they want to stop it, reverse it, and revitalize rural America, said pollsters Lake and Goeas, and they believe they are being ignored by politicians and government and blame them for the state of the rural economy. Nevertheless, the poll found divided views about the role of government and populist views about the economy and big institutions. Three fourths agree that Americas future is weakened by a widening gap between the rich and families struggling to make ends meet. But they split evenly on whether its time for government to play a stronger role in strengthening rural communities and making the economy work for the average person in rural and small-town America; or whether turning to big government to solve our problems will do more harm than good. Neither the conservative nor progressive ideological perspective has it right, said Lake. On the one hand, the language around lower taxes, smaller government, and fewer regulations is one of the highest testing messages. On the other, they support policies that call for more job training, increased infrastructure investments, more technology, and better preschools all requiring a role for government in making things better. Goeas said, It is too simplistic to believe rural America is antigovernment and that there is nothing for progressives to say, nor is it possible to say that rural America wants bigger government and more spending. They want tax breaks but they also support increased loans and grants to help people gain skills and open small businesses. They want more ef cient and effective government and view much of public policy as a fairness issue in which rural America has not received fair treatment. Among the results: Over half said that owning my own business or farm is a big part of the American dream for me and most agreed with helping small business through less government (cutting taxes, spending and regulation) and strengthened government (loans, tax credits, training and antitrust enforcement). Three fourths agree that too much of federal farm subsidies go to the largest farms, hurting smaller family farms. Three fourths support tax credits and investment in new transmission lines for development of wind, solar and other renewable electric generation in rural areas. Eight in ten support grants and loans to revitalize small towns through upgrades to water and sewer systems and investments in roads and bridges. Six in ten say government has some or a lot of responsibility to help the working poor advance economically (versus a little or none). Eight in ten support job training to improve earnings, Medicaid for health coverage and helping the working poor afford necessities through payroll tax refunds like the Earned Income Tax Credit. Eighty ve percent favor preschool programs to prepare lower-income children to succeed in school. Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years ago, said Lake. But rural Americans are somewhat optimistic that things will get better, said Goeas, and younger rural Americans are most optimistic. Center for Rural Affairs Executive Director Chuck Hassebrook said the optimism of the upcoming generation re ects the new entrepreneurial opportunities in rural America and growing appreciation for the rural way of life. They get it, said Hassebrook, and that gives them the capacity to lead their communities to a better future. Politically, said Hassebrook, the poll reveals openings for candidates of either party willing to ght for federal policy that supports genuine opportunity for rural people and a better future for their communities. He pointed to the question asking voters whether they would nd it convincing if a US Senate candidate made certain statements. Eighty seven percent said they would nd it convincing for a Senate candidate to say: Small-town America is a big and important part of what makes America go. We are hard working, patriotic, faithful, and skilled. Making sure our families, our small business owners, and our workers have the same chance as everyone else is fair and smart. That means supporting policies like investing more in helping our small businesses get started and bringing technology to our areas so we can be connected to the new economy. A full copy of the report and polling data can be viewed and downloaded at: http:// www.cfra.org/news/130625/ rural-poll-released-today Established in 1973, the Center for Rural Affairs is a private, non-pro t organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, July 4, 2013 APage 5SectionMemories of my ride on a muleDear Editor, I always wanted to go horseback riding but since we didnt own a horse, I never got the opportunity. But whats the difference between riding a horse or a mule? I soon found out when I decided to go for a ride on the mule that belonged to the young man who farmed our play place and had left his mule tied to our fence. Oh, I thought, this is my golden opportunity. With no former experience at horseback riding, I crawled on the mules back and took off down the road for my first ride. The mule did not want to be taking anyone for a ride during his time in the shade, so he tried to turn around and go back to the cool shade. I kept making him go forward until he carried me over to a ditch. I could tell what he had in mind, so I pulled the right reign and turned him around and let him go back to his place under the shade of the large oak tree. I have not tried to ride a mule again.Audrey ParrishPort St. JoeEmployees make a differenceDear Editor, I would like to commend the man merchants as well as their employees in Port St. Joe for their courtesy and helpfulness to the shopper. It makes shopping more enjoyable.Sincerely,Audrey Parrish Port St. Joe Letters to the EDITORHave you ever ordered something online that was delivered damaged or never arrived at all? Or been double-billed by a merchant? Or spotted a charge on your credit card statement you didnt make? Most of us have. Fortunately, the 1975 Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) protects your rights during such credit card billing disputes. It also outlines the process for contesting charges made to your account. Heres how it works First, FCBA protection applies only to openend credit account transactions those involving credit cards or revolving charges (e.g., department store accounts). It doesnt cover installment contracts you repay on a fixed schedule, such as car loans. Billing errors that are covered by the FCBA include: Fraudulent or unauthorized use of your credit card, whether it was stolen or merchants charged unapproved items to your account. Charges that list the wrong date or amount. Charges for goods or services you either did not accept or that werent delivered as agreed. Math errors, such as being charged twice for a transaction. Failure to post payments or other credits. (Note: Report suspected fraud immediately. By law, youre only liable for the first $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.) Review all billing statements carefully upon receipt because in order to be covered under FCBA rules, most disputed transactions must be reported within 60 days of the statement date on which the error appeared. First, contact the merchant and try to resolve the dispute directly with them. If this good-faith resolution attempt doesnt work, you can escalate the process by filing a written report with your credit card issuer within the 60-day window. The card issuer is then obligated to investigate the dispute on your behalf. They must acknowledge your complaint, in writing, within 30 days of receipt and resolve the dispute with the merchant within two billing cycles but not more than 90 days. Send your letter via certified mail to the card issuers billing inquiry address, not the payment address. Include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error. Include copies of sales slips or other documents that support your position. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), you may withhold payment of the disputed amount and related charges during the investigation. In fact, many card issuers may voluntarily remove the charge until the matter is resolved since they are representing you, their client, in the dispute. If it turns out your bill contains a mistake, the creditor must explain, in writing, the corrections that will be made. In addition to crediting your account, they must remove all finance charges, late fees, or other charges related to the error. However, if the card issuers investigation determines that you owe part or all of the disputed amount, they must promptly provide you with a written explanation. If you disagree with the investigations results, you may further dispute your claim with the creditor, as outlined by the FTC at www.consumer.ftc.gov/ articles/0219-fair-creditbilling. (That site also contains a sample dispute letter and other helpful FCBA information.) If you believe a creditor has violated the FCBA, you may file a complaint with the FTC or sue them in court. Hopefully, youll never have a billing dispute that goes to these extremes. But its good to know how consumer laws protect you, just in case. Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney.How to dispute a credit card chargeNew poll suggests more nuanced attitude towards federal role JASON ALDERMAN Rural Americans are frustrated that the economy has grown stagnant, feel they have too little control over their own economic situation and feel worse off now than four years agoCelinda Lake Lake ResearchReport suspected fraud immediately. By law, youre only liable for the rst $50 in unauthorized charges; however, most card issuers waive that liability if you report the charges quickly.

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COMEJOINUSFORTHE... 4 TH OFJULY SIDEWALKSALE! JULY3RD&4TH Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, July 4, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore OffshoreRed snapper is still in season in state waters, 9 miles from land, but the fish will be harder to land in shallow water. Try using lighter line and smaller hooks with cut bait fished half way to the bottom. Gag grouper is open again in our region this week with no new changes in the bag limits or sizes. Good sized fish are in 150ft of water due south of the Cape. Our regions lakes, rivers, and creeks are close to full with so much rain lately and the fish have responded well to the cooler rain water. Big bream and catfish are being caught in the Brother and Howard creek. Try using a 5-6ft light fly rod and a chartruse or glow popper for great action under low hanging trees and limbs.By Tom BairdSpecial to The Star Florida has over 1,000 miles of coastline, more than any state in the continental U.S. Here physical forces have shaped barrier islands and offshore keys with abundant shallow bays that are perfect habitats for the luxuriant growth of submerged plants. Along the northern Gulf coast a broad shallow continental shelf absorbs wave energy produced by storms far at sea. Here the shallow, quiet waters and rm limestone substrate offer ideal conditions for the growth of seagrasses. The angler and weekend scalloper are well aware of the submerged seagrasses in St. Joseph Bay. Anyone swimming or snorkeling at Eagle Harbor in St. Joseph Peninsula State Park has seen or felt these grasses underfoot. You might have seen windrows of decaying grasses after a storm as you walk the beach looking for shells, or you have seen the long propeller scars cut through grass ats when they are exposed at very low tides. In the bay, one can observe the wading herons and egrets dining on trapped shes and crustaceans on low tides. These vast submerged meadows are teeming with marine life. Many scuba divers and snorkelers feel that the offshore beds of seagrasses are just as impressive as any coral reef. Despite the name, seagrasses are not true grasses at all. The plants in our bay and offshore belong to usually one to ve or so species of plants that produce owers and seeds underwater in tropical seas. One of these, turtle grass, has been reported to ower as far north as Tarpon Springs, and occasionally around Panama City. However, most of our local seagrasses reproduce vegetatively with long runners. Seagrass beds form extensive animal spawning grounds and habitats, with some fishes becoming so adapted to this environment that they can mimic the waving grass blades as camouflage. The grass blades also offer a site for smaller plants and animals to colonize. The seagrasses are fed upon directly by manatees, sea turtles, sea urchins and some fishes. At one time large herds of sea turtles fed on these grasses and St. Joseph Bay remains a vital feeding ground for sea turtles. Seagrasses are important indirectly as food. The decaying leaves are decomposed by an array of small worms, crustaceans and fishes that are in turn feed upon by larger forms of life. An example of this abundant productivity is provided by the results of a study of common turtle grass in Boca Ciega Bay in Pinellas County, which found the grass can produce up to 3000 pounds per acre in dry weight of leaves. There was even a study that found that cattle and sheep grow better on turtle grass than any other forage. However, the grass beds do not stand up well to harvesting, so it is best to harvest the seagrasses indirectly as seafood on the table. Like all plants, seagrasses need a suitable substrate on which to grow, but the location of seagrass beds is also determined by salinity, depth and the clarity of the water. Each species of seagrass has its own preference in each category. Turtle grass, our most common grass in the bay, prefers relatively high salinities and cannot stand being uncovered at low tide. Since St. Joseph Bay is often as salty as the gulf, turtle grass thrives. Growing closest to the edge is shoal grass. It can stand some occasional drying at low tide and lowered salinity from rainfall runoff. Since all green plants need sunlight to make food, the seagrasses are very much affected by any action that makes the water muddy or turbid. Turtle grass can be seen growing at 100 foot depths in the Florida Keys, but in more turbid waters grows to depths of about 8 or 9 feet. Dredging operations to deepen channels or past practices to make land for housing not only smother the grasses and other bottom life, but also make the water too turbid for light to penetrate to sufficient depths. The different species of seagrasses are easy to identify. Turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum), our most common seagrass in the bay, has a long strap-shaped leaf blade (2-12 inches) that is about one-half inch wide. This wide blade sets it apart from the other grasses. The stem is connected to a tough root or rhizome that parallels the surface of the mud or sand with leaves arising in clusters of two to five blades. Turtle grass is often considered a plant of the tropics as it occurs extensively throughout the Caribbean and West Indies. However, it ranges throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico as well. Boat propellers can damage this grass severely. Boaters should take care not to damage these grass beds, especially in the shallow south end of the bay, because it is very slow to grow back. Shoal grass or Shoalweed (Halodule wrightii) has a very thin, narrow leaf that is only about one-eighth inch wide. The leaves can be 1 to 18 inches long and often have a blunt tip. Youll find shoal grass in the narrow intertidal shallows of the bay. Since large areas of seagrass beds have been destroyed throughout the state by past dredging for buildings, finger-fill canals, island hopping for road construction and pollution, the care of the remaining seagrass beds is critical. Because their elaborate rhizome and root systems trap and stabilize sediments, they ensure better water clarity. Their role as nursery and feeding ground for young fish, shrimp, crabs, scallops and turtles makes them critical to the success of sport and commercial fisheries. Take care not to damage our submerged seagrasses. Tom Baird has been a fisheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas.The seagrass beds of St. Joseph Bay are the places to look for scallops this season. WEEKLYALMANACDate HighLow%Precip Thu,July0484 7880% Fri,July0587 7870% Sat,July0688 8040% Sun,July0789 7930% Mon,July0889 7910% Tues,July0989 7860% Wed,July1089 7960% ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS 4514932ishereforyourboatingneeds! MARINAFORKLIFT/RACKSTORAGE CANOPIEDBOATSTORAGE&BOASTRENTAL DIESEL&GASOLINE CAPTAINSALTYBAITS&ICE GATEDSELFSTORAGE,TRAILEREDBOATS&RV'S(850)-227-33571617GROUPERAVENUE,PORTST.JOE,FLWWW.CAPTAINSCOVEFL.COM SPONSORTHEWEEKLYALMANAC227-7847 CALLTODAY! Page 6 Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.starfl.com By Tom Baird swimming or snorkeling The seagrass beds of St. Joseph Bay are the places to look for scallops this season. SeagrassesSPECIAL TO THE STAR A green sea turtle resting in seagrass. SCALLOPING SEASONSPECIAL TO THE STARSeveral groups of people were out searching for scallops earlier this week.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASectionThursday, July 4, 2013 Page 7Noah Wich, Braden Baumgartner, Jacob Curcie and Michael Sherrill participated in the free golf lessons in June. SJBGC nishes free junior golf lessonsSpecial to The StarThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club completed a series of free golf lessons for junior golfers on Friday, June 28. Each year, the club offers these free lessons on each Friday in June. Twenty-three juniors took advantage of this free offering. The sessions were led by Certi ed Golf Instructor, Ethel Bardsley. Ethel was assisted by Penelope Evanoff, Russell Bardsley and other members of the club. In addition to learning the game of golf, the students were allowed to enjoy the club swimming pool following each lesson. The club is open to the public and is an important community asset year around.SPECIAL TO THE STAR Penelope Evanoff teaches the ner points of putting to Leanne Baumgartner, Ryanne Wich and Ellie Wich. Star Staff ReportFor the rst time, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls basketball team joined the boys in spending a portion of the summer playing and attending camps. The Lady Tiger Sharks nished their summer 8-14, a respectable record for a team that will have no seniors or juniors this coming season. The team is comprised of three sophomores, Callie Fleshner, Morgan Gant, and Jamarion Larry, three freshmen, Hallie Jasnski, Khaliayah Johnson and Maliayah McNair and four 8th-graders, Teiyahna Hutchinson, Brooklynn Quinn, Aliayah Johnson, and Java Patterson. The month of June began with a trip to Freeport where the Lady Tiger Sharks went 1-2, playing Freeport, Paxton and South Walton. Next up was a trip to Poplar Springs, for a camp known as the Border War during which Florida schools compete against schools from Alabama. The Lady Tiger Sharks played six games in two days, going 1-5. Port St. Joe boarded a bus again for a four-hour drive to Columbus, GA to compete at the Columbus State University team camp. The Lady Tiger Sharks played schools Class 3A and larger and came away 2-5. The last stop was this past weekend at the University of Florida where 82 high school girls teams came to enjoy the Gator campus. The Lady Tiger Sharks went 4-2, the two losses coming by a combined ve points. The team would like to thank the following people for making this summer a success: Mrs. Brenda Fisher, Coach Kenny Parker, George Durens Piggly Wiggly, Greg Williams of Williams Gunn and Pawn, and Joey Browning of Columbus Trophy and Screen Printing. Lady Tiger Sharks hone skills during summer LADY TIGER SHARKS 2013 SCHEDULE DATE Day Opponent Home/Away Time(ET) 26 Aug Mon Rutherford Away 6:00/7:00 27 Aug Tue West Gadsden Home 6:00 3 Sep Tue Bay Haven Away 6:00/7:00 5 Sep Thu Bay High Home 6:00/7:00 9 Sep Mon Wewahitchka Away 6:00/7:00 10 Sep Tue South Walton Away 6:00/7:00 12 Sep Thu Bozeman Home 6:00/7:00 14 Sep Sat Chipley Tour. Away All Day 17 Sep Tue Franklin County Away 6:00/7:00 19 Sep Thu Bozeman Away 6:00/7:00 23 Sep Mon Liberty County Home 6:00/7:00 24 Sep Tue West Gadsden Away 6:00 26 Sep Thu Bay Haven Home 6:00/7:00 3 Oct Thu South Walton Away 6:00/7:00 7 Oct Mon Liberty County Away 6:00/7:00 8 Oct Tue Franklin County Home 6:00/7:00 10 Oct Thur Bay High Away 6:00/7:00 15 Oct Tue Rutherford Home 6:00/7:00 17 Oct Thu Wewahitchka Home 6:00/7:00 21 Oct Mon Quarter Finals Franklin 5:00/7:00 22 Oct Tue Semi-Finals Franklin 5:00/7:00 24 Oct Thu Finals Franklin 7:00 5 Nov Tue Reg. Semi-Finals TBA 7:00 9 Nov Sat Reg. Finals TBA 2:00 12-16 Nov FHSAA Finals Kissimmee Star Staff ReportVolleyball conditioning for Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School began at 8 a.m. ET on Monday, July 1. All upcoming 7th through 12th grade girls that are interested in volleyball are encouraged to attend. All participants must have a current (within one calendar year) FHSAA sports physical. Players must also ll out new consent forms. All three FHSAA forms, EL2, EL3 and EL3CH, can be found on our volleyball web page. The upcoming fall schedule is also posted there. The website is http:// psjhs-gcs.schoolloop.com/volleybal l.Volleyball conditioning begins at PSJHS Star Staff ReportFree physicals for those who will participate in football this fall at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will be provided from 5-8 p.m. ET on July 23 at the Medical Of ce Building on the campus of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Athletes must have a Florida High School Athletics Association physical form, which can be picked up at the high school of ce. 2013 TIGER SHARK VARSITY FOOTBALL SCHEDULEDate Team Where Time 23 Aug Blountstown Away 8:00 PM 30 Aug Wewa. Jr. Sr. HS Away 8:00 PM 6 Sep Bay High Home 7:30 PM 13 Sep Bozeman Home 8:00 PM 20 Sep Jefferson County Away 7:30 PM 27 Sep Chipley Away 8:00 PM 4 Oct Franklin County Home 7:30 PM11 Oct Open 18 Oct Florida A&M HS Away 7:30 PM 25 Oct West Gadsden HS Home 7:30 PM 1 Nov Liberty County HS Home 7:30 PM 8 Nov Arnold High School Away 8:00 PMPort St. Joe football physicals By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Kites lled the sky above George Core Park during the kite ying competition. After some quality time spent waiting for Mother Nature to supply the wind, more than 20 participants across three age groups had kites soaring through the air. Children and adults alike enjoyed that hung above the park during the afternoon festivities. Though twisted lines and temperamental kites threatened to ground some of the competitors, teamwork prevailed and the dragons, butter ies, sharks, planes and sh were in the air. In the 10 and under group, rst place went to Genavieve Rocha; second place, Taylor Burkett; third place, Brayden Dailey. Winners for the 10-14 group; Wilson Turner, rst place; Brian Burkett, second; Joel Bogaert, third. In the 14 and older category; Ian Williams, rst place; Brian Burkett, second place; and Richard Aarons, third place. It was a successful event, said host Mike Lacour. We look forward to doing it again next year. The event was a joint fundraiser between the Gulf County Soccer Boosters, Port St. Joe Youth Soccer and Port St. Joe Elementary School Parent Teacher Organization (PTO). Dana Boyer and Steve Kerigan were of cial judges for the competition.Kite ying competition erce at family fun dayPhotos by WES LOCHER | The StarWilson Turner, Brian Burkett and Joel Bogaert took home trophies for the 10-14 age group. Joel Bogaert stayed focused on keeping his kite in the sky. During Sundays family fun day, kites lled the sky over George Core Park.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013Board, which is not subject to the 10 percent cap on annual increases, the drop in the tax base will represent two-tenths of 1 percent, falling from $1.405 billion to $1.402 billion. The largest decline came in the city of Wewahitchka, which saw property values fall 7 percent, from $61.6 million to $57.3 million. Burke said the primary reason for the decline was two larger personal property accounts declining in value. The Northwest Florida Water Management District will realize a drop of one-third of 1 percent, Burke said. In addition, each Fire District in the county saw a drop in taxable value. The Tupelo Fire Zone dropped 1.7 percent; the St. Joe Fire Zone one-tenth of 1 percent; Howard Creek Fire Zone fell 1.5 percent and the Overstreet Fire Zone took the biggest hit at 3.5 percent. Going back to at least 1982, county property values had not dropped in any single year until 2007, two years after the height of the real estate bubble when property values exploded past $2 billion with a 55 percent increase in 2005. However, after dropping by more than 20 percent in both 2009 and 2010, the decline steadied. The two Municipal Services Taxing Units (MSTUs) that fund the local share of the bond for beach renourishment have expired. The property roll is essentially a historical marker, establishing what the market reects based on sales of like properties in the county as of Jan. 1, 2013. When prices are moving up, as was historically the case for decades, that system works to the advantage of the property owner who can, over those six months, see the value of property move higher on the market than the county assessment. When the market declines, however, property owners can be in retreat on value compared to assessment for a given year. The BOCC and Coastal Community Association lobbied state lawmakers to allow the use of bank and short sales, which were accounted for the rst time in 2012. The Property Appraisers Ofce assesses 17,527 properties in the county; 1,211, or just 6.9 percent, are not taxable and the vast majority of those properties are owned by government, local, state and federal. ASEAistheonly patentedproduct intheworldthat providesyourbody withRedoxSignaling molecules,thenative moleculesessentialto yourcellsabilityto protect,repair,and replacethemselves.WhatisASEA? TyRobinson www.TY.TEAMASEA.com(850)229.2679 4514931NOTICEOF ANNUALMEETINGTheBoardofCommissionersof theNorthwestFloridaRegional HousingAuthoritywillholdits AnnualMeetingonJuly18,2013, attheHolidayInn&Suites,2725 GravesRoad,Tallahassee,Florida. Meetingwillbeginat1:00p.m. E.D.S.T.Themeetingwillbeopen tothepublic. FORMERLYMINNIELEES CLOSEDMONDAY SAMELOCATION 674-4323HONEY BEES DINER DAILYLUNCH &DINNERSPECIALS AnnualMembership MeetingandElectionTuesdayEveningJuly9,2013at6:00RancyHouseCarriageHouse Apalachicola,FloridaePanhandlePlayersinvitesyoutojoinusforour annualmeetingsandfortheelectionofBoardmembers andocers.Hearaboutourplansforthecomingseason andabouthowyoucanbecomeinvolved.Formoreinformationortoexpressaninterest inrunningfortheBoardofDirectors, pleasecallElaineKozlowskyat850-670-1671 orBobInguagiatoat850-370-5281. TheMagicofCapeSanBlas andtheSurroundingAreaBooksavailableat: NoNameBookstore, BluewaterOutriggers, AreaBookstores,MaddoxHouse**AvailableOnline**www.marlenewomack.com PROPERTY from page A1response vehicles. Sunday was family fun day, and once the wind picked up, dozens of colorful kites soared into the sky during the kite ying contest. Children, teens and adults competed against Mother Nature and one another to take home a trophy for effort. The event was sponsored by the Gulf County Soccer Boosters. Theres still plenty of celebrating to be done. Stop by the Event Welcome Center at 234 Reid Avenue to see the timeline display, sign the ofcial guestbook and enjoy student art. The nal static light show display will be presented on Wednesday night at dark at George Core Park and the annual street dance will be taking place on Martin Luther King Boulevard starting at 8 p.m. EST with food, vendors and live performances. Before the reworks go off on Thursday night, an interactive glow stick exhibit and lantern release will light up Frank Pate Park. After the reworks show, head to The Thirsty Goat at The Port Inn for the 10-year reunion of the Buddy Hamm Band. Friday will close out the celebration with an alumni basketball game at the Washington Gym, and it will be your last opportunity to visit the event welcome center. Dont miss out the remaining centennial events. Remember that its going to be a long wait until the next one.Kites of all shapes, sizes and colors lled the sky above George Core Park. Trophies were handed out to the strongest competitors in the kids, teens and adult age groups. CENTENNIAL from page A1

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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Surveys say Roman candles are the most favorite type of reworks for the 4th with what the least favorite? Firecrackers, Smokeballs, Pinwheels, Snaps 2) Where is Rebildfest billed as the largest celebration of American independence held outside the U.S.? Germany, Denmark, Mexico, Australia 3) On July 4, 1848, President Polk laid the cornerstone of what famous structure? Lincoln Memorial, Library of Congress, Capitol building, Washington Monument 4) Thomas Jefferson and which other former president died July 4, 1826? George Washington, John Adams, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson 5) On that same date of July 4, 1826, what noted American was born? Robert E. Lee, Stephen Foster, Walt Whitman, Henry David Thoreau 6) Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776; one was Hancock, who was the other? Henry, Franklin, Pinckney, Thomson 7) What famous American patriot was hung as a spy in 1776 by the British? Paul Revere, Nathan Hale, Daniel Webster, Nathaniel Hawthorne 8) Whos been the only future President of the United States to be born on a July 4th? Jackson, Van Buren, Taft, Coolidge 9) Where did the Continental Congress sign the Declaration of Independence? Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, Mount Vernon 10) Who was the rst President of the Continental Congress? Peyton Randolph, Roger Sherman, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin 11) At signing time the colonies were under which English King? George I, George III, Charles I, Charles III 12) Which colony had the most signers at 9? Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Massachusetts 13) On July 4, 1960 Mickey Mantle hit which career-number homerun? 300, 400, 500, 600 14) Which former president died July 4, 1831? Madison, Monroe, Tyler, Polk ANSWERS 1) Smokeballs. 2) Denmark. 3) Washington Monument. 4) John Adams. 5) Stephen Foster. 6) Thomson. 7) Nathan Hale. 8) Coolidge. 9) Philadelphia. 10) Peyton Randolph. 11) George III. 12) Pennsylvania. 13) 300. 14) Monroe. COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, July 4, 2013 BPage 1SectionTrivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com In an area where most emergency preparations focus on hurricanes, the Gulf County Health Department added an active shooter program to its schedule in an effort to be ready for anything. The exercise, held last Thursday at the Gulf County Emergency Operations Center, was designed to test the knowledge, skills and abilities of multi-agency coordination during a shooting-related incident. The program was funded and hosted by the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County and brought together Gulf County Emergency Management, Franklin County Department of Health, Gulf County EMS, the Gulf County Sherriffs Office, Gulf County School District, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf and Gulf Coast State College to align on policies and procedures. Using a map of the health department, the active shooter scenario played out in real time throughout the day and the group went step-bystep to share best practices for such a situation from initial contact, to a weapon being fired, to injured employees and hostage situations. Also explained in detail were police team entry and extraction procedures. The program stresses the importance of what everyone is doing to take care of the situation and what to expect from the EOC, said county Emergency Operations director Marshall Nelson. The training detailed the process of alerting the necessary emergency departments and creating a funnel for information. In an active shooter situation, the EOC will set up a phone number to handle all emergencies, freeing up law enforcement to report to the scene and work toward taking the shooter into custody. Shooter situations often end up on the six oclock news and Health Education Manager and Public Information Officer Sarah Hinds is responsible for controlling the release of information to the media. The public will focus on what they hear first and last and will always accept the negative over the positive, said Hinds. Equally important to what is happening outside the building; the training covered the accountability of employees who find themselves inside during a shooting. Employees were reminded to take care of themselves first and to not be a hero, or take any actions that may interfere with police operations. Attendees were also provided vital information about police tactics and were told that in the scenario, law enforcers would look at hands. If employees were able to escape, they should keep their arms visible and not to carry anything that could be misinterpreted as a weapon. Communication is critically important, said Terry Schenk, exercise director for Disaster Strategies and Ideas, the group that created the scenario. Throughout the presentation, a representative from DSI took detailed notes, including the answers to any questions that arose and the answers. Several days after the exercise, a full report is provided that allows companies to update their policies, procedures and can be utilized in future trainings. It can make a huge difference if people preplan, said Schenk. If this scenario happens, this training will give people awareness that could be the difference between life and death. The Florida Department of Health in Gulf County had an all-hazards plan but an active shooter procedure was missing. We didnt have a structured plan, said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator of the Florida Department of Health in Gulf and Franklin Counties. We train often for weather situations, but there are other threats in this day and age, She stressed the importance of such a program for healthcare providers, schools and businesses that are wide open to Gulf County health department hosts active shooter training program ACTIVE SHOOTER TRAININGAttendees from Gulf Coast Emergency Management, School Districts, Sheriffs Of ce and Sacred Heart Hospital attended the Active Shooter training.See SHOOTER B2By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Theres a new face at The Artery in the form of intern Leanna Knapp. Though Knapp was raised in Macon, Georgia, she found her way to Gulf County when her mother recently relocated to Mexico Beach. Once Knapp had nished up her studies at the University of Georgia in September, she faced the task of guring out what was next. Determined to nd a job she loved, she moved in with her mother at the beach for some relaxation and inspiration. On a trip to Port St. Joe, she visited The Artery where she met owner and operator Leslie Wentzell. The recent recipient of a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in sculpture, Knapp felt right at home in the studio and eagerly showed Wentzell her art portfolio. Wentzell liked what she saw and mentioned to Knapp that she needed some extra help around the studio and was looking for a face to help her business appeal to a younger crowd. As it happened, Knapp was looking for some experience working in an art-based environment. The meeting led to Knapp starting an internship with The Artery in February and its been a dream come true for the young sculptor. Everything fell into place, said Knapp. Ill work here until Leslie kicks me out! Knapp admits that she never saw herself as the type to work an of ce job. She was drawn to more creative roles spurred by a love of photography that hit during her high school days. In college, she bounced around majors, starting in art history and toeing the waters of experimental art before nding her The Artery gains prize-winning internBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com What started as a sixweek project to get kids performing together in a band and learning three cover songs turned into a 10-month project that birthed the local music sensation known as Thirty-Three. After playing only spiritual cover songs, the Christian rock band celebrated the release of its rst original single, Jesus Loves You and I Love You Too last Tuesday. The group is made up of 11and 12-year-olds with a passion for music and a strong belief in their faith. Vocalist Brianna Butler, guitarist Zack McFarland, bassist Cole Haddock and drummer Joel Bogaert were thrilled to release their rst original song. Im very excited, said Bogaert, who has played the drums for three years. The St. Joe Music and Performance Program, founded in August 2012, was developed by Tom McEniry, operator of St. Joe Music and RSR Recording Studios, and area musician and choir director, Phil Densmore. Tom was looking for a vocal and bass coach, said Densmore. It was a great opportunity that Ive really enjoyed. Added McEniry, Im constantly surprised by their professionalism. McEniry thought that the students would come together, have some fun and then go their separate ways, but was proud when the group took shape and started playing shows in Port St. Joe and Panama City. Prior to Haddock joining the group on bass guitar, Densmore lled in on the instrument. It was great when Cole joined on bass. I wasnt doing a very good Local band celebrates release of rst single SPECIAL TO THE STARLeanna Knapp won second place out of 400 contestants for her life-size wedding dress sculpture at the 2013 Art Fields show.WES LOCHER | The StarAbove: The band practices for two hours a week at RSR Recording Studio. Top: Christian rock group Thirty-Three celebrated the release of their rst single, Jesus Loves You and I Love You TooSPECIAL TO THE STARSee RELEASE B2 See INTERN B2

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B2 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 MeetScar,brothertoMufasaandAlex.Heisveryoutgoingandplayful.Scarisfullyvettedandreadyfor hisforeverhome.Ifyoucangiveanyoneofoursweetkittiesahomeorfoster1or2,donothesitateto comebytheshelterandmeetthem. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation.Allpetsadoptedfrom SJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend. hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comor calltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103 andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailable atwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWerequireallpotential adopterstocompleteanapplicationform.Adoptionfees includeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10 am-4pm! FaithsThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupportthe animalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetin PortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon!www.sjbhumanesociety.org Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet, pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety 4514866SponsorthePetoftheWeek!forONLY$15perweek $60permonthJoelReed814.7377orKariFortune227.7847 CallToday PSYCHICREADINGS850-319-3711BayCounty's#1PsychicDoyouwanttoknowwhatthefuturehasinstore? Havequestionsaboutlove,businessormarriage? Ann'sanswerstellthepast,present&future.Allreadingsarecondential-SeHablaEspaol THISWEEKONLYTAROTCARD READING$10byMissAnnCalltodayforabettertomorrow... SocietyCameron Gage Cherry turned two on May 6. He celebrated with family and had a Thomas the Trainthemed party. Camerons parents are Kevin and Stephanie Cherry. Grandparents are Terry and Debra Watson, Carol and Eric Mann and Ronnie Cherry. Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Garden last month hosted the 11 garden clubs in the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs District II for its spring meeting. The meeting was held at the Centennial Building, and more than 80 club members from around Northwest Florida attended. District II is comprised of clubs from Port St. Joe, Chipley, Bonifay, Vernon, Wausau, Panama City, Panama City Beach, Graceville, Lynn Haven, Marianna Friendship and Marianna. The theme was Party at the Beach, and club president Barbara Conway and club members did an excellent job of working together the showcase into a shelly day for attendees. We may be a small club, but garden clubbers know how to get things done, Conway said. She thanked the Panama City Garden ClubAmaryllis Circle for its assistance and Sylvia Holley of Gulf Beach Garden Club for beautiful oral designs made for the event. The group was welcomed to the city by Mayor Mel Magidson and invited to tour historic Port St. Joe by County Commissioner Tan Smiley. After spring reports, Linda and Jim Brunner of the Gulf Coast Shell Club presented an entertaining and educational program on shells that can be found on local beaches and waters. They also displayed their collection of shells. Chipley Garden Club was named the 2013 Garden Club of the Year during the FFGC Spring Convention in Fort Myers. This is the number one award in FFGC, said Jane Brewer, past district director. The award recognizes the Florida garden club that best excels in all of the following categories: membership increase, service to membership, club programs and projects, members attending club, district and state meetings and/or sponsored programs. Chipley Garden Club truly shares the joys of gardening with their community and each other. This is an awesome accomplishment not only for Chipley, but for District II because when one wins, we all win. The Chipley club also claimed the 2013 Nell Coe (Grow) Ward, the Civic Beautication Award and National Garden Club/Deep South Region third-place Youth Horticulture Award. Other FFGC awards included Wausau Garden Club members Judy Solgers two Digital Photography awards, Marianna Garden Clubs Garden Therapy (Geriatric) Award and District IIs Best Newsletter (District) Award. Pam Cates, President of Vernon Garden Club, discussed a $100,000 highway beautication grant from the Florida Department of Transportation her club was granted in March and the extensive application process involved. We are the rst garden club to ever apply for this kind of grant, Cates said. And we got it now the fun begins. The club received a Certicate of Excellence for 2011-2013 from district President Jan Sillik and a Presidents FFGC Award for its efforts. Louise Michaels from Chipley, the chairperson for District II Wetlands and Waterways, discussed clean water shortage, desalination technology, water conservation and the lack of concern for maintaining the fresh water supply. She also discussed the disheartening condition of Little Blue in Washington County. We are working towards rescuing and reclaiming the spring, Michaels said. Due to pollution, abuse by recreational vehicles and dumping, the spring has receded over 15 feet and is polluted. It was once beautiful, pristine and able to supply an abundance of clean water. We want it to be that way again. Following the meetings, plants made by the Port St. Joe Garden Club were available for purchase. If you are interested in joining the Port St. Joe Garden Club or would like more information, please contact the Port St. Joe Garden Club on its Facebook page. Happy Birthday to Mr. Billy and Cheryl Quinn. We love you. We celebrate you! The Quinn and Granger Family BirthdaysStar Staff ReportThe Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild will hold a membership drive from 57 p.m. ET July 16 at the Haughty Heron. Become a new member for $20 and receive a free martini from the Haughty Heron. The event will include live music, light food and a local breast cancer survivor who will speak on the importance of early detection. Support the drive for breast cancer screenings and other health initiatives by becoming a member of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. The Guild provides helping hands of support and fundraising activities to bring new health care programs and services to the community. Funds raised will be contributed in part to the development of a fund to assist uninsured and underinsured residents receive breast cancer screenings.PSJ Garden Club hosts district spring meeting Join Sacred Heart for music, martinis and mammos 1 love, 2 birthdays July 5Cam Cam turns 2 SPEc C IAL TO TT HE STARPort St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson (left) and County Commissioner Tan Smiley (right) spoke during the meeting.

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The Star| B3Thursday, July 4, 2013 Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentied whattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandare oeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks! (Inthissection),Discoverthebestrealestatevalues inMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola, CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelle andsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast 4515151 SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD 4515158 ONTHEPOOPDECK -INTHECROWSNEST-WEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY KARAOKE DJ DANCING *AllTimesEasternFunTime*9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM THURSDAY-AfterFireworksKonkreteSoul RandyStarkwithArtLongWed.July10th SATURDAY-9PMPublicAddress FRIDAY-9PMDJ SUNDAY-7PMTheCurrys WEDNESDAY-7PMAllenDykes -1STSUNDAYCELEBRATIONALLDAYANDNIGHTLIVEMUSICWITHTHECURRYS7PM GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand SpaciousFacility AlbertByas,DVM StephenCollier,DVM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009Monday-Friday 8:00AM-5:30PM ANIMALHOSPITALofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients School NewsHigh School High Tech  named Program of the YearSpecial to The StarWe are small but we are mighty.  Because of our Program Coordinator, Lynn Hauck, the students participating in High School High Tech program at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and the many business partners in Port St. Joe, the PSJHS program is No. 1 in the State of Florida.  This is the programs seventh year in Gulf County and there are 36 programs around the state, some much larger and much better funded, but not with the heart that fuels the program in Gulf County .  Here is what The ABLE Trust had to say when delivering the award. Dyslexia Research Institute serves approximately 20 students with disabilities in Gulf County for The ABLE Trusts Florida High School/High Tech (HS/HT) program on an annual basis. Under the leadership of Dr. Patricia Hardman and Robyn Rennick, and through the talented work of Program Coordinator, Lynn Hauck, the team ensures that students experience the depth and breadth of career and youth development, which is the core intent of the HS/HT program.  Their program structure of building upon career and workbased experiences throughout the school year, culminating in a coveted summer internship can be considered a statewide model for the Florida HS/HT program.  Gulf County HS/HT has outstanding community and employer support, which is evidenced through its Business Advisory Council.  In the last ve years, 100 percent of their seniors have graduated from high school all of whom are going directly to college or employment.  This summer, nearly half of their students will participate in paid summer internship experiences as a result of community business partnerships and fundraising on the part of the program leadership and students.  The ABLE Trust commends Dyslexia Research Institute with the HS/HT Program of the Year Award for creating and sustaining a highly successful HS/HT program in Gulf County. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARCongratulations to the following Faith Christian School students for maintaining a straight A average for the 2012-2013 academic year: Left to right: Kristen Bouington, Alex Taylor, Magnolia Sarmiento, Taylor Burkett and Carter Costin. SLOAN EARNs S NACA NACA DA A s S CHOLARs S HIPMiranda M. Sloan, Graduate Academic Advisor, College of Education at University of South Florida, has been selected to receive a Wesley R. Habley NACADA Summer Institute Scholarship. The Institute Is sponsored by the National Academic Advising Association. Sloan will attend the Institute this summer in either Jacksonville or Scottsdale, Ariz., for a week-long, intensive program that helps advising administrators, faculty, professional advisors, and advising program directors develop specic strategies for improvement of advising at institutions of higher learning. Sloan is one of 10 individuals honored with this scholarship award in the nation-wide competition this year. Various professionals from the United States as well as international members participate in general sessions, workshops and topical sessions at each Institute to increase their understanding of the important role advising plays on campuses. Individuals are also assigned to small group discussions sessions in which individual action plans are developed which focus on the enhancement or implementation of quality programs on their campuses. Miranda is the daughter of Maxine Leslie Hammons and the late Joel E. Sloan of Port St. Joe. She is the granddaughter of the late Rev. Walter and Mrs. Mable Leslie of Port St. Joe. MIRANDA M. SLOAN The Lions Tale

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget Dr.GeoffreyLentz Pastor BobbiLassiter MinistertoFamilies AnnComforter DirectorofMusic 1001ConstitutionDr. 850.227.1724 www.psjumc.org SundaySchedule9:00AMEST-WorshipontheWater, underthesailsonSt.JosephBay. 11:00AMEST-SanctuaryService withSpecialChildrenstime. SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE 1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.comWEEKLYSCHEDULESUNDAY -8:00AM-WorshipatSunsetPark (onthesand) 9:30AM-BibleStudyat1602Highway98 MONDAY -7:00PM-LifetreeCaf. JointheConversation TUESDAY -5:00PM-WomensBibleStudy 6:30PM-BibleStudyTocontactworshipleader:(850)648.1151orlwcpastor@fairpoint.net www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org WestonDear Friends and Family, Thank you so very much for your expressions of sympathy during the loss of my wife, Eva Weston. Our family was really touched by your calls, cards, visits and prayers. We especially thank our friends of White City First Baptist Church and the entire White City community for their enormous outpouring of support and caringly providing for our family immediately following our loss. And a very special thank you to Rev. Nick Davis and Mary Lou Cumbie for leading a touching memorial service. May God bless you all, Claude R. Weston Special to The StarWays to cope with grief and nd peace after loss will be discussed at Lifetree Caf at 7 a.m. CT on Monday, July 8. The program, titled Coping with Grief: Find Your Path to Peace, features a lmed interview with Ken Doka, author of more than 20 books, including Grieving Beyond Gender: Understanding the Ways Men and Woman Mourn. Its a common misunderstanding that grief follows a fairly predictable pattern, says Doka. But each of us has our own pathway; each of us takes our own journey as we grieve. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net.Lewis FamilyThe Lewis Family would like to thank everyone for their support, prayers and love for their son, Christopher L. Anderson. God put us here for a reason, He said He would supply our need. Hell guide our every footstep, If we read His Word and heed. Jesus gave us a choice, When He went to the cross. Accept His love or suffer the loss. Ive had a few problems down through the years, Had some heartaches, and shed a few tears. Most of these problems were brought on by greed. I wanted to do things my way, I just wouldnt heed. He loved me all this time, It took me a while to see. No matter what I did, He still provided for me. Im not a nished product yet, Hes still working on me, But I thank God every day, That Im not what I used to be.Billy JohnsonCora Sue Robinson, 75, of Port St. Joe, FL peacefully passed away on June 26, 2013, at her home with her loving family at her side. Cora Sue was born on Feb 25, 1938, in Port St. Joe to Charles and Margaret Smith. Cora Sue was a lifetime resident of Gulf County, and after her retirement in 2001 she enjoyed cookouts with her family and her grandchildren and spending time in her oasis she grew in her yard. To say she had a green thumb would be an understatement. Cora Sue enjoyed each day tending to her trees, owers, and roses. It was not unusual for her to have hundreds of owers and roses blooming on any given day. She also enjoyed her birds each morning with a cup of coffee. For the longest time she would get upset at the squirrels for getting into her bird feeders, but they too nally won her over and she said I think the squirrels and the birds worked well together. Cora Sue was a dedicated red, white, and blue American. One of her favorite pictures was her standing with the Olympic Torch and the American Flag. She served as a public servant for Gulf County for more than 35 years. She served for the Gulf County School Board as the Payroll Manager for over 15 years until she was elected as Supervisor of Elections for Gulf County. As Supervisor of Elections she excelled in her job. In 1984, Gulf County was recognized as the number one county for having the highest percentage of registered voters in the state with 7,555 out of an estimated 7,561 people of voting age residing in Gulf County, for a percentage of 99.93 percent. Cora Sue accomplished this by conducting voting registration drives throughout the county and she brought the books into the schools in the county to register those who quali ed and acquainting the students nearing voting age with their responsibilities. Cora Sue is predeceased by her four sisters and one brother; Margaret Smith, Pauline Miller, Carolyn Hill, Joan Wise, and C. R. Smith; she is survived by her sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Chuck Baumgart, and her brother and sister-inlaw, Thomas and Pat Smith; three daughters and two sons-in-law, Cindy Medlin, Deb and Tim Harvey, Kim and Ronnie Terry; one son Thomas Medlin; her nine grandchildren; James Taunton, Jocelyn Williams, Kristin Medlin, Charles Medlin, Tara Goss, Craig Medlin, Jason Mathes, Brooke Harrell, and Alyson Harvey; seven greatgrandchildren, many nieces and nephews, numerous relatives, and several close lifelong friends. A visitation was held for family and friends from 5-7 p.m. Monday, July 1, at the Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe. Her funeral service was held at 3 p.m. EDT Tuesday, July 2 at the First United Methodist Church with Dr. Geoffrey Lenz of ciating. Immediately following the service, a graveside service will be held at Holy Hill Cemetery. To show respect for Cora Sues public service and all past and present public servants of Gulf County, the family asks that you y your American Flag on Tuesday, July 2, 2013. In lieu of owers the family asks that you make a contribution to the Taunton Family Childrens Home, P.O. Box 870, Wewahitchka, Fl 32465. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Cora Sue Robinson CORA SUE ROBINSON Obituary Cards of THANKSThursday, July 4, 2013How to cope with grief explored at Lifetree Caf First United Methodist Church FundraiserA fundraiser will be held 3:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. CT on Friday, July 12, at First United Methodist Church of Mexico Beach. There will be pulled pork sandwich, chips, drink and brownie for $6. Eat in or take out. Proceeds to bene t FUMC disaster team.Aint God good

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.cityportstjoe.comPostOceBox278305CecilG.Costin,Sr.Blvd.Phone(850)229-8261Fax(850)227-7522 PortSt.Joe,Florida32457"AnEqualOpportunityEmployer" PUBLICNOTICEREDUCEDHOURSFORCLERKOFCOURTANNEXOFFICEINWEWAHITCHKA Duetobudgetconstraints,theGulfCountyClerkofCourtmustreducethehoursofoperation oftheClerksAnnexOceinWewahitchka.EectiveJuly1,2013,theannexocewillonlybe openfrom8am-4pmC.T.onMondayandFriday. RebeccaL.(Becky)Norris GulfCountyClerkoftheCircuitCourt 2091547 Advertorial by WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Mary Ann Conroy loves to cook, but the restaurant business wasnt for her. After working in the banking industry for 30 years and experiencing the economic downturn, she decided to use the opportunity to explore her passions and reinvent herself as a personal chef, founding the local culinary experience known as Gourmet Chef Now. I wanted to do something that I was passionate about, said Conroy, who quickly acquired her catering license to get the ball rolling. After attending several cooking classes in the Panama City area, she thought that something similar might work in Port St. Joe. Not interested in opening a restaurant and devoting all her time to running it, she saw herself doing something more intimate and decided to host classes for a small group of audience members. Her mission was to prepare gourmet food simply through an interactive experience that would end in a restaurant-quality meal. I love good food with bold avors, lots of courses and rich sauces, she said. In October of last year, Gourmet Chef Now launched in the Appliance Showroom kitchen in Port St. Joe. Classes started small with friends and family in attendance but news of the class quickly spread through word of mouth. Soon enough, the weekly, $35 classes began to ll up and Conroy was able to tweak the experience to be as interactive as the guests wanted. Some help cook, taste or plate, while others simply come to watch, take notes and get tips, techniques and new recipes for their kitchens. At the end of the class, the audience enjoys a gourmet meal and a glass of wine. Conroy has hosted many classes centered on seafood keeping in mind the amount of delicious food located just offshore in Gulf Countys waters. I try to make something you can easily recreate at home with things you can buy locally, she said. Classes vary in size and her guests have ranged in age from 20 all the way to 91 years old. She also offers occasional classes for kids during which they create their own pizzas and also hosts special date nights for couples. Before long, Conroy had hosted enough classes shed used up her favorite recipes from her collection of 50 cookbooks. She took suggestions from her audience on food theyd like to see made, which led to classes featuring Thai food and sushi. It pushed Conroy to try new and exciting dishes at home before bringing them to the classroom. She admits that her husband, Steve, is the guinea pig for the gourmet meals. Steve smiled and added sarcastically, Its a tough job, but someone has to do it. As the classes continued and regulars began coming each week, Conroy realized that shed accomplished exactly what she set out to do, earning a living off of something shes passionate about. In addition, Conroy cooks the meals each Wednesday for the First United Methodist Church and has fed over 100 people each week for the last four years. Her pastor, knowing her passion for the culinary arts invited her to replace the previous cook who had retired. Conroy is inspired by many cooks but said you cant go wrong with Julia Child. She credits a rising interest in televised cooking shows for bringing awareness to creating great food at home. Its all about eating good food, and having fun, she said. For class schedules and registration info visit Gourmet Chef Now online at www. gourmetchefnow.com.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com In May, artist Dolores Lowery realized a longtime dream when she opened the Seagrass Art Gallery in Mexico Beachs The Grove. Teaching since 2009, the full-time, self-taught artist has spent time in Gulf and Franklin County schools hosting workshops and using art to teach special needs students. After taking note at the lack of local galleries or art classes in Mexico Beach, Lowery set out to be the rst. After securing a lease at The Grove she set up shop and has received support from the locals and tourists over the last month. Its been great, said Lowery. Weve had lots of trafc through since opening. She aims to be hosting art classes by the summer and has plans for a three-hour acrylic class where she delivers a theme, but and allows the artist to make it their own. Lowery plans for the classes to be accessible to artists of all levels and will package all materials into the cost. It doesnt matter what your experience level is, she said, youre going to learn something new every time you paint. In her never-ending mission to support local arts, Lowery founded and is President of the Society of Expressive Artists. Formed in 2011, the group meets once a month to network, share techniques and raise awareness for local artbased opportunities. Each year the SEA group hosts an art walk in Mexico Beach immediately following the Gumbo Cook-off. Tents line highway 98 and beneath them, local artist showcase their wares. This year the group plans to hold a second event, which is currently in the works. SEA is open to local artists across the coast and can visit Lowery at her gallery for more information. Lowery is also a staple of the Art Happens initiative, a new group that will host small, art-centric events across the Forgotten Coast. Each event will feature a different medium in one of the areas most picturesque locations. Its all about promoting the arts throughout the area, said Lowery. Art opens peoples minds and creative spirit. It stimulates critical thinking and unies people. Along with Lowerys homemade jewelry, photography, acrylic and encaustic pieces, the gallery features sea foam art and ceramics from Pat Van West, caulk-based works from Dixie Hester, clay pieces from Leslie Wentzell and glass art by Gretchen Mayes. Never one to miss an opportunity to shine the light on area talent, Lowery also stocks locally-made soaps, Tupelo honey candles and music by local artists. Lowerys art is also featured at the Sea Oates Gallery on St. George Island, Studio Gallery in Grayton Beach and the 621 Gallery in Tallahassee. As a full time artist Lowery is given the exibility to keep the gallery fresh. She enjoys the thrill of completing a piece at night and having it in the gallery the following morning. For more information on classes or how to get involved with the SEA or Art Happens initiatives, call 814-2826.WES LOCHER | The StarSeagrass Art Gallery recently opened within The Grove in Mexico Beach. Mexico Beach artist opens gallery for showcases and classesPHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarMary Ann Conroy teaches gourmet made simply.Local cook invites all to become a gourmet chef

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Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction 4515031 J&MSCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILEHOMES CAMPERTRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOWA/C WASHERS/DRYERS STOVES/REFRIGERATORS FREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWNMOWERS SCRAPMETAL,ETC... Local6 | The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013the public. Lindeman herself had been in a scenario with an active shooter before, and noted that from time to time, companies receive threats and its vital that the staff knows how to respond. Im excited to have had such a collaborative exercise, she said. It created a great dialogue between agencies.The program walked attendees through a real time scenario shooter scenario and explained how all local response services will work together toward a positive outcome. SHOOTER from page B1niche with sculpture. It was when she took a trip to study abroad in Italy and saw the historic sculptures that adorned buildings, streets and parks that her true passion was ignited. They knocked me off my feet, she said. Though she started school at the Savannah College of Art and Design, she transferred to University of Georgia and it was there she said she ourished and made friends. Knapp revealed that she had a love affair with pottery and clay from a young age and she received her rst potters wheel as a gift at age seven. I love working with my hands and throwing on the wheel, said Knapp. It allows me to put emotion into something. Though shes recently enjoyed some watercolor classes taken through The Artery, Knapp doesnt nd much inspiration in paints and said that a blank white canvas scares her. She feels that her art is best created and represented on a three-dimensional plane. In April of this year, Knapp was accepted to showcase a life-sized sculpture of a wedding dress at the Art Fields show in Lake City, South Carolina. The event is the largest art show in the Southeast with over 800 applicants and only 400 invited to exhibit. On her rst time out, Knapp snagged a secondplace victory and a prize of $25,000. The win validated Knapps talent, especially since the sculpture had been created under the duress of a relationship-gone-wrong. Sometimes you want something so bad, you dont see what its doing to you, she said. Both the sculpture and the positive feedback from the piece helped her get through a very emotional time. Though Knapp is proud of her success to-date, she also understands that the bar has been set and her future works need to meet or exceed her wedding dress piece. In the meantime, shell continue learning from Wentzell and creating art with her hands. She enjoys meeting the artistic people that Gulf County attracts and is attered when visitors to the studio nd out about her background and ask her opinion of their art. A strong art community can positively impact everyone, she said. Art is a great way to express love, joy, sadness all range of emotions. She reported that she was happy to have found a community of supportive and encouraging people and wants aspiring artists to know that a career doing what you love is possible. I take pride in what I create, said Knapp. I love my life, and I love my job. 11-year-old impression, Densmore joked. Since nalizing the lineup, the group has played numerous churches in the area and said that their favorite gig to-date was at the Port St. Joe Relay for Life event in April. I liked it because we played for a good cause, said McFarland. As the group continued to get booking requests, McEniry viewed it as the perfect opportunity for the band members to learn the business side of the music world. Joels father, David Bogaert, who has a background in sales, became the groups agent, setting up the groups shows and coordinating practices. David was surprised when his son rst mentioned wanting to play the drums. David took him to RSR Studio for an evaluation. After 10 minutes on the kit, McEniry, who was thoroughly impressed with what he heard, pulled David aside and asked how long his son had been playing. Drum lessons started immediately. I have no idea where he got the talent, said David. Its been fantastic and rewarding watching them grow. When it was time for the band to learn some original tunes, local songwriter Doug Roberts was brought it to aid the band. He had written a few Christian-based songs that he taught to the group and was pleasantly surprised with how quick they picked up the structures and progressions. Roberts only had vocals, rhythm guitar and bass written for the bands rst single and encouraged Bogaert to get creative in adding drum parts. It was frustrating, said the drummer. It took time to nd what t the song. While creating music is a challenge for some, it came naturally for others. McFarland said that his whole family is musical and noted local performer Buddy Hamm as an inuence. Haddock knew he wanted to play the bass when his step-father played him the song Higher Ground by the Red Hot Chili Peppers. When it came time to record the single, the band wasnt sure what to expect. They were used to playing as a group, but in the studio, songs are constructed differently with each musician recording their instrument separately. It was weird, said McFarland. We felt really separated. The members of ThirtyThree came to enjoy the recording process and are excited to do it again for their second single. Hearing the nished product made all the difference. Its awesome when you rst record the song, but then hearing it mixed together makes it, like, whoa! McFarland said. The group members said the experience of being in a band together also brought them closer as friends. The members had attended school together but didnt run in the same social circles. It connected us, said Bogaert. It turns out that the rock and roll lifestyle isnt always glamorous. The band admits that theyve had their share of on-stage problems. McFarland was once stung in the leg by a wasp mid-song, but kept his cool and turned the inch into a cool rock pose. Haddock has had his instrument go out of tune during songs and Bogaert has battled with his drum stool slowly lowering itself throughout the course of one of their sets. The bands favorite part of playing live shows? Shattering the crowds expectations of what 11 and 12-year-olds can do. People dont think we can actually play, said McFarland. At the last church we played, I saw mouths drop. Densmore, the vocal and bass coach added, Its gratifying to watch them perform and seeing peoples reactions. It makes you feel proud. Haddock encouraged everyone in Gulf County to see the band perform live. Itll be a great experience, he said. You might feel God touch your heart. With the rst single in the can, the group is focused on the future. Im anxious to learn new original songs, said Haddock. Within ve years, McFarland and Haddock would like to see the band get big and play stadiums, while drummer Bogaert is content with where they are right now. For McEniry and Densmore, theyll help the group get wherever they can and dont set lofty expectations for the youngsters. If you dont have fun, you wont be successful, said Densmore. We give them our full support. Music is all teamwork and thats what we try to instill in them. Its about getting everyone in sync and into a groove. said McEniry. Ive never had a more rewarding experience. Thirty-Three will play the Panama City Shriners Festival on July 20 and the Port St. Joe Scallop Festival on August 4. A concert to celebrate the release of their rst single is also in the works. Kids looking to be involved in the St. Joe Music and Performance program can contact Tom at St. Joe Music for more information. Visit the Thirty-Three band online at www.33band. com. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARThe group made up of, Zack McFarland, Brianna Butler, Joel Bogaert and Cole Haddock received plaques commemorating the release of their rst single. RELEASE from page B1Knapp was awarded a $25,000 prize for her sculpture. INTERN from page B1

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LocalThe Star| B7Thursday, July 4, 2013 A10| The Times Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 91530T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000489 DIVISION: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER B. MORRIS Last Known Address: 3940 W W Kelley Rd. W Tallahassee, FL 32311 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST A S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin county, Florida: LOT 3 BLOCK 12 OF EAST, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 7 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 317 E GORRIE DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328-2821 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafer: otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 12th day of June, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilites Act In accordance with the Americans with Disabilites Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850)577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850)6538861; Fax: (850)6539339. June 27, July 4, 2013 91564T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA -000539 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, INC.; TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY; SUSAN M. GUNN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 11th day of June, 2013, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000539, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and OLLIE L. GUNN, JR A/K/A OLLIE L. GUNN, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., LAS BRISAS HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF F RANKLIN COUNTY, INC., TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY, SUSAN M. GUNN and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 15th day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 31, LAS BRISAS, A SUBDIVISION ON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of June, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954)453-0365 Fax: (954)771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA.R.JUD.ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.co m File No: 09-25120 June 27, July 4, 2013 94159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-187-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK and GULF STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GEORGE T. PATRENOS, JR., a/k/a GEORGE T. PATRENOS; JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI, JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH F. ZINGARELLI JR., a/k/a JACK ZINGARELLI; TWO Js TRADING COMPANY, a Florida corporation; MARIO LANE; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TRUST FUND and RAPE CRISIS PROGRAM TRUST FUND; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1, who may be in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, in Case No.: 12-187-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on August 15, 2013 the following described property: PARCEL NO. 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST 1449.94 FEET TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE WITH SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 83 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST 617.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH, THENCE WITH SAID CURVE RUN EASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 5629.65 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 48 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 163.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 38 SECONDS Sacred Heart announces MRI servicesSpecial to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf initiated the rst MRI diagnostic test in Gulf County on June 3. A new, state-of-the-art mobile GE Signal 1.5 Tesla unit will be providing Magnetic Resonance Imaging from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Mondays. MRI is an advanced diagnostic test that uses computers and magnetic elds, rather than radiation, to capture images of the human body. Although MRI is a very advanced medical technique, the MRI is probably one of the easiest and most comfortable exams you may ever experience. The technologist will simply ask you to lie down on a cushioned table which will automatically move into the magnet after you have been comfortably positioned for scanning. For certain studies, a contrast injection may be required. However, unlike many other contrast agents, MRI contrast does not contain iodine and therefore rarely cause allergic responses. The average scan takes 20-60 minutes dependent upon the specic test ordered. Appointments are required. To schedule a MRI at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, call 229-5802. Star Staff ReportClasses in pet rst aid and CPR/AED will be July 16 at the Cape San Blas Fire Station next to Salinas Park. The Pet First Aid class will be 9:30-11:30 a.m. ET, and the CPR/AED class will be 12:304:30 p.m. Pet First Aid is a two-hour class teaching how to be prepared to save an animals life. Participants will have the chance to learn basic rst aid such as rescue breathing and anti-choking techniques for dogs and cats. The goals of the class are to teach participants how to be prepared for emergencies that involve a cat or a dog and how to protect themselves and the animal from further harm, injury or suffering during emergencies by teaching prompt, effective rst aid actions and care. Do not bring your pet. Everyone is asked to bring a stuffed animal to bandage. The four-hour CPR/AED course incorporates the latest science and teaches students how to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies for victims 12 and older. Students who successfully complete the course will receive a certicate for Adult CPR/AED valid for two years. Combining lecture, video demonstrations and hands-on mannequin training, this course teaches participants to: call and work with EMS, preform CPR and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies, avoid bloodborne pathogens exposure, know the role of automated external debrillators (AEDs) in Cardiac Chain of Survival and more. If participants need a certication card from the American Red Cross there will be $12 charge per person. Those interested must register for this course as space is limited. For registration and information, call Natalie Shoaf at 227-4355 or email natalieshoaf@ gmail.com. FDOT will host public meeting on Cape San Blas Road improvementsStar Staff ReportThe Florida Department of Transportation will host a public information meeting for proposed improvements to State Road 30-E (Cape San Blas Road) from 5-9 p.m. ET July 16 at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Center, Building B, 3915 State Road 30-A, Port St. Joe. FDOT is planning to resurface Cape San Blas Road from State 30-A to the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve. Additional improvements include paved shoulders and minor drainage modications. Construction is scheduled to begin fall 2015. The meeting will provide an opportunity to preview the proposed project, ask questions and/or submit comments concerning the proposed project. Public participation is solicited with regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact John S. Glenn, P.E., toll-free at 888-638-0250, ext. 1459 at least seven days before the meeting. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @ MyFDOT_NWFL. Florida is well known for its beautiful pine trees, many of which provide decorative shade for home grounds, not to mention signicant revenue for timber and pulpwood growers. We usually think of pines as being relatively troublefree. Unfortunately, several species of bark beetles are destroying pines throughout the south, including those in suburban landscapes. Southern pine beetle is one of the most serious pests of pines in the United States, but normally is a scavenger of dying pines. It becomes a pest when its populations increase. Dendroctonous beetles are distinguished by round posterious, in contrast to IPS beetles, the abdomens of which are concave posteriorly and have spines on the wing covers. Adult beetles, active throughout the year whenever temperatures are above 58F, disperse widely to infest injured weakened of stressed trees. When abundant, they can attack and overwhelm trees. The presence of pitch masses on the tree trunk may indicate and attack. Adults tunnel beneath the bark constructing frass-packed egg galleries in patterns resembling the letter S. The tunneling quickly destroys the phloem and kills the tree. My information on these destructive insects was provided by Extension Entomologist and Nematologist Dr. Eillen A. Buss with IFAS of the University of Florida. Normally, these beetles inhabit forest areas. But, they often migrate to home grounds. If your landscape includes one or more pines, you need to learn how to recognize and cope with bark beetle infections. Mature bark beetles are about the side of a grain of rice. They range in color from reddish-brown to solid black. Within the inner bark of most pines, the insect go through four life stages egg, larva, pupa and adult. The eggs are glistening white dots. Larvae, or grubs as theyre commonly called are white and crescent shaped with glossy reddishbrown heads and no legs. Pupae, which also are white, closely resemble the adult beetle shape. Bark beetles mature in about month; and three to eight generations are born each year. The adults have wings. After, they kill the tree in which they developed. They fly off to other trees and start the life cycle again. The first sign of bark beetle infestation are popcorn-sized lumps of pitch, called pitch tubes. These occur at heights up to 16 feet. Although pitch tubes do not appear during dry weather, a dust, which looks something like red sawdust collects in the bark crevices and at the base of trees that are suffering from beetle attack. In the later stages of infestation, small feeding cuts, resembling tiny tunnels, appear on the inside of the bark. The final sign, a sure mark of death for a tree, is change in the color of its needles, which turn from green, to yellow, to red and finally, to brown. For more information on pine bark beetles contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas.ufl. edu or edis.ifas.ufl.edu and see Publication ENY-327. ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorPine bark beetles a danger to pine treesCPR, pet rst aid classes to be offered

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B8| The Star Thursday, July 4, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4515147 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW 2 BR / 1 BA APARTMENT APARTMENT/LANARK ...................................... $550 2 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED IN LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED ........................................ $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO W/ POOL ON TIMBER ISLAND ................... ....................... $750 1 BR / 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT IN LANARK ...................................................... $500 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1500 SQ FT / 2 LOTS HIGHWAY 98 FRONT AGE ................................. $650COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ON HWY 98 UNLIMITED POSSIBILITIES CALL CHARLOTTE FOR DETAILS. 850 370 6223 1112685This individual will teach an assigned course load & be responsible for academic advising & supervision of clinical activities. Collaborate with the Program Coordinator & other faculty in the continuous systematic program evaluation & other activities as assigned related to accreditation & quality improvement. Curriculum design, review, & revision are also essential skills for this position. Requires: MSN required, Doctorate or current enrollment in doctoral study preferred, 5 years experience as a Registered Nurse with current clinical skills preferred. 1-2 years teaching experience & candidate must possess an active, unencumbered Florida Nursing License. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.873.3516 Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. NURSING FACULTY RN TO BSN PROGRAMSalary commensurate with education and experience. Position open until lled. Apply at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98. 1112668 CHAIR, DIVISION PUBLIC SAFETYResponsible for directing the overall Public Safety program to include; coordinating faculty, maintain budget, resolve complaints from students, insure facilities are maintained properly, coordinate class schedules ensuring classes have qualied instructors, maintain & submit curriculum & catalog revisions, schedules, etc. Assist in writing grants; attend meetings as needed & other related duties. Requires: Bachelors degree in Criminology, Criminal Justice or related eld. Masters preferred. Salary Range starts at $52,020 Deadline to apply: 7/18/2013 at GCSC Human Resources, 5230 W. U.S. Highway 98. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Oce 850.872.3866 Veterinary TechnicianFull TimeWanted for Veterinary clinic in Eastpoint. Full time. Candidate must be professional, personable, work well with others, have good employment history, work well with public, have computer skills, be a high school graduate. Medical or Animal Experience preferred. Please call 850-670-8306 for appointment. 4510161 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Check our cars and trucks in todays classified section! Creamers Tree ServiceLicensed & Insured. Free estimates. (850) 832-9343 Coastal CateringGourmet meals cooked in your own home! We cook & do the dishes.850-447-4751 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains! Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on July 18th, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: June 17, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 June 27, July 4, 2013 94127S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank c/o Bridge Tax LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 375 Application No. 2013-28 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 01713-000R Description of Property: PARCEL NO. I: BEGINNING at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, thence Northeasterly on a Magnetic Bearing of North 1 Degree 30 Minutes East, for a distance of 245.82 feet to a point; thence turn an angle 19 Degrees 3 Minutes Left and continue Line on a Magnetic Bearing of North 17 Degrees 33 Minutes West, a distance of 131.70 feet to a POINT OF BEGINNING, said point being at right angles to and 33 feet Easterly from the C/L of State Highway No. 71; from the POINT OF BEGINNING, project a line on a Magnetic Bearing North 49 Degrees 32 Minutes East for a distance of 250.00 feet, more or less, to a point on the West edge of the West ARM of Dead Lakes Swamp, said Point along being a Point on the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida; thence Northwesterly on a Meandering line along the City Limits boundary of Wewahitchka, Florida, to a point on the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71, formerly No. 6, said point being the Point of Intersection of the East boundary of the R/W of State Road 71 and the channel of the West Arm of Dead Lakes Swamp; thence Southeasterly on the East boundary of State Road 71 (33 feet East of C/L of State Road 71) a distance of 734 feet to POINT OF BEGINNING; being in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, all said land lying and being in Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL NO. II: COMMENCE at the Southwest Corner of Section 13, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, and extend a line East along the South line of said Section 13, for 232.65 feet, then turn 44 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 672.48 feet to a point of intersection of the C/L of State Road 71 and Jehu Road; then extend a line North 51 Degrees 00 Minutes West along the Centerline of said State Road 71 for 938.0 feet; then turn 92 Degrees 35 Minutes Right for 37.39 feet to a concrete monument on the East R/W line of said State Road 71; then turn left along said R/W line for 89.98 feet to a concrete monument; then turn right and extend a line North 46 Degrees 24 Minutes East for 266 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the channel of a Slough for a POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, extend a line South 46 Degrees 24 Minutes West for 266 feet, more or less, to a concrete monument on the East Right of Way line of State Road 71; then turn right along said R/W line for 80.0 feet; then turn right and extend a line North 45 Degrees 58 Minutes 20 Seconds East, for 234 feet, more or less, to the C/L of the Slough; then turn right along said Slough to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This parcel of land is in Sections 13 and 14, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: James E. Lester, Sr. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 31st day of July, 2013. Dated this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2013 94167S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 13-37PR IN RE: ESTATE OF HELEN ELAINE DURANT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Helen Elaine Durant, deceased, whose date of death was March 18, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 27, 2013. Personal Representative: Sue Recknagel 2728 Via Baya Jacksonville, FL 32223 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson Jr. Attorney for Sue Recknagel FL Bar No.: 261629 P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227-7800 Fax: (850) 227-7878 E-Mail: mmagidson@ gtcom.net June 27, July 4, 2013 94201S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on July 25, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: REAL PROPERTY Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company Monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence N89W, along the Southerly line of said Section 35, 228.08 feet to the Easterly right of way of State Road No. 71 and to a point on a curve; thence run Northeasterly along said Easterly right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the Northwest having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a delta of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E 421.06 feet, an arc length of 421.22 feet to the point of tangency; thence N08E along said Easterly right of way, 969.90 feet; thence N89E, 7.09 feet to the Easterly maintained right of way of said State Road No. 71 and the Point of Beginning; thence N08E, along said Easterly maintained right of way, 396.05 feet to the point of curvature, thence run Northerly along said Easterly maintained right of way along the arc of said curve concave to the West having a radius of 3097.04 feet, a delta of 07, a chord bearing and distance of N04E 421.41 feet, an arc length of 421.73 feet; thence N90E, 494.61 feet; thence S00E, 807.59 feet; thence S89W, 590.66 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Lot 4, Block C, St. Johns Village as per plat recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 7, Page 21. Also Less and Except: Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N89W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N08E, along said Easterly right of way line 969.90 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N89E, 231.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N00W, 155.31 feet along said East right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue along said East right of way line, N00W, 50.00 feet; thence leaving said East right of way line, N90E, 92.00 feet; thence S00E, 50.00 feet; thence N90W, 92.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands also known as Lot 3, Block B of St. Johns Village, Unit 1 (Proposed) Together with an easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property to-wit: Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; and run thence N89W, 228.08 feet along the Southerly line of said Section 35 to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 71, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest; thence along said Easterly right of way line, along said curve having a radius of 4384.04 feet, a central angle of 05, a chord bearing and distance of N11E, 421.06 feet, for an arc length of 421.22 feet to a point of tangency; thence N08E, along said Easterly right of way line 936.48 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, N89E, 7.09 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N89E, 229.03 feet to a point on the Southerly extension of the proposed East right of way of Saint Andrew Street; thence N00W, 238.31 feet along said East right of way line; thence leaving said East right of way line, N90W, 50 feet; thence S00E, 172.63 feet; thence S89W, 168.84 feet; thence S08W, 66.84 feet to the Point of Beginning. PERSONAL PROPERTY Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoir, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Amended Motion for Summary Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ST. JOHNS VILLAGE OF GULF COUNTY, INC., a Florida corporation; JERRY HUFT; JAMES TOWNSEND; and ALAN MCNAIR, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-00210. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 4349200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 24th day of June, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 4, 11, 2013 ADOPTION:Adoring Financially Secure Couple, at-home parent awaits baby. Kelly & Josh 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Mexico Bch, 111 N 38th St, 7/5 and 7/6, 8:30am-1:30pm ESTMulti-Family Yard Sale GUN SHOWJuly 6th & 7th Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 EducationEarly Education and Care, Inc.Center Directorposition available in our Franklin County Early Head Start center. This position will supervise center staff and insure that the philosophy, goals and objectives of our programs are fulfilled. Applicant must possess a BA/BS in early childhood, child development or related field. A minimum of three (3) years supervisory experience in an early childhood setting plus two (2) years of teaching experience preferred. Excellent benefits! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 450 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP WebID#: 34255583 Text FL55583 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityJoin the Collins Vacation Rentals Team!Photographer / Multi Media SpecialistCollins Vacation Rentals, on St. George Island, is looking for a Multi Media Specialist. Job duties include: photography, social media, monthly e-newsletter, website updates. Knowledge of Photoshop and In-Design helpful. Email resume to nancy@collinsvacationrentals.com or call Nancy at: 850-927-2900 Web ID# 34256068Text FL56068 to 56654 OtherPart Time Activities DirectorFor High School High Tech Career Mentoring Program35 hours per month, flexible hours during school time. Working with PSJHS students and community employers. Must have experience working with teenage students. Approx: $412.00 per month. High energy, organized, want to make a difference in kids lives. Email drills@talstar.com for info or call Pat Hardman 229-7799. Web ID#: 34256596 Text FL56596 to 56654 Sales/Retail/Bus DevSales ClerkPart time experienced help needed to work afternoons in Marine Store at Bay Bity Lodge. Must enjoy working with people and fishing. Call for interview. 653-9294 Web ID# 34257403 2 bedroom apt.; close to town; Dogwood Terrace Apartments; 808 Woodward Ave, Port St. Joe; (850) 227-7800 Text FL57640 to 56654 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Mexico Bch: 2BD & 2.5BA, furn townhome, beachside, CH&A, DW, W/D, fans throughout, reserved parking. $1000/mo + first/last. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 or Gil 201-895-4255Text FL53889 to 56654 3BR/2BA 1850 sq home on quiet dead end street about mile from the beach in Mexico Beach. Home was built in 2000 and is undergoing significant remodeling including new floors, paint, granite countertops, and stainless appliances. Move in ready by July 15th. $1,300/month 1 Year Lease/Credit Check Required $1,500 Deposit Call Zach Childs Broker/Owner 850-819-0833. Quality Long Term Rentals2 & 3br Avalible, Port St Joe, Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach. Call for more info 348-0262 WEWA Efficiency $390/mo plus $390 security deposit. Also have RVs for rent by the week. Call (850) 639-5721 121 Hunter Circle 3br/2.5ba with bonus room; Completely remodeled 6.5 years ago. 24x40 pole barn with 24x20 closed-in with electricity. In ground sprinkler system, fenced in backyard. Located close to schools and town. $224,700. For more information, call 850-227-5713 or 850-527-5685 Realtors are welcome Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Turn to classifieds Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!