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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03864
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03892


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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 31 Thursday, MAY 16, 2013 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5 Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . A5 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A9 School News . . . . . . . . B3, B5 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . . B7-8 County considers recycling program Also mandatory garbage pickup By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Two weeks after hearing the extent to which taxpayers are underwriting the losses at Five Points Land ll the Board of County Commissioners debated issues of recycling and mandatory garbage pickup for county residents. Commissioners decided to hold off any vote for two weeks, but sentiment is moving in the direction of alleviating the hundreds of thousands the county loses each year at the land ll. Commissioner Warren Yeager pushed for a pilot recycling program for South Gulf County and asked commissioners to support funding the program at a maximum of $6,000 for the remainder of the scal year with an eye toward expanding the program in the next scal cycle. The pilot project would not be mandatory, but would be the opportunity to put in place a recycling program that many locals and visitors want. During a Tourist Development Council advisory board meeting, it was noted that a number of visitors arrive from places where recycling is mandatory and a fact of life. I think this is the right thing to do for the community, Yeager said. The pilot project proposal would be to establish the bins at Salinas Park on Cape San Blas. The area would be open to all residents, but the pilot program targets the Cape and St. Joseph Peninsula due to solid waste issues during tourist seasons. Paper, cardboard, glass and plastic would be recycled. I have a problem spending tax dollars on that recycling, said Commissioner Carmen McLemore. Yeager added that for a recycling program to truly work and the city of Port St. Joe and county have each experienced failure with such programs in the past the county should move to mandatory garbage pickup. At the end of the day the way recycling will work will depend on mandatory garbage pickup, Yeager said. And we could include yard debris. I think thats the direction the county needs to go. Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson said during last weeks TDC meeting that the city should join the county in pushing recycling as well as mandatory garbage pickup. Yeager said that the county needs to examine how to assist the elderly and those on xed incomes to handle the new garbage bill, but as part of ending the bleeding from the land ll the county will be forced to consider mandatory pickup. See RECYCLING A10 Patterson reelected; Thursbay wins PSJ Group I By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Bo Patterson and William Thursbay each noted the work that went into Tuesdays Port St. Joe municipal election. For the two, the effort paid off. Patterson easily won a second two-year term as the Group II commissioner with a win over political newcomer Eddie Fields. Thursbay, also making his rst foray into the political arena, beat fellow newcomer David Ashbrook to win the Group I seat being vacated by rst-term Commissioner Bill Kennedy. Results are unof cial until the canvassing board meets Wednesday. There were three provisional ballots to be counted, though they will not impact either race. Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon predicted a turnout of 32-33 percent. By poll closing, 35 percent of the citys registered voters had cast ballots. Patterson saw a lead built by early voting and absentee ballots hold up after the precinct count; Thursbay came from 27 votes down with precinct numbers. Thursbay garnered 55 percent of the vote, 474 votes, to Ashbrooks 45 percent, or 382 votes. Ashbrook immediately shook Thursbays hand and congratulated him on working his rear end off. I worked hard and it paid off, Thursbay said. The people of Port St. Joe are great people. Without my family I could not have done this. Patterson had a healthy lead, over 70 percent of the vote, after the early and absentee votes were counted, a lead that only barely narrowed with the nal numbers. Patterson took 589 votes, or 68 percent, compared to 272 votes, or 32 percent for Fields. I am very happy with the results, Patterson said. It was a tough race. I worked the early votes hard and I knocked on doors. I worked hard and I am very proud of the results. The only remaining seat up for balloting this year was that held by Mayor Mel Magidson who, after being unopposed, was able to observe Tuesdays outcome without worrying about numbers. I just thank everybody who gave me an opportunity again, said Magidson, who earned his fourth term. I appreciate the grati cation of people with what we have been doing. Six years and I think we are heading in the right direction. Bed tax revenue rising, TDC approves special grant funding By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Bed tax revenue? Up. Welcome Center visitors? Up. Visitors to the Gulf County Tourist Development Council website? Up. The trends are spiking as TDC director Jennifer Jenkins nears her one-year anniversary in Gulf County and the TDC advisory council last week heard about progress made and opportunities ahead. Everything is good, going quite well, Jenkins said while outlining the bed tax revenue for the rst six months of the scal year was more than $30,000 ahead of the prior year. Jenkins said that visitors to the Welcome Center, with hours extended in the past month, have risen by roughly 70 percent. We are seeing a lot more people, she told her board. The board took action on one of Jenkins major overhauls this year, a new rubric and award structure for special event funding from the TDC. In past years, the special event funding has been something of a grab bag, but this year the concentration is on return on investment how many heads to By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Fifth-graders at Wewahitchka Elementary School enjoyed a feast of large and healthy proportions during a luncheon to celebrate the end of the From Seed to Plate program which taught them how to grow and maintain a vegetable garden. The food served at the luncheon, which was prepared by Marie L. Jones, was the fruits of the students labor. Everything the students munched on came from the garden they spent eight months maintaining and cultivating. Though summer will soon arrive for the students, they end the school year with these specialized skills thanks to Gulf County Extension Director Roy Lee Carter. Now in its third year at Wewahitchka Elementary, the From Seed to Plate Program sprouted about 15 years ago from an idea nurtured by the Port St. Joe Garden Club. After proposing the program, the club received a grant from DuPont, a national corporation dedicated to driving innovation in science and sustainability, and launched From Seed to Plate at Port St. Joe Elementary. It has since expanded to all schools in Gulf County including Faith Christian. The garden itself is located across the street from the school on a plot of land owned by Charles Cleckley. Fifth-graders enjoy garden party See BED TAX A10 PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Fifth graders lined up to enjoy the sweet taste of success during the From Seed to Plate luncheon. Students Case Johnson, Lavender Abdulla, Meshach Jackson and Cyrina Jackson displayed the potatoes they grew in the Wewahitchka garden. See GARDEN A10 Kids Win Fishing B1 BO PATTERSON WILLIAM THURSBAY

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 O N CE A GAIN RES ER VE Y O UR B U T T S A T WWW .SGCFIRE.C O M B U T T S MA Y B E A V AIL AB LE FO R D RIVE-BY P I CKUP B U T T O B E S URE T O GE T O NE, P LEA S E RES ER VE O NLINE GAIN CE A N O Ser ving Cape Sans, Simmons Bayou, Jones Homestead, Money Bayou and Indian Pass "T o serve our community and those ar ound us with Fir e & Rescue pr otection" NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS otection" e & Rescue pr ound us with F ir o serve our co mmunity and th ose ar "T SOUTH GULF COU NTY SOUTH GULF COU NTY SOUTH GULF COU NTY SOUTH GULF COU NTY SOUTH GULF COU NTY SOUTH GULF COU NTY TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Jacob Lacour came dressed for success last Friday. The eighth-grader at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School was in a business suit and tie, his shoes glossed, main taining eye contact while de livering answers in a mea sured, thoughtful tone. And the lesson he was learning at the schools me dia center was about the future, about his transition beyond high school and into the adult world. It can make you pretty nervous, answering all the questions, Lacour said af ter his mock interview with a teacher and an up perclassman from the High School High Tech program. This was about learning how, under pressure, to get the right answers out in the right way. Lacour is not a member of the High School High Tech program, which pro vides a host of opportunities to students with learning challenges and an Individu al Education Plan (IEP). But as a student in teacher Shirley Thompsons CAPE program, a careerskills program largely tech nology based, Lacour, al ready certied in Word and PowerPoint, was part of last weeks training in interview ing for students in the High School High Tech program. The interviewing exer cise is part of the programs summer internship process which attempts to match students with workplace experience. The program is teach ing me to be more of a lead er and to learn about getting along with all kinds of peo ple, said Shenoya Fennell, a junior who will continue her internship this summer with Hungry Howies. The difference between when I was a freshman in the program is growing up and really learning who you are and how to be ready for the adult world. We also learn to be leaders and not followers. The HSHT students meet twice a month with program specialist Lynn Hauck to discuss a variety of issues school and work related. They embark on eld trips to places such as the robotics lab at Tyndall Air Force Base and learn about maintaining and balancing a checkbook from a local bank manager. Throughout the year, through participation in such activities, the students earn points toward opportu nities such as Career Shad owing Day, summer intern ships and a personal laptop. The program is funded by the Able Trust and the Dyslexia Research Institute in Tallahassee. It has taught me how to work with people and to learn how to do your job the right way even if you may not like your supervisor, said Torey Williams with a chuckle. I have learned a lot about myself and I have had a lot of fun. Williams and Fennell joined Hauck, Thompson and teacher Gloria Gant last week in the exercise in interviewing. The students received general questions they might be asked two days before the mock interview and were given tips on dress and demeanor, though not all students absorbed those lessons as well as Lacour. They didnt just show up, they had a little advance help, but they have done a pretty good job, Gant said. Working with a scoring rubric, the interviewers went through the questions, some familiar, some not, and scored each student for later coaching and counseling. It gives them work on leadership skills and the poise to work, Hauck said. We ask the students what they think they did well and we provide them with their strengths and some areas that they need to work on. It gives our kids the in teraction with adults and students who have been summer interns so they can understand what skills they need to work on. The mock interviews also provide a lesson for the interviewers. It gives Shenoya an idea what kind of things she may be asked in a job interview and the students always give me ideas how to improve the interview process, said Hauck, who was teamed during the interviews with Fennell. The High School High Tech program is in need of sponsors for the summer internship program. Any business interested in par ticipating is urged to con tact Hauck at lynnhauck@ gmail.co m SETTING IT STRAIGHT Last weeks edition included a story Dolores Lowery, an artist in residence with Gulf and Franklin County schools. The Star wanted to note that the funding for this program comes from VSA Florida, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. VSA is a nonprot organization and program of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. that offers arts education and creative expression to enhance cognitive and social outcomes for people of all abilities. Interviewing for life beyond school Cameron Pryor, left, has excelled in the High School High Tech program and the mock interviews provided another lesson for teacher Shirley Thompsons students in the CAPE program, which employs a technology skills curriculum. P hotos by T IM CROFT | The Star Lynn Hauck and Shenoya Fennell interview a student on their prospects for employment and the skills they would bring to the workplace. Star Staff Report Everyone is abuzz about the 23rd annual Tupelo Honey Festival to be held on Saturday at Lake Alice Park in Wewahitchka. Wewahitchka is home to a large section of Tupelo Honey farmers and togeth er theyll celebrate the rare Gulf County delicacy. The community is invit ed and local vendors will be on-hand to serve up over 40 different treats and sweets. Enjoy a day of arts and crafts, food, live entertain ment plus a petting zoo, pony rides, face painting and a mechanical bull for the kids. Sponsored in part by the Gulf County Tourist Devel opment Council, the festival will take place on May 18 at Lake Alice Park in Wewa hitchka beginning at 9 a.m. CT. A sweet celebration of honey

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, May 16, 2013 Animal H ospital of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Will Rosenbaum, VMD Stephen Collier DVM M on, T ues T hurs & F ri 8:00 AM 5:30 P M 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 By LOIS SWOBODA Halifax Media Group A dozen talented teens went one on one with plein air artists on Wednesday and one student is already a star. Students from Wewahitchka and Port Saint Joe high schools traveled to Eastpoint on May 8 to receive hands on instruction from artists painting in the eighth annual Forgotten Coast Plein Air Invitational. One girl already has an artistic feath er in her cap. Lauren Wagner of Port St. Joe High found out on Monday, May 6, that “Boat in the Ocean,” a watercolor she entered in the annual Congressio nal Art Competition has been chosen out of 20 Congressional District 2 en tries to hang in the Capital Building in Washington DC for a year. Since the competition began in 1982, more than 650,000 high school students have participated in the Congressional Art Competition. Lori Hutto from Congressman Steve Southerland’s ofce said Wagner’s will be one of over 200 paintings on display this year. In June, Wagner will travel to the nation’s capital with a guest on a ight provided free of charge by Southwest Airlines. Students are responsible for all other expenses on the trip. She will attend an opening reception for the art exhibit and meet Souther land. Hutto said the honored students will also participate in a workshop with professional artists. Wagner said she has been an artist from a very early age and was encour aged and gifted with art supplies by her grandmother, Karen Odum, who is a fourth grade teacher in Port St. Joe. On Wednesday, Wagner worked with Luke Buck who specializes in watercol ors. Buck also mentored Caroline Rish of Port St. Joe who has worked with him for several years. Wewahitchka students partici pating in the workshop were Bree Scruggs who painted with Morgan Samuel Price; Alyssa Whitehurst worked with Greg Barnes; Chelsy Toney who was paired with Haidee-Jo Summer; Rebecca Holyeld with Mary Erickson and Alexa Alison with James Hempel. From Port St. Joe High School Ana Paul painted with Tracey Frugoli; Illi ana Maestri studied with Katie Cundiff; Ramello Zaccaro worked with Dawn Whitelaw; Ryan Jones worked with Mitch Kolbe and Jacob Jones studied with Natalia Andreeva. Julie Hodges, who teaches art at Port St. Joe High School attended the plein air workshop. She said she thought the students were, “pleasantly surprised at how well their art worked out.” She added, “It was a positive experi ence and gave them the opportunity to see real artists who are making it work as their career.” By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Lauren Wagner, a sophomore at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School won this year’s Congressional Art Competition for her watercolor painting, “Boat in the Ocean.” Originally painted for a classroom assignment to express Florida through paint, art teacher Julie Hodges enjoyed the vivid colors of the piece and submitted it to the competition. “I was shocked,” said Wagner of her win. “I didn’t expect it.” For her win, Wagner received a free trip to Washington D.C. in June to see her painting as it hangs inside the Capitol Building. She’ll take her mother as her guest for the journey. Hodges is raising money to pay for Wagner’s hotel stay. Though she has only lived in Port St. Joe for a year, Wagner has found much artistic inspiration in the area. She has already been commissioned to do paintings of shing boats, the George Tapper Bridge, and a local sunset over the summer months and will spend the remaining time working with local children to create art out of recycled materials. Wagner enjoys painting with acrylics and nds herself drawn to subjects that are realistic. The arts run in her family, it seems. Wagner’s grandmother is fourth-grade teacher Karen Odom who works at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Also an artist, Odom encouraged her granddaughter to be creative from a young age, purchasing art supplies and canvases for the budding painter. “I’d known Karen for years, but I didn’t know they were related,” said Hodges. “I was able to see Lauren’s talent without connecting her to a family member.” Hodges said that Wagner is quiet and shy but art is what really opens her up. “I’m not like everyone else,” Wagner said. “I get into my work.” For Hodges, that’s what it’s all about. She’s constantly looking for new ways to bring art into the classroom in order to expose students to as many mediums as possible. She hopes that they’ll nd a form of self-expression that ignites a passion. Even though Wagner didn’t feel the painting was her best work, Hodges knew it was a winner when she saw it. “It’s been her moment,” said the teacher. Gulf students dive into art on the waterfront JULIE HODGES | Special to The Star Lauren Wagner’s winning painting, “Boat in the Ocean.” Wagner wins congressional art competition LOISLOIS SS W O O B OD OD A | Halifax Media Group Artist Katie Cundiff, right, adopts local footwear to paint the working waterfront with Illiana Maestri of Port St. Joe High. James Hempel and Alexa Alison of Wewahitchka High left the group at the pavilion to paint a store front on the working waterfront. Artist Luke Buck is seen with Caroline Rish and Lauren Wagner on the far right, both of Port St. Joe. While most of the students worked in oils, Buck demonstrated techniques with watercolors, his own specialty.

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The other night, I started cooking dinner or thinking about cooking dinner for my son and myself. I shouldnt have, but I turned the television on and sat down in my chair and put my feet up. My dogs seemed to be happy I was sitting down. The television was still on the Hallmark Movie Channel from my early morning rendezvous with Ben Matlock (you know, Andy Grif th in the 1980s). I knew better. It was around 5 p.m., and I was watching the Hallmark channel. Men and dogs arent supposed to watch this channel. The dogs and I knew that, but we did it anyway. People who review Hallmark movies usually use words like sweet and happy. They also say things like Slow and predictable You think? Personally, I like knowing whats going to happen, especially when I know its going to be good. If a cake looks like its going to be chocolate, I want it to be chocolate not some sort squished up bananas or other fruity lling that I have to guess what it actually is, or God forbid coconut. I only eat coconut when Im mad. After watching a few Hallmark movies over the course of the past week, I come away with that song from the Country Music group Shenandoah on my mind. You know the one I Wanna be Loved like that. It talks about mamas, daddies, Natalie Wood, James Dean and promises you cant take back. Hallmark movies are actually pretty good movies to watch while cooking or thinking about cooking dinner. They all last two hours, which includes about 30 minutes of commercials usually loaded more toward the end of the movie to make you wait to see what you know is de nitely going to happen. You need to use low heat and walk back and forth to the kitchen a lot. The commercials on the Hallmark channel are also usually slow and predictable. After watching a Hallmark movie, one usually has a craving to sit in a Craftmatic bed eating Smuckers jelly out of the jar with a plastic spoon with Acne medicine on your face while lling out an application to join AARP. You feel a little guilty about eating the Smuckers right out of the jar with the plastic spoon, so you call the 800 number for Nutrisystem. In the middle of all this, you still feel good and you want to be loved like the folks in the Hallmark movie. You want everything to be alright and for this twohour period. Youd bet the mortgage that it will be. The movie I was watching was about a nice-looking lady who had gone home to spread her estranged fathers ashes per his wishes and have a couple of his feuding friends sing while she tossed the ashes up into the rural Massachusetts wind. After reading about the movie, I gured out that it was actually lmed in Canada, but it seemed more like Ireland. Everyone had Irish accents. It seems Ive heard there are a lot of Irish folks in Massachusetts. The location doesnt matter, and please dont think I didnt like this movie. I loved it. Was it hokey? You better know it was, and it made you want to be there right in the middle of it. Have you ever stood just stood and read Hallmark cards at the store? All those one liners? All those cards with nice love words oozing out of them? You say things to yourself like, I wish someone would say that to me, Now that would crank my tractor, or I wanna be loved like that. Hallmark movies are full of these zingers that should be in Hallmark cards. It makes you think about the Chicken and the Egg. You know did they make the movie from the cards or make the cards from the movie. At one point in the movie, the lady who you know will fall for the hometown fellow tells her friends husband, Sometimes a woman just needs you to show her that she means more to you than anything in the world. Hallmark movies have a tendency I wanna be loved like that Welcome to Gulf County. Welcome to Port St. Joe. Welcome to the Port of Port St. Joe. Today representatives from the Colombian port city of Barranquilla will be visiting the area and enjoying time with community, port and economic development of cials. Theyll be getting a feel for the landscape around the port and the opportunities available. The trip is a reciprocal journey following a recent Florida trade delegation to Colombia. The folks from Barranquilla will have visited state of cials in Tallahassee and made a visit to the Port of Panama City before venturing to this postcard paradise we call home. We in Gulf County appreciate the time and effort required of you to take a glance at the Port of Port St. Joe. Echoing the words of County Commissioner Warren Yeager during a recent meeting of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, there is reason to be as optimistic about the future of the port as ever. The collaboration agreement signed last year to develop a combined 300 acres of Port Authority and St. Joe Company property in the port planning area seems in hindsight the starting line for the steady drumbeat of optimism about the port. Once the Port Authority had an invested and passionate private partner, one as interested in unlocking the ports potential as port leaders have been for more than a decade, the race seemed to have truly begun. Actually, lets call it a marathon. As an investment banker from the Bank of Montreal the engagement of which by St. Joe provided another shot of adrenaline this will all take time and there is no hesitation among port of cials about staying the course for the long haul. St. Joe, in addition to bringing to the table an international player in the investment in infrastructure, the Bank of Montreal, also worked to secure a Florida Department of Transportation grant for $5 million for rail line improvements along the Genesse Wyoming line. One end of that rail line is in Chattahoochee for movement of goods and people north, west and east; the other end is on the old Arizona Chemical property site that is now unencumbered in port hands. Not a bad asset to have in the back pocket. The FDOT has also championed the Port of Port St. Joe, providing a critical extension that keeps the port in the Strategic Intermodal System (SIS), a system that receives the lions share of FDOT discretionary funding. The department certainly could have pulled the plug, but representatives, re ecting the governors passion for ports as job creators, bent over backwards to make sure the SIS designation remained in place to allow the port more time and space to lure customers. The Florida Department of Economic Development also had been a partner, providing funding and expertise to update the port master plan to re ect the addition in lands and the collaborative agreement with St. Joe. The Florida Ports Council, while acknowledging work to be done, noted the signi cant changes over the past 18 months in its annual report on Floridas deepwater ports. Did we mention that, friends from Barranquilla? This is a deepwater port, authorized for a depth of 35 feet in the shipping channel and one of just 15 such ports in Florida. That shipping channel has become another source of recent good news. Port of Port St. Joe of cials just last week learned that a grant was available to begin the preliminary engineering and permitting for dredging of the deepwater channel, seen as one of two major keys to unlocking the ports potential. The other lock may be opened soon, depending on the governors veto pen. The state budget includes funding to bring a mortgage on a parcel of port land current and provide additional breathing room for the port in its hunt for customers and tenants. That one even carries a very public campaign to Protect Our Port. As one Port Authority member noted last week, it would be hard to underestimate what the funding for dredging and the mortgage would mean for the port. There is also Eastern Shipbuilding, paying its lease for bulkhead space on the deepwater old mill site, booming with business and heading to Port St. Joe when its wharf space in Bay County is lled to capacity. In other words, there is a lot happening and we are certainly glad you folks from Colombia have given us a chance to show off a bit. But we can also learn. As said by Tom Gibson and a shout out to Gibson for joining the trade delegation to Colombia on his dime and Marina Pennington, the citys planning consultant, who plowed considerable groundwork in her homeland prior to that Florida visit your Colombian ports share many of the challenges facing Port St. Joe and have made them work. According to Gibson, you have done an outstanding job of marrying the industry of a diverse operational port with a tourist outpost with ne beaches and plenty of sun. You have overcome those challenges, with public and private partnerships, and ourish today and when the newly-widened Panama Canal opens next year, you will be in a position to bene t. As will the Port of Port St. Joe, which as the crow ies is one of the closest Florida ports to the Canal Zone. So whether there is any actual deal that comes out of your visit, we have much to learn from you while we show you our slice of heaven. That you took the time to visit is another feather of optimism in what has been a quiver full over the past 18 months. As we like to say, sit a spell, enjoy the waters and beaches that lure so many of us to put down roots, having found home. Welcome to Gulf County; we are tickled to have you. Thank goodness Ive got my own list! Keyboard KLATTERINGS (Red) Carpet rolling TIM CROFT Star news editor Time Magazine just published its list of the 100 most in uential people in the world. I didnt make it. Shucks. Ed Ruscha did. Ive never heard of him. I dont know what he does. And Im fairly certain hes never in uenced me. Nor had I heard of Wang Shu. Or Joaquim Barbosa, Andrew Sheng, Mary Nichols or Don YeomansI am sure they are all outstanding men and women but Im still searching for their direct impact on my life. In fact, I did not know 85 percent of the people on the list. Did I sleep through something? I had heard of Justin Timberlake, but I cant tell you one song he sings. I couldnt understand why Jimmy Kimmel was included, but Im in bed when he comes on TV. LeBron James was the most familiar name on the list. Well, and Barack Obama. My basketball days are way behind me, and if Dwight David Eisenhower, Bill Clinton and George Bush didnt in uence me, I dont think Obama has a chance. And please, hear me this morning, Im not knocking any of these people, I am proud for them. They obviously have a lot to offer. And I am not making light of the of ce of the president of the United States. They are all great men. What they do might affect me but, let me tell you, there is a world of difference between affecting and in uencing. My father did in uence me. As in, When you go down that row, son, turn your hat around backwards. I want you to be pulling so much corn I cant tell if you are coming or going! Even as he chided us to work a little harder he was always the one doing the most work, lifting the biggest logs, pulling the heaviest load. He didnt have to yell a work ethic into us; he taught by example. Daddy also told us more than once, Be careful, boys, on who you listen to; make sure they are worthy of your attention and trust. Miss Carolyn Blades in uenced me. She taught from the rst day I walked into her classroom that studying hard pays off. She didnt exactly say a mind is a terrible thing to waste but that was her message. She loved the ABCs into us. Bobby C. Melton in uenced me. He was big and fast and could spin on a dime. When I was in grade school, Id go to the high school football games just to watch him run. He picked his knees up so high, and hed slice into the off-tackle hole! I was going to be just like him someday. Mrs. Charlie Mitchum was the rst older person outside of family that took an active interest in me. She would stop and talk to me just like I was an adult. She was kind, and she was always telling me what a ne boy I was. By high school, I would take my dates by to meet her and see if she approved which, of course, she always did. I steered away from some trouble I saw my friends get into partly because I didnt want to disappoint Mrs. Mitchum. She was so positive and upbeat and caring. She single-handedly changed my thinking about elderly people. Now, that is in uence! My teenage friends held a great sway on my life in those formative years. If Ricky and Buddy thought it was cool, so did I. If Skip liked the Kingston Trio, I bought their albums. If Squeaky could kick a half dollar off his heel and ip it into his shirt pocket, I was going to practice until I could do it to. We didnt look to national magazines, the new fangled television or world leaders for direction. We scratched out our path by mostly observing the ones closest to us. We dont always have to think individuals when we are talking in uence. I have made a career out of writing about the little West Tennessee town I grew up in. How they shaped me, molded me, in uenced me. And I couldnt for the life of me single out one particular part of that town that touched me the most. Maybe it was the magic coming out of the movie theater. Or the way everyone turned out for the homecoming parade or the 4th of July celebration. It could have been Mr. Holland delivering the milk with a wave and a smile. Or the loud hullabaloo abounding at Franks Dairy Bar or the quiet sereneness of the town square late at night. I appreciated then, and more so now, the conservative, solid, small town values that were so lovingly instilled in me. Maybe Time has lost sight of what has made us such a great nation. Maybe they just made up that list to sell magazines. Or maybe, quite possibly, Time (time) has simply past me by. If the editor had consulted me, I would have added Billy Graham to the mix. I dont care that hes a tad older now with perhaps one foot already in Heaven. If he is alive, he should be on that list! And I would put Avery Lee and Hannah Colbert in there, too. They are my two youngest granddaughters and they can get me to do anything and everything they want me to. If they point to it, I buy it! Ed Ruscha, Wang Shu, Justin Timberlake and Barack Obama can only dream of in uence like that! Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, May 16, 2013 A Page 4 Section See CRANKS A5

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to sometimes bash men. I understand. Every once in a while they need to put the shoe on the other foot. Cate with a C is the lady there to dispose of her fathers ashes; she is engaged to an old fogey named Stewart who is 20 years older than she. How do I say this? Stewart is a backside of a donkey or something like that. He has to be. Hes going to lose. You know he will lose. The winner is Connor. He wears his collar up once in a while, has a dog and smiles like hes just eaten a jar of Smuckers jelly with a plastic spoon. During commercials, you want to go to the powder room and look in the mirror and tell yourself that you are a Connor, rather than the anc that acts like he is experiencing some of the undesirable side effects of the medication from the commercials. I was boiling carrots on low, I love carrots. Before Connor shows back up in New York City with his dog to woo Cate with a C back to rural Massachusetts, you get all of the other things that have to be in a Hallmark movie. Just like country music songs need tractors, cheating, drinking, dying and cowboys, Hallmark movies need wicker picnic baskets, a fair or festival of some sort, some mist or fog, beds covered with chenille bedspreads, birds (seagulls work nice), porches and roads that look like they couldnt handle two cars side by side. Before the end, youll see some more acne medication commercials and more than likely one for a purple pill that could cause diarrhea. They dont want you to experience the side effects, but they warn you that you could. You dont worry about acne or diarrhea, because you know everything in the movie is going to be alright. I put sugar in my carrots I was cooking, because Mama would when no one was looking and Hallmark movies make me think of Mama. Cate with a C ends up telling her anc (the old donkeys derriere) that she wants kids and a dog. He understands that means she does not want him. Of course she needs to kiss Connor, the hometown boy on the mouth, make his collar stand up, pat his dog on the head and go dream under a chenille bedspread. What does one take from all this? I think if you want to be loved like they get loved in a Hallmark Channel movie, you need a dog, a wicker picnic basic and someone to shoo some seagulls your way. Just make sure you have the lid on the Smuckers jelly when they do the shooing of the seagulls. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, May 16, 2013 A Page 5 Section CRANKS from page A4 Weddings have always been big business, but I was shocked to see how expensive theyve become in the 17 years since my wife and I got married. According to the annual Real Weddings Study, the average wedding in the U.S. now costs $28,427, and that doesnt even count the honeymoon. Wait, it gets worse. Among the more than 17,500 surveyed brides who got married in 2012, the average amount paid for a wedding dress was $1,211. On average they also spent $204 per wedding guest and dropped $12,905 for the reception venue. There are many ways to rein in wedding-related costs while still having a memorable event. Here are a few suggestions: Create a budget. Unless youre a professional wedding planner, youll probably be oored by how many expenses weddings can amass, including wedding and engagement rings, invitations, postage, marriage license, clergy and location fees, owers, bridal gown and grooms tuxedo, rehearsal dinner and reception, photography, catering, DJ or band, limousine, parking attendants, tips, gifts for wedding participants and honeymoon expenses. Shop around. Bridal expos are a good way to meet a lot of vendors and gather ideas. Just dont get caught up in the excitement and commit to anything before youve done follow-up research. Some tips: Bring along someone from the wedding party as well as a trustworthy friend who isnt emotionally and nancially connected to the wedding. You may feel pressured by vendors to sign contracts or put down deposits, but its probably wiser to take their contact information and research them rst. Create a separate email account for wedding vendor communications. Once you sign up for one offer or contest, believe me, your inbox will be swamped. After youve settled on vendors, get signed contracts that specify dates, products, prices, deposit and payment terms, cancellation policies, liability insurance and whether tax and gratuities are included. Here are a few suggestions for trimming costs: Date exibility. Youll get more bang for your buck offseason a June wedding might cost 20 to 30 percent more than one in April or October. Have your orist use inseason owers. Daytime weddings are often cheaper than evening events. Instead of a hotel, consider less-costly alternative reception venues like community centers, museums, city park clubhouses or other public facilities looking to earn extra income. Ask whether they have their own tables, chairs, sound and lighting systems; if not, add equipment rental costs into the equation. A buffet dinner reception could save you $15 or more per guest compared to a plated dinner, because youre not paying for table service. Save even more by hosting an afternoon reception and serving lunch or hors doeuvres. If youre hosting a large reception, have a smaller display cake for the cutting ceremony, with a sheet cake stored in the kitchen. Serve wine, beer and one signature cocktail, instead of offering a full bar. Consider renting or buying a second-hand wedding dress from a consignment shop, or an online specialty site. The same goes for grooms wear. Hiring a disc jockey instead of a live band will save hundreds of dollars; plus you get a broader selection of music and a built-in emcee to move things along. One last budgeting tip: Limit the number of guests to ensure you can have a meaningful interaction with each. Remember, spending just one minute apiece with 300 guests would take ve hours. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney Special to The Star TALLAHASSEE This session was a very active and productive session for Senator Bill Montford and his voice was heard, strong and clear, advocating for North Floridas hardworking citizens. Senator Montfords actions, can only af rm that he understands our needs and works tirelessly to nd principled, common sense solutions to those needs. This session he demonstrated his knowledge of and support for issues important to all of us, by participating in the following Florida Legislation: Improvements to Education: I truly believe our future is in our childrens hands, and it is this that drives my passion to give them the best opportunities. His passion for education led the Senator to support improvements to Floridas educational system including providing more college and career-ready opportunities, ensuring low performing students needs are met and instituting more local control by reducing unnecessary regulations. He sponsored a very successful deregulation bill that removed unnecessary and duplicative regulation and rules. State Employee Pay Raise: Recognizing Floridas public employees, the legislature mandated that state employees, school teachers and school district employees be given a well-deserved pay raise. These are honest people putting in a hard days work, and they deserve to be rewarded with livable pay. A pay increase is long overdue and its high time we acknowledge how hard our state employees work, Senator Montford said in regards the pay raise. Preservation of the Apalachicola River Basin and Bay: Senator Montford supported Governor Rick Scotts funding of $3 million towards Water Quality Improvement projects in the Apalachicola Bay and Apalachicola River Basin. The allocation of $400,000 to the protection, restoration and research of natural oyster reefs and beds came as a result of his leadership during the 2013 Legislative Session and budgetary process. Public Work Squads: To ensure the continuation of the public work squads from our prisons a line item of $34 million was added to the budget. This will result in a tremendous savings for the taxpayer. FRS Retirement System: After numerous threats to change the retirement system, Senators stood up for the hard-working people of Florida and left the retirement system intact. North Florida has something unique and special and it must be recognized and protected. Listed below are some of local projects that were funded in the 2013-2014 that will bene t Gulf County: Gulf County Billy Joe Rish Recreational Park: $1.4 million Technology Transformation Grant to establish/enhance Wireless network for Gulf School District: $78,779 Port St. Joe Historic Cape San Blas Lighthouse Complex Rescue and Relocation Project: $649,000 Gulf Coast Parkway from SR 30 (U.S. 98) to Gulf to Bay Highway Add lanes & reconstruct: $900,000 SR 71 from end of Concrete Pavement to Intercoastal Bridge Resurfacing: $3 million SR 30E Cape San Blas Stump Hole Revetment Road/Slope Protection: $427,435 SR 22 from Bay County Line to Wetappo Creek Bridge Resurfacing: $2.1 million SR 30 (US 98) from Pine Street to Beaconhill Park Road Bike Path/Trail..$87,080 **All Line Items are subject to the Governors Veto JASON ALDERMAN How to trim your wedding costs Dear Editor, My wife, Tammy and I have never written a letter to the editor before but would like to take this opportunity to relay our recent experience of purchasing coastal property in the Port St. Joe area. After vacationing in the area for several years, we grew very fond of the natural beauty, the relaxed lifestyle and most especially the warm and friendly people who call the area home. We decided we would ful ll a longtime dream of ours to own coastal real estate. Having spent 35-plus years in the construction and real estate development business in Tennessee, I had a basic understanding of the complexity of coastal real estate investment but most of all understood the importance of competent representation. To educate ourselves, we started reading Sherri Dodsworths (Boardwalk Realty) blog, and over time, recognized and appreciated her commitment to informing others about the Cape San Blas, Indian Pass and Port St. Joe real estate market. We contacted Sherri, and on our next trip met with her, beginning our journey to nd beach property for our planned cottage. Some months later after having Sherri help us build an adequate foundation of knowledge, we felt comfortable moving forward with our purchase. We are looking forward to spending more and more time in the Port St. Joe area. Sincerely, Bill A. Hodges Knoxville, Tenn. Letter to the EDITOR A passionate commitment Montford supports Floridians with Senate votes Special to The Star TAMPA The majority of Florida residents (70 percent) plan to take a vacation this summer of four days or more between May and September. This re ects a 5 percentage point increase from 2012, according to a recent AAA Consumer Pulse survey on summer travel plans. Florida consumers place a high value on their summer vacation, with more than six in 10 of them (62 percent) saying they think travel is very important to their well-being. The top three reasons Florida residents think travel is important are it creates experiences (69 percent), lets them recharge (65 percent) and allows for family time (62 percent). This year marks the second year that AAA data shows an increase in the number of Floridians who plan to take a summer vacation a positive sign for the travel industry, said Jessica Brady, spokeswoman, AAA Travel, The Auto Club Group. A relaxing vacation at a city destination or beach is the number one desire among Florida travelers who look to get away this summer. The great thing about Florida is travelers dont have to go far to nd what theyre looking for in a vacation. The majority of travelers (64 percent) plan to spend $1,500 or less on their summer vacation, about the same amount as last year. The top three vacation destinations for Florida travelers this year are city destinations (47 percent), beach getaways (36 percent) and trips to theme parks/attractions (27 percent). The AAA Consumer Pulse Survey was conducted online among residents living in the Southern Region of The Auto Club Group (Florida, Georgia and Tennessee) from April 4-8, 2013. A total of 407 Florida residents completed the survey. The survey has a maximum margin of error of 4.9 percentage points. Overall survey responses are weighted by gender and age to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the adult population (18+) in Florida. AAA: Number of Floridians planning to travel this summer up 5 percent

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 PUB LI C N O TI CE N O TI CE IS HEREBY GIVEN t h a t t h e P o r t S t. J o e P o r t A u t h o r i t y w i l l h o ld a p u b lic h e a r in g o n W e dn es d a y M a y 22, 2013, a t 11:00 a.m. ED T f o r t h e p ur p os e o f r e cei v in g co mm en ts o n t h e P o r t S t. J o e P o r t A u t h o r i t y’ s n e w P o r t M a s t er P l a n 2013. e p u b lic h e a r in g w i l l b e h e ld in B ui ldin g A o f t h e G u lf/F ra n k lin C en t er a t 3800 Ga r r i s o n A v en ue P o r t S t. J o e Flo r id a. e P o r t M a s t er P l a n 2013 m a y b e v ie w e d o n t h e P o r t ’ s w e b si t e a t w w w .p o r t o f p o r ts t j o e .co m; a l s o co p ies o n co m p ac t di s c c a n b e p ic k e d u p a t t h e P o r t ’ s o ce a t 206 M a r in a Dr i v e P o r t S t. J o e I n t er es t e d p er s o n s m a y a t t en d a n d b e h e a r d a t t h e p u b lic h e a r in g o r p r o v ide co mm en ts in w r i t in g t o t h e P o r t S t. J o e P o r t A u t h o r i t y P .O B o x 745, P o r t S t. J o e Flo r id a 32457. T ra n s ac t io n s o f t h e p u b lic h e a r in g w i l l n o t b e r e co r de d P er s o n s w i s hin g t o a p p e a l a n y de ci sio n m ade d ur in g t h e h e a r in g w i l l n e e d a r e co r d o f t h e p r o ce e din g a n d s h o u ld en s ur e a v erb a t im r e co r d i s m ade in c l udin g t h e t es t im o n y o n w hic h t h e a p p e a l i s b a s e d A n y p er s o n w h o w i s h es t o a t t en d a n d r e q uir es a s si s t a n ce m a y c a l l t h e P o r t S t. J o e P o r t A u t h o r i t y a t (850) 229-5240. Conventiona l/FHA/VA Lot Loans | Refinancing Adjustable & Fixed Rate USDA Rural Housing Affordable Housing Construction / Permanent Financing Whether you’re buying your first home or just need room to grow, our customized approach to mortgage lending can get you moving. Call us today or apply online at www.ccbg .com Mov ing in the right direc tion. MEMBER FDIC All products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all markets or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. Loans are not made or originated by the FHA, VA, HUD or any other governmental entity. MA Y IS S TR OKE A W ARENESS MONTH Know how to recognize stroke warning signs and symptoms F .A.S.T .! F A CE DROOPING: D oes one side of the face dr oop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. ARM WE AK NE SS : I s one arm w eak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. D oes one arm drift do wnwar d? SPEECH DI FF ICUL T Y : I s speech slurr ed, ar e they unable to speak, or ar e they har d to understand? Ask the person to r epeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." I s the sentence r epeated corr ectly? Time to call 911 If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately B EY ON D F A S T — O THER SY MP T O M S Y O U SHO ULD KNO W By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m On May 23, the Healthy Start Coalition for Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties will host its annual baby shower in Port St. Joe. The event aims to edu cate and be a resource for new parents. Though the focus of the event is on delivering parenting information to new or expectant mothers with a baby six months or younger, caregivers, fa thers and new moms from other counties are wel come to attend. Healthy Start’s mission is to educate new parents and promote positive birth outcomes and protect the health and well-being of all mothers and children in the surrounding area. “It’s essentially a bridal expo for new parents,” said Director Sharon Owens, who’s been involved with Healthy Start for the past eight years. With a reputation for keeping its baby showers fun, informative and en gaging, Healthy Start’s an nual events draw 50-100 at tendees, but the coalition is always looking to increase their numbers to ensure all babies in the region get off to a safe and healthy start. Car seat safety, safe sleeping and available community resources are just a few of the topics covered during the twohour seminar. Information booths will also be on-site to pass along yers for pe diatric physicians, dentists and other infant services. To keep things light, information will be deliv ered through activities and games, and a series of door prizes will be given away throughout the presenta tions. The grand prize win ner will be awarded a $200 gift certicate to Wal-Mart. “Sometimes people are scared to death when they come to the baby shower,” Owens said. “It’s neat to see new moms realize that there’s so much support.” In addition to passing along information and re sources to new parents, Owens emphasized the importance of building a network of supportive and knowledgeable people. “You have to get a driv er’s license to drive a car, but there’s not a test to have a baby,” she said. Healthy Start gives guidance to anyone with a baby up to three years of age. There are no eli gibility requirements and new parents can call 800895-9506 with questions. The Florida Association of Healthy Start Coalitions has 32 branches across the state all working to improve pregnancy out comes, reduce infant mor tality rates and promote healthy growth and devel opment in all children. Healthy Start’s fth Gulf County baby shower will take place at the Centen nial Building from 4-6 p.m. ET. The shower is a free community-wide event. Free baby shower for Gulf, Franklin counties FILE PHOTOS Part of the fun and games is seeing how new dads do with diapers. New and expectant mothers will have the opportunity for a host of gifts and information during the Health Start Coalition Baby Shower.

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, May 16, 2013 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Still faced with a short fall of $868,249 for the 201314 school year, Gulf County School Board formally an nounced at its regular meet ing that they would put into effect a reduction in work force for the new year. The School Board has discussed the move in a special meeting, but made the Reduction in Force of cial Tuesday during its regular monthly meeting. In public comment, As sociate Director of the Gulf County Educators’ Association, Sandra But ler said that the teacher’s union felt that the district was moving too fast and that letting teachers go should be “the last thing we consider.” She warned the board that if it chooses not to fol low teacher contracts then they potentially face unfair labor practice. “Our hearts break,” re sponded Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. “We’ve looked at every avenue and it’s not with a light heart that we move forward.” For the 12-15 teaching positions anticipated to be eliminated, the Florida De partment of Education dic tates that the board cannot make their decisions based on seniority or certica tions and they would have to utilize the latest teacher evaluations. Teachers with the low est scores would be re leased until the needed number was reached. “This takes subjectivity out of play,” said Norton. “There’s no way we can op erate the district without reaching our target cuts.” Outsourcing the school’s custodial and janitorial services was ex plored further as GCA Ser vices Group presented to the board for consideration in the bid. They currently work with Bay County schools and received high recommendations. Previously in the meet ing, the board recognized seven students in grades Kindergarten through twelfth who had perfect or near-perfect attendance for the school year. Buck Watford, a major in the U.S. Army Reserves returned from his fth de ployment to Afghanistan last week and appeared before the council on Tues day to thank them for the warm welcome home. He mentioned that not a week went by during his deployment that he didn’t receive packages or letters from the students. He presented Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Principal Jeremy Knapp and Port St. Joe Elementa ry principal Susan Gannon with ags that were own on his base. NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 A c ooler home and lo w er bills? No w tha t f eels good! Y ou could sa v e up t o 40 per cent on ener gy costs b y r eplacing y our heating and cooling unit with one that has a SEER — seasonal ener gy e cienc y ratio — rating of 15 or g r eat er w w w .gc ec .c om or (850) 639.2216 1.800.333.9392 y costs b gy cent on ener o 40 per e up t v ou could sa Y O v erlook ing S t Joseph B a y and C ape S an B las B ar ef oot C ottages o ers the most a or dable beach homes on F lorida ’ s F or gott en C oast in a w ell-appoin t ed 18-acr e c oastal village T he c ottages ar e designed f or laid back turn of the c en tur y living and amenities include t w o pools pla y gr ounds BBQ ar eas and our V illage G r een with C ommunit y C en t er wher e families ga ther t o mak e beach memories L oc a t ed just w est of P or t S t Joe on High w a y 98 and bor dering W indMark B each, B ar ef oot C ottages is y our oppor tunit y t o o wn no w in a desir able ba yside c ommunit y with e x c ellen t r en tal demand T w o bedr oom, 2.5 ba th homes ar e a v ailable fr om $129,900. T hr ee -bedr oom, 3.5 ba th homes ar e a v ailable star ting a t $179,900. Ba y s i d e L iv in g f r o m $129,900 I t's t he p erfe ct ti me t o jo i n us 249065 Gulf F r ont C ape S an Blas $899,900 Incr edible H ome tha t e xudes luxur y and charm with 3 open and c o v er ed decks o ering amazing beach views and glorious w est erly sunsets this home c omes c omplet ely furnished and has an e x c ellen t r en tal hist or y as a pr emium gulf fr on t pr oper t y 4 st ories high with one of the best vistas an y wher e O ne c an ac tually see the ba y fr om the t op deck as a bonus E lev a t or equiped f or e or tless ac c ess t o ev er y lev el 241453 Gulf F r ont C ape S an Blas $599,900 B eautiful G ulf F r on t home loc a t ed in an X FL OOD Z ONE in secluded ar ea on a lar ge stable beach. H ome w as designed t o maximiz e e xpansiv e unobstr uc tiv e views fr om ev er y r oom. O pen design with lar ge c o v er ed decks F ir eplac e irriga tion sysetm, sec urit y syst em lar ge st or age undernea th. 75 f oot wide lot boasting o v er an acr e in siz e O ther amenities include c ust om oak c abinets elec tric mot oriz ed st orm shutt ers gulf views fr om ev er y r oom, c o v er ed decks and much mor e 249132 Gulf F r ont Me xico Beach $679,000 F abulous old st yle beach house with r ar e f ea tur es L oc a t ed lo w t o the gr ound with a full driv e -in gar age Unlik e most beachfr on t homes this c ottage is not highly elev a t ed f or easy ac c ess O pen oor plan with mast er bedr oom, k it chen, gr ea t r oom and an incr edible lar ge 14 x 44 scr eened in por ch tha t o v erlooks the gulf tha t c ould bec ome an amazing glassed in bonus r oom. Upstairs has a sitting r oom and t w o bedr ooms and t w o ba ths T her e is a gulf view fr om ev er y r oom in the house P riv ac y f enc e on the lef t side of home with double outside sho w ers and a side en tr y Nic e boar dw alk t o the beach. T his is a r ar e nd in a lo w er lev el beach c ottage with charm and personalit y NO HO A FEES. S tar t y our lif etime memories t oda y!! 249330 O v a tion L ot $84,500 F abulous ba y fr on t lot in e x clusiv e O v a tion S ubdivision. T his lev el lot c omes c omplet e with sew er tap f ee and new sur v ey A menities G alor e! C urr en tly the only a v ailable ba y fr on t lot in O v a tion. h ; = ; S X ? N K ? ; S ; Y ; \ ^ S D \ D Z W ; Q D \ Q ; D Q L ^ L Z > Q ; > O V A L K A > O > W > ; D K ^ /; /189 1;/ /9 9<3 3 < 3 99 ; + / 389 09 5 19 /;; 3 ) # $ $ %" $ $ $ # $ % ) ; / 83 /30 3;; < #
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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORS Section Section A By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH After 13 years on the federal over shing list, red snapper has been removed after a report showed the species has made a comeback in the Gulf of Mexico. Released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the report provides a snapshot of U.S. sheries stocks in 2012. Results showed a 59 percent increase in the red snapper quota since 2009. However, red snapper remain on NOAAs overshed list, which is different from the over shing list. The critical list that its still on is the over shed designation, said local charter captain Bob Zales. Many of us believe were past that and this shery is not over shed anymore. According to NOAA, an over shing stock is a product of over shing for many years and has a harvest rate that is too high to produce its maximum sustainable yield. Over shed species have a biomass level depleted to a degree that the stocks capacity to produce the maximum sustainable yield is jeopardized. Over shed species like red snapper are subject to shery management and rebuilding plans. A separate report was released by Ocean Conservancy and Pew Charitable Trusts, outlining the success of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the law governing shery management in the U.S. The Ocean Conservancy/Pew report was released in conjunction with a sheries summit taking place this week in Washington, D.C. Zales described the report as propaganda. The three-day summit will set the stage for what could result in fundamental changes to the Magnuson-Stevens Act, with federal management agencies pushing Congress to reauthorize the act. Zales said the last reauthorization of the act in 2007 was far too restrictive and not based on sound science. Its hard for us to counter the propaganda that comes out, said Zales, who has been charter shing in Panama City for 48 years. Youre getting two completely different stories. One of them is reality and one is where the environmentalists want to take it. Thats a signi cant problem for most of us on the water. In response to the NOAA Fisheries report Status of Stocks 2012 that showed record rebuilding of sheries, Elizabeth Fetherston, deputy director of Ocean Conservancys Fish Conservation Program, said, Todays report is great news and further proof that the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) is working to restore our sheries. According to an economic report by NOAA, U.S. saltwater shing generated more than $199 billion in sales and supported 1.7 million jobs in 2011. Monda y S a tur da y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST S unda y : 7:00 A M 5:00 PM EST Fi s h i ng H e a dq u a r ters : WEEKL Y ALM ANA C ST JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W ES T P ASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 227-7847 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M a y 16 81 67 10 % F ri, M a y 17 80 68 10 % S a t M a y 18 80 69 20 % Sun, M a y 19 80 69 0 % M on, M a y 20 80 70 10 % T ues M a y 21 80 65 0 % W ed M a y 22 81 70 20 % Sat ur da y Ma y 25th 1 0am til 3pm. At the boat basin acr oss fr om Harr y A s on St. Geor ge Island Page 8 Thursday, May 16, 2013 SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Some kingfish are starting to show up around the buoy line out of Mexico beach and down around the Cape this week. Watch for the birds diving on the bait fish for a good indicator of feeding fish. Amberjack are holding good on the B-site numbers and in 150ft of water due south of St. Joe. The 2013 cobia run is just about to be over in our area. Several good fish have been caught this year over the 50 pound mark. St. Joe Bay continues to heat up this month. Good trout and flounder catches are reported from Blacks Island and The Eagle Harbor areas so far this week. Spanish Mackerel and pompano are still running the beaches from Mexico beach to Indian pass. Star Staff Report Duke Energy, formerly Progress Energy, has joined with the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association to build two new arti cial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico which will help restore marine habitat so sh like gag grouper, amberjack, trigger sh and red snapper can grow and prosper. The two new reefs that will be built with a $15,000 grant from Duke Energy are off Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe. The rst reef is in the Bell Shoal area which is about 3.5 miles off of the beach in 20 feet of water. It consists of six Florida limestone reefs and two grouper reef-ecosystem hybrids that are in uential in the growth of gag grouper especially in the juvenile stage. The second reef is in the North Site about 17 miles out in an area that is about 100 feet deep. The reef consists of two Florida limestone reefs and one grouper-reef ecosystem. Duke Energy has also joined as a Corporate Friend of the MBARA which includes entities like Guy Harvey, American Fishing Tackle Company, Bay County Outdoors, Bluewater Outriggers, Florida Insider Fishing Report, Sportsman Adventures, Floridaze Adventures, Mexico Beach Marina, Al Agnew and Stolen Moments Photography. We are so proud to have the Duke Energy people supporting our efforts to build marine habitat which will promote sheries in our area which brings anglers and divers from all over to our local area, said MBARA president Bob Cox. This effort supports the local economy and helps sustain sh populations for many years to come. These new reefs will be posted on the MBARA website at www.mbara. or g with all the GPS coordinates, range and bearing. Red snapper off over shing list Duke Energy, MBARA build new reefs WES LOCHER | The Star Ron Childs with the MBARA, Bobby Pickels with Duke Energy and Bob Cox, president of the MBARA, celebrate a partnership to build new reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more online at star .com www.starfl.com

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section T o R eg ist er or f or mor e inf or ma tion, please c on tac t (850) 482-6500 or bnuc cio@bigb endahec .or g or T oll fr ee 1-87QUIT -NO W 6 I n t er est ed in quitting t obac c o? P lease c ome t o our upc oming FREE T o ols t o Q uit session. B ecause N OW is the best time t o quit W hen: T hursda y June 13, 2013 T ime: 11am 1pm EST W her e: S acr ed H ear t H ospital on the G ulf FREE Nic otine P a t ches A nd/or Gum for pro gr a m pa r tic ipa nts iZZTh iZ ak J i Page 9 Thursday, May 16, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m When asked what his primary focus has been during spring football practice this month, Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School Dennis Kizziah did not think long. “Blocking and tackling,” was the answer before the question was barely in the air. “We’ve been so bad at blocking and tackling the last couple of years. We have to get better. “And I’ve learned through the years of coaching that the kid who wants to do it will do it. The kid who doesn’t want to block or tackle, he just doesn’t need to be out there.” That ethic is also part of what Kizziah has used during the 16 days – fewer due to weather in Wewahitchka – of spring practice to toughen his team, to put an edge in his redand-white clad team. “We are trying to make them tougher,” Kizziah said. “We have a lot of kids who have been out before so they understand what we are trying to do, but we have really had some practices where we have done a lot of hitting. “Part of it has been the fewer days we’ve had, I would guess we have had about 10 good practice days. But we have been really doing some hitting on some days. We have had three or four pretty long practices, longer than I prefer, which involved a lot of just basic blocking and tackling.” The Gators lost a few key seniors, but are likely to dress out just a handful of seniors this season. Last year’s deep sophomore and freshmen classes are now the sophomores and juniors that will lead the team. “We returned quite a few but we will still be young,” Kizziah said. “We also have some real good athletes. “A real key is that we are returning our offensive line. That will be important.” The Gators, who suffered through a tough three-win season last year, will also have quarterback Rashard Rainie, a dual-threat, back at quarterback. Javar Hill, the tight end last year, will serve as the feature running back in the Wing offense. “I am still looking for another running back,” Kizziah said. “Javar will get most of the carries and Rashard is dangerous on any down, but I would like to have another running back to take some carries. “We have some good size and the kids come off the ball real well. We are going to just run it at them.” The Gators also have found a kicker – after having no real kicker last season Kizziah said he has a senior and a freshman able to handle punting and place-kicking duties – and continue to put the pieces of the puzzle in place. The effort, Kizziah said, has been there all spring. “You know they are burned out from playing sports all year,” Kizziah said. “Most of our kids played baseball, so they are just a little worn out. But the effort has been there and the attitude has just been great.” Spring practice ends tonight with the Spring Jamboree, which will feature the Gators opening the evening with two quarters of play against Franklin County and ending the evening with two quarters against Port St. Joe. “We need to have some success in the spring game so we can just have a little con dence going into the summer and getting into the weight room,” Kizziah said. “The score isn’t so much important as I want them to see themselves on tape. “We want them to see themselves on tape executing a block, then executing it again and then executing it again, showing them the improvement. We are looking for improvement and something to hang our hat on as we go into the summer.” Kizziah said the playbook will be “watered down” a bit because the emphasis on blocking and tackling has meant less time working on the nesse and timing of the passing game. What he wants to know at the end tonight is that he has 30 or so players amped for summer workouts and getting on the eld in the fall. “We are looking forward to playing (tonight),” Kizziah said. “I want to see how the kids will do faced against somebody else. They have hit each other enough. “You want to make sure your kids are aggressive and they are doing what they have been shown.” IF YOU GO... The Spring Jamboree will begin at 6:30 p.m. ET tonight at Shark Field. Franklin County will face Wewahitchka for two quarters and the Seahawks will play Port St. Joe for two quarters. The nal two quarters will pit county rivals Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. Gators looking for boost into summer The Gators will open the spring jamboree tonight against Franklin County and will close it against Port St. Joe. P hotos by WES LOCHER | The Star Blocking and tackling have been an emphasis this spring for Wewahitchka.

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 TH U R S D A Y M A Y 23, 2013 4:00P M E S T T HE C E N T E NNI A L B U IL DIN G 300 A L L E N M E MO R I A L W A Y P O R T S T J O E FL F R E E A DM ISS I ON F O O D F U N G A M E S A N D L O T S OF D O OR P R IZE S W e invite all Franklin and Gulf County pr egnant women, new par ents who have had a baby within the last six months and their families to join us for: HE A L THY S T A R T S 5t h An n u a l Ba b y Sh ow e r Ther e will be information stations on various topics such as: Car Seat Safety Shaken Baby Birth Contr ol, Safe Sleep, Community Resour ces and Much Mor e! And, lots of fabulous door prizes! E ve r y b a by de se r ve s a H e a l t hy St art! F OR M OR E INF OR M A TI ON, C A LL 1-800-895-9506 H E A LT H Y S TA R T S S H OW E R B A BY At some point we need to address mandatory pickup in a way that works for everybody, Yeager said. Commissioners did raise the landll fees to re ect a suggestion made by Public Works director Joe Danford during a workshop two weeks ago. The fee was raised from $35 per ton to $40 per ton. Commissioner Ward McDaniel said that much of District 2, he estimated 95 percent, is already on some kind of garbage pickup and that both cities also require mandatory pickup. But Commissioner Joanna Bryan said the issue was one she would like to more fully review and consider before voting and commissioners agreed to table a decision on the pilot recycling program for two weeks. Port of Port St. Joe Commissioners expressed various opinions as to whether to write a letter to the governor in sup port of a $2 million appropriation that would allevi ate a pressing foreclosure issue on a parcel of land owned by the Port of Port St. Joe. Commission chair Tan Smiley said he had al ready written one representing himself as chair man in support of the appropriation, but his fellow commissioners had mixed views. McLemore said he opposed using tax money in bailing out a bank and McDaniel wondered if re ceiving the $2 million against a mortgage that is in excess of $4 million was doing nothing more than buying time for the port before it would nd itself in the same situation. McDaniel said he did support money in the state budget roughly $1.4 million for dredging the shipping channel to authorized depth, but was hesitant about supporting the $2 million to help on the mortgage. Yeager said that the $2 million appropriation was being driven by Capital City Bank, not the Port Authority, and that the governor should decide the worthiness of that appropriation but agreed the dredging money was badly needed. I think the port is a regional project, Yeager said. It is going to go. Im in full support of any thing we can do to make that port go. Smiley said his decision was one of jobs. Helping (the port) out is helping Gulf County out, Smiley said. Just letting it sit there and do nothing isnt an option. I come from when Port St. Joe had plenty of jobs. I am seeing getting back to where that was. Is (the $2 million) going to help? We need the jobs. CBRA Yeager said a bill that would strike Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Peninsula from the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) was scheduled for a committee hearing. That is much farther along than weve ever been, he said, adding that three or four other states also had land areas believed mistakenly placed in CBRA. (Having the CBRA designation removed) would be a huge impact for this county. RECYCLING from page A1 events put in beds and the ex tent of draw in a radius beyond 60 miles from Gulf County. We have to break from the past, said board member and Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. In one instance, the board denied an application for fund ing this year from Project Graduation of Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School due to the new award parameters. The event was not seen as a boon for tourism, despite the ne intentions, said board member Ronald Pickett. The emphasis was on iden tifying so-called signature events and marking the cal endar with so-called niche events, events which draw more locals and bed tax col lection is not as lofty, Jenkins said. Our job is to spend the money as smartly as we can, said Alyson Gerlach, who chairs the TDC marketing committee. The marketing commit tee approved, and in turn the full advisory board approved, several signature events sig nature events, Jenkins said, were those events in which the expected bed tax collections exceed the amount of the spe cial event award. Those events include the Scallop Festival, Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival, the Great Florida Plein Air Paint Out and the Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast. Bay Day, held twice a year as a fundraising celebration of the St. Joseph Bay State Pre serves, is currently considered a niche event that will become a signature event. The niche events funded under the special grant funding were broken into categories. Those categories are golf ing, snowbirds, pet friendly, shing, festivals, eco-tourism, art/music and the nal catego ry simply local. A major component to the difference in funding niche and signature events is the role the TDC will play in marketing the events. For the niche, more local, events the key is that the TDC will hold back 50 percent of any grant award to do the market ing, be it a shing event such as the Sheriffs Ofce annual tournament or a local event such as Ghosts on the Coast. I have condence in our ability to do all that work in house, Jenkins said. When we can take these niche events and grow them into larger events the money will follow. The TDC staff will have a major presence at signature events, but the amount of the award for example $10,000 for the Scallop Festival will go to organizers to handle the bulk of the marketing and advertising. For any event, at least 50 percent of marketing and ad vertising must be done out side a 60-mile radius of Gulf County. And the grants provide something of a road map for the TDC in creating website and social media content. (The partners) help us with the content development, Jenkins said. Im starting to tie (events) to messaging and broaden it. In total, the TDC received grant proposals requesting more than $107,000. Events qualied for $76,447, but with the TDC share of marketing the niche events backed out the amount awarded this year totaled $54,848. The TDC board also hand ed out grant funding for the remainder of the scal year for several events and functions. The board granted addi tion funding this year of $9,600 to the MBARA for magazine advertising, the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce for ad ditional Scallop Festival fund ing, the Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, the an nual Street Dance in the neigh borhood of North Port St. Joe and National Marina Day. BED TAX from page A1 He supports the program and allows the class to use his well to keep the plants watered throughout the school year. A portion of what grows in garden was donated by Bonnie Plants in Alabama while other donations came from the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Carter said that the fth grade is the ideal age level to learn gardening because the students are able to retain what they learn. For those who are interested in gardening, it lets us plant the seed, he said. The program is part of the science classes taught by fth-grade teachers Melanie Hinote, April Bidwell and Kim Ludlau. Before the 60 students ever stepped foot in the garden they spent class time discussing the act of planting, the role that bees play in pollination and took a eld trip to the North Florida Research and Education Center. David Beyl and his wife, Sally have been volunteers with the program for the last ve years. Both are Master Gardeners who trained at the University of Florida for 12 weeks and must perform 50 hours of horticulturerelated volunteer work each year. The students love it, said Beyl. You can tell that they enjoy the experience. Cabbage, lettuce, strawberries, potatoes, carrots, onions, eggplant, watermelon, beans, peppers, squash, sugarcane and various herbs made up this years garden with produce being grown both in-ground and in pots. We use pots to show the students that even if you dont have room for a garden, you can still have a garden, Beyl said. While in the garden students were broken up into groups of four to ve and they learned how to plant seeds, rake, fertilize and cultivate. Those who had the courage even learned how to operate a rototiller under Beyls close supervision. They also learned how to pick and eat the strawberries when no one was looking, he added. Students are made aware of what dishes can be made from the contents of a garden and students took home cabbages, carrots and potatoes to share with their families. Those who had an interest in starting their own gardens were given seeds to plant. It was a lot of fun, said student Lavender Abdulla about the program. We learned where plants grow but also got to get in the dirt. It was fun and we also learned a lot, echoed fellow fth-grader Case Johnson. John Rich, a volunteer with the program for 10 years, served up greens and sweet potato casserole to the hungry students at the luncheon. Its all about getting kids to eat something other than hamburgers, Rich said. County Commissioner Ward McDaniel was also on-site for the festivities. A gardener himself, he applauded Carter for his time and dedication to the program. Roy does a marvelous job with the kids, he said. Carter added, Its the only gardening program youll nd in North Florida. Its a pleasure to be a part of it. GARDEN from page A1

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Thursday, May 16, 2013 “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Of these who was not born in the year 1970? Uma Thurman, Andre Agassi, Shania Twain, Matt Damon 2) Geographically which is NYC’s largest borough? Brooklyn, Staten Island, Manhattan, Queens 3) From the comics who’s the wife of Hagar the Horrible? Helga, Anna, Gertrude, Bertha 4) What January date does a U.S. president’s term of of ce begin? 3rd, 12th, 20th, 23rd 5) Mainly from years past, what were spats worn over? Shoes, Neck, Lap, Neckties 6) Which of these slangily refers to a bowling ball? Grapefruit, Apple, Melon, Coconut 7) Which presidential candidate wanted Americans to explore the “New Frontier”? Jefferson, Lincoln, FDR, JFK 8) Either of the vertical sides of a window is called its? Jamb, Balance, Sash, Glide 9) Aubergine is another name for? Alps, Eggplant, Trumpet, Ri e 10) Of these, who was not born in California? Rene Russo, Molly Ringwald, Meryl Streep, Marilyn Monroe 11) White and which other are the most common school-mascot colors? Red, Blue, Green, Yellow 12) Where was singer Jimmy Buffet born? Idaho, Florida, Texas, Mississippi 13) Which is a log turner? Peavey, Dermot, Pincher, Dolman 14) River, snow, and blood are all types of? Maps, Beds, Cells, Banks ANSWERS 1) Shania Twain. 2) Queens. 3) Helga. 4) 20th. 5) Shoes. 6) Apple. 7) JFK. 8) Jamb. 9) Eggplant. 10) Meryl Streep. 11) Blue. 12) Mississippi. 13) Peavey. 14) Banks. C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Centennial TRIVIA T he 1912 Cadillac Model 30 parked in front of the Port St. Joe railroad depot in this 1916 photograph was the rst car to have all electric lighting and an electric self-starter. What else was unique about this Cadillac? Hint: This car would never have a at tire! Pelican Pete has a Centennial Stumper for You! ANSWER ON PAGE B6 Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Raymond “Elmo” Aylmer seems to have this Florida Paratransit Roadeo down to an art form. Aylmer, representing Gulf Public Transportation, won two more rst-place plaques in Fort Myers during the recent statewide competition for drivers from organizations that provide public transportation to the disabled, seniors and needy. “The competition is intense, it is nothing you just show up for and do,” Aylmer said. “It makes you feel good about yourself. “You competed against everybody in the state and being from this small community, it’s nice knowing the services we provide people is recognized because the people down south, they know who we are.” That is in large measure because of Aylmer, who has made success at the Roadeo an annual rite of spring. Aylmer has been with Gulf Transportation for 16 years. He has competed in 11 Roadeos. He has taken home a plaque for one of the top three spots in all but three of those competitions and has nished second once at the national Roadeo. He has won four rst-place awards for Highest Bus Inspection Score in the past ve years. This year Aylmer won for Highest Bus Inspection Score and also took rst in the Van category. Those honors guaranteed a spot for Aylmer in the National Paratransit Roadeo to be held the rst of June in Albuquerque, N.M. “That competition is really intense,” Aylmer said. “You are competing against people from 47 other states and sometimes drivers come down from Canada. “You’ve got a lot more people used to driving under much different circumstances that you might have encountered. That can get pretty intense.” Not that the state competition is any cruise with top down. For example, in the Bus Inspection Category, the buses are sabotaged with four defects. One year, Aylmer recalled, the hose on the re extinguisher in the bus had been loosened. The driver has seven minutes to nd and address each defect. “It could be anything, like a missing lug nut,” Aylmer said. “But you have to nd them in just By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Music Through the Years Music Festival, set to take place last weekend at George Core Park was over before it could begin. Mother Nature, it seemed, wasn’t in the mood for a concert as rain soaked the afternoon making the electronic setup needed to run the show impossible. The festival, planned by Dana Boyer and the music committee, was planned as a fundraiser for the upcoming Centennial Celebration in June. This week the committee gathered to gure out what they would do in lieu of the cancellation, but no of cial announcement has been made. Pre-sale tickets will be refunded at City Hall for those who purchased in advance. “We’ll see what we can do,” said Mayor Mel Magidson. “We hope people will step up and provide nancial support.” The concert had been delayed until later in the day, but as storms continued, the bands were sent home. The headlining act, The Villagers, who had reunited for the rst time in 15 years, made the best of a bad situation and set up shop at The Thirsty Goat at The Port Inn and let the good times roll. WES LOCHER | The Star After the Music Festival was canceled, The Villagers played to a packed house at The Thirsty Goat. Aylmer continues ‘Roadeo’ winning streak TIM CROFT | The Star Raymond “Elmo” Aylmer has lled one wall at Gulf Transportation with state and national awards during the past 16 years. See ROADEO B6 The Villagers perform despite weather See VILLAGERS B6 Star Staff Report With more than 342 registered contestants, the 11th annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament took place amid the rain and clouds at the Port St. Joe Marina last Saturday. Fishing and casting classes were given on Friday to prepare the kids for the shing to come and the wind and rain that appeared Saturday couldn’t keep them from casting as the tournament began. Kids win Annual shing tournament geared toward children P hotos by DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM; ADDITIONAL PHOTOS BY JOEL REED AND JONATHAN BROWN. See KIDS WIN B6

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I f y o u a r e u n a b l e t o a d o p t a t t h i s t i m e p e r h a p s y o u c o u l d f o s t e r o r m a k e a D o n a t i o n A l l p e t s a d o p t e d f r o m S J B H S w i l l b e c u r r e n t o n v a c c i n a t i o n s a n d s p a y e d / n e u t e r e d P l e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n s e n d h s d i r e c t o r @ g m a i l .c o m o r a d o p t b a y s t j o e @ g m a i l .c o m o r c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e O n l i n e a p p l i c a t i o n s a n d p e t p h o t o s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j b h uma n eso c i e t y o r g A do pt i on f e e s i n c l u de o ur c o s t of s p a y / ne u t e r a nd c ur r e n t va c c i n a t i on s. O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 4 p m F a i t h ’ s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o l u n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n Po r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t h e r e s o o n I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y FREE SP A Y / NEUTER Fixing y our pet sa v es liv es! St. J oseph Ba y Humane Society is of f er ing FREE Spa y/Neut er f or the pets of Gulf County ONL Y Millions of health y adoptable c a ts and dogs ar e euthaniz ed each y ear simply bec ause ther e ar e not enough homes f or them all C A L L : 850 227 1103 O R PI C K U P A N APPL I C A T ION A T 1 0 0 7 1 0 T H S T POR T S T JOE FL + % $ # % & % # % + &" ( "% ) #!"% # WWW .LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM 1 5 5 )+ 1 % % $ % + % # 5 ON THE POOP DECK % 60/ "/0 # /8 70/ "/0 # /8 76 4 # / 0/ 1! % 62 IN THE CR O W’S NEST 70/ # / 0/ 1 PM D J LADIES NIGHT % 20/ ) 2020/ PM HAPPY HOUR 0/ 70/ 2092215 THANK Y OU I will continue to w ork to impr o v e our city P aid for and appr o v ed b y Mel Magidson Jr for Ma y or/Commissioner POR T ST JOE for the honor & privilege of serving as y our Ma y or for the next 2 y ears. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Society B2 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 McKenzie Grace Lyle! Happy Birthday, Baby Girl. We love you Mom, Steven and Preston McKenzie will be celebrating her big day on Sunday with family and friends! She is the daughter of  Tonyia McDaniel Lyle of Wewahitchka, and Phillip Lyle of Panama City Beach, and sister of Steven Lyle of Wewahitchka. She also is the granddaughter of Nancy Mack of Carrabelle and the granddaughter of the late Stewart “Yank” Lyle from Highland View, and the late Patricia Coker Mims and David H. Mims of Wewahitchka. Look who’s turning 8 Star Staff Report Pictured are members of the Port St. Joe Lions Club, led by President Jim Norton, and board members from the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society surrounding a new sign the money for which was donated by the Lions Club. The new sign, at the intersection of State 71 and Knowles Avenue in Port St. Joe, provides motorists clearer directions on the location of the Humane Society Shelter and adjacent Faith’s Thrift Hut, which helps support Humane Society. operations. According to the Sandi Christy of the Humane Society, “The sign has already made a big difference in people being able to locate the shelter and thrift hut. The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society greatly appreciates the Lions Club’s support.” Lions Club donates sign for Humane Society Special to THE St T AR 26 Troop 47 Scouts earn merit badges Special to The Star Troop 47 Scoutmasters had a busy night Monday, May 6 with handing out 26 merit badges earned by eight scouts. Scouts Josh Willis, Thomas Miniat, Tyler Watson, Hunter Van Der Tulip, Dokata Braun, Caleb Schweikert, Christian Quaranta and Preston Burkett earned Eagle Scout-required merit badges at an Eagle Academy held by Camp Osborne of the South Georgia Council. The merit badges they earned were rst aid, emergency preparedness, citizenship in the world, citizenship in the community, personal tness, environmental science and ngerprinting. A great job done by all and they are halfway toward their Eagle Scout requirements. PSJ Cub Scout Pack 347 Crossover The same night Cub Master Abigail Cozine had two scouts from her pack cross over with Arrow of Light honors to Troop 47 of PSJ. Scouts Sean Farnsley and Christian Quaranta had earned the Arrow of Light the highest award that can be earned in cub scouting and the only award that can be worn on their Boy Scout uniform after the cross over. Troop 47 Scout masters and scouts also were there to receive their new members with a scout handbook and a neckerchief with a slide. Congrats boys and Good Luck on your new path toward Eagle. RR eward for information Star Staff Report On the night of March 29, the home at 6385 Long St. in Overstreet was burglarized and several items were stolen: a Sear Craftsman 75th anniversary circular saw; a Dewalt variable speed drill; a Stihl gasoline chain saw; a box of metal drill bits; and a small hatchet. The thieves destroyed a sliding glass door. The owner of the home, Glenn Davis, is asking for help to catch these people. A reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest of the person(s) responsible. Call Davis at 227-4748. GCEC welcomes Moore to Board of Trustees Special to The Star Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is proud to welcome Betty J. Moore to its board of trustees. Moore was elected at the Cooperative’s 65th Annual Members’ Meeting, held earlier this month, to serve as the District I, Group 1 Trustee. She represents GCEC members in Jackson and Washington counties and is the rst female board member in the Cooperative’s 71year history. Moore is a graduate of Bay High School and attended Gulf Coast State College. She has more than 30 years of banking experience, primarily in lending operations, and has worked in Bay, Franklin, Gulf, Jackson and Okaloosa counties. “I look forward to the opportunity to learn more about my local coop and to serve its members and employees,” Moore said. “This opportunity will enhance my knowledge of the operations of our co-op and give me a chance to use my professional experience to benet the cooperative.” Special to The Star With summer right around the corner, it’s time to think about keeping children healthy while school is out. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board will be providing free nutritionally balanced meals to children during the summer through the Summer Food Service Program. From June 17Aug. 2, meals will be served at the Washington Gym Complex at 414 East Kenny St. in Port St. Joe Monday through Friday (closed July 4-5 in observance of Independence Day). Lunch will be served from 12 p.m.1 p.m. ET with a snack to follow at 2 p.m. Gulf County children, age 18 and under, regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age, or national origin may come to eat. For more information, contact Gulf Coast Workforce Board at 850-913-3285. Each year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture partners with local organizations like the Gulf Coast Workforce Board to provide free meals to children when school is out for the summer. For more information about the national Summer Food Service Program, visit www.fns. usda.gov/cnd/summer. Workforce board offers food for kids

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The Star| B3 Thursday, May 16, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! (In this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast """ ) " ) " $ & & ( # $ )" " !(! % !! "& SELL YOUR LISTI NGS HERE! # ! (850)81 4-7377 (850)22 7-7847 S O L D Hey Golfers, Come Join Us! Open to the Public Discount for Active Military Discounts and Bene ts for Club Members Join Befor e July 1st, 2013 and we'll waive the $400 initiation fee The Course is in Gr eat Shape! T ee Times optional Gr oups available to join! St. Joseph Bay Golf Club Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 227-1751 SALON LUX 850-227-4582 220 REID A VENUE P OR T S AIN T J OE F LORIDA 32456 www .facebook.com/ salonluxpsj HAIR SERVICES % %! % # + # % %% % )+)+ $ $ MAKE-UP %& "! % % $# % %+% $# ( "! *% $ (%) $ %) $! '+% School News Front Row: Nathan Lipford, Makayan Jones, Caroline Sapp, Kylie Ingalls, Raelynn Hardy Back Row: Tad Russell, Lauren Jenkins,  Natalie Graziano, Tyrell Patterson, Chris Bryan Dazzling DOLPHINS By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com As his economic teacher at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr.. High School, Derek Kurnitsky, said, “What can’t Javarri do?” The subject of the question was Javarri Beachum, who recently placed second in the Northwest Florida region in simulated stock market game. The Florida Stock Market Simulation game is an online exercise in economic class. Students receive $100,000 in “free” money and go to a website that effectively mirrors the New York Stock Exchange, down to company trading symbols and trading prices. Students can buy and sell stocks, purchase bonds and Treasury notes and by mid-April the closing bell rings on the class and tallies are made. Beachum, an outstanding leader with the NJROTC program, headed to the Naval Academy Prep School, outstanding student, standout soccer player, nished second in the region among all high schoolers. As he told Kurnitsky, if the game had continued this month, when the market is at record levels, “He’s pretty sure he could have nished rst,” Kurnitsky said with a laugh. “Is there anything he can’t do?” Beachum earned an award and also a $50 gift card to Papa John’s Pizza. Beachum rewarded for stock playsS p P ECi I A l L T o O ThTH E STAR Javarri Beachum is anked by Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Principal Jeremy Knapp, left and teacher Derek Kurnitsky. Prayer is a big part of our nations history Special to The Star “Fasting and prayer are religious exercises; the enjoining them an act of discipline. Every religious society has a right to determine for itself the time for these exercises, and the objects proper for them, according to their own particular tenets; and right can never be safer than in their hands, where the Constitution has deposited it.” Thomas Jefferson, 1808 Because of the faith of many of our founding fathers, public prayer and national days of prayer have a long-standing and signicant history in American tradition. The Supreme Court afrmed the right of state legislatures to open their sessions with prayer in Marsh vs. Chambers (1983). The National Day of Prayer is a vital part of our heritage. Since the rst call to prayer in 1775, when the Continental Congress asked the colonies to pray for wisdom in forming a nation, the call to prayer has continued through our history, including President Lincoln’s proclamation of a day of “humiliation, fasting, and prayer” in 1863. In 1952, a joint resolution by Congress, signed by President Truman, declared an annual, national day of prayer. In 1988, the law was amended and signed by President Reagan, permanently setting the day as the rst Thursday of every May. Each year, the president signs a proclamation, encouraging all Americans to pray on this day. Last year, all 50 state governors plus the governors of several U.S. territories signed similar proclamations. 1952    Harry S. Truman declares a National Day of Prayer and signs into law an annual observance there of – United States Congress passed Joint Resolution 382 on April 17, 1952/ President Truman signs Public Law 82-324 (Public Law 82-324; 66 Stat. 64—April 17, 1952). 1988    Ronald Reagan signs into law the designation of the rst Thursday in May as the annual observance for the National Day of Prayer  – President Reagan signs Public Law 100-307 January 25, 1988, in the Second Session of the One Hundredth Congress (Public Law 100-307—May 5, 1988). The preceding information was taken from the National Day of Prayer ofcial website. John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 Ladies Auxiliary scholarship Special to The Star At the NJROTC Awards Banquet held May 9, Se nior Vice President of the Ladies Auxiliary, Ginny Seefeldt, had the honor of presenting a $500 scholar ship to Cadet Kassandra Favre. It is the Ladies Auxiliary’s privilege to each year present a scholarship to a worthy NJROTC female Cadet. We wish Kassandra the best of everything as she enters the United States Navy after her graduation. The Lion’s Tale M oO RE sS C hoolHOOL nN EW sS B5

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et SUND A Y : WOR S HIP A T SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM CS T 1 0 : 3 0 AM CS T ON THE 2 ND SUND A Y OF THE MONTH SUND A Y : BI B LE CL A SS 9 : 3 0 AM CS T M OND A Y : L IFE T REE C AF 7 PM CS T TUE S D A Y : MEN S BI B LE STUDY 6 : 3 0 PM CS T T HUR S D A Y : WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM CS T 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g Thursday, May 16, 2013 Bobbie Jo Cox, 73, passed away Saturday, May 11, 2013, after a long ght with Alzheimers disease. She was resident of Clinton, Tenn., for many years where she was retired from Nannys Educational Preschool in Knoxville, Tenn. Bobbie loved to spend time with family and friends on the beach or just visiting. She is survived by her husband of 49 years, Carl Cox; son, David Cox; and granddaughter, Hailey Cox all of Clinton, Tenn.; daughter Carla and Wayne ODell of St. Joe Beach with her beloved dog Babyscooter. Bobbies memorial service will be Thursday, May 16, 2013, at 8 p.m. at Hatmaker Funeral Home in Lake City, Tenn., with burial at Oak Grove Cemetery on Friday, May 17, 2013. The family would like to thank the nurses and staff at The Bridge of Bay St. Joe for all the wonderful cared they gave Bobbie during her ve-year stay with them. Also, the family would like to give many thanks for all the prayers that have been given over the past ve years. Bobbie Jo Cox Charles Howard Stephens Sr., child of God, loving husband, dedicated father and granddaddy as well as community servant, was born in Donalsonville, Ga., on March 8, 1943, and went to be the Lord on May 10, 2013. He and his wife Bonnie celebrated 52 years of marriage. He is survived by his wife Bonnie; his children Chuck Stephens (Julia), Gaynell Jones (Bob) and Lynn Watts (John); and his grandchildren Ty and Anna Drake Stephens, Phillip and David Jones, and Sarah Beth and Trevor Watts. He is also survived by his brothers Steve, of California, and Robert and Pete, both of Georgia, as well as dearest friends Harry Lee Smith and Phil Early. He is now celebrating with his parents, Clyde and Grover, brothers, Nelson and David, sister Mary Alice, and many other friends and family members. Charles and Bonnie made their home Port St. Joe in 1967 when Charles accepted a position at the St. Joe Paper Company. He worked there as a shift supervisor until the mill closed in 1998. One of Charless greatest testimonies of his faith in God was exempli ed after the mill shut down permanently and he continued to live his life in such a way that demonstrated his belief in Gods promise to sustain us in all of our needs. One of Charles passions included spending time with his family. If he wasnt taking them to the beach, he was taking them to a campground, the mountains, or Disney. Charles was an active member of First Baptist Church, serving as usher, bus driver for Sunday School trips, and cooking at the monthly Mens Fellowship Breakfast. He loved being fed with Gods Word, fellowship, and worship. From 2007-2011 Charles served as City Commissioner. Charles lived his life serving the needs of others rst; as a commissioner, this passion guided him in all ethical decisions and ideas to better the community he loved. Charles was instrumental in having several structures built for the community members. There will be a Dedication Ceremony on May 31 to name the Holly Hill Cemetery Pavilion in his memory. Charles had a strong determination to stay active and loved working at St. Joe Rent-All. The family invited all friends and family to come celebrate Charles life and share in remembrance of countless good times. There was an open visitation from 1-2 p.m. ET and a life celebration service at 2 p.m. on May 14, 2013 E.S.T at the First Baptist Church, Port St. Joe. The family would like to thank all the friends and family members who have shown kind acts during these past few months, the EMT, nurses, doctors, Comforter Funeral Home, the staff of The Tommy Hamm Cancer Center, and Covenant Hospice. Memorial donations may be made to First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, The American Cancer Society, or Covenant Hospice. The LORD is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer; my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. Psalm 18:2. Charles Howard Stephens Sr. CHARLES STEPHENS SR. Memorial services for Clyde Whitehead of Port Saint Joe will be in the pavilion at Holly Hill Cemetery at 11 a.m. ET on Saturday, May 18, 2013. Clyde Whitehead OBITUARIES Tips for experiencing a satisfying life presented at Lifetree Caf Special to The Star How to experience a full and satisfying life will be explored at Lifetree Caf at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, May 20. The program, How to Live Before You Die: Embracing Life to the Fullest, features an exclusive lmed interview with Sasha Vukelja, who as a young girl escaped from communist Yugoslavia and emigrated to the United States. Vukelja, now an oncologist, tells how she works with patients facing an uncertain future to nd hope and a positive attitude. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 Highway 98, Mexico Beach FL 32456 across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. @ PSJ_Star FOLLOW US ON TWITTER FISH FRY, YARD SALE AT FUMC First United Methodist Churchs Youth and Children Ministries will hold a yard sale/ sh fry under the sails on Friday. Proceeds will go toward summer camps and mission trips. Find hidden treasures and leave with a delicious lunch. For $8 you will get fresh local sh provided by Greg Abrams Tarpon Dock, baked beans, cole slaw and bread. COMMUNITY CHOIR AT PHILADELPHIA PRIMITIVE North Port St. Joe Community Choir will have a program on Saturday at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church. The performance will begin at 6 p.m. ET, and the guest speaker will be CoPastor Bell of Panama City. BLOOD DRIVE AT FIRST BAPTIST First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe will hold a Blood Drive from 1-6 p.m. ET on Monday at the church. All donors will receive a special Military Appreciation T-shirt. If online signup is available, make an appointment at www.fbsdonor.org and use account G7016. CHILDREN AND YOUTH DAY AT PHILADELPHIA PRIMITIVE Children and Youth Day will be celebrated at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on May 27. This years theme is Being Prepared By God. The speaker for this 11 a.m. ET worship hour will be Master Therron Smith, Jr. T.J. is a dynamic third-grader and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Therron Smith Sr., and they attend Faith Bible Church in Port St. Joe. Pastor Hawkins and Philadelphias Youth Group cordially invites everyone to come and be a part of this great experience. The church is on Avenue D. Faith BRIEFS

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GULF COUNTY CURRENTS 4514455 4514457 ( $ ( $ ' & # PUB LI C N O TI CE A Pu b li c H e a rin g w i l l b e he l d a t the P l a nnin g a nd D e v e l o p me n t R e v i e w B o a r d (P D RB) me e t in g o n M o nd a y M a y 20 2013 a t 8:45 a.m. ES T a nd a t the B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmiss i o ne rs (B O C C) me e t in g o n T u es d a y M a y 28, 2013 a t 9:00 a.m. ES T B o th p u b li c he a rin gs w i l l b e he l d in the B O C C M e e t in g R o o m a t the R o b e r t M. M o o r e A dminis t r a t i o n B ui l din g, 1000 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B lv d ., P o r t S t J o e F l o ri d a. e p u b li c he a rin gs w i l l b e t o dis c uss a nd ac t o n the f o l l o w in g: 1. A p p r o va l o f M in u t es 2. V a r i a n ce T er r y C o l w e l l et a l f o r P a r ce l ID #03806-019R L o c a t e d in S e c t io n 31, T o w n s hi p 6 S o u t h, R a n g e 11 W es t, G u lf C o un t y Flo r id a R o ad s etb ac k en cr o ac hm en t d ue t o C C CL r es u l t in g in a 10.71' s etb ac k. 3. V a r i a n ce T r en t & M a r lin e V a n D y k e P a r ce l ID # 03903-000R L o c a t e d in S e c t io n 5, T o w n s hi p 7 S o u t h, R a n g e 11 W es t, G u lf C o un t y Flo r id a R o ad s etb ac k en cr o ac hm en t a n d S o u t h er n p r o p er t y s etb ac k. 4. S m a l l S c a le L a n d U s e A m en dm en t W a n d a B r o w n D a v i s P a r ce l ID #02949-000R L o c a t e d in S e c t io n 11, T o w n s hi p 7 S o u t h, R a n g e 10 W es t, G u lf C o un t y Flo r id a C h a n g in g a p p r o xim a t e l y 1.22 acr es f r o m R esiden t i a l t o M ix e d C o mm er ci a l/R esiden t i a l 5. R e v i sio n s t o t h e C o un t y D e v e lo p m en t R egu l a t io n s a n d P o licies (LD R) 6. S t a Pu b lic a n d O p en Di s c u s sio n e p u b lic i s en co ura g e d t o a t t en d a n d b e h e a r d o n t h es e m a t t er s. I nf o r m a t io n p r io r t o t h e m e et in g c a n b e v ie w e d a t t h e P l a nnin g D ep a r t m en t a t 1000 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B l v d ., R o o m 311. (2013.59) School News The Star| B5 Thursday, May 16, 2013 It is remarkable to earn perfect attendance and the Parker children are siblings. Back row from left, Sam Parker, Blake Lynn and Laurel Parker. Front row from left, Zion Parker and Hannah Watts. Those who only missed one day are Andrew Simmons and Bray Gavrun, pictured at left. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Third-grade students from Wewahitchka Elementary School recently had a eld trip to the St. Joseph Peninsular State Park. While there they learned about the intertidal salt ats and the Gulf dune system. The rangers prepared touch tanks with many animals for the students to observe and experience. The students experienced a truly great eld trip. Thank you to Mr. Knapke, the park manager, Ranger LeAnn, Ranger Kathy and Ranger Joe for all the hard work making this trip possible. Serenity Davidson, Avery Davis, Caleb Carter, Jasmine Lister, Sierra Kirkland, Alex Baldwin, Cody Pickron, Jordan Pippin, Joshua Rafeld, Ava Kelsoe, McKaylah Harrison, Hayden McDaniel, Laurel Parker, Taylor Roberts, Zeth Hanlon, Chloe Fuller, Izavion Hellum, Terrell Womack, Sarah Bailey, Mikey Roberts, Jonathan Harvey, Shiloh Jamerson, Breanna Weathers, Jasmine Causey, Hallie Vann, James Jensen and Matthew Randig. S pecial to TT HE STAR The president, board of trustees, faculty and staff of Florida A&M University announced the graduation of Princess Royce A. Likely with the degree of master of science in Health Care Administration on Saturday, May 4 in the Lawson Center in Tallahassee. Princess is a 2001 graduate of Port St. Joe High School. She is the daughter of Ray and Minnie Likely and the mother of Jakari Sims of Port St. Joe. LIKELY GRADUATEsS FROM FAMUFAMU PERFECT ATTENDANCE AT WEWAHITCHKA ELEMENTARY sS CHOOL WEWAHITCHKA ELEMENTARY sS CHOOL sS TUDENT sS OF THE MONTH SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR As of Monday, May 13, Wewahitchka Elementary School third-grade teachers Mr. John Huft and Ms. Alisa Burnette are proud to present their students who have completed FCAT Explorer Third Grade Galactic Library! First row, from left: Alex Williams, Katie Shealy, Zeth Hanlon, Lilly Dennson, Josh Kemp, Jaiyden Scruggs, Chelsi Sorenson, Kaylee Easter. Second row, from left: Briceson Davis, Caden Wooten, Wesley Hunt, Destiny Palmer, Taylor Roberts, Lee Holton, Blake Hightower. Matt Hall is not pictured. THE GREATEsS T FIELD TRIP EVER THIRD GRADE GALACTIC LIBRARY

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T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 T r a d e s & S er v i c e s Ž CALL T OD A Y! 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 From A to Z 850-340-0756 Gr eg’ s Handyman Ser vice & Lawn Maintenance C heck out m y w ork on F acebook! JOE’S LA WN CARE IF IT ’ S IN Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT FULL L A WN SER VICES TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL ALSO CLEAN GUT TERS AND IRRIG A TION INSTILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL JOES L A WN Y AHOO C OM GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Ž GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Local B6 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 This Cadillac underwent extensive modication to its wheels, axles, steering and braking systems to give it a new life as a “rail car”. This rail car was used to inspect track, perform errands and transport VIP’s along the Apalachicola Northern rail system. Trivia ANSWER seven minutes. “But it is also part of your daily habits, what you should be doing for a public transportation organiza tion like ours.” In each category there is also a 25-question written exam and drivers also must be able to prop erly secure a wheelchair to van for transport in seven minutes — from greeting the rider, asking questions about their destination to securing the wheelchair. The driving test in the Van Cat egory is no less intense. “The most pressure is once you get out on the course and it is going through your mind everything you need to remember,” Aylmer said. There is a course of tennis balls and cones on which the driver must navigate the wheels of the van be tween the tennis balls — no farther apart than inches — while ensur ing no cones are touched. “Everything has to be precise,” Aylmer said. The driver also must perform a passenger stop, ensuring proper distance from the curb and practic ing the best hospitality in greeting and boarding the passenger. There also are cones shaped in a ‘V’ which drivers must enter driving 20 mph while ensuring they have remained clear of every cone. “This is basically what you do every day,” Aylmer said. “It is what you should strive to do every day.” And as Aylmer provides an ex ample for his fellow drivers at Gulf Transportation, he also has built a reputation among the many con testants at the Florida Paratransit Roadeo. “One lady had a question and she said she’d go ask the expert, which she said was me,” Alymer said. “I am no expert, but they have come to know about me down south.” A wall of plaques at Gulf Trans portation serves as a reminder of why. ROADEO from page B1 Locals and out-of-town visitors who originally came for the music festival crowd ed the porch area of the lounge and enjoyed some of their favorite tunes from the ’60s and ’70s. Even after be ing rained out once, The Vil lagers took the stage a sec ond time and played another set much to the delight of the crowd. It seemed that Mother Nature couldn’t stop the mu sic after all. Only seven weeks out from the kickoff of the cen tennial events, the fundrais er was expected to bring in much-needed funds for the planned activities which in clude a parade, a light show and the annual reworks display. Funds are currently be ing raised through the sale of the commemorative centen nial coins and PSJ T-shirts with a sh fry currently be ing planned. VILLAGERS from page B1 As summer approaches, the preparation and care you’ve given your vegetable garden will really be put to the test. We say this because insect problems at this time of year can be quite serious. Summer in our area of the state provides the heat and humidity on which insects thrive. Without adequate control, pests can destroy your garden. Very soon, all the time and effort you’ve put into your garden should begin to pay off in delicious fresh vegetables that is, if you can’t get to your crops before the insect do. All the care you’ve given your vegetable garden up till now will be meaningless if insects are allowed to rob you of your harvest. We’ll talk about the most common and bothersome bugs you may nd on your vegetables. We’ll offer some advice on their control. My information on controlling garden insects was provided by Susan E. Webb, associate professor, Entomology and Nematology, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, University of Florida. The insects you need to worry about in the weeks ahead are divided into two broad categories, those which live and do their damage above ground and those which live in the soil and bother the roots and lower stem of vegetables. The most common above ground pests include leaf miners, armyworms, spider mites, ea beetles aphids, whitey leaf footed plant bug, bean leaf rollers and stinkbugs. Cutworms, wireworms and mole crickets top the list of below ground villains. Leaf miners seem to cause the greatest damage on tomato and cucumber plants. They’re called leaf miners because they burrow in between the transparent membranes on the top and bottom surfaces of the leaves as they feed. They eat the living plant tissue, leaving the membranes, which then look like tiny window panes. The army worm you’ll nd in your garden are the same as those you’re probably all too familiar with in your lawn. They feed on plant foliage and attack a variety of crops. Spider mites aren’t really insects. In fact, as the name suggest, they’re actually more closely related to spiders. They’re tine pests usually no more than a ftieth of an inch long. They gather on the undersides of plant leaves, and feed by piercing the leaves with their needle-like mouthparts and sucking out the plant juices. Aphids – sometimes called plant lice also causes damage by piercing leaf tissue and sucking out the plant juices. Flea beetles are chewing insects which cause damage by chewing small holes in vegetables leaves. Bean leaf rollers – The bean leaf roller feeds on members of the bean family. The adult, a skipper buttery, deposits eggs on the lower leaf surface, either singly or in cluster of 2 to 6. The caterpillar cut triangles or semicircles from the edges of the plant leaf and fold them over to make individual shelters, only at night to feed. Flea beetle – are tiny (1/16 inch long) bronze, black or brown beetles which attack young tomato plants, peppers, egg plants and other garden plants. They can jump rapidly for great distances when approached and they resemble large “eas” in appearance and habit. Leaf footed plant bugs – gets its name from the appearance of its hind legs which are large and attened in a leaf-like shape near the feet it is generally dark or chestnut brown with a cross bar about halfway down its body. Whitey – the most common whitey found on Florida vegetables is called the sliver leaf whitey because of the effect its feeding has on squash leaves. Feeding by the immature stages or nymphs can also result in white areas in tomato fruits, streaking of pepper fruit, and blanching of broccoli stems. Whiteies are not ies, but distant relatives of aphids and leaf hoppers and like them, feed on plant sap with piercing-sucking mouthparts. Stinkbugs – are common pests of most all plants and are generally solitary feeders in the adult stage. Immature nymphs, which do not y, may be found in groups. All stinkbugs give off a characteristic foul smell as a defensive weapon when disturbed. All this may sound discouraging. But, fortunately, it’s actually fairly easy and inexpensive to control your local County Extension Ofce or Garden Center for recommended insecticides to control foliage feeding pests. The insects which live in the soil are a different matter, because it’s hard to reach them with sprays. Cutworms simply cut young vegetable plants off at the soil surface. Mole crickets tunnel through the soil in the root zone, feeding on the roots and disturbing the surrounding earth. Wireworms attack a wide variety of vegetables. Living deep in the soil, they move up quickly to attack seeds or young plants. Wireworms drill holes in the seeds and feed inside them or they bore into the taproot of the plant. Insects in this category are best controlled with insecticide baits, which are normally available at garden centers. One thing we don’t want to do is encourage you to use pesticides if you really don’t need to. While a preventative spray program might be essential in a large scale commercial operation, you usually can deal with insects in the backyard garden on an “as needed” basis. For more information on garden insects contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf.ifas.u. edu or www.edis.ifas.u. edu and see Publication ENY 476 and ENY 012. Don’t allow garden insects to rob you of produce ROY L eeEE C arAR T erER County extension director College basketball Coach Cliff Ellis crooned to the crowd. W es ES LL OCHer ER | The Star KIDS WIN from page B1 Trophies were given out for the biggest sh and most sh caught within each division. The “Small Fry” division featured kids aged 3 to 8 and the “Junior” class was for children 9 to 16. The contest was limited to in-shore, near-shore, Intracostal waterway shing and contestants could be no further than three miles from shore. Fishing could take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. “It was an excel lent turnout,” said Rick Carrie, President of the Kids Win Foundation. “Everybody had a great time.”

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, May 16, 2013 The Star | B7 90948S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232007CA 000446CAXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-2, Plaintiff, v. RICHARD LEE MULLINAX A/K/A RICHARD L. MULLINAX A/K/A RICHARD MULLINAX; PATRICIA KELLY MULLINAX A/K/A PATRICIA KELLY A/K/A PATRICIA E. KELLY A/K/A PATRICIA MULLINAX; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 14, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 232007CA000446CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 23rd day of May, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL 1: COMMENCE AT A 6” SQUARE ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 412.59 FEET ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED); THENCE GO SOUTH 34 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 462.14 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 418.55 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 350.59 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 321.17 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF FIELDSTONE LANE (HAVING A 66 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 282.76 FEET TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LONG MEADOW DRIVE (HAVING A 66 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO NORTH 10 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 339.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL CONTAINING 2.41 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ALSO PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH SQUARE ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NW CORNER OF THE NE OF THE SE OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12’ 35” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 412.59 FEET ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NE OF THE SE (AS MONUMENTED); THENCE GO SOUTH 34 DEGREES 55’ 28” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 349.12 FOR THE POB; THENCE GO SOUTH 55 DEGREES 04’ 32” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 19.97 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 34 DEGREES 55’ 28” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 285.02 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12’ 35” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 194.44 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47’ 25” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 728.36 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 12’ 35” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 350.59 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 10 DEGREES 45’ 00” WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 418.56 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 34 DEGREES 55’28” EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 113.02 FEET; TO THE POB. SAID PARCEL CONTAINING 5.95 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1990 MERITT LIVESTOCK, TRIPLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME VIN# HMLCP40023885930A, HMLCP40023885930B, AND HMLCP40023885930C. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration Gulf County P.O. Box 826 Marianna, FL 32447 Phone: (850)718-0026 DATED AT PORT SAINT JOE, FLORIDA THIS 26TH DAY OF APRIL, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BA BAXTER DEPUTY CLERK May 9, 16, 2013 93425S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for Janitorial Supplies. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850-2298369 May 9, 16, 2013 91038S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of L.A. LOFT, located at 133 E. Church Ave., in the County of Gulf, in the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, 32465 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Wewahitchka, Florida, this 6th day of May, 2013. Lee Ann Bennett May 16, 2013 93463S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2011-CA-000394 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Roper a/k/a Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft, Husband and Wife Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated April 25, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA000394 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Roper a/k/a Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Rebecca L. Norris, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DESK OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. ET on May 30th, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 9, BLOCK “I”, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17’24”E. ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE, RUN S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. ALONG THE SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N, 62 DEGREES 20’46’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 85 DEGREES 19’08’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.35 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 439.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID CORN GRIFFIN STREET; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59’26”E. ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A NONTANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 17 DEGREES 21’10”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 82 DEGREES 46’56”E. FOR 53.40 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE A, ARC DISTANCE OF 53.61 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 403.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORN PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36 RUNNING THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26’W. ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N, 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 00 DEGREES 00’34’W, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY, AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 75 DEGREES 40’09”E. 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 92 DEGREES 07’41 “, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 30’55”E. 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE, THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 00’34”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 59’26”E. 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF I SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17’24”E. ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 59’26”W. 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF “TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 00’34”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 93 DEGREES 00’26”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 57’18”W. 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 84 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40’50”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 75 DEGREES 40’09”W. 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 56 DEGREES 19’45”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 81 DEGREES 11’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 08 DEGREES 34’29”W. 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 81 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 00’00”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N, 61 DEGREES 18’02”E. 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 41 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 65 DEGREES 38’59”E. 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42’03”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 45 DEGREES 38’58”E. 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18’02”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00’00”W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02’W. FOR DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42’04”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 45 DEGREES 38’58”W. 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 48 DEGREES 41’59”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 65 DEGREES 38’59”W. 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 41 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 40’40”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 61 DEGREES 18’02”W. 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 81 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE N. 42 DEGREES 54’14”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49’51”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 25 DEGREES 59’18”E. 122.20 FEET;THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 09 DEGREES 04’22”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 55’37”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.06 DEGREES 20’44”W. 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00’00”W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 18’47”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 07 DEGREES 45’39”E. 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE S. 09 DEGREES 04’22”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49’52”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 25 DEGREES 59’18”W. 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 42 DEGREES 54’14’W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 85 DEGREES 44’46”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 06 DEGREES 46’55”E., 561.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE S. 57 DEGREES 15’51 “W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DE-SAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A’ CENTRAL ANGLE OF 286 DEGREES 15’35”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 32 DEGREES 44’09”E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC; THENCE N. 57 DEGREES 15’51 “E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19’45”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59’26”W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50’38”, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 00 DEGREES 00’34’E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18’02”W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59’26”E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER TH SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order) to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted by: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE’, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-201433 FC01 CHE May 9, 16, 2013 93429S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850-2271204. Items that are up for bid. Tires/Tubes, Bid #14-002 Gas/Diesel/Oil, Bid #14-004 Seat Covers, Bid #14-003 May 9, 16, 2013 93431S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting extermination/ pest control bids for Gulf School District Facilities. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road or faxed by calling 850229-8369. May 9, 16, 2013 93467S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23 2009 CA 000503 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HALO 2007-2, Plaintiff, vs. DIANE M. ZIMMERMAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 06, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23 2009 CA 000503 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET LOAN OBLIGATION TRUST 2007-2, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-21, is the Plaintiff and DIANE M. ZIMMERMAN; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 30th day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THAT CERTAIN TRACT, PARCEL OR PLOT OF LAND LYING WESTERLY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98) IMMEDIATELY IN FRONT OF AND ACROSS THE, RIGHT WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 30 AND GULF STREET IN YON’S ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, FLORIDA, AS IF THE NORTH AND SOUTH BOUNDARY LINES OF GULF STREET WERE EXTENDED TO THE SEASHORE WESTERLY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98), AND BEING A STRIP OR PARCEL OF LAND 70 FEET IN WIDTH AND EXTENDING FROM THE RIGHT WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 30 TO THE HIGH WATER MARK OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, AND INCLUDING RIPARIAN RIGHTS; THE LOT BEING UNNUMBERED LOT DELINEATED ON THE MAP OF YON’S ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 6801 HWY 98 SJB, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on April 30, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F09087960 May 9, 16, 2013 93465S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 13-27 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of ALBERT J. FLEISCHMANN, JR., also Known as ALBERT J. FLEISCHMANN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of ALBERT J. FLEISCHMANN, JR., deceased, File Number 13-27 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 9, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Nikola Fleischmann NIKOLA FLEISCHMANN 247 Selma Street Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON FL Bar No. 0350583 RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 Sailor’s Cove Dr. P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 229-8211 May 9, 16, 2013 93555S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-29 CA Division: PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: All persons claiming by, through, under, or against Defendant, Gulf Supply Company of Port St. Joe, Inc. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage lien on real property and a security interest lien on personal property located in Gulf County, Florida described as follows: Real Property Lot 3, of Port St. Joe,

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B8 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4514621 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE,FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www.rsttness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW2 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT .............................. $550 3 BR / 2 BAMOBILEHOME .......... $700 1 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT, INCLUDESUTILITIES .................. $650 2 BR/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME WITHPOOL ............................... $850 OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1 500 SQ. FT 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY98 FRONTAGE ......... $650 4514614 Dockside Caf & Raw Bar @ PSJ Marina **Seasonal Bonus Top Pay!**NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: € Kitchen Managers/Cooks € Bartenders/Managers € Servers/Bussers € Shuckers € Dishwashers APPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com BARTENDER / THERAPIST NEEDEDThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWPPort Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 NOW HIRINGPARTTIME EVENING COOKThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time evening cook. The ideal candidate will have kitchen experience, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED The MainStay Suites and Port Inn are now accepting applications for housekeepers. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe Fl, 32456 4514568 Apalachicola Bay Charter School THE APALACHICOLA BAY CHARTER SCHOOL IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR 201314 SCHOOL YEAR: € Certied Elementary Education Teachers € Physical Education Teacher € Preschool Teacher ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 2090916 HIRING WEEK $8.25 Hr. with open availability Port St. Joe McDonald’s Come join our team!!! We offer part or full time positions with opportunities for advancement! Open Interviews May 20-23 from 2-4 pm at the Port St. Joe Location Apply online at www.costamcd.com2090916 1109836 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions. We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benet package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCEon Tuesdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions. ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW Commerce Park Phase II, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, at Page(s) 54 and 55 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. P ersonal Property Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. All replacements and additions. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Thomas S. Gibson, of Rish, Gibson & Scholz, P.A., the Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P. O. Box 39, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32457, on or before June 10, 2013, 2013 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this the 6th day of May, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court By: /s/ BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 16, 23, 2013 93595S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on June 6, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: SEE EXHIBIT “A” ATTACHED HERETO “EXHIBIT A” Real Property TRACT 4: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 6 FOR 1842.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 30-E; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 335.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 149.69 FEET; THENCE NORTH 3809’06” EAST, FOR 513.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER’S EDGE OF ST. JOSEPH BAY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATER’S EDGE FOR 100.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS NORTH 3809’06” EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 3809’06” WEST, FOR 595.4 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND TRACT 5: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 6 FOR 1842.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 30E; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 185.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 149.69 FEET; THENCE NORTH 3809’06” EAST, FOR 595.4 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER’S EDGE OF ST. JOSEPH BAY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATER’S EDGE FOR 100.02 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS NORTH 3809’06” EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 3809’06” WEST, FOR 676.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND TRACT 6: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 6 FOR 1842.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 30-E; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 33.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 0004’21” EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 152.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 3809’06” EAST, FOR 676.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER’S EDGE OF ST. JOSEPH BAY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATER’S EDGE FOR 100.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS NORTH 3801’11” EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 3801’11” WEST, FOR 760.3 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS (A, B AND C): PARCEL A: A parcel or tract of land lying and being in Fractional Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of said Fractional Section 6 and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary line of said Section 6, for a distance of 1842.81 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, continue North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along said West boundary line, for a distance of 31.65 feet; thence leaving said West line run North 38 degrees 01 minutes 28 seconds East, for a distance of 339.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, said Point of Beginning also being on a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Northwesterly along said curve with a radius of 197.14 feet, through a central angle of 27 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds, for an arc distance of 93.62 feet (chord of said arc being North 09 degrees 30 minutes 27 seconds West, 92.74 feet); thence North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 395.39 feet to a point on the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, located at elevation 0.89 feet NAVD 1988; thence Southeasterly along said mean high water line as follows: South 27 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East, for a distance of 33.91 feet; thence South 51 degrees 56 minutes 16 seconds East, for a distance of 37.48 feet; thence leaving said mean high water line run South 38 degrees 01 minutes 28 seconds West, for a distance of 444.19 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with a Private Road Easement as recorded in Official Records Book 134, Pages 625 through 627, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL B: A parcel or tract of land lying and being in Fractional Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence of the Southwest corner of said Fractional Section 6 and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East along the West boundary line of said Section 6 for a distance of 1842.81 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, continue North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along said West boundary line, for a distance of 142.83 feet; thence leaving said West line run North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 314.48 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, said Point of Beginning also being on a curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northwesterly along said curve with a radius of 120.00 feet, through a central angle of 32 degrees 52 minutes 15 seconds, for an arc distance of 68.84 feet (chord of said arc being North 12 degrees 20 minutes 17 seconds West, 67.90 feet); thence North 28 degrees 46 minutes 25 seconds West, for a distance of 17.61 feet; thence North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 369.17 feet to a point on the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, located at elevation 0.89 feet NAVD 1988; thence Southeasterly along said mean high water line as follows: South 45 degrees 33 minutes 54 seconds East, for a distance of 19.47 feet; thence South 27 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East, for a distance of 53.78 feet; thence leaving said mean high water line run South 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds West, for a distance of 395.39 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with a Private Road Easement as recorded in Official Records Book 134, Pages 625 through 627, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL C: A parcel or tract of land lying and being in Fractional Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of said Fractional Section 6 and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary line of said Section 6, for a distance of 1842.81 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, continue North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along said West boundary line, for a distance of 254.19 feet; thence leaving said West line, proceed North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 276.93 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 369.17 feet to a point on the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, located at elevation 0.89 feet NAVD 1988; thence Northwesterly along said mean high water line as follows: thence North 45 degrees 33 minutes 54 seconds West, for a distance of 16.68 feet; thence North 31 degrees 50 minutes 28 seconds West, for a distance of 48.72 feet; thence North 13 degrees 58 minutes 21 seconds West, for a distance of 34.51 feet; thence leaving said mean high water line, proceed South 38 degrees 09 minutes 06 seconds West, for a distance of 237.47 feet; thence South 21 degrees 18 minutes 58 seconds East, for a distance of 30.68 feet; thence South 38 degrees 09 minutes 06 seconds West, for a distance of 128.52 feet; thence South 28 degrees 46 minutes 25 seconds East, for a distance of 60.69 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a Private Road Easement as recorded in Official Records Book 134, Pages 625 through 627, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. P ersonal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future be part of the Real Property. Any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Real Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure upon Default entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM J. RISH, JR.; HEATHER ILENE THOMPSON JONES; BANKTRUST; PROSPERITY BANK, Defendant. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000240 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 (850) 434-9200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 7th day of May, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 16, 23, 2013 93647S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BID #1213-14 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive proposals from any company or corporation interested and qualified in providing the following: St. Joseph Bay Seagrass Protection Signage RFP specifications can be accessed at www. gulfcounty-fl.gov or at the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain Fred’s Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Responses to this RFP must be delivered to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 by Friday, May 31, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. E.T. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, June 3, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. E.T. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED RFP and include the BID NUMBER. The GCTDC is seeking proposals from fully established and qualified consulting firms that can partner with the GCTDC in developing, implementing and monitoring an educational signage program for seagrass protection in St. Joseph Bay. In response to this RFP, qualified firms are invited to submit proposals that include: Detailed description of proposed approach to project with costs regarding development, implementation and monitoring of Seagrass Protection Signage program. Project schedule/ timeline. Case studies/ examples (2-3) of similar successful projects including approach, implementation and status. Case studies should also provide clear examples of your experience working with other Governmental entities to obtain permitting. Biography/ professional experience of your firm and the qualifications of the leadership team to be assigned. Assurance that your firm is familiar with Gulf County, Florida, St. Joseph Bay, and the issues related to seagrass protection and our natural environment. List of clients who have retained your firm to develop similar programs. References. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to GCTDC Executive Director Jennifer Jenkins at 850229-7800 or Jennifer@ visitgulf.com. May 16, 23, 2013 Port St. Joe 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Friday May 17, 3pm-8pm Large Family Yard SaleToo much to list! Text FL52163 to 56654 PSJ Beach : 7199 W Hwy 98, Fri & Sat, May 17th & 18th, 8am til 4pm LOOK Yard Sale!Years of accumilated items! Everything you could imagine and more! Hunting Lease Renewal Need two members. near Port St. Joe. 2000 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $410-$510/ yr. Call John 850-227-5052 Food Svs/HospitalityBartender / Therapist Needed The Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook Needed The Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HospitalityHousekeeping Part Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairLine Technician TraineeGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for two positions of Line Tech Trainee at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, May 24, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34251839 Text FL51839 to 56654 LOW INTEREST FINANCING Borrow up to $20K, pay $386/month. 8 % interest 6 year term. Personal and Small Business loans, debt consolodiation, bad credit ok. Call 888-994-0029 2 bedroom apt.; close to town; Dogwood Terrace Apartments; 808 Woodward Ave, Port St. Joe; (850) 227-7800 For Rent Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Long Term RentalsLong Term Rentals available in Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach, and Port St Joe, 1, 2, & 3Br, Call 850-348-0262 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot -LG yard. W/D incl $550/mo + dep. 301-265-5368 or 301-437-7904 WEWA Efficiancey. $390 per month plus $390 Security deposit. Call (850) 639-5721 Wewa: 2Br/1Ba with heat & A/C, $400mo + $400 sec dep, RV for RENT $135 a week + Dep, includes everything, 639-5721 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition ABS brakes, Reinhart pipes, two seats, cover, two helmets, charger, extra chrome, two windshields and more. Always garage kept, less than 10,000 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $16,500 NADA suggestedretail is $16,000 850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 31 Thursday, MAY 16, 2013Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5Letters to the Editor . . . . . . .A5Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A9School News . . . . . . . . B3, B5Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-8County considers recycling programAlso mandatory garbage pickupBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Two weeks after hearing the extent to which taxpayers are underwriting the losses at Five Points Land ll the Board of County Commissioners debated issues of recycling and mandatory garbage pickup for county residents. Commissioners decided to hold off any vote for two weeks, but sentiment is moving in the direction of alleviating the hundreds of thousands the county loses each year at the land ll. Commissioner Warren Yeager pushed for a pilot recycling program for South Gulf County and asked commissioners to support funding the program at a maximum of $6,000 for the remainder of the scal year with an eye toward expanding the program in the next scal cycle. The pilot project would not be mandatory, but would be the opportunity to put in place a recycling program that many locals and visitors want. During a Tourist Development Council advisory board meeting, it was noted that a number of visitors arrive from places where recycling is mandatory and a fact of life. I think this is the right thing to do for the community, Yeager said. The pilot project proposal would be to establish the bins at Salinas Park on Cape San Blas. The area would be open to all residents, but the pilot program targets the Cape and St. Joseph Peninsula due to solid waste issues during tourist seasons. Paper, cardboard, glass and plastic would be recycled. I have a problem spending tax dollars on that recycling, said Commissioner Carmen McLemore. Yeager added that for a recycling program to truly work and the city of Port St. Joe and county have each experienced failure with such programs in the past the county should move to mandatory garbage pickup. At the end of the day the way recycling will work will depend on mandatory garbage pickup, Yeager said. And we could include yard debris. I think thats the direction the county needs to go. Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson said during last weeks TDC meeting that the city should join the county in pushing recycling as well as mandatory garbage pickup. Yeager said that the county needs to examine how to assist the elderly and those on xed incomes to handle the new garbage bill, but as part of ending the bleeding from the land ll the county will be forced to consider mandatory pickup.See RECYCLING A10Patterson reelected; Thursbay wins PSJ Group IBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Bo Patterson and William Thursbay each noted the work that went into Tuesdays Port St. Joe municipal election. For the two, the effort paid off. Patterson easily won a second two-year term as the Group II commissioner with a win over political newcomer Eddie Fields. Thursbay, also making his rst foray into the political arena, beat fellow newcomer David Ashbrook to win the Group I seat being vacated by rst-term Commissioner Bill Kennedy. Results are unof cial until the canvassing board meets Wednesday. There were three provisional ballots to be counted, though they will not impact either race. Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon predicted a turnout of 32-33 percent. By poll closing, 35 percent of the citys registered voters had cast ballots. Patterson saw a lead built by early voting and absentee ballots hold up after the precinct count; Thursbay came from 27 votes down with precinct numbers. Thursbay garnered 55 percent of the vote, 474 votes, to Ashbrooks 45 percent, or 382 votes. Ashbrook immediately shook Thursbays hand and congratulated him on working his rear end off. I worked hard and it paid off, Thursbay said. The people of Port St. Joe are great people. Without my family I could not have done this. Patterson had a healthy lead, over 70 percent of the vote, after the early and absentee votes were counted, a lead that only barely narrowed with the nal numbers. Patterson took 589 votes, or 68 percent, compared to 272 votes, or 32 percent for Fields. I am very happy with the results, Patterson said. It was a tough race. I worked the early votes hard and I knocked on doors. I worked hard and I am very proud of the results. The only remaining seat up for balloting this year was that held by Mayor Mel Magidson who, after being unopposed, was able to observe Tuesdays outcome without worrying about numbers. I just thank everybody who gave me an opportunity again, said Magidson, who earned his fourth term. I appreciate the grati cation of people with what we have been doing. Six years and I think we are heading in the right direction. Bed tax revenue rising, TDC approves special grant fundingBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Bed tax revenue? Up. Welcome Center visitors? Up. Visitors to the Gulf County Tourist Development Council website? Up. The trends are spiking as TDC director Jennifer Jenkins nears her one-year anniversary in Gulf County and the TDC advisory council last week heard about progress made and opportunities ahead. Everything is good, going quite well, Jenkins said while outlining the bed tax revenue for the rst six months of the scal year was more than $30,000 ahead of the prior year. Jenkins said that visitors to the Welcome Center, with hours extended in the past month, have risen by roughly 70 percent. We are seeing a lot more people, she told her board. The board took action on one of Jenkins major overhauls this year, a new rubric and award structure for special event funding from the TDC. In past years, the special event funding has been something of a grab bag, but this year the concentration is on return on investment how many heads to By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Fifth-graders at Wewahitchka Elementary School enjoyed a feast of large and healthy proportions during a luncheon to celebrate the end of the From Seed to Plate program which taught them how to grow and maintain a vegetable garden. The food served at the luncheon, which was prepared by Marie L. Jones, was the fruits of the students labor. Everything the students munched on came from the garden they spent eight months maintaining and cultivating. Though summer will soon arrive for the students, they end the school year with these specialized skills thanks to Gulf County Extension Director Roy Lee Carter. Now in its third year at Wewahitchka Elementary, the From Seed to Plate Program sprouted about 15 years ago from an idea nurtured by the Port St. Joe Garden Club. After proposing the program, the club received a grant from DuPont, a national corporation dedicated to driving innovation in science and sustainability, and launched From Seed to Plate at Port St. Joe Elementary. It has since expanded to all schools in Gulf County including Faith Christian. The garden itself is located across the street from the school on a plot of land owned by Charles Cleckley. Fifth-graders enjoy garden partySee BED TAX A10PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarFifth graders lined up to enjoy the sweet taste of success during the From Seed to Plate luncheon. Students Case Johnson, Lavender Abdulla, Meshach Jackson and Cyrina Jackson displayed the potatoes they grew in the Wewahitchka garden. See GARDEN A10Kids Win Fishing, B1 BO PATTERSON WILLIAM THURSBAY

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 ONCEAGAIN RESERVEYOURBUTTSAT WWW.SGCFIRE.COM BUTTSMAYBEAVAILABLEFOR DRIVE-BYPICKUP,BUTTOBESURETO GETONE,PLEASERESERVEONLINE! GAINCE ANO ServingCapeSans,SimmonsBayou, JonesHomestead,MoneyBayou andIndianPass"ToserveourcommunityandthosearounduswithFire&Rescueprotection"NEIGHBORSHELPINGNEIGHBORS otection" e & Rescue pr ound us with Fir o serve our community and those ar "T SOUTH GULF COUNTY SOUTH GULF COUNTY SOUTH GULF COUNTY SOUTH GULF COUNTY SOUTH GULF COUNTY SOUTH GULF COUNTY TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V TMENT AR OLUNTEER FIRE DEP V By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Jacob Lacour came dressed for success last Friday. The eighth-grader at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School was in a business suit and tie, his shoes glossed, maintaining eye contact while delivering answers in a measured, thoughtful tone. And the lesson he was learning at the schools media center was about the future, about his transition beyond high school and into the adult world. It can make you pretty nervous, answering all the questions, Lacour said after his mock interview with a teacher and an upperclassman from the High School High Tech program. This was about learning how, under pressure, to get the right answers out in the right way. Lacour is not a member of the High School High Tech program, which provides a host of opportunities to students with learning challenges and an Individual Education Plan (IEP). But as a student in teacher Shirley Thompsons CAPE program, a careerskills program largely technology based, Lacour, already certied in Word and PowerPoint, was part of last weeks training in interviewing for students in the High School High Tech program. The interviewing exercise is part of the programs summer internship process which attempts to match students with workplace experience. The program is teaching me to be more of a leader and to learn about getting along with all kinds of people, said Shenoya Fennell, a junior who will continue her internship this summer with Hungry Howies. The difference between when I was a freshman in the program is growing up and really learning who you are and how to be ready for the adult world. We also learn to be leaders and not followers. The HSHT students meet twice a month with program specialist Lynn Hauck to discuss a variety of issues school and work related. They embark on eld trips to places such as the robotics lab at Tyndall Air Force Base and learn about maintaining and balancing a checkbook from a local bank manager. Throughout the year, through participation in such activities, the students earn points toward opportunities such as Career Shadowing Day, summer internships and a personal laptop. The program is funded by the Able Trust and the Dyslexia Research Institute in Tallahassee. It has taught me how to work with people and to learn how to do your job the right way even if you may not like your supervisor, said Torey Williams with a chuckle. I have learned a lot about myself and I have had a lot of fun. Williams and Fennell joined Hauck, Thompson and teacher Gloria Gant last week in the exercise in interviewing. The students received general questions they might be asked two days before the mock interview and were given tips on dress and demeanor, though not all students absorbed those lessons as well as Lacour. They didnt just show up, they had a little advance help, but they have done a pretty good job, Gant said. Working with a scoring rubric, the interviewers went through the questions, some familiar, some not, and scored each student for later coaching and counseling. It gives them work on leadership skills and the poise to work, Hauck said. We ask the students what they think they did well and we provide them with their strengths and some areas that they need to work on. It gives our kids the interaction with adults and students who have been summer interns so they can understand what skills they need to work on. The mock interviews also provide a lesson for the interviewers. It gives Shenoya an idea what kind of things she may be asked in a job interview and the students always give me ideas how to improve the interview process, said Hauck, who was teamed during the interviews with Fennell. The High School High Tech program is in need of sponsors for the summer internship program. Any business interested in participating is urged to contact Hauck at lynnhauck@ gmail.com.SETTING IT STRAIGHTLast weeks edition included a story Dolores Lowery, an artist in residence with Gulf and Franklin County schools. The Star wanted to note that the funding for this program comes from VSA Florida, the State Organization on Arts and Disability. VSA is a nonprot organization and program of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. that offers arts education and creative expression to enhance cognitive and social outcomes for people of all abilities. Interviewing for life beyond schoolCameron Pryor, left, has excelled in the High School High Tech program and the mock interviews provided another lesson for teacher Shirley Thompsons students in the CAPE program, which employs a technology skills curriculum. Photos by T T IM CROFT | The StarLynn Hauck and Shenoya Fennell interview a student on their prospects for employment and the skills they would bring to the workplace. Star Staff ReportEveryone is abuzz about the 23rd annual Tupelo Honey Festival to be held on Saturday at Lake Alice Park in Wewahitchka. Wewahitchka is home to a large section of Tupelo Honey farmers and together theyll celebrate the rare Gulf County delicacy. The community is invited and local vendors will be on-hand to serve up over 40 different treats and sweets. Enjoy a day of arts and crafts, food, live entertainment plus a petting zoo, pony rides, face painting and a mechanical bull for the kids. Sponsored in part by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, the festival will take place on May 18 at Lake Alice Park in Wewahitchka beginning at 9 a.m. CT.A sweet celebration of honey

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, May 16, 2013 AnimalHospitalofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand Spacious FacilityAlbertByas,DVM WillRosenbaum,VMD StephenCollier,DVMMon,Tues,Thurs&Fri 8:00AM-5:30PM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009 By LOIS SWOBODAHalifax Media Group A dozen talented teens went one on one with plein air artists on Wednesday and one student is already a star. Students from Wewahitchka and Port Saint Joe high schools traveled to Eastpoint on May 8 to receive hands on instruction from artists painting in the eighth annual Forgotten Coast Plein Air Invitational. One girl already has an artistic feather in her cap. Lauren Wagner of Port St. Joe High found out on Monday, May 6, that Boat in the Ocean, a watercolor she entered in the annual Congressional Art Competition has been chosen out of 20 Congressional District 2 entries to hang in the Capital Building in Washington DC for a year. Since the competition began in 1982, more than 650,000 high school students have participated in the Congressional Art Competition. Lori Hutto from Congressman Steve Southerlands ofce said Wagners will be one of over 200 paintings on display this year. In June, Wagner will travel to the nations capital with a guest on a ight provided free of charge by Southwest Airlines. Students are responsible for all other expenses on the trip. She will attend an opening reception for the art exhibit and meet Southerland. Hutto said the honored students will also participate in a workshop with professional artists. Wagner said she has been an artist from a very early age and was encouraged and gifted with art supplies by her grandmother, Karen Odum, who is a fourth grade teacher in Port St. Joe. On Wednesday, Wagner worked with Luke Buck who specializes in watercolors. Buck also mentored Caroline Rish of Port St. Joe who has worked with him for several years. Wewahitchka students participating in the workshop were Bree Scruggs who painted with Morgan Samuel Price; Alyssa Whitehurst worked with Greg Barnes; Chelsy Toney who was paired with Haidee-Jo Summer; Rebecca Holyeld with Mary Erickson and Alexa Alison with James Hempel. From Port St. Joe High School Ana Paul painted with Tracey Frugoli; Illiana Maestri studied with Katie Cundiff; Ramello Zaccaro worked with Dawn Whitelaw; Ryan Jones worked with Mitch Kolbe and Jacob Jones studied with Natalia Andreeva. Julie Hodges, who teaches art at Port St. Joe High School attended the plein air workshop. She said she thought the students were, pleasantly surprised at how well their art worked out. She added, It was a positive experience and gave them the opportunity to see real artists who are making it work as their career.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Lauren Wagner, a sophomore at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School won this years Congressional Art Competition for her watercolor painting, Boat in the Ocean. Originally painted for a classroom assignment to express Florida through paint, art teacher Julie Hodges enjoyed the vivid colors of the piece and submitted it to the competition. I was shocked, said Wagner of her win. I didnt expect it. For her win, Wagner received a free trip to Washington D.C. in June to see her painting as it hangs inside the Capitol Building. Shell take her mother as her guest for the journey. Hodges is raising money to pay for Wagners hotel stay. Though she has only lived in Port St. Joe for a year, Wagner has found much artistic inspiration in the area. She has already been commissioned to do paintings of shing boats, the George Tapper Bridge, and a local sunset over the summer months and will spend the remaining time working with local children to create art out of recycled materials. Wagner enjoys painting with acrylics and nds herself drawn to subjects that are realistic. The arts run in her family, it seems. Wagners grandmother is fourth-grade teacher Karen Odom who works at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Also an artist, Odom encouraged her granddaughter to be creative from a young age, purchasing art supplies and canvases for the budding painter. Id known Karen for years, but I didnt know they were related, said Hodges. I was able to see Laurens talent without connecting her to a family member. Hodges said that Wagner is quiet and shy but art is what really opens her up. Im not like everyone else, Wagner said. I get into my work. For Hodges, thats what its all about. Shes constantly looking for new ways to bring art into the classroom in order to expose students to as many mediums as possible. She hopes that theyll nd a form of self-expression that ignites a passion. Even though Wagner didnt feel the painting was her best work, Hodges knew it was a winner when she saw it. Its been her moment, said the teacher. Gulf students dive into art on the waterfrontJULIE HODGES | Special to The StarLauren Wagners winning painting, Boat in the Ocean.Wagner wins congressional art competition LOISLOIS SS WO O BOD OD A | Halifax Media GroupArtist Katie Cundiff, right, adopts local footwear to paint the working waterfront with Illiana Maestri of Port St. Joe High. James Hempel and Alexa Alison of Wewahitchka High left the group at the pavilion to paint a store front on the working waterfront. Artist Luke Buck is seen with Caroline Rish and Lauren Wagner on the far right, both of Port St. Joe. While most of the students worked in oils, Buck demonstrated techniques with watercolors, his own specialty.

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The other night, I started cooking dinner or thinking about cooking dinner for my son and myself. I shouldnt have, but I turned the television on and sat down in my chair and put my feet up. My dogs seemed to be happy I was sitting down. The television was still on the Hallmark Movie Channel from my early morning rendezvous with Ben Matlock (you know, Andy Grif th in the 1980s). I knew better. It was around 5 p.m., and I was watching the Hallmark channel. Men and dogs arent supposed to watch this channel. The dogs and I knew that, but we did it anyway. People who review Hallmark movies usually use words like sweet and happy. They also say things like Slow and predictable You think? Personally, I like knowing whats going to happen, especially when I know its going to be good. If a cake looks like its going to be chocolate, I want it to be chocolate not some sort squished up bananas or other fruity lling that I have to guess what it actually is, or God forbid coconut. I only eat coconut when Im mad. After watching a few Hallmark movies over the course of the past week, I come away with that song from the Country Music group Shenandoah on my mind. You know the one I Wanna be Loved like that. It talks about mamas, daddies, Natalie Wood, James Dean and promises you cant take back. Hallmark movies are actually pretty good movies to watch while cooking or thinking about cooking dinner. They all last two hours, which includes about 30 minutes of commercials usually loaded more toward the end of the movie to make you wait to see what you know is de nitely going to happen. You need to use low heat and walk back and forth to the kitchen a lot. The commercials on the Hallmark channel are also usually slow and predictable. After watching a Hallmark movie, one usually has a craving to sit in a Craftmatic bed eating Smuckers jelly out of the jar with a plastic spoon with Acne medicine on your face while lling out an application to join AARP. You feel a little guilty about eating the Smuckers right out of the jar with the plastic spoon, so you call the 800 number for Nutrisystem. In the middle of all this, you still feel good and you want to be loved like the folks in the Hallmark movie. You want everything to be alright and for this twohour period. Youd bet the mortgage that it will be. The movie I was watching was about a nice-looking lady who had gone home to spread her estranged fathers ashes per his wishes and have a couple of his feuding friends sing while she tossed the ashes up into the rural Massachusetts wind. After reading about the movie, I gured out that it was actually lmed in Canada, but it seemed more like Ireland. Everyone had Irish accents. It seems Ive heard there are a lot of Irish folks in Massachusetts. The location doesnt matter, and please dont think I didnt like this movie. I loved it. Was it hokey? You better know it was, and it made you want to be there right in the middle of it. Have you ever stood just stood and read Hallmark cards at the store? All those one liners? All those cards with nice love words oozing out of them? You say things to yourself like, I wish someone would say that to me, Now that would crank my tractor, or I wanna be loved like that. Hallmark movies are full of these zingers that should be in Hallmark cards. It makes you think about the Chicken and the Egg. You know did they make the movie from the cards or make the cards from the movie. At one point in the movie, the lady who you know will fall for the hometown fellow tells her friends husband, Sometimes a woman just needs you to show her that she means more to you than anything in the world. Hallmark movies have a tendency I wanna be loved like thatWelcome to Gulf County. Welcome to Port St. Joe. Welcome to the Port of Port St. Joe. Today representatives from the Colombian port city of Barranquilla will be visiting the area and enjoying time with community, port and economic development of cials. Theyll be getting a feel for the landscape around the port and the opportunities available. The trip is a reciprocal journey following a recent Florida trade delegation to Colombia. The folks from Barranquilla will have visited state of cials in Tallahassee and made a visit to the Port of Panama City before venturing to this postcard paradise we call home. We in Gulf County appreciate the time and effort required of you to take a glance at the Port of Port St. Joe. Echoing the words of County Commissioner Warren Yeager during a recent meeting of the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, there is reason to be as optimistic about the future of the port as ever. The collaboration agreement signed last year to develop a combined 300 acres of Port Authority and St. Joe Company property in the port planning area seems in hindsight the starting line for the steady drumbeat of optimism about the port. Once the Port Authority had an invested and passionate private partner, one as interested in unlocking the ports potential as port leaders have been for more than a decade, the race seemed to have truly begun. Actually, lets call it a marathon. As an investment banker from the Bank of Montreal the engagement of which by St. Joe provided another shot of adrenaline this will all take time and there is no hesitation among port of cials about staying the course for the long haul. St. Joe, in addition to bringing to the table an international player in the investment in infrastructure, the Bank of Montreal, also worked to secure a Florida Department of Transportation grant for $5 million for rail line improvements along the Genesse Wyoming line. One end of that rail line is in Chattahoochee for movement of goods and people north, west and east; the other end is on the old Arizona Chemical property site that is now unencumbered in port hands. Not a bad asset to have in the back pocket. The FDOT has also championed the Port of Port St. Joe, providing a critical extension that keeps the port in the Strategic Intermodal System (SIS), a system that receives the lions share of FDOT discretionary funding. The department certainly could have pulled the plug, but representatives, re ecting the governors passion for ports as job creators, bent over backwards to make sure the SIS designation remained in place to allow the port more time and space to lure customers. The Florida Department of Economic Development also had been a partner, providing funding and expertise to update the port master plan to re ect the addition in lands and the collaborative agreement with St. Joe. The Florida Ports Council, while acknowledging work to be done, noted the signi cant changes over the past 18 months in its annual report on Floridas deepwater ports. Did we mention that, friends from Barranquilla? This is a deepwater port, authorized for a depth of 35 feet in the shipping channel and one of just 15 such ports in Florida. That shipping channel has become another source of recent good news. Port of Port St. Joe of cials just last week learned that a grant was available to begin the preliminary engineering and permitting for dredging of the deepwater channel, seen as one of two major keys to unlocking the ports potential. The other lock may be opened soon, depending on the governors veto pen. The state budget includes funding to bring a mortgage on a parcel of port land current and provide additional breathing room for the port in its hunt for customers and tenants. That one even carries a very public campaign to Protect Our Port. As one Port Authority member noted last week, it would be hard to underestimate what the funding for dredging and the mortgage would mean for the port. There is also Eastern Shipbuilding, paying its lease for bulkhead space on the deepwater old mill site, booming with business and heading to Port St. Joe when its wharf space in Bay County is lled to capacity. In other words, there is a lot happening and we are certainly glad you folks from Colombia have given us a chance to show off a bit. But we can also learn. As said by Tom Gibson and a shout out to Gibson for joining the trade delegation to Colombia on his dime and Marina Pennington, the citys planning consultant, who plowed considerable groundwork in her homeland prior to that Florida visit your Colombian ports share many of the challenges facing Port St. Joe and have made them work. According to Gibson, you have done an outstanding job of marrying the industry of a diverse operational port with a tourist outpost with ne beaches and plenty of sun. You have overcome those challenges, with public and private partnerships, and ourish today and when the newly-widened Panama Canal opens next year, you will be in a position to bene t. As will the Port of Port St. Joe, which as the crow ies is one of the closest Florida ports to the Canal Zone. So whether there is any actual deal that comes out of your visit, we have much to learn from you while we show you our slice of heaven. That you took the time to visit is another feather of optimism in what has been a quiver full over the past 18 months. As we like to say, sit a spell, enjoy the waters and beaches that lure so many of us to put down roots, having found home. Welcome to Gulf County; we are tickled to have you.Thank goodness Ive got my own list! Keyboard KLATTERINGS(Red) Carpet rolling TIM CROFTStar news editor Time Magazine just published its list of the 100 most in uential people in the world. I didnt make it. Shucks. Ed Ruscha did. Ive never heard of him. I dont know what he does. And Im fairly certain hes never in uenced me. Nor had I heard of Wang Shu. Or Joaquim Barbosa, Andrew Sheng, Mary Nichols or Don YeomansI am sure they are all outstanding men and women but Im still searching for their direct impact on my life. In fact, I did not know 85 percent of the people on the list. Did I sleep through something? I had heard of Justin Timberlake, but I cant tell you one song he sings. I couldnt understand why Jimmy Kimmel was included, but Im in bed when he comes on TV. LeBron James was the most familiar name on the list. Well, and Barack Obama. My basketball days are way behind me, and if Dwight David Eisenhower, Bill Clinton and George Bush didnt in uence me, I dont think Obama has a chance. And please, hear me this morning, Im not knocking any of these people, I am proud for them. They obviously have a lot to offer. And I am not making light of the of ce of the president of the United States. They are all great men. What they do might affect me but, let me tell you, there is a world of difference between affecting and in uencing. My father did in uence me. As in, When you go down that row, son, turn your hat around backwards. I want you to be pulling so much corn I cant tell if you are coming or going! Even as he chided us to work a little harder he was always the one doing the most work, lifting the biggest logs, pulling the heaviest load. He didnt have to yell a work ethic into us; he taught by example. Daddy also told us more than once, Be careful, boys, on who you listen to; make sure they are worthy of your attention and trust. Miss Carolyn Blades in uenced me. She taught from the rst day I walked into her classroom that studying hard pays off. She didnt exactly say a mind is a terrible thing to waste but that was her message. She loved the ABCs into us. Bobby C. Melton in uenced me. He was big and fast and could spin on a dime. When I was in grade school, Id go to the high school football games just to watch him run. He picked his knees up so high, and hed slice into the off-tackle hole! I was going to be just like him someday. Mrs. Charlie Mitchum was the rst older person outside of family that took an active interest in me. She would stop and talk to me just like I was an adult. She was kind, and she was always telling me what a ne boy I was. By high school, I would take my dates by to meet her and see if she approved which, of course, she always did. I steered away from some trouble I saw my friends get into partly because I didnt want to disappoint Mrs. Mitchum. She was so positive and upbeat and caring. She single-handedly changed my thinking about elderly people. Now, that is in uence! My teenage friends held a great sway on my life in those formative years. If Ricky and Buddy thought it was cool, so did I. If Skip liked the Kingston Trio, I bought their albums. If Squeaky could kick a half dollar off his heel and ip it into his shirt pocket, I was going to practice until I could do it to. We didnt look to national magazines, the new fangled television or world leaders for direction. We scratched out our path by mostly observing the ones closest to us. We dont always have to think individuals when we are talking in uence. I have made a career out of writing about the little West Tennessee town I grew up in. How they shaped me, molded me, in uenced me. And I couldnt for the life of me single out one particular part of that town that touched me the most. Maybe it was the magic coming out of the movie theater. Or the way everyone turned out for the homecoming parade or the 4th of July celebration. It could have been Mr. Holland delivering the milk with a wave and a smile. Or the loud hullabaloo abounding at Franks Dairy Bar or the quiet sereneness of the town square late at night. I appreciated then, and more so now, the conservative, solid, small town values that were so lovingly instilled in me. Maybe Time has lost sight of what has made us such a great nation. Maybe they just made up that list to sell magazines. Or maybe, quite possibly, Time (time) has simply past me by. If the editor had consulted me, I would have added Billy Graham to the mix. I dont care that hes a tad older now with perhaps one foot already in Heaven. If he is alive, he should be on that list! And I would put Avery Lee and Hannah Colbert in there, too. They are my two youngest granddaughters and they can get me to do anything and everything they want me to. If they point to it, I buy it! Ed Ruscha, Wang Shu, Justin Timberlake and Barack Obama can only dream of in uence like that!Respectfully,Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, May 16, 2013 APage 4SectionSee CRANKS A5

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to sometimes bash men. I understand. Every once in a while they need to put the shoe on the other foot. Cate with a C is the lady there to dispose of her fathers ashes; she is engaged to an old fogey named Stewart who is 20 years older than she. How do I say this? Stewart is a backside of a donkey or something like that. He has to be. Hes going to lose. You know he will lose. The winner is Connor. He wears his collar up once in a while, has a dog and smiles like hes just eaten a jar of Smuckers jelly with a plastic spoon. During commercials, you want to go to the powder room and look in the mirror and tell yourself that you are a Connor, rather than the anc that acts like he is experiencing some of the undesirable side effects of the medication from the commercials. I was boiling carrots on low, I love carrots. Before Connor shows back up in New York City with his dog to woo Cate with a C back to rural Massachusetts, you get all of the other things that have to be in a Hallmark movie. Just like country music songs need tractors, cheating, drinking, dying and cowboys, Hallmark movies need wicker picnic baskets, a fair or festival of some sort, some mist or fog, beds covered with chenille bedspreads, birds (seagulls work nice), porches and roads that look like they couldnt handle two cars side by side. Before the end, youll see some more acne medication commercials and more than likely one for a purple pill that could cause diarrhea. They dont want you to experience the side effects, but they warn you that you could. You dont worry about acne or diarrhea, because you know everything in the movie is going to be alright. I put sugar in my carrots I was cooking, because Mama would when no one was looking and Hallmark movies make me think of Mama. Cate with a C ends up telling her anc (the old donkeys derriere) that she wants kids and a dog. He understands that means she does not want him. Of course she needs to kiss Connor, the hometown boy on the mouth, make his collar stand up, pat his dog on the head and go dream under a chenille bedspread. What does one take from all this? I think if you want to be loved like they get loved in a Hallmark Channel movie, you need a dog, a wicker picnic basic and someone to shoo some seagulls your way. Just make sure you have the lid on the Smuckers jelly when they do the shooing of the seagulls. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, May 16, 2013 APage 5Section CRANKS from page A4Weddings have always been big business, but I was shocked to see how expensive theyve become in the 17 years since my wife and I got married. According to the annual Real Weddings Study, the average wedding in the U.S. now costs $28,427, and that doesnt even count the honeymoon. Wait, it gets worse. Among the more than 17,500 surveyed brides who got married in 2012, the average amount paid for a wedding dress was $1,211. On average they also spent $204 per wedding guest and dropped $12,905 for the reception venue. There are many ways to rein in wedding-related costs while still having a memorable event. Here are a few suggestions: Create a budget. Unless youre a professional wedding planner, youll probably be oored by how many expenses weddings can amass, including wedding and engagement rings, invitations, postage, marriage license, clergy and location fees, owers, bridal gown and grooms tuxedo, rehearsal dinner and reception, photography, catering, DJ or band, limousine, parking attendants, tips, gifts for wedding participants and honeymoon expenses. Shop around. Bridal expos are a good way to meet a lot of vendors and gather ideas. Just dont get caught up in the excitement and commit to anything before youve done follow-up research. Some tips: Bring along someone from the wedding party as well as a trustworthy friend who isnt emotionally and nancially connected to the wedding. You may feel pressured by vendors to sign contracts or put down deposits, but its probably wiser to take their contact information and research them rst. Create a separate email account for wedding vendor communications. Once you sign up for one offer or contest, believe me, your inbox will be swamped. After youve settled on vendors, get signed contracts that specify dates, products, prices, deposit and payment terms, cancellation policies, liability insurance and whether tax and gratuities are included. Here are a few suggestions for trimming costs: Date exibility. Youll get more bang for your buck offseason a June wedding might cost 20 to 30 percent more than one in April or October. Have your orist use inseason owers. Daytime weddings are often cheaper than evening events. Instead of a hotel, consider less-costly alternative reception venues like community centers, museums, city park clubhouses or other public facilities looking to earn extra income. Ask whether they have their own tables, chairs, sound and lighting systems; if not, add equipment rental costs into the equation. A buffet dinner reception could save you $15 or more per guest compared to a plated dinner, because youre not paying for table service. Save even more by hosting an afternoon reception and serving lunch or hors doeuvres. If youre hosting a large reception, have a smaller display cake for the cutting ceremony, with a sheet cake stored in the kitchen. Serve wine, beer and one signature cocktail, instead of offering a full bar. Consider renting or buying a second-hand wedding dress from a consignment shop, or an online specialty site. The same goes for grooms wear. Hiring a disc jockey instead of a live band will save hundreds of dollars; plus you get a broader selection of music and a built-in emcee to move things along. One last budgeting tip: Limit the number of guests to ensure you can have a meaningful interaction with each. Remember, spending just one minute apiece with 300 guests would take ve hours. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoneySpecial to The Star TALLAHASSEE This session was a very active and productive session for Senator Bill Montford and his voice was heard, strong and clear, advocating for North Floridas hardworking citizens. Senator Montfords actions, can only af rm that he understands our needs and works tirelessly to nd principled, common sense solutions to those needs. This session he demonstrated his knowledge of and support for issues important to all of us, by participating in the following Florida Legislation: Improvements to Education: I truly believe our future is in our childrens hands, and it is this that drives my passion to give them the best opportunities. His passion for education led the Senator to support improvements to Floridas educational system including providing more college and career-ready opportunities, ensuring low performing students needs are met and instituting more local control by reducing unnecessary regulations. He sponsored a very successful deregulation bill that removed unnecessary and duplicative regulation and rules. State Employee Pay Raise: Recognizing Floridas public employees, the legislature mandated that state employees, school teachers and school district employees be given a well-deserved pay raise. These are honest people putting in a hard days work, and they deserve to be rewarded with livable pay. A pay increase is long overdue and its high time we acknowledge how hard our state employees work, Senator Montford said in regards the pay raise. Preservation of the Apalachicola River Basin and Bay: Senator Montford supported Governor Rick Scotts funding of $3 million towards Water Quality Improvement projects in the Apalachicola Bay and Apalachicola River Basin. The allocation of $400,000 to the protection, restoration and research of natural oyster reefs and beds came as a result of his leadership during the 2013 Legislative Session and budgetary process. Public Work Squads: To ensure the continuation of the public work squads from our prisons a line item of $34 million was added to the budget. This will result in a tremendous savings for the taxpayer. FRS Retirement System: After numerous threats to change the retirement system, Senators stood up for the hard-working people of Florida and left the retirement system intact. North Florida has something unique and special and it must be recognized and protected. Listed below are some of local projects that were funded in the 2013-2014 that will bene t Gulf County: Gulf County Billy Joe Rish Recreational Park: $1.4 million Technology Transformation Grant to establish/enhance Wireless network for Gulf School District: $78,779 Port St. Joe Historic Cape San Blas Lighthouse Complex Rescue and Relocation Project: $649,000 Gulf Coast Parkway from SR 30 (U.S. 98) to Gulf to Bay Highway Add lanes & reconstruct: $900,000 SR 71 from end of Concrete Pavement to Intercoastal Bridge Resurfacing: $3 million SR 30E Cape San Blas Stump Hole Revetment Road/Slope Protection: $427,435 SR 22 from Bay County Line to Wetappo Creek Bridge Resurfacing: $2.1 million SR 30 (US 98) from Pine Street to Beaconhill Park Road Bike Path/Trail..$87,080 **All Line Items are subject to the Governors Veto JASON ALDERMANHow to trim your wedding costsDear Editor, My wife, Tammy and I have never written a letter to the editor before but would like to take this opportunity to relay our recent experience of purchasing coastal property in the Port St. Joe area. After vacationing in the area for several years, we grew very fond of the natural beauty, the relaxed lifestyle and most especially the warm and friendly people who call the area home. We decided we would ful ll a longtime dream of ours to own coastal real estate. Having spent 35-plus years in the construction and real estate development business in Tennessee, I had a basic understanding of the complexity of coastal real estate investment but most of all understood the importance of competent representation. To educate ourselves, we started reading Sherri Dodsworths (Boardwalk Realty) blog, and over time, recognized and appreciated her commitment to informing others about the Cape San Blas, Indian Pass and Port St. Joe real estate market. We contacted Sherri, and on our next trip met with her, beginning our journey to nd beach property for our planned cottage. Some months later after having Sherri help us build an adequate foundation of knowledge, we felt comfortable moving forward with our purchase. We are looking forward to spending more and more time in the Port St. Joe area. Sincerely, Bill A. HodgesKnoxville, Tenn. Letter to the EDITORA passionate commitmentMontford supports Floridians with Senate votes Special to The StarTAMPA The majority of Florida residents (70 percent) plan to take a vacation this summer of four days or more between May and September. This re ects a 5 percentage point increase from 2012, according to a recent AAA Consumer Pulse survey on summer travel plans. Florida consumers place a high value on their summer vacation, with more than six in 10 of them (62 percent) saying they think travel is very important to their well-being. The top three reasons Florida residents think travel is important are it creates experiences (69 percent), lets them recharge (65 percent) and allows for family time (62 percent). This year marks the second year that AAA data shows an increase in the number of Floridians who plan to take a summer vacation a positive sign for the travel industry, said Jessica Brady, spokeswoman, AAA Travel, The Auto Club Group. A relaxing vacation at a city destination or beach is the number one desire among Florida travelers who look to get away this summer. The great thing about Florida is travelers dont have to go far to nd what theyre looking for in a vacation. The majority of travelers (64 percent) plan to spend $1,500 or less on their summer vacation, about the same amount as last year. The top three vacation destinations for Florida travelers this year are city destinations (47 percent), beach getaways (36 percent) and trips to theme parks/attractions (27 percent). The AAA Consumer Pulse Survey was conducted online among residents living in the Southern Region of The Auto Club Group (Florida, Georgia and Tennessee) from April 4-8, 2013. A total of 407 Florida residents completed the survey. The survey has a maximum margin of error of 4.9 percentage points. Overall survey responses are weighted by gender and age to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the adult population (18+) in Florida. AAA: Number of Floridians planning to travel this summer up 5 percent

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 PUBLICNOTICENOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthatthePortSt.JoePortAuthority willholdapublichearingonWednesday,May22,2013,at11:00a.m. EDTforthepurposeofreceivingcommentsonthePortSt.JoePort AuthoritysnewPortMasterPlan2013.epublichearingwillbeheld inBuildingAoftheGulf/FranklinCenter,at3800GarrisonAvenue, PortSt.Joe,Florida. ePortMasterPlan2013maybeviewedonthePortswebsiteat www.portofportstjoe.com;also,copiesoncompactdisccanbepicked upatthePortsoceat206MarinaDrive,PortSt.Joe.Interestedpersonsmayattendandbeheardatthepublichearingorprovidecommentsinwritingtothe PortSt.JoePortAuthority,P.O.Box745,PortSt.Joe,Florida32457.Transactionsofthepublichearing willnotberecorded.Personswishingtoappealanydecisionmadeduringthehearingwillneedarecord oftheproceedingandshouldensureaverbatimrecordismade,includingthetestimonyonwhichthe appealisbased.AnypersonwhowishestoattendandrequiresassistancemaycallthePortSt.JoePort Authorityat(850)229-5240. Conventional/FHA/VA* LotLoans|Refinancing Adjustable&FixedRate USDARuralHousing AffordableHousing* Construction/Permanent Financing Whetheryourebuyingyour firsthomeorjustneedroomto grow,ourcustomizedapproach tomortgagelendingcangetyou moving.Callustodayorapply onlineat www.ccbg.com.Movingin theright direction.MEMBERFDIC Allproductsaresubjecttocreditandpropertyapproval.Programtermsandconditionssubjecttochangewithoutnotice. Notallproductsareavailableinallmarketsorforallamounts.Otherrestrictionsandlimitationsmayapply.*Loansarenotmadeor originatedbytheFHA,VA,HUDoranyothergovernmentalentity. MAYISSTROKEAWARENESSMONTHKnowhowtorecognizestrokewarningsignsandsymptomsF.A.S.T.! FACEDROOPING:Doesonesideofthefacedrooporisitnumb? Askthepersontosmile.ARMWEAKNESS:Isonearmweakornumb?Askthepersontoraise botharms.Doesonearmdriftdownward?SPEECHDIFFICULTY:Isspeechslurred,aretheyunabletospeak, oraretheyhardtounderstand?Askthepersontorepeatasimple sentence,like"theskyisblue."Isthesentencerepeatedcorrectly?Timetocall911Ifthepersonshowsanyofthesesymptoms,evenifthe symptomsgoaway,call9-1-1andgetthemtothehospitalimmediately.BEYONDF.A.S.T.OTHERSYMPTOMSYOUSHOULDKNOW By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com On May 23, the Healthy Start Coalition for Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties will host its annual baby shower in Port St. Joe. The event aims to educate and be a resource for new parents. Though the focus of the event is on delivering parenting information to new or expectant mothers with a baby six months or younger, caregivers, fathers and new moms from other counties are welcome to attend. Healthy Starts mission is to educate new parents and promote positive birth outcomes and protect the health and well-being of all mothers and children in the surrounding area. Its essentially a bridal expo for new parents, said Director Sharon Owens, whos been involved with Healthy Start for the past eight years. With a reputation for keeping its baby showers fun, informative and engaging, Healthy Starts annual events draw 50-100 attendees, but the coalition is always looking to increase their numbers to ensure all babies in the region get off to a safe and healthy start. Car seat safety, safe sleeping and available community resources are just a few of the topics covered during the twohour seminar. Information booths will also be on-site to pass along yers for pediatric physicians, dentists and other infant services. To keep things light, information will be delivered through activities and games, and a series of door prizes will be given away throughout the presentations. The grand prize winner will be awarded a $200 gift certicate to Wal-Mart. Sometimes people are scared to death when they come to the baby shower, Owens said. Its neat to see new moms realize that theres so much support. In addition to passing along information and resources to new parents, Owens emphasized the importance of building a network of supportive and knowledgeable people. You have to get a drivers license to drive a car, but theres not a test to have a baby, she said. Healthy Start gives guidance to anyone with a baby up to three years of age. There are no eligibility requirements and new parents can call 800895-9506 with questions. The Florida Association of Healthy Start Coalitions has 32 branches across the state all working to improve pregnancy outcomes, reduce infant mortality rates and promote healthy growth and development in all children. Healthy Starts fth Gulf County baby shower will take place at the Centennial Building from 4-6 p.m. ET. The shower is a free community-wide event.Free baby shower for Gulf, Franklin countiesFILE PHOTOSPart of the fun and games is seeing how new dads do with diapers. New and expectant mothers will have the opportunity for a host of gifts and information during the Health Start Coalition Baby Shower.

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LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, May 16, 2013By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Still faced with a shortfall of $868,249 for the 201314 school year, Gulf County School Board formally announced at its regular meeting that they would put into effect a reduction in workforce for the new year. The School Board has discussed the move in a special meeting, but made the Reduction in Force ofcial Tuesday during its regular monthly meeting. In public comment, Associate Director of the Gulf County Educators Association, Sandra Butler said that the teachers union felt that the district was moving too fast and that letting teachers go should be the last thing we consider. She warned the board that if it chooses not to follow teacher contracts then they potentially face unfair labor practice. Our hearts break, responded Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. Weve looked at every avenue and its not with a light heart that we move forward. For the 12-15 teaching positions anticipated to be eliminated, the Florida Department of Education dictates that the board cannot make their decisions based on seniority or certications and they would have to utilize the latest teacher evaluations. Teachers with the lowest scores would be released until the needed number was reached. This takes subjectivity out of play, said Norton. Theres no way we can operate the district without reaching our target cuts. Outsourcing the schools custodial and janitorial services was explored further as GCA Services Group presented to the board for consideration in the bid. They currently work with Bay County schools and received high recommendations. Previously in the meeting, the board recognized seven students in grades Kindergarten through twelfth who had perfect or near-perfect attendance for the school year. Buck Watford, a major in the U.S. Army Reserves returned from his fth deployment to Afghanistan last week and appeared before the council on Tuesday to thank them for the warm welcome home. He mentioned that not a week went by during his deployment that he didnt receive packages or letters from the students. He presented Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Principal Jeremy Knapp and Port St. Joe Elementary principal Susan Gannon with ags that were own on his base. NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 Acoolerhomeandlowerbills? Nowthatfeelsgood!Youcouldsaveupto40percentonenergycostsby replacingyourheatingandcoolingunitwithonethat hasaSEERseasonalenergyeciencyratiorating of15orgreater. www.gcec.com or (850)639.2216 1.800.333.9392 y costs bgy cent on ener o 40 per e up tv ou could sa Y OverlookingSt.JosephBayandCapeSan Blas,BarefootCottagesoersthemost aordablebeachhomesonFloridas ForgottenCoastinawell-appointed, 18-acrecoastalvillage.Thecottagesare designedforlaidback,turnofthecentury livingandamenitiesincludetwopools, playgrounds,BBQareas,andourVillage GreenwithCommunityCenterwhere familiesgathertomakebeachmemories. LocatedjustwestofPortSt.JoeonHighway 98andborderingWindMarkBeach, BarefootCottagesisyouropportunityto ownnowinadesirablebaysidecommunity withexcellentrentaldemand.Twobedroom,2.5bathhomesareavailablefrom $129,900.Three-bedroom,3.5bathhomes areavailablestartingat$179,900. BaysideLivingfrom $129,900 It'stheperfecttime tojoinus! 249065-GulfFront-CapeSanBlas-$899,900 IncredibleHomethatexudesluxuryandcharmwith 3openandcovereddecksoeringamazingbeach viewsandgloriouswesterlysunsets.thishomecomes completelyfurnishedandhasanexcellentrental historyasapremiumgulffrontproperty.4stories highwithoneofthebestvistasanywhere.Onecan actuallyseethebayfromthetopdeckasabonus. Elevatorequipedforeortlessaccesstoeverylevel. 241453-GulfFront-CapeSanBlas-$599,900 BeautifulGulfFronthomelocatedinanXFLOODZONE insecludedareaonalargestablebeach.Homewas designedtomaximizeexpansiveunobstructiveviews fromeveryroom.Opendesignwithlargecovered decks.Fireplace,irrigationsysetm,securitysystem largestorageunderneath.75footwidelotboasting overanacreinsize.Otheramenitiesincludecustom oakcabinets,electricmotorizedstormshutters,gulf viewsfromeveryroom,covereddecks,andmuch more. 249132-GulfFront-MexicoBeach-$679,000Fabulousoldstylebeachhousewithrarefeatures.Locatedlow tothegroundwithafulldrive-ingarage.Unlikemostbeachfront homes,thiscottageisnothighlyelevatedforeasyaccess.Openoor planwithmasterbedroom,kitchen,greatroomandanincredible large14x44screenedinporchthatoverlooksthegulfthatcould becomeanamazingglassedinbonusroom.Upstairshasasitting roomandtwobedroomsandtwobaths.Thereisagulfviewfrom everyroominthehouse.Privacyfenceontheleftsideofhomewith doubleoutsideshowersandasideentry.Niceboardwalktothe beach.Thisisararendinalowerlevelbeachcottagewithcharm andpersonality.NOHOAFEES.Startyourlifetimememoriestoday!! 249330-OvationLot-$84,500FabulousbayfrontlotinexclusiveOvation Subdivision.Thislevellotcomescomplete withsewertapfeeandnewsurvey. AmenitiesGalore!Currentlytheonly availablebayfrontlotinOvation. School district formalizes reduction in workforceWES LOCHER | The StarArmy Reserves Major Buck Watford presented commemorative ags to Gulf County Principals Susan Gannon and Jeremy Knapp.

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSSection Section A By VALERIE GARMAN747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH After 13 years on the federal over shing list, red snapper has been removed after a report showed the species has made a comeback in the Gulf of Mexico. Released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the report provides a snapshot of U.S. sheries stocks in 2012. Results showed a 59 percent increase in the red snapper quota since 2009. However, red snapper remain on NOAAs overshed list, which is different from the over shing list. The critical list that its still on is the over shed designation, said local charter captain Bob Zales. Many of us believe were past that and this shery is not over shed anymore. According to NOAA, an over shing stock is a product of over shing for many years and has a harvest rate that is too high to produce its maximum sustainable yield. Over shed species have a biomass level depleted to a degree that the stocks capacity to produce the maximum sustainable yield is jeopardized. Over shed species like red snapper are subject to shery management and rebuilding plans. A separate report was released by Ocean Conservancy and Pew Charitable Trusts, outlining the success of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the law governing shery management in the U.S. The Ocean Conservancy/Pew report was released in conjunction with a sheries summit taking place this week in Washington, D.C. Zales described the report as propaganda. The three-day summit will set the stage for what could result in fundamental changes to the Magnuson-Stevens Act, with federal management agencies pushing Congress to reauthorize the act. Zales said the last reauthorization of the act in 2007 was far too restrictive and not based on sound science. Its hard for us to counter the propaganda that comes out, said Zales, who has been charter shing in Panama City for 48 years. Youre getting two completely different stories. One of them is reality and one is where the environmentalists want to take it. Thats a signi cant problem for most of us on the water. In response to the NOAA Fisheries report Status of Stocks 2012 that showed record rebuilding of sheries, Elizabeth Fetherston, deputy director of Ocean Conservancys Fish Conservation Program, said, Todays report is great news and further proof that the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) is working to restore our sheries. According to an economic report by NOAA, U.S. saltwater shing generated more than $199 billion in sales and supported 1.7 million jobs in 2011. Monday-Saturday:7:00AM-7:00PMEST Sunday:7:00AM-5:00PMEST FishingHeadquarters: WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May1681 6710% Fri,May1780 6810% Sat,May1880 6920% Sun,May1980 69 0% Mon,May2080 7010% Tues,May2180 65 0% Wed,May2281 7020% Saturday,May25th10amtil3pm. Attheboatbasinacrossfrom HarryAsonSt.GeorgeIsland Page 8 Thursday, May 16, 2013 SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomSome kingfish are starting to show up around the buoy line out of Mexico beach and down around the Cape this week. Watch for the birds diving on the bait fish for a good indicator of feeding fish. Amberjack are holding good on the B-site numbers and in 150ft of water due south of St. Joe. The 2013 cobia run is just about to be over in our area. Several good fish have been caught this year over the 50 pound mark. St. Joe Bay continues to heat up this month. Good trout and flounder catches are reported from Blacks Island and The Eagle Harbor areas so far this week. Spanish Mackerel and pompano are still running the beaches from Mexico beach to Indian pass.Star Staff ReportDuke Energy, formerly Progress Energy, has joined with the Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association to build two new arti cial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico which will help restore marine habitat so sh like gag grouper, amberjack, trigger sh and red snapper can grow and prosper. The two new reefs that will be built with a $15,000 grant from Duke Energy are off Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe. The rst reef is in the Bell Shoal area which is about 3.5 miles off of the beach in 20 feet of water. It consists of six Florida limestone reefs and two grouper reef-ecosystem hybrids that are in uential in the growth of gag grouper especially in the juvenile stage. The second reef is in the North Site about 17 miles out in an area that is about 100 feet deep. The reef consists of two Florida limestone reefs and one grouper-reef ecosystem. Duke Energy has also joined as a Corporate Friend of the MBARA which includes entities like Guy Harvey, American Fishing Tackle Company, Bay County Outdoors, Bluewater Outriggers, Florida Insider Fishing Report, Sportsman Adventures, Floridaze Adventures, Mexico Beach Marina, Al Agnew and Stolen Moments Photography. We are so proud to have the Duke Energy people supporting our efforts to build marine habitat which will promote sheries in our area which brings anglers and divers from all over to our local area, said MBARA president Bob Cox. This effort supports the local economy and helps sustain sh populations for many years to come. These new reefs will be posted on the MBARA website at www.mbara. org with all the GPS coordinates, range and bearing. Red snapper off over shing listDuke Energy, MBARA build new reefsWES LOCHER | The StarRon Childs with the MBARA, Bobby Pickels with Duke Energy and Bob Cox, president of the MBARA, celebrate a partnership to build new reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more online at star .com. www.starfl.com

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection ToRegisterorformoreinformation,pleasecontact (850)482-6500 or bnuccio@bigbendahec.org orTollfree 1-87-QUIT-NOW6Interestedinquittingtobacco?Pleasecome toourupcoming FREE ToolstoQuit session. Because NOW isthebest timetoquit. When: Thursday June13,2013 Time: 11am-1pmEST Where:SacredHeartHospital ontheGulfFREE NicotinePatches And/orGum forprogram participants Page 9 Thursday, May 16, 2013By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com When asked what his primary focus has been during spring football practice this month, Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School Dennis Kizziah did not think long. Blocking and tackling, was the answer before the question was barely in the air. Weve been so bad at blocking and tackling the last couple of years. We have to get better. And Ive learned through the years of coaching that the kid who wants to do it will do it. The kid who doesnt want to block or tackle, he just doesnt need to be out there. That ethic is also part of what Kizziah has used during the 16 days fewer due to weather in Wewahitchka of spring practice to toughen his team, to put an edge in his redand-white clad team. We are trying to make them tougher, Kizziah said. We have a lot of kids who have been out before so they understand what we are trying to do, but we have really had some practices where we have done a lot of hitting. Part of it has been the fewer days weve had, I would guess we have had about 10 good practice days. But we have been really doing some hitting on some days. We have had three or four pretty long practices, longer than I prefer, which involved a lot of just basic blocking and tackling. The Gators lost a few key seniors, but are likely to dress out just a handful of seniors this season. Last years deep sophomore and freshmen classes are now the sophomores and juniors that will lead the team. We returned quite a few but we will still be young, Kizziah said. We also have some real good athletes. A real key is that we are returning our offensive line. That will be important. The Gators, who suffered through a tough three-win season last year, will also have quarterback Rashard Rainie, a dual-threat, back at quarterback. Javar Hill, the tight end last year, will serve as the feature running back in the Wing offense. I am still looking for another running back, Kizziah said. Javar will get most of the carries and Rashard is dangerous on any down, but I would like to have another running back to take some carries. We have some good size and the kids come off the ball real well. We are going to just run it at them. The Gators also have found a kicker after having no real kicker last season Kizziah said he has a senior and a freshman able to handle punting and place-kicking duties and continue to put the pieces of the puzzle in place. The effort, Kizziah said, has been there all spring. You know they are burned out from playing sports all year, Kizziah said. Most of our kids played baseball, so they are just a little worn out. But the effort has been there and the attitude has just been great. Spring practice ends tonight with the Spring Jamboree, which will feature the Gators opening the evening with two quarters of play against Franklin County and ending the evening with two quarters against Port St. Joe. We need to have some success in the spring game so we can just have a little con dence going into the summer and getting into the weight room, Kizziah said. The score isnt so much important as I want them to see themselves on tape. We want them to see themselves on tape executing a block, then executing it again and then executing it again, showing them the improvement. We are looking for improvement and something to hang our hat on as we go into the summer. Kizziah said the playbook will be watered down a bit because the emphasis on blocking and tackling has meant less time working on the nesse and timing of the passing game. What he wants to know at the end tonight is that he has 30 or so players amped for summer workouts and getting on the eld in the fall. We are looking forward to playing (tonight), Kizziah said. I want to see how the kids will do faced against somebody else. They have hit each other enough. You want to make sure your kids are aggressive and they are doing what they have been shown. IF YOU GO...The Spring Jamboree will begin at 6:30 p.m. ET tonight at Shark Field. Franklin County will face Wewahitchka for two quarters and the Seahawks will play Port St. Joe for two quarters. The nal two quarters will pit county rivals Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe.Gators looking for boost into summerThe Gators will open the spring jamboree tonight against Franklin County and will close it against Port St. Joe. Photos by WES LOCHER | The StarBlocking and tackling have been an emphasis this spring for Wewahitchka.

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LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 THURSDAY,MAY23,2013 4:00PMEST THECENTENNIALBUILDING 300ALLENMEMORIALWAY PORTST.JOE,FLFREEADMISSIONFOOD,FUN,GAMESANDLOTSOFDOORPRIZESWeinviteallFranklinandGulfCounty pregnant women,newparents whohavehadababywithin thelastsixmonthsandtheirfamiliestojoinusfor:HEALTHYSTART'S5thAnnualBabyShowerTherewillbeinformationstationsonvarioustopics suchas:CarSeatSafety,ShakenBaby,Birth Control,SafeSleep,CommunityResourcesand MuchMore!And,lotsoffabulousdoorprizes! EverybabydeservesaHealthyStart! FORMOREINFORMATION, CALL1-800-895-9506HEALTHY START'S SHOWERBABY At some point we need to address mandatory pickup in a way that works for everybody, Yeager said. Commissioners did raise the landll fees to reect a suggestion made by Public Works director Joe Danford during a workshop two weeks ago. The fee was raised from $35 per ton to $40 per ton. Commissioner Ward McDaniel said that much of District 2, he estimated 95 percent, is already on some kind of garbage pickup and that both cities also require mandatory pickup. But Commissioner Joanna Bryan said the issue was one she would like to more fully review and consider before voting and commissioners agreed to table a decision on the pilot recycling program for two weeks.Port of Port St. JoeCommissioners expressed various opinions as to whether to write a letter to the governor in support of a $2 million appropriation that would alleviate a pressing foreclosure issue on a parcel of land owned by the Port of Port St. Joe. Commission chair Tan Smiley said he had already written one representing himself as chairman in support of the appropriation, but his fellow commissioners had mixed views. McLemore said he opposed using tax money in bailing out a bank and McDaniel wondered if receiving the $2 million against a mortgage that is in excess of $4 million was doing nothing more than buying time for the port before it would nd itself in the same situation. McDaniel said he did support money in the state budget roughly $1.4 million for dredging the shipping channel to authorized depth, but was hesitant about supporting the $2 million to help on the mortgage. Yeager said that the $2 million appropriation was being driven by Capital City Bank, not the Port Authority, and that the governor should decide the worthiness of that appropriation but agreed the dredging money was badly needed. I think the port is a regional project, Yeager said. It is going to go. Im in full support of anything we can do to make that port go. Smiley said his decision was one of jobs. Helping (the port) out is helping Gulf County out, Smiley said. Just letting it sit there and do nothing isnt an option. I come from when Port St. Joe had plenty of jobs. I am seeing getting back to where that was. Is (the $2 million) going to help? We need the jobs.CBRAYeager said a bill that would strike Cape San Blas and St. Joseph Peninsula from the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) was scheduled for a committee hearing. That is much farther along than weve ever been, he said, adding that three or four other states also had land areas believed mistakenly placed in CBRA. (Having the CBRA designation removed) would be a huge impact for this county. RECYCLING from page A1events put in beds and the extent of draw in a radius beyond 60 miles from Gulf County. We have to break from the past, said board member and Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. In one instance, the board denied an application for funding this year from Project Graduation of Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School due to the new award parameters. The event was not seen as a boon for tourism, despite the ne intentions, said board member Ronald Pickett. The emphasis was on identifying so-called signature events and marking the calendar with so-called niche events, events which draw more locals and bed tax collection is not as lofty, Jenkins said. Our job is to spend the money as smartly as we can, said Alyson Gerlach, who chairs the TDC marketing committee. The marketing committee approved, and in turn the full advisory board approved, several signature events signature events, Jenkins said, were those events in which the expected bed tax collections exceed the amount of the special event award. Those events include the Scallop Festival, Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival, the Great Florida Plein Air Paint Out and the Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast. Bay Day, held twice a year as a fundraising celebration of the St. Joseph Bay State Preserves, is currently considered a niche event that will become a signature event. The niche events funded under the special grant funding were broken into categories. Those categories are golfing, snowbirds, pet friendly, shing, festivals, eco-tourism, art/music and the nal category simply local. A major component to the difference in funding niche and signature events is the role the TDC will play in marketing the events. For the niche, more local, events the key is that the TDC will hold back 50 percent of any grant award to do the marketing, be it a shing event such as the Sheriffs Ofce annual tournament or a local event such as Ghosts on the Coast. I have condence in our ability to do all that work in house, Jenkins said. When we can take these niche events and grow them into larger events the money will follow. The TDC staff will have a major presence at signature events, but the amount of the award for example $10,000 for the Scallop Festival will go to organizers to handle the bulk of the marketing and advertising. For any event, at least 50 percent of marketing and advertising must be done outside a 60-mile radius of Gulf County. And the grants provide something of a road map for the TDC in creating website and social media content. (The partners) help us with the content development, Jenkins said. Im starting to tie (events) to messaging and broaden it. In total, the TDC received grant proposals requesting more than $107,000. Events qualied for $76,447, but with the TDC share of marketing the niche events backed out the amount awarded this year totaled $54,848. The TDC board also handed out grant funding for the remainder of the scal year for several events and functions. The board granted addition funding this year of $9,600 to the MBARA for magazine advertising, the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce for additional Scallop Festival funding, the Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, the annual Street Dance in the neighborhood of North Port St. Joe and National Marina Day. BED TAX from page A1 He supports the program and allows the class to use his well to keep the plants watered throughout the school year. A portion of what grows in garden was donated by Bonnie Plants in Alabama while other donations came from the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Carter said that the fth grade is the ideal age level to learn gardening because the students are able to retain what they learn. For those who are interested in gardening, it lets us plant the seed, he said. The program is part of the science classes taught by fth-grade teachers Melanie Hinote, April Bidwell and Kim Ludlau. Before the 60 students ever stepped foot in the garden they spent class time discussing the act of planting, the role that bees play in pollination and took a eld trip to the North Florida Research and Education Center. David Beyl and his wife, Sally have been volunteers with the program for the last ve years. Both are Master Gardeners who trained at the University of Florida for 12 weeks and must perform 50 hours of horticulturerelated volunteer work each year. The students love it, said Beyl. You can tell that they enjoy the experience. Cabbage, lettuce, strawberries, potatoes, carrots, onions, eggplant, watermelon, beans, peppers, squash, sugarcane and various herbs made up this years garden with produce being grown both in-ground and in pots. We use pots to show the students that even if you dont have room for a garden, you can still have a garden, Beyl said. While in the garden students were broken up into groups of four to ve and they learned how to plant seeds, rake, fertilize and cultivate. Those who had the courage even learned how to operate a rototiller under Beyls close supervision. They also learned how to pick and eat the strawberries when no one was looking, he added. Students are made aware of what dishes can be made from the contents of a garden and students took home cabbages, carrots and potatoes to share with their families. Those who had an interest in starting their own gardens were given seeds to plant. It was a lot of fun, said student Lavender Abdulla about the program. We learned where plants grow but also got to get in the dirt. It was fun and we also learned a lot, echoed fellow fth-grader Case Johnson. John Rich, a volunteer with the program for 10 years, served up greens and sweet potato casserole to the hungry students at the luncheon. Its all about getting kids to eat something other than hamburgers, Rich said. County Commissioner Ward McDaniel was also on-site for the festivities. A gardener himself, he applauded Carter for his time and dedication to the program. Roy does a marvelous job with the kids, he said. Carter added, Its the only gardening program youll nd in North Florida. Its a pleasure to be a part of it. GGARDEN from page A1

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Thursday, May 16, 2013Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Of these who was not born in the year 1970? Uma Thurman, Andre Agassi, Shania Twain, Matt Damon 2) Geographically which is NYCs largest borough? Brooklyn, Staten Island, Manhattan, Queens 3) From the comics whos the wife of Hagar the Horrible? Helga, Anna, Gertrude, Bertha 4) What January date does a U.S. presidents term of of ce begin? 3rd, 12th, 20th, 23rd 5) Mainly from years past, what were spats worn over? Shoes, Neck, Lap, Neckties 6) Which of these slangily refers to a bowling ball? Grapefruit, Apple, Melon, Coconut 7) Which presidential candidate wanted Americans to explore the New Frontier? Jefferson, Lincoln, FDR, JFK 8) Either of the vertical sides of a window is called its? Jamb, Balance, Sash, Glide 9) Aubergine is another name for? Alps, Eggplant, Trumpet, Ri e 10) Of these, who was not born in California? Rene Russo, Molly Ringwald, Meryl Streep, Marilyn Monroe 11) White and which other are the most common school-mascot colors? Red, Blue, Green, Yellow 12) Where was singer Jimmy Buffet born? Idaho, Florida, Texas, Mississippi 13) Which is a log turner? Peavey, Dermot, Pincher, Dolman 14) River, snow, and blood are all types of? Maps, Beds, Cells, Banks ANSWERS 1) Shania Twain. 2) Queens. 3) Helga. 4) 20th. 5) Shoes. 6) Apple. 7) JFK. 8) Jamb. 9) Eggplant. 10) Meryl Streep. 11) Blue. 12) Mississippi. 13) Peavey. 14) Banks. COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Centennial TRIVIAThe 1912 Cadillac Model 30 parked in front of the Port St. Joe railroad depot in this 1916 photograph was the rst car to have all electric lighting and an electric self-starter. What else was unique about this Cadillac? Hint: This car would never have a at tire! Pelican Pete has a Centennial Stumper for You! ANSWER ON PAGE B6Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Raymond Elmo Aylmer seems to have this Florida Paratransit Roadeo down to an art form. Aylmer, representing Gulf Public Transportation, won two more rst-place plaques in Fort Myers during the recent statewide competition for drivers from organizations that provide public transportation to the disabled, seniors and needy. The competition is intense, it is nothing you just show up for and do, Aylmer said. It makes you feel good about yourself. You competed against everybody in the state and being from this small community, its nice knowing the services we provide people is recognized because the people down south, they know who we are. That is in large measure because of Aylmer, who has made success at the Roadeo an annual rite of spring. Aylmer has been with Gulf Transportation for 16 years. He has competed in 11 Roadeos. He has taken home a plaque for one of the top three spots in all but three of those competitions and has nished second once at the national Roadeo. He has won four rst-place awards for Highest Bus Inspection Score in the past ve years. This year Aylmer won for Highest Bus Inspection Score and also took rst in the Van category. Those honors guaranteed a spot for Aylmer in the National Paratransit Roadeo to be held the rst of June in Albuquerque, N.M. That competition is really intense, Aylmer said. You are competing against people from 47 other states and sometimes drivers come down from Canada. Youve got a lot more people used to driving under much different circumstances that you might have encountered. That can get pretty intense. Not that the state competition is any cruise with top down. For example, in the Bus Inspection Category, the buses are sabotaged with four defects. One year, Aylmer recalled, the hose on the re extinguisher in the bus had been loosened. The driver has seven minutes to nd and address each defect. It could be anything, like a missing lug nut, Aylmer said. But you have to nd them in just By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Music Through the Years Music Festival, set to take place last weekend at George Core Park was over before it could begin. Mother Nature, it seemed, wasnt in the mood for a concert as rain soaked the afternoon making the electronic setup needed to run the show impossible. The festival, planned by Dana Boyer and the music committee, was planned as a fundraiser for the upcoming Centennial Celebration in June. This week the committee gathered to gure out what they would do in lieu of the cancellation, but no of cial announcement has been made. Pre-sale tickets will be refunded at City Hall for those who purchased in advance. Well see what we can do, said Mayor Mel Magidson. We hope people will step up and provide nancial support. The concert had been delayed until later in the day, but as storms continued, the bands were sent home. The headlining act, The Villagers, who had reunited for the rst time in 15 years, made the best of a bad situation and set up shop at The Thirsty Goat at The Port Inn and let the good times roll.WES LOCHER | The StarAfter the Music Festival was canceled, The Villagers played to a packed house at The Thirsty Goat.Aylmer continues Roadeo winning streak TIM CROFT | The StarRaymond Elmo Aylmer has lled one wall at Gulf Transportation with state and national awards during the past 16 years.See ROADEO B6 The Villagers perform despite weatherSee VILLAGERS B6 Star Staff ReportWith more than 342 registered contestants, the 11th annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament took place amid the rain and clouds at the Port St. Joe Marina last Saturday. Fishing and casting classes were given on Friday to prepare the kids for the shing to come and the wind and rain that appeared Saturday couldnt keep them from casting as the tournament began. Kids winAnnual shing tournament geared toward childrenPhotos by DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM; ADDITIONAL PHOTOS BY JOEL REED AND JONATHAN BROWN.See KIDS WIN B6

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MeetBubba,a83#1yr+BassetHound/AmericanBulldog mix.Hehasawonderfuloutgoingattitude.Bubbaloves attentionandpraise.Hewalksfairlywellonhisleashand wantstoplease.Bubbawouldlikeaforeverhomewherehe canbespoiled. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucould fosterormakeaDonation.AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwill becurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Please donothesitatetoemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.com oradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBay HumaneSocietyat850-227-1103andaskforMelodyor Debbie!Onlineapplicationsandpetphotosareavailableat www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm!FaithsThriftHutisalwaysinneed ofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare!Thehours forthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothour storeandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetosee youalltheresoon! Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet, pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety FREE SPAY/NEUTERFixingyourpet saveslives! St.JosephBayHumane SocietyisofferingFREE Spay/Neuterforthepetsof GulfCountyONLY Millionsofhealthy,adoptablecatsanddogsareeuthanizedeach yearsimplybecausetherearenotenoughhomesforthemall. CALL:8502271103ORPICKUPANAPPLICATIONAT100710THST.,PORTST.JOE,FL WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM -ONTHEPOOPDECK-INTHECROWSNESTPM DJ -LADIESNIGHTPM -HAPPYHOUR2092215 THANKYOUIwillcontinuetowork toimproveourcity.PaidforandapprovedbyMelMagidsonJr.forMayor/Commissioner PORTST.JOEforthehonor&privilege ofservingasyourMayor forthenext2years.(Pd.Pol.Ad.) SocietyB2 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 McKenzie Grace Lyle!Happy Birthday, Baby Girl. We love youMom, Steven and Preston McKenzie will be celebrating her big day on Sunday with family and friends! She is the daughter of  Tonyia McDaniel Lyle of Wewahitchka, and Phillip Lyle of Panama City Beach, and sister of Steven Lyle of Wewahitchka. She also is the granddaughter of Nancy Mack of Carrabelle and the granddaughter of the late Stewart Yank Lyle from Highland View, and the late Patricia Coker Mims and David H. Mims of Wewahitchka. Look whos turning 8 Star Staff ReportPictured are members of the Port St. Joe Lions Club, led by President Jim Norton, and board members from the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society surrounding a new sign the money for which was donated by the Lions Club. The new sign, at the intersection of State 71 and Knowles Avenue in Port St. Joe, provides motorists clearer directions on the location of the Humane Society Shelter and adjacent Faiths Thrift Hut, which helps support Humane Society. operations. According to the Sandi Christy of the Humane Society, The sign has already made a big difference in people being able to locate the shelter and thrift hut. The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society greatly appreciates the Lions Clubs support.Lions Club donates sign for Humane SocietySpecial to THE St T AR 26 Troop 47 Scouts earn merit badgesSpecial to The StarTroop 47 Scoutmasters had a busy night Monday, May 6 with handing out 26 merit badges earned by eight scouts. Scouts Josh Willis, Thomas Miniat, Tyler Watson, Hunter Van Der Tulip, Dokata Braun, Caleb Schweikert, Christian Quaranta and Preston Burkett earned Eagle Scout-required merit badges at an Eagle Academy held by Camp Osborne of the South Georgia Council. The merit badges they earned were rst aid, emergency preparedness, citizenship in the world, citizenship in the community, personal tness, environmental science and ngerprinting. A great job done by all and they are halfway toward their Eagle Scout requirements.PSJ Cub Scout Pack 347 Crossover The same night Cub Master Abigail Cozine had two scouts from her pack cross over with Arrow of Light honors to Troop 47 of PSJ. Scouts Sean Farnsley and Christian Quaranta had earned the Arrow of Light the highest award that can be earned in cub scouting and the only award that can be worn on their Boy Scout uniform after the cross over. Troop 47 Scout masters and scouts also were there to receive their new members with a scout handbook and a neckerchief with a slide. Congrats boys and Good Luck on your new path toward Eagle. RReward for informationStar Staff ReportOn the night of March 29, the home at 6385 Long St. in Overstreet was burglarized and several items were stolen: a Sear Craftsman 75th anniversary circular saw; a Dewalt variable speed drill; a Stihl gasoline chain saw; a box of metal drill bits; and a small hatchet. The thieves destroyed a sliding glass door. The owner of the home, Glenn Davis, is asking for help to catch these people. A reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest of the person(s) responsible. Call Davis at 227-4748. GCEC welcomes Moore to Board of TrusteesSpecial to The StarGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is proud to welcome Betty J. Moore to its board of trustees. Moore was elected at the Cooperatives 65th Annual Members Meeting, held earlier this month, to serve as the District I, Group 1 Trustee. She represents GCEC members in Jackson and Washington counties and is the rst female board member in the Cooperatives 71year history. Moore is a graduate of Bay High School and attended Gulf Coast State College. She has more than 30 years of banking experience, primarily in lending operations, and has worked in Bay, Franklin, Gulf, Jackson and Okaloosa counties. I look forward to the opportunity to learn more about my local coop and to serve its members and employees, Moore said. This opportunity will enhance my knowledge of the operations of our co-op and give me a chance to use my professional experience to benet the cooperative.Special to The StarWith summer right around the corner, its time to think about keeping children healthy while school is out. The Gulf Coast Workforce Board will be providing free nutritionally balanced meals to children during the summer through the Summer Food Service Program. From June 17Aug. 2, meals will be served at the Washington Gym Complex at 414 East Kenny St. in Port St. Joe Monday through Friday (closed July 4-5 in observance of Independence Day). Lunch will be served from 12 p.m.1 p.m. ET with a snack to follow at 2 p.m. Gulf County children, age 18 and under, regardless of race, color, sex, disability, age, or national origin may come to eat. For more information, contact Gulf Coast Workforce Board at 850-913-3285. Each year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture partners with local organizations like the Gulf Coast Workforce Board to provide free meals to children when school is out for the summer. For more information about the national Summer Food Service Program, visit www.fns. usda.gov/cnd/summer. Workforce board offers food for kids

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The Star| B3Thursday, May 16, 2013 RealEstatePicksOurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentied whattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundand areoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(In thissection),Discoverthebestrealestatevalues inMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,Cape SanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelle andsurroundingareas. BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD HeyGolfers,ComeJoinUs! OpentothePublicDiscountforActiveMilitaryDiscountsandBenetsforClubMembersJoinBeforeJuly1st,2013andwe'llwaive the $400initiationfeeTheCourseisinGreatShape! TeeTimesoptionalGroupsavailabletojoin!St.JosephBayGolfClub PortSt.Joe,FL32456 (850)227-1751 SALONLUX850-227-4582 220REIDAVENUE PORTSAINTJOE,FLORIDA32456www.facebook.com/salonluxpsjHAIRSERVICES MAKE-UP School News Front Row: Nathan Lipford, Makayan Jones, Caroline Sapp, Kylie Ingalls, Raelynn Hardy Back Row: T ad Russell, Lauren Jenkins,  Natalie Graziano, Tyrell Patterson, Chris Bryan Dazzling DOLPHINSBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com As his economic teacher at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr.. High School, Derek Kurnitsky, said, What cant Javarri do? The subject of the question was Javarri Beachum, who recently placed second in the Northwest Florida region in simulated stock market game. The Florida Stock Market Simulation game is an online exercise in economic class. Students receive $100,000 in free money and go to a website that effectively mirrors the New York Stock Exchange, down to company trading symbols and trading prices. Students can buy and sell stocks, purchase bonds and Treasury notes and by mid-April the closing bell rings on the class and tallies are made. Beachum, an outstanding leader with the NJROTC program, headed to the Naval Academy Prep School, outstanding student, standout soccer player, nished second in the region among all high schoolers. As he told Kurnitsky, if the game had continued this month, when the market is at record levels, Hes pretty sure he could have nished rst, Kurnitsky said with a laugh. Is there anything he cant do? Beachum earned an award and also a $50 gift card to Papa Johns Pizza.Beachum rewarded for stock playsSp P ECi I Al L To O ThTH E STARJavarri Beachum is anked by Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Principal Jeremy Knapp, left and teacher Derek Kurnitsky. Prayer is a big part of our nations historySpecial to The StarFasting and prayer are religious exercises; the enjoining them an act of discipline. Every religious society has a right to determine for itself the time for these exercises, and the objects proper for them, according to their own particular tenets; and right can never be safer than in their hands, where the Constitution has deposited it. Thomas Jefferson, 1808 Because of the faith of many of our founding fathers, public prayer and national days of prayer have a long-standing and signicant history in American tradition. The Supreme Court afrmed the right of state legislatures to open their sessions with prayer in Marsh vs. Chambers (1983). The National Day of Prayer is a vital part of our heritage. Since the rst call to prayer in 1775, when the Continental Congress asked the colonies to pray for wisdom in forming a nation, the call to prayer has continued through our history, including President Lincolns proclamation of a day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer in 1863. In 1952, a joint resolution by Congress, signed by President Truman, declared an annual, national day of prayer. In 1988, the law was amended and signed by President Reagan, permanently setting the day as the rst Thursday of every May. Each year, the president signs a proclamation, encouraging all Americans to pray on this day. Last year, all 50 state governors plus the governors of several U.S. territories signed similar proclamations. 1952   Harry S. Truman declares a National Day of Prayer and signs into law an annual observance there of United States Congress passed Joint Resolution 382 on April 17, 1952/ President Truman signs Public Law 82-324 (Public Law 82-324; 66 Stat. 64April 17, 1952). 1988   Ronald Reagan signs into law the designation of the rst Thursday in May as the annual observance for the National Day of P rayer  President Reagan signs Public Law 100-307 January 25, 1988, in the Second Session of the One Hundredth Congress (Public Law 100-307May 5, 1988). The preceding information was taken from the National Day of Prayer ofcial website. John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069 Ladies Auxiliary scholarshipSpecial to The StarAt the NJROTC Awards Banquet held May 9, Senior Vice President of the Ladies Auxiliary, Ginny Seefeldt, had the honor of presenting a $500 scholarship to Cadet Kassandra Favre. It is the Ladies Auxiliarys privilege to each year present a scholarship to a worthy NJROTC female Cadet. We wish Kassandra the best of everything as she enters the United States Navy after her graduation. The Lions Tale MoORE sSChoolHOOL nNEWsS B5

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget SUNDAY:WORSHIPATSUNSETPARK8AMCST 10:30AMCSTONTHE2NDSUNDAYOFTHEMONTH SUNDAY:BIBLECLASS9:30AMCST MONDAY:LIFETREECAF7PMCST TUESDAY:MENSBIBLESTUDY6:30PMCST THURSDAY:WOMENSBIBLESTUDY5PMCST1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.com SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org Thursday, May 16, 2013 Bobbie Jo Cox, 73, passed away Saturday, May 11, 2013, after a long ght with Alzheimers disease. She was resident of Clinton, Tenn., for many years where she was retired from Nannys Educational Preschool in Knoxville, Tenn. Bobbie loved to spend time with family and friends on the beach or just visiting. She is survived by her husband of 49 years, Carl Cox; son, David Cox; and granddaughter, Hailey Cox all of Clinton, Tenn.; daughter Carla and Wayne ODell of St. Joe Beach with her beloved dog Babyscooter. Bobbies memorial service will be Thursday, May 16, 2013, at 8 p.m. at Hatmaker Funeral Home in Lake City, Tenn., with burial at Oak Grove Cemetery on Friday, May 17, 2013. The family would like to thank the nurses and staff at The Bridge of Bay St. Joe for all the wonderful cared they gave Bobbie during her ve-year stay with them. Also, the family would like to give many thanks for all the prayers that have been given over the past ve years.Bobbie Jo CoxCharles Howard Stephens Sr., child of God, loving husband, dedicated father and granddaddy as well as community servant, was born in Donalsonville, Ga., on March 8, 1943, and went to be the Lord on May 10, 2013. He and his wife Bonnie celebrated 52 years of marriage. He is survived by his wife Bonnie; his children Chuck Stephens (Julia), Gaynell Jones (Bob) and Lynn Watts (John); and his grandchildren Ty and Anna Drake Stephens, Phillip and David Jones, and Sarah Beth and Trevor Watts. He is also survived by his brothers Steve, of California, and Robert and Pete, both of Georgia, as well as dearest friends Harry Lee Smith and Phil Early. He is now celebrating with his parents, Clyde and Grover, brothers, Nelson and David, sister Mary Alice, and many other friends and family members. Charles and Bonnie made their home Port St. Joe in 1967 when Charles accepted a position at the St. Joe Paper Company. He worked there as a shift supervisor until the mill closed in 1998. One of Charless greatest testimonies of his faith in God was exempli ed after the mill shut down permanently and he continued to live his life in such a way that demonstrated his belief in Gods promise to sustain us in all of our needs. One of Charles passions included spending time with his family. If he wasnt taking them to the beach, he was taking them to a campground, the mountains, or Disney. Charles was an active member of First Baptist Church, serving as usher, bus driver for Sunday School trips, and cooking at the monthly Mens Fellowship Breakfast. He loved being fed with Gods Word, fellowship, and worship. From 2007-2011 Charles served as City Commissioner. Charles lived his life serving the needs of others rst; as a commissioner, this passion guided him in all ethical decisions and ideas to better the community he loved. Charles was instrumental in having several structures built for the community members. There will be a Dedication Ceremony on May 31 to name the Holly Hill Cemetery Pavilion in his memory. Charles had a strong determination to stay active and loved working at St. Joe Rent-All. The family invited all friends and family to come celebrate Charles life and share in remembrance of countless good times. There was an open visitation from 1-2 p.m. ET and a life celebration service at 2 p.m. on May 14, 2013 E.S.T at the First Baptist Church, Port St. Joe. The family would like to thank all the friends and family members who have shown kind acts during these past few months, the EMT, nurses, doctors, Comforter Funeral Home, the staff of The Tommy Hamm Cancer Center, and Covenant Hospice. Memorial donations may be made to First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe, The American Cancer Society, or Covenant Hospice. The LORD is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer; my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. Psalm 18:2.Charles Howard Stephens Sr. CHARLES STEPHENS SR.Memorial services for Clyde Whitehead of Port Saint Joe will be in the pavilion at Holly Hill Cemetery at 11 a.m. ET on Saturday, May 18, 2013. Clyde Whitehead OBITUARIESTips for experiencing a satisfying life presented at Lifetree CafSpecial to The StarHow to experience a full and satisfying life will be explored at Lifetree Caf at 7 p.m. CT on Monday, May 20. The program, How to Live Before You Die: Embracing Life to the Fullest, features an exclusive lmed interview with Sasha Vukelja, who as a young girl escaped from communist Yugoslavia and emigrated to the United States. Vukelja, now an oncologist, tells how she works with patients facing an uncertain future to nd hope and a positive attitude. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 Highway 98, Mexico Beach FL 32456 across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. @PSJ_StarFOLLOW US ON TWITTERFISH FRY, YARD SALE AT FUMCFirst United Methodist Churchs Youth and Children Ministries will hold a yard sale/ sh fry under the sails on Friday. Proceeds will go toward summer camps and mission trips. Find hidden treasures and leave with a delicious lunch. For $8 you will get fresh local sh provided by Greg Abrams Tarpon Dock, baked beans, cole slaw and bread. COMMUNITY CHOIR AT PHILADELPHIA PRIMITIVENorth Port St. Joe Community Choir will have a program on Saturday at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church. The performance will begin at 6 p.m. ET, and the guest speaker will be CoPastor Bell of Panama City.BLOOD DRIVE AT FIRST BAPTISTFirst Baptist Church of Port St. Joe will hold a Blood Drive from 1-6 p.m. ET on Monday at the church. All donors will receive a special Military Appreciation T-shirt. If online signup is available, make an appointment at www.fbsdonor.org and use account G7016.CHILDREN AND YOUTH DAY AT PHILADELPHIA PRIMITIVEChildren and Youth Day will be celebrated at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on May 27. This years theme is Being Prepared By God. The speaker for this 11 a.m. ET worship hour will be Master Therron Smith, Jr. T.J. is a dynamic third-grader and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Therron Smith Sr., and they attend Faith Bible Church in Port St. Joe. Pastor Hawkins and Philadelphias Youth Group cordially invites everyone to come and be a part of this great experience. The church is on Avenue D. Faith BRIEFS

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GULFCOUNTY CURRENTS 4514455 4514457 PUBLICNOTICEAPublicHearingwillbeheldatthePlanning andDevelopmentReviewBoard(PDRB)meetingonMonday,May20,2013at8:45a.m.EST, andattheBoardofCountyCommissioners (BOCC)meetingonTuesday,May28,2013at 9:00a.m.EST.Bothpublichearingswillbeheld intheBOCCMeetingRoomattheRobertM. MooreAdministrationBuilding,1000CecilG. CostinSr.Blvd.,PortSt.Joe,Florida.epublic hearingswillbetodiscussandactonthefollowing: 1.ApprovalofMinutes 2.Variance-TerryColwelletal-forParcelID #03806-019R-LocatedinSection31, Township6South,Range11West,Gulf County,Florida-Roadsetbackencroachment duetoCCCLresultingina10.71'setback. 3.Variance-Trent&MarlineVanDyke-Par celID#03903-000R-LocatedinSection5, Township7South,Range11West,Gulf County,Florida-Roadsetbackencroachment andSouthernpropertysetback. 4.SmallScaleLandUseAmendment-Wanda BrownDavis-ParcelID#02949-000RLocatedinSection11,Township7South, Range10West,GulfCounty,Florida-Chang ingapproximately1.22acresfromResidential toMixedCommercial/Residential. 5.RevisionstotheCountyDevelopmentRegula tionsandPolicies(LDR) 6.Sta,PublicandOpenDiscussion epublicisencouragedtoattendandbeheard onthesematters.InformationpriortothemeetingcanbeviewedatthePlanningDepartmentat 1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,Room311. (2013.59) School NewsThe Star| B5Thursday, May 16, 2013 It is remarkable to earn perfect attendance and the Parker children are siblings. Back row from left, Sam Parker, Blake Lynn and Laurel Parker. Front row from left, Zion Parker and Hannah Watts. Those who only missed one day are Andrew Simmons and Bray Gavrun, pictured at left. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARThird-grade students from Wewahitchka Elementary School recently had a eld trip to the St. Joseph Peninsular State Park. While there they learned about the intertidal salt ats and the Gulf dune system. The rangers prepared touch tanks with many animals for the students to observe and experience. The students experienced a truly great eld trip. Thank you to Mr. Knapke, the park manager, Ranger LeAnn, Ranger Kathy and Ranger Joe for all the hard work making this trip possible. Serenity Davidson, Avery Davis, Caleb Carter, Jasmine Lister, Sierra Kirkland, Alex Baldwin, Cody Pickron, Jordan Pippin, Joshua Rafeld, Ava Kelsoe, McKaylah Harrison, Hayden McDaniel, Laurel Parker, Taylor Roberts, Zeth Hanlon, Chloe Fuller, Izavion Hellum, Terrell Womack, Sarah Bailey, Mikey Roberts, Jonathan Harvey, Shiloh Jamerson, Breanna Weathers, Jasmine Causey, Hallie Vann, James Jensen and Matthew Randig. Special to T T HE STARThe president, board of trustees, faculty and staff of Florida A&M University announced the graduation of Princess Royce A. Likely with the degree of master of science in Health Care Administration on Saturday, May 4 in the Lawson Center in Tallahassee. Princess is a 2001 graduate of Port St. Joe High School. She is the daughter of Ray and Minnie Likely and the mother of Jakari Sims of Port St. Joe. LIKELY GRADUATEsS FROM FAMUFAMU PERFECT ATTENDANCE AT WEWAHITCHKA ELEMENTARY sSCHOOL WEWAHITCHKA ELEMENTARY sSCHOOL sSTUDENTsS OF THE MONTHSPECIAL TO TT HE STARAs of Monday, May 13, Wewahitchka Elementary School third-grade teachers Mr. John Huft and Ms. Alisa Burnette are proud to present their students who have completed FCAT Explorer Third Grade Galactic Library! First row, from left: Alex Williams, Katie Shealy, Zeth Hanlon, Lilly Dennson, Josh Kemp, Jaiyden Scruggs, Chelsi Sorenson, Kaylee Easter. Second row, from left: Briceson Davis, Caden Wooten, Wesley Hunt, Destiny Palmer, Taylor Roberts, Lee Holton, Blake Hightower. Matt Hall is not pictured. THE GREATEsST FIELD TRIP EVER THIRD GRADE GALACTIC LIBRARY

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Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 Trades&ServicesCALLTODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction StumpGrinder StumpGrinder 4514617 FromAtoZ850-340-0756 GregsHandymanService &LawnMaintenance CheckoutmyworkonFacebook! JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES,TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVALALSOCLEANGUTTERSANDIRRIGATIONINSTILLATION,PLANTINGANDBEDDINGAVAILABLECALLJOE8503230741OREMAILJOES_LAWNYAHOO.COM LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 This Cadillac underwent extensive modication to its wheels, axles, steering and braking systems to give it a new life as a rail car. This rail car was used to inspect track, perform errands and transport VIPs along the Apalachicola Northern rail system. Trivia ANSWERseven minutes. But it is also part of your daily habits, what you should be doing for a public transportation organization like ours. In each category there is also a 25-question written exam and drivers also must be able to properly secure a wheelchair to van for transport in seven minutes from greeting the rider, asking questions about their destination to securing the wheelchair. The driving test in the Van Category is no less intense. The most pressure is once you get out on the course and it is going through your mind everything you need to remember, Aylmer said. There is a course of tennis balls and cones on which the driver must navigate the wheels of the van between the tennis balls no farther apart than inches while ensuring no cones are touched. Everything has to be precise, Aylmer said. The driver also must perform a passenger stop, ensuring proper distance from the curb and practicing the best hospitality in greeting and boarding the passenger. There also are cones shaped in a V which drivers must enter driving 20 mph while ensuring they have remained clear of every cone. This is basically what you do every day, Aylmer said. It is what you should strive to do every day. And as Aylmer provides an example for his fellow drivers at Gulf Transportation, he also has built a reputation among the many contestants at the Florida Paratransit Roadeo. One lady had a question and she said shed go ask the expert, which she said was me, Alymer said. I am no expert, but they have come to know about me down south. A wall of plaques at Gulf Transportation serves as a reminder of why. ROADEO from page B1Locals and out-of-town visitors who originally came for the music festival crowded the porch area of the lounge and enjoyed some of their favorite tunes from the 60s and 70s. Even after being rained out once, The Villagers took the stage a second time and played another set much to the delight of the crowd. It seemed that Mother Nature couldnt stop the music after all. Only seven weeks out from the kickoff of the centennial events, the fundraiser was expected to bring in much-needed funds for the planned activities which include a parade, a light show and the annual reworks display. Funds are currently being raised through the sale of the commemorative centennial coins and PSJ T-shirts with a sh fry currently being planned. VILLAGERS from page B1As summer approaches, the preparation and care youve given your vegetable garden will really be put to the test. We say this because insect problems at this time of year can be quite serious. Summer in our area of the state provides the heat and humidity on which insects thrive. Without adequate control, pests can destroy your garden. Very soon, all the time and effort youve put into your garden should begin to pay off in delicious fresh vegetables that is, if you cant get to your crops before the insect do. All the care youve given your vegetable garden up till now will be meaningless if insects are allowed to rob you of your harvest. Well talk about the most common and bothersome bugs you may nd on your vegetables. Well offer some advice on their control. My information on controlling garden insects was provided by Susan E. Webb, associate professor, Entomology and Nematology, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, University of Florida. The insects you need to worry about in the weeks ahead are divided into two broad categories, those which live and do their damage above ground and those which live in the soil and bother the roots and lower stem of vegetables. The most common above ground pests include leaf miners, armyworms, spider mites, ea beetles aphids, whitey leaf footed plant bug, bean leaf rollers and stinkbugs. Cutworms, wireworms and mole crickets top the list of below ground villains. Leaf miners seem to cause the greatest damage on tomato and cucumber plants. Theyre called leaf miners because they burrow in between the transparent membranes on the top and bottom surfaces of the leaves as they feed. They eat the living plant tissue, leaving the membranes, which then look like tiny window panes. The army worm youll nd in your garden are the same as those youre probably all too familiar with in your lawn. They feed on plant foliage and attack a variety of crops. Spider mites arent really insects. In fact, as the name suggest, theyre actually more closely related to spiders. Theyre tine pests usually no more than a ftieth of an inch long. They gather on the undersides of plant leaves, and feed by piercing the leaves with their needle-like mouthparts and sucking out the plant juices. Aphids sometimes called plant lice also causes damage by piercing leaf tissue and sucking out the plant juices. Flea beetles are chewing insects which cause damage by chewing small holes in vegetables leaves. Bean leaf rollers The bean leaf roller feeds on members of the bean family. The adult, a skipper buttery, deposits eggs on the lower leaf surface, either singly or in cluster of 2 to 6. The caterpillar cut triangles or semicircles from the edges of the plant leaf and fold them over to make individual shelters, only at night to feed. Flea beetle are tiny (1/16 inch long) bronze, black or brown beetles which attack young tomato plants, peppers, egg plants and other garden plants. They can jump rapidly for great distances when approached and they resemble large eas in appearance and habit. Leaf footed plant bugs gets its name from the appearance of its hind legs which are large and attened in a leaf-like shape near the feet it is generally dark or chestnut brown with a cross bar about halfway down its body. Whitey the most common whitey found on Florida vegetables is called the sliver leaf whitey because of the effect its feeding has on squash leaves. Feeding by the immature stages or nymphs can also result in white areas in tomato fruits, streaking of pepper fruit, and blanching of broccoli stems. Whiteies are not ies, but distant relatives of aphids and leaf hoppers and like them, feed on plant sap with piercing-sucking mouthparts. Stinkbugs are common pests of most all plants and are generally solitary feeders in the adult stage. Immature nymphs, which do not y, may be found in groups. All stinkbugs give off a characteristic foul smell as a defensive weapon when disturbed. All this may sound discouraging. But, fortunately, its actually fairly easy and inexpensive to control your local County Extension Ofce or Garden Center for recommended insecticides to control foliage feeding pests. The insects which live in the soil are a different matter, because its hard to reach them with sprays. Cutworms simply cut young vegetable plants off at the soil surface. Mole crickets tunnel through the soil in the root zone, feeding on the roots and disturbing the surrounding earth. Wireworms attack a wide variety of vegetables. Living deep in the soil, they move up quickly to attack seeds or young plants. Wireworms drill holes in the seeds and feed inside them or they bore into the taproot of the plant. Insects in this category are best controlled with insecticide baits, which are normally available at garden centers. One thing we dont want to do is encourage you to use pesticides if you really dont need to. While a preventative spray program might be essential in a large scale commercial operation, you usually can deal with insects in the backyard garden on an as needed basis. For more information on garden insects contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit our website: gulf.ifas.u. edu or www.edis.ifas.u. edu and see Publication ENY 476 and ENY 012.Dont allow garden insects to rob you of produce ROY LeeEE CarAR TerERCounty extension director College basketball Coach Cliff Ellis crooned to the crowd.Wes ES LL OCHer ER | The Star KIDS WIN from page B1Trophies were given out for the biggest sh and most sh caught within each division. The Small Fry division featured kids aged 3 to 8 and the Junior class was for children 9 to 16. The contest was limited to in-shore, near-shore, Intracostal waterway shing and contestants could be no further than three miles from shore. Fishing could take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. It was an excellent turnout, said Rick Carrie, President of the Kids Win Foundation. Everybody had a great time.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 16, 2013 The Star | B7 90948S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232007CA 000446CAXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-2, Plaintiff, v. RICHARD LEE MULLINAX A/K/A RICHARD L. MULLINAX A/K/A RICHARD MULLINAX; PATRICIA KELLY MULLINAX A/K/A PATRICIA KELLY A/K/A PATRICIA E. KELLY A/K/A PATRICIA MULLINAX; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 14, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 232007CA000446CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 23rd day of May, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: PARCEL 1: COMMENCE AT A 6 SQUARE ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 412.59 FEET ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED); THENCE GO SOUTH 34 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 462.14 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 418.55 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 350.59 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 321.17 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF FIELDSTONE LANE (HAVING A 66 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 282.76 FEET TO A POINT OF INTERSECTION WITH THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF LONG MEADOW DRIVE (HAVING A 66 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO NORTH 10 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 339.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL CONTAINING 2.41 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ALSO PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH SQUARE ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NW CORNER OF THE NE OF THE SE OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12 35 EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 412.59 FEET ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NE OF THE SE (AS MONUMENTED); THENCE GO SOUTH 34 DEGREES 55 28 WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 349.12 FOR THE POB; THENCE GO SOUTH 55 DEGREES 04 32 EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 19.97 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 34 DEGREES 55 28 EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 285.02 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 89 DEGREES 12 35 EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 194.44 FEET; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 25 WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 728.36 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 89 DEGREES 12 35 WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 350.59 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 10 DEGREES 45 00 WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 418.56 FEET; THENCE GO NORTH 34 DEGREES 55 EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 113.02 FEET; TO THE POB. SAID PARCEL CONTAINING 5.95 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1990 MERITT LIVESTOCK, TRIPLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME VIN# HMLCP40023885930A, HMLCP40023885930B, AND HMLCP40023885930C. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administration Gulf County P.O. Box 826 Marianna, FL 32447 Phone: (850)718-0026 DATED AT PORT SAINT JOE, FLORIDA THIS 26TH DAY OF APRIL, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BA BAXTER DEPUTY CLERK May 9, 16, 2013 93425S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids for Janitorial Supplies. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850-2298369 May 9, 16, 2013 91038S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of L.A. LOFT, located at 133 E. Church Ave., in the County of Gulf, in the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, 32465 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Wewahitchka, Florida, this 6th day of May, 2013. Lee Ann Bennett May 16, 2013 93463S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2011-CA-000394 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Roper a/k/a Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft, Husband and Wife Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated April 25, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA000394 of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Michael Edward Croft a/k/a Michael E. Croft a/k/a Michael Croft and Theresa Faye Roper a/k/a Theresa Faye Croft a/k/a Theresa F. Croft a/k/a Teresa Croft are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Rebecca L. Norris, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DESK OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 5TH STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. ET on May 30th, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 9, BLOCK I, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36, RUNNING THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17E. ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE, RUN S. 89 DEGREES 59W. ALONG THE SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N, 62 DEGREES 20W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N. 85 DEGREES 19W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 200.35 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 439.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID CORN GRIFFIN STREET; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59E. ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A NONTANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 17 DEGREES 21, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 82 DEGREES 46E. FOR 53.40 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE A, ARC DISTANCE OF 53.61 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 403.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING 60 FOOT PRIVATE ROAD, BEING MORN PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36 RUNNING THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 652.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N, 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 499.32 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 00 DEGREES 00W, 60.00 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY, NORTHERLY, AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 497.94 FEET; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 456.59 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 25.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 75 DEGREES 40E. 99.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 101.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 84 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 144.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 237.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 92 DEGREES 07 , AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 30E. 341.34 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 381.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE, THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 00W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 11.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 40.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 44 DEGREES 59E. 56.57 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF I SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 17E. ALONG SAID EAST LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 59W. 141.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 157.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 00 DEGREES 00E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 12.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 177.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 93 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 44 DEGREES 57W. 256.80 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 287.32 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 84 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 148.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 90.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 38 DEGREES 40, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 75 DEGREES 40W. 59.61 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 60.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 56 DEGREES 19W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 432.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 367.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 81 DEGREES 11, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 08 DEGREES 34W. 477.23 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 519.54 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 81 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 244.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 334.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 00, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N, 61 DEGREES 18E. 228.98 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 233.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 41 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 146.20 FEET, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 65 DEGREES 38E. 120.56 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.26 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 155.46 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 45 DEGREES 38E. 217.35 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 240.67 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 01 DEGREES 18E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 18.56 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W. FOR DISTANCE OF 17.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 95.46 FEET; A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 88 DEGREES 42, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 45 DEGREES 38W. 133.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 147.78 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE, SAID CURVE BEING CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 206.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 48 DEGREES 41, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 65 DEGREES 38W. 170.03 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 175.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 41 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 274.75 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 40, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 61 DEGREES 18W. 187.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 191.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 81 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 175.00 FEET; THENCE N. 42 DEGREES 54E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 38.36 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 210.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N. 25 DEGREES 59E. 122.20 FEET;THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 124.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE N. 09 DEGREES 04E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 78.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 487.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 55, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N.06 DEGREES 20W. 185.24 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 186.37 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE S. 90 DEGREES 00W. ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 63.28 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 18, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 07 DEGREES 45E. 178.66 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 158.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE S. 09 DEGREES 04W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 76.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 150.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 33 DEGREES 49, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 25 DEGREES 59W. 87.29 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 88.57 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 42 DEGREES 54W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 111.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 427.00, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 85 DEGREES 44, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 06 DEGREES 46E., 561.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF 639.03 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 120.10 FEET; THENCE S. 57 DEGREES 15 W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 272.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DE-SAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 286 DEGREES 15, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 32 DEGREES 44E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.81 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CULDE-SAC; THENCE N. 57 DEGREES 15 E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 298.97 FEET; THENCE S. 56 DEGREES 19E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 153.33 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 496.00 FEET; THENCE S. 89 DEGREES 59W. FOR A DISTANCE OF 454.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVING CUL-DESAC CONCAVE TO THE EAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 75.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 312 DEGREES 50, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S. 00 DEGREES 00E. 60.00 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY, SOUTHERLY, AND EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC AN ARC DISTANCE OF 409.52 FEET TO A POINT OF NON-TANGENCY IN SAID CURVING CUL-DE-SAC; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 452.89 FEET; THENCE S. 01 DEGREES 18W, FOR A DISTANCE OF 245.25 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 59E. FOR A DISTANCE OF 60.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER TH SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order) to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted by: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 10-201433 FC01 CHE May 9, 16, 2013 93429S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting bids. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Transportation Department, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 or faxed by calling 850-2271204. Items that are up for bid. Tires/Tubes, Bid #14-002 Gas/Diesel/Oil, Bid #14-004 Seat Covers, Bid #14-003 May 9, 16, 2013 93431S ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS: The Gulf County School Board will be accepting extermination/ pest control bids for Gulf School District Facilities. A bid package may be picked up at the Gulf County School Board, Maintenance Department, 150 Middle School Road or faxed by calling 850229-8369. May 9, 16, 2013 93467S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23 2009 CA 000503 DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HALO 2007-2, Plaintiff, vs. DIANE M. ZIMMERMAN, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 06, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23 2009 CA 000503 of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HSI ASSET LOAN OBLIGATION TRUST 2007-2, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-21, is the Plaintiff and DIANE M. ZIMMERMAN; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 30th day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THAT CERTAIN TRACT, PARCEL OR PLOT OF LAND LYING WESTERLY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98) IMMEDIATELY IN FRONT OF AND ACROSS THE, RIGHT WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 30 AND GULF STREET IN YONS ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, FLORIDA, AS IF THE NORTH AND SOUTH BOUNDARY LINES OF GULF STREET WERE EXTENDED TO THE SEASHORE WESTERLY OF STATE ROAD 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY 98), AND BEING A STRIP OR PARCEL OF LAND 70 FEET IN WIDTH AND EXTENDING FROM THE RIGHT WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD 30 TO THE HIGH WATER MARK OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, AND INCLUDING RIPARIAN RIGHTS; THE LOT BEING UNNUMBERED LOT DELINEATED ON THE MAP OF YONS ADDITION TO BEACON HILL, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 6801 HWY 98 SJB, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on April 30, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717 Hearing Impaired: Dial 711 Email: ADARequest@ jud14.flcourts.org F09087960 May 9, 16, 2013 93465S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 13-27 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of ALBERT J. FLEISCHMANN, JR., also Known as ALBERT J. FLEISCHMANN, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of ALBERT J. FLEISCHMANN, JR., deceased, File Number 13-27 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is May 9, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Nikola Fleischmann NIKOLA FLEISCHMANN 247 Selma Street Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Thomas S. Gibson THOMAS S. GIBSON FL Bar No. 0350583 RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. 116 Sailors Cove Dr. P. O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 229-8211 May 9, 16, 2013 93555S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-29 CA Division: PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: All persons claiming by, through, under, or against Defendant, Gulf Supply Company of Port St. Joe, Inc. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage lien on real property and a security interest lien on personal property located in Gulf County, Florida described as follows: Real Property Lot 3, of Port St. Joe,

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B8| The Star Thursday, May 16, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4514621 RENTALS 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE,FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 www.seacrestre.com www.rsttness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW2 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT .............................. $550 3 BR / 2 BAMOBILEHOME .......... $700 1 BR/1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT, INCLUDESUTILITIES .................. $650 2 BR/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME WITHPOOL ............................... $850OFFICE BUILDING FOR RENT 1 500 SQ. FT 2 LOTS, HIGHWAY98 FRONTAGE ......... $650 4514614 Dockside Caf & Raw Bar @ PSJ Marina**Seasonal Bonus Top Pay!**NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: Kitchen Managers/Cooks Bartenders/Managers Servers/Bussers Shuckers DishwashersAPPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com BARTENDER / THERAPIST NEEDEDThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWPPort Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 NOW HIRINGPARTTIME EVENING COOKThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time evening cook. The ideal candidate will have kitchen experience, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HOUSEKEEPER NEEDEDThe MainStay Suites and Port Inn are now accepting applications for housekeepers. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe Fl, 324564514568 Apalachicola Bay Charter School THE APALACHICOLA BAY CHARTER SCHOOL IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR 201314 SCHOOL YEAR: Certied Elementary Education Teachers Physical Education Teacher Preschool Teacher ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 2090916 HIRING WEEK $8.25 Hr. with open availability Port St. Joe McDonalds Come join our team!!! We offer part or full time positions with opportunities for advancement! Open Interviews May 20-23 from 2-4 pm at the Port St. Joe Location Apply online at www.costamcd.com2090916 1109836 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive benet package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! REPRESENTATIVES will be at theGULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCEon Tuesdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Commerce Park Phase II, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, at Page(s) 54 and 55 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. P ersonal Property Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property, and all easements, appurtenances, and fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. All replacements and additions. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Thomas S. Gibson, of Rish, Gibson & Scholz, P.A., the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P. O. Box 39, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32457, on or before June 10, 2013, 2013 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. DATED this the 6th day of May, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court By: /s/ BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 16, 23, 2013 93595S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on June 6, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statues, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Gulf County, Florida: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO EXHIBIT A Real Property TRACT 4: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 6 FOR 1842.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 30-E; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 335.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 149.69 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 EAST, FOR 513.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. JOSEPH BAY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE FOR 100.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS NORTH 38 EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 38 WEST, FOR 595.4 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND TRACT 5: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 6 FOR 1842.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 30E; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 185.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 149.69 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 EAST, FOR 595.4 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. JOSEPH BAY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE FOR 100.02 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS NORTH 38 EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 38 WEST, FOR 676.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND TRACT 6: A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN GOVERNMENT LOT 1 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 6; THENCE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 6 FOR 1842.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 30-E; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 33.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 EAST, ALONG SAID WEST LINE FOR 152.47 FEET; THENCE NORTH 38 EAST, FOR 676.7 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATERS EDGE OF ST. JOSEPH BAY; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE FOR 100.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS NORTH 38 EAST FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 38 WEST, FOR 760.3 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS (A, B AND C): PARCEL A: A parcel or tract of land lying and being in Fractional Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of said Fractional Section 6 and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary line of said Section 6, for a distance of 1842.81 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, continue North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along said West boundary line, for a distance of 31.65 feet; thence leaving said West line run North 38 degrees 01 minutes 28 seconds East, for a distance of 339.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, said Point of Beginning also being on a curve concave to the Northeast; thence Northwesterly along said curve with a radius of 197.14 feet, through a central angle of 27 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds, for an arc distance of 93.62 feet (chord of said arc being North 09 degrees 30 minutes 27 seconds West, 92.74 feet); thence North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 395.39 feet to a point on the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, located at elevation 0.89 feet NAVD 1988; thence Southeasterly along said mean high water line as follows: South 27 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East, for a distance of 33.91 feet; thence South 51 degrees 56 minutes 16 seconds East, for a distance of 37.48 feet; thence leaving said mean high water line run South 38 degrees 01 minutes 28 seconds West, for a distance of 444.19 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with a Private Road Easement as recorded in Official Records Book 134, Pages 625 through 627, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL B: A parcel or tract of land lying and being in Fractional Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence of the Southwest corner of said Fractional Section 6 and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East along the West boundary line of said Section 6 for a distance of 1842.81 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, continue North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along said West boundary line, for a distance of 142.83 feet; thence leaving said West line run North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 314.48 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, said Point of Beginning also being on a curve concave to the Southwest; thence Northwesterly along said curve with a radius of 120.00 feet, through a central angle of 32 degrees 52 minutes 15 seconds, for an arc distance of 68.84 feet (chord of said arc being North 12 degrees 20 minutes 17 seconds West, 67.90 feet); thence North 28 degrees 46 minutes 25 seconds West, for a distance of 17.61 feet; thence North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 369.17 feet to a point on the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, located at elevation 0.89 feet NAVD 1988; thence Southeasterly along said mean high water line as follows: South 45 degrees 33 minutes 54 seconds East, for a distance of 19.47 feet; thence South 27 degrees 58 minutes 37 seconds East, for a distance of 53.78 feet; thence leaving said mean high water line run South 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds West, for a distance of 395.39 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with a Private Road Easement as recorded in Official Records Book 134, Pages 625 through 627, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL C: A parcel or tract of land lying and being in Fractional Section 6, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of said Fractional Section 6 and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along the West boundary line of said Section 6, for a distance of 1842.81 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way line of State Road No. 30-E; thence leaving said Easterly right of way line, continue North 00 degrees 04 minutes 21 seconds East, along said West boundary line, for a distance of 254.19 feet; thence leaving said West line, proceed North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 276.93 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continue North 38 degrees 01 minutes 05 seconds East, for a distance of 369.17 feet to a point on the mean high water line of St. Joseph Bay, located at elevation 0.89 feet NAVD 1988; thence Northwesterly along said mean high water line as follows: thence North 45 degrees 33 minutes 54 seconds West, for a distance of 16.68 feet; thence North 31 degrees 50 minutes 28 seconds West, for a distance of 48.72 feet; thence North 13 degrees 58 minutes 21 seconds West, for a distance of 34.51 feet; thence leaving said mean high water line, proceed South 38 degrees 09 minutes 06 seconds West, for a distance of 237.47 feet; thence South 21 degrees 18 minutes 58 seconds East, for a distance of 30.68 feet; thence South 38 degrees 09 minutes 06 seconds West, for a distance of 128.52 feet; thence South 28 degrees 46 minutes 25 seconds East, for a distance of 60.69 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Subject to a Private Road Easement as recorded in Official Records Book 134, Pages 625 through 627, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. P ersonal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future be part of the Real Property. Any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Real Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure upon Default entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM J. RISH, JR.; HEATHER ILENE THOMPSON JONES; BANKTRUST; PROSPERITY BANK, Defendant. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000240 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Megan F. Fry, Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 (850) 434-9200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 7th day of May, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF COURT GULF COUNTY, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 16, 23, 2013 93647S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BID #1213-14 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive proposals from any company or corporation interested and qualified in providing the following: St. Joseph Bay Seagrass Protection Signage RFP specifications can be accessed at www. gulfcounty-fl.gov or at the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain Freds Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Responses to this RFP must be delivered to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 by Friday, May 31, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. E.T. Bids will be opened at this same location on Monday, June 3, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. E.T. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED RFP and include the BID NUMBER. The GCTDC is seeking proposals from fully established and qualified consulting firms that can partner with the GCTDC in developing, implementing and monitoring an educational signage program for seagrass protection in St. Joseph Bay. In response to this RFP, qualified firms are invited to submit proposals that include: Detailed description of proposed approach to project with costs regarding development, implementation and monitoring of Seagrass Protection Signage program. Project schedule/ timeline. Case studies/ examples (2-3) of similar successful projects including approach, implementation and status. Case studies should also provide clear examples of your experience working with other Governmental entities to obtain permitting. Biography/ professional experience of your firm and the qualifications of the leadership team to be assigned. Assurance that your firm is familiar with Gulf County, Florida, St. Joseph Bay, and the issues related to seagrass protection and our natural environment. List of clients who have retained your firm to develop similar programs. References. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to GCTDC Executive Director Jennifer Jenkins at 850229-7800 or Jennifer@ visitgulf.com. May 16, 23, 2013 Port St. Joe, 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Friday May 17, 3pm-8pmLarge Family Yard SaleToo much to list! Text FL52163 to 56654 PSJ Beach : 7199 W Hwy 98, Fri & Sat, May 17th & 18th, 8am til 4pmLOOK Yard Sale!Years of accumilated items! Everything you could imagine and more! Hunting Lease Renewal Need two members. near Port St. Joe. 2000 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $410-$510/ yr. Call John 850-227-5052 Food Svs/HospitalityBartender / Therapist NeededThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairLine Technician TraineeGulf Coast Electric Cooperative is accepting applications for two positions of Line Tech Trainee at Workforce Center of Florida, 625 Highway 231, Panama City, Florida through Friday, May 24, 2013. For more information visit our website at www .gcec.com. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34251839 Text FL51839 to 56654 LOW INTEREST FINANCINGBorrow up to $20K, pay $386/month. 8 % interest 6 year term. Personal and Small Business loans, debt consolodiation, bad credit ok. Call 888-994-0029 2 bedroom apt.; close to town; Dogwood Terrace Apartments; 808 Woodward Ave, Port St. Joe; (850) 227-7800 For Rent Duplex2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath, Large Kitchen & Family Room, Elevator, Swimming Pool, Game Room, T.V., Laundry Room. Fully Furnished, includes Elec Power & Water, garbage pickup. $1,100 month. + $300 dep. Location: C30 2 mi East pass Raw Bar on left. 770-639-6203 or 850-227-3361. Long Term RentalsLong Term Rentals available in Mexico Beach, St Joe Beach, and Port St Joe, 1, 2, & 3Br, Call 850-348-0262 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot -LG yard. W/D incl $550/mo + dep. 301-265-5368 or 301-437-7904 WEWA Efficiancey. $390 per month plus $390 Security deposit. Call (850) 639-5721 Wewa: 2Br/1Ba with heat & A/C, $400mo + $400 sec dep, RV for RENT, $135 a week + Dep, includes everything, 639-5721 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay EditionABS brakes, Reinhart pipes, two seats, cover, two helmets, charger, extra chrome, two windshields and more. Always garage kept, less than 10,000 miles. Excellent condition. Asking $16,500 NADA suggestedretail is $16,000 850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020