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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03864
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03890


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50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A site visit next week, a visit from a delegation from Colombia in a couple of weeks and a master plan update almost ready for public rollout have activity surrounding the Port of Port St. Joe on an upswing. Though the Port Authority had few concrete decisions to make during its regular bi-monthly meeting, chairman Leonard Costin could hardly hide his enthusiasm for events out of the public eye. “I feel like things are coming to a boil, so to speak,” Costin said. “I am excited about what is happening. I think we are close to having some happy news to report.” Barry Sellers, executive director of the newly formed Gulf County Economic Development Alliance Inc., agreed and said an announcement could be coming before the summer is too far along. “I think sometime before July, we’ll have an announcement that will make everybody happy,” Sellers said. “I don’t want to get too far ahead, but I do believe it will happen. Things are looking good.” The good starts with a site visit next week by representatives from an unidenti ed company that specializes in the manufacture of New coffee company building buzz By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Tyler Ford is in the business of waking people up. Ford is the owner and operator of Satellite Republic Coffee, a new company in Marianna whose product has quickly found its way onto local shelves and maybe even into your kitchen’s Brewmaster 5000. The coffee, available at Piggly Wiggly stores in Port St. Joe, Blountstown and Bristol, has traveled as far away as Chicago, Nashville and San Francisco through online sales. Though Ford and his family reside north of Gulf County, his roots are rmly planted in Port St. Joe. A former student of Faith Christian School and a 1990 graduate of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, he went on to obtain a business degree from Bryan College in Tennessee. His father, Tom, worked at the Port St. Joe paper mill, and his mother, Dawne, still lives locally and has helped to spread the word of Ford’s newest venture. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com With the budget process approaching, the Board of County Commissioners faces tough questions on how to handle the county’s trash. With less than ve years remaining in the life expectancy of Five Points Land ll and given the money pit that is solid waste removal, commissioners are examining myriad questions about the future of garbage collection and who picks up the tab. That will almost certainly mean an increase in tipping fees at Five Points Land ll and possibly the end of roadside yard debris removal and the implementation of mandatory garbage pickup. And looming over any discussion is the reality that unless the county has a permitted, operational method of disposing of solid waste, the county is prohibited by law from issuing any building permit. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Early voting for the Port St. Joe municipal election begins Saturday at the Supervisor of Elections of ce, 401 Long Ave. Early voting will continue through May 11. Voting hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET every day but Sundays. Election Day is May 14, with voting from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET at the Port St. Joe Fire Department next to City Hall on Williams Avenue. This is a universal election; each voter may cast a vote for every seat on the ballot. Three commissioners were up for re-election this year. Mayor and Commissioner Mel Magidson was re-elected to a fourth term after he drew no opposition during candidate qualifying in March. Group I Commissioner Bill Kennedy elected not to run again after one term. Two political newcomers, David Ashbrook and William Thursbay, are vying for the seat Kennedy will vacate. Group II Commissioner Bo Patterson is running for a second term and facing a challenge from Eddie Fields, another political newcomer. The last day to request an absentee ballot is 5 p.m. ET May 8. Voters are encouraged to ensure their voting registration information — address, signature, etc. — is up to date to ensure quick processing when voting. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Among local projects included in the state budget being crafted by the Florida Legislature is a $325,000 appropriation to fund the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The money is in the budgets of both the Florida House of Representatives and the Florida Senate. The houses are putting the nal touches on the budget in conference before passage. “The money is listed under local projects, and that means (Rep.) Halsey Beshears and (Sen.) Bill Montford would be the sponsors, since they are our local representatives,” said Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. “All I know is that it was proposed as a local project. We hope it will be sent to the governor. Until he puts paper to pen, you never know.” Gov. Rick Scott’s veto pen would be the nal hurdle to securing the funding. For example, a $5 million appropriation for bulkhead improvements at the Port of Port St. Joe was vetoed last year after clearing both legislative houses. Magidson noted state law contains a mandate that the Legislature must appropriate dollars to preserve historic structures, lighthouses in particular. “I am hopeful we will get the money,” Magidson said. Based on current estimates, the money would fund the relocation of the lighthouse, two keepers’ quarters and an oil house from Cape San Blas to George Core Park in Port St. Joe. The lighthouse would become the centerpiece of the park, the site near Miss Zola Drive and the historic Maddox House property. The appropriation would represent the largest contribution to the relocation project. A fundraising campaign by the St. Joseph Humane Society has not exceeded $40,000. It also would represent the rst use of taxpayer money in the project, which commissioners pledged not to use. The move of the lighthouse and ancillary structures is estimated to cost $200,000 to $250,000. That would not include the cost of any site prep work, foundational work in George Core Park or ongoing maintenance. County faces land ll expiration date Thursday, MAY 2, 2013 PSJ early voting begins Saturday State budget includes funds to move lighthouse “I accomplished what I set out to do. I took a great product and a great cause and put them together.” Tyler Ford owner, Satellite Republic Coffee BEANS FOR BEDS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR Fifteen orphans are housed in Satellite Republic Coffee’s facility in West Africa. Tyler Ford, below, a native of Port St. Joe, is the owner of Satellite Republic. LOCAL MAN’S COFFEE COMPANY FUNDS ORPHANAGE Chairman: Port activity ‘coming to a boil’ “Since it opened, we have operated with negative income. Five Points has never made a pro t, and that means the taxpayer has paid the costs all along.” Joe Danford director, Solid Waste/Public Works See LANDFILL A3 See PORT A6 See BEANS A6 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A9 Society . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B7-B8 YEAR 75, NUMBER 29 Plein Air events A5

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 Pr ogr ess Ener gy now has a new name: Duke Ener gy Y ou’ll see our new name and logo in your bills and other places soon. No other aspect of your service or account is changing. Although our name is changing, our commitment to you and the communities we serve r emains the same. So you can count on us for r eliable electricity – every time you ip the switch. Learn mor e at duke-ener gy .com/newname A n nou nc i n g a ne w n am e f o r P ro g re s s E n e r g y “' B ‹  C’ƒ A”•”v‡”’ By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com APALACHICOLA — A newly released report on Apala chicola Bay’s oyster situa tion is long on analysis but short on solutions, recom mending more studies and conrming the conventional wisdom that the shery is in dire straits. The study by the Uni versity of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, which has been assessing the oyster situation since October 2012, backs up lawmakers’ and researchers’ claims that water ow down the Apalachicola River is the key ingredient to a healthy shery. For years, Florida has squabbled in a “water war” with neighboring states, particularly Georgia, to release more water out of suburban Atlanta’s Lake Lanier, which feeds the river and ultimately the bay. The study states the bay had high salinity in 2012 caused by low river ow and “limited local rainfall in most months.” In fact, the lower part of the Apala chicola-ChattahoocheeFlintRiver Basin has been in “exceptional drought” over the last three years, ac cording to the National Inte grated Drought Information System. Thus, problems have set in and appear to be here for the long haul. “The 2012 decline in oys ter landings and recruit ment of juvenile oysters is unprecedented during the period of data analyzed and has likely involved recruit ment failure or high mor tality of small oysters,” the study states. The study found a “gen eral downward trend” in le gal-sized oysters (3 inch or larger) and a “large decline” in sub-legal oysters (smaller than 3 inches) in 2012. That means it’s likely this year will see another devastating oyster harvesting year, and 2014 could be even worse. The study did reveal a few positives, though, such as the 3-inch minimum oyster size preventing over-harvesting. “However, it is essential that this size limit be ac cepted by the community, adopted by the industry, and enforced by regulatory agencies and the county judicial system,” the study said. Another silver lining is oil from 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster appears to have stayed out of Apala chicola Bay. Oysters, white shrimp, brown shrimp, blue crab and various nsh spe cies have all been tested for oil residue, but no “chemical contamination” was found, according to the study. But, plenty of concerns remain, including the fact that a large percentage of oysters’ shells suffer from parasitic sea life. Familiar bay residents, including clams, sponges and other organisms, will prey on the oysters’ shells, the study said. The parasites hurt shell growth and produc tivity, though it’s difcult to say to what extent because there’s no historical data on the phenomenon. Legislator speaks out State Rep. Halsey Bes hears, R-Monticello, thinks drastic measures need to be taken. “We’re going to have to change our harvesting practices there to give (the oysters) the time to grow adequately, to where they can catch up,” he said. Beshears said the lack of ow down the river and drought has changed the en vironment, so adjustments must be made to allow the oysters to recover and our ish. He said during the BP oil spill three years ago oys ters were over-harvested to a disastrous effect. “We just didn’t have enough foresight to go, ‘Hey, wait a minute; maybe we ought to hold up,’ “ he said, adding, “Essentially we raped the land out there. We over-harvested and we haven’t had a chance to grow those oysters back.” Beshears stopped short of saying there should be a harvesting moratorium, but he did say dramatic chang es need to be put in place to let the oysters come back. He said there are a lot of ways to “skin that cat,” but, he thinks, on the whole har vesting should be reduced dramatically. “We have to nd a way to stop harvesting, give the sea a chance to recoup, but at the same time we can’t just hand out checks to oys termen to just do nothing,” he said. Beshears suggested in creasing programs to relay oyster shells in the bay, to which the oyster spat af xes itself, as a recovery idea. He also said opening up restricted areas for oys ter harvesting is another option. “There’s a lot of different ways to do it; we just haven’t found that right balanced yet,” he said. Beshears said more studies are a good idea, but they will “only prolong the inevitable” — the need for major changes in harvest ing practices and recovery programs. “We have to readjust our farming practices now. … I think that we’re going to ex plore all our opportunities and options,” he said. Oyster study conrms shery problems A University of Florida study conrms the dire straits of the Apalachicola Bay shery By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The hunt has com menced for a new City Clerk for Mexico Beach. The position has been va cant since Debbie McLeod’s resignation. During its preagenda meeting last week, the council agreed to con tinue looking at resumes and applications to ensure that McLeod’s former re sponsibilities don’t fall by the wayside. “I don’t want us to get behind or bogged down,” Mayor Al Cathey said of the clerk’s responsibilities that included ling payroll and ensuring that all incoming invoices are paid on time. The advertisement for the vacant position was posted in the Panama City News Herald, Monster.com and the Florida League of Cities website. According to the classi ed ad led by the council, Mexico Beach is seeking a highly motivated and en ergetic city clerk and ap plicants should have excep tional accounting, organiza tional and personnel skills. Cathey said of the re sumes they had received so far, more than half are not remotely qualied, and at a previous special meeting where the council reviewed 20 applicants, there was only one good candidate. The mayor suggested if a qualied candidate did not le an application they should seek “someone trainable.” Councilmember Lanny Howell said he had re searched salaries in nine towns of similar size to Mex ico Beach where the city clerk was also the director of nance. The council scheduled a special meeting Monday to review additional ap plications that had been received. During the special meet ing the city council com pared the salaries of city clerks in sister cities to de cide on a nal salary range for a new clerk. “Our salary is one of the highest around,” said coun cilmember Jack Mullen of McLeod’s former $27 an hour wage. Councilmember Tanya Castro encouraged every one to consider whether or not the clerk needed to be a full-time position and sug gested they hire a consul tant to evaluate the respon sibilities to help them come up with a nal number. “City clerk is a full-time job,” Cathey said. Some candidates had a higher salary than what the city could offer while others had no government experi ence. Only two locals made the shortlist while all others were from out of town or out of state. Of the six candidates who made the cut, only two received unanimous “yes” votes from the council. After the applications had been reviewed, Mullen proposed a salary range of $41,600 to $56,160 annually based on qualications. Castro offered to reach out to the six and discuss the salary to see if it would shorten the list, after which the council would meet again to determine a time and process for interviews. In other business, the council discussed the aban doned church and surround ing land they had planned to buy and use as a site for the town’s public safety depart ment. The council agreed to discontinue discussions with the church owners because an agreeable purchase price could not be reached by ei ther party. The current city hall, a former bank which has been leased for $2,600 a month, does not have the space to suit the needs of the administration. Mexico Beach continues search for new city clerk

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, May 2, 2013 During a workshop on Monday, commissioners were provided the stark reality of the county’s plight by Solid Waste/Pub lic Works director Joe Danford. The portrait was noth ing to cheer about. For years, the county has operated the Five Points Landll, the lone remaining landll in the county, at a signicant loss. Several years ago, that loss was close to $1 million per year. During the cur rent fiscal year, the coun ty will lose $452,013.73, all borne by ad valorem taxpayers. “Since it opened, we have operated with nega tive income,” Danford said. “Five Points has nev er made a prot, and that means the taxpayer has paid the costs all along.” The primary problem, Danford said, is the BOCC has over the years never charged a sufcient tipping fee, which is compounded by the lack of solid waste to sustain the landll in the black. The county currently charges $35 per ton. Further, the county handles roughly 3,800 tons a year, with 99 percent of household garbage hauled out of the county. “We can’t support a new landll,” Danford said. “We are never going to have another landll. It is too expensive. To my mind, expansion will cost way too much. Of course, none of it is going to be cheap. “And we can’t support an incinerator” (as in Bay County). Five Points, opened in 1987 with a permit upgrade in 2009, also has a short shelf life. The permit for the land ll will expire in 2018, and the county must choose between expanding the landll, which Danford said would add roughly 10 years to the site, or mov ing in the direction of es tablishing a transfer sta tion from which the county would haul solid waste to Panama City. Danford said the logis tics of expanding the land ll would prove problemat ic because wetlands issues — the recent modication to the Florida Department of Environmental Protec tion permit, three years in the approval, was to cre ate a dome at Five Points — and costs. Moving to 80 acres the county owns on the north end of the county near Wetappo would be unsuit able for the same reasons: wetlands. The cost of dirt alone in building up a 20 acre site to suitable level, Danford said, could run $11 million to $12 million. The estimate to expand the landll, Danford said, would bring about an an nual operating decit of $664,426.14, or more than $6.6 million to taxpayers over the life of the expan sion, through 2028. That would include an increase in tipping fees to $46.50. Establishing a trans fer station on the south end — and Danford said eventually commissioners would have to create one on the north end as well — would be less costly, would require no funds be placed in escrow to handle costs associated with closing a landll and would open up the potential for recycling. Closing a landll is ex pensive. The county cur rently sets aside $96,000 a year, and has for 20 years, to cover Five Points at its expiration date. The coun ty would have to budget $320,000 a year to ultimate ly cover any expansion. The transfer station, though, would be oper ated in the red at almost the same cost the county currently sinks into Five Points. The transfer station would cost the county $447,920 a year, with the potential the county could recoup at least $90,000 by recycling at the transfer station. “I need a decision from this board, and I need one by September,” Danford said, noting the time re quired to prepare to expan sion of the landll or creat ing a transfer station in the next ve years. “I think a transfer station is the way to go, but it won’t magically happen. “One transfer station probably would not be enough to handle every thing we have. Eventually you are going to have to have one at both ends of the county.” Commissioner Carmen McLemore agreed, saying it sounded like the county would need to go the direc tion of a transfer station. Commissioners also agreed with Danford’s sug gestion to increase tipping fees by $5 per ton to $40. “That would give us a place to start, and I would suggest an increase every year,” Danford said, citing the higher prices charged by neighboring counties. Given they were in a workshop, commission ers could take no formal action. They also wondered if the roadside pickup of yard debris had to stop. The BOCC had voted to stop the pickup several years ago, but the service has returned, and some resi dents, one commissioner said, had to come to see it “as an entitlement.” But deputy administra tor Michael Hammond not ed the county loses $125,000 a year while removing yard debris at no cost, another burden uniformly borne by ad valorem taxpayers while not universally used. “The people deserve some services,” McLemore said. “I am not in favor of cutting them out.” The discussion about mandatory garbage pickup echoed that theme. Danford suggested it as a necessity and noted the amount of garbage that ends up on roadsides and under bridges. “It is ending up in your parks,” Danford said. “It becomes a commu nity problem and a health problem.” Commissioner Joanna Bryan said commission ers need to nd the most efcient method of dealing with solid waste because taxpayers are “paying ei ther way.” McLemore said he had a big problem with tourists coming down and leaving their trash behind while tacking on more expense for residents on a xed income. “It is going to be hard for me to support manda tory garbage pickup,” he said. “There are people who can’t afford manda tory garbage pickup.” Administrator Don But ler said mandatory garbage pickup has issues, most no tably that some residents won’t pay and others will dispose of their garbage by other means. Commissioner Tan Smi ley said he had no real prob lem with mandatory pickup because the cities already employ it. Animal H ospital of P or t S t Joe 24-Hour Emergenc y Ser vice For Our Current Clients Great Ser vice F air Price Q ualit y I n t er nal M edicine S of t T issue/Or thopedic Sur ger y D en tistr y Clean and Spacious F acilit y Albert By as, DVM Will Rosenbaum, VMD Stephen Collier DVM M on, T ues T hurs & F ri 8:00 AM 5:30 P M 300 L ong A v e PSJ FL 32456 850-229-6009 FGGdZW @tD  NG@ eOWL =9QQ ?BB \ VU 9 = IB 9 ]LU G ] V ?9 f Ž• Ž. u  CMC1249673 9 ]]B U ]LV U I V R B V b U B [ \ ‡œ “ NO CREDIT CHE C K H ASSLE FREE FI N A NC I N G A V AIL ABLE =V R WQ B ]B \ f\]B R L U\] 9Q Q I ncludes I ndoor & O ut door Units A ll M a t erials t o change c omplet e sy st em out \] 9 [ ]LU G 9\ Q V b 9\ u •‰uŽ WB [ R VU] I LANDFILL from page A1 For years, the county has operated the Five Points Landll, the lone remaining landll in the county, at a signicant loss. Several years ago, that loss was close to $1 million per year. During the current fiscal year, the county will lose $452,013.73, all borne by ad valorem taxpayers. Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net

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Major League Baseball players know their swing can be the difference in being a great hitter or being sent down to the minor leagues. Teams have hitting coaches whose job is to nd problems with batters’ swings and help them improve. This is a story that is more about changing your swing than it is baseball. There is a book I keep in my of ce at work that I will always treasure; I will often just open it and read a random page or two. I’ve read it many times. Today, I rst turned to the pages in the book about joy and sorrow. The author notes, “The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain.” I thought about it. It’s dif cult when you see folks on the digging side of that thought; when sorrow is digging into them making room for joy. It’s even more dif cult when it’s you or someone you love being dug into. Then I thought about Daddy’s baby sister, my “Aunt Ruby.” You probably have someone close to you that comes to mind. How can she be so doggone happy all the time? It can be the worst of situations and Aunt Ruby will quote a Bible verse and say “GIG,” meaning “God is good.” Then again, perhaps the answer possibly is knowing sorrow has made room for all this joy and happiness. She has lost many of her loved ones including a grandson and a husband much too early in their lives. She keeps going and keeps saying how blessed she is. Recently, Aunt Ruby’s health hasn’t been so good, but you’d never know it. A day or two before she had to check into the hospital, she was sitting in the car with her daughter watching the local junior college play baseball. She noted, “We parked near the out eld, it was a gorgeous day, God outdid Himself today!” Perhaps it was because “her boys” won. None are related to her, they just play in the rural Alabama town where she now lives. Honestly, I think if either team won, she would be just as happy. She loves baseball. She still watches her grandsons when her health permits and watched her son and husband play the game. Her son played college basketball. “The Georgia Peach,” Ty Cobb told the St. Louis Cardinals to give her husband a shot to play baseball many years ago. They did and he played for awhile but never made it to the big leagues, perhaps he had an issue with his swing. Aunt Ruby’s husband came from a baseball family; his uncle had played for the Brooklyn Dodgers. His uncle, Jake Daniel is still the only professional baseball player to come out of Roanoke, Alabama (Population ~ 6000). After spending time with the Dodgers, Jake came back south to play and coach for many of the southern minor league teams that were prevalent in the 1940’s and 50’s. As a matter of fact, at age 42 in his last season, he hit .284 for Vidalia (GA) in the Georgia State League. From Brooklyn to Vidalia, sounds like he knew what he wanted to do. Aunt Ruby knew what she wanted from Jake Daniel’s nephew also. As my Daddy used to say about his baby sister, “When she gets something on her mind, Ruby is going to do it.” Back in 1951, Aunt Ruby’s boyfriend at the time made the mistake of stopping by the drugstore where she was working to introduce her to a sailor friend of his named Bobby. With her quoting those Bible verses all the time, you would think Aunt Ruby would take things kind of slow. She didn’t in 1951. She went out with her boyfriend one more time to let him down gently and then married my Uncle Bob (Bobby) about Where have all the children gone ... Changing your swing Folks, there is a military school in Pyongyang, North Korea, where eleven year old students are being taught tactics and strategy aimed at preparing them for the “ ght” against the United States. One of the pre-teen students at the Mangyongdae Revolutionary School was quoted as saying, “I am trying to study harder, because I really think that’s how I can get my revenge on the American imperialists”. The shaven headed Jo Chung Hyok, between taekwondo thrusts, added, “It’s my revolutionary duty.” Are you kidding me! What kind of world are we living in? It sometimes can be a razor thin line between “brainwashed” and “hogwash”! And listen, the problem I have here is not that North Korea hates us. That is not breaking news. And I’m not concerned this morning about the upcoming 60th anniversary of the close of the Korean War. Or who has the most missiles aimed at whom. Or who, for goodness sakes, has right or might on their side! I’m not even thinking about the eventual outcome of all of this. I believe with all my heart that an eleven year old kid ought to be rst and foremost... an eleven year old kid! I don’t care what language you speak. I don’t care who your father is mad at. I don’t care about national policy or U. N. sanctions. It doesn’t even matter if your national leader is a complete nincompoop. When I was eleven years old I was swinging on a grapevine across that big ditch down behind George Sexton’s house. I was polishing the Johnson waxed dining room oor with my back side as I slid into an imaginary home plate with the winning run. I was racing my little brother to the top of the hill in front of Paul David Campbell’s house. I wasn’t mad at anyone. Hate wasn’t a part of my vocabulary. I wasn’t trying to “get even” or “settle an old score”. I wasn’t concerned about strategy or tactics. I wasn’t living for the future... I was trying to have the most fun that I could have at that particular moment. It seemed like the God intended natural thing for a little boy to be doing. Oh, I knew about world events. You sit on the front steps of Woodrow Kennon’s store and listen to the men talk for ve minutes and you came away with a working knowledge of hog prices in Memphis, the weather “coming up” from the Arkansas/ Missouri area and the job Ike was, or wasn’t, doing in Washington. We took it all in, we gured some of it was important but to tell you the truth, we were much more interested in the peanuts we were pouring down the neck of the Coca-Cola in our sweaty little hands. Mrs. Cox, in the fth grade, taught us arithmetic, reading and spelling. She didn’t teach revenge. We read books that had pictures of little children jumping mud puddles and playing on slides. She helped us grasp the rudimentary elements of knowledge commensurate with our age and ability. She certainly didn’t scare us or threaten us with ideas and worldly affairs way above our station. I was eleven years old when Calvin Purvis ran into Bill Argo’s Gulf Station with the news that Russia had just sent this “Sputnik” thing into outer space. Didn’t no one there panic. Mr. Argo didn’t turn to me and say, “Kesley, you’ve got to start training right now to ‘get us back ahead’ of those Commies.” He didn’t give the old “win one for America” speech. He didn’t stick a BB gun or a KaBar knife in my hand and admonish me to “learn to use them”. They talked of the “space race” and what Khrushchev might be up to... but they didn’t include me in the conversation. I was, after all, just a little boy. When my rst son was only a few days old, Coach Wayne Taylor gave me the best single piece of advice I ever received on raising children. He said, “Let him be the age he is. Don’t wish him to be older for your bene t. And don’t try to keep him a little boy after he grows past that stage.” I wish today those little shaven headed eleven year olds in North Korea had that same opportunity. What a warped sense of life, not the beauty and joy of it, is being forced on them! They will have plenty of chances to see the twisted, contorted world that grownups have created. Let’s don’t rush them into that! Besides, the world picture changes way too often for “long range hates and enemies”. In 1958, we were preparing for the Russians. There was no other enemy looming. I get to be an adult and so much of the world attention has shifted to the Middle East; and then on to Afghanistan and the Al-Qaeda. Those little boys in North Korea are preparing for a ght against a perceived enemy that may not even exist, or could actually be an ally, when they grow into a position to use all these ghting skills they are so ardently pursuing now. How sad. I wish I could sit down with each one of them, hug their necks, and discuss life... over a six and a half ounce bottle of Coca-Cola lled to the brim with a bag of Tom’s Peanuts. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard O PINION www.starfl.com Thursday, May 2, 2013 A Page 4 Section See CRANKS A5 Now that the longdebated estate tax rules have nally been settled, let’s get real: Despite all the hoopla raised, most people probably would never be impacted whether the lifetime estate tax threshold had stayed at $5.12 million or reverted to $1 million. In the end, it actually went up a bit to $5.25 million for 2013. Even if your estate will only be a fraction of that amount, it still pays to have a plan for distributing your assets. If your nances are in good shape, there’s no reason not to start sharing the wealth while you’re still around to enjoy helping others. It also doesn’t hurt that you can reap signi cant tax advantages by distributing a portion of your assets now. Before you start doling out cash, however, make sure you are on track to fund your own retirement, have adequate health insurance, can pay off your mortgage and are otherwise debt-free. You wouldn’t want to deplete your resources and then become a nancial burden on others. If you can check all those boxes, consider these options: Avoid the gift tax. You can give cash or property worth up to $14,000 per year, per individual, before you’ll trigger the federal gift tax. (Married couples ling jointly can give $28,000 per recipient.) You’ll probably never have to pay a gift tax, however, since you’re allowed to bestow up to $5.25 million in gifts during your lifetime above and beyond the annual $14,000 excluded amounts before the gift tax kicks in – which for most of us means never. Read IRS Publication 950 (at www. irs.gov ) for details. Pay for education. If college is still far off for your children, grandchildren or others, consider funding a 529 State Quali ed Tuition Plan for them. Any interest the account earns is not subject to federal (and in most cases, state) income tax; plus, many states offer tax deductions for contributions made to their own 529 Plans. And don’t worry: If one child decides not to attend college, you can always transfer the account balance to another without penalty. Roth IRAs for kids. If your minor children or grandchildren earn income (allowances and gifts don’t count), you may fund a Roth IRA on their behalf. You can contribute up to $5,500 or the amount of their taxable earnings for the year, whichever is less. Your contributions are made on an after-tax basis but the earnings grow, tax-free, until the account is tapped at retirement. Fund someone’s bene ts. Many people cannot afford health or other insurance and so forego coverage, putting themselves just one serious illness or accident away from nancial disaster. Many also can’t fund their 401(k) plan or IRA. Consider applying your tax-exempt gifts to help loved ones pay for these critical bene ts. You’ll not help protect them from catastrophe, but also greatly increase their long-term nancial self-suf ciency. Charitable contributions. If you’re planning to leave money or property to charities in your will, consider beginning to share those assets now, if you can afford to. You’ll be able to enjoy watching your contributions at work – and be able to deduct them from your income taxes. Read IRS Publication 526 for details. Before taking any of these actions, consult your nancial advisor to make sure your own bases are covered. If you don’t have an advisor, visit www. fpaforfinancialplanning. or g for help locating one. Jason Alderman directs Visa’s nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMone y JASON ALDERMAN Share your money before you die Dear Editor: This year’s Earth Day served as an outstanding reminder that everyone can make an important difference for the environment through the simple act of donating gently used clothing or household items to Goodwill. Each year, donors help Goodwill prevent more than two billion pounds of usable goods from ending up in landfills. But the impact to the environment is only part of the story. Revenue raised from the sale of donated items at Goodwill stores funds job training programs, employment placement services and other vital programs in the community. People, as well as the planet, benefit. To show individuals how their donations truly impact their communities, Goodwill developed a Donation Impact Calculator ( http:// donate.goodwill.or g ). The calculator shows how your donation can help a person receiving services from Goodwill. For example, a donation of one working computer translates into 5.8 hours of a job search class that can help a person right in our community who may be unemployed and struggling to support his or her family. Goodwill encourages everyone to making one small green change in your life. Individual actions add up to global impact. Not only will you be helping those in your community who face challenges in finding employment, but you will also reduce waste in our landfills. To find your nearest Goodwill donation site, go to www.goodwillbigbend. co m Brooke Lochore Vice President of Public Relations blochore@goodwillbigbend.co m Earth Day reminder from Goodwill “... an eleven year old kid ought to be rst and foremost... an eleven year old kid!”

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CRANKS from page A4 a month later. She moved fast. As she would say, “God is good” (especially when you’re in a hurry). They had three children and were happily married until Uncle Bob’s untimely death in 1989 at age 58. His “Uncle Jake,” the Brooklyn Dodger would die six years later at age 84. In 2006, Aunt Ruby lost a grandson in an automobile accident. He was 22. I’m sure you or folks you know have suffered similar heartaches. It’s tough. Sometimes you want to say, “I’m tired of this sorrow shovel digging room for joy. Just stop and let me try to ll this hole with happiness.” Everybody needs an “Aunt Ruby.” You watch her lling in that hole and trying to nd the good in everything. In her most recent trip to the hospital which she refers to as “The Spa,” she not only found joy, but also “a blessing.” Her nurse’s last name was “Blessing.” That could only happen to your Aunt Ruby. It makes me wonder what she could have done for Ty Cobb’s soul (as everyone knows, in addition to being the best player of his era, he also was known to play dirty and use foul language). “The Spa” couldn’t hold Aunt Ruby. She was back again on the porch in her yellow swing in a day or so sitting with her cat, “Sister Sarah.” Hopefully, Sister Sarah has been “ xed” and doesn’t give birth to any “Isaac’s.” One cat is more than enough in my opinion. Aunt Ruby loves her porch swing. She had stored it for awhile. Her daughters talked her into hanging up again and painting it yellow to make it look “happier.” You see this baseball player gave her that swing, but never got around to painting it. They had three kids and a wonderful life together after courting for all of a month. Things get to moving fast, you don’t time to paint or change your swing; you just count your blessings along the way. But Uncle Bob would know, their children would know and we all know that porch swing will always be the perfect swing with Aunt Ruby sitting in it. I looked back in the book again where the author, Kahlil Gibran described “love.” He spoke of what your desires should be, including one that struck me “To wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving…” There you go. Aunt Ruby does just that. Each morning, she and Sister Sarah enjoy a cup of coffee, Uncle Bob’s perfect swing and another day of loving. If we really think about it, we all should try. Read more stories online at www. CranksMyTractor.com. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS L OCAL www.starfl.com Thursday, May 2, 2013 A Page 5 Section By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Starting May 2, America’s Great Plein Air Paint-Out will welcome 23 artists from around the world to the Forgotten Coast where they’ll spend 10 days making art, hosting workshops and taking in the local culture. The Wetroom, located at 234 Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe, will be a hub of activity during the event and will showcase the paintings created each day. Several exhibits can be seen up and down the Forgotten Coast displaying some of the best art from years past. Watch Art Happen will take place throughout the entire event as artists paint any open air scenery that grabs their attention all along the coast between Mexico Beach and Alligator Point. Another exhibit, Our Seafood Heritage, will be inside the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET, the gallery will feature art from past years that features oyster shuckers along with shrimp and shing boats. The Plein Air Classics exhibit will be housed inside the Mexico Beach Visitor Center and will feature major paintings from past years. Art and history collide with a focus on paintings whose objects no longer exist, such as the old Mexico Beach pier. The Nature’s Bounty exhibit takes place at the Carrabelle History Museum Monday through Saturday from noon until 5 p.m. ET and has a focus on paintings of nature scenes. The Artist’s Choice collection will be housed at the St. George Lighthouse Museum. Each year, artists submit one of their paintings to be considered for the prestigious award and the winners are chosen by their peers. Each winning painting is purchased by the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition and displayed the following year. Enjoy the best of the best daily from noon until 5 p.m. ET. Each day of the event is packed with ways to quench your thirst for art. As much as it is about the paint, Plein Air is also a time to bring creative minds together in a social setting. To kick off this year’s events, a luncheon will be held at noon on May 3 at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art to welcome the artists to the Forgotten Coast and show them some southern hospitality. Art demonstrations taking place the same day include “A Working Waterfront” in Riverfront Park, Apalachicola, from 9 a.m. to 11 ET and “Reid Avenue Streetscapes” in downtown Port St. Joe from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. Watch artists render the town, along with its buildings and residents on canvas. Artist Tracey Frugoli will teach her workshop, “Simplify Your Way to Better Paintings,” on May 2 and 3. Frugoli will discuss theory and the beauty in simplicity with her students. The fee for the workshop is $200 and registration can be completed online. On May 4 the Quickdraw event will bring together professional and amateur artists to capture the beauty of Cape San Blas on canvas. The event will take place at St. Joe Peninsula State Park inside the T.G. Stone Memorial pavilion. The fee is $10 and the event starts at 10 a.m. ET. Later that evening, enjoy a reception for the artists at Salinas Park on the Cape from 4 p.m. to 6 ET. Meet and greet with the artists, view their works in progress or just talk some shop. Demonstrations on this day include the “Salinas Park Panorama” at Cape San Blas and day two of “A Working Waterfront” at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. Both events run from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. “The View from Eastpoint” at the Apalachicola Estuarine Research Reserve will be the lone demonstration on May 5, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET and will be followed by the Nocturne Paint event where artists will capture evening landscapes. This event, from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. ET will happen simultaneously at the Apalachicola Riverfront and the Port St. Joe Marina. Carrabelle will be the epicenter of activity on May 6. The demonstration, “Marine Avenue Vistas,” will take place at the Marine Street Pavilion from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET and be followed by a reception for the artists at the Carrabelle History Museum. From 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. ET, guests can meet the artists and view their work. The art moves to St. George Island on May 7 with the “Island Vistas” demonstration at the Lighthouse and Visitor Center from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. It will be followed by a reception in the same location. The annual Student Art Day event will take place on May 8 at the Eastpoint Community Pavilion. Artisticallydriven students from Gulf and Franklin counties will meet and receive one-onone instruction from the the professional artists from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. Mexico Beach becomes the art hub on May 9 with the “Mexico Beach Tableau” demonstration at the Welcome Center from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. A reception with the artists will immediately follow. The “Art as a Window” event will take place on May 10. Join an artists’ roundtable discussion on their love of the medium and their careers to date. The discussion takes place from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET at the Wetroom in Port St. Joe. That night, head over to the Plein Air T.G.I.F social event at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. Relax with the artists and enjoy a low-country boil, music and more. The festivities begin at 7 p.m. ET and tickets are $10. The Grand Patrons’ Party, the biggest event of the Plein Air Festival takes place on May 11 at 6 p.m. in the Wetroom. Here guests can meet the artists, view and even purchase their works. The Artist’s Choice paint will also make its debut. Tickets for the event are $40. End your 2013 PaintOut experience with “Art in the Afternoon,” and family-friendly event at the Wetroom in Port St. Joe. Here you can view the paintings one last time and make any last-minute sales. The event runs from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. ET. Greg LaRock. Will teach his own class, “Guiding the Eye,” on May 12 and 13. The fee for his workshop is $200 and registration can be completed online. With 10 days of amazing art and talent you’ll count the days until the 2014 Plein Air on the Forgotten Coast. America’s Great Plein Air Paint-Out kicks off today FILE PHOTOS Top: Artists will be out in force throughout the Forgotten Coast, from Mexico Beach to Alligator Point. Right: Take time and stop to see the artists at work throughout the next 10 days. Bottom: Student art day is a highlight each year, offering a chance for local high school students top learn from a master.

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Local A6 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 After college, Ford spent some time in Atlanta work ing sales in the telecommu nications eld and even tually felt the call of the ministry, spending the past decade as a pastor in Mari anna. After his father died, Ford found himself asking an important question. “What do I really want to do with my life?” He missed sales, the corporate structure and enjoyed interacting with people, and he sought a way to combine those loves with the skill set he had developed. After several conversa tions with his wife, Kristy, and their three children, Zack, Jake and Nicole, the answer was clear as mud. They recalled that their fa vorite vacations were the ones where they relaxed on the back porch of a rus tic cabin and drank great coffee. Ford’s new path began brewing. After letting the ideas percolate for a bit, he made a bold move in November and left his job to start Sat ellite Republic. After he ex plained the business plan to his mother, she loaned him $1,000 to get things moving. Ford’s friends were con fused by the sudden job change, and it took a while to lter in that he wasn’t the sales rep for a new cof fee company, but rather the owner. “I wanted a fun, quirky name for the company,” said Ford. “Everyone is connect ed. Satellites and republics both bring people together in their own ways.” The quirkiness didn’t stop there. Satellite Republic’s packaging, logo and labels, designed by brother-in-law Dave George, were created to stand out against the competition. “I wanted something completely different,” said Ford, “something Earthy.” Ford enjoys naming his coffees as much as drink ing them. Rocketboy is the moniker given to his Suma tra blend, Major Tom comes from Ethiopia, Planet Love hails from Costa Rica and Mosaic Moon uses beans from Guatemala. While seeking the perfect roaster to create the com pany’s signature blends, he visited a facility outside of Little Rock, Ark., where he was able to sample the cof fees they offered and cus tomize his own avors. “For a coffee lover, it was like going to Disney world,” Ford said of the experience. After the ultimate tastetest, Ford teamed up with the roaster and soon af ter found a partner in Ed ward “Bubba” Vance, who brought years of experi ence with import/export to the burgeoning business. As much as Ford and his family love coffee, he admit ted to a secondary agenda behind Satellite Republic. All prots from his busi ness are donated to the maintenance of a girls or phanage situated on the Ivory Coast of West Africa. The orphanage houses girls whose parents were killed during recent mili tary coups in the country. The building has 15 occu pants with the capacity to hold up to 144. Ford said it’s a “wonder ful life” to help children who can’t fend for themselves and have no one to take care of them. His father-inlaw was a missionary who dedicated his life to build ing orphanages, and hear ing the stories of the places and children touched Ford’s heart enough for him to fol low suit. In addition to building more orphanages in West Africa, Ford said he would like to see his company help fund projects in troubled ar eas around India and Haiti. “Through our business, people can enjoy a product but also give back to some thing bigger than them selves,” he said. He noted feedback on his products has been “ex tremely positive,” and he hopes to see Satellite Re public on more store shelves as the year continued. The company is exploring a deal with a larger grocery chain in the south. With “100 ideas” for new avors of coffee, more quirky names and new marketing strategies, it leaves one to question if these creative sparks might be grounds to keep Ford awake at night. If they don’t, the coffee will. “I accomplished what I set out to do,” said Ford, “I took a great product and a great cause and put them together.” Visit Satellite Republic Coffee at www.satellitere publiccoffee.com to learn more about their coffees, their cause and to order online. T o R eg ist er or f or mor e inf or ma tion, please c on tac t (850) 482-6500 or bnuc cio@bigb endahec .or g or T oll fr ee 1-87QUIT -NO W 6 I n t er est ed in quitting t obac c o? P lease c ome t o our upc oming FREE T o ols t o Q uit session. B ecause N OW is the best time t o quit W hen: M onda y M a y 6, 2013 T ime: 12:00 2:00 P M CST W her e: W e w ahit chk a Libr ar y 314 N. 2nd S tr eet FREE Nic otine P a t ches A nd/or Gum for pro gr a m pa r tic ipa nts iZZTh iZ ak J i %ˆ%% R e h ab C ar e NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 C oup on Expir es: 5-31-13 C ODE: P J00 pre-cast concrete, port di rector Tommy Pitts said. Pitts and Sellers said they had been in communi cation with the company, a large nationwide concern, for about four months. The company would hope to establish a facility on Port of Port St. Joe land. “It is a lot of talk right now, but there is a lot of interest,” Costin said. “It would be a big operation that would change the port in a substantial way. “This is a good potential customer if it turns out to be feasible.” Port staff does not have some of the particulars, such as nancial backing and the scope of the facility the company is proposing for the Port of Port St. Joe, but the site visit is a step in the right direction, Pitts said. “There would be a good domino effect if that com pany did come here,” Sell ers said in reference to additional businesses that might follow the company to the port. Also drawing interest, Sellers said, is the former Gulf County Shipbuilding site. Though not part of the 300 acres of combined Port of Port St. Joe and St. Joe Company land that com prises the port planning area, the shipbuilding site has water access and much of the infrastructure al ready in place for a marine products manufacturer. The complex also would serve as a natural link to the port and its rail and deepwater and barge ter minal access. “There has been a lot of interest in that site,” Sell ers said. The Port of Port St. Joe also is scheduled to have a visit by members of the of ce of Congressman Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, as state and federal stakeholders take a growing interest in the development of the port under the collab orative agreement between the port and St. Joe. Further, a delegation of representatives from a port city in Colombia that was visited during a Flori da trade delegation to that South American company is scheduled to visit Port St. Joe before the end of May. The Colombian port city is one visited by represen tatives of the Port of Port St. Joe and St. Joe Company during the trade delegation earlier this year. The EDA board also will begin facilitating com munity discussions among stakeholders concerning the viability of attracting “boutique” cruise lines to Port St. Joe. Loretta Costin of the EDA said the plan would be to invite parties such as the city of Port St. Joe, county, Chamber of Commerce, Tourist Development Coun cil and EDA, among others, to discuss the existing op portunities for such cruis es and identify the cruise companies. “We want to facilitate what would be a commu nity-wide discussion,” Lo retta Costin said. “I think there is a great opportunity there,” Leon ard Costin said. “I think it has a lot of potential.” The update to the port master plan, Pitts said, is 80-85 percent completed and is awaiting feedback from Port Authority board members before the nish ing touches are put on the document. The hope is to review the master plan in a public hearing later this month in order to communicate the plan to the city of Port St. Joe for incorporation into the city’s comprehensive plan. “We would hope to have a public hearing on May 22,” Pitts said, the date of the second May meeting of the Port Authority. The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity funded the update through a $70,000 grant. The master planning document is crucial for attracting state and fed eral funds to develop the infrastructure for the port. The Port of Port St. Joe is a member of the Strategic Intermodal System. Some 75 percent of Florida De partment of Transportation discretionary funding each year is spent on projects within the SIS. The port, signicantly, recently received a threeyear extension on its SIS designation. SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Prots from Satellite Republic Coffee go toward maintaining an orphanage in West Africa. PORT from page A1 BEANS from page A1

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, May 2, 2013 Real E sta t e P icks O ur loc al r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden tied wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in Real Esta t e P icks! (In this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in Me xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an B las S t G eor ge I sland C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LIST I NGS HERE! (850)81 4-7377 (850)22 7-7847 S O L D # ## $ $ % $ ( "$ *$ ( $ $! "$% $ ($$! ( $ $ ($$! $ $ $ &&"% $ ) % ) $ ( !! )* # # ## $( Family V alues Military Integrity Business Sense V OTE M A Y 14TH As a family man, business man, and veteran, I have acquired many of the skills necessary to serve as your next City Commissioner I am not a politician, but rather a concerned citizen who wants to serve you and represent our community to create a better Port St. Joe for everyone. I live my life by adhering to the Army values of Loyalty Duty Respect, Seless Service, Honor Integrity and Personal Courage. These values have served me well in my personal and professional life and are qualities that will help me make the hard decisions necessary to strengthen this city Don't forget that early voting is May 4th May 11th at the Supervisor of Elections' Ofce, 9am 5pm Monday Saturday Election Day is May 14th, 7am 7pm at the City Firehouse on Williams A venue. Thank you for your support and please contact me if I can provide any additional information. (850) 2274068 WILL WORK TO IMPROVE W A TER C O S T & QUA LIT Y E CO N OMIC G ROWT H IN TERGOVER N ME N T A L R EL A TIO NS www .F acebook.com/D a vidAshbr ook1 978 P aid for and appro ved by David Ashbrook for City Commissioner Group 1 )58 ) & & ) 7 ) 1 , 8 1 1 ,) ,8,* 5 / )88 / ) 5, ,, #5, 55 WWW .LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM 2 2 # ,) 588 ) , 5 ) * 5 8 5 5 ( 2 & -First Sunda y C inco de Ma yo C ele bra tion! 2 FOR 1 BEER WINE DRINKS TEQUILA A ll Day & N ight | Potluck 6PM L ive on the P OO P D E C K 6PM: N eal James ON THE P OOP DECK 3$ + + 9 / 6+ + 9 "$ + + 9 ) 8 4 IN T HE CR O W’S NES T / 6+ "$ + PM 7 )) 7, D J )*51 LA D IES NIGH T $0+ # 0+0+ & PM HA PP Y H O UR + / 6+ PM By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com The local head of Bay County’s Florida Depart ment of Health (DOH) ofce has received a top honor. Douglas Kent, 63, was named the 2013 Statewide Community Healthcare Pioneer of the Year for his efforts to abate “racial and ethnic health disparities” and enhance the health of all residents of Bay and Gulf counties, according to a statement released by his ofce. Kent said he was com peting for the honor with all those nominated across Florida — DOH employees as well as other residents. But the DOH’s Ofce of Mi nority Health tapped Kent for the honor. “I’m thrilled to be recog nized,” he said. Kent serves as DOH’s Bay County administrator, a position he’s held since April 2010. Before leaving to head the Bay County of ce, Kent served as envi ronmental manager and ad ministrator at Gulf County’s DOH ofce from September 1996 to February 2010. Kent said in both coun ties he’s tried to decrease health disparities in not just the minority communi ties, but the population at large. And he’s been lead ing the charge to bring bet ter health services to the area. “When you’re doing this job, you’re really trying to do what’s best for the community as a whole,” he said. Since joining the Bay County DOH, Kent’s led several initiatives to im prove health and wellness in the area. Kent helped start the “after hours/ER diversion clinic,” which of fers medical services to the community’s uninsured and underserved. He also started a children’s den tistry clinic, which serves kids on Medicaid. He called it a “top priority” and said it came online within the rst year of his arriving in Bay County. Kent also began a pre scription drug assistance program, which now has three locations. And he in creased the number of loca tions for the federally fund ed Women, Infants and Chil dren nutrition program. Kent even got into the septic realm, creating a same day “septic tank per mitting service” and “on line sewage treatment and disposal system records search.” Though he’s been with the organization a long time and is fresh off a nice award, Kent said he has no plans to retire — to take his honor and ride off into the sunset. “I’m proud to be a part of the community and be able to do public health in this area,” he said. By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com BLOUNTSTOWN — The city of Blount stown operates on a $3 million per year budget, and the Calhoun County seat is struggling to keep up with in frastructure needs. “It’s no cheaper to x things here than it is in a big city,” City Manager Emory Pierce said. “But in big cit ies with multimillion-dollar budgets, a couple of thousand dollars to x something is nothing.” The story is similar for rural communities across the Panhandle, and U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, RPanama City, said he hopes a new bill might help those areas he said “form the backbone of North and Northwest Florida.” Southerland recently introduced the Building Rural Communities Act, aimed at giving rural government ofcials the necessary tools to plan large-scale improvement projects in a more cost-effective manner. Co-sponsored by Rep. Mike Mc Intyre, D-N.C., the legislation would channel between 3 percent and 5 per cent of funding from the U.S. Depart ment of Agriculture’s Rural Develop ment Essential Communities Facili ties loan and grant program toward technical assistance and nancial planning for rural communities. “Unfortunately, across America many of these bedrock communities are fading away because they can’t match the access to infrastructure and services that larger cities provide,” Southerland said. “Our legislation will make it easier for rural communities to thrive by providing the technical assistance and project planning they need to strengthen public safety, public health and public access to upgraded services — all at no additional cost to taxpayers.” Pierce said funding issues have halted a project to run a force main sewer line from Altha to the Blount stown wastewater treatment plant. All of Altha’s buildings run off septic tanks. “Without real community sewer lines, they are severely limited in Al tha and along that entire corridor to ward Blountstown,” Pierce said. He said the Calhoun County School District is exploring options for a new high school in Altha, but the current infrastructure cannot sup port a structure that size. Overall, Pierce said he would sup port any bill that could help rural ar eas such as Blountstown. “We have the normal, aging infra structure that all cities big and small have, and we are searching for fund ing to help with our internally gener ated funds,” said Pierce, who noted the city cannot raise utility rates for fear of losing customers. “All the peo ple and businesses here are strapped. If we raise rates, I would estimate we would lose several customers and the community just can’t stand that.” Southerland’s bill was referred to the U.S. House Committee on Agri culture for further consideration. DOH leader named ‘Pioneer of the Year’ SPECIAl L toTO THE St T AR Douglas Kent was named 2013 Statewide Community Healthcare Pioneer of the Year. Bill aims to help rural communities “Unfortunately, across America many of these bedrock communities are fading away because they can’t match the access to infrastructure and services that larger cities provide. Our legislation will make it easier for rural communities to thrive by providing the technical assistance and project planning they need to strengthen public safety, public health and public access to upgraded services — all at no additional cost to taxpayers.”RR ep. Steve Southerland Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas | tXXX#VZ5IF'PSHPUUFO$PBTUOFU

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The 11h annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament will take at the Port St. Joe Marina on May 10 and 11. Presented by the Kids Win Foundation, children ages 3-16 who register will learn the basics of shing and be armed with the know-how to reel in a big one. Trophies will be given out for the biggest sh and most sh caught within each division. The “Small Fry” division is for kids aged 3-8 and “Junior,” for children 9-16. The contest is limited to in-shore, nearshore, Intracoastal waterway shing, and contestants can be no further than three miles from shore. Fishing can take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. “It’s about teaching kids to sh,” said Rick Carrie, president of the Kids Win Foundation. Carrie spent the last nine years working around the marina and has always encouraged locals to sh, especially the kids. His reasons have deep, historical roots. “My grandmother said that it’s hard for kids to get in trouble when they’re shing,” Carrie said with a laugh. The rst 350 kids to register for the event will receive a rod and reel, a tackle packet, T-shirt and goodie bag. With 348 participants in the 2012 event, Carrie predicted 2013 to be the biggest tournament to date. On Friday, May 10, registered contestants can pick up their shing equipment at the Port St. Joe Marina between 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. ET. Kids will also enjoy a cookout, exhibits, and onsite classes to get tips on rod casting, knot tying, and casting nets. These classes will provide kids with important information to ensure they have a fun and active day of catching sh instead of remembering the one that got away. The of cial rules meeting will follow at 6:30 p.m. at the Marina. The tournament kicks off at 7 a.m. ET on Saturday. Fishing ends by noon with trophy presentation to follow at 1 p.m. Children may sh with an adult but must be the ones to reel in all sh entered into the competition. Registration is free and is open until May 9. Those interested in volunteering or making donations should contact the Port St. Joe Marina at 850-227-9393. FILE PHOTO A “small fry” shows off his big win at the 2012 tournament. Kids Win shing tourney coming up Star Staff Report The Blountstown Rotary Club will host the 17th annual Big River Roundup Florida Flathead Cat sh Tournament Memorial Day weekend, May 24-25. The tournament was not held in 2012, but after encouragement by the community to continue the event, the Rotary Club re-launched the tourney. This year’s tourney will have some changes, such as no bank shing and more cash prizes. The 2013 Big River Roundup marks the 17th anniversary of the rst organized athead cat sh tournament in Florida. The Roundup tournament is unlike any other, with erce competition between locals for bragging rights, cash prizes and $50,000 at stake if the current state record is broken during the event. Contestants vie for $1,000 for the largest athead; $500 for second largest; $400 for third largest; $300 for the fourth largest; and largest nonathead cat sh will win $100. In addition, the most athead cat sh total poundage for the event will pocket $100. The tournament has graced the pages of Field & Stream, Florida Fish & Game and GAFF magazines, and sherman from Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee, South Carolina and even as far as Ohio have regularly traveled to take their chances at winning the event. The tournament entry fee for adults is $50 per person if pre-registering or $55 per person at the gate. Ages 14 and younger may enter in the youth category for $20 per person. Pre-register to be included in a special pre-registration prize drawing. Participants can also register onsite from 9 a.m. CT to midnight CT on May 24 and from 6 a.m. CT to 10 a.m. CT on May 25 at the Blountstown Landing (Neal Landing). There will be multiple boat launch sites available and approved by the Blountstown Rotary Club. The tournament begins at 4 p.m. CT on May 24 and ends at noon CT on May 25. Awards presentation will be held at noon CT on Saturday at the Blountstown landing. For more information on the tournament, a list of rules and an application, visit www.blountstownrotary. com, or call Tournament Director Phil McMillan at 850643-7082 or Assistant Tournament Director Phillip Hill at 850-447-1975. Mail applications to Blountstown Rotary Club, P.O. Box 161 Blountstown, FL 32424, or drop off applications at the Calhoun County Senior Center, Gulf State Chemical, Adams Funeral Home or Centennial Bank in Blountstown. Monda y S unda y : 7:00 A M 7:00 PM EST \9QB ;B GLU \ 5 R9 f Ž]I uŽ]I WEEKL Y ALM ANA C ST JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W ES T P ASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 227-7847 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu M a y 02 78 63 50 % F ri, M a y 03 77 60 40 % S a t M a y 04 75 61 20 % Sun, M a y 05 77 64 0 % M on, M a y 06 79 67 0 % T ues M a y 07 79 68 30 % W ed M a y 08 80 68 0 % Special to The Star The 98 Real Estate Group Ling Ding shing tournament came to a conclusion on Saturday with the winning cobia coming in at 67.30 pounds. Capt. Mitch Coleman on the Floridaze landed the winning sh the rst week in April and never gave up the lead in the following four weeks. Week two had a 37.96 pound cobia weighed in by Capt. Charlene Burke on St. Misbehavin, and week three was led by Capt. David Mullis on Spirit Horse, who weighed a sh weighing 41.85 pounds. In week four, the winning sh was landed by Nathan Murphy and weighed 50.71 pounds. Don Sutton and Tennessee Chuck McGibbon landed a 43.11 pound cobia followed by Murray Gaskins who landed a cobia weighing 36.76 pounds. The largest amberjack was caught by Keith Carraway, which weighed 71.87 pounds. The winning Spanish mackerel was 2.91 pounds and was landed by the crew of the Sand Dancer. “We are so pleased to bring back this tournament to our area,” said Zach Childs, owner and broker of 98 Real Estate Group. “It was a great turn out and we hope it will continue to grow each and every year. “The tournament supports the efforts of the (Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association) to build more arti cial reefs in our area, and this is something we all believe in. We have an amazing system of arti cial reefs in our area that support diving and shing, and we all bene t.” SPECIAL TO THE STAR Capt. Mitch Burke aboard the boat Floridaze brought in the winning cobia. Coleman wins Ling Ding shing tourney Big River Roundup Tourney returns SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Cobia action has heated up with 10 fish caught last week over the 50# mark. Most anglers are reporting fish running the stretch from Mexico Beach to Shell Island. Only one month away from red snapper season in our waters, so get your gear ready. New laws are in place again this year for both federal and state waters, so make sure you check them before heading out. Trout and redfish are on the move in St. Joe Bay still. Good reports from the “flats” behind Black’s Island are coming in daily, with most anglers using live shrimp or bull minnows for the trout and bull minnows for the flounder. Surf fishing is producing great pompano catches along Mexico Beach and the Cape. Page 9 Thursday, May 2, 2013 LING DING KING

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section Star Staff Report Nicole Endres, Maya Robbins and N’Namdi Davis of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School each medaled last weekend during the state Class 1A track and eld meet in Jacksonville. Endres was the top individual nisher, placing fth in the pole vault with a jump of 10 feet. Robbins took seventh, in the points, in the 100 meter dash and nished in ninth in the long jump. Davis, the lone Port St. Joe boy to qualify for state, was fth in the 100 meters, earning team points. He also nished 11th in the triple jump. Davis is also the lone senior on the track and eld team. Coach Kenny Parker and the team would like to thank everyone for their support for this year’s track team. “We had a good season, but our future is very bright,” Parker said. Special to The Star Haley Porter, a freshman tennis player at Southwestern College in Win eld, Kan., completed her undefeated singles season last week with a threeset win in a dual match with Kansas Wesleyan. Porter’s singles match was Southwestern’s only win of the day as the Lady Builders fell to the Coyotes 8-1 in Salina. The Moundbuilders end the regular season at 10-9 and 4-3 in Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference play. Southwestern has quali ed for the KCAC Woman’s Tennis Championship, which will be played May 2 at Riverside Tennis Center in Wichita. Porter led her team with a perfect 14-0 record this season as a freshman and was picked as Woman’s Athlete of the Week on April 15 for the entire KCAC. She is the daughter of Ron and Holly Porter of Grain Valley, Mo., and the granddaughter of Cecil and Beth Lyons of Port St. Joe. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School cheerleaders wish to thank the following for their assistance with the cheerleaders’ fth annual shrimp boil, held April 13. Tommy Ward, 13 Mile Seafood and Sara Ward, PSJ cheerleading alum, for their time and talent in making the fundraiser so successful since 2009; John Wright, Steve Norris and Clay Smallwood for their help every year with the cooking; and the community for buying shrimp plates and support these girls. Coaches Kristal Smallwood and Anna McFarland want the girls to know how much they appreciate the parents and their help. Also, the coaches are very proud of the girls and their hard work that made the fundraiser a success. Beach Blast draws large turnout Star Staff Report Perfect weather lured a large eld for the spring Beach Blast Triathlon/Duathlon last weekend at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. According to race director Olga Cemore, 325 athletes turned out to participate in one of the four races that comprise the Beach Blast: Olympic triathlon, Sprint Triathlon, Olympic Duathlon and Sprint Duathlon. Cemore sent a special shout-out to the dozens of volunteers who assisted with the race. “The race simply cannot exist without volunteers,” Cemore said. “Also, Gulf County helped with permits and clean-up and maintenance of the park, and Sheriff (Mike) Harrison and his new and fresh support of the event helped tremendously. “The event was a great success, and we heard only appreciation of local support from athletes. The athletes also raised over $600 for Boston Marathon bombing victims, and event T-shirts were designed as a tribute to the terrible tragedy.” The participants represented a wide demographic. Sixty percent were men, 40 percent women and 58 percent of the athletes hailed from around Florida. Twenty-two percent came from Georgia, 10 percent from Alabama and participants came from as far as Mississippi and Texas. Roughly one-quarter of the participants competed in the Duathlon and the remainder the triathlons, 60 percent in the Sprint and 40 percent in the Olympic. Almost three in four participants brought at least one other person with them, lling the park with hundreds of visitors, Cemore said. SOFTBALL SEASONS END Star Staff Report The softball seasons for the two county high schools ended in the Region 1-1A quarter nals on Tuesday. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, runner-up in District 4-1A, traveled to Sneads and lost 7-4. Wewahitchka, runner-up in District 1-1A, was at the District 4 champion Liberty County. The Lady Gators lost 10-0 in a game ended on the run-rule. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Haley Porter was undefeated this year at Southwestern College in Kansas. Page 9 Thursday, May 2, 2013 Porter a tennis standout at Southwestern College SPECIAL TO THE STAR Maya Robbins, N’Namdi Davis and Nicole Endres each earned medals at the state track and eld meet. Athletes emerge from the Gulf of Mexico after the swim portion of the triathlon. WES LOCHER | The Star Cheerleaders extend thanks 3 medal at state

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 2012 A nn u a l Dr in k in g W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka W e a r e p le a s e d t o a nn o un ce t h a t o ur dr in k in g wa t er m e ets a l l f e dera l a n d s t a t e r e q uir em en ts. W e ’ r e p l e as e d t o p r e s en t t o y o u t h i s y e a r ’ s A n n u a l W a t er Q u a l i ty R e p o r t i s r e p o r t i s d e s i g n e d t o i n f o r m y o u a b o u t t h e q u a l i ty w a t er a n d s er v i c e s w e d e l i v er t o y o u e v er y d a y O u r c o ns t a n t go a l i s t o p r o v i d e y o u w i t h a s a f e a n d d e p en d a b l e s u p p l y o f d r i n k i n g w a t er W e w a n t y o u t o u n d er s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o c o n t i n u a l l y i m p r o v e t h e w a t er t r e a t m en t p r o c e s s a n d p r o t e c t o u r w a t er r e s o u r c e s. W e a r e c o m m i tt e d t o ens u r i n g t h e q u a l i ty o f y o u r w a t er O u r w a t er s o u r c e i s g r o u n d w a t er f r o m tw o w e l l s. e w e l l s d r a w f r o m t h e F l o r i d a n A q u i f er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex c e l l en t q u a l i ty o f o u r w a t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en ts r e q u i r e d a r e c h l o r i n e f o r d i s i n f e c t i o n p u r p o s e s a n d a er a t i o n f o r r em o v a l o f h y d r ogen s u l d e. I n 2011 t h e D e p a r t m en t o f E n v i r o n m en t a l P r o t e c t i o n p er f o r m e d a S o u r c e W a t er A s s e s s m en t o n o u r s ys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o u r c e s i n d i c a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o u r c e s o f c o n t a m i n a t i o n n e a r o u r w e l l s. e as s e s s m en t r e s u l ts a r e a v a i l a b l e o n t h e FD EP S o u r c e W a t er A s s e s s m en t a n d P r o t e c t i o n P r og r a m w e b s i t e a t w w w .d e p .s t a t e..u s/s w a p p I f y o u h a v e a n y q u e s t i o ns a b o u t t h i s r e p o r t o r c o n c er n i n g y o u r w a t er u t i l i ty p l e as e c o n t a c t D o n M i n c h e w a t (850)-639-2605 W e en c o u r a ge o u r v a l u e d cu s t o m er s t o b e i n f o r m e d a b o u t t h ei r w a t er u t i l i ty I f y o u w a n t t o l e a r n m o r e, p l e as e a tt en d a n y o f o u r r e g u l a r l y s c h e d u l e d m e e t i n g s. e y a r e h e l d o n t h e s e c o n d a n d f o r t h M o n d a y o f e a c h m o n t h a t 6:30 PM a t C i ty H a l l. C i ty o f W e w a h i t c h k a r o u t i n e l y m o n i t o r s f o r c o n t a m i n a n ts i n y o u r d r i n k i n g w a t er a c c o r d i n g t o F e d er a l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u l e s, a n d r e g u l a t i o ns. E x c e p t w h er e i n d i c a t e d o t h er w i s e, t h i s r e p o r t i s b as e d o n t h e r e s u l ts o f o u r m o n i t o r i n g f o r t h e p er i o d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e c em b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a i n e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r e s en t e d i n t h i s r e p o r t a r e f r o m t h e m o s t r e c en t t e s t i n g d o n e i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h t h e l a ws, r u l e s, a n d r e g u l a t i o ns. I n t h e t a b l e b e l o w y o u m a y n d u n f a m i l i a r t er ms a n d a b b r e v i a t i o ns. T o h e l p y o u b e tt er u n d er s t a n d t h e s e t er ms w e ’ v e p r o v i d e d t h e f o l l o w i n g d e n i t i o ns: M axi m u m C o n t a m i n a n t L e v e l o r M CL: e h i gh e s t l e v e l o f a c o n t a m i n a n t t h a t i s a l l o w e d i n d r i n k i n g w a t er M CLs a r e s e t as c l o s e t o t h e M CL Gs as f e as i b l e u s i n g t h e b e s t a v a i l a b l e t r e a t m en t t e c h n o l og y M axi m u m C o n t a m i n a n t L e ve l G oa l o r M CL G: e l e v e l o f a c o n t a m i n a n t i n d r i n k i n g w a t er b e l o w w h i c h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. M CL Gs a l l o w f o r a m a r g i n o f s a f e ty A c t i o n L e ve l (AL): e c o n c en t r a t i o n o f a c o n t a m i n a n t w h i c h, i f ex c e e d e d, t r i g ger s t r e a t m en t o r o t h er r e q u i r em en ts t h a t a w a t er s ys t em m u s t f o l l o w M axi m u m r e s i d u a l d i s i n f e c t a n t l e v e l o r MRD L: e h i gh e s t l e v e l o f a d i s i n f e c t a n t a l l o w e d i n d r i n k i n g w a t er er e i s c o n v i n ci n g e v i d en c e t h a t a d d i t i o n o f a d i s i n f e c t a n t i s n e c e s s a r y f o r c o n t r o l o f m i cr o b i a l c o n t a m i n a n ts. M axi m u m r es i d u a l d i s i n f ec t a n t l e ve l g oa l o r MRD L G: e l e v e l o f a d r i n k i n g w a t er d i s i n f e c t a n t b e l o w w h i c h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. MRD L Gs d o n o t r e e c t t h e b en e ts o f t h e u s e o f d i s i n f e c t a n ts t o c o n t r o l m i cr o b i a l c o n t a m i n a n ts. P a r ts pe r m i l l i o n (p p m) o r M i l l i g r a m s pe r l i t e r (m g/l) – o n e p a r t b y w ei gh t o f a n a l y t e t o 1 m i l l i o n p a r ts b y w ei gh t o f t h e w a t er s a m p l e. P a r ts pe r b i l l i o n (p p b) o r M i cr o g r a m s pe r l i t e r (g/l) – o n e p a r t b y w ei gh t o f a n a l y t e t o 1 b i l l i o n p a r ts b y w ei gh t o f t h e w a t er s a m p l e. P i c ocu r i e pe r l i t e r (pC i/L) m e as u r e o f t h e r a d i o a c t i v i ty i n w a t er I n i t i a l D i s t r i b u t i o n S ys t e m E va l u a t i o n (IDSE): A n i m p o r t a n t p a r t o f t h e S t a ge 2 D i s i n f e c t i o n B y p r o d u c ts R u l e (D BP R). e IDS E i s a o n e-t i m e s t u d y c o n d u c t e d b y w a t er s ys t ems t o i d en t i f y d i s t r i b u t i o n s ys t em l o c a t i o ns w i t h h i gh c o n c en t r a t i o ns o f t r i h a l o m e t h a n e s ( THMs) a n d h a l o a c e t i c a ci d s (H AA s). W a t er s ys t ems w i l l u s e r e s u l ts f r o m t h e IDS E, i n c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h t h ei r S t a ge 1 D BP R c o m p l i a n c e m o n i t o r i n g d a t a, t o s e l e c t c o m p l i a n c e m o n i t o r i n g l o c a t i o ns f o r t h e S t a ge 2 D BP R “ ND ” m e a ns n o t d e t e c t e d a n d i n d i c a t e s t h a t t h e s u b s t a n c e w as n o t f o u n d b y l a b o r a t o r y a n a l ys i s. I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in k in g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h t t p://w w w .ep a.g o v/s a f e wa t er/le ad e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di s s o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) M icr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I n o r ga nic co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t icides a n d h erb icides, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Or ga nic c h emic a l co n t a min a n ts, in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b y-p r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adio ac t i v e co n t a min a n ts, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t ra t io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y’ s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791 a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r ee c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o m e p e o p le m a y b e m o r e vu ln era b le t o co n t a min a n ts in dr in k in g wa t er t h a n t h e g en era l p o p u l a t io n. I mm un o-co m p r o mi s e d p er s o n s s uc h a s p er s o n s w i t h c a n cer un der g o in g c h em o t h era p y p er s o n s w h o h a v e un der g o n e o r ga n t ra n s p l a n ts, p e o p le w i t h HIV/AIDS o r o t h er imm un e sys t em di s o r der s, s o m e e lder l y a n d infa n ts c a n b e p a r t ic u l a r l y a t r i s k f r o m inf e c t io n s. es e p e o p le s h o u ld s e e k ad v ice a b o u t dr in k in g wa t er f r o m t h eir h e a l t h c a r e p r o v ider s. EP A/CD C guide lin es o n a p p r o p r i a t e m e a n s t o les s en t h e r i s k o f inf e c t io n b y Cr yp t os p o r idi um a n d o t h er micr o b io log ic a l co n t a min a n ts a r e a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e (800-426-4791) W e a t Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka w o u ld li k e y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o in s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s o r co n cer n s a b o u t t h e inf o r m a t io n p r o v ide d p le a s e f e e l f r e e t o c a l l a n y o f t h e n um b er s li s t e d 2012 A nn u a l Dr in k in g W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka W e a r e p le a s e d t o a nn o un ce t h a t o ur dr in k in g wa t er m e ets a l l f e dera l a n d s t a t e r e q uir em en ts. W e ’ r e p le a s e d t o p r es en t t o y o u t hi s y e a r ’ s A nn u a l W a t er Q u a li t y R ep o r t. i s r ep o r t i s desig n e d t o inf o r m y o u a b o u t t h e q u a li t y wa t er a n d s er v ices w e de li v er t o y o u e v er y d a y O ur co n s t a n t g o a l i s t o p r o v ide y o u w i t h a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le s u p p l y o f dr in k in g wa t er W e wa n t y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o en s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er O ur wa t er s o ur ce i s g r o un d wa t er f r o m t w o w e l l s. e w e l l s dra w f r o m t h e Flo r id a n A q uif er B e c a u s e o f t h e ex ce l len t q u a li t y o f o ur wa t er t h e o n l y t r e a t m en ts r e q uir e d a r e c h lo r in e f o r di sinf e c t io n p ur p os es a n d aera t io n f o r r em o va l o f h y dr og en s u lde I n 2011 t h e D ep a r t m en t o f En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n p er f o r m e d a S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t o n o ur sys t em a n d a s e a r c h o f t h e d a t a s o ur ces in dic a t e d n o p o t en t i a l s o ur ces o f co n t a min a t io n n e a r o ur w e l l s. e a s s es sm en t r es u l ts a r e a va i l a b le o n t h e FD EP S o ur ce W a t er A s s es sm en t a n d P r o t e c t io n P r og ra m w e bsi t e a t w w w .dep .s t a t e .u s/swa p p I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s a b o u t t hi s r ep o r t o r co n cer nin g y o ur wa t er u t i li t y p le a s e co n t ac t D o n M in c h e w a t (850)-639-2605 W e en co ura g e o ur va l ue d c u s t o m er s t o b e inf o r m e d a b o u t t h eir wa t er u t i li t y I f y o u wa n t t o le a r n m o r e p le a s e a t t en d a n y o f o ur r egu l a r l y s c h e d u le d m e et in gs. e y a r e h e ld o n t h e s e co n d a n d f o r t h M o n d a y o f e ac h m o n t h a t 6:30 PM a t Ci t y H a l l Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka r o u t in e l y m o ni t o r s f o r co n t a min a n ts in y o ur dr in k in g wa t er acco r din g t o F e dera l a n d S t a t e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. E x cep t w h er e in dic a t e d o t h er w i s e t hi s r ep o r t i s b a s e d o n t h e r es u l ts o f o ur m o ni t o r in g f o r t h e p er io d o f J a n u a r y 1 t o D e cem b er 31, 2012. D a t a o b t a in e d b ef o r e J a n u a r y 1, 2012, a n d p r es en t e d in t hi s r ep o r t a r e f r o m t h e m os t r e cen t t es t in g do n e in acco r d a n ce w i t h t h e l a ws, r u les, a n d r egu l a t io n s. I n t h e t a b le b e lo w y o u m a y n d unfa mi li a r t er m s a n d a b b r e v i a t io n s. T o h e l p y o u b et t er un der s t a n d t h es e t er m s w e ’ v e p r o v ide d t h e f o l lo w in g deni t io n s: M axim um C o n t a min a n t L e v e l o r M CL: e hig h es t le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t t h a t i s a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er M CLs a r e s et a s c los e t o t h e M CL Gs a s f e a si b le u sin g t h e b es t a va i l a b le t r e a t m en t t e c hn o log y M axim um C o n t a min a n t L e v e l G o a l o r M CL G: e le v e l o f a co n t a min a n t in dr in k in g wa t er b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. M CL Gs a l lo w f o r a m a r g in o f s a f et y A c t io n L e v e l (AL): e co n cen t ra t io n o f a co n t a min a n t w hic h, if ex ce e de d t r ig g er s t r e a t m en t o r o t h er r e q uir em en ts t h a t a wa t er sys t em m u s t f o l lo w M axim um r esid u a l di sinf e c t a n t le v e l o r MRD L: e hig h es t le v e l o f a di sinf e c t a n t a l lo w e d in dr in k in g wa t er er e i s co n v in cin g e v iden ce t h a t addi t io n o f a di sinf e c t a n t i s n e ces s a r y f o r co n t r o l o f micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. M axim um r esid u a l di sinf e c t a n t le v e l g o a l o r MRD L G: e le v e l o f a dr in k in g wa t er di sinf e c t a n t b e lo w w hic h t h er e i s n o k n o w n o r exp e c t e d r i s k t o h e a l t h. MRD L Gs do n o t r ee c t t h e b en e ts o f t h e u s e o f di sinf e c t a n ts t o co n t r o l micr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts. P a r ts p er mi l lio n (p p m) o r M i l lig ra m s p er li t er (m g/l) – o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 mi l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P a r ts p er b i l lio n (p p b) o r M icr og ra m s p er li t er (g/l) – o n e p a r t b y w eig h t o f a n a l yt e t o 1 b i l lio n p a r ts b y w eig h t o f t h e wa t er s a m p le P ico c ur ie p er li t er (pCi/L) m e a s ur e o f t h e radio ac t i v i t y in wa t er I ni t i a l Di s t r i b u t io n S ys t em E va l u a t io n (IDS E): A n im p o r t a n t p a r t o f t h e S t a g e 2 Di sinf e c t io n B yp r o d uc ts R u le (D B P R). e IDS E i s a o n e-t im e s t ud y co n d uc t e d b y wa t er sys t em s t o iden t if y di s t r i b u t io n sys t em lo c a t io n s w i t h hig h co n cen t ra t io n s o f t r i h a lo m et h a n es (THMs) a n d h a lo acet ic acid s (H AA s). W a t er sys t em s w i l l u s e r es u l ts f r o m t h e IDS E, in co n j un c t io n w i t h t h eir S t a g e 1 D B P R co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g d a t a, t o s e le c t co m p li a n ce m o ni t o r in g lo c a t io n s f o r t h e S t a g e 2 D B P R “ ND ” m e a n s n o t det e c t e d a n d in dic a t es t h a t t h e s u bs t a n ce wa s n o t f o un d b y l a b o ra t o r y a n a l ysi s. I f p r es en t, e le va t e d le v e l s o f le ad c a n c a u s e s er io u s h e a l t h p r o b lem s, es p e ci a l l y f o r p r eg n a n t w o m en a n d y o un g c hi ldr en. L e ad in dr in k in g wa t er i s p r im a r i l y f r o m m a t er i a l s a n d co m p o n en ts a s s o ci a t e d w i t h s er v ice lin es a n d h o m e p l um b in g Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka i s r es p o n si b le f o r p r o v idin g hig h q u a li t y dr in k in g wa t er b u t c a nn o t co n t r o l t h e va r iet y o f m a t er i a l s u s e d in p l um b in g co m p o n en ts. W h en y o ur wa t er h a s b e en si t t in g f o r s e v era l h o ur s, y o u c a n minimize t h e p o t en t i a l f o r le ad exp os ur e b y u s hin g y o ur t a p f o r 30 s e co n d s t o 2 min u t es b ef o r e u sin g wa t er f o r dr in k in g o r co o k in g I f y o u a r e co n cer n e d a b o u t le ad in y o ur wa t er y o u m a y w i s h t o h a v e y o ur wa t er t es t e d I nf o r m a t io n o n le ad in dr in k in g wa t er t es t in g m et h o d s, a n d s t eps y o u c a n t a k e t o minimize exp os ur e i s a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e o r a t h t t p://w w w .ep a.g o v/s a f e wa t er/le ad e s o ur ces o f dr in k in g wa t er (b o t h t a p wa t er a n d b o t t le d wa t er) in c l ude r i v er s, l a k es, s t r e a m s, p o n d s, r es er v o ir s, s p r in gs, a n d w e l l s. A s wa t er t ra v e l s o v er t h e s ur face o f t h e l a n d o r t hr o ug h t h e g r o un d i t di s s o l v es n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g min era l s a n d in s o m e c a s es, radio ac t i v e m a t er i a l a n d c a n p ic k u p s u bs t a n ces r es u l t in g f r o m t h e p r es en ce o f a nim a l s o r f r o m h um a n ac t i v i t y C o n t a min a n ts t h a t m a y b e p r es en t in s o ur ce wa t er in c l ude: (A) M icr o b i a l co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s v ir u s es a n d b ac t er i a, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m s e wa g e t r e a t m en t p l a n ts, s ep t ic sys t em s, a g r ic u l t ura l li v es t o c k o p era t io n s, a n d w i ld lif e (B) I n o r ga nic co n t a min a n ts, s uc h a s s a l ts a n d m et a l s, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y-o cc ur r in g o r r es u l t f r o m urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o in d u s t r i a l o r do m es t ic wa s t e wa t er di s c h a r g es, o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n, minin g o r fa r min g (C) P es t icides a n d h erb icides, w hic h m a y co m e f r o m a va r iet y o f s o ur ces s uc h a s a g r ic u l t ur e urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d r esiden t i a l u s es. (D) Or ga nic c h emic a l co n t a min a n ts, in c l udin g sy n t h et ic a n d v o l a t i le o r ga nic c h emic a l s, w hic h a r e b y-p r o d uc ts o f in d u s t r i a l p r o ces s es a n d p et r o leum p r o d uc t io n, a n d c a n a l s o co m e f r o m ga s s t a t io n s, urb a n s t o r m wa t er r un o a n d s ep t ic sys t em s. (E) R adio ac t i v e co n t a min a n ts, w hic h c a n b e n a t ura l l y o cc ur r in g o r b e t h e r es u l t o f o i l a n d ga s p r o d uc t io n a n d minin g ac t i v i t ies. I n o r der t o en s ur e t h a t t a p wa t er i s s a f e t o dr in k, t h e EP A p r es cr i b es r egu l a t io n s, w hic h limi t t h e a m o un t o f cer t a in co n t a min a n ts in wa t er p r o v ide d b y p u b lic wa t er sys t em s. e F o o d a n d Dr ug A dmini s t ra t io n (FD A) r egu l a t io n s es t a b li s h limi ts f o r co n t a min a n ts in b o t t le d wa t er w hic h m u s t p r o v ide t h e s a m e p r o t e c t io n f o r p u b lic h e a l t h. Dr in k in g wa t er in c l udin g b o t t le d wa t er m a y r e a s o n a b l y b e exp e c t e d t o co n t a in a t le a s t sm a l l a m o un ts o f s o m e co n t a min a n ts. e p r es en ce o f co n t a min a n ts do es n o t n e ces s a r i l y in dic a t e t h a t t h e wa t er p os es a h e a l t h r i s k. M o r e inf o r m a t io n a b o u t co n t a min a n ts a n d p o t en t i a l h e a l t h e e c ts c a n b e o b t a in e d b y c a l lin g t h e En v ir o nm en t a l P r o t e c t io n A g en c y’ s Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e a t 1-800-426-4791 a n k y o u f o r a l lo w in g u s t o co n t in ue p r o v idin g y o ur fa mi l y w i t h c le a n, q u a li t y wa t er t hi s y e a r I n o r der t o m a in t a in a s a f e a n d dep en d a b le wa t er s u p p l y w e s o m et im es n e e d t o m a k e im p r o v em en ts t h a t w i l l b en e t a l l o f o ur c u s t o m er s. es e im p r o v em en ts a r e s o m et im es r ee c t e d a s ra t e s t r uc t ur e ad j u s t m en ts. a n k y o u f o r un der s t a n din g S o m e p e o p le m a y b e m o r e vu ln era b le t o co n t a min a n ts in dr in k in g wa t er t h a n t h e g en era l p o p u l a t io n. I mm un o-co m p r o mi s e d p er s o n s s uc h a s p er s o n s w i t h c a n cer un der g o in g c h em o t h era p y p er s o n s w h o h a v e un der g o n e o r ga n t ra n s p l a n ts, p e o p le w i t h HIV/AIDS o r o t h er imm un e sys t em di s o r der s, s o m e e lder l y a n d infa n ts c a n b e p a r t ic u l a r l y a t r i s k f r o m inf e c t io n s. es e p e o p le s h o u ld s e e k ad v ice a b o u t dr in k in g wa t er f r o m t h eir h e a l t h c a r e p r o v ider s. EP A/CD C guide lin es o n a p p r o p r i a t e m e a n s t o les s en t h e r i s k o f inf e c t io n b y Cr yp t os p o r idi um a n d o t h er micr o b io log ic a l co n t a min a n ts a r e a va i l a b le f r o m t h e Sa f e Dr in k in g W a t er H o t lin e (800-426-4791) -W e a t Ci t y o f W e wa hi t c h ka w o u ld li k e y o u t o un der s t a n d t h e e o r ts w e m a k e t o co n t in u a l l y im p r o v e t h e wa t er t r e a t m en t p r o ces s a n d p r o t e c t o ur wa t er r es o ur ces. W e a r e co mmi t t e d t o in s ur in g t h e q u a li t y o f y o ur wa t er I f y o u h a v e a n y q ues t io n s o r co n cer n s a b o u t t h e inf o r m a t io n p r o v ide d p le a s e f e e l f r e e t o c a l l a n y o f t h e n um b er s li s t e d

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“Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Besides money what’s the most common reward employers give their workers? Weekend getaway, Discounts, Lunch, Afternoon off 2) 73 percent of women are more apt to marry a man who has what? Driver’s license, Tattoo, Home, Pet 3) What’s the a.k.a. of Donald Duck’s sister, Della Thelma Duck? Ductella, Dumbella, Thelmaletta, Thelmor 4) Where is America’s No. 1 bus destination? Branson, Las Vegas, Hollywood, Area 51 5) The average guy will lie how many times on the rst date? 1, 3, 6, 9 6) “Surete Nationale” is the French equivalent of our? NASA, FBI, NRA, Library of Congress 7) From a classic “Brady Bunch,” what game did Alice trip over, spraining her ankle? Chinese Checkers, Scrabble, Monopoly, Life 8) Who entered the country music charts for the rst time with “Cry Cry Cry”? Johnny Cash, Kenny Chesney, Willie Nelson, George Strait 9) Who was the original choice to play Lamont on TV’s “Sanford and Son”? Cleavon Little, Richard Pryor, Flip Wilson, Bill Cosby 10) Until rubber erasers were invented, what did writers commonly use? Flour, Bread crumbs, Saliva, Lemon juice 11) What product was introduced in the colors of steel blue and chrome? Tupperware, Velcro, Frisbee, Duct tape 12) “Kelly’s Eye” is sometimes referred to as what number on a dartboard? 1, 3, 7, 9 13) What’s the term for the playing surface of a soccer eld? Kite, Pitch, Lume, Masa 14) If you have a desk job, you do what twice as much as one who does manual labor? Pray, Eat, Loaf, Bathroom trips ANSWERS 1) Lunch. 2) Pet. 3) Dumbella. 4) Branson. 5) 6. 6) FBI. 7) Chinese Checkers. 8) Johnny Cash. 9) Cleavon Little. 10) Bread crumbs. 11) Duct tape. 12) 1. 13) Pitch. 14) Eat. C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, May 2, 2013 B Page 1 Section Centennial TRIVIA Pelican Pete has a Centennial Stumper for You! ANSWER ON PAGE B6 Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Everyone loves a birthday party and the residents of Port St. Joe are no exception. In preparation for the big 100, Mayor Mel Magidson appointed several committee members late last year to plan out a series of events that would take place on and around July rst, the of cial day that the town became incorporated in 1913. The committees came up with events to entertain the town and promote the history that would involve enthrall longtime residents and newcomers alike. The Music through the Years Music Festival at George Core Park will be the rst of several events leading up to the centennial celebration to help raise funds for the festivities to come. The concert, which will feature six bands of different genres, will also mark the third reunion of the hit 1970s band, The Villagers, in 15 years. The concert was coordinated by a music committee and will take place on Saturday, May 11. Food and beverages will be sold on-site. Additional fundraisers in the planning stages include a sh fry and a restaurant tasting. City Auditor and Clerk, Charlotte Pierce and Patti Blaylock of Sunset Coastal Grill have been busy planning a parade that will open the celebration on June 28 by cruising down Reid Avenue. Floats will feature well-known community members for PSJ’s past and present. The parade route would end at George Core Park where locals would be treated by a light show, currently being planned by Tim Nelson, Anna Duren and Jennifer Jenkins. Over the weekend, the City Commons will be abuzz with an art fair joining the regular farmer’s market as local artists set up to sell their wares and share inspiration with the community. The event is being orchestrated by John Parker. Nelson and Dana Boyer of Boyer Signs are working with the St. Joseph Historical Society to create a Timeline Wall to be on display for the duration of the celebration. Using old photos scanned at recent events, the group has collected and is working to chronologically organize the images to show the past and present of Port St. Joe. The wall will stand 30 feet long and seven feet tall, displaying the town’s heritage as far back to 1913 as possible. The timeline photos will also be collected into a book printed speci cally for the event and available for purchase during the festivities. Parker and the photo committee are hard at work on the details. To help residents and visitors get into the centennial mood, Steve Kerigan and Boyer are collecting vintage artwork, relative to the community, to hang in the windows of vacant buildings in the downtown area. These works will show off the deep artistic roots of Port St. Joe and entertain and By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Relay for Life celebrated those who survived the ght against cancer and those who continue to ght. Held at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football eld, the event brought the relay total to just over $39,500 for the year. The funds will be donated to the American Cancer Society. On the beautiful Friday afternoon, the Relay started as the colors were posted by the NJROTC students from the high school and the national anthem sung by Lisa Keels. The announcers for the relay, Event Chair Kim Kurnitsky and Jera Horton welcomed everyone and thanked the community for their outpouring of support. Cancer survivor Amy Nobles took to the stage and shared the story of her year-and-a-half battle with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. She hopes to soon be certi ed cancer-free. Each Relay for Life event is made up of fundraising teams who sell goods and provide entertainment while a member from each must walk around a track for 18 hours, swapping out members as needed to keep someone moving at all times. Around the By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Drivers in Port St. Joe last week noticed a long line of bicyclists along the picturesque strip. These bikers were 18 members of the Sumter Landing Bicycle Club and most of them were enjoying their rst visit to the Forgotten Coast. The 340-member group is based out of The Villages, an active retirement community in central Florida with more than 85,000 residents. “Port St. Joe was just gorgeous,” said Dave Taylor, the club’s president. “The people were very nice.” Taylor said that the group rides together four times a week, usually bringing over 200 members wherever they go. Several times a year the group organizes an “away ride” where they bike 60 miles a day, and stop at major tourist destinations along the way. For this year’s ride, dubbed the “Forgotten Florida Tour,” the group started at a Best Western Hotel in Crawfordville and spent four days visiting sites in St. George Island, Apalachicola, Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. The bikers were followed by two vehicles carrying spouses, suitcases and emergency equipment and ended their rst leg at the Wakulla State Park Lodge where they were joined by Get ready to party like its 1913 JOE MIZERECK | Special to The Star Members of the Sumter Landing Bicycle Club rode through Port St. Joe last week on its “Forgotten Florida Tour.” TOUR DE JOE See TOUR B6 Forgotten Florida tour comes through Port St. Joe Beach See 1913 B6 WES LOCHER | The Star Mayor Mel Magidson prepares for the centennial celebration by picking up the rst of the commemorative coins. St. Joe Relay for Life raises $40,000 What year do you think this photograph of two ladies strolling on the boardwalk in front of the Port Inn was taken? a) 1902, b) 1912, c) 1922, d) 1932. WES LOCHER | The Star The rst lap of the relay belong to cancer survivors at the Port St. Joe Relay for Life. Cancer survivors celebrated during Relay for Life See RELAY B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 Star Staff Report The Panhandle Writers will hold a book signing at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse Gift Shop from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET May 11. Participants can meet authors Sandra Bass Joines, Marlene Womack, Corinda Pitts Marsh, Beverly Mount-Douds and Dawn Evans Radford. Check out all their books and other local stories pertaining to this area and by authors in the Florida Panhandle. The gift shop is at 155 Capt. Fred’s Place (the old Maddox House), Port St. Joe, next door to the Welcome Center in Port St. Joe. C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et WEE K PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society W e w o u l d l i k e t o t h a n k a l l o f o u r v o l u n t e e r s t h a t s h o w e d u p f o r o u r a p p r e c i a t i o n d a y c e l e b r a t i o n W i t h t h e i r h e l p w e w e r e a b l e t o p l a c e 2 a d u l t s c a t s f r e e o f c h a r g e W e a r e c e l e b r a t i n g t h i s w e e k w i t h a “ C i n c o d e M e o w ” f i e s t a a t t h e s h e l t e r M a y 2 n d 7 t h A n y v e t t e d c a t o v e r 5 m o. w i l l h a v e t h e i r a d o p t i o n f e e w a i v e d t o a n a p p r o v e d h o m e C a t s l i k e t h e w o n d e r f u l k i t t y G r e g s h o w n a b o v e w i l l b e f r e e t o a n a p p r o v e d h o m e T o p r e q u a l i f y f i l l o u t a n a p p l i c a t i o n o n l i n e a t w w w s j b h u m a n eso ci et y o r g I f y o u a r e u n a b l e t o a d o p t a t t h i s t i m e p e r h a p s y o u c o u l d f o s t e r o r m a k e a D o n a t i o n A l l p e t s a d o p t e d f r o m S J B H S w i l l b e c u r r e n t o n v a c c i n a t i o n s a n d s p a y e d / n e u t e r e d P l e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n s e n d h s d i r e c t o r @ g m a i l .c o m o r a d o p t b a y s t j o e @ g m a i l .c o m o r c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e A p p l i c a t i o n s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y o r g W e r e q u i r e a l l p o t e n t i a l a d o p t e r s t o c o m p l e t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r m A d o p t i o n f e e s i n c l u d e o u r c o s t of s p a y / ne u t e r a n d c ur r e n t va c c i n a t i on s. O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 4 p m F a i t h ’ s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o l u n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n Po r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t h e r e s o o n w w w s jbh uma n e so c i e t y o r g I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y 2092215 FREE SP A Y / NEUTER Fixing y our pet sa v es liv es! St. J oseph Ba y Humane Society is of f er ing FREE Spa y/Neut er f or the pets of Gulf County ONL Y Millions of health y adoptable c a ts and dogs ar e euthaniz ed each y ear simply bec ause ther e ar e not enough homes f or them all C A L L : 850 227 1103 O R PI C K U P A N APPL I C A T ION A T 1 0 0 7 1 0 T H S T POR T S T JOE FL Society Special to The Star The Artery Studio will open its doors to the public this weekend for a Spring Art Sale and Open House. The works of 19 artists will be on sale, including pottery, jewelry, stained glass, paintings, notecards, mosaics, driftwood art and more. The sale will take place in the studio, 214 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Saturday, May 4. A Preview Party from 6-8 p.m. Friday will give people the opportunity to meet and mingle with the artists. Many of the participating artists make their work right at The Artery with other area artists taking part as well. With Mother’s Day right around the corner, all of the artists have included work that would make unique gift items and are priced accordingly. With this in mind, several of the artists each produced hand-made or hand-decorated ower pots especially for this sale, and there will be a small selection of plants available for purchase as well. The Artery is a working art studio that is open to the public for classes and drop-in art activities. The studio will be transformed for the sale, but underneath it all, “You’ll get a glimpse of the fun and funky atmosphere here,” owner Leslie Wentzell said. Wentzell is a clay artist, so there is a strong emphasis on pottery in the studio, but she also brings in other artists to teach painting classes and other mediums. “Just as important as the art experiences here at The Artery is the sense of community and fellowship,” Wentzell said. “Seeing the studio, and more importantly, meeting the people who come here to be creative is the reason we want to open our doors for an event like this.” For more information, call Wentzell at 2275741 or visit www. ArteryStudio.com. Callie Clayton turned 2 Covered in cake and icing, You smile from ear to ear. Two candles celebrate Our joy of your second year. We sing Happy Birthday And you play with the wrapping and bows We are amazed at how you have touched our lives Just two years ago. Happy Birthday Callie! We love you! Callie Clayton turned 2 on April 25, 2013. She celebrated her birthday with a Carnivalthemed party with her family and friends. Callie is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton; granddaughter of Keith and Debbie Ford, and Sam Sr. and Jeannette Amerson; and the niece to Sam Jr. Amerson and Jeremy Owens. Special to The Star Kemp Family Reunion The 53rd Kemp Family Reunion will be Sunday, May 5. All family and friends, please come and enjoy fellowship and food. We will draw names for prizes. We will meet at the Kemp Cemetery off of State 22, seven miles from Wewahitchka. All family, please bring old family pictures. We will eat at 12:45 p.m. CT, but come early if you can. Cinco de Mayo fundraiser The St. Joseph Bay Humane Society will have a Cinco de Mayo Mexican esta from 5-8 p.m. ET on Cuando Sunday, May 5, at Barrier Dunes at the end of Cape San Blas Road. For $20, enjoy fun and food, with rafes, margaritas, sangria, Mexican beer, wine and bottled water. Mexican attire optional. Proceeds benet the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Purchase tickets at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, Scallop Cove BP or call 628-1013. Amateur radio license exams Ham it up! Get on the air! Enter the exciting world of amateur radio. Communicate with people around the world. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will give licensing exams at 10 a.m. ET May 11 at the Gulf County Emergency Operations Center behind the County Courthouse. Get your initial license or upgrade a present license. For registration, details and/or assistance, call Cecil Tillis at 648-8251. Special to The Star The Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizens Award luncheon was April 24 at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. The Good Citizens from the area schools are Kassandra Marie Favre of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, Shelby Anna Wood of Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School and Christina Michelle Collins of Franklin County High School. After the luncheon, the students read their essays, “Our American Heritage and our Responsibility to Preserve It.” The Good Citizen Award is given annually to a member of each senior class in Gulf and Franklin counties and is chosen by faculty and students on a merit basis. The student selected must have the qualities of dependability, service, leadership and patriotism. The Good Citizens are presented with a certicate and a DAR pen at the luncheon and will receive a scholarship at graduation or Awards Day at their schools. WES LOc C HEr R | The Star The recipients of the Good Citizens Award are Christina Collins, Shelby Wood and Kassandra Favre. 3 earn DAR Good Citizen Awards Happy BI rR THD aA Y Panhandle Writers coming to Port St. Joe The Artery to host spring art sale, Open House Society B rR IE fF S

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The Star| B3 Thursday, May 2, 2013 4IBSL 5BML T he P arade of H omes is an annual e v ent f ea turing a collec tion of brand ne w homes built b y Ba y C ount y ’ s nest builders T he homes span e v er y par t of Ba y C ount y and co v er a wide range of prices fr om highl y a or dable t o luxur y c ust om homes OUUN GUX \KE V?X?CE UG KUQEZ \U]X ZVEBL?O ZEB\LUS LS U]X SE_Z KEX?OC US Q? @+ 21st Annual T rinity Episcopal Church Ticket Pre-sale $20; Day of T our $25; Lunch $12; Symposium $75 For infor mation and tickets contact T rinity Episcopal Church 850-653-9550 or Apalachicola Bay Chamber 850-653-9419 www .apalachicolahistorichometour .org Historic Apalachicola Home & Garden T our May 3-4, 2013 Friday May 3 Preser vation Symposium 8:30am-4:30pm “Public Places, Private Spaces: A Garden Symposium” Evening Ser vice 5:30pm Reception 6pm; Lecture 6:30pm Saturday May 4 T our 10am-4pm Sealed Bid Auction 10am-2pm Parish Hall Lunch 11am-2pm Robert C. Bruner Attorne y P ersonal & Business Bankruptcy Ov er 30 Y ears Le g al Experience O f c e l o c a t e d a t : 19 Island Dri v e, Eastpoint, FL 850-670-3030 “W e are a debt relief agenc y W e can help people le bankruptc y relief under the U.S. Bankruptc y Code. ” “The hiring of a la wyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon adv ertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualications and e xperience. ” A p a l achi c ol a Ba y A nim a l C lini c P r o u d l y a n n o u n c e s t h e a d d i t i o n o f D r A l i s on J e n n a r t t o o ur p ra c ti c e S m a l l A n i m a l M e d i ci n e S u r ge r y a n d De n t is t r y L a se r S u r ge r y Di a g n o s t i c U l t r a so u n d, N u t ri t i o n, P a ra s i t e C o n tro l B o a rdin g B a t h i n g P e t C a r e S u p p l i e s, H i l l ’ s Sci e n c e Di e t W e l l n e s s P r o g r a m s 187 H ig h wa y 98 E a s t p o in t C a l l 850-670-8306 f o r a n a p p o in t m en t! H o urs M o nd a y-F ri d a y 7:30-5:30 Special to The Star Developing a strong foundation with the FCS curriculum creates a bridge that helps students obtain a better understanding of written language. Phonics can help students break down words with certain sounds, and children who can “sound out” a word have an enormous advantage when reading. This skill branches into all academics and gives students the tools to succeed. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a good reader. Open enrollment for new students has begun for the 2013-14 school year. Class sizes are limited, so early registration is recommended. Call 229-6707 or visit www. FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. School News Special to The Star FCAT/EOC testing: Algebra 1 EOC is scheduled for May 7. Standardized testing is concluded with the Geometry EOC scheduled for May 14. NJROTC News: The NJROTC will hold a Change of Command and Awards Ceremony at 6 p.m. ET May 9 in the commons area. Next year’s staff will be installed, and outgoing seniors will be honored for their performance throughout their high school careers. Shark Bites: Anyone interested in receiving “Shark Bites” our weekly schedule of events, please email LCDR Marty Jarosz at mjarosz@ gulf.k12.,.us and we will put you on the list. Spring football: Spring football has begun. Support our Tiger Shark Gridders as they compete in the annual Spring Jamboree 7 p.m. ET May 16 against the Seahawks of Franklin County and the Gators of Wewahitchka. GO TIGER SHARKS! Drama performance: Under the direction of Ann Comforter, the drama students will present “Alice in Wonderland” on May 13 in the commons area. Slip down the Rabbit Hole, and enjoy the timeless story of a young girl’s adventures behind the Looking Glass. PSJHS Spring Art Show: Come to Sacred Heart Hospital in Port St Joe to view the many and varied art works of our high school students from 6-8 p.m. ET May 2. Senior News: This year’s Senior Trip to Orlando will be May 3-5. Our seniors will be leaving early Friday morning and will return Sunday. A fun time is scheduled for all. Our seniors’ last day of ofcial classes will be May 15. A baccalaureate will be held for all seniors at 5:30 p.m. ET May 22 in the gymnasium. Port St. Joe Junior-Senior High School will hold commencement exercises for the Senior Class of 2013 at 7 p.m. ET May 23. Last day for underclassmen: The last day of classes for all Port St Joe Junior-Senior High School underclassmen will be May 24. By AU bB REY CL aA Y tT ON and J aA DEN MO sS ELY Special to The Star Wewahitchka Elementary School fthgrade scientists have been exploring, observing, constructing and testing air-pressured rockets and building and programming their Lego Mindstorm robots. This club brings together students who are excited about science, technology, engineering and math. As an added bonus, students at WES have been participating in NASA Explorer Schools — NASA’s Design Challenges. The club is an extension of the regular curriculum; however, being a member of NASA Explorer Schools program gives WES students a deeper understanding of designing, creating and testing our masterpieces. It also opens up doors for students to work with other fth-graders around the United States. It is exciting watching young minds at work. The environment is one where it is OK if your model doesn’t y straight or the parachute doesn’t open properly. Each scientist offers his opinion or skill to assist in correcting the design aw. Students also discuss constraints of their challenges and help each other gure out how to overcome these obstacles. Young people also explore their strengths and weakness they bring to the projects. Teamwork is the key to making this club successful. C orrectORRECT I onalONAL offOFF I cerCER G radRAD U atATI onON S pec PEC I al AL toTO theTHE S tar TAR Gulf Coast State College will be graduating the Correctional Ofcer Basic Standards Class 219 at 7 p.m. ET May 9 at the Gulf/Franklin campus. The students wish to invite family and friends to join them in the graduating ceremony. D aA ZZ lL I nN G dolphDOLPH I nsNS S pec PEC I al AL toTO theTHE starSTAR Front row: Jackson Buckner, Hunter Ard and Jamicia Glen. Back row: Ali Evans, Luke Lentz, Jackson Vaughn, Tristan Butler, Micaela Fedd and Jacob Kennedy. The Lion’s Tale WES club explores Rockets, Rovers and Robots S tT U dentsDENTS paPAI ntNT forFOR C oO V enantENANT H ospOSP I ceCE S pec PEC I al AL toTO T he HE S tar TAR Each year, Debbie Cole’s art classes at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School have created something for the annual Covenant Hospice Mask Parade gala during the 11 years the event has been held. This year’s theme was “Under the Sea,” and the class painted a coral reef scene. Shown here are Bree Scruggs and Alexa Allison with the vignette they painted in art class. FCS students get intro to phonics

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F AITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street • Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S ’ E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) • Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peter’s Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive “An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World” Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive “An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World” www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Y• <}• u} usˆ tx ›Š• }Š†x B ’ <}• u} Šz ’}x Vsœs xˆx & % "" "# & (850) 229-9596 '" '" % "# '" '" $ '" Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor B ’ :sŒ’ ’ <}• u} $ && & 6’rr 8oŒ–tF O{ „{ Œ t‹ †v O’ Œ{ q {‹Œ 6oˆ{ Œ 8y’‹qy ^’„ro ^qy†† e†‹Œy{ˆ ^t‹•{q t C' o‚ ^’„ro ^qy†† e†‹Œy{ˆ ^t‹•{qt 'S o‚ ^’„ro <•t„{„x 4r’ 6{pt ^’r ' ˆ‚ etr„tŒro R{xy ^’ˆˆt‹ m'S ˆ‚ !! #% !!# 'S ˆ‚ !! #% "%! 'S ˆ‚ !! #% % 'S ˆ‚ www .fbcpsj.or g www .fbcpsj.or g `›‹xu ¡ `›‹xu ¡ `w ~… Q* u‰ g ’ ”~ `z’ wz *f u‰ ?~’ '* ‰ Rt– ^t‹•{ qt ^qytr’ t v†‹ >{‹Œ 6oˆ{ Œ 8y’‹qy g zx‹z”xu ¡ @‹‹ z’ ‡* '* ‰ 9 g 9W 9 ' * G *f  ‰ `›’ ’ z‹x z ’ ` —›x z‹— T‹ ” —’ ¡ '* ‡ G *f ‰ [’ u ¡ z’ ;v …z ` —›x¡ '*f G *f ‰ W ›’ ”z’ ¡ '* G *f  ‰ SUND A Y : WOR S HIP A T SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM CS T 1 0 : 3 0 AM CS T ON THE 2 ND SUND A Y OF THE MONTH SUND A Y : BI B LE CL A SS 9 : 3 0 AM CS T M OND A Y : L IFE T REE C AF 7 PM CS T TUE S D A Y : MEN ’ S BI B LE STUDY 6 : 3 0 PM CS T T HUR S D A Y : WOMEN ’ S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM CS T 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL ( 850) 648.1151 www .livingwateratthebeach.com SUNDA Y : Sunday School 9:15 Morning W orship 10:30 Evening W orship 5:00 1601 Long A ve Port St Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-8691 W E DN ES DA Y : Family D inner 5:30 Prayer Meeting 6:30 Student Ministr y 6:30 Children’ s Ministr y / Choir 6:30 A dult Choir 7:30 MINISTR Y S CHEDULE COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. “Rocky” Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 Lewis “Buddy” Franklin Hefner, 83, of Eastpoint passed away April 29, 2013. He was preceded in death by his sons, Dennis F. Hefner and S.L. Pruitt. Mr. Hefner is survived by his wife of 48 years, Hazel Rainey Hefner; daughters, Jacki Hefner and son, “LiL Buddy” of Eastpoint and Nola Stout of Arizona; and sons Andrew C. Pruitt of Marietta, Ga., John W. Pruitt of North Georgia and William G Hefner of Ga.; 18 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; one sister, Ellen Fox of Washburn, Tenn.; and many nieces and nephews. The family wishes to thank all of their friends and family for all the prayers and support. In lieu of owers, those who wish may make donations to Covenant House Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road Suite 150, Tallahassee, FL 32308. A Memorial service will be held at a later time in Georgia. Local services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Lewis ‘Buddy’ Franklin Hefner Graveside services for Delores Faye Crosby Clark, 82, of Port St. Joe, Fla., (formerly of Cairo, Ga.) were held at 2 p.m. ET Sunday, April 28, 2013, in Greenwood Cemetery, Cairo, Ga. Dr. Ron McCaskill of ciated. Mrs. Clark passed away on Friday, April 26, 2013, at The Bridge of Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe, Fla. Mrs. Clark was born on June 23, 1930, in Berlin, Ga., to the late Ralph and Evelyn Ruth Tidd Crosby. On Oct. 29, 1950, she married E. Lamar Clark. Mr. Clark preceded her in death on Sept. 9, 2002. She was a retired registered nurse, having worked at Grady General Hospital, Archbold Hospital and Southwestern State Hospital. She was a member of Cairo First Baptist Church. Survivors include a daughter and son-in-law, Karen and Ken Collins of Port St. Joe, Fla.; granddaughter, Tessa C. and Jim Anderson of Port St. Joe, Fla.; grandsons, Simon Collins and anc, Kristen Mackery, of Jacksonville, Fla., and Terrell and Susan Collins of Cedar Hill, Tenn.; great-granddaughters, Samantha Anderson of Port St. Joe, Fla., and Sadie Collins of Cedar Hill, Tenn.; greatgrandsons, Brett Collins and Gage Collins of Cedar Hill, Tenn.; and a brother, Earl Lynwood Crosby (Martha) of Baton Rouge, La. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St, Panama City, FL 32405. The family received friends at Clark Funeral Home from 1-2 p.m. ET Sunday. Guests may sign the online register at www. clarkfuneral.com. Delores Faye Crosby Clark June 23, 1930 – April 26, 2013 Andy L. Stewart, 51, of Wewahitchka, passed away Thursday afternoon in a Panama City hospital. He was a lifelong resident of Wewahitchka and he worked at Taunton Truss Co. and later Eastern Marine. He was a loving father and son. He was preceded in death by his father, Vernon Stewart, and his sister Dinah Stewart. Survivors are his mother, Christina Stewart of Wewahitchka; two daughters, Hannah Stewart and Elizabeth Stewart of Apalachicola; one sister, Linda Stewart; one brother, Eric Stewart (Stacy), all of Wewahitchka; a niece, Crystal Ake (Buddy); and a nephew, Joseph Shiver. Graveside services were at 2 p.m. CT Sunday, April 27, 2013, at Roberts Cemetery in Wewahitchka with the Rev. Dallas Presley of ciating. Interment followed. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Andy L. Stewart Special to The Star The issue of racism will be explored at Lifetree Caf at 7 p.m. CT Monday, May 6. The program, titled “The Black and White Truth About Racism: Will We Ever Live in a Colorblind World?” features an exclusive lmed interview with Daryl Davis, a black man who in ltrated the Ku Klux Klan. Davis said, “I wanted to question those people who would lynch me for no other reason than the color of my skin,” Davis said. “Why do you hate me when you don’t even know me?” Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. Special to The Star Revival at Howard Creek Baptist Howard Creek Baptist Church is having a revival at 7 p.m. May 10, 7 p.m. May 11 and 11 a.m. May 12 with lunch after the service. The guest speaker will be Dave Fernandez. The church is at 7230 Doc Whit eld Road, Howard Creek. Matron Auxiliary anniversary The Matron Auxiliary of Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate its anniversary at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 5. The community is cordially invited to come out for this worshipful service. The church is at 259 Ave. D. THE TRUTH WILL SET YOU FREE The truth will set you free, if only you believe. I’ve often wondered why it’s turned down, when by accepting your sins He would relieve. He made the world and all there in, Why can’t you believe that He’d die for your sin? He not only died, He arose the third day. If you’re making plans for heaven, He is the only way. He’ll not beg or plead; you have to ask Him in. The truth is then; He’ll forgive all your sin. You are on your way to heaven, so let everyone know. That’s what it’s all about; He wants all of us to go. Billy Johnson Thursday, May 2, 2013 Obituaries Lifetree Caf to discuss racism Faith BRIEFS 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, May 2, 2013 THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPOR T OVER THE LAST TWO YEARS. I HA VE ENJOYED SER VING YOU AND LOOK FOR W ARD TO ANOTHER TWO YEARS IN OFFICE. I NEED Y OUR VOTE AGAIN ON May 14th! EARL Y VOTING IS MA Y 4TH 11TH A T THE SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS OFFICE 9:00 AM UNTIL 5:00 PM ET MOND A Y SA TURD A Y Paid for and Approved by James “Bo Knows” Patterson for City Commissioner Group II RE-ELECT JAMES “BO KNOWS” P A TTERSON FOR CITY COMMISSIONER GROUP II PD .POL.AD “ A M a n Y o u K no w A M a n Y o u C a n T r us t ” Special to The Star The Supporters of St. Vin cent National Wildlife Re serve are announcing this new program to increase awareness of and participa tion in the annual sea turtle nesting season. One of the objects of the program is to provide nancial assistance to support the sea turtle program. Sea turtle nesting season begins in mid-May and lasts through October. Loggerhead turtles are the species most often found on St. Vincent Island. Fe male Loggerhead sea turtles lay their eggs along the gulf side beaches of St. Vincent. Each nest contains over 100 eggs. Unfortunately, there are quite a few predators on the island that disturb the nests and destroy the eggs. The main predators are fe ral hogs and raccoons. Con rmed nests, those nests that actually contain eggs, need protection from the predators. Wire cages are placed over the conrmed nests to discourage the predators. In most cases, these cages do a very good job. The gulf side beaches of the island are patrolled sev eral times each week by vol unteers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife staff. The number of patrols per week depends on stafng levels. The beaches are patrolled for evidence of turtle activity (crawls). The crawls are examined to determine the species of sea turtle making the crawl and whether the turtle actu ally made a nest. The nests are examined to determine if there are eggs present, marked, documented, and GPS location noted. All nests are monitored during the nesting season and accurate records kept. This is done so that complete survey data can be kept and used to de termine nesting trends, etc. The Supporter’s group is requesting a tax-deductible donation of $25 to “adopt” a specic sea turtle nest. This donation applies to one nest per nesting season. Donors will receive an “adoption certicate,” a photo of the nest, and a complete activ ity report at the end of the nesting season. All donors will be recognized in the Supporter’s newsletter. The $25 donation will help pay for the cost of the wire cag es, supplies, and fuel for the patrol vehicles. Your support of this project will be greatly appreciated by the mother sea turtles, volunteers, staff, and sea turtle lovers everywhere. For more information on this program, email at sup portstvin@hotmail.com or call 229-6735. A beautiful lawn can add substantial value to your home. While providing an attractive setting for landscape ornamentals, a good lawn will reduce weed growth and prevent erosion. Selecting the proper grass for your specic location is a basic key to attaining these goals. Five lawngrasses are commonly grown in Florida. Saint Augustine, Bahia, Centipede, Zoyia are most popular, though carpet is used less often. In this article we’ll offer some facts which could help you choose the species that would be best for your home site. My information was provided by J. Bryan Unruh, associate center director and professor, West Florida Research and Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Jay, Fla. The most important thing to consider when selecting a lawngrass is the compatibility of that grass with the soil, climate, and growing conditions of your specic area. For example, if you live along the coast, you should plant a salt tolerant grass, such as Saint Augustine. If you try to grow Centipede or Bahia, you’re asking for trouble. You might be able to establish these grasses in a coastal location, but only with considerable expenditures of time and money. Likewise, if you need a grass for a shaded lawn, you should plant Saint Augustine or Bahia, not Bermuda, which requires full sun. After you decide which lawngrasses will grow well in your area, you should choose one that you’ll be able to manage properly. Now lawngrass is maintenance free, but some types do require more care than others. For example, Bermuda produces the most beautiful lawns, but only if it’s heavily fertilized, frequently mowed, and kept free of pests and diseases. If you can’t provide such high maintenance, you’d be wise to plant a low care grass, such as Bahia, or Centipede. Saint Augustine is not difcult to maintain, but thatch and chinch bugs are common problems. The amount of water a particular grass requires is another consideration. Bahia has excellent drought tolerance Saint Augustine ranks second and Centipede ranks third. In recent year, dramatic improvements in Zoysia grass have been made by turfgrass breeders. These improvements include insect resistance, accelerated establishment, and overall performance. Zoyiagrasses are adapted to a variety of soil types and have good tolerance to shade, salt, and trafc. They provide and extremely dense sod that resist weed invasion, but certain pest can be problematic. Of all Florida lawngrasses, Bahia is mot resistant to pests. It’s the best choice for landscapes heavily infested with nematodes. Saint Augustine also has good nematode tolerance. But, as we said, chinch bugs are a serious threat to this grass. While it may be severely damaged by nematodes, centipede has few other pest problems, providing it is not fertilized to heavily. Bermuda is plagued by many problems, in fact, it’s particularly impossible to grow this grass without a continuous control program to cope with nematodes, insects, and diseases. As we pointed out in the beginning, a number of good lawngrasses grow well in Florida. But, each has certain advantages and disadvantages, as well as specic cultural requirement. Area climate, landscape soil type, amount of home site shade and sun, and the degree of trafc by people and pets are important considerations. You should also evaluate the expenditure of time, effort, and money that will be required to keep a particular grass healthy and attractive. For more information on choosing a lawngrass, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas.u.edu or edis.ifas.u.edu. Special to The Star St. Joseph Peninsula is host to one of the highest densities of nesting sea tur tles in the Florida Panhan dle. St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol volunteers as sist in the continued moni toring of sea turtle nesting activity on St. Joseph Pen insula to aid in the survival of these threatened and en dangered species. From May 1 through Oct. 31, volunteers survey six miles of beach daily, look ing for signs of nesting and hatching activity. Volunteers identify nests, post nesting signs and protect the nests from predators, and collect and submit data on nesting activity. During hatching season, nests are checked for signs of emergence and then excavated to record hatching success. Volun teers also rescue turtles that become disoriented af ter hatching. Dedicated volunteers are critical to the success of this monitoring program, and the St. Joseph Penin sula Turtle Patrol needs your help. Volunteers must be able to: commit to sur veying shortly after sunrise at least one day a week; walk two to four miles on the beach if necessary; ac curately collect and record data; and deal effectively with the public to increase awareness about sea turtles and the human impacts on them. We need your help to pro tect local sea turtles! If you are interested in volunteer ing for Turtle Patrol, please contact Jessica McKenzie for more information: call 205-910-4717 or email sjptur tlepatrol@gmail.com. Things everyone can do to help sea turtles: •Never disturb a nesting female, nests or emerging hatchlings. •Sea turtles can get dis oriented by beachfront light ing. Be sure to shield indoor lights and turn off outdoor lights after dark. •Fires and reworks can also disorient sea tur tles. Avoid these activities on beaches during nesting season. •Recreational equip ment left on beaches over night can block or ensnare nesting sea turtles and their hatchlings. Make sure to remove all equipment from the beach each night. •Report sea turtle viola tions, injured or stranded turtles or disoriented hatch lings to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission at 888-404-FWCC. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com North Florida Child Develop ment’s north end facility hosted its rst Celebrity Read-A-Thon last Wednesday. Local celebrities were invited to read to the children, aged zero through ve and could bring their own book or have a class favorite supplied. Celebrity guests included We wahitchka author Michael Lister, Panama City news anchor Amy Hoyt and Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. The event, coordinated by Center Manager Gina Crane, was used to promote early literacy and language enrichment in preschool children. “If we get them into reading now, it goes with them as they grow,” Crane said. In addition to calling on local celebrities to come for story time, the event allowed students to see and interact with new people. The North Florida Child Devel opment Center in Wewahitchka has more than 40 students and three classrooms enjoyed hearing their favorite stories. “It was great,” said Hoyt of the experience after she nished her reading of the folk tale, “The Lit tle Red Hen,” the moral of which encourages contribution and collaboration. Much to the delight of the class, Sheriff Harrison came prepared with the Dr. Seuss classic, “Green Eggs and Ham,” which he recited condently. “I have three kids of my own,” he said. “I’ve had lots of practice.” Award-winning novelist Lister read P.D. Eastman’s “Are You My Mother?” utilizing the participa tion of the energetic class to pro vide the sounds of the dogs, cats and birds within the story. “They loved the story and said it was their favorite,” Lister said. “They knew what was coming.” Crane plans to continue the Read-A-Thon as a monthly event at the NFCD Center. ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Tips for choosing a lawngrass Program increases sea turtle awareness St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol seeks volunteers WES LL OCHEr R | The Star Celebrity guests at the Read-A-Thon included Michael Lister, Amy Hoyt and Mike Harrison. Local celebrities participate in rst NFCD read-a-thon

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Local Thursday, May 2, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 T r a d e s & S er v i c e s Ž CALL T OD A Y 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 Stump Grinder # Stump Grinder # 4514617 From A to Z 850-340-0756 Gr eg’ s Handyman Ser vice & Lawn Maintenance C heck out m y w ork on F acebook! 4514430 JOE’S LA WN CARE IF IT ’ S IN Y OUR Y ARD LE T JOE T AKE C ARE OF IT FULL L A WN SER VICES TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV AL ALSO CLEAN GUT TERS AND IRRIG A TION INSTILL A TION PL ANTING AND B EDDING A V AIL AB LE C A L L J O E 850 323 0741 OR E MAIL JOES L A WN Y AHOO C OM GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Ž GB ] fV^[ 9? LU Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net 4514634 3*, 3 2,,) 13, 2( 2, 3 ,& 35( 4,* 3 344 ), 2,4+ !,+(" ( %0 %" 3 2, 3, (3 44 ( !" (+ *4, !2, .4431 ..3*, 344 ), ,4,* 3 5533, (+ 5533, ,1331 ( 0" % ( %% %" 3*4+, (+( ( 02 (+ ( %% 2' (4 # 31 344 ), 2,4+ ( 2, ,3 4,* 3 ..3*, 4*(, + ( 0% 1 ,, .5 " !2,, 344 ), +( 31 ( % 4" ),,, (44 5( ), ,,,+ ) 344 ), 5(34, + (., ,*,3,+ .5 3, 1913 from page B1 TOUR from page B1 20 more members of the club before continuing on to St. Marks and Tallahassee. The trip was organized by ride leader Sandy Larson, who mapped the course and made accommodations. A fan of long rides, she made the trek from San Diego to St. Augustine on two wheels along with trips from Maine to Florida and across New Zealand. “Most residents of The Villages come from other places and they’re not familiar with the Florida coast,” said Larson, who has lived in the Sunshine State for 13 years. “It was a great experience and we had a fun time riding through.” Larson and her husband had driven their RV through the area over the years and she was eager to share the Forgotten Coast with her bicycle buddies. Five-year member of the club Larry Peart said that Port St. Joe was a “delight to visit” and praised local motorists for being considerate. Why do they do it? “Bicycling is good for you, physically,” said Taylor. “It’s fun to do and gives you a true feeling of independence.” inspire passersby. The commemorative centennial coin which was produced to raise funds for the upcoming celebration ofcially went on sale last week. The token is available for sale at Portside Trading Company, The No Name Caf, Cadence Bank, Joseph’s Cottage and City Hall. The cost is $15 and the coin comes with a velvet bag for storage. Clarence Monette is coordinating the details of a time capsule that will soon be under construction at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. The capsule will then be lled with mementos created by local students or donated by businesses and buried in the City Commons on July rst. Monette has also been organizing a basketball game to take place at the Washington Gym that will feature athletes of note from the past and present. Not to be left out, Magidson has prepared several speeches about Port St. Joe. He will speak at several of the events throughout the celebration. The Centennial Celebration will culminate on Thursday, July 4 with the annual reworks display, closing out the festivities with a bang. A website for the week-long was created by Rick Lamberson at the Bluewater iNet Group and features a schedule of the events, historic photos and a list of the centennial celebration sponsors. For more information on how to get involved or donate funds, visit www. psjcentennialcelebration. com. 1922 Trivia ANSWER perimeter of the track teams sold goodies and had game to raise additional money for the American Cancer Society. As is tradition with any Relay for Life, a group of local cancer survivors and their caregivers were on hand to take the rst journey around the track in a “Survivor’s Lap.” Music for the event was provided by local band, Thirty-Three. The traditional Luminaria ceremony took place at 9 p.m. Candles were lit inside of white paper bags, decorated to honor the memories of loved ones who lost the ght to cancer and those who continue to ght. Teams at the event included Beach Realty, Beat It, Bridge At Bay Saint Joe, Cadence Bank, Capital City Bank, Centennial Bank, First United Methodist Church, Gulf County Health Department, the Mexico Beach Tumor-nators, Oak Grove Church, Outlaw Cancer, Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, Port St. Joe Schools/District, Sacred Heart Lifesavers, Super Survivors, VFW Post 10069, Waswas and Zumba for a Cure. The event was sponsored by Progress Energy, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Bluewater Outriggers, Piggly Wiggly, 98 Real Estate, Buy Rite Drugs and Cathey Construction. Gulf County’s Relay for Life team had a goal of $51,000 for the year and will host additional fundraisers within the community as they work their way toward reaching it. RELAY from page B1 W es ES LOCHer ER | The Star Left: Survivors were treated to dinner and a beautiful relay themed cake. Right: The Survivor dinner was in the center of the track for all to see. B6 | The Star

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 2, 2013 The Star | B7 4514604JOB NOTICEe City of Port St. Joe is accepting Applications for the following positions:Part Time Summer Program Assistants and Supervisors:Duties include but not limited to: plan, implement and lead youth activities at a recreation site. Ensure all events and activities conform to appropriate safety and other rules. Ensure that facilities and equipment being used for programs or events are properly set up and maintained. Maintain the grounds and buildings for program. is is a rewarding job opportunity working with children ages 5 … 18 years. is position requires a criminal background investigation. Recreation experience is preferred. Closing date is May 17, 2013. Employment applications may be picked up at City Hall or they are available on line at www.cityofportstjoe.com Please submit an application to e City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, P. O. Box 278 … Port St. Joe, FL 32457. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 229-8261. e City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. 4514608 JOB NOTICEe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following volunteer position: Planning and Development Review Board Member Please submit an application to e City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. PDRB Members are appointed by the City Commission and meet on the second Tuesday of each month at 4:00 P.M. EST. e PDRB utilizes the Land Development Regulations and City Ordinances to review complex development requests. PDRB members must live within the City limits and/or own a business within the City limits. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 2298261. e Position will close on May 17, 2013, at 5:00 P.M. EST. is is a non paid position. e City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. 90930S In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Gulf County, Florida Case No.: 12-205CA Prosperity Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Frank E. Bell, Ellis Yon and any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants, Defenants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: EXHIBIT A A portion of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the iron pipe marking the SE Corner of the SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section 25; thence along the North R/W line of Johnson Lane, South 9000’00” West, 377.00 feet; thence leaving said North R/W line, North 0009’24” West, 244.38 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 9000’00” West, 171.99 feet; thence North 0009’24” West 158.71 feet; thence North 7623’14” East, 176.84 feet; thence South 0009’24” East, 200.33 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with an ingress, egress and utility easement more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence South 8959’13” West, along the North right of way line of Johnson Lane, for a distance of 366.91 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue South 8953’13” West, along said North right of way line for a distance of 20.00 feet; thence leaving said North right of way line run North 0010’42” West, for a distance of 244.47 feet; thence East for a distance of 10.00 feet; thence North 0008’55” West, for a distance of 20.00 feet; thence North 8949’39” East, for a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 0010’42” East, for a distance of 264.49 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 am ET on May 23, 2013. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus funds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 26th day of April, 2013. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 2, 9, 2013 90836S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-20 PR IN RE: ESTATE OF J.D. RAYBURN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of J.D. Rayburn, deceased, whose date of death was November 8, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe, FL32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 25, 2013. Personal Representative: J.D. Rayburn II 4055 Kilmartin Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Kimberly L. King Attorney for J.D. Rayburn II Florida Bar Number: 0593011 KING & WOOD, P.A. 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104 Tallahassee, FL32308 Phone: (850)580-7711 Fax: (850)205-4501 E-Mail: kimking@king andwoodlaw.com Secondary E-Mail: eservice@kingandwoodlaw.com April 25, May 2, 2013 93265S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-00021-PR Division:________ IN RE: ESTATE OF JEAN ELAINE QUARANTA Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jean Elaine Quaranta, deceased, whose date of death was February 3, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 25, 2013. Personal Representative: Jayne Bamburg 126 Gulf Coast Circle Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint. net April 25, May 2, 2013 93271S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WHITE CITY FIRE STATION RFP #1213-09 Qualified “Design-Build” TEAM for the design and construction of the new White City Volunteer Fire Station for the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Proposers shall be ranked per the following selection criteria: **Firms shall be limited to those certified under 489.119 F.S. as a General Contractor, Building Contractor, under 471.023 F.S. to practice engineering, under 481.219 F.S. to practice architecture. **Submittals must be spiral bound and must include the following: Letter of Transmittal Table of Contents Introduction of Firm General approach to deliver services Information regarding the firms qualifications to provide the DesignBuild services Project Team and Qualifications Experience with Metal Building design Experience with Metal Building construction Experience with Owner Direct Purchase Method of Costing/ Estimating Project Proof of Errors and Omissions Insurance for Designer Proof of Bonding Limit for Builder Florida License for Builder Florida License(s) for Designer Verification of ability to furnish payment and performance bond in the amount of contract and insurance coverage required by Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Current work load of Designer and Builder **Special attention shall be given to: Similar experience(s) in the State of Florida Engineering/ Construction experience(s), with similar facilities Experience with Civil Design, Permitting with FDEP, FDOT & NWFWMD Experience with Design-Build projects Experience of Project Team Ability of Firm to deliver project in a timely manner Availability to project site(s) (Designer and Builder) Upon selection of a Design-Build team by Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, the designer shall meet with the owner, tour the proposed site and assist in evaluating the various building size, function and budget. This phase will include schematic floor plans, site plan and evaluation of individual fire department budget. The second phase shall be as follows: **The Designer shall complete documents for each site with budget review at 30%, 60% and 90% document states. After final review, the Builder shall conduct a final cost breakdown for each site and enter into a construction contract with Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Proposals must be submitted by 4:30 P.M. (local time) on Friday, May 10, 2013 at Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida. Proposals will be opened on Monday, May 13, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., local time at the same location. Questions to this RFP may be directed to Brad Price, Gulf County BOCC, (850) 229-6106, or via e-mail at bprice@gulfcounty-fl.gov. All questions must be submitted by May 1, 2013 and all answers will be disseminated by May 2, 2013. Please check the website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov for any addendums which will be posted NLT May 2, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., E.T. /s/ Tan Smiley Chairman Gulf County Board of County Commissioners /s/ Rebecca Norris, Clerk April 25, May 2, 2013 93313S PUBLIC NOTICE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR INMATE COMMISSARY SERVICES RFP NO: 1213-10 The Board of County Commissioners, Gulf County, Florida (the “County”) is seeking proposals from qualified individuals or organizations to provide commissary services for the inmates incarcerated in the Gulf County Detention Facility, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. RFP DEADLINE: May 10, 2013 no later than 4:30PM local time and will be opened on Monday, May 13, 2013. LATE PROPOSALS RECEIVED AFTER THE AFOREMENTIONED DEADLINE DATE, EITHER BY MAIL OR OTHERWISE, WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED AND RETURNED UNOPENED. NO FAXED, ELECTRONIC, OR ORAL PROPOSALS WILL BE ACCEPTED. To be considered, Proposer must submit an original and five (5) copies of the RFP in a sealed envelope or package, clearly marked with the Proposer’s name, address, and the words “INMATE COMMISSARY SERVICES” addressed to: Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Rm 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Questions may be directed to Michael Hammond, (850) 227-1124 or via email at mhammond@gulf county-fl.gov. Tynalin Smiley Chairman Rebecca Norris Clerk April 25, May 2, 2013 93413S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 12000281CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL J. ALGUESEVA, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: RHONDA ALDERMAN: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 2531 COUNTRY ROAD 381, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees. grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and being a part of Lot 3, Block 3, MIDWAY PARK SUBDIVISION as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a Saint Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of said Lot 3 and run thence N8959’39”E along the North boundary of said Lot 3 for 104.16 feet to a set 1/2” iron rod and cap no. LB7137 for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue N8959’39”E along said North boundary for 210.81 feet to a found 5/8” iron rod and cap no. 4889 of the West Right-of-Way line of Lake Drive; thence S0011’33”W along said West Right-of-Way line for 209.00 feet to a found 5/8” iron rod and cap no.4889; thence leaving said West Right-of-Way line run S8958’14”W for 210.82 feet to set 1/2 inch iron rod & cap no. LB7137; thence N0011’38”E for 209.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 foot ingress, egress and utility easement across the North 20.00 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2008 Southern Homes Manufactured Home, Serial Not(s): more commonly known as: 381 N BASS DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff’s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by June 3, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this of this Court on the 22nd day of April, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of the Court GULF County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 2, 9, 2013 93363S PUBLIC NOTICE PORT ST. JOE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency will receive sealed bids from any qualified company interested in providing services for the following project: Measure, Fabricate and Install Shade Cover at Dr. Joe Memorial Parking Lot Project is located at the corner of Fourth and Williams in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, and consists of measuring, fabricating, and installing canopy system consisting of two (2) “kites” using Commercial 95 Coolaroo Shade Sail Material on existing poles. Field measuring is required; as-built plans are not available. Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on Thursday, May 9 and will be opened and read aloud at the PSJRA office, 150 Captain Fred’s Place, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. For additional information, contact Gail Alsobrook at 850-229-6899 or Gail@PSJRA.com. May 2, 2013 93423S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ #: 1213-11 INMATE TELEPHONE SERVICE GULF COUNTY hereby gives notice of the opportunity to submit a response to this Request for Qualifications (“RFQ”) for inmate telephone service at the GULF COUNTY DETENTION FACILITY. GULF COUNTY must receive RFQ responses no later than May 17 2013 at 4:30 pm EST (“Response Due Date”). One (1) original and six (6) hard copies of the proposal must be delivered to Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on or before May 17, 2013, at 4:30 p.m. local time. Bids will be opened on May 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. local time at the same location. The outside of Vendor’s RFQ response must be marked INMATE TELEPHONE RFQ. All proposals failing to meet the due date and time will be returned to the Vendor unopened. Fax or email copies are not acceptable. Questions to this RFQ may be directed to Lynn Lanier, Gulf County BOCC, (850) 229-6106, or via e-mail at llanier@gulf county-fl.gov. All questions must be submitted by May 8, 2013 and all answers will be disseminated by May 9, 2013. Please check the website at www.gulf county-fl.gov for any addendums which will be posted NLT May 9, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., E.T. /s/ Tan Smiley Chairman Gulf County Board of County Commissioners /s/ Rebecca Norris, Clerk May 2, 9, 2013 Your New Buddy!Male and female Teacup Yorkies, 12 wks old, potty trained, vet checked, AKC reg, shots, dewormed. Papers. $500 (862)262-1919, dbpets17@yahoo.com Text FL47546 to 56654 PSJ: 624 Gulf Aire Dr Saturday, May 4th 8:00-1:00pmYard SaleThis & That Old & New! Text FL50375 to 56654 Classified can!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership.We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects.

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B8| The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS TheCallCenterManagerisdirectlyresponsibleformanagingagroupofCallCenterassociates.Responsibilities include,butarenotlimitedtothefollowing: € Successfullymotivate,coachanddevelopCallCenterassociates € Driveteamperformanceanddeliveroncriticalperformancemeasuresincludingteamproductivity,efficiency, andquality € Fosterateamenvironmentthatpromotesthehighestlevelofservicetoallcustomers,departmentsand propertiestoensuretotalcustomer(bothexternalandinternal)satisfaction € Createacollaborativeenvironmentinwhichassociates atalllevelsoftheorganizationareencouragedtovoice ideasandconcerns € Deliverperformancefeedback,includingperformanceappraisals,developmentalactionplans,performance improvementplansanddisciplinaryaction € Recommendpromotions,terminationsandsalaryadjustmentsforsalesassociates € Facilitateeffectiveteammeetings € Participateinthenewhiresalesassociateinterviewandhiringprocess € Analyzereportsanddatatoimprovethecustomerexperience € Demonstratestrongcommunication,p resentation,andinfluencingskills € Abilitytobuildandmaintainpositiveworkingrela tionshipswithindividualsatmultiplelevels € Provideexemplaryserviceandsetexpectationsofprovidingsolutionsforeveryoneyouencounter,makeiteasy forcustomerstodobusinesswithusandgiveeverycustomeranextraordinaryexperience g y y p € Mustbeabletounderstandcallmatrix,setoperationa lgoalsfordepartment,teamandyourselfwithpassion andaccountabilitytostrivetoattainthem € Continuouslyimproveyourselfandothersaroundyou € Contributetothecompanybyprovidinggreatideasandfeedback Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com Qualications: €2+yearsofManagementwithinacallcenterandaminimumof5yearsofcallcenter experience. €Proventrackrecordofachievingrevenuegoalsandgrowth. PreferredQualications: €Fouryeardegree €Stronganalyticalskills €Basicunderstandingofsalesoperations €Excellentverbalandwrittencommunicationskills €Strongpeoplemanagementexperienceinacallcenterenvironment €Abilitytomakequickandaccuratedecisionswhichmay,attimes,bebased onlimitedinformationandrequiremulti-tasking. Allfull-timeemployeesareeligibleforhealth&dentalinsurance, life/Ad*D/long-termdisabilityinsurance,401Kplan,andpaidtimeoff.TheNewsHeraldandHalifaxMediaGroupofNorthwestFloridaareGROWING....Wannajoinus?Wearehiringforan experiencedCallCenterManagerwithapassiontobuildandcreateanevenstrongerteamwithafunenvironment. Call Center Manager 1109719 HOUSEKEEPER NEEDEDThe MainStay Suites and Port Inn are now accepting applications for housekeepers. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe Fl, 324564514568 NOW HIRINGPARTTIME EVENING COOKThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time evening cook. The ideal candidate will have kitchen experience, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 BARTENDER / THERAPIST NEEDEDThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWPPort Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 4514488 Dockside Caf & Raw Bar @ PSJ Marina**Seasonal Bonus Top Pay!**NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: € Kitchen Managers/Cooks€ Bartenders/Managers € Servers/Bussers € Shuckers € DishwashersAPPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! That’s where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! Emerald Coast Marketplace 850-747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Calhoun County, 11636 S.E. Chipola Park Rd. Hwy 71, 6 miles N of Wewa, Thursday and Friday May 2nd and 3rd, 8am CST;Covenant Annual Springtime Yard SaleTrampoline, sofas, bedroom furniture, dining table and chairs, household items, bedding, TVs and lots more! Come in search of Treasures and you will find! Text FL50144 to 56634 Mexico Beach 211 Tennessee Dr, Friday & Saturday May 3 &4, 8am-2pm (CST)2 Family Garage SaleBig mens clothes, ladies wear, household, misc.Text FL50502 to 56654 Hunting Lease Renewal Need two members. near Port St. Joe. 2000 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $410-$510/ yr. Call John 850-227-5052 Creative/DesignGRAPHIC DESIGNER/ PRODUCTION ARTIST!GRAPHIC DESIGNER/ PRODUCTION ARTIST! Established and growing design studio/ printer/ signmaker/ publisher seeks organized, responsible individual for full-time, long-term position in Port St. Joe. Mac-based Photoshop/ Illustrator/InDesign experience a must. Signmaking and web design skills a plus. Interested parties respond with complete contact information, a brief note of introduction, and four work samples to:info@mustseemagazine.comWeb ID#: 34250581 Text FL50581 to 56654 Food Services/HospitalityKitchen Help/ DishwashersNeeded to work day and night shifts. Need cooks/ kitchen assistant. Apply: Call (850) 227-5272 before 11 am Web ID# 34248916 Text Fl48916 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Editorial/WritingWRITER(S) NEEDED NOW!!WRITER(S) NEEDED NOW! Established and growing local interest publication has immediate assignments available for responsible, qualified writers. Interested parties respond with complete contact information, a brief note of introduction, and two work samples to:info@mustseemagazine.comWeb ID#: 34250571 Text FL50571 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityBartender / Therapist NeededThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESIs accepting application for Inspectors Reliable, hardworking inspectors with good customer service & teamwork skills. Must have reliable transportation & work weekends. Reservationist Good written and oral communication skills, excellent customer service. Prior sales experience helpful. Must work weekends. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 8th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach, Fl for ENTRYLEVELInstaller No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid driver’s license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, visit our website at www.mediacomcable.com/car eers refer to job 5607. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34249882 Text FL49882 to 56654 Medical/Health LPN or Medical Asst. FTposition available for an office nurse at Shoreline Medical Group in PSJ. We see adults and children. We are a very busy practice. Responsibilities will include, primary patient care, vaccinations, medical procedures, telephone triage & scheduling. Benefits include paid sick/vacation time and health insurance. The successful applicant will be energetic, flexible, willing to learn & committed to patient care. Prior experience is helpful but not necessary. Anyone interested may call 850-229-8010 for information. EOE. OtherEBROGREYHOUND PARK and Poker Room is Hiring For the Following Positions:•Mutual Clerks Food & Beverage Server’s Concessions and Bartenders Please apply Monday through Saturday at 6558 Dog Track Rd. Ebro, FL WEB ID 34249424 OtherJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is accepting applications for a Small Engine Mechanic for our Public Works Department. Starting salary is $15.8312 per hour. This is a bargaining unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applications and a complete job description are available in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www .gulfcounty fl.gov Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T. on May 16, 2013 at the Gulf County Human Resources Office. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at (850) 229-5335. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Web-Id 34250441 Text FL50441to 56554 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot -LG yard. W/D incl $550/mo + dep. 301-265-5368 or 301-437-7904 Call To Place An Ad 747-5020 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 1110758Facility ManagerSt. George Plantation (SGPOA) is seeking to hire a FT Facility Manager. SGPOA is a gated residential community in the Florida Panhandle. Position reports to the GM & is responsible for all aspects of managing the facilities & common elements of SGPOA. Position works closely w/ outside professionals to design, develop, inspect & oversee all SGPOA projects. Candidate must be able to read surveys, drawings, plans, & prepare bids, contracts & RFPs. Candidate should be able to prepare written & verbal updates on projects & assignments. Strong computer skills are essential. SGPOA oers an excellent benet package w/ salary commensurate w/ exp. Candidate should have a HS diploma plus 2 yrs of additional education or formal training & 5 yrs related exp w/ evidence of having performed duties.Send rsum to General Manager, St. George Plantation Homeowners’ Association 1712 Magnolia Rd, St. George Island, FL 32328 No later than May 17th or e-mail gmanager@sgpoa.com Web ID: 34249666 | Text FL49666 to 56654



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A site visit next week, a visit from a delegation from Colombia in a couple of weeks and a master plan update almost ready for public rollout have activity surrounding the Port of Port St. Joe on an upswing. Though the Port Authority had few concrete decisions to make during its regular bi-monthly meeting, chairman Leonard Costin could hardly hide his enthusiasm for events out of the public eye. I feel like things are coming to a boil, so to speak, Costin said. I am excited about what is happening. I think we are close to having some happy news to report. Barry Sellers, executive director of the newly formed Gulf County Economic Development Alliance Inc., agreed and said an announcement could be coming before the summer is too far along. I think sometime before July, well have an announcement that will make everybody happy, Sellers said. I dont want to get too far ahead, but I do believe it will happen. Things are looking good. The good starts with a site visit next week by representatives from an unidenti ed company that specializes in the manufacture of New coffee company building buzzBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Tyler Ford is in the business of waking people up. Ford is the owner and operator of Satellite Republic Coffee, a new company in Marianna whose product has quickly found its way onto local shelves and maybe even into your kitchens Brewmaster 5000. The coffee, available at Piggly Wiggly stores in Port St. Joe, Blountstown and Bristol, has traveled as far away as Chicago, Nashville and San Francisco through online sales. Though Ford and his family reside north of Gulf County, his roots are rmly planted in Port St. Joe. A former student of Faith Christian School and a 1990 graduate of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, he went on to obtain a business degree from Bryan College in Tennessee. His father, Tom, worked at the Port St. Joe paper mill, and his mother, Dawne, still lives locally and has helped to spread the word of Fords newest venture.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com With the budget process approaching, the Board of County Commissioners faces tough questions on how to handle the countys trash. With less than ve years remaining in the life expectancy of Five Points Land ll and given the money pit that is solid waste removal, commissioners are examining myriad questions about the future of garbage collection and who picks up the tab. That will almost certainly mean an increase in tipping fees at Five Points Land ll and possibly the end of roadside yard debris removal and the implementation of mandatory garbage pickup. And looming over any discussion is the reality that unless the county has a permitted, operational method of disposing of solid waste, the county is prohibited by law from issuing any building permit.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Early voting for the Port St. Joe municipal election begins Saturday at the Supervisor of Elections of ce, 401 Long Ave. Early voting will continue through May 11. Voting hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET every day but Sundays. Election Day is May 14, with voting from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET at the Port St. Joe Fire Department next to City Hall on Williams Avenue. This is a universal election; each voter may cast a vote for every seat on the ballot. Three commissioners were up for re-election this year. Mayor and Commissioner Mel Magidson was re-elected to a fourth term after he drew no opposition during candidate qualifying in March. Group I Commissioner Bill Kennedy elected not to run again after one term. Two political newcomers, David Ashbrook and William Thursbay, are vying for the seat Kennedy will vacate. Group II Commissioner Bo Patterson is running for a second term and facing a challenge from Eddie Fields, another political newcomer. The last day to request an absentee ballot is 5 p.m. ET May 8. Voters are encouraged to ensure their voting registration information address, signature, etc. is up to date to ensure quick processing when voting. By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Among local projects included in the state budget being crafted by the Florida Legislature is a $325,000 appropriation to fund the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The money is in the budgets of both the Florida House of Representatives and the Florida Senate. The houses are putting the nal touches on the budget in conference before passage. The money is listed under local projects, and that means (Rep.) Halsey Beshears and (Sen.) Bill Montford would be the sponsors, since they are our local representatives, said Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson. All I know is that it was proposed as a local project. We hope it will be sent to the governor. Until he puts paper to pen, you never know. Gov. Rick Scotts veto pen would be the nal hurdle to securing the funding. For example, a $5 million appropriation for bulkhead improvements at the Port of Port St. Joe was vetoed last year after clearing both legislative houses. Magidson noted state law contains a mandate that the Legislature must appropriate dollars to preserve historic structures, lighthouses in particular. I am hopeful we will get the money, Magidson said. Based on current estimates, the money would fund the relocation of the lighthouse, two keepers quarters and an oil house from Cape San Blas to George Core Park in Port St. Joe. The lighthouse would become the centerpiece of the park, the site near Miss Zola Drive and the historic Maddox House property. The appropriation would represent the largest contribution to the relocation project. A fundraising campaign by the St. Joseph Humane Society has not exceeded $40,000. It also would represent the rst use of taxpayer money in the project, which commissioners pledged not to use. The move of the lighthouse and ancillary structures is estimated to cost $200,000 to $250,000. That would not include the cost of any site prep work, foundational work in George Core Park or ongoing maintenance.County faces land ll expiration dateThursday, MAY 2, 2013 PSJ early voting begins SaturdayState budget includes funds to move lighthouse I accomplished what I set out to do. I took a great product and a great cause and put them together.Tyler Ford owner, Satellite Republic CoffeeBEANS FOR BEDS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARFifteen orphans are housed in Satellite Republic Coffees facility in West Africa. Tyler Ford, below, a native of Port St. Joe, is the owner of Satellite Republic. LOCAL MANS COFFEE COMPANY FUNDS ORPHANAGEChairman: Port activity coming to a boil Since it opened, we have operated with negative income. Five Points has never made a pro t, and that means the taxpayer has paid the costs all along.Joe Danford director, Solid Waste/Public WorksSee LANDFILL A3 See PORT A6 See BEANS A6 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A9Society . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-B8YEAR 75, NUMBER 29Plein Air events, A5

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 ProgressEnergynowhasanewname: DukeEnergy.Youllseeournewnameandlogoinyourbillsandotherplacessoon.Nootheraspectofyour serviceoraccountischanging. Althoughournameischanging,ourcommitmenttoyouandthecommunitiesweserveremains thesame.Soyoucancountonusforreliableelectricityeverytimeyouiptheswitch. Learnmoreat duke-energy.com/newname. Announcing anewnamefor ProgressEnergy. By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com APALACHICOLA A newly released report on Apalachicola Bays oyster situation is long on analysis but short on solutions, recommending more studies and conrming the conventional wisdom that the shery is in dire straits. The study by the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, which has been assessing the oyster situation since October 2012, backs up lawmakers and researchers claims that water ow down the Apalachicola River is the key ingredient to a healthy shery. For years, Florida has squabbled in a water war with neighboring states, particularly Georgia, to release more water out of suburban Atlantas Lake Lanier, which feeds the river and ultimately the bay. The study states the bay had high salinity in 2012 caused by low river ow and limited local rainfall in most months. In fact, the lower part of the Apalachicola-ChattahoocheeFlintRiver Basin has been in exceptional drought over the last three years, according to the National Integrated Drought Information System. Thus, problems have set in and appear to be here for the long haul. The 2012 decline in oyster landings and recruitment of juvenile oysters is unprecedented during the period of data analyzed and has likely involved recruitment failure or high mortality of small oysters, the study states. The study found a general downward trend in legal-sized oysters (3 inch or larger) and a large decline in sub-legal oysters (smaller than 3 inches) in 2012. That means its likely this year will see another devastating oyster harvesting year, and 2014 could be even worse. The study did reveal a few positives, though, such as the 3-inch minimum oyster size preventing over-harvesting. However, it is essential that this size limit be accepted by the community, adopted by the industry, and enforced by regulatory agencies and the county judicial system, the study said. Another silver lining is oil from 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster appears to have stayed out of Apalachicola Bay. Oysters, white shrimp, brown shrimp, blue crab and various nsh species have all been tested for oil residue, but no chemical contamination was found, according to the study. But, plenty of concerns remain, including the fact that a large percentage of oysters shells suffer from parasitic sea life. Familiar bay residents, including clams, sponges and other organisms, will prey on the oysters shells, the study said. The parasites hurt shell growth and productivity, though its difcult to say to what extent because theres no historical data on the phenomenon.Legislator speaks outState Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, thinks drastic measures need to be taken. Were going to have to change our harvesting practices there to give (the oysters) the time to grow adequately, to where they can catch up, he said. Beshears said the lack of ow down the river and drought has changed the environment, so adjustments must be made to allow the oysters to recover and ourish. He said during the BP oil spill three years ago oysters were over-harvested to a disastrous effect. We just didnt have enough foresight to go, Hey, wait a minute; maybe we ought to hold up, he said, adding, Essentially we raped the land out there. We over-harvested and we havent had a chance to grow those oysters back. Beshears stopped short of saying there should be a harvesting moratorium, but he did say dramatic changes need to be put in place to let the oysters come back. He said there are a lot of ways to skin that cat, but, he thinks, on the whole harvesting should be reduced dramatically. We have to nd a way to stop harvesting, give the sea a chance to recoup, but at the same time we cant just hand out checks to oystermen to just do nothing, he said. Beshears suggested increasing programs to relay oyster shells in the bay, to which the oyster spat afxes itself, as a recovery idea. He also said opening up restricted areas for oyster harvesting is another option. Theres a lot of different ways to do it; we just havent found that right balanced yet, he said. Beshears said more studies are a good idea, but they will only prolong the inevitable the need for major changes in harvesting practices and recovery programs. We have to readjust our farming practices now. I think that were going to explore all our opportunities and options, he said. Oyster study conrms shery problemsA University of Florida study conrms the dire straits of the Apalachicola Bay sheryBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The hunt has commenced for a new City Clerk for Mexico Beach. The position has been vacant since Debbie McLeods resignation. During its preagenda meeting last week, the council agreed to continue looking at resumes and applications to ensure that McLeods former responsibilities dont fall by the wayside. I dont want us to get behind or bogged down, Mayor Al Cathey said of the clerks responsibilities that included ling payroll and ensuring that all incoming invoices are paid on time. The advertisement for the vacant position was posted in the Panama City News Herald, Monster.com and the Florida League of Cities website. According to the classied ad led by the council, Mexico Beach is seeking a highly motivated and energetic city clerk and applicants should have exceptional accounting, organizational and personnel skills. Cathey said of the resumes they had received so far, more than half are not remotely qualied, and at a previous special meeting where the council reviewed 20 applicants, there was only one good candidate. The mayor suggested if a qualied candidate did not le an application they should seek someone trainable. Councilmember Lanny Howell said he had researched salaries in nine towns of similar size to Mexico Beach where the city clerk was also the director of nance. The council scheduled a special meeting Monday to review additional applications that had been received. During the special meeting the city council compared the salaries of city clerks in sister cities to decide on a nal salary range for a new clerk. Our salary is one of the highest around, said councilmember Jack Mullen of McLeods former $27 an hour wage. Councilmember Tanya Castro encouraged everyone to consider whether or not the clerk needed to be a full-time position and suggested they hire a consultant to evaluate the responsibilities to help them come up with a nal number. City clerk is a full-time job, Cathey said. Some candidates had a higher salary than what the city could offer while others had no government experience. Only two locals made the shortlist while all others were from out of town or out of state. Of the six candidates who made the cut, only two received unanimous yes votes from the council. After the applications had been reviewed, Mullen proposed a salary range of $41,600 to $56,160 annually based on qualications. Castro offered to reach out to the six and discuss the salary to see if it would shorten the list, after which the council would meet again to determine a time and process for interviews. In other business, the council discussed the abandoned church and surrounding land they had planned to buy and use as a site for the towns public safety department. The council agreed to discontinue discussions with the church owners because an agreeable purchase price could not be reached by either party. The current city hall, a former bank which has been leased for $2,600 a month, does not have the space to suit the needs of the administration.Mexico Beach continues search for new city clerk

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, May 2, 2013During a workshop on Monday, commissioners were provided the stark reality of the countys plight by Solid Waste/Public Works director Joe Danford. The portrait was nothing to cheer about. For years, the county has operated the Five Points Landll, the lone remaining landll in the county, at a signicant loss. Several years ago, that loss was close to $1 million per year. During the current fiscal year, the county will lose $452,013.73, all borne by ad valorem taxpayers. Since it opened, we have operated with negative income, Danford said. Five Points has never made a prot, and that means the taxpayer has paid the costs all along. The primary problem, Danford said, is the BOCC has over the years never charged a sufcient tipping fee, which is compounded by the lack of solid waste to sustain the landll in the black. The county currently charges $35 per ton. Further, the county handles roughly 3,800 tons a year, with 99 percent of household garbage hauled out of the county. We cant support a new landll, Danford said. We are never going to have another landll. It is too expensive. To my mind, expansion will cost way too much. Of course, none of it is going to be cheap. And we cant support an incinerator (as in Bay County). Five Points, opened in 1987 with a permit upgrade in 2009, also has a short shelf life. The permit for the landll will expire in 2018, and the county must choose between expanding the landll, which Danford said would add roughly 10 years to the site, or moving in the direction of establishing a transfer station from which the county would haul solid waste to Panama City. Danford said the logistics of expanding the landll would prove problematic because wetlands issues the recent modication to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection permit, three years in the approval, was to create a dome at Five Points and costs. Moving to 80 acres the county owns on the north end of the county near Wetappo would be unsuitable for the same reasons: wetlands. The cost of dirt alone in building up a 20 acre site to suitable level, Danford said, could run $11 million to $12 million. The estimate to expand the landll, Danford said, would bring about an annual operating decit of $664,426.14, or more than $6.6 million to taxpayers over the life of the expansion, through 2028. That would include an increase in tipping fees to $46.50. Establishing a transfer station on the south end and Danford said eventually commissioners would have to create one on the north end as well would be less costly, would require no funds be placed in escrow to handle costs associated with closing a landll and would open up the potential for recycling. Closing a landll is expensive. The county currently sets aside $96,000 a year, and has for 20 years, to cover Five Points at its expiration date. The county would have to budget $320,000 a year to ultimately cover any expansion. The transfer station, though, would be operated in the red at almost the same cost the county currently sinks into Five Points. The transfer station would cost the county $447,920 a year, with the potential the county could recoup at least $90,000 by recycling at the transfer station. I need a decision from this board, and I need one by September, Danford said, noting the time required to prepare to expansion of the landll or creating a transfer station in the next ve years. I think a transfer station is the way to go, but it wont magically happen. One transfer station probably would not be enough to handle everything we have. Eventually you are going to have to have one at both ends of the county. Commissioner Carmen McLemore agreed, saying it sounded like the county would need to go the direction of a transfer station. Commissioners also agreed with Danfords suggestion to increase tipping fees by $5 per ton to $40. That would give us a place to start, and I would suggest an increase every year, Danford said, citing the higher prices charged by neighboring counties. Given they were in a workshop, commissioners could take no formal action. They also wondered if the roadside pickup of yard debris had to stop. The BOCC had voted to stop the pickup several years ago, but the service has returned, and some residents, one commissioner said, had to come to see it as an entitlement. But deputy administrator Michael Hammond noted the county loses $125,000 a year while removing yard debris at no cost, another burden uniformly borne by ad valorem taxpayers while not universally used. The people deserve some services, McLemore said. I am not in favor of cutting them out. The discussion about mandatory garbage pickup echoed that theme. Danford suggested it as a necessity and noted the amount of garbage that ends up on roadsides and under bridges. It is ending up in your parks, Danford said. It becomes a community problem and a health problem. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said commissioners need to nd the most efcient method of dealing with solid waste because taxpayers are paying either way. McLemore said he had a big problem with tourists coming down and leaving their trash behind while tacking on more expense for residents on a xed income. It is going to be hard for me to support mandatory garbage pickup, he said. There are people who cant afford mandatory garbage pickup. Administrator Don Butler said mandatory garbage pickup has issues, most notably that some residents wont pay and others will dispose of their garbage by other means. Commissioner Tan Smiley said he had no real problem with mandatory pickup because the cities already employ it. AnimalHospitalofPortSt.Joe24-HourEmergencyServiceForOurCurrentClients GreatService-FairPriceQualityInternalMedicineSoftTissue/OrthopedicSurgeryDentistryCleanand Spacious FacilityAlbertByas,DVM WillRosenbaum,VMD StephenCollier,DVMMon,Tues,Thurs&Fri 8:00AM-5:30PM300LongAve PSJ,FL32456 850-229-6009 CMC1249673 NOCREDITCHECK!HASSLEFREEFINANCINGAVAILABLE! IncludesIndoor& OutdoorUnits AllMaterialsto changecomplete systemout LANDFILL from page A1For years, the county has operated the Five Points Landll, the lone remaining landll in the county, at a signicant loss. Several years ago, that loss was close to $1 million per year. During the current fiscal year, the county will lose $452,013.73, all borne by ad valorem taxpayers. Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net

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Major League Baseball players know their swing can be the difference in being a great hitter or being sent down to the minor leagues. Teams have hitting coaches whose job is to nd problems with batters swings and help them improve. This is a story that is more about changing your swing than it is baseball. There is a book I keep in my of ce at work that I will always treasure; I will often just open it and read a random page or two. Ive read it many times. Today, I rst turned to the pages in the book about joy and sorrow. The author notes, The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain. I thought about it. Its dif cult when you see folks on the digging side of that thought; when sorrow is digging into them making room for joy. Its even more dif cult when its you or someone you love being dug into. Then I thought about Daddys baby sister, my Aunt Ruby. You probably have someone close to you that comes to mind. How can she be so doggone happy all the time? It can be the worst of situations and Aunt Ruby will quote a Bible verse and say GIG, meaning God is good. Then again, perhaps the answer possibly is knowing sorrow has made room for all this joy and happiness. She has lost many of her loved ones including a grandson and a husband much too early in their lives. She keeps going and keeps saying how blessed she is. Recently, Aunt Rubys health hasnt been so good, but youd never know it. A day or two before she had to check into the hospital, she was sitting in the car with her daughter watching the local junior college play baseball. She noted, We parked near the out eld, it was a gorgeous day, God outdid Himself today! Perhaps it was because her boys won. None are related to her, they just play in the rural Alabama town where she now lives. Honestly, I think if either team won, she would be just as happy. She loves baseball. She still watches her grandsons when her health permits and watched her son and husband play the game. Her son played college basketball. The Georgia Peach, Ty Cobb told the St. Louis Cardinals to give her husband a shot to play baseball many years ago. They did and he played for awhile but never made it to the big leagues, perhaps he had an issue with his swing. Aunt Rubys husband came from a baseball family; his uncle had played for the Brooklyn Dodgers. His uncle, Jake Daniel is still the only professional baseball player to come out of Roanoke, Alabama (Population ~ 6000). After spending time with the Dodgers, Jake came back south to play and coach for many of the southern minor league teams that were prevalent in the 1940s and 50s. As a matter of fact, at age 42 in his last season, he hit .284 for Vidalia (GA) in the Georgia State League. From Brooklyn to Vidalia, sounds like he knew what he wanted to do. Aunt Ruby knew what she wanted from Jake Daniels nephew also. As my Daddy used to say about his baby sister, When she gets something on her mind, Ruby is going to do it. Back in 1951, Aunt Rubys boyfriend at the time made the mistake of stopping by the drugstore where she was working to introduce her to a sailor friend of his named Bobby. With her quoting those Bible verses all the time, you would think Aunt Ruby would take things kind of slow. She didnt in 1951. She went out with her boyfriend one more time to let him down gently and then married my Uncle Bob (Bobby) about Where have all the children gone ...Changing your swing Folks, there is a military school in Pyongyang, North Korea, where eleven year old students are being taught tactics and strategy aimed at preparing them for the ght against the United States. One of the pre-teen students at the Mangyongdae Revolutionary School was quoted as saying, I am trying to study harder, because I really think thats how I can get my revenge on the American imperialists. The shaven headed Jo Chung Hyok, between taekwondo thrusts, added, Its my revolutionary duty. Are you kidding me! What kind of world are we living in? It sometimes can be a razor thin line between brainwashed and hogwash! And listen, the problem I have here is not that North Korea hates us. That is not breaking news. And Im not concerned this morning about the upcoming 60th anniversary of the close of the Korean War. Or who has the most missiles aimed at whom. Or who, for goodness sakes, has right or might on their side! Im not even thinking about the eventual outcome of all of this. I believe with all my heart that an eleven year old kid ought to be rst and foremost... an eleven year old kid! I dont care what language you speak. I dont care who your father is mad at. I dont care about national policy or U. N. sanctions. It doesnt even matter if your national leader is a complete nincompoop. When I was eleven years old I was swinging on a grapevine across that big ditch down behind George Sextons house. I was polishing the Johnson waxed dining room oor with my back side as I slid into an imaginary home plate with the winning run. I was racing my little brother to the top of the hill in front of Paul David Campbells house. I wasnt mad at anyone. Hate wasnt a part of my vocabulary. I wasnt trying to get even or settle an old score. I wasnt concerned about strategy or tactics. I wasnt living for the future... I was trying to have the most fun that I could have at that particular moment. It seemed like the God intended natural thing for a little boy to be doing. Oh, I knew about world events. You sit on the front steps of Woodrow Kennons store and listen to the men talk for ve minutes and you came away with a working knowledge of hog prices in Memphis, the weather coming up from the Arkansas/ Missouri area and the job Ike was, or wasnt, doing in Washington. We took it all in, we gured some of it was important but to tell you the truth, we were much more interested in the peanuts we were pouring down the neck of the Coca-Cola in our sweaty little hands. Mrs. Cox, in the fth grade, taught us arithmetic, reading and spelling. She didnt teach revenge. We read books that had pictures of little children jumping mud puddles and playing on slides. She helped us grasp the rudimentary elements of knowledge commensurate with our age and ability. She certainly didnt scare us or threaten us with ideas and worldly affairs way above our station. I was eleven years old when Calvin Purvis ran into Bill Argos Gulf Station with the news that Russia had just sent this Sputnik thing into outer space. Didnt no one there panic. Mr. Argo didnt turn to me and say, Kesley, youve got to start training right now to get us back ahead of those Commies. He didnt give the old win one for America speech. He didnt stick a BB gun or a KaBar knife in my hand and admonish me to learn to use them. They talked of the space race and what Khrushchev might be up to... but they didnt include me in the conversation. I was, after all, just a little boy. When my rst son was only a few days old, Coach Wayne Taylor gave me the best single piece of advice I ever received on raising children. He said, Let him be the age he is. Dont wish him to be older for your bene t. And dont try to keep him a little boy after he grows past that stage. I wish today those little shaven headed eleven year olds in North Korea had that same opportunity. What a warped sense of life, not the beauty and joy of it, is being forced on them! They will have plenty of chances to see the twisted, contorted world that grownups have created. Lets dont rush them into that! Besides, the world picture changes way too often for long range hates and enemies. In 1958, we were preparing for the Russians. There was no other enemy looming. I get to be an adult and so much of the world attention has shifted to the Middle East; and then on to Afghanistan and the Al-Qaeda. Those little boys in North Korea are preparing for a ght against a perceived enemy that may not even exist, or could actually be an ally, when they grow into a position to use all these ghting skills they are so ardently pursuing now. How sad. I wish I could sit down with each one of them, hug their necks, and discuss life... over a six and a half ounce bottle of Coca-Cola lled to the brim with a bag of Toms Peanuts.Respectfully,Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, May 2, 2013 APage 4SectionSee CRANKS A5Now that the longdebated estate tax rules have nally been settled, lets get real: Despite all the hoopla raised, most people probably would never be impacted whether the lifetime estate tax threshold had stayed at $5.12 million or reverted to $1 million. In the end, it actually went up a bit to $5.25 million for 2013. Even if your estate will only be a fraction of that amount, it still pays to have a plan for distributing your assets. If your nances are in good shape, theres no reason not to start sharing the wealth while youre still around to enjoy helping others. It also doesnt hurt that you can reap signi cant tax advantages by distributing a portion of your assets now. Before you start doling out cash, however, make sure you are on track to fund your own retirement, have adequate health insurance, can pay off your mortgage and are otherwise debt-free. You wouldnt want to deplete your resources and then become a nancial burden on others. If you can check all those boxes, consider these options: Avoid the gift tax. You can give cash or property worth up to $14,000 per year, per individual, before youll trigger the federal gift tax. (Married couples ling jointly can give $28,000 per recipient.) Youll probably never have to pay a gift tax, however, since youre allowed to bestow up to $5.25 million in gifts during your lifetime above and beyond the annual $14,000 excluded amounts before the gift tax kicks in which for most of us means never. Read IRS Publication 950 (at www. irs.gov) for details. Pay for education. If college is still far off for your children, grandchildren or others, consider funding a 529 State Quali ed Tuition Plan for them. Any interest the account earns is not subject to federal (and in most cases, state) income tax; plus, many states offer tax deductions for contributions made to their own 529 Plans. And dont worry: If one child decides not to attend college, you can always transfer the account balance to another without penalty. Roth IRAs for kids. If your minor children or grandchildren earn income (allowances and gifts dont count), you may fund a Roth IRA on their behalf. You can contribute up to $5,500 or the amount of their taxable earnings for the year, whichever is less. Your contributions are made on an after-tax basis but the earnings grow, tax-free, until the account is tapped at retirement. Fund someones bene ts. Many people cannot afford health or other insurance and so forego coverage, putting themselves just one serious illness or accident away from nancial disaster. Many also cant fund their 401(k) plan or IRA. Consider applying your tax-exempt gifts to help loved ones pay for these critical bene ts. Youll not help protect them from catastrophe, but also greatly increase their long-term nancial self-suf ciency. Charitable contributions. If youre planning to leave money or property to charities in your will, consider beginning to share those assets now, if you can afford to. Youll be able to enjoy watching your contributions at work and be able to deduct them from your income taxes. Read IRS Publication 526 for details. Before taking any of these actions, consult your nancial advisor to make sure your own bases are covered. If you dont have an advisor, visit www. fpaforfinancialplanning. org for help locating one. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney JASON ALDERMANShare your money before you die Dear Editor: This years Earth Day served as an outstanding reminder that everyone can make an important difference for the environment through the simple act of donating gently used clothing or household items to Goodwill. Each year, donors help Goodwill prevent more than two billion pounds of usable goods from ending up in landfills. But the impact to the environment is only part of the story. Revenue raised from the sale of donated items at Goodwill stores funds job training programs, employment placement services and other vital programs in the community. People, as well as the planet, benefit. To show individuals how their donations truly impact their communities, Goodwill developed a Donation Impact Calculator (http:// donate.goodwill.org). The calculator shows how your donation can help a person receiving services from Goodwill. For example, a donation of one working computer translates into 5.8 hours of a job search class that can help a person right in our community who may be unemployed and struggling to support his or her family. Goodwill encourages everyone to making one small green change in your life. Individual actions add up to global impact. Not only will you be helping those in your community who face challenges in finding employment, but you will also reduce waste in our landfills. To find your nearest Goodwill donation site, go to www.goodwillbigbend. com.Brooke LochoreVice President of Public Relations blochore@goodwillbigbend.comEarth Day reminder from Goodwill ... an eleven year old kid ought to be rst and foremost... an eleven year old kid!

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CRANKS from page A4a month later. She moved fast. As she would say, God is good (especially when youre in a hurry). They had three children and were happily married until Uncle Bobs untimely death in 1989 at age 58. His Uncle Jake, the Brooklyn Dodger would die six years later at age 84. In 2006, Aunt Ruby lost a grandson in an automobile accident. He was 22. Im sure you or folks you know have suffered similar heartaches. Its tough. Sometimes you want to say, Im tired of this sorrow shovel digging room for joy. Just stop and let me try to ll this hole with happiness. Everybody needs an Aunt Ruby. You watch her lling in that hole and trying to nd the good in everything. In her most recent trip to the hospital which she refers to as The Spa, she not only found joy, but also a blessing. Her nurses last name was Blessing. That could only happen to your Aunt Ruby. It makes me wonder what she could have done for Ty Cobbs soul (as everyone knows, in addition to being the best player of his era, he also was known to play dirty and use foul language). The Spa couldnt hold Aunt Ruby. She was back again on the porch in her yellow swing in a day or so sitting with her cat, Sister Sarah. Hopefully, Sister Sarah has been xed and doesnt give birth to any Isaacs. One cat is more than enough in my opinion. Aunt Ruby loves her porch swing. She had stored it for awhile. Her daughters talked her into hanging up again and painting it yellow to make it look happier. You see this baseball player gave her that swing, but never got around to painting it. They had three kids and a wonderful life together after courting for all of a month. Things get to moving fast, you dont time to paint or change your swing; you just count your blessings along the way. But Uncle Bob would know, their children would know and we all know that porch swing will always be the perfect swing with Aunt Ruby sitting in it. I looked back in the book again where the author, Kahlil Gibran described love. He spoke of what your desires should be, including one that struck me To wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving There you go. Aunt Ruby does just that. Each morning, she and Sister Sarah enjoy a cup of coffee, Uncle Bobs perfect swing and another day of loving. If we really think about it, we all should try. Read more stories online at www. CranksMyTractor.com. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LOCAL www.starfl.comThursday, May 2, 2013 APage 5SectionBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Starting May 2, Americas Great Plein Air Paint-Out will welcome 23 artists from around the world to the Forgotten Coast where theyll spend 10 days making art, hosting workshops and taking in the local culture. The Wetroom, located at 234 Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe, will be a hub of activity during the event and will showcase the paintings created each day. Several exhibits can be seen up and down the Forgotten Coast displaying some of the best art from years past. Watch Art Happen will take place throughout the entire event as artists paint any open air scenery that grabs their attention all along the coast between Mexico Beach and Alligator Point. Another exhibit, Our Seafood Heritage, will be inside the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET, the gallery will feature art from past years that features oyster shuckers along with shrimp and shing boats. The Plein Air Classics exhibit will be housed inside the Mexico Beach Visitor Center and will feature major paintings from past years. Art and history collide with a focus on paintings whose objects no longer exist, such as the old Mexico Beach pier. The Natures Bounty exhibit takes place at the Carrabelle History Museum Monday through Saturday from noon until 5 p.m. ET and has a focus on paintings of nature scenes. The Artists Choice collection will be housed at the St. George Lighthouse Museum. Each year, artists submit one of their paintings to be considered for the prestigious award and the winners are chosen by their peers. Each winning painting is purchased by the Forgotten Coast Cultural Coalition and displayed the following year. Enjoy the best of the best daily from noon until 5 p.m. ET. Each day of the event is packed with ways to quench your thirst for art. As much as it is about the paint, Plein Air is also a time to bring creative minds together in a social setting. To kick off this years events, a luncheon will be held at noon on May 3 at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art to welcome the artists to the Forgotten Coast and show them some southern hospitality. Art demonstrations taking place the same day include A Working Waterfront in Riverfront Park, Apalachicola, from 9 a.m. to 11 ET and Reid Avenue Streetscapes in downtown Port St. Joe from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. Watch artists render the town, along with its buildings and residents on canvas. Artist Tracey Frugoli will teach her workshop, Simplify Your Way to Better Paintings, on May 2 and 3. Frugoli will discuss theory and the beauty in simplicity with her students. The fee for the workshop is $200 and registration can be completed online. On May 4 the Quickdraw event will bring together professional and amateur artists to capture the beauty of Cape San Blas on canvas. The event will take place at St. Joe Peninsula State Park inside the T.G. Stone Memorial pavilion. The fee is $10 and the event starts at 10 a.m. ET. Later that evening, enjoy a reception for the artists at Salinas Park on the Cape from 4 p.m. to 6 ET. Meet and greet with the artists, view their works in progress or just talk some shop. Demonstrations on this day include the Salinas Park Panorama at Cape San Blas and day two of A Working Waterfront at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. Both events run from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. The View from Eastpoint at the Apalachicola Estuarine Research Reserve will be the lone demonstration on May 5, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET and will be followed by the Nocturne Paint event where artists will capture evening landscapes. This event, from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. ET will happen simultaneously at the Apalachicola Riverfront and the Port St. Joe Marina. Carrabelle will be the epicenter of activity on May 6. The demonstration, Marine Avenue Vistas, will take place at the Marine Street Pavilion from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET and be followed by a reception for the artists at the Carrabelle History Museum. From 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. ET, guests can meet the artists and view their work. The art moves to St. George Island on May 7 with the Island Vistas demonstration at the Lighthouse and Visitor Center from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. It will be followed by a reception in the same location. The annual Student Art Day event will take place on May 8 at the Eastpoint Community Pavilion. Artisticallydriven students from Gulf and Franklin counties will meet and receive one-onone instruction from the the professional artists from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET. Mexico Beach becomes the art hub on May 9 with the Mexico Beach Tableau demonstration at the Welcome Center from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. A reception with the artists will immediately follow. The Art as a Window event will take place on May 10. Join an artists roundtable discussion on their love of the medium and their careers to date. The discussion takes place from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET at the Wetroom in Port St. Joe. That night, head over to the Plein Air T.G.I.F social event at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. Relax with the artists and enjoy a low-country boil, music and more. The festivities begin at 7 p.m. ET and tickets are $10. The Grand Patrons Party, the biggest event of the Plein Air Festival takes place on May 11 at 6 p.m. in the Wetroom. Here guests can meet the artists, view and even purchase their works. The Artists Choice paint will also make its debut. Tickets for the event are $40. End your 2013 PaintOut experience with Art in the Afternoon, and family-friendly event at the Wetroom in Port St. Joe. Here you can view the paintings one last time and make any last-minute sales. The event runs from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. ET. Greg LaRock. Will teach his own class, Guiding the Eye, on May 12 and 13. The fee for his workshop is $200 and registration can be completed online. With 10 days of amazing art and talent youll count the days until the 2014 Plein Air on the Forgotten Coast.Americas Great Plein Air Paint-Out kicks off today FILE PHOTOSTop: Artists will be out in force throughout the Forgotten Coast, from Mexico Beach to Alligator Point. Right: Take time and stop to see the artists at work throughout the next 10 days. Bottom: Student art day is a highlight each year, offering a chance for local high school students top learn from a master.

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 After college, Ford spent some time in Atlanta working sales in the telecommunications eld and eventually felt the call of the ministry, spending the past decade as a pastor in Marianna. After his father died, Ford found himself asking an important question. What do I really want to do with my life? He missed sales, the corporate structure and enjoyed interacting with people, and he sought a way to combine those loves with the skill set he had developed. After several conversations with his wife, Kristy, and their three children, Zack, Jake and Nicole, the answer was clear as mud. They recalled that their favorite vacations were the ones where they relaxed on the back porch of a rustic cabin and drank great coffee. Fords new path began brewing. After letting the ideas percolate for a bit, he made a bold move in November and left his job to start Satellite Republic. After he explained the business plan to his mother, she loaned him $1,000 to get things moving. Fords friends were confused by the sudden job change, and it took a while to lter in that he wasnt the sales rep for a new coffee company, but rather the owner. I wanted a fun, quirky name for the company, said Ford. Everyone is connected. Satellites and republics both bring people together in their own ways. The quirkiness didnt stop there. Satellite Republics packaging, logo and labels, designed by brother-in-law Dave George, were created to stand out against the competition. I wanted something completely different, said Ford, something Earthy. Ford enjoys naming his coffees as much as drinking them. Rocketboy is the moniker given to his Sumatra blend, Major Tom comes from Ethiopia, Planet Love hails from Costa Rica and Mosaic Moon uses beans from Guatemala. While seeking the perfect roaster to create the companys signature blends, he visited a facility outside of Little Rock, Ark., where he was able to sample the coffees they offered and customize his own avors. For a coffee lover, it was like going to Disneyworld, Ford said of the experience. After the ultimate tastetest, Ford teamed up with the roaster and soon after found a partner in Edward Bubba Vance, who brought years of experience with import/export to the burgeoning business. As much as Ford and his family love coffee, he admitted to a secondary agenda behind Satellite Republic. All prots from his business are donated to the maintenance of a girls orphanage situated on the Ivory Coast of West Africa. The orphanage houses girls whose parents were killed during recent military coups in the country. The building has 15 occupants with the capacity to hold up to 144. Ford said its a wonderful life to help children who cant fend for themselves and have no one to take care of them. His father-inlaw was a missionary who dedicated his life to building orphanages, and hearing the stories of the places and children touched Fords heart enough for him to follow suit. In addition to building more orphanages in West Africa, Ford said he would like to see his company help fund projects in troubled areas around India and Haiti. Through our business, people can enjoy a product but also give back to something bigger than themselves, he said. He noted feedback on his products has been extremely positive, and he hopes to see Satellite Republic on more store shelves as the year continued. The company is exploring a deal with a larger grocery chain in the south. With 100 ideas for new avors of coffee, more quirky names and new marketing strategies, it leaves one to question if these creative sparks might be grounds to keep Ford awake at night. If they dont, the coffee will. I accomplished what I set out to do, said Ford, I took a great product and a great cause and put them together. Visit Satellite Republic Coffee at www.satelliterepubliccoffee.com to learn more about their coffees, their cause and to order online. ToRegisterorformoreinformation,pleasecontact (850)482-6500 or bnuccio@bigbendahec.org orTollfree 1-87-QUIT-NOW6Interestedinquittingtobacco?Pleasecome toourupcoming FREE ToolstoQuit session. Because NOW isthebest timetoquit. When: Monday May6,2013 Time: 12:00-2:00PMCST Where:WewahitchkaLibrary 314N.2ndStreetFREE NicotinePatches And/orGum forprogram participants Rehab Care NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:5-31-13 CODE:PJ00 pre-cast concrete, port director Tommy Pitts said. Pitts and Sellers said they had been in communication with the company, a large nationwide concern, for about four months. The company would hope to establish a facility on Port of Port St. Joe land. It is a lot of talk right now, but there is a lot of interest, Costin said. It would be a big operation that would change the port in a substantial way. This is a good potential customer if it turns out to be feasible. Port staff does not have some of the particulars, such as nancial backing and the scope of the facility the company is proposing for the Port of Port St. Joe, but the site visit is a step in the right direction, Pitts said. There would be a good domino effect if that company did come here, Sellers said in reference to additional businesses that might follow the company to the port. Also drawing interest, Sellers said, is the former Gulf County Shipbuilding site. Though not part of the 300 acres of combined Port of Port St. Joe and St. Joe Company land that comprises the port planning area, the shipbuilding site has water access and much of the infrastructure already in place for a marine products manufacturer. The complex also would serve as a natural link to the port and its rail and deepwater and barge terminal access. There has been a lot of interest in that site, Sellers said. The Port of Port St. Joe also is scheduled to have a visit by members of the ofce of Congressman Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, as state and federal stakeholders take a growing interest in the development of the port under the collaborative agreement between the port and St. Joe. Further, a delegation of representatives from a port city in Colombia that was visited during a Florida trade delegation to that South American company is scheduled to visit Port St. Joe before the end of May. The Colombian port city is one visited by representatives of the Port of Port St. Joe and St. Joe Company during the trade delegation earlier this year. The EDA board also will begin facilitating community discussions among stakeholders concerning the viability of attracting boutique cruise lines to Port St. Joe. Loretta Costin of the EDA said the plan would be to invite parties such as the city of Port St. Joe, county, Chamber of Commerce, Tourist Development Council and EDA, among others, to discuss the existing opportunities for such cruises and identify the cruise companies. We want to facilitate what would be a community-wide discussion, Loretta Costin said. I think there is a great opportunity there, Leonard Costin said. I think it has a lot of potential. The update to the port master plan, Pitts said, is 80-85 percent completed and is awaiting feedback from Port Authority board members before the nishing touches are put on the document. The hope is to review the master plan in a public hearing later this month in order to communicate the plan to the city of Port St. Joe for incorporation into the citys comprehensive plan. We would hope to have a public hearing on May 22, Pitts said, the date of the second May meeting of the Port Authority. The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity funded the update through a $70,000 grant. The master planning document is crucial for attracting state and federal funds to develop the infrastructure for the port. The Port of Port St. Joe is a member of the Strategic Intermodal System. Some 75 percent of Florida Department of Transportation discretionary funding each year is spent on projects within the SIS. The port, signicantly, recently received a threeyear extension on its SIS designation. SPECIAL TO TT HE STARProts from Satellite Republic Coffee go toward maintaining an orphanage in West Africa. PORT from page A1 BEANS from page A1

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LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, May 2, 2013 RealEstatePicksOurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhat theyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandare oeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthis section),Discoverthebestrealestatevaluesin MexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSan Blas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelle andsurroundingareas. BestValueson theForgottenCoast SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)814-7377 (850)227-7847SOLD FamilyValues MilitaryIntegrity BusinessSense VOTE-MAY14TH Asafamilyman,businessman,andveteran,Ihaveacquiredmanyoftheskillsnecessarytoserve asyournextCityCommissioner.Iamnotapolitician,butratheraconcernedcitizenwhowants toserveyouandrepresentourcommunitytocreateabetterPortSt.Joeforeveryone.Ilivemy lifebyadheringtotheArmyvaluesofLoyalty,Duty,Respect,SelessService,Honor,Integrity andPersonalCourage.Thesevalueshaveservedmewellinmypersonalandprofessionallife andarequalitiesthatwillhelpmemaketheharddecisionsnecessarytostrengthenthiscity. Don'tforgetthatearlyvotingisMay4th-May11thattheSupervisorofElections'Ofce,9am5pmMonday-Saturday. ElectionDayisMay14th,7am-7pmattheCityFirehouseonWilliamsAvenue. ThankyouforyoursupportandpleasecontactmeifIcanprovideanyadditionalinformation.(850)227-4068 WILLWORKTOIMPROVE WATERCOST&QUALITY-ECONOMICGROWTH-INTERGOVERNMENTALRELATIONSwww.Facebook.com/DavidAshbrook1978PaidforandapprovedbyDavidAshbrookforCityCommissioner,Group1 WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM -FirstSundayCinco de Mayo Celebration! 2FOR1BEER*WINE*DRINKS*TEQUILA AllDay&Night|Potluck-6PM LiveonthePOOPDECK-6PM: NealJames -ONTHEPOOPDECK-INTHECROWSNESTPM DJ -LADIESNIGHTPM -HAPPYHOURPM By MATTHEW BEATON 522-5114 | @matthewbeaton mbeaton@pcnh.com The local head of Bay Countys Florida Department of Health (DOH) ofce has received a top honor. Douglas Kent, 63, was named the 2013 Statewide Community Healthcare Pioneer of the Year for his efforts to abate racial and ethnic health disparities and enhance the health of all residents of Bay and Gulf counties, according to a statement released by his ofce. Kent said he was competing for the honor with all those nominated across Florida DOH employees as well as other residents. But the DOHs Ofce of Minority Health tapped Kent for the honor. Im thrilled to be recognized, he said. Kent serves as DOHs Bay County administrator, a position hes held since April 2010. Before leaving to head the Bay County ofce, Kent served as environmental manager and administrator at Gulf Countys DOH ofce from September 1996 to February 2010. Kent said in both counties hes tried to decrease health disparities in not just the minority communities, but the population at large. And hes been leading the charge to bring better health services to the area. When youre doing this job, youre really trying to do whats best for the community as a whole, he said. Since joining the Bay County DOH, Kents led several initiatives to improve health and wellness in the area. Kent helped start the after hours/ER diversion clinic, which offers medical services to the communitys uninsured and underserved. He also started a childrens dentistry clinic, which serves kids on Medicaid. He called it a top priority and said it came online within the rst year of his arriving in Bay County. Kent also began a prescription drug assistance program, which now has three locations. And he increased the number of locations for the federally funded Women, Infants and Children nutrition program. Kent even got into the septic realm, creating a same day septic tank permitting service and online sewage treatment and disposal system records search. Though hes been with the organization a long time and is fresh off a nice award, Kent said he has no plans to retire to take his honor and ride off into the sunset. Im proud to be a part of the community and be able to do public health in this area, he said.By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com BLOUNTSTOWN The city of Blountstown operates on a $3 million per year budget, and the Calhoun County seat is struggling to keep up with infrastructure needs. Its no cheaper to x things here than it is in a big city, City Manager Emory Pierce said. But in big cities with multimillion-dollar budgets, a couple of thousand dollars to x something is nothing. The story is similar for rural communities across the Panhandle, and U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, RPanama City, said he hopes a new bill might help those areas he said form the backbone of North and Northwest Florida. Southerland recently introduced the Building Rural Communities Act, aimed at giving rural government ofcials the necessary tools to plan large-scale improvement projects in a more cost-effective manner. Co-sponsored by Rep. Mike McIntyre, D-N.C., the legislation would channel between 3 percent and 5 percent of funding from the U.S. Department of Agricultures Rural Development Essential Communities Facilities loan and grant program toward technical assistance and nancial planning for rural communities. Unfortunately, across America many of these bedrock communities are fading away because they cant match the access to infrastructure and services that larger cities provide, Southerland said. Our legislation will make it easier for rural communities to thrive by providing the technical assistance and project planning they need to strengthen public safety, public health and public access to upgraded services all at no additional cost to taxpayers. Pierce said funding issues have halted a project to run a force main sewer line from Altha to the Blountstown wastewater treatment plant. All of Althas buildings run off septic tanks. Without real community sewer lines, they are severely limited in Altha and along that entire corridor toward Blountstown, Pierce said. He said the Calhoun County School District is exploring options for a new high school in Altha, but the current infrastructure cannot support a structure that size. Overall, Pierce said he would support any bill that could help rural areas such as Blountstown. We have the normal, aging infrastructure that all cities big and small have, and we are searching for funding to help with our internally generated funds, said Pierce, who noted the city cannot raise utility rates for fear of losing customers. All the people and businesses here are strapped. If we raise rates, I would estimate we would lose several customers and the community just cant stand that. Southerlands bill was referred to the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture for further consideration.DOH leader named Pioneer of the Year SPECIAl L toTO THE St T ARDouglas Kent was named 2013 Statewide Community Healthcare Pioneer of the Year. Bill aims to help rural communitiesUnfortunately, across America many of these bedrock communities are fading away because they cant match the access to infrastructure and services that larger cities provide. Our legislation will make it easier for rural communities to thrive by providing the technical assistance and project planning they need to strengthen public safety, public health and public access to upgraded services all at no additional cost to taxpayers.RRep. Steve Southerland Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas |

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The 11h annual Kids Win Fishing Tournament will take at the Port St. Joe Marina on May 10 and 11. Presented by the Kids Win Foundation, children ages 3-16 who register will learn the basics of shing and be armed with the know-how to reel in a big one. Trophies will be given out for the biggest sh and most sh caught within each division. The Small Fry division is for kids aged 3-8 and Junior, for children 9-16. The contest is limited to in-shore, nearshore, Intracoastal waterway shing, and contestants can be no further than three miles from shore. Fishing can take place from a boat, dock, bridge, pier, beach, shore or while wading. Its about teaching kids to sh, said Rick Carrie, president of the Kids Win Foundation. Carrie spent the last nine years working around the marina and has always encouraged locals to sh, especially the kids. His reasons have deep, historical roots. My grandmother said that its hard for kids to get in trouble when theyre shing, Carrie said with a laugh. The rst 350 kids to register for the event will receive a rod and reel, a tackle packet, T-shirt and goodie bag. With 348 participants in the 2012 event, Carrie predicted 2013 to be the biggest tournament to date. On Friday, May 10, registered contestants can pick up their shing equipment at the Port St. Joe Marina between 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. ET. Kids will also enjoy a cookout, exhibits, and onsite classes to get tips on rod casting, knot tying, and casting nets. These classes will provide kids with important information to ensure they have a fun and active day of catching sh instead of remembering the one that got away. The of cial rules meeting will follow at 6:30 p.m. at the Marina. The tournament kicks off at 7 a.m. ET on Saturday. Fishing ends by noon with trophy presentation to follow at 1 p.m. Children may sh with an adult but must be the ones to reel in all sh entered into the competition. Registration is free and is open until May 9. Those interested in volunteering or making donations should contact the Port St. Joe Marina at 850-227-9393. FILE PHOTOA small fry shows off his big win at the 2012 tournament.Kids Win shing tourney coming upStar Staff ReportThe Blountstown Rotary Club will host the 17th annual Big River Roundup Florida Flathead Cat sh Tournament Memorial Day weekend, May 24-25. The tournament was not held in 2012, but after encouragement by the community to continue the event, the Rotary Club re-launched the tourney. This years tourney will have some changes, such as no bank shing and more cash prizes. The 2013 Big River Roundup marks the 17th anniversary of the rst organized athead cat sh tournament in Florida. The Roundup tournament is unlike any other, with erce competition between locals for bragging rights, cash prizes and $50,000 at stake if the current state record is broken during the event. Contestants vie for $1,000 for the largest athead; $500 for second largest; $400 for third largest; $300 for the fourth largest; and largest nonathead cat sh will win $100. In addition, the most athead cat sh total poundage for the event will pocket $100. The tournament has graced the pages of Field & Stream, Florida Fish & Game and GAFF magazines, and sherman from Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee, South Carolina and even as far as Ohio have regularly traveled to take their chances at winning the event. The tournament entry fee for adults is $50 per person if pre-registering or $55 per person at the gate. Ages 14 and younger may enter in the youth category for $20 per person. Pre-register to be included in a special pre-registration prize drawing. Participants can also register onsite from 9 a.m. CT to midnight CT on May 24 and from 6 a.m. CT to 10 a.m. CT on May 25 at the Blountstown Landing (Neal Landing). There will be multiple boat launch sites available and approved by the Blountstown Rotary Club. The tournament begins at 4 p.m. CT on May 24 and ends at noon CT on May 25. Awards presentation will be held at noon CT on Saturday at the Blountstown landing. For more information on the tournament, a list of rules and an application, visit www.blountstownrotary. com, or call Tournament Director Phil McMillan at 850643-7082 or Assistant Tournament Director Phillip Hill at 850-447-1975. Mail applications to Blountstown Rotary Club, P.O. Box 161 Blountstown, FL 32424, or drop off applications at the Calhoun County Senior Center, Gulf State Chemical, Adams Funeral Home or Centennial Bank in Blountstown. Monday-Sunday:7:00AM-7:00PMEST WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,May0278 6350% Fri,May0377 6040% Sat,May0475 6120% Sun,May0577 64 0% Mon,May0679 67 0% Tues,May0779 6830% Wed,May0880 68 0% Special to The StarThe 98 Real Estate Group Ling Ding shing tournament came to a conclusion on Saturday with the winning cobia coming in at 67.30 pounds. Capt. Mitch Coleman on the Floridaze landed the winning sh the rst week in April and never gave up the lead in the following four weeks. Week two had a 37.96 pound cobia weighed in by Capt. Charlene Burke on St. Misbehavin, and week three was led by Capt. David Mullis on Spirit Horse, who weighed a sh weighing 41.85 pounds. In week four, the winning sh was landed by Nathan Murphy and weighed 50.71 pounds. Don Sutton and Tennessee Chuck McGibbon landed a 43.11 pound cobia followed by Murray Gaskins who landed a cobia weighing 36.76 pounds. The largest amberjack was caught by Keith Carraway, which weighed 71.87 pounds. The winning Spanish mackerel was 2.91 pounds and was landed by the crew of the Sand Dancer. We are so pleased to bring back this tournament to our area, said Zach Childs, owner and broker of 98 Real Estate Group. It was a great turn out and we hope it will continue to grow each and every year. The tournament supports the efforts of the (Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association) to build more arti cial reefs in our area, and this is something we all believe in. We have an amazing system of arti cial reefs in our area that support diving and shing, and we all bene t. SPECIAL TO THE STARCapt. Mitch Burke aboard the boat Floridaze brought in the winning cobia.Coleman wins Ling Ding shing tourneyBig River Roundup Tourney returns SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomCobia action has heated up with 10 fish caught last week over the 50# mark. Most anglers are reporting fish running the stretch from Mexico Beach to Shell Island. Only one month away from red snapper season in our waters, so get your gear ready. New laws are in place again this year for both federal and state waters, so make sure you check them before heading out. Trout and redfish are on the move in St. Joe Bay still. Good reports from the flats behind Blacks Island are coming in daily, with most anglers using live shrimp or bull minnows for the trout and bull minnows for the flounder. Surf fishing is producing great pompano catches along Mexico Beach and the Cape.Page 9 Thursday, May 2, 2013 LING DING KING

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection Star Staff ReportNicole Endres, Maya Robbins and NNamdi Davis of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School each medaled last weekend during the state Class 1A track and eld meet in Jacksonville. Endres was the top individual nisher, placing fth in the pole vault with a jump of 10 feet. Robbins took seventh, in the points, in the 100 meter dash and nished in ninth in the long jump. Davis, the lone Port St. Joe boy to qualify for state, was fth in the 100 meters, earning team points. He also nished 11th in the triple jump. Davis is also the lone senior on the track and eld team. Coach Kenny Parker and the team would like to thank everyone for their support for this years track team. We had a good season, but our future is very bright, Parker said. Special to The StarHaley Porter, a freshman tennis player at Southwestern College in Win eld, Kan., completed her undefeated singles season last week with a threeset win in a dual match with Kansas Wesleyan. Porters singles match was Southwesterns only win of the day as the Lady Builders fell to the Coyotes 8-1 in Salina. The Moundbuilders end the regular season at 10-9 and 4-3 in Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference play. Southwestern has quali ed for the KCAC Womans Tennis Championship, which will be played May 2 at Riverside Tennis Center in Wichita. Porter led her team with a perfect 14-0 record this season as a freshman and was picked as Womans Athlete of the Week on April 15 for the entire KCAC. She is the daughter of Ron and Holly Porter of Grain Valley, Mo., and the granddaughter of Cecil and Beth Lyons of Port St. Joe. Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School cheerleaders wish to thank the following for their assistance with the cheerleaders fth annual shrimp boil, held April 13. Tommy Ward, 13 Mile Seafood and Sara Ward, PSJ cheerleading alum, for their time and talent in making the fundraiser so successful since 2009; John Wright, Steve Norris and Clay Smallwood for their help every year with the cooking; and the community for buying shrimp plates and support these girls. Coaches Kristal Smallwood and Anna McFarland want the girls to know how much they appreciate the parents and their help. Also, the coaches are very proud of the girls and their hard work that made the fundraiser a success.Beach Blast draws large turnoutStar Staff ReportPerfect weather lured a large eld for the spring Beach Blast Triathlon/Duathlon last weekend at Veterans Memorial Park in Beacon Hill. According to race director Olga Cemore, 325 athletes turned out to participate in one of the four races that comprise the Beach Blast: Olympic triathlon, Sprint Triathlon, Olympic Duathlon and Sprint Duathlon. Cemore sent a special shout-out to the dozens of volunteers who assisted with the race. The race simply cannot exist without volunteers, Cemore said. Also, Gulf County helped with permits and clean-up and maintenance of the park, and Sheriff (Mike) Harrison and his new and fresh support of the event helped tremendously. The event was a great success, and we heard only appreciation of local support from athletes. The athletes also raised over $600 for Boston Marathon bombing victims, and event T-shirts were designed as a tribute to the terrible tragedy. The participants represented a wide demographic. Sixty percent were men, 40 percent women and 58 percent of the athletes hailed from around Florida. Twenty-two percent came from Georgia, 10 percent from Alabama and participants came from as far as Mississippi and Texas. Roughly one-quarter of the participants competed in the Duathlon and the remainder the triathlons, 60 percent in the Sprint and 40 percent in the Olympic. Almost three in four participants brought at least one other person with them, lling the park with hundreds of visitors, Cemore said. SOFTBALL SEASONS ENDStar Staff ReportThe softball seasons for the two county high schools ended in the Region 1-1A quarter nals on Tuesday. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, runner-up in District 4-1A, traveled to Sneads and lost 7-4. Wewahitchka, runner-up in District 1-1A, was at the District 4 champion Liberty County. The Lady Gators lost 10-0 in a game ended on the run-rule. SPECIAL TO THE STARHaley Porter was undefeated this year at Southwestern College in Kansas.Page 9 Thursday, May 2, 2013Porter a tennis standout at Southwestern College SPECIAL TO THE STARMaya Robbins, NNamdi Davis and Nicole Endres each earned medals at the state track and eld meet. Athletes emerge from the Gulf of Mexico after the swim portion of the triathlon.WES LOCHER | The StarCheerleaders extend thanks 3 medal at state

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LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 2012AnnualDrinkingWaterQualityReport CityofWewahitchkaWearepleasedtoannouncethatourdrinkingwatermeetsallfederalandstaterequirements.WerepleasedtopresenttoyouthisyearsAnnualWaterQualityReport.isreportisdesignedtoinformyouaboutthequalitywaterandserviceswedelivertoyoueveryday.Ourconstantgoalistoprovideyouwithasafeanddependablesupplyofdrinkingwater.Wewantyoutounderstandthe eortswemaketocontinuallyimprovethewatertreatmentprocessandprotectourwaterresources.Wearecommittedtoensuringthequalityofyourwater.Ourwatersourceisgroundwaterfromtwowells.ewellsdrawfromtheFloridanAquifer.Becauseoftheexcellentqualityofourwater,the onlytreatmentsrequiredarechlorinefordisinfectionpurposesandaerationforremovalofhydrogensulde. In2011theDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtectionperformedaSourceWaterAssessmentonoursystemandasearchofthedatasourcesindicatednopotentialsourcesofcontaminationnearourwells.eassessmentresultsareavailableontheFDEPSourceWaterAssessmentandProtection Programwebsiteatwww.dep.state..us/swapp. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsaboutthisreportorconcerningyourwaterutility,pleasecontactDonMinchewat(850)-639-2605.Weencourageourvaluedcustomerstobeinformedabouttheirwaterutility.Ifyouwanttolearnmore,pleaseattendanyofourregularlyscheduledmeetings.eyareheldon thesecondandforthMondayofeachmonthat6:30PMatCityHall. CityofWewahitchkaroutinelymonitorsforcontaminantsinyourdrinkingwateraccordingtoFederalandStatelaws,rules,andregulations.Exceptwhereindicatedotherwise,thisreportisbasedontheresultsofourmonitoringfortheperiodofJanuary1toDecember31,2012.Dataobtainedbefore January1,2012,andpresentedinthisreportarefromthemostrecenttestingdoneinaccordancewiththelaws,rules,andregulations. Inthetablebelow,youmayndunfamiliartermsandabbreviations.Tohelpyoubetterunderstandthesetermsweveprovidedthefollowingdenitions: MaximumContaminantLevelorMCL: ehighestlevelofacontaminantthatisallowedindrinkingwater.MCLsaresetasclosetotheMCLGsasfeasibleusingthebestavailabletreatmenttechnology. MaximumContaminantLevelGoalorMCLG: elevelofacontaminantindrinkingwaterbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MCLGsallowforamarginofsafety ActionLevel(AL): econcentrationofacontaminantwhich,ifexceeded,triggerstreatmentorotherrequirementsthatawatersystemmustfollow. MaximumresidualdisinfectantlevelorMRDL:ehighestlevelofadisinfectantallowedindrinkingwater.ereisconvincingevidencethatadditionofadisinfectantisnecessaryforcontrolofmicrobialcontaminants. MaximumresidualdisinfectantlevelgoalorMRDLG: elevelofadrinkingwaterdisinfectantbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MRDLGsdonotreectthebenetsoftheuseofdisinfectantstocontrolmicrobialcontaminants. Partspermillion(ppm)orMilligramsperliter(mg/l) onepartbyweightofanalyteto1millionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Partsperbillion(ppb)orMicrogramsperliter(g/l) onepartbyweightofanalyteto1billionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Picocurieperliter(pCi/L) -measureoftheradioactivityinwater InitialDistributionSystemEvaluation(IDSE): AnimportantpartoftheStage2DisinfectionByproductsRule(DBPR).eIDSEisaone-timestudyconductedbywatersystemstoidentifydistributionsystemlocationswithhighconcentrationsoftrihalomethanes(THMs)andhaloaceticacids(HAAs). WatersystemswilluseresultsfromtheIDSE,inconjunctionwiththeirStage1DBPRcompliancemonitoringdata,toselectcompliancemonitoringlocationsfortheStage2DBPR. NDmeansnotdetectedandindicatesthatthesubstancewasnotfoundbylaboratoryanalysis. Ifpresent,elevatedlevelsofleadcancauseserioushealthproblems,especiallyforpregnantwomenandyoungchildren.Leadindrinkingwaterisprimarilyfrommaterialsandcomponentsassociatedwithservicelinesandhomeplumbing.CityofWewahitchkaisresponsibleforproviding highqualitydrinkingwater,butcannotcontrolthevarietyofmaterialsusedinplumbingcomponents.Whenyourwaterhasbeensittingforseveralhours,youcanminimizethepotentialforleadexposurebyushingyourtapfor30secondsto2minutesbeforeusingwaterfordrinkingor cooking.Ifyouareconcernedaboutleadinyourwater,youmaywishtohaveyourwatertested.Informationonleadindrinkingwater,testingmethods,andstepsyoucantaketominimizeexposureisavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineorathttp://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. esourcesofdrinkingwater(bothtapwaterandbottledwater)includerivers,lakes,streams,ponds,reservoirs,springs,andwells.Aswatertravelsoverthesurfaceofthelandorthroughtheground,itdissolvesnaturallyoccurringmineralsand,insomecases,radioactivematerial,andcan pickupsubstancesresultingfromthepresenceofanimalsorfromhumanactivity. Contaminantsthatmaybepresentinsourcewaterinclude: (A)Microbialcontaminants,suchasvirusesandbacteria,whichmaycomefromsewagetreatmentplants,septicsystems,agriculturallivestockoperations,andwildlife. (B)Inorganiccontaminants,suchassaltsandmetals,whichcanbenaturally-occurringorresultfromurbanstormwaterruno,industrialordomesticwastewaterdischarges,oilandgasproduction,mining,orfarming. (C)Pesticidesandherbicides,whichmaycomefromavarietyofsourcessuchasagriculture,urbanstormwaterruno,andresidentialuses. (D)Organicchemicalcontaminants,includingsyntheticandvolatileorganicchemicals,whichareby-productsofindustrialprocessesandpetroleumproduction,andcanalsocomefromgasstations,urbanstormwaterruno,andsepticsystems. (E)Radioactivecontaminants,whichcanbenaturallyoccurringorbetheresultofoilandgasproductionandminingactivities. Inordertoensurethattapwaterissafetodrink,theEPAprescribesregulations,whichlimittheamountofcertaincontaminantsinwaterprovidedbypublicwatersystems.eFoodandDrugAdministration(FDA)regulationsestablishlimitsforcontaminantsinbottledwater,whichmust providethesameprotectionforpublichealth. Drinkingwater,includingbottledwater,mayreasonablybeexpectedtocontainatleastsmallamountsofsomecontaminants.epresenceofcontaminantsdoesnotnecessarilyindicatethatthewaterposesahealthrisk.Moreinformationaboutcontaminantsandpotentialhealtheectscan beobtainedbycallingtheEnvironmentalProtectionAgencysSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineat1-800-426-4791. ankyouforallowingustocontinueprovidingyourfamilywithclean,qualitywaterthisyear.Inordertomaintainasafeanddependablewatersupply,wesometimesneedtomakeimprovementsthatwillbenetallofourcustomers.eseimprovementsaresometimesreectedasrate structureadjustments.ankyouforunderstanding. Somepeoplemaybemorevulnerabletocontaminantsindrinkingwaterthanthegeneralpopulation.Immuno-compromisedpersonssuchaspersonswithcancerundergoingchemotherapy,personswhohaveundergoneorgantransplants,peoplewithHIV/AIDSorotherimmunesystem disorders,someelderly,andinfantscanbeparticularlyatriskfrominfections.esepeopleshouldseekadviceaboutdrinkingwaterfromtheirhealthcareproviders.EPA/CDCguidelinesonappropriatemeanstolessentheriskofinfectionbyCryptosporidiumandothermicrobiological contaminantsareavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotline(800-426-4791). WeatCityofWewahitchkawouldlikeyoutounderstandtheeortswemaketocontinuallyimprovethewatertreatmentprocessandprotectourwaterresources.Wearecommittedtoinsuringthequalityofyourwater.Ifyouhaveanyquestionsorconcernsabouttheinformationprovided, pleasefeelfreetocallanyofthenumberslisted. 2012AnnualDrinkingWaterQualityReport CityofWewahitchka Wearepleasedtoannouncethatourdrinkingwatermeetsallfederalandstaterequirements. WerepleasedtopresenttoyouthisyearsAnnualWaterQualityReport.isreportisdesignedtoinformyouaboutthequalitywaterandserviceswedelivertoyoueveryday.Ourconstantgoalistoprovideyouwithasafeanddependablesupplyofdrinkingwater.Wewantyoutounderstandtheeortswemaketocontinuallyimprovethewatertreatmentprocessandprotectourwaterresources.Wearecommittedtoensuringthequalityofyourwater.Ourwatersourceisgroundwaterfromtwowells.ewellsdrawfromtheFloridanAquifer.Becauseoftheexcellentquality ofourwater,theonlytreatmentsrequiredarechlorinefordisinfectionpurposesandaerationforremovalofhydrogensulde. In2011theDepartmentofEnvironmentalProtectionperformedaSourceWaterAssessmentonoursystemandasearchofthedatasourcesindicatednopotentialsourcesofcontaminationnearourwells.eassessmentresultsareavailableontheFDEPSourceWaterAssessmentandProtectionProgramwebsiteatwww.dep.state..us/swapp. Ifyouhaveanyquestionsaboutthisreportorconcerningyourwaterutility,pleasecontactDonMinchewat(850)-639-2605.Weencourageourvaluedcustomerstobeinformedabouttheirwaterutility.Ifyouwanttolearnmore,pleaseattendanyofourregularlyscheduledmeetings.eyare heldonthesecondandforthMondayofeachmonthat6:30PMatCityHall. CityofWewahitchkaroutinelymonitorsforcontaminantsinyourdrinkingwateraccordingtoFederalandStatelaws,rules,andregulations.Exceptwhereindicatedotherwise,thisreportisbasedontheresultsofourmonitoringfortheperiodofJanuary1toDecember31,2012.Data obtainedbeforeJanuary1,2012,andpresentedinthisreportarefromthemostrecenttestingdoneinaccordancewiththelaws,rules,andregulations. Inthetablebelow,youmayndunfamiliartermsandabbreviations.Tohelpyoubetterunderstandthesetermsweveprovidedthefollowingdenitions: MaximumContaminantLevelorMCL:ehighestlevelofacontaminantthatisallowedindrinkingwater.MCLsaresetasclosetotheMCLGsasfeasibleusingthebestavailabletreatmenttechnology. MaximumContaminantLevelGoalorMCLG:elevelofacontaminantindrinkingwaterbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MCLGsallowforamarginofsafety ActionLevel(AL):econcentrationofacontaminantwhich,ifexceeded,triggerstreatmentorotherrequirementsthatawatersystemmustfollow. MaximumresidualdisinfectantlevelorMRDL:ehighestlevelofadisinfectantallowedindrinkingwater.ereisconvincingevidencethatadditionofadisinfectantisnecessaryforcontrolofmicrobialcontaminants. MaximumresidualdisinfectantlevelgoalorMRDLG:elevelofadrinkingwaterdisinfectantbelowwhichthereisnoknownorexpectedrisktohealth.MRDLGsdonotreectthebenetsoftheuseofdisinfectantstocontrolmicrobialcontaminants. Partspermillion(ppm)orMilligramsperliter(mg/l)onepartbyweightofanalyteto1millionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Partsperbillion(ppb)orMicrogramsperliter(g/l)onepartbyweightofanalyteto1billionpartsbyweightofthewatersample. Picocurieperliter(pCi/L)-measureoftheradioactivityinwater InitialDistributionSystemEvaluation(IDSE):AnimportantpartoftheStage2DisinfectionByproductsRule(DBPR).eIDSEisaone-timestudyconductedbywatersystemstoidentifydistributionsystemlocationswithhighconcentrationsoftrihalomethanes(THMs)andhaloacetic acids(HAAs).WatersystemswilluseresultsfromtheIDSE,inconjunctionwiththeirStage1DBPRcompliancemonitoringdata,toselectcompliancemonitoringlocationsfortheStage2DBPR. NDmeansnotdetectedandindicatesthatthesubstancewasnotfoundbylaboratoryanalysis. Ifpresent,elevatedlevelsofleadcancauseserioushealthproblems,especiallyforpregnantwomenandyoungchildren.Leadindrinkingwaterisprimarilyfrommaterialsandcomponentsassociatedwithservicelinesandhomeplumbing.CityofWewahitchkaisresponsibleforproviding highqualitydrinkingwater,butcannotcontrolthevarietyofmaterialsusedinplumbingcomponents.Whenyourwaterhasbeensittingforseveralhours,youcanminimizethepotentialforleadexposurebyushingyourtapfor30secondsto2minutesbeforeusingwaterfordrinkingor cooking.Ifyouareconcernedaboutleadinyourwater,youmaywishtohaveyourwatertested.Informationonleadindrinkingwater,testingmethods,andstepsyoucantaketominimizeexposureisavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineorathttp://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead. esourcesofdrinkingwater(bothtapwaterandbottledwater)includerivers,lakes,streams,ponds,reservoirs,springs,andwells.Aswatertravelsoverthesurfaceofthelandorthroughtheground,itdissolvesnaturallyoccurringmineralsand,insomecases,radioactivematerial,andcan pickupsubstancesresultingfromthepresenceofanimalsorfromhumanactivity. Contaminantsthatmaybepresentinsourcewaterinclude: (A)Microbialcontaminants,suchasvirusesandbacteria,whichmaycomefromsewagetreatmentplants,septicsystems,agriculturallivestockoperations,andwildlife. (B)Inorganiccontaminants,suchassaltsandmetals,whichcanbenaturally-occurringorresultfromurbanstormwaterruno,industrialordomesticwastewaterdischarges,oilandgasproduction,mining,orfarming. (C)Pesticidesandherbicides,whichmaycomefromavarietyofsourcessuchasagriculture,urbanstormwaterruno,andresidentialuses. (D)Organicchemicalcontaminants,includingsyntheticandvolatileorganicchemicals,whichareby-productsofindustrialprocessesandpetroleumproduction,andcanalsocomefromgasstations,urbanstormwaterruno,andsepticsystems. (E)Radioactivecontaminants,whichcanbenaturallyoccurringorbetheresultofoilandgasproductionandminingactivities. Inordertoensurethattapwaterissafetodrink,theEPAprescribesregulations,whichlimittheamountofcertaincontaminantsinwaterprovidedbypublicwatersystems.eFoodandDrugAdministration(FDA)regulationsestablishlimitsforcontaminantsinbottledwater,whichmust providethesameprotectionforpublichealth. Drinkingwater,includingbottledwater,mayreasonablybeexpectedtocontainatleastsmallamountsofsomecontaminants.epresenceofcontaminantsdoesnotnecessarilyindicatethatthewaterposesahealthrisk.Moreinformationaboutcontaminantsandpotentialhealtheectscan beobtainedbycallingtheEnvironmentalProtectionAgencysSafeDrinkingWaterHotlineat1-800-426-4791. ankyouforallowingustocontinueprovidingyourfamilywithclean,qualitywaterthisyear.Inordertomaintainasafeanddependablewatersupply,wesometimesneedtomakeimprovementsthatwillbenetallofourcustomers.eseimprovementsaresometimesreectedasrate structureadjustments.ankyouforunderstanding. Somepeoplemaybemorevulnerabletocontaminantsindrinkingwaterthanthegeneralpopulation.Immuno-compromisedpersonssuchaspersonswithcancerundergoingchemotherapy,personswhohaveundergoneorgantransplants,peoplewithHIV/AIDSorotherimmunesystem disorders,someelderly,andinfantscanbeparticularlyatriskfrominfections.esepeopleshouldseekadviceaboutdrinkingwaterfromtheirhealthcareproviders.EPA/CDCguidelinesonappropriatemeanstolessentheriskofinfectionbyCryptosporidiumandothermicrobiological contaminantsareavailablefromtheSafeDrinkingWaterHotline(800-426-4791). -WeatCityofWewahitchkawouldlikeyoutounderstandtheeortswemaketocontinuallyimprovethewatertreatmentprocessandprotectourwaterresources.Wearecommittedtoinsuringthequalityofyourwater.Ifyouhaveanyquestionsorconcernsabouttheinformationprovided, pleasefeelfreetocallanyofthenumberslisted.

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Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Besides money whats the most common reward employers give their workers? Weekend getaway, Discounts, Lunch, Afternoon off 2) 73 percent of women are more apt to marry a man who has what? Drivers license, Tattoo, Home, Pet 3) Whats the a.k.a. of Donald Ducks sister, Della Thelma Duck? Ductella, Dumbella, Thelmaletta, Thelmor 4) Where is Americas No. 1 bus destination? Branson, Las Vegas, Hollywood, Area 51 5) The average guy will lie how many times on the rst date? 1, 3, 6, 9 6) Surete Nationale is the French equivalent of our? NASA, FBI, NRA, Library of Congress 7) From a classic Brady Bunch, what game did Alice trip over, spraining her ankle? Chinese Checkers, Scrabble, Monopoly, Life 8) Who entered the country music charts for the rst time with Cry Cry Cry? Johnny Cash, Kenny Chesney, Willie Nelson, George Strait 9) Who was the original choice to play Lamont on TVs Sanford and Son? Cleavon Little, Richard Pryor, Flip Wilson, Bill Cosby 10) Until rubber erasers were invented, what did writers commonly use? Flour, Bread crumbs, Saliva, Lemon juice 11) What product was introduced in the colors of steel blue and chrome? Tupperware, Velcro, Frisbee, Duct tape 12) Kellys Eye is sometimes referred to as what number on a dartboard? 1, 3, 7, 9 13) Whats the term for the playing surface of a soccer eld? Kite, Pitch, Lume, Masa 14) If you have a desk job, you do what twice as much as one who does manual labor? Pray, Eat, Loaf, Bathroom trips ANSWERS 1) Lunch. 2) Pet. 3) Dumbella. 4) Branson. 5) 6. 6) FBI. 7) Chinese Checkers. 8) Johnny Cash. 9) Cleavon Little. 10) Bread crumbs. 11) Duct tape. 12) 1. 13) Pitch. 14) Eat. COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, May 2, 2013 BPage 1Section Centennial TRIVIAPelican Pete has a Centennial Stumper for You! ANSWER ON PAGE B6Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Everyone loves a birthday party and the residents of Port St. Joe are no exception. In preparation for the big 100, Mayor Mel Magidson appointed several committee members late last year to plan out a series of events that would take place on and around July rst, the of cial day that the town became incorporated in 1913. The committees came up with events to entertain the town and promote the history that would involve enthrall longtime residents and newcomers alike. The Music through the Years Music Festival at George Core Park will be the rst of several events leading up to the centennial celebration to help raise funds for the festivities to come. The concert, which will feature six bands of different genres, will also mark the third reunion of the hit 1970s band, The Villagers, in 15 years. The concert was coordinated by a music committee and will take place on Saturday, May 11. Food and beverages will be sold on-site. Additional fundraisers in the planning stages include a sh fry and a restaurant tasting. City Auditor and Clerk, Charlotte Pierce and Patti Blaylock of Sunset Coastal Grill have been busy planning a parade that will open the celebration on June 28 by cruising down Reid Avenue. Floats will feature well-known community members for PSJs past and present. The parade route would end at George Core Park where locals would be treated by a light show, currently being planned by Tim Nelson, Anna Duren and Jennifer Jenkins. Over the weekend, the City Commons will be abuzz with an art fair joining the regular farmers market as local artists set up to sell their wares and share inspiration with the community. The event is being orchestrated by John Parker. Nelson and Dana Boyer of Boyer Signs are working with the St. Joseph Historical Society to create a Timeline Wall to be on display for the duration of the celebration. Using old photos scanned at recent events, the group has collected and is working to chronologically organize the images to show the past and present of Port St. Joe. The wall will stand 30 feet long and seven feet tall, displaying the towns heritage as far back to 1913 as possible. The timeline photos will also be collected into a book printed speci cally for the event and available for purchase during the festivities. Parker and the photo committee are hard at work on the details. To help residents and visitors get into the centennial mood, Steve Kerigan and Boyer are collecting vintage artwork, relative to the community, to hang in the windows of vacant buildings in the downtown area. These works will show off the deep artistic roots of Port St. Joe and entertain and By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Relay for Life celebrated those who survived the ght against cancer and those who continue to ght. Held at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football eld, the event brought the relay total to just over $39,500 for the year. The funds will be donated to the American Cancer Society. On the beautiful Friday afternoon, the Relay started as the colors were posted by the NJROTC students from the high school and the national anthem sung by Lisa Keels. The announcers for the relay, Event Chair Kim Kurnitsky and Jera Horton welcomed everyone and thanked the community for their outpouring of support. Cancer survivor Amy Nobles took to the stage and shared the story of her year-and-a-half battle with Hodgkins Lymphoma. She hopes to soon be certi ed cancer-free. Each Relay for Life event is made up of fundraising teams who sell goods and provide entertainment while a member from each must walk around a track for 18 hours, swapping out members as needed to keep someone moving at all times. Around the By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Drivers in Port St. Joe last week noticed a long line of bicyclists along the picturesque strip. These bikers were 18 members of the Sumter Landing Bicycle Club and most of them were enjoying their rst visit to the Forgotten Coast. The 340-member group is based out of The Villages, an active retirement community in central Florida with more than 85,000 residents. Port St. Joe was just gorgeous, said Dave Taylor, the clubs president. The people were very nice. Taylor said that the group rides together four times a week, usually bringing over 200 members wherever they go. Several times a year the group organizes an away ride where they bike 60 miles a day, and stop at major tourist destinations along the way. For this years ride, dubbed the Forgotten Florida Tour, the group started at a Best Western Hotel in Crawfordville and spent four days visiting sites in St. George Island, Apalachicola, Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. The bikers were followed by two vehicles carrying spouses, suitcases and emergency equipment and ended their rst leg at the Wakulla State Park Lodge where they were joined by Get ready to party like its 1913 JOE MIZERECK | Special to The StarMembers of the Sumter Landing Bicycle Club rode through Port St. Joe last week on its Forgotten Florida Tour. TOUR DE JOESee TOUR B6Forgotten Florida tour comes through Port St. Joe BeachSee 1913 B6WES LOCHER | The StarMayor Mel Magidson prepares for the centennial celebration by picking up the rst of the commemorative coins. St. Joe Relay for Life raises $40,000What year do you think this photograph of two ladies strolling on the boardwalk in front of the Port Inn was taken? a) 1902, b) 1912, c) 1922, d) 1932. WES LOCHER | The StarThe rst lap of the relay belong to cancer survivors at the Port St. Joe Relay for Life.Cancer survivors celebrated during Relay for Life See RELAY B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013Star Staff ReportThe Panhandle Writers will hold a book signing at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse Gift Shop from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET May 11. Participants can meet authors Sandra Bass Joines, Marlene Womack, Corinda Pitts Marsh, Beverly Mount-Douds and Dawn Evans Radford. Check out all their books and other local stories pertaining to this area and by authors in the Florida Panhandle. The gift shop is at 155 Capt. Freds Place (the old Maddox House), Port St. Joe, next door to the Welcome Center in Port St. Joe. CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget WEEKPET St.JosephBayHumaneSocietyWewouldliketothankallofourvolunteersthatshowed upforourappreciationdaycelebration.Withtheirhelp wewereabletoplace2adultscatsfreeofcharge.Weare celebratingthisweekwithaCincodeMeowfiestaatthe shelterMay2nd-7th.Anyvettedcatover5mo.willhave theiradoptionfeewaivedtoanapprovedhome.Catslike thewonderfulkittyGreg,shownabovewillbefreetoan approvedhome.Topre-qualifyfilloutanapplicationonline atwww.sjbhumanesociety.org. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucould fosterormakeaDonation.AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHS willbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend. hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat 850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety. orgWerequireallpotentialadopterstocompleteanapplicationform.Adoptionfeesincludeour costofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! FaithsThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectlytosupportthe animalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreet inPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyoualltheresoon! www.sjbhumanesociety.org Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet, pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter.FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety 2092215 FREE SPAY/NEUTERFixingyourpet saveslives! St.JosephBayHumane SocietyisofferingFREE Spay/Neuterforthepetsof GulfCountyONLY Millionsofhealthy,adoptablecatsanddogsareeuthanizedeach yearsimplybecausetherearenotenoughhomesforthemall. CALL:8502271103ORPICKUPANAPPLICATIONAT100710THST.,PORTST.JOE,FL SocietySpecial to The StarThe Artery Studio will open its doors to the public this weekend for a Spring Art Sale and Open House. The works of 19 artists will be on sale, including pottery, jewelry, stained glass, paintings, notecards, mosaics, driftwood art and more. The sale will take place in the studio, 214 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Saturday, May 4. A Preview Party from 6-8 p.m. Friday will give people the opportunity to meet and mingle with the artists. Many of the participating artists make their work right at The Artery with other area artists taking part as well. With Mothers Day right around the corner, all of the artists have included work that would make unique gift items and are priced accordingly. With this in mind, several of the artists each produced hand-made or hand-decorated ower pots especially for this sale, and there will be a small selection of plants available for purchase as well. The Artery is a working art studio that is open to the public for classes and drop-in art activities. The studio will be transformed for the sale, but underneath it all, Youll get a glimpse of the fun and funky atmosphere here, owner Leslie Wentzell said. Wentzell is a clay artist, so there is a strong emphasis on pottery in the studio, but she also brings in other artists to teach painting classes and other mediums. Just as important as the art experiences here at The Artery is the sense of community and fellowship, Wentzell said. Seeing the studio, and more importantly, meeting the people who come here to be creative is the reason we want to open our doors for an event like this. For more information, call Wentzell at 2275741 or visit www. ArteryStudio.com. Callie Clayton turned 2Covered in cake and icing, You smile from ear to ear. Two candles celebrate Our joy of your second year. We sing Happy Birthday And you play with the wrapping and bows We are amazed at how you have touched our lives Just two years ago. Happy Birthday Callie! We love you! Callie Clayton turned 2 on April 25, 2013. She celebrated her birthday with a Carnivalthemed party with her family and friends. Callie is the daughter of Jamie and Mary Clayton; granddaughter of Keith and Debbie Ford, and Sam Sr. and Jeannette Amerson; and the niece to Sam Jr. Amerson and Jeremy Owens. Special to The Star Kemp Family ReunionThe 53rd Kemp Family Reunion will be Sunday, May 5. All family and friends, please come and enjoy fellowship and food. We will draw names for prizes. We will meet at the Kemp Cemetery off of State 22, seven miles from Wewahitchka. All family, please bring old family pictures. We will eat at 12:45 p.m. CT, but come early if you can. Cinco de Mayo fundraiserThe St. Joseph Bay Humane Society will have a Cinco de Mayo Mexican esta from 5-8 p.m. ET on Cuando Sunday, May 5, at Barrier Dunes at the end of Cape San Blas Road. For $20, enjoy fun and food, with rafes, margaritas, sangria, Mexican beer, wine and bottled water. Mexican attire optional. Proceeds benet the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Purchase tickets at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, Scallop Cove BP or call 628-1013.Amateur radio license examsHam it up! Get on the air! Enter the exciting world of amateur radio. Communicate with people around the world. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will give licensing exams at 10 a.m. ET May 11 at the Gulf County Emergency Operations Center behind the County Courthouse. Get your initial license or upgrade a present license. For registration, details and/or assistance, call Cecil Tillis at 648-8251.Special to The StarThe Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizens Award luncheon was April 24 at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. The Good Citizens from the area schools are Kassandra Marie Favre of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, Shelby Anna Wood of Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School and Christina Michelle Collins of Franklin County High School. After the luncheon, the students read their essays, Our American Heritage and our Responsibility to Preserve It. The Good Citizen Award is given annually to a member of each senior class in Gulf and Franklin counties and is chosen by faculty and students on a merit basis. The student selected must have the qualities of dependability, service, leadership and patriotism. The Good Citizens are presented with a certicate and a DAR pen at the luncheon and will receive a scholarship at graduation or Awards Day at their schools. WES LOc C HEr R | The StarThe recipients of the Good Citizens Award are Christina Collins, Shelby Wood and Kassandra Favre.3 earn DAR Good Citizen Awards Happy BIrR THDaA Y Panhandle Writers coming to Port St. JoeThe Artery to host spring art sale, Open House Society BrRIEfFS

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The Star| B3Thursday, May 2, 2013 TheParadeofHomesisanannualevent featuringacollectionofbrandnewhomes builtbyBayCountysnestbuilders. ThehomesspaneverypartofBayCounty andcoverawiderangeofpricesfrom highlyaordabletoluxurycustomhomes. 21stAnnualTrinityEpiscopalChurchTicketPre-sale$20;DayofTour$25;Lunch$12;Symposium$75 Forinformationandticketscontact TrinityEpiscopalChurch850-653-9550or ApalachicolaBayChamber850-653-9419 www.apalachicolahistorichometour.org HistoricApalachicola Home&GardenTourMay3-4,2013Friday,May3PreservationSymposium 8:30am-4:30pm PublicPlaces,PrivateSpaces:AGardenSymposium EveningService 5:30pm Reception6pm;Lecture6:30pmSaturday,May4Tour 10am-4pm SealedBidAuction 10am-2pm ParishHallLunch 11am-2pm RobertC. BrunerAttorneyPersonal&Business BankruptcyOver30YearsLegalExperienceOfcelocatedat:19IslandDrive,Eastpoint,FL850-670-3030Weareadebtreliefagency.Wecanhelppeoplele bankruptcyreliefundertheU.S.BankruptcyCode. Thehiringofalawyerisanimportantdecisionthat shouldnotbebasedsolelyuponadvertisements.Before youdecide,askustosendyoufreewritteninformation aboutourqualicationsandexperience. ApalachicolaBay AnimalClinicProudlyannouncestheadditionofDr.AlisonJennarttoourpractice SmallAnimalMedicine,Surgery andDentistry,LaserSurgery, DiagnosticUltrasound,Nutrition, ParasiteControl,Boarding, Bathing,PetCareSupplies,Hills ScienceDiet,WellnessPrograms187Highway98EastpointCall850-670-8306foranappointment! HoursMonday-Friday 7:30-5:30 Special to The StarDeveloping a strong foundation with the FCS curriculum creates a bridge that helps students obtain a better understanding of written language. Phonics can help students break down words with certain sounds, and children who can sound out a word have an enormous advantage when reading. This skill branches into all academics and gives students the tools to succeed. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a good reader. Open enrollment for new students has begun for the 2013-14 school year. Class sizes are limited, so early registration is recommended. Call 229-6707 or visit www. FaithChristianPSJ.net for more information. School NewsSpecial to The StarFCAT/EOC testing: Algebra 1 EOC is scheduled for May 7. Standardized testing is concluded with the Geometry EOC scheduled for May 14. NJROTC News: The NJROTC will hold a Change of Command and Awards Ceremony at 6 p.m. ET May 9 in the commons area. Next years staff will be installed, and outgoing seniors will be honored for their performance throughout their high school careers. Shark Bites: Anyone interested in receiving Shark Bites our weekly schedule of events, please email LCDR Marty Jarosz at mjarosz@ gulf.k12.,.us and we will put you on the list. Spring football: Spring football has begun. Support our Tiger Shark Gridders as they compete in the annual Spring Jamboree 7 p.m. ET May 16 against the Seahawks of Franklin County and the Gators of Wewahitchka. GO TIGER SHARKS! Drama performance: Under the direction of Ann Comforter, the drama students will present Alice in Wonderland on May 13 in the commons area. Slip down the Rabbit Hole, and enjoy the timeless story of a young girls adventures behind the Looking Glass. PSJHS Spring Art Show: Come to Sacred Heart Hospital in Port St Joe to view the many and varied art works of our high school students from 6-8 p.m. ET May 2. Senior News: This years Senior Trip to Orlando will be May 3-5. Our seniors will be leaving early Friday morning and will return Sunday. A fun time is scheduled for all. Our seniors last day of ofcial classes will be May 15. A baccalaureate will be held for all seniors at 5:30 p.m. ET May 22 in the gymnasium. Port St. Joe Junior-Senior High School will hold commencement exercises for the Senior Class of 2013 at 7 p.m. ET May 23. Last day for underclassmen: The last day of classes for all Port St Joe Junior-Senior High School underclassmen will be May 24. By AUbBREY CLaA YtTON and Ja ADEN MOsSELYSpecial to The Star Wewahitchka Elementary School fthgrade scientists have been exploring, observing, constructing and testing air-pressured rockets and building and programming their Lego Mindstorm robots. This club brings together students who are excited about science, technology, engineering and math. As an added bonus, students at WES have been participating in NASA Explorer Schools NASAs Design Challenges. The club is an extension of the regular curriculum; however, being a member of NASA Explorer Schools program gives WES students a deeper understanding of designing, creating and testing our masterpieces. It also opens up doors for students to work with other fth-graders around the United States. It is exciting watching young minds at work. The environment is one where it is OK if your model doesnt y straight or the parachute doesnt open properly. Each scientist offers his opinion or skill to assist in correcting the design aw. Students also discuss constraints of their challenges and help each other gure out how to overcome these obstacles. Young people also explore their strengths and weakness they bring to the projects. Teamwork is the key to making this club successful. CorrectORRECTIonalONAL offOFFIcerCER GradRADUatATIonONSpec PEC Ial AL toTO theTHE Star TARGulf Coast State College will be graduating the Correctional Ofcer Basic Standards Class 219 at 7 p.m. ET May 9 at the Gulf/Franklin campus. The students wish to invite family and friends to join them in the graduating ceremony. DaAZZlLInNG dolphDOLPHInsNSSpec PEC Ial AL toTO theTHE starSTARFront row: Jackson Buckner, Hunter Ard and Jamicia Glen. Back row: Ali Evans, Luke Lentz, Jackson Vaughn, Tristan Butler, Micaela Fedd and Jacob Kennedy. The Lions TaleWES club explores Rockets, Rovers and Robots StTUdentsDENTS paPAIntNT forFOR CoOVenantENANT HospOSPIceCESpec PEC Ial AL toTO The HE Star TAREach year, Debbie Coles art classes at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School have created something for the annual Covenant Hospice Mask Parade gala during the 11 years the event has been held. This years theme was Under the Sea, and the class painted a coral reef scene. Shown here are Bree Scruggs and Alexa Allison with the vignette they painted in art class. FCS students get intro to phonics

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor www.fbcpsj.org www.fbcpsj.org SUNDAY:WORSHIPATSUNSETPARK8AMCST 10:30AMCSTONTHE2NDSUNDAYOFTHEMONTH SUNDAY:BIBLECLASS9:30AMCST MONDAY:LIFETREECAF7PMCST TUESDAY:MENSBIBLESTUDY6:30PMCST THURSDAY:WOMENSBIBLESTUDY5PMCST1602Hwy98,MexicoBeach,FL(850)648.1151www.livingwateratthebeach.com SUNDAY:SundaySchool-9:15 MorningWorship-10:30 EveningWorship-5:00 1601LongAvePortStJoe,FL32456(850)229-8691WEDNESDAY:FamilyDinner-5:30 PrayerMeeting-6:30 StudentMinistry-6:30ChildrensMinistry/Choir-6:30AdultChoir-7:30 MINISTRYSCHEDULE COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 Lewis Buddy Franklin Hefner, 83, of Eastpoint passed away April 29, 2013. He was preceded in death by his sons, Dennis F. Hefner and S.L. Pruitt. Mr. Hefner is survived by his wife of 48 years, Hazel Rainey Hefner; daughters, Jacki Hefner and son, LiL Buddy of Eastpoint and Nola Stout of Arizona; and sons Andrew C. Pruitt of Marietta, Ga., John W. Pruitt of North Georgia and William G Hefner of Ga.; 18 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; one sister, Ellen Fox of Washburn, Tenn.; and many nieces and nephews. The family wishes to thank all of their friends and family for all the prayers and support. In lieu of owers, those who wish may make donations to Covenant House Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road Suite 150, Tallahassee, FL 32308. A Memorial service will be held at a later time in Georgia. Local services are provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Lewis Buddy Franklin HefnerGraveside services for Delores Faye Crosby Clark, 82, of Port St. Joe, Fla., (formerly of Cairo, Ga.) were held at 2 p.m. ET Sunday, April 28, 2013, in Greenwood Cemetery, Cairo, Ga. Dr. Ron McCaskill of ciated. Mrs. Clark passed away on Friday, April 26, 2013, at The Bridge of Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe, Fla. Mrs. Clark was born on June 23, 1930, in Berlin, Ga., to the late Ralph and Evelyn Ruth Tidd Crosby. On Oct. 29, 1950, she married E. Lamar Clark. Mr. Clark preceded her in death on Sept. 9, 2002. She was a retired registered nurse, having worked at Grady General Hospital, Archbold Hospital and Southwestern State Hospital. She was a member of Cairo First Baptist Church. Survivors include a daughter and son-in-law, Karen and Ken Collins of Port St. Joe, Fla.; granddaughter, Tessa C. and Jim Anderson of Port St. Joe, Fla.; grandsons, Simon Collins and anc, Kristen Mackery, of Jacksonville, Fla., and Terrell and Susan Collins of Cedar Hill, Tenn.; great-granddaughters, Samantha Anderson of Port St. Joe, Fla., and Sadie Collins of Cedar Hill, Tenn.; greatgrandsons, Brett Collins and Gage Collins of Cedar Hill, Tenn.; and a brother, Earl Lynwood Crosby (Martha) of Baton Rouge, La. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St, Panama City, FL 32405. The family received friends at Clark Funeral Home from 1-2 p.m. ET Sunday. Guests may sign the online register at www. clarkfuneral.com. Delores Faye Crosby ClarkJune 23, 1930 April 26, 2013 Andy L. Stewart, 51, of Wewahitchka, passed away Thursday afternoon in a Panama City hospital. He was a lifelong resident of Wewahitchka and he worked at Taunton Truss Co. and later Eastern Marine. He was a loving father and son. He was preceded in death by his father, Vernon Stewart, and his sister Dinah Stewart. Survivors are his mother, Christina Stewart of Wewahitchka; two daughters, Hannah Stewart and Elizabeth Stewart of Apalachicola; one sister, Linda Stewart; one brother, Eric Stewart (Stacy), all of Wewahitchka; a niece, Crystal Ake (Buddy); and a nephew, Joseph Shiver. Graveside services were at 2 p.m. CT Sunday, April 27, 2013, at Roberts Cemetery in Wewahitchka with the Rev. Dallas Presley of ciating. Interment followed. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Andy L. StewartSpecial to The StarThe issue of racism will be explored at Lifetree Caf at 7 p.m. CT Monday, May 6. The program, titled The Black and White Truth About Racism: Will We Ever Live in a Colorblind World? features an exclusive lmed interview with Daryl Davis, a black man who in ltrated the Ku Klux Klan. Davis said, I wanted to question those people who would lynch me for no other reason than the color of my skin, Davis said. Why do you hate me when you dont even know me? Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. Special to The StarRevival at Howard Creek Baptist Howard Creek Baptist Church is having a revival at 7 p.m. May 10, 7 p.m. May 11 and 11 a.m. May 12 with lunch after the service. The guest speaker will be Dave Fernandez. The church is at 7230 Doc Whit eld Road, Howard Creek. Matron Auxiliary anniversary The Matron Auxiliary of Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will celebrate its anniversary at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 5. The community is cordially invited to come out for this worshipful service. The church is at 259 Ave. D. THE TRUTH WILL SET YOU FREEThe truth will set you free, if only you believe. Ive often wondered why its turned down, when by accepting your sins He would relieve. He made the world and all there in, Why cant you believe that Hed die for your sin? He not only died, He arose the third day. If youre making plans for heaven, He is the only way. Hell not beg or plead; you have to ask Him in. The truth is then; Hell forgive all your sin. You are on your way to heaven, so let everyone know. Thats what its all about; He wants all of us to go.Billy JohnsonThursday, May 2, 2013 Obituaries Lifetree Caf to discuss racism Faith BRIEFS 850-648-3000 www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, May 2, 2013 THANKYOUFORYOURSUPPORTOVERTHELASTTWO YEARS.IHAVEENJOYEDSERVINGYOUANDLOOK FORWARDTOANOTHERTWOYEARSINOFFICE.INEEDYOURVOTEAGAINONMay14th!EARLYVOTINGISMAY4TH-11THATTHESUPERVISOROFELECTIONSOFFICE 9:00AMUNTIL5:00PMETMONDAY-SATURDAYPaidforandApprovedbyJamesBoKnowsPattersonforCityCommissionerGroupII RE-ELECTJAMESBOKNOWSPATTERSONFORCITYCOMMISSIONER GROUPIIPD.POL.ADAManYouKnow,AManYouCanTrust Special to The StarThe Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Reserve are announcing this new program to increase awareness of and participation in the annual sea turtle nesting season. One of the objects of the program is to provide nancial assistance to support the sea turtle program. Sea turtle nesting season begins in mid-May and lasts through October. Loggerhead turtles are the species most often found on St. Vincent Island. Female Loggerhead sea turtles lay their eggs along the gulf side beaches of St. Vincent. Each nest contains over 100 eggs. Unfortunately, there are quite a few predators on the island that disturb the nests and destroy the eggs. The main predators are feral hogs and raccoons. Conrmed nests, those nests that actually contain eggs, need protection from the predators. Wire cages are placed over the conrmed nests to discourage the predators. In most cases, these cages do a very good job. The gulf side beaches of the island are patrolled several times each week by volunteers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife staff. The number of patrols per week depends on stafng levels. The beaches are patrolled for evidence of turtle activity (crawls). The crawls are examined to determine the species of sea turtle making the crawl and whether the turtle actually made a nest. The nests are examined to determine if there are eggs present, marked, documented, and GPS location noted. All nests are monitored during the nesting season and accurate records kept. This is done so that complete survey data can be kept and used to determine nesting trends, etc. The Supporters group is requesting a tax-deductible donation of $25 to adopt a specic sea turtle nest. This donation applies to one nest per nesting season. Donors will receive an adoption certicate, a photo of the nest, and a complete activity report at the end of the nesting season. All donors will be recognized in the Supporters newsletter. The $25 donation will help pay for the cost of the wire cages, supplies, and fuel for the patrol vehicles. Your support of this project will be greatly appreciated by the mother sea turtles, volunteers, staff, and sea turtle lovers everywhere. For more information on this program, email at supportstvin@hotmail.com or call 229-6735. A beautiful lawn can add substantial value to your home. While providing an attractive setting for landscape ornamentals, a good lawn will reduce weed growth and prevent erosion. Selecting the proper grass for your specic location is a basic key to attaining these goals. Five lawngrasses are commonly grown in Florida. Saint Augustine, Bahia, Centipede, Zoyia are most popular, though carpet is used less often. In this article well offer some facts which could help you choose the species that would be best for your home site. My information was provided by J. Bryan Unruh, associate center director and professor, West Florida Research and Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Jay, Fla. The most important thing to consider when selecting a lawngrass is the compatibility of that grass with the soil, climate, and growing conditions of your specic area. For example, if you live along the coast, you should plant a salt tolerant grass, such as Saint Augustine. If you try to grow Centipede or Bahia, youre asking for trouble. You might be able to establish these grasses in a coastal location, but only with considerable expenditures of time and money. Likewise, if you need a grass for a shaded lawn, you should plant Saint Augustine or Bahia, not Bermuda, which requires full sun. After you decide which lawngrasses will grow well in your area, you should choose one that youll be able to manage properly. Now lawngrass is maintenance free, but some types do require more care than others. For example, Bermuda produces the most beautiful lawns, but only if its heavily fertilized, frequently mowed, and kept free of pests and diseases. If you cant provide such high maintenance, youd be wise to plant a low care grass, such as Bahia, or Centipede. Saint Augustine is not difcult to maintain, but thatch and chinch bugs are common problems. The amount of water a particular grass requires is another consideration. Bahia has excellent drought tolerance Saint Augustine ranks second and Centipede ranks third. In recent year, dramatic improvements in Zoysia grass have been made by turfgrass breeders. These improvements include insect resistance, accelerated establishment, and overall performance. Zoyiagrasses are adapted to a variety of soil types and have good tolerance to shade, salt, and trafc. They provide and extremely dense sod that resist weed invasion, but certain pest can be problematic. Of all Florida lawngrasses, Bahia is mot resistant to pests. Its the best choice for landscapes heavily infested with nematodes. Saint Augustine also has good nematode tolerance. But, as we said, chinch bugs are a serious threat to this grass. While it may be severely damaged by nematodes, centipede has few other pest problems, providing it is not fertilized to heavily. Bermuda is plagued by many problems, in fact, its particularly impossible to grow this grass without a continuous control program to cope with nematodes, insects, and diseases. As we pointed out in the beginning, a number of good lawngrasses grow well in Florida. But, each has certain advantages and disadvantages, as well as specic cultural requirement. Area climate, landscape soil type, amount of home site shade and sun, and the degree of trafc by people and pets are important considerations. You should also evaluate the expenditure of time, effort, and money that will be required to keep a particular grass healthy and attractive. For more information on choosing a lawngrass, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas.u.edu or edis.ifas.u.edu.Special to The StarSt. Joseph Peninsula is host to one of the highest densities of nesting sea turtles in the Florida Panhandle. St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol volunteers assist in the continued monitoring of sea turtle nesting activity on St. Joseph Peninsula to aid in the survival of these threatened and endangered species. From May 1 through Oct. 31, volunteers survey six miles of beach daily, looking for signs of nesting and hatching activity. Volunteers identify nests, post nesting signs and protect the nests from predators, and collect and submit data on nesting activity. During hatching season, nests are checked for signs of emergence and then excavated to record hatching success. Volunteers also rescue turtles that become disoriented after hatching. Dedicated volunteers are critical to the success of this monitoring program, and the St. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol needs your help. Volunteers must be able to: commit to surveying shortly after sunrise at least one day a week; walk two to four miles on the beach if necessary; accurately collect and record data; and deal effectively with the public to increase awareness about sea turtles and the human impacts on them. We need your help to protect local sea turtles! If you are interested in volunteering for Turtle Patrol, please contact Jessica McKenzie for more information: call 205-910-4717 or email sjpturtlepatrol@gmail.com. Things everyone can do to help sea turtles: Never disturb a nesting female, nests or emerging hatchlings. Sea turtles can get disoriented by beachfront lighting. Be sure to shield indoor lights and turn off outdoor lights after dark. Fires and reworks can also disorient sea turtles. Avoid these activities on beaches during nesting season. Recreational equipment left on beaches overnight can block or ensnare nesting sea turtles and their hatchlings. Make sure to remove all equipment from the beach each night. Report sea turtle violations, injured or stranded turtles or disoriented hatchlings to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at 888-404-FWCC. By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com North Florida Child Developments north end facility hosted its rst Celebrity Read-A-Thon last Wednesday. Local celebrities were invited to read to the children, aged zero through ve and could bring their own book or have a class favorite supplied. Celebrity guests included Wewahitchka author Michael Lister, Panama City news anchor Amy Hoyt and Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison. The event, coordinated by Center Manager Gina Crane, was used to promote early literacy and language enrichment in preschool children. If we get them into reading now, it goes with them as they grow, Crane said. In addition to calling on local celebrities to come for story time, the event allowed students to see and interact with new people. The North Florida Child Development Center in Wewahitchka has more than 40 students and three classrooms enjoyed hearing their favorite stories. It was great, said Hoyt of the experience after she nished her reading of the folk tale, The Little Red Hen, the moral of which encourages contribution and collaboration. Much to the delight of the class, Sheriff Harrison came prepared with the Dr. Seuss classic, Green Eggs and Ham, which he recited condently. I have three kids of my own, he said. Ive had lots of practice. Award-winning novelist Lister read P.D. Eastmans Are You My Mother? utilizing the participation of the energetic class to provide the sounds of the dogs, cats and birds within the story. They loved the story and said it was their favorite, Lister said. They knew what was coming. Crane plans to continue the Read-A-Thon as a monthly event at the NFCD Center. ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorTips for choosing a lawngrassProgram increases sea turtle awarenessSt. Joseph Peninsula Turtle Patrol seeks volunteers WES LL OCHEr R | The StarCelebrity guests at the Read-A-Thon included Michael Lister, Amy Hoyt and Mike Harrison.Local celebrities participate in rst NFCD read-a-thon

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LocalThursday, May 2, 2013 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 Trades&ServicesCALLTODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 StumpGrinder Stump Grinder 4514617 FromAtoZ850-340-0756 GregsHandymanService &LawnMaintenance CheckoutmyworkonFacebook!4514430 JOESLAWNCARE IFITSINYOURYARDLETJOETAKECAREOFITFULLLAWNSERVICES,TREETRIMMINGANDREMOVALALSOCLEANGUTTERSANDIRRIGATIONINSTILLATION,PLANTINGANDBEDDINGAVAILABLECALLJOE8503230741OREMAILJOES_LAWNYAHOO.COM Mexico Beach, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass, Port St. Joe & Surrounding Areas850-648-3000www.BuyTheForgottenCoast.net 4514634 1913 from page B1 TOUR from page B120 more members of the club before continuing on to St. Marks and Tallahassee. The trip was organized by ride leader Sandy Larson, who mapped the course and made accommodations. A fan of long rides, she made the trek from San Diego to St. Augustine on two wheels along with trips from Maine to Florida and across New Zealand. Most residents of The Villages come from other places and theyre not familiar with the Florida coast, said Larson, who has lived in the Sunshine State for 13 years. It was a great experience and we had a fun time riding through. Larson and her husband had driven their RV through the area over the years and she was eager to share the Forgotten Coast with her bicycle buddies. Five-year member of the club Larry Peart said that Port St. Joe was a delight to visit and praised local motorists for being considerate. Why do they do it? Bicycling is good for you, physically, said Taylor. Its fun to do and gives you a true feeling of independence. inspire passersby. The commemorative centennial coin which was produced to raise funds for the upcoming celebration ofcially went on sale last week. The token is available for sale at Portside Trading Company, The No Name Caf, Cadence Bank, Josephs Cottage and City Hall. The cost is $15 and the coin comes with a velvet bag for storage. Clarence Monette is coordinating the details of a time capsule that will soon be under construction at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. The capsule will then be lled with mementos created by local students or donated by businesses and buried in the City Commons on July rst. Monette has also been organizing a basketball game to take place at the Washington Gym that will feature athletes of note from the past and present. Not to be left out, Magidson has prepared several speeches about Port St. Joe. He will speak at several of the events throughout the celebration. The Centennial Celebration will culminate on Thursday, July 4 with the annual reworks display, closing out the festivities with a bang. A website for the week-long was created by Rick Lamberson at the Bluewater iNet Group and features a schedule of the events, historic photos and a list of the centennial celebration sponsors. For more information on how to get involved or donate funds, visit www. psjcentennialcelebration. com. 1922 Trivia ANSWERperimeter of the track teams sold goodies and had game to raise additional money for the American Cancer Society. As is tradition with any Relay for Life, a group of local cancer survivors and their caregivers were on hand to take the rst journey around the track in a Survivors Lap. Music for the event was provided by local band, Thirty-Three. The traditional Luminaria ceremony took place at 9 p.m. Candles were lit inside of white paper bags, decorated to honor the memories of loved ones who lost the ght to cancer and those who continue to ght. Teams at the event included Beach Realty, Beat It, Bridge At Bay Saint Joe, Cadence Bank, Capital City Bank, Centennial Bank, First United Methodist Church, Gulf County Health Department, the Mexico Beach Tumor-nators, Oak Grove Church, Outlaw Cancer, Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, Port St. Joe Schools/District, Sacred Heart Lifesavers, Super Survivors, VFW Post 10069, Waswas and Zumba for a Cure. The event was sponsored by Progress Energy, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Bluewater Outriggers, Piggly Wiggly, 98 Real Estate, Buy Rite Drugs and Cathey Construction. Gulf Countys Relay for Life team had a goal of $51,000 for the year and will host additional fundraisers within the community as they work their way toward reaching it. RELAY from page B1 Wes ES LOCHer ER | The StarLeft: Survivors were treated to dinner and a beautiful relay themed cake. Right: The Survivor dinner was in the center of the track for all to see. B6 | The Star

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 2, 2013 The Star | B7 4514604JOB NOTICEe City of Port St. Joe is accepting Applications for the following positions:Part Time Summer Program Assistants and Supervisors:Duties include but not limited to: plan, implement and lead youth activities at a recreation site. Ensure all events and activities conform to appropriate safety and other rules. Ensure that facilities and equipment being used for programs or events are properly set up and maintained. Maintain the grounds and buildings for program. is is a rewarding job opportunity working with children ages 5 18 years. is position requires a criminal background investigation. Recreation experience is preferred. Closing date is May 17, 2013. Employment applications may be picked up at City Hall or they are available on line at www.cityofportstjoe.com Please submit an application to e City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, P. O. Box 278 Port St. Joe, FL 32457. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 229-8261. e City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. 4514608 JOB NOTICEe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following volunteer position: Planning and Development Review Board Member Please submit an application to e City of Port St. Joe, Attn. Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications can be found on our website cityofportstjoe.com. PDRB Members are appointed by the City Commission and meet on the second Tuesday of each month at 4:00 P.M. EST. e PDRB utilizes the Land Development Regulations and City Ordinances to review complex development requests. PDRB members must live within the City limits and/or own a business within the City limits. If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850) 2298261. e Position will close on May 17, 2013, at 5:00 P.M. EST. is is a non paid position. e City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. 90930S In The Circuit Court Of The Fourteenth Judicial Circuit In And For Gulf County, Florida Case No.: 12-205CA Prosperity Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Frank E. Bell, Ellis Yon and any unknown parties, including any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees and spouses, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants, Defenants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned case, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: EXHIBIT A A portion of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the iron pipe marking the SE Corner of the SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section 25; thence along the North R/W line of Johnson Lane, South 90 West, 377.00 feet; thence leaving said North R/W line, North 00 West, 244.38 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 90 West, 171.99 feet; thence North 00 West 158.71 feet; thence North 76 East, 176.84 feet; thence South 00 East, 200.33 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with an ingress, egress and utility easement more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southeast Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and run thence South 89 West, along the North right of way line of Johnson Lane, for a distance of 366.91 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue South 89 West, along said North right of way line for a distance of 20.00 feet; thence leaving said North right of way line run North 00 West, for a distance of 244.47 feet; thence East for a distance of 10.00 feet; thence North 00 West, for a distance of 20.00 feet; thence North 89 East, for a distance of 10.00 feet; thence South 00 East, for a distance of 264.49 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 am ET on May 23, 2013. Any person other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens claiming an interest in any surplus funds from the sale, must file a claim for said funds with the clerk of court within 60 days from the date of the sale. DATED this 26th day of April, 2013. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 2, 9, 2013 90836S IN THE CIRCUIT COURTFOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-20 PR IN RE: ESTATE OF J.D. RAYBURN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of J.D. Rayburn, deceased, whose date of death was November 8, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe, FL32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 25, 2013. Personal Representative: J.D. Rayburn II 4055 Kilmartin Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Kimberly L. King Attorney for J.D. Rayburn II Florida Bar Number: 0593011 KING & WOOD, P.A. 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104 Tallahassee, FL32308 Phone: (850)580-7711 Fax: (850)205-4501 E-Mail: kimking@king andwoodlaw.com Secondary E-Mail: eservice@kingandwoodlaw.com April 25, May 2, 2013 93265S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-00021-PR Division:________ IN RE: ESTATE OF JEAN ELAINE QUARANTA Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Jean Elaine Quaranta, deceased, whose date of death was February 3, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is April 25, 2013. Personal Representative: Jayne Bamburg 126 Gulf Coast Circle Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint. net April 25, May 2, 2013 93271S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WHITE CITY FIRE STATION RFP #1213-09 Qualified Design-Build TEAM for the design and construction of the new White City Volunteer Fire Station for the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Proposers shall be ranked per the following selection criteria: **Firms shall be limited to those certified under 489.119 F.S. as a General Contractor, Building Contractor, under 471.023 F.S. to practice engineering, under 481.219 F.S. to practice architecture. **Submittals must be spiral bound and must include the following: Letter of Transmittal Table of Contents Introduction of Firm General approach to deliver services Information regarding the firms qualifications to provide the DesignBuild services Project Team and Qualifications Experience with Metal Building design Experience with Metal Building construction Experience with Owner Direct Purchase Method of Costing/ Estimating Project Proof of Errors and Omissions Insurance for Designer Proof of Bonding Limit for Builder Florida License for Builder Florida License(s) for Designer Verification of ability to furnish payment and performance bond in the amount of contract and insurance coverage required by Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Current work load of Designer and Builder **Special attention shall be given to: Similar experience(s) in the State of Florida Engineering/ Construction experience(s), with similar facilities Experience with Civil Design, Permitting with FDEP, FDOT & NWFWMD Experience with Design-Build projects Experience of Project Team Ability of Firm to deliver project in a timely manner Availability to project site(s) (Designer and Builder) Upon selection of a Design-Build team by Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, the designer shall meet with the owner, tour the proposed site and assist in evaluating the various building size, function and budget. This phase will include schematic floor plans, site plan and evaluation of individual fire department budget. The second phase shall be as follows: **The Designer shall complete documents for each site with budget review at 30%, 60% and 90% document states. After final review, the Builder shall conduct a final cost breakdown for each site and enter into a construction contract with Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. Proposals must be submitted by 4:30 P.M. (local time) on Friday, May 10, 2013 at Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida. Proposals will be opened on Monday, May 13, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., local time at the same location. Questions to this RFP may be directed to Brad Price, Gulf County BOCC, (850) 229-6106, or via e-mail at bprice@gulfcounty-fl.gov. All questions must be submitted by May 1, 2013 and all answers will be disseminated by May 2, 2013. Please check the website at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov for any addendums which will be posted NLT May 2, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., E.T. /s/ Tan Smiley Chairman Gulf County Board of County Commissioners /s/ Rebecca Norris, Clerk April 25, May 2, 2013 93313S PUBLIC NOTICE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR INMATE COMMISSARY SERVICES RFP NO: 1213-10 The Board of County Commissioners, Gulf County, Florida (the County) is seeking proposals from qualified individuals or organizations to provide commissary services for the inmates incarcerated in the Gulf County Detention Facility, located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. RFP DEADLINE: May 10, 2013 no later than 4:30PM local time and will be opened on Monday, May 13, 2013. LATE PROPOSALS RECEIVED AFTER THE AFOREMENTIONED DEADLINE DATE, EITHER BY MAIL OR OTHERWISE, WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED AND RETURNED UNOPENED. NO FAXED, ELECTRONIC, OR ORAL PROPOSALS WILL BE ACCEPTED. To be considered, Proposer must submit an original and five (5) copies of the RFP in a sealed envelope or package, clearly marked with the Proposers name, address, and the words INMATE COMMISSARY SERVICES addressed to: Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Rm 149, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Questions may be directed to Michael Hammond, (850) 227-1124 or via email at mhammond@gulf county-fl.gov. Tynalin Smiley Chairman Rebecca Norris Clerk April 25, May 2, 2013 93413S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 12000281CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL J. ALGUESEVA, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: RHONDA ALDERMAN: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 2531 COUNTRY ROAD 381, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees. grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: A parcel of land lying and being in Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida and being a part of Lot 3, Block 3, MIDWAY PARK SUBDIVISION as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, and being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a Saint Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of said Lot 3 and run thence N89E along the North boundary of said Lot 3 for 104.16 feet to a set 1/2 iron rod and cap no. LB7137 for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue N89E along said North boundary for 210.81 feet to a found 5/8 iron rod and cap no. 4889 of the West Right-of-Way line of Lake Drive; thence S00W along said West Right-of-Way line for 209.00 feet to a found 5/8 iron rod and cap no.4889; thence leaving said West Right-of-Way line run S89W for 210.82 feet to set 1/2 inch iron rod & cap no. LB7137; thence N00E for 209.08 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to a 20 foot ingress, egress and utility easement across the North 20.00 feet thereof. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2008 Southern Homes Manufactured Home, Serial Not(s): more commonly known as: 381 N BASS DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by June 3, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this of this Court on the 22nd day of April, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of the Court GULF County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk May 2, 9, 2013 93363S PUBLIC NOTICE PORT ST. JOE REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency will receive sealed bids from any qualified company interested in providing services for the following project: Measure, Fabricate and Install Shade Cover at Dr. Joe Memorial Parking Lot Project is located at the corner of Fourth and Williams in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, and consists of measuring, fabricating, and installing canopy system consisting of two (2) kites using Commercial 95 Coolaroo Shade Sail Material on existing poles. Field measuring is required; as-built plans are not available. Bids will be received until 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time, on Thursday, May 9 and will be opened and read aloud at the PSJRA office, 150 Captain Freds Place, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. For additional information, contact Gail Alsobrook at 850-229-6899 or Gail@PSJRA.com. May 2, 2013 93423S PUBLIC NOTICE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ #: 1213-11 INMATE TELEPHONE SERVICE GULF COUNTY hereby gives notice of the opportunity to submit a response to this Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for inmate telephone service at the GULF COUNTY DETENTION FACILITY. GULF COUNTY must receive RFQ responses no later than May 17 2013 at 4:30 pm EST (Response Due Date). One (1) original and six (6) hard copies of the proposal must be delivered to Gulf County Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on or before May 17, 2013, at 4:30 p.m. local time. Bids will be opened on May 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. local time at the same location. The outside of Vendors RFQ response must be marked INMATE TELEPHONE RFQ. All proposals failing to meet the due date and time will be returned to the Vendor unopened. Fax or email copies are not acceptable. Questions to this RFQ may be directed to Lynn Lanier, Gulf County BOCC, (850) 229-6106, or via e-mail at llanier@gulf county-fl.gov. All questions must be submitted by May 8, 2013 and all answers will be disseminated by May 9, 2013. Please check the website at www.gulf county-fl.gov for any addendums which will be posted NLT May 9, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., E.T. /s/ Tan Smiley Chairman Gulf County Board of County Commissioners /s/ Rebecca Norris, Clerk May 2, 9, 2013 Your New Buddy!Male and female Teacup Yorkies, 12 wks old, potty trained, vet checked, AKC reg, shots, dewormed. Papers. $500 (862)262-1919, dbpets17@yahoo.com Text FL47546 to 56654 PSJ: 624 Gulf Aire Dr Saturday, May 4th 8:00-1:00pmYard SaleThis & That Old & New! Text FL50375 to 56654 Classified can!If youre ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership.Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects.

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B8| The Star Thursday, May 2, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS TheCallCenterManagerisdirectlyresponsibleformanagingagroupofCallCenterassociates.Responsibilities include,butarenotlimitedtothefollowing: Successfullymotivate,coachanddevelopCallCenterassociates Driveteamperformanceanddeliveroncriticalperformancemeasuresincludingteamproductivity,efficiency, andquality Fosterateamenvironmentthatpromotesthehighestlevelofservicetoallcustomers,departmentsand propertiestoensuretotalcustomer(bothexternalandinternal)satisfaction Createacollaborativeenvironmentinwhichassociates atalllevelsoftheorganizationareencouragedtovoice ideasandconcerns Deliverperformancefeedback,includingperformanceappraisals,developmentalactionplans,performance improvementplansanddisciplinaryaction Recommendpromotions,terminationsandsalaryadjustmentsforsalesassociates Facilitateeffectiveteammeetings Participateinthenewhiresalesassociateinterviewandhiringprocess Analyzereportsanddatatoimprovethecustomerexperience Demonstratestrongcommunication,p resentation,andinfluencingskills Abilitytobuildandmaintainpositiveworkingrela tionshipswithindividualsatmultiplelevels Provideexemplaryserviceandsetexpectationsofprovidingsolutionsforeveryoneyouencounter,makeiteasy forcustomerstodobusinesswithusandgiveeverycustomeranextraordinaryexperience g y y p Mustbeabletounderstandcallmatrix,setoperationa lgoalsfordepartment,teamandyourselfwithpassion andaccountabilitytostrivetoattainthem Continuouslyimproveyourselfandothersaroundyou ContributetothecompanybyprovidinggreatideasandfeedbackPlease submit resume & cover letter to:lgrimes@pcnh.com Qualications: 2+yearsofManagementwithinacallcenterandaminimumof5yearsofcallcenter experience. Proventrackrecordofachievingrevenuegoalsandgrowth. PreferredQualications: Fouryeardegree Stronganalyticalskills Basicunderstandingofsalesoperations Excellentverbalandwrittencommunicationskills Strongpeoplemanagementexperienceinacallcenterenvironment Abilitytomakequickandaccuratedecisionswhichmay,attimes,bebased onlimitedinformationandrequiremulti-tasking. Allfull-timeemployeesareeligibleforhealth&dentalinsurance, life/Ad*D/long-termdisabilityinsurance,401Kplan,andpaidtimeoff.TheNewsHeraldandHalifaxMediaGroupofNorthwestFloridaareGROWING....Wannajoinus?Wearehiringforan experiencedCallCenterManagerwithapassiontobuildandcreateanevenstrongerteamwithafunenvironment.Call Center Manager1109719 HOUSEKEEPER NEEDEDThe MainStay Suites and Port Inn are now accepting applications for housekeepers. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below. Make beds, make friends, make money. Inquire about benets package. E.O.E, D.F.W.P. Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe Fl, 324564514568 NOW HIRINGPARTTIME EVENING COOKThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time evening cook. The ideal candidate will have kitchen experience, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 BARTENDER / THERAPIST NEEDEDThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWPPort Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 4514488 Dockside Caf & Raw Bar @ PSJ Marina**Seasonal Bonus Top Pay!**NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: Kitchen Managers/Cooks Bartenders/Managers Servers/Bussers Shuckers DishwashersAPPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! Thats where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! Emerald Coast Marketplace 850-747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Calhoun County, 11636 S.E. Chipola Park Rd. Hwy 71, 6 miles N of Wewa, Thursday and Friday May 2nd and 3rd, 8am CST;Covenant Annual Springtime Yard SaleTrampoline, sofas, bedroom furniture, dining table and chairs, household items, bedding, TVs and lots more! Come in search of Treasures and you will find! Text FL50144 to 56634 Mexico Beach 211 Tennessee Dr, Friday & Saturday May 3 &4, 8am-2pm (CST)2 Family Garage SaleBig mens clothes, ladies wear, household, misc.Text FL50502 to 56654 Hunting Lease Renewal Need two members. near Port St. Joe. 2000 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $410-$510/ yr. Call John 850-227-5052 Creative/DesignGRAPHIC DESIGNER/ PRODUCTION ARTIST!GRAPHIC DESIGNER/ PRODUCTION ARTIST! Established and growing design studio/ printer/ signmaker/ publisher seeks organized, responsible individual for full-time, long-term position in Port St. Joe. Mac-based Photoshop/ Illustrator/InDesign experience a must. Signmaking and web design skills a plus. Interested parties respond with complete contact information, a brief note of introduction, and four work samples to:info@mustseemagazine.comWeb ID#: 34250581 Text FL50581 to 56654 Food Services/HospitalityKitchen Help/ DishwashersNeeded to work day and night shifts. Need cooks/ kitchen assistant. Apply: Call (850) 227-5272 before 11 am Web ID# 34248916 Text Fl48916 to 56654 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Editorial/WritingWRITER(S) NEEDED NOW!!WRITER(S) NEEDED NOW! Established and growing local interest publication has immediate assignments available for responsible, qualified writers. Interested parties respond with complete contact information, a brief note of introduction, and two work samples to:info@mustseemagazine.comWeb ID#: 34250571 Text FL50571 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityBartender / Therapist NeededThe Port Inn/Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for a part time bartender. The ideal candidate will have a thorough knowledge of liquors, beers, wines, and mixology techniques, but we are willing to train the right person. If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESIs accepting application for Inspectors Reliable, hardworking inspectors with good customer service & teamwork skills. Must have reliable transportation & work weekends. Reservationist Good written and oral communication skills, excellent customer service. Prior sales experience helpful. Must work weekends. Apply 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 8th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach, Fl for ENTRYLEVELInstaller No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid drivers license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, visit our website at www.mediacomcable.com/car eers refer to job 5607. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34249882 Text FL49882 to 56654 Medical/Health LPN or Medical Asst. FTposition available for an office nurse at Shoreline Medical Group in PSJ. We see adults and children. We are a very busy practice. Responsibilities will include, primary patient care, vaccinations, medical procedures, telephone triage & scheduling. Benefits include paid sick/vacation time and health insurance. The successful applicant will be energetic, flexible, willing to learn & committed to patient care. Prior experience is helpful but not necessary. Anyone interested may call 850-229-8010 for information. EOE. OtherEBROGREYHOUND PARK and Poker Room is Hiring For the Following Positions:Mutual Clerks Food & Beverage Servers Concessions and Bartenders Please apply Monday through Saturday at 6558 Dog Track Rd. Ebro, FL WEB ID 34249424 OtherJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is accepting applications for a Small Engine Mechanic for our Public Works Department. Starting salary is $15.8312 per hour. This is a bargaining unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applications and a complete job description are available in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www .gulfcounty fl.gov Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T. on May 16, 2013 at the Gulf County Human Resources Office. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at (850) 229-5335. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Web-Id 34250441 Text FL50441to 56554 PSJ, 3 br, 1 ba, all brick 404 Battles Street, corner lot -LG yard. W/D incl $550/mo + dep. 301-265-5368 or 301-437-7904 Call To Place An Ad 747-5020 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane! Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 1110758Facility ManagerSt. George Plantation (SGPOA) is seeking to hire a FT Facility Manager. SGPOA is a gated residential community in the Florida Panhandle. Position reports to the GM & is responsible for all aspects of managing the facilities & common elements of SGPOA. Position works closely w/ outside professionals to design, develop, inspect & oversee all SGPOA projects. Candidate must be able to read surveys, drawings, plans, & prepare bids, contracts & RFPs. Candidate should be able to prepare written & verbal updates on projects & assignments. Strong computer skills are essential. SGPOA oers an excellent benet package w/ salary commensurate w/ exp. Candidate should have a HS diploma plus 2 yrs of additional education or formal training & 5 yrs related exp w/ evidence of having performed duties.Send rsum to General Manager, St. George Plantation Homeowners Association 1712 Magnolia Rd, St. George Island, FL 32328 No later than May 17th or e-mail gmanager@sgpoa.com Web ID: 34249666 | Text FL49666 to 56654