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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03864
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 02-07-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03879

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Humane society saves neglected dog By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Orson arrived at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society is less than idyllic condition. The chocolate lab, pure-bred by all indications, had been picked up by county Animal Control of cer Roland Jones in the Stone Mill Creek area when Orson stumbled into a strangers yard in the rst week of January. Orsons future was bleak. He could only use three legs, he was emaciated and lethargic, and he had broken teeth, said Melody Townsend, director of the Humane Society. We had our vet do an assessment, and he said he had one dislocated hip, likely from being hit by a car, and the other hip was injured, sad to say, by a gunshot, Townsend said, noting that in the past couple of months the Humane Society has taken in at least six dogs that have been shot. The shame of it all, Townsend noted, was that Orson once had belonged to somebody. The fur on his neck showed a line where Orson had worn a collar. That he indicates he belonged to somebody for a long time, Townsend said. To top it off, Orson tested positive for heartworms. 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 17 Woman celebrates 100th birthday B1 Humane society saves neglected dog The shame of it all, Townsend noted, was that Orson once had belonged The fur on his neck showed a line where Orson had worn a That he indicates he belonged to somebody for a long time, Townsend said. To top it off, Orson tested positive for heartworms. Humane society saves neglected dog The fur on his neck showed a line where Orson had worn a That he indicates he belonged to somebody for a long To top it off, Orson tested Dodson named Teacher of the Year By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Carmel Dodson wasnt so much surprised when Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton strolled into her thirdgrade room at Port St. Joe Elementary School. As Dodson said later, she was a bit frightened. Any fear was unwarranted, as highlighted by the decorative plant Norton was carrying, as Nortons arrival was to recognize Dodson as Gulf District Schools Teacher of the Year for 2013. Dodson, a reading teacher at the elementary school, was selected from fellow nalists T.C. Brewer, a science teacher from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School; Jay Bidwell, who teaches Spanish at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School; and language arts teacher Misty Harper from Wewahitchka Elementary School. All four were voted their respective schools teacher of the year by their peers. All were evaluated by an out-ofcounty group last week. This is more scary than the evaluation, Dodson said after composing herself and wiping away a few tears. I really just cant believe this; that is about all I can say. I give everything, my heart, every day. There are a lot of deserving teachers who do the same thing. The kids teach me, my coteachers teach me as I teach them. It is a team effort every day, 24 hours a day. That team effort was on full display as Norton arrived. Third-grade teachers had their students huddled and waiting in the third-grade pod and the kids poured in to cheer for Dodson. Dodson is known as a caring and devoted teacher, one who goes the extra mile for students, from writing grants to the Gulf Education Foundation to bring innovative programs into the classroom to spearheading the creation of the schools butter y garden. She is particularly involved in assisting those who struggle, Port St. Joe Elementary School Principal Sue Gannon said. Carmel is a great teacher, very innovative, Gannon said. She is always looking TIM CROFT | The Star Superintendent of Schools surprised Carmel Dodson with a plant and recognition as Gulf County Teacher of the Year. See TEACHER A3 PSJRA workshop eyes park plans By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Plans for a bayfront park in Port St. Joe were examined during a public workshop again last week, but the Cape San Blas Lighthouse remained a primary focus for opponents of the park plans. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency held a second public workshop as part of the due diligence phase, aimed at securing public input, for a new park to be constructed along the bay front. The meeting took on more import recently when city commissioners named a focus group of 14 to serve as a sounding board for ideas for the park. However, barely half of the focus group members attended the workshop. The public workshops, Eric Davidson of the planning team explained, were aimed at continuing the conversation about what would and would not work with a proposed new park, with a planning label of BayPark, but one which will incorporate much of George Core Park. The objective with a master plan like this is to achieve some sort of strategic objective, Davidson said. This is just the start. This is just part of the conversation. The goal of the park is to get locals and tourists alike to the waterfront and to connect with the Reid Avenue business district, Gail Alsobrook, director of the PSJRA said. The opportunity was there, she added, to create a unique destination along the coast. We want people to stop, Alsobrook said. We want them to nd out who we are, what this town is, what it offers. This is the best part of the process. See WORKSHOP A10 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5 Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . A5 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A9 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B5 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B7-B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS PHOTO COURTESY OF MELODY TOWNSEND NJROTC RANKS THRIVING PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The Star Under the watchful eyes of Commander Michael Egan, unit commander Javarri Beachum begins the drill segment of the inspection. With unit commander Javarri Beachum (left) leading, Commander Michael Egan inspects the troops, asking questions about the NJROTC program while examining uniforms and appearance. PORT ST. JOE NJROTC PROGRAM UNDERGOES INSPECTIONS See DOG A6 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Four years ago the NJROTC program at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School was almost a casualty of district budget woes. Four years later, the ranks are bulging. The NJROTC program had its annual inspection last week as the cadets demonstrated their skills and military manners and put on display the rapid growth of the program over the past four years under Lt. Commander Marty Jarosz (Ret.). We are growing steadily, Jarosz said. In four years, we have more than doubled our numbers and we have kids that want to do this but who cant t it into their class schedule. We cant do the NJROTC program without a lot of support. Support from parents, from teachers, from other students. They accept NJROTC as part of the fabric of the high school and part of the fabric of the community. And that community is what this county stands for. See NJROTC A7

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE 315-4445 | @LaurenRnwfdn lreinlie@nwfdailynews.com HURLBURT FIELD This past Sunday, 15 airmen lined along the sidewalk in the morning sun. They read the names of their ve fallen comrades, hoisted their 40-pound rucksacks onto their backs and took their rst brisk steps. More than 450 miles of winding road lay before them. The men are marching day and night to Tampa in remembrance of the ve special operations airmen from Hulburt Field who were killed in action last year. They expect to arrive Friday. They were in Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe on Monday, staying overnight at the Port Inn in Port St. Joe. Were honoring our heroes step by step, said Sgt. Deon McGowen, who organized the rucksack march. Its great today, tomorrow is going to be tough, Tuesday is going to be even harder. The men who were killed were the marchers friends, roommates and brothers-in-arms. Mitch Sherman is marching for his best friend, Capt. Ryan Hall, who was killed at age 30 when his U-28A plane went down near Djibouti, Africa, on Feb. 18, 2012. Sherman said he has known people who were killed during his career, but never anyone he was as close to as Hall. Its been a real challenge, Sherman said of the year since the crash. Its tough because we all have to move on, but it catches up with you every now and then. Three other special operations airmen, Capt. Nicholas Whitlock, 29, 1st Lt. Justin Wilkens, 26, and Senior Airman Julian Scholten, 26, were also killed in the crash. They were returning from a mission when the plane went down. About a week later, on Feb. 28, 2012, another Hurlburt airman, Lt. Col. John Loftis, 44, was shot to death at his desk during an attack on the Interior Ministry in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. Loftis wife, Holley, and his two daughters were there Sunday to see the marchers off. It means a lot to us that they would do this, Holley said. They have taken the time and taken the effort to remember the people who gave their lives for our country. The marchers are also raising money for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation, which provides scholarships for the children of Special Ops servicemen who are killed in action. Two Hurlburt airmen are en route to Tanzania to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro as part of the effort. By Sunday afternoon, they had raised over $8,000. They hope to reach $50,000 by the end of the march, McGowen said. The men will march in a relay to Tampa; at least two will be on the road at all times. Each will likely cover at least 100 miles over the next ve days. They began training in October, walking six miles every Wednesday and eight to 12 every weekend. Most have never done anything like it before. Im not built for it really. Im a pilot, joked Tom Leyden, one of the marchers who is also a U-28 pilot and served with the men that died in the plane crash. Its going to be grueling, but its a great sacri ce to dedicate this to those ve fallen. This is the second march Hurlburt airmen have made to Tampa. Last year, McGowen organized a similar event to honor his friends who died in a helicopter crash in 2011. He is the only one returning for the march this year. The marchers will end their journey at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, headquarters for all Special Operations forces. They will march to a wall etched with the names of all the special operations servicemen who have been killed in action. You can rub your hand along the wall, for these guys who have fallen, and you know they gave the ultimate sacri ce, McGowen said, choking back tears before the marchers took off Sunday. Thats whats going to get you through this. Chaplain Jonathan Hurt, of the 1st Special Operations Wing, said it was going to be a tough few days, but the men who are participating will never forget the miles they gave to those who were lost. With every step, with every strained muscle and every drop of sweat, we honor their sacri ces, he said. TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. N o A ppointment N ecessary Walk-ins Welcome N o A ppointment N ecessary Walk-ins Welcome Valentines Day & Gift Baskets Available 7 FOILS for $ 29 00 (cut not included) Expires 2/28/13 FREE Paran Spa Hand Treatment with every Full Color Service Expires 2/28/13 Spa Pedi and Mani for $ 35 00 Expires 2/28/13 DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net Valentines Day Surf and Turf Special $ 20 95 Ronnie Bs Steak & Seafood Restaurant & Lounge Dinner includes: 8-10oz Angus Ribeye, 6 Large Butteried Fried Shrimp, Your Choice of Side Item & Salad Bar or upgrade to Lobster Tail for additional $5.00 FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: (850)227-1386 aer 4:00 EST Like Us On Facebook! Located: Behind Centennial Bank Bldg with views of the St. Joseph Bay WANT TO HELP? To donate, nd out more information and track the groups march visit their Facebook page Air Commando Ruckers or their page at rstgiving. com under Air Commando Ruck & Climb. March honors fallen comrades COURTESY OF BILL FAUTH One team of Special Ops airmen on their way from to Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe, where they stayed Monday night. THE PORT ST. JOE STAR FIND US ON FACEBOOK

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for ways to help her students, whether working on their weaknesses or playing to their strengths. She is very much concerned about those students with special needs, who might not come from a great home life, who struggle in the classroom, who might not be our top students. Or, as her former principal Melissa Ramsey, now the district supervisor for curriculum and testing said, Dodsons heart always is evident. Whether donating money for a childs lunch or class supplies, or allowing a child in a tough home situation the safety of her home, Dodson is present when her students need her, Ramsey said. She is a nurturer, that is a good word to describe her, Ramsey said. She donates her time, energy and money to her students. She wholeheartedly cares about her students. She is totally dedicated and gives above and beyond every single day. I put her wherever there was a need, she is that good and caring with her students. Dodson will go on to represent the district in state Teacher of the Year competition, the winner to be announced in the spring during a convention in Orlando. As Gulf Countys Teacher of the Year, Dodson will attend the convention and participate in a series of workshops. This is an A school, and I cant think of a better honor, Norton said after hugging Dodson. We are honored to honor her. Helping Clients Keep More Of What They Earn All Tax Services IRS Problem Resolution Enterprise Zone Tax Incentives QuickBooks Pro Advisor Business Formation Management Consulting Centenial Bank Building 202 Marina Drive, Suite 303 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-1040 keith@keithjonescpa.com MEMBER: AMERIC A N A ND FLORID A INSTITUTES OF C PAS KEITH L. JONES, CPA ACCOUNTING, TAX & CONSULTING SERVICES WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Family Care and Rotating Specialty Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola Quick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-653-8853 ext. 118 Local The Star| A3 Thursday, February 7, 2013 Third-grade students from Port St. Joe Elementary crowd around their reading teacher Carmel Dodson after she was named Gulf County Teacher of the Year in a surprise classroom celebration Tuesday. TIM CROFT | The Star TEACHER from page A1 THE PORT ST. JOE STAR FIND US ON FACEBOOK @ PSJ_Star FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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I know my Law and Order. As most any family member will attest I have likely seen every episode over the 20-year reign of that cops and lawyers procedural at least 10 times apiece. There are some episodes I could probably recite on the spot, line for line. I can give you the timeline for every detective, every assistant district attorney and every district attorney on that show from the original pilot episode. I can pick out actors and, in a heartbeat, click off the general plotline and possibly year that they appeared in other episodes and what character they played and how many people they killed. I have seen Jack McCoys eyebrows arch more times than I could count and watched Ben Stone there is a time warp hold his glasses while trapping some defendant with sheer indignation. And I have heard plenty of speeches about the jobs of the police and the district attorneys and serving the public and holding that ideal up as paramount what serves the people. Dick Wolf, the creator of that show and its many spinoffs, is a spinner of myths. Because if there is any way to explain how the public was served by a recently closed state attorney investigation into the 2012 election campaign it sure hasnt been speechi ed. Where are you Jack when we need you? The latest development arrived in the past couple of weeks as the matter of removing the president of Citizens Improving Gulf County, a political action committee established last year and with support throughout the county, was stopped. Turned out that the Supervisor of Elections Of ce was not comfortable just taking the word of the state attorney that Jim Garth should be removed from the voter rolls without any evidence. And the state Division of Elections could not nd a trail of a felony conviction that according to Garth did not involve a court, jury, judge, jail or booking and could only date to more than four decades ago or the need to restore civil, voting, rights. The State Attorneys Of ce communicated that the process of removing a voter from the rolls could stop at this time. So either Garth did or did not have a felony conviction. Either he voted illegally for years or not. Either Garth was able to pass every background check, but one, over the span of 40 years or not. This is the conclusion of an investigation into the alleged extortion of a county commission candidate? I have seen enough Law and Order to wonder about that one. This I do know and what is known should provide pause for every citizen of this county, every taxpayer. What is known about this case should enrage all the Second Amendment stalwarts worried about gun control from Washington because this is about the amendment that came rst and the threat is much closer to home. What is known is that public money was used in this investigation. That public money helped drive an investigation that started, based on the le released to the public, on a passel of hearsay I know my Law and Order as I said that could fairly classi ed as the recitation of a sandbox schoolyard spat. What is the old adage about sticks and stones and words? This is all about words communicated through a phone chain that would rival any backroom game of Post Of ce. Public money went into investigating and interviewing and putting a recording device on a sitting county commissioner in order to gather evidence. Public money was devoted to investigating an organization and its president that had committed the crime, by all indications from the public le, of simply using politics to battle politics in a county election. A group that dared to question leadership by, again, according to the nal investigative le, sending a letter to said commissioner raising an issue that remains the core of an ongoing investigation by the Florida Commission on Ethics. A group that exercised that fundamental right spelled out in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to assemble and protest government. And public money was also used to gather less than attering information on others, to even threaten them with possible indictment, as was spelled out in the letter that originally closed the case in October and did not reference Garth. Finally, public money was expended in initially recommending the removal of a voter from the voter rolls and then when the rubber hit the road and evidence had to be provided, recommending stopping the process. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the State Attorneys Of ce are so rolling in public money they have suf cient resources to devote to this, what could be fairly described as an investigation into critics of Gulf County government? This investigation merits expending those resources instead of, say, solving the murder of Mary Thomas which remains unsolved more than six years after she was found brutally murdered in woods off Avenue A? Now, if Commissioner Tan Smiley wants to grind an axe about investment in the white and minority communities, as he did at the end of the last Board of County Commissioners meeting, there is some genuine fuel. So the real question I have, given my extensive background of viewing Law and Order, is how exactly did this investigation and devotion of public resources (read: other peoples money) serve the public? From what is known, Jack McCoys eyebrows would be knitting a sweater by now. Case closed? While sitting in my den chair the other night, I heard the jingling of change hitting the oor. I looked down and saw that the change from my pockets was of course falling out and hitting the oor. It wasnt enough to buy a gallon of gas or even a cup of coffee, but it was mine so I picked it up. It brought back wonderful memories of going to my Papas house on weekends when I was a little boy. My older brother and I would ip the cushions on Grandmamas worn out green sofa knowing we would nd change that had fallen from Papas pockets. Papa owned a coin operated car wash and was a change hound. He was always rolling quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies to take to the bank. It was not uncommon to nd $5 worth of change in Grandmamas sofa, and that was a lot of money. In 1970, gas was 36 cents a gallon, bread was 24 cents a loaf, eggs were 51 cents a dozen and a postage stamp was 6 cents. Doing the math, $5 would have almost bought me 14 gallons of gas back then. I didnt need that much gas, the most I ever needed was about a gallon for the minibike that had a Briggs & Stratton lawnmower engine running it (when it would run). Papa usually supplied the gas for it also, so times were good. Sometimes I wonder if Papa planted that money in the sofa or if it actually came out of his pockets. He lived frugally, but well. He seemed to always wear the same couple of shirts and pairs of pants. I dont even remember him wearing the new annel shirts we would give him at Christmas. Most of our grandparents grew up in a time where frugality did not mean doing without, but rather being thankful for what they had worked for. Times have changed. Many folks are struggling to just get by, seeing that what they work for just doesnt seem to be enough. There are others who seem to be a little lazy, expecting someone else to dump money in their sofas for them to nd. What do I mean? Take for example, rolling coins to take to the bank. There are machines now in grocery stores where you can take your coins and dump them in; the machine will give you paper money back. Great idea isnt it? Not really. The machine takes 8% as a fee. In other words, if you put $10 worth of quarters in the machine, it will give you $9.20 back. Want to talk about a stupid tax? I think that borders on it. Folks justify this by saying, Its more convenient. If you have that much money to spend on convenience, I understand. Let me note here, if you have $10,000 in quarters, I will roll them for you for $800. The other option if you dont want to roll them yourself, is to take them to the bank. The teller may look at you kind of funny, and might even complain, but money is money. We take clothes that the children have outgrown and other things that we no longer need to the local thrift store operated by the Disabled American Veterans. If they are still useable, we would like to think that someone could get some use out of them. The thrift store sells these items to fund various charities, most importantly helping disabled veterans. I enjoy going to the thrift store, not only to donate things, but to nd odds and ends that I nd interesting. I look for cast iron skillets that folks have given up on, golf clubs and things that remind me of when I was young (and ipping sofa cushions). Recently, I was reading a story about folks who go to thrift stores to nd money. This was not a story about nding treasures at the thrift store to sell to someone else at a pro t, but literally going to the thrift store and looking for money. This concerned me, because at rst sight, it seemed a lot like stealing. The more I read, I A tad more than a pound of esh Keyboard KLATTERINGS Hoping for change TIM CROFT Star news editor It is well documented that the United States of America is something akin to $17 trillion dollars in debt. Im not even going to get into here how much money that is cause I dont know. I care, of course, we all do! But $17 trillion of anything is light years beyond my comprehension. Heres what Id like someone to explain to me this morning. Who, exactly, do we owe that money to? It cant be France. Weve done bailed them out twice. We lend leased every thing we had to England back in 1940. I dont think theyve paid us back yet. It cant be Germany. After we attened them in World War II, we immediately paid for most of the rebuilding. Germany, more than any country on earth, has proved that old Will Rogers adage, The best thing a country can do is to get into a war with America ... and lose. It obviously isnt Greece, Spain or Italy. They are all three broke ... and I dont think even they could spend $17 trillion that fast! Im running out of countries! Americans have bought enough Toyotas to make Japan rich ... but that enterprising nation had rather sell us electronic devices and Godzilla movies than loan us money. The oil-rich Middle East nations dont trust us enough to loan us anything. Plus, wed have to turn over Israel in any deal with them. We all know it is not GM, Chrysler or Fannie Mae. Those folks seem to have some kind of open account with Washington. You would think a United States of America note holder would naturally be one of the big banks ... but that cant be the case. Our government has been giving them money just to keep them open. If somehow we were indebted to them to the tune of $17 trillion, it would be the other way around! Questions abound here. How do you get seventeen trillion dollars in debt? That, in itself, is near bout unfathomable! Youd have to have government of cials spending around the clock, or just giving it away, to unload that kind of dough. Someone must be laying awake at night, scheming up ways to reach such debt heights! Ive heard of pork barreling, expense accounts sinkholes, foreign reparations and the cost of doing business but something here has gotten way out of hand. And please, dont give us the ole best interest of the country speech! I read recently that our government spent right at $18 million dollars on a test project to create an in atable home for astronauts in space. Well there you go! Why didnt they just borrow a pup tent from the nearest Boy Scout? Dont tell me weve got people in charge of our money that have eyes that are bigger than their stomachs! What kind of interest do you pay on $17 trillion? I bought a house once for $24,000. I spent the rst 15 years (of a 25 year note) just paying on the interest. How long do you suppose we are going to be working off this debt? Ive heard talk of grandchildren and great-grandchildren being saddled with this liability. What kind of legacy is that for goodness sakes! Its a dilemma that has caused more nger pointing than who shot J.R. What did America put up as collateral on this deal? Could it have been the Washington Monument, Congress ... or maybe Pennsylvania? Would someone hold the Grand Canyon until they were repaid in full? Theres nothing in this country worth $17 trillion ... except its people. Do you reckon were being leveraged here? It stands to reason that we owe this money to someone or some entity. Youd think a Donald Trump or a Warren Buffett would be way too smart to loan money to what might be a sinking ship. I keep thinking who, or what, has got $17 trillion to loan? You dont reckon Wall Street is behind any of this, do you? I am as puzzled as all get out over this thing. Doc Bell was the president of the McKenzie Banking Company when I was a boy. He was an outstanding Christian. He sang in the choir and would occasionally provide a solo as the special music. He was a super fair man with a big heart ... but sooner or later, no matter what you owed him, no matter who owed him, hed be around to collect! Am I the only person here wondering whats going to happen to our nation when whoever we owe this money to shows up to collect? Someone said we are borrowing it from ourselves. If that is the case, Id say lets give it back! Some have suggested that we just take it out of the National Treasury on paper or, if needed, we simply print more money. That sounds like voodoo economics to me. I dont think you can voodoo yourself into a $17 trillion dollar hole. I borrowed $2 once from my older brother to take Charlotte Melton to hear Bo Diddley over at the Bethel College auditorium. I gured hed forget about it in a few weeks. He didnt. When I couldnt come up with the money, I countered with We didnt sign no papers. He beat the living daylights out of me for 14 days hand running. I reckon he was exacting his pound of esh. When it became apparent to me he wasnt satis ed with the esh, I stole two dollars from my little brother and paid him back! $17 trillion is too much to steal ... and Im not sure America has got that much esh left. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, February 7, 2013 A Page 4 Section See CRANKS A5

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, February 7, 2013 A Page 5 Section CRANKS from page A4 determined that it wasnt like stealing, it was stealing. These folks gave instructions on where to look to nd money while shopping in a thrift store. Reading through the ideas, they all seemed like something a kid would do. However, this article was meant for adults. It was noted that you should climb under desks and tables, pulling out drawers and looking under shelves. The article said that many older people will tape envelopes of cash in these places and forget about them. It is important to note here that the article did not suggest that you buy the item rst, it noted to just take the money. Other places the folks suggested to look included mens suit pockets, pants pockets, luggage compartments, book pages and also of course, under seat cushions of sofas and chairs. Again, they did not note that you should buy the item; they just noted that you could nd money there. If thats not stealing from the folks at the thrift store, Im not sure what it is. The way I see it, its the same as going over to somebodys house and ransacking it, looking for money. Perhaps these same folks go to a restaurant and steal the servers tips to pay for their own meals. It is bothersome. Times are hard; it seems we have to make enough for our families and somebody elses. If its for folks that cant work, Im ok with that. If its for folks who spend their time not working and going through other folks sofa cushions, Im not ok with that. Im sure this wasnt the change you were expecting. It seldom is. Always hope for the best and prepare for the worst. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. Sinful people, not guns, are the problem By ED MCATEER Contributing Writer Like most of America, I am saddened with the recent school shootings across America. Loss of life is never good, and we can only wonder how those who commit such atrocities can do so. Tragic as the shootings are, do we, as a people need to heed President Obamas gun control concerns? As a believer in Christ, is it right to own a gun? Debates over whether to control guns or how much to control them depend largely on political and philosophical arguments, not moral ones. This is not to say there is no moral component to the issue. The gun itself is amoral, an object that can be used for good or for evil. More important is the morality of the person wielding the gun, and that is often the missing consideration in the guncontrol argument. The fact that someone may use guns to commit a crime does not mean guns are the problem. Sin is the problem, and that is a moral and spiritual issue. Since the beginning of humanity, people have been killing other people, with and without weapons. Taking a weapon out of circulation might make murder more dif cult but not impossible. The recent shootings across the United States have caused much heartache. The senseless and tragic incidents also renewed the intensity of discussion about American gun laws. Politicians, athletes, and theologians have all weighed in on the issue of gun control. Guns are readily available in America, and ownership is protected by the Constitution. So, how should a Christian view gun control? Does the Bible have anything to say that applies? Written before the invention of any gun, the phrase gun control is not found in Scripture. However, the Bible records many accounts of wars, battles, and the use of weapons. Warfare is presented as an unavoidable part of living in a fallen world, and weaponry is a necessary part of warfare. Weapons in the Bible were also used for personal protection. In parts of Israel, robbers were common and people carried weapons when they traveled. Carrying a weapon for self-defense is never condemned in the Bible. In fact, Luke 22:35-38 mentions it in a positive light by Jesus Himself. Christians are called to submit to governing authorities, and they are to obey the laws of the land. This would have to apply to gun laws, too. If American gun laws change, Christians should submit to these changes and work through democratic means toward any desired alternatives. The Bible does not forbid possessing weapons, and neither does it command such possession. Laws may come and go, but the goal of the believer in Jesus Christ remains the same: to glorify the Lord. Another biblical principle to consider is that all who draw the sword will die by the sword. Jesus said this to Peter when Peter tried to mount a reckless defense of Jesus against the mob that had come to arrest Him. Peters actions were not only useless against such a large crowd armed with swords and clubs, but his foolish behavior also refuted Jesus submissive attitude and worked against ful lling Scripture. There is a time for war and a time for peace, and Peter confused the two. Christianity supports personal freedom. When Scripture does not clearly address a particular issue, there is freedom for individual choice. America has historically embraced personal freedom that resonates with this principle, and the founding documents guarantee wide freedoms regarding rearms. Some may point to Matthew 5:9 in which Jesus pronounces a blessing on the peacemakers, and apply it to the issue of gun control. The idea is that guns are opposing to peace. This may be more of a philosophical or political idea than a theological one. There is nothing theologically, or even logically, that links guns to a lack of peace; sometimes, guns help keep civil peace. As I see it, the use of guns is a matter of personal conviction. I believe the Bible supports this train of thought. There is nothing unspiritual about owning a gun or knowing how to use one. There is nothing wrong with protecting oneself or loved ones, even if it involves the use of weapons. We need not pretend there is never a need for guns, but pointing a gun at a person should always be a last resort. We should seek to defuse threats without violence whenever possible. With the authority God has entrusted to it, the government has the right to allow or disallow gun ownership to whatever degree it considers right. We, as citizens, are called to submit to whatever gun control laws the government institutes. This is not, however, a statement on the wisdom of gun control. There are good reasons to allow lawabiding citizens to own guns. Ultimately, guns are not the problem. Sinful people are the problem. Stealing from the needy Dear Editor: Recently my wife and I went through all our clothing and decided to contribute our unneeded excess clothing to The Care Closet on Fourth Street in Port St. Joe. My wife delivered our contribution to the bin in front of the Care Closet building on Sunday afternoon at approximately 2:30 p.m. We knew the Care Closet folks would receive and sort our clothing in the next day or two. We didnt expect that someone would steal that clothing the same afternoon and pass them off to someone who would start posting pictures of them for sale on a Facebook Yard Sale website that very night and the next day. Fortunately, our daughter spotted them online and advised us on Monday afternoon. That evening, we contacted the Port St. Joe Police, and the investigating of cer was able to retrieve the stolen property that very evening, explaining that the person who posted the items for sale advised that she was not aware that the property was stolen and gladly gave them up. What we have learned from this experience is that nothing is sacred to some people who are even willing to steal items intended for the truly needy. Secondly, we will deliver any future contributions in person to representatives of the chosen charity to make sure they are received and not stolen. Other charitable organizations have had similar problems, including the Faiths Thrift Shop at the Human Society here in town and Goodwill. So, lets all continue to contribute needed goods to these ne charities, but lets do it as outlined above so they reach the right people. Dan & Barb Van Treese Port St. Joe No more school taxes Dear Editor: The world is going crazy, and sometimes I think I am the only sane person left. Why would anybody vote to raise their own taxes? Oh, I forgot, everyone is allowed to vote, including those who do not own property, so to them it doesnt matter how much homeowners have to pay. Its just like with federal income taxes with almost 50 percent of Americans paying zero taxes. For those who do not pay, why should they care how much the others have to pay? I remember the last time we voted to temporarily raise the mil rate to help fund the schools, and a conversation I had with a particular young man. This young man, who was in favor of raising the rate, made the statement that he did not want his young son attending an inferior school system, which I could not argue with. However, I did mention he did own a home so he would be unaffected by any new tax. Since he was not married to the mother of his child I seriously doubt he even contributed to the support of his child. In case the school board hasnt noticed the demographics are changing. More and more of our homeowners are seniors and are on xed incomes and do not have children in the public schools. Yet these same folks are bearing the lions share of the nancial responsibility for funding our schools. I fear things are going to get a lot worse before they start getting better. Starting in January my health care premiums jumped a whopping 13.5 percent. Both my wife and I are on Medicare yet I still must pay almost $700 per month for my secondary health care insurance. God only knows what the cost will be when Obamacare is fully implemented next year. I might be stupid, but I think the school board could do a much better job of living with the reality of the economic situation of today. The school system needs to do more with less instead of asking the citizens of Gulf County to do more with less. It seems to me a better solution would be to go to the state legislature for a statewide solution to the problem. I personally think the real estate tax system in Florida is in need of some serious xing. The system, as it now is, makes it dif cult for young couples just starting out to purchase their rst homes. The current system needs to be scrapped and replaced with one that has everyone paying a more balanced amount. I dont mind doing my fair share, but I also think those parents who have children in school but do not own property should also pay as well. Yes, I understand the landlord pays taxes and those taxes come from the rent; however, most renters do not consider this when they vote to raise someone elses taxes. To me the sales tax is the best tax because it touches everyone and it doesnt matter where the money comes from. Honest and dishonest alike pay the same tax when they choose to purchase something and the added bonus is we get the help of those visiting our state as well. Marcus Sturdivant Port St. Joe Explanation owed Dear Editor: This is in response to the recent article titled PAC President Voting Rights Removal Stopped. As Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon stated, stripping a person of the right to vote is a major thing to happen without evidence. Any citizen should, regardless of their political persuasion, be incensed that an attempt was made to prevent a citizen from voting without evidence. State Attorney Mr. Glenn Hess in a letter to Mr. Hanlon stated that he found evidence of a conviction in Jim Garths past and apparently his voting rights had not been restored. Then in a phone call, Mr. Hess recommended the removal process be stopped. Why stop the removal process, Mr. Hess, if you have evidence of a felony? Why? You either have evidence or you dont. Mr. Garth stated that your of ce would be in touch, and the news media has also asked for clari cation, and your of ce remains silent. Mr. Hess, you are an elected of cial and you owe the people of Gulf County an explanation or you should consider removing the word Honorable from your name. Al Whit eld Wewahitchka COLUMN The Bible does not forbid possessing weapons, and neither does it command such possession. Laws may come and go, but the goal of the believer in Jesus Christ remains the same: to glorify the Lord.

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With local surgery and rehabilitation, the vet said he had about a 60 percent chance of surviving, Townsend said. The cost, including treatment for heart worm, would be about $3,000, precious funds for a small humane society. But there was more to Orson, estimated at about 6 years old, than the injuries, Townsend and her staff soon discovered. Orson had the friendly nature of a lab, wagging his tail incessantly around people and navigating the compound among other dogs, apparently happily, with his three good legs. We put him out for a temperament evaluation, and they fell in love with him, Townsend said. He does his sits. Hell walk up to anybody. We had to do something. The options were to perform the surgery or euthanize Orson. Townsend began reaching out to rescue groups that specialize in assisting with dif cult animal cases. A rescue shelter in Tampa responded to the call. The shelter will undertake the heart worm regimen and perform the surgeries. They have even lined up a foster home for him, Townsend said. With a light at the end of the tunnel, Townsend and her staff set out to build Orsons strength for the trip to Tampa and the looming surgeries. We treated his pain, gave him antibiotics and steroids for the cough he got from the heartworms, Townsend said. We fed him, kept him comfortable and prepared him for the trip to Tampa. Last week, Orson nally made the trip, transported to his new home in Central Florida, a fatter, happier dog, on his way to recovery and a new home. As many animals as we get, this was just a special case, Townsend said. In these kinds of cases, you have to tell yourself you are a humane society. Spay/neuter grant The St. Joseph Humane Society was recently awarded a $20,000 grant from Pet Smart Charities targeting spay and neutering of dogs in the 32456 ZIP code. The purpose of the grant is to make the biggest impact, Townsend said. The purpose is to make a large dent in a targeted area. The grant will pay for the surgeries to spay and neuter dogs and to come up with a plan to address animal over-population in that zip code, Townsend said. The vets on board for the effort are Dr. Hobson Fulmer and Dr. Albert Biaz. Weve got a year to spend it and we are really focused on the areas of Oak Grove, Highland View and North Port St. Joe, Townsend said. Townsend said the grant was important because rural communities rarely have the resources to undertake such a program. Most of similar grants target more urban or heavily populated areas, but they were impressed with our pitch to them. As for a long-term address of spay and neuter needs, Townsend said the grant provides the ability for the humane society to get out in the community to educate people on the need to spay and neuter pets. We are hoping to go into churches, Townsend said. We want to just educate people. Giving an unwanted or surprise litter away, Townsend said, does not address the problem as there is no telling where those dogs will end up and whether those offspring will be spayed or neutered. Passing on the problem, Townsend noted, does not address the problem. What happens to their offspring? she said. To download an application form to spay or neuter a dog in the 32456 ZIP code, visit sjbhumanesociety.org or fax the SJBHS at 2271191. Application forms can also be picked up at the Humane Society shelter on 10th Street in Port St. Joe or at Bow Wow Beach downtown. For additional information, call the SJBHS at 227-1103. Valentines Sweetheart Special February 14 Cup of Lobster Bisque Sunset Rainbow Garden Salad Filet of Beef and Bahamian Lobster Tail Sugar Snap Peas Choice of Baked Potato, Sweet Potato Souf Steak Fries or Wild Rice Dinner Rolls Special Dessert Plate ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND D IGITAL PACKAGES Starting at $ 234 per month Starting at $ 199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA C ON S UL T A T ION T O FI T YOUR BU S INE SS C ALL TODA Y 850-227-4183 JessicaPaterson@live.com 252 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe Selling Your Home? Jessica Paterson is the ONE to CALL! Local A6 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 DOG from page A1

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The growth of the program was at full attention much of last Tuesday morning under the watchful eyes of inspector Commander Michael Egan from the Naval Salvage and Diving Station in Panama City Beach. As the school district considered cutting the program four years ago, there were 21 cadets enrolled in the program, slightly under the 10 percent threshold required of the U.S. Navy in sponsoring the program. The Navy agreed to waive that requirement for one year, the school board maintained the program and today the ranks include 51 cadets, almost 20 percent of the schools enrollment. Ive watched them for months; they are here early and stay late, working on drills and around the school, Principal Jeremy Knapp said. They are out in the community. The annual inspection is part of a points-earning process that every NJROTC program undertakes each year. Points are earned for participating in drill competitions, community and school outreach projects and other activities. The goal: to earn recognition as a Distinguished Unit or a Unit Achievement Award, the two highest honors for a NJROTC program. We are too small to earn enough points to be a Distinguished Unit but wed like that Unit Achievement, Jarosz said. We came up just a couple of points short last year. We are actually ahead of where we were last year. This is something you need to take seriously and they do. Weve worked long and hard for this. The inspection had several phases. Egan, led by unit commander Javarri Beachum, reviewed the ranks, examining uniform and appearance and also asking cadets questions about the NJROTC program and their aspirations. Cadets earning outstanding marks were recognized and congratulated personally by Egan. They did a great job today, Egan said. The program, quite honestly, is one of the strongest Ive seen. I know they are doing something right. After individual and platoon inspections, the cadets broke into groups for drills. Marching, parade formation, ri e drills, a platoon comprised entirely of females, one-by-one they marched in front of local dignitaries, parents, students, teachers and audience members. The female platoon is another testament to the growth of the Port St. Joe program. We have all kinds in our program, from honors students to ESE students, male, female, minorities, they all have to do the same things, Jarosz said. During the inspection there is an emphasis on the new cadets to show what they have learned and the seniors for their leadership. After an hour, Egan pronounced the inspection a rousing success, praised Jarosz and the support the district has provided and marveled at the picture of the future standing at attention in front of him. This is our future, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson said. I feel more con dent about the future just looking at them. To Register or for more information, please contact (850) 482-6500 or bnuccio@bigbendahec.org or Toll free 1-87-QUIT-NOW 6 Interested in quitting tobacco? Please come to our upcoming Tools to Quit session. Because NOW is the best time to quit. When: Thursday March 7, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM 1:00 PM EST Where: Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Port St. Joe, FL Conference Room AB FREE Nicotine Patches And/or Gum for program participants Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-28-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM Thursday, February 7, 2013 Local The Star| A7 Thursday, February 7, 2013 NJROTC from page A1 TIM CROFT | The Star A platoon of female cadets undertake drills while demonstrating the programs diversity.

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Special to The Star The new year looks like it will be another busy one on St. Vincent Island. February brings the annual meeting for the Supporters Group of the refuge and then in March the open house on the island takes place. The winter hunts are over, and the focus shifts to turtle monitoring, wolf tracking and island maintenance. This year we hope to have more local faces joining the activities on St. Vincent Island. The St. Vincent Island Supporters Group will welcome visitors to the island March 22 to explore and learn more about this island wildlife refuge. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided. More about this special event will be released next month. The three hunts that took place on St. Vincent Island this winter had mild weather and dry conditions, which produced three very successful hunts. The white-tailed Deer Archery Hunt was Nov. 15-17 and had 57 hunters participate. Thirteen deer were harvested, including four bucks and nine does. Five feral hogs also were harvested, four females and one male that weighed 103 pounds, the heaviest animal harvested in that hunt. The Sambar Deer Hunt took place Nov. 29 to Dec. 1. The Sambar deer, an elk from India, was brought to the island in the early 1900s by Dr. Pierce, who was using the island as a private exotic hunting preserve. This imported deer was the only non-native animal permitted to remain on the island after the island became part of the National Wildlife Refuge system. The Sambar deer, which can measure up to 6 feet tall weigh up to 700 pounds, acclimated to the island terrain and does not interfere with the natural habitat of the island. The harvest drew 128 hunters, who harvested 12 Sambar deer. The deer included eight stags and four hinds with dressed weight ranging from 191 to 368 pounds and two to six points. Three feral hogs also were harvested weighing 30-60 pounds. The Primitive Weapon Hunt took place Jan. 2426. One hundred and eighteen hunters harvested 28 white-tailed deer, seven feral hogs and one raccoon during this hunt. The January hunt concluded the 2012-13 winter hunting season on St. Vincent Island. Volunteers are needed by the St. Vincent Island NWR. Both outdoor and ofce-based volunteer work is available. At the Apalachicola of ce, volunteers help with visitor services, assist with administrative tasks or help write grant proposals. On the island you can help track the red wolves, join the sea turtle patrol, participate in bird counts, clean up trash on the islands beautiful beaches, remove invasive plants or assist with maintenance projects. To volunteer or learn more about how you can help, email supportstvin@hotmail.com. The monthly island tours have several more months before the summer heat and bugs arrive. All tours are on the second Wednesdays, Feb.13, March 13, April 10 and May 8. The groups enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation at www.stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You also can visit the island on your own. Do remember the island is primitive bring everything you need, including drinking water, and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Visit www.stvincentfriends.com for more information and volunteer opportunities, and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. NEW FISHI N G TACKLE ARRIVI N G DAILY! S HOP N EW ITEMS FROM P E NN S HIMA N O, A N D A BU G ARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE O F THE NEW PENN S P IN F I S HER V REEL S S TARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $ 139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, Feb. 07 72 62 50 % Fri, Feb. 08 73 57 20 % Sat, Feb. 09 72 59 0 % Sun, Feb. 10 73 61 20 % Mon, Feb. 11 71 56 10 % T ues, Feb. 12 67 56 30 % Wed, Feb. 13 65 47 60 % 1 Fr 154am 0.2 214pm 0.7 519am 0.1 1122pm -0.1 2 Sa 243pm 0.9 3 Su 330pm 1.0 101am -0.3 4 Mo 428pm 1.2 212am -0.6 5 Tu 531pm 1.3 315am -0.7 6 We 636pm 1.4 411am -0.8 7 Th 737pm 1.4 502am -0.9 8 Fr 834pm 1.3 546am -0.8 9 Sa 929pm 1.1 621am -0.7 10 Su 1022pm 0.9 645am -0.4 11 Mo 1117pm 0.7 650am -0.2 12 Tu 105pm 0.3 629am 0.0 518pm 0.2 13 We 1221am 0.4 1244pm 0.6 537am 0.2 742pm 0.1 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Fr 644am 0.8 632pm 1.1 1240am 0.1 1209pm 0.3 2 Sa 808am 0.7 705pm 1.1 144am 0.0 1237pm 0.5 3 Su 1005am 0.6 745pm 1.2 308am -0.1 101pm 0.6 4 Mo 836pm 1.2 442am -0.2 5 Tu 941pm 1.2 602am -0.4 6 We 311pm 0.9 1057pm 1.2 707am -0.5 554pm 0.9 7 Th 331pm 1.0 802am -0.6 714pm 0.9 8 Fr 1214am 1.2 354pm 1.0 849am -0.6 812pm 0.8 9 Sa 123am 1.2 414pm 1.0 930am -0.5 901pm 0.6 10 Su 224am 1.2 431pm 1.0 1006am -0.4 947pm 0.5 11 Mo 319am 1.1 447pm 1.0 1036am -0.2 1031pm 0.3 12 Tu 412am 1.1 503pm 1.0 1102am 0.0 1115pm 0.2 13 We 503am 1.0 521pm 1.0 1125am 0.1 Gun Show February 9th & 10th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2077810 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 8 Thursday, February 7, 2013 OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf Inshore Most action around town is still in the ICW canal in St. Joe. Try starting out under the powerlines and moving your way up toward the T. Live shrimp has been the bait of choice, however, Gulp shrimp and DOA are good alternatives this week. Unusually warm weather has the fish confused again in our area this week. With a cold front predicted to be moving our way, now is the time to be out on the water. Lake Wimico and parts of the Apalachicol River are seeing good sheepshead and a few stripped bass still this week. ANNUAL MEETING The Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge will hold its sixth annual meeting 1-4 p.m. ET Feb. 17. The meeting will take place at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center at 3915 State 30A. The Center is 4.5 miles south of the intersection of U.S. Highway 98 and County 30A in Port St. Joe and 5 miles north of the Indian Pass Raw Bar. The guest speaker for the meeting will be Erik Lovestrand, the Education Coordinator at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. The topic of his talk is The Snakes of Florida. Food will be catered by Paul Gants Bar-B-Q. Memberships will be sold at the door and you must be a member to attend. Annual memberships are $15 for individuals and $20 per family. For more information, call 229-6735. COURTESY OF TRISH PETRIE The Sambar deer, an elk from India, was brought to the island in the early 1900s. A New Year on St. Vincent Island Sixth annual Sportsmans banquet Feb. 21 Special to The Star What better way to wish fall away and usher in spring than to spend the evening at the sixth annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet sharing with friends your outdoor adventures of the fall and planning new ones for the spring. One of the areas most anticipated sportsmens events is soon to occur. The date of the annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet has been set for Feb. 21. Port St. Joe Lions Club members are busy working to make this years event not only one of the biggest and best ever, but another special moment to remember. Attendees will enjoy the historic surroundings of the Port St. Joe Centennial Building while socializing with numerous area sportsmen and friends, and enjoying appetizers of Apalachicola oysters, boiled shrimp and all the trimmings beginning at 5 p.m. The beverage bar also will open at that time. At 6:30 p.m. the serious eating begins. Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left-hungry ribeye steaks will take up a goodly portion of the dinner plate, leaving just enough room for the salad, potato and rolls. Dont forget to save room for Sisters almost equally famous banana pudding. The Centennial Building will remove the threat of inclement weather impacting the evening and provide the backdrop of the historic building, erected in recognition of the signing site of Floridas First Constitution. At 7:30 p.m., its time to let a few notches out of your belt and get ready for the real excitement. More than $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through live auctions and raf es. A few of the items offered will include over 24 shotguns, hunting ri es and pistols, along with numerous other outdoor products. There will also be items available for women and children. This will mark the third year of the $8,000 cash drawing held during the event. The lucky winner could win up to $8,000 if his ticket is drawn last from the box, but each ticket holder will have a one in 25 chance of at least doubling their money. Tickets for the event are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Of ce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. The real winners at this years banquet will be the bene ciaries of the community service projects supported by the Lions Club. Almost $15,000 was raised at 2011s banquet for community service programs in the panhandle.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, February 7, 2013 A Section Dixie Youth Baseball registration Star staff report The Port St. Joe Dixie Youth Baseball League will hold registration for the upcoming season Saturday, Feb. 12 and Feb. 16 at the STAC house on Eighth Street. Times are from 9 a.m. until noon ET Saturday and 5-7 p.m. Tuesday. The league is open to all children ages 5-12 (cannot turn 13 on or before April 30). First-time players in the league must provide a copy of their birth certi cates and turn it in to the league. The cost of registration is $60. Star staff report Philly.com Sports, the online edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper, this week provided its rundown of the top prospects in the Philadelphia Phillies organization. Written by staff writers Bob Brookover and Matt Gelb, the list is, as the writers noted, like trying to predict the new president four years from now. I dont remember anybody having Darin Ruf on their list last year, said Joe Jordan, the Phillies director of player development, mentioning a prospect shooting up lists. But with less than 10 days left before pitchers and catchers report to Phillies camp in Clearwater for spring training, the writers compiled their list. Jordan was not part of compiling the list, but agreed to provide comment on the players listed, the writers wrote. And coming at No. 4 on the list was Port St. Joes Roman Quinn, coming off a record performance in his rst season of pro ball at short-season Class A Williamsport (PA). The writers wrote, As a shortstop, a switch-hitter and a second-round pick, Quinn is bound to be compared to Jimmy Rollins, a 1996 second-round pick, as he climbs the minorleague ladder. His 30 stolen bases were six more than any player in the New York-Penn League and his 11 triples were ve more than any player. Jordans comments: There is not a higher-ceiling player in our system if everything comes together and clicks. Roman has a lot of work to do, but what he brings to the table is really exciting. Last year was his rst as a full-time shortstop and his rst as a full-time switch hitter. We need to take our time with him, but he has a chance to impact the game in a lot of ways. STAR STAFF REPORT Two players honored during the banquet for the 2012 Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football team were not pictured two weeks ago. Ramello Zacarro, No. 7, earned a Captains Pick award and Jarkeice Davis, No. 1, was named Offensive Player of the Year. Star staff report Last Thursday night was dj vu for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School soccer program. Tallahassee Maclay, which ended the Lady Tiger Sharks season the prior week, ended the boys season Thursday night when an early goal held up for a 1-0 victory in a Region 1-1A quarter nal match at Sam Cox Field. The Tiger Sharks, District 1-1A champs, nish the season 13-3-1. Maclay posted only the third shutout of Port St. Joe this season. The only goal in the hardfought match came in the 10th minute and was the result, Port St. Joe coach Gary Hindley said, of miscommunication between two Port St. Joe defenders and goalkeeper Tucker Smith. Hindley noted that Smith, a senior, played a ne game and kept the score line at one as the Marauders outshot Port St. Joe 10-2. Smith had six saves. Smith, in his rst year as a soccer goalkeeper, nished with a 13-3-1 record and a 1.125 Goals Against Average. Maclay advanced to the regional semi nal on Saturday. Maclay is a ne club and is probably, as a program, still ahead of us, but we are closing the gap tremendously, Hindley said. We had a very successful season and the participation numbers continue to grow in both numbers and athleticism. We will miss our ve graduating seniors, but will still welcome back 19 returnees. Lady Tiger Sharks reach regional for 12th year Star staff report They did not take away a district crown, but the Lady Tiger Sharks of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School reached the district championship game and the rst round of the regional playoffs during last weeks District 4-1A tournament at South Walton. This is the 12th consecutive year the Port St. Joe girls have reached regional play, the ninth-straight under Coach Kenny Parker. Port St. Joe played West Gadsden in the opening round of the tournament last Tuesday 49-19. The Lady Tiger Sharks never trailed, taking an 18-6 lead after one quarter, building the lead to 31-10 at halftime and nishing the third period up 44-15. Brooklyn Quinn scored 10 points to lead Port St. Joe. Callie Fleshren, Alyssa Parker and Hallie Jasinski each had eight, Shannon Pridgeaon and Maya Robbins added ve each, Teiyahna Hutchinson four and DaVida Tschudi with one. The Lady Tiger Sharks faced Blountstown, a winner over Bozeman in the opening round, in last Fridays semi nals. The two split during the regular season, each winning on its own court. Port St. Joe jumped to a 10-4 rst quarter lead and was up 17-14 at halftime. Blountstown pulled to within 28-26 after three periods and took a 30-28 lead halfway through the nal quarter. The Lady Tiger Sharks outscored Blountstown 9-2 over the nal minutes to win 37-30. Quinn led the way with 14 points. Hutchison added nine, Fleshren six, Robbins three and Parker and Jasinski each had 2. The following night the title game was no contest as top-seeded South Walton, starting ve seniors with two more seniors coming off the bench, breezed to a 50-20 win. Robbins led Port St. Joe with eight points, Hutchinson added six and Quinn and Jasinski three. Port St. Joe plays at Ponce de Leon in the Regional 1-1A quarter nals at 8 p.m. ET Tuesday. SPORTS Section Section Jordans comments: There is not a higher-ceiling player in our system if everything comes together and clicks. Roman has a lot of work to do, but what he brings to the table is really exciting. Last year was his rst as a full-time shortstop and his rst as a full-time switch hitter. We need to take our time with him, but he has a chance to impact the game in a lot of ways. Jordans comments: There is not a higher-ceiling player in our system if everything comes together and clicks. Roman has a lot of work to do, but what he brings to the table is really exciting. Last year was his rst as a full-time shortstop and his rst as a full-time switch hitter. We need to take our time with him, but he has a chance to impact the game in a lot of At right, Roman Quinn had a record-setting year in his rst year of pro ball. Philly.com Sports selected him this week the Philadelphia Phillies No. 4 prospect. Quinn named Phillies No. 4 prospect Page 9 SPECIAL TO THE STAR Alyssa Parker recently was recognized during Senior Night. She is the lone graduating player on this years Lady Tiger Shark basketball team. 2012 TIGER SHARK FOOTBALL HONORS The boys celebrated a second-straight, and third in four years, District 1-1A title the week before region playoffs. Port St. Joe falls to Maclay in soccer

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What followed those introductory remarks was just over an hour of discussion pertaining to various aspects of the proposed park plans, which include three distinct portions: a promenade connecting to recreational opportunities, a marine center and the lighthouse. The lighthouse continued to be a major point of contention. Although there were some pointed questions about various proposals for the park, the most controversial is the relocation of the lighthouse to the city. As Davidson noted, the potential for the lighthouse landing at the park came after planning of the park had already begun. Finding a suitable location, particularly after the city was awarded the lighthouse by the U.S. Department of Interior in December, only then became a priority. I like the concept (of the park), said Jimmy McNeill of Indian Pass, whose mother has been among the most outspoken critics of the relocation of the lighthouse into the city. It will draw people. In another forum, I have a problem with the lighthouse. That could have been a theme for the night as Alsobrook de ected repeated questions about the relocation of the lighthouse, particularly the costs of that move, as an issue for city commissioners, not the PSJRA. The agency, she noted, was doing what it was charged by commissioners to do: use a $20,000 grant for the planning of the new park. The lighthouse, she said repeatedly, was not an issue for the PSJRA. Those are questions we are aware of and are considering, Alsobrook said after several questioned whether the city could fund the relocation and ongoing maintenance of the lighthouse. It is not anticipated it is going to be funded by tax dollars. As was noted during the workshop, the city has a pre-proposal before the county RESTORE Act committee to secure just less than $1 million for the relocation. Alsobrook said during the workshop that she envisioned public/private partnerships funding much of the cost of construction of the new park, including potentially the relocation of the lighthouse. Davidson said the lighthouse move was an opportunity under the RESTORE Act, but was not dependent on receiving any RESTORE funds. One critic of the move of the lighthouse, Julia Cunningham, said she did not see how the relocation of the lighthouse to the city would increase bed tax revenue from tourists. Cunningham noted the number of beds in Port St. Joe was not what it was on the cape and wondered how much the economic impact would be. Culture is a business, a big business, Alsobrook said. And it brings dollars into the community. Alsobrook noted one study that showed that for every $1 invested in a community to increase cultural activities, the economic impact equaled $5. Its going to bene t everybody, Davidson said. Its a bene t for the city, for the county and (St. Joseph Bay) As the mayor (Mayor Mel Magidson) says, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. Davidson also noted that although the planning documents are available for public review, the process was uid and public input was a positive. Lets keep the ideas coming, Davidson said. We are very carefully considering a lot of stuff to get the conversation going. People are talking back to us with great ideas. One came from Eugene Raf eld. Raf eld suggested a shipwreck replica intended for the recreational area could instead be an authentic shrimp boat converted into a museum of the communitys maritime history, with a gang plank extending out over the bay waters. Tim Nelson suggested a landscaping focus that would create a green corridor along Third Street as it crosses U.S. Highway 98 into the general park area. Dewey Blaylock has suggested ideas for transforming at least a section of the proposed Marine Resource Center into a turtle rescue operation. We want to celebrate what we have had, what we have and what we are going to have, Alsobrook said. One Reid Avenue business owner said the proposed park was a win-win from the standpoint that by investing in the town and its history, businesses will also be interested in investing in the community and interest in living in Gulf County will increase. Davidson said the area for the recreational area/ promenade was a redeveloping area and said the Florida Department of Environmental Protection was very collaborative with the PSJRA planning team on the park plans. Its a good idea; it looks good on paper, Port St. Joe resident Dusty May said. Its a win-win if its done right. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIAL St. Louis Style Ribs Served with choice of two sides.................. $ 10.99 Fried Shrimp Served with choice of two sides................. $ 10.99 8 oz. Ribeye Steak Served with choice of two sides................ $ 11.99 L U N CH SPECIAL DAILY HOU RS O F O PE R ATION: Monday Friday Meat and choice of 3 Sides $ 7.99 WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM FRIDAY @ 9:00 PM EST RANDY STA R K ON T HE P OOP D ECK SATURDAY @ 9:00 PM EST RANDY STA R K WITH A R T L O NG O N S AX ON T HE P OOP D ECK O O O N N S S S AX ON AX ON AX ON AX ON AX ON S AX ON S T T T HE P HE P HE P HE P T HE P T OOP OOP OOP OOP D D D ECK ECK ECK ECK FRI & SAT @ 9:00 PM EST KA R A O KE / DJ IN THE C RO W S NE S T KA KA KA R R R A A R A R O O O KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C RO RO RO W W W S S W S W W S W NE NE NE NE S NE S S S NE S NE T T TUES. & WEDS. 5-10 PM LADIE S NIGHT HAPPY HOUR MONDAY FRIDAY 5 7 PM Local A10 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 WORKSHOP from page A1 THE STAR The Cape San Blas Lighthouse continued to be a major point of contention regarding plans for a bayfront park in Port St. Joe.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society HENRY! Henry is a 40# 1yr Foxhound. This fun and outgoing dog is very friendly with kids and adults. He is friendly with other like-minded dogs and is willing to have a cat live with him in his forever home. Henry is an all-around great dog and would make a great addition to any family. If you are unable to adopt at this time, perhaps you could foster or make a Donation. All pets adopted from SJBHS will be current on vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org and will be emailed to our office or you can print and fax to 850-227-1191 SHBHS is a proud member of www.petsforpatriots.org We require all potential adopters to complete an application form. Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. In some cases donations may be requested to offset cost of pets requiring any additional medical care. If you are missing a pet or want to adopt a new pet, please check with your local Humane Society or Shelter. 2084420 PROCEEDS BENEFIT Vote Between: Feb. 4th at 9 a.m.Feb 25th, at 4 p.m. To vote go online at www.newsherald.com Round 1 Voting: Narrows to 50 Entrants: Feb. 4th-Feb.11th Round 2 Voting: Narrows to 25 Entrants: Feb. 11th-18th Round 3 Voting: Narrows to 10 Entrants and Winner: Feb. 18th-25th $1 Per Vote Voting Bundles: 6 Votes:$10 | 12 Votes for $20 50 Votes for $40 | 100 Votes for $75 FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.com Second Place :$250, Third Place: $100. all participants will be featured in the Panama City News Herald special section FIRST PLACE WINS $500! Your Name : _______________________________________ Street Address: ____________________________________ City, State, Zip: ____________________________________ Telephone: ________________________________________ Email: ____________________________________________ Number of Votes Purchased: _________________________ Vote for Contestant: _________________________________ CC Number: __________________ exp: __________ cvv: ____ Return hand written forms to the Panama City News Herald at 501 W 11th St, Panama City, FL or go to www.newsherald.com Vote for the Top 50! Voting Rules Voting Prices 2nd Annual 2nd Annual Special to The Star Dr. Kirk Garcia-Rios, a family medicine practitioner, has joined Sacred Heart Medical Group and is seeing patients in the medical ofce building on the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf campus. It is great to come back home and be near the water, said Dr. Garcia-Rios, originally from Valparaiso. Garcia-Rios joined Sacred Heart after completing his residency at Bay Regional Medical Center in Michigan. He received his medical degree from Kansas City University and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine in Missouri. Ofce hours will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday. For more information or to set up an appointment, call 229-5661. As with nitrogen, Floridas sandy soils are naturally low in potassium. But unlike nitrogen, potassium deciency can be kind of tricky to diagnose and treat. One reason is because plants seem to be able to tolerate a wide range of potassium levels without showing signs of deciency. Also, high levels of certain elements in the soil will prevent plants from using potassium. But applying potassium where a deciency doesnt exist might lead to a deciency in some other elements. My information in this article was provided by Professor Emeritus Dr. Robert Black of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Potassium must be carefully balanced with other nutrients, so you have to be very sure youre diagnosing any deciencies correctly. One general symptom of potassium deciency is interveinal chlorosis of the leaves. Interveinal chlorosis is a yellowing of leaf tissue between the veins of the leaf. You might notice leaf drop occurring later in the season. If potassium deciency persists, growth is slowed down, and limbs and branches of the plants might die. These symptoms, however, dont always mean potassium deciency. Magnesium deciency, for example, shows almost exactly the same symptoms. Yet treating one deciency when the problem is really the other will only make matters worse. If you suspect potassium deciency, take a sample of soil to your local county extension ofce, which can send it to the IFAS Soil Testing Laboratory and have it analyzed to determine exactly what the problem is. After you have determined your soil needs more potassium, you can correct the problem with fertilizer treatments. You can use commercial garden fertilizer, such as 8-8-8; high analysis fertilizers, such as 16-4-8; or you can supply just the potassium by using a compound such as potassium sulfate. If you decide to use a basic gardening fertilizer, apply it four times a year at the rate of two or four pounds for every 100 square feet of soil. You might decide to use a high analysis fertilizer. Theoretically, the high nitrogen content in the high analysis fertilizer could aggravate potassium deciency symptoms. But in the landscape, this is rarely, if ever, a problem. Most soils could benet from the increase in nitrogen, so its OK to use a high analysis fertilizer to treat potassium deciency. Apply it four times a year, but only use one to two pounds for a 100-square-foot area. If you want to use a single potassium compound, such as potassium sulfate, apply enough of the compound so that it supplies the same amount of potassium thats found in the 8-8-8 fertilizer. This will come out to about a half a pound of the mixture for a 100 square foot area. In summary, potassium deciency is common in Florida soils, but the deciency isnt easy to identify. Treating a soil for potassium deciency when something else is really the problem will only aggravate the situation. Have a reputable soil specialist test your soil, and if a potassium deciency exists, apply the appropriate fertilizer. For more information contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or http://gulf.ifas.u. edu. From Staff Reports Gulf Amateur Radio Society to provide license exams The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will provide ham radio license exams at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, at the Gulf County EOC building behind the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe. Those interested in obtaining a ham license or upgrading a present license should call C.H. Tillis at 648-8251 for information and exam registration. Ham it up get your license today, and become part of amateur radio! Beekeeping in the Panhandle The University of Florida/IFAS will sponsor Beekeeping in the Panhandle, an interactive video class to be held at the Gulf County Extension Ofce, 232 Lake Ave. in Wewahitchka. The deadline for registration is Feb. 8, and the fee, $25 per person, $40 for a family, covers course materials and refreshments. The schedule of classes, which will be 6-8 p.m. CT, 7-9 p.m. ET on Mondays: Feb. 18: Queen and Package Bee Production; Feb. 25: Nutrition/ Immunity in Honey Bees March 4: IPM for Disease/Pest Control March 11: History and Theory of Honey Production. The cost of the Field Day and Trade Show is $15 per person, $10 for additional family members. For more information or to register call the Gulf County Extension Ofce at 639-3200. Star Staff Report The Corinne Costin Gibson/ Gulf County Library has announced its Winter Program Series. All three programs are free and will be in the Alfred I/DuPont Florida History-Genealogy Center at the Corrine Costin Gibson/Gulf County Library in Port St. Joe. The series kicks off at 2 p.m. ET Feb. 14 with Courting and Marriage in the Olden Days. Presented by Ann Robbins, head of circulation and literacy at the Bay County Public Library, this program explains how love and courting has changed in America from the 1600s to modern times. A display of antiques will make excellent discussion pieces. The second program, at 2 p.m. Feb. 21, will be Genealogy: How to Get Started using your Library. Presented by Rebecca Saunders, head of genealogy and local history with the Bay County Public Library, this program will explain how to use Ancestry.com and Heritage Quest databases and other resources to research family history. The nal program, at 2 p.m. March 7, is Bone Mizell: Florida Cracker Cowhunter. Presented by Robbins, the life of Bone Mizell described the typical life of the men of Florida during the late 1880s. For more information about the Winter Program Series, call 229-8879. ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director Community BRIEFS Library offers Winter Program Series Potassium deciency hard to spot New physician joins Sacred HeartDR. KIRK GARCIA-RIOS Society

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The Star| B3 Thursday, February 7, 2013 School News Special to The Star Senior info Cap and gown photos: Cap and gown photos will be taken at the school at 9 a.m. Feb. 13. There is a $25 sitting fee. See Coach Taylor to sign up for a time slot. Yearbook news: The nal date to preorder your 2012-2013 yearbook is Feb. 28. No extra books are ordered. Please dont miss out on this opportunity to purchase your yearbook. You can order online at www.jostens.com or from the link provided at the schools main page on the web. You may also order at the school in Coach Taylors room. Remember, Feb. 28 is the last day to order. Senior recognition: The nal date to order a yearbook recognition ad for your senior is Feb. 28. Ad forms and templates may be picked up in Coach Taylors class. All forms and pictures need to be turned in no later than Feb. 28. FAFSA seminar: Guidance will be holding a Financial Aid Workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 16 in Computer Lab 103. Senior parents are encouraged to attend this important training session. Please bring a copy of your current IRS Tax Form and Social Security Numbers for parents and students. Parent info FCAT Write: FCAT Write 2.0 for eighthand 10th-graders will be Feb. 26. Shark Bites: Any parent or guardian interested in receiving Shark Bites, our weekly schedule of events, please email LCDR Marty Jarosz at mjarosz@gulf. k12.fl.us and we will put you on the list. Black History Celebration: Our Black History Month celebration will be at 9 a.m. Feb. 28 in the gym. All are invited to attend. Football: Spring football begins May 1. All interested students need to have a completed or updated sports physical to be eligible to practice. See Coach Gannon for more details. Physical forms may be picked up in the main ofce. Congratulations to the honor students of Faith Christian School.ALL AS FOR THE FIRST SEMESTER Kindergarten: Austin Ramsey, Torren Smith, Kole Street and Karis Whicker First grade: Taylor Burkett, Carter Costin and Alex Taylor Second grade: Magnolia Sarmiento and Halee Whicker Third grade: Kristen BouingtonALL AS AND BS FOR THE FIRST SEMESTER First grade: Riley McGufn Third grade: Theron Smith Fourth grade: Riley Noah Fifth grade: Catherine Bouington Port St. Joe summer program gets a boost Special to The Star Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Principal Jeremy Knapp presented $250 to the Gulf Coast Workforce Board during the halftime at the Sharks basketball game Jan. 18. Gulf Coast Workforce Board representatives Tamlyn Smith, Melvin Martin and Mike Harris were on hand to accept the donation, which will be used to purchase new equipment for the Port St. Joe Summer Leadership Program coming up this summer at the Washington Recreation Center. HANNAH ANDERSON WINS SCIENCE FAIR AWARDS P E C I A L T O T H E S TA R Port St. Joe Elementary School would like to congratulate Hannah Elizabeth Anderson for her recent participation in the Three Rivers Science Fair. This event was sponsored by the U.S. Army, and Hannah received an award for Outstanding Science Project in her division. Hard work and perseverance pays off. Way to go, Hannah! We are proud of you! DAZZLING DOLPHINSS P E C I A L T O T H E S TA R PreK, Raegan Mathews; Kindergarten, Gregory Dean; rst grade, Chase Dykes; second grade, Macie Burrows; third grade, Gage Medina; fourth grade, Bradley Lewis; fth grade, Rainey Nobles; and sixth grade, Cole Haddock.S P E C I A L T O T H E S TA R From left are Port St. Joe High School Basketball Coach K (Derek Kurnitsky), Tamlyn Smith, Melvin Martin of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, and Port St. Joe High School Principal Jeremy Knapp. These students earned all As and Bs during the rst semester.S P E C I A L T O T H E S TA R These students earned all As during the rst semester. The Lions Tale FCS students earn academic honors

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Dinner.5:00 6:00 pm AWANA.6:00 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry6:15 7:30 pm Prayer/Bible Study.6:30 7:30 pm Read the Bible for Life Class6:15 7:30 pm Nursery..6:00 7:30 pm SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM (CS T ) 10:30 AM (CS T ) ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM (CS T ) M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM (CS T ) TUE S DAY : MEN S BI B LE STUDY 6:30 PM (CS T ) T HUR S DAY: WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM (CS T ) 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 648.1151 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Star Staff Report The Fifth Annual St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club Chili Cook-off will be held on Saturday, Feb. 23 at the Church Hall. Do you think you make a mean chili? Or, do you just love to sample various chilies? Will then this event is a must-do for you. The fifth annual will take place from 5-7 p.m. ET on Feb. 23. The nominal ticket fee is $6 for adults, $3 for children age 4 to 12, and free for children 4 and under. Start off with sampling as many chilies as you wish, vote for your favorite, and then go back for a full bowl of your choice. Soft drinks, coffee, tea or water is included, along with dessert and ice crme. A donation bar offering beer and wine will also be available. Tickets are available from any Mens Club member, at The No Name Caf on Reid Ave., at the Church Hall office (227-1417), or from Dan Van Treese (227-9837). If you would like to compete (number of contestants limited to 9), or more information on the event or other St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club activities, please call Dan at the above number. Annual Fruit of the Spirit Program A Red and White Evening of Worship, the second annual Fruit of the Spirit Program and Love Feast will be held 6 p.m. ET on Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Washington Improvement Center, 401 Peters Street in Port St. Joe. The theme of the program is Galatians 5:22, 23 But the greatest gift of them all is Love. The program is sponsored by Gathering Gods Harvest Outreach Ministries of Tallahassee, Mother Evangelist Stella Stallworth, pastor, Evangelist Pinkie Patterson, program chairperson. When Eve was tempted by Satan, he told her she would not die. This half of what he told her was surely a lie. That her eyes would be opened and shed know good from bad. This part was true, and that made it sad. This started sin and its gets worse each day. Many still believe these halftruths, and fall by the way. There are those who preach good works, but what about Jesus. Good works wont save you, its Jesus that frees us. From the bondage of sin He frees us, and then our works come in. So beware of believing a halftruth, it might bee the wrong half my friend. Billy Johnson Special to The Star The state of marriage in America will be explored at Lifetree Caf 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 11. The program, Is Marriage Obsolete? Why More People Are Saying, I Dont, will examine the declining marriage rate and the underlying causes of the trend. With divorces on the rise and people getting married later or not marrying at all, the institution of marriage is coming under re, said Lifetree representative Craig Cable. Some wonder if marriage is an outdated concept and is still needed. The program encourages those who attend to share their views of marriage. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. FAITH Thursday, February 7, 2013 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Church to hold fth annual Chili Cookoff Beware of half-truths State of marriage discussed at Lifetree Cafe Faith BRIEF

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2084417 2084477 Entry Form www.newsherald.com BENEFITTING To enter go online at the Panama City News Herald website at www.newsherald.com or by mail or enter in-person To enter by mail or in person, complete an Of cial Entry Form printed in The Panama City News Herald, and return or mail to: Beautiful Baby Contest, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.com To Enter Rules $5 entry fee shall accompany each entry. Categories. The contest shall consist of four categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 13-24 months, and 25-36 months Photographs must be submitted by the parents or guardians entrant. No third-party entries will be accepted. Hardcopy photos must be at least 3 inches on one side and no more than 10 inches. Poor quality photos will not be accepted. All photos featured in a special section in the newspaper : _____________________________________ : _____________________________________________ : _______________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ________________________________________ ____________________________________________ __________________ __________ ____ Return hand written forms to the at 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL or go to March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013 The Bay County Fairgrounds Register now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo special section, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show: Call: 850-248-3976 or E-mail: expostradeshows@aol.com For sponsorship information call: 850-763-6587 For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 SPONSORS THERE IS S T ILL SPACE FOR YOU A T T HE Friday: Noon 5 PM Saturday: 9 AM 5 PM Sunday: 10 AM 3 PM A HOST OF SHABBY CHIC VENDORS ALREADY SIGNED UP! Jimmie Vernon Lester, 64, of Honeyville passed away Tuesday, January 29, 2013. A lifelong resident of Gulf County, he served in the United States Air Force, worked for Premier Chemical and he loved to sh and hunt. He is preceded in death by his father, John Vance Lester; his mother, Trudie Harrison; and three sisters, Valeare Gliem, Verna Cannon, and Shirley Mederak. He is survived by his wife, Jeanie Lester of Wewahitchka; his children, Christie Quick and husband Danny of Anchorage, AK, Michelle Pitts and husband Cliff of Kinard, and Mark Lester and wife Dede, of Panama City; two brothers, Bo John Lester and Bobby Lester and wife Jeter of Wewahitchka; three sisters, Linda Hale and husband Phillip of Greensboro, NC, Juanita Martel of Jacksonville, and Odell Guerino and husband Sully of Panama City; and three grandchildren. Funeral services were held Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, at 2 p.m. CT at Glad Tidings Church in Wewahitchka with Rev. Joey Smith and Rev. Jerry Arhelger of ciating. Interment followed in Roberts Cemetery. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Jimmie Vernon Lester Lucille (Sowell) Nelson, aged 96, died peacefully on Feb. 4, 2013, at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe Nursing Home in Port St. Joe. Lucille was born August 24, 1916, in Washington County, Florida, the daughter of Bunyon and Bobbie Sowell. May 8, 1942 Lucille married F. F. Nelson, and upon his completion of military duty they attended Beauty and Barber School in Jacksonville before moving to Port St. Joe in 1948. F. F. went to work at Coopers Barber Shop and Lucille opened the rst beauty shop in Port St. Joe named My Fair Lady. Lucille quit work to raise a family and after the children where older she opened a second beauty shop in their home where she could continue to raise her family while working. Lucille was an active member of First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe where she taught Sunday school and volunteered her time in the nursery and childrens programs. Lucille is survived by her sons Glen Nelson of Port St. Joe and Marshall Nelson and wife Tracie of Port St. Joe; grandson Reis Nelson of Port St. Joe; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her mother and father, Bunyon and Bobbie Sowell of Chipley, FL; two sisters, Beatrice Nichols of Birmingham, AL and Thelma Nichols of Chipley, FL; one brother Buster Sowell of Pensacola, FL; and one grandson Bryce Nelson of Port St. Joe. Viewing will be at 2 p.m. and service is at 3 p.m. ET on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe with Bro. Buddy Caswell of ciating. Friends are invited to visit with the family in the sanctuary after the service. Lucille (Sowell) Nelson Albert J. (Al) Fleischmann, 64, of St. Joe Beach, passed away Jan. 31, 2013, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was owner and operator of A & R Fencing of St. Joe Beach and a member of the body of St. Josephs Catholic Church in Port St. Joe. He served as an usher at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church of Mexico Beach for many years until its closure. Al was predeceased by his parents, Albert and Eva Fleischmann and his wife Rose Jeanette (Jenny) Fleischmann. He is survived by his sister, Pat Johnson of Keansburg, New Jersey; a nephew, T.J. and nieces, Cindy and Tricia; children Ronni Bedell (Al), Lisa Bryke (Roger), Nikola (Brian), Celeste, Jeanette (Warren), Dana (Richie Bowes), Steven and Matthew; 17 grandchildren, ve from Gulf County, Patricia Rose, Addison, Xavier and Xaviers father, Jamie Bateman, Albert John (A.J.) and Tyler Fleischmann; three greatgrandchildren; plus his four canine buddies, Cheetz his little buddy, Peanut, Mena and Raven. Als wish was to be cremated and buried with Jenny. A memorial Mass of Celebration of Life will be held at 10:15 a.m. ET on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at St. Anns Catholic Church in Keansburg, New Jersey. In lieu of owers the family asks that donations be made to St Joseph Humane Society or your favorite charity. Albert J. (Al) Fleischmann Clements Card of Thanks Webb and Jo Clements would like to personally thank all their extended family in Port St. Joe for remembering us during the death of my mother, JoAnne Rehberg. It is great to know the support we have here in Gulf County. We will never forget all the cards, owers, food and most of all the care and concern you have shown our family. God is God all the timeand all the time He is Good! Thanks again, Webb, Jo, Laura-Leigh and Carley Clements Tillery family Card of Thanks As you all know I lost my oldest son Wallace Wade Tillery on Dec. 6, 2012 due to a massive heart attack. He had no insurance so the burden fell upon our family. In our time of need so many generous people in my hometown gave what they could from the bottom of their hearts. During our time of sorrow we received food, money, donations, cards, phone calls, support and love and prayers. Words are no enough. But I want to say thank you to some that I know personally that helped make the burden a little easy on myself and my wife and family. Some of these people I have known for years, Gracie Smith, George and Hilda Duren for their food, support and donations. On Jan. 5 we held a bene t dinner sh fry to raise money to help pay the funeral expenses. I would like to thank Harold Raf eld for donating the sh, Gracie Smith for organizing the dinner, George Boyer, Tony Harrison for cooking, Becky Wood, Diana King, Ewell Harrison for their help. Also, Harry Paul and VFW Post 10069 and VFW Post 8205 in Parker also donated. There are so many good people who do care and give what they can and I want to say thank you from the bottom of my heart. I have always heard the saying shop at home. Well, I can see how that pays off. I shop at our local stores and I nd that that saying pays off. There are good people in this county that I live in. Again, thanks very much. From the Tillery family Cards of THANKS Memorie Porter Sundin, age 81, passed away suddenly Friday, Feb 1, 2013. She was born October 7, 1931 in Apalachicola to parents Ned S. Porter and Louise Messina Porter. She graduated from Port St. Joe High School, Class of 49 and attended Barry University in Miami, after which she worked as a medical technologist in Panama City. It was here she met a dashing young Air Force pilot from Minnesota, Charles Sundin. They were married at St Patricks Church in Apalachicola in 1955 and were soon on their way to Rantoul, IL, Sacramento, CA and Taiwan. In 1960, she and Chuck returned stateside to Nellis AFB Las Vegas and soon after, son one and two came along. After USAF retirement in 1965, she and Chuck moved the family to Harlingen, Texas to start an aviation business and the family grew by adding a daughter. In 1982 with kids off and running and a second retirement, she moved to Port Charlotte, FL where her and Chuck enjoyed sailing and traveling and seeing grandkids. In 1999, she moved back to Port St. Joe where she enjoyed family and friends. She will be missed by her sons Michael Porter Sundin, Dallas TX, Christopher Ned Sundin and daughter-in-law Michelle, Bradenton; and daughter, Laurie Louise Sundin, Irving TX. She adored and was adored by her grandchildren Christian, Catherine, and Dulaney. Funeral services will be held 11 a,m. EST Thursday, February 7, 2013 at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Port St. Joe with Father Philip Fortin and Father Janus Jancarz of ciating. Interment will immediately follow in Magnolia Gardens in Apalachicola. The family will receive friends from 10 a.m. EST until service time at the church. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily.com. Southerland Family Funeral Home 100 East 19th Street Panama City, FL 32405 Memorie Porter Sundin MEMORIE PORTER SUNDIN Obituaries Faith The Star| B5 Thursday, February 7, 2013

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, February 18 2013 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application Ellis C. Smith Parcel ID # 03806-085R Located in Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback to within 10 of ROW. 2. Variance Application Sprit of Holiness Church Parcel ID #02892-000R Located in Section 11, Township 7 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, encroachment into road setback. 3. Variance Application Mars Real Estate Ven tures, LLC Parcel ID #06345-810R Located in Section 25, Township 8 South, Range 12 West, Gulf County, Florida, encroachment into road setback. 4. cel ID #03806-005R Located in Section 31, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, encroachment into road setback. 5. County Development Regulations and Policies 6. Staff, Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. Ad #2013-07 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN TRADES & SERVICES CA LL TODAY! 227-7847 G ET YOUR AD IN CA LL TODAY 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction bobgilbert54@gmail.com J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 From A to Z 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance Check out my work on Facebook! JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM GET YOUR AD IN TRADES & SERVICES 227-2847 By donating all proceeds to the Friends of the Library, a nonpro t established to sustain the library mission, the Bunco Babes ensure plenty of exibility in how those funds are spent, generally toward items that have become out of reach for the library. We are just trying to increase the librarys ability to educate, entertain and inform, Garmon said. In addition to the games of Bunco, there also will be raf es for items donated by the Reid Avenue Bunco Babes and others in the community. That is the request to our members, everybody has got something stuffed away in their homes they can donate, Garmon said. The cost of entry to the Bunco for Books is $30, with $20 going to the Friends of the Port St. Joe Library and $10 for covering the nights meal of gumbo, a salad and dessert. Tickets are available in advance at the following locations: The Fish House, No Name Caf, Boyers Signs, Coast2Coast Printing and the Port St. Joe Public Library. Tickets also can be purchased at the door. She bore and raised six daughters. She was the heart of the household while her husband sold insurance and worked with shermen in the community. Beulah was an early carrier for the Panama City News Herald and toted her daughters with her on her paper route. She returned to college, balancing studies with the work of raising her girls. Beulah went on to teach special education in Gulf County, the rst special education teacher in the history of the countys public schools. She devoted her life to her faith, studying the Bible daily and teaching other women in Sunday School. She was known for her helping hands to the needy. As a daughter wrote in her book of memories, She is a woman of strength and dignity and has no fear of old age. When she speaks her words are wise, and kindness is the rule for everything she says. She prays faithfully for her childrens families; she does not interfere or give advice. Charm is deceptive and beauty doesnt last, but a woman who reverences and fears God shall be greatly praised. Praise her for the many ne things she does. These good deeds of her shall bring her honor and recognition. Much of that honor and recognition can be found in the tribute book, the dedication of which spells out the impact Beulah Clark had on her family and the community around her. Vacation trips, passings and births, family photos, remembrances of the day her husband graduated college, details about a daughters contraction of and return to good health from polio, the highlights of a hog kill, anniversaries, memories of summer, weddings and reunions abound in the book. The book was put together by children, grandchildren and other relatives and friends. So many memories, so little time, to remember and relive in our minds all the many ways she has molded and in uenced our lives, the book dedication reads in part.Happy birthday Mama, Grandmamma Clark, Aunt Beulah, Mrs. Clark. We have all been blessed to have your gracious in uence in our lives. Thank you for being a role model for so many; for holding forth Godly principles and examples for us to follow; showing us, by your faith in God, that we, too, can live a victorious life in Christ right on until he calls us home to be with him. The Clark family wishes to thank all who contributed to last weeks celebration, especially Covenant Hospice (Darwin Barwick created the celebratory banner), Parthenon Prints (which printed the memories book), Durens Piggly Wiggly (which provided the cake), Bayside Florist and Gifts (which sent owers) and Bay Breeze Antiques (which donated a bird feeder). The family also thanks all who brought or sent cards, owers, gifts, prayers and thoughts and other blessings. recorded for posterity as the committee builds a history book that will be posted online and will be captured later in a printed form. It is about them; it is about history, said Danny Raf eld, also a member of the committee. At some point, a DVD will be available for purchase, and the archive, once nished will be available within the Florida Genealogy Room at the Port St. Joe Public Library. There will be ice cream and pie served during the Scan Day as refreshments for those who come out, and donations for the Centennial Celebration also will be accepted. The Centennial Committee is hoping the folks who comprise this community will help them tell the tale of the city of Port St. Joe over the past 100 years, since the founding of the modern city. Help us tell the story of Port St. Joe, Boyer said. Doodlebug was the common name for a selfpropelled railcar. In 1938, the ANR bought the gaselectric EMC Doodlebug No. 24 to use for passenger runs, replacing the less ef cient steam passenger trains. Trivia ANSWER HISTORY from page B1 The Reid Avenue Bunco Babes, some of whom are pictured during a check presentation to the Friends of the Port St. Joe Library, have raised almost $20,000 since their rst Bunco for Books 18 months ago. SPECIAL TO THE STAR BUNCO from page B1 100 YEARS from page B1 TIM CROFT | The Star Daughters Ruth, left, and Joy, right, and granddaughter Donna McCroan ank Clark as she celebrates her birthday. Joy is holding a bound scrapbook of memories created by Clarks family in celebration of her 100th birthday. The scrapbook is more than 100 pages of memories and photos marking the milestones of Clarks life.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 7, 2013 The Star | B7 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach OtherJanitorial ServicesGulf Coast Electric Cooperative, Inc. is soliciting perspective bidders from qualified firms/ person for janitorial services for its Wewahitchka Office located at 722 W. Hwy. 22 Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 and its Tyndall Office located at 6243 East Hwy. 98 Panama City, FL 32404. Any qualified applicants must contact Lacy Pettis at 850.265.3631 by 4:00 pm Monday, February 11, 2013 to be eligible to receive a RFP. The Cooperative will then send perspective bidders a RFP packet that will include scope of work, insurance requirements, site visit information, selection process, etc. GCEC reserves the right to reject any potential bidder. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID# 34240252 Text FL40252 to 56654 Bargain’sNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Cash Management SystemRoyal Alpha 710 ML Exc cond. Barely used. $150. 850-229-8072 Text FL40365 to 56654 Freezer 22 cubit foot Upright freezer, In excellent condition. $125. (850) 229-8072 Church SecretaryMethodist Church Port St. Joe, approx. 30 hrs a week, to manage office, Mon-Fri, Send resume to Dr Lentz at goffreylentz@me.com Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepet sitting.com Port St. Joe, St. Joseph Catholic Church on 20th St. Sat Feb. 9th, 8am-1pmYard & Bake SaleEverything from furniture to play things to clothing to yard & kitchen items. Text FL40438 to 56654 Port. St. Joe : 1405 Constitution Drive. (Hwy 98) 02/08, 02/09 Fri. & Sat.9a-3pHuge Yard SaleFurniture, antiques, colums, and Lots of good stuff! Come Rain or ShineText FL40605 to 56654 92191S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST SCHOOL BOARD REFERENDUM ELECTION MARCH 5, 2013 GULF COUNTY, FL The Logic and Accuracy test for the M100 Tabulation System and the Ivotronic Touch Screen System to be used for the March 5, 2013 School Board Referendum Election will be held at the Gulf County Supervisor of Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St Joe on February 13, 2013 9:00 AM EST. This test is open to the public. John M. Hanlon Supervisor of Elections Gulf County, Florida February 7, 2013 *Adopt*:Active educated couple yearn to share LOVE of outdoors, music, each other w/baby *Dirk & Claudia* Expenses Paid FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 92087S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of the following amendments and Ordinances with the following titles: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; WHEREBY AMENDING ORIGINAL GULF COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL ORDINANCE NUMBER 2005-24 AND THEREAFTER ITS AMENDMENT THROUGH ORDINANCE NUMBER 2008-20 AND HEREIN AMENDING BY ADOPTION OF “GULF COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL ORDINANCE” WHEREBY PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY AND ENFORCEMENT; PROVIDING FOR ADOPTION BY REFERENCE: FLORIDA STATUTES RELATING TO ANIMAL CONTROL, ANIMAL WELFARE AND ANIMAL CRUELTY; PROHIBITION AGAINST NUISANCE ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR HUMANE CARE GUIDELINES; PROHIBITION AGAINST ANIMALS FROM RUNNING-ATLARGE; PROVIDING FOR PERMITTING REQUIRMENTS; PROVIDING FOR MULTIPLE PET PERMITS AND KENNELING; PROHIBITION ON FEEDING FERAL ANIMALS; REGULATING SALE OF ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR PROPER REDEMPTION AND DISPOSITION OF UNWANTED AND IMPOUNDED ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR RABIES CONTROL; PROVIDING FOR PROPER HANDLING OF DANGEROUS AND AGGRESSIVE ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR SPAY AND NEUTERING REQUIREMENTS; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE *Complete Ordinance on file in the Clerk’s Office* A first public reading and introduction will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioner’s Regular Meeting on Tuesday, February 12th at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissioner’s meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. A second reading in addition to a public hearing and consideration will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioner’s Regular Meeting on Tuesday, February 26th, at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissio-ner’s meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. All interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance and referenced amendments. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the Gulf County Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. A copy of the proposed Ordinance and amendments are available for inspection on weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and 5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY, CHAIRMAN Jan. 31, Feb. 7, 2013 90060S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL #41 Karen Chancey #52 Keresa Roberts #66 Kathie Sarllento Will be up for sale on February 22, 2013, 8:30 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. February 7, 14, 2013 91923S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENT Pursuant to Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the position of Emergency Management Director, Public Works Director, and Maintenance Superintendent as Senior Management Class Positions under the Florida Retirement System, effective October 1, 2012. /s/ Tynalin, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk January 31, 2013 89996S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-201CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES A. GUFFEY and JENNIFER A. BARNES, f/k/a JENNIFER A. GUFFEY, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of foreclosure entered December 13, 2012 in the above-styled cause, the Clerk of Court for Gulf County, Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder at the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL, 32456, on February 21, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. EST the following described property: Lot 17, Block C, Seven Springs Lake Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida at Plat Book 5, Pages 17 and 18. Parcel ID: 02624-460R (the “Property”). ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 18th day of January 2013. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Jan 31, Feb 7, 2013 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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B8| The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtected H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .......................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ............$600 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ 10X15 STORAGE AND POOL ...................................$950 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ POOL $150/ NIGHTLY OR $700/WEEKLY 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Help seniors in your community: Make informed choices about their health insurance Answer Medicare questions and resolve problems Save money on their prescription medications Learn about programs they may be eligible forBilingual volunteers are encouraged to call1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337) REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! NORTH FLORIDA CHILD DEVELOPMENT, INC.JOB ANNOUNCEMENTS Substitute Teachers … Gulf CountySeeking quali ed applicants for Substitute Teacher positions at their Gulf County Centers. Assist teaching sta with schedules, routines, and activities. Requirements include an High School Diplolma; some experience teaching in early childhood setting, and training courses and certi cations mandated by DCF. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL 32465 or email smcgill@ oridachildren.org. Closing Date: February 15, 2013 € DFWP/MF/6-6/EOE € C14GU0134 € C14GU0624Infant/Toddler Teachers … North Gulf CountySeeking 2 positions of Infant and Toddler Teachers in North Gulf County. The teacher prepares and implements appropriate curriculum for individuals and small groups. Must have a minimum of a CDA (FCCPC) or Associates degree or higher in Early Childhood Education; 2 years experiences in an early childhood setting working with infants and toddlers preferred and certi cates for state mandated courses. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL 32465 or email smcgill@ oridachildren.org. Closing Date: February 15, 2013 € DFWP/MF/6-6/EOE € C14GU0134 Family Case Manager … North Gulf CountySeeking quali ed applicant for Family Case Manager in North Gulf County. Works with families to enhance the quality of their lives and support them in their e orts to reach established goals. Must have a minimum of a Bachelors degree in Social Work or related eld; 2 years experiences in social work eld. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL 32465 or email smcgill@ oridachildren.org. Closing Date: February 15, 2013 € DFWP/MF/6-6/EOE € C14GU0134 MUSIC FACULTYTeach music courses including but not limited to Music Theory, Sight Singing/Ear Training, direct performing groups, and maintain o ce hours & recruit students. Requires MS degree in Music with 18 graduate hours outside of music education, ability to drive 15-passenger van & valid FL drivers license. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 3/22/13. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www. gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 TECHNICAL COORDINATORServe as the technical coordinator for all events in the Amelia Tapper Center for the Arts, and supervise set, sound and lighting construction for the theatre program. Requires BS degree (MS preferred) in technical theatre eld; minimum two years experience working in a technical theatre capacity; ability to drive 15-passenger van + trailer and valid FL drivers license. Open Until Filled with review starting 3/22/13. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/ hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 NOW HIRING Scallop Cove, 4310 Cape San Blas Road, is looking for Full Time Permanent Positions as well as Summer Help. Must be dependable, honest and have the ability to get to and from work. Starting pay is $8.00/hour with increased pay for work performance after 90 day period. Responsibilities include retail sales, cashier, stocking, customer service, deli food prep, among other things. Must be able to work well with others and have a great attitude with the general public.COME IN AND GET AN APPLICATION AND ASK FOR MELISSIA OR JILLWe are also looking for individuals to work March and April only to handle spring break. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Wewa Lot 3, wooded lot, great campsite or for home, Paid &17k, Best Deal ever $9k. No owner financing. (850) 348-6606/ or janice50 griffin@yahoo.com 2001 Fleetwood 14’ x 68’ mobile home for sale to be moved by buyer, Asking $9,500, NADA appraisel OBO; Call 850-247-9450 to set up appointment St George IslandBeach Front 3 Br, 2 Ba $1500 mo + $1500 deposit. Call Pets upon approval 816-698-2405 Year Round Rental. 3br 2ba w/ deep water dock 1st/ last + sec/ deposit $750 Call (850) 348-7774 Mexico Beach 3 Br/ 2 Ba, Utilties Inc., $700/ month + Dep, NO Pets, (850) 544-2218 Cape San Blas 2 BR/2BA, $1,400.00 mo., unfurn,. 1 yr. lease. 850-370-6007 Port St Joe Beach 4 Br/ 2 Ba, 2 car Garage, one block from the beach, No Pets. $950/ month. (850) 544-2218 Buy it! Classified. 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Humane society saves neglected dogBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Orson arrived at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society is less than idyllic condition. The chocolate lab, pure-bred by all indications, had been picked up by county Animal Control of cer Roland Jones in the Stone Mill Creek area when Orson stumbled into a strangers yard in the rst week of January. Orsons future was bleak. He could only use three legs, he was emaciated and lethargic, and he had broken teeth, said Melody Townsend, director of the Humane Society. We had our vet do an assessment, and he said he had one dislocated hip, likely from being hit by a car, and the other hip was injured, sad to say, by a gunshot, Townsend said, noting that in the past couple of months the Humane Society has taken in at least six dogs that have been shot. The shame of it all, Townsend noted, was that Orson once had belonged to somebody. The fur on his neck showed a line where Orson had worn a collar. That he indicates he belonged to somebody for a long time, Townsend said. To top it off, Orson tested positive for heartworms. 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, FEBRUARY 7, 2013 quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 17 Woman celebrates 100th birthday, B1 Humane society saves neglected dog The shame of it all, Townsend noted, was that Orson once had belonged The fur on his neck showed a line where Orson had worn a That he indicates he belonged to somebody for a long time, Townsend said. To top it off, Orson tested positive for heartworms. Humane society saves neglected dog The fur on his neck showed a line where Orson had worn a That he indicates he belonged to somebody for a long To top it off, Orson tested Dodson named Teacher of the YearBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Carmel Dodson wasnt so much surprised when Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton strolled into her thirdgrade room at Port St. Joe Elementary School. As Dodson said later, she was a bit frightened. Any fear was unwarranted, as highlighted by the decorative plant Norton was carrying, as Nortons arrival was to recognize Dodson as Gulf District Schools Teacher of the Year for 2013. Dodson, a reading teacher at the elementary school, was selected from fellow nalists T.C. Brewer, a science teacher from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School; Jay Bidwell, who teaches Spanish at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School; and language arts teacher Misty Harper from Wewahitchka Elementary School. All four were voted their respective schools teacher of the year by their peers. All were evaluated by an out-ofcounty group last week. This is more scary than the evaluation, Dodson said after composing herself and wiping away a few tears. I really just cant believe this; that is about all I can say. I give everything, my heart, every day. There are a lot of deserving teachers who do the same thing. The kids teach me, my coteachers teach me as I teach them. It is a team effort every day, 24 hours a day. That team effort was on full display as Norton arrived. Third-grade teachers had their students huddled and waiting in the third-grade pod and the kids poured in to cheer for Dodson. Dodson is known as a caring and devoted teacher, one who goes the extra mile for students, from writing grants to the Gulf Education Foundation to bring innovative programs into the classroom to spearheading the creation of the schools butter y garden. She is particularly involved in assisting those who struggle, Port St. Joe Elementary School Principal Sue Gannon said. Carmel is a great teacher, very innovative, Gannon said. She is always looking TIM CROFT | The StarSuperintendent of Schools surprised Carmel Dodson with a plant and recognition as Gulf County Teacher of the Year.See TEACHER A3 PSJRA workshop eyes park plansBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Plans for a bayfront park in Port St. Joe were examined during a public workshop again last week, but the Cape San Blas Lighthouse remained a primary focus for opponents of the park plans. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency held a second public workshop as part of the due diligence phase, aimed at securing public input, for a new park to be constructed along the bay front. The meeting took on more import recently when city commissioners named a focus group of 14 to serve as a sounding board for ideas for the park. However, barely half of the focus group members attended the workshop. The public workshops, Eric Davidson of the planning team explained, were aimed at continuing the conversation about what would and would not work with a proposed new park, with a planning label of BayPark, but one which will incorporate much of George Core Park. The objective with a master plan like this is to achieve some sort of strategic objective, Davidson said. This is just the start. This is just part of the conversation. The goal of the park is to get locals and tourists alike to the waterfront and to connect with the Reid Avenue business district, Gail Alsobrook, director of the PSJRA said. The opportunity was there, she added, to create a unique destination along the coast. We want people to stop, Alsobrook said. We want them to nd out who we are, what this town is, what it offers. This is the best part of the process.See WORKSHOP A10 Subscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5Letters to the Editor . . . . . . .A5Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A8 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A9School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B5Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-B8TABLE OF CONTENTS PHOTO COURTESY OF MELODY TOWNSENDNJROTC RANKS THRIVINGPHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The StarUnder the watchful eyes of Commander Michael Egan, unit commander Javarri Beachum begins the drill segment of the inspection. With unit commander Javarri Beachum (left) leading, Commander Michael Egan inspects the troops, asking questions about the NJROTC program while examining uniforms and appearance.PORT ST. JOE NJROTC PROGRAM UNDERGOES INSPECTIONSSee DOG A6By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Four years ago the NJROTC program at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School was almost a casualty of district budget woes. Four years later, the ranks are bulging. The NJROTC program had its annual inspection last week as the cadets demonstrated their skills and military manners and put on display the rapid growth of the program over the past four years under Lt. Commander Marty Jarosz (Ret.). We are growing steadily, Jarosz said. In four years, we have more than doubled our numbers and we have kids that want to do this but who cant t it into their class schedule. We cant do the NJROTC program without a lot of support. Support from parents, from teachers, from other students. They accept NJROTC as part of the fabric of the high school and part of the fabric of the community. And that community is what this county stands for.See NJROTC A7

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013By LAUREN SAGE REINLIE 315-4445 | @LaurenRnwfdn lreinlie@nwfdailynews.com HURLBURT FIELD This past Sunday, 15 airmen lined along the sidewalk in the morning sun. They read the names of their ve fallen comrades, hoisted their 40-pound rucksacks onto their backs and took their rst brisk steps. More than 450 miles of winding road lay before them. The men are marching day and night to Tampa in remembrance of the ve special operations airmen from Hulburt Field who were killed in action last year. They expect to arrive Friday. They were in Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe on Monday, staying overnight at the Port Inn in Port St. Joe. Were honoring our heroes step by step, said Sgt. Deon McGowen, who organized the rucksack march. Its great today, tomorrow is going to be tough, Tuesday is going to be even harder. The men who were killed were the marchers friends, roommates and brothers-in-arms. Mitch Sherman is marching for his best friend, Capt. Ryan Hall, who was killed at age 30 when his U-28A plane went down near Djibouti, Africa, on Feb. 18, 2012. Sherman said he has known people who were killed during his career, but never anyone he was as close to as Hall. Its been a real challenge, Sherman said of the year since the crash. Its tough because we all have to move on, but it catches up with you every now and then. Three other special operations airmen, Capt. Nicholas Whitlock, 29, 1st Lt. Justin Wilkens, 26, and Senior Airman Julian Scholten, 26, were also killed in the crash. They were returning from a mission when the plane went down. About a week later, on Feb. 28, 2012, another Hurlburt airman, Lt. Col. John Loftis, 44, was shot to death at his desk during an attack on the Interior Ministry in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack. Loftis wife, Holley, and his two daughters were there Sunday to see the marchers off. It means a lot to us that they would do this, Holley said. They have taken the time and taken the effort to remember the people who gave their lives for our country. The marchers are also raising money for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation, which provides scholarships for the children of Special Ops servicemen who are killed in action. Two Hurlburt airmen are en route to Tanzania to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro as part of the effort. By Sunday afternoon, they had raised over $8,000. They hope to reach $50,000 by the end of the march, McGowen said. The men will march in a relay to Tampa; at least two will be on the road at all times. Each will likely cover at least 100 miles over the next ve days. They began training in October, walking six miles every Wednesday and eight to 12 every weekend. Most have never done anything like it before. Im not built for it really. Im a pilot, joked Tom Leyden, one of the marchers who is also a U-28 pilot and served with the men that died in the plane crash. Its going to be grueling, but its a great sacri ce to dedicate this to those ve fallen. This is the second march Hurlburt airmen have made to Tampa. Last year, McGowen organized a similar event to honor his friends who died in a helicopter crash in 2011. He is the only one returning for the march this year. The marchers will end their journey at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, headquarters for all Special Operations forces. They will march to a wall etched with the names of all the special operations servicemen who have been killed in action. You can rub your hand along the wall, for these guys who have fallen, and you know they gave the ultimate sacri ce, McGowen said, choking back tears before the marchers took off Sunday. Thats whats going to get you through this. Chaplain Jonathan Hurt, of the 1st Special Operations Wing, said it was going to be a tough few days, but the men who are participating will never forget the miles they gave to those who were lost. With every step, with every strained muscle and every drop of sweat, we honor their sacri ces, he said. TANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS.NoAppointmentNecessary Walk-ins Welcome N o A ppointment N ecessary Walk-ins Welcome Valentines Day & Gift Baskets Available 7 FOILS for $29.00(cut not included)Expires 2/28/13 FREEParan Spa Hand Treatment with every Full Color ServiceExpires 2/28/13 Spa Pedi and Mani for $35.00Expires 2/28/13 DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net Valentines Day Surf and Turf Special $20.95 Ronnie Bs Steak & SeafoodRestaurant & Lounge Dinner includes:8-10oz Angus Ribeye, 6 Large Butteried Fried Shrimp, Your Choice of Side Item & Salad Bar or upgrade to Lobster Tail for additional $5.00FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: (850)227-1386 aer 4:00 EST Like Us On Facebook! Located:Behind Centennial Bank Bldg with views of the St. Joseph Bay WANT TO HELP? To donate, nd out more information and track the groups march visit their Facebook page Air Commando Ruckers or their page at rstgiving. com under Air Commando Ruck & Climb.March honors fallen comradesCOURTESY OF BILL FAUTHOne team of Special Ops airmen on their way from to Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe, where they stayed Monday night. THE PORT ST. JOE STARFIND US ON FACEBOOK

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for ways to help her students, whether working on their weaknesses or playing to their strengths. She is very much concerned about those students with special needs, who might not come from a great home life, who struggle in the classroom, who might not be our top students. Or, as her former principal Melissa Ramsey, now the district supervisor for curriculum and testing said, Dodsons heart always is evident. Whether donating money for a childs lunch or class supplies, or allowing a child in a tough home situation the safety of her home, Dodson is present when her students need her, Ramsey said. She is a nurturer, that is a good word to describe her, Ramsey said. She donates her time, energy and money to her students. She wholeheartedly cares about her students. She is totally dedicated and gives above and beyond every single day. I put her wherever there was a need, she is that good and caring with her students. Dodson will go on to represent the district in state Teacher of the Year competition, the winner to be announced in the spring during a convention in Orlando. As Gulf Countys Teacher of the Year, Dodson will attend the convention and participate in a series of workshops. This is an A school, and I cant think of a better honor, Norton said after hugging Dodson. We are honored to honor her. Helping Clients Keep More Of What They Earn All Tax Services IRS Problem Resolution Enterprise Zone Tax Incentives QuickBooks Pro Advisor Business Formation Management Consulting Centenial Bank Building202 Marina Drive, Suite 303 Port St. Joe, FL 32456(850) 229-1040keith@keithjonescpa.comMEMBER: AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPASKEITH L. JONES, CPAACCOUNTING, TAX & CONSULTING SERVICES WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Family Care and Rotating Specialty Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST135 Avenue G, ApalachicolaQuick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-653-8853 ext. 118 LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, February 7, 2013 Third-grade students from Port St. Joe Elementary crowd around their reading teacher Carmel Dodson after she was named Gulf County Teacher of the Year in a surprise classroom celebration Tuesday.TIM CROFT | The Star TEACHER from page A1 THE PORT ST. JOE STARFIND US ON FACEBOOK @PSJ_StarFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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I know my Law and Order. As most any family member will attest I have likely seen every episode over the 20-year reign of that cops and lawyers procedural at least 10 times apiece. There are some episodes I could probably recite on the spot, line for line. I can give you the timeline for every detective, every assistant district attorney and every district attorney on that show from the original pilot episode. I can pick out actors and, in a heartbeat, click off the general plotline and possibly year that they appeared in other episodes and what character they played and how many people they killed. I have seen Jack McCoys eyebrows arch more times than I could count and watched Ben Stone there is a time warp hold his glasses while trapping some defendant with sheer indignation. And I have heard plenty of speeches about the jobs of the police and the district attorneys and serving the public and holding that ideal up as paramount what serves the people. Dick Wolf, the creator of that show and its many spinoffs, is a spinner of myths. Because if there is any way to explain how the public was served by a recently closed state attorney investigation into the 2012 election campaign it sure hasnt been speechi ed. Where are you Jack when we need you? The latest development arrived in the past couple of weeks as the matter of removing the president of Citizens Improving Gulf County, a political action committee established last year and with support throughout the county, was stopped. Turned out that the Supervisor of Elections Of ce was not comfortable just taking the word of the state attorney that Jim Garth should be removed from the voter rolls without any evidence. And the state Division of Elections could not nd a trail of a felony conviction that according to Garth did not involve a court, jury, judge, jail or booking and could only date to more than four decades ago or the need to restore civil, voting, rights. The State Attorneys Of ce communicated that the process of removing a voter from the rolls could stop at this time. So either Garth did or did not have a felony conviction. Either he voted illegally for years or not. Either Garth was able to pass every background check, but one, over the span of 40 years or not. This is the conclusion of an investigation into the alleged extortion of a county commission candidate? I have seen enough Law and Order to wonder about that one. This I do know and what is known should provide pause for every citizen of this county, every taxpayer. What is known about this case should enrage all the Second Amendment stalwarts worried about gun control from Washington because this is about the amendment that came rst and the threat is much closer to home. What is known is that public money was used in this investigation. That public money helped drive an investigation that started, based on the le released to the public, on a passel of hearsay I know my Law and Order as I said that could fairly classi ed as the recitation of a sandbox schoolyard spat. What is the old adage about sticks and stones and words? This is all about words communicated through a phone chain that would rival any backroom game of Post Of ce. Public money went into investigating and interviewing and putting a recording device on a sitting county commissioner in order to gather evidence. Public money was devoted to investigating an organization and its president that had committed the crime, by all indications from the public le, of simply using politics to battle politics in a county election. A group that dared to question leadership by, again, according to the nal investigative le, sending a letter to said commissioner raising an issue that remains the core of an ongoing investigation by the Florida Commission on Ethics. A group that exercised that fundamental right spelled out in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to assemble and protest government. And public money was also used to gather less than attering information on others, to even threaten them with possible indictment, as was spelled out in the letter that originally closed the case in October and did not reference Garth. Finally, public money was expended in initially recommending the removal of a voter from the voter rolls and then when the rubber hit the road and evidence had to be provided, recommending stopping the process. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the State Attorneys Of ce are so rolling in public money they have suf cient resources to devote to this, what could be fairly described as an investigation into critics of Gulf County government? This investigation merits expending those resources instead of, say, solving the murder of Mary Thomas which remains unsolved more than six years after she was found brutally murdered in woods off Avenue A? Now, if Commissioner Tan Smiley wants to grind an axe about investment in the white and minority communities, as he did at the end of the last Board of County Commissioners meeting, there is some genuine fuel. So the real question I have, given my extensive background of viewing Law and Order, is how exactly did this investigation and devotion of public resources (read: other peoples money) serve the public? From what is known, Jack McCoys eyebrows would be knitting a sweater by now.Case closed?While sitting in my den chair the other night, I heard the jingling of change hitting the oor. I looked down and saw that the change from my pockets was of course falling out and hitting the oor. It wasnt enough to buy a gallon of gas or even a cup of coffee, but it was mine so I picked it up. It brought back wonderful memories of going to my Papas house on weekends when I was a little boy. My older brother and I would ip the cushions on Grandmamas worn out green sofa knowing we would nd change that had fallen from Papas pockets. Papa owned a coin operated car wash and was a change hound. He was always rolling quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies to take to the bank. It was not uncommon to nd $5 worth of change in Grandmamas sofa, and that was a lot of money. In 1970, gas was 36 cents a gallon, bread was 24 cents a loaf, eggs were 51 cents a dozen and a postage stamp was 6 cents. Doing the math, $5 would have almost bought me 14 gallons of gas back then. I didnt need that much gas, the most I ever needed was about a gallon for the minibike that had a Briggs & Stratton lawnmower engine running it (when it would run). Papa usually supplied the gas for it also, so times were good. Sometimes I wonder if Papa planted that money in the sofa or if it actually came out of his pockets. He lived frugally, but well. He seemed to always wear the same couple of shirts and pairs of pants. I dont even remember him wearing the new annel shirts we would give him at Christmas. Most of our grandparents grew up in a time where frugality did not mean doing without, but rather being thankful for what they had worked for. Times have changed. Many folks are struggling to just get by, seeing that what they work for just doesnt seem to be enough. There are others who seem to be a little lazy, expecting someone else to dump money in their sofas for them to nd. What do I mean? Take for example, rolling coins to take to the bank. There are machines now in grocery stores where you can take your coins and dump them in; the machine will give you paper money back. Great idea isnt it? Not really. The machine takes 8% as a fee. In other words, if you put $10 worth of quarters in the machine, it will give you $9.20 back. Want to talk about a stupid tax? I think that borders on it. Folks justify this by saying, Its more convenient. If you have that much money to spend on convenience, I understand. Let me note here, if you have $10,000 in quarters, I will roll them for you for $800. The other option if you dont want to roll them yourself, is to take them to the bank. The teller may look at you kind of funny, and might even complain, but money is money. We take clothes that the children have outgrown and other things that we no longer need to the local thrift store operated by the Disabled American Veterans. If they are still useable, we would like to think that someone could get some use out of them. The thrift store sells these items to fund various charities, most importantly helping disabled veterans. I enjoy going to the thrift store, not only to donate things, but to nd odds and ends that I nd interesting. I look for cast iron skillets that folks have given up on, golf clubs and things that remind me of when I was young (and ipping sofa cushions). Recently, I was reading a story about folks who go to thrift stores to nd money. This was not a story about nding treasures at the thrift store to sell to someone else at a pro t, but literally going to the thrift store and looking for money. This concerned me, because at rst sight, it seemed a lot like stealing. The more I read, I A tad more than a pound of esh Keyboard KLATTERINGSHoping for change TIM CROFTStar news editor It is well documented that the United States of America is something akin to $17 trillion dollars in debt. Im not even going to get into here how much money that is cause I dont know. I care, of course, we all do! But $17 trillion of anything is light years beyond my comprehension. Heres what Id like someone to explain to me this morning. Who, exactly, do we owe that money to? It cant be France. Weve done bailed them out twice. We lend leased every thing we had to England back in 1940. I dont think theyve paid us back yet. It cant be Germany. After we attened them in World War II, we immediately paid for most of the rebuilding. Germany, more than any country on earth, has proved that old Will Rogers adage, The best thing a country can do is to get into a war with America ... and lose. It obviously isnt Greece, Spain or Italy. They are all three broke ... and I dont think even they could spend $17 trillion that fast! Im running out of countries! Americans have bought enough Toyotas to make Japan rich ... but that enterprising nation had rather sell us electronic devices and Godzilla movies than loan us money. The oil-rich Middle East nations dont trust us enough to loan us anything. Plus, wed have to turn over Israel in any deal with them. We all know it is not GM, Chrysler or Fannie Mae. Those folks seem to have some kind of open account with Washington. You would think a United States of America note holder would naturally be one of the big banks ... but that cant be the case. Our government has been giving them money just to keep them open. If somehow we were indebted to them to the tune of $17 trillion, it would be the other way around! Questions abound here. How do you get seventeen trillion dollars in debt? That, in itself, is near bout unfathomable! Youd have to have government of cials spending around the clock, or just giving it away, to unload that kind of dough. Someone must be laying awake at night, scheming up ways to reach such debt heights! Ive heard of pork barreling, expense accounts sinkholes, foreign reparations and the cost of doing business but something here has gotten way out of hand. And please, dont give us the ole best interest of the country speech! I read recently that our government spent right at $18 million dollars on a test project to create an in atable home for astronauts in space. Well there you go! Why didnt they just borrow a pup tent from the nearest Boy Scout? Dont tell me weve got people in charge of our money that have eyes that are bigger than their stomachs! What kind of interest do you pay on $17 trillion? I bought a house once for $24,000. I spent the rst 15 years (of a 25 year note) just paying on the interest. How long do you suppose we are going to be working off this debt? Ive heard talk of grandchildren and great-grandchildren being saddled with this liability. What kind of legacy is that for goodness sakes! Its a dilemma that has caused more nger pointing than who shot J.R. What did America put up as collateral on this deal? Could it have been the Washington Monument, Congress ... or maybe Pennsylvania? Would someone hold the Grand Canyon until they were repaid in full? Theres nothing in this country worth $17 trillion ... except its people. Do you reckon were being leveraged here? It stands to reason that we owe this money to someone or some entity. Youd think a Donald Trump or a Warren Buffett would be way too smart to loan money to what might be a sinking ship. I keep thinking who, or what, has got $17 trillion to loan? You dont reckon Wall Street is behind any of this, do you? I am as puzzled as all get out over this thing. Doc Bell was the president of the McKenzie Banking Company when I was a boy. He was an outstanding Christian. He sang in the choir and would occasionally provide a solo as the special music. He was a super fair man with a big heart ... but sooner or later, no matter what you owed him, no matter who owed him, hed be around to collect! Am I the only person here wondering whats going to happen to our nation when whoever we owe this money to shows up to collect? Someone said we are borrowing it from ourselves. If that is the case, Id say lets give it back! Some have suggested that we just take it out of the National Treasury on paper or, if needed, we simply print more money. That sounds like voodoo economics to me. I dont think you can voodoo yourself into a $17 trillion dollar hole. I borrowed $2 once from my older brother to take Charlotte Melton to hear Bo Diddley over at the Bethel College auditorium. I gured hed forget about it in a few weeks. He didnt. When I couldnt come up with the money, I countered with We didnt sign no papers. He beat the living daylights out of me for 14 days hand running. I reckon he was exacting his pound of esh. When it became apparent to me he wasnt satis ed with the esh, I stole two dollars from my little brother and paid him back! $17 trillion is too much to steal ... and Im not sure America has got that much esh left. Respectfully,Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, February 7, 2013 APage 4SectionSee CRANKS A5

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, February 7, 2013 APage 5Section CRANKS from page A4determined that it wasnt like stealing, it was stealing. These folks gave instructions on where to look to nd money while shopping in a thrift store. Reading through the ideas, they all seemed like something a kid would do. However, this article was meant for adults. It was noted that you should climb under desks and tables, pulling out drawers and looking under shelves. The article said that many older people will tape envelopes of cash in these places and forget about them. It is important to note here that the article did not suggest that you buy the item rst, it noted to just take the money. Other places the folks suggested to look included mens suit pockets, pants pockets, luggage compartments, book pages and also of course, under seat cushions of sofas and chairs. Again, they did not note that you should buy the item; they just noted that you could nd money there. If thats not stealing from the folks at the thrift store, Im not sure what it is. The way I see it, its the same as going over to somebodys house and ransacking it, looking for money. Perhaps these same folks go to a restaurant and steal the servers tips to pay for their own meals. It is bothersome. Times are hard; it seems we have to make enough for our families and somebody elses. If its for folks that cant work, Im ok with that. If its for folks who spend their time not working and going through other folks sofa cushions, Im not ok with that. Im sure this wasnt the change you were expecting. It seldom is. Always hope for the best and prepare for the worst. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com.Sinful people, not guns, are the problemBy ED MCATEERContributing Writer Like most of America, I am saddened with the recent school shootings across America. Loss of life is never good, and we can only wonder how those who commit such atrocities can do so. Tragic as the shootings are, do we, as a people need to heed President Obamas gun control concerns? As a believer in Christ, is it right to own a gun? Debates over whether to control guns or how much to control them depend largely on political and philosophical arguments, not moral ones. This is not to say there is no moral component to the issue. The gun itself is amoral, an object that can be used for good or for evil. More important is the morality of the person wielding the gun, and that is often the missing consideration in the guncontrol argument. The fact that someone may use guns to commit a crime does not mean guns are the problem. Sin is the problem, and that is a moral and spiritual issue. Since the beginning of humanity, people have been killing other people, with and without weapons. Taking a weapon out of circulation might make murder more dif cult but not impossible. The recent shootings across the United States have caused much heartache. The senseless and tragic incidents also renewed the intensity of discussion about American gun laws. Politicians, athletes, and theologians have all weighed in on the issue of gun control. Guns are readily available in America, and ownership is protected by the Constitution. So, how should a Christian view gun control? Does the Bible have anything to say that applies? Written before the invention of any gun, the phrase gun control is not found in Scripture. However, the Bible records many accounts of wars, battles, and the use of weapons. Warfare is presented as an unavoidable part of living in a fallen world, and weaponry is a necessary part of warfare. Weapons in the Bible were also used for personal protection. In parts of Israel, robbers were common and people carried weapons when they traveled. Carrying a weapon for self-defense is never condemned in the Bible. In fact, Luke 22:35-38 mentions it in a positive light by Jesus Himself. Christians are called to submit to governing authorities, and they are to obey the laws of the land. This would have to apply to gun laws, too. If American gun laws change, Christians should submit to these changes and work through democratic means toward any desired alternatives. The Bible does not forbid possessing weapons, and neither does it command such possession. Laws may come and go, but the goal of the believer in Jesus Christ remains the same: to glorify the Lord. Another biblical principle to consider is that all who draw the sword will die by the sword. Jesus said this to Peter when Peter tried to mount a reckless defense of Jesus against the mob that had come to arrest Him. Peters actions were not only useless against such a large crowd armed with swords and clubs, but his foolish behavior also refuted Jesus submissive attitude and worked against ful lling Scripture. There is a time for war and a time for peace, and Peter confused the two. Christianity supports personal freedom. When Scripture does not clearly address a particular issue, there is freedom for individual choice. America has historically embraced personal freedom that resonates with this principle, and the founding documents guarantee wide freedoms regarding rearms. Some may point to Matthew 5:9 in which Jesus pronounces a blessing on the peacemakers, and apply it to the issue of gun control. The idea is that guns are opposing to peace. This may be more of a philosophical or political idea than a theological one. There is nothing theologically, or even logically, that links guns to a lack of peace; sometimes, guns help keep civil peace. As I see it, the use of guns is a matter of personal conviction. I believe the Bible supports this train of thought. There is nothing unspiritual about owning a gun or knowing how to use one. There is nothing wrong with protecting oneself or loved ones, even if it involves the use of weapons. We need not pretend there is never a need for guns, but pointing a gun at a person should always be a last resort. We should seek to defuse threats without violence whenever possible. With the authority God has entrusted to it, the government has the right to allow or disallow gun ownership to whatever degree it considers right. We, as citizens, are called to submit to whatever gun control laws the government institutes. This is not, however, a statement on the wisdom of gun control. There are good reasons to allow lawabiding citizens to own guns. Ultimately, guns are not the problem. Sinful people are the problem.Stealing from the needyDear Editor: Recently my wife and I went through all our clothing and decided to contribute our unneeded excess clothing to The Care Closet on Fourth Street in Port St. Joe. My wife delivered our contribution to the bin in front of the Care Closet building on Sunday afternoon at approximately 2:30 p.m. We knew the Care Closet folks would receive and sort our clothing in the next day or two. We didnt expect that someone would steal that clothing the same afternoon and pass them off to someone who would start posting pictures of them for sale on a Facebook Yard Sale website that very night and the next day. Fortunately, our daughter spotted them online and advised us on Monday afternoon. That evening, we contacted the Port St. Joe Police, and the investigating of cer was able to retrieve the stolen property that very evening, explaining that the person who posted the items for sale advised that she was not aware that the property was stolen and gladly gave them up. What we have learned from this experience is that nothing is sacred to some people who are even willing to steal items intended for the truly needy. Secondly, we will deliver any future contributions in person to representatives of the chosen charity to make sure they are received and not stolen. Other charitable organizations have had similar problems, including the Faiths Thrift Shop at the Human Society here in town and Goodwill. So, lets all continue to contribute needed goods to these ne charities, but lets do it as outlined above so they reach the right people.Dan & Barb Van TreesePort St. Joe No more school taxesDear Editor: The world is going crazy, and sometimes I think I am the only sane person left. Why would anybody vote to raise their own taxes? Oh, I forgot, everyone is allowed to vote, including those who do not own property, so to them it doesnt matter how much homeowners have to pay. Its just like with federal income taxes with almost 50 percent of Americans paying zero taxes. For those who do not pay, why should they care how much the others have to pay? I remember the last time we voted to temporarily raise the mil rate to help fund the schools, and a conversation I had with a particular young man. This young man, who was in favor of raising the rate, made the statement that he did not want his young son attending an inferior school system, which I could not argue with. However, I did mention he did own a home so he would be unaffected by any new tax. Since he was not married to the mother of his child I seriously doubt he even contributed to the support of his child. In case the school board hasnt noticed the demographics are changing. More and more of our homeowners are seniors and are on xed incomes and do not have children in the public schools. Yet these same folks are bearing the lions share of the nancial responsibility for funding our schools. I fear things are going to get a lot worse before they start getting better. Starting in January my health care premiums jumped a whopping 13.5 percent. Both my wife and I are on Medicare yet I still must pay almost $700 per month for my secondary health care insurance. God only knows what the cost will be when Obamacare is fully implemented next year. I might be stupid, but I think the school board could do a much better job of living with the reality of the economic situation of today. The school system needs to do more with less instead of asking the citizens of Gulf County to do more with less. It seems to me a better solution would be to go to the state legislature for a statewide solution to the problem. I personally think the real estate tax system in Florida is in need of some serious xing. The system, as it now is, makes it dif cult for young couples just starting out to purchase their rst homes. The current system needs to be scrapped and replaced with one that has everyone paying a more balanced amount. I dont mind doing my fair share, but I also think those parents who have children in school but do not own property should also pay as well. Yes, I understand the landlord pays taxes and those taxes come from the rent; however, most renters do not consider this when they vote to raise someone elses taxes. To me the sales tax is the best tax because it touches everyone and it doesnt matter where the money comes from. Honest and dishonest alike pay the same tax when they choose to purchase something and the added bonus is we get the help of those visiting our state as well.Marcus SturdivantPort St. JoeExplanation owedDear Editor: This is in response to the recent article titled PAC President Voting Rights Removal Stopped. As Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon stated, stripping a person of the right to vote is a major thing to happen without evidence. Any citizen should, regardless of their political persuasion, be incensed that an attempt was made to prevent a citizen from voting without evidence. State Attorney Mr. Glenn Hess in a letter to Mr. Hanlon stated that he found evidence of a conviction in Jim Garths past and apparently his voting rights had not been restored. Then in a phone call, Mr. Hess recommended the removal process be stopped. Why stop the removal process, Mr. Hess, if you have evidence of a felony? Why? You either have evidence or you dont. Mr. Garth stated that your of ce would be in touch, and the news media has also asked for clari cation, and your of ce remains silent. Mr. Hess, you are an elected of cial and you owe the people of Gulf County an explanation or you should consider removing the word Honorable from your name.Al Whit eldWewahitchka COLUMNThe Bible does not forbid possessing weapons, and neither does it command such possession. Laws may come and go, but the goal of the believer in Jesus Christ remains the same: to glorify the Lord.

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With local surgery and rehabilitation, the vet said he had about a 60 percent chance of surviving, Townsend said. The cost, including treatment for heart worm, would be about $3,000, precious funds for a small humane society. But there was more to Orson, estimated at about 6 years old, than the injuries, Townsend and her staff soon discovered. Orson had the friendly nature of a lab, wagging his tail incessantly around people and navigating the compound among other dogs, apparently happily, with his three good legs. We put him out for a temperament evaluation, and they fell in love with him, Townsend said. He does his sits. Hell walk up to anybody. We had to do something. The options were to perform the surgery or euthanize Orson. Townsend began reaching out to rescue groups that specialize in assisting with dif cult animal cases. A rescue shelter in Tampa responded to the call. The shelter will undertake the heart worm regimen and perform the surgeries. They have even lined up a foster home for him, Townsend said. With a light at the end of the tunnel, Townsend and her staff set out to build Orsons strength for the trip to Tampa and the looming surgeries. We treated his pain, gave him antibiotics and steroids for the cough he got from the heartworms, Townsend said. We fed him, kept him comfortable and prepared him for the trip to Tampa. Last week, Orson nally made the trip, transported to his new home in Central Florida, a fatter, happier dog, on his way to recovery and a new home. As many animals as we get, this was just a special case, Townsend said. In these kinds of cases, you have to tell yourself you are a humane society. Spay/neuter grant The St. Joseph Humane Society was recently awarded a $20,000 grant from Pet Smart Charities targeting spay and neutering of dogs in the 32456 ZIP code. The purpose of the grant is to make the biggest impact, Townsend said. The purpose is to make a large dent in a targeted area. The grant will pay for the surgeries to spay and neuter dogs and to come up with a plan to address animal over-population in that zip code, Townsend said. The vets on board for the effort are Dr. Hobson Fulmer and Dr. Albert Biaz. Weve got a year to spend it and we are really focused on the areas of Oak Grove, Highland View and North Port St. Joe, Townsend said. Townsend said the grant was important because rural communities rarely have the resources to undertake such a program. Most of similar grants target more urban or heavily populated areas, but they were impressed with our pitch to them. As for a long-term address of spay and neuter needs, Townsend said the grant provides the ability for the humane society to get out in the community to educate people on the need to spay and neuter pets. We are hoping to go into churches, Townsend said. We want to just educate people. Giving an unwanted or surprise litter away, Townsend said, does not address the problem as there is no telling where those dogs will end up and whether those offspring will be spayed or neutered. Passing on the problem, Townsend noted, does not address the problem. What happens to their offspring? she said. To download an application form to spay or neuter a dog in the 32456 ZIP code, visit sjbhumanesociety.org or fax the SJBHS at 2271191. Application forms can also be picked up at the Humane Society shelter on 10th Street in Port St. Joe or at Bow Wow Beach downtown. For additional information, call the SJBHS at 227-1103. Valentines Sweetheart SpecialFebruary 14 Cup of Lobster Bisque Sunset Rainbow Garden Salad Filet of Beef and Bahamian Lobster Tail Sugar Snap Peas Choice of Baked Potato, Sweet Potato Souf Steak Fries or Wild Rice Dinner Rolls Special Dessert Plate ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND DIGITAL PACKAGESStarting at $234 per month -Starting at $199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA CONSULTATION TO FIT YOUR BUSINESS, CALL TODAY! 850-227-4183JessicaPaterson@live.com252 Marina Drive, Port St. JoeSelling Your Home? Jessica Paterson is the ONE to CALL! LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 DOG from page A1

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The growth of the program was at full attention much of last Tuesday morning under the watchful eyes of inspector Commander Michael Egan from the Naval Salvage and Diving Station in Panama City Beach. As the school district considered cutting the program four years ago, there were 21 cadets enrolled in the program, slightly under the 10 percent threshold required of the U.S. Navy in sponsoring the program. The Navy agreed to waive that requirement for one year, the school board maintained the program and today the ranks include 51 cadets, almost 20 percent of the schools enrollment. Ive watched them for months; they are here early and stay late, working on drills and around the school, Principal Jeremy Knapp said. They are out in the community. The annual inspection is part of a points-earning process that every NJROTC program undertakes each year. Points are earned for participating in drill competitions, community and school outreach projects and other activities. The goal: to earn recognition as a Distinguished Unit or a Unit Achievement Award, the two highest honors for a NJROTC program. We are too small to earn enough points to be a Distinguished Unit but wed like that Unit Achievement, Jarosz said. We came up just a couple of points short last year. We are actually ahead of where we were last year. This is something you need to take seriously and they do. Weve worked long and hard for this. The inspection had several phases. Egan, led by unit commander Javarri Beachum, reviewed the ranks, examining uniform and appearance and also asking cadets questions about the NJROTC program and their aspirations. Cadets earning outstanding marks were recognized and congratulated personally by Egan. They did a great job today, Egan said. The program, quite honestly, is one of the strongest Ive seen. I know they are doing something right. After individual and platoon inspections, the cadets broke into groups for drills. Marching, parade formation, ri e drills, a platoon comprised entirely of females, one-by-one they marched in front of local dignitaries, parents, students, teachers and audience members. The female platoon is another testament to the growth of the Port St. Joe program. We have all kinds in our program, from honors students to ESE students, male, female, minorities, they all have to do the same things, Jarosz said. During the inspection there is an emphasis on the new cadets to show what they have learned and the seniors for their leadership. After an hour, Egan pronounced the inspection a rousing success, praised Jarosz and the support the district has provided and marveled at the picture of the future standing at attention in front of him. This is our future, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson said. I feel more con dent about the future just looking at them. To Register or for more information, please contact (850) 482-6500 or bnuccio@bigbendahec.org or Toll free 1-87-QUIT-NOW 6Interested in quitting tobacco?Please come to our upcoming Tools to Quit session. Because NOW is the best time to quit. When: Thursday March 7, 2013 Time: 11:00 AM 1:00 PM EST Where: Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, Port St. Joe, FL Conference Room ABFREE Nicotine Patches And/or Gum for program participants Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-28-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM Thursday, February 7, 2013 LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, February 7, 2013 NJROTC from page A1 TIM CROFT | The StarA platoon of female cadets undertake drills while demonstrating the programs diversity.

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Special to The StarThe new year looks like it will be another busy one on St. Vincent Island. February brings the annual meeting for the Supporters Group of the refuge and then in March the open house on the island takes place. The winter hunts are over, and the focus shifts to turtle monitoring, wolf tracking and island maintenance. This year we hope to have more local faces joining the activities on St. Vincent Island. The St. Vincent Island Supporters Group will welcome visitors to the island March 22 to explore and learn more about this island wildlife refuge. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided. More about this special event will be released next month. The three hunts that took place on St. Vincent Island this winter had mild weather and dry conditions, which produced three very successful hunts. The white-tailed Deer Archery Hunt was Nov. 15-17 and had 57 hunters participate. Thirteen deer were harvested, including four bucks and nine does. Five feral hogs also were harvested, four females and one male that weighed 103 pounds, the heaviest animal harvested in that hunt. The Sambar Deer Hunt took place Nov. 29 to Dec. 1. The Sambar deer, an elk from India, was brought to the island in the early 1900s by Dr. Pierce, who was using the island as a private exotic hunting preserve. This imported deer was the only non-native animal permitted to remain on the island after the island became part of the National Wildlife Refuge system. The Sambar deer, which can measure up to 6 feet tall weigh up to 700 pounds, acclimated to the island terrain and does not interfere with the natural habitat of the island. The harvest drew 128 hunters, who harvested 12 Sambar deer. The deer included eight stags and four hinds with dressed weight ranging from 191 to 368 pounds and two to six points. Three feral hogs also were harvested weighing 30-60 pounds. The Primitive Weapon Hunt took place Jan. 2426. One hundred and eighteen hunters harvested 28 white-tailed deer, seven feral hogs and one raccoon during this hunt. The January hunt concluded the 2012-13 winter hunting season on St. Vincent Island. Volunteers are needed by the St. Vincent Island NWR. Both outdoor and ofce-based volunteer work is available. At the Apalachicola of ce, volunteers help with visitor services, assist with administrative tasks or help write grant proposals. On the island you can help track the red wolves, join the sea turtle patrol, participate in bird counts, clean up trash on the islands beautiful beaches, remove invasive plants or assist with maintenance projects. To volunteer or learn more about how you can help, email supportstvin@hotmail.com. The monthly island tours have several more months before the summer heat and bugs arrive. All tours are on the second Wednesdays, Feb.13, March 13, April 10 and May 8. The groups enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation at www.stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You also can visit the island on your own. Do remember the island is primitive bring everything you need, including drinking water, and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Visit www.stvincentfriends.com for more information and volunteer opportunities, and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. NEW FISHING TACKLE ARRIVING DAILY!SHOPNEW ITEMS FROM PENN,SHIMANO, AND ABUGARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE OF THE NEW PENN SPINFISHER V REELSSTARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, Feb. 0772 6250% Fri, Feb. 0873 5720% Sat, Feb. 0972 59 0% Sun, Feb. 1073 6120% Mon, Feb. 1171 5610% Tues, Feb. 1267 5630% Wed, Feb. 1365 4760% 1 Fr 154am 0.2 214pm 0.7 519am 0.1 1122pm -0.1 2 Sa 243pm 0.9 3 Su 330pm 1.0 101am -0.3 4 Mo 428pm 1.2 212am -0.6 5 Tu 531pm 1.3 315am -0.7 6 We 636pm 1.4 411am -0.8 7 Th 737pm 1.4 502am -0.9 8 Fr 834pm 1.3 546am -0.8 9 Sa 929pm 1.1 621am -0.7 10 Su 1022pm 0.9 645am -0.4 11 Mo 1117pm 0.7 650am -0.2 12 Tu 105pm 0.3 629am 0.0 518pm 0.2 13 We 1221am 0.4 1244pm 0.6 537am 0.2 742pm 0.1 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Fr 644am 0.8 632pm 1.1 1240am 0.1 1209pm 0.3 2 Sa 808am 0.7 705pm 1.1 144am 0.0 1237pm 0.5 3 Su 1005am 0.6 745pm 1.2 308am -0.1 101pm 0.6 4 Mo 836pm 1.2 442am -0.2 5 Tu 941pm 1.2 602am -0.4 6 We 311pm 0.9 1057pm 1.2 707am -0.5 554pm 0.9 7 Th 331pm 1.0 802am -0.6 714pm 0.9 8 Fr 1214am 1.2 354pm 1.0 849am -0.6 812pm 0.8 9 Sa 123am 1.2 414pm 1.0 930am -0.5 901pm 0.6 10 Su 224am 1.2 431pm 1.0 1006am -0.4 947pm 0.5 11 Mo 319am 1.1 447pm 1.0 1036am -0.2 1031pm 0.3 12 Tu 412am 1.1 503pm 1.0 1102am 0.0 1115pm 0.2 13 We 503am 1.0 521pm 1.0 1125am 0.1 Gun ShowFebruary9th & 10thPanama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2077810Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 8 Thursday, February 7, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Pier/Surf InshoreMost action around town is still in the ICW canal in St. Joe. Try starting out under the powerlines and moving your way up toward the T. Live shrimp has been the bait of choice, however, Gulp shrimp and DOA are good alternatives this week. Unusually warm weather has the fish confused again in our area this week. With a cold front predicted to be moving our way, now is the time to be out on the water. Lake Wimico and parts of the Apalachicol River are seeing good sheepshead and a few stripped bass still this week. ANNUAL MEETINGThe Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge will hold its sixth annual meeting 1-4 p.m. ET Feb. 17. The meeting will take place at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center at 3915 State 30A. The Center is 4.5 miles south of the intersection of U.S. Highway 98 and County 30A in Port St. Joe and 5 miles north of the Indian Pass Raw Bar. The guest speaker for the meeting will be Erik Lovestrand, the Education Coordinator at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. The topic of his talk is The Snakes of Florida. Food will be catered by Paul Gants Bar-B-Q. Memberships will be sold at the door and you must be a member to attend. Annual memberships are $15 for individuals and $20 per family. For more information, call 229-6735. COURTESY OF TRISH PETRIEThe Sambar deer, an elk from India, was brought to the island in the early 1900s.A New Year on St. Vincent IslandSixth annual Sportsmans banquet Feb. 21 Special to The StarWhat better way to wish fall away and usher in spring than to spend the evening at the sixth annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet sharing with friends your outdoor adventures of the fall and planning new ones for the spring. One of the areas most anticipated sportsmens events is soon to occur. The date of the annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet has been set for Feb. 21. Port St. Joe Lions Club members are busy working to make this years event not only one of the biggest and best ever, but another special moment to remember. Attendees will enjoy the historic surroundings of the Port St. Joe Centennial Building while socializing with numerous area sportsmen and friends, and enjoying appetizers of Apalachicola oysters, boiled shrimp and all the trimmings beginning at 5 p.m. The beverage bar also will open at that time. At 6:30 p.m. the serious eating begins. Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left-hungry ribeye steaks will take up a goodly portion of the dinner plate, leaving just enough room for the salad, potato and rolls. Dont forget to save room for Sisters almost equally famous banana pudding. The Centennial Building will remove the threat of inclement weather impacting the evening and provide the backdrop of the historic building, erected in recognition of the signing site of Floridas First Constitution. At 7:30 p.m., its time to let a few notches out of your belt and get ready for the real excitement. More than $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through live auctions and raf es. A few of the items offered will include over 24 shotguns, hunting ri es and pistols, along with numerous other outdoor products. There will also be items available for women and children. This will mark the third year of the $8,000 cash drawing held during the event. The lucky winner could win up to $8,000 if his ticket is drawn last from the box, but each ticket holder will have a one in 25 chance of at least doubling their money. Tickets for the event are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Of ce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. The real winners at this years banquet will be the bene ciaries of the community service projects supported by the Lions Club. Almost $15,000 was raised at 2011s banquet for community service programs in the panhandle.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.comThursday, February 7, 2013 ASectionDixie Youth Baseball registrationStar staff reportThe Port St. Joe Dixie Youth Baseball League will hold registration for the upcoming season Saturday, Feb. 12 and Feb. 16 at the STAC house on Eighth Street. Times are from 9 a.m. until noon ET Saturday and 5-7 p.m. Tuesday. The league is open to all children ages 5-12 (cannot turn 13 on or before April 30). First-time players in the league must provide a copy of their birth certi cates and turn it in to the league. The cost of registration is $60. Star staff reportPhilly.com Sports, the online edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper, this week provided its rundown of the top prospects in the Philadelphia Phillies organization. Written by staff writers Bob Brookover and Matt Gelb, the list is, as the writers noted, like trying to predict the new president four years from now. I dont remember anybody having Darin Ruf on their list last year, said Joe Jordan, the Phillies director of player development, mentioning a prospect shooting up lists. But with less than 10 days left before pitchers and catchers report to Phillies camp in Clearwater for spring training, the writers compiled their list. Jordan was not part of compiling the list, but agreed to provide comment on the players listed, the writers wrote. And coming at No. 4 on the list was Port St. Joes Roman Quinn, coming off a record performance in his rst season of pro ball at short-season Class A Williamsport (PA). The writers wrote, As a shortstop, a switch-hitter and a second-round pick, Quinn is bound to be compared to Jimmy Rollins, a 1996 second-round pick, as he climbs the minorleague ladder. His 30 stolen bases were six more than any player in the New York-Penn League and his 11 triples were ve more than any player. Jordans comments: There is not a higher-ceiling player in our system if everything comes together and clicks. Roman has a lot of work to do, but what he brings to the table is really exciting. Last year was his rst as a full-time shortstop and his rst as a full-time switch hitter. We need to take our time with him, but he has a chance to impact the game in a lot of ways.STAR STAFF REPORTTwo players honored during the banquet for the 2012 Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football team were not pictured two weeks ago. Ramello Zacarro, No. 7, earned a Captains Pick award and Jarkeice Davis, No. 1, was named Offensive Player of the Year.Star staff reportLast Thursday night was dj vu for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School soccer program. Tallahassee Maclay, which ended the Lady Tiger Sharks season the prior week, ended the boys season Thursday night when an early goal held up for a 1-0 victory in a Region 1-1A quarter nal match at Sam Cox Field. The Tiger Sharks, District 1-1A champs, nish the season 13-3-1. Maclay posted only the third shutout of Port St. Joe this season. The only goal in the hardfought match came in the 10th minute and was the result, Port St. Joe coach Gary Hindley said, of miscommunication between two Port St. Joe defenders and goalkeeper Tucker Smith. Hindley noted that Smith, a senior, played a ne game and kept the score line at one as the Marauders outshot Port St. Joe 10-2. Smith had six saves. Smith, in his rst year as a soccer goalkeeper, nished with a 13-3-1 record and a 1.125 Goals Against Average. Maclay advanced to the regional semi nal on Saturday. Maclay is a ne club and is probably, as a program, still ahead of us, but we are closing the gap tremendously, Hindley said. We had a very successful season and the participation numbers continue to grow in both numbers and athleticism. We will miss our ve graduating seniors, but will still welcome back 19 returnees.Lady Tiger Sharks reach regional for 12th yearStar staff reportThey did not take away a district crown, but the Lady Tiger Sharks of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School reached the district championship game and the rst round of the regional playoffs during last weeks District 4-1A tournament at South Walton. This is the 12th consecutive year the Port St. Joe girls have reached regional play, the ninth-straight under Coach Kenny Parker. Port St. Joe played West Gadsden in the opening round of the tournament last Tuesday 49-19. The Lady Tiger Sharks never trailed, taking an 18-6 lead after one quarter, building the lead to 31-10 at halftime and nishing the third period up 44-15. Brooklyn Quinn scored 10 points to lead Port St. Joe. Callie Fleshren, Alyssa Parker and Hallie Jasinski each had eight, Shannon Pridgeaon and Maya Robbins added ve each, Teiyahna Hutchinson four and DaVida Tschudi with one. The Lady Tiger Sharks faced Blountstown, a winner over Bozeman in the opening round, in last Fridays semi nals. The two split during the regular season, each winning on its own court. Port St. Joe jumped to a 10-4 rst quarter lead and was up 17-14 at halftime. Blountstown pulled to within 28-26 after three periods and took a 30-28 lead halfway through the nal quarter. The Lady Tiger Sharks outscored Blountstown 9-2 over the nal minutes to win 37-30. Quinn led the way with 14 points. Hutchison added nine, Fleshren six, Robbins three and Parker and Jasinski each had 2. The following night the title game was no contest as top-seeded South Walton, starting ve seniors with two more seniors coming off the bench, breezed to a 50-20 win. Robbins led Port St. Joe with eight points, Hutchinson added six and Quinn and Jasinski three. Port St. Joe plays at Ponce de Leon in the Regional 1-1A quarter nals at 8 p.m. ET Tuesday. SPORTS Section Section Jordans comments: There is not a higher-ceiling player in our system if everything comes together and clicks. Roman has a lot of work to do, but what he brings to the table is really exciting. Last year was his rst as a full-time shortstop and his rst as a full-time switch hitter. We need to take our time with him, but he has a chance to impact the game in a lot of ways. Jordans comments: There is not a higher-ceiling player in our system if everything comes together and clicks. Roman has a lot of work to do, but what he brings to the table is really exciting. Last year was his rst as a full-time shortstop and his rst as a full-time switch hitter. We need to take our time with him, but he has a chance to impact the game in a lot of At right, Roman Quinn had a record-setting year in his rst year of pro ball. Philly.com Sports selected him this week the Philadelphia Phillies No. 4 prospect.Quinn named Phillies No. 4 prospect Page 9 SPECIAL TO THE STARAlyssa Parker recently was recognized during Senior Night. She is the lone graduating player on this years Lady Tiger Shark basketball team. 2012 TIGER SHARK FOOTBALL HONORS The boys celebrated a second-straight, and third in four years, District 1-1A title the week before region playoffs.Port St. Joe falls to Maclay in soccer

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What followed those introductory remarks was just over an hour of discussion pertaining to various aspects of the proposed park plans, which include three distinct portions: a promenade connecting to recreational opportunities, a marine center and the lighthouse. The lighthouse continued to be a major point of contention. Although there were some pointed questions about various proposals for the park, the most controversial is the relocation of the lighthouse to the city. As Davidson noted, the potential for the lighthouse landing at the park came after planning of the park had already begun. Finding a suitable location, particularly after the city was awarded the lighthouse by the U.S. Department of Interior in December, only then became a priority. I like the concept (of the park), said Jimmy McNeill of Indian Pass, whose mother has been among the most outspoken critics of the relocation of the lighthouse into the city. It will draw people. In another forum, I have a problem with the lighthouse. That could have been a theme for the night as Alsobrook de ected repeated questions about the relocation of the lighthouse, particularly the costs of that move, as an issue for city commissioners, not the PSJRA. The agency, she noted, was doing what it was charged by commissioners to do: use a $20,000 grant for the planning of the new park. The lighthouse, she said repeatedly, was not an issue for the PSJRA. Those are questions we are aware of and are considering, Alsobrook said after several questioned whether the city could fund the relocation and ongoing maintenance of the lighthouse. It is not anticipated it is going to be funded by tax dollars. As was noted during the workshop, the city has a pre-proposal before the county RESTORE Act committee to secure just less than $1 million for the relocation. Alsobrook said during the workshop that she envisioned public/private partnerships funding much of the cost of construction of the new park, including potentially the relocation of the lighthouse. Davidson said the lighthouse move was an opportunity under the RESTORE Act, but was not dependent on receiving any RESTORE funds. One critic of the move of the lighthouse, Julia Cunningham, said she did not see how the relocation of the lighthouse to the city would increase bed tax revenue from tourists. Cunningham noted the number of beds in Port St. Joe was not what it was on the cape and wondered how much the economic impact would be. Culture is a business, a big business, Alsobrook said. And it brings dollars into the community. Alsobrook noted one study that showed that for every $1 invested in a community to increase cultural activities, the economic impact equaled $5. Its going to bene t everybody, Davidson said. Its a bene t for the city, for the county and (St. Joseph Bay) As the mayor (Mayor Mel Magidson) says, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. Davidson also noted that although the planning documents are available for public review, the process was uid and public input was a positive. Lets keep the ideas coming, Davidson said. We are very carefully considering a lot of stuff to get the conversation going. People are talking back to us with great ideas. One came from Eugene Raf eld. Raf eld suggested a shipwreck replica intended for the recreational area could instead be an authentic shrimp boat converted into a museum of the communitys maritime history, with a gang plank extending out over the bay waters. Tim Nelson suggested a landscaping focus that would create a green corridor along Third Street as it crosses U.S. Highway 98 into the general park area. Dewey Blaylock has suggested ideas for transforming at least a section of the proposed Marine Resource Center into a turtle rescue operation. We want to celebrate what we have had, what we have and what we are going to have, Alsobrook said. One Reid Avenue business owner said the proposed park was a win-win from the standpoint that by investing in the town and its history, businesses will also be interested in investing in the community and interest in living in Gulf County will increase. Davidson said the area for the recreational area/ promenade was a redeveloping area and said the Florida Department of Environmental Protection was very collaborative with the PSJRA planning team on the park plans. Its a good idea; it looks good on paper, Port St. Joe resident Dusty May said. Its a win-win if its done right. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIAL St. Louis Style RibsServed with choice of two sides..................$10.99 Fried ShrimpServed with choice of two sides................. $10.99 8 oz. Ribeye SteakServed with choice of two sides................ $11.99 LUNCH SPECIAL DAILY HOURS OFOPERATION: Monday Friday Meat and choice of 3 Sides$7.99 WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM FRIDAY @ 9:00 PM EST RANDY STARK ON THE POOPDECK SATURDAY @ 9:00 PM EST RANDY STARK WITH ART LONG ONSAX ON THE POOPDECK O O O N N S S S AX ON AX ON AX ON AX ON AX ON S AX ON S T T T HE P HE P HE P HE P T HE P T OOP OOP OOP OOP D D D ECK ECK ECK ECK FRI & SAT @ 9:00 PM EST KARAOKE / DJ IN THE CROWS NEST KA KA KA R R R A A R A R O O O KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C KE / DJ IN THE C RO RO RO W W W S S W S W W S W NE NE NE NE S NE S S S NE S NE T T TUES. & WEDS. 5-10 PM -LADIESNIGHT HAPPY HOUR MONDAY FRIDAY 5 7 PM LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 WORKSHOP from page A1THE STARThe Cape San Blas Lighthouse continued to be a major point of contention regarding plans for a bayfront park in Port St. Joe.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyHENRY!Henry is a 40# 1yr Foxhound. This fun and outgoing dog is very friendly with kids and adults. He is friendly with other like-minded dogs and is willing to have a cat live with him in his forever home. Henry is an all-around great dog and would make a great addition to any family. If you are unable to adopt at this time, perhaps you could foster or make a Donation. All pets adopted from SJBHS will be current on vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org and will be emailed to our office or you can print and fax to 850-227-1191 SHBHS is a proud member of www.petsforpatriots.org We require all potential adopters to complete an application form. Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. In some cases donations may be requested to offset cost of pets requiring any additional medical care.If you are missing a pet or want to adopt a new pet, please check with your local Humane Society or Shelter. 2084420 PROCEEDS BENEFIT Vote Between: Feb. 4th at 9 a.m.Feb 25th, at 4 p.m.To vote go online at www.newsherald.com Round 1 Voting: Narrows to 50 Entrants: Feb. 4th-Feb.11th Round 2 Voting: Narrows to 25 Entrants: Feb. 11th-18th Round 3 Voting: Narrows to 10 Entrants and Winner: Feb. 18th-25th $1 Per Vote Voting Bundles:6 Votes:$10 | 12 Votes for $20 50 Votes for $40 | 100 Votes for $75FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.comSecond Place :$250, Third Place: $100. all participants will be featured in the Panama City News Herald special sectionFIRST PLACE WINS $500! Your Name:_______________________________________Street Address:____________________________________City, State, Zip:____________________________________Telephone:________________________________________Email:____________________________________________Number of Votes Purchased:_________________________Vote for Contestant:_________________________________CC Number:__________________exp:__________cvv:____Return hand written forms to the Panama City News Herald at 501 W 11th St, Panama City, FL or go to www.newsherald.com Vote for the Top 50!Voting Rules Voting Prices 2nd Annual 2nd Annual Special to The StarDr. Kirk Garcia-Rios, a family medicine practitioner, has joined Sacred Heart Medical Group and is seeing patients in the medical ofce building on the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf campus. It is great to come back home and be near the water, said Dr. Garcia-Rios, originally from Valparaiso. Garcia-Rios joined Sacred Heart after completing his residency at Bay Regional Medical Center in Michigan. He received his medical degree from Kansas City University and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine in Missouri. Ofce hours will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday. For more information or to set up an appointment, call 229-5661. As with nitrogen, Floridas sandy soils are naturally low in potassium. But unlike nitrogen, potassium deciency can be kind of tricky to diagnose and treat. One reason is because plants seem to be able to tolerate a wide range of potassium levels without showing signs of deciency. Also, high levels of certain elements in the soil will prevent plants from using potassium. But applying potassium where a deciency doesnt exist might lead to a deciency in some other elements. My information in this article was provided by Professor Emeritus Dr. Robert Black of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Potassium must be carefully balanced with other nutrients, so you have to be very sure youre diagnosing any deciencies correctly. One general symptom of potassium deciency is interveinal chlorosis of the leaves. Interveinal chlorosis is a yellowing of leaf tissue between the veins of the leaf. You might notice leaf drop occurring later in the season. If potassium deciency persists, growth is slowed down, and limbs and branches of the plants might die. These symptoms, however, dont always mean potassium deciency. Magnesium deciency, for example, shows almost exactly the same symptoms. Yet treating one deciency when the problem is really the other will only make matters worse. If you suspect potassium deciency, take a sample of soil to your local county extension ofce, which can send it to the IFAS Soil Testing Laboratory and have it analyzed to determine exactly what the problem is. After you have determined your soil needs more potassium, you can correct the problem with fertilizer treatments. You can use commercial garden fertilizer, such as 8-8-8; high analysis fertilizers, such as 16-4-8; or you can supply just the potassium by using a compound such as potassium sulfate. If you decide to use a basic gardening fertilizer, apply it four times a year at the rate of two or four pounds for every 100 square feet of soil. You might decide to use a high analysis fertilizer. Theoretically, the high nitrogen content in the high analysis fertilizer could aggravate potassium deciency symptoms. But in the landscape, this is rarely, if ever, a problem. Most soils could benet from the increase in nitrogen, so its OK to use a high analysis fertilizer to treat potassium deciency. Apply it four times a year, but only use one to two pounds for a 100-square-foot area. If you want to use a single potassium compound, such as potassium sulfate, apply enough of the compound so that it supplies the same amount of potassium thats found in the 8-8-8 fertilizer. This will come out to about a half a pound of the mixture for a 100 square foot area. In summary, potassium deciency is common in Florida soils, but the deciency isnt easy to identify. Treating a soil for potassium deciency when something else is really the problem will only aggravate the situation. Have a reputable soil specialist test your soil, and if a potassium deciency exists, apply the appropriate fertilizer. For more information contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or http://gulf.ifas.u. edu.From Staff ReportsGulf Amateur Radio Society to provide license examsThe Gulf Amateur Radio Society will provide ham radio license exams at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, at the Gulf County EOC building behind the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe. Those interested in obtaining a ham license or upgrading a present license should call C.H. Tillis at 648-8251 for information and exam registration. Ham it up get your license today, and become part of amateur radio! Beekeeping in the PanhandleThe University of Florida/IFAS will sponsor Beekeeping in the Panhandle, an interactive video class to be held at the Gulf County Extension Ofce, 232 Lake Ave. in Wewahitchka. The deadline for registration is Feb. 8, and the fee, $25 per person, $40 for a family, covers course materials and refreshments. The schedule of classes, which will be 6-8 p.m. CT, 7-9 p.m. ET on Mondays: Feb. 18: Queen and Package Bee Production; Feb. 25: Nutrition/ Immunity in Honey Bees March 4: IPM for Disease/Pest Control March 11: History and Theory of Honey Production. The cost of the Field Day and Trade Show is $15 per person, $10 for additional family members. For more information or to register call the Gulf County Extension Ofce at 639-3200.Star Staff ReportThe Corinne Costin Gibson/ Gulf County Library has announced its Winter Program Series. All three programs are free and will be in the Alfred I/DuPont Florida History-Genealogy Center at the Corrine Costin Gibson/Gulf County Library in Port St. Joe. The series kicks off at 2 p.m. ET Feb. 14 with Courting and Marriage in the Olden Days. Presented by Ann Robbins, head of circulation and literacy at the Bay County Public Library, this program explains how love and courting has changed in America from the 1600s to modern times. A display of antiques will make excellent discussion pieces. The second program, at 2 p.m. Feb. 21, will be Genealogy: How to Get Started using your Library. Presented by Rebecca Saunders, head of genealogy and local history with the Bay County Public Library, this program will explain how to use Ancestry.com and Heritage Quest databases and other resources to research family history. The nal program, at 2 p.m. March 7, is Bone Mizell: Florida Cracker Cowhunter. Presented by Robbins, the life of Bone Mizell described the typical life of the men of Florida during the late 1880s. For more information about the Winter Program Series, call 229-8879. ROY LEE CarAR TErRCounty extension director Community br BRIEfsFS Library offers Winter Program Series Potassium deciency hard to spotNew physician joins Sacred HeartDrR. KIIRK GARCICIA-RIOIOS Society

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The Star| B3Thursday, February 7, 2013 School NewsSpecial to The StarSenior infoCap and gown photos: Cap and gown photos will be taken at the school at 9 a.m. Feb. 13. There is a $25 sitting fee. See Coach Taylor to sign up for a time slot. Yearbook news: The nal date to preorder your 2012-2013 yearbook is Feb. 28. No extra books are ordered. Please dont miss out on this opportunity to purchase your yearbook. You can order online at www.jostens.com or from the link provided at the schools main page on the web. You may also order at the school in Coach Taylors room. Remember, Feb. 28 is the last day to order. Senior recognition: The nal date to order a yearbook recognition ad for your senior is Feb. 28. Ad forms and templates may be picked up in Coach Taylors class. All forms and pictures need to be turned in no later than Feb. 28. FAFSA seminar: Guidance will be holding a Financial Aid Workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 16 in Computer Lab 103. Senior parents are encouraged to attend this important training session. Please bring a copy of your current IRS Tax Form and Social Security Numbers for parents and students.Parent info FCAT Write: FCAT Write 2.0 for eighthand 10th-graders will be Feb. 26. Shark Bites: Any parent or guardian interested in receiving Shark Bites, our weekly schedule of events, please email LCDR Marty Jarosz at mjarosz@gulf. k12.fl.us, and we will put you on the list. Black History Celebration: Our Black History Month celebration will be at 9 a.m. Feb. 28 in the gym. All are invited to attend. Football: Spring football begins May 1. All interested students need to have a completed or updated sports physical to be eligible to practice. See Coach Gannon for more details. Physical forms may be picked up in the main ofce. Congratulations to the honor students of Faith Christian School.ALL AsS fFOR thTHE fFIRstST s SEMEstSTERKindergarten: Austin Ramsey, Torren Smith, Kole Street and Karis Whicker First grade: Taylor Burkett, Carter Costin and Alex Taylor Second grade: Magnolia Sarmiento and Halee Whicker Third grade: Kristen BouingtonALL AsS aAND BsS fFOR thTHE f FIRstST sSEMEstSTERFirst grade: Riley McGufn Third grade: Theron Smith Fourth grade: Riley Noah Fifth grade: Catherine BouingtonPort St. Joe summer program gets a boostSpecial to The StarPort St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Principal Jeremy Knapp presented $250 to the Gulf Coast Workforce Board during the halftime at the Sharks basketball game Jan. 18. Gulf Coast Workforce Board representatives Tamlyn Smith, Melvin Martin and Mike Harris were on hand to accept the donation, which will be used to purchase new equipment for the Port St. Joe Summer Leadership Program coming up this summer at the Washington Recreation Center. HaANNahAH ANDERsSON wWINsS scSCIENcCE faFAIR awaAWARDSp P Ec C Ia A L tT O Th H E Sta TA RPort St. Joe Elementary School would like to congratulate Hannah Elizabeth Anderson for her recent participation in the Three Rivers Science Fair.  This event was sponsored by the U.S. Army, and Hannah received an award for Outstanding Science Project in her division.  Hard work and perseverance pays off. Way to go, Hannah!  We are proud of you! DaDAZZLING DDOLphPHINsSSp P Ec C Ia A L tT O Th H E Sta TA RPreK, Raegan Mathews; Kindergarten, Gregory Dean; rst grade, Chase Dykes; second grade, Macie Burrows; third grade, Gage Medina; fourth grade, Bradley Lewis; fth grade, Rainey Nobles; and sixth grade, Cole Haddock.Sp P Ec C Ia A L tT O Th H E Sta TA RFrom left are Port St. Joe High School Basketball Coach K (Derek Kurnitsky), Tamlyn Smith, Melvin Martin of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, and Port St. Joe High School Principal Jeremy Knapp. These students earned all As and Bs during the rst semester.Sp P Ec C Ia A L tT O Th H E Sta TA RThese students earned all As during the rst semester. The Lions TaleFCS students earn academic honors

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayDinner.5:00 6:00 pm AWANA.6:00 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry6:15 7:30 pm Prayer/Bible Study.6:30 7:30 pm Read the Bible for Life Class6:15 7:30 pm Nursery..6:00 7:30 pm SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM (CST) 10:30 AM (CST) ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM (CST) MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM (CST) TUESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 6:30 PM (CST) THURSDAY: WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM (CST)1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL(850) 648.1151 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Star Staff ReportThe Fifth Annual St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club Chili Cook-off will be held on Saturday, Feb. 23 at the Church Hall. Do you think you make a mean chili? Or, do you just love to sample various chilies? Will then this event is a must-do for you. The fifth annual will take place from 5-7 p.m. ET on Feb. 23. The nominal ticket fee is $6 for adults, $3 for children age 4 to 12, and free for children 4 and under. Start off with sampling as many chilies as you wish, vote for your favorite, and then go back for a full bowl of your choice. Soft drinks, coffee, tea or water is included, along with dessert and ice crme. A donation bar offering beer and wine will also be available. Tickets are available from any Mens Club member, at The No Name Caf on Reid Ave., at the Church Hall office (227-1417), or from Dan Van Treese (227-9837). If you would like to compete (number of contestants limited to 9), or more information on the event or other St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club activities, please call Dan at the above number.Annual Fruit of the Spirit ProgramA Red and White Evening of Worship, the second annual Fruit of the Spirit Program and Love Feast will be held 6 p.m. ET on Saturday, Feb. 9 at the Washington Improvement Center, 401 Peters Street in Port St. Joe. The theme of the program is Galatians 5:22, 23 But the greatest gift of them all is Love. The program is sponsored by Gathering Gods Harvest Outreach Ministries of Tallahassee, Mother Evangelist Stella Stallworth, pastor, Evangelist Pinkie Patterson, program chairperson.When Eve was tempted by Satan, he told her she would not die. This half of what he told her was surely a lie. That her eyes would be opened and shed know good from bad. This part was true, and that made it sad. This started sin and its gets worse each day. Many still believe these halftruths, and fall by the way. There are those who preach good works, but what about Jesus. Good works wont save you, its Jesus that frees us. From the bondage of sin He frees us, and then our works come in. So beware of believing a halftruth, it might bee the wrong half my friend.Billy JohnsonSpecial to The StarThe state of marriage in America will be explored at Lifetree Caf 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Feb. 11. The program, Is Marriage Obsolete? Why More People Are Saying, I Dont, will examine the declining marriage rate and the underlying causes of the trend. With divorces on the rise and people getting married later or not marrying at all, the institution of marriage is coming under re, said Lifetree representative Craig Cable. Some wonder if marriage is an outdated concept and is still needed. The program encourages those who attend to share their views of marriage. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. FAITHThursday, February 7, 2013 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comChurch to hold fth annual Chili CookoffBeware of half-truths State of marriage discussed at Lifetree Cafe Faith BRIEF

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2084417 2084477 Entry Form www.newsherald.com BENEFITTING To enter go online at the Panama City News Herald website at www.newsherald.com or by mail or enter in-person To enter by mail or in person, complete an Of cial Entry Form printed in The Panama City News Herald, and return or mail to: Beautiful Baby Contest, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.comTo Enter Rules $5 entry fee shall accompany each entry. Categories. The contest shall consist of four categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 13-24 months, and 25-36 months. Photographs must be submitted by the parents or guardians entrant. No third-party entries will be accepted. Hardcopy photos must be at least 3 inches on one side and no more than 10 inches. Poor quality photos will not be accepted. All photos featured in a special section in the newspaper :_____________________________________:_____________________________________________:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Return hand written forms to theat 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL or go to March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013The Bay County FairgroundsRegister now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo special section, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show:Call: 850-248-3976 orE-mail: expostradeshows@aol.comFor sponsorship information call:850-763-6587For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo, contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 SPONSORSTHERE IS STILL SPACE FOR YOU ATTHE Friday: Noon 5 PM Saturday: 9 AM 5 PM Sunday: 10 AM 3 PM A HOST OF SHABBY CHIC VENDORS ALREADY SIGNED UP! Jimmie Vernon Lester, 64, of Honeyville passed away Tuesday, January 29, 2013. A lifelong resident of Gulf County, he served in the United States Air Force, worked for Premier Chemical and he loved to sh and hunt. He is preceded in death by his father, John Vance Lester; his mother, Trudie Harrison; and three sisters, Valeare Gliem, Verna Cannon, and Shirley Mederak. He is survived by his wife, Jeanie Lester of Wewahitchka; his children, Christie Quick and husband Danny of Anchorage, AK, Michelle Pitts and husband Cliff of Kinard, and Mark Lester and wife Dede, of Panama City; two brothers, Bo John Lester and Bobby Lester and wife Jeter of Wewahitchka; three sisters, Linda Hale and husband Phillip of Greensboro, NC, Juanita Martel of Jacksonville, and Odell Guerino and husband Sully of Panama City; and three grandchildren. Funeral services were held Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, at 2 p.m. CT at Glad Tidings Church in Wewahitchka with Rev. Joey Smith and Rev. Jerry Arhelger of ciating. Interment followed in Roberts Cemetery. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Jimmie Vernon LesterLucille (Sowell) Nelson, aged 96, died peacefully on Feb. 4, 2013, at The Bridge at Bay St. Joe Nursing Home in Port St. Joe. Lucille was born August 24, 1916, in Washington County, Florida, the daughter of Bunyon and Bobbie Sowell. May 8, 1942 Lucille married F. F. Nelson, and upon his completion of military duty they attended Beauty and Barber School in Jacksonville before moving to Port St. Joe in 1948. F. F. went to work at Coopers Barber Shop and Lucille opened the rst beauty shop in Port St. Joe named My Fair Lady. Lucille quit work to raise a family and after the children where older she opened a second beauty shop in their home where she could continue to raise her family while working. Lucille was an active member of First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe where she taught Sunday school and volunteered her time in the nursery and childrens programs. Lucille is survived by her sons Glen Nelson of Port St. Joe and Marshall Nelson and wife Tracie of Port St. Joe; grandson Reis Nelson of Port St. Joe; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her mother and father, Bunyon and Bobbie Sowell of Chipley, FL; two sisters, Beatrice Nichols of Birmingham, AL and Thelma Nichols of Chipley, FL; one brother Buster Sowell of Pensacola, FL; and one grandson Bryce Nelson of Port St. Joe. Viewing will be at 2 p.m. and service is at 3 p.m. ET on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, at the First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe with Bro. Buddy Caswell of ciating. Friends are invited to visit with the family in the sanctuary after the service.Lucille (Sowell) NelsonAlbert J. (Al) Fleischmann, 64, of St. Joe Beach, passed away Jan. 31, 2013, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was owner and operator of A & R Fencing of St. Joe Beach and a member of the body of St. Josephs Catholic Church in Port St. Joe. He served as an usher at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church of Mexico Beach for many years until its closure. Al was predeceased by his parents, Albert and Eva Fleischmann and his wife Rose Jeanette (Jenny) Fleischmann. He is survived by his sister, Pat Johnson of Keansburg, New Jersey; a nephew, T.J. and nieces, Cindy and Tricia; children Ronni Bedell (Al), Lisa Bryke (Roger), Nikola (Brian), Celeste, Jeanette (Warren), Dana (Richie Bowes), Steven and Matthew; 17 grandchildren, ve from Gulf County, Patricia Rose, Addison, Xavier and Xaviers father, Jamie Bateman, Albert John (A.J.) and Tyler Fleischmann; three greatgrandchildren; plus his four canine buddies, Cheetz his little buddy, Peanut, Mena and Raven. Als wish was to be cremated and buried with Jenny. A memorial Mass of Celebration of Life will be held at 10:15 a.m. ET on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at St. Anns Catholic Church in Keansburg, New Jersey. In lieu of owers the family asks that donations be made to St Joseph Humane Society or your favorite charity.Albert J. (Al) Fleischmann Clements Card of ThanksWebb and Jo Clements would like to personally thank all their extended family in Port St. Joe for remembering us during the death of my mother, JoAnne Rehberg. It is great to know the support we have here in Gulf County. We will never forget all the cards, owers, food and most of all the care and concern you have shown our family. God is God all the timeand all the time He is Good!Thanks again, Webb, Jo, Laura-Leigh and Carley ClementsTillery family Card of ThanksAs you all know I lost my oldest son Wallace Wade Tillery on Dec. 6, 2012 due to a massive heart attack. He had no insurance so the burden fell upon our family. In our time of need so many generous people in my hometown gave what they could from the bottom of their hearts. During our time of sorrow we received food, money, donations, cards, phone calls, support and love and prayers. Words are no enough. But I want to say thank you to some that I know personally that helped make the burden a little easy on myself and my wife and family. Some of these people I have known for years, Gracie Smith, George and Hilda Duren for their food, support and donations. On Jan. 5 we held a bene t dinner sh fry to raise money to help pay the funeral expenses. I would like to thank Harold Raf eld for donating the sh, Gracie Smith for organizing the dinner, George Boyer, Tony Harrison for cooking, Becky Wood, Diana King, Ewell Harrison for their help. Also, Harry Paul and VFW Post 10069 and VFW Post 8205 in Parker also donated. There are so many good people who do care and give what they can and I want to say thank you from the bottom of my heart. I have always heard the saying shop at home. Well, I can see how that pays off. I shop at our local stores and I nd that that saying pays off. There are good people in this county that I live in. Again, thanks very much.From the Tillery family Cards of THANKSMemorie Porter Sundin, age 81, passed away suddenly Friday, Feb 1, 2013. She was born October 7, 1931 in Apalachicola to parents Ned S. Porter and Louise Messina Porter. She graduated from Port St. Joe High School, Class of 49 and attended Barry University in Miami, after which she worked as a medical technologist in Panama City. It was here she met a dashing young Air Force pilot from Minnesota, Charles Sundin. They were married at St Patricks Church in Apalachicola in 1955 and were soon on their way to Rantoul, IL, Sacramento, CA and Taiwan. In 1960, she and Chuck returned stateside to Nellis AFB Las Vegas and soon after, son one and two came along. After USAF retirement in 1965, she and Chuck moved the family to Harlingen, Texas to start an aviation business and the family grew by adding a daughter. In 1982 with kids off and running and a second retirement, she moved to Port Charlotte, FL where her and Chuck enjoyed sailing and traveling and seeing grandkids. In 1999, she moved back to Port St. Joe where she enjoyed family and friends. She will be missed by her sons Michael Porter Sundin, Dallas TX, Christopher Ned Sundin and daughter-in-law Michelle, Bradenton; and daughter, Laurie Louise Sundin, Irving TX. She adored and was adored by her grandchildren Christian, Catherine, and Dulaney. Funeral services will be held 11 a,m. EST Thursday, February 7, 2013 at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Port St. Joe with Father Philip Fortin and Father Janus Jancarz of ciating. Interment will immediately follow in Magnolia Gardens in Apalachicola. The family will receive friends from 10 a.m. EST until service time at the church. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily.com. Southerland Family Funeral Home 100 East 19th Street Panama City, FL 32405Memorie Porter Sundin MEMORIE PORTER SUNDIN Obituaries FaithThe Star| B5Thursday, February 7, 2013

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, February 18 2013 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1.Variance Application Ellis C. Smith Parcel ID # 03806-085R Located in Section 31, Township6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback to within 10 of ROW. 2.Variance Application Sprit of Holiness Church Parcel ID #02892-000R Located in Section 11, Township 7 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, encroachment into road setback. 3.Variance Application Mars Real Estate Ventures,LLC Parcel ID #06345-810R Located in Section 25, Township 8 South, Range 12 West, Gulf County,Florida, encroachment into road setback. 4. cel ID #03806-005R Located in Section 31, Township6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, encroachmentinto road setback. 5.County Development Regulations and Policies 6.Staff, Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. Ad #2013-07 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN TRADES & SERVICESCALL TODAY! 227-7847 GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction bobgilbert54@gmail.com J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 From A to Z850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance Check out my work on Facebook! JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM GET YOUR AD IN TRADES & SERVICES 227-2847 By donating all proceeds to the Friends of the Library, a nonpro t established to sustain the library mission, the Bunco Babes ensure plenty of exibility in how those funds are spent, generally toward items that have become out of reach for the library. We are just trying to increase the librarys ability to educate, entertain and inform, Garmon said. In addition to the games of Bunco, there also will be raf es for items donated by the Reid Avenue Bunco Babes and others in the community. That is the request to our members, everybody has got something stuffed away in their homes they can donate, Garmon said. The cost of entry to the Bunco for Books is $30, with $20 going to the Friends of the Port St. Joe Library and $10 for covering the nights meal of gumbo, a salad and dessert. Tickets are available in advance at the following locations: The Fish House, No Name Caf, Boyers Signs, Coast2Coast Printing and the Port St. Joe Public Library. Tickets also can be purchased at the door. She bore and raised six daughters. She was the heart of the household while her husband sold insurance and worked with shermen in the community. Beulah was an early carrier for the Panama City News Herald and toted her daughters with her on her paper route. She returned to college, balancing studies with the work of raising her girls. Beulah went on to teach special education in Gulf County, the rst special education teacher in the history of the countys public schools. She devoted her life to her faith, studying the Bible daily and teaching other women in Sunday School. She was known for her helping hands to the needy. As a daughter wrote in her book of memories, She is a woman of strength and dignity and has no fear of old age. When she speaks her words are wise, and kindness is the rule for everything she says. She prays faithfully for her childrens families; she does not interfere or give advice. Charm is deceptive and beauty doesnt last, but a woman who reverences and fears God shall be greatly praised. Praise her for the many ne things she does. These good deeds of her shall bring her honor and recognition. Much of that honor and recognition can be found in the tribute book, the dedication of which spells out the impact Beulah Clark had on her family and the community around her. Vacation trips, passings and births, family photos, remembrances of the day her husband graduated college, details about a daughters contraction of and return to good health from polio, the highlights of a hog kill, anniversaries, memories of summer, weddings and reunions abound in the book. The book was put together by children, grandchildren and other relatives and friends. So many memories, so little time, to remember and relive in our minds all the many ways she has molded and in uenced our lives, the book dedication reads in part.Happy birthday Mama, Grandmamma Clark, Aunt Beulah, Mrs. Clark. We have all been blessed to have your gracious in uence in our lives. Thank you for being a role model for so many; for holding forth Godly principles and examples for us to follow; showing us, by your faith in God, that we, too, can live a victorious life in Christ right on until he calls us home to be with him. The Clark family wishes to thank all who contributed to last weeks celebration, especially Covenant Hospice (Darwin Barwick created the celebratory banner), Parthenon Prints (which printed the memories book), Durens Piggly Wiggly (which provided the cake), Bayside Florist and Gifts (which sent owers) and Bay Breeze Antiques (which donated a bird feeder). The family also thanks all who brought or sent cards, owers, gifts, prayers and thoughts and other blessings. recorded for posterity as the committee builds a history book that will be posted online and will be captured later in a printed form. It is about them; it is about history, said Danny Raf eld, also a member of the committee. At some point, a DVD will be available for purchase, and the archive, once nished will be available within the Florida Genealogy Room at the Port St. Joe Public Library. There will be ice cream and pie served during the Scan Day as refreshments for those who come out, and donations for the Centennial Celebration also will be accepted. The Centennial Committee is hoping the folks who comprise this community will help them tell the tale of the city of Port St. Joe over the past 100 years, since the founding of the modern city. Help us tell the story of Port St. Joe, Boyer said.Doodlebug was the common name for a selfpropelled railcar. In 1938, the ANR bought the gaselectric EMC Doodlebug No. 24 to use for passenger runs, replacing the less ef cient steam passenger trains. Trivia ANSWER HISTORY from page B1 The Reid Avenue Bunco Babes, some of whom are pictured during a check presentation to the Friends of the Port St. Joe Library, have raised almost $20,000 since their rst Bunco for Books 18 months ago.SPECIAL TO THE STAR BUNCO from page B1 100 YEARS from page B1 TIM CROFT | The StarDaughters Ruth, left, and Joy, right, and granddaughter Donna McCroan ank Clark as she celebrates her birthday. Joy is holding a bound scrapbook of memories created by Clarks family in celebration of her 100th birthday. The scrapbook is more than 100 pages of memories and photos marking the milestones of Clarks life.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 7, 2013 The Star | B7 HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach OtherJanitorial ServicesGulf Coast Electric Cooperative, Inc. is soliciting perspective bidders from qualified firms/ person for janitorial services for its Wewahitchka Office located at 722 W. Hwy. 22 Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 and its Tyndall Office located at 6243 East Hwy. 98 Panama City, FL 32404. Any qualified applicants must contact Lacy Pettis at 850.265.3631 by 4:00 pm Monday, February 11, 2013 to be eligible to receive a RFP. The Cooperative will then send perspective bidders a RFP packet that will include scope of work, insurance requirements, site visit information, selection process, etc. GCEC reserves the right to reject any potential bidder. Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID# 34240252 Text FL40252 to 56654 BargainsNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Cash Management SystemRoyal Alpha 710 ML Exc cond. Barely used. $150. 850-229-8072 Text FL40365 to 56654 Freezer 22 cubit foot Upright freezer, In excellent condition. $125. (850) 229-8072 Church SecretaryMethodist Church Port St. Joe, approx. 30 hrs a week, to manage office, Mon-Fri, Send resume to Dr Lentz at goffreylentz@me.com Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepet sitting.com Port St. Joe, St. Joseph Catholic Church on 20th St. Sat Feb. 9th, 8am-1pmYard & Bake SaleEverything from furniture to play things to clothing to yard & kitchen items. Text FL40438 to 56654 Port. St. Joe: 1405 Constitution Drive. (Hwy 98) 02/08, 02/09 Fri. & Sat.9a-3pHuge Yard SaleFurniture, antiques, colums, and Lots of good stuff! Come Rain or ShineText FL40605 to 56654 92191S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF LOGIC AND ACCURACY TEST SCHOOL BOARD REFERENDUM ELECTION MARCH 5, 2013 GULF COUNTY, FL The Logic and Accuracy test for the M100 Tabulation System and the Ivotronic Touch Screen System to be used for the March 5, 2013 School Board Referendum Election will be held at the Gulf County Supervisor of Elections Office, 401 Long Ave, Port St Joe on February 13, 2013 9:00 AM EST. This test is open to the public. John M. Hanlon Supervisor of Elections Gulf County, Florida February 7, 2013 *Adopt*:Active educated couple yearn to share LOVE of outdoors, music, each other w/baby *Dirk & Claudia* Expenses Paid FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 92087S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of the following amendments and Ordinances with the following titles: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; WHEREBY AMENDING ORIGINAL GULF COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL ORDINANCE NUMBER 2005-24 AND THEREAFTER ITS AMENDMENT THROUGH ORDINANCE NUMBER 2008-20 AND HEREIN AMENDING BY ADOPTION OF GULF COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL ORDINANCE WHEREBY PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY AND ENFORCEMENT; PROVIDING FOR ADOPTION BY REFERENCE: FLORIDA STATUTES RELATING TO ANIMAL CONTROL, ANIMAL WELFARE AND ANIMAL CRUELTY; PROHIBITION AGAINST NUISANCE ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR HUMANE CARE GUIDELINES; PROHIBITION AGAINST ANIMALS FROM RUNNING-ATLARGE; PROVIDING FOR PERMITTING REQUIRMENTS; PROVIDING FOR MULTIPLE PET PERMITS AND KENNELING; PROHIBITION ON FEEDING FERAL ANIMALS; REGULATING SALE OF ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR PROPER REDEMPTION AND DISPOSITION OF UNWANTED AND IMPOUNDED ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR RABIES CONTROL; PROVIDING FOR PROPER HANDLING OF DANGEROUS AND AGGRESSIVE ANIMALS; PROVIDING FOR SPAY AND NEUTERING REQUIREMENTS; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE *Complete Ordinance on file in the Clerks Office* A first public reading and introduction will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Regular Meeting on Tuesday, February 12th at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissioners meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. A second reading in addition to a public hearing and consideration will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Regular Meeting on Tuesday, February 26th, at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissio-ners meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. All interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance and referenced amendments. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the Gulf County Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. A copy of the proposed Ordinance and amendments are available for inspection on weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and 5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY, CHAIRMAN Jan. 31, Feb. 7, 2013 90060S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL #41 Karen Chancey #52 Keresa Roberts #66 Kathie Sarllento Will be up for sale on February 22, 2013, 8:30 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. February 7, 14, 2013 91923S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENT Pursuant to Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the position of Emergency Management Director, Public Works Director, and Maintenance Superintendent as Senior Management Class Positions under the Florida Retirement System, effective October 1, 2012. /s/ Tynalin, Chairman Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk January 31, 2013 89996S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-201CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES A. GUFFEY and JENNIFER A. BARNES, f/k/a JENNIFER A. GUFFEY, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of foreclosure entered December 13, 2012 in the above-styled cause, the Clerk of Court for Gulf County, Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder at the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL, 32456, on February 21, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. EST the following described property: Lot 17, Block C, Seven Springs Lake Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida at Plat Book 5, Pages 17 and 18. Parcel ID: 02624-460R (the Property). ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 18th day of January 2013. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Jan 31, Feb 7, 2013 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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B8| The Star Thursday, February 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtectedH&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .......................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ............$600 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ 10X15 STORAGE AND POOL ...................................$950 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ POOL $150/ NIGHTLY OR $700/WEEKLY 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Help seniors in your community: Make informed choices about their health insurance Answer Medicare questions and resolve problems Save money on their prescription medications Learn about programs they may be eligible forBilingual volunteers are encouraged to call1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337) REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! NORTH FLORIDA CHILD DEVELOPMENT, INC.JOB ANNOUNCEMENTSSubstitute Teachers Gulf CountySeeking quali ed applicants for Substitute Teacher positions at their Gulf County Centers. Assist teaching sta with schedules, routines, and activities. Requirements include an High School Diplolma; some experience teaching in early childhood setting, and training courses and certi cations mandated by DCF. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL 32465 or email smcgill@ oridachildren.org. Closing Date: February 15, 2013 DFWP/MF/6-6/EOE C14GU0134 C14GU0624Infant/Toddler Teachers North Gulf CountySeeking 2 positions of Infant and Toddler Teachers in North Gulf County. The teacher prepares and implements appropriate curriculum for individuals and small groups. Must have a minimum of a CDA (FCCPC) or Associates degree or higher in Early Childhood Education; 2 years experiences in an early childhood setting working with infants and toddlers preferred and certi cates for state mandated courses. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL 32465 or email smcgill@ oridachildren.org. Closing Date: February 15, 2013 DFWP/MF/6-6/EOE C14GU0134 Family Case Manager North Gulf CountySeeking quali ed applicant for Family Case Manager in North Gulf County. Works with families to enhance the quality of their lives and support them in their e orts to reach established goals. Must have a minimum of a Bachelors degree in Social Work or related eld; 2 years experiences in social work eld. Submit resumes to NFCD, Human Resource Department, PO Box 38, Wewahitchka FL 32465 or email smcgill@ oridachildren.org. Closing Date: February 15, 2013 DFWP/MF/6-6/EOE C14GU0134 MUSIC FACULTYTeach music courses including but not limited to Music Theory, Sight Singing/Ear Training, direct performing groups, and maintain o ce hours & recruit students. Requires MS degree in Music with 18 graduate hours outside of music education, ability to drive 15-passenger van & valid FL drivers license. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 3/22/13. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www. gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 TECHNICAL COORDINATORServe as the technical coordinator for all events in the Amelia Tapper Center for the Arts, and supervise set, sound and lighting construction for the theatre program. Requires BS degree (MS preferred) in technical theatre eld; minimum two years experience working in a technical theatre capacity; ability to drive 15-passenger van + trailer and valid FL drivers license. Open Until Filled with review starting 3/22/13. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/ hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 NOW HIRINGScallop Cove, 4310 Cape San Blas Road, is looking for Full Time Permanent Positions as well as Summer Help. Must be dependable, honest and have the ability to get to and from work. Starting pay is $8.00/hour with increased pay for work performance after 90 day period. Responsibilities include retail sales, cashier, stocking, customer service, deli food prep, among other things. Must be able to work well with others and have a great attitude with the general public.COME IN AND GET AN APPLICATION AND ASK FOR MELISSIA OR JILLWe are also looking for individuals to work March and April only to handle spring break. 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