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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03864
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 01-10-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03875

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In front of a packed courtroom, County Judge Tim McFarland swore in ve constitutional of cers for the next four years. McFarland noted all were products of Gulf County Schools and represented part of the community fabric stepping up to lead the county. Being sworn in were Shirley Jenkins, who ran unopposed for Tax Collector; Becky Norris, who was re-elected Clerk of Courts; and three newcomers to of ce, Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon, Property Appraiser Mitch Burke and Sheriff Mike Harrison. Tim Croft 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, JANUARY 10, 2013 Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5 Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . A5 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B7-B8 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 13 Friends of Bay Preserves to host annual membership meeting B1 School levy vote set for March 5 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Four more years. That is what Gulf District Schools will ask voters when they return to the polls March 5 to renew or extend the additional mil operating levy that has been in place the past four years. The Gulf County School Board unanimously voted to conduct the balloting during a one-day election March 5, instead of the mail-out ballot that was used four years ago when voters approved the additional operating levy. The difference was cost and timeliness. A mailed ballot, newly-installed Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon said, would cost more than $2 per voter or about $20,000 to mail ballots to all registered voters in the county. The total cost of an election conducted by mail would be about $25,000, Hanlon said. However, conducting the election on a single day would cut that price to $14,500, Hanlon said. We would not have to hold early voting for this kind of election, and that would dramatically reduce the costs, Hanlon said. We would still have absentee ballots available for anyone who wishes to vote that way, but we would not do early voting. On March 5, all polling places in all county precincts would be open the typical hours for election day, 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET. Voting by mail also would require Hanlon to submit a plan to the state Division of Elections for approval, which likely would push back the date at least two weeks. We dont need to spend any more than we have to, and we want to know what we are dealing with as quick as we can, board member John Wright said. If voters do not approve the extension of the mil operating levy, Wright said, the results could be ugly and the board will need as much lead time before budget crafting for the coming scal year as possible. The district is asking voters to approve extending the additional mil operating levy for four years in order to stave off drastic reductions. Bed taxes down for November, up for year By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Gulf County Tourism Development Council reported bed tax revenue slipped slightly year over year in November, but overall the gains of the prior scal year continue. Bed tax revenue dropped 1.29 percent in November 2012 compared to the same month in 2011, but the current scal year is up more than 90 percent compared to the previous scal year. That continues an upward trend that saw the TDC collect 12.40 percent more in bed tax revenue for the prior scal year, TDC director Jennifer Jenkins said during last weeks board meeting. Those numbers are conrmation of one opportunity that has been seen in the ongoing TDC research into quantifying perceptions of Gulf County and its amenities: that the shoulder seasons, particularly winter, offer growth opportunities. That was underscored in a Visitor Perception Survey that was completed as part of a multi-layer research effort that will be discussed during a public workshop at 5:30 p.m. ET Feb. 5 in the Board of County Commissioners meeting room. The research is meant to affect not only what we do today but what we look at in the future, Jenkins said. The Visitor Perception Survey ndings were discussed during last weeks meeting, though Jenkins emphasized the survey is just one layer in the research being conducted into the Gulf County market, who does and does not visit and opportunities for building on the existing foundation. This is just a midpoint, Jenkins said. The survey response, Jenkins said, exceeded expectations. Some 21,000 were sent out, to visitors and nonvisitors alike, and Jenkins Constitutional of cers sworn in to of ce SHIRLEY JENKINS BECKY NORRIS JOHN HANLON MIKE HARRISON MITCH BURKE BOCC debates lighthouse award; sets EDC workshop By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter to the National Parks Service stating the county would work with Port St. Joe on the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. But the letter also would highlight if the city is unable to fund and perform the relocation to a proposed BayPark the county still had an interest in moving the lighthouse to Salinas Park. The discussion was spurred by several residents of Cape San Blas and Indian Pass who dissented to the National Parks Service decision to award the lighthouse to the city. The BOCC also had submitted an application for the lighthouse the city and county were the only two applicants but the National Parks Service in a letter stated the citys proposal was the more attractive. Thank you for trying to keep the Cape San Blas Lighthouse on the cape; we have been out-lobbied by the city, said Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Association. We just didnt get out and lobby that we had a safer place. Hardman noted the county had a lease with the U.S. Air Force which declared the lighthouse and grounds surplus early last year that spanned until 2029 and that the county had provided annual upkeep and insured the lighthouse and grounds for recreational activities. She said the cost to move the lighthouse to Salinas Park was estimated at half that to move the structures into the city and that Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidons legacy could become the mayors folly. She urged the BOCC to protest the decision and to let the federal government know the county still wanted the lighthouse for Salinas Park. Julia Cunningham said once the lighthouse, which has stood on the cape for some 200 years, was moved to the city the history will be lost. Particularly outspoken about the proposed move to the city was Betty McNeill, who served on the lighthouse committee with the St. Joseph Historical Society when that group was seeking grant funds to preserve the keepers quarters and lighthouse. McNeill was not present when the Historical Society recently voted unanimously in support of the move to the city, but said she saw the citys action as a covetous, greedy land grab. I am shocked that this could come up, McNeill said. A mistake has been made, and I think with effort a mistake can be corrected. I dont think the lighthouse should be taken off the cape. I am shocked, surprised and certainly disappointed that the city would steal something that belongs on the south end of the county. Commissioner Warren Yeager said the BOCC should send a letter to the National Park Services saying if the city could not ful ll its obligations to move the lighthouse, the county should be considered next in line. We are in line and ready to take that on, Yeager said. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said the BOCC should consider the tone of such a letter. She said she did want to reinforce existing ssures between the city and county and that the county should express its willingness to work with the city, with the caveat that if the city could not fund the relocation the county be considered. See SCHOOL A2 See BED TAXES A8 See BOCC A8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Florida Department of Edu cation released tentative high school grades for 2011-12 during the holiday break. Gulf District Schools would like the DOE to take another look at the C given to Wewahitchka High School before grades are nalized at the end of this month. WHS fell two points shy of a B and school, and district staff has been crunching numbers since grades were released. They believe there are two areas of possible review, the prominent one being what the district believes is a miscalculation on the number of mid dle school students counted in endof-course exams in Algebra I. We are appealing that grade, said Sara Joe Wooten, the districts deputy superintendent for instruction. Port St. Joe High School received an A on the tentative grades and both schools nished well above the state average for total points ac crued under the high school grading system. Gulf District Schools, with two C schools in Wewahitchka and two A schools in Port St. Joe if the WHS grade is not changed remains a B district, as it was last year. The district has been an honor roll district, based on state criteria, earning an A or B for six straight years. The district also is considered a high-performing district covering the same span. The high-performing designa tion includes not only school grades but also nancial stability as evi denced by a clean annual audit. We are continuing to be a B district and high-performing, Woo ten said. But we have challenges at each school. High school grades are released about six months after elementary and middle school grades because there is an additional set of compo nents for high school grading. Fifty-percent of high school grades are based on scores from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. The other 50 percent is based on col lege-readiness, including enrollment and success in dual-enrolled cours es or advanced placement courses as well as graduation and drop-out rates. We still have a high graduation rate, but we would like to see more minorities participating in dual en rollment, Wooten said. And both our high schools showed improvement in graduating at-risk students and that is a plus. Wooten said both high schools demonstrated they are making learning gains in math and reading for students pretty much across all populations. The gains in reading have been a particular focus for the district for several years with designated read ing coaches and reading instruction connecting to other core coursework across the board. Everything we can do for reading we do, Wooten said. The number of students in dualenrolled courses also has increased. Not only are 80 students in dualenrolled courses, but the success in those courses also is reected in the states grading formula, which awards points for students earn ing a C or better in such college courses. One hundred percent of our dualenrolled students made a C or bet ter, and I think this is because we put certied teachers in the classroom or they were learning directly from col lege professors, Wooten said. More kids are taking dual enrollment courses. We are continuing to grow there. It is really pretty phenomenal for a district this size. The challenges, Wooten said, in cluded science scores at Wewahitch ka Middle School and math at Wewa hitchka Elementary School. Those are our biggies, Wooten said. Those are the areas we know we have to address. She said reaching minority stu dents and the at-risk population will continue to be an emphasis as the state transitions to a new grading matrix in the next two years. By 2014-15, districts will not only be graded differently, but the major ity of state assessment tests will be taken online, Wooten said, continuing a trend that began in the past three years. District appealing WHS grade This is a renewal tax, it is not the creation of a new tax, Superintendent of Schools Jim Nor ton said. We have cut funding for the past four years but maintained standards. For us to con tinue the integrity of the product, we are pro viding for the good of Gulf County we need this funding. The district is facing a shortfall of about $500,000 even without the additional funding. There will be cuts to jobs or programs. However, take away the ad ditional mil levy, currently worth about $1.3 million, and the budget decit would be $1.8 million, Norton said. Even if this (levy) passes we will still be short dollars, board member George Cox said. It will be easier to cut half a million dollars than it will be al most $2 million. If the levy does not pass, that could mean as many as 50 jobs cut and would likely render the district out of compliance with state constitutional mandates on class size ratios. Norton said it would be likely the district could not cut 50 jobs, more likely about 30, but said the cuts would then have to come from programs. We are not asking for anything but to maintain, Norton said. Wright said, School wont be like we have it now if this doesnt pass. It will be ugly. Voters approved the additional operating levy four years ago, but the economic winds have whittled the worth of that mil nearly in half over the four years. What once was worth $2.2 million is now equal to $1.3 million. Meanwhile, the School Board has maintained local capital improvement millage rates, which the board could levy itself, at the lowest level in the state. Local capital improvement dollars may not be used for operating expenses, so the only method available to the district is to ask voters to extend the levy, which sunsets in the current scal year. The funding is desperately needed, board mem ber Billy Quinn Jr. said. We hope the community will rally behind this. Board chairwoman Linda Wood said the levy was not so much for the district or the schools. This is about those little heads that get on and off the school bus each day, Wood said. We need the people in place to make sure they get the education they need so that their world will be better than their parents. SCHOOL from page A1 Special to The Star Childrens Hospital at Sacred Heart is helping families enroll their children in low-cost health insurance through Florida KidCare. Florida ranks third in the U.S. for the number of uninsured children, with more than 500,000 young lives without coverage. Children who do not have health insurance often miss preventive care, such as immunizations, doctors visits, vision care and dental checkups. Florida KidCare is comprehensive health insurance that covers services such as prescription medications, sports physicals, dental care, eye and hearing exams, eyeglasses, doctors visits, emergencies and x-rays. Regular physician and dental vis its are important to childrens good health, says Cheryl Pilling, Manager of Sacred Hearts Community Well ness Outreach Program. The earlier a problem is detected, the better chance a child has of getting treatment and avoiding complications. With insur ance from Florida KidCare, families will be able to obtain the healthcare their children need to thrive. Sacred Heart will provide one-onone assistance to parents, grandpar ents and guardians in understanding their options, and will assist them to enroll in the Florida KidCare pro gram. A community-health worker is available to help families in Gulf and Franklin counties. For more information, please email InsureKidsNow@shhpens.org or call 1-877-787-1838 for the contact in Gulf and Franklin counties. Hospital assisting in low-cost insurance for children Star Staff Report Students and young people are invited to par ticipate in the MLK365 days and a day of service essay contest designed to teach children about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy. This year, the essay contest program will be Monday, Jan. 21, which will coincide with the presidential inaugura tion day ceremony. This milestone is a per fect opportunity for Amer icans to come together in honor of Dr. Kings legacy through public service and move us as citizen of Gulf County, youth and adults closer to Dr. Kings vision of a beloved com munity. Students from kindergarten through 12th grade are encouraged to participate. The goal for this project is to influence students to read books from the Gulf County School library and Gulf County Public Li brary and create a piece of art responding to the following prompt: Dr. King said If you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter. Essays should focus on What will you be a drum major for? Essays are not to ex ceed 500 words and the deadline is Thursday Jan. 17. First-, secondand third-place prizes will be awarded. Every essay submitted by Jan. 17 will earn the writer a certifi cate of participation. For more information contact Amy Rogers at 227-4041 or 229-1551. MLK365 holding essay contest

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Special to The Star Resolving to make changes in the coming year to improve your health and/ or nances? Taking small steps makes them easier to stick to and often more successful than resolving to lose a lot of weight or save a large amount of money. If you are looking for an affordable and doable program, you should consider the nationwide online Small Steps to Health and Wealth Challenge. This free six-week program will run from Sunday through Feb. 23 and is open to anyone who enrolls online. The challenge provides motivation to take action to simultaneously improve both health and nances. Create your own group with friends or in the workplace to provide additional motivation and support as you take part in the challenge. This program is offered in cooperation with Rutgers/New Jersey Extension Services. To sign up for Winter 2013 SSHW Challenge, visit http://rutgers.ancc.net. The Challenge is based on the daily performance of 10 recommended practices: ve that involve health and nutrition and ve that involve nancial management. The ve daily health and nutrition practices are: eat at least four cups of fruits and vegetables; get at least 30 minutes of physical activity; drink water or unsweetened beverages instead of sugar-sweetened beverages; eat at least two servings of whole-grain foods; and learn something new about health and nutrition. The ve daily nancial management practices are: save a $1 bill (or more) and/ or pocket change; invest $5 or more per day (including automated retirement savings plan deposits); track money spent throughout the day; eat lunch prepared at home; and learn something new about personal nance. Ten points are given for performing each practice, for a maximum of 700 points per week and 4,200 points for the entire challenge (700 times six weeks). Prizes will be awarded for participants who report the highest total points. Doing even one of the 10 recommended daily practices is a great way to get started on the path to better health and improved nancial security. The more SSHW Challenge activities that are performed by participants, the better. For information, email Melanie Taylor at metaylor@u .edu or call 639-3200. The Gulf County Extension Of ce sponsors all programs, which is a partnership between the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences and the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal-opportunity institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or af liations. CASH FOR GOLD & SILVER Gold Party Group, LLC N O W O P E N I N P OR T S T. J OE 301 MONUMENT AVENUE (A couple blocks west of HWY 71) SCRAP GOLD Broken & Unwanted Jewelry, Watches, Dental gold, etc. COINS 1964 or Before: Dollars, Half Dollars, Quarters & Dimes GOLD/SILVER BULLION We pay up to 90% of spot price for Gold Bullion & 80% of spot price for Silver Bullion stamped .999 STERLING SILVER Flatware, tea sets, goblets & Jewelry marked .925 or Sterling FREE N O OBLIGA T IO N A PP RAISAL! PRESENT THIS COUPON TO RECEIVE 10% E XT RA AFTER RECEIVING YOUR APPRAISAL [ Valid Until January 15, 2013 Excluding Gold and Silver Bullion ] 2084406 Enter Starting January 27th www.nwfdail y news.com BENEFITTING Local The Star| A3 Thursday, January 10, 2013 Program helps improve health, wealth THE PORT ST. JOE STAR FIND US ON FACEBOOK @ PSJ_Star FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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The newspapers piled up over the holidays. A neighbor was nice enough to collect them and save them for us while we were gone. Growing up in a newspaper, I still enjoy holding one close to my face and hoping to smell the newsprint and ink that remind me so much of my Daddy, who spent about 40 years in the newspaper business. Scanning the headlines of the main sections of the piles of papers, one caught my attention. The headline proclaimed, 10 ideas for a happier home in 2013. The story was written by a lady named Nara, who based her story on a list made by a best-selling author named, Gretchen. Women have a great deal of in uence on happiness, so I decided to take a look at what could make for a happier home. Who doesnt want a happier home this year? After the rst suggestion, I was a bit skeptical about the intended audience for this article. They want me to try Warm greetings and farewells. How much warmer can I get? I tell everyone, Hello, Goodbye and I love you. It doesnt get any warmer than that. On New Years Eve, I even went so far as to yell out at the fellow next door, Happy New Year Neighbor! He has a loud obnoxious barking dog that he is ashamed of (he should be). Standing in the garage, he never turned around, but he threw his hand up in the air. Im not sure my neighbor speaks English; I think he may be a college professor. He probably thought I was complaining about his dog. Speaking of dogs, the next suggestion was to Take time to smell things. My dog, Doolittle ate a lot of table food over the holidays. It was within his reach, so he ate it. You dont want to be in the same room with him when he changes his diet. I was. Some things you really dont want to take time to smell, I usually leave the room. The next suggestion was to go shelf by shelf reducing clutter. How many books and lists are written about this? How many products are sold with this sole purpose? Im sure a whole lot of money is spent and made on and by folks worrying about getting rid of and organizing their junk. They always have some attractive models involved, looking happy and seeming to want to hug you. They lead you to believe that you will be loved more if you dejunkify your home, garage and closet. They make us feel bad about our cluttered closets and garages. I dont think I can ever get my clutter completely removed, or organized. Theres no need to do it, because these ladies fourth suggestion is to, Abandon a project. The project I have decided to abandon is getting rid of my clutter. Im already happier. Somebody hug me. The next way to be happier was, Be a tourist in your own hometown. Thats really not hard for me to do. I live right smack dab in the middle of tourism central, with a theme park and water park less than 2 minutes away and less than ve minutes away from Americas Colonial Capitol. I get to ght tourist traf c, pay tourist prices for gas and get taxed at the tourist rate year-round. This is not a complaint, just a fact of life. The good part is that I can go into a 7-Eleven and run into folks wearing triangle hats, presidents I thought were dead and Redcoats. Speaking of Redcoats, did you know that the red dye used in Colonial America came from a bug (the cochineal)? Im a tourist in my own hometown, I know these things. The next idea to make for a happier 2013 home was to have a holiday breakfast, or as I read it, Fix a fancy breakfast for your family. Its amazing how things that once were commonplace are now thought of as wonderful ideas that will solve all your problems. I still make breakfast. I cook eggs, bacon, sausage, grits and biscuits. I hate Quick Grits and I hated them before they poked fun at Southerners Though written 55 years ago this year, the words at the bottom of this space remain tting for today. Written by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthday the nation will observe in the coming week, they are the foundation of so much more than equality of races. King was much more than a civil rights activist, much more than a rousing speaker. He was a man, awed as we all may be, who reached far beyond the narrowness of civil rights to consider the human condition. And during the times we face now, with economic uncertainty and great disparity, with far too many living in desperate need, with partisanship ripping at our seams, his words of 1958 remain achingly relevant. Following are portions of an essay entitled The Dimensions of a Complete Life. It is one essay in the book The Measure of a Man and provides insight into the philosophical foundation of Kings work. They are words I refer to often, the book passed on to me by my father. They are words of belief in a power beyond human understanding, humanity without conditions, and a belief in self and community, in the intersection of us all, that still speaks to our times. King wrote, Many, many centuries ago, out on a lonely, obscure island called Patmos, a man by the name of John caught a vision of the new Jerusalem descending out of heaven from God. One of the greatest glories of this new city of God that John saw was its completeness. It was not partial and one-sided, but it was complete in all three of its dimensions. And so, in describing the city in the twentyrst chapter of the book of Revelation, John says this: The length and the breadth and the height of it are equal. Now John is saying something quite signi cant here What John is really saying is this: that life as it should be and life at its best is the life that is complete on all sides. There are three dimensions of any complete life to which we can tly give the words of this text: length, breadth and height. The length of life as we shall think of it here is not its duration or its longevity, but it is the push of a life forward to achieve its personal ends and ambitions. It is the inward concern for ones own welfare. The breadth of life is the outward concern for the welfare of others. The height of life is the upward reach for God. These are the three dimensions of life, and without the three being correlated, working harmoniously together, life is incomplete Now let us notice rst the length of life Some years ago a learned rabbi wrote a book entitled Peace of Mind He has a chapter in the book entitled Love Thyself Properly. In this chapter he says in substance that it is impossible to love other selves adequately unless you love your own self properly So every individual has a responsibility to be concerned about himself enough to discover what he is made for. After he discovers his calling he should set out to do it with all the strength and power of his being No matter how small one thinks his lifes work is in terms of the norms of the world and the so-called big jobs, he must realize that it has cosmic signi cance if he is serving humanity and doing the will of God. To carry this to one extreme, if it falls your lot to be a streetsweeper, sweep streets as Raphael painted pictures, as Michelangelo carved marble, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote poetry In the words of Douglas Mallock: If you cant be a highway, just be a trail; If you cant be the sun, be a star; For it isnt the size that you win or you fail Be the best of whatever you are. But dont stop here; it is dangerous to stop here The breadth of life is that dimension of life in which we are concerned about others. An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow con nes of his individualistic concerns to broader concerns of all humanity. As long as there is poverty in the world I can never be rich, even if I have a billion dollars. As long as diseases are rampant and millions of people in this world cannot expect to live more than twentyeight or thirty years, I can never be totally healthy even if I just got a good checkup at the Mayo Clinic. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be No individual or nation can stand out boasting of being independent. We are interdependent When we discover this, we master the second dimension of life. Some people never get beyond the rst two dimensions of life. They master the rst two. They develop their inner powers; they love humanity, but they stop right there They seek to live life without a sky. But if we are to live the complete life we must reach up and discover God. H.G. Wells was right: The man who is not religious begins at nowhere and ends at nothing. In a real sense everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see. Plato was right: The visible is a shadow cast by the invisible. Love yourself, if that means rational, healthy and moral selfinterest. You are commanded to do that. That is the length of life. Love your neighbor as you love yourself. You are commanded to do that. That is the breadth of life. But never forget that there is a rst and even greater commandment, Love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and all thy soul and all thy mind. This is the height of life. And when you do this you live the complete life. Fiscal cliff my hind foot Keyboard KLATTERINGS Be happier in 2013 The dimensions of life TIM CROFT Star news editor Lets see, the President of the United States makes $400,000 a year, plus another $100,000 (non taxable) for travel expenses, and an additional $50,000 special expense account, and, oh yeah, another $19,000 for entertainment. He ies his whole family to Hawaii every year for a Christmas vacation! There is a Congressman from Texas named Michael McCaul who lists his net worth at $294 million! Representative Darrell Issa from California weighs in at $220 million. Senator John Kerrys total worth is $193 million. Nancy Pelosis net is a mere $35 million or so. Lamar Alexander, a Senator from Tennessee who has made a career out of putting on a plaid work shirt and being one of us, is worth $10 million. Congressman John Boehner, who checks in way down the list, still is worth $2 million. Youre telling me these kinds of people can get up with a straight face and talk about going over some kind of mythical scal cliff? You think they are sweating their next pay check? Reckon any of them have ever counted the change in their pockets before walking into McDonalds? Or admired that shirt in the window.until you silently turned the price tag face up? Wonder how many of them have asked someone to please hold that check till Friday? We may have the wrong people voting for us on this deal. Baseball consumed my early years. I loved it and I was fairly good at it. I could have been even better if I had owned a real glove. With all my heart I coveted one of those Rawlings three ngered PM Playmaker models. They cost $12 dollars even in 1954! You talk about a genuine, sure nuff, real scal cliff. I spent my youth hemming up line drives off the bats of Jackie Burns, Bobby C. Melton and Buddy Wiggleton with a dollar and a half Revelation glove my older brother had purchased at the Western Auto. I remember the year Dad lost two eighteen wheelers. One of them caught re over some faulty wiring as he was driving a load to Tupelo, Mississippi; and one of his drivers wrecked the other one. We didnt y to Hawaii that Christmas. We huddled around the tree as he passed out some nuts and oranges to my brothers and me for our presents. This is not a sob story. As I look back, that might have been the best Christmas my family ever spent together. We enjoyed, respected and loved each other because each other was about all we had! But the point here, of course, is that there was no bail out for us. We couldnt postpone our money problems to a later date. We didnt get to take a vote. We werent play pretending or posturing for some kind of political advantage. We were at broke! And no one, no institution, no World Bank or no unending stream of tax dollars were rushing to our rescue. Dont play games with me about scal cliffs. I have hung over the edge! I stood in front of Mr. Cannons Rexall Drugstore up on the square and stared endlessly at the Timex watch he had in his window. That thing was shock proof, antimagnetic, glowed in the dark and best of all, it had a red sweep second hand. A life long love affair with time pieces of all kinds began for me as I leaned against that glass. It cost nine dollars. Might has well been nine thousand! There wasnt a cliff here. It was a stone wall that reached from Mr. Cannons concrete sidewalk to the sky! Billie Jean liked me a little back in high school. I kinda liked her back but she was big on brand name sweaters, eating out and, boy howdy, how she loved going to the movies! I was working summers at the swimming pool and cutting rewood for a little extra money but Billie Jeans taste seemed to outstrip my pay check. I liked long walks on a bright sunny afternoon or a bicycle ride out to the Tri-County Stockyards. She didnt give a hoot about sitting on the porch and watching for out of state cars to pass by. I was sixteen years old. And I was forced to think about a budget. It was idiotic to expect that I HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard OPINION www.starfl.com Thursday, January 10, 2013 A Page 4 Section See CRANKS A5 See HUNKER A5 And during the times we face now, with economic uncertainty and great disparity, with far too many living in desperate need, with partisanship ripping at our seams, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s words of 1958 remain achingly relevant.

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.com Thursday, January 10, 2013 A Page 5 Section CRANKS from page A4 in the My Cousin Vinny movie. If I want it to be fancy, Ill make omelets or put a happy face on a pancake with whip cream or chocolate chips. These ladies live in a big city where folks dont make breakfast anymore and they will no doubt be lauded for such a glorious idea. For your information, we use cloth napkins all the time. Perhaps the List Ladies will form a breakfast group, where they can sit around and talk about what a good idea it was and wishing they could nd the napkin rings their Aunt Lucille gave them for a wedding present. Dont get me wrong, its a good idea. Its just not earth shattering. A lot of folks eat breakfast at home. You will love this next one Assemble a shrine comes in at No. 7. What in the world do you think all of my clutter is? It IS a shrine. Thanks so much for giving it a better name. My clutter is A group of related objects that makes me smile. Deal with it. No. 8 is a super idea Make a photo album. You have me there; I think that would make us all happier. Ill even give a recommendation; put a lot of pictures of dogs and happy children in it. Dogs and children make the world a better place. Then theres old number 9, I knew it was coming. They always say it, but they dont mean it. Set a quitting time because our homes should be places of rest and leisure. The lists, the clutter problems, the yard, the garage, your closet and dont forget you have to pay the mortgage. Make sure to set aside a little free time for yourself. This should be after everyone goes to bed and if it were me, Id just sit down right in the middle of my clutter and appreciate the shrine I have created. The list ended. What happened to No. 10? Going back through the happier 2013 home list, I had missed something in the rst paragraph about making a scrapbook. I felt a little like Ralphie in A Christmas Story after he decoded Little Orphan Annies secret message to drink more Ovaltine. The list was probably just a ploy to get you to buy more supplies. If that cranks your tractor, that is just ne by me. Just stay out of my cluttered closet and I can guarantee you that it will de nitely be a happier year! Read more at www. CranksMyTractor.com HUNKER from page A4 could spend more than I had! It fell my lot to determine when I had the money for a movie and when we had to ride out to the stockyards. Somehow I managed to live life, enjoy Billie Jeans company, buy a Timex and make enough sensible decisions that I didnt go over any scal cliffs. Folks, most all of you have done the exact same thing! Daddy would say we were living within our means. If we gured it out years ago, why does it seem to be such a mystery to our national government? It might get back to a Senator that is worth $200 million not being in touch with the rest of us. A Congressman raised on caviar and Rolex might not have a clue about a bicycle ride versus a fty cent movie. Of course, when you take Billie Jean along, it became a dollar movie. And sometimes that extra fty cents made the difference! I dont think they count half dollars like we used to. And they can talk scal cliff until the cows come home, it doesnt ring authentic to me when so many of the ones voting for us have such a large personal safety net to fall back on. We need to send people to Washington who have actually seen a scal cliff. Or, maybe, it would be a refreshing wake up call if we plunged over one time. I wonder how we would react as a nation if both of our trucks got destroyed in the same year. Respectfully, Kes By Jason Alderman According to a recent survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the U.S. Census Bureau, 17 million American adults now live in unbanked households, while another 51 million are considered underbanked. In other words, over 28 percent of households either have no traditional checking or savings accounts (unbanked); or their basic nancial needs arent being met by their bank or credit union so they also rely on alternative lenders like check-cashing services or payday loans (underbanked). There have always been millions of Americans who are either unable to or choose not to conduct their nancial transactions through a bank. Common reasons cited include: Dont have enough money to need an account. Dont write enough checks to justify monthly fees and minimum balance requirements just buy money orders when needed. Lack of proper identi cation. Denied accounts due to bad banking track record. Language barriers. Bad previous banking experience or lack of trust in banking institutions. Big retailers and other alternative nancial services providers have rushed to ll the void for customers who cant or wont use banks or credit card issuers. For example, Bankrate. com lists dozens of prepaid cards that offer many of the same functionalities as regular credit or debit cards, including direct deposit, online purchases and bill pay, ATM access, etc. Other businesses provide such varied services as check-cashing, money orders, wire transfers, and payday, pawn shop or cartitle loans. However, charges for these services can quickly add up. After youve paid a fee to cash your paycheck and bought money orders to pay your monthly bills, you probably will have spent far more than the $5 to $15 a month a regular checking account typically costs. Although monthly checking and savings account fees at large banks have risen, you still may be able to nd free or low-cost accounts at banks and credit unions. To nd competitive bank account rates, visit www. bankrate.com/checking.asp x To nd a credit union for which you might be eligible, use the Credit Union Locator at www.ncua.go v High fees aside, theres also a safety risk factor to being unbanked. Carrying or storing cash at home tempts robbers; also, money can easily be destroyed in a re or other natural disaster. Plus, money deposited in FDIC-insured banks is insured up to $250,000 per account (similar insurance is available to credit union accounts through NCUA). Its also more dif cult for unbanked consumers to improve their credit scores due to lack of access to credit-building products like credit cards and loans. To help bring unbanked and underbanked people into the system, an increasing number of public/private programs like Bank On ( www.joinbankon. or g ) are being formed. These voluntary partnerships between local or state governments, nancial institutions and community-based organizations provide low-income unand underbanked people with free or low-cost starter or second chance bank accounts and access to nancial education. In addition, many nancial education resources are available, including: MyMoney.gov. the governments website dedicated to teaching Americans the basics about nancial education ( www.mymoney.go v ). FDICs MoneySmart program of nancial education workshops ( www.fdic. gov/moneysmar t ). Practical Money Skills for Life ( www.practicalmoneyskills. co m ), a free personal nancial management program run by Visa Inc. Theres no law that says everyone must have a traditional banking relationship. But if you choose to go unbanked, carefully investigate the nancial consequences you may not be saving money after all. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMone y Helping the unbanked get affordable nancial services Dear editor, The Gulf County Sheriffs Office would like to thank those that made the Christmas Wishes Program possible this year. We would like to thank all of the people who donated toys and funds to our program, Special thanks goes to the Dollar General Stores in St. Joe Beach and Port St. Joe, the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069, Washington Improvement Group, South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department, members of the St. Joseph Bay County Club, Bay Breeze Antiques, James Vespa and Mr. Earl, Port St Joe Lions Club and Jerry Stokoe. Thanks to their generosity we were able to provide a Merry Christmas for over 175 children in Gulf County. We look forward to working with everyone again next year. The Gulf County Sheriffs Office JASON ALDERMAN It is time to look at the root cause of mass killings. The horror of Newtown has already resulted in an outcry for more gun control. This is an understandable reaction, but to focus on it prevents us from doing the hard work of analyzing the fundamental, root cause of mass killings. While there is no question that we must take serious measures to prevent guns from falling into the hands of those who would misuse them, such as requiring background checks for all gun purchases, outlawing the instrumentality of the Newtown killings will not stop the massacres. The worst killing of elementary school children in the United States occurred in 1927 at Bath Consolidated School in Bath Township, Michigan. A mentally ill farmer used explosives to kill 38 children. In 1995, Timothy McVeigh killed 168 people in Oklahoma City, including 19 small children, using fertilizer, diesel fuel, and a rental truck. Mass killings are perpetrated by those who are mentally ill and who are willing to give up their own life to accomplish the task. They are planned. More gun control will not serve to stop them anymore than tighter controls on diesel fuel and rental trucks will. Now is not the time to focus the discussion on gun control; we must nd and solve the root causes of mass killings. The starting point is the question, What causes someone to do this? The next question is, How can we recognize them before they act and intervene to prevent it? These are hard and complex questions but until we answer them, we are not going to reduce or stop horri c tragedies like Oklahoma City, Virginia Tech, and Newtown. Most of the mass killers are males who have at least a high school education. They are mentally ill to the point of suicide. Whether they were born with mental illness or it developed as they grew older, we must ask ourselves how we have failed as a society to recognize it and to intervene timely. Here are some areas where we can look for answers along with some suggestions on steps we can take to stop mass killings. Parenting Parenting has always been important. Now, with the instability in our mobile society, the importance of parenting has increased. The state of our economy often requires that both parents work. So who is raising the children? Television? The Internet? Their friends? When our economy is in such a state that working people with children have to get Food Stamps to feed their families, things are way out of balance. Our economy must be structured so that it gives working people a good living without both parents having to spend so much time at work that there is no time left to parent. There is great wisdom in the words of the Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young song Teach Your Children Well. If you are over 40, you may remember how it goes Teach your children well Teach your children what you believe in. Make a world that we can live in. There is no substitute for parents. Education system School is a wonderful place for most children. It is a very cruel place for the children who are left out of the social circles, activities, and friendships that most children enjoy. We have made great progress against bullying in schools. Now, it is time to train our teachers and school personnel to recognize the children who are not included in social activities, those who are left out, who are socially ostracized, and to come up with appropriate interventions to diagnose and treat these cases before they develop into personalities who become so anti-social that they harm themselves and others. Church attendance Over the last two decades, church attendance has dropped dramatically in the United States. With very few exceptions, the JudeoChristian based faiths have the same core beliefs. One of them is the Golden Rule Do Unto Others as You Would Have Them Do Unto You. It is well documented that the more examples and messages of good behavior that people are exposed to, the better their own behavior becomes. I submit that you would be hardpressed to nd an agnostic or even an atheist who would argue that we should not teach our children to treat others as they would want to be treated. We would all bene t if parents of every faith would participate regularly in their faith with their children. Mental health America has the best trauma care in the world. We rank below some third world countries in most other areas of health care. The philosophy of x it instead of prevent it has pervaded all disciplines of health care, including mental health. Ready access to health care for all Americans regardless of nancial means, including mental health care, is long overdue. A word about cost if other rst world countries (Taiwan, Canada, England) can nd a way to pay for it, we can. The price we cannot pay is another Newtown massacre. America is not an everyman for himself society. We cannot expect to enjoy the bene ts of a free, stable, and secure society without taking our share of the responsibility for building and maintaining that society. Part of that responsibility is that on some levels we must all look out for and take care of each other. The fabric of our society is woven with many threads. Three of the most important are our moral code, our education system, and our economic system. On December 14th, we suffered a violent and horri c tear in our fabric. It has left a painful, gaping hole. If we dont do the hard work to start repairing it now, that tear will rip through the fabric of our society until it is torn in two. Carlton Duke Fagan is a native of Jacksonville. Our delicate society is torn CARLTON DUKE FAGAN Letter to the EDITOR

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) CALL FOR A QUOTE 1-877-216-9600 Corner of Marina Drive, CALL FOR A QUOTE CALL FOR A QUOTE Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, January 10, 2013 OUTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater: Inshore: Live shrimp continues to be the hot bait in the I.C.W. again this week with good catches of decent sized trout. The T and powerlines area have been good this week and all the way up to the White City Brige area. Try using grubs and jigs to cover more ground if the bite slows down. Most area creeks and lakes are producing good numbers of bream and crappie. Before the New Year, cold weather increased the bite in Depot Creek and Howard Creek. Moving water on the big river and back waters have got the catfish biting again, but no news this week on the bass. Barnacleencrusted docks make an excellent winter sheepshead refuge. Many anglers scrape the pilings to create a chumline and lure the sh in to their shrimp or crab baits. Below, sheepshead are a prime winter target because theyre less cold sensitive than reds and trout. PHOTOS BY FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The Star HOT TUBS FOR FISH By FRANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net The kingfish go to Key West when it gets cold. Smart fish. But for those species not designed to migrate, a few finny spas around the Panhandle have to suffice when the weather turns colder in January and February. One of the best known is the Warren Bayou Power Plant, aka the Steam Plant, where water is sucked in from North Bay, used in the generating process and then discharged some 20 degrees warmer into a 10,000-foot-long canal that feeds into Warren Bayou and West Bay. Cold-sensitive species hone in on this warm outflow just like humans gathering around a fireplace on a chilly day. Thus, on a frosty morning when the Steam Plant water earns its name, its not uncommon to catch sea trout, redfish, jack crevalle, ladyfish, sheepshead, pompano, black drum, sharks and rays in the warm outflow, along with even the rare tarpon. The fish are there strictly because of the warm water; its not a good feeding area, and if it were all the available food soon would be gobbled up by the assembled fish-mob. So they are hungry, and that often makes them easy to catch. So easy, in fact, that a few years back the FWC designated the area all catch-and-release from November through February annually. Although the canal stretches some 2 miles through the flatlands, only the west quartermile is accessible to boats; a dike with drain culverts block navigation. However, the warm outflow affects most of Warren Bayou, and fish sometimes can be found up to a half-mile away from the mouth of the canal, feeding in tendrils of the warm water; a water temperature gauge on your sonar can be a huge help here in tracking the warm spots where fish are likely to gather. Though deeper water often is the attraction the canal is about 8 feet for much of its length the sand bars on the edges sometimes attract fish on sunny afternoons as they come up to soak up some UV rays both trout and reds do this at times. When they do, staying well back and pitching a live shrimp or small killifish or pinfish to the bars can do the job. (Because this is an all-release area, its not a bad idea to use a size 1 or 1/0 circle hook, which the fish are less likely to swallow.) For general fishfinding a DOA Shrimp in the 4-inch size, a Tsunami Split-Tail Minnow, also 4-inch, or any standard Cockahoe Minnow plastic tail on a quarter-ounce jig will do the job. Big difference is its winter, the retrieve must be even slower, barely crawling with the DOA, and with very short twitches with the swimbaits and jigs. Adding a tiny tag of fresh cut shrimp to the jig hook will greatly increase the number of bites. Because the live baits and lures are light weight, best delivery system is a spinning rig loaded with 10-pound-test braid. Add 18 inches of 20-pound-test fluorocarbon to decrease visibility and also to avoid some of the tangles that result from working artificials on braid. (A doubled-line double Uniknot is the best non-slip line to leader connection Ive found, retaining very close to 100 percent of the line strength.) Warren Bayou is not difficult to find thanks to the tall smokestacks; its a couple miles northeast of Marker 1 on the ICW headed toward Choctawhatchee Bay out of West Bay. Just motor northward until you can look directly up the bayou at the smokestacks, then turn right and follow them to the canal. This area has plenty of shallow, unmarked bars; a shallow draft boat and a sharp eye are a must. The navigable water tends to be along the south side in most areas; youll want to idle in, both for the safety of your prop and to avoid spooking fish or disturbing other anglers. WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, Jan. 10 69 59 20 % Fri, Jan. 11 69 58 30 % Sat, Jan. 12 70 58 10 % Sun, Jan. 13 70 58 10 % Mon, Jan. 14 68 56 30 % T ues, Jan. 15 67 54 10 % Wed, Jan. 16 65 44 10 % 10 Th 830pm 1.6 602am -1.0 11 Fr 921pm 1.4 651am -1.0 12 Sa 1010pm 1.3 732am -0.9 13 Su 1055pm 1.1 803am -0.7 14 Mo 1135pm 0.8 818am -0.4 15 Tu 809am -0.2 16 We 1207am 0.4 340pm 0.4 729am 0.0 17 Th 323pm 0.7 602am 0.0 18 Fr 339pm 0.8 235am -0.1 19 Sa 410pm 0.9 229am -0.2 20 Su 451pm 1.0 304am -0.4 21 Mo 538pm 1.1 345am -0.6 22 Tu 627pm 1.1 426am -0.6 10 Th 1208am 1.2 433pm 1.0 900am -0.8 811pm 0.9 11 Fr 110am 1.3 501pm 1.0 945am -0.8 904pm 0.8 12 Sa 209am 1.3 526pm 1.0 1026am -0.7 954pm 0.7 13 Su 306am 1.2 547pm 1.0 1103am -0.5 1043pm 0.6 14 Mo 401am 1.1 608pm 1.0 1136am -0.4 1135pm 0.4 15 Tu 457am 1.0 628pm 1.0 1205pm -0.2 16 We 556am 0.9 650pm 1.0 1231am 0.3 1231pm 0.0 17 Th 703am 0.8 715pm 1.0 133am 0.2 1255pm 0.2 18 Fr 827am 0.6 744pm 1.0 243am 0.1 119pm 0.4 19 Sa 1020am 0.6 820pm 1.0 359am 0.0 145pm 0.6 20 Su 902pm 1.0 511am -0.1 21 Mo 954pm 1.0 615am -0.3 22 Tu 257pm 0.8 1051pm 1.0 709am -0.4 552pm 0.8 23 We

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To learn how you can support our communitys university, contact Mary Beth Lovingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITY THE CAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY Endowment for Tomorrows Jobs $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Sign Up Now & Get The Early Bird Rate $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. I NSTANTLY MA K E IT YOUR EX PO GAIN THE EXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Vendors, Exhibitors, Non-Prot Organizations The 2013 Health Expo is Calling Your Business BOARDWAL K BEACH RESORT F EBRUARY 19, 2013 9 AM 2 PM S o n s o r e y T e N e w s H e r a PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com Thursday, January 10, 2013 A Page 7 Section PSJ Dixie Softball annual meeting Star Staff Report Port St. Joe Dixie Softball annual meeting for the 2013 season will be held at 6 p.m. ET, on Thursday, Jan. 24, at the STAC House on 8th Street. Anyone interested in getting involved as an of cer, coach, umpire or team parent please attend this organizational meeting. If you have any questions or would like to get involved please contact: Mike Lacour at 850-774-6446, or email lacour6@gtcom.net. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Middle School girls basketball team traveled to Wakulla Riversprings, Dec. 17, and won 30-6. The Lady Tiger Sharks led 14-3 at halftime. Hallie Jasinski paced Port St. Joe with 15 points. Khaliyah Johnson had 11 and Destiny Gadson and ZaCarion Pittman each had two points. Port St. Joe traveled to Wewahitchka the following day, and won 24-14. Jasinski had 18 points and Johnson chipped in six. Host Wakulla Middle School handed Port St. Joe its second loss of the season with a 24-21 win on Dec. 19. Port St. Joe trailed 13-5 at the half but the rally came up short in the second half. Jasinski led Port St. Joe with 17 points, 13 in the second half. Johnson had four points. Port St. Joe nishes the season at Bozeman tonight. Lady Tiger Sharks win 2 of 3 over holiday break Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls basketball team beat Franklin County and Wakulla and lost to Bay High in between during the holiday break. The Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Franklin County on Dec. 21, and after struggling in the rst half caught re in the second for a 38-27 win. Port St. Joe missed some baskets in close and also turned the ball over several times in falling behind 18-9 in the rst half. Those mistakes were not present in the second half as the Lady Tiger Sharks out-scored Franklin County 29-9. Brooklyn Quinn and Maya Robbins each had 12 points, with Robbins scoring 11 of her points in the nal quarter. Teiyahna Hutchinson and Callie Fleshren each had seven points. The Lady Tigers Sharks broke out in front of Bay High the following night, taking a 15-9 lead into intermission. Port St. Joe managed just one basket from the oor in the third quarter as Bay knotted the score at 17-all. Port St. Joe led 25-24 with 14 seconds remaining when Lady Tornado Lisa Kelso drove the oor and scored to give Bay the win 26-25. Hutchinson led Port St. Joe with 12 points while Robbins added nine, Quinn three and Alyssa Parker two. One week later, on Dec. 29, the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted Wakulla. The Lady Tiger Sharks rolled to a 272 lead at intermission and coasted to a 49-18 win. Quinn led Port St. Joe with 14 points, Hutchinson had 11, Parker nine and Shannon Pridgeon added ve. Fleshren, DaVida Tschudi, Maliayah McNair, and Hallie Jasniski each had two points. Star Staff Report In a uke of scheduling, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School soccer teams played doubleheaders last Saturday against Baker. Both the boys and girls won both games with the District 1-1A playoffs on the horizon. The Lady Tiger Sharks nished district play 3-2-1 (8-3-1 overall) after winning 4-0 and 2-1 over Baker last weekend. Coach Gary Hindley expects the girls will be a second or third seed for the district tournament, which begins Tuesday, Jan. 15, with the nals Jan. 18, in Port St. Joe. The Tiger Sharks beat Baker 6-3 and 8-0 to improve to 10-1-1 for the year, 7-0-1 in district play. The boys will be a one or two seed when the district tournament begins Jan. 22 in Freeport. The unusual doubleheaders at Baker were necessitated due to a scheduling con ict and the need to nish district play with the girls tournament next week. Lady Tiger Sharks The rst game against Baker (a third-year program new to the district), was keyed by Kathleen Rishs two goals, increasing her team-high goals to 10. Juniors Lexie McGhee (her eighth) and defender Brittney Shoemaker (her second) each scored on penalty kicks. Junior Christian Laine started in goal and played 20 minutes with seventh-grader Celeste Childs nishing. Both faced just one shot and made on save to share the shutout. The second match was much tighter but Port St. Joe prevailed behind goals by Rish and McGhee. The single assist on the day was earned in this game by senior defender Jaclyn Kerigan. Tiger Sharks A record setting day by sophomore Marcel Duarte paced the boys. Duarte had three goals in each match, increasing his team-high total to 25. With his rst goal of the day, Duarte scored his 20th of the year to break the singleseason school record set two years ago by JMason Ray and equaled by Duarte last year. Duarte is closing in on the school career goal-scoring record of which is currently held by Ray at 72. Duarte has 38 currently with two-plus seasons to play. Additional goals in the rst game came from Kaleb Odum, with two (his fourth and fth of the year), and an own goal. All 25 players on the roster saw playing time in the match, Hindley said. Senior Tucker Smith was in goal and was called on to make ve saves on nine Baker shots. The Tiger Sharks had 24 shots in the match. The second game was called due to the mercy rule with the score 8-0 in the middle of the second half. Duarte had his fth hat trick of the season. Senior defensive mid elder\defender Javarri Beachum also scored three goals (his second hat trick of the season) and now has 10 goals on the year. Adding a goal was Odum. Assists came from Duarte, senior Daniel Jones, and eighth-grader Jacob Lacour. Smith was in goal once again and saw 60 minutes of action before giving way to Jones for 10 minutes and Drew Lacour for 10. They shared the shutout as Smith made ve saves, Jones one and Lacour three. Smith earned the win and is now 101-1 with a 1.269 Goals Against Average. Both teams were back in action on Tuesday at Bozeman. Star Staff Report The Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School boys basketball team nished second during a holiday tournament at Franklin County High School. The Gators opened the tournament with a loss to eventual champion Madison County, dropping a 67-51 decision. Raheem Wright had 27 points for the Gators (10-4 overall) and Javar Hill had 13 rebounds. The Gators bounced back to beat Tallavana in the next round 92-68. Wright had 45 points and 15 rebounds to lead Wewahitchka. The Gators fell again to Madison County in the title game. Last Friday, the Gators played at Ponce de Leon. The junior varsity boys lost 57-38 with Jeff Hunter dropping a team-high 18 points. The varsity boys won 89-44. Wright had 37 points and Clay Sasser added 20 points. Wright had 10 rebounds, Hill grabbed nine. The Gators hosted Vernon on Tuesday. PSJHS soccer teams play doubleheaders, sweep Baker Port St. Joe Junior High girls win two, lose one Gators nish second in Franklin County tourney

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hoped to receive back 350. But more than 745 came back completed and 400 were randomly selected: 300 visitors, 100 non-visitors. The sample size is well above what I was looking for, Jenkins said. The pro le that emerges is one that shows the vast majority of visitors drive to Gulf County, 90 percent identify themselves as being from non-urban suburban or rural households that include a married couple and, on average, 2.7 other members. The age range is about 35-64 with household incomes typically between $50,000 and $150,000 per year. There is a Southern skew to those visitors, but the Midwest presence is very strong, Jenkins said. Those visitors primarily identify themselves as explorers/adventurers and planners. They are largely looking for solitude and the outdoors. More than half of visitors said they stay a full week and have visited in the past year 90 percent indicated they had visited Gulf County in the past two years. Almost one in ve indicated they had visited Gulf County at least ve times in the past two years. Summer is the strongest season, but more than half said they visited in the fall or spring, which Jenkins said provides some insight into potential growth opportunities in the shoulder months or winter. She also noted 75 percent of visitors venture outside the county to shop or eat, presenting another opportunity for growth by expanding eating and shopping options in the county, Jenkins said. One in three survey respondents said they wanted to see no changes to Gulf County other than more restaurants and more deals at those restaurants. Almost one out of three visitors said they visit Gulf County because it was unique. However, Jenkins noted 30 percent of non-visitors compare Gulf County to Destin and 26 percent think Gulf County is like Panama City Beach. Those perceptions, Jenkins said, provide opportunity to educate travelers on the distinct differences between Gulf County and Panama City Beach or Destin. What we have found is that we are not an uber destination. We have a lot of very good organic attributes that are very attractive to our visitors, Jenkins said. Not only do (visitors) know our beaches are not crowded, the visitors dont want a crowded beach. When asked to provide adjectives to describe free time in Gulf County, visitors used phrases such as at home, peaceful and happy. I have never seen at home in one of these surveys, Jenkins said. Again, Jenkins stressed none of the survey numbers were a de nitive snapshot of Gulf County and its visitors, but combined with other aspects of the research being undertaken would provide a portrait of what the TDC is doing right and where it could be doing better moving forward. Beach cleaning Jenkins said she will seek approval from the BOCC this week to move ahead with a Request for Quali cations regarding beach cleaning. Working with county staff, Jenkins and her staff have already made changes to the layout and maintenance of pet friendly stations, improving the trash disposal with inmate crews providing the upkeep for the station. Incoming Sheriff Mike Harrison was present at the meeting and said he would work with the TDC to bring more consistency to the patrolling of the beaches. We are just really looking for some consistency, both in the cleaning but the patrolling, Jenkins said. The hope is to have a beach cleaning contractor in place by March. Visitors guides The TDC will go back out for bids on the printing of the new Visitors Guide after no bids completely in compliance were received by deadline. More insulation now means less energy costs later Why? A well-insulated home is an investment you wont regret. Cellulose or foam insulation are sprayed into voids where air can escape or enter your home and allow you to enjoy a lower energy bill. www.gcec.com or 850-639-2216 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Quick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola Quick Care and Family Care Services Tuesday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-653-8853 ext. 118 Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs Local A8 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013 I dont want to see us in a position of being against the city, Bryan said. The city is in our county. Weve got to get rid of drawing that line (between us). We all need to work together to do what is best for the county, not dig in our heels and waste resources and time. Gail Alsobrook, director of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency, which has spearheaded the planning for BayPark said the city was about to embark on a capital campaign to fund the relocation and urged commissioners to consider the psychological impact of a vote that would be seen as being anti-city. I thought this was a wonderful opportunity to work together in solidarity, Alsobrook said. Yeager, acknowledging Bryans comments, said he would amend his motion to note that the county would work with the city but if the city failed in its efforts, encourage the National Parks Service to consider the county. We all agreed that once this decision was made we would do all we need to do to work together to preserve and protect this piece of Gulf County history, Yeager said. We want to work with the city. EDC workshop The BOCC in conjunction with the city of Port St. Joe and other stakeholders will hold a workshop on the future of the Economic Development Council 10 a.m. ET Jan. 16 at the EOC building. BOCC from page A1 BED TAXES from page A1 COLBERT BIDS ADIEU AFTER 28 YEARS The staff at the Gulf County Property Appraisers Of ce and throughout the county courthouse gathered on Monday to properly send off Kesley Colbert, who after 28 years in of ce stepped into retirement with the installation of new constitutional of cers this week. TIM CROFT | The Star

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Friends of Bay Preserves seeks members Star staff report The Friends of St. Joseph Bay P reserves will hold its annual general membership meeting at 11 a.m. EST Saturday at the Preserves Center. Members are en couraged to bring guests who may be interested in becoming a Friend of the Preserves. After the meeting, everyone can enjoy assorted chili recipes including vegetarian chili. During the meeting the new Buffer Manager Dylan Shoemaker and two new resource managers on staff, Lisa Dlugolecki and Barry Townsend, will be introduced. Also present will be Kim Wren, stewardship coordinator, who will make a short presentation. The key item on the agenda is the nomination and election of the 2013 Board of Directors and a vote on a proposed amendment to the bylaws Members also will receive a recap of 2012 accomplishments. The theme for 2013 is volunteerism. There are so many ideas the board and staff wish to implement, but more people need to step forward to help make these projects happen. At the meeting, you will have the chance to review and sign up for some of these projects and tasks. Memberships New memberships and renewals will be collected at the meeting: $15 for individuals; $25 for families; $10 for seniors (65 and older); $10 for students/ researchers; $100 or more are sponsors. Donations also are accepted. Membership fees may qualify for a charitable tax deduction. Board election One of the most important items on the membership COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, January 10, 2013 B Page 1 Section See PRESERVES B7 Make a New Years resolution to volunteer in community By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com As 2013 arrives, resolve to chip in to make the community a better place. Local volunteer opportunities allow people to invest in the community, including a few in time for the holidays. Contact the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Trish Petrie at Turtle Beach Inn or Tim Croft at tcroft@star com to provide additional opportunities. Here are a number of opportunities: Volunteers needed for the 2013 Great America Plein Air Paint-out. Come join and learn more about participating in the 2013 activities. The 2013 Plein Air Kickoff/ Volunteer Appreciation Gathering will be 6:30 p.m. ET Monday at the Indian Pass Raw Bar. There will be oysters, shrimp and gumbo. Bring a friend. Goodwill Career Training Center is asking retirees and volunteers to share their expertise and skills by volunteering to tutor or mentor. Many participants at the Center need help completing their GED, including language, writing, mathematics and computer skills. Call Tandra Burns at 229-1273. Be a part of making a difference in your local schools. Volunteer to teach a Junior Achievement class at the fth-grade, eighth-grade or high school-level, and elp teach students real life skills. Junior Achievement teaches our children about running businesses, managing money and preparing to get a job. All of our classes are taught by volunteers from the community. Whether you are an employee, employer, retiree or stay-at-home parent, Junior Achievement values the life experiences you can share with the students while teaching the Junior Achievement courses. All volunteers are provided course kits that have everything you need to teach a class, as well as training that will help you feel more comfortable in the classroom. All kits have hands-on activities that keep the students engaged and interested. A class lasts ve to seven weeks, depending on the age group, and meets once each week, during the school day, for an hour. The amount of commitment time is ve to seven hours to teach the class, two hours for training, and your preparation time which varies from person to person. The classes are sponsored by individuals and businesses in the community, and by the Tapper Foundation and Port St. Joe Capacity Building Fund. There is no cost to the school or the volunteer. Junior Achievement of Northwest Florida is a nonpro t, educational organization dedicated to teaching students K-12 about entrepreneurship, personal nance, and work readiness skills. We provide 13 classes at the fth-grade, eighth-grade and high school levels in Port St. Joe, and six classes at the eighth-grade and high school levels in Wewahitchka. For information about volunteering for fall or spring classes, email Jackie Brooks at jabay@knology.net or call at 624-0524. Are you interested in making a difference in someones life? Covenant Hospice is in need of volunteers in Gulf County. Covenant Hospice provides a special kind of caring for persons with lifelimiting illnesses, their families and loved ones. We offer many volunteer opportunities for all ages, to t into any schedule. Our volunteers are the heart of the Covenant Hospice team. They receive free specialized training to Community honors MLK birthday, holiday Star Staff Report The annual communitywide Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 2013 Birthday Celebration and National Holiday Observance will kick off with a spirituallled program dedicated to the memories of his life and legacy at 6 p.m. ET Tuesday at New Bethel AME Church, 146 Ave. C at the corner of U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. The observance will culminate with activities focusing on community service, A Day On! Not A Day Off from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET Jan. 21. Activities scheduled will focus on healthcare, education, religious, social and political involvement in living and honoring Dr. Kings legacy. The theme for this year is From King to Obama. This years Jan. 21 national MLK holiday celebration will be a historical landmark with a two-fold achievement with the Inauguration Day swearing-in ceremony of President Barack Obama on the same day. The community is welcome and encouraged to attend and share and become a part of this commemoration and help make this years Dr. Kings event a celebration to remember. For more information, call Amy Rogers at 227-4041. Star staff report The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and the city have been awarded two grants through the BP-sponsored Gulf Coast Promotional Tourism Fund. A $24,481 grant was awarded to the PSJRA to update the Historic Downtown brochure and to design and manufacture a new downtown banner series. The other, for $125,000, was awarded to fund a professional-quality video documentary of the rescue and relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Through this award, the 1997 Historic Downtown Brochure will be updated to re ect the color palette and fonts that coordinate with the redesigned Gulf County Visitor Guide. The map will highlight existing businesses and provide visitors with the geographic outline of the historic and marina districts. The brochure highlights the history of Port St. Joe and various reasons to shop, stay, dine and play. The annual events listed coincide with those published in the Visitor Guide. The new banner series will feature custom designs by local artist Richard Henderson and again coordinates with the updated color palettes and new branding initiated by the Gulf County Tourism Council. The art showcases Port St. Joe as a yearround destination and highlights Plein Air, Salt Air Farmers Market, Cape San Blas Lighthouse, live music, and the annual Scallop Festival. Banners will be displayed along Marina Drive, Martin Luther King Boulevard, U.S. 98 and in the Historic Downtown District. The City of Port St. Joe was awarded a grant to produce a professional-quality video documentary capturing the story of the rescue of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse from impending destruction by the Gulf of Mexico and relocation to the BayPark area of St. Joseph Bay. Request for Quali cations will be published shortly for this project. The mission of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is to serve the community by guiding redevelopment activities to create a vibrant downtown core and revitalized neighborhood, to improve quality of life, and to stimulate economic growth within the Agencys District. Grants aid downtown, lighthouse See VOLUNTEER B7

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Star staff report The sun had just started rising when the ovens were turned on preparations began. Jimmie Gainey, David Grif n and Eric Asher were busy preparing the dressing and turkeys, while Doug and Nancy Calendine along with Jerrry and Lyd Stokoe were busy chopping cranberry jelly and cooking gravy. Then came all the other volunteers. They came as singles, and then the remaining volunteers laughing, joking and working so well together to prepare, cook, pack and deliver more than 700 dinners. Bunnnie Gainey was busy gathering the remaining supplies needed and led all present in this effort. The following volunteers aging from 6 to 80-something worked so well together that they packed and delivered more than 700 plates: Dianna Williams, Larry Chism, Donna Masseo, Chaz Wright, Tom Todd, Susan Ashworth, Nichollas Ashworth, Raymond Ashworth, Diana Parrish, Mal Parrish, Mike Guthrie, Tyler Guthrie Leonard and Loretta Costin, Rose Surber, Kelvin Ash, Tommy and Ruth Sauls, Ben Welch, Debbie Maulding, Shelli & Bill Leffert, Dusty and Debbie Stitt, Guy Sweazy, Deanne Williams, the Treglown Family, Joe Chastain, Roger, Sheryl Karah and Kenny Bradley, Denny Hughes, Cheryl Howell, Linda Bettage, Ruby and Benny Hodge, Bill and Shirley Sanders, Kathy Krum, Ron and Elaine Smith, Charlie Black, Christie Todd, Melissa and Zee Haranek, Pat and Guy Nemitz, Wandaa and Danny Wawruck, Dale Smith, David Warriner, Randy Raf eld, Kristy Raf eld, Jasslyn Raf eld, Bionca Raf eld, Mary Belin, Ron and Mary Kelly, Terry Schafer, Joel Rogers, Fisher van Der Tulip, Abby Cozine, Hunter van Der Tulip, Bill Van Der Tulip, Maya Robbins, Kiara Monette, Tiffany Godwin, Donna Murray, Sandie and Bill Kennedy, Charles Givens, Troy White and the GANG (Getting to A New Generation) Lauren White, Caitlin White, Branden, Nakigan Jones, Khaliyan Johnson, Aliyah Johnson, Kanon Martin, Tyson Davis, Murcell Johnson and Bob Sutton, Chase McCullouch, Rick Norrell, Austin Webb, Cindy Balew and Prophet Billy Dixson. The committee that planned this event are very grateful to all our sponsors, the wonderful volunteers, the Oak Grove Church staff and Pastor James Wiley. Thanks also to Eddie Martin for tending to the sound and picture projector and creating the nice slides and music. All projects of this size need good accounting personnel and the committee would like to thank Carol Lyles, who has done a wonderful job for all of us. Finally the committee would like to thank Carol Dow for her help in recruiting the volunteers to help our project so much. We hope to see all of the volunteers next Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society GALE! Meet Gale a young Maine Coon mix cat. Gale is very smart, and friendly. He loves to play with toys, kids and is very proficient on an Ipad. He would make a wonderful pet for a family or a companion for a senior. Please give this guy a second chance at a forever home. He even likes dogs. Gale meets the qualifications for a Pets for Patriots sponsored adoption. www.petsforpatriots.org If you are unable to adopt at this time, perhaps you could foster or make a Donation. All pets adopted from SJBHS will be current on vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Applications are available at http://www.sjbhumanesociety.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Faiths Thrift Hut is always in need of donations also, and all the proceeds go directly to support the animals in our care! Faiths Thrift Hut Has Expanded! We now have more furniture & appliances. Plus lots of other great thrift store treasures. The hours for the store are Thursday-Saturday from 10 am-3 pm. Volunteers are always welcome at both our store and our shelter! Our store and shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! Hope to see you all there soon! If you are missing a pet or want to adopt a new pet, please check with your local Humane Society or Shelter. Pet Wellness Campaign Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM PERFORMED IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY! CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM FRIDAY @ 9:00 PM EST RANDY STA R K ON T HE P OOP D ECK SATURDAY @ 9:00 PM EST RANDY STA R K WITH A R T L O NG O N S AX ON T HE P OOP D ECK FRI & SAT @ 9:00 PM EST KA R A O KE / DJ IN THE C RO W S NE S T NOW NO N -SMOKI N G I N THE CROW S NE S T A N D D OW NS TAIR S I N THE SHIP S STORE CALL 215-3264 Need a New Primary Care Physician Society B2 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013 Special to The Star Wheeling around with Rotary The members of the Port St Joe Rotary are busy nalizing the details for the Gulf County Health and Safety Fair. This free event is open to the public from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET Jan. 24 at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. This is a great time to get free health screening for blood pressure, cholesterol, vision, hearing, HIV, glucose etc. Many community services also will be available. This Health and Safety Fair is sponsored by Gulf County Senior Citizens Center and your local Rotary Club. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, call Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Gulf Amateur Radio Society license exams The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will provide ham radio license exams at 10 a.m. Feb. 9. The exams will be given at the Gulf County EOC building behind the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe. Those interested in obtaining a ham license or upgrading a present license should contact C.H. Tillis at 648-8251 for information and exam registration. Anyone who would like to become involved in amateur radio and needs information as to what is needed and how to obtain a license should contact the above number. American Legion Post 116 regular meeting There will be a regular general meeting of American Legion Post 116 at 4 p.m. ET Jan. 24 at VFW Post 10069 on Trout Avenue in Highland View. This will be a meeting to elect a new rst vice commander, general business with discussion of future fundraising events, and rehearsal for the up-coming memorial service. Eligibility for membership and bene ts can be found at www.legion.org. All eligible veterans are invited to join the organization. For God and Country. Every time we talk about woody ornamentals for the Florida landscape, we say something about fertilizer requirements. For healthy normal growth landscape, plants need a variety of nutrient elements some you add in regular fertilizer applications some you have available in the soil around your home. My information on nutrient de ciencies of woody ornamentals was provided by IFAS Horticultural Specialist, Emeritus, Dr. Robert J. Black. Most people know nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium are the major plant food elements. But you might be surprised to learn plants also might need varying amounts of magnesium, calcium, sulphur, manganese, iron, zinc, copper, molybdenum, chlorine and boron. Most of the nutrient de ciency problems we have with woody ornamentals in our landscapes are partly because of the poor quality of our soil. Throughout most of the state, the soil is sandy and slightly acidic, except along the coast where soil tends to be alkaline. Because of the soil chemistry of our sandy Florida soils, important nutrient elements are leached out easily. That means water runs down through the soil very quickly and carries plant nutrients with it. When the water moves beyond the root zone of your plants, so do some of the soil elements your plants depend on for nutrition. Another factor which can cause a de ciency of one nutrient element is having too much of another element in the soil. For example, if you add potassium to soil that is low in magnesium, you could make the magnesium de ciency even worse. This is called an antagonistic effect; high levels of one element make it more dif cult for plants to utilize another element. As I said at the beginning, your landscape plants need proper amount of various nutrients for healthy growth. But if a plant isnt growing well, its almost impossible for the home gardener to tell which nutrient is absent judging from visible symptoms. Many of the de ciency symptoms that show up on leaves, twigs and branches can be misleading. For example yellow of the leaves. Several nutrients de ciencies cause leaves to turn yellow. But it usually takes a trained expert to recognize the tine differences among the yellowing patterns, and thats how you tell which element is in short supply. You should be able to tell something is causing a nutritional de ciency by looking for a few easy to recognize symptoms. The yellowing of the leaves we just mentioned, a plants failure to grow vigorously even when it has plenty of light and water, sparse foliage and a lot of dead wood on the plant, these are all general indications of nutrient de ciency. If these symptoms appear on woody ornamental in our landscape, follow standard fertilizer recommendations and see if their condition doesnt improve. For more information on Nutrient de ciencies of woody ornamentals contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit http:// gulf.ifas.u .edu. ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Nutrient de ciencies of woody ornamentals Society BRIEFS Volunteers deliver 730 Christmas dinners

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The Star| B3 Thursday, January 10, 2013 CLYDE WHITEHEAD W ILL NOT BE PREPARING T AX R ETURNS Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp NEW LOCATION: dbutler@coastalcoverage.com FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIAL FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL 10 oz New York Strip ...................... $11.95 or Fried Shrimp ................................. $10.95 Served with 2 sides L U N CH SPECIAL S MO N DAY FRIDAY MONDAY: Meat loaf or Chicken, served with Mashed Potato, Country Veggies & Roll TUE S DAY: Fried Shrimp, served w/Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cheese Grits, or Potato Salad WEDNE S DAY: Pork Chop or Chicken, served with Mashed Potato, Country Veggies & Roll THUR S DAY: Country Fried Steak, Mashed Potato, Country Veggies, & Roll HOUR S O F O PERATIO N : Monday Friday Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Over 35 Years Experience. 208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111 www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Gifts Ornaments Jewelry School News By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A no muss, no fuss continuing education. That is what Gulf Coast State College at its Gulf/Franklin Center will be offering in the coming weeks as Education Encore returns for another session. Education Encore offers noncredit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics. We have a saying, you are never too old to learn, said Jim Barr, coordinator of Education Encore. There are no tests, no grades, no stress, just fun. Registration for Education Encore begins at 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, Jan. 16, in Building A, Room 101, at the Gulf/Franklin Center. Registration is rst-come, rst-served. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays, beginning Jan. 23 and continuing through Feb. 27. Classes are being offered in three morning time periods, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, making it possible for a student to take three classes during this years Encore. In fact, the fee is based on each student having access to all three classes each Wednesday. The goal of Education Encore, Barr said, is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom in Special to The Star Choosing a school for your child is one of the most important decisions you will ever make. If a family atmosphere with nurturing teachers and a stimulating, God-based curriculum is what you are looking for, then Faith Christian School is the place for you. Faith Christian school is taking applications for new students. Interactive learning will be a part of your childs day, along with Spanish classes for all grades. Discovery learning days are incorporated into the academic year, and technology classes enhance the elementary program. Your child will experience academic excellence through Godly instruction. Please take a few minutes and browse through www. FaithChristianPSJ.net. Communication with teachers will be available through this site as well as the latest news. Partial scholarship opportunities for tuition are available for K5 through the eighth grade. Contact the of ce at 2296707 to ensure your childs spot. The Lions Tale SPECIAL TO THE STAR FCS offers kids faith-based education EDUCATION ENCORE The following classes will be offered Jan. 23 to Feb. 27 at the Gulf/ Franklin Center. PERIOD ONE: 8:30-9:30 A.M. Computer Basics Digital Photography Drawing: An Easy Approach Poetry Writing Chair Yoga Home Repair Marine Biology Habitats PERIOD TWO: 9:4510:45 A.M. Computer New Technology Photo Editing with Adobe Photoshop Acrylic Painting (Two periods) Works of Louis LAmore Yoga Meaning Every Moment Marine Biology Plants & Animals PERIOD THREE: 11 A.M. TO NOON Computer Internet & E-mail Photography Lighting & Composition Acrylic Painting (Cont.) Travel Portugal Tai Chi Creative Writing Marine Biology Setting Up & Maintaining a Saltwater Aquarium MAY NAMED DISTRICTS TOP SCHOLAR DANIEL MAY Daniel May, a 2012 graduate of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, has been named the recipient of the Academic Top Scholar Award for Gulf District Schools. To be eligible to be named Academic Top Scholar, a student must meet all eligibility requirements; have received a Bright Futures Academic Scholar scholarship and attended a Florida college during the fall semester the year following high school graduation; and be the highest ranked FAS award recipient based on their Bright Futures GPA and combined SAT score or equivalent ACT score. The Academic Top Scholar Award, going to just one student in each school district, provides a cost per credit hour award, established by the Florida Legislature, in addition to the Florida Academic Scholars scholarship. May is the son of Dusty and Carla May of Port St. Joe. which adults explore new ideas. If you have been to college, Barr said, this is an opportunity to relive the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live it. Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t, exercising the mind keeps one mentally t, he said. The courses offered at the Gulf/Franklin Center include basic computer skills, digital camera, drawing, writing, chair yoga, marine biology, Dare to Repair, acrylic painting and conversational Spanish, among others. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit the website at www.gulfcoast.edu/ EducationEncore, call 872-3823 or email Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. As Barr said, Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. You are never too old to learn. Education Encore back this month TIM CROFT | The Star Education Encore, offering an array of noncredit classes for adults, begins at the Gulf/Franklin Center in the coming weeks.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Dinner.5:00 6:00 pm AWANA.6:00 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry6:15 7:30 pm Prayer/Bible Study.6:30 7:30 pm Read the Bible for Life Class6:15 7:30 pm Nursery..6:00 7:30 pm SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM (CS T ) 10:30 AM (CS T ) ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM (CS T ) M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM (CS T ) TUE S DAY : MEN S BI B LE STUDY 6:30 PM (CS T ) W EDNE S DAY : WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM (CS T ) 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 648.1151 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Seasoned Women anniversary at Victory Temple Victory Temple First Born Holiness Church Seasoned Women Department will celebrate their anniversary nightly at 7:30 p.m. ET on Jan. 25-26. There will be a Saturday Prayer Breakfast at 9 a.m. on Jan. 26. Everyone is cordially invited to attend. Special to The Star Practical solutions for overcoming hardship will be discussed at Lifetree Caf 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Jan. 14. The program, titled Overcoming Hardship: A Father and Son Beat the Odds features an exclusive lm of Patrick Henry Hughes and his father. The younger Hughes was born without eyes or the ability to extend his limbs. Though in a wheelchair, Hughes performed in the University of Louisville marching band, his father pushing his wheelchair through every practice and performance. I dont think I have anything holding me back, said the younger Hughes. All I have to do is think about the goal I wish to achieve, look at the resources that might help me achieve that goal, reach out to them, and see what happens. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. Obituaries Franklin Page Bauer of Port St. Joe, FL passed away on January 1, 2013 at the age of 64 after a brief illness. A memorial service will be planned sometime in the future. Frank was a long-time proprietor of High Point, a bed and breakfast in Natchez, MS, where he loved to cook for and entertain guests. Frank grew up in Greenville, MS, graduated from Greenville High School, and went on to graduate from Delta State University in Cleveland, Miss. Frank is survived by his sister Beth Bauer and her husband, Andy Durance; his brother Carl Bauer and his wife Connie, along with their children Brett and Jessica and their families; his uncle Fred P. Bauer and his wife Yvonne; and numerous cousins. Frank is preceded in death by his parents, Carl A. Bauer and Betty Bauer Anzaldo; longtime friend and partner, John Davis; and many beloved aunts and uncles. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital in Memphis, TN; www.stjude.org/donate or call 800-873-6983. Franklin Page Bauer FAITH Thursday, January 10, 2013 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Sybil Lamb Ferris passed peacefully Dec. 30, 2012 in Covenant Hospice Care Center. Sybil was a longtime faithful member of St. James Episcopal Church where she will be memorialized during the 11 a.m. service on Sunday, January 13. Sybil was preceded in death by her husband Michael Ferris. She is survived by her daughter Margelyn Woodham, and several beloved nieces and nephews and their families as well as a beloved sister-in-law, Violet Lamb. Sybil Lamb Ferris Grace Gay, 102, of Oak Grove, passed away on Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012. Grace had a long and wonderful life. She enjoyed helping her family, friends and even strangers. She never asked, or expected anything in return. Her hugs, kisses and home made pound cake would always make everything better! She is gone from this earth, but will remain in the hearts of her family and friends always. She was preceded in death by her husband, Lonnie Gay, her son, Roy Gay, her granddaughter, Cynthia Gay Cunningham; four sisters and one brother. She is s survived by her daughter, Elma Lonsford and husband Jim; her son, Troy Gay and wife Betty; her daughter-in-law, Artie Mae Gay; her sister-in-law, Christine Levins; also, seven grandchildren, 18 great grandchildren and 24 great-great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. Her funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. E.S.T. on Thursday, January 3, 2013 at the graveside in Holly Hill Cemetery, conducted by the Rev. David Fernandez. Viewing will be held for a half hour prior to the service. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Grace Gay Faith BRIEF Overcoming hardship explored at Lifetree Caf Only God hears the cries of pain when abortions take place. America protects the spotted owl and animals, but forsakes the human race. We prosecute cruelty to animals with nes and possibly a little jail time. But abortionists can slice up an unborn child and not have to pay a dime. As a matter of fact, they get paid, sounds like murder for hire. Elected of cials are backing this; Americas needs are very dire. America was founded by men who put their trust in God. These men are in history books and covered by six feet of sod. The almighty dollar has replaced God in America today. Our leaders know how to spend our tax dollars, but they have forgotten how to pray. Will God Forgive America is the question today? No doubt about it, if we pray and ask forgiveness, and turn from our wicked way. Its time For Christians to get on our knees and pray for our of cials one and all. That they would repent and nd Jesus as their Savior before He makes his nal call. There is no doubt, He will return. Get right with Him or get ready to burn. Billy Johnson Will God forgive America?

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, January 10, 2013 By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com MEXICO BEACH A sticker is on the door to the room with the evidence control vault in the Mexico Beach Police station. Its a white skull and crossbones on a black backdrop that says, The beatings will continue until morale improves! For of cer Jesse Burkett, one of the few of cers still with the department after a tumultuous 2012, the beatings have stopped and morale has improved. Burkett was the of cer assigned to implement former Chief Brad Halls get well plan in December 2011 after the Bay County Sheriffs Of ces Professional Standards Division conducted an audit of the department and found it lacking in several serious areas including morale, by the way. We just went through an evaluation, which was not pleasant, and the feedback we got on it we shouldve taken and worked with it, and that was my intent, Burkett said. By the following spring, things only had gotten worse within the department, and Burkett had become a target for retaliation from several members of the police and re departments, a subsequent BCSO investigation showed. He contacted the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which began to investigate. Trumped-up charges In November of 2011, Burkett walked into the police station and found the son of a re department member, Dan Christopher, sitting unattended. Because there were guns, drugs and con dential police information unsecured in the building, Burkett escorted the teenager outside. When Christopher found out, he was upset and brought his concerns to Hall. Hall would later tell several members of the city Department of Public Safety that city leaders had prohibited him from punishing Burkett, which wasnt true, according to a BCSO report. Hall, who has not responded to attempts to contact him since his retirement in early October, denied lying to his employees, but investigators found him in violation of the departments truthfulness policy. In May, almost six months after the incident with Christophers son, Christopher led a battery complaint against Burkett with the sheriffs of ce over the incident. On Dec. 7, 2011, the day Hall released his get well plan, Burkett was already at work putting a fresh coat of paint on the interior walls of the police station, which is in the same building as the re station. Fire department member Levi Wilson, one of several re ghters with a criminal record, came through and touched a wall with dirty hands, and Burkett grabbed his hand and told him not to mess up the wall. Burkett insisted the exchange with Wilson was good-natured, but more than four months later Wilson led a battery complaint against Burkett with the Sheriffs Of ce. Reprimand One day during this time, Burkett got confused about which shotgun he was assigned to clean. When he cleaned the wrong one, Cpl. Deborah Everett, Burketts former supervising officer, issued a written reprimand. But instead of a corrective reprimand that Burkett said would be more typical for a minor infraction, Everett gave Burkett his final warning. Another misstep could result in termination. Burkett led a complaint against Everett with Hall. Hall pledged to investigate; instead he cleared Everett without investigating, a violation of department policy. He denied telling Everett and others city leaders had forbidden him from terminating Burkett, but several members of the department, including Everett, said Hall did describe Burkett as untouchable, the BCSO investigation showed. DIVAS4CHRIST MINISTRIES PRESENTS: BEGINNING A NEW 2 NIGHT EVENT FRI. JANUARY 11 th pm Pastor Michael McClelland New Life Tabernacle Newnan, GA Elder Calvin Freeman Grace to Grace Detroit, MI GUEST MINISTERS: SAT. JANUARY 12 th pm A GO S P E L S H O W C ASE DBrass Elitha Gant Kymani Smith Tasmin Nickson LaTrika J.Quinn Farica Gant Resurrected Soldiers Shakinah Quinn The Men of God Sonya Quinn-Freeman Triple Anointing *This is a non-prot gospel ministry event of singers, dancers, spoken word, gospel rap, & more!!!! Please join us in celebrating Christ our Savior. Free event, donations accepted* March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013 The Bay County Fairgrounds Register now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo program, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show: Call: 850-248-3976 or E-mail: expostradeshows@aol.com SIGN UP NOW & RECEIVE THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT S PACE I S L IMITED S O R ESERVE Y OURS TODAY! For sponsorship information call: 850-763-6587 For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 CALL TO ALL VENDORS! NEW THIS YEAR! LOO K ING FOR SHABBY CHIC VENDORS SPONSORS HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Mexico Beach re ghter Charles Hollingsworth helps Gene Cline, right, don his oxygen tank during selfcontained breathing apparatus training Thursday at the Mexico Beach Fire Department. Of cers say police station morale improvingBIG CHANGES IN MEXICO BEACH See MEXICO BEACH B6 By the following spring, things only had gotten worse within the department, and of cer Jesse Burkett had become a target for retaliation from several members of the police and re departments, a subsequent Bay County Sheriffs Of ce investigation showed.

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013 Like the battery allegations, which were unfounded, Everetts reprimand was bogus. It has been removed from his le, and she has been terminated for creating an intimidating and hostile work environment for Burkett. But the bogus reprimand was minor compared to the secret meetings she held with Wilson and others. The purpose of these meetings which were often held in the station during work hours, effectively leaving the streets of Mexico Beach unsupervised was to set up Burkett, according to the BCSO investigative le. Start of the problem How had Burkett become so unpopular? His problems started when he was put in charge of improving the department. He thinks it was simple: he was asking of cers to do work they didnt want to do. Had we continued down the road I thought we needed to go down and I thought the chief wanted to go down, everybody was going to be accountable, Burkett said. They dont want any accountability. He stepped into the role with an enthusiasm that was not shared by the rest of the small department. Burkett and his wife would spend their off-hours working on improvement projects at police headquarters while many other of cers couldnt be bothered to even work the hours they were being paid for, Burkett said. It seemed like every turn, it was like hitting my head up against a wall, Burkett said. I could get no cooperation from anyone on anything. Burkett never liked how evidence and weapons were left unsecured in the police station. After the bogus reprimand, Hall began telling people in the department city leaders had prohibited him from disciplining Burkett, the BCSO investigation showed. When shed had enough of his complaining, Everett and other members of the department began gathering information against Burkett. Christopher said in a sworn statement he was pressured by Everett and Of cer J.T. Hallman to bring the battery allegation against his son; Wilson told investigators he came forward on his own. But Burkett already had been warned by his only ally within the Department of Public Safety at the time, EMS supervisor Diana Epple, that she had overheard members of the police and re departments discussing him. (Epple would become so concerned about these meetings that she got a bulletproof vest.) Their whole intent, again, was to discredit me so anything I may have said in the future would be questionable at best, Burkett said. Investigators were not able to substantiate an allegation that Hall had offered marijuana to a woman so she would le a harassment complaint against Burkett. Hall dismissed the allegation as a rumor in an interview with investigators. But after Hall left the department, an audit revealed an unknown quantity of marijuana had been stolen from the departments evidence control locker, which allowed someone to reach inside and pull out the contents. No one has ever been charged with the theft. The departments new chief, Glenn Norris, said whoever stole the pot wouldve had to be a cop or have broken into the police station, and there were never any signs of forced entry. New era These days, Norris is the only cop in Mexico Beach with access to the new evidence locker, which is triple-locked, stainless steel, and empty. Most of the police and re ghters who worked under Hall have left the Department of Public Safety voluntarily. Weve got basically a whole new re department and a whole new police department, Norris said. And the difference has been night and day, Burkett said. The reason he agreed to participate in this story is to let people know what happened in Mexico Beach is an anomaly in law enforcement, he said. Aside from the evidence locker, the department has an improved rearms storage system. The police station has been forti ed. There are new of cers and a new chief who are training more often and making more arrests. Thats what happens when you actually get out and patrol when you get out of the of ce instead of sitting around trying to set people up, Norris said. The re department had fallen into disrepair as well under Halls authority. Equipment was not being stored or maintained properly or tested frequently. The training meetings that had become an opportunity to gripe and conspire are now an opportunity for the mostly new volunteer members to actually train. It got to the point where I just stopped coming to the meetings, said re Chief Kevin Martin. The trucks were a mess. The SCBA (Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus) tanks were just thrown into the trucks. Martin has addressed equipment issues. Fire trucks dont have to warm up anymore for the air brakes to work; now a re crew can jump in the truck and go. They even train with other re departments and several members are taking a certi cation course that will give them the legit re training that most of the department lacked under Hall. Its coming. I know it dont look like much, but weve had big changes in morale, Norris said. Norris would not take responsibility for the sticker on the door. That was under the former chief, he said. PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the B oard of C ounty C ommissioners ( BOCC ) meeting on T uesday, January 22, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. E S T T he public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration B uilding, 1000 C ecil G. C ostin Sr. B lvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. T he public hearings will be to discuss and act on the proposed adoption of the following ordinance: AN O RD I NAN CE P E R T H E R E Q UI R E M E N T S O F F LO R I DA S T A TUE 163.3177(3)(b) TO Y E AR L Y R E V IE W AND U PDA TE T H E G UL F COU N T Y F I V E -Y E AR C AP IT A L I MPR O V E M E N T SH E D ULE ; I N CO RP O RA TI NG T H E G UL F COU N T Y S C H OOL D I S T R ICT 2012/2013 W O RK P L AN; I N CO RP O RA TI NG B Y R E F E R E N CE T H E U PDA TE D CO N CU RR E N C Y T RA C K I NG DA T A; PR O V I D I NG F O R R E P E A L O F O RD I NAN CE I N CO NF LICT T H E R E W IT H, PR O V I D I NG F O R S E V E RA BLIT Y AND PR O V I D I NG F O R AN E FF ECTI V E DA TE The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this matter. The ordinance and contents are Department Room 311 in the Robert M. Moore Ad #2012-117 PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Plan ning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, January 21 2013 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1. Variance Application Miles & Susan Bry Parcel ID # 03180-120R Located in Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback by 12 feet for a pool. 2. Animal Control Ordinance Review and comment on the Countys proposed Animal Control Ordinance as applicable to the Comprehensive Plan and Land Development Regulations (LDR). 3. Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. 2013.01 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 T ODAY! C A LL Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction Rays Quality Service NO JOB TOO SMALL! J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERS CENTRAL/WINDOW A/C WASHERS/DRYERS STOVES/REFRIGERATORS FREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWN MOWERS SCRAP METAL, ETC. . J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 MEXICO BEACH from page B5 HEATHER LEIPHART | Halifax Media Group Mexico Beach Police Chief Glenn Norris speaks about improvements to the police and re station.

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Local The Star| B7 Thursday, January 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Star | B7 89588S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232012CA 000225CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Plaintiff, vs. TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 3, BLOCK I, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; RUNNING THENCE N 01 DEG. 1724 E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE RUN S 89 DEG. 5926 W ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEG. 0000, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S 44 DEG. 5926 W FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N 62 DEG. 2046 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N 85 DEG. 1908 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 264.35 FEET; THENCE N 01 DEG. 0605 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 429.15 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRESBYTERIAN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE N 41 DEG. 1502 E ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 145.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 24 DEG. 20 59, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N 53 DEG. 28 29 E FOR 61.67 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.13 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN S 11 DEG. 04 17 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 601.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. a/k/a 364 JIM RISH STREET, WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 19th, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 1000 Cecil Costin Boulevard, Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FI 32456, Phone No. (850)229-6112 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-9958770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 7th day of December, 2012. DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM As Clerk of the Court Cindy Strange As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-04376 BOA Dec 20, 27, 2012 Jan 3, 10, 2013 91199 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The public is welcome to attend. January 10, 2012 89680S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 2012-158CA EMERALD COAST FEDERALCREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICAL CENTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 13, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-158-CAof the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COASTFEDERALCREDITUNION, is Plaintiff and WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICALCENTER, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ETon the 17th day of January 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Begin at Southwest corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West and run East for 630 feet; thence run North 30 feet to the North right of way line of Transfer Landing Road for Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning run thence East along the North right of way line of said road for 100 feet; thence run North 145 feet; thence run West 100 feet; thence run South 145 feet to the Point of Beginning. Lying and being in Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH: 2008 Horton EH-4 Mobile Home DATED this 13th day of December, 2012. REBECCANORRIS CIRCUITCOURT CLERK By: Cindy Strange DEPUTYCLERK January 3, 2012 January 10, 2013 89818S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1213-05 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Printing of the 2013 Official Gulf County Visitor Guide Printing specs and PDF of sample layout can be accessed at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov or at the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain provide companionship and support to patients and families, or to assist with fundraising, administrative support, and community outreach. If you, your church or organization would be interested in becoming a part of our Covenant Hospice team, call Shelley Frazier, volunteer services manager at 785-3040. Abused and neglected children need a voice in court. There are several children without volunteer advocate representation in Gulf County. The 14th Circuit Guardian Ad Litem Program wants these children spoken for. Be a strong, dependable voice, appointed by the court, to support these children. Training classes begin in August. Call 747-5180 for more information and an application. Volunteers are needed to assist greeting guests and doing ofce duties at the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge ofce in Apalachicola. Introduce visitors to displays and information about St. Vincent Island. Call 653-8808 and ask for Charlotte if you can help on Mondays and/or Wednesdays. Able-bodied volunteers are needed to help with outdoor work on St. Vincent Island. You need to be able to tolerate heat and sweat, but the island and wildlife are amazing. Call Shelley at 527-8535 if you can help on the island. VOLUNTEER from page B1 meeting agenda is the presentation of the nominating committees slate of candidates for the 2013 Board of Directors of the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves and a vote by all attending current members for the new years board positions. Currently serving on the board are Marcia Boothe, president; Charla Boggs, past president; John Ehrman, president elect; Nick Baldwin; Bill Boothe; and Gene Cox. The Boothes, Cox and Ehrman will remain on the 2013 board as they serve their second year of a two-year term. The proposed slate of candidates for election to the board includes William Sonny Chan, Margaret Margo Posten and Jody Wood-Putnam. Amendmen t to bylaw s Members also will vote on an amendment to the bylaws of the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves. The current bylaws state in Article V Section 1: Members shall consist of any individual or business entity whose yearly dues are current. With dues being charged under the following categories: Student/Senior: $10; Individual: $15; Family: $25; Sponsor: $100; Patron: $250; Silver Benefactor: $500 or more; Gold Benefactor: $1,000 or more; Corporate Benefactor: $1,000 or more. The Board of Directors recommends the following amendment to the bylaws in Article V Section 1: Members shall consist of any individual or business entity whose yearly dues are current with dues being charged as stated below or as stipulated by a majority vote of the Board of Directors under the following categories or as amended by a majority vote of the Board of Directors: Student/ Senior: $10; Individual: $15; Family: $25; Sponsor: $100; Patron: $250; Silver Benefactor: $500 or more; Gold Benefactor: $1,000 or more; Corporate Benefactor: $1,000 or more. Purpose of this proposed change: From time to time, ination will necessitate a small increase in membership fees. Also, currently there are no categories for lifetime or honorary membership levels. Chili potluck After the meeting, join the Friends for a potluck chili luncheon, prepared by fellow Friends members and free to all attendees. There will be several chili recipes including vegetarian that range from mild to hot. You do not need to bring any food unless you wish to share some of your favorite xings to go along with the chili. Be prepared to have a good time and meet fellow friends. If you have any questions or concerns, call the Preserves Center at 229-1787. PRESERVE from page B1 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Star | B7 89588S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232012CA 000225CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Plaintiff, vs. TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 3, BLOCK I, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; RUNNING THENCE N 01 DEG. 1724 E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE RUN S 89 DEG. 5926 W ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEG. 0000, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S 44 DEG. 5926 W FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N 62 DEG. 2046 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N 85 DEG. 1908 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 264.35 FEET; THENCE N 01 DEG. 0605 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 429.15 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRESBYTERIAN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE N 41 DEG. 1502 E ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 145.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 24 DEG. 20 59, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N 53 DEG. 28 29 E FOR 61.67 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.13 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN S 11 DEG. 04 17 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 601.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. a/k/a 364 JIM RISH STREET, WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 19th, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 1000 Cecil Costin Boulevard, Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FI 32456, Phone No. (850)229-6112 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-9958770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 7th day of December, 2012. DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM As Clerk of the Court Cindy Strange As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-04376 BOA Dec 20, 27, 2012 Jan 3, 10, 2013 91199 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The public is welcome to attend. January 10, 2012 89680S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 2012-158CA EMERALD COAST FEDERALCREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICAL CENTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 13, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-158-CAof the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COASTFEDERALCREDITUNION, is Plaintiff and WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICALCENTER, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ETon the 17th day of January 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Begin at Southwest corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West and run East for 630 feet; thence run North 30 feet to the North right of way line of Transfer Landing Road for Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning run thence East along the North right of way line of said road for 100 feet; thence run North 145 feet; thence run West 100 feet; thence run South 145 feet to the Point of Beginning. Lying and being in Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH: 2008 Horton EH-4 Mobile Home DATED this 13th day of December, 2012. REBECCANORRIS CIRCUITCOURT CLERK By: Cindy Strange DEPUTYCLERK January 3, 2012 January 10, 2013 89818S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1213-05 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Printing of the 2013 Official Gulf County Visitor Guide Printing specs and PDF of sample layout can be accessed at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov or at the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain

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B8| The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL ............................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH .............$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ..............$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! 2005 Chevy Impala, $7,995; Call 227-3100 St George IslandBeach Front 3 Br, 2 Ba 1 year lease. $1500 mo + $1500 deposit. Call 816-698-2405 WEWA: 2bdrm, 1bath, CH&A. $400/mo + $400 dep. RVs for Rent850-639-5721 2 Story duplex, both units available, new appliances, fully furnished, 2 br, 1 ba, top story $800 mo, bottom unit $700 mo. 1st & last, yrly lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-227-7234 Mexico Bch 3 Br 1400 SF Modular Home. 2 blocks from the beach. New carpet, flooring, & paint. $950 mo + $950 dep. Tenant pay utils. 850-867-0371/247-8023 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Fred’s Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Proposals must contain detailed printing timeline (files to be ready January 25, 2013), cost estimates and samples of similarly quoted print material. Proposals must be delivered to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 by Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 12:00 p.m., E.T. Bids will be opened at this same location on Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 2:00 p.m., E.T. Only proposals that provide two pricing options for printing as requested in specifications will be considered. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to T.D.C Director Jennifer Jenkins at 850-229-7800 or Jennifer@visitgulf.com. Jan 10, 2013 91741S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-59-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY M. O’SHALL Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of DOROTHY M. O’SHALL, deceased, whose date of death was November 23, 2012 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. 8 week old Pug Puppies, 3 black and 1 fawn First shots included $200 call 850-720-1117 Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepet sitting.com Cue’s Furniture NEW queen size mattresses. $189, Twin Size $89 New 6 Peice Bedroom set. $799 Open Mon Sat, 10am -5pm (850) 639-2343 or (850) 639-3512. Text FL37495 to 56654 Port Saint Joe 201 8th ST. Saturday, January 12th, 8am to 1pmMoving Estate Sale/ Dr. Oksanen’s OfficeFurniture, computer desk, cabinets, printers, organizing supplies, exercising equiptment and Misc. items. Port St. Joe : 4th St. Unit 11, Friday January 11th 12 Noon til ? & Saturday 12th 7am til ? Furniture, Appliances, Houshold Goods, and Much More!! Tallahassee 2437 Beautyberry Ct. Sunday, January 13th ~ 12:00pmBeautyberry Estate & Real Estate AuctionFeaturing: Art, Collectibles, Coins, Jewelry, Silver, Furniture, Glassware, China, Electronics, Power Tools, Hand Tools, And Much More! Tallahassee Affiliated Galleries 2500 Apalachee Pkwy January 12th 10am Est.Coins, Firearms, and Collectibles AuctionCoins, Firearms, Jewelry, Collectibles, Antiques, Fine Art Military Items Internet Bidding available Accounting/ClerkAccounting ClerkThe City of Mexico Beach is currently accepting applications for ONE full time position, that of Accounting Clerk. The position’s primary duties include the balancing of bank account statements, cash receipt deposit reconciliation, other bookkeeping duties as required, and maintaining public records of the City. These duties require attention to detail and accuracy as well as time management skills; potential applicants must have strong organizational, documentation, and basic accounting skills. The successful applicant will be expected to exercise considerable initiative and independent judgment and work well with limited supervision; as part of the hiring process, the applicant will be required to pass background and drug tests prior to hire. Applications will be accepted at Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL 32456. Applications will stop being accepted on January 31, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. For more information please call (850) 648-5700. The City of Mexico Beach is a Drug-Free work place and is an EEOC provider. Web ID#: 34237096 Text FL37096 to 56654 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Director of Nursing Radiology Tech. RN LPN EMT CDM Dietary Aide Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34237468 Text FL37468 to 56654 All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 10, 2013. Personal Representative: Lynn O’Shall Carr 13913-B Panama City Beach Pkwy Panama City Beach, FL 32407 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 January 10,17, 2013 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Baileys Crab Houseis NOW HIRINGCooks Servers Dishwashers Shuckers Buss BoyCall: Toye Roberts (850) 258.4691 or Email: toye6158@yahoo.com



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In front of a packed courtroom, County Judge Tim McFarland swore in ve constitutional of cers for the next four years. McFarland noted all were products of Gulf County Schools and represented part of the community fabric stepping up to lead the county. Being sworn in were Shirley Jenkins, who ran unopposed for Tax Collector; Becky Norris, who was re-elected Clerk of Courts; and three newcomers to of ce, Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon, Property Appraiser Mitch Burke and Sheriff Mike Harrison. Tim Croft 50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Thursday, JANUARY 10, 2013Subscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . A4-A5Letters to the Editor . . . . . . .A5Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-B8TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 13Friends of Bay Preserves to host annual membership meeting B1 School levy vote set for March 5By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Four more years. That is what Gulf District Schools will ask voters when they return to the polls March 5 to renew or extend the additional mil operating levy that has been in place the past four years. The Gulf County School Board unanimously voted to conduct the balloting during a one-day election March 5, instead of the mail-out ballot that was used four years ago when voters approved the additional operating levy. The difference was cost and timeliness. A mailed ballot, newly-installed Supervisor of Elections John Hanlon said, would cost more than $2 per voter or about $20,000 to mail ballots to all registered voters in the county. The total cost of an election conducted by mail would be about $25,000, Hanlon said. However, conducting the election on a single day would cut that price to $14,500, Hanlon said. We would not have to hold early voting for this kind of election, and that would dramatically reduce the costs, Hanlon said. We would still have absentee ballots available for anyone who wishes to vote that way, but we would not do early voting. On March 5, all polling places in all county precincts would be open the typical hours for election day, 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET. Voting by mail also would require Hanlon to submit a plan to the state Division of Elections for approval, which likely would push back the date at least two weeks. We dont need to spend any more than we have to, and we want to know what we are dealing with as quick as we can, board member John Wright said. If voters do not approve the extension of the mil operating levy, Wright said, the results could be ugly and the board will need as much lead time before budget crafting for the coming scal year as possible. The district is asking voters to approve extending the additional mil operating levy for four years in order to stave off drastic reductions. Bed taxes down for November, up for yearBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Gulf County Tourism Development Council reported bed tax revenue slipped slightly year over year in November, but overall the gains of the prior scal year continue. Bed tax revenue dropped 1.29 percent in November 2012 compared to the same month in 2011, but the current scal year is up more than 90 percent compared to the previous scal year. That continues an upward trend that saw the TDC collect 12.40 percent more in bed tax revenue for the prior scal year, TDC director Jennifer Jenkins said during last weeks board meeting. Those numbers are conrmation of one opportunity that has been seen in the ongoing TDC research into quantifying perceptions of Gulf County and its amenities: that the shoulder seasons, particularly winter, offer growth opportunities. That was underscored in a Visitor Perception Survey that was completed as part of a multi-layer research effort that will be discussed during a public workshop at 5:30 p.m. ET Feb. 5 in the Board of County Commissioners meeting room. The research is meant to affect not only what we do today but what we look at in the future, Jenkins said. The Visitor Perception Survey ndings were discussed during last weeks meeting, though Jenkins emphasized the survey is just one layer in the research being conducted into the Gulf County market, who does and does not visit and opportunities for building on the existing foundation. This is just a midpoint, Jenkins said. The survey response, Jenkins said, exceeded expectations. Some 21,000 were sent out, to visitors and nonvisitors alike, and Jenkins Constitutional of cers sworn in to of ceSHIRLEY JENKINS BECKY NORRIS JOHN HANLON MIKE HARRISON MITCH BURKEBOCC debates lighthouse award; sets EDC workshopBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Board of County Commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter to the National Parks Service stating the county would work with Port St. Joe on the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. But the letter also would highlight if the city is unable to fund and perform the relocation to a proposed BayPark the county still had an interest in moving the lighthouse to Salinas Park. The discussion was spurred by several residents of Cape San Blas and Indian Pass who dissented to the National Parks Service decision to award the lighthouse to the city. The BOCC also had submitted an application for the lighthouse the city and county were the only two applicants but the National Parks Service in a letter stated the citys proposal was the more attractive. Thank you for trying to keep the Cape San Blas Lighthouse on the cape; we have been out-lobbied by the city, said Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Association. We just didnt get out and lobby that we had a safer place. Hardman noted the county had a lease with the U.S. Air Force which declared the lighthouse and grounds surplus early last year that spanned until 2029 and that the county had provided annual upkeep and insured the lighthouse and grounds for recreational activities. She said the cost to move the lighthouse to Salinas Park was estimated at half that to move the structures into the city and that Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidons legacy could become the mayors folly. She urged the BOCC to protest the decision and to let the federal government know the county still wanted the lighthouse for Salinas Park. Julia Cunningham said once the lighthouse, which has stood on the cape for some 200 years, was moved to the city the history will be lost. Particularly outspoken about the proposed move to the city was Betty McNeill, who served on the lighthouse committee with the St. Joseph Historical Society when that group was seeking grant funds to preserve the keepers quarters and lighthouse. McNeill was not present when the Historical Society recently voted unanimously in support of the move to the city, but said she saw the citys action as a covetous, greedy land grab. I am shocked that this could come up, McNeill said. A mistake has been made, and I think with effort a mistake can be corrected. I dont think the lighthouse should be taken off the cape. I am shocked, surprised and certainly disappointed that the city would steal something that belongs on the south end of the county. Commissioner Warren Yeager said the BOCC should send a letter to the National Park Services saying if the city could not ful ll its obligations to move the lighthouse, the county should be considered next in line. We are in line and ready to take that on, Yeager said. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said the BOCC should consider the tone of such a letter. She said she did want to reinforce existing ssures between the city and county and that the county should express its willingness to work with the city, with the caveat that if the city could not fund the relocation the county be considered. See SCHOOL A2 See BED TAXES A8 See BOCC A8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Florida Department of Education released tentative high school grades for 2011-12 during the holiday break. Gulf District Schools would like the DOE to take another look at the C given to Wewahitchka High School before grades are nalized at the end of this month. WHS fell two points shy of a B and school, and district staff has been crunching numbers since grades were released. They believe there are two areas of possible review, the prominent one being what the district believes is a miscalculation on the number of middle school students counted in endof-course exams in Algebra I. We are appealing that grade, said Sara Joe Wooten, the districts deputy superintendent for instruction. Port St. Joe High School received an A on the tentative grades and both schools nished well above the state average for total points accrued under the high school grading system. Gulf District Schools, with two C schools in Wewahitchka and two A schools in Port St. Joe if the WHS grade is not changed remains a B district, as it was last year. The district has been an honor roll district, based on state criteria, earning an A or B for six straight years. The district also is considered a high-performing district covering the same span. The high-performing designation includes not only school grades but also nancial stability as evidenced by a clean annual audit. We are continuing to be a B district and high-performing, Wooten said. But we have challenges at each school. High school grades are released about six months after elementary and middle school grades because there is an additional set of components for high school grading. Fifty-percent of high school grades are based on scores from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. The other 50 percent is based on college-readiness, including enrollment and success in dual-enrolled courses or advanced placement courses as well as graduation and drop-out rates. We still have a high graduation rate, but we would like to see more minorities participating in dual enrollment, Wooten said. And both our high schools showed improvement in graduating at-risk students and that is a plus. Wooten said both high schools demonstrated they are making learning gains in math and reading for students pretty much across all populations. The gains in reading have been a particular focus for the district for several years with designated reading coaches and reading instruction connecting to other core coursework across the board. Everything we can do for reading we do, Wooten said. The number of students in dualenrolled courses also has increased. Not only are 80 students in dualenrolled courses, but the success in those courses also is reected in the states grading formula, which awards points for students earning a C or better in such college courses. One hundred percent of our dualenrolled students made a C or better, and I think this is because we put certied teachers in the classroom or they were learning directly from college professors, Wooten said. More kids are taking dual enrollment courses. We are continuing to grow there. It is really pretty phenomenal for a district this size. The challenges, Wooten said, included science scores at Wewahitchka Middle School and math at Wewahitchka Elementary School. Those are our biggies, Wooten said. Those are the areas we know we have to address. She said reaching minority students and the at-risk population will continue to be an emphasis as the state transitions to a new grading matrix in the next two years. By 2014-15, districts will not only be graded differently, but the majority of state assessment tests will be taken online, Wooten said, continuing a trend that began in the past three years.District appealing WHS gradeThis is a renewal tax, it is not the creation of a new tax, Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton said. We have cut funding for the past four years but maintained standards. For us to continue the integrity of the product, we are providing for the good of Gulf County we need this funding. The district is facing a shortfall of about $500,000 even without the additional funding. There will be cuts to jobs or programs. However, take away the additional mil levy, currently worth about $1.3 million, and the budget decit would be $1.8 million, Norton said. Even if this (levy) passes we will still be short dollars, board member George Cox said. It will be easier to cut half a million dollars than it will be almost $2 million. If the levy does not pass, that could mean as many as 50 jobs cut and would likely render the district out of compliance with state constitutional mandates on class size ratios. Norton said it would be likely the district could not cut 50 jobs, more likely about 30, but said the cuts would then have to come from programs. We are not asking for anything but to maintain, Norton said. Wright said, School wont be like we have it now if this doesnt pass. It will be ugly. Voters approved the additional operating levy four years ago, but the economic winds have whittled the worth of that mil nearly in half over the four years. What once was worth $2.2 million is now equal to $1.3 million. Meanwhile, the School Board has maintained local capital improvement millage rates, which the board could levy itself, at the lowest level in the state. Local capital improvement dollars may not be used for operating expenses, so the only method available to the district is to ask voters to extend the levy, which sunsets in the current scal year. The funding is desperately needed, board member Billy Quinn Jr. said. We hope the community will rally behind this. Board chairwoman Linda Wood said the levy was not so much for the district or the schools. This is about those little heads that get on and off the school bus each day, Wood said. We need the people in place to make sure they get the education they need so that their world will be better than their parents. SCHOOL from page A1 Special to The StarChildrens Hospital at Sacred Heart is helping families enroll their children in low-cost health insurance through Florida KidCare. Florida ranks third in the U.S. for the number of uninsured children, with more than 500,000 young lives without coverage. Children who do not have health insurance often miss preventive care, such as immunizations, doctors visits, vision care and dental checkups. Florida KidCare is comprehensive health insurance that covers services such as prescription medications, sports physicals, dental care, eye and hearing exams, eyeglasses, doctors visits, emergencies and x-rays. Regular physician and dental visits are important to childrens good health, says Cheryl Pilling, Manager of Sacred Hearts Community Wellness Outreach Program. The earlier a problem is detected, the better chance a child has of getting treatment and avoiding complications. With insurance from Florida KidCare, families will be able to obtain the healthcare their children need to thrive. Sacred Heart will provide one-onone assistance to parents, grandparents and guardians in understanding their options, and will assist them to enroll in the Florida KidCare program. A community-health worker is available to help families in Gulf and Franklin counties. For more information, please email InsureKidsNow@shhpens.org or call 1-877-787-1838 for the contact in Gulf and Franklin counties. Hospital assisting in low-cost insurance for childrenStar Staff ReportStudents and young people are invited to participate in the MLK365 days and a day of service essay contest designed to teach children about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy. This year, the essay contest program will be Monday, Jan. 21, which will coincide with the presidential inauguration day ceremony. This milestone is a perfect opportunity for Americans to come together in honor of Dr. Kings legacy through public service and move us as citizen of Gulf County, youth and adults closer to Dr. Kings vision of a beloved community. Students from kindergarten through 12th grade are encouraged to participate. The goal for this project is to influence students to read books from the Gulf County School library and Gulf County Public Library and create a piece of art responding to the following prompt: Dr. King said If you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter. Essays should focus on What will you be a drum major for? Essays are not to exceed 500 words and the deadline is Thursday Jan. 17. First-, secondand third-place prizes will be awarded. Every essay submitted by Jan. 17 will earn the writer a certificate of participation. For more information contact Amy Rogers at 227-4041 or 229-1551. MLK365 holding essay contest

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Special to The StarResolving to make changes in the coming year to improve your health and/ or nances? Taking small steps makes them easier to stick to and often more successful than resolving to lose a lot of weight or save a large amount of money. If you are looking for an affordable and doable program, you should consider the nationwide online Small Steps to Health and Wealth Challenge. This free six-week program will run from Sunday through Feb. 23 and is open to anyone who enrolls online. The challenge provides motivation to take action to simultaneously improve both health and nances. Create your own group with friends or in the workplace to provide additional motivation and support as you take part in the challenge. This program is offered in cooperation with Rutgers/New Jersey Extension Services. To sign up for Winter 2013 SSHW Challenge, visit http://rutgers.ancc.net. The Challenge is based on the daily performance of 10 recommended practices: ve that involve health and nutrition and ve that involve nancial management. The ve daily health and nutrition practices are: eat at least four cups of fruits and vegetables; get at least 30 minutes of physical activity; drink water or unsweetened beverages instead of sugar-sweetened beverages; eat at least two servings of whole-grain foods; and learn something new about health and nutrition. The ve daily nancial management practices are: save a $1 bill (or more) and/ or pocket change; invest $5 or more per day (including automated retirement savings plan deposits); track money spent throughout the day; eat lunch prepared at home; and learn something new about personal nance. Ten points are given for performing each practice, for a maximum of 700 points per week and 4,200 points for the entire challenge (700 times six weeks). Prizes will be awarded for participants who report the highest total points. Doing even one of the 10 recommended daily practices is a great way to get started on the path to better health and improved nancial security. The more SSHW Challenge activities that are performed by participants, the better. For information, email Melanie Taylor at metaylor@u .edu or call 639-3200. The Gulf County Extension Of ce sponsors all programs, which is a partnership between the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences and the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners. The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal-opportunity institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or af liations. CASH FOR GOLD & SILVERGold Party Group, LLC NOWOPENIN PORTST. JOE!301 MONUMENT AVENUE(A couple blocks west of HWY 71) SCRAP GOLDBroken & Unwanted Jewelry, Watches, Dental gold, etc. COINS1964 or Before: Dollars, Half Dollars, Quarters & Dimes GOLD/SILVER BULLIONWe pay up to 90% of spot price for Gold Bullion & 80% of spot price for Silver Bullion stamped .999 STERLING SILVERFlatware, tea sets, goblets & Jewelry marked .925 or Sterling FREE NO OBLIGATION APPRAISAL! PRESENT THIS COUPON TO RECEIVE10%EXTRAAFTER RECEIVING YOUR APPRAISAL[ Valid Until January 15, 2013 Excluding Gold and Silver Bullion ] 2084406 Enter Starting January 27th www.nwfdail y news.com BENEFITTING LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, January 10, 2013Program helps improve health, wealth THE PORT ST. JOE STARFIND US ON FACEBOOK @PSJ_StarFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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The newspapers piled up over the holidays. A neighbor was nice enough to collect them and save them for us while we were gone. Growing up in a newspaper, I still enjoy holding one close to my face and hoping to smell the newsprint and ink that remind me so much of my Daddy, who spent about 40 years in the newspaper business. Scanning the headlines of the main sections of the piles of papers, one caught my attention. The headline proclaimed, 10 ideas for a happier home in 2013. The story was written by a lady named Nara, who based her story on a list made by a best-selling author named, Gretchen. Women have a great deal of in uence on happiness, so I decided to take a look at what could make for a happier home. Who doesnt want a happier home this year? After the rst suggestion, I was a bit skeptical about the intended audience for this article. They want me to try Warm greetings and farewells. How much warmer can I get? I tell everyone, Hello, Goodbye and I love you. It doesnt get any warmer than that. On New Years Eve, I even went so far as to yell out at the fellow next door, Happy New Year Neighbor! He has a loud obnoxious barking dog that he is ashamed of (he should be). Standing in the garage, he never turned around, but he threw his hand up in the air. Im not sure my neighbor speaks English; I think he may be a college professor. He probably thought I was complaining about his dog. Speaking of dogs, the next suggestion was to Take time to smell things. My dog, Doolittle ate a lot of table food over the holidays. It was within his reach, so he ate it. You dont want to be in the same room with him when he changes his diet. I was. Some things you really dont want to take time to smell, I usually leave the room. The next suggestion was to go shelf by shelf reducing clutter. How many books and lists are written about this? How many products are sold with this sole purpose? Im sure a whole lot of money is spent and made on and by folks worrying about getting rid of and organizing their junk. They always have some attractive models involved, looking happy and seeming to want to hug you. They lead you to believe that you will be loved more if you dejunkify your home, garage and closet. They make us feel bad about our cluttered closets and garages. I dont think I can ever get my clutter completely removed, or organized. Theres no need to do it, because these ladies fourth suggestion is to, Abandon a project. The project I have decided to abandon is getting rid of my clutter. Im already happier. Somebody hug me. The next way to be happier was, Be a tourist in your own hometown. Thats really not hard for me to do. I live right smack dab in the middle of tourism central, with a theme park and water park less than 2 minutes away and less than ve minutes away from Americas Colonial Capitol. I get to ght tourist traf c, pay tourist prices for gas and get taxed at the tourist rate year-round. This is not a complaint, just a fact of life. The good part is that I can go into a 7-Eleven and run into folks wearing triangle hats, presidents I thought were dead and Redcoats. Speaking of Redcoats, did you know that the red dye used in Colonial America came from a bug (the cochineal)? Im a tourist in my own hometown, I know these things. The next idea to make for a happier 2013 home was to have a holiday breakfast, or as I read it, Fix a fancy breakfast for your family. Its amazing how things that once were commonplace are now thought of as wonderful ideas that will solve all your problems. I still make breakfast. I cook eggs, bacon, sausage, grits and biscuits. I hate Quick Grits and I hated them before they poked fun at Southerners Though written 55 years ago this year, the words at the bottom of this space remain tting for today. Written by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthday the nation will observe in the coming week, they are the foundation of so much more than equality of races. King was much more than a civil rights activist, much more than a rousing speaker. He was a man, awed as we all may be, who reached far beyond the narrowness of civil rights to consider the human condition. And during the times we face now, with economic uncertainty and great disparity, with far too many living in desperate need, with partisanship ripping at our seams, his words of 1958 remain achingly relevant. Following are portions of an essay entitled The Dimensions of a Complete Life. It is one essay in the book The Measure of a Man and provides insight into the philosophical foundation of Kings work. They are words I refer to often, the book passed on to me by my father. They are words of belief in a power beyond human understanding, humanity without conditions, and a belief in self and community, in the intersection of us all, that still speaks to our times. King wrote, Many, many centuries ago, out on a lonely, obscure island called Patmos, a man by the name of John caught a vision of the new Jerusalem descending out of heaven from God. One of the greatest glories of this new city of God that John saw was its completeness. It was not partial and one-sided, but it was complete in all three of its dimensions. And so, in describing the city in the twentyrst chapter of the book of Revelation, John says this: The length and the breadth and the height of it are equal. Now John is saying something quite signi cant here What John is really saying is this: that life as it should be and life at its best is the life that is complete on all sides. There are three dimensions of any complete life to which we can tly give the words of this text: length, breadth and height. The length of life as we shall think of it here is not its duration or its longevity, but it is the push of a life forward to achieve its personal ends and ambitions. It is the inward concern for ones own welfare. The breadth of life is the outward concern for the welfare of others. The height of life is the upward reach for God. These are the three dimensions of life, and without the three being correlated, working harmoniously together, life is incomplete Now let us notice rst the length of life Some years ago a learned rabbi wrote a book entitled Peace of Mind He has a chapter in the book entitled Love Thyself Properly. In this chapter he says in substance that it is impossible to love other selves adequately unless you love your own self properly So every individual has a responsibility to be concerned about himself enough to discover what he is made for. After he discovers his calling he should set out to do it with all the strength and power of his being No matter how small one thinks his lifes work is in terms of the norms of the world and the so-called big jobs, he must realize that it has cosmic signi cance if he is serving humanity and doing the will of God. To carry this to one extreme, if it falls your lot to be a streetsweeper, sweep streets as Raphael painted pictures, as Michelangelo carved marble, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote poetry In the words of Douglas Mallock: If you cant be a highway, just be a trail; If you cant be the sun, be a star; For it isnt the size that you win or you fail Be the best of whatever you are. But dont stop here; it is dangerous to stop here The breadth of life is that dimension of life in which we are concerned about others. An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow con nes of his individualistic concerns to broader concerns of all humanity. As long as there is poverty in the world I can never be rich, even if I have a billion dollars. As long as diseases are rampant and millions of people in this world cannot expect to live more than twentyeight or thirty years, I can never be totally healthy even if I just got a good checkup at the Mayo Clinic. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be No individual or nation can stand out boasting of being independent. We are interdependent When we discover this, we master the second dimension of life. Some people never get beyond the rst two dimensions of life. They master the rst two. They develop their inner powers; they love humanity, but they stop right there They seek to live life without a sky. But if we are to live the complete life we must reach up and discover God. H.G. Wells was right: The man who is not religious begins at nowhere and ends at nothing. In a real sense everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see. Plato was right: The visible is a shadow cast by the invisible. Love yourself, if that means rational, healthy and moral selfinterest. You are commanded to do that. That is the length of life. Love your neighbor as you love yourself. You are commanded to do that. That is the breadth of life. But never forget that there is a rst and even greater commandment, Love the Lord thy God with all thy heart and all thy soul and all thy mind. This is the height of life. And when you do this you live the complete life.Fiscal cliff my hind foot Keyboard KLATTERINGSBe happier in 2013The dimensions of life TIM CROFTStar news editor Lets see, the President of the United States makes $400,000 a year, plus another $100,000 (non taxable) for travel expenses, and an additional $50,000 special expense account, and, oh yeah, another $19,000 for entertainment. He ies his whole family to Hawaii every year for a Christmas vacation! There is a Congressman from Texas named Michael McCaul who lists his net worth at $294 million! Representative Darrell Issa from California weighs in at $220 million. Senator John Kerrys total worth is $193 million. Nancy Pelosis net is a mere $35 million or so. Lamar Alexander, a Senator from Tennessee who has made a career out of putting on a plaid work shirt and being one of us, is worth $10 million. Congressman John Boehner, who checks in way down the list, still is worth $2 million. Youre telling me these kinds of people can get up with a straight face and talk about going over some kind of mythical scal cliff? You think they are sweating their next pay check? Reckon any of them have ever counted the change in their pockets before walking into McDonalds? Or admired that shirt in the window.until you silently turned the price tag face up? Wonder how many of them have asked someone to please hold that check till Friday? We may have the wrong people voting for us on this deal. Baseball consumed my early years. I loved it and I was fairly good at it. I could have been even better if I had owned a real glove. With all my heart I coveted one of those Rawlings three ngered PM Playmaker models. They cost $12 dollars even in 1954! You talk about a genuine, sure nuff, real scal cliff. I spent my youth hemming up line drives off the bats of Jackie Burns, Bobby C. Melton and Buddy Wiggleton with a dollar and a half Revelation glove my older brother had purchased at the Western Auto. I remember the year Dad lost two eighteen wheelers. One of them caught re over some faulty wiring as he was driving a load to Tupelo, Mississippi; and one of his drivers wrecked the other one. We didnt y to Hawaii that Christmas. We huddled around the tree as he passed out some nuts and oranges to my brothers and me for our presents. This is not a sob story. As I look back, that might have been the best Christmas my family ever spent together. We enjoyed, respected and loved each other because each other was about all we had! But the point here, of course, is that there was no bail out for us. We couldnt postpone our money problems to a later date. We didnt get to take a vote. We werent play pretending or posturing for some kind of political advantage. We were at broke! And no one, no institution, no World Bank or no unending stream of tax dollars were rushing to our rescue. Dont play games with me about scal cliffs. I have hung over the edge! I stood in front of Mr. Cannons Rexall Drugstore up on the square and stared endlessly at the Timex watch he had in his window. That thing was shock proof, antimagnetic, glowed in the dark and best of all, it had a red sweep second hand. A life long love affair with time pieces of all kinds began for me as I leaned against that glass. It cost nine dollars. Might has well been nine thousand! There wasnt a cliff here. It was a stone wall that reached from Mr. Cannons concrete sidewalk to the sky! Billie Jean liked me a little back in high school. I kinda liked her back but she was big on brand name sweaters, eating out and, boy howdy, how she loved going to the movies! I was working summers at the swimming pool and cutting rewood for a little extra money but Billie Jeans taste seemed to outstrip my pay check. I liked long walks on a bright sunny afternoon or a bicycle ride out to the Tri-County Stockyards. She didnt give a hoot about sitting on the porch and watching for out of state cars to pass by. I was sixteen years old. And I was forced to think about a budget. It was idiotic to expect that I HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTORBN Heard OPINION www.starfl.comThursday, January 10, 2013 APage 4SectionSee CRANKS A5 See HUNKER A5And during the times we face now, with economic uncertainty and great disparity, with far too many living in desperate need, with partisanship ripping at our seams, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s words of 1958 remain achingly relevant.

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Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS LETTERS www.starfl.comThursday, January 10, 2013 APage 5Section CRANKS from page A4in the My Cousin Vinny movie. If I want it to be fancy, Ill make omelets or put a happy face on a pancake with whip cream or chocolate chips. These ladies live in a big city where folks dont make breakfast anymore and they will no doubt be lauded for such a glorious idea. For your information, we use cloth napkins all the time. Perhaps the List Ladies will form a breakfast group, where they can sit around and talk about what a good idea it was and wishing they could nd the napkin rings their Aunt Lucille gave them for a wedding present. Dont get me wrong, its a good idea. Its just not earth shattering. A lot of folks eat breakfast at home. You will love this next one Assemble a shrine comes in at No. 7. What in the world do you think all of my clutter is? It IS a shrine. Thanks so much for giving it a better name. My clutter is A group of related objects that makes me smile. Deal with it. No. 8 is a super idea Make a photo album. You have me there; I think that would make us all happier. Ill even give a recommendation; put a lot of pictures of dogs and happy children in it. Dogs and children make the world a better place. Then theres old number 9, I knew it was coming. They always say it, but they dont mean it. Set a quitting time because our homes should be places of rest and leisure. The lists, the clutter problems, the yard, the garage, your closet and dont forget you have to pay the mortgage. Make sure to set aside a little free time for yourself. This should be after everyone goes to bed and if it were me, Id just sit down right in the middle of my clutter and appreciate the shrine I have created. The list ended. What happened to No. 10? Going back through the happier 2013 home list, I had missed something in the rst paragraph about making a scrapbook. I felt a little like Ralphie in A Christmas Story after he decoded Little Orphan Annies secret message to drink more Ovaltine. The list was probably just a ploy to get you to buy more supplies. If that cranks your tractor, that is just ne by me. Just stay out of my cluttered closet and I can guarantee you that it will de nitely be a happier year! Read more at www. CranksMyTractor.com HUNKER from page A4could spend more than I had! It fell my lot to determine when I had the money for a movie and when we had to ride out to the stockyards. Somehow I managed to live life, enjoy Billie Jeans company, buy a Timex and make enough sensible decisions that I didnt go over any scal cliffs. Folks, most all of you have done the exact same thing! Daddy would say we were living within our means. If we gured it out years ago, why does it seem to be such a mystery to our national government? It might get back to a Senator that is worth $200 million not being in touch with the rest of us. A Congressman raised on caviar and Rolex might not have a clue about a bicycle ride versus a fty cent movie. Of course, when you take Billie Jean along, it became a dollar movie. And sometimes that extra fty cents made the difference! I dont think they count half dollars like we used to. And they can talk scal cliff until the cows come home, it doesnt ring authentic to me when so many of the ones voting for us have such a large personal safety net to fall back on. We need to send people to Washington who have actually seen a scal cliff. Or, maybe, it would be a refreshing wake up call if we plunged over one time. I wonder how we would react as a nation if both of our trucks got destroyed in the same year. Respectfully, Kes By Jason AldermanAccording to a recent survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the U.S. Census Bureau, 17 million American adults now live in unbanked households, while another 51 million are considered underbanked. In other words, over 28 percent of households either have no traditional checking or savings accounts (unbanked); or their basic nancial needs arent being met by their bank or credit union so they also rely on alternative lenders like check-cashing services or payday loans (underbanked). There have always been millions of Americans who are either unable to or choose not to conduct their nancial transactions through a bank. Common reasons cited include: Dont have enough money to need an account. Dont write enough checks to justify monthly fees and minimum balance requirements just buy money orders when needed. Lack of proper identi cation. Denied accounts due to bad banking track record. Language barriers. Bad previous banking experience or lack of trust in banking institutions. Big retailers and other alternative nancial services providers have rushed to ll the void for customers who cant or wont use banks or credit card issuers. For example, Bankrate. com lists dozens of prepaid cards that offer many of the same functionalities as regular credit or debit cards, including direct deposit, online purchases and bill pay, ATM access, etc. Other businesses provide such varied services as check-cashing, money orders, wire transfers, and payday, pawn shop or cartitle loans. However, charges for these services can quickly add up. After youve paid a fee to cash your paycheck and bought money orders to pay your monthly bills, you probably will have spent far more than the $5 to $15 a month a regular checking account typically costs. Although monthly checking and savings account fees at large banks have risen, you still may be able to nd free or low-cost accounts at banks and credit unions. To nd competitive bank account rates, visit www. bankrate.com/checking.aspx. To nd a credit union for which you might be eligible, use the Credit Union Locator at www.ncua.gov. High fees aside, theres also a safety risk factor to being unbanked. Carrying or storing cash at home tempts robbers; also, money can easily be destroyed in a re or other natural disaster. Plus, money deposited in FDIC-insured banks is insured up to $250,000 per account (similar insurance is available to credit union accounts through NCUA). Its also more dif cult for unbanked consumers to improve their credit scores due to lack of access to credit-building products like credit cards and loans. To help bring unbanked and underbanked people into the system, an increasing number of public/private programs like Bank On (www.joinbankon. org) are being formed. These voluntary partnerships between local or state governments, nancial institutions and community-based organizations provide low-income unand underbanked people with free or low-cost starter or second chance bank accounts and access to nancial education. In addition, many nancial education resources are available, including: MyMoney.gov. the governments website dedicated to teaching Americans the basics about nancial education (www.mymoney.gov). FDICs MoneySmart program of nancial education workshops (www.fdic. gov/moneysmart). Practical Money Skills for Life (www.practicalmoneyskills. com), a free personal nancial management program run by Visa Inc. Theres no law that says everyone must have a traditional banking relationship. But if you choose to go unbanked, carefully investigate the nancial consequences you may not be saving money after all. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www. twitter.com/PracticalMoney .Helping the unbanked get affordable nancial servicesDear editor, The Gulf County Sheriffs Office would like to thank those that made the Christmas Wishes Program possible this year. We would like to thank all of the people who donated toys and funds to our program, Special thanks goes to the Dollar General Stores in St. Joe Beach and Port St. Joe, the John C. Gainous VFW Post 10069, Washington Improvement Group, South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department, members of the St. Joseph Bay County Club, Bay Breeze Antiques, James Vespa and Mr. Earl, Port St Joe Lions Club and Jerry Stokoe. Thanks to their generosity we were able to provide a Merry Christmas for over 175 children in Gulf County. We look forward to working with everyone again next year.The Gulf County Sheriffs Office JASON ALDERMANIt is time to look at the root cause of mass killings. The horror of Newtown has already resulted in an outcry for more gun control. This is an understandable reaction, but to focus on it prevents us from doing the hard work of analyzing the fundamental, root cause of mass killings. While there is no question that we must take serious measures to prevent guns from falling into the hands of those who would misuse them, such as requiring background checks for all gun purchases, outlawing the instrumentality of the Newtown killings will not stop the massacres. The worst killing of elementary school children in the United States occurred in 1927 at Bath Consolidated School in Bath Township, Michigan. A mentally ill farmer used explosives to kill 38 children. In 1995, Timothy McVeigh killed 168 people in Oklahoma City, including 19 small children, using fertilizer, diesel fuel, and a rental truck. Mass killings are perpetrated by those who are mentally ill and who are willing to give up their own life to accomplish the task. They are planned. More gun control will not serve to stop them anymore than tighter controls on diesel fuel and rental trucks will. Now is not the time to focus the discussion on gun control; we must nd and solve the root causes of mass killings. The starting point is the question, What causes someone to do this? The next question is, How can we recognize them before they act and intervene to prevent it? These are hard and complex questions but until we answer them, we are not going to reduce or stop horri c tragedies like Oklahoma City, Virginia Tech, and Newtown. Most of the mass killers are males who have at least a high school education. They are mentally ill to the point of suicide. Whether they were born with mental illness or it developed as they grew older, we must ask ourselves how we have failed as a society to recognize it and to intervene timely. Here are some areas where we can look for answers along with some suggestions on steps we can take to stop mass killings.ParentingParenting has always been important. Now, with the instability in our mobile society, the importance of parenting has increased. The state of our economy often requires that both parents work. So who is raising the children? Television? The Internet? Their friends? When our economy is in such a state that working people with children have to get Food Stamps to feed their families, things are way out of balance. Our economy must be structured so that it gives working people a good living without both parents having to spend so much time at work that there is no time left to parent. There is great wisdom in the words of the Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young song Teach Your Children Well. If you are over 40, you may remember how it goes Teach your children well Teach your children what you believe in. Make a world that we can live in. There is no substitute for parents.Education systemSchool is a wonderful place for most children. It is a very cruel place for the children who are left out of the social circles, activities, and friendships that most children enjoy. We have made great progress against bullying in schools. Now, it is time to train our teachers and school personnel to recognize the children who are not included in social activities, those who are left out, who are socially ostracized, and to come up with appropriate interventions to diagnose and treat these cases before they develop into personalities who become so anti-social that they harm themselves and others. Church attendanceOver the last two decades, church attendance has dropped dramatically in the United States. With very few exceptions, the JudeoChristian based faiths have the same core beliefs. One of them is the Golden Rule Do Unto Others as You Would Have Them Do Unto You. It is well documented that the more examples and messages of good behavior that people are exposed to, the better their own behavior becomes. I submit that you would be hardpressed to nd an agnostic or even an atheist who would argue that we should not teach our children to treat others as they would want to be treated. We would all bene t if parents of every faith would participate regularly in their faith with their children.Mental healthAmerica has the best trauma care in the world. We rank below some third world countries in most other areas of health care. The philosophy of x it instead of prevent it has pervaded all disciplines of health care, including mental health. Ready access to health care for all Americans regardless of nancial means, including mental health care, is long overdue. A word about cost if other rst world countries (Taiwan, Canada, England) can nd a way to pay for it, we can. The price we cannot pay is another Newtown massacre. America is not an everyman for himself society. We cannot expect to enjoy the bene ts of a free, stable, and secure society without taking our share of the responsibility for building and maintaining that society. Part of that responsibility is that on some levels we must all look out for and take care of each other. The fabric of our society is woven with many threads. Three of the most important are our moral code, our education system, and our economic system. On December 14th, we suffered a violent and horri c tear in our fabric. It has left a painful, gaping hole. If we dont do the hard work to start repairing it now, that tear will rip through the fabric of our society until it is torn in two. Carlton Duke Fagan is a native of Jacksonville.Our delicate society is torn CARLTON DUKE FAGAN Letter to the EDITOR

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) CALL FOR A QUOTE1-877-216-9600 Corner of Marina Drive, CALL FOR A QUOTE CALL FOR A QUOTE Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 6 Thursday, January 10, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater: Inshore:Live shrimp continues to be the hot bait in the I.C.W. again this week with good catches of decent sized trout. The T and powerlines area have been good this week and all the way up to the White City Brige area. Try using grubs and jigs to cover more ground if the bite slows down. Most area creeks and lakes are producing good numbers of bream and crappie. Before the New Year, cold weather increased the bite in Depot Creek and Howard Creek. Moving water on the big river and back waters have got the catfish biting again, but no news this week on the bass. Barnacleencrusted docks make an excellent winter sheepshead refuge. Many anglers scrape the pilings to create a chumline and lure the sh in to their shrimp or crab baits. Below, sheepshead are a prime winter target because theyre less cold sensitive than reds and trout.PHOTOS BY FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The Star HOT TUBS FOR FISHBy FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net The kingfish go to Key West when it gets cold. Smart fish. But for those species not designed to migrate, a few finny spas around the Panhandle have to suffice when the weather turns colder in January and February. One of the best known is the Warren Bayou Power Plant, aka the Steam Plant, where water is sucked in from North Bay, used in the generating process and then discharged some 20 degrees warmer into a 10,000-foot-long canal that feeds into Warren Bayou and West Bay. Cold-sensitive species hone in on this warm outflow just like humans gathering around a fireplace on a chilly day. Thus, on a frosty morning when the Steam Plant water earns its name, its not uncommon to catch sea trout, redfish, jack crevalle, ladyfish, sheepshead, pompano, black drum, sharks and rays in the warm outflow, along with even the rare tarpon. The fish are there strictly because of the warm water; its not a good feeding area, and if it were all the available food soon would be gobbled up by the assembled fish-mob. So they are hungry, and that often makes them easy to catch. So easy, in fact, that a few years back the FWC designated the area all catch-and-release from November through February annually. Although the canal stretches some 2 miles through the flatlands, only the west quartermile is accessible to boats; a dike with drain culverts block navigation. However, the warm outflow affects most of Warren Bayou, and fish sometimes can be found up to a half-mile away from the mouth of the canal, feeding in tendrils of the warm water; a water temperature gauge on your sonar can be a huge help here in tracking the warm spots where fish are likely to gather. Though deeper water often is the attraction the canal is about 8 feet for much of its length the sand bars on the edges sometimes attract fish on sunny afternoons as they come up to soak up some UV rays both trout and reds do this at times. When they do, staying well back and pitching a live shrimp or small killifish or pinfish to the bars can do the job. (Because this is an all-release area, its not a bad idea to use a size 1 or 1/0 circle hook, which the fish are less likely to swallow.) For general fishfinding a DOA Shrimp in the 4-inch size, a Tsunami Split-Tail Minnow, also 4-inch, or any standard Cockahoe Minnow plastic tail on a quarter-ounce jig will do the job. Big difference is its winter, the retrieve must be even slower, barely crawling with the DOA, and with very short twitches with the swimbaits and jigs. Adding a tiny tag of fresh cut shrimp to the jig hook will greatly increase the number of bites. Because the live baits and lures are light weight, best delivery system is a spinning rig loaded with 10-pound-test braid. Add 18 inches of 20-pound-test fluorocarbon to decrease visibility and also to avoid some of the tangles that result from working artificials on braid. (A doubled-line double Uniknot is the best non-slip line to leader connection Ive found, retaining very close to 100 percent of the line strength.) Warren Bayou is not difficult to find thanks to the tall smokestacks; its a couple miles northeast of Marker 1 on the ICW headed toward Choctawhatchee Bay out of West Bay. Just motor northward until you can look directly up the bayou at the smokestacks, then turn right and follow them to the canal. This area has plenty of shallow, unmarked bars; a shallow draft boat and a sharp eye are a must. The navigable water tends to be along the south side in most areas; youll want to idle in, both for the safety of your prop and to avoid spooking fish or disturbing other anglers. WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, Jan. 1069 5920% Fri, Jan. 1169 5830% Sat, Jan. 1270 5810% Sun, Jan. 1370 5810% Mon, Jan. 1468 5630% Tues, Jan. 1567 5410% Wed, Jan. 1665 4410% 10 Th 830pm 1.6 602am -1.0 11 Fr 921pm 1.4 651am -1.0 12 Sa 1010pm 1.3 732am -0.9 13 Su 1055pm 1.1 803am -0.7 14 Mo 1135pm 0.8 818am -0.4 15 Tu 809am -0.2 16 We 1207am 0.4 340pm 0.4 729am 0.0 17 Th 323pm 0.7 602am 0.0 18 Fr 339pm 0.8 235am -0.1 19 Sa 410pm 0.9 229am -0.2 20 Su 451pm 1.0 304am -0.4 21 Mo 538pm 1.1 345am -0.6 22 Tu 627pm 1.1 426am -0.6 10 Th 1208am 1.2 433pm 1.0 900am -0.8 811pm 0.9 11 Fr 110am 1.3 501pm 1.0 945am -0.8 904pm 0.8 12 Sa 209am 1.3 526pm 1.0 1026am -0.7 954pm 0.7 13 Su 306am 1.2 547pm 1.0 1103am -0.5 1043pm 0.6 14 Mo 401am 1.1 608pm 1.0 1136am -0.4 1135pm 0.4 15 Tu 457am 1.0 628pm 1.0 1205pm -0.2 16 We 556am 0.9 650pm 1.0 1231am 0.3 1231pm 0.0 17 Th 703am 0.8 715pm 1.0 133am 0.2 1255pm 0.2 18 Fr 827am 0.6 744pm 1.0 243am 0.1 119pm 0.4 19 Sa 1020am 0.6 820pm 1.0 359am 0.0 145pm 0.6 20 Su 902pm 1.0 511am -0.1 21 Mo 954pm 1.0 615am -0.3 22 Tu 257pm 0.8 1051pm 1.0 709am -0.4 552pm 0.8 23 We

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To learn how you can support our communitys university, contact Mary Beth Lovingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITYTHECAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITYEndowment for Tomorrows Jobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Sign Up Now & Get The Early Bird Rate $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. INSTANTLYMAKEIT YOUR EXPO!GAIN THEEXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Vendors, Exhibitors, Non-Prot Organizations The 2013 Health Expo is Calling Your Business BOARDWALK BEACH RESORT FEBRUARY 19, 2013 9AM 2 PMSonsoreyTeNewsHera PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.comThursday, January 10, 2013 APage 7SectionPSJ Dixie Softball annual meetingStar Staff ReportPort St. Joe Dixie Softball annual meeting for the 2013 season will be held at 6 p.m. ET, on Thursday, Jan. 24, at the STAC House on 8th Street. Anyone interested in getting involved as an of cer, coach, umpire or team parent please attend this organizational meeting. If you have any questions or would like to get involved please contact: Mike Lacour at 850-774-6446, or email lacour6@gtcom.net.Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Middle School girls basketball team traveled to Wakulla Riversprings, Dec. 17, and won 30-6. The Lady Tiger Sharks led 14-3 at halftime. Hallie Jasinski paced Port St. Joe with 15 points. Khaliyah Johnson had 11 and Destiny Gadson and ZaCarion Pittman each had two points. Port St. Joe traveled to Wewahitchka the following day, and won 24-14. Jasinski had 18 points and Johnson chipped in six. Host Wakulla Middle School handed Port St. Joe its second loss of the season with a 24-21 win on Dec. 19. Port St. Joe trailed 13-5 at the half but the rally came up short in the second half. Jasinski led Port St. Joe with 17 points, 13 in the second half. Johnson had four points. Port St. Joe nishes the season at Bozeman tonight.Lady Tiger Sharks win 2 of 3 over holiday breakStar Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls basketball team beat Franklin County and Wakulla and lost to Bay High in between during the holiday break. The Lady Tiger Sharks traveled to Franklin County on Dec. 21, and after struggling in the rst half caught re in the second for a 38-27 win. Port St. Joe missed some baskets in close and also turned the ball over several times in falling behind 18-9 in the rst half. Those mistakes were not present in the second half as the Lady Tiger Sharks out-scored Franklin County 29-9. Brooklyn Quinn and Maya Robbins each had 12 points, with Robbins scoring 11 of her points in the nal quarter. Teiyahna Hutchinson and Callie Fleshren each had seven points. The Lady Tigers Sharks broke out in front of Bay High the following night, taking a 15-9 lead into intermission. Port St. Joe managed just one basket from the oor in the third quarter as Bay knotted the score at 17-all. Port St. Joe led 25-24 with 14 seconds remaining when Lady Tornado Lisa Kelso drove the oor and scored to give Bay the win 26-25. Hutchinson led Port St. Joe with 12 points while Robbins added nine, Quinn three and Alyssa Parker two. One week later, on Dec. 29, the Lady Tiger Sharks hosted Wakulla. The Lady Tiger Sharks rolled to a 272 lead at intermission and coasted to a 49-18 win. Quinn led Port St. Joe with 14 points, Hutchinson had 11, Parker nine and Shannon Pridgeon added ve. Fleshren, DaVida Tschudi, Maliayah McNair, and Hallie Jasniski each had two points.Star Staff ReportIn a uke of scheduling, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School soccer teams played doubleheaders last Saturday against Baker. Both the boys and girls won both games with the District 1-1A playoffs on the horizon. The Lady Tiger Sharks nished district play 3-2-1 (8-3-1 overall) after winning 4-0 and 2-1 over Baker last weekend. Coach Gary Hindley expects the girls will be a second or third seed for the district tournament, which begins Tuesday, Jan. 15, with the nals Jan. 18, in Port St. Joe. The Tiger Sharks beat Baker 6-3 and 8-0 to improve to 10-1-1 for the year, 7-0-1 in district play. The boys will be a one or two seed when the district tournament begins Jan. 22 in Freeport. The unusual doubleheaders at Baker were necessitated due to a scheduling con ict and the need to nish district play with the girls tournament next week.Lady Tiger SharksThe rst game against Baker (a third-year program new to the district), was keyed by Kathleen Rishs two goals, increasing her team-high goals to 10. Juniors Lexie McGhee (her eighth) and defender Brittney Shoemaker (her second) each scored on penalty kicks. Junior Christian Laine started in goal and played 20 minutes with seventh-grader Celeste Childs nishing. Both faced just one shot and made on save to share the shutout. The second match was much tighter but Port St. Joe prevailed behind goals by Rish and McGhee. The single assist on the day was earned in this game by senior defender Jaclyn Kerigan.Tiger SharksA record setting day by sophomore Marcel Duarte paced the boys. Duarte had three goals in each match, increasing his team-high total to 25. With his rst goal of the day, Duarte scored his 20th of the year to break the singleseason school record set two years ago by JMason Ray and equaled by Duarte last year. Duarte is closing in on the school career goal-scoring record of which is currently held by Ray at 72. Duarte has 38 currently with two-plus seasons to play. Additional goals in the rst game came from Kaleb Odum, with two (his fourth and fth of the year), and an own goal. All 25 players on the roster saw playing time in the match, Hindley said. Senior Tucker Smith was in goal and was called on to make ve saves on nine Baker shots. The Tiger Sharks had 24 shots in the match. The second game was called due to the mercy rule with the score 8-0 in the middle of the second half. Duarte had his fth hat trick of the season. Senior defensive mid elder\defender Javarri Beachum also scored three goals (his second hat trick of the season) and now has 10 goals on the year. Adding a goal was Odum. Assists came from Duarte, senior Daniel Jones, and eighth-grader Jacob Lacour. Smith was in goal once again and saw 60 minutes of action before giving way to Jones for 10 minutes and Drew Lacour for 10. They shared the shutout as Smith made ve saves, Jones one and Lacour three. Smith earned the win and is now 101-1 with a 1.269 Goals Against Average. Both teams were back in action on Tuesday at Bozeman. Star Staff ReportThe Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School boys basketball team nished second during a holiday tournament at Franklin County High School. The Gators opened the tournament with a loss to eventual champion Madison County, dropping a 67-51 decision. Raheem Wright had 27 points for the Gators (10-4 overall) and Javar Hill had 13 rebounds. The Gators bounced back to beat Tallavana in the next round 92-68. Wright had 45 points and 15 rebounds to lead Wewahitchka. The Gators fell again to Madison County in the title game. Last Friday, the Gators played at Ponce de Leon. The junior varsity boys lost 57-38 with Jeff Hunter dropping a team-high 18 points. The varsity boys won 89-44. Wright had 37 points and Clay Sasser added 20 points. Wright had 10 rebounds, Hill grabbed nine. The Gators hosted Vernon on Tuesday.PSJHS soccer teams play doubleheaders, sweep BakerPort St. Joe Junior High girls win two, lose oneGators nish second in Franklin County tourney

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hoped to receive back 350. But more than 745 came back completed and 400 were randomly selected: 300 visitors, 100 non-visitors. The sample size is well above what I was looking for, Jenkins said. The pro le that emerges is one that shows the vast majority of visitors drive to Gulf County, 90 percent identify themselves as being from non-urban suburban or rural households that include a married couple and, on average, 2.7 other members. The age range is about 35-64 with household incomes typically between $50,000 and $150,000 per year. There is a Southern skew to those visitors, but the Midwest presence is very strong, Jenkins said. Those visitors primarily identify themselves as explorers/adventurers and planners. They are largely looking for solitude and the outdoors. More than half of visitors said they stay a full week and have visited in the past year 90 percent indicated they had visited Gulf County in the past two years. Almost one in ve indicated they had visited Gulf County at least ve times in the past two years. Summer is the strongest season, but more than half said they visited in the fall or spring, which Jenkins said provides some insight into potential growth opportunities in the shoulder months or winter. She also noted 75 percent of visitors venture outside the county to shop or eat, presenting another opportunity for growth by expanding eating and shopping options in the county, Jenkins said. One in three survey respondents said they wanted to see no changes to Gulf County other than more restaurants and more deals at those restaurants. Almost one out of three visitors said they visit Gulf County because it was unique. However, Jenkins noted 30 percent of non-visitors compare Gulf County to Destin and 26 percent think Gulf County is like Panama City Beach. Those perceptions, Jenkins said, provide opportunity to educate travelers on the distinct differences between Gulf County and Panama City Beach or Destin. What we have found is that we are not an uber destination. We have a lot of very good organic attributes that are very attractive to our visitors, Jenkins said. Not only do (visitors) know our beaches are not crowded, the visitors dont want a crowded beach. When asked to provide adjectives to describe free time in Gulf County, visitors used phrases such as at home, peaceful and happy. I have never seen at home in one of these surveys, Jenkins said. Again, Jenkins stressed none of the survey numbers were a de nitive snapshot of Gulf County and its visitors, but combined with other aspects of the research being undertaken would provide a portrait of what the TDC is doing right and where it could be doing better moving forward.Beach cleaningJenkins said she will seek approval from the BOCC this week to move ahead with a Request for Quali cations regarding beach cleaning. Working with county staff, Jenkins and her staff have already made changes to the layout and maintenance of pet friendly stations, improving the trash disposal with inmate crews providing the upkeep for the station. Incoming Sheriff Mike Harrison was present at the meeting and said he would work with the TDC to bring more consistency to the patrolling of the beaches. We are just really looking for some consistency, both in the cleaning but the patrolling, Jenkins said. The hope is to have a beach cleaning contractor in place by March.Visitors guidesThe TDC will go back out for bids on the printing of the new Visitors Guide after no bids completely in compliance were received by deadline. More insulation now means less energy costs later Why?A well-insulated home is an investment you wont regret. Cellulose or foam insulation are sprayed into voids where air can escape or enter your home and allow you to enjoy a lower energy bill. www.gcec.com or 850-639-2216 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Quick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST135 Avenue G, ApalachicolaQuick Care and Family Care Services Tuesday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-653-8853 ext. 118 Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013I dont want to see us in a position of being against the city, Bryan said. The city is in our county. Weve got to get rid of drawing that line (between us). We all need to work together to do what is best for the county, not dig in our heels and waste resources and time. Gail Alsobrook, director of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency, which has spearheaded the planning for BayPark said the city was about to embark on a capital campaign to fund the relocation and urged commissioners to consider the psychological impact of a vote that would be seen as being anti-city. I thought this was a wonderful opportunity to work together in solidarity, Alsobrook said. Yeager, acknowledging Bryans comments, said he would amend his motion to note that the county would work with the city but if the city failed in its efforts, encourage the National Parks Service to consider the county. We all agreed that once this decision was made we would do all we need to do to work together to preserve and protect this piece of Gulf County history, Yeager said. We want to work with the city.EDC workshopThe BOCC in conjunction with the city of Port St. Joe and other stakeholders will hold a workshop on the future of the Economic Development Council 10 a.m. ET Jan. 16 at the EOC building. BOCC from page A1 BED TAXES from page A1 COLBERT BIDS ADIEU AFTER 28 YEARSThe staff at the Gulf County Property Appraisers Of ce and throughout the county courthouse gathered on Monday to properly send off Kesley Colbert, who after 28 years in of ce stepped into retirement with the installation of new constitutional of cers this week.TIM CROFT | The Star

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Friends of Bay Preserves seeks membersStar staff reportThe Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves will hold its annual general membership meeting at 11 a.m. EST Saturday at the Preserves Center. Members are encouraged to bring guests who may be interested in becoming a Friend of the Preserves. After the meeting, everyone can enjoy assorted chili recipes including vegetarian chili. During the meeting the new Buffer Manager Dylan Shoemaker and two new resource managers on staff, Lisa Dlugolecki and Barry Townsend, will be introduced. Also present will be Kim Wren, stewardship coordinator, who will make a short presentation. The key item on the agenda is the nomination and election of the 2013 Board of Directors and a vote on a proposed amendment to the bylaws. Members also will receive a recap of 2012 accomplishments. The theme for 2013 is volunteerism. There are so many ideas the board and staff wish to implement, but more people need to step forward to help make these projects happen. At the meeting, you will have the chance to review and sign up for some of these projects and tasks.MembershipsNew memberships and renewals will be collected at the meeting: $15 for individuals; $25 for families; $10 for seniors (65 and older); $10 for students/ researchers; $100 or more are sponsors. Donations also are accepted. Membership fees may qualify for a charitable tax deduction.Board electionOne of the most important items on the membership COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, January 10, 2013 BPage 1SectionSee PRESERVES B7Make a New Years resolution to volunteer in communityBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com As 2013 arrives, resolve to chip in to make the community a better place. Local volunteer opportunities allow people to invest in the community, including a few in time for the holidays. Contact the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Trish Petrie at Turtle Beach Inn or Tim Croft at tcroft@star com to provide additional opportunities. Here are a number of opportunities: Volunteers needed for the 2013 Great America Plein Air Paint-out. Come join and learn more about participating in the 2013 activities. The 2013 Plein Air Kickoff/ Volunteer Appreciation Gathering will be 6:30 p.m. ET Monday at the Indian Pass Raw Bar. There will be oysters, shrimp and gumbo. Bring a friend. Goodwill Career Training Center is asking retirees and volunteers to share their expertise and skills by volunteering to tutor or mentor. Many participants at the Center need help completing their GED, including language, writing, mathematics and computer skills. Call Tandra Burns at 229-1273. Be a part of making a difference in your local schools. Volunteer to teach a Junior Achievement class at the fth-grade, eighth-grade or high school-level, and elp teach students real life skills. Junior Achievement teaches our children about running businesses, managing money and preparing to get a job. All of our classes are taught by volunteers from the community. Whether you are an employee, employer, retiree or stay-at-home parent, Junior Achievement values the life experiences you can share with the students while teaching the Junior Achievement courses. All volunteers are provided course kits that have everything you need to teach a class, as well as training that will help you feel more comfortable in the classroom. All kits have hands-on activities that keep the students engaged and interested. A class lasts ve to seven weeks, depending on the age group, and meets once each week, during the school day, for an hour. The amount of commitment time is ve to seven hours to teach the class, two hours for training, and your preparation time which varies from person to person. The classes are sponsored by individuals and businesses in the community, and by the Tapper Foundation and Port St. Joe Capacity Building Fund. There is no cost to the school or the volunteer. Junior Achievement of Northwest Florida is a nonpro t, educational organization dedicated to teaching students K-12 about entrepreneurship, personal nance, and work readiness skills. We provide 13 classes at the fth-grade, eighth-grade and high school levels in Port St. Joe, and six classes at the eighth-grade and high school levels in Wewahitchka. For information about volunteering for fall or spring classes, email Jackie Brooks at jabay@knology.net or call at 624-0524. Are you interested in making a difference in someones life? Covenant Hospice is in need of volunteers in Gulf County. Covenant Hospice provides a special kind of caring for persons with lifelimiting illnesses, their families and loved ones. We offer many volunteer opportunities for all ages, to t into any schedule. Our volunteers are the heart of the Covenant Hospice team. They receive free specialized training to Community honors MLK birthday, holidayStar Staff ReportThe annual communitywide Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 2013 Birthday Celebration and National Holiday Observance will kick off with a spirituallled program dedicated to the memories of his life and legacy at 6 p.m. ET Tuesday at New Bethel AME Church, 146 Ave. C at the corner of U.S. Highway 98 in Port St. Joe. The observance will culminate with activities focusing on community service, A Day On! Not A Day Off from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET Jan. 21. Activities scheduled will focus on healthcare, education, religious, social and political involvement in living and honoring Dr. Kings legacy. The theme for this year is From King to Obama. This years Jan. 21 national MLK holiday celebration will be a historical landmark with a two-fold achievement with the Inauguration Day swearing-in ceremony of President Barack Obama on the same day. The community is welcome and encouraged to attend and share and become a part of this commemoration and help make this years Dr. Kings event a celebration to remember. For more information, call Amy Rogers at 227-4041. Star staff reportThe Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency and the city have been awarded two grants through the BP-sponsored Gulf Coast Promotional Tourism Fund. A $24,481 grant was awarded to the PSJRA to update the Historic Downtown brochure and to design and manufacture a new downtown banner series. The other, for $125,000, was awarded to fund a professional-quality video documentary of the rescue and relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Through this award, the 1997 Historic Downtown Brochure will be updated to re ect the color palette and fonts that coordinate with the redesigned Gulf County Visitor Guide. The map will highlight existing businesses and provide visitors with the geographic outline of the historic and marina districts. The brochure highlights the history of Port St. Joe and various reasons to shop, stay, dine and play. The annual events listed coincide with those published in the Visitor Guide. The new banner series will feature custom designs by local artist Richard Henderson and again coordinates with the updated color palettes and new branding initiated by the Gulf County Tourism Council. The art showcases Port St. Joe as a yearround destination and highlights Plein Air, Salt Air Farmers Market, Cape San Blas Lighthouse, live music, and the annual Scallop Festival. Banners will be displayed along Marina Drive, Martin Luther King Boulevard, U.S. 98 and in the Historic Downtown District. The City of Port St. Joe was awarded a grant to produce a professional-quality video documentary capturing the story of the rescue of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse from impending destruction by the Gulf of Mexico and relocation to the BayPark area of St. Joseph Bay. Request for Quali cations will be published shortly for this project. The mission of the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency is to serve the community by guiding redevelopment activities to create a vibrant downtown core and revitalized neighborhood, to improve quality of life, and to stimulate economic growth within the Agencys District.Grants aid downtown, lighthouseSee VOLUNTEER B7

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Star staff reportThe sun had just started rising when the ovens were turned on preparations began. Jimmie Gainey, David Grif n and Eric Asher were busy preparing the dressing and turkeys, while Doug and Nancy Calendine along with Jerrry and Lyd Stokoe were busy chopping cranberry jelly and cooking gravy. Then came all the other volunteers. They came as singles, and then the remaining volunteers laughing, joking and working so well together to prepare, cook, pack and deliver more than 700 dinners. Bunnnie Gainey was busy gathering the remaining supplies needed and led all present in this effort. The following volunteers aging from 6 to 80-something worked so well together that they packed and delivered more than 700 plates: Dianna Williams, Larry Chism, Donna Masseo, Chaz Wright, Tom Todd, Susan Ashworth, Nichollas Ashworth, Raymond Ashworth, Diana Parrish, Mal Parrish, Mike Guthrie, Tyler Guthrie Leonard and Loretta Costin, Rose Surber, Kelvin Ash, Tommy and Ruth Sauls, Ben Welch, Debbie Maulding, Shelli & Bill Leffert, Dusty and Debbie Stitt, Guy Sweazy, Deanne Williams, the Treglown Family, Joe Chastain, Roger, Sheryl Karah and Kenny Bradley, Denny Hughes, Cheryl Howell, Linda Bettage, Ruby and Benny Hodge, Bill and Shirley Sanders, Kathy Krum, Ron and Elaine Smith, Charlie Black, Christie Todd, Melissa and Zee Haranek, Pat and Guy Nemitz, Wandaa and Danny Wawruck, Dale Smith, David Warriner, Randy Raf eld, Kristy Raf eld, Jasslyn Raf eld, Bionca Raf eld, Mary Belin, Ron and Mary Kelly, Terry Schafer, Joel Rogers, Fisher van Der Tulip, Abby Cozine, Hunter van Der Tulip, Bill Van Der Tulip, Maya Robbins, Kiara Monette, Tiffany Godwin, Donna Murray, Sandie and Bill Kennedy, Charles Givens, Troy White and the GANG (Getting to A New Generation) Lauren White, Caitlin White, Branden, Nakigan Jones, Khaliyan Johnson, Aliyah Johnson, Kanon Martin, Tyson Davis, Murcell Johnson and Bob Sutton, Chase McCullouch, Rick Norrell, Austin Webb, Cindy Balew and Prophet Billy Dixson. The committee that planned this event are very grateful to all our sponsors, the wonderful volunteers, the Oak Grove Church staff and Pastor James Wiley. Thanks also to Eddie Martin for tending to the sound and picture projector and creating the nice slides and music. All projects of this size need good accounting personnel and the committee would like to thank Carol Lyles, who has done a wonderful job for all of us. Finally the committee would like to thank Carol Dow for her help in recruiting the volunteers to help our project so much. We hope to see all of the volunteers next Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society GALE!Meet Gale a young Maine Coon mix cat. Gale is very smart, and friendly. He loves to play with toys, kids and is very proficient on an Ipad. He would make a wonderful pet for a family or a companion for a senior. Please give this guy a second chance at a forever home. He even likes dogs. Gale meets the qualifications for a Pets for Patriots sponsored adoption. www.petsforpatriots.orgIf you are unable to adopt at this time, perhaps you could foster or make a Donation. All pets adopted from SJBHS will be current on vaccinations and spayed/neutered. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie!Applications are available at http://www.sjbhumanesociety.orgOur hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Faiths Thrift Hut is always in need of donations also, and all the proceeds go directly to support the animals in our care! Faiths Thrift Hut Has Expanded! We now have more furniture & appliances. Plus lots of other great thrift store treasures. The hours for the store are Thursday-Saturday from 10 am-3 pm. Volunteers are always welcome at both our store and our shelter! Our store and shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! Hope to see you all there soon!If you are missing a pet or want to adopt a new pet, please check with your local Humane Society or Shelter. Pet Wellness CampaignDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM PERFORMED IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY! CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR WWW.LOOKOUTLOUNGE.COM FRIDAY @ 9:00 PM ESTRANDY STARK ON THE POOPDECKSATURDAY @ 9:00 PM ESTRANDY STARK WITH ART LONGONSAX ONTHE POOPDECKFRI & SAT @ 9:00 PM ESTKARAOKE / DJ IN THE CROWS NEST NOW NON-SMOKING IN THE CROWS NEST ANDDOWNSTAIRS IN THE SHIPS STORE CALL 215-3264 Need a New Primary Care Physician SocietyB2 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013Special to The StarWheeling around with RotaryThe members of the Port St Joe Rotary are busy nalizing the details for the Gulf County Health and Safety Fair. This free event is open to the public from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET Jan. 24 at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. This is a great time to get free health screening for blood pressure, cholesterol, vision, hearing, HIV, glucose etc. Many community services also will be available. This Health and Safety Fair is sponsored by Gulf County Senior Citizens Center and your local Rotary Club. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, call Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Gulf Amateur Radio Society license examsThe Gulf Amateur Radio Society will provide ham radio license exams at 10 a.m. Feb. 9. The exams will be given at the Gulf County EOC building behind the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe. Those interested in obtaining a ham license or upgrading a present license should contact C.H. Tillis at 648-8251 for information and exam registration. Anyone who would like to become involved in amateur radio and needs information as to what is needed and how to obtain a license should contact the above number. American Legion Post 116 regular meetingThere will be a regular general meeting of American Legion Post 116 at 4 p.m. ET Jan. 24 at VFW Post 10069 on Trout Avenue in Highland View. This will be a meeting to elect a new rst vice commander, general business with discussion of future fundraising events, and rehearsal for the up-coming memorial service. Eligibility for membership and bene ts can be found at www.legion.org. All eligible veterans are invited to join the organization. For God and Country. Every time we talk about woody ornamentals for the Florida landscape, we say something about fertilizer requirements. For healthy normal growth landscape, plants need a variety of nutrient elements some you add in regular fertilizer applications some you have available in the soil around your home. My information on nutrient de ciencies of woody ornamentals was provided by IFAS Horticultural Specialist, Emeritus, Dr. Robert J. Black. Most people know nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium are the major plant food elements. But you might be surprised to learn plants also might need varying amounts of magnesium, calcium, sulphur, manganese, iron, zinc, copper, molybdenum, chlorine and boron. Most of the nutrient de ciency problems we have with woody ornamentals in our landscapes are partly because of the poor quality of our soil. Throughout most of the state, the soil is sandy and slightly acidic, except along the coast where soil tends to be alkaline. Because of the soil chemistry of our sandy Florida soils, important nutrient elements are leached out easily. That means water runs down through the soil very quickly and carries plant nutrients with it. When the water moves beyond the root zone of your plants, so do some of the soil elements your plants depend on for nutrition. Another factor which can cause a de ciency of one nutrient element is having too much of another element in the soil. For example, if you add potassium to soil that is low in magnesium, you could make the magnesium de ciency even worse. This is called an antagonistic effect; high levels of one element make it more dif cult for plants to utilize another element. As I said at the beginning, your landscape plants need proper amount of various nutrients for healthy growth. But if a plant isnt growing well, its almost impossible for the home gardener to tell which nutrient is absent judging from visible symptoms. Many of the de ciency symptoms that show up on leaves, twigs and branches can be misleading. For example yellow of the leaves. Several nutrients de ciencies cause leaves to turn yellow. But it usually takes a trained expert to recognize the tine differences among the yellowing patterns, and thats how you tell which element is in short supply. You should be able to tell something is causing a nutritional de ciency by looking for a few easy to recognize symptoms. The yellowing of the leaves we just mentioned, a plants failure to grow vigorously even when it has plenty of light and water, sparse foliage and a lot of dead wood on the plant, these are all general indications of nutrient de ciency. If these symptoms appear on woody ornamental in our landscape, follow standard fertilizer recommendations and see if their condition doesnt improve. For more information on Nutrient de ciencies of woody ornamentals contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, 229-2909 or visit http:// gulf.ifas.u .edu. ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension directorNutrient de ciencies of woody ornamentals Society BRIEFS Volunteers deliver 730 Christmas dinners

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The Star| B3Thursday, January 10, 2013 CLYDE WHITEHEAD WILL NOT BE PREPARING TAX RETURNS Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp NEW LOCATION:dbutler@coastalcoverage.com FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIAL FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY FRIDAY NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL NIGHT SPECIAL 10 oz New York Strip ...................... $11.95 or Fried Shrimp ................................. $10.95 Served with 2 sides LUNCH SPECIALS MONDAY FRIDAY MONDAY: Meat loaf or Chicken, served with Mashed Potato, Country Veggies & Roll TUESDAY: Fried Shrimp, served w/Baked Beans, Coleslaw, Cheese Grits, or Potato Salad WEDNESDAY: Pork Chop or Chicken, served with Mashed Potato, Country Veggies & Roll THURSDAY: Country Fried Steak, Mashed Potato, Country Veggies, & RollHOURS OFOPERATION: Monday Friday Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Over 35 Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Gifts Ornaments Jewelry School NewsBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A no muss, no fuss continuing education. That is what Gulf Coast State College at its Gulf/Franklin Center will be offering in the coming weeks as Education Encore returns for another session. Education Encore offers noncredit enrichment classes for adults on a variety of topics. We have a saying, you are never too old to learn, said Jim Barr, coordinator of Education Encore. There are no tests, no grades, no stress, just fun. Registration for Education Encore begins at 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, Jan. 16, in Building A, Room 101, at the Gulf/Franklin Center. Registration is rst-come, rst-served. Classes will be held on six consecutive Wednesdays, beginning Jan. 23 and continuing through Feb. 27. Classes are being offered in three morning time periods, from 8:30 a.m. to noon, making it possible for a student to take three classes during this years Encore. In fact, the fee is based on each student having access to all three classes each Wednesday. The goal of Education Encore, Barr said, is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom in Special to The StarChoosing a school for your child is one of the most important decisions you will ever make. If a family atmosphere with nurturing teachers and a stimulating, God-based curriculum is what you are looking for, then Faith Christian School is the place for you. Faith Christian school is taking applications for new students. Interactive learning will be a part of your childs day, along with Spanish classes for all grades. Discovery learning days are incorporated into the academic year, and technology classes enhance the elementary program. Your child will experience academic excellence through Godly instruction. Please take a few minutes and browse through www. FaithChristianPSJ.net. Communication with teachers will be available through this site as well as the latest news. Partial scholarship opportunities for tuition are available for K5 through the eighth grade. Contact the of ce at 2296707 to ensure your childs spot. The Lions TaleSPECIAL TO THE STARFCS offers kids faith-based education EDUCATION ENCOREThe following classes will be offered Jan. 23 to Feb. 27 at the Gulf/ Franklin Center. PERIOD ONE: 8:30-9:30 A.M.Computer Basics Digital Photography Drawing: An Easy Approach Poetry Writing Chair Yoga Home Repair Marine Biology Habitats PERIOD TWO: 9:4510:45 A.M.Computer New Technology Photo Editing with Adobe Photoshop Acrylic Painting (Two periods) Works of Louis LAmore Yoga Meaning Every Moment Marine Biology Plants & Animals PERIOD THREE: 11 A.M. TO NOONComputer Internet & E-mail Photography Lighting & Composition Acrylic Painting (Cont.) Travel Portugal Tai Chi Creative Writing Marine Biology Setting Up & Maintaining a Saltwater AquariumMAY NAMED DISTRICTS TOP SCHOLARDANIEL MAY Daniel May, a 2012 graduate of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, has been named the recipient of the Academic Top Scholar Award for Gulf District Schools. To be eligible to be named Academic Top Scholar, a student must meet all eligibility requirements; have received a Bright Futures Academic Scholar scholarship and attended a Florida college during the fall semester the year following high school graduation; and be the highest ranked FAS award recipient based on their Bright Futures GPA and combined SAT score or equivalent ACT score. The Academic Top Scholar Award, going to just one student in each school district, provides a cost per credit hour award, established by the Florida Legislature, in addition to the Florida Academic Scholars scholarship. May is the son of Dusty and Carla May of Port St. Joe. which adults explore new ideas. If you have been to college, Barr said, this is an opportunity to relive the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live it. Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t, exercising the mind keeps one mentally t, he said. The courses offered at the Gulf/Franklin Center include basic computer skills, digital camera, drawing, writing, chair yoga, marine biology, Dare to Repair, acrylic painting and conversational Spanish, among others. The fee for participants is $66 for the six-week program, which includes three classes on each of the six Wednesdays. To browse the selection of classes offered, visit the website at www.gulfcoast.edu/ EducationEncore, call 872-3823 or email Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. As Barr said, Dont miss this great opportunity to continue your education or pursue a longtime interest. You are never too old to learn.Education Encore back this monthTIM CROFT | The StarEducation Encore, offering an array of noncredit classes for adults, begins at the Gulf/Franklin Center in the coming weeks.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 TOUCHING LIVES WITH THE LOVE OF JESUS 6pm Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET Dr. Geoffrey Lentz Pastor First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayDinner.5:00 6:00 pm AWANA.6:00 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry6:15 7:30 pm Prayer/Bible Study.6:30 7:30 pm Read the Bible for Life Class6:15 7:30 pm Nursery..6:00 7:30 pm SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM (CST) 10:30 AM (CST) ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM (CST) MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM (CST) TUESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 6:30 PM (CST) WEDNESDAY: WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM (CST)1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL(850) 648.1151 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Seasoned Women anniversary at Victory TempleVictory Temple First Born Holiness Church Seasoned Women Department will celebrate their anniversary nightly at 7:30 p.m. ET on Jan. 25-26. There will be a Saturday Prayer Breakfast at 9 a.m. on Jan. 26. Everyone is cordially invited to attend.Special to The StarPractical solutions for overcoming hardship will be discussed at Lifetree Caf 7 p.m. CT on Monday, Jan. 14. The program, titled Overcoming Hardship: A Father and Son Beat the Odds features an exclusive lm of Patrick Henry Hughes and his father. The younger Hughes was born without eyes or the ability to extend his limbs. Though in a wheelchair, Hughes performed in the University of Louisville marching band, his father pushing his wheelchair through every practice and performance. I dont think I have anything holding me back, said the younger Hughes. All I have to do is think about the goal I wish to achieve, look at the resources that might help me achieve that goal, reach out to them, and see what happens. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-8065667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. ObituariesFranklin Page Bauer of Port St. Joe, FL passed away on January 1, 2013 at the age of 64 after a brief illness. A memorial service will be planned sometime in the future. Frank was a long-time proprietor of High Point, a bed and breakfast in Natchez, MS, where he loved to cook for and entertain guests. Frank grew up in Greenville, MS, graduated from Greenville High School, and went on to graduate from Delta State University in Cleveland, Miss. Frank is survived by his sister Beth Bauer and her husband, Andy Durance; his brother Carl Bauer and his wife Connie, along with their children Brett and Jessica and their families; his uncle Fred P. Bauer and his wife Yvonne; and numerous cousins. Frank is preceded in death by his parents, Carl A. Bauer and Betty Bauer Anzaldo; longtime friend and partner, John Davis; and many beloved aunts and uncles. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital in Memphis, TN; www.stjude.org/donate or call 800-873-6983.Franklin Page Bauer FAITHThursday, January 10, 2013 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comSybil Lamb Ferris passed peacefully Dec. 30, 2012 in Covenant Hospice Care Center. Sybil was a longtime faithful member of St. James Episcopal Church where she will be memorialized during the 11 a.m. service on Sunday, January 13. Sybil was preceded in death by her husband Michael Ferris. She is survived by her daughter Margelyn Woodham, and several beloved nieces and nephews and their families as well as a beloved sister-in-law, Violet Lamb.Sybil Lamb FerrisGrace Gay, 102, of Oak Grove, passed away on Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012. Grace had a long and wonderful life. She enjoyed helping her family, friends and even strangers. She never asked, or expected anything in return. Her hugs, kisses and home made pound cake would always make everything better! She is gone from this earth, but will remain in the hearts of her family and friends always. She was preceded in death by her husband, Lonnie Gay, her son, Roy Gay, her granddaughter, Cynthia Gay Cunningham; four sisters and one brother. She is s survived by her daughter, Elma Lonsford and husband Jim; her son, Troy Gay and wife Betty; her daughter-in-law, Artie Mae Gay; her sister-in-law, Christine Levins; also, seven grandchildren, 18 great grandchildren and 24 great-great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. Her funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. E.S.T. on Thursday, January 3, 2013 at the graveside in Holly Hill Cemetery, conducted by the Rev. David Fernandez. Viewing will be held for a half hour prior to the service. All services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Grace Gay Faith BRIEFOvercoming hardship explored at Lifetree Caf Only God hears the cries of pain when abortions take place. America protects the spotted owl and animals, but forsakes the human race. We prosecute cruelty to animals with nes and possibly a little jail time. But abortionists can slice up an unborn child and not have to pay a dime. As a matter of fact, they get paid, sounds like murder for hire. Elected of cials are backing this; Americas needs are very dire. America was founded by men who put their trust in God. These men are in history books and covered by six feet of sod. The almighty dollar has replaced God in America today. Our leaders know how to spend our tax dollars, but they have forgotten how to pray. Will God Forgive America is the question today? No doubt about it, if we pray and ask forgiveness, and turn from our wicked way. Its time For Christians to get on our knees and pray for our of cials one and all. That they would repent and nd Jesus as their Savior before He makes his nal call. There is no doubt, He will return. Get right with Him or get ready to burn.Billy JohnsonWill God forgive America?

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, January 10, 2013By CHRIS OLWELL747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com MEXICO BEACH A sticker is on the door to the room with the evidence control vault in the Mexico Beach Police station. Its a white skull and crossbones on a black backdrop that says, The beatings will continue until morale improves! For of cer Jesse Burkett, one of the few of cers still with the department after a tumultuous 2012, the beatings have stopped and morale has improved. Burkett was the of cer assigned to implement former Chief Brad Halls get well plan in December 2011 after the Bay County Sheriffs Of ces Professional Standards Division conducted an audit of the department and found it lacking in several serious areas including morale, by the way. We just went through an evaluation, which was not pleasant, and the feedback we got on it we shouldve taken and worked with it, and that was my intent, Burkett said. By the following spring, things only had gotten worse within the department, and Burkett had become a target for retaliation from several members of the police and re departments, a subsequent BCSO investigation showed. He contacted the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, which began to investigate.Trumped-up chargesIn November of 2011, Burkett walked into the police station and found the son of a re department member, Dan Christopher, sitting unattended. Because there were guns, drugs and con dential police information unsecured in the building, Burkett escorted the teenager outside. When Christopher found out, he was upset and brought his concerns to Hall. Hall would later tell several members of the city Department of Public Safety that city leaders had prohibited him from punishing Burkett, which wasnt true, according to a BCSO report. Hall, who has not responded to attempts to contact him since his retirement in early October, denied lying to his employees, but investigators found him in violation of the departments truthfulness policy. In May, almost six months after the incident with Christophers son, Christopher led a battery complaint against Burkett with the sheriffs of ce over the incident. On Dec. 7, 2011, the day Hall released his get well plan, Burkett was already at work putting a fresh coat of paint on the interior walls of the police station, which is in the same building as the re station. Fire department member Levi Wilson, one of several re ghters with a criminal record, came through and touched a wall with dirty hands, and Burkett grabbed his hand and told him not to mess up the wall. Burkett insisted the exchange with Wilson was good-natured, but more than four months later Wilson led a battery complaint against Burkett with the Sheriffs Of ce.ReprimandOne day during this time, Burkett got confused about which shotgun he was assigned to clean. When he cleaned the wrong one, Cpl. Deborah Everett, Burketts former supervising officer, issued a written reprimand. But instead of a corrective reprimand that Burkett said would be more typical for a minor infraction, Everett gave Burkett his final warning. Another misstep could result in termination. Burkett led a complaint against Everett with Hall. Hall pledged to investigate; instead he cleared Everett without investigating, a violation of department policy. He denied telling Everett and others city leaders had forbidden him from terminating Burkett, but several members of the department, including Everett, said Hall did describe Burkett as untouchable, the BCSO investigation showed. DIVAS4CHRIST MINISTRIES PRESENTS:BEGINNING A NEW 2 NIGHT EVENT FRI. JANUARY 11thpm Pastor Michael McClelland New Life Tabernacle Newnan, GA Elder Calvin Freeman Grace to Grace Detroit, MIGUEST MINISTERS: SAT. JANUARY 12thpmA GOSPEL SHOWCASE DBrassElitha Gant Kymani SmithTasmin Nickson LaTrika J.QuinnFarica GantResurrected Soldiers Shakinah QuinnThe Men of GodSonya Quinn-Freeman Triple Anointing*This is a non-prot gospel ministry event of singers, dancers, spoken word, gospel rap, & more!!!! Please join us in celebrating Christ our Savior. Free event, donations accepted* March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013The Bay County FairgroundsRegister now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo program, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show:Call: 850-248-3976 orE-mail: expostradeshows@aol.com SIGN UP NOW & RECEIVE THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT SPACE IS LIMITED, SO RESERVE YOURS TODAY!For sponsorship information call:850-763-6587For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo, contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 CALL TO ALL VENDORS! NEW THIS YEAR! LOOKINGFOR SHABBYCHIC VENDORS! SPONSORS HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldMexico Beach re ghter Charles Hollingsworth helps Gene Cline, right, don his oxygen tank during selfcontained breathing apparatus training Thursday at the Mexico Beach Fire Department. Of cers say police station morale improvingBIG CHANGES IN MEXICO BEACHSee MEXICO BEACH B6By the following spring, things only had gotten worse within the department, and of cer Jesse Burkett had become a target for retaliation from several members of the police and re departments, a subsequent Bay County Sheriffs Of ce investigation showed.

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013Like the battery allegations, which were unfounded, Everetts reprimand was bogus. It has been removed from his le, and she has been terminated for creating an intimidating and hostile work environment for Burkett. But the bogus reprimand was minor compared to the secret meetings she held with Wilson and others. The purpose of these meetings which were often held in the station during work hours, effectively leaving the streets of Mexico Beach unsupervised was to set up Burkett, according to the BCSO investigative le.Start of the problemHow had Burkett become so unpopular? His problems started when he was put in charge of improving the department. He thinks it was simple: he was asking of cers to do work they didnt want to do. Had we continued down the road I thought we needed to go down and I thought the chief wanted to go down, everybody was going to be accountable, Burkett said. They dont want any accountability. He stepped into the role with an enthusiasm that was not shared by the rest of the small department. Burkett and his wife would spend their off-hours working on improvement projects at police headquarters while many other of cers couldnt be bothered to even work the hours they were being paid for, Burkett said. It seemed like every turn, it was like hitting my head up against a wall, Burkett said. I could get no cooperation from anyone on anything. Burkett never liked how evidence and weapons were left unsecured in the police station. After the bogus reprimand, Hall began telling people in the department city leaders had prohibited him from disciplining Burkett, the BCSO investigation showed. When shed had enough of his complaining, Everett and other members of the department began gathering information against Burkett. Christopher said in a sworn statement he was pressured by Everett and Of cer J.T. Hallman to bring the battery allegation against his son; Wilson told investigators he came forward on his own. But Burkett already had been warned by his only ally within the Department of Public Safety at the time, EMS supervisor Diana Epple, that she had overheard members of the police and re departments discussing him. (Epple would become so concerned about these meetings that she got a bulletproof vest.) Their whole intent, again, was to discredit me so anything I may have said in the future would be questionable at best, Burkett said. Investigators were not able to substantiate an allegation that Hall had offered marijuana to a woman so she would le a harassment complaint against Burkett. Hall dismissed the allegation as a rumor in an interview with investigators. But after Hall left the department, an audit revealed an unknown quantity of marijuana had been stolen from the departments evidence control locker, which allowed someone to reach inside and pull out the contents. No one has ever been charged with the theft. The departments new chief, Glenn Norris, said whoever stole the pot wouldve had to be a cop or have broken into the police station, and there were never any signs of forced entry.New eraThese days, Norris is the only cop in Mexico Beach with access to the new evidence locker, which is triple-locked, stainless steel, and empty. Most of the police and re ghters who worked under Hall have left the Department of Public Safety voluntarily. Weve got basically a whole new re department and a whole new police department, Norris said. And the difference has been night and day, Burkett said. The reason he agreed to participate in this story is to let people know what happened in Mexico Beach is an anomaly in law enforcement, he said. Aside from the evidence locker, the department has an improved rearms storage system. The police station has been forti ed. There are new of cers and a new chief who are training more often and making more arrests. Thats what happens when you actually get out and patrol when you get out of the of ce instead of sitting around trying to set people up, Norris said. The re department had fallen into disrepair as well under Halls authority. Equipment was not being stored or maintained properly or tested frequently. The training meetings that had become an opportunity to gripe and conspire are now an opportunity for the mostly new volunteer members to actually train. It got to the point where I just stopped coming to the meetings, said re Chief Kevin Martin. The trucks were a mess. The SCBA (Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus) tanks were just thrown into the trucks. Martin has addressed equipment issues. Fire trucks dont have to warm up anymore for the air brakes to work; now a re crew can jump in the truck and go. They even train with other re departments and several members are taking a certi cation course that will give them the legit re training that most of the department lacked under Hall.Its coming. I know it dont look like much, but weve had big changes in morale, Norris said. Norris would not take responsibility for the sticker on the door. That was under the former chief, he said. PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Board ofCountyCommissioners (BOCC) meeting onTuesday, January 22, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. EST. The public hearings will be held in theBOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G.Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the proposed adoption of the following ordinance:ANORDINANCE PERTHE REQUIREMENTSOF FLORIDA STATUE 163.3177(3)(b) TO YEARLY REVIEW AND UPDATETHE GULF COUNTY FIVE-YEARCAPITALIMPROVEMENT SHEDULE;INCORPORATINGTHE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT2012/2013 WORK PLAN; INCORPORATINGBY REFERENCETHEUPDATED CONCURRENCYTRACKING DATA; PROVIDING FORREPEALOF ORDINANCEINCONFLICTTHEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABLITYAND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on this matter. The ordinance and contents are Department, Room 311 in the Robert M. Moore Ad #2012-117 PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planningand Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, January 21 2013 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday,January 22, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following: 1.Variance Application Miles & Susan Bry Parcel ID # 03180-120R Located in Section 19, Township 9 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback by 12 feet for a pool. 2.Animal Control Ordinance Review and comment on the Countys proposed Animal Control Ordinance as applicable to the Comprehensive Plan and Land DevelopmentRegulations (LDR). 3.Public and Open DiscussionThe public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311.2013.01 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847TODAY!CALL Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction Rays Quality Service NO JOB TOO SMALL! J&M SCRAPPING CARS/TRUCKS MOBILE HOMES CAMPER TRAILERSCENTRAL/WINDOW A/CWASHERS/DRYERSSTOVES/REFRIGERATORSFREEZER/MICROWAVES LAWNMOWERSSCRAP METAL, ETC. . J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 MEXICO BEACH from page B5HEATHER LEIPHART | Halifax Media GroupMexico Beach Police Chief Glenn Norris speaks about improvements to the police and re station.

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LocalThe Star| B7Thursday, January 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 10, 2013 The Star | B7 89588S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232012CA 000225CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Plaintiff, vs. TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 3, BLOCK I, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; RUNNING THENCE N 01 DEG. 1724 E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE RUN S 89 DEG. 5926 W ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEG. 0000, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S 44 DEG. 5926 W FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N 62 DEG. 2046 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N 85 DEG. 1908 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 264.35 FEET; THENCE N 01 DEG. 0605 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 429.15 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRESBYTERIAN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE N 41 DEG. 1502 E ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 145.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 24 DEG. 20 59, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N 53 DEG. 28 29 E FOR 61.67 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.13 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN S 11 DEG. 04 17 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 601.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. a/k/a 364 JIM RISH STREET, WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 19th, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 1000 Cecil Costin Boulevard, Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FI 32456, Phone No. (850)229-6112 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-9958770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 7th day of December, 2012. DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM As Clerk of the Court Cindy Strange As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-04376 BOA Dec 20, 27, 2012 Jan 3, 10, 2013 91199 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The public is welcome to attend. January 10, 2012 89680S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE N O. 2012-158CA EMERALD COAST FEDERALCREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICAL CENTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 13, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-158-CAof the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COASTFEDERALCREDITUNION, is Plaintiff and WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICALCENTER, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ETon the 17th day of January 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Begin at Southwest corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West and run East for 630 feet; thence run North 30 feet to the North right of way line of Transfer Landing Road for Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning run thence East along the North right of way line of said road for 100 feet; thence run North 145 feet; thence run West 100 feet; thence run South 145 feet to the Point of Beginning. Lying and being in Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH: 2008 Horton EH-4 Mobile Home DATED this 13th day of December, 2012. REBECCANORRIS CIRCUITCOURT CLERK By: Cindy Strange DEPUTYCLERK January 3, 2012 January 10, 2013 89818S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1213-05 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Printing of the 2013 Official Gulf County Visitor Guide Printing specs and PDF of sample layout can be accessed at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov or at the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain provide companionship and support to patients and families, or to assist with fundraising, administrative support, and community outreach. If you, your church or organization would be interested in becoming a part of our Covenant Hospice team, call Shelley Frazier, volunteer services manager at 785-3040. Abused and neglected children need a voice in court. There are several children without volunteer advocate representation in Gulf County. The 14th Circuit Guardian Ad Litem Program wants these children spoken for. Be a strong, dependable voice, appointed by the court, to support these children. Training classes begin in August. Call 747-5180 for more information and an application. Volunteers are needed to assist greeting guests and doing ofce duties at the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge ofce in A palachicola.  Introduce visitors to displays and information about St. V incent Island.  Call 653-8808 and ask for Charlotte if you can help on Mondays and/or Wednesdays. Able-bodied volunteers are needed t o  help with outdoor work on St. Vincent Island. You need to be able to tolerate heat and sweat, but the island and wildlife are amazing. Call Shelley at 527-8535 if you can help on the island. VOLUNTEER from page B1 meeting agenda is the presentation of the nominating committees slate of candidates for the 2013 Board of Directors of the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves and a vote by all attending current members for the new years board positions. Currently serving on the board are Marcia Boothe, president; Charla Boggs, past president; John Ehrman, president elect; Nick Baldwin; Bill Boothe; and Gene Cox. The Boothes, Cox and Ehrman will remain on the 2013 board as they serve their second year of a two-year term. The proposed slate of candidates for election to the board includes William Sonny Chan, Margaret Margo Posten and Jody Wood-Putnam. Amendment to bylawsMembers also will vote on an amendment to the bylaws of the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves. The current bylaws state in Article V Section 1: Members shall consist of any individual or business entity whose yearly dues are current. With dues being charged under the following categories: Student/Senior: $10; Individual: $15; Family: $25; Sponsor: $100; Patron: $250; Silver Benefactor: $500 or more; Gold Benefactor: $1,000 or more; Corporate Benefactor: $1,000 or more. The Board of Directors recommends the following amendment to the bylaws in Article V Section 1: Members shall consist of any individual or business entity whose yearly dues are current with dues being charged as stated below or as stipulated by a majority vote of the Board of Directors under the following categories or as amended by a majority vote of the Board of Directors: Student/ Senior: $10; Individual: $15; Family: $25; Sponsor: $100; Patron: $250; Silver Benefactor: $500 or more; Gold Benefactor: $1,000 or more; Corporate Benefactor: $1,000 or more. Purpose of this proposed change: From time to time, ination will necessitate a small increase in membership fees. Also, currently there are no categories for lifetime or honorary membership levels.Chili potluckAfter the meeting, join the Friends for a potluck chili luncheon, prepared by fellow Friends members and free to all attendees. There will be several chili recipes including vegetarian that range from mild to hot. You do not need to bring any food unless you wish to share some of your favorite xings to go along with the chili. Be prepared to have a good time and meet fellow friends. If you have any questions or concerns, call the Preserves Center at 229-1787. PRESERVE from page B1 CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 10, 2013 The Star | B7 89588S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 232012CA 000225CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA N.A. Plaintiff, vs. TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TREZIA HUDDLESTON A/K/A TREZIA L. HUDDLESTON (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 364 JIM RISH ST. WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 3, BLOCK I, RISH SUBDIVISION, BEING AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 36; RUNNING THENCE N 01 DEG. 1724 E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 36 FOR A DISTANCE OF 1090.39 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID EAST LINE WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF CORN GRIFFIN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE LEAVING SAID EAST LINE RUN S 89 DEG. 5926 W ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 118.31 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 100.00 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEG. 0000, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING S 44 DEG. 5926 W FOR 141.42 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN N 62 DEG. 2046 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 247.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE N 85 DEG. 1908 W FOR A DISTANCE OF 264.35 FEET; THENCE N 01 DEG. 0605 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 429.15 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRESBYTERIAN STREET (A PRIVATE 60 FOOT R/W); THENCE N 41 DEG. 1502 E ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR A DISTANCE OF 136.68 FEET TO THE POINT ON THE CURVATURE OF A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 145.20 FEET, A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 24 DEG. 20 59, AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD BEARING N 53 DEG. 28 29 E FOR 61.67 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 62.13 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CURVING SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, RUN S 11 DEG. 04 17 E FOR A DISTANCE OF 601.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. a/k/a 364 JIM RISH STREET, WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 19th, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 1000 Cecil Costin Boulevard, Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FI 32456, Phone No. (850)229-6112 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-9958770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 7th day of December, 2012. DOUGLAS C. BIRMINGHAM As Clerk of the Court Cindy Strange As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No.: 12-04376 BOA Dec 20, 27, 2012 Jan 3, 10, 2013 91199 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, January 17, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The public is welcome to attend. January 10, 2012 89680S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE N O. 2012-158CA EMERALD COAST FEDERALCREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICAL CENTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 13, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-158-CAof the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COASTFEDERALCREDITUNION, is Plaintiff and WESLEYB. JONES and BAYMEDICALCENTER, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ETon the 17th day of January 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Begin at Southwest corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West and run East for 630 feet; thence run North 30 feet to the North right of way line of Transfer Landing Road for Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning run thence East along the North right of way line of said road for 100 feet; thence run North 145 feet; thence run West 100 feet; thence run South 145 feet to the Point of Beginning. Lying and being in Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH: 2008 Horton EH-4 Mobile Home DATED this 13th day of December, 2012. REBECCANORRIS CIRCUITCOURT CLERK By: Cindy Strange DEPUTYCLERK January 3, 2012 January 10, 2013 89818S PUBLIC NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID #1213-05 The Gulf County Tourist Development Council (GCTDC) will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Printing of the 2013 Official Gulf County Visitor Guide Printing specs and PDF of sample layout can be accessed at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov or at the Gulf County Tourist Development Council, 150 Captain

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B8| The Star Thursday, January 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL............................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH .............$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ..............$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! 2005 Chevy Impala, $7,995; Call 227-3100 St George IslandBeach Front 3 Br, 2 Ba 1 year lease. $1500 mo + $1500 deposit. Call 816-698-2405 WEWA: 2bdrm, 1bath, CH&A. $400/mo + $400 dep. RVs for Rent850-639-5721 2 Story duplex, both units available, new appliances, fully furnished, 2 br, 1 ba, top story $800 mo, bottom unit $700 mo. 1st & last, yrly lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652 Charming 1BR Garage Apt. 907 1/2 Monument Avenue. $535 month. MUST CALL for APPT. 850-227-7234 Mexico Bch 3 Br 1400 SF Modular Home. 2 blocks from the beach. New carpet, flooring, & paint. $950 mo + $950 dep. Tenant pay utils. 850-867-0371/247-8023 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Freds Place, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Proposals must contain detailed printing timeline (files to be ready January 25, 2013), cost estimates and samples of similarly quoted print material. Proposals must be delivered to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 by Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 12:00 p.m., E.T. Bids will be opened at this same location on Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 2:00 p.m., E.T. Only proposals that provide two pricing options for printing as requested in specifications will be considered. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Any questions concerning this bid should be directed to T.D.C Director Jennifer Jenkins at 850-229-7800 or Jennifer@visitgulf.com. Jan 10, 2013 91741S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-59-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF DOROTHY M. OSHALL Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of DOROTHY M. OSHALL, deceased, whose date of death was November 23, 2012 is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. 8 week old Pug Puppies, 3 black and 1 fawn First shots included $200 call 850-720-1117 Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepet sitting.com Cues Furniture NEW queen size mattresses. $189, Twin Size $89 New 6 Peice Bedroom set. $799 Open Mon Sat, 10am -5pm (850) 639-2343 or (850) 639-3512. Text FL37495 to 56654 Port Saint Joe, 201 8th ST. Saturday, January 12th, 8am to 1pmMoving Estate Sale/ Dr. Oksanens OfficeFurniture, computer desk, cabinets, printers, organizing supplies, exercising equiptment and Misc. items. Port St. Joe : 4th St. Unit 11, Friday January 11th 12 Noon til ? & Saturday 12th 7am til ? Furniture, Appliances, Houshold Goods, and Much More!! Tallahassee 2437 Beautyberry Ct. Sunday, January 13th ~ 12:00pmBeautyberry Estate & Real Estate AuctionFeaturing: Art, Collectibles, Coins, Jewelry, Silver, Furniture, Glassware, China, Electronics, Power Tools, Hand Tools, And Much More! Tallahassee Affiliated Galleries 2500 Apalachee Pkwy January 12th 10am Est.Coins, Firearms, and Collectibles AuctionCoins, Firearms, Jewelry, Collectibles, Antiques, Fine Art Military Items Internet Bidding available Accounting/ClerkAccounting ClerkThe City of Mexico Beach is currently accepting applications for ONE full time position, that of Accounting Clerk. The positions primary duties include the balancing of bank account statements, cash receipt deposit reconciliation, other bookkeeping duties as required, and maintaining public records of the City. These duties require attention to detail and accuracy as well as time management skills; potential applicants must have strong organizational, documentation, and basic accounting skills. The successful applicant will be expected to exercise considerable initiative and independent judgment and work well with limited supervision; as part of the hiring process, the applicant will be required to pass background and drug tests prior to hire. Applications will be accepted at Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL 32456. Applications will stop being accepted on January 31, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. For more information please call (850) 648-5700. The City of Mexico Beach is a Drug-Free work place and is an EEOC provider. Web ID#: 34237096 Text FL37096 to 56654 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Director of Nursing Radiology Tech. RN LPN EMT CDM Dietary Aide Applications are available at:www weemsmemorial.com &may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com By mail to: PO Box 580, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or FAXED to(850)-653-1879 Web ID 34237468 Text FL37468 to 56654 All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is January 10, 2013. Personal Representative: Lynn OShall Carr 13913-B Panama City Beach Pkwy Panama City Beach, FL 32407 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles A. Costin FL Bar No. 699070 P O Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850)-227-1159 January 10,17, 2013 If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Baileys Crab Houseis NOW HIRINGCooks Servers Dishwashers Shuckers Buss BoyCall: Toye Roberts (850) 258.4691 or Email: toye6158@yahoo.com