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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03855
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 08-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03855

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, AUGUST 23 2012 YEAR 74, NUMBER 45 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Over the course of two days and two meetings, members of the Port Authority of Port St. Joe listened to two speakers offer the outlines of potential lifelines for port development. Last Thursday, it was a representative from the newly-created Department of Economic Opportunity, in town to hear about the progress at the Port of Port St. Joe and potential opportunities for the DEO to provide assistance. Last Friday, the speaker was from the University of West Florida discussing a newly-created pot of economic development/environmental protection dollars created by the Florida Legislature to assist the eight Northwest Florida counties most impacted by the 2010 BP oil spill. While little concrete came from either meeting other than a divided board pertaining to how to handle local administrative obligations both provided lights in the tunnel for the Port Authority and The St. Joe Company in their collaboration to develop the Port of Port St. Joe. We need jobs, said Port Authority member Eugene Raf eld. We need to be more creative. We need to roll up our sleeves and go to work. Tom Beck from the DEO said he was in Gulf County on a listening tour, to hear how the department created by combining functions from the former Department of Community Affairs and the former Governors Of ce of Transportation, Trade and Economic Development and the Of ce of Workforce Innovation roughly 10 months ago could assist the port. The DEO, Beck said, works closely and provides signi cant funds for Enterprise Florida, the states quasi-public economic development agency. We have never funded port development anywhere but we are doing a lot of things differently, Beck said. This would be a rst and we want to do it right. Ports are a huge priority for the governor. This governor is geared toward jobs and ports provide an opportunity for real job creation. Beck noted that cap amounts on Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) have been raised a potential funding stream for infrastructure, Beck said and another Port Authority hears of possible assistance By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com State Rep. Jimmy Patronis (RPanama City Beach) arrived last week for a tour of the Bridge at Bay St. Joe. Patronis, along with Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson, got the complete tour. So in addition to a brief legislative update with administrators with Signature Health Care, which owns and operates the Bridge at Bay St. Joe, Patronis, joined after some good-natured ribbing by Magidson, received a complete tour of the facility, including two rooms, two programs, that are integral to the mission of the Bridge. The Bridge name, site administrator Ron Reid noted, is no mistake. The mission of the facility can be summed as attempting to bridge the gap to (a patients) needs. At Bay St. Joe, currently the largest private-sector employer in Gulf County, the specialization is in the treatment of dementia and Alzheimers. The facility is the only one of its kind in Florida and one of just nine among Signatures more than 70-facilities located primarily in the Southeast that focuses so speci cally A tour of the world of a dementia patient By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@stara .com Drenching rains and the spread of the West Nile virus across the country has local health ofcials urging residents to be alert for standing water and to protect themselves from the potential for a mosquito-borne illness. Because of all the rainwater that we have experienced and information from (Gulf County) Mosquito Control, we thought it would be a good idea to send out information, said Sarah Hinds, public information of cer for the Gulf County Health Department. We want to make people aware of not having standing water and to protect themselves from mosquitoes. Gulf County Mosquito Control is currently operating at an elevated level until we see mosquito numbers drop, said director Mark Cothran. The West Nile virus is also currently enjoying its peak season. Cases of the virus have been reported in more than 40 states and more than 60 deaths, including over 20 in Texas alone. This is the time of year that West Nile becomes more widespread, especially after a period of extremely dry weather is followed by heavy rains. Cothran said mosquitoes lay eggs during dry periods. Some 30 inches of rain in three months has helped create a thriving population. Luckily we have not had a local case, Hinds said. This information is strictly precautionary. In 2004, the county experienced an outbreak of the West Nile virus, with at least ve patients diagnosed with illnesses related to virus infection with one death. The Health Department recommends residents follow the Five Ds of mosquito control: Dusk, avoid the outside when mosquitoes are most active; Dawn, avoid the outside during the second most active period for mosquitoes; DEET, use personal chemical protection to ward off mosquitoes; Dress, cover exposed skin to block access for mosquitoes; and Drain, remove standing water in pots, pet dishes, gutters and other retainers. Further, residents should apply repellent to exposed skin or onto clothing, but never under clothing; read repellent labels to ensure safety for children (DEET is not recommended for children younger than two months and repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years); and avoid applying repellent to hands of children adults should apply to their hands and then transfer to a childs skin or clothing. The key, health of cials said on Monday, was to understand the dangers of mosquitoborne illnesses such as West Nile. Adults over age 50 and people who have ever received an organ transplant are more likely to develop serious symptoms of West Nile if they do get sick, therefore they should take special care not to be bitten by a mosquito. Not all people who are bitten by a mosquito carrying West Nile will become sick. Just one out of 150 people infected with the virus develop serious disease, known as West Nile encephalitis, West Nile meningitis, or in ammation of the brain or the area around the brain. By FELICIA KITZMILLER and VALERIE GARMAN News Herald Writer @PCNHFelicia PANAMA CITY BEACH Local leaders can be protective of money, but in the interest of keeping the state government out of the billions of dollars expected to ow to Florida from the RESTORE Act, county leaders from Floridas Gulf Coast are trying to get along. Representatives from 19 of Floridas 23 Gulf Coast counties convened at the Wyndham Bay Point Resort on Thursday to discuss forming a consortium that would coordinate and implement a plan to assist in Floridas long-term economic and environmental recovery from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The RESTORE (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourism Opportunities and Revived Economies) Act mandates 80 percent of Clean Water Act penalties paid by those responsible for the spill go directly to the affected states. The penalties could range from $5 billion to $20 billion. Nobody thought wed be getting the RESTORE Act passed, but we did it, said Florida Association of Counties Executive Director Chris Holley. This could be a gamechanger for the Gulf Coast states. Now the Florida Association of Counties (FAC) and its members are scrambling to establish a system for equitably doling out the money while maintaining the local control that was the impetus of the RESTORE Act. The legislation requires that a legal entity to receive the funds be established within six months of the bill being signed and a plan be in the works for how the money will be used. A draft of an interlocal agreement is Counties prep for oil spill funding Local health of cials: beware of water, mosquitoes See PORT A7 Plan needed to split millions of dollars between 23 affected counties See DEMENTIA A3 See OIL A7 See HEALTH A3 TIM CROFT | The Star Training of staff at the Bridge centers on empathy training, said administrator Ron Reid. New semester at Gulf/Franklin, B1 quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 74, NUMBER 45 New semester at Gulf/Franklin, YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A8 Sports......................................... A9-A10 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Society ......................................... B2 Classi eds .................................... B7-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 I would like to thank all the people who supported me in the campaign for Superintendent of Schools. I enjoyed meeting so many of the people in our county and renewing old friendships. It was a pleasure to run for public ofce in this wonderful area. I was treated with dignity and respect by all Gulf County citizens. I would like to commend my opponent and his supporters for running a very positive campaign. Thanks again, Phil Lanford We tried to remove all of our campaign signs. If we missed any, please call 227-5450 or 340-0302 with the location. THANK YOU (Pd.Pol.Ad.) PA ID BY P HIL L A NFORD, DEM. FOR SU P ERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FR EE tobacco cessation classes in Gulf County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE N I COT I NE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com Gloria Salinard saw the local real estate market come to a screeching halt in the months following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. More than two years later, Salinard said the market is taking baby steps toward recovery. Basically the market has been picking up, said Salinard, the account executive for the Realtor Association for Franklin and Gulf Counties. Theres a lot of interest. The offices are very busy and the agents are very busy its definitely on the increase finally. After the bubble burst for the housing market in 2006, the market started picking back up in Gulf and Franklin Counties in January 2010, Salinard said, but was halted once again by the oil spill. It started picking back up in the second half of 2011, and weve gained momentum month by month, Salinard said. Theyre baby steps, but theyre baby steps in the right direction. According to statistics from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) for listings in Franklin County, Gulf County and Mexico Beach, residential sales have risen 35 percent, from 223 sales from Jan. 1 to June 30 of last year, to 301 during the same time period in 2012. Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach saw the most signi cant increase, jumping 47 percent from 64 sales in 2011 to 94 in 2012. Sales of lots and land are also up 103 percent in the area, rising from 134 to 273, with signi cant rises in land sales in South Gulf County and on Cape San Blas, more than tripling from 28 to 96. We have a lot of people coming in with investment moneythe prices are great, Salinard said. Most of our sales are second homes and investment properties. Most of the large numbers of sales have been in Cape San Blas, Mexico Beach and St. George Island. Salinard said residential sales within area cities like Port St. Joe and Carrabelle saw less signi cant increases. The main economy is tourists and vacation homes, Salinard said. A lot of the buyers are coming from Georgia and Alabama. Along with increased number of sales, total sales prices are up so far this year, from roughly $55 million to $76 million this year. The average sales price also rose slightly from $245,983 to $253,758, but the median sales price dropped from $190,000 to $179,000. Salinard said the drop in the median sales price may be attributed to less inventory, especially on Cape San Blas. Last week, Port Authority of Port St. Joe attorney Tom Gibson noted that for the rst time in several years his law rm was handling closings in which the sale price was actually above the county appraised price. Salinard also cited a much lower number of short sales and foreclosures in the area compared to last year. A lot of the foreclosure and short sale listings have been purchased, said Salinard, who noted the wonderful interest rates have also helped boost sales. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this story. By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com The Gulf County Tourism Development Council has broken previous months bed tax collections for seven out of the last nine months, with June collections up 23 percent from last year. June was great, said TDC Director Jennifer Jenkins. I think its an indication of a really good rebound. June accounted for roughly 33 percent of the TDCs total collections for this scal year, which runs Oct. 1 through Sept. 30. Collections for June totaled $149,033, topping even July of last year which came in at $147,605. Although the TDC does not yet have bed tax numbers for July, traditionally the councils highest collections month, Jenkins said all signs are pointing toward another banner month. October and December of 2011 were the only two months that posted decreases in bed tax collections this scal year, with numbers for October dropping 16 percent and December dropping 7 percent. Jenkins said she hopes to get those numbers back up this year, with a number of programs targeting potential fall visitors online highlighting a less-busy Gulf County and a number of events planned for this fall. The big thing were going to start to do is really pushing our concept out, Jenkins said. All of our issues that were hanging out there because of resource changes, weve resolved all of them. The TDC marketing committee has been hard at work this summer developing a core communications plan to steer the agency in the right direction through the development of nite goals. Jenkins said all TDC practices must aim at four major goals: to increase visitation to Gulf County, increase visitor spending in Gulf County, deliver qualied leads to TDC and partners and acquire long-time, loyal visitors. The plan also outlines principles for increasing awareness of Gulf County that include leveraging a distinct product and bene t of the area, communicating consistent messaging and branding, and developing emotional connections with the audience. The marketing committee has been reviewing applications for the new event sponsorship program, focusing on how proposed events re ect the underlying TDC principles developed. Jenkins said the big question is, remind me how this promotes tourism. The marketing committee will meet at the Gulf County Welcome Center Tuesday to further review sponsorship applications and make a recommendation for the full board for approval. At the TDCs last meeting Aug. 7, the marketing committee presented a list of 17 events they favored sponsoring, with the largest $10,000 sponsorship going to the Blue Skies Music Festival, a music festival for Blue Skies Ministries, an organization that hosts beach getaways in Port St. Joe for families throughout the country who have children battling cancer. The committee is still looking at combining two submitted July 4 events, two submitted Christmas events and applications received for the Scallop Festival and Scallop Drop Treasure Hunt. Were in a really good position to start with a clean slate, Jenkins said. Even with all the rain, weve had a great summer. Another banner month for Gulf County TDC Area real estate beginning to pick up Basically the market has been picking up. Theres a lot of interest. The of ces are very busy and the agents are very busy its de nitely on the increase nally. Gloria Salinard account executive for the Realtor Association for Franklin and Gulf Counties ..................................................................................... June was great. I think its an indication of a really good rebound. Jennifer Jenkins TDC Director .........................................

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 23, 2012 on dementia. The programs it offers in the treatment of dementia patients are unique not just for the area, but for the state. We specialize in the treatment of dementia patients, Reid said. Everybody takes a two-day training course when they are hired in how to treat those with dementia. It is empathy-based training. That is our focus. The Signature mission is to change the landscape of long-term care forever. Patronis added, You think of the skilled services and versatility of services that are provided here and it is pretty impressive. Patronis, in particular, received a good look at two special programs or services offered by the Bridge at Bay St. Joe. One is a room that provides a Multi Sensory Environment. Essentially, the room is darkened with a large cushy living room-style chair in one corner, draped in light strands of soft soothing lights. A mural on the wall is effectively, through a light and specialized machine, a large lava lamp, shaping shapes and colors. Soothing music spills from speakers on the walls. It is a room for calming, for dialing down a dementia patients anxiousness without the use of prescription drugs which often come with signi cant side effects. We are looking to package this and give it to other nursing homes, Reid said. We want (the patients) off their meds. The second program is one that raises awareness of day-to-day life for a dementia patient and is called the Virtual Dementia Tour. The tour was developed in 1997 by geriatrics specialist P.K. Beville and marketed by Second Wind Dreams, a non-pro t organization that focuses on changing the perception of aging. Patronis and Magidson were suited up to simulate the sensory losses and obscurities people with dementia feel on a daily basis. They placed prickly shoe inserts to imitate the effects of nervous system damage, donned gloves lled with popcorn seeds to reduce dexterity. Headphones with sounds of static, scratching, buzzing and the occasional telephone ring or siren, simulating the effect even minor sounds has on those with dementia, and the two were tted with goggles to block central and peripheral vision. The thumb and fore nger of their dominant hands were taped together as well as the last three ngers of the opposite hand to hinder mobility. They were walked down a hall to a darkened room with a strobe light blinking in the corner and were told to perform three simple tasks fold a speci c colored towel or a set of socks, write a note to a loved one and place it in an envelope, and don a sweater. Patronis spent much of his time muttering, trying to remember the tasks while repeatedly folding the same towel. He found the pen and paper to write the note, but missed on the envelope while Magidson toppled over a table with a plastic pitcher and utensils believing them to be the pen and paper. Neither completed their tasks, though Magidson did, fairly easily, nd the reporter shooting photos in the dark room. I am very familiar with this facility and very proud that it is here in Port St. Joe, Magidson said. Before the tour, Patronis did discuss some legislative issues of a priority to facilities such as the Bridge. Tort reform he saw as remaining on the front burner in the Florida House of Representatives, but he said the key would be the Senate and whether the party numbers there change. The Senate last year was in civil war because there was no clear majority, Patronis said. Another priority for companies such as Signature is to see a current moratorium on additional Certi cates of Need (a CON is provided by the state and is essential to opening any hospital or nursing home) continues. There is also a hope for funding to help renovate facilities, which is particularly important, Reid noted, in rural communities. Rural facilities tend to be older and renovation is in play as a real need, he said. There was also discussion about the importance of the partnership with Sacred Heart on the Gulf We want to have a partnership with them and it is hard to nd CNs and RNs in specialized care, Reid said and the anticipated rollout of managed care and how that would be implemented. 850-227-1276, x 168 I want to thank the voters of District Three for their support during the recent primary election. I was honored to meet so many of you and appreciate all those who voted. I also appreciate all the kind words of encouragement since the election. I am thankful to live in Gulf County and to have had the opportunity to run Sincerely, Johnny Mize (Pd.Pol.Ad) Paid for and approved by Johnny Mize, Republican for County Commissioner, District 3 N OW O PE N (850) 640-0602 Mention This Ad And Get 10% OFF Your Purchase Your Electronic Cigarette Specialist in Panama City located next to Chow Time Safe Alternative to Smoking Locally Owned & Operated P V P A N AMA V APOR T HE E -C IG S PE C IALI STS DEMENTIA from page A1 Symptoms of severe illness include headache, high fever, stiff neck, mental confusion, muscle weakness, tremors, convulsions, coma and paralysis. Symptoms may last several weeks and neurological impacts could be permanent. Some will come down with milder symptoms, which resemble the flu, with fever, headache, swollen lymph glands, nausea, vomiting, skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. However, most people who get infected with West Nile virus do not have any symptoms. There is no specific treatment for West Nile virus infection and no vaccine. HEALTH from page A1 PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The Star Throughout the tour of the facility, Reid and Patronis discussed services provided at the facility and challenges the facility faces. On the Virtual Dementia Tour, while Patronis performs one of his tasks of putting on a sweater, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson topples a plastic jug of utensils and cups believing them to be pen and paper needed to write a note to a family member.

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Opinion A4 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 July or August, sometimes sooner, the Halloween candy hits the shelves of drugstores and your local big box stores. Have you ever wondered why they put the stuff on the counters so soon? Surely, there is a good answer. I have no idea, maybe because they need to ll space or get it out of their warehouses. One thing is for sure, it will go from the big box stores, to houses, to childrens Halloween buckets and bags, then back to their parents workplaces. At least that is the case with where I work. Its usually around January or February when it rst starts showing up. Someone will bring in their leftover Halloween candy that they either didnt pass out, their kids didnt eat or they wouldnt let their kids eat. All it takes is one bag. Then everyone else starts bringing their leftover candy in. Halloween candy is a pack animal, once there is one bag, they keep coming. And it starts to disappear. Someone in the ofce eats it, I have nally gured out what to call these people. Halloween candy must be like ne wine, it must get better with age. As noted, the rst batch usually is from the previous fall. Then, folks start bringing in vintage year stock. Stuff they nd in the back of the cabinet, pantry or car trunk. It still disappears. What do you call these folks? Now, I will call them the Ofce Cows. Let me tell you why. Recently, I was reading where farmers and ranchers, who were ghting with the rising cost of corn prices due to drought conditions in some areas, have gone to feeding their cows candy. Yes, candy. Some folks want to get mad at the farmers, or worse, the cows. Im not an animal science person, so I am not complaining about this. Farmers have to be creative to survive. If it keeps the cows going to market, they have to do it. This one fellow noted that the price of corn was so high, that he had to gure out something, so the secondhand candy did the trick. Second-hand candy has a higher ratio of fat than straight corn according to the farmer. Im not sure if that is good or bad, but the farmer said it did the trick. The farmer noted they did balance out the fat content. The farmer makes some sort of concoction out of an ethanol byproduct, mineral nutrients and the second-hand candy. The cows have not had any health problems, they do gain weight and it does seem to be a tting last meal if they were indeed headed to their end goal. I do eat steak and hamburgers. Im not going to lie about that. If you dont, Im ok with that. That is your business. The farmers simply found out that the candy companies dont sell all of their packaged candy. (I could have told them that.) The candy companies give the farmers a good deal on the candy, the cows eat the candy, and some of us eat the cows. Its that simple. There are many folks that understand this more than me, Im not picking sides. Im just making a point. If its good enough for the guys at the ofce that will eat Halloween candy from 1994, its probably ok with the cows. Thus, Im coining the term, Ofce Cows. Its really not derogatory. This fellow, who was a former butcher, and now a writer, invented an adjective to describe the way that cows stand calmly. He calls it cowpeaceably. We assume cows are not so smart; however those that know cows understand that they have some sense. Have you ever tried to milk a cow that didnt want to be milked? They can be quite stubborn. Cows are capable of friendships, like the guys in the ofce who eat the vintage Halloween candy. Within cow herd, there is a pecking order, or a leader and followers. I would compare this to the one fellow in the ofce who will eat anything, no matter the expiration date. Once he delves in, others follow. The bottom line is there are going to be some cows and people who are going to eat the candy. Some of us work with the people who do and eat steaks that may be from cows that ate candy corn or those black and orange wrapped peanut butter things that no one ever eats. I understand. I also am one of those who personally like the black and orange wrapped peanut butter things that stick to your teeth. Are the Valentines Day cards out yet? Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. When Eugene Rafeld speaks I have found it best to listen. Sure, a good chew on words has never been an aversion for Eugene, but behind that big-man Southern drawl is a mind at work, one of ideas and common sense in a package that typically cuts to the chase. And last week during a meeting of the Port Authority of Port St. Joe, of which Eugene is a board member, he said something about the RESTORE Act process that cut to the marrow. Paraphrasing here, Eugenes point was that many segments of the community in short the community as a whole needed to be in the conversation concerning how the county handles and spends what commissioners have described as a potential windfall in the tens of millions of dollars. There are plenty of buts here, as have been pointed out in meetings of the Board of County Commissioners, Port Authority, Port St. Joe City Commission and School Board. The amount of money is an unknown. There is a formula in place for dividing it among states and, in Florida, among counties, but at this point they could be dividing Pi instead of a dollar pie and it would make no difference. If there is payout of nes by BP, would it come after a long, drawnout trial or in a settlement with the federal government? This could be a court case that lasts past the lifetime of many of us. Any adjudication or settlement would also come with a question mark similar to those queries from bill collectors when will the check arrive? So there are plenty of unknowns to the RESTORE Act, enough that we have to hope that history wont repeat itself in Gulf County as it goes to nancial responsibility and accountability. Right now, a small committee is sifting through a mound of paperwork and trying to work with their respective constituencies there is representation from Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka, the Board of County Commissioners, Chamber of Commerce, Tourist Development Council, and others to come up with potential projects for funding. The emphasis is in two areas: economic development and environmental protection and restoration. But the criteria for ranking projects is also unknown. Last weeks two Port Authority meetings, at which economic development experts versed in the entire RESTORE process spoke, highlighted that few even understand some basic rules. Yet by January the eight most impacted Northwest Florida counties are supposed to have written and documented plans and projects. That is a short window of time, leading to further potential that accountability for the funds wont be properly assigned, and potential for more controversy like the Tourist Development Council suffered over the past 18 months. With the TDC asco, there was money in the seven gures rolling into an agency that had no plans in place to spend it. The TDC pretty much made up a plan on the y because there was a short deadline for spending more money, by a long shot, than the TDC had ever pocketed in any one-year window. As the audit of the TDC commissioned by the BOCC demonstrated, policies, procedures and rules went by the wayside from the BOCC to the county administrator to the Clerk of Courts to the TDC board to the TDC director while the money that owed was directed to a constricted number of people. And now were talking about 10 times that amount of money. Rafeld wondered rightly last week where was the representation for the shing industry as hard hit as any local industry by the oil spill on the county subcommittee? Taking it further why isnt the community more involved? Certainly a series of town hall meetings could be conducted, at both ends of the county, to discuss the potential elected ofcials speak of when they talk of remaking the region. Certainly the citizens, the residents most impacted by the BP oil spill, could provide insight into worthy projects to consider. How about the long-term nancial health of the county? Given the hard times many are experiencing these days is there not a way to bank some of that windfall for an even rainier day? This, given the potential, could be a watershed moment for the county. This has the potential to impact the county in ways that those proposing county-wide voting can only dream about. To succeed in truly reshaping the future of Gulf County this must be a county process that ends with decisions good for the entire county. In a county of just 15,000 or so residents that doesnt seem a leap. Leaving the entire process up to the BOCC, in the aftermath of the TDC debacle, seems like forgetting history. Mr. Aaron would look you in the eye Keyboard KLATTERINGS Ofce of cows A community conversation TIM CROFT Star news editor Folks, I got caught speeding. I think! Ripley wouldnt believe this one! I was going through the mail, minding my own business, thinking all was right with the world when I ran across this semi ofcial looking letter from Brentwood, Tennessee. I started to throw it away. I dont know anyone in Brentwood. I hadnt been through there in years. I gured it was just another political advertisement. It was a speeding ticket! By mail mind you. From a town that I hadnt been to! Signed by an ofcer I never met or even saw. Stating an offence that may or may not have occurred two weeks before I got the notice! People! I dont remember what I had for breakfast day before yesterday! You tell me it is jurisprudentially legal to site me for this crime? Isnt there a statue of limitations? Have we suspended the Fourth Amendment? I reckon Im the Corpus Deliciti for sure in this deal! On closer examination this heinous crime was committed not in Brentwood, but a hundred or so miles west, in the little town I grew up in. Now I was more confused than ever! They know me in McKenzie. They didnt have to put me on the most wanted list. They could have called. Theyve hurt my feelings by shipping my punishment abroad. On the Notice of Violation someone had attached a one inch by one inch grainy picture of a brown car. I own a brown car. So do sixteen jillion other people. It might have shown a Florida tag. Or, maybe WyomingI couldnt really tell. It was supposedly snapped on Highland Drive. I didnt recognize the telephone pole in the background. The picture could have been taken in Hoboken, Sacramento or Wiesbaden, Germany, along the Autobahn for all I know. This alleged photo op was made on or about (that is the exact wording on the citation) 7/12/2012. If the guy who signed it had checked his watch, cell phone or calendar when he supposedly witnessed this crime, he wouldnt have to be so vague. Course, if he had just pulled me over and asked me, I could have lled him in on the exact date. There shouldnt be nothing on or about when accusations are ying. I was tempted to send them a picture of a fty dollar bill. I was supposedly going 58 miles per hour in a 40 mph zone. Listen, when I lived there they didnt have a speed limit on Highland Drive. Once you got past The Dixie Coffee Cup, you could drive as fast as you wanted to! Ive seen Ricky Gene Stafford and Robert Earl Melton drag racing in front of Dr. Holmes house. Nicky Joe would be a blur going by in that sports car of his. Didnt nobody ever stop him! Shoot, Ive seen John Ingram and Larry Ridinger running faster than that down that road! When the highways iced over in the winter, David would take that rear engine Corvair of ours and see how many times he could spin it around going down Highland Drive. I guarantee you I wasnt going as fast as the night Eddie Carden roared though the red light in front of the Park Theatre. He skidded his tires the complete length of the Utoteem grocery store as he braked and slid up in front of the park bench where we were hanging out. Night patrolman Jim Dick Crews was among our group. As a matter of fact, Eddie almost hit the police car as he roared to a stop. Boy howdy, he got a lecture! But no ticket! Me and Diane Stoner took that bad curve out on the Shiloh road going more than 58 miles an hour. She was driving her dads pick-up. I was holding on for dear life! Where was your picture taker that night? Man, Id love to have a souvenir of that old Dodge up on two wheels. You ought to have seen the people slinging gravel as they pulled onto Highland Drive from Joe Chadwicks service station. Teenagers drove through Roe Alexanders Twin Pools parking lot faster than 58 miles per hour. David Mark could almost get up to that speed in the half of a mile it took us to get from the house to the high school. And Im not even going to tell you about the speed merchants thundering in and out of Franks Dairy Bar. I sent in the requested money. I was too bemused, confused and bewildered not to. Beside I had no idea who to protest to! I gured if my hometown needed the money that badly, I was obliged to help. The truth is that little burg has given me so much more than I could ever repay. Id send them a hundred times that amount if they needed it! You cant believe how the town took to me when I was growing up. It offered guidance, love, nurture, care. I understood even as an unsuspecting youth that it was pretty special, but it was not until years later, as the ravages of life tear at your beliefs, that I truly appreciated the blessing that had been mine. You have no idea the pride with which I tell people exactly where I am from. It was the best fty bucks I have spent in years. I just want the city to collect the same from David and Robert Earl, Diane, Ricky Gene and all those fellers that scratched off from Joe Chadwicks or raced through Roe Alexanders parking lot. Whats fair for the goose.. Ill tell you what was special about Police Chief Aaron Pinson back in our growing up days. When he stopped you for speeding, hed lean down close to the window and look you right in the eye. There is something very personal and non-confusing about that. Respectfully, Kes USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard I was supposedly going 58 miles per hour in a 40 mph zone. Listen, when I lived there they didnt have a speed limit on Highland Drive. Once you got past The Dixie Coffee Cup, you could drive as fast as you wanted to! HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert

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I would like to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for gifting me the knowledge, strength, and ability to carry out my assignment as the District 4 School Board Representative once again. I would also like to thank those who voted on August 14, 2012 and others who assisted in helping make this election a success. Thanks for your continued prayers and support. Your District 4 School Board Member, Billy C. Quinn, Jr. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid by Billy C. Quinn, Jr. for School Board, District 4 8292440 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S Letters A5 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 Its no secret that health care costs have been spiraling out of control for years. To ght back, your best bet is to be a well-informed consumer: Know the true costs of medical procedures, supplies and medications so you can bargain effectively; carefully anticipate and track medical expenses; and stay on top of your bills. But sometimes, even when you follow the rules you still can get burned. Ive heard many appalling stories about people even those with comprehensive insurance who have been denied benets, over-charged, sent to collections or even forced to le for bankruptcy because they couldnt pay their medical bills. Here are a few coping strategies: Carefully review each doctor, lab or hospital bill and match it against the Explanation of Benets statement that shows how much they were reimbursed by the insurance company. Also, watch for items that may have been charged to you by mistake such as: Medications, supplies, treatments or meals you didnt receive while hospitalized or getting an outpatient procedure. Duplicate charges for a single procedure (such as x-rays, MRIs and lab work), including those that had to be redone due to a technicians error. Charges for a full days hospitalization when you checked out early; or private room rates when you shared a suite. The summary hospital bill you were sent probably doesnt contain many details, so ask for an itemized bill along with a copy of your medical chart and a pharmacy ledger showing which drugs you were given during your stay. If youre having difculty paying a medical bill, dont simply ignore it. Like any creditor, doctors and hospitals often turn unpaid bills over to collection agencies, which will wreak havoc with your credit score. Contact creditors as soon as possible, explain your situation and ask them to set up an installment payment plan or work out a reduced rate. Many people with no insurance discover that theyre often charged much higher rates than those negotiated by insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid. Dont be afraid to ask for those lower rates and to work out a repayment plan just be sure to get the agreement in writing. Most doctors and hospitals would rather accept reduced payments than have to deal with collection agencies and possibly no reimbursement at all. Ask the hospitals patient liaison to review your case and see whether you qualify for nancial assistance from the government, a charitable organization or the hospital itself. Most will forgive some or all bills for people whose income falls below certain amounts tied to federal poverty levels. Also pursue this avenue with your doctor or other provider ideally before theyve begun collections. A few additional cost-savings tips: Ask whether your employer offers exible spending accounts, which let you pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and/or dependent care expenses on a pre-tax basis. Use online price-comparison services like Healthcare Blue Book and OutofPocket.com to research going rates for a variety of medical services. Unless its a true emergency, try to avoid emergency rooms and use an urgent care network facility afliated with your insurance company or ask your doctor for recommendations. Bottom line: Know what health services cost and dont be afraid to negotiate. Youll haggle over the price of a car why not your health? Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Dear Editor: After giving a lot of thought to the voter suppression going on in this state and other states after it was proved there was no fraud, I am beginning to wonder if ghting for and defending this country was worth it to all the people who have fought and died for democracy only to see a group of politicians elected by the people who thought that under no circumstances would even think about rigging the voting system. Well instead of taking care of the peoples business they decided they would take care of their own business which was to retain power and to get another president in ofce and I guarantee that he will have this country in WWIII within one year. Any time you see a draft dodger around military equipment that should be enough code for you. Even after this stunt they have pulled off and even if you decided to vote them out it is also possible that the machines are also rigged and guess what, it could be very hard to get rid of these people. You are probably already thinking my representative is such a nice guy, he wouldnt ever think of hurting me. Some are even bringing out their mama to prove to you how honest they are. My old daddy used to say, you can take a good dog and put him with a couple of sheepkilling dogs then guess what you wind up with but as a society are we going to accept this laying down. Are we so dumb we cant gure out whats going on? Only today when a news reporter asked Mr. Romney about his tax returns, he said basically that Americans are small-minded and didnt need to know about his tax returns .Of course he couldnt say it but among his friends he probably said the that the American people are dumber than a two-day-old monkey and all you gotta do is throw them a banana every once and awhile and they will be quiet and go along with you on anything. Voting is a very serious matter and some this time will be denied this right because they are old, poor or being a minority because of new restrictions that werent there in 2008. In closing it seems to me that some folks dont realize that they are next if they let this continue to happen. Most will not bother to nd out who these bad actors are and get rid of them, they prefer bananas. Ray Maiden Mexico Beach Dear Editor: A bill recently introduced by Rep. Steve SoutherlandH.R. 4150-would open-up areas of Gulf County to large amounts of taxpayer money to subsidize risky coastal development. Many groups and citizens concerned about wasteful government spending are working hard to raise awareness about the bill so that it does not become law. Back in the early 1980s, Congress recognized that Federal tax dollars were subsidizing high-risk development in oodprone coastal areas. So Congress passed the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA), which designated undeveloped areas along the US coast that were no longer eligible for Federal subsidies like ood insurance, beach nourishment, and disaster assistance. Much of the Indian Pass and Cape San Blas areas were rightly included. President Reagan signed the Act into law and praised its widespread support that included the American Red Cross, National Taxpayers Union, and major conservation groups. CBRA is considered a model piece of legislation, saving taxpayers over $1.3 billion so far. One of the things people really like about CBRA is that it does not infringe on private property rights at all. The law simply restores the free market by saying that if a landowner chooses to develop in one of these high-risk areas, they must do so with their own money and not that of the American taxpayer. But it turns out that having personal responsibility in high-risk coastal areas is expensive. People who own homes there dont want to pay the full market rate for private ood insurance, which is much higher than the subsidized government insurance. And they would rather have the government foot the bill for the pricy beach nourishment projects used to protect homes built too close to an eroding shoreline. Despite claims otherwise, there have been multiple reviews of these CBRA areas in Gulf County, and its been found that they clearly met the criteria and were rightly included. If passed, Rep. Southerlands bill would send tens of millions of dollars in government money into an area where Congress clearly determined that Federal subsidies were a wasteful expenditure. We have a nation that is increasingly upset about out-of-control government spending, so lets ask Congress to practice scal restraint and decline to open its checkbook to H.R. 4150 and the high-dollar, highrisk development it would promote. Christian Wagley Pensacola What happens when you cant pay your medical bills? JASON ALDERMAN CBRA designation should stand Shameful

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Health Solutions for Individuals, Families or Small Businessess Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Your Local Agency for Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER The Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce will be conducting vehicle safety checkpoints and DUI check points in August. The check points will be throughout the county to include Highway 98 near St. Joe Beach, Highway 98 and Garrison Avenue, C-30 Simmons Bayou, Highway 71 North of White City, Highway 22 and Highway 22A, Highway 71 and Westarm Creek, Highway 71 Dalkeith Area and Highway 71 near the Calhoun line. On 08/13/2012 Damon Bernard Walker was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear; the original charge was eeing and eluding and DWLSR. On 08/14/2012 a vehicle operated by Ryan Mitchell Duke, 37, was stopped for a traf c violation. When the deputy made contact with the driver he noticed the odor of an alcoholic beverage about his person. Duke was asked to perform several eld sobriety exercises which he did poorly on; he was arrested for DUI. His breath test results were .193 and .201 over twice the legal limit. On 080/14/2012 narcotics investigators conducted a roundup of several subjects wanted for sale of crack cocaine. Those arrested were Charles Edward Peterson, 54, one count of sale of crack cocaine; James Earnest Lacy, 59, three counts of sale of crack cocaine; James Edward Hamilton, 50, two counts of sale of crack cocaine; Willa Davis, 56, two counts sale of crack cocaine; Bernard Lamount Wilson, 55, two counts sale of crack cocaine; and Penny Marie Ramos, 25, six counts of sale of crack cocaine. On 08/14/2012 a vehicle operated by John Edward Burrows, 29, was stopped after the sheriffs of ce received complaints about him driving with a suspended license; he was arrested for driving on a suspended license. On 08/14/2012 Tony Joseph King, 46, was arrested for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. On 08/15/2012 Gary Scott Adkison, 44, was arrested on a warrant for failure to pay child support. On 08/17/2012 Davis Matos was arrested as he was being released from Gulf Correctional Unit on a warrant from New York. On 08/17/2012 Rodney Dewayne Adkison, 31, was arrested for driving on a suspended drivers license. On 08/19/2012 Steve Bernard Fennell, 47, was arrested for DUI; he refused to take a breath test. On 08/19/2012 Melissa Leona Rhodes, 27, was arrested at Gulf Correctional unit for possession of marijuana and introduction of contraband as she tried to smuggle marijuana in to the prison during visitation. On 08/19/2012 Timothy David Gainious was arrested for domestic battery; it is alleged he grabbed the victim by the arm pushed her down and hit her in the nose. On 08/20/2012 Christopher J. Jones turned himself in on a violation of probation warrant the original charge was domestic battery. Port St Joe Police Department Shayla Leighann Gay, 31, arrested for DWLSR Melissa Danielle Sims, 27, arrested for aggravated battery Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce ARREST LOG Special to The Star PANAMA CITY The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 8.2 percent in July 2012. This rate was up from 8.0 percent in June 2012. The July 2012 rate was 1.5 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 9.7 percent and below the state rate of 9.3 percent. Out of a labor force of 105,018, there were 8,569 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Overall our job market has been trending in the right direction despite slight uctuations from month to month. We are encouraged by the efforts of our local economic development partners and County Commissions to attract more businesses to the area, said Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. Right now are our unemployment rate is below both the state and the nation however we anticipate that might change as we face recent layoffs and enter into the slower tourism months. The July 2012 unemployment rates in the counties that comprise the Gulf Coast Workforce region were: Local unemployment increases slightly over the month Jul. 12 Jun. 12 Bay County 8.2 8.1 Franklin County 6.5 6.2 Gulf County 8.7 8.4

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Local The Star| A7 Thursday, August 23, 2012 Thank you Gulf County for your vote of I continue to ask your the upcoming General Election, as I ask to become your next Supervisor of Elections. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to Home George E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy, cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy. Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independence by optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. PORT from page A1 agency pot of money might be applicable to assisting the Port of Port St. Joe to update the port master plan. That master plan is in need of updating due to growth in the port footprint the past 18 months. The port development area combining St. Joe and Port Authority lands is now some 300 acres. There is a participatory agreement between St. Joe, the Port Authority and Genessee-Wyoming Railroad to push rail line to port land. There are two large-scale natural gas pumps on Port Authority land, electrical capability of up to 30 megawatts, the Planned Unit Development designation for the old paper mill site has been removed and the new collaboration with St. Joe changes the dynamics from less than two years ago. Eastern Shipbuilding has begun site work on the 20 acres of mill site it is leasing from St. Joe and the rst ship to be out tted in Gulf County is expected to arrive late in the year. Eastern is expected to ll up to 200 jobs in Gulf County and representatives from the company take applications at the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce twice a week. That is a very signi cant small port development footprint, said port director Tommy Pitts, who continues to work for the Port Authority at $1 per month. Most of the discussion is how do we proceed. Thats where we are at, how to move forward and nd the customers that will bring the jobs. St. Joe is proceeding on several fronts. Company senior vice president Jorge Gonzalez said the company was to the point of being able to rollout the new Port of Port St. Joe website and would bring the webpage for viewing and input at the next Port Authority meeting. The company is in the midst of its market analysis which will provide insight into what companies and industries target for the Port of Port St. Joe. He said the rail grant to fund the expansion and improvement of rail lines was moving ahead and he was close to providing drafts of the marketing plan for review and input. Eastern is moving along and work has begun on the site, Gonzalez said. When the cranes get here it will be exciting. We are trying to frame the opportunity (in the marketing plan). The port is all of us. We are shining a bright light on the entire port. With Gonzalez last Friday was Dr. Rick Harper, director of the Of ce of Economic Development and Engagement at the University of West Florida. Harpers of ce is charged, under Senate Bill 2156, to provide performance-based appropriations from a $30 million fund $10 million per year for three years to assist with economic development and environmental projects in the eight Florida counties impacted by the BP spill. The funds are intended, Harper said, as supplemental funding beyond any received by counties from other sources, such as the RESTORE Act. This is a closing fund to be used to provide incentives to businesses to bring jobs to Florida, Harper said, noting the funding is based on a per-job formula. We are eager to recruit projects to Gulf County and rural counties to the east. That incentive has to be the thing that pushes the project over the nish line. It is but not for funding. But not for these funds, the project would not happen. The emphasis in on expansion, recruitment and retention of businesses and jobs. He said some restrictions on spending the money such as household income thresholds have been relaxed to facilitate distribution of the funds. Harper said the Port of Port St. Joe would t into the niche of a geographydependent business, providing marine services to the oil industry, for example. You are likely to succeed in niches and one niche is servicing the underwater drilling industry, Harper said. The governor is high on ports. Hearing the plans for the Port of Port St. Joe sounds like it is in the sweet spot. We are looking for projects big enough to make a difference. This is essentially a zero percent loan which when the job performance threshold is met, the principal will be forgiven. Niche-based operations have been our focus, said Port Authority member Patrick Jones. Gonzalez said that Harper highlighted another potential pot of funding for port development, a pot that supplements the pots of funding potentially coming from BP oil spill nes the RESTORE Act facilitating federal action while Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi pursues a separate claim from BP. This (pot) is unique because it is geographic and it is unique because it is time-sensitive, Gonzalez said. OIL from page A1 circulating among the counties and the goal is to have it passed by all counties by Oct. 1. If it is unsuccessful, or if the counties begin ghting amongst themselves, there is a possibility that Gov. Rick Scott or the Legislature could step in and form their own committee to meet the requirements, FAC of cials said. I think some of the reason its set up the way it is right now is because the state didnt think we could do it, but they thought wed screw it up and they could have our money, Bay County Commissioner Mike Thomas said. The consortium will have at least one representative from each county and be responsible for the development of a state plan for Floridas share of the RESTORE Act dollars. Individual counties will have total control of their local allocation. This consortium has to prepare the plan, Holley said. Will there be competition for projects between the counties? You bet. With 23 counties combining in a single consortium, Panhandle of cials said they were concerned they would be outvoted by the peninsula counties and would lose out on state fund dollars. FAC representatives said they were working to address those concerns, which could be solved with a weighted voting system, but urged locals not to be distracted by details. The perfect de nition of a compromise is when everyone is equally dissatis ed, said Santa Rosa County Commissioner Jim Melvin, who spoke in favor of the consortium. Ecosystem The FAC vetted concerns from Rep. Steve Southerland, a Panama City Republican and major force in Washington behind the RESTORE Act, that the Gulf Coasts shing communities and smaller, rural counties would be overlooked in the process. Franklin County Commissioner Smokey Parrish said Franklin County has been particularly affected because of the large population that relies on the Gulf and Apalachicola Bay to make a living. Thats the base of our economy, Parrish said. Its all about the pristine value of our area. Were more concerned about our environment and our ecosystem. Parrish said RESTORE funding is needed to bring the Franklin County economy back to where it was before the spill. Theres no shrimp in Apalachicola Bay; there hasnt been in two years, Parrish said. We need studies to nd out whats going on. We need to take RESTORE dollars and gure out how to x it. Okaloosa County Commissioner Dave Parisot suggested addressing the economic losses felt by shing communities be carved out from the state plan, perhaps by setting aside a certain amount of money for sheries, instead of weighting the distribution formula to counties. I think we all need to go home and digest the draft and talk about it, he said. Key to the kingdom Gulf County Commissioner and former FAC President Bill Williams said the key to the kingdom lies in knowing the pots of money and where they ow. Williams also said he feels there is doubt at the state level as to whether the counties will be able to pull it off. I do think a lot of people, including the state, dont think we can do this, Williams said. The key is effectiveness, the key is implementation and the key is staying together; if we do that, well be ne. Williams, who has been involved with RESTORE since day one, said the process has gone from very few people understanding the bill to folks coming out of the woodwork looking for money. Weve got the opportunity to change the Panhandle and the state of Florida like no one has ever seen, Williams said. Our opportunity is through our numbers and our strategies. Between now and Oct. 1, FAC representatives will establish consortium framework, establish policy guidelines for the agency and conduct a preliminary legal analysis. The proposed budget for the transition period is $53,000, 75 percent of which will be paid for by the eight disproportionately affected counties and 25 percent by the remaining 15. The Details The ve affected states will split 35 percent of the RESTORE Act funds. In Florida the allotted amount is being split among the affected Gulf Coast counties based on the severity of oil spill impact and to be used for ecological and economic restoration of counties. A formula based on population, distance from the spill, miles of affected shoreline and other factors has been established by the Florida Association of Counties. Florida is unique in the RESTORE process as the only one of the ve Gulf Coast states to send the money directly to the affected counties. The eight disproportionately impacted counties Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla will receive 75 percent of the funds, with the remaining 15 coastal counties splitting 25 percent. The remaining money will be divided between research, a federally designed plan and state-designed and implemented plans.

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR TH E ENTIR E YE AR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, August 23 85 74 50 % Fri, August 24 85 75 30 % Sat, August 25 84 75 30 % Sun, August 26 83 75 30 % Mon, August 27 85 76 60 % T ues, August 28 85 75 20 % Wed, August 29 84 75 20 % 23 Mo 130pm 1.0 810pm 0.6 24 Tu 355am 1.0 327pm 0.7 1053am 0.6 630pm 0.6 25 We 352am 1.2 117pm 0.4 26 Th 419am 1.4 240pm 0.1 27 Fr 505am 1.7 349pm -0.1 28 Sa 602am 1.9 451pm -0.2 29 Su 704am 2.0 549pm -0.3 30 Mo 805am 2.1 639pm -0.3 31 Tu 901am 2.1 722pm -0.2 23 Mo 712am 1.4 657pm 1.2 1238am 0.3 118pm 0.7 24 Tu 735am 1.5 813pm 1.1 105am 0.5 220pm 0.6 25 We 803am 1.5 951pm 1.0 133am 0.7 336pm 0.5 26 Th 836am 1.6 200am 0.9 505pm 0.3 27 Fr 918am 1.6 629pm 0.1 28 Sa 1010am 1.6 739pm 0.0 29 Su 1113am 1.6 838pm -0.1 30 Mo 448am 1.3 1224pm 1.6 707am 1.4 929pm -0.2 31 Tu 505am 1.3 134pm 1.6 825am 1.4 1014pm -0.2 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Sa 1235am 1.0 1209pm 1.2 423am 0.9 547pm 1.0 2 Su 1200am 1.2 142pm 1.1 618am 0.8 430pm 1.0 3 Mo 1202am 1.3 746am 0.7 4 Tu 1220am 1.6 906am 0.6 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Sa 446am 1.4 441pm 1.6 1047am 0.8 1117pm 0.7 2 Su 459am 1.5 529pm 1.5 1125am 0.6 1136pm 0.8 3 Mo 513am 1.5 618pm 1.4 1203pm 0.6 1154pm 1.0 4 Tu 532am 1.6 710pm 1.4 1242pm 0.5 E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 8 Thursday, August 23, 2012 O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY By FELICIA KITZMILLER 522-5114 | @PCNHFelicia fkitzmiller@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH They might be concrete and rebar to a human, but to sh off Bay Countys coast the 40 structures lowered into the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday are a sanctuary. Using a $60,000 grant from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Bay County sank 40 arti cial reef structures in the Gulf about 10 nautical miles from St. Andrew Pass. The structures are placed in pods of four and scattered in 10 locations in the area. Bay County extension agent Scott Jackson said the reefs will attract snapper, grouper and bait sh. The thing thats neat about this project is weve got all these different types of reefs, Jackson said. Weve been getting a lot of snapper, but these should give us some different types of sh. The 40 structures were a mix of four-sided limestone pyramids, multilevel rock cylinders and rectangular concrete caves. As the crew of the Maranatha sank the structures, each weighing more than 4,000 pounds, the GPS coordinates were recorded and will be posted on the extensions website. There are about 230 arti cial reefs in Bay County and the surrounding area in various stages of development. Small, bait sh are attracted to the reefs quickly, sometimes in only a day or two, but larger sh take longer to locate the structures. A reef typically reaches maturity in four to ve years, Jackson said. Reefs are constructed to last for about 20 years but can be destroyed or abandoned before then. Were enlisting the help of shermen to help evaluate the quality of the reefs, Jackson said. The reefs commissioned through the FWC grant cost about $1,500 each. Finding the funding for a large number of reefs is difcult, Jackson said. We dont get the money to do this very often, he said. The money for the project was fronted by Bay County and will be reimbursed by FWC. Commissioner Bill Dozier said the development of arti cial reefs long has been a priority of the commission because of the economic effect on the county. Whether its for commercial shing or sport shing, its an enhancement to the industry, he said. For longevity you cant just keep taking, taking, taking and never give back. Arti cial reefs have about a $134 return on every dollar invested in Bay County, Jackson said. Bay County charter sherman Bobby Fuller said he has been shing the Gulf of Mexico off the Bay County coast for 17 years and was excited about the expansion of the arti cial reef network. We do have natural reefs, but they are covered and uncovered by storms, he said. By doing this, it builds the population to where we can sh. Increasing the number of sh also gives charter shermen more options so the same reefs arent being shed and the populations depleted. We need to have these places for next time, Fuller said. I dont want to kill it because it saves the day sometimes. This is more than fun to me; this is how I make a living. Bay County sinks 40 arti cial reefs Photos by ANDREW WARDLOW | The News Herald A worker with Walter Marine stands on an arti cial reef before it is lowered into the Gulf of Mexico about 10 nautical miles off Panama City Beach. Below, an arti cial reef is lowered into the Gulf. THE PORT ST. JOE STAR FIND US ON FACEBOOK @PSJ_STAR FOLLOW US ON TWITTER The MBARA king sh tournament will be going on this weekend, so hundreds of boats will be in our waters, making for some crowded boat ramps and long lines. The offshore grouper bite is the best bet going with a amberjack in the mix. Most anglers are shing the hard bottom 40 plus miles due south from Cape San Blas. Offshore Inshore As the rain continues, St. Joe Bay will remain stained and muddy this week. Although the bad weather is upon us again this week, the shing is rather good. Great catches of trout and ounder are reported around the Pig Island area. Try shing the deeper channels for mid-afternoon action.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com A Section Healthy Lifestyles We say it all the time, Boy if I could just start exercising. So, we put on our cross trainers and head out, only to and our minds want more. Yoga is a low impact, easy calms and focuses the mind. Yoga achieves these successes through Asanas or poses and Breathe work. Using your such as a Sun Salutation, targets major muscle groups, pressure. As we end each session with Savasana, our senses and closing the eyes, we slowly rejoin the rest of the hectic world with a sense of completeness and satisfaction, eagerly looking forward to our next yoga class. By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA The clock has struck midnight, and the carriage has reverted back to a pumpkin. So who wants a slice of pumpkin pie? Wewahitchka football coach Dennis Kizziah and the Gators will be hard-pressed to duplicate last years run into the Class 1A playoffs, but Kizziah remains self-assured the team can turn the upcoming football season into something positive. Kizziah will be escorting a young, inexperienced team to the eld every Friday night. What we do is just encourage them to continue to work, Kizziah said. The only way we get better is continue to work and work hard. Last years team started off and lost the kickoff classic. Then we lost to Port St. Joe and we lost to Vernon. But we kept preaching, We can do this. We can do it. Youve got to believe in what were doing. Just keep working. Finally things started going our way. We won a close game or two, and all of a sudden wed won seven games in a row. Were approaching it the same way. The kids know we have a young team, but at the same time we want them to know that we can compete. Were not going to lay it all on being young. Were going to do our very best and compete hard to win every game. The Gators will nd it dif cult to approach last years gaudy offensive numbers. Theryl Brown, who rushed for 2,226 yards and scored 37 touchdowns, was tabbed the Class 1A player of the year as a senior. Quarterback Justin Flowers accounted for nearly 1,600 yards of total offense, but he, too, was a senior last year. Also gone is last years leading tackler, Corey Walding. The burden will rest largely on a new set of playmakers if the team wants to return to the postseason. There are two noteworthy returnees, though, who will be featured prominently on both sides of the ball: tailback Jalyn Addison and linebacker Brandon Price. Addison ran for 734 yards on 74 carries last year, and he also contributed in the passing game with 13 receptions for 227 yards. His presence will take some pressure off sophomore Rashard Ranie, who is taking over as the full-time quarterback. Hes a lot stronger and hopefully a step or two quicker, Kizziah said of Addison. He worked extremely hard in the offseason, and in camp hes been working very hard. He knows a lot lies on his shoulders. If he can stay injury-free and carry the ball 20, 25 times a game, thats what we want. Kizziah said Ranie was on the eld a lot last year both as a free safety and a backup quarterback. Kizziah called Ranie a very good athlete who stands 6-foot-1, 180 pounds. He thrown the football really well, and hes got a lot of football savvy, Kizziah said. We throw it all at him. He played on JV, and they ran the same thing that we run varsity-wise. When their season was over, we moved him up and he got a lot of snaps last year with the varsity. He played a lot of defense and offense last year. Kizziah said the Gators have good size across the offensive and defensive lines, but he cautioned those groups are inexperienced and dont feature a lot of depth. He highlighted sophomore Jared Melvin, a 280-pound right tackle who is a very strong man. The left tackle, junior Trey Bowles, is 6-1, 235. Starting left guard Gage Gaskin is 6-1, 220. Kizziah hopes his team will play a physical brand of football. Weve got probably 15 kids who play on everything, Kizziah said. They play on all special teams, on offense and on defense. What weve preached is we try to play ironman football. We preach to them every day about conditioning. We work em, man. The kids that get through our camp are tough kids, I promise you. Last year we were in so much better shape than the teams we played. Wed be down three, four touchdowns going into the fourth quarter in several games. All of a sudden it was time to turn the switch on and wed end up winning by a touchdown. Wed score three, four touchdowns in the fourth quarter. A lot of that went to conditioning. Our kids believe in that, that theyre never out of a ballgame. Price highlights the Wewa defense, returning for his senior campaign after collecting 87 tackles last year. Hes back, and he really had a great offseason, Kizziah said. Hell be our (weakside) linebacker. Hes just hard to block. He sees things really well, and the rst step is key. Whatever his keys are, he works hard in practice to get those down. He believes in those keys we teach him, and that gets him to the football. Kizziah noted another two newcomers whom he expects to contribute. Tristen Bryant will step in at strong safety, and 225pound Josh Hurd will be a blocking back on offense and a noseguard on defense. Fortunately, those kids are very aggressive kids, so you put them somewhere they can use that aggression, Kizziah said. Go to the ball and make plays or block somebody. Fortunately these two kids, each one of them has knowledge about the game. Were taking them and using that aggression. Theyre doing a good job for us. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Roman Quinn didnt wait long for his rst allstar selection. Quinn, playing in the Class A short-season New York-Penn League, was selected to play in the leagues All-Star Game last Tuesday. The game was played in front of 5,897 at Mahoning Valleys Eastwood Field in Niles, Ohio, according to Scott Dykstra, a contributing writer for MLB.com. Quinn, selected as a shortstop, had two hits, including his rst professional home run, an inside-the-park homer, as his National League team beat the American League 8-1. Quinn, playing for the Williamsport (Pa.) Crosscutters, entered the game as a pinch hitter in the eighth inning. Quinn faced Hudson Valley right-hander and Tampa Bay Rays rstrounder Taylor Guerrieri and the Phillies secondround selection from 2011 laced a shot through the hole at shortstop and started running, Dykstra reported. Once I hit the ball, I thought it was an easy double, Quinn told Dykstra. So I just took off and saw that they were waving me in. Gosh, it was just really unexplainable. Quinn had an RBI single in the ninth to nish 2 for 2 with a game-high 2 RBIs. Quinn had nine triples entering the All-Star Game and talked to Dykstra about getting his rst over-the-fence home run. Its a big deal, obviously, Quinn said of his inside-the-park home run. But at the same time, it loses a little bit because I know its not going to be showing up on my stats sheet. Quinn is proving his all-star bona des while learning a generally new position and hitting approach, according to a story that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer just before the All-Star game. In the story, Staff Writer Marc Narducci reports how the short season in Class A ball has been a learning one for Quinn. Not only has Quinn had to learn a new position, he also took up switch-hitting after signing with the Phillies. The 5-foot-10, 170pounder, a center elder at Port St. Joseph (sic) High School (Fla.), is playing shortstop now. A natural right-handed batter, he has become a switch-hitter because the Phillies wanted to make use of his speed, Narducci writes. Quinn did play some at shortstop as an underclassman, but was a fulltime center elder as a senior. Quinn experimented with switch hitting during summer ball before he was drafted. Heading into the weekend before the All-Star Game, Quinn was batting .277 for the Crosscutters with an on-base percentage of .353 as leadoff hitter, according to the teams website. Quinn also had 17 stolen bases in 21 attempts and had nine triples. The kid never hit left-handed and is facing college pitchers in our league, and it is pretty special what he is doing this year, said Williamsport first-year manager Andy Tracy to Narducci. He is a game-changer, and when he gets on base we are a different club. Quinn was the 66th overall selection in 2011 and the fastest player in the draft. His signing for $775,000 went down to the deadline. Quinn also had a scholarship offer from Florida State University. Quinn, the Phillies No. 8 prospect according to rankings by The Inquirer, understands he is a work in progress at the plate and in the field, Narducci wrote. With switch-hitting, I am getting more comfortable each game, Quinn said before a recent 7-1 loss to the visiting Connecticut Tigers. Ive been having my ups and down with it and have to keep with it. In the game against the Tigers, Quinn was 3 for 5 with a double, a standup triple and an RBI, all batting left-handed. One of his most impressive plays was a groundout to short, a routine ball that he almost beat out, Narducci reported. He has the ability to change a game in a number of ways, Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan told Narducci. We see him developing as a switch-hitter and being an offensive threat from both sides. Page 9 Thursday, August 23, 2012 PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER Roman Quinn is learning how to switch-hit on the y during his rst season of professional baseball. Quinn shines in all-star game Wewa will just keep on working Star Staff Report Both county high school football teams will tackle and block somebody in another colored jersey for the rst time this fall when they participate in Kickoff Classics the next two days. Port St. Joe will be at Cottondale, with action beginning at 7 p.m. ET Friday with the Tiger Shark junior varsity playing one quarter against the Cottondale junior varsity. The Tiger Shark varsity will play one half against Cottondale and one half against R.F. Munroe before Cottondale and Munroe nish the night with a half. Wewahitchka will host Blountstown at 7 p.m. CT tonight at Gator Field. There will be a special ceremony at 6:45 p.m. to dedicate the new scoreboard to Tim Strange, a former Gator player who was paralyzed after being hurt on the eld. KICKOFF CLASSICS TONIGHT The only way we get better is continue to work and work hard. Last years team started off and lost the kickoff classic. Then we lost to Port St. Joe and we lost to Vernon. But we kept preaching, We can do this. We can do it. Youve got to believe in what were doing. Just keep working. Finally things started going our way. We won a close game or two, and all of a sudden wed won seven games in a row. Were approaching it the same way. Wewahitchka football coach Dennis Kizziah

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Local A10 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The numbers continue to multiply for the Shark 100 Club. Entering the clubs 26th year in existence, participation and enthusiasm is up this year, president Willie Ramsey said, and the total contributions to Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School athletics continues to move north of $100,000. This past year, the members were a catalyst for $7,592.54, which after minor expenses for hats and programs, goes entirely toward supporting Tiger Shark athletics, Ramsey said. The membership dollars are multiplied each year by the biggest fundraiser of the calendar, the annual chicken dinner. The Shark 100 Club purchases all the chickens and xins and ensures they are cooked to delicious perfection, and athletes sell the tickets and receive all money from ticket sales for their respective program. Last spring, 765 chicken dinners were sold, generating almost $4,600 for Tiger Shark athletic programs, with the Shark 100 Club forking over less than half that amount to fund the dinner. Community support is the key, Ramsey said. This requires a team effort. And this year I see a little additional excitement. The Shark 100 Club sells memberships in four categories: Tiger Shark: for a donation of $100, the individual, businesses or organization receives one Shark 100 hat, two reserved seats to home football games, program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Mako Shark: for a contribution of $250, an individual, businesses or organization receives two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Bull Shark: for a contribution of $500, individuals, businesses or organizations receive two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, two reserved seats at home basketball games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Sand Shark: for a $50 donation, parents of Tiger Shark athletes receive one Shark 100 hat and program recognition. The following are members of the Shark 100 Club: Rich and Liz Brenner $250, James and Rita Simmons $250, Matthew and Kara Taylor $100, Bayside Florist & Gifts $100, Waterfront Auto Sales LLC $100, Bay Wash of Port St. Joe $100, June and Eddie Davis $100, Gulf Coast Real Estate Group, Sherry Thacker and Blair Morgan $250, Dan Christie $100, The Pickels Family $100, Kerigan Marketing Associates Inc. $100, Mel Magidson Jr., P.A. $100, Blake Rish (Haughty Heron) $100, Jim Norton $100, Andy Smith $100, Aaron Farnsley $100, Ronald Pickett $100, Tommy Lake $100, Capital City Bank $100, Roberson & Associates $250, Sisters Restaurant and Preble Rish. Anyone interested in joining the Shark 100 Club may submit their contribution to the Shark 100 Club, P.O. Box 524, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Voters of Gulf County For those in Gulf County that supported me in the Primary Election, thank you. Your show of support is humbling. For the many of you that will now be voting in the general election, I hope that you will consider me for your Supervisor of Elections. My past experience in business and Supervisor of Elections by working diligently with the people I serve. It is so nice to live in a county that has been so receptive and encouraging. Mr. Shawn Butler has proven to be a tough competitor and I have the sincerest respect for him. It takes courage to put your name before the public and I admire his well ran efforts. Thank you Shawn for running a race with dignity and honor. In the general election, November, you have my assurance that I will continue to run with that standard. I look forward to answering any questions or listening to your suggestions. Dont hesitate to call me at 850-647-2564 or email me at electwyvonne@hotmail.com Thank you and God Bless America...... voting is our inherited right....so VOTE! Democratic candidate for Supervisor of Elections, Gulf County (Pd.Pol.Ad.) THANK YOU GULF COUNTY It has been an honor and privilege to walk the streets and knock on doors of the voters in Gulf County. I have enjoyed meeting with you and seeking your con sideration in this years election. Although I was not successful in winning the election, my campaign was a success. I got to meet and talk with a lot of wonderful people across this great county. In life, we all go through times of discouragement. us into the people we should become. It has truly been an honor to serve you the last twelve years, and I am looking forward to continuing to serve you for many years to come. Thanks again for your support! Brian Hill Candidate for Gulf County Judge Paid by Brian Hill For County Judge (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Prompt Dependable Same Day Service Local A10 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 GRL Football sign-ups to end Saturday Star Staff Report From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET Saturday, Aug. 25. will be the nal time to sign up to play football for the Port St. Joe Dolphins or Jaguars of the Gene Raf eld Football League. The Dolphins will eld a team of 7-, 8and 9-yearold players. The Jaguars are 10, 11 and 12 years old. The sign-up will be at the Port St. Joe Fire Station on Williams Avenue. Please be sure to bring a copy of the players birth certi cate, proof of a recent physical exam and $60. If a physical was not done recently, one should be scheduled right away. Immediately following sign-up, the players will be tted for and receive their practice equipment. First practice will be at 5:15 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27, with the players dressed in shorts and helmets. One week later, the teams will go into full pads and the real fun begins. Parents should be assured that Gene Raf eld Football League coaches are an experienced group that not only know the game but always have the safety of your child in mind. They know how to teach our youngsters the proper way to play the game. Sportsmanship, responsibility and teamwork are emphasized. Sign up your young athlete this Saturday and let them have the opportunity to participate in this outstanding program. Shark 100 Club celebrating 26 years TIM CROFT | The Star The Shark 100 Club is celebrating its 26th year, during which the club has donated more than $100,000 to Port St. Joe Tiger Shark athletics. FIND MORE NEWS AND SPORTS AT WWW.STARFL. COM

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By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A career came full circle on Monday for Loretta Costin. Having begun her career as a teacher at Rutherford High School in Spring eld and spending the past three decades in an assortment of positions at the Florida Department of Education, the new director of Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Center was all smiles Monday evening as she greeted students for the opening of the fall semester. We are getting it kicked off, Costin said. This is a great job. Its great to work with students again. To be back with students, I love it. It is rewarding. I want to see the campus grow and play an important role in the community. And I think it will play an important part in economic development. Costin chose to begin the semester as on the main campus in Panama City, with a party, complete with cookies, brownies and piping hot pizzas. Although the students might have been somewhat bashful about digging in, Costin was like a sprinter in the blocks. A primary goal is to reach out to the high schools a fair percentage of the almost 350 students enrolled for the fall at Gulf/Franklin are dual-enrollment high school students and highlight to those students not enrolled what the college offers. In particular, Costin said, she wants to raise awareness among those students and the community have been somewhat bashful about digging in, Costin was like a sprinter in the blocks. A primary goal is to reach out to the high schools a fair percentage of the almost 350 students enrolled for the fall at Gulf/Franklin are dual-enrollment high school students and highlight to those students not enrolled what the college offers. In particular, Costin said, she wants to raise awareness among those students and the community A primary goal is to reach out to the high schools a fair percentage of the almost 350 students enrolled for the fall at Gulf/Franklin are dual-enrollment high school students and highlight to those students not enrolled what the college offers. In particular, Costin said, she wants to raise awareness among those students and the community COMMUNITY www.starfl.com Thursday, August 23, 2012 B Page 1 Section A new year at Gulf/Franklin Center FairPoint boosts area Internet speeds Special to The Star Port St. Joe area residents and businesses have faster broadband Internet speeds available from FairPoint Communications. These improved speeds are a result of FairPoints signi cant upgrades to its network and will provide up to 15 Mbps, depending on location. FairPoint serves almost 11,000 customers in the Port St. Joe area. FairPoint is connecting more customers to the people, information and opportunities they care about, now even faster, plain and simple, said Lisa Hood, senior vice president of the Telecom Group. We have a range of packages to suit all types of Internet users and budgets from our standard package, which is recommended for basic Internet users, to our ultra package, which is recommended for online gaming, streaming video and other high-bandwidth activities. Customers should call FairPoint at 877954-8508 to learn more about the new Internet speed options, nd out what speeds they qualify for and choose a plan that best suits their needs. FairPoint offers broadband packages as low as $19.99 per month with a new one-year term commitment. Some customers might be eligible for free speed upgrades or FairPoints ber broadband service, available in select locations, which delivers impeccable speeds and reliability. Additional information about FairPoint products and services is available at www. FairPoint.com. You also can connect with FairPoint on Twitter (http://www.twitter. com/myfairpoint) and Facebook (http:// www.facebook.com/myfairpoint). Star Staff Report Young country star Lee Brice, whose stunning second album, Hard 2 Love (Curb Records), has rocketed him to the top of the charts, has been selected to headline this falls Florida Seafood Festival. Brice will take the stage on Saturday night, Nov. 3, and is expected to draw a huge crowd to the main stage at Battery Park in Apalachicola. A four-time Academy of Country Music nominee, his highest-charting single A Woman Like You, reached No. 1 in April 2012. He also had Billboards Top Country Song of 2010 with Love Like Crazy, the title track to his 2010 debut album of the same name. The song spent 56 weeks on the Hot Country Songs chart, peaking at No. 3 and setting a record for the longest run in the charts history. Besides his own material, he has co-written singles for Garth Brooks, Adam Gregory, Eli Young Band and Tim McGraw. JARRETT ELLIOT | Special to The Star Jasmine Elliott, daughter of Jarrett Elliott, met American Idol runner-up Lauren Alaina on July 31 while in the Piggly Wiggly in Apalachicola. Alaina was staying on St. George Island while on a vocal cord rest. She is touring with Sugarland. Alaina was in the Piggly Wiggly and was spotted by cashier Maegan Andrews, who asked for a picture, but Alaina said she would rather come back the next day when she could be dressed better, The next day, in the pouring rain, the 17-year-old singing sensation did as promised and came back to have pictures taken. Alainas debut album Wild ower was No. 2 on Billboards Top Country Album chart and No. 5 on the Billboard Top 200. MEETING AN IDOL Lee Brice to headline Seafood Festival LEE BRICE See GULF/FRANKLIN B5 Childhood memories of local pioneers Editors note: This is another in a continuing series on local pioneers. This story, the second part of which appears this week, concerns how the community of Jones Homestead came to be. This is a story shared by a granddaughter of one of the children raised by the Jones family By BEVERLY MOUNT-DOUDS Dr. Adolphus Winston Jones was born at Columbus, Ga., Sept. 20, 1864, the son of Joseph and Mary E. Jones. He was given a dental education by the Seaboard Railroad and for several years he was employed at the State Hospital and practiced dentistry in River Junction. He also carried the R.F.D. mail from there for four years. He moved to Port St. Joe in 1908 where he lived on a homestead several miles south of town, practicing his profession here and in Franklin and Liberty counties. He built his present home in 1918. He and Miss Ada Belle Rogers of Smyrna section near River Junction were married in 1894. They raised a large family of children of their own and took care of a number of motherless children. Dr. Jones and Ada Belle raised, six sons, Henry, Rutherford, Marcellus, George W. and Clyde W. and Richard B. Jones; and one daughter, Mrs. Sarah (Jones) Johnson. Here is the childhood memoirs of Katherine Lombard (as told to her daughter Kathy Freeman), stepdaughter to George Jones. To my dearest Mother, I pursued this project as a tribute to you who along with Dad provided me with memories of a happy childhood. Kathy The Depression deepens The depression affected everybody. When the train went into Port St. Joe, men would sneak rides on it. They rode in seeking work. Grandpa had a car and took us riding from time to time. When he passed men walking down the road searching for a job, he stopped and took them as far as he could. It was a terrible time! Grandpa was older and there was a new dentist in town. He still had work but not as much. We always had food to eat..Grandmas canned food and seafood, mainly sh. PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHY FREEMAN Before becoming Miss Gulf County, Ethel Milstead was crowned Miss Port St. Joe in 1934. See HOMESTEAD B6

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B2 | The Star OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Meet the adorable Susan, a 17# 8yr Shih Tzu. Susan is very friendly and playful for her age. She loves attention from everyone and is very attentive. She walks very well on her leash and knows the commands of sit and stay. This little girl is housebroken, cat friendly and is a sweet as they come. Susan would make a great companion for a senior or someone that just needs a friend. WE ARE IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH SOME GENERAL MAINTANCE, CLEANING, PAINTING ECT VOLUNTEERS ARE ALSO NEEDED FOR PET SOCIALIZATION AND FOSTER HOMES. SCHOOL CREDIT AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. We are now proud partners with www.petsforpatriots.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Our shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! IF YOU ARE MISSING A PET, PLEASE CHECK WITH US! Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society Thursday, August 23, 2012 Star Staff Report The GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc. will hold an auction at 9 a.m. CT on Saturday, Oct. 27, at Lake Alice Park. Items are needed for this auction. If you have anything that you would like to donate to the auction, we will take almost anything, and will pick up the items. The Club is also selling tickets for Desserts for a Year. Tickets are $5 each, and the winner will receive a homemade dessert made by members of the Club each month for a year. Drawing for the Desserts for a Year will be done during the upcoming auction. If you would like to donate any items or purchase tickets for the Desserts for a Year, call either Patty Fisher at 639-9794 or Dianne Semmes at 639-5345/227-6425. All proceeds from these projects will go to scholarships for students at Wewahitchka High School, as well as various projects to help support our community. Star Staff Report A class on eBooks will be held at the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Gulf County Library 1-2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, in the librarys meeting room. The class will teach participants how to download free eBooks to your Kindle, Nook, iPad or other device. Class size for this free class is limited so registration is urged. Call 229-8879 to register and reserve your seat. Star Staff Report The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 1. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be served at 12 noon CT. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a welllled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering, held on the Saturday before Labor Day, strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. For more info, call Ludine Riddle at 974-8438, Star Staff Report Gulf County Senior Citizens, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of non-perishable foods for their low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for clients that love to play bingo several times a week. Hot, nutritious noon meals are provided Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and older. Transportation may be available to meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to the sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items listed above can call Debbie at 229-8466. Star Staff Report Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will close its Port St. Joe satellite location as of Sept. 20. Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will be available for your continued orthopedic care at its other locations. For appointments, call 850526-3236 or 850-229-1177 If you would like copies of records you can contact the TOC of ce at 850-8778174 or Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic, 3334 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 400, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Star Staff Report On July 20, Wanda Wheeler, a long-time resident of Port St. Joe, suffered a massive lifechanging stroke. The family has established an account at Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union in Wandas name to help defray medical costs for her ongoing care and long-term recovery. Wheeler is currently employed at Bo Knows Pest Control and has worked for Watson Brothers Construction and Monumental Fabrication. Any donations for Wheeler are greatly appreciated. Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engaged Jimmy and Dianne Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University in 2010. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in Dec. 2012. Jessica is currently employed as a second grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, and a 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is currently employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012 at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with a reception to follow at the Centennial Building. Meghan Williams, Mathew Peek to wed Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Williams and the late Mrs. Susan Porter Gaylor would like to announce the engagement and the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Meghan Elizabeth Williams, to Mathew Jacob Peek, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Peek of Grif n, Georgia. Meghan is the granddaughter of Ms. Bobbie Watts Marshall of Port St. Joe and the late Jack Watts of Hawaii, the late Mr. and Mrs. Sam Williams of Blakely, Georgia, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Farmer of Wewahitchka and Mr. and Mrs. Roger Beasley of Wewahitchka. Matt is the grandson of Ms. Mary Carver and Mr. John Floyd, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Peek of Thomaston, Georgia. On Sept. 15, 2012, the ceremony will be at Long Avenue Baptist Church at 3:30 p.m. ET. Reception to follow at Oak Grove Church. All family and friends are invited. After their honeymoon, Meghan and Matt will be living in Grif n, Ga. Wewahitchka Womans Club to hold auction Senior citizens in need of donations Annual Noma Community reunion Sept. 1 Library to hold eBooks class Bank account established to assist Wanda Wheeler Orthopedic of ce in Port St. Joe to close www star .com

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AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com REBECCA L. BECKY NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Pol. Adv.approved & paid for by Becky Norris, Dem., for Clerk of Court (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Thank you for allowing me to continue serving you as your Clerk of Court; it is very humbling and an extreme honor. I am truly blessed. Respectfully, Rebecca Becky Norris Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Special to The Star The rst week of school has come and gone. It is amazing to see our students grow and change from year to year. It is also very exciting to see new little faces with backpacks as big as their little bod ies. The bright smiles and their en thusiasm for school will make any teacher work hard. The Faith Christian School staff works as a team to produce Christcentered students who are wise, healthy and well adjusted. Every staff member works independently within the team; using his or her God-given talents and tools to attain this goal. It is not too late to enroll for the 20122013 school year. Call the ofce at 229-6707 for more information. Scholarships are available. The 2011-2012 yearbooks have arrived. Stop by the front ofce for your copy. The yearbook editor, Jan ice Evans, and her staff have once again presented a fabulous book of memories. Special to The Star Gulf Coast State College will offer new health care programs starting this fall with an Associate in Science Degree. Were very excited to be able to offer these programs. Theres a lot of interest and students can nd jobs right here, said Libby McNaron, coordinator of Surgical Services. The Endoscopy Technician program is new, and the Central Sterile Processing Technician and Surgical Technology programs will be included. This is the rst time any of the 28 colleges in the Florida College System has offered the Endoscopy Technician program. Were the rst in the state of Florida, McNaron said. Endos copy Techs work in GI Labs (Gas trointestinal) and work with En doscopy rigid scopes. Gulf Coast is one of only three colleges in Florida to offer the Central Sterile Processing Technician program. that was re cently changed from a vocational to college certicate and now qual ies for Pell Grant funding, making it more affordable and accessible to students. Central Sterile Processing graduates work in the sterile pro cessing areas of hospitals, out patient surgical centers or physi cian ofces where they clean and prepare instruments, McNaron explained. Without these types of pro grams, its basically on-the-job training, but now these technicians can go in with great preparation, she said. The Surgical Technology pro gram prepares students to become members of the surgical team. They work in operating rooms, pre paring the sterile eld and passing instruments to surgeons and other surgical team members. For more information, contact McNaron at (850) 873-3551 or visit www.gulfcoast.edu. Special to The Star If you missed your se nior portrait appointment, call the photographer at 769-6277 to schedule your portraits. If you just want the formal pose only, we will be have make-up sessions on Wednesday, Aug. 28, at the school. There will be a $15 sitting fee. You may have your por traits taken by any photog rapher you choose.However, your formal portrait for the yearbook must be taken by Ro-Mo Photo. If you want a formal, yearbook only pose, contact Mr. Taylor in Room 718 prior to Wednesday. Wednesday, Aug. 28, will be fall picture day for grades 9-11. On Thursday, Aug. 29, fall pictures for grades 7-8 will be taken. Star Staff Report For many years, students from Port St. Joe High School have attended the South Florida Leader ship Training Camp (SFLTC) in Davie. This sum mer, Carley Clements, president of the Student Government Association, and Nicolette Haddock, treasurer, attended Eagle Advanced Leadership Training Camp. In order to attend this camp, a camper must have already attended SFLTC. Carley and Nicolette attended SFLTC last summer, where Megan Gannon, 2010-2011 SGA president, was selected to be a junior counselor. Last summer, Carley was selected to be a mem ber of the Honor Council for SFLTC, which has only happened one other time at Port St. Joe High, when Gannon won the honor in 2008. This summer, Carley also won the honor council for Camp Eagle. She is the rst student from Port St. Joe to ever win this prestigious award. The honor council awards are given out by the counselors and are given to students who demonstrate the characteristics of a true leader. Congratulations Carley and Port St. Joe High School SGA for con tinuing the legacy of leadership at Port St. Joe High School. The Lions Tale School News The Star| B3 Thursday, August 23, 2012 The Lions TALE SGA continues legacy PSJHS to hold portrait days GCSC offers new programsSPECIAL TO T HE STAR Nicolette Haddock, Carley Clements and Megan Gannon.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Dinner.5:00 6:00 pm AWANA.6:00 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry6:15 7:30 pm Prayer/Bible Study.6:30 7:30 pm Read the Bible for Life Class6:15 7:30 pm Nursery..6:00 7:30 pm SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM 10:30 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE T IME 9 11 AM M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM W EDNE S DAY : MEN S B I B LE S TUDY 8 AM & WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Special to The Star We thank the following churches and the community for their Christian outpouring of love, participation, donations and kindly responding to our request for help to support the bene t program on Aug. 12 for Sister Jean Whitley-Thompson. We are grateful for your participation, and your presence truly helped made the program a success. Again, we thank the below listed churches and individuals for your donations to assist Sister Jean Whitley-Thompson with the repairing to the roof of a house for her to have a safe place to live. In addition to the public offering received, we thank the community for a total of $1,930.90 in donations. First stage: Temporary roof top Individuals: Brother Threadwill, Panama City, $20; Brother Leon Campbell, Panama City, $10; Deacon Raymond Rogers, materials, $40; Deaconess Amy Rogers, $20; and Elder Donald Nickson, $20. Second stage: Bene t Program New Bethel Baptist Church, PSJ, $40; New Bethel AME Church, PSJ, $50; Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church, PSJ, $75; Thompson Temple Holiness Church, PSJ, $50; Church of God In Christ, PSJ, $25; Amazing Grace Apostolic Church, PSJ, $25; Victory Temple Holiness, PSJ, $50; North Port St. Joe Adult Community Choir, PSJ, $100; Rev. Jesse Hawkins (Tallahassee), $100; Elder David Wood, $5; Greater Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church, Tallahassee, the Rev. Dr. Craig Riley, Pastor, $700. Annual Mens Day at Zion Fair Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will observe their 51st annual Mens Day at 11 a.m. ET on Sunday. Elder Willie Chambers of Greater Deliverance in Panama City will speak. The Rev. Wilson Hall and the Zion Fair family invite you to come and have a blessed time in the Lord. Tent Revival to feature Evangelist Thomas Boozer There will be a Salvation and Healing Tent Revival at 1249 Hwy. 22 South in Wewahitchka. The revival will be nightly, excluding Sundays, at 7:30 p.m. CDT. Evangelist Thomas Boozer will preach the word of God. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information call (229) 465-3312. Come expecting your miracle. Ladies Fall Bible Study at FUMC FUMC Fall Bible Study will begin Wednesday, Sept. 5. There is a Season: Finding Contentment in Every Season of Life, written by Laurie Cole. Cole will help to recognize and understand Gods purpose for each season of our lives. The wisdom we gain will allow us to grow in our walk with Him, to know Him more intimately and to rediscover His glorious and meaningful plan for our lives. There will be fellowship and refreshments. Study books may be purchased for $15 in the church of ce or on the rst day. For more information, call the church of ce at (227-1724.) Women Fashioned by God program A Women Fashioned by God program will be at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church at 7 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 8. During this program, local community women will be honored. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information, see Sister Freddie Davis, program coordinator. Annual Women Day at Philadelphia Primitive Annual Women Day will be at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on Sunday, Sept. 16. Mother Patricia Mayes of Crawfordville will be the guest speaker. An inspirational and motivational service is planned. Drummond Family at New Harvest The Drummond Family will be in concert at 10:30 a.m. CT Sunday, Sept. 23 at New Harvest Fellowship Assembly of God Church, 1800 N. State Highway 71 in Wewahitchka. Special to The Star On Sunday, The Masters Men will lead both the 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. worship services at First United Methodist Church. This group of men began to sing in Milton when the Rev. Fulcher was serving there at First United Methodist Church. This is a great opportunity to hear some excellent gospel music and you want to be sure to invite someone to come worship with you. The Masters Men, a Southern Gospel quartet, was founded in late 1995 as the Men of Woodbine. The Masters Men Quartet emerged from that original group. What began as a Thursday night sing-along became a music ministry the Lord continues to bless in amazing ways. Throughout the past 17 years, they have performed more than 800 concerts and have released six projects, Glory to His Name, Im Free Again, Waiting for His Return, Farmers Opry House Favorites, Nothing But The Oldies and Tryin To Make It Home. The quartet has competed in several national talent contests and achieved rst place nishes in both the Suwannee River Jubilee and Gold City Homecoming. For more information on the Masters Men Quartet, visit www.mastersmenquartet.com. Faith BRIEFS FAITH Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com The Masters Men to visit area At no time does God withdraw His love, just because we sin. He will apply a little pressure at times to restore our fellowship again. The Holy Spirit lives within, but not every time will this keep us from sin. Getting out of fellowship is through the hardness of our heart. This has caused much sin, and our fellowship to depart. Many times He takes things that cause us to part. We have to be stripped of pride many times to make a new start. Ask with a contrite heart, return to me your power that once by grace I knew; forgive my sin that grieved your heart, and help me to be true. If you lived it once you can do it again. Its only a matter of asking forgiveness, and turning from your sin. Billy Johnson Whom God forgives, He also restores Thanks received for Jean Whitley-Thompson bene t program

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National Formidable Footprint Hurricane Exercise Saturday August 25 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon EST Gulf County EOC, 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd. Bldg 500 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Local Community groups and neighborhood associations are being sought to partici pate in the Formidable Footprint A National Neighborhood Exercise to be held on Saturday, August 25 from 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon EST. The three-hour disaster training event will focus on a hurricane scenario and is part of an ongoing series of nationwide disaster exercises. tional participation across the different United States time zones. For important exercise and registration information please go to: www.FormidableFootprint.org designed for local organizations such as Neighborhood Watch and Community Emer gency Response Teams (CERT), Fire Corps and faith / community-based organizations that work to support the needs of community and neighborhood residents during and following a disaster. To-date, 2,097 neighborhood associations, community response teams, community / faith-based organizations and local governments across the United States have suc The Formidable Footprint National Neighborhood Exercise series is underwritten by a team of national, regional and state organizations with the joint goal of providing an opportunity for local organizations to assess their disaster preparedness, response and recovery capabilities. For more information contact Gulf County Emergency Manage ment. Stephanie Richardson 850-229-9110 MEDIA ADVISORY (2012.84) BURKE PRO P PP www.VoteMitchBurke.com Political advertisement paid for and approved by Mitch Burke, Republican for Property Appraiser Pd.Pol.Ad. Dear Gulf County Voters: I humbly thank you for your support and encouragement through the Primary Election. I am excited about the upcoming election on November 6th and am honored that you have elected to put me on the ballot for Gulf County Property Appraiser. Now is a great time for fresh eyes on property values and a willingness to work hard. As a citizen born and raised in Gulf County, I am excited about the opportunity to give back and serve this community. I look forward to listening to your concerns and serving the people of Gulf County. If elected, I promise that my door will be open to all citizens and I will serve the people of Gulf County with honesty, integrity and accountability. I will work hard to earn your vote on November 6th. I am available to speak with you anytime. Please feel free to call me on my cell at 227-5702 or email me at mtburke12@gmail.com Thanks again for your valued support! Sincerely, Local The Star| B5 Thursday, August 23, 2012 GULF/FRANKLIN from page B1 Summer is a time for enjoying the great outdoors, but before you go tromping off into unfamiliar woods, and wild terrain, you should familiarize yourself with some of the more common poisonous plants. A little preparation can save you hours or days of the uncomfortable after-effects of coming in contact with poisonous plants. This also is a good time of year to talk about poisonous plants because the sap is most abundant during the summer time, and its usually the sap which causes the problems. In this article I will talk about poisonous plants in general, and then well go into a little detail about poison ivy, oak and sumac. My information was provided by Sydney Park Brown and Patricia Grace, Horticulturists of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Poisonous plants can be divided into two groups: those that cause skin irritation and those that cause internal distress and in rare cases even death. Its important to note that even though we usually think of poisonous plants as something you nd only in the woods, they actually are almost everywhere in the garden, along roadsides, even in the house. Many factors inuence the poisonous nature of a particular plant. Plant poisons can be dispersed throughout the plant, or they may be localized in a particular plant part, such as in roots, berries, or seeds. The amount of poison in a plant may vary, even among plants of the same species depending on the time of year, the weather conditions and the soil. In addition, the poisonous reaction varies among people coming in contact with the plant. Obviously, the health and age of the person, and the quantity of the poison contacted or ingested will inuence the effects. As we said, if you can learn to identify some of the common poisonous plants, youll be better able to avoid them. So well briey go over the three most common ones: poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. Poison ivy can have a variety of leaf shapes, but one identifying feature remains constant, the leaets always come in threes, with two of them directly opposite each other. White waxy owers can be found on the smaller branches, and sometimes remain on the stems even after the leaves have fallen. Poison ivy commonly grows as a vine, climbing into trees, over fences, and up the side of walls. In open elds, however, poison ivy might appear as a shrub. Poison oak usually appears as a low growing shrub. The slender, upright branches bear leaet which resemble oak leaves. They also grow in threes, just like poison ivy. Usually the undersides of the leaves are lighter in color, because theyre covered with ne hairs. Poison sumac is a coarse woody shrub or small tree. It never grows in a vine like fashion the way other poisonous plants do. It frequently grows near swamps, and ranges in height from 5 or 6 feet to 25 feet. The leaves are divided into seven to thirteen leaets that grow in pairs. At the end of each stem, is a single leaet. In the spring, leaves are bright orange and velvety in texture. Later in the summer, they become dark green and glossy, with lower leaves a pale green in color. In the fall, the leaves take on a russet brownish color. These are the most common poisonous plants, but there are many more that you should familiarize yourself with. Learn the poisonous plants in your neighborhood and keep small children away from the. For more information on Poisonous Plants, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u.edu. that while the Center offers thriving nurs ing and correctional ofcer programs, students also can receive many, if not all, of their general education core credits at Gulf/Franklin. That is an opportunity for growth, Costin said. I want to reach out to those students who are not dual-enrolled. It is im portant that the community realize that the next time they are thinking about the Gulf/ Franklin Center they are thinking we have a lot of opportunities here. We can offer students a lot of general education courses. That makes it possible for them to get what they need here. A lot of Gulf and Franklin county students just cant get to the main campus. Costin also sees a strong role for the col lege in economic development. She said she hopes to enhance the com puter lab into something of a workforce cen ter and provide career guidance and coun seling. She is seeking feedback from the business community regarding potential workforce training programs beyond nurs ing and corrections. Part of her mission is visibility, being at meetings of the Board of County Commis sioners, the Gulf County Chamber of Com merce, Economic Development Committee, the Port Authority, to both raise awareness of the college but also glean a better under standing of local workforce training needs. When the port starts creating jobs we want to be ready to provide the skills that will be needed, Costin said. The college is ready. We want to look at workforce train ing. That outreach and being visible in the community ties together with economic development. Overall, everybody (at the main cam pus) has been 100 percent supportive. Dr. (Jim) Kerley has been great about wanting to grow this campus and provide greater access. That is what it is about for him, greater access to higher education. Costin also noted the board of trustees of the college decided this year not to raise tuition or fees. We are still a nice value, Costin said. And on opening night, it is a value with a slice of pizza thrown in. ROY LEE CAR TER County extension director Some things you should know about poisonous plants T IM CR OFT | The Star The new semester under a new director, Loretta Costin, began with a pizza party for the students.

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Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 T ODAY! C A LL 227-7847 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction Local B6 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 HOMESTEAD from page B1 The dining room was a large room with a beautiful decorative sideboard. It was wide and long with two drawers and two doors that opened at the bottom. It had little shelves and a big mirror at the top. The table was a large oval that seated a large family. We ate many meals around that big table. When Papa went to town, he took the horse and cart. Often I rode with him and he dropped me off or picked me up at the grammar school. Sometimes there were two or three children whose parents were a little late picking them up. They chanted to me in singsong voices, Ethel Milstead, lives on a homestead, sleeps on a bedstead! I got used to hearing it and paid very little attention to them. When the silent movies rst came out, they showed them in a large public building in Port St. Joe. The building was always used as a multi-purpose building. If the men of the town needed it for a meeting, it was available. It was the same for the women. Up until then, we only had a radio. The whole town turned out for the movies. This was very exciting! One day Pauline and I went to the movies and since the younger people always sat near the front, we had the front row seats. The plot in this particular movie included a bad man sneaking up on the other man whose back was turned to him. Pauline got so caught up in the plot that she suddenly sat up and yelled, Watch out! Hes behind you! Suddenly she realized what she had done and her eyes got big. She quickly slid down in her seat where nobody could see her. So everybody looked at me! They thought I had done it! I was so embarrassed. Aunt Sarah was an excellent seamstress and often sewed for her daughter, June, and me. She had a funny little habit of sticking her tongue straight out of the corner of her mouth when she was cutting a pattern. I particularly remember her making me a pretty dress out of dotted Swiss fabric. She also made my graduation dress out of white organdie with small ower designs. The pattern was designed with shoulders straps. Later when I entered the beauty pageants, she made the dresses I wore. She kept June and I dressed nicely especially when we were teenagers. A new stove Grandpa bought Grandma a new range (stove). It was long, wide and had a high back. The top of the range had a warming closet with two little doors that lifted up and closed, similar to a ap. It kept the food warm until all the food was cooked for the meal. The front right side opened up so a re could be built in it. On the other end of the stove was a tank that held water. We kept it lled so the water would be heated and ready to be used when needed. I helped Grandma cook a lot when I was a teenager. In those days, our came in large containers about 2 feet tall. Grandma Jones always kept an empty container to sit on while she cooked. On many mornings, we made pancakes for the men. I carried stacks of huge pancakes to the table. The men came in hungry from early morning shing and ready to eat a big breakfast. Kelloggs Corn Flakes had become popular, and I was fond of them. Grandma Jones bought them so I could eat them for breakfast. Grandpa and Grandmas boys were named Clyde, Gus (Augustus), Henry, Elbert and George (my stepdad). Grandma loved to read. I brought books home from the school library to read. Often I found Grandma reading the books. She always looked rather sheepish when I saw her. She got the boys names from the books she read. During my teen years, all of the men were gone from home except Clyde. He left one time but then returned home. Fishing, day or night The men enjoyed shing from time to time. Some of them would go oundering all night. Sometimes I went with one of them. They had a little skiff that was rigged with a metal basket that protruded from the front of the boat. Since it was dark and hard to see, a re was started in the metal basket. As the re burned, the embers would fall into the water and the re would light up the nearby water so we could see the sh. The men held the gig with one hand and guided the boat with the other hand. When the light from the re fell on a sh, they gigged it, caught it with their hand and put it in the boat. Most of the ounder were huge. Many times when they returned home, they had so many sh they shared with the neighbors. I helped Grandma fry them for breakfast. We always had grits and biscuits to serve with the sh. One night I went oundering with Clyde. We got out of the boat and waded in the shallow water looking for sh. Suddenly he yelled, Climb in the boat, climb in the boat! I scrambled in the boat with him right behind me. The movement of the boat caused the re in the basket to go out. I did not know what happened until he told me that we were standing near a big bed of stingrays. We no longer cared to sh! We went home. Every afternoon, Grandpa walked to the post of ce to buy a newspaper. Then he went across the street to the local store where all the old men gathered to talk. They sat on long wooden benches in front of the store and visited for an hour or so. Then Grandpa went back home. School days I was involved in a lot of school plays from the time I was a little bitty girl. Grandpa and Grandma Jones never went out for entertainment except to see me in one of the plays. They never missed a one! In fact, the entire town turned out for all the school activities. There was one particular play when I was a junior in high school that had a boys role. All the boys refused to be in it. The teacher who taught our Spanish class asked me if I would take the part. I agreed. I had my hair cut in a boyish bob and even wore boys clothes for my role. The play called for a balcony where the senorita stood. I strummed a guitar and sang to her. When I was a senior in high school, my teacher asked me to take charge of the exams for three children instead of staying in study hall. I assumed the responsibility of their paperwork and stayed with them while they took their tests. I loved school always made good grades. I enjoyed writing poetry and stories. I always planned to write a book but never did. While in school, I had to write an essay. I wrote about a girl who lived in the mountains. She wanted to leave and go off to school but since her family was very poor, she had to save what little money she could get before she left. Finally she saved enough money and prepared to leave. Just before she left, she overheard her sister and boyfriend talking. The boy wanted to marry her sister. The girl did not want her sister to stay there with no education, marry, and continue to live in poverty. After the boyfriend left, she confronted her sister and told her she had changed her mind. Instead of the young girl leaving home and pursuing an education, she wanted her sister to have the opportunity. The essence of the story was the young girl wanted her sister to have a better life. Miss Port St. Joe, Miss Gulf County There were some ladies in town who were involved in the school activities. A contest for Miss Port St. Joe came up and they approached me about entering the contest. I laughed but actually ended up a contestant. The contest was based on beauty, poise, and personality. On the night of the pageant that was held at the local hotel, Port Inn, I laughed, smiled, and had a great time but thinking all the time I would never win. But much to my surprise, I did! I won Miss Port St. Joe and walked off with the silver loving cup! Later in 1934, I entered the Miss Gulf County beauty pageant and again to my amazement, I won! After graduating from high school, I worked for a man and woman who owned a small caf. They had a lady who cooked while I waited on tables. One day I accidentally broke a cup. I was so upset over it. While the lady who owned the caf was resting that afternoon, I went to the store and bought another cup with my own money. It was not the same pattern but I did the best I could. When I told the lady about it, she was so surprised that I replaced the cup myself. She told me I did not have to do that. I was deeply touched one day when the lady asked me to keep the moneybag while she rested in the afternoons. I felt honored that she trusted me with the bag of money. There were a lot of older, retired men who went to Florida to work. They ate at the caf often. On two occasions, men proposed to me. I declined their proposals. Lilly Mae went to Heron Bay, Ala., to live with Grandma Jones son, Henry, who owned a seafood business. Henry had married a lady named Celia. Lilly worked for them, doing their housework while they worked in their oyster shop. She worked for them until she married William Jasper Johnson. He was nicknamed Pie because of his love for eating pies. The small pies were homemade, sold and delivered to the local shops. I was the only one of the children left for a while with Grandpa and Grandma Jones. After I graduated, I went to Downing Shafner Institute (DSI). Although Grandpa and Grandma Jones were not blood relatives, they treated us as if we were. They not only provided a home for us but also took good care of us. I have fond memories of both of them. I always felt grateful to them for taking care of us. I stayed there longer than any of the other children and always felt loved by them. Aside from losing my Daddy and Mama at an early age, I had a very happy childhood and happy memories of growing up in Port St. Joe with my brother (for a while) and sisters. THE BEGINNING In Katherine Freemans words, here is how the granddaughter of one of the original Jones boys of the eponymous Jones Homestead came to write about early Port St. Joe: Mother was staying with us during the month of August 2006. One morning while she and I were having breakfast on the patio, she began telling me a childhood story. The next morning we were dining again on the patio and she told me a different one. When she began recalling memories yet again on the third morning, I unobtrusively reached for a pen and began taking notes. I planned to keep them and read the stories later. A few days later the idea came to me about putting together a collection of her childhood memories. So this began. Each day we collaborated on her stories. I listened, questioned, and wrote. Finally I began compiling the notes that I had accumulated by hand, on my laptop, and on my desk computer. I tried to use Mothers descriptions, expressions and actual sentences as much as possible. Every day I keyed the latest stories into the computer, printed the pages, and gave them to Mother to edit. Each edit stimulated her memory with more details and additional childhood stories. Some things I had heard many times, others were new to me. Placing the stories in chronological order allowed me visualize Mothers childhood as never before. All were real life stories.some were painfully sad and brought tears to my eyes.others were so sweet and deeply touching. All of the stories woven together reveal the childhood memories of my Mother. I contacted Charlotte Pierce, city historian of Port St. Joe on September 16, 1998, and explained the reason for my call. I was looking for any archived newspaper articles about the beauty pageants in which Mother had competed. Charlotte kindly referred me to her Dad, Dave Maddox. Charlotte said her Dad was a little younger than Mother but would probably remember the family. I called Dave, explained what I was looking for and he immediately told me there was no newspaper in Port St. Joe in 1934. He began to reminisce about Doc, Adolphus Jones, whom Mother knew as Grandpa Jones. Dave said that Doc was not only the dentist but a legend in Port St. Joe. Doc worked for the railroad until he became crippled from an accident. After his injury, the railroad company sent him to dental school and that was the reason he changed vocations. According to Dave (and Mother), Doc had a dental of ce with a large window in the side of his house. When Doc was in a hurry, he would open the window, stick the mans feet out, close the window on his feet, call a couple of his sons to sit on the mans lap, and pull the tooth! Dave said that Doc along with some of his sons, would pack up their boat, and go shing for days at a time. When he returned, he would always have a long beard. Doc would go home, heat up some water, get in the tub and soak. Katherine Elmira Milstead, born November 30, 1917, died February 23, 2010, she married Paul Oliver Lombard who became a minister. They had ve children: Paul Lombard Jr., Barbara Holland, Anthony Lombard, Beverly Melton, and Kathleen Freeman. They also had nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 23, 2012 The Star | B7 24/7 Experienced Care giver looking for a private in home senior, care giver or sitter job. In Gulf County, please call 850-639-3029 Text FL19665 to 56654 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 3530783 88943 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2012 PR 33D Division “——” IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN, deceased, whose date of death was June 7, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. Personal Representative: Diane E. Suchan 105 Ocean Ridge Lane Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles L. Hoffman, Jr. Attorney for Diane E. Suchan FL Bar No: 229768 SHELL FLEMING DAVIS & MENGE 226 Palafox Place, 9th Floor Post Office Box 1831 Pensacola, FL 325911831 (850) 434 2411 Fax: (850) 435 1074 E-Mail: choffman@ shellfleming.com August 16, 23, 2012 88892 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000321 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KELLY A HARTSFIELD; MICHAEL A HARTSFIELD;, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 7th day of August, 2012, and entered in Case No. 23-201-CA-000321, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, Wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and KELLY A HARTSFIELD, MICHAEL A HARTSFIELD and UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5th STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM ET on the 13th day of Sept., 2012,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, SOUTH LAGOON SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 13th day of September, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk Of The Circuit Court B. A. Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 (954) 453-0365 FAX (954) 771-6052 1-800-441-2438 August 23, 30, 2012 88919S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2012-90-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL P. KUMARICKAL; ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICES IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 13, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on August 30, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 3, Block 35 of SAINT JOSEPH’S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NUMBER THREE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale Dated August 6, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 89209 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1594 Application No. 2012-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 06291-225R Description of Property: Lot 45, Surfside Estates, Phase II, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 46 and 47, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: William Green and Robert Green (Deceased) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 26th day of September, 2012. Dated this 21st day of August, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 26, August 23, 30, September 6, 13, 2012 89143S IN THE CIRCUIT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-146 PLANTERSFIRST Plaintiff, vs. SAND DUNES DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a Georgia Limited Liability Company, et al., NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final judgment of Foreclosure entered herein, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on the 13th day of September, 2012, the following described property: LOT 58, JUBILATION PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 12, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on this 13th day of August, 2012. **Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Notice. Individuals with Disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the court administrators office, as soon as possible, telephone (850) 229-6112; or if hearing impaired, 1-800-995-8771 (TTD); or 1-800-955-8770(V), VIA Florida Relay Services. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 89141S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-09CA CAPITAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. RHONDA M. HARRISON, FRANK R. CATALANO A/K/A FRANK RAY CATALANO, EAST COAST RECOVERY, INC., L.W.T., INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT (S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: FRANK R. CATALANO A/K/A FRANK RAY CATALANO: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County Florida: Beginning 1623 feet North of the Southwest corner of Section Eleven (11), Township Seven (7) South, Range Ten (10) West, thence run along the West side of State Highway Numbered Seventy-One (71) in a Northeasterly direction one hundred (100) feet; thence in a Northwesterly direction a distance of four hundred forty-four (444) feet; thence in a Southwesterly direction a distance of one hundred (100) feet; thence running in a Southeasterly direction a distance of four hundred and forty-four (444) feet to the Point of Beginning. All of said land situate, lying and being in Section 11, Township 7 South, of Range 10 West. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth & Bowden, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within 30 days of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: August 8, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 89211S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1508 Application No. 2012-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 06268-301R Description of Property: PARCEL ONE-COMMENCING at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 Degrees 15 Minutes 46 Seconds East (South 89 Degrees 15 Minutes 46 Seconds East), along the North line of Section 20, a distance of 1318.57 feet to a point; thence South 00 Degrees 41 Minutes 27 Seconds West (South 00 Degrees 41 Minutes 27 Seconds West) a distance of 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southerly margin of County Road 30E; thence North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West (North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West) along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E, a distance of 270.77 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING of the lands herein described, thence continue North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West (North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West) along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E, a distance of 56.95 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West (South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West), a distance of 280.00 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West (South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West) a distance of 69.1 feet, more or less, to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeast along the waters of the Gulf of Mexico to a point which is South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West (South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West) from the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East (North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East) a distance of 95.6 feet, more or less, to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East (North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East), a distance of 263.67 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, Name in which assessed: McGill Escrow & Title, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 26th day of September, 2012. Dated this 21st day of August, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 26, August 23, 30, September 6, 13, 2012 89153S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL #95 David Skipper #L-6 Gloria Bruce To be sold on September 4, 2012, 8:30 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. August 23, 30, 2012 89207S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1451 Application No. 2012-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 06248-685R Description of Property: Lot 37, of SHALLOW REED PHASE TWO, ACCORDING TO THE Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Pages 21-24, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C. Calvin Warriner and Rebecca Warriner All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 26th day of September, 2012. Dated this 21st day of August, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 26, August 23, 30, September 6, 13, 2012 89245S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 12-35PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN EDWARD PARKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Edward Parker, deceased, whose date of death was July 5, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 23, 2012. Personal Representative: Clifton Osborne 273 Settler’s Ridge Rd. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson, Jr. Attorney for Clifton Osborne FL Bar No: 261629 528 6th St. P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227 7800 Fax: (850) 227 7878 August 22, 30, 2012 89251S PUBLIC NOTICE Regular meetings of the Port St. Joe Port Authority Board are held on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month. Meetings are held at 10:00 Eastern Time in Building A of the Gulf/Franklin Center (Gulf Coast State College), 3800 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida. The following are meeting dates from September, 2012 through August, 2013. Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Wednesday, September 26, 2012 Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Wednesday, October 24, 2012 Wednesday, November 14, 2012 Wednesday, November 28, 2012 Wednesday, December 12, 2012 Wednesday, December 26, 2012 Wednesday, January 9, 2013 Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Wednesday, February 13, 2013 Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Wednesday, March 13, 2013 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Wednesday, April 10, 2013 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Wednesday, May 22, 2013 Wednesday, June 12, 2013 Wednesday, June 26, 2013 Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public meetings or provide comments in writing to the Port St. Joe Port Authority, Post Office Box 745, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32457. Transactions of the public meetings will be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the Port Authority Office at (850) 229-5240. August 23, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Howard Creek: 6811 Blossom Hill Rd. Sat Aug 25th 8am-?PORCH SALEMisc., tools, collectibles, Baiwa reels, Pabst Blue Ribbon hanging light, generator ($300, paid $600.) Text FL21736 to 56654 Hunting Lease Member Wanted near Port St. Joe. 1,600 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $500. For details: 850-227-5052 Cash Management SystemRoyal Alpha 710 ML Exc cond. Barely used. $150. 850-229-8072 Text FL21626 to 56654 Port St Joe: 2br, 2ba 1cg, kitchen, LR, Balcony, long rental, near bay & dock, close to downtown, excellent area, 850-624-4264 Text FL21705 to 56654 Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 Mexico Beach Canal Front3 BR, 1.5 BA, boat dock, large lot, available 09/15/12, stove, DW, fridge, no pets. Close to Tyndall. $1,100 per month. Call (850) 340-1072.Text FL21191 to 56654 St. Joe Beach, 3br, 2ba, Mobile Home, large, fenced backyard, large front porch. $800/mo + $800 dep. (575) 491-9037. Please leave a message. $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By DIANE DIRESTAMonster Contributing Writer You might look good on paper or in your interview suit, but if you are looking to nail your big interview, looks are not everything. How you sound often is more important. But many job seekers let careless speech habits sink their chances of landing that plum job. Here are six common language mistakes and how to keep them from sabotaging your interview:1. NonwordsFiller words such as um,Ž ah,Ž you know,Ž OKŽ or likeŽ tell the interviewer you are not prepared and make you sound like a Valley Girl (or Boy). A better strategy is to think before you speak, taking pauses and breaths when you lose your train of thought. Everybody utters an occasional um,Ž but dont let it start every sentence.2. Up-talkA singsong or rising inflection at the end of every sentence creates a tentative impression and makes it sound as though you are asking a question instead of making a definitive statement. You need to speak with conviction when selling yourself in an interview. Bring your intonation down when ending a sentence to avoid talking up.3. Grammatical errorsThe interviewer might question your education when you use incorrect grammar or slang. Expressions such as aintŽ she dont,Ž me and my friendŽ and so I goes to himŽ are not appropriate. Be sure you speak in complete sentences and that tenses agree. The interview is not the venue for regional expressions or informality.4. Sloppy speechSlurring words together or dropping their endings impairs the clarity of your message. To avoid slurring and increase understanding, speak slowly during an interview. Make a list of commonly mispronounced words, and practice saying them into a tape recorder before the interview. Some common incorrect pronunciations include aksŽ for ask,Ž ath-a-leteŽ for athlete,Ž wifŽ for withŽ and dreeŽ for three.Ž5. Speed talkingWhile everybody is a bit anxious during an interview, you do not want your information to fly by like a speeding bullet. A rapid speaking rate is difficult to follow, and speed talkers are seen as nervous. Slow down your racing heart by doing some breathing exercises before the interview. To avoid rushing, listen to the question, and then count two beats in your head before answering. When you finish a sentence, count two beats again before continuing. Dont be afraid of silence. Pausing is an effective communication technique. The interviewer needs a few seconds to process what you just said anyway.6. Weak speakWimpy words modify or water down your conviction and in the end your position. When you pepper a conversation with hopefully,Ž perhaps,Ž I feel,Ž kind ofŽ and sort of,Ž the message you convey is a lack of confidence. Use power words such as Im confident that,Ž my track record shows,Ž I take the position that,Ž I recommendŽ or my goal is.Ž The language you use gives the listener an impression about your level of confidence and conviction.The bottom lineYou do not have to study elocution to speak well. Simply slow down, take time to pronounce all the syllables and leave slang at home. Companies want job candidates who are well-spoken and articulate, and recruiters will not represent a job candidate if they do not match the clients profile. According to Lori Zelman, vice president of human resources at Strategic Workforce Solutions in New York City, The people most highly sought after are the ones who are succinct in the explanation of their work experience.Ž6 speech habits which sabotage F e a t u r e d J o b s Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs HELP WANTEDFast pace of ce Must have excellent computer, organizational,& phone skills. Bring resume by of ce located at : 106 Reid Ave Port St. Joe Mon – Fri 9:00 5:00No phone calls please. AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS Thursday, AUGUST 23 2012 YEAR 74, NUMBER 45 By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Over the course of two days and two meetings, members of the Port Authority of Port St. Joe listened to two speakers offer the outlines of potential lifelines for port development. Last Thursday, it was a representative from the newly-created Department of Economic Opportunity, in town to hear about the progress at the Port of Port St. Joe and potential opportunities for the DEO to provide assistance. Last Friday, the speaker was from the University of West Florida discussing a newly-created pot of economic development/environmental protection dollars created by the Florida Legislature to assist the eight Northwest Florida counties most impacted by the 2010 BP oil spill. While little concrete came from either meeting other than a divided board pertaining to how to handle local administrative obligations both provided lights in the tunnel for the Port Authority and The St. Joe Company in their collaboration to develop the Port of Port St. Joe. We need jobs, said Port Authority member Eugene Raf eld. We need to be more creative. We need to roll up our sleeves and go to work. Tom Beck from the DEO said he was in Gulf County on a listening tour, to hear how the department created by combining functions from the former Department of Community Affairs and the former Governors Of ce of Transportation, Trade and Economic Development and the Of ce of Workforce Innovation roughly 10 months ago could assist the port. The DEO, Beck said, works closely and provides signi cant funds for Enterprise Florida, the states quasi-public economic development agency. We have never funded port development anywhere but we are doing a lot of things differently, Beck said. This would be a rst and we want to do it right. Ports are a huge priority for the governor. This governor is geared toward jobs and ports provide an opportunity for real job creation. Beck noted that cap amounts on Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) have been raised a potential funding stream for infrastructure, Beck said and another Port Authority hears of possible assistanceBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com State Rep. Jimmy Patronis (RPanama City Beach) arrived last week for a tour of the Bridge at Bay St. Joe. Patronis, along with Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson, got the complete tour. So in addition to a brief legislative update with administrators with Signature Health Care, which owns and operates the Bridge at Bay St. Joe, Patronis, joined after some good-natured ribbing by Magidson, received a complete tour of the facility, including two rooms, two programs, that are integral to the mission of the Bridge. The Bridge name, site administrator Ron Reid noted, is no mistake. The mission of the facility can be summed as attempting to bridge the gap to (a patients) needs. At Bay St. Joe, currently the largest private-sector employer in Gulf County, the specialization is in the treatment of dementia and Alzheimers. The facility is the only one of its kind in Florida and one of just nine among Signatures more than 70-facilities located primarily in the Southeast that focuses so speci cally A tour of the world of a dementia patientBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@stara .com Drenching rains and the spread of the West Nile virus across the country has local health ofcials urging residents to be alert for standing water and to protect themselves from the potential for a mosquito-borne illness. Because of all the rainwater that we have experienced and information from (Gulf County) Mosquito Control, we thought it would be a good idea to send out information, said Sarah Hinds, public information of cer for the Gulf County Health Department. We want to make people aware of not having standing water and to protect themselves from mosquitoes. Gulf County Mosquito Control is currently operating at an elevated level until we see mosquito numbers drop, said director Mark Cothran. The West Nile virus is also currently enjoying its peak season. Cases of the virus have been reported in more than 40 states and more than 60 deaths, including over 20 in Texas alone. This is the time of year that West Nile becomes more widespread, especially after a period of extremely dry weather is followed by heavy rains. Cothran said mosquitoes lay eggs during dry periods. Some 30 inches of rain in three months has helped create a thriving population. Luckily we have not had a local case, Hinds said. This information is strictly precautionary. In 2004, the county experienced an outbreak of the West Nile virus, with at least ve patients diagnosed with illnesses related to virus infection with one death. The Health Department recommends residents follow the Five Ds of mosquito control: Dusk, avoid the outside when mosquitoes are most active; Dawn, avoid the outside during the second most active period for mosquitoes; DEET, use personal chemical protection to ward off mosquitoes; Dress, cover exposed skin to block access for mosquitoes; and Drain, remove standing water in pots, pet dishes, gutters and other retainers. Further, residents should apply repellent to exposed skin or onto clothing, but never under clothing; read repellent labels to ensure safety for children (DEET is not recommended for children younger than two months and repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under three years); and avoid applying repellent to hands of children adults should apply to their hands and then transfer to a childs skin or clothing. The key, health of cials said on Monday, was to understand the dangers of mosquitoborne illnesses such as West Nile. Adults over age 50 and people who have ever received an organ transplant are more likely to develop serious symptoms of West Nile if they do get sick, therefore they should take special care not to be bitten by a mosquito. Not all people who are bitten by a mosquito carrying West Nile will become sick. Just one out of 150 people infected with the virus develop serious disease, known as West Nile encephalitis, West Nile meningitis, or in ammation of the brain or the area around the brain.By FELICIA KITZMILLER and VALERIE GARMAN News Herald Writer @PCNHFelicia PANAMA CITY BEACH Local leaders can be protective of money, but in the interest of keeping the state government out of the billions of dollars expected to ow to Florida from the RESTORE Act, county leaders from Floridas Gulf Coast are trying to get along. Representatives from 19 of Floridas 23 Gulf Coast counties convened at the Wyndham Bay Point Resort on Thursday to discuss forming a consortium that would coordinate and implement a plan to assist in Floridas long-term economic and environmental recovery from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The RESTORE (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourism Opportunities and Revived Economies) Act mandates 80 percent of Clean Water Act penalties paid by those responsible for the spill go directly to the affected states. The penalties could range from $5 billion to $20 billion. Nobody thought wed be getting the RESTORE Act passed, but we did it, said Florida Association of Counties Executive Director Chris Holley. This could be a gamechanger for the Gulf Coast states. Now the Florida Association of Counties (FAC) and its members are scrambling to establish a system for equitably doling out the money while maintaining the local control that was the impetus of the RESTORE Act. The legislation requires that a legal entity to receive the funds be established within six months of the bill being signed and a plan be in the works for how the money will be used. A draft of an interlocal agreement is Counties prep for oil spill fundingLocal health of cials: beware of water, mosquitoesSee PORT A7Plan needed to split millions of dollars between 23 affected countiesSee DEMENTIA A3 See OIL A7 See HEALTH A3TIM CROFT | The Star Training of staff at the Bridge centers on empathy training, said administrator Ron Reid. New semester at Gulf/Franklin, B1 quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YEAR 74, NUMBER 45 New semester at Gulf/Franklin, YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Opinion .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor ...................A5Outdoors .....................................A8 Sports.........................................A9-A10School News ................................B3Faith .............................................B4 Society .........................................B2Classi eds ....................................B7-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 I would like to thank all the peoplewho supported me in the campaignfor Superintendent of Schools. I enjoyed meeting so many of the people in our county and renewing old friendships. Itwas a pleasure to run for public ofcein this wonderful area. I was treatedwith dignity and respect by all Gulf County citizens. I would like to commend my opponent and his supporters for running a very positive campaign. Thanks again, Phil LanfordWe tried to remove all of our campaign signs. If we missed any, please call 227-5450 or 340-0302 with the location.THANK YOU(Pd.Pol.Ad.)PAID BY PHIL LANFORD, DEM. FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Gulf County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need.For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE NICOTINE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! By VALERIE GARMAN747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com Gloria Salinard saw the local real estate market come to a screeching halt in the months following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. More than two years later, Salinard said the market is taking baby steps toward recovery. Basically the market has been picking up, said Salinard, the account executive for the Realtor Association for Franklin and Gulf Counties. Theres a lot of interest. The offices are very busy and the agents are very busy its definitely on the increase finally. After the bubble burst for the housing market in 2006, the market started picking back up in Gulf and Franklin Counties in January 2010, Salinard said, but was halted once again by the oil spill. It started picking back up in the second half of 2011, and weve gained momentum month by month, Salinard said. Theyre baby steps, but theyre baby steps in the right direction. According to statistics from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) for listings in Franklin County, Gulf County and Mexico Beach, residential sales have risen 35 percent, from 223 sales from Jan. 1 to June 30 of last year, to 301 during the same time period in 2012. Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach saw the most signi cant increase, jumping 47 percent from 64 sales in 2011 to 94 in 2012. Sales of lots and land are also up 103 percent in the area, rising from 134 to 273, with signi cant rises in land sales in South Gulf County and on Cape San Blas, more than tripling from 28 to 96. We have a lot of people coming in with investment moneythe prices are great, Salinard said. Most of our sales are second homes and investment properties. Most of the large numbers of sales have been in Cape San Blas, Mexico Beach and St. George Island. Salinard said residential sales within area cities like Port St. Joe and Carrabelle saw less signi cant increases. The main economy is tourists and vacation homes, Salinard said. A lot of the buyers are coming from Georgia and Alabama. Along with increased number of sales, total sales prices are up so far this year, from roughly $55 million to $76 million this year. The average sales price also rose slightly from $245,983 to $253,758, but the median sales price dropped from $190,000 to $179,000. Salinard said the drop in the median sales price may be attributed to less inventory, especially on Cape San Blas. Last week, Port Authority of Port St. Joe attorney Tom Gibson noted that for the rst time in several years his law rm was handling closings in which the sale price was actually above the county appraised price. Salinard also cited a much lower number of short sales and foreclosures in the area compared to last year. A lot of the foreclosure and short sale listings have been purchased, said Salinard, who noted the wonderful interest rates have also helped boost sales. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this story. By VALERIE GARMAN747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com The Gulf County Tourism Development Council has broken previous months bed tax collections for seven out of the last nine months, with June collections up 23 percent from last year. June was great, said TDC Director Jennifer Jenkins. I think its an indication of a really good rebound. June accounted for roughly 33 percent of the TDCs total collections for this scal year, which runs Oct. 1 through Sept. 30. Collections for June totaled $149,033, topping even July of last year which came in at $147,605. Although the TDC does not yet have bed tax numbers for July, traditionally the councils highest collections month, Jenkins said all signs are pointing toward another banner month. October and December of 2011 were the only two months that posted decreases in bed tax collections this scal year, with numbers for October dropping 16 percent and December dropping 7 percent. Jenkins said she hopes to get those numbers back up this year, with a number of programs targeting potential fall visitors online highlighting a less-busy Gulf County and a number of events planned for this fall. The big thing were going to start to do is really pushing our concept out, Jenkins said. All of our issues that were hanging out there because of resource changes, weve resolved all of them. The TDC marketing committee has been hard at work this summer developing a core communications plan to steer the agency in the right direction through the development of nite goals. Jenkins said all TDC practices must aim at four major goals: to increase visitation to Gulf County, increase visitor spending in Gulf County, deliver qualied leads to TDC and partners and acquire long-time, loyal visitors. The plan also outlines principles for increasing awareness of Gulf County that include leveraging a distinct product and bene t of the area, communicating consistent messaging and branding, and developing emotional connections with the audience. The marketing committee has been reviewing applications for the new event sponsorship program, focusing on how proposed events re ect the underlying TDC principles developed. Jenkins said the big question is, remind me how this promotes tourism. The marketing committee will meet at the Gulf County Welcome Center Tuesday to further review sponsorship applications and make a recommendation for the full board for approval. At the TDCs last meeting Aug. 7, the marketing committee presented a list of 17 events they favored sponsoring, with the largest $10,000 sponsorship going to the Blue Skies Music Festival, a music festival for Blue Skies Ministries, an organization that hosts beach getaways in Port St. Joe for families throughout the country who have children battling cancer. The committee is still looking at combining two submitted July 4 events, two submitted Christmas events and applications received for the Scallop Festival and Scallop Drop Treasure Hunt. Were in a really good position to start with a clean slate, Jenkins said. Even with all the rain, weve had a great summer. Another banner month for Gulf County TDCArea real estate beginning to pick up Basically the market has been picking up. Theres a lot of interest. The of ces are very busy and the agents are very busy its de nitely on the increase nally. Gloria Salinard account executive for the Realtor Association for Franklin and Gulf Counties .....................................................................................June was great. I think its an indication of a really good rebound. Jennifer Jenkins TDC Director .........................................

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, August 23, 2012on dementia. The programs it offers in the treatment of dementia patients are unique not just for the area, but for the state. We specialize in the treatment of dementia patients, Reid said. Everybody takes a two-day training course when they are hired in how to treat those with dementia. It is empathy-based training. That is our focus. The Signature mission is to change the landscape of long-term care forever. Patronis added, You think of the skilled services and versatility of services that are provided here and it is pretty impressive. Patronis, in particular, received a good look at two special programs or services offered by the Bridge at Bay St. Joe. One is a room that provides a Multi Sensory Environment. Essentially, the room is darkened with a large cushy living room-style chair in one corner, draped in light strands of soft soothing lights. A mural on the wall is effectively, through a light and specialized machine, a large lava lamp, shaping shapes and colors. Soothing music spills from speakers on the walls. It is a room for calming, for dialing down a dementia patients anxiousness without the use of prescription drugs which often come with signi cant side effects. We are looking to package this and give it to other nursing homes, Reid said. We want (the patients) off their meds. The second program is one that raises awareness of day-to-day life for a dementia patient and is called the Virtual Dementia Tour. The tour was developed in 1997 by geriatrics specialist P.K. Beville and marketed by Second Wind Dreams, a non-pro t organization that focuses on changing the perception of aging. Patronis and Magidson were suited up to simulate the sensory losses and obscurities people with dementia feel on a daily basis. They placed prickly shoe inserts to imitate the effects of nervous system damage, donned gloves lled with popcorn seeds to reduce dexterity. Headphones with sounds of static, scratching, buzzing and the occasional telephone ring or siren, simulating the effect even minor sounds has on those with dementia, and the two were tted with goggles to block central and peripheral vision. The thumb and fore nger of their dominant hands were taped together as well as the last three ngers of the opposite hand to hinder mobility. They were walked down a hall to a darkened room with a strobe light blinking in the corner and were told to perform three simple tasks fold a speci c colored towel or a set of socks, write a note to a loved one and place it in an envelope, and don a sweater. Patronis spent much of his time muttering, trying to remember the tasks while repeatedly folding the same towel. He found the pen and paper to write the note, but missed on the envelope while Magidson toppled over a table with a plastic pitcher and utensils believing them to be the pen and paper. Neither completed their tasks, though Magidson did, fairly easily, nd the reporter shooting photos in the dark room. I am very familiar with this facility and very proud that it is here in Port St. Joe, Magidson said. Before the tour, Patronis did discuss some legislative issues of a priority to facilities such as the Bridge. Tort reform he saw as remaining on the front burner in the Florida House of Representatives, but he said the key would be the Senate and whether the party numbers there change. The Senate last year was in civil war because there was no clear majority, Patronis said. Another priority for companies such as Signature is to see a current moratorium on additional Certi cates of Need (a CON is provided by the state and is essential to opening any hospital or nursing home) continues. There is also a hope for funding to help renovate facilities, which is particularly important, Reid noted, in rural communities. Rural facilities tend to be older and renovation is in play as a real need, he said. There was also discussion about the importance of the partnership with Sacred Heart on the Gulf We want to have a partnership with them and it is hard to nd CNs and RNs in specialized care, Reid said and the anticipated rollout of managed care and how that would be implemented. 850-227-1276, x 168 I want to thank the voters of District Three for their support during the recent primary election. I was honored to meet so many of you and appreciate all those who voted. I also appreciate all the kind words of encouragement since the election. I am thankful to live in Gulf County and to have had the opportunity to run Sincerely, Johnny Mize(Pd.Pol.Ad)Paid for and approved by Johnny Mize, Republican for County Commissioner, District 3 NOWOPEN(850) 640-0602 Mention This Ad And Get 10% OFF Your PurchaseYour Electronic Cigarette Specialistin Panama City located next to Chow Time Safe Alternative to Smoking Locally Owned & OperatedP V PANAMA VAPOR THEE-CIG SPECIALISTS DEMENTIA from page A1Symptoms of severe illness include headache, high fever, stiff neck, mental confusion, muscle weakness, tremors, convulsions, coma and paralysis. Symptoms may last several weeks and neurological impacts could be permanent. Some will come down with milder symptoms, which resemble the flu, with fever, headache, swollen lymph glands, nausea, vomiting, skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. However, most people who get infected with West Nile virus do not have any symptoms. There is no specific treatment for West Nile virus infection and no vaccine. HEALTH from page A1 PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The StarThroughout the tour of the facility, Reid and Patronis discussed services provided at the facility and challenges the facility faces. On the Virtual Dementia Tour, while Patronis performs one of his tasks of putting on a sweater, Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson topples a plastic jug of utensils and cups believing them to be pen and paper needed to write a note to a family member.

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OpinionA4 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012July or August, sometimes sooner, the Halloween candy hits the shelves of drugstores and your local big box stores. Have you ever wondered why they put the stuff on the counters so soon? Surely, there is a good answer. I have no idea, maybe because they need to ll space or get it out of their warehouses. One thing is for sure, it will go from the big box stores, to houses, to childrens Halloween buckets and bags, then back to their parents workplaces. At least that is the case with where I work. Its usually around January or February when it rst starts showing up. Someone will bring in their leftover Halloween candy that they either didnt pass out, their kids didnt eat or they wouldnt let their kids eat. All it takes is one bag. Then everyone else starts bringing their leftover candy in. Halloween candy is a pack animal, once there is one bag, they keep coming. And it starts to disappear. Someone in the ofce eats it, I have nally gured out what to call these people. Halloween candy must be like ne wine, it must get better with age. As noted, the rst batch usually is from the previous fall. Then, folks start bringing in vintage year stock. Stuff they nd in the back of the cabinet, pantry or car trunk. It still disappears. What do you call these folks? Now, I will call them the Ofce Cows. Let me tell you why. Recently, I was reading where farmers and ranchers, who were ghting with the rising cost of corn prices due to drought conditions in some areas, have gone to feeding their cows candy. Yes, candy. Some folks want to get mad at the farmers, or worse, the cows. Im not an animal science person, so I am not complaining about this. Farmers have to be creative to survive. If it keeps the cows going to market, they have to do it. This one fellow noted that the price of corn was so high, that he had to gure out something, so the secondhand candy did the trick. Second-hand candy has a higher ratio of fat than straight corn according to the farmer. Im not sure if that is good or bad, but the farmer said it did the trick. The farmer noted they did balance out the fat content. The farmer makes some sort of concoction out of an ethanol byproduct, mineral nutrients and the second-hand candy. The cows have not had any health problems, they do gain weight and it does seem to be a tting last meal if they were indeed headed to their end goal. I do eat steak and hamburgers. Im not going to lie about that. If you dont, Im ok with that. That is your business. The farmers simply found out that the candy companies dont sell all of their packaged candy. (I could have told them that.) The candy companies give the farmers a good deal on the candy, the cows eat the candy, and some of us eat the cows. Its that simple. There are many folks that understand this more than me, Im not picking sides. Im just making a point. If its good enough for the guys at the ofce that will eat Halloween candy from 1994, its probably ok with the cows. Thus, Im coining the term, Ofce Cows. Its really not derogatory. This fellow, who was a former butcher, and now a writer, invented an adjective to describe the way that cows stand calmly. He calls it cowpeaceably. We assume cows are not so smart; however those that know cows understand that they have some sense. Have you ever tried to milk a cow that didnt want to be milked? They can be quite stubborn. Cows are capable of friendships, like the guys in the ofce who eat the vintage Halloween candy. Within cow herd, there is a pecking order, or a leader and followers. I would compare this to the one fellow in the ofce who will eat anything, no matter the expiration date. Once he delves in, others follow. The bottom line is there are going to be some cows and people who are going to eat the candy. Some of us work with the people who do and eat steaks that may be from cows that ate candy corn or those black and orange wrapped peanut butter things that no one ever eats. I understand. I also am one of those who personally like the black and orange wrapped peanut butter things that stick to your teeth. Are the Valentines Day cards out yet? Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. When Eugene Rafeld speaks I have found it best to listen. Sure, a good chew on words has never been an aversion for Eugene, but behind that big-man Southern drawl is a mind at work, one of ideas and common sense in a package that typically cuts to the chase. And last week during a meeting of the Port Authority of Port St. Joe, of which Eugene is a board member, he said something about the RESTORE Act process that cut to the marrow. Paraphrasing here, Eugenes point was that many segments of the community in short the community as a whole needed to be in the conversation concerning how the county handles and spends what commissioners have described as a potential windfall in the tens of millions of dollars. There are plenty of buts here, as have been pointed out in meetings of the Board of County Commissioners, Port Authority, Port St. Joe City Commission and School Board. The amount of money is an unknown. There is a formula in place for dividing it among states and, in Florida, among counties, but at this point they could be dividing Pi instead of a dollar pie and it would make no difference. If there is payout of nes by BP, would it come after a long, drawnout trial or in a settlement with the federal government? This could be a court case that lasts past the lifetime of many of us. Any adjudication or settlement would also come with a question mark similar to those queries from bill collectors when will the check arrive? So there are plenty of unknowns to the RESTORE Act, enough that we have to hope that history wont repeat itself in Gulf County as it goes to nancial responsibility and accountability. Right now, a small committee is sifting through a mound of paperwork and trying to work with their respective constituencies there is representation from Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka, the Board of County Commissioners, Chamber of Commerce, Tourist Development Council, and others to come up with potential projects for funding. The emphasis is in two areas: economic development and environmental protection and restoration. But the criteria for ranking projects is also unknown. Last weeks two Port Authority meetings, at which economic development experts versed in the entire RESTORE process spoke, highlighted that few even understand some basic rules. Yet by January the eight most impacted Northwest Florida counties are supposed to have written and documented plans and projects. That is a short window of time, leading to further potential that accountability for the funds wont be properly assigned, and potential for more controversy like the Tourist Development Council suffered over the past 18 months. With the TDC asco, there was money in the seven gures rolling into an agency that had no plans in place to spend it. The TDC pretty much made up a plan on the y because there was a short deadline for spending more money, by a long shot, than the TDC had ever pocketed in any one-year window. As the audit of the TDC commissioned by the BOCC demonstrated, policies, procedures and rules went by the wayside from the BOCC to the county administrator to the Clerk of Courts to the TDC board to the TDC director while the money that owed was directed to a constricted number of people. And now were talking about 10 times that amount of money. Rafeld wondered rightly last week where was the representation for the shing industry as hard hit as any local industry by the oil spill on the county subcommittee? Taking it further why isnt the community more involved? Certainly a series of town hall meetings could be conducted, at both ends of the county, to discuss the potential elected ofcials speak of when they talk of remaking the region. Certainly the citizens, the residents most impacted by the BP oil spill, could provide insight into worthy projects to consider. How about the long-term nancial health of the county? Given the hard times many are experiencing these days is there not a way to bank some of that windfall for an even rainier day? This, given the potential, could be a watershed moment for the county. This has the potential to impact the county in ways that those proposing county-wide voting can only dream about. To succeed in truly reshaping the future of Gulf County this must be a county process that ends with decisions good for the entire county. In a county of just 15,000 or so residents that doesnt seem a leap. Leaving the entire process up to the BOCC, in the aftermath of the TDC debacle, seems like forgetting history.Mr. Aaron would look you in the eye Keyboard KLATTERINGSOfce of cowsA community conversation TiIM CrROFtTStar news editor Folks, I got caught speeding. I think! Ripley wouldnt believe this one! I was going through the mail, minding my own business, thinking all was right with the world when I ran across this semi ofcial looking letter from Brentwood, Tennessee. I started to throw it away. I dont know anyone in Brentwood. I hadnt been through there in years. I gured it was just another political advertisement. It was a speeding ticket! By mail mind you. From a town that I hadnt been to! Signed by an ofcer I never met or even saw. Stating an offence that may or may not have occurred two weeks before I got the notice! People! I dont remember what I had for breakfast day before yesterday! You tell me it is jurisprudentially legal to site me for this crime? Isnt there a statue of limitations? Have we suspended the Fourth Amendment? I reckon Im the Corpus Deliciti for sure in this deal! On closer examination this heinous crime was committed not in Brentwood, but a hundred or so miles west, in the little town I grew up in. Now I was more confused than ever! They know me in McKenzie. They didnt have to put me on the most wanted list. They could have called. Theyve hurt my feelings by shipping my punishment abroad. On the Notice of Violation someone had attached a one inch by one inch grainy picture of a brown car. I own a brown car. So do sixteen jillion other people. It might have shown a Florida tag. Or, maybe WyomingI couldnt really tell. It was supposedly snapped on Highland Drive. I didnt recognize the telephone pole in the background. The picture could have been taken in Hoboken, Sacramento or Wiesbaden, Germany, along the Autobahn for all I know. This alleged photo op was made on or about (that is the exact wording on the citation) 7/12/2012. If the guy who signed it had checked his watch, cell phone or calendar when he supposedly witnessed this crime, he wouldnt have to be so vague. Course, if he had just pulled me over and asked me, I could have lled him in on the exact date. There shouldnt be nothing on or about when accusations are ying. I was tempted to send them a picture of a fty dollar bill. I was supposedly going 58 miles per hour in a 40 mph zone. Listen, when I lived there they didnt have a speed limit on Highland Drive. Once you got past The Dixie Coffee Cup, you could drive as fast as you wanted to! Ive seen Ricky Gene Stafford and Robert Earl Melton drag racing in front of Dr. Holmes house. Nicky Joe would be a blur going by in that sports car of his. Didnt nobody ever stop him! Shoot, Ive seen John Ingram and Larry Ridinger running faster than that down that road! When the highways iced over in the winter, David would take that rear engine Corvair of ours and see how many times he could spin it around going down Highland Drive. I guarantee you I wasnt going as fast as the night Eddie Carden roared though the red light in front of the Park Theatre. He skidded his tires the complete length of the Utoteem grocery store as he braked and slid up in front of the park bench where we were hanging out. Night patrolman Jim Dick Crews was among our group. As a matter of fact, Eddie almost hit the police car as he roared to a stop. Boy howdy, he got a lecture! But no ticket! Me and Diane Stoner took that bad curve out on the Shiloh road going more than 58 miles an hour. She was driving her dads pick-up. I was holding on for dear life! Where was your picture taker that night? Man, Id love to have a souvenir of that old Dodge up on two wheels. You ought to have seen the people slinging gravel as they pulled onto Highland Drive from Joe Chadwicks service station. Teenagers drove through Roe Alexanders Twin Pools parking lot faster than 58 miles per hour. David Mark could almost get up to that speed in the half of a mile it took us to get from the house to the high school. And Im not even going to tell you about the speed merchants thundering in and out of Franks Dairy Bar. I sent in the requested money. I was too bemused, confused and bewildered not to. Beside I had no idea who to protest to! I gured if my hometown needed the money that badly, I was obliged to help. The truth is that little burg has given me so much more than I could ever repay. Id send them a hundred times that amount if they needed it! You cant believe how the town took to me when I was growing up. It offered guidance, love, nurture, care. I understood even as an unsuspecting youth that it was pretty special, but it was not until years later, as the ravages of life tear at your beliefs, that I truly appreciated the blessing that had been mine. You have no idea the pride with which I tell people exactly where I am from. It was the best fty bucks I have spent in years. I just want the city to collect the same from David and Robert Earl, Diane, Ricky Gene and all those fellers that scratched off from Joe Chadwicks or raced through Roe Alexanders parking lot. Whats fair for the goose.. Ill tell you what was special about Police Chief Aaron Pinson back in our growing up days. When he stopped you for speeding, hed lean down close to the window and look you right in the eye. There is something very personal and non-confusing about that. Respectfully, Kes USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 CranksRANKS MY tra TRACtTOrRBN Heard I was supposedly going 58 miles per hour in a 40 mph zone. Listen, when I lived there they didnt have a speed limit on Highland Drive. Once you got past The Dixie Coffee Cup, you could drive as fast as you wanted to! HUnkerNKER DOWnNKesley Colbert

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I would like to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for gifting me the knowledge, strength, and ability to carry out my assignment as the District 4 School Board Representative once again. I would also like to thank those who voted on August 14, 2012 and others who assisted in helping make this election a success. Thanks for your continued prayers and support. Your District 4 School Board Member, Billy C. Quinn, Jr. (Pd.Pol.Ad.)Paid by Billy C. Quinn, Jr. for School Board, District 4 8292440 Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LettersA5 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012Its no secret that health care costs have been spiraling out of control for years. To ght back, your best bet is to be a well-informed consumer: Know the true costs of medical procedures, supplies and medications so you can bargain effectively; carefully anticipate and track medical expenses; and stay on top of your bills. But sometimes, even when you follow the rules you still can get burned. Ive heard many appalling stories about people even those with comprehensive insurance who have been denied benets, over-charged, sent to collections or even forced to le for bankruptcy because they couldnt pay their medical bills. Here are a few coping strategies: Carefully review each doctor, lab or hospital bill and match it against the Explanation of Benets statement that shows how much they were reimbursed by the insurance company. Also, watch for items that may have been charged to you by mistake such as: Medications, supplies, treatments or meals you didnt receive while hospitalized or getting an outpatient procedure. Duplicate charges for a single procedure (such as x-rays, MRIs and lab work), including those that had to be redone due to a technicians error. Charges for a full days hospitalization when you checked out early; or private room rates when you shared a suite. The summary hospital bill you were sent probably doesnt contain many details, so ask for an itemized bill along with a copy of your medical chart and a pharmacy ledger showing which drugs you were given during your stay. If youre having difculty paying a medical bill, dont simply ignore it. Like any creditor, doctors and hospitals often turn unpaid bills over to collection agencies, which will wreak havoc with your credit score. Contact creditors as soon as possible, explain your situation and ask them to set up an installment payment plan or work out a reduced rate. Many people with no insurance discover that theyre often charged much higher rates than those negotiated by insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid. Dont be afraid to ask for those lower rates and to work out a repayment plan just be sure to get the agreement in writing. Most doctors and hospitals would rather accept reduced payments than have to deal with collection agencies and possibly no reimbursement at all. Ask the hospitals patient liaison to review your case and see whether you qualify for nancial assistance from the government, a charitable organization or the hospital itself. Most will forgive some or all bills for people whose income falls below certain amounts tied to federal poverty levels. Also pursue this avenue with your doctor or other provider ideally before theyve begun collections. A few additional cost-savings tips: Ask whether your employer offers exible spending accounts, which let you pay for eligible out-of-pocket health care and/or dependent care expenses on a pre-tax basis. Use online price-comparison services like Healthcare Blue Book and OutofPocket.com to research going rates for a variety of medical services. Unless its a true emergency, try to avoid emergency rooms and use an urgent care network facility afliated with your insurance company or ask your doctor for recommendations. Bottom line: Know what health services cost and dont be afraid to negotiate. Youll haggle over the price of a car why not your health? Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. Dear Editor: After giving a lot of t hought to the  voter suppression  going on in this  state and other states after  it  was proved there was no fraud, I am beginning  to wonder  if ghting for and defending this country was worth it to all the p eople  who  have fought and died for  democracy only to  see a group  of politicians elected  by the people who thought  that under  no  circumstances  would  even think about rigging  the voting system. Well instead  of taking  care of the peoples  business they  decided they would take care o f their own  business which was  to retain  power and to  get another president in ofce and I guarantee that he will have this country in W WIII within  one year. Any time you see a draft dodger a round  military equipment that should  be enough code for you. E ven after  this stunt they  have  pulled off and even if you decided  to vote them out it is also possible that the machines are also rigged and guess what, it c ould be  very hard to  get rid of these people. You  are probably  already thinking  my representative  is such  a nice guy, he wouldnt  ever think of hurting  me. Some are even bringing out their m ama to prove to you  how honest they are. My old d addy used to  say, you  can  take a good dog  and put him with a  couple of sheepkilling dogs then guess  what you wind up with but as  a society are  we going to  accept this laying  down. Are we so dumb we cant gure out whats going on? O nly today  when a  news reporter asked Mr. Romney about his tax returns, he said basically that Americans a re  small-minded and didnt need to know  about  his tax returns .Of course  he couldnt  say it but among his  friends he probably said  the that the American  people are dumber than a two-day-old monkey and all y ou gotta do is throw them  a banana every once  and awhile and they will  be quiet and go along with you on a nything. Voting is  a very serious matter and some t his time will  be denied this right because they are old, p oor or  being a minority because of new restrictions that werent there in 2008. In c losing it seems  to me that some folks dont realize that t hey are next if  they let this continue to happen. Most will not bother to nd out who t hese bad  actors are and get rid of them, they prefer bananas.Ray MaidenMexico Beach Dear Editor: A bill recently introduced by Rep. Steve SoutherlandH.R. 4150-would open-up areas of Gulf County to large amounts of taxpayer money to subsidize risky coastal development. Many groups and citizens concerned about wasteful government spending are working hard to raise awareness about the bill so that it does not become law. Back in the early 1980s, Congress recognized that Federal tax dollars were subsidizing high-risk development in oodprone coastal areas. So Congress passed the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA), which designated undeveloped areas along the US coast that were no longer eligible for Federal subsidies like ood insurance, beach nourishment, and disaster assistance. Much of the Indian Pass and Cape San Blas areas were rightly included. President Reagan signed the Act into law and praised its widespread support that included the American Red Cross, National Taxpayers Union, and major conservation groups. CBRA is considered a model piece of legislation, saving taxpayers over $1.3 billion so far. One of the things people really like about CBRA is that it does not infringe on private property rights at all. The law simply restores the free market by saying that if a landowner chooses to develop in one of these high-risk areas, they must do so with their own money and not that of the American taxpayer. But it turns out that having personal responsibility in high-risk coastal areas is expensive. People who own homes there dont want to pay the full market rate for private ood insurance, which is much higher than the subsidized government insurance. And they would rather have the government foot the bill for the pricy beach nourishment projects used to protect homes built too close to an eroding shoreline. Despite claims otherwise, there have been multiple reviews of these CBRA areas in Gulf County, and its been found that they clearly met the criteria and were rightly included. If passed, Rep. Southerlands bill would send tens of millions of dollars in government money into an area where Congress clearly determined that Federal subsidies were a wasteful expenditure. We have a nation that is increasingly upset about out-of-control government spending, so lets ask Congress to practice scal restraint and decline to open its checkbook to H.R. 4150 and the high-dollar, highrisk development it would promote. Christian WagleyPensacolaWhat happens when you cant pay your medical bills? JasoASON Alder LDERMaANCBRA designation should stand Shameful

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LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-8310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITS KARAOKE & DJ IN THE CROWS NEST HOLLY ADKINS & LUKEABBEY ON THE POOP DECK COMEENJOYTHESUNSETRANDYSTARK WITH ART LONG ON SAX ON THE POOP DECK 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T ITS (850) 647-8310 UPCOMING EVENTS FIRST SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 2ND2 FOR 1 DRINKS AND BEER ALL DAY & NIGHTPotluck 6PM ET VERY SPECIAL PERFORMANCEAT 7PM ETAward Winning Songwriters dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp 7008 Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach, FL 32456 (850) 647-6167 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FloridaInsuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals, Families or Small Businessess Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Your Local Agency for Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER The Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce will be conducting vehicle safety checkpoints and DUI check points in August. The check points will be throughout the county to include Highway 98 near St. Joe Beach, Highway 98 and Garrison Avenue, C-30 Simmons Bayou, Highway 71 North of White City, Highway 22 and Highway 22A, Highway 71 and Westarm Creek, Highway 71 Dalkeith Area and Highway 71 near the Calhoun line. On 08/13/2012 Damon Bernard Walker was arrested on a warrant for failure to appear; the original charge was eeing and eluding and DWLSR. On 08/14/2012 a vehicle operated by Ryan Mitchell Duke, 37, was stopped for a traf c violation. When the deputy made contact with the driver he noticed the odor of an alcoholic beverage about his person. Duke was asked to perform several eld sobriety exercises which he did poorly on; he was arrested for DUI. His breath test results were .193 and .201 over twice the legal limit. On 080/14/2012 narcotics investigators conducted a roundup of several subjects wanted for sale of crack cocaine. Those arrested were Charles Edward Peterson, 54, one count of sale of crack cocaine; James Earnest Lacy, 59, three counts of sale of crack cocaine; James Edward Hamilton, 50, two counts of sale of crack cocaine; Willa Davis, 56, two counts sale of crack cocaine; Bernard Lamount Wilson, 55, two counts sale of crack cocaine; and Penny Marie Ramos, 25, six counts of sale of crack cocaine. On 08/14/2012 a vehicle operated by John Edward Burrows, 29, was stopped after the sheriffs of ce received complaints about him driving with a suspended license; he was arrested for driving on a suspended license. On 08/14/2012 Tony Joseph King, 46, was arrested for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. On 08/15/2012 Gary Scott Adkison, 44, was arrested on a warrant for failure to pay child support. On 08/17/2012 Davis Matos was arrested as he was being released from Gulf Correctional Unit on a warrant from New York. On 08/17/2012 Rodney Dewayne Adkison, 31, was arrested for driving on a suspended drivers license. On 08/19/2012 Steve Bernard Fennell, 47, was arrested for DUI; he refused to take a breath test. On 08/19/2012 Melissa Leona Rhodes, 27, was arrested at Gulf Correctional unit for possession of marijuana and introduction of contraband as she tried to smuggle marijuana in to the prison during visitation. On 08/19/2012 Timothy David Gainious was arrested for domestic battery; it is alleged he grabbed the victim by the arm pushed her down and hit her in the nose. On 08/20/2012 Christopher J. Jones turned himself in on a violation of probation warrant the original charge was domestic battery. Port St Joe Police Department Shayla Leighann Gay, 31, arrested for DWLSR Melissa Danielle Sims, 27, arrested for aggravated battery Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce ARREST LOGSpecial to The StarPANAMA CITY The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 8.2 percent in July 2012. This rate was up from 8.0 percent in June 2012. The July 2012 rate was 1.5 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 9.7 percent and below the state rate of 9.3 percent. Out of a labor force of 105,018, there were 8,569 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Overall our job market has been trending in the right direction despite slight uctuations from month to month. We are encouraged by the efforts of our local economic development partners and County Commissions to attract more businesses to the area, said Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. Right now are our unemployment rate is below both the state and the nation however we anticipate that might change as we face recent layoffs and enter into the slower tourism months. The July 2012 unemployment rates in the counties that comprise the Gulf Coast Workforce region were: Local unemployment increases slightly over the month Jul. 12 Jun. 12 Bay County 8.2 8.1 Franklin County 6.5 6.2 Gulf County 8.7 8.4

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LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, August 23, 2012 Thank you Gulf County for your vote of I continue to ask your the upcoming General Election, as I ask to become your next Supervisor of Elections. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." 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Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to HomeGeorge E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy,cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy.Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independenceby optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. PORT from page A1agency pot of money might be applicable to assisting the Port of Port St. Joe to update the port master plan. That master plan is in need of updating due to growth in the port footprint the past 18 months. The port development area combining St. Joe and Port Authority lands is now some 300 acres. There is a participatory agreement between St. Joe, the Port Authority and Genessee-Wyoming Railroad to push rail line to port land. There are two large-scale natural gas pumps on Port Authority land, electrical capability of up to 30 megawatts, the Planned Unit Development designation for the old paper mill site has been removed and the new collaboration with St. Joe changes the dynamics from less than two years ago. Eastern Shipbuilding has begun site work on the 20 acres of mill site it is leasing from St. Joe and the rst ship to be out tted in Gulf County is expected to arrive late in the year. Eastern is expected to ll up to 200 jobs in Gulf County and representatives from the company take applications at the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce twice a week. That is a very signi cant small port development footprint, said port director Tommy Pitts, who continues to work for the Port Authority at $1 per month. Most of the discussion is how do we proceed. Thats where we are at, how to move forward and nd the customers that will bring the jobs. St. Joe is proceeding on several fronts. Company senior vice president Jorge Gonzalez said the company was to the point of being able to rollout the new Port of Port St. Joe website and would bring the webpage for viewing and input at the next Port Authority meeting. The company is in the midst of its market analysis which will provide insight into what companies and industries target for the Port of Port St. Joe. He said the rail grant to fund the expansion and improvement of rail lines was moving ahead and he was close to providing drafts of the marketing plan for review and input. Eastern is moving along and work has begun on the site, Gonzalez said. When the cranes get here it will be exciting. We are trying to frame the opportunity (in the marketing plan). The port is all of us. We are shining a bright light on the entire port. With Gonzalez last Friday was Dr. Rick Harper, director of the Of ce of Economic Development and Engagement at the University of West Florida. Harpers of ce is charged, under Senate Bill 2156, to provide performance-based appropriations from a $30 million fund $10 million per year for three years to assist with economic development and environmental projects in the eight Florida counties impacted by the BP spill. The funds are intended, Harper said, as supplemental funding beyond any received by counties from other sources, such as the RESTORE Act. This is a closing fund to be used to provide incentives to businesses to bring jobs to Florida, Harper said, noting the funding is based on a per-job formula. We are eager to recruit projects to Gulf County and rural counties to the east. That incentive has to be the thing that pushes the project over the nish line. It is but not for funding. But not for these funds, the project would not happen. The emphasis in on expansion, recruitment and retention of businesses and jobs. He said some restrictions on spending the money such as household income thresholds have been relaxed to facilitate distribution of the funds. Harper said the Port of Port St. Joe would t into the niche of a geographydependent business, providing marine services to the oil industry, for example. You are likely to succeed in niches and one niche is servicing the underwater drilling industry, Harper said. The governor is high on ports. Hearing the plans for the Port of Port St. Joe sounds like it is in the sweet spot. We are looking for projects big enough to make a difference. This is essentially a zero percent loan which when the job performance threshold is met, the principal will be forgiven. Niche-based operations have been our focus, said Port Authority member Patrick Jones. Gonzalez said that Harper highlighted another potential pot of funding for port development, a pot that supplements the pots of funding potentially coming from BP oil spill nes the RESTORE Act facilitating federal action while Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi pursues a separate claim from BP. This (pot) is unique because it is geographic and it is unique because it is time-sensitive, Gonzalez said. OIL from page A1circulating among the counties and the goal is to have it passed by all counties by Oct. 1. If it is unsuccessful, or if the counties begin ghting amongst themselves, there is a possibility that Gov. Rick Scott or the Legislature could step in and form their own committee to meet the requirements, FAC of cials said. I think some of the reason its set up the way it is right now is because the state didnt think we could do it, but they thought wed screw it up and they could have our money, Bay County Commissioner Mike Thomas said. The consortium will have at least one representative from each county and be responsible for the development of a state plan for Floridas share of the RESTORE Act dollars. Individual counties will have total control of their local allocation. This consortium has to prepare the plan, Holley said. Will there be competition for projects between the counties? You bet. With 23 counties combining in a single consortium, Panhandle of cials said they were concerned they would be outvoted by the peninsula counties and would lose out on state fund dollars. FAC representatives said they were working to address those concerns, which could be solved with a weighted voting system, but urged locals not to be distracted by details. The perfect de nition of a compromise is when everyone is equally dissatis ed, said Santa Rosa County Commissioner Jim Melvin, who spoke in favor of the consortium. EcosystemThe FAC vetted concerns from Rep. Steve Southerland, a Panama City Republican and major force in Washington behind the RESTORE Act, that the Gulf Coasts shing communities and smaller, rural counties would be overlooked in the process. Franklin County Commissioner Smokey Parrish said Franklin County has been particularly affected because of the large population that relies on the Gulf and Apalachicola Bay to make a living. Thats the base of our economy, Parrish said. Its all about the pristine value of our area. Were more concerned about our environment and our ecosystem. Parrish said RESTORE funding is needed to bring the Franklin County economy back to where it was before the spill. Theres no shrimp in Apalachicola Bay; there hasnt been in two years, Parrish said. We need studies to nd out whats going on. We need to take RESTORE dollars and gure out how to x it. Okaloosa County Commissioner Dave Parisot suggested addressing the economic losses felt by shing communities be carved out from the state plan, perhaps by setting aside a certain amount of money for sheries, instead of weighting the distribution formula to counties. I think we all need to go home and digest the draft and talk about it, he said. Key to the kingdomGulf County Commissioner and former FAC President Bill Williams said the key to the kingdom lies in knowing the pots of money and where they ow. Williams also said he feels there is doubt at the state level as to whether the counties will be able to pull it off. I do think a lot of people, including the state, dont think we can do this, Williams said. The key is effectiveness, the key is implementation and the key is staying together; if we do that, well be ne. Williams, who has been involved with RESTORE since day one, said the process has gone from very few people understanding the bill to folks coming out of the woodwork looking for money. Weve got the opportunity to change the Panhandle and the state of Florida like no one has ever seen, Williams said. Our opportunity is through our numbers and our strategies. Between now and Oct. 1, FAC representatives will establish consortium framework, establish policy guidelines for the agency and conduct a preliminary legal analysis. The proposed budget for the transition period is $53,000, 75 percent of which will be paid for by the eight disproportionately affected counties and 25 percent by the remaining 15.The DetailsThe ve affected states will split 35 percent of the RESTORE Act funds. In Florida the allotted amount is being split among the affected Gulf Coast counties based on the severity of oil spill impact and to be used for ecological and economic restoration of counties. A formula based on population, distance from the spill, miles of affected shoreline and other factors has been established by the Florida Association of Counties. Florida is unique in the RESTORE process as the only one of the ve Gulf Coast states to send the money directly to the affected counties. The eight disproportionately impacted counties Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla will receive 75 percent of the funds, with the remaining 15 coastal counties splitting 25 percent. The remaining money will be divided between research, a federally designed plan and state-designed and implemented plans.

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR THE ENTIREYEAR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, August 2385 7450% Fri, August 2485 7530% Sat, August 2584 7530% Sun, August 2683 7530% Mon, August 2785 7660% Tues, August 2885 7520% Wed, August 2984 7520% 23 Mo 130pm 1.0 810pm 0.6 24 Tu 355am 1.0 327pm 0.7 1053am 0.6 630pm 0.6 25 We 352am 1.2 117pm 0.4 26 Th 419am 1.4 240pm 0.1 27 Fr 505am 1.7 349pm -0.1 28 Sa 602am 1.9 451pm -0.2 29 Su 704am 2.0 549pm -0.3 30 Mo 805am 2.1 639pm -0.3 31 Tu 901am 2.1 722pm -0.2 23 Mo 712am 1.4 657pm 1.2 1238am 0.3 118pm 0.7 24 Tu 735am 1.5 813pm 1.1 105am 0.5 220pm 0.6 25 We 803am 1.5 951pm 1.0 133am 0.7 336pm 0.5 26 Th 836am 1.6 200am 0.9 505pm 0.3 27 Fr 918am 1.6 629pm 0.1 28 Sa 1010am 1.6 739pm 0.0 29 Su 1113am 1.6 838pm -0.1 30 Mo 448am 1.3 1224pm 1.6 707am 1.4 929pm -0.2 31 Tu 505am 1.3 134pm 1.6 825am 1.4 1014pm -0.2 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Sa 1235am 1.0 1209pm 1.2 423am 0.9 547pm 1.0 2 Su 1200am 1.2 142pm 1.1 618am 0.8 430pm 1.0 3 Mo 1202am 1.3 746am 0.7 4 Tu 1220am 1.6 906am 0.6 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Sa 446am 1.4 441pm 1.6 1047am 0.8 1117pm 0.7 2 Su 459am 1.5 529pm 1.5 1125am 0.6 1136pm 0.8 3 Mo 513am 1.5 618pm 1.4 1203pm 0.6 1154pm 1.0 4 Tu 532am 1.6 710pm 1.4 1242pm 0.5 E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com Page 8 Thursday, August 23, 2012 OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY By FELICIA KITZMILLER522-5114 | @PCNHFelicia fkitzmiller@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH They might be concrete and rebar to a human, but to sh off Bay Countys coast the 40 structures lowered into the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday are a sanctuary. Using a $60,000 grant from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Bay County sank 40 arti cial reef structures in the Gulf about 10 nautical miles from St. Andrew Pass. The structures are placed in pods of four and scattered in 10 locations in the area. Bay County extension agent Scott Jackson said the reefs will attract snapper, grouper and bait sh. The thing thats neat about this project is weve got all these different types of reefs, Jackson said. Weve been getting a lot of snapper, but these should give us some different types of sh. The 40 structures were a mix of four-sided limestone pyramids, multilevel rock cylinders and rectangular concrete caves. As the crew of the Maranatha sank the structures, each weighing more than 4,000 pounds, the GPS coordinates were recorded and will be posted on the extensions website. There are about 230 arti cial reefs in Bay County and the surrounding area in various stages of development. Small, bait sh are attracted to the reefs quickly, sometimes in only a day or two, but larger sh take longer to locate the structures. A reef typically reaches maturity in four to ve years, Jackson said. Reefs are constructed to last for about 20 years but can be destroyed or abandoned before then. Were enlisting the help of shermen to help evaluate the quality of the reefs, Jackson said. The reefs commissioned through the FWC grant cost about $1,500 each. Finding the funding for a large number of reefs is difcult, Jackson said. We dont get the money to do this very often, he said. The money for the project was fronted by Bay County and will be reimbursed by FWC. Commissioner Bill Dozier said the development of arti cial reefs long has been a priority of the commission because of the economic effect on the county. Whether its for commercial shing or sport shing, its an enhancement to the industry, he said. For longevity you cant just keep taking, taking, taking and never give back. Arti cial reefs have about a $134 return on every dollar invested in Bay County, Jackson said. Bay County charter sherman Bobby Fuller said he has been shing the Gulf of Mexico off the Bay County coast for 17 years and was excited about the expansion of the arti cial reef network. We do have natural reefs, but they are covered and uncovered by storms, he said. By doing this, it builds the population to where we can sh. Increasing the number of sh also gives charter shermen more options so the same reefs arent being shed and the populations depleted. We need to have these places for next time, Fuller said. I dont want to kill it because it saves the day sometimes. This is more than fun to me; this is how I make a living.Bay County sinks 40 arti cial reefs Photos by ANDREW WARDLOW | The News HeraldA worker with Walter Marine stands on an arti cial reef before it is lowered into the Gulf of Mexico about 10 nautical miles off Panama City Beach. Below, an arti cial reef is lowered into the Gulf. THE PORT ST. JOE STARFIND US ON FACEBOOK@PSJ_STARFOLLOW US ON TWITTER The MBARA king sh tournament will be going on this weekend, so hundreds of boats will be in our waters, making for some crowded boat ramps and long lines. The offshore grouper bite is the best bet going with a amberjack in the mix. Most anglers are shing the hard bottom 40 plus miles due south from Cape San Blas.Offshore InshoreAs the rain continues, St. Joe Bay will remain stained and muddy this week. Although the bad weather is upon us again this week, the shing is rather good. Great catches of trout and ounder are reported around the Pig Island area. Try shing the deeper channels for mid-afternoon action.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com ASection Healthy LifestylesWe say it all the time, Boy if I could just start exercising.So, we put on our cross trainers and head out, only to and our minds want more. Yoga is a low impact, easy calms and focuses the mind. Yoga achieves these successes through Asanas or poses and Breathe work. Using your such as a Sun Salutation, targets major muscle groups, pressure. As we end each session with Savasana, our senses and closing the eyes, we slowly rejoin the rest of the hectic world with a sense of completeness and satisfaction,eagerly looking forward to our next yoga class. By JASON SHOOT747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com WEWAHITCHKA The clock has struck midnight, and the carriage has reverted back to a pumpkin. So who wants a slice of pumpkin pie? Wewahitchka football coach Dennis Kizziah and the Gators will be hard-pressed to duplicate last years run into the Class 1A playoffs, but Kizziah remains self-assured the team can turn the upcoming football season into something positive. Kizziah will be escorting a young, inexperienced team to the eld every Friday night. What we do is just encourage them to continue to work, Kizziah said. The only way we get better is continue to work and work hard. Last years team started off and lost the kickoff classic. Then we lost to Port St. Joe and we lost to Vernon. But we kept preaching, We can do this. We can do it. Youve got to believe in what were doing. Just keep working. Finally things started going our way. We won a close game or two, and all of a sudden wed won seven games in a row. Were approaching it the same way. The kids know we have a young team, but at the same time we want them to know that we can compete. Were not going to lay it all on being young. Were going to do our very best and compete hard to win every game. The Gators will nd it dif cult to approach last years gaudy offensive numbers. Theryl Brown, who rushed for 2,226 yards and scored 37 touchdowns, was tabbed the Class 1A player of the year as a senior. Quarterback Justin Flowers accounted for nearly 1,600 yards of total offense, but he, too, was a senior last year. Also gone is last years leading tackler, Corey Walding. The burden will rest largely on a new set of playmakers if the team wants to return to the postseason. There are two noteworthy returnees, though, who will be featured prominently on both sides of the ball: tailback Jalyn Addison and linebacker Brandon Price. Addison ran for 734 yards on 74 carries last year, and he also contributed in the passing game with 13 receptions for 227 yards. His presence will take some pressure off sophomore Rashard Ranie, who is taking over as the full-time quarterback. Hes a lot stronger and hopefully a step or two quicker, Kizziah said of Addison. He worked extremely hard in the offseason, and in camp hes been working very hard. He knows a lot lies on his shoulders. If he can stay injury-free and carry the ball 20, 25 times a game, thats what we want. Kizziah said Ranie was on the eld a lot last year both as a free safety and a backup quarterback. Kizziah called Ranie a very good athlete who stands 6-foot-1, 180 pounds. He thrown the football really well, and hes got a lot of football savvy, Kizziah said. We throw it all at him. He played on JV, and they ran the same thing that we run varsity-wise. When their season was over, we moved him up and he got a lot of snaps last year with the varsity. He played a lot of defense and offense last year. Kizziah said the Gators have good size across the offensive and defensive lines, but he cautioned those groups are inexperienced and dont feature a lot of depth. He highlighted sophomore Jared Melvin, a 280-pound right tackle who is a very strong man. The left tackle, junior Trey Bowles, is 6-1, 235. Starting left guard Gage Gaskin is 6-1, 220. Kizziah hopes his team will play a physical brand of football. Weve got probably 15 kids who play on everything, Kizziah said. They play on all special teams, on offense and on defense. What weve preached is we try to play ironman football. We preach to them every day about conditioning. We work em, man. The kids that get through our camp are tough kids, I promise you. Last year we were in so much better shape than the teams we played. Wed be down three, four touchdowns going into the fourth quarter in several games. All of a sudden it was time to turn the switch on and wed end up winning by a touchdown. Wed score three, four touchdowns in the fourth quarter. A lot of that went to conditioning. Our kids believe in that, that theyre never out of a ballgame. Price highlights the Wewa defense, returning for his senior campaign after collecting 87 tackles last year. Hes back, and he really had a great offseason, Kizziah said. Hell be our (weakside) linebacker. Hes just hard to block. He sees things really well, and the rst step is key. Whatever his keys are, he works hard in practice to get those down. He believes in those keys we teach him, and that gets him to the football. Kizziah noted another two newcomers whom he expects to contribute. Tristen Bryant will step in at strong safety, and 225pound Josh Hurd will be a blocking back on offense and a noseguard on defense. Fortunately, those kids are very aggressive kids, so you put them somewhere they can use that aggression, Kizziah said. Go to the ball and make plays or block somebody. Fortunately these two kids, each one of them has knowledge about the game. Were taking them and using that aggression. Theyre doing a good job for us.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Roman Quinn didnt wait long for his rst allstar selection. Quinn, playing in the Class A short-season New York-Penn League, was selected to play in the leagues All-Star Game last Tuesday. The game was played in front of 5,897 at Mahoning Valleys Eastwood Field in Niles, Ohio, according to Scott Dykstra, a contributing writer for MLB.com. Quinn, selected as a shortstop, had two hits, including his rst professional home run, an inside-the-park homer, as his National League team beat the American League 8-1. Quinn, playing for the Williamsport (Pa.) Crosscutters, entered the game as a pinch hitter in the eighth inning. Quinn faced Hudson Valley right-hander and Tampa Bay Rays rstrounder Taylor Guerrieri and the Phillies secondround selection from 2011 laced a shot through the hole at shortstop and started running, Dykstra reported. Once I hit the ball, I thought it was an easy double, Quinn told Dykstra. So I just took off and saw that they were waving me in. Gosh, it was just really unexplainable. Quinn had an RBI single in the ninth to nish 2 for 2 with a game-high 2 RBIs. Quinn had nine triples entering the All-Star Game and talked to Dykstra about getting his rst over-the-fence home run. Its a big deal, obviously, Quinn said of his inside-the-park home run. But at the same time, it loses a little bit because I know its not going to be showing up on my stats sheet. Quinn is proving his all-star bona des while learning a generally new position and hitting approach, according to a story that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer just before the All-Star game. In the story, Staff Writer Marc Narducci reports how the short season in Class A ball has been a learning one for Quinn. Not only has Quinn had to learn a new position, he also took up switch-hitting after signing with the Phillies. The 5-foot-10, 170pounder, a center elder at Port St. Joseph (sic) High School (Fla.), is playing shortstop now. A natural right-handed batter, he has become a switch-hitter because the Phillies wanted to make use of his speed, Narducci writes. Quinn did play some at shortstop as an underclassman, but was a fulltime center elder as a senior. Quinn experimented with switch hitting during summer ball before he was drafted. Heading into the weekend before the All-Star Game, Quinn was batting .277 for the Crosscutters with an on-base percentage of .353 as leadoff hitter, according to the teams website. Quinn also had 17 stolen bases in 21 attempts and had nine triples. The kid never hit left-handed and is facing college pitchers in our league, and it is pretty special what he is doing this year, said Williamsport first-year manager Andy Tracy to Narducci. He is a game-changer, and when he gets on base we are a different club. Quinn was the 66th overall selection in 2011 and the fastest player in the draft. His signing for $775,000 went down to the deadline. Quinn also had a scholarship offer from Florida State University. Quinn, the Phillies No. 8 prospect according to rankings by The Inquirer, understands he is a work in progress at the plate and in the field, Narducci wrote. With switch-hitting, I am getting more comfortable each game, Quinn said before a recent 7-1 loss to the visiting Connecticut Tigers. Ive been having my ups and down with it and have to keep with it. In the game against the Tigers, Quinn was 3 for 5 with a double, a standup triple and an RBI, all batting left-handed. One of his most impressive plays was a groundout to short, a routine ball that he almost beat out, Narducci reported. He has the ability to change a game in a number of ways, Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan told Narducci. We see him developing as a switch-hitter and being an offensive threat from both sides.Page 9 Thursday, August 23, 2012 PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRERRoman Quinn is learning how to switch-hit on the y during his rst season of professional baseball. Quinn shines in all-star game Wewa will just keep on working Star Staff ReportBoth county high school football teams will tackle and block somebody in another colored jersey for the rst time this fall when they participate in Kickoff Classics the next two days. Port St. Joe will be at Cottondale, with action beginning at 7 p.m. ET Friday with the Tiger Shark junior varsity playing one quarter against the Cottondale junior varsity. The Tiger Shark varsity will play one half against Cottondale and one half against R.F. Munroe before Cottondale and Munroe nish the night with a half. Wewahitchka will host Blountstown at 7 p.m. CT tonight at Gator Field. There will be a special ceremony at 6:45 p.m. to dedicate the new scoreboard to Tim Strange, a former Gator player who was paralyzed after being hurt on the eld. KICKOFF CLASSICS TONIGHTThe only way we get better is continue to work and work hard. Last years team started off and lost the kickoff classic. Then we lost to Port St. Joe and we lost to Vernon. But we kept preaching, We can do this. We can do it. Youve got to believe in what were doing. Just keep working. Finally things started going our way. We won a close game or two, and all of a sudden wed won seven games in a row. Were approaching it the same way.Wewahitchka football coach Dennis Kizziah

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LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The numbers continue to multiply for the Shark 100 Club. Entering the clubs 26th year in existence, participation and enthusiasm is up this year, president Willie Ramsey said, and the total contributions to Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School athletics continues to move north of $100,000. This past year, the members were a catalyst for $7,592.54, which after minor expenses for hats and programs, goes entirely toward supporting Tiger Shark athletics, Ramsey said. The membership dollars are multiplied each year by the biggest fundraiser of the calendar, the annual chicken dinner. The Shark 100 Club purchases all the chickens and xins and ensures they are cooked to delicious perfection, and athletes sell the tickets and receive all money from ticket sales for their respective program. Last spring, 765 chicken dinners were sold, generating almost $4,600 for Tiger Shark athletic programs, with the Shark 100 Club forking over less than half that amount to fund the dinner. Community support is the key, Ramsey said. This requires a team effort. And this year I see a little additional excitement. The Shark 100 Club sells memberships in four categories: Tiger Shark: for a donation of $100, the individual, businesses or organization receives one Shark 100 hat, two reserved seats to home football games, program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Mako Shark: for a contribution of $250, an individual, businesses or organization receives two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Bull Shark: for a contribution of $500, individuals, businesses or organizations receive two Shark 100 hats, two reserved seats at home football games, two reserved seats at home basketball games, special program recognition and reserved parking at football games. Sand Shark: for a $50 donation, parents of Tiger Shark athletes receive one Shark 100 hat and program recognition. The following are members of the Shark 100 Club: Rich and Liz Brenner $250, James and Rita Simmons $250, Matthew and Kara Taylor $100, Bayside Florist & Gifts $100, Waterfront Auto Sales LLC $100, Bay Wash of Port St. Joe $100, June and Eddie Davis $100, Gulf Coast Real Estate Group, Sherry Thacker and Blair Morgan $250, Dan Christie $100, The Pickels Family $100, Kerigan Marketing Associates Inc. $100, Mel Magidson Jr., P.A. $100, Blake Rish (Haughty Heron) $100, Jim Norton $100, Andy Smith $100, Aaron Farnsley $100, Ronald Pickett $100, Tommy Lake $100, Capital City Bank $100, Roberson & Associates $250, Sisters Restaurant and Preble Rish. Anyone interested in joining the Shark 100 Club may submit their contribution to the Shark 100 Club, P.O. Box 524, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Voters of Gulf CountyFor those in Gulf County that supported me in the Primary Election, thank you. Your show of support is humbling. For the many of you that will now be voting in the general election, I hope that you will consider me for your Supervisor of Elections. My past experience in business and Supervisor of Elections by working diligently with the people I serve. It is so nice to live in a county that has been so receptive and encouraging. Mr. Shawn Butler has proven to be a tough competitor and I have the sincerest respect for him. It takes courage to put your name before the public and I admire his well ran efforts. Thank you Shawn for running a race with dignity and honor. In the general election, November, you have my assurance that I will continue to run with that standard. I look forward to answering any questions or listening to your suggestions. Dont hesitate to call me at 850-647-2564 or email me at electwyvonne@hotmail.comThank you and God Bless America...... voting is our inherited right....so VOTE! Democratic candidate for Supervisor of Elections, Gulf County (Pd.Pol.Ad.) THANK YOU GULF COUNTYIt has been an honor and privilege to walk the streets and knock on doors of the voters in Gulf County. I have enjoyed meeting with you and seeking your consideration in this years election. Although I was not successful in winning the election, my campaign was a success. I got to meet and talk with a lot of wonderful people across this great county. In life, we all go through times of discouragement. us into the people we should become. It has truly been an honor to serve you the last twelve years, and I am looking forward to continuing to serve you for many years to come. Thanks again for your support! Brian HillCandidate for Gulf County JudgePaid by Brian Hill For County Judge (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Prompt Dependable Same Day Service LocalA10 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012GRL Football sign-ups to end SaturdayStar Staff ReportFrom 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET Saturday, Aug. 25. will be the nal time to sign up to play football for the Port St. Joe Dolphins or Jaguars of the Gene Raf eld Football League. The Dolphins will eld a team of 7-, 8and 9-yearold players. The Jaguars are 10, 11 and 12 years old. The sign-up will be at the Port St. Joe Fire Station on Williams Avenue. Please be sure to bring a copy of the players birth certi cate, proof of a recent physical exam and $60. If a physical was not done recently, one should be scheduled right away. Immediately following sign-up, the players will be tted for and receive their practice equipment. First practice will be at 5:15 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27, with the players dressed in shorts and helmets. One week later, the teams will go into full pads and the real fun begins. Parents should be assured that Gene Raf eld Football League coaches are an experienced group that not only know the game but always have the safety of your child in mind. They know how to teach our youngsters the proper way to play the game. Sportsmanship, responsibility and teamwork are emphasized. Sign up your young athlete this Saturday and let them have the opportunity to participate in this outstanding program. Shark 100 Club celebrating 26 yearsTIM CROFT | The StarThe Shark 100 Club is celebrating its 26th year, during which the club has donated more than $100,000 to Port St. Joe Tiger Shark athletics. FIND MORE NEWS AND SPORTS AT WWW.STARFL. COM

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By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com A career came full circle on Monday for Loretta Costin. Having begun her career as a teacher at Rutherford High School in Spring eld and spending the past three decades in an assortment of positions at the Florida Department of Education, the new director of Gulf Coast State Colleges Gulf/Franklin Center was all smiles Monday evening as she greeted students for the opening of the fall semester. We are getting it kicked off, Costin said. This is a great job. Its great to work with students again. To be back with students, I love it. It is rewarding. I want to see the campus grow and play an important role in the community. And I think it will play an important part in economic development. Costin chose to begin the semester as on the main campus in Panama City, with a party, complete with cookies, brownies and piping hot pizzas. Although the students might have been somewhat bashful about digging in, Costin was like a sprinter in the blocks. A primary goal is to reach out to the high schools a fair percentage of the almost 350 students enrolled for the fall at Gulf/Franklin are dual-enrollment high school students and highlight to those students not enrolled what the college offers. In particular, Costin said, she wants to raise awareness among those students and the community have been somewhat bashful about digging in, Costin was like a sprinter in the blocks. A primary goal is to reach out to the high schools a fair percentage of the almost 350 students enrolled for the fall at Gulf/Franklin are dual-enrollment high school students and highlight to those students not enrolled what the college offers. In particular, Costin said, she wants to raise awareness among those students and the community A primary goal is to reach out to the high schools a fair percentage of the almost 350 students enrolled for the fall at Gulf/Franklin are dual-enrollment high school students and highlight to those students not enrolled what the college offers. In particular, Costin said, she wants to raise awareness among those students and the community COMMUNITY www.starfl.comThursday, August 23, 2012 BPage 1Section A new year at Gulf/Franklin Center FairPoint boosts area Internet speedsSpecial to The StarPort St. Joe area residents and businesses have faster broadband Internet speeds available from FairPoint Communications. These improved speeds are a result of FairPoints signi cant upgrades to its network and will provide up to 15 Mbps, depending on location. FairPoint serves almost 11,000 customers in the Port St. Joe area. FairPoint is connecting more customers to the people, information and opportunities they care about, now even faster, plain and simple, said Lisa Hood, senior vice president of the Telecom Group. We have a range of packages to suit all types of Internet users and budgets from our standard package, which is recommended for basic Internet users, to our ultra package, which is recommended for online gaming, streaming video and other high-bandwidth activities. Customers should call FairPoint at 877954-8508 to learn more about the new Internet speed options, nd out what speeds they qualify for and choose a plan that best suits their needs. FairPoint offers broadband packages as low as $19.99 per month with a new one-year term commitment. Some customers might be eligible for free speed upgrades or FairPoints ber broadband service, available in select locations, which delivers impeccable speeds and reliability. Additional information about FairPoint products and services is available at www. FairPoint.com. You also can connect with FairPoint on Twitter (http://www.twitter. com/myfairpoint) and Facebook (http:// www.facebook.com/myfairpoint).Star Staff ReportYoung country star Lee Brice, whose stunning second album, Hard 2 Love (Curb Records), has rocketed him to the top of the charts, has been selected to headline this falls Florida Seafood Festival. Brice will take the stage on Saturday night, Nov. 3, and is expected to draw a huge crowd to the main stage at Battery Park in Apalachicola. A four-time Academy of Country Music nominee, his highest-charting single A Woman Like You, reached No. 1 in April 2012. He also had Billboards Top Country Song of 2010 with Love Like Crazy, the title track to his 2010 debut album of the same name. The song spent 56 weeks on the Hot Country Songs chart, peaking at No. 3 and setting a record for the longest run in the charts history. Besides his own material, he has co-written singles for Garth Brooks, Adam Gregory, Eli Young Band and Tim McGraw. JARRETT ELLIOT | Special to The StarJasmine Elliott, daughter of Jarrett Elliott, met American Idol runner-up Lauren Alaina on July 31 while in the Piggly Wiggly in Apalachicola. Alaina was staying on St. George Island while on a vocal cord rest. She is touring with Sugarland. Alaina was in the Piggly Wiggly and was spotted by cashier Maegan Andrews, who asked for a picture, but Alaina said she would rather come back the next day when she could be dressed better, The next day, in the pouring rain, the 17-year-old singing sensation did as promised and came back to have pictures taken. Alainas debut album Wild ower was No. 2 on Billboards Top Country Album chart and No. 5 on the Billboard Top 200. MEETING AN IDOL Lee Brice to headline Seafood FestivalLEE BRICE See GULF/FRANKLIN B5 Childhood memories of local pioneers Editors note: This is another in a continuing series on local pioneers. This story, the second part of which appears this week, concerns how the community of Jones Homestead came to be. This is a story shared by a granddaughter of one of the children raised by the Jones family .By BEVERLY MOUNT-DOUDSDr. Adolphus Winston Jones was born at Columbus, Ga., Sept. 20, 1864, the son of Joseph and Mary E. Jones. He was given a dental education by the Seaboard Railroad and for several years he was employed at the State Hospital and practiced dentistry in River Junction. He also carried the R.F.D. mail from there for four years. He moved to Port St. Joe in 1908 where he lived on a homestead several miles south of town, practicing his profession here and in Franklin and Liberty counties. He built his present home in 1918. He and Miss Ada Belle Rogers of Smyrna section near River Junction were married in 1894. They raised a large family of children of their own and took care of a number of motherless children. Dr. Jones and Ada Belle raised, six sons, Henry, Rutherford, Marcellus, George W. and Clyde W. and Richard B. Jones; and one daughter, Mrs. Sarah (Jones) Johnson. Here is the childhood memoirs of Katherine Lombard (as told to her daughter Kathy Freeman), stepdaughter to George Jones. To my dearest Mother, I pursued this project as a tribute to you who along with Dad provided me with memories of a happy childhood. KathyThe Depression deepensThe depression affected everybody. When the train went into Port St. Joe, men would sneak rides on it. They rode in seeking work. Grandpa had a car and took us riding from time to time. When he passed men walking down the road searching for a job, he stopped and took them as far as he could. It was a terrible time! Grandpa was older and there was a new dentist in town. He still had work but not as much. We always had food to eat..Grandmas canned food and seafood, mainly sh.PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHY FREEMANBefore becoming Miss Gulf County, Ethel Milstead was crowned Miss Port St. Joe in 1934. See HOMESTEAD B6

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B2 | The Star OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyMeet the adorable Susan, a 17# 8yr Shih Tzu. Susan is very friendly and playful for her age. She loves attention from everyone and is very attentive. She walks very well on her leash and knows the commands of sit and stay. This little girl is housebroken, cat friendly and is a sweet as they come. Susan would make a great companion for a senior or someone that just needs a friend. WE ARE IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH SOME GENERAL MAINTANCE, CLEANING, PAINTING ECT VOLUNTEERS ARE ALSO NEEDED FOR PET SOCIALIZATION AND FOSTER HOMES. SCHOOL CREDIT AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. We are now proud partners with www.petsforpatriots.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Our shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! IF YOU ARE MISSING A PET, PLEASE CHECK WITH US!Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society SocietyThursday, August 23, 2012Star Staff ReportThe GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club Inc. will hold an auction at 9 a.m. CT on Saturday, Oct. 27, at Lake Alice Park. Items are needed for this auction. If you have anything that you would like to donate to the auction, we will take almost anything, and will pick up the items. The Club is also selling tickets for Desserts for a Year. Tickets are $5 each, and the winner will receive a homemade dessert made by members of the Club each month for a year. Drawing for the Desserts for a Year will be done during the upcoming auction. If you would like to donate any items or purchase tickets for the Desserts for a Year, call either Patty Fisher at 639-9794 or Dianne Semmes at 639-5345/227-6425. All proceeds from these projects will go to scholarships for students at Wewahitchka High School, as well as various projects to help support our community. Star Staff ReportA class on eBooks will be held at the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Gulf County Library 1-2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, in the librarys meeting room. The class will teach participants how to download free eBooks to your Kindle, Nook, iPad or other device. Class size for this free class is limited so registration is urged. Call 229-8879 to register and reserve your seat.Star Staff ReportThe annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 1. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be served at 12 noon CT. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a welllled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering, held on the Saturday before Labor Day, strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. For more info, call Ludine Riddle at 974-8438,Star Staff ReportGulf County Senior Citizens, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of non-perishable foods for their low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for clients that love to play bingo several times a week. Hot, nutritious noon meals are provided Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and older. Transportation may be available to meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to the sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items listed above can call Debbie at 229-8466.Star Staff ReportTallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will close its Port St. Joe satellite location as of Sept. 20. Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will be available for your continued orthopedic care at its other locations. For appointments, call 850526-3236 or 850-229-1177 If you would like copies of records you can contact the TOC of ce at 850-8778174 or Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic, 3334 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 400, Tallahassee, FL 32308.Star Staff ReportOn July 20, Wanda Wheeler, a long-time resident of Port St. Joe, suffered a massive lifechanging stroke. The family has established an account at Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union in Wandas name to help defray medical costs for her ongoing care and long-term recovery. Wheeler is currently employed at Bo Knows Pest Control and has worked for Watson Brothers Construction and Monumental Fabrication. Any donations for Wheeler are greatly appreciated. Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engagedJimmy and Dianne Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University in 2010. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in Dec. 2012. Jessica is currently employed as a second grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, and a 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is currently employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012 at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with a reception to follow at the Centennial Building. Meghan Williams, Mathew Peek to wedMr. and Mrs. Sammie Williams and the late Mrs. Susan Porter Gaylor would like to announce the engagement and the forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Meghan Elizabeth Williams, to Mathew Jacob Peek, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Peek of Grif n, Georgia. Meghan is the granddaughter of Ms. Bobbie Watts Marshall of Port St. Joe and the late Jack Watts of Hawaii, the late Mr. and Mrs. Sam Williams of Blakely, Georgia, Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Farmer of Wewahitchka and Mr. and Mrs. Roger Beasley of Wewahitchka. Matt is the grandson of Ms. Mary Carver and Mr. John Floyd, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Peek of Thomaston, Georgia. On Sept. 15, 2012, the ceremony will be at Long Avenue Baptist Church at 3:30 p.m. ET. Reception to follow at Oak Grove Church. All family and friends are invited. After their honeymoon, Meghan and Matt will be living in Grif n, Ga.Wewahitchka Womans Club to hold auction Senior citizens in need of donations Annual Noma Community reunion Sept. 1 Library to hold eBooks class Bank account established to assist Wanda WheelerOrthopedic of ce in Port St. Joe to close www star .com

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AUTOMATIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7**PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATIONNo lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENERAC standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT:$4500.00**Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com REBECCA L. BECKY NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURTPol. Adv.approved & paid for by Becky Norris, Dem., for Clerk of Court(Pd.Pol.Ad.)Thank you for allowing me to continue serving you as your Clerk of Court; it is very humbling and an extreme honor. I am truly blessed. Respectfully, Rebecca Becky Norris Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Special to The StarThe rst week of school has come and gone. It is amazing to see our students grow and change from year to year. It is also very exciting to see new little faces with backpacks as big as their little bodies. The bright smiles and their enthusiasm for school will make any teacher work hard. The Faith Christian School staff works as a team to produce Christcentered students who are wise, healthy and well adjusted. Every staff member works independently within the team; using his or her God-given talents and tools to attain this goal. It is not too late to enroll for the 20122013 school year. Call the ofce at 229-6707 for more information. Scholarships are available. The 2011-2012 yearbooks have arrived. Stop by the front ofce for your copy. The yearbook editor, Janice Evans, and her staff have once again presented a fabulous book of memories. Special to The StarGulf Coast State College will offer new health care programs starting this fall with an Associate in Science Degree. Were very excited to be able to offer these programs. Theres a lot of interest and students can nd jobs right here, said Libby McNaron, coordinator of Surgical Services. The Endoscopy Technician program is new, and the Central Sterile Processing Technician and Surgical Technology programs will be included. This is the rst time any of the 28 colleges in the Florida College System has offered the Endoscopy Technician program. Were the rst in the state of Florida, McNaron said. Endoscopy Techs work in GI Labs (Gastrointestinal) and work with Endoscopy rigid scopes. Gulf Coast is one of only three colleges in Florida to offer the Central Sterile Processing Technician program. that was recently changed from a vocational to college certicate and now qualies for Pell Grant funding, making it more affordable and accessible to students. Central Sterile Processing graduates work in the sterile processing areas of hospitals, outpatient surgical centers or physician ofces where they clean and prepare instruments, McNaron explained. Without these types of programs, its basically on-the-job training, but now these technicians can go in with great preparation, she said. The Surgical Technology program prepares students to become members of the surgical team. They work in operating rooms, preparing the sterile eld and passing instruments to surgeons and other surgical team members. For more information, contact McNaron at (850) 873-3551 or visit www.gulfcoast.edu.Special to The StarIf you missed your senior portrait appointment, call the photographer at 769-6277 to schedule your p ortraits.  If you just want the formal pose only, we will b e have  make-up sessions on Wednesday, Aug. 28, at t he school.  There will be a $15 sitting fee. You may have your portraits taken by any photographer you choose.However, your formal portrait for the yearbook must be taken by Ro-Mo Photo. If you want a formal, yearbook only pose, contact Mr. Taylor in Room 718 prior to Wednesday. Wednesday, Aug. 28, will be fall picture day for grades 9-11. On Thursday, Aug. 29, fall pictures for grades 7-8 will be taken.Star Staff ReportFor many years, students from Port St. Joe High School have attended the South Florida Leadership Training Camp (SFLTC) in Davie. This summer, Carley Clements, president of the Student Government Association, and Nicolette Haddock, treasurer, attended Eagle Advanced Leadership Training Camp. In order to attend this camp, a camper must have already attended SFLTC. Carley and Nicolette attended SFLTC last summer, where Megan Gannon, 2010-2011 SGA president, was selected to be a junior counselor. Last summer, Carley was selected to be a member of the Honor Council for SFLTC, which has only happened one other time at Port St. Joe High, when Gannon won the honor in 2008. This summer, Carley also won the honor council for Camp Eagle. She is the rst student from Port St. Joe to ever win this prestigious award. The honor council awards are given out by the counselors and are given to students who demonstrate the characteristics of a true leader. Congratulations Carley and Port St. Joe High School SGA for continuing the legacy of leadership at Port St. Joe High School. The Lions Tale School NewsThe Star| B3Thursday, August 23, 2012 The Lions TALE SGA continues legacy PSJHS to hold portrait days GCSC offers new programsSPECIAL TO TT HE STARNicolette Haddock, Carley Clements and Megan Gannon.

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Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayDinner.5:00 6:00 pm AWANA.6:00 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry6:15 7:30 pm Prayer/Bible Study.6:30 7:30 pm Read the Bible for Life Class6:15 7:30 pm Nursery..6:00 7:30 pm SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM 10:30 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE TIME 9 11 AM MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM WEDNESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 8 AM & WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL(850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Special to The StarWe thank the following churches and the community for their Christian outpouring of love, participation, donations and kindly responding to our request for help to support the bene t program on Aug. 12 for Sister Jean Whitley-Thompson. We are grateful for your participation, and your presence truly helped made the program a success. Again, we thank the below listed churches and individuals for your donations to assist Sister Jean Whitley-Thompson with the repairing to the roof of a house for her to have a safe place to live. In addition to the public offering received, we thank the community for a total of $1,930.90 in donations. First stage: Temporary roof top Individuals: Brother Threadwill, Panama City, $20; Brother Leon Campbell, Panama City, $10; Deacon Raymond Rogers, materials, $40; Deaconess Amy Rogers, $20; and Elder Donald Nickson, $20. Second stage: Bene t Program New Bethel Baptist Church, PSJ, $40; New Bethel AME Church, PSJ, $50; Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church, PSJ, $75; Thompson Temple Holiness Church, PSJ, $50; Church of God In Christ, PSJ, $25; Amazing Grace Apostolic Church, PSJ, $25; Victory Temple Holiness, PSJ, $50; North Port St. Joe Adult Community Choir, PSJ, $100; Rev. Jesse Hawkins (Tallahassee), $100; Elder David Wood, $5; Greater Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church, Tallahassee, the Rev. Dr. Craig Riley, Pastor, $700.Annual Mens Day at Zion FairZion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will observe their 51st annual Mens Day at 11 a.m. ET on Sunday. Elder Willie Chambers of Greater Deliverance in Panama City will speak. The Rev. Wilson Hall and the Zion Fair family invite you to come and have a blessed time in the Lord.Tent Revival to feature Evangelist Thomas BoozerThere will be a Salvation and Healing Tent Revival at 1249 Hwy. 22 South in Wewahitchka. The revival will be nightly, excluding Sundays, at 7:30 p.m. CDT. Evangelist Thomas Boozer will preach the word of God. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information call (229) 465-3312. Come expecting your miracle. Ladies Fall Bible Study at FUMCFUMC Fall Bible Study will begin Wednesday, Sept. 5. There is a Season: Finding Contentment in Every Season of Life, written by Laurie Cole. Cole will help to recognize and understand Gods purpose for each season of our lives. The wisdom we gain will allow us to grow in our walk with Him, to know Him more intimately and to rediscover His glorious and meaningful plan for our lives. There will be fellowship and refreshments. Study books may be purchased for $15 in the church of ce or on the rst day. For more information, call the church of ce at (227-1724.)Women Fashioned by God programA Women Fashioned by God program will be at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church at 7 p.m. ET on Saturday, Sept. 8. During this program, local community women will be honored. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information, see Sister Freddie Davis, program coordinator. Annual Women Day at Philadelphia PrimitiveAnnual Women Day will be at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church on Sunday, Sept. 16. Mother Patricia Mayes of Crawfordville will be the guest speaker. An inspirational and motivational service is planned. Drummond Family at New HarvestThe Drummond Family will be in concert at 10:30 a.m. CT Sunday, Sept. 23 at New Harvest Fellowship Assembly of God Church, 1800 N. State Highway 71 in Wewahitchka.Special to The StarOn Sunday, The Masters Men will lead both the 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. worship services at First United Methodist Church. This group of men began to sing in Milton when the Rev. Fulcher was serving there at First United Methodist Church. This is a great opportunity to hear some excellent gospel music and you want to be sure to invite someone to come worship with you. The Masters Men, a Southern Gospel quartet, was founded in late 1995 as the Men of Woodbine. The Masters Men Quartet emerged from that original group. What began as a Thursday night sing-along became a music ministry the Lord continues to bless in amazing ways. Throughout the past 17 years, they have performed more than 800 concerts and have released six projects, Glory to His Name, Im Free Again, Waiting for His Return, Farmers Opry House Favorites, Nothing But The Oldies and Tryin To Make It Home. The quartet has competed in several national talent contests and achieved rst place nishes in both the Suwannee River Jubilee and Gold City Homecoming. For more information on the Masters Men Quartet, visit www.mastersmenquartet.com. Faith BRIEFS FAITHThursday, August 23, 2012 Page B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com The Masters Men to visit area At no time does God withdraw His love, just because we sin. He will apply a little pressure at times to restore our fellowship again. The Holy Spirit lives within, but not every time will this keep us from sin. Getting out of fellowship is through the hardness of our heart. This has caused much sin, and our fellowship to depart. Many times He takes things that cause us to part. We have to be stripped of pride many times to make a new start. Ask with a contrite heart, return to me your power that once by grace I knew; forgive my sin that grieved your heart, and help me to be true. If you lived it once you can do it again. Its only a matter of asking forgiveness, and turning from your sin.Billy JohnsonWhom God forgives, He also restoresThanks received for Jean Whitley-Thompson bene t program

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National Formidable Footprint Hurricane Exercise Saturday August 25 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon ESTGulf County EOC, 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd. Bldg 500 Port St. Joe, FL 32456Local Community groups and neighborhood associations are being sought to participate in the Formidable Footprint A National Neighborhood Exercise to be held on Saturday, August 25 from 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon EST. The three-hour disaster training event will focus on a hurricane scenario and is part of an ongoing series of nationwide disaster exercises. tional participation across the different United States time zones. For important exercise and registration information please go to:www.FormidableFootprint.org designed for local organizations such as Neighborhood Watch and Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT), Fire Corps and faith / community-based organizations that work to support the needs of community and neighborhood residents during and following a disaster. To-date, 2,097 neighborhood associations, community response teams, community / faith-based organizations and local governments across the United States have sucThe Formidable Footprint National Neighborhood Exercise series is underwritten by a team of national, regional and state organizations with the joint goal of providing an opportunity for local organizations to assess their disaster preparedness, response and recovery capabilities. For more information contact Gulf County Emergency Management. Stephanie Richardson 850-229-9110MEDIA ADVISORY(2012.84) BURKEPROP PP www.VoteMitchBurke.comPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Mitch Burke, Republican for Property AppraiserPd.Pol.Ad.Dear Gulf County Voters:I humbly thank you for your support and encouragement through the Primary Election. I am excited about the upcoming election on November 6th and am honored that you have elected to put me on the ballot for Gulf County PropertyAppraiser. Now is a great time for fresh eyes on property values and a willingness to work hard. As a citizen born and raised in Gulf County, I am excited about the opportunity to give back and serve this community. I look forward to listening to your concerns and serving the people of Gulf County. If elected, I promise that my door will be open to all citizens and I will serve the people of Gulf County with honesty, integrity and accountability. I will work hard to earn your vote on November 6th. I am available to speak with you anytime. Please feel free to call me on my cell at 227-5702 or email me at mtburke12@gmail.com.Thanks again for your valued support! Sincerely, LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, August 23, 2012 GULF/FFRANKLIN from page B1Summer is a time for enjoying the great outdoors, but before you go tromping off into unfamiliar woods, and wild terrain, you should familiarize yourself with some of the more common poisonous plants. A little preparation can save you hours or days of the uncomfortable after-effects of coming in contact with poisonous plants. This also is a good time of year to talk about poisonous plants because the sap is most abundant during the summer time, and its usually the sap which causes the problems. In this article I will talk about poisonous plants in general, and then well go into a little detail about poison ivy, oak and sumac. My information was provided by Sydney Park Brown and Patricia Grace, Horticulturists of the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Poisonous plants can be divided into two groups: those that cause skin irritation and those that cause internal distress and in rare cases even death. Its important to note that even though we usually think of poisonous plants as something you nd only in the woods, they actually are almost everywhere in the garden, along roadsides, even in the house. Many factors inuence the poisonous nature of a particular plant. Plant poisons can be dispersed throughout the plant, or they may be localized in a particular plant part, such as in roots, berries, or seeds. The amount of poison in a plant may vary, even among plants of the same species depending on the time of year, the weather conditions and the soil. In addition, the poisonous reaction varies among people coming in contact with the plant. Obviously, the health and age of the person, and the quantity of the poison contacted or ingested will inuence the effects. As we said, if you can learn to identify some of the common poisonous plants, youll be better able to avoid them. So well briey go over the three most common ones: poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac. Poison ivy can have a variety of leaf shapes, but one identifying feature remains constant, the leaets always come in threes, with two of them directly opposite each other. White waxy owers can be found on the smaller branches, and sometimes remain on the stems even after the leaves have fallen. Poison ivy commonly grows as a vine, climbing into trees, over fences, and up the side of walls. In open elds, however, poison ivy might appear as a shrub. Poison oak usually appears as a low growing shrub. The slender, upright branches bear leaet which resemble oak leaves. They also grow in threes, just like poison ivy. Usually the undersides of the leaves are lighter in color, because theyre covered with ne hairs. Poison sumac is a coarse woody shrub or small tree. It never grows in a vine like fashion the way other poisonous plants do. It frequently grows near swamps, and ranges in height from 5 or 6 feet to 25 feet. The leaves are divided into seven to thirteen leaets that grow in pairs. At the end of each stem, is a single leaet. In the spring, leaves are bright orange and velvety in texture. Later in the summer, they become dark green and glossy, with lower leaves a pale green in color. In the fall, the leaves take on a russet brownish color. These are the most common poisonous plants, but there are many more that you should familiarize yourself with. Learn the poisonous plants in your neighborhood and keep small children away from the. For more information on Poisonous Plants, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u.edu. that while the Center offers thriving nursing and correctional ofcer programs, students also can receive many, if not all, of their general education core credits at Gulf/Franklin. That is an opportunity for growth, Costin said. I want to reach out to those students who are not dual-enrolled. It is important that the community realize that the next time they are thinking about the Gulf/ Franklin Center they are thinking we have a lot of opportunities here. We can offer students a lot of general education courses. That makes it possible for them to get what they need here. A lot of Gulf and Franklin county students just cant get to the main campus. Costin also sees a strong role for the college in economic development. She said she hopes to enhance the computer lab into something of a workforce center and provide career guidance and counseling. She is seeking feedback from the business community regarding potential workforce training programs beyond nursing and corrections. Part of her mission is visibility, being at meetings of the Board of County Commissioners, the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Economic Development Committee, the Port Authority, to both raise awareness of the college but also glean a better understanding of local workforce training needs. When the port starts creating jobs we want to be ready to provide the skills that will be needed, Costin said. The college is ready. We want to look at workforce training. That outreach and being visible in the community ties together with economic development. Overall, everybody (at the main campus) has been 100 percent supportive. Dr. (Jim) Kerley has been great about wanting to grow this campus and provide greater access. That is what it is about for him, greater access to higher education. Costin also noted the board of trustees of the college decided this year not to raise tuition or fees. We are still a nice value, Costin said. And on opening night, it is a value with a slice of pizza thrown in. ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension directorSome things you should know about poisonous plants TT IM CrCR OFT | The StarThe new semester under a new director, Loretta Costin, began with a pizza party for the students.

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Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847TODAY!CALL 227-7847 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 HOMESTEAD from page B1The dining room was a large room with a beautiful decorative sideboard. It was wide and long with two drawers and two doors that opened at the bottom. It had little shelves and a big mirror at the top. The table was a large oval that seated a large family. We ate many meals around that big table. When Papa went to town, he took the horse and cart. Often I rode with him and he dropped me off or picked me up at the grammar school. Sometimes there were two or three children whose parents were a little late picking them up. They chanted to me in singsong voices, Ethel Milstead, lives on a homestead, sleeps on a bedstead! I got used to hearing it and paid very little attention to them. When the silent movies rst came out, they showed them in a large public building in Port St. Joe. The building was always used as a multi-purpose building. If the men of the town needed it for a meeting, it was available. It was the same for the women. Up until then, we only had a radio. The whole town turned out for the movies. This was very exciting! One day Pauline and I went to the movies and since the younger people always sat near the front, we had the front row seats. The plot in this particular movie included a bad man sneaking up on the other man whose back was turned to him. Pauline got so caught up in the plot that she suddenly sat up and yelled, Watch out! Hes behind you! Suddenly she realized what she had done and her eyes got big. She quickly slid down in her seat where nobody could see her. So everybody looked at me! They thought I had done it! I was so embarrassed. Aunt Sarah was an excellent seamstress and often sewed for her daughter, June, and me. She had a funny little habit of sticking her tongue straight out of the corner of her mouth when she was cutting a pattern. I particularly remember her making me a pretty dress out of dotted Swiss fabric. She also made my graduation dress out of white organdie with small ower designs. The pattern was designed with shoulders straps. Later when I entered the beauty pageants, she made the dresses I wore. She kept June and I dressed nicely especially when we were teenagers.A new stoveGrandpa bought Grandma a new range (stove). It was long, wide and had a high back. The top of the range had a warming closet with two little doors that lifted up and closed, similar to a ap. It kept the food warm until all the food was cooked for the meal. The front right side opened up so a re could be built in it. On the other end of the stove was a tank that held water. We kept it lled so the water would be heated and ready to be used when needed. I helped Grandma cook a lot when I was a teenager. In those days, our came in large containers about 2 feet tall. Grandma Jones always kept an empty container to sit on while she cooked. On many mornings, we made pancakes for the men. I carried stacks of huge pancakes to the table. The men came in hungry from early morning shing and ready to eat a big breakfast. Kelloggs Corn Flakes had become popular, and I was fond of them. Grandma Jones bought them so I could eat them for breakfast. Grandpa and Grandmas boys were named Clyde, Gus (Augustus), Henry, Elbert and George (my stepdad). Grandma loved to read. I brought books home from the school library to read. Often I found Grandma reading the books. She always looked rather sheepish when I saw her. She got the boys names from the books she read. During my teen years, all of the men were gone from home except Clyde. He left one time but then returned home. Fishing, day or nightThe men enjoyed shing from time to time. Some of them would go oundering all night. Sometimes I went with one of them. They had a little skiff that was rigged with a metal basket that protruded from the front of the boat. Since it was dark and hard to see, a re was started in the metal basket. As the re burned, the embers would fall into the water and the re would light up the nearby water so we could see the sh. The men held the gig with one hand and guided the boat with the other hand. When the light from the re fell on a sh, they gigged it, caught it with their hand and put it in the boat. Most of the ounder were huge. Many times when they returned home, they had so many sh they shared with the neighbors. I helped Grandma fry them for breakfast. We always had grits and biscuits to serve with the sh. One night I went oundering with Clyde. We got out of the boat and waded in the shallow water looking for sh. Suddenly he yelled, Climb in the boat, climb in the boat! I scrambled in the boat with him right behind me. The movement of the boat caused the re in the basket to go out. I did not know what happened until he told me that we were standing near a big bed of stingrays. We no longer cared to sh! We went home. Every afternoon, Grandpa walked to the post of ce to buy a newspaper. Then he went across the street to the local store where all the old men gathered to talk. They sat on long wooden benches in front of the store and visited for an hour or so. Then Grandpa went back home. School daysI was involved in a lot of school plays from the time I was a little bitty girl. Grandpa and Grandma Jones never went out for entertainment except to see me in one of the plays. They never missed a one! In fact, the entire town turned out for all the school activities. There was one particular play when I was a junior in high school that had a boys role. All the boys refused to be in it. The teacher who taught our Spanish class asked me if I would take the part. I agreed. I had my hair cut in a boyish bob and even wore boys clothes for my role. The play called for a balcony where the senorita stood. I strummed a guitar and sang to her. When I was a senior in high school, my teacher asked me to take charge of the exams for three children instead of staying in study hall. I assumed the responsibility of their paperwork and stayed with them while they took their tests. I loved school always made good grades. I enjoyed writing poetry and stories. I always planned to write a book but never did. While in school, I had to write an essay. I wrote about a girl who lived in the mountains. She wanted to leave and go off to school but since her family was very poor, she had to save what little money she could get before she left. Finally she saved enough money and prepared to leave. Just before she left, she overheard her sister and boyfriend talking. The boy wanted to marry her sister. The girl did not want her sister to stay there with no education, marry, and continue to live in poverty. After the boyfriend left, she confronted her sister and told her she had changed her mind. Instead of the young girl leaving home and pursuing an education, she wanted her sister to have the opportunity. The essence of the story was the young girl wanted her sister to have a better life.Miss Port St. Joe, Miss Gulf CountyThere were some ladies in town who were involved in the school activities. A contest for Miss Port St. Joe came up and they approached me about entering the contest. I laughed but actually ended up a contestant. The contest was based on beauty, poise, and personality. On the night of the pageant that was held at the local hotel, Port Inn, I laughed, smiled, and had a great time but thinking all the time I would never win. But much to my surprise, I did! I won Miss Port St. Joe and walked off with the silver loving cup! Later in 1934, I entered the Miss Gulf County beauty pageant and again to my amazement, I won! After graduating from high school, I worked for a man and woman who owned a small caf. They had a lady who cooked while I waited on tables. One day I accidentally broke a cup. I was so upset over it. While the lady who owned the caf was resting that afternoon, I went to the store and bought another cup with my own money. It was not the same pattern but I did the best I could. When I told the lady about it, she was so surprised that I replaced the cup myself. She told me I did not have to do that. I was deeply touched one day when the lady asked me to keep the moneybag while she rested in the afternoons. I felt honored that she trusted me with the bag of money. There were a lot of older, retired men who went to Florida to work. They ate at the caf often. On two occasions, men proposed to me. I declined their proposals. Lilly Mae went to Heron Bay, Ala., to live with Grandma Jones son, Henry, who owned a seafood business. Henry had married a lady named Celia. Lilly worked for them, doing their housework while they worked in their oyster shop. She worked for them until she married William Jasper Johnson. He was nicknamed Pie because of his love for eating pies. The small pies were homemade, sold and delivered to the local shops. I was the only one of the children left for a while with Grandpa and Grandma Jones. After I graduated, I went to Downing Shafner Institute (DSI). Although Grandpa and Grandma Jones were not blood relatives, they treated us as if we were. They not only provided a home for us but also took good care of us. I have fond memories of both of them. I always felt grateful to them for taking care of us. I stayed there longer than any of the other children and always felt loved by them. Aside from losing my Daddy and Mama at an early age, I had a very happy childhood and happy memories of growing up in Port St. Joe with my brother (for a while) and sisters. THE BEGINNINGIn Katherine Freemans words, here is how the granddaughter of one of the original Jones boys of the eponymous Jones Homestead came to write about early Port St. Joe: Mother was staying with us during the month of August 2006. One morning while she and I were having breakfast on the patio, she began telling me a childhood story. The next morning we were dining again on the patio and she told me a different one. When she began recalling memories yet again on the third morning, I unobtrusively reached for a pen and began taking notes. I planned to keep them and read the stories later. A few days later the idea came to me about putting together a collection of her childhood memories. So this began. Each day we collaborated on her stories. I listened, questioned, and wrote. Finally I began compiling the notes that I had accumulated by hand, on my laptop, and on my desk computer. I tried to use Mothers descriptions, expressions and actual sentences as much as possible. Every day I keyed the latest stories into the computer, printed the pages, and gave them to Mother to edit. Each edit stimulated her memory with more details and additional childhood stories. Some things I had heard many times, others were new to me. Placing the stories in chronological order allowed me visualize Mothers childhood as never before. All were real life stories.some were painfully sad and brought tears to my eyes.others were so sweet and deeply touching. All of the stories woven together reveal the childhood memories of my Mother. I contacted Charlotte Pierce, city historian of Port St. Joe on September 16, 1998, and explained the reason for my call. I was looking for any archived newspaper articles about the beauty pageants in which Mother had competed. Charlotte kindly referred me to her Dad, Dave Maddox. Charlotte said her Dad was a little younger than Mother but would probably remember the family. I called Dave, explained what I was looking for and he immediately told me there was no newspaper in Port St. Joe in 1934. He began to reminisce about Doc, Adolphus Jones, whom Mother knew as Grandpa Jones. Dave said that Doc was not only the dentist but a legend in Port St. Joe. Doc worked for the railroad until he became crippled from an accident. After his injury, the railroad company sent him to dental school and that was the reason he changed vocations. According to Dave (and Mother), Doc had a dental of ce with a large window in the side of his house. When Doc was in a hurry, he would open the window, stick the mans feet out, close the window on his feet, call a couple of his sons to sit on the mans lap, and pull the tooth! Dave said that Doc along with some of his sons, would pack up their boat, and go shing for days at a time. When he returned, he would always have a long beard. Doc would go home, heat up some water, get in the tub and soak. Katherine Elmira Milstead, born November 30, 1917, died February 23, 2010, she married Paul Oliver Lombard who became a minister. They had ve children: Paul Lombard Jr., Barbara Holland, Anthony Lombard, Beverly Melton, and Kathleen Freeman. They also had nine grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 23, 2012 The Star | B7 24/7 Experienced Care giver looking for a private in home senior, care giver or sitter job. In Gulf County, please call 850-639-3029 Text FL19665 to 56654 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 3530783 88943 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2012 PR 33D Division IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN, deceased, whose date of death was June 7, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. Personal Representative: Diane E. Suchan 105 Ocean Ridge Lane Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles L. Hoffman, Jr. Attorney for Diane E. Suchan FL Bar No: 229768 SHELL FLEMING DAVIS & MENGE 226 Palafox Place, 9th Floor Post Office Box 1831 Pensacola, FL 325911831 (850) 434 2411 Fax: (850) 435 1074 E-Mail: choffman@ shellfleming.com August 16, 23, 2012 88892 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000321 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KELLY A HARTSFIELD; MICHAEL A HARTSFIELD;, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 7th day of August, 2012, and entered in Case No. 23-201-CA-000321, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, Wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and KELLY A HARTSFIELD, MICHAEL A HARTSFIELD and UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5th STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM ET on the 13th day of Sept., 2012,the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, SOUTH LAGOON SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 13th day of September, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk Of The Circuit Court B. A. Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 (954) 453-0365 FAX (954) 771-6052 1-800-441-2438 August 23, 30, 2012 88919S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2012-90-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL P. KUMARICKAL; ET AL., Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICES IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 13, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on August 30, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 3, Block 35 of SAINT JOSEPHS ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NUMBER THREE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale Dated August 6, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 89209 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1594 Application No. 2012-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 06291-225R Description of Property: Lot 45, Surfside Estates, Phase II, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Pages 46 and 47, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: William Green and Robert Green (Deceased) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 26th day of September, 2012. Dated this 21st day of August, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 26, August 23, 30, September 6, 13, 2012 89143S IN THE CIRCUIT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-146 PLANTERSFIRST Plaintiff, vs. SAND DUNES DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a Georgia Limited Liability Company, et al., NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final judgment of Foreclosure entered herein, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., on the 13th day of September, 2012, the following described property: LOT 58, JUBILATION PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 12, PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on this 13th day of August, 2012. **Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Notice. Individuals with Disabilities needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the court administrators office, as soon as possible, telephone (850) 229-6112; or if hearing impaired, 1-800-995-8771 (TTD); or 1-800-955-8770(V), VIA Florida Relay Services. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 89141S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-09CA CAPITAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. RHONDA M. HARRISON, FRANK R. CATALANO A/K/A FRANK RAY CATALANO, EAST COAST RECOVERY, INC., L.W.T., INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT (S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: FRANK R. CATALANO A/K/A FRANK RAY CATALANO: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County Florida: Beginning 1623 feet North of the Southwest corner of Section Eleven (11), Township Seven (7) South, Range Ten (10) West, thence run along the West side of State Highway Numbered Seventy-One (71) in a Northeasterly direction one hundred (100) feet; thence in a Northwesterly direction a distance of four hundred forty-four (444) feet; thence in a Southwesterly direction a distance of one hundred (100) feet; thence running in a Southeasterly direction a distance of four hundred and forty-four (444) feet to the Point of Beginning. All of said land situate, lying and being in Section 11, Township 7 South, of Range 10 West. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth & Bowden, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within 30 days of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: August 8, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 89211S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1508 Application No. 2012-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 06268-301R Description of Property: PARCEL ONE-COMMENCING at the Northwest Corner of Section 20, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 89 Degrees 15 Minutes 46 Seconds East (South 89 Degrees 15 Minutes 46 Seconds East), along the North line of Section 20, a distance of 1318.57 feet to a point; thence South 00 Degrees 41 Minutes 27 Seconds West (South 00 Degrees 41 Minutes 27 Seconds West) a distance of 2843.64 feet to a point on the Southerly margin of County Road 30E; thence North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West (North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West) along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E, a distance of 270.77 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING of the lands herein described, thence continue North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West (North 16 Degrees 50 Minutes 42 Seconds West) along the Southerly margin of County Road 30E, a distance of 56.95 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West (South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West), a distance of 280.00 feet to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West (South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West) a distance of 69.1 feet, more or less, to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico; thence Southeast along the waters of the Gulf of Mexico to a point which is South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West (South 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds West) from the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East (North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East) a distance of 95.6 feet, more or less, to a point marked by an iron pin; thence continue North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East (North 58 Degrees 15 Minutes 29 Seconds East), a distance of 263.67 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, Name in which assessed: McGill Escrow & Title, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 26th day of September, 2012. Dated this 21st day of August, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 26, August 23, 30, September 6, 13, 2012 89153S PUBLIC NOTICE Hwy 22 Storage 1249 Hwy 22, Wewahitchka, FL #95 David Skipper #L-6 Gloria Bruce To be sold on September 4, 2012, 8:30 A.M. if payments are not brought up to date. August 23, 30, 2012 89207S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1451 Application No. 2012-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 06248-685R Description of Property: Lot 37, of SHALLOW REED PHASE TWO, ACCORDING TO THE Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Pages 21-24, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C. Calvin Warriner and Rebecca Warriner All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 26th day of September, 2012. Dated this 21st day of August, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 26, August 23, 30, September 6, 13, 2012 89245S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA File No. 12-35PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN EDWARD PARKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Edward Parker, deceased, whose date of death was July 5, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 23, 2012. Personal Representative: Clifton Osborne 273 Settlers Ridge Rd. Wewahitchka, FL 32465 Attorney for Personal Representative: Mel C. Magidson, Jr. Attorney for Clifton Osborne FL Bar No: 261629 528 6th St. P.O. Box 340 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 227 7800 Fax: (850) 227 7878 August 22, 30, 2012 89251S PUBLIC NOTICE Regular meetings of the Port St. Joe Port Authority Board are held on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month. Meetings are held at 10:00 Eastern Time in Building A of the Gulf/Franklin Center (Gulf Coast State College), 3800 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida. The following are meeting dates from September, 2012 through August, 2013. Wednesday, September 12, 2012 Wednesday, September 26, 2012 Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Wednesday, October 24, 2012 Wednesday, November 14, 2012 Wednesday, November 28, 2012 Wednesday, December 12, 2012 Wednesday, December 26, 2012 Wednesday, January 9, 2013 Wednesday, January 23, 2013 Wednesday, February 13, 2013 Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Wednesday, March 13, 2013 Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Wednesday, April 10, 2013 Wednesday, April 24, 2013 Wednesday, May 8, 2013 Wednesday, May 22, 2013 Wednesday, June 12, 2013 Wednesday, June 26, 2013 Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Wednesday, July 24, 2013 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 Wednesday, August 28, 2013 Interested persons may attend and be heard at the public meetings or provide comments in writing to the Port St. Joe Port Authority, Post Office Box 745, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32457. Transactions of the public meetings will be recorded. Persons wishing to appeal any decision made during the hearing will need a record of the proceeding and should ensure a verbatim record is made, including the testimony on which the appeal is based. Any person who wishes to attend and requires assistance may call the Port Authority Office at (850) 229-5240. August 23, 2012 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Howard Creek: 6811 Blossom Hill Rd. Sat Aug 25th 8am-?PORCH SALEMisc., tools, collectibles, Baiwa reels, Pabst Blue Ribbon hanging light, generator ($300, paid $600.) Text FL21736 to 56654 Hunting Lease Member Wanted near Port St. Joe. 1,600 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $500. For details: 850-227-5052 Cash Management SystemRoyal Alpha 710 ML Exc cond. Barely used. $150. 850-229-8072 Text FL21626 to 56654 Port St Joe: 2br, 2ba 1cg, kitchen, LR, Balcony, long rental, near bay & dock, close to downtown, excellent area, 850-624-4264 Text FL21705 to 56654 Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 Mexico Beach Canal Front3 BR, 1.5 BA, boat dock, large lot, available 09/15/12, stove, DW, fridge, no pets. Close to Tyndall. $1,100 per month. Call (850) 340-1072.Text FL21191 to 56654 St. Joe Beach, 3br, 2ba, Mobile Home, large, fenced backyard, large front porch. $800/mo + $800 dep. (575) 491-9037. Please leave a message. $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 23, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By DIANE DIRESTAMonster Contributing Writer You might look good on paper or in your interview suit, but if you are looking to nail your big interview, looks are not everything. How you sound often is more important. But many job seekers let careless speech habits sink their chances of landing that plum job. Here are six common language mistakes and how to keep them from sabotaging your interview:1. NonwordsFiller words such as um, ah, you know, OK or like tell the interviewer you are not prepared and make you sound like a Valley Girl (or Boy). A better strategy is to think before you speak, taking pauses and breaths when you lose your train of thought. Everybody utters an occasional um, but dont let it start every sentence.2. Up-talkA singsong or rising inflection at the end of every sentence creates a tentative impression and makes it sound as though you are asking a question instead of making a definitive statement. You need to speak with conviction when selling yourself in an interview. Bring your intonation down when ending a sentence to avoid talking up.3. Grammatical errorsThe interviewer might question your education when you use incorrect grammar or slang. Expressions such as aint she dont, me and my friend and so I goes to him are not appropriate. Be sure you speak in complete sentences and that tenses agree. The interview is not the venue for regional expressions or informality.4. Sloppy speechSlurring words together or dropping their endings impairs the clarity of your message. To avoid slurring and increase understanding, speak slowly during an interview. Make a list of commonly mispronounced words, and practice saying them into a tape recorder before the interview. Some common incorrect pronunciations include aks for ask, ath-a-lete for athlete, wif for with and dree for three.5. Speed talkingWhile everybody is a bit anxious during an interview, you do not want your information to fly by like a speeding bullet. A rapid speaking rate is difficult to follow, and speed talkers are seen as nervous. Slow down your racing heart by doing some breathing exercises before the interview. To avoid rushing, listen to the question, and then count two beats in your head before answering. When you finish a sentence, count two beats again before continuing. Dont be afraid of silence. Pausing is an effective communication technique. The interviewer needs a few seconds to process what you just said anyway.6. Weak speakWimpy words modify or water down your conviction and in the end your position. When you pepper a conversation with hopefully, perhaps, I feel, kind of and sort of, the message you convey is a lack of confidence. Use power words such as Im confident that, my track record shows, I take the position that, I recommend or my goal is. The language you use gives the listener an impression about your level of confidence and conviction.The bottom lineYou do not have to study elocution to speak well. Simply slow down, take time to pronounce all the syllables and leave slang at home. Companies want job candidates who are well-spoken and articulate, and recruiters will not represent a job candidate if they do not match the clients profile. 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