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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03854
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 08-16-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03854

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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR COUNTY RACES INCUMBENTS RETAIN POSITIONS By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Where the term applied, incumbents ruled Tuesday night in Gulf County. District 5 County Commissioner Warren Yeager survived a particularly brutal campaign, Becky Norris easily beat back a challenge for Clerk of Courts, Tim McFarland earned from voters what he received early this year from the governor, and Billy Quinn Jr. and Linda Wood survived challenges to their school board seats. Those were the universal primaries, election-deciding outcomes based on being either nonpartisan elections County Judge, Gulf County School Board or contested by members of the same party with no challengers on the other side. The total votes cast, 5,381, represented 54.45 percent of the registered voters. Almost 2,000 of those votes were cast either by absentee ballot or early voting. Results are unof cial until the canvassing board certi es the results in the next two days. Yeager, who survived a blistering campaign season, won 50.04 percent of the vote against challengers Bill Koran, 15 percent, and Barbara Radcliff, 35 percent. Radcliff was seeking the District 5 seat for the second time. It is very satisfying, said Yeager, who won another fouryear term in an all Republican race for his seat on the Board of County Commissioners. I am grateful to the public. It is a humbling experience. Yeagers District 1 peer, Commissioner Carmen McLemore, also a subject of a singeing campaign, won the Democratic primary over Freddie Whit eld 631-504 and will face Republican Kenny Peak in November. The closest race of the night came in the District 3 BOCC Republican primary, where Joanna Bryan beat Johnny Mize by 11 votes to earn the right to move to November. Then Bryan will face Democrat Jimmy Rogers and John Grantland, who is running with CANDIDATE VOTES PCT COUNTY JUDGE Brian Hill 1,598 30 Tim McFarland 3,041 58 Jarred Patterson 627 12 COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 5 Bill Koran 186 15 Barbara Radcliff 450 35 Warren Yeager 637 50 SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 4 Lois Byrd 263 41 Billy Quinn, Jr. 382 59 SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 3 Melissa Farrell 336 35 Linda Wood 629 65 CLERK OF COURTS Keith Duke Jones 1,307 25 Becky Norris 3,903 75 Yeager, Norris, McFarland, Wood, Quinn re-elected $35,000 raised so far to save structure By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Exposure and awareness is everything to the effort to save the Cape San Blas Lighthouse and move it along the bayfront in Port St. Joe. Charlotte Pierce, city clerk and president of the St. Joseph Historical Society, said the General Services Administration, which must perform the red tape of having the property of cially declared surplus, available to interested parties and then awarded to an appropriate entity, is moving at light speed on the process. That is a huge hurdle to overcome. With erosion almost cutting off the access road to the lighthouse and keepers quarters, time is of the essence. On the fundraising side, a publication in British Columbia, Canada, has posted to its readers the story that ran several weeks ago in The Star concerning the plight of the lighthouse and the Historical Societys selling of Christmas ornament replicas of the lighthouse. The groups publisher said the article had generated considerable interest among lighthouse lovers north of the border and his group would be making a large order. Each ornament costs $20, of which $10 bene ts the lighthouse cause. Pierce said sales of the ornaments, which go to the Historical Society, have helped raise almost $35,000. The city also might have something of an answer from the Florida Legislature. A bill passed in 2012 speci cally mandates the Division of Historical Resources of the Department of State to undertake a study of all lighthouses in the state: The study must determine the location, ownership, condition and historical signi cance of all lighthouses ensure that all historically signi cant lighthouses are nominated for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places must assess the condition and restoration needs of historic lighthouses and help develop plans for appropriate future public access and use. The Division of Historical Resources is charged with a leadership role in implementing plans to stabilize lighthouses and associated structures and to preserve and protect them from future deterioration. When possible, the lighthouses and associated buildings should be made available to the public for educational and recreational purposes. The Department of State shall request in its annual legislative budget requests funding necessary to carry out the duties and responsibilities specied in this act. Funds for the rehabilitation of lighthouses should be allocated through matching grants-in-aid to state and local government agencies and to nonpro t organizations. Mayor Mel Magidson said it was unclear at this time what help the state could provide, but the statute seems to provide something of a lifeline. There is some indication to us that the Department of State must request funding to carry out this act, Magidson said. We may be able to coerce the state into helping us from a money standpoint. City gets push on Gulf Pines Port St. Joe city commissioners understood there would be a day of reckoning on several outstanding tax certi cates for Gulf Pines Hospital. They just didnt expect to have that day arrive so soon. Gulf County Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins noti ed city of cials recently of a request for a tax deed Victim of shooting off life support By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Everett Gant, shot in the head by a neighbor on July 30, continues to hang in there after being taken off life support equipment last week, according to Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent. The family decided late last week to take Gant off life support, but he has been breathing on his own, has shown some reaction to stimulus and opened an eye, said his mother, Gloria Gant. Gloria Gant said the family is still in a wait-and-see mode, and it remains unknown the extent of the damage sustained when Everett Gant was shot between the eyes at close range with a .22 ri e by Walton Henry Butler. Butler is in the Gulf County Jail being held without bond on a charge of attempted murder with a hate crime enhancement. Cape San Blas Lighthouse on historians radar SPECIAL TO THE STAR Debbie Hooper of joebay.com shot this gorgeous sunset shot over St. Joseph Bay during the Aug. 4 Scallop & Music Festival. While music was playing, some concert-goers took a break from the heat with a little wade into the bay. A golden moment Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A6 Sports ........................................... A7 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classi eds .................................... B7-B8 See LIGHTHOUSE A8 See SHOOTING A8 See ELECTION A8 Thursday, AUGUST 16 2012 YEAR 74, NUMBER 44 MBARA tourney next Saturday | B1 M c FARLAND YEAGER WOOD NORRIS

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012 RANDAL YAKEY 522-5108 | @ryakey ryakey@pcnh.com U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland is cosponsoring a resolution that aims to alter annual sh catch limits. Southerland, R-Panama City, said he introduced the legislation to remedy concerns with the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the federal policy that administers Americas sheries. H.R. 6350, known as the Transparent and ScienceBased Fishery Management Act of 2012, is designed to address inequities in annual catch limits, catch shares in the Gulf of Mexico, enforcement of shery laws and disaster assistance, among other issues. Parts of the legislation would open up catch numbers and over shing for review by local shery councils. If approved, the Secretary of Commerce would decide if the closing of sheries has become disruptive to sport (or) charter shing operations. I have heard from anglers from across North and Northwest Florida who have asked me to act as their voice in Washington, Southerland said just after the legislation was submitted. Southerland said the reason the legislation was introduced was to improve methods for setting annual catch limits and prohibit the expansion of catch share programs without a referendum. He also wanted to strengthen accountability measures for federal of cials who collect sheries data and determine disaster assistance. Environmental advocates counter the current policies are having a positive effect on the environment and loosening of those restricting early would be detrimental. Im certainly sensitive to the economic hardship, said Sera Drevenak, policy and outreach director of the Marine Fish Conservation Network. Our current system of sheries management isnt perfect; however, weve made major gains in our efforts to stop over shing and rebuild over shed stocks. According to Drevenak, Congress reauthorized the Magnuson-Stevens Act in 2006; at that time, the United States had 48 stocks that were subject to over shing. Drevenak said that number has dropped to 36 and, because of the science-based plan in place, can reduce that number further. The laws annual catch limits and accountability measures are working, and translating into greater shing opportunities for many of Americas anglers and commercial shermen, Drevenak said. Joining Southerland as original cosponsors of the bill are U.S. Reps. David Rivera, R-Fla.; Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla.; Jon Runyan, R-N.J.; Frank LoBiondo, R-Fla.; and Frank Guinta, R-N.H. New bill takes aim at shing catch limits By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Gulf County eighth-graders are moving to the information superhighway with greater speed thanks to a pilot program. The expansion of Information Technology courses, already offered to the high school students, will put eighth-grade students on a fast-track to industry certi cation in Microsoft Suites. This is teacher training and in turn the teachers will be training the students to earn industry certi cation in Microsoft Suites, said Sara Joe Wooten, assistant superintendent for instruction with Gulf County Schools. We already provide Computing for College and Careers (CCC) courses in the high school. Eighth-grader learning the IT courses will be able to move directly into the CCC curriculum. Port St. Joe Junior High School was selected in a competitive process to participate in a Middle School Information Technology Career Academy Assistance demonstration project sponsored by Workforce Florida Inc. Workforce Florida Inc. has teamed with The Whetstone Group (TWG), a leader in youth talent development, for the implementation of the technical assistance utilizing TWGs LEAD Through Workforce Innovations Career Pathways/Academy model to establish new CAPE IT Career Academies in 15 selected middle schools across the state of Florida. Workforce Floridas mission is to help Floridians enter, remain and advance in the workforce, said Chris Hart IV, Workforce Florida President/ CEO. Career Academies efforts to prepare Florida youth to meet 21st Century workforce demands advance this mission and support Gov. Rick Scotts vision of making Florida the worlds top business destination. The Port St. Joe Junior High IT teacher will be Shirley Thompson. Wewahitchka Junior High, with Debbie Gerber as lead teacher, will implement a similar program under the auspices of the Florida Department of Education. The main thing we are doing at both schools is putting in a computer course in eighth grade in order to lead to industry certi cation, Wooten said. Workforce Florida chose Port St. Joe Junior High and the DOE picked up several schools in the state that are doing the same thing. An analysis of national education data reveals that less than one in four high school graduates will attend college and earn a four-year degree, according to a press release from Workforce Florida. This means the potential exists for the majority of students in our country and state to enter the workplace without the skills necessary to compete in an ever-changing and global economy. This also means there has never been a more important time for the leaders of our schools and communities to recognize the value of quality career and technical education (CTE) programs that produce students with marketable skill sets tied to their community and states economic and workforce needs. By ensuring students graduate with skills needed by local businesses, Gulf County Schools is ensuring students have access to career opportunities while also ensuring the development of an ongoing talent supply chain that strengthens the competitiveness and economic well being of the entire community, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. These demonstration projects focus on middle school grade students earning nationally recognized industry certi cations in Microsoft and Adobe, two of the worlds leading digital literacy vendors. In looking at the data, it just makes sense to focus on Information Technology (IT) as these skills are foundational to many STEM occupations and support competitiveness across industry sectors which are vital to Floridas economy, said Whetstone Group president Melissa Bumpers. The goal, according to the Workforce Florida press release, is establish a talent pool supply chain essential to business recruitment and retention strategies while also experiencing many of the additional positive outcomes associated with these career academy initiatives; outcomes such as increased funding through the Florida Career & Professional Education Act, decreased disciplinary actions, decreased drop-out rates, increased academic scores and graduation rates. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to Home George E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy, cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy. Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independence by optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) County junior highs part of IT pilot program

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 16, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) T H E 1 6 T H A N N U A L CLASSI C CAR S HOW SPONSORS: The Star, St Joe Ace Hardware, Catheys Ace Hardware, Napa Auto Parts, Mango Marleys, Steamers Hot Dogs, Sharons Cafe, Killer Seafood, Chris Williams, Advanced Auto Parts, Bluewater Outriggers, The Port Fine Wine and Liquors, Mexico Beach Marina, Toucans, Half Hitch Tackle, Peggy and Cletus Heaps, St. Joe Auto Parts, Auto Value, Port St. Joe Police Department and The First Baptist Church. RONNIE Bs RESTAURANT GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. The Gulf County Chamber and 2012 Scallop Festival Committee would like to thank all of our sponsors, vendors, and volunteers for their hard work & generosity in making this years festival a success. CATHEY CONSTRUCTION By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Mexico Beach Chief of Public Safety Brad Hall submitted a letter to city administrator Chris Hubbard on Aug. 2 informing Hubbard that Hall would be retiring effective at 4:30 p.m. CT on Oct. 2. Halls retirement comes at a time when the Department of Public Safety is in upheaval. Hall, as well as two of cers, is currently on paid administrative leave pending inquiries or investigations by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. In addition, leaders of the volunteer re department have expressed dissent with several budget proposals from the city council to cut funding to the department, resulting in a threat to disband the department. According to the Sheriffs Ofce, FDLE has completed its initial inquiry, opening the way for the Sheriffs Of ce to undertake an investigation, which just got underway. According to Hubbard, who addressed the subject at last weeks city council meeting when asked by Councilwoman Tonya Castro, Halls retirement plans did not negate or stop the investigations in progress. The announcement that Hall was retiring was met by an audible gasp from the audience during the meeting. The FDLE inquiry was launched in May into what to date have been unspeci ed allegations. The council asked the BCSO to undertake an internal investigation after the FDLE was through. Castro said she wanted the council to look into hiring an independent agency to vet candidates for the chiefs position, and not to simply hire internally without a more in-depth search, although, she added, current Mexico Beach police of cers could apply for the position. No decision was made at last weeks meeting. In his retirement letter, Hall noted that he has been associated with the City of Mexico Beach since the age of 12 when he became a Chief of the Junior Fire Department. He served later as a volunteer re ghter, auxiliary police of cer, reserve of cer, full time of cer and was promoted from corporal to sergeant to lieutenant and nally chief of the Department of Public Safety, created in the late 1990s to consolidate police, re and EMS services. He noted that his tenure has featured ups and downs but I have many great experiences and memories to take with me on my next endeavors in life. Saying he would be grateful to assist in the process of administrative transition, Hall added that, I want to thank all of the citizens who supported me and gave me the opportunity to serve them as a true public servant for the last 21 years. This will be my greatest memory of all, I will forever cherish my public service. There will be a special city council meeting at 5 p.m. CT tonight at the Civic Center as the council discusses the design and plans for the new city hall and police department to be constructed within the rehabbed Parker House, which the city purchased last year. Hall to retire from Mexico Beach I want to thank all of the citizens who supported me and gave me the opportunity to serve them as a true public servant for the last 21 years. This will be my greatest memory of all, I will forever cherish my public service. Brad Hall, Mexico Beach chief of public safety

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A4 | The Star USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 How highs the water, mama? Its two feet high and rising. We can make it to the road in a homemade boat, Thats the only thing we got left thatll float, Its already over all the wheat and oats That Johnny Cash classic referring to a very real flood from his boyhood days in Arkansas is hitting just a little too close to home this morning. If it rains anymore Im gonna start looking for that Old Testament guy with the large boat and all those two by two animals on board. Dog days didnt come and go. They came and stayed! Its enough to make you search for your snorkel and goggles. I figure about one more day of this and ebay or Amazon.com will reinvent the term galoshes. We used to try to figure it out. Me, Leon and David Mark would sit out on the porch, with the rain pelting down, and discuss the scientific and weathermetric cause and effects that dogs had on the monsoon type rain that beset us every August. Leon declared it to be tied to some Sirius Dog Star constellation. It all took place high above the earth. The moon and the stars lined up just right and pressed, or maybe compressed, some cumulus clouds and the result was a steady stream of water hurling down on the whole world. I would lean over the side of the porch and peer skyward. It had been so cloudy we hadnt seen the sun, much less a star, since the middle of July! It was hard to test out that Dog Star theory if you couldnt see it! I will tell you this for a fact; our dogs knew something was amiss. Duke would hardly come out from under the house. He wouldnt run a coon. He didnt eat nothing, which wasnt like ole Duke at all. He did howl a lot. He barked at shadows. Hed chew on his tail. And hed fight those swarming mosquitoes like it was the war to end all wars! David and I thought it was just a coincidence that it rained a little more in the late summer. It was like a harbinger of the impending, and dreaded, new school year that was about to crank off. Daddy would bemoan how we could have used some of this rain back in the spring. I had trouble accepting that our dogs were the culprits. But it was as plain as the nose on your face that our canine crew knew more about the downpour than they were telling! But still, I really liked Duke. And I never thought it quite fair to blame forty-seven straight days of rain on him. We are all too quick to point fingers when we are standing up to our arm pits in water. And besides, it was pretty clear to us out at the end of Stonewall Street that dogs werent the only thing affected by the dark, ominous weather. While we were deeply engrossed in this meteorologistic hyperbole Mr. Walter Higgins drove by in his International three-quarter ton pickup truck. Folks, his two daughters were riding in the back, drenching wet, while Mr. Higgins and a couple of his prized beagles were living high and dry up in the cab. Didnt none of us speak till the truck turned on down the Como Road and went out of sight. It made no sense to me. I knew Charlene and Raylene fairly well. We wrestled sometimes in that field down below Terry Browns old house. They were not the prettiest girls in town by a whole heap, but they were nice enough. Raylene could toss you over her head and slam you to the ground if you werent careful. She put Ricky Gene in a headlock once till he turned pure purple. Both had enough sense to get in out of the rain! It appears, Leon broke the silence, Mr. Higgins opted for beauty over brawn. Grown-ups would be a tad more short tempered discussing hog prices in MaCadams Tractor and Implement Companys show room. Fights would break out among life long friends. No marriage was safe. Ive seen it raining so hard Calvin Purvis wouldnt come out from the Gulf Station and put gas in your car. All my girl friends told me its over for good in August, midst a downpour, usually with a little anger attached to their declaration. Sometimes I howled for joy, sometimes not. Mothers cakes would drop. Hens wouldnt lay. Milk cows would balk at being touched. I reckon every facet of life was affected by some aspect of the continuing rain. Were not mowing the grass. Leon always saw the glass half full. Course, he couldnt think past next Tuesday! Eventually the rain was going to stop and the yard would be knee deep to a Tyrannosaurs rex and wed have to bale it as we mowed! We chided Leon for being shortsighted. Hed shove me. Id hit Dave. As you might imagine, three teenage boys couldnt be confined to the porch very long. Wed both dump Leon out of the swing. The chase was on! Leon was World War II older than us and maybe a tad faster. But neither David nor I wanted that whipping hed give us if he caught us. We ran like the wind down Stonewall Street oblivious to the rain, the dogs, that Sirius Star or some weather report coming out of Memphis predicting dont put up your umbrellas just yet. I wonder today what Mr. and Mrs. Brooks or the Kennons or Vonell Webb must have thought as they sat on their front porches watching that scene unfold. I figure they either shook their heads and sighed, those Colbert boys again...or rightly surmised it was just another common place, every day, ordinary, phenomenon of Dog Days. Respectfully, Kes Raylene was as tough as she looked HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Back in July, I went back to see Ms. Fannie Lou in Vernon, Florida. Over a year ago, I had traveled back to Vernon to rekindle memories of RC Cola and MoonPie adventures with my Papa, who used to take me to Vernon, Fla., on adventures over 40 years ago. Ms. Fannie Lou was kind enough to invite me in her house and talk to me about Vernon when I came back in 2011. A magazine publisher recently called me to tell me that Ms. Fannie Lou was planning on moving to a retirement home soon. I needed to see her in Vernon one more time. We found her eating one Sunday afternoon at the United Methodist Church in Vernon. My children stood and stared as I sat down at the table with Ms. Fannie Lou and the other women. Im sure this house out back of the United Methodist Church, was for these types of events (eating, socials, etc.). I opened the door and went right in. Sometimes folks think I make up the people I write about. I dont. People from in and around Vernon, Fla., know Ms. Fannie Lou is real and is more wonderful than I could ever explain. Ms. Fannie Lou would probably remind you of someone from your hometown or perhaps a relative, maybe even your grandmother. Everyone in Vernon and I do mean everyone knows Ms. Fannie Lou. As a matter of fact, folks in Vernon have usually seen her, talked to her or waved at her within the last couple of days. Since rst writing about Ms. Fannie Lou, I have been getting messages from people who either know her or are related to her. They simply say things like, She is wonderful, We love her, or I will always remember her. Ms. Fannie Lou makes a difference. What more should one want out of this life? During the past 90-plus years, she has been a part of the wonderful little city called Vernon. She is a cherished friend, a good neighbor and the type of citizen every city needs regardless of size. According to the latest Census numbers, Vernons population is about 750. Vernons present Mayor, a very nice lady, was elected this year by a vote of 59-51. Papa always said he wanted to be Mayor of Vernon. I think I would rather just be a citizen. Vernon is a place where time stops, people speak to each other and folks love each other for who and what they are. Honestly, I think everyone has a Mayberry in their mind. It doesnt have to be in the South, it doesnt even have to be in America. I guess it doesnt even have to be real but, let me tell you, Vernon, Fla., is real. Now, what did Ms. Fannie Lou have to say? She was just as sweet and kind as she was the rst time I met her. I told her I had heard rumors about her plans to move to a retirement home. She conrmed that she would be moving and noted it was a very nice place she was going to. This made me happy. We talked about how my Mama had lived in a retirement home in Alabama and it went something like this. Ms. Fannie Lou asked, Did she like it? I said a lot of stuff, but this is what I remember saying. Mama didnt like it at rst, but then she started meeting folks she knew from long ago and rekindling old friendships. Mama wasnt very keen on the social events when she got there, but she then decided she liked them. She got to paint, lead Bible studies and eat with folks she knew every day. Ms. Fannie Lou looked at me like a little girl about to go out the door on her rst day of school. However, she did it with the beautiful eyes of a woman who had spent more than 90 years loving folks, helping them and being an important part of their lives. The other ladies sat around the table just kind of staring me. I understood why. Therefore, I changed the conversation to something else; I didnt know what else to do. I started talking about my Papa and our trips to Vernon over 40 years ago. The RC Colas, MoonPies, hoop cheese, boiled peanuts, green tomatoes and other things that made the trip and the destination perfect. The ladies around the table smiled and piped in with I remember and Do you remember? and Did you know? The minister was anxious to get the meal blessed and the ladies fed. I understood. My objective had been met. I saw Ms. Fannie Lou in Vernon, Fla. One of the nice ladies helping with the meal gave me two handfuls of pears she had picked in her yard. After I correctly identied them as sand pears, my children and I stayed until the minister had asked the blessing. We all know Ms. Fannie Lou will make new friends and meet old friends at her new home. She will continue to successfully do what I have tried to do with my stories about Vernon, Fla. Ms. Fannie Lou will share Vernon with those who might not know about it and revel in Vernon with those who do. I went to the car and cried. My children understood. They werent sad tears; they were happy tears joyful tears of Vernon, the people there and my memories that will always be there. Some folks poke fun at me for getting emotional over such things and say that I try to nd a story everywhere I go. To that, I must confess, Yes, I do. Im sorry if you dont fancy those stories and you dont get emotional over places like Vernon. In my opinion, this life is just a book of short stories. We can make the RC Colas, MoonPies and Vernon, Fla. Opinion Thursday, August 16, 2012 Much was made of the size and complexity of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act when President Obama signed it into law in 2010. But now that the Supreme Court has upheld much of the acts constitutionality, its a good time to review key provisions that already have gone live and to plot out whats expected to happen in the next two years. Changes already in place include: Children under 19 cannot be denied coverage because of preexisting conditions. Adult children may remain on parents medical plan until they turn 26. Lifetime insurance maximum payouts were eliminated. In addition, annual coverage limits are being phased out. Effective September 23, 2012, the annual limit increases to $2 million. All new plans now must provide certain preventive services for free, such as mammograms, immunizations and colonoscopies. People who have been refused insurance because of preexisting conditions may now be eligible for coverage through a high-risk pool program. Go to https://www.pcip.gov/ for information and to apply online. Medicare Part D participants who reach the infamous doughnut hole now receive a 50 percent discount on brandname prescription drugs 14 percent on generics. (These discounts will gradually increase until 2020 when the doughnut hole will disappear.) Many core features of the Affordable Care Act wont take full effect until 2014 and details are still being nalized, but here are highlights of whats expected to happen between now and then: By Aug. 1, 2012, insurance companies that didnt spend at least 85 percent of 2011 premium dollars for large group plans (more than 50 employees) on medical care must refund the difference, through refund checks or discounted future premiums (80 percent for individual or small group plans). By Oct. 1, 2012, plans must begin adopting rules for the secure electronic exchange of health information this will reduce paperwork, costs and medical errors. By Jan. 1, 2013, new federal funding will be in place to state Medicaid programs that choose to cover preventive services to patients at little or no cost. By Oct. 1, 2013, states will receive two additional years of funding to continue coverage for children not eligible for Medicaid. Effective Jan. 1, 2014, most key provisions will be in place. For example: Individuals and those whose employers dont offer health insurance will be able to buy it directly from state-based Affordable Insurance Exchanges, which will offer a choice of health plans that meet certain benets and cost standards. Most who can afford basic health coverage will be required to obtain it or pay a fee to offset the costs of caring for uninsured Americans. Americans earning less than 133 percent of the poverty level will be eligible to enroll in Medicaid. Refundable tax credits will be available to those earning between 100 and 400 percent of the poverty level to help pay for affordable insurance. They also may qualify for reduced copayments, coinsurance and deductibles. Annual coverage dollar amount limits will be prohibited. Adults will no longer be refused coverage due to preexisting conditions. These are only a few of the many health care changes we will see as a result of the Affordable Care Act. To learn more, please visit www. HealthCare.gov. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. What does health care reform mean for you? JASON ALDERMAN CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See CRANKS A5

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A5 | The Star Voting in Babylon Dear Editor: As the election season heats up Christians have been given a dilemma: voting and the faith of a leader. The simple solution: Our political leaders are not our spiritual leaders, they merely need to be qualied to perform the duties of the ofce of President. It is true that a candidates stated faith and actual practice thereof will tell a lot about their character. What if their deeds are in contrast to their stated faith? Then you can expect mixed results, including total failure. Our example is Christ, the One whose Word does keep the duties of The Church out of structure of world government but His character is to be inclusive in our work. American voters have unwisely moved to put the charitable deeds of The Church under the banner of government to the perversion of those deeds by pagan servants. An act that would have made Caesar proud! If a candidate merely borrows Christs name, not holding to salvation, it is better if they are the kind of pseudo-Christian who will keep to their job of rather than making further encroachments on the charitable function of The Church thus making us slaves of his government! America needs a leader performing the duties of the ofce, not a manipulator who will justify governmental overreach into duties of The Church with blasphemous spiritual rhetoric to a spiritually blind audience! The American political structure was not designed to be a charitable organization but a secure nation of charitable, free individuals who can give charity in the name of The LORD, or whatever idol they choose so long as it is outside of government control. To the spiritually blind the government is their church, ask Hitler. Why dont the charitable voices just start voluntary foundations instead of forcing ideology and forcing taxes on everyone managed by corrupt politicians that use that force to further secure their tyranny? Because corrupt pastors and people have forfeited their duty to the government! For Christians, our structure is in The Bible. I am voting for politicians who wake up and tell pastors, Christians and pagans to quit telling them to do their charitable duties, the Christian duty: fasting (self-denial, Isaiah 58) to feed the poor, to clothe the naked, to care for the sick and to house the homeless. (No mention of retirement.) Let politicians govern and house the lawless. Or, has the church of the lawless taken over the lawless as well as the lawful? Indeed, if Christians examined themselves and their pastor as closely as the job of the president you might nd the source of the problem. Candidates need to tell the pastors to teach the full breadth of justice and hold their ock accountable to their failures so the lawmakers do not have cause to step in. No, the corrupted pastors and ocks scold the politicians on charity and the politicians happily take over the charitable duties of The Church as they take idolatrous hearts into submission to their control; no more freedom, compulsory taxes have taken over freewill offerings. Pastors are too weak to teach hard lessons, boy, these lessons will be hard indeed. We have sold our freedom and The Church for the sake of a false doctrine of social justice that offers retirement to our Sabbath duties a day for Gods work, not rest and rejection of honest, well-portioned preaching. Every member of a church or denomination for any government entitlement or subsidy should quit paying their tithe and submit to the authority of the politicians and just pay their taxes, or get a different pastor. We have a common practice applicable for voting, example: workers are hired to do their job, right, the Ofce of President is not Pastor in Chief but Commander in Chief. The media is not shaping narratives around the duties of the ofce; they are manipulating followers of faiths with spiritual narratives designed for the cult of personality, not Jesus Christ. I will never get spiritual advice from a president; that is not his calling. Ask yourself, is the candidate and his surrogates willing to perform the duties of the ofce, equal justice for all, big and small, or must they tempt the souls of voters and buy them with thefts, taxation, from others that have been renamed entitlements that assemble and destroy the duties of The Church, little dog treats they redistribute so his government can keep representing a voters oppressors? Contemporary America is built on these thefts that are the evil omens Jacob rejected because that wise man perceived the evil intent to enslave his children (Genesis 42:27-28, 35-36; 43:1-15). Corporations steal in the name of national security. We cheer as one state steals from other states, cleverly labeled as pork. A generation steals from its own children with unfunded entitlements. Your politicians didnt fund all that. And the granddaddy of them all is the bad debt we sell around the world to fund our prodigal lifestyle. America could be blamed for breaking down the entire economic structure of the world once we bottom out (Revelation 18). We simply need justice and it has to start with pastors and their people who have aided the governments assimilation of the needs of the needy that have been gradually reshaped into wanton dependencies of the greedy while pandering to church sensibilities to a country that has grown spiritually dull due to excess and indulgence (Deuteronomy 28:47). The Church has outsourced its duties to pagan hirelings and we have enslaved ourselves to taxes rather than voluntary service and tithing and fasting! Gods rst action in restoring a land is with righteous leaders who speak all of Gods Word (Isaiah 1:26-28). Church members should be ineligible for all government assistance, per The Bible, or the church should lose all special tax statuses that do nothing more than give tax shelter to a false, apostate church that now uses its funds to fund retirement and pay bloated salaries (heresies). Did you know there is no Biblical support for the retirement of healthy people? None, only warnings. Churches with the deeds of Babylon should be honest, they belong to Babylon. God will not allow the best leader to surface in this generation of thieves (Isaiah 3:6-7). Now, consider this: If we all do as we are to believe and not as we are, we are acting, look at how fast our budgets balance and our debts pay down. Christians in America need to revisit all the commands on fasting, work and duty; duties that are not optional. There is no rapture to the nal, most evil generation of mankind built on theft and rejecting duty. A comment sure to generate indignation instead of contrition or conviction. Voting to outsource your duty to Caesar by supporting an apostate church is not doing your duty, no, you are willingly creating your own curse and forfeiting your freedom, a sublime deception indeed. Vote for the one who will hold us accountable to the duty we have abandoned. We need a leader who will remove charity out of government and put it back to the people. America will not have a leader we can be proud of until there is a revival repentant to Jesus. Apathy and patriotism will only bring on civil war and the Christian Holocaust. Turner Echols Port Saint Joe, Fla. Humane approach to feral cats needed Dear Editor: It has come to my attention that the Gulf County Board of Commissioners is in the process of rewriting the ordinances regarding Animal Control et al. They will soon nalize their draft being written by J. Novak and present it to be made into law. A very disturbing section will be added. THE PROHIBITION ON FEEDING FERAL ANIMALS. We, who do so in order to trap them, so as to then neuter/spay/ vaccinate homeless, stray cats, would be vilied. Citizens who understand the only way to control the excessive breeding by TNR (trap, neuter, return) are being undermined by those without a working knowledge of modern techniques. Every Vet School advocates TNR and the subsequent establishment of Colonies. These vetted cat colonies are then tended to by very dedicated care givers around town. Most do this at their own expense. Instead of taking away the right to care for a helpless, starving animal, by compassionate people, the county should address the real underlying problem. What needs to be written, mandated, and funded is low cost SPAY and NEUTER. The people who allow their unsterilized animals to roam and breed are the real problem. Many cities and counties including Bay advocate these established programs. Bay also is in the process of offering a program called OPERATION SPAY BAY. The Wiregrass has a similar outreach program. Animal control ofcer Rolands position is that the only good feral/homeless cat is a dead one. This is indeed a very dangerous opinion being held by a person in a position of authority. I hope that The Gulf County Commissioners listen to reason and adapt a humane approach when it comes to this issue. The irony is that these ordinances are being rewritten to prevent animal abuse and yet adding that language on feeding strays is just that. Do they really want the notoriety as the community that advocates animal cruelty as a method of control? Starvation is not an acceptable alternative. Thank you, Nancy Leist PSJ Alley Cats Team Scallop memories Dear Editor: As I observed the Scallop Festival and all the activities, my thoughts were how times have changed since 1936 when I was 14 years old. We lived at the end of 4th Street (presently Captain Freds Place) on the waterfront now known as Maddox Park. I would walk around barefoot in the grass beds in the bay in front of our home feeling for scallops. When I had collected enough I would shuck them and my mother would cook scallops for our family. Sometimes I would get enough to ll a quart jar after they were shucked. This was before we had face masks and SCUBA gear. I would pour cold water over them in the jar and hitchhike to Beacon Hill to sell them for 10 cents a quart. There were only a few houses out there at this time and people from Marianna and Dothan came to spend time at the beach. Times were hard back then during the Great Depression and a dime was big money to me. Capt. Dave Maddox Port St. Joe decision to nd, remember and write about the good ones in our life books or we can complain, cry and dwell on all the bad ones. My children and I drove up the road to Wausau to see the Possum Monument. It is worth seeing. Some folks have written to me and told me their stories about Vernon and how much they love it. Other folks have written to me and said that I am guilty of generalizing too much about folks from other parts of the country (other than the South). I agree with you, it is unfair for me to say that ALL folks from the north or from Hollywood make fun of the South. There are wonderful people from everywhere and there are wonderful cities and places throughout the country. The next letter I get will be about how I capitalize South, and not north. The person will tell me that it is grammatically incorrect. They may also point out my spelling of Mama or Grandmama as being wrong. Yes, they are incorrect, if you go by the book or the map. The way I see it, I capitalize South because it is my home in the same way I capitalize Mama, Daddy, Papa and Grandmama, because they are mine. They were my Mama and my Grandmama, so I spell it the way I want to. You miss a lot of good stuff, if you simply go by the book or the map. Vernon, Fla., is one of those places you might miss. Dont miss it. Go to Vernon stop, get out of your car and talk to people. If youve traveled to Vernon with me, you understand. My children heard the excitement in my voice when I saw the Vernon City Limit sign. Papa knew. He loved me so much that he took me to this wonderful place called Vernon six hours away from his home in Alabama and let me hang my head out the window along the way. We stopped and talked to folks and drank RC Colas and ate hoop cheese, crackers and boiled peanuts. When he said, Lets go to Vernon, he was saying, I love you. Now that I think about it, Papa was also probably saying, Ive had enough of Cora Belles nagging, lets get out of here. Cora Belle was my Grandmama, she was sweet and wonderful, but she sometimes could get Papa ustered. It could be at any time of the day or night. He would open his eyes real wide, clear his throat, scratch his orange-tinted at-top with his left hand, pick his little dog up and put him under his right arm and say, Lets go to Vernon. Therefore, Grandmama should also get a little credit for me getting to go to and knowing about Vernon, Fla. As of the last City Council meeting in July, I am very proud to say that I am an Honorary Citizen of Vernon, Fla. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Develop ment Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, August 20, 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Com missioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, August 28, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Adminis tration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discucc and act on the following: 1. Variance Application Mickey and Sharon Winchester Parcel ID # 03805-130R Located in Section 23, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback. 2. Development Policy, Ordinances, Comprehensive Plan, and LDR Revisions Comprehensive Plan Amendments Transmittal of proposed military support and other comp plan amendments Comp Plan and LDR review of vested private properties within conservation land use amendment Occupational License Additional development & planning issues 3. Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. (2012.83) Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y O U R OPINION S CRANKS from page A5 Letters Thursday, August 16, 2012 Letters to the EDITOR

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR TH E ENTIR E YE AR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, August 16 85 77 40 % Fri, August 17 85 77 40 % Sat, August 18 84 77 50 % Sun, August 19 84 76 60 % Mon, August 20 84 76 60 % T ues, August 21 84 76 60 % Wed, August 22 85 76 60 % 16 Mo 824am 1.8 702pm -0.2 17 Tu 906am 1.9 734pm -0.2 18 We 945am 1.9 800pm -0.2 19 Th 1023am 1.8 822pm -0.1 20 Fr 1101am 1.7 838pm 0.0 21 Sa 1143am 1.6 846pm 0.2 22 Su 1230pm 1.3 841pm 0.4 23 Mo 130pm 1.0 810pm 0.6 24 Tu 355am 1.0 327pm 0.7 1053am 0.6 630pm 0.6 25 We 352am 1.2 117pm 0.4 26 Th 419am 1.4 240pm 0.1 27 Fr 505am 1.7 349pm -0.1 28 Sa 602am 1.9 451pm -0.2 15 Su 426am 1.2 1201pm 1.5 652am 1.3 910pm -0.1 16 Mo 452am 1.2 1254pm 1.5 802am 1.3 950pm -0.1 17 Tu 518am 1.3 146pm 1.6 856am 1.3 1024pm -0.1 18 We 540am 1.3 235pm 1.6 941am 1.3 1055pm -0.1 19 Th 600am 1.3 322pm 1.6 1021am 1.2 1122pm -0.1 20 Fr 618am 1.3 410pm 1.5 1100am 1.1 1147pm 0.0 21 Sa 634am 1.3 500pm 1.5 1141am 1.0 22 Su 652am 1.4 555pm 1.4 1212am 0.1 1226pm 0.9 23 Mo 712am 1.4 657pm 1.2 1238am 0.3 118pm 0.7 24 Tu 735am 1.5 813pm 1.1 105am 0.5 220pm 0.6 25 We 803am 1.5 951pm 1.0 133am 0.7 336pm 0.5 26 Th 836am 1.6 200am 0.9 505pm 0.3 27 Fr 918am 1.6 629pm 0.1 28 Sa 1010am 1.6 739pm 0.0 29 Su 1113am 1.6 838pm -0.1 Inshore Offshore SPONSORED BY Inshore action continues to be dominated by trout in St. Joe Bay. Good trout catches are still reported in Pig Island and the surrounding areas. Most of the action is on live shrimp; however, arti cials such as Gulp and D.O.A. lures will work ne also. Large amounts of mullet are also in these waters right now. Good grouper catches are still coming to the docks in St. Joe. Most action can be found on the live bottom or hard bottom sites due south of Cape San Blas. Good shing for gag, red grouper and scamp grouper are all found here. King sh are still hanging around the buoy line, but not in great numbers right now. Team Reel Smoker wins shootout; king shing Kadels take 2nd place By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The King sh Shootout gave leukemia research a shot in the arm, and a pair of angling prodigies scored big again. The ninth annual shootout raised $35,000 for the Leukemia Research Foundation and gave 45 boatloads of shermen a weekend of fun. The weather was perfect by all accounts, but the king sh must have been warned because they were in short supply. Team Reel Smoker out of Panacea shing with boat captain Blake Gardener took the gold and a check for $5,000 with a 48-pound whopper. The team already holds the record for the tourney with a 53pound monster caught last year. Team BudK captained by Bud Kadel of Thomasville took second place on Saturday with a 36-pound sh landed by 9-year-old Nic Kadel. On Sunday, big brother Alex, 11, caught a 38-pound sh that replaced Nics catch in the No. 2 spot for the shootout. The Kadels, or the boys as competing shermen dubbed them during the tournament, already had proven to be shing prodigies when Alex took rst place in the juniors division with a record-setting 48-pound king and Nic took second place for king sh during the Big Bend Saltwater Classic in June. Nic and little brother Will also took home ribbons for red snapper in that tourney. The boys attribute their shing success to a secret bait. Mom and dad said the boys will not sh as juniors in the Saltwater Classic next year but are jumping up to the recreational category. Father Bud said the $4,000 purse earned on Sunday will be divided among the team, and most of it is going into college funds for Alex, Nic and 5-year-old Will who also shes on team BudK. Though king sh were scarce, the tourney was the setting for a very unusual catch. Max Lawhon, son of Mary Lawhon the tournament organizer, landed a sail sh on Sunday. Max Lawhon said the sh was not even hooked but became entangled in the shing cable. The sh was 70 inches long and took 45 minutes to land. Landing that beautiful animal was as good as it gets, Lawhon said. Team Yes Dear was shing in 68 feet of water on Millard Collins boat the Smooth Drag when he landed the sail sh. The rare catch was returned unharmed to the Gulf after a few photos were snapped with a cellphone. Collins, C-Quarters dockmaster and a cornerstone of tournament since its beginning in 2003, was honored and presented with a Yeti Cooler during the awards ceremony. Collins said he appreciated the thought, but the cooler will probably not be big enough to hold his average catch. The Hayes family of Camilla, Ga., was honored for their fundraising efforts. The family sold $12,000 in raf e tickets before the tournament. Son Matthew, who attends Auburn University, is a leukemia survivor. The King sh Shootout, dedicated to the memory of Lisa Crowder Jackson, is the largest privately organized fundraiser for the Leukemia Research Foundation. Organizer Mary Lawhon said she was very pleased with the amount of money raised for research this year. She thanked the shootouts sponsors, C-Quarters and everyone who helped make the shing fun. She said plans are already under way to make next years No. 10 tourney bigger and better than ever. GATOR SEASON IS HERE SPECIAL TO THE STAR This 14-footer is the biggest gator processed by Kents Alligator Processing Plant in Wewahitchka so far in the 2012 season. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Team Reel Smoker of Panacea with their 48-pound, rst-place sh. SMOKIN THE COMPETITION LOIS SWOBODA | The Times TOP: The Kadel family with their 38-pound king, from left, are Alane, Will, Nic, Bud and Alex. ABOVE: A sail sh was landed by Max Lawhon during the tournament. Page 6 Thursday, August 16, 2012

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com A Section Star Staff Report Last year was the most successful in the history of Gene Raf eld Football with all three of the Port St. Joe teams winning the Big Bend Football League Championship. The young players cant wait for the new season to begin. Sign-up for ages 7 through 12 will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET Saturday, Aug. 18 at the Port St. Joe Fire Station on Williams Avenue. Please bring $60 for the fee, evidence of health insurance and, if the player was not a member of the league last year, a copy of his birth certi cate. Every player must have a physical exam before playing. The league suggests you get this done as soon as possible. Equipment distribution will be done immediately following registration so the player must be present. There will be two teams rather than the three teams of last year. The Dolphins will eld players that are 7, 8 and 9 years old; Jaguars will be 10, 11 and 12 years old. This change will insure that all the cities in the Big Bend League will be able to eld teams in every age division. To make it possible for all players to get plenty of playing time, each game will feature a fth quarter that will not count but will give the younger players game experience to better prepare them for great things to come. Last year, for the rst time, videos were made of each game available so parents would have a record of their young players achievements. The program was very well received so it will be available again this year. Cost is $45 for videos of every game, $10 for individual games. We also will have both Dolphin and Jaguar T-shirts available at very reasonable prices. If you have any questions whatsoever about this great program, please contact Matt Herring at 247-9842 or Dona Sander at 227-4839. JOES LAWN CARE 850.323.0741 J OE S _L AWN @Y A H OO .C O M People, Natural Gas & Safety Digging? If you are planning to install a pool, fence or any other construction that requires digging on your property the law requires that you call Sunshine State One Call at 811 before digging. This will ensure that all underground utilities have been located. Check with your contractor before excavation because, as a home owner, you may be responsible for making that call. What Should You Know About Gas Odor? Natural gas doesnt normally have an odor. A substance is added by your natural gas company to give natural gas a rotten-egg smell should it escape. Become familiar with the smell. Should you detect this odor, it does not positively tell you that there is a gas leak: but this your gas company and have them investigate. What Can You Do To Reduce The Possibility Of An Accident? First keep the emergency phone number of your gas company handy. A good place to write this number is in the front of your Natural gas supplies vitally needed energy to thousands of homes, businesses and industries in Florida. Energy, whether it be in the form of gas, electricity, oil, water, etc., when uncontrolled can be dangerous. Even though a record of safe operations has been established over the years by the regulated gas industry, knowledge of the information contained in this ad can assist you in recognizing a potentially hazardous condition and take appropriate action to safeguard life and property. Why & Where? Natural gas is cleaner and cheaper than other forms of energy available for your home or business. Because many people use Natural Gas it is likely that you have a gas line on or near your property if you live in our service area. We have 2 types of lines that are both located underground. Main lines are located on the side of most roads and their purpose is to deliver the gas that is needed for a particular area. Service lines which are located on customer property and are used to feed gas to the customer from the main. phonebook along with other emergency telephone numbers such which should be done to improve safety as well as conserve energy are: 1. Teach children that they are not to play with any appliances in the home. 2. Clean the burners and have them checked for proper adjustment periodically. 3. Repairs, installations and removal work. 4. If lighting of an appliance is required. ALWAYS light match and hold at ignition point of burner before you turn on the gas. 5. Follow the manufacturers instructions for operation and care of gas appliances. 6. Never take a chance. If you think you smell gas, call your gas company. What Should Be Done If The Smell Of Gas Is Believed To Be Present? There are many possible conditions which could be encountered, thus i t instructions for every situation: The following examples provide general instructions which should assist: 1. If a slight odor is detected in a localized area or room of a buildingin the area; call the gas company immediately. 2. If a strong odor is detected in a do not operate electrical switches, however, do open windows and doors to ventilate the area (caution: dont turn on exhaust fans) leave the building and call the gas company. 3. If a strong odor is detected in a building and/or va hissing sound is heard-do not operate electrical switches, lights or other devices: do evacuate the building leaving exit doors open on your way out, warn persons to stay clear of the building company immediately from another location. 4. If the odor of gas is detected outside (in the yard, at the sidewalk, etc.)-immediately call the gas company. ST. JOE NATURAL GAS COMPANY 301 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL Phone 229-8216 www.stjoegas.com www.theappliancesolution.com Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 7 By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com Chuck Gannons return to Port St. Joes football coach came with one particular caveat. The Tiger Sharks were going to step up their efforts in the weight room. We demand it of the kids, and they did a good job, Gannon said. The kids have been here two or three times during the summer. Weve gotten a little bit stronger since I took over in January. One thing we really tried to stress was getting ourselves in the weight room. We have to get back to play what Port St. Joe football was in the past: Getting (stronger) physically and teams knowing they have to go through us for four quarters. PSJ was 3-7 overall last year and 1-3 in District 4-1A and struggled to keep pace with district rivals Blountstown, Liberty County and West Gadsden. Gannon, who served as the teams head coach from 1996 to 2001 and was the defensive coordinator last year, hopes a team that is a little older and a little more experienced will hold up better this fall. Gannon said the team will have about two dozen players on the roster and as many as seven or eight athletes playing on both sides of the line of scrimmage. That placed added emphasis on the weight room, where players can put on the muscle and bulk necessary to endure the seasons daily grind. We have a lot of kids going both ways, he said. One of things we try to explain is that the weight room is going to help them. Its going to be a long season. We have a great conditioning coach (track coach Kenneth Parker) who does a great job. Thats one of the things we have to sell em. We want to be as fresh in the fourth quarter as in the rst quarter. Coach Parker does a good job getting the kids in shape, and thats a big mental thing. Gannon will turn to senior quarterback Ramello Zaccaro to run the offense. Zaccaro got a chance to run the offense during spring practice. He did a good job, Gannon said. Hes a senior, so were hoping hes got some leadership and got some athletic qualities. Im not sure if hes really a true quarterback, but hes the best one weve got as far as athleticism. Hell help get the ball off to people, and he can throw it a little bit. Gannon said PSJ has a stable of running backs ready to contribute. Seniors Dusty Richter and Decorian North will share carries, and Gannon said North has bounced back from a high ankle sprain that hampered him during the spring. Another senior, Joe Love, and junior Natron Lee also will contribute. Jack Cummings is a 6-foot-2, 225-pound transfer from Texas who will get some carries, too, Gannon said. As it is at most programs of similar size, depth along the offensive and defensive lines will prove to be crucial for the Tiger Sharks. Weve got to keep everybody healthy, Gannon said. Were pretty good across the front of the offense and defense with our starting group. Were trying to develop that backup role. We play a split look up front (defensively), and we try to get where we have three defensive ends we can rotate around, and we try to get three defensive tackles inside we can rotate around. Most of these guys are not only going on offense and defense but on every special team weve got. Cummings will line up as a defensive end but can shift to linebacker if necessary, Gannon said, and senior Ricky Pennington will line up at the other end position. Reggie Smith and Jacobi Jones will contribute at defensive tackle. Senior Dallas Burke and Lee have been tabbed the teams inside linebackers, and Cummings will play some downs there when hes not lined up at defensive end. Richter, North and Jakice Davis are among the athletes competing for playing time at outside linebacker. Zaccaro, Jack Riley, Carter Thacker and Josh Cabaniss lead the group of players starting in the defensive back eld. Gannon stressed that many of the players on the defensive side of the ball are interchangeable and can be moved around. The team may have a limited number of players on the eld, but it will help that several players arent tied down to a single position, he said. If we can play aggressive defense, swarm to the football, make it physical, then hopefully well be around in the fourth quarter and have a chance to win the ball game, Gannon said. Tiger Sharks prep for season Time is here to sign up for Gene Raf eld Football

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S KARAO K E & DJ IN THE CROWS N EST H OLLY ADK INS & L U K E A BBEY O N THE POO P DE CK C O M E EN J OY THE SUNSET R AN D Y S TAR K WITH A RT L ONG ON S AX O N THE POO P DE CK KARAO K E & DJ IN THE CROWS K E & DJ IN THE CROWS K N EST N EST N UPCOMING EVENTS dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp An account has been established at Centennial Bank in Everett Gants name to assist the family in defraying medical costs. Gloria Gant thanked the community on behalf of her family for the outpouring of support, thoughts and prayers since the shooting rocked the community. When people read about what happened, they might think this is the most awful community, Gloria Gant said. But it is not. This is the warmest, most generous community, and we cant thank everyone enough for their support. We would not be getting through this without that support. We have just been amazed with all the people who have reached out. We have been amazed by the number of people Everett has touched. I know my son and he is just a gentle boy. The family thanks the community for everything and hopes the community will keep Everett in their thoughts and prayers. Gant, a black man, was shot by Butler, who is white, at the Pine Ridge Apartments in Port St. Joe. According to the arresting af davit, an incident occurred earlier in the day when a woman came to Butlers apartment in the apartment complex on Garrison Avenue with a child in tow. Butler immediately used a racial slur to refer to the child. Investigators discovered Butler had been making similar racial slurs to other children in the complex during recent days. The woman became upset and left Butlers apartment. Gant then went to Butlers apartment to discuss the comments. Upon arriving at the apartment, Butler shot Gant between the eyes and shut his door, leaving Everett Gant to bleed outside the door. Butler called 911, nished cooking supper, sat down and began eating. Nugent arrived on the scene and contacted Butler by phone, at which time Butler told Nugent to come in, he was eating dinner and had put up the gun. Nugent said Butler acted as if inconvenienced when put under arrest, saying he could not understand the problem as he had only shot a (racial slur). for a certi cate holder of property taxes for 2004 on the former Gulf Pines Hospital site. The process of application to tax deed and tax sale, city attorney Tom Gibson said, likely will take about two months, allowing commissioners time to explore their options. We knew all along wed have to deal with (the three outstanding tax certi cates), Gibson said. This is a little sooner than we hoped. The city is trying to get the hospital property the state closed the facility permanently in 2005 cleaned up and back on the property tax roll. The city hopes to make a few bucks with a bounce back of the real estate market, but the property has become an eyesore and health hazard, and razing it and getting it on the market remain the primary goals. The city is working with the Internal Revenue Service, which has taken a $1.7 million tax lien down to a last offer of $75,000. However, the IRS, which is at least considering wiping the debt clean, would like the city which took deed earlier this year to address outstanding local property taxes to avoid a private entity from bene ting from the elimination of the federal tax debt. The IRS has indicated it would consider an application for wiping away its tax lien if the local property tax issues are dealt with. The Gulf County School Board and Board of County Commissioners have agreed to work with the city on tax debts of recent years, but one certi cate holder has the ability to press for a tax deed. The downside for the certi cate holder, a company out of Central Florida that specializes in buying tax certi cates that accrue interest during their life cycle, is that it would be on the hook for the full federal tax lien if it presses for the tax deed. Gibson has said that would be his bargaining approach to any entity seeking a tax deed there is one other tax certi cate that could be the foundation for an application for a tax deed in the future. In short strokes, Gibson has said any entity seeking a tax deed, and in turn securing ownership the city currently holds deed to the property but can walk away at any time would be on the hook for cleanup of the property as well as the federal tax debt. The city is in the best position to take this property, City Commissioner Rex Buzzett said. The city, on the other hand, would like to develop the land, just more than two acres, in keeping with the neighborhood, by creating four to ve single-family residences. Though not fully costout, the project likely would leave the city slightly in the hole, although if the IRS and local property taxes can be addressed, there is a solid chance the city could make a small pro t. Part of any pro t would be returned to residents in the neighborhood who put up the money for a required appraisal and the county and school board, depending on what arrangements can be made with those governing bodies. SHOOTING from page A1 LIGHTHOUSE from page A1 no party af liation; neither had a primary opponent. Incumbent Commissioner Bill Williams chose not to stand for re-election. McFarland and Norris each coasted to victory and earned four-year terms. McFarland garnered 3,041 votes to easily outpace Brian Hill (1,598) and Jarred Patterson (627). Norris earned nearly three times the votes of challenger Keith Jones in the race for Clerk of Courts, taking 74.91 percent of the ballots to 25 percent for Jones. Wood, who beat Farrell for the District 3 seat 629-336, and Quinn, who beat Lois Byrd for the District 4 seat 382-263, also easily won new four-year terms. The general election campaign for Gulf County property appraiser, to replace retiring Kesley Colbert, will be among Mitch Burke, who beat Jamie Lester 1,092-906 in the Republican primary, Dan Christie, who is running with no party af liation, and Democrat James Rish, who did not have a primary opponent. The campaign for the next supervisor of elections Linda Grif n is retiring was whittled to two, John Hanlon beating Brittany Alford Beauchamp 71-29 percent, winning the Republican primary, and Wyvonne Grif n Pickett beating Shawn Butler 1,593-1,413 in the Democratic primary. Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton will face Democratic primary winner Jay Bidwell. Bidwell and Phil Lanford were close all night until the nal results pushed Bidwell to a 1,783-1,315 vote victory. That was the way our whole campaign went, smooth, Lanford said. We both worked hard. Neither of us was negative in any way. In state and federal races, Glenn Hess took 61 percent of the county vote, Jamey Westbrook edged Halsey Beshears 34-32 percent in Gulf County in the District 7 Republican race and Robert Hill garnered 45 percent in the Democratic primary for the same seat. Al Lawson, who once represented Gulf County in the Florida Senate, easily won the Democratic race for the 2nd Congressional District, and Bill Nelson won the county vote in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate. ELECTION from page A1

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, August 16, 2012 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com With nearly $2.5 million invested into the community, the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA) has plenty to boast about as the agency hits the seven year mark. From improved parking and streetscapes downtown, faade and sign improvements and most importantly expansion of the former Downtown Improvement Agency to include nearly all of the central and business districts of Port St. Joe, the agency is celebrating seven years of investment. Small-town development expert Robert Gibbs suggested during a visit in 2006 that Port St. Joe should make the business district look like somebody cares, said PSJRA executive director Gail Alsobrook. Many took that to heart certainly the PSJRA did and now it shows. The PSJRA adopted its new moniker and acronym after the expansion of its boundaries to include all of the neighborhood known as North Port St. Joe. Since a scuf ing beginning a lawsuit muddied goals and in turn progress before being dismissed the PSJRA has linked the north and south ends in several ways. The construction of David Langston Drive provided a thoroughfare between disparate business districts, creating a seamless connection. Lighting PSJRA celebrates 7 years The Billy Joe Rish Memorial Parking Lot is one of the latest improvements to downtown infrastructure sponsored and funded by the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency. TIM CROFT The Star See PSJRA B6 By Bill Bishop and Roberto Gallardo Special to The Star Gulf County has experienced a brain gain in the last 40 years, joining the rest of the country in what has been a massive increase in the number of adults who have earned college degrees. In 1970, 5.7 percent of those over 25 years of age had college degrees in Gulf County. By 2010, 13.6 percent of adults here had completed college. The percentage of adults with college degrees in Gulf County was less than the national average of 27.9 percent in 2010. The collegeeducated rate here was less than the Florida average of 25.9 percent. The number of adults in the United States with college degrees has almost tripled since 1970, when only 10.7 percent of adults had graduated from college. But the percentage of adults with degrees in rural counties, such as Gulf County, while increasing, has generally fallen behind the proportion of college-educated residents in urban counties. The loss of young, welleducated residents has posed a long-standing dif culty for rural communities. One of the problems that rural areas face is that in order to get a college education, young people often have to leave, says Judith Stallmann, an economist at the University of Missouri. Once you leave, that introduces you to other opportunities that you might not have seen had you not left. County sees increase in college graduates See GRADUATES B6 MBARA king sh tourney next Saturday Star Staff Report The Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association is set to have its 16th Annual MBARA King sh Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 25. This one-day tournament is the biggest fundraiser for this all volunteer organization which has raised over a million dollars and built over 200 new arti cial reefs since 1997. We are so thankful for all of the support we have received from our members over the years who know how important arti cial reefs are to our area for shing and diving, said Ron Childs, tournament director. It brings tourists to the area which means jobs and economic development for the local area. Just this spring we built over $100,000 worth of new reefs -actually we try to build new reefs every year. The tournament will host a Captains Party on Friday night at Beacon Hill Veterans Memorial Park right outside of Mexico Beach which will include smoked sausage, drinks, door prizes, Miss King sh and more. This is a change from the past when the Captains Party was at the El Governor Motel. The new location will be really nice with a view of the Gulf and plenty of parking and space for the thousand or so anglers who show up for this event, Childs said. We will have some great door prizes provided by Bluewater Outriggers and Half Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe. The prize payout will be $3,000 for the rst place king, $2,000 for the second place king and $1,000 for the third place king. A special payout of $1,000 will go to the biggest Wahoo and $500 for the biggest Spanish mackerel. Second and third place Spanish will pay $300 and $200, respectively. The weigh-in will still be at the Mexico Beach Marina in Mexico Beach from 1-5 p.m. CT. Entry fee is $150 per boat, and the tournament shing begins at 5 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. CST. The number of anglers on the boat is not limited. For complete details go to www.mbara.org and click on tournaments. You can pre-register online at the same website or go to Bluewater Outriggers and Half Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe or Mexico Beach Marina in Mexico Beach. The weekend will conclude with a huge party on Saturday night at Toucans Restaurant and Bar in Mexico Beach for everyone in the tournament. Special to the Star Last years winners Larry Lemieux and Russell Stewart with Miss King sh. FLORIDA PIONEERS By Beverly Mount-Douds Editors note: This is another chapter in a continuing series on local pioneers. This story, the second part of which will appear next week, concerns how the community of Jones Homestead came to be. This is a story shared by a granddaughter of one of the children raised by the Jones family. D r. Adolphus Winston Jones was born at Columbus, Ga., Sept 20, 1864, the son of Joseph and Mary E. Jones. He was given a dental education by the Seaboard Railroad and for several years he was employed at the State Hospital and practiced dentistry in River Junction. He also carried the R.F.D. mail from there for four years. He moved to Port St. Joe in 1908 where he lived on a homestead several miles south of town, practicing his profession here and in Franklin and Liberty counties. He built his present home in 1918. He and Miss Ada Belle Rogers of Smyrna section near River Junction were married in 1894. They raised a large family of children of their own and took care of a number of motherless children. Dr. Jones and Ada Belle raised, six sons, Henry, Rutherford, Marcellus, George W. and Clyde W. and Richard B. Jones; and one daughter, Mrs. Sarah (Jones) Johnson. Here is the childhood memoirs of Katherine Ethel Milstead Lombard (as told to her daughter Childhood memories recalled of Jones Homestead See PIONEERS B5 COURTESY OF KATHY FREEMAN Before becoming Miss Gulf County, Ethel Milstead was crowned Miss Port St. Joe in 1934.

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Thursday, August 16, 2012 Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Meet Macklin a Labrador Retriever/Mix. Macklin has learned to walk on his leash and is a very patient puppy. He loves the attention of kids and loves to play with them. He loves his puppy friends but is still a little timid around kitties. Macklin will grow up to be a very big dog one day. This great puppy deserves a loving, forever home of his very own. If you can give him one let us know and we will tell him. WE ARE IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH SOME GENERAL MAINTANCE, CLEANING, PAINTING ECT VOLUNTEERS ARE ALSO NEEDED FOR PET SOCIALIZATION AND FOSTER HOMES. SCHOOL CREDIT AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. We are now proud partners with www.petsforpatriots.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Our shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! IF YOU ARE MISSING A PET, PLEASE CHECK WITH US! Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida Insuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals, Families or Small Businessess Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Your Local Agency for B2 | The Star Star Staff Report Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will be closing its Port St. Joe satellite location as of Sept. 20. Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will be available for your continued orthopedic care at its other locations. For appointments call 850-526-3236 or 850-229-1177 If you would like copies of records you can contact the TOC office at 850-877-8174 or Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic, 3334 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 400, Tallahassee, FL. 32308. SPECIAL TO THE STAR From singing to dancing, piano playing, joke telling and inspirational writings, the residents at The Bridge at Bay St Joe have many talents! The funlled resident talent show was held on Thursday, Aug. 2 with a packed audience. The panel of judges was Serenity Healthcare corporate consultants who were visiting from Louisville, KY. First place honors were given to Wilma Tipton for her beautiful singing of the gospel song Had He Not Been. Second place was given to Louise Setterich for her dynamic reading of the poem Footprints in the Sand. Virginia Rogers won the third place honor for her inspirational poem she wrote and presented. Mrs. Tipton received a trophy and cash award, Mrs. Setterich received a trophy and Mrs. Rogers was presented a ribbon. Everyone enjoyed the fun event and the residents at The Bridge at Bay St Joe are busy working on their talents for the next show. Special to The Star Steve Kerigan will be coming to discuss the mission of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. He will provide statistical information and all the new services and doctors that they have at the hospital now. It is their goal to increase awareness and involvement throughout our community and let others know how they can help make this hospital and even greater success! If you are interested in hearing Steve speak, please contact Sunset Coastal Grill at 850-2277900 to reserve a seat at lunchtime. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon on Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, please contact Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Gibson and Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Gegenheimer request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their children, Margaret Sandifer Gibson and Michael Eugene Gegenheimer at 4 p.m. Central Time on Saturday, October 13, 2012 at the Wood Place Farm near Abbeville, AL. All friends and family are invited to attend. A reception will follow the ceremony. No local invitations will be sent. For directions, please contact the parents of the bride. Jimmy and Diane Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University in 2010. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in Dec. 2012. Jessica is currently employed as a second grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, and a 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is currently employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012 at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with a reception to follow at the Centennial Building. Happy 8th birthday Eva! Love Mom, Dad, & Emily WHO HAS TALENT? TOC of ce in Port St. Joe closing Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engaged Society Wheeling around with Rotary Margaret Gibson, Michael Gegenheimer WEDDING

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The Star| B3 Thursday, August 16, 2012 Calling All Beginner Artists! Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep. Glynis Holcombe OSCI (One Stroke Certied Instructor) www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 $10.00 OFF SERVICE WITH THIS AD (850) 647-2772 goodwinapplianceservice.com Now Servicing Gulf and Bay County PART S ALES & S ERVICE 20 years experience Licensed and Insured All work guaranteed Factory authorized & trained S ervicing all makes and models NO matter where you purchased them Prompt Dependable Same Day Service 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE 7008 Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach, FL 32456 (850) 647-6167 MEDICARE PLANS EX CELLEN T COV ERA G E A N YO NE C AN AFFO RD TOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU Ross E. T ucker, Agent since 1981 Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter 850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005 www.tuckerlifehealth.com PUBLIC HEARING N OTICE 2nd C D BG Public Hearing The City of Port St Joe is considering applying to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), Depart ment of Community Planning and Development for a grant under the Neighborhood Revitalization category for an amount up to $650,000 under the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-NR) Program. For each activity that The proposed project A ctivity B udget ( A pproximately) L M I % ( A pproximately) Replace +8,700LF Waterline $570,000 >51 And Fire Hydrants and patch. Administration $52,000 >51 Engineering $28,000 >51 policy. The Citizens Advisory Task Force has considered and approved the approach for the application. A public hearing DEO on or around September 28th. To obtain additional information concerning the application and public hearing, contact ing special mobility accommodation at this meeting should contact Charlotte Pierce at the City Hall, or by phone at (850) PORT ST. JOE IS A FAIR HOUSING School News Star Staff Report Students, teachers and volunteers at Port St. Joe Elementary School came together during the 20112012 school year to raise $1,359.81 in the Pennies for Patients fundraising program. The program, a School and Youth Program fundraising effort for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), raised more than $660,000 in the Northern and Central Florida Chapter during the 20112012 school year. Funds raised support blood cancer research and patient services. Its almost unbelievable to me that one school can raise so much money to help nd a cure for blood cancers, said Kelley Lesperance, Executive Director of the Northern and Central Florida Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Were honored that Port St. Joe Elementary School put forth so much effort to be the winning school in Gulf County this year, and were proud to partner with the school to make such an impact on research and patient services. Nationally, more than 27,000 schools engaged in service, leadership and teamwork on behalf of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to raise money to help save lives. Through these programs, students connected with the LLS mission, collected spare change, and learned they could make a real difference in the lives of others. Across the nation, the LLS School & Youth Programs raised more than $26 million! Pennies for Patients is a coin collection and classroom competition program that encourages service learning, team work, and philanthropy while raising signi cant funds for blood cancer research and patient services. For more information about the program, or to learn how your school can participate, visit www. schoolandyouth.org/nc About the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the worlds largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkins disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services. To learn more about the local chapter, please visit www.lls.org/nc Special to The Star As the summer winds down, the faculty and staff at Faith Christian School are making preparations for your child. A family atmosphere with nurturing teachers and a stimulating, God-based curriculum is the foundation of Faiths educational principles. If you would like for your child to experience academic excellence through Godly instruction, FCS is the place for you. Faith Christian school is taking applications for new students. Interactive learning will be a part of your childs day, along with Spanish classes for all grades. Discovery learning days are incorporated into the academic year, and technology classes enhance the elementary program. Faith Christian has a website (www.FaithChristianPSJ.net). We urge you to take a few minutes and browse through our different links. Communication with teachers will be available through this site as well as the latest news. Partial scholarship opportunities for tuition are available for K5 through the eighth grade. Contact the of ce at 229-6707 to ensure your childs spot. Special to The Star An opportunity for licensed pesticide applicators to earn CEUs will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT Aug. 21. An applicator will be able to earn up to six FDACS approved CEUs in various categories for pesticide licensing recerti cation credit. The event will be conducted via polycom from the Gulf County Extension Service, located in the Old Courthouse Building ,200 North Second Street, Wewahitchka. Also two CEUs will be offered for Chapter 482 Applicators. Sessions for these licensed pesticide applicators will start at 1 p.m. EST and end at 3 p.m. EST. If you have further questions concerning this matter please contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909. Special to The Star The 2012-13 term at Gulf Coast State College is about to begin, and reports and surveys from inside and outside the College point to an exceptional outlook for incoming and returning students. According to the 2011 National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP), Gulf Coasts combined graduation/ transfer rate was almost 11% higher than the national average. Additionally, the cumulative rstyear GPA of Gulf Coast students at transfer institutions was 5.2 percent higher. And a recent student satisfaction survey at Gulf Coast found that 100 percent of students felt they were prepared when they transferred to a four-year institution, and 99 percent of students would recommend Gulf Coast to others. GCSC graduated 1,377 students for the 2011-12 term, representing a 14 percent increase over the 2010-11 number. For some students, the road to success may take a little longer. GCSC is well-suited to meeting those students unique needs as well, committed to ensuring that education remains accessible as well as affordable. For the students who arent quite prepared for rstyear college coursework, Gulf Coast provides developmental courses and tutoring to get them prepared. GCSCs success rate theremeaning students who demonstrate pro ciency in the basic skill areas so they can go on to pursue their goals is again higher than the national average in math and writing. That translates into more graduates, more productive workers in our economy. Further, the NCCBP revealed success in Gulf Coast students mastery of core courses. Students must complete the fundamental courses their degree or program requires, and in all core areasWriting/Comp I, Writing/Comp II, Algebra and Speech GCSC students again surpassed the average. The commitment and involvement of the Gulf Coast faculty goes a long way in recruiting, retaining, graduating and preparing students for the life ahead of them. Kerley is quick to note the value GCSC students nd in the quality of education and training at this local institution. Gulf Coast State College offers a variety of twoyear transfer tracks, multiple workforce programs, continuing education classes, and two bachelor degrees. In addition to the main campus in Panama City, the College operates the North Bay Campus in Southport, the Gulf/Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe and the Tyndall Education Center on Tyndall Air Force Base. Visit www. GulfCoast.edu for more information GCSC scores high in student, national surveys PSJES wins county Pennies for Patients competition The Lions TALE University of Florida IFAS CEU Day The Lions Tale

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FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM 10:30 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE T IME 9 11 AM M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM W EDNE S DAY : MEN S B I B LE S TUDY 8 AM & WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Thursday, August 16, 2012 Mrs. Ruby L. Jean Stephens, 88, of Port Saint Joe, passed away Saturday, August 11, 2012, in Panama City following a lingering illness. Born in Louisville, AL, she has been a resident of Port Saint Joe since 1952 and was a member of the First Baptist Church. She married her childhood sweetheart, Emory Stephens, who preceded her in death. She is survived by her children, Lorraine Daniel of Pelham, AL, James Stephens and wife Melody of Port Saint Joe, Billy Stephens and wife Phyllis of Marion, SC, and Arden Stephens and wife Susan of Tallahassee; eight grandchildren; 13 greatgrandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. The funeral service was held at 10 a.m. EDT Tuesday, August 14, 2012 at the First Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Howard Browning and the Rev. Dr. Jeff Pinder. Interment will follow in the family plot in Holly Hill Cemetery. The family received friends at the church from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. E.S.T. on Monday. Those who wish may make donations in her memory to The Gideons, P.O.B. 422, Port Saint Joe, FL, 32457, or to Covenant Hospice, 107 W 19th Street, Panama City, Fl 32405. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Ruby L. Jean Stephens Eunice Marie Wynn, age 88, went to be with the Lord on August 8, 2012, in Port St. Joe, Florida. She was born in Blountstown, Florida on December 9, 1923, to the late Maude and Gordon Burch. She was a faithful servant of the Lord having played the piano and organ at the Oak Grove Assembly of God Church in Port St. Joe for over 50 years, and, more recently, at Beach Baptist Church in the St. Joe Beach community. She was a loving mother to two children, Joyce Wynn of Wewahitchka, and Jerry Wynn and wife Jane of Chattahoochee. She was born into a large family that included ve surviving siblings: Fred Burch and wife Dorothy Nell, James Burch, Jeanette Lee, Annie Ruth Carone and husband Carl, and Marjorie Carr and husband Doug. She also left behind a loving sister in-law, Verna Burch, and her caregiver, Lee Perry. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ed Wynn, her brothers, Roy Burch and Cecil Burch, and her sister, Edna Bush. Ms. Wynn is also survived by six grandchildren: Jamie Lester, Wendy Wynn Roberson, Amy Wynn Driggers and husband Stacey, Jenny Wynn Simmons and husband Aaron, Ted Wynn, and Jamey Holt. Her great grandchildren include Jered, Jesse and Travis Roberson; Jordan Heath; Jillian and Jenna Driggers; Trey and Luke Lester; Hunter Simmons; and Andrew, Gavin and Rylee Holt. An artist by many de nitions, her love of music was only part of the many things for which she was known. She was avid about drawing and painting and even taught art at Gulf Coast College. She loved to sh, to travel, to witness about her faith and to take care of the elderly. She was a member of the Rebecca lodge and served as the local and state musician for that esteemed organization. Services for Ms. Wynn are scheduled for Saturday, August 11, 2012, at Beach Baptist Church, St Joe Beach, at 3 p.m. ET, with visitation preceding the service in the church at 2 p.m. ET. Burial will follow at Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. Donations may be made to Beach Baptist Church at St. Joe Beach, the childrens program or roo ng fund at the First Baptist Church in Chattahoochee, FL, or to a favorite charity. The family would like to express special appreciation to Dr. Oksanen and the staff of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Southerland Family Funeral Home 100 East 19th Street Panama City, FL 32405 Eunice Marie Wynn Franchon Williams, 72, of Port St. Joe, FL passed away Saturday, August 4, 2012 in her home after a long illness. Fran was born in Harrison, Arkansas and lived in Port St. Joe for the past 20 years. She was a homemaker and member of Beach Baptist Chapel. Through the years Fran was active both in her church and her community. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, Jim Williams; children, Sheila Godwin of Lake City, SC, Mark (Kathy) Williams of Pottstown, PA; sister, Barbara Kempter of Richardson, TX; granddaughter, Michelle Godwin; and grandson, Chris Williams. Also, special friends Janet Calvarese, India Miller and Jenni Pitts. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. ET on Thursday, August 9 at Beach Baptist Chapel in St. Joe Beach. The family will receive friends at the church from 10 to 11 a.m. EDT prior to the service. Interment will be in Harrison, Arkansas. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to: Beach Baptist Chapel, 311 Columbus Street, St. Joe Beach, FL 32456. Wilson Funeral Home Franchon Fran Williams 7-18-23 8-6-12 Wayra Peterson passed away on Monday, August 6, 2012 at 6:45 am at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee, Florida. A faithful and devoted wife for 66 years, she is survived by her husband, Clynton C. Peterson of Port St. Joe, FL. She was a loving and beautiful mother of four children, Norma Basham and husband, Terry; Jan Colbert and husband, David; Kathy Shelton of Tallahassee, and Ray Peterson and wife, Susan of Colquitt, Georgia. She has one surviving sister, Juanita Cassidy from DeFuniak Springs, FL, seven grandchildren, and four great grandchildren. She was predeceased by her mother and father, J. and Doni Laird, two brothers, Kylea and Dwaine Laird, and one sister, Eula Scott. She was a member of the Highland View Baptist Church, and was dedicated to her family and her faith. She fought a tough battle for too long, unquestionably, considering her familys needs. Her suffering has ended and she is now resting in peace and tranquility among her family in heaven. The world has lost a masterpiece here in earth, and she will truly be missed. Services were provided by Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850-385-2193, www.bevisfh.com) 11 a.m. CT on Friday, August 10, 2012 at the Sandy Creek Baptist Church in Ponce De Leon, Florida. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to the Alzheimers Project, Inc., 301 E. Tharpe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 and/or Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Wayra B. (Laird) Peterson FRANCHON WILLIAMS WAYRA PETERSON Obituaries Philadelphia Primitive breakfast sale Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church will sponsor a breakfast sale from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. ET on Saturday, Aug. 18. For a $5 donation, you can eat in or take out a full meal with bacon or sausage as an entre. All tickets sold for July 21 will be honored, and must be presented when breakfast is picked up. You may call ahead at 229-6692 to place an order New Life Christian Center World Explosion New Life Church and Pastors Johnny and Shirley Jenkins would like to invite everyone to come out and join them in a three night World Explosion Service Aug 15, 16 and 17 starting at 7 p.m. ET nightly. The speaker will be Pastor Michelle Bradley of Mobile, Ala. She operates in the of ce as a Pastor, Evangelist and Seer. Please come and be blessed. The church is at 504 6th Street. Women Fashioned by God program A Women Fashioned by God program will be held at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church at 7 p.m. ET on Sept. 8. During this program, local community women will be honored. Everyone is invited. For further information see Sister Freddie Davis, program coordinator. Faith BRIEFS

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, August 16, 2012 Kathy Freeman), stepdaughter to George Jones. To my dearest Mother, I pursued this project as a tribute to you who along with Dad provided me with memories of a happy childhood. Kathy Beginnings There was one boy and three girls. Lilly Mae was the oldest. Lilly was small and petite, but feisty. She used to pull herself up proudly and say, I may be small but Im loud! Harry was the only brother, admired and loved by all of us girls. Pauline was the next in line. She was the quietest child. I was the youngest but also tallest of all.standing at 5 feet 3 inches. We lived in Mobile, Ala., where my real Daddy, Jefferson Milstead, worked. I recall he was of medium height and had brown hair. I remember Mama vividly. She was slim with long, dark brown hair and brown eyes. Harry was the only child who inherited her brown eyes. All of us girls had blue eyes. Mama was a very smart, sweet, gentle and kind person who loved us children dearly. Sadly, Mama and Daddy divorced when I was quite young. Later, Mama met a man by the name of George Jones (Papa) who worked at a shipyard in Mobile. They dated for some time. One night, he asked her to marry him. She burst into tears and told him she could not. When he asked her the reason, she led him into the bedroom where all of us children were asleep. He told her it did not matter to him if she had children; he still wanted to marry her. Finally she was convinced of his love and accepted his proposal. George was dark haired, slightly heavy set, and just a nice man. Before their marriage, George took Pauline and me by train to Port St. Joe to meet Grandpa and Grandma Jones. During the trip, Pauline and I sang songs. One of the songs was, Im a little teapot, short and stout, here is my handle, here is my spout, pour me out, pour me out. People who were sitting nearby smiled at us and thought we were so sweet. A homestead in Port St. Joe After a while, George and Mama got married and moved to a forty acre homestead in Port St. Joe. The homestead was owned by Georges Daddy whom we called Grandpa Jones. Uncle Henry, Aunt Celia and their children lived down the road from us for a while. Eventually they moved back to Heron Bay, Ala., which was Aunt Celias hometown. Papa planted crops and sold them to the public to make a living. He also sold milk from his small dairy. Each day Harry took the milk and sold it to the hotel in Port St. Joe. Mama was an industrious lady. She cleaned rooms at the local hotel. She also picked up the very dirty clothes of some of the sherman, took them home, washed them and returned them. She was an exception not many women worked in that day Mama milked the cows in our small dairy. We only had a few cows but one cow got his tail caught so it was forever shortened. Every time Mama milked that cow, the short tail switched in her face. Finally she got a piece of cloth and tied it to the tail. Then one of children held the cloth while she milked the cow. A few years passed and Mama got very sick. They took her to the Mobile Inrmary (hospital) in Mobile, Ala. Sadly, she was diagnosed with advanced cancer. When she realized how bad it was, she made Papa promise he would take us children back to Port St. Joe after she died. Papa worked at the shipyard in Mobile and stayed in a boarding house during Mamas illness so he could be near her. Aunt Sarah and her husband also went to Mobile to be with them during this time. Her husband worked at the shipyard along with Papa. Harry, Lily, Pauline and I were placed in an orphanage for a short time while Mama was sick. Since I was so young, it was difcult for me to be separated from her. I cried and cried. Papa, Aunt Sarah, and her husband stayed in Mobile the entire time Mama was sick. The men worked but aside from that, they all helped take care of Mama until she died. Keep the children together Before Mama died with cancer, she made Papa and Aunt Sarah promise to keep us children together. She knew she was not going to live long so she tried to make arrangements for our future. After Mamas death, we all went back to Port St. Joe and lived in Grandpa and Grandma Jones house. Grandpa Jones was a dentist by trade. Grandma took care of the house. Uncle Joe had no children and always wanted to raise Harry but Mama would not let him while she was alive. After her death, Harry talked to Lilly, Pauline and me. He explained why it would be best for his future to leave. Although we were just children, we understood his reasoning so before long he went to live with Uncle Joe. Uncle Joe worked for the railroad and provided a good home for him. Harry was talented as an artist. After he moved in with Uncle Joe, he stayed busy painting murals on walls for different businesses. Each summer he came back to Port St. Joe to visit us. One time he brought me a notebook of his drawings that he drew from the characters in the newspaper. Since I was still in school, I took the notebook and showed it to some of my school friends. They were so impressed with his work. Grandpa and Grandma lived in a two-story house that was one block away and faced the highway. We could look over the palmettos and see the highway from the house. Our cousin, June, lived in a nearby house. Of course, since this was Florida and not too far from the beach, the front yard was nothing but sand. Grandma did everything she could to change the soil. Grandpa even built a walkway out of red clay that hardened so we could walk on it. The house was built with a wraparound porch. When we walked onto the porch, we could go through the door or walk down the porch to the entrance of the kitchen. Life with Grandpa and Grandma Jones Grandpa Jones plowed the elds each summer and Grandma planted watermelons for us to enjoy. After they ripened, we girls went to the eld, picked one up, dropped it and ate it right there. They tasted so good! There were two grapevines in the garden. There was a large scuppernong on one side and a small grapevine on the other side. The small vine was called Little Willie after a pet dog that died and was buried under the vine. The grapevines were trained to grow along a wire that had supports. When the grapes ripened, Grandma spread sheets under the vines. Then June and I crawled on top of the vines, picked them up and shook them. The ripe grapes fell onto the sheets. We took the sheets lled with grapes to the side porch, removed the stems, washed the grapes, cooked and canned most of them. Grandma made wine out of the remaining grapes. The wine was kept in a wooden barrel under the house. Although we had chores to do, many times we went swimming in the bay after we ate dinner. We swam for a while, went home, completed the chores, and went swimming again. I kept a nice tan due to the Florida sun. (After my sisters left home, my cousin June and I often sunned on the side porch of the house.) Grandma Jones was not only a good homemaker but a good quilter. She made a quilt for each one of her ve sons. She designed each quilt with the initial of the son in the center of every other block in the quilt. Once a year, Grandma took all the bedding including the mattresses to the side porch for cleaning. When my sisters and I beat the cotton lled bedding with switches, we removed the dust and made the bedding soft again. Then we shook the mattresses well. I was always amazed at the amount of dust that came out of the bedding! Near the grapevine was a huge chinaberry tree that we played under. It also provided shelter while washing clothes since the Florida sun was so hot. Grandma had two iron wash pots that we useda large one and a small one. When we washed clothes, we used a rub board to soap and clean them. The clothes were boiled, rinsed, rubbed and rinsed again. Since Grandma was old, I usually did the rubbing. Incidentally, the rub board gave me a slim waist! The clothesline stretched out across the side porch. The clothesline was unusual because clothespins were not needed. There was a twist in the wire about every 12 inches or so. We took the clothes, pushed them into the twist and they easily hung there. Grandma had a scrubber that had a long handle and a piece of wood attached to the bottom of it. The wooden scrubber had holes that went all the way through it. We took cornhusks and pulled them through the holes. Then we used the husks to scrub the oors. The cornhusks spread out and really cleaned the wooden oors well. The husks were sturdy and lasted through several scrubbings. When they became thin, we replaced them with new ones. The depression arrives The depression began and money became scarce. Instead of buying a new broom when it was needed, Grandma made hers. She had been raised in the country and was familiar with making those kinds of things. She made the broom out of a bushy type of weed and tied it together at the top. The brushy part on the bottom would spread out and was used as a broom. The pump was at the end of the porch next to the kitchen. Grandpa ran the pipe up the side of the porch so we could stand on the porch and pump water. That was really something for that day! We played hard, got hot, ran to the pump, primed it, pumped it until the water ran cold and drank it. It tasted so cold and good! Just inside the front door of our house, there was a hall with stairs on the right side, a short distance from the door. Grandpas telephone hung there on the wall. When it rang, all three of us girls scrambled to answer it. One day we girls were at home by ourselves. The telephone rang and Pauline beat me to it. Well, Pauline always had a little trouble in pronouncing some of her words. I listened as she told the caller, Grandpa, he not here. He gone to Wewawhiskey! Translated, Grandpa is not here. He went to Wewahitchka! (A nearby town) It was so sweet! I laughed about that for many years! The living room was on the left side of the hall. After Grandpa got older, the living room doubled as his dental ofce. One day one of his patients arrived to have a baby tooth pulled. Grandpa began working on her and she started screaming. She screamed throughout the entire procedure! I was thoroughly disgusted with the little girls behavior over such a simple thing! The phonograph stood tall in a corner of the hall. We played it a little but were very careful with it since it did not belong to us. It was owned by a daughter-in-law, Celia Jones. The hall opened up to a dining room. The staircase had a small closet like opening underneath it. It was built low and Grandma had to stoop over when she used it. She kept her canned goods in this pantry. Each summer she set a goal of canning one hundred jars of food. She canned anything she could get her hands on including lots of blueberries. During the depression, sugar was scarce and expensive so she canned some things without sugar or with very little. Times were very hard then. Next week, the depression hits hard, silent movies arrive and Port St. Joe continues to grow. We cannot guarantee when this offer will be repeated in the newspaper. Clip this offer and please call today! $10,000.00 Bene t $7,000.00 Bene t $5,000.00 Bene t $3,000.00 Bene t Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85 Male 32.50 36.00 45.00 55.00 66.00 89.00 121.00 166.00 Female 27.00 30.00 37.50 42.00 51.00 69.00 98.00 139.50 Male 23.05 25.50 31.80 38.80 46.50 62.60 85.00 116.50 Female 19.20 21.30 26.55 29.70 36.00 48.60 68.90 97.95 Male 16.75 18.50 23.00 28.00 33.50 45.00 61.00 83.50 Female 14.00 15.50 19.25 21.50 26.00 35.00 49.50 70.25 Male 10.45 11.50 14.20 17.20 20.50 27.40 37.00 50.50 Female 8.80 9.70 11.95 13.30 16.00 21.40 30.10 42.55 Your a ordable monthly rate will lock-in at your enrollment age ... Or enroll online at www.mutualofomahalifedirect.com Now, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company ... Whole Life Insurance. Are you between the ages of 45 and 8 5 ? Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU! >> 4 bene t levels up to $10,000! >> Rates lock-in at age you enroll! >> Call for FREE all-by-mail enrollment packet! NO medical exam! NO health questions! Our graded death bene t whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, nal medical expenses...or other monthly bills. Right now, you can make a decision that could help make a di cult time a little easier for your loved ones. You may have been putting o purchasing life insurance, but you dont have to wait another day. is policy is renewable to age 100**! Plus, your policy will never be canceled EVER because of changes in health. So call today! Why this policy? Why now? AFN44167 Life Insurance underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha NE 68175; 1-800-775-6000. United of Omaha is licensed nationwide, except New York. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505). This policy contains reductions, limitations, and exclusions, including a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership **In FL, policy is renewable until age 121. This is a solicitation of insurance, an insurance agent may contact you. PIONEERS from page B1COUR T E S Y OF K AT HY F REEM A N Ethel Milstead poses with a neighbor at the time, Alma Daugthry. Top, Ethel Milstead, once crowned Miss Gulf County in the late 1930s, was stepdaughter to George Jones his family founded Jones Homestead and grandmother to Kathy Freeman.

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012 The good news for rural America is that it has caught up in every other measure of education. In 1970, 7.8 percent of adults in rural counties had some education after high school, but less than a college degree. By 2010, 27.4 percent of rural adults had attained some post high school education without earning a college diploma. That level of education was close to the national average of 28.1 percent. In Gulf County, 6.4 percent of adults had some college in 1970, rising to 24.7 percent in 2010. The Florida average in 2010 was 29.1 percent. Gulf County had 5,274 adults (those over 25 years of age) in 1970 and 11,785 adults in 2010. Overall, Stallmann says, the trends show rural people have responded to the demand for increased job skills by the increasing their post secondary education. Only 22.3 percent of the adult population in Gulf County had failed to graduate from high school in 2010. Nationally 15 percent of adults had not completed high school; in Florida, the rate was 14.7 percent. Mark Partridge, a rural economist at Ohio State University, says that regional differences in college graduation rates have increased in recent years. Partridge said his studies have found that rural counties and counties with small cities in the South and West didnt fare as well as those in the Midwest and Northeast in attracting college graduates. Even though the Sunbelt has seen tremendous growth over the past few decades, the Souths rural counties havent kept up in terms of attracting adults with college degrees. But the problem of keeping college graduates in rural America is a national issue and one that is also enduring. Missouri economist Stallmann said this is a reection of the kinds of jobs that are generally available in rural communities. If there are fewer jobs demanding college degrees in a community, there are likely to be fewer college graduates. Its a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you dont see a lot of jobs that require a college education, Stallmann said. Young people graduating from high school dont see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they dont think about coming home once they leave for the university. There can be a selfreinforcing cycle in rural communities, Stallmann said young people leave to gain higher education, they dont come back after college because there arent jobs that demand such education, and their absence diminishes the chances that more of these kinds of jobs will be created. Nationally, rural counties and counties with small cities have caught up with urban counties in the percentage of adults who have some post high school education. Stallmann sees this as a sign that there are perhaps more jobs in rural areas that require post secondary education but not college. Both Stallmann and Partridge said the data on college education rates told them that rural communities should consider the kind of jobs being created locally. Rural communities may need to think about the types of jobs being created, Stallmann said. There are some communities that are doing things like getting local businesses to put an emphasis on hiring local kids who got a college education. It really suggests that rural communities that arent thinking about making themselves attractive to educated people are really going to suffer, Partridge said. Bill Bishop is co-editor of the Daily Yonder (www.dailyyonder.com), an online news publication covering rural America that is published by the Center for Rural Strategies. The Center for Rural Strategies (www. ruralstrategies.org) is a nonpartisan, nonpro t organization whose mission is to promote healthy civic discourse about rural issues. Roberto Gallardo is an assistant extension professor at the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University, (srdc.msstate. edu) For the raw information included in this story and charts, graphs and a map, visit this site: http://www. dailyyonder.com/education-and-rural-americadata-page/2012/07/06/4165 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 T ODAY! C A LL 227-7847 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction National Formidable Footprint Hurricane Exercise Saturday August 25 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon EST Gulf County EOC, 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd. Bldg 500 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Local Community groups and neighborhood associations are being sought to partici pate in the Formidable Footprint A National Neighborhood Exercise to be held on Saturday, August 25 from 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon EST. The three-hour disaster training event will focus on a hurricane scenario and is part of an ongoing series of nationwide disaster exercises. tional participation across the different United States time zones. For important exercise and registration information please go to: www.FormidableFootprint.org designed for local organizations such as Neighborhood Watch and Community Emer gency Response Teams (CERT), Fire Corps and faith / community-based organizations that work to support the needs of community and neighborhood residents during and following a disaster. To-date, 2,097 neighborhood associations, community response teams, community / faith-based organizations and local governments across the United States have suc The Formidable Footprint National Neighborhood Exercise series is underwritten by a team of national, regional and state organizations with the joint goal of providing an opportunity for local organizations to assess their disaster preparedness, response and recovery capabilities. For more information contact Gulf County Emergency Manage ment. Stephanie Richardson 850-229-9110 MEDIA ADVISORY (2012.84) AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com has since been a priority. The road, which was a collaboration between the PSJRA and several private contractors who donated work, is just one of the many infrastructure improvements totaling $1.449 million that the PSJRA has funded in part or in whole. The Billy Joe Rish Memorial Parking Lot along U.S. Highway 98 and the Dr. Joe Memorial Parking Lot and Park on Williams Avenue provided much needed parking for visitors to downtown. Reid Avenue, Williams Avenue and U.S. 98 and State Highway 71 in the business district received badly needed facelifts and the PSJRA was crucial to the creation of Jetty Park along the waterfront behind the Port St. Joe Marina and Miss Zolas Drive, which provides a connection from downtown to the bayfront George Core Park. The agency has also invested nearly $1 million in the business community through faade improvement grants, landscaping, banners and branding and planning and visioning for the future of downtown, in ve years, in 10 years and beyond. The PSJRA has also leveraged its base funding, known as Tax Increment Financing, which re ects a small percentage of any taxable property value increases in its service area. Through a variety of grant awards, the PSJRA has brought in more than $1.12 million in funding, equaling a return on investment of its TIF funds of some 53 percent. For example, in the 2012 scal year alone, the PSJRA nearly doubled the TIF through grants awards: the agency received $249,231 from the county and City of Port St. Joe and received another $215,000 in grant awards. I think it demonstrates to the community that we provide a valuable asset, Alsobrook said. An asset with demonstrable results. PSJRA from page B1 GRADUATES from page B1 Its a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you dont see a lot of jobs that require a college education. Young people graduating from high school dont see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they dont think about coming home once they leave for the university. Judith Stallmann economist at the University of Missouri

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 16, 2012 The Star | B7 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 89133 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 11 000512 CA WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, AS TRUSTEE FOR CARRINGTON MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-RFC1, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES Plaintiff, vs. CLETUS F. HEAPS, III, ET. AL. Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated August 7, 2012 entered in Civil Case 11 000512 CA of the Circuit Court in and for GULF County, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at on the 13th day of September, 2012 at 11:00 AM, AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 the following described as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: LOT 17A, PONDEROSA PINES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW ) OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 1979.80 FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST, 267.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 100.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST, 267.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 100.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 18, PONDEROSA PINES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW ) OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30, SAID POINT BEING S0001’37”E, 1879.73 FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE N 8958’23”E, 267.00 FEET; THENCE S0001’37”E, 100.07 FEET; THENCE S 8958’23”W, 267.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, N0001’32” W, 100.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS CONTAINING 0.61 ACRE, MORE OR LESS. Address: 401 PONDEROSA PINE DRIVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Dated this 13th day of August, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 days after the sale. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk David Bakalar, PA Attorney for Plaintiff 2901 Stirling Road Suite 208 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312 (954) 965-9101 11-01559 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the office of the Court Administrator, GULF County Courthouse, at 850 229 6112 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Sale; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) for hearing impaired or 1-800955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. August 16, 23, 2012 88943 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2012 PR 33D Division “——” IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN, deceased, whose date of death was June 7, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. Personal Representative: Diane E. Suchan 105 Ocean Ridge Lane Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles L. Hoffman, Jr. Attorney for Diane E. Suchan FL Bar No: 229768 SHELL FLEMING DAVIS & MENGE 226 Palafox Place, 9th Floor Post Office Box 1831 Pensacola, FL 325911831 (850) 434 2411 Fax: (850) 435 1074 E-Mail: choffman@ shellfleming.com August 16, 23, 2012 88653S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000431 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. JERMAINE ROBINSON AND URSULA ROBINSON, HIS WIFE, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in July 13 2012 in the above-styled cause, the Clerk shall offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash on August 23, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the COURTHOUSE LOBBY of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL, the following described property: EXHIBIT “A” COMMENCE AT A 4” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED) FOR A DISTANCE OF 225.60 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD (HAVING A 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 211.56 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 105.78 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L. B. NO 6596, THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 481.29 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES. 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 411.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND TOP OF BANK OF STONE MILL CREEK; THEN TURN RIGHT AND MEANDER UPSTREAM ALONG THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND TOP OF BANK FOR 208 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND THE TOP OF. BANK, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 326.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 6596; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 431.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2006 Nobility, Kingswood 66 x 28 manufactured home, Serial No: N8-12961AB, located on the property. Property Address: 1842 Stone Mill Creek, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 26, 2012 Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88687S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 2012-89 EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELIA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-89-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT “A” Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northwest Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Sect. 23, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; and thence go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East along the North Boundary line of said SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 (as monumented) for a distance of 432.33 feet; thence go South 00 degrees 25 minutes 22 seconds West for a distance of 41.2.00 feet, thence go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 52.73 feet to a point on the Westerly right of way line of Creekview Drive (having a 66 foot wide right of way) for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning go Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 131.00 feet and a central angle of 0,1 degrees 57 minutes 18 seconds for an arc length of 4.47 feet (Chord bearing South 21 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds East for 4.47 feet) to a Point of Reverse Curve; thence continue Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 366.88 feet and a central angle of 15 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds for an are length of 99.54 feet (Chord bearing South 14 degrees 34 minutes 18 seconds East for 99.23 feet); thence departing said right of way line go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West for a distance of 242.00 feet, more or. less, to the water’s edge of Wetappo Creek; thence go Northerly along said water’s edge to a pint which is North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West, 293.40 feet, more or less, from thb Point of Beginning; thence departing said water’s edge go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 293.40 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land being known as Lot 6 of the UNRECORDED PLAT OF CREEKVIEW ESTATES. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88685S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2012-02CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., and administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/s SWAMPYS by and through its Director, Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 201202-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., an administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/a SWAMPY’S, by and through its Director Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 30 and 31 of Mack’s Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, according To the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. AND The North Six (6) Feet of Lot 29 of Mack’s Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida According to the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in Plat Book 1, Page 14 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88737S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-482 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KC “LLC”, a Florida limited liability company, KAY W. EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS, and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS, Defendants. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 5th day of April, 2011, in Case Number 10-482 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK. N.A., is Plaintiff, and KC “LLC”, a Florida limited liability company, KAY EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 23rd day of August, 2012, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 4, Block 6, RIVERSIDE ESTATES ADDITION TO IOLA UNIT NUMBER 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA “Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, rights, oil and gas rights, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”)”, including a 2001 Claz mobile home, ID# CLS097249TN. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 31st day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: B. A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 89033S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS RFP 2012-07 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Thursday September 13, 2012. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Thursday September 13, 2012 at 4:15 PM EST, in the City Commission Room. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “City of Port St. Joe Hwy71-98 Maintenance” DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Work consists of landscape and grounds maintenance of the following sites: Highway 71 median from the corner of Hwy 71 and 98 north to Woodward Ave. and Hwy 98 right of ways from the corner of Hwy 98 and 71 west to Ave. A, Port St Joe, FL 32456. The landscaping services required include weeding, cultivating, trimming, pruning, mowing, edging and maintenance. A more detailed description of the work requirements is available in the bid package. BID NO: RFP 2012-07 Copies of the Bid Package are available at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and may be examined at this address or obtained free of charge. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (30) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer This notice dated August 9, 2012 Submitted by: John Grantland, Public Works Director August 16, 2012 88919S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2012-90-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL P. KUMARICKAL; ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICES IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 13, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on August 30, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 3, Block 35 of SAINT JOSEPH’S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NUMBER THREE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale Dated August 6, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 89035S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL Bayfront Recreational Facilities Concept and Plan The Port St Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA) is seeking proposals from qualified firms to provide professional design services for a Bayfront Recreational Facility in Port St. Joe, FL. Proposals should include proposed fees, statements of qualifications, and examples of similar completed projects. General project scope includes, but is not limited to, Conceptual Design for recreational activities and structures intended to increase public access and enjoyment of St. Joseph Bay; Conceptual Design of a Coastal Cultural Center; integration of the plan into the existing Waterfront Master Plan; public workshops; programming; entitlements; and design/build specifications, cost estimates, and schedules as required to solicit further funding and qualified design/ build construction/development of the project. Full proposal and bid requirements are available on request from the PSJRA Executive Director Gail Alsobrook at 850-229-6899 or Gail@PSJRA.com or www.psjra.com. The proposal deadline is 2:00 PM EDT on Friday, August 31. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to accept or reject any and all proposals in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new proposals, or to postpone the proposal deadline. Each proposal shall be valid to the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency for period of (120) days after the proposal deadline. August 16, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Port Saint Joe : 682 Dolphin St. in Highland View Sat. 8/18th 7-?h YARD SALERain or Shine, Many items to see clothing knick knacks 13’ box t.v., motorcycle chaps, helmet, saddlebags, & motorcycle stand ,etc Text FL20706 to 56654 Hunting Lease Member Wanted near Port St. Joe. 1,600 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $500. For details: 850-227-5052 2 br, 1 ba, apartments for rent. call Kenny 850-227-6077 or Phil 850-227-6241 Government assistance accepted Port St Joe: 2br, 2ba 1cg, kitchen, LR, Balcony, long rental, near bay & dock, close to downtown, excellent area, 850-624-4264 Text FL20904 to 56654 Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 FOR RENT: 2br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets, $500 month + $400 dd. Call: 850-229-6495 Text FL20096 to 56654 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 24/7 Experienced Care giver looking for a private in home senior, care giver or sitter job. In Gulf County, please call 850-639-3029 Text FL19665 to 56654

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By Bridget Quigg Imagine the following scenario. S omeone asks you how work is going and y ou say, Not bad. The pay is great and t he stress is manageable.Ž According to r esearch from online salary database P ayScale.com that could be your reality if y ou choose one of the following well-paying j obs where workers report below-average l evels of stress. PayScale.com collects salary and job i nformation from employees around the c ountry and has found the most enviable g igs are typically knowledge-based and r equire highly specialized training and e ducation. Being smart at something really helps y ou feel happy,Ž says Katie Bardaro, lead r esearch analyst at PayScale.com The m ore preparation you put into a career, the m ore you can define your career, such as b eing able to set your schedule and your t asks.Ž She adds that not having the pressure o f being a cog in the machine alleviates s ome stress.Ž It seems that being able to w alk into a room and command everyones a ttention as you share your expertise m akes you less likely to crave that sixth c up of coffee. Perhaps the promise of a career like t his will inspire you to get the degree or a dditional job training you need to land one of these five high-paying, low-stress jobs.1. Optometrist Median annual salary $99,200Good attention to detail and a strong background in the sciences help optometrists diagnose vision problems, prescribe vision-correcting eyewear and help manage eye diseases such as glaucoma. In addition to earning a bachelors degree and doctorate, optometrists must pass state and national exams. After all that, apparently, they are pretty happy. Job prospects are excellent, with 24 percent job growth expected through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).2. Materials scientist Median annual salary $90,600Synthetic fibers, lubricants, leakproof materials „ these are a few of the products created by materials scientists. They need strong chemistry backgrounds and at least a bachelors degree to get started. Those holding a Ph.D. often specialize in areas such as analytical chemistry or polymer chemistry. 3. Economist Median annual salary $85,600Economists pay attention to the distribution of goods and resources. They might focus on money, natural resources or other valuables, and often work to predict future outcomes. Those with a Ph.D. fare best in what can be a very competitive job market. You have to be willing to produce plenty of reports and analyses based on hours of number crunching. The government employs the majority of economists, according to the BLS.4. Aeronautical engineer Median annual salary $82,800Who would not feel inspired working on the wonder of flight every day? From lowering aircraft weight and fuel needs to improving safety, aeronautical engineers spend a lot of time rethinking and improving how we travel through the air. Aeronautical engineers typically have a bachelors degree to start, but many earn masters degrees and pass both licensing and professional advancement exams.5. User experience designer Median annual salary $79,100User experience (UX) designers optimize any experience where humans interact with objects, such as board games, ATMs and cars. For example, in a world where almost anyone can create a website in hours, leading companies often hire UX designers to make their site more attractive and easy to use. UX designers come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, industrial design and anthropology. I work on projects just as they start or even initiate the project myself,Ž says Mike Bibik, a senior UX designer in Seattle. This affords (me) a greater amount of influence, and I am not dealing with the stress of project decisions or directions with which I disagree.Ž5 high-paying, low-stress jobs Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! HELP WANTEDFast pace of ce Must have excellent computer, organizational,& phone skills. Bring resume by of ce located at : 106 Reid Ave Port St. Joe Mon – Fri 9:00 5:00No phone calls please. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34216824 Text FL16824 to 56654 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR COUNTY RACES INCUMBENTS RETAIN POSITIONSBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Where the term applied, incumbents ruled Tuesday night in Gulf County. District 5 County Commissioner Warren Yeager survived a particularly brutal campaign, Becky Norris easily beat back a challenge for Clerk of Courts, Tim McFarland earned from voters what he received early this year from the governor, and Billy Quinn Jr. and Linda Wood survived challenges to their school board seats. Those were the universal primaries, election-deciding outcomes based on being either nonpartisan elections County Judge, Gulf County School Board or contested by members of the same party with no challengers on the other side. The total votes cast, 5,381, represented 54.45 percent of the registered voters. Almost 2,000 of those votes were cast either by absentee ballot or early voting. Results are unof cial until the canvassing board certi es the results in the next two days. Yeager, who survived a blistering campaign season, won 50.04 percent of the vote against challengers Bill Koran, 15 percent, and Barbara Radcliff, 35 percent. Radcliff was seeking the District 5 seat for the second time. It is very satisfying, said Yeager, who won another fouryear term in an all Republican race for his seat on the Board of County Commissioners. I am grateful to the public. It is a humbling experience. Yeagers District 1 peer, Commissioner Carmen McLemore, also a subject of a singeing campaign, won the Democratic primary over Freddie Whit eld 631-504 and will face Republican Kenny Peak in November. The closest race of the night came in the District 3 BOCC Republican primary, where Joanna Bryan beat Johnny Mize by 11 votes to earn the right to move to November. Then Bryan will face Democrat Jimmy Rogers and John Grantland, who is running with CANDIDATE VOTES PCT COUNTY JUDGEBrian Hill 1,598 30 Tim McFarland 3,041 58 Jarred Patterson 627 12COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 5Bill Koran 186 15 Barbara Radcliff 450 35 Warren Yeager 637 50SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 4Lois Byrd 263 41 Billy Quinn, Jr. 382 59SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 3Melissa Farrell 336 35 Linda Wood 629 65CLERK OF COURTSKeith Duke Jones 1,307 25 Becky Norris 3,903 75 Yeager, Norris, McFarland, Wood, Quinn re-elected$35,000 raised so far to save structureBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Exposure and awareness is everything to the effort to save the Cape San Blas Lighthouse and move it along the bayfront in Port St. Joe. Charlotte Pierce, city clerk and president of the St. Joseph Historical Society, said the General Services Administration, which must perform the red tape of having the property of cially declared surplus, available to interested parties and then awarded to an appropriate entity, is moving at light speed on the process. That is a huge hurdle to overcome. With erosion almost cutting off the access road to the lighthouse and keepers quarters, time is of the essence. On the fundraising side, a publication in British Columbia, Canada, has posted to its readers the story that ran several weeks ago in The Star concerning the plight of the lighthouse and the Historical Societys selling of Christmas ornament replicas of the lighthouse. The groups publisher said the article had generated considerable interest among lighthouse lovers north of the border and his group would be making a large order. Each ornament costs $20, of which $10 bene ts the lighthouse cause. Pierce said sales of the ornaments, which go to the Historical Society, have helped raise almost $35,000. The city also might have something of an answer from the Florida Legislature. A bill passed in 2012 speci cally mandates the Division of Historical Resources of the Department of State to undertake a study of all lighthouses in the state: The study must determine the location, ownership, condition and historical signi cance of all lighthouses ensure that all historically signi cant lighthouses are nominated for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places must assess the condition and restoration needs of historic lighthouses and help develop plans for appropriate future public access and use. The Division of Historical Resources is charged with a leadership role in implementing plans to stabilize lighthouses and associated structures and to preserve and protect them from future deterioration. When possible, the lighthouses and associated buildings should be made available to the public for educational and recreational purposes. The Department of State shall request in its annual legislative budget requests funding necessary to carry out the duties and responsibilities specied in this act. Funds for the rehabilitation of lighthouses should be allocated through matching grants-in-aid to state and local government agencies and to nonpro t organizations. Mayor Mel Magidson said it was unclear at this time what help the state could provide, but the statute seems to provide something of a lifeline. There is some indication to us that the Department of State must request funding to carry out this act, Magidson said. We may be able to coerce the state into helping us from a money standpoint.City gets push on Gulf PinesPort St. Joe city commissioners understood there would be a day of reckoning on several outstanding tax certi cates for Gulf Pines Hospital. They just didnt expect to have that day arrive so soon. Gulf County Tax Collector Shirley Jenkins noti ed city of cials recently of a request for a tax deed Victim of shooting off life supportBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Everett Gant, shot in the head by a neighbor on July 30, continues to hang in there after being taken off life support equipment last week, according to Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent. The family decided late last week to take Gant off life support, but he has been breathing on his own, has shown some reaction to stimulus and opened an eye, said his mother, Gloria Gant. Gloria Gant said the family is still in a wait-and-see mode, and it remains unknown the extent of the damage sustained when Everett Gant was shot between the eyes at close range with a .22 ri e by Walton Henry Butler. Butler is in the Gulf County Jail being held without bond on a charge of attempted murder with a hate crime enhancement.Cape San Blas Lighthouse on historians radar SPECIAL TO THE STARDebbie Hooper of joebay.com shot this gorgeous sunset shot over St. Joseph Bay during the Aug. 4 Scallop & Music Festival. While music was playing, some concert-goers took a break from the heat with a little wade into the bay.A golden moment Opinion .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor ...................A5Outdoors .....................................A6 Sports...........................................A7School News ................................B3Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4Classi eds ....................................B7-B8See LIGHTHOUSE A8 See SHOOTING A8 See ELECTION A8Thursday, AUGUST 16 2012 YEAR 74, NUMBER 44 MBARA tourney next Saturday | B1 McFARLAND YEAGER WOOD NORRIS

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012RANDAL YAKEY 522-5108 | @ryakey ryakey@pcnh.com U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland is cosponsoring a resolution that aims to alter annual sh catch limits. Southerland, R-Panama City, said he introduced the legislation to remedy concerns with the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the federal policy that administers Americas sheries. H.R. 6350, known as the Transparent and ScienceBased Fishery Management Act of 2012, is designed to address inequities in annual catch limits, catch shares in the Gulf of Mexico, enforcement of shery laws and disaster assistance, among other issues. Parts of the legislation would open up catch numbers and over shing for review by local shery councils. If approved, the Secretary of Commerce would decide if the closing of sheries has become disruptive to sport (or) charter shing operations. I have heard from anglers from across North and Northwest Florida who have asked me to act as their voice in Washington, Southerland said just after the legislation was submitted. Southerland said the reason the legislation was introduced was to improve methods for setting annual catch limits and prohibit the expansion of catch share programs without a referendum. He also wanted to strengthen accountability measures for federal of cials who collect sheries data and determine disaster assistance. Environmental advocates counter the current policies are having a positive effect on the environment and loosening of those restricting early would be detrimental. Im certainly sensitive to the economic hardship, said Sera Drevenak, policy and outreach director of the Marine Fish Conservation Network. Our current system of sheries management isnt perfect; however, weve made major gains in our efforts to stop over shing and rebuild over shed stocks. According to Drevenak, Congress reauthorized the Magnuson-Stevens Act in 2006; at that time, the United States had 48 stocks that were subject to over shing. Drevenak said that number has dropped to 36 and, because of the science-based plan in place, can reduce that number further. The laws annual catch limits and accountability measures are working, and translating into greater shing opportunities for many of Americas anglers and commercial shermen, Drevenak said. Joining Southerland as original cosponsors of the bill are U.S. Reps. David Rivera, R-Fla.; Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla.; Jon Runyan, R-N.J.; Frank LoBiondo, R-Fla.; and Frank Guinta, R-N.H.New bill takes aim at shing catch limitsBy TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Gulf County eighth-graders are moving to the information superhighway with greater speed thanks to a pilot program. The expansion of Information Technology courses, already offered to the high school students, will put eighth-grade students on a fast-track to industry certi cation in Microsoft Suites. This is teacher training and in turn the teachers will be training the students to earn industry certi cation in Microsoft Suites, said Sara Joe Wooten, assistant superintendent for instruction with Gulf County Schools. We already provide Computing for College and Careers (CCC) courses in the high school. Eighth-grader learning the IT courses will be able to move directly into the CCC curriculum. Port St. Joe Junior High School was selected in a competitive process to participate in a Middle School Information Technology Career Academy Assistance demonstration project sponsored by Workforce Florida Inc. Workforce Florida Inc. has teamed with The Whetstone Group (TWG), a leader in youth talent development, for the implementation of the technical assistance utilizing TWGs LEAD Through Workforce Innovations Career Pathways/Academy model to establish new CAPE IT Career Academies in 15 selected middle schools across the state of Florida. Workforce Floridas mission is to help Floridians enter, remain and advance in the workforce, said Chris Hart IV, Workforce Florida President/ CEO. Career Academies efforts to prepare Florida youth to meet 21st Century workforce demands advance this mission and support Gov. Rick Scotts vision of making Florida the worlds top business destination. The Port St. Joe Junior High IT teacher will be Shirley Thompson. Wewahitchka Junior High, with Debbie Gerber as lead teacher, will implement a similar program under the auspices of the Florida Department of Education. The main thing we are doing at both schools is putting in a computer course in eighth grade in order to lead to industry certi cation, Wooten said. Workforce Florida chose Port St. Joe Junior High and the DOE picked up several schools in the state that are doing the same thing. An analysis of national education data reveals that less than one in four high school graduates will attend college and earn a four-year degree, according to a press release from Workforce Florida. This means the potential exists for the majority of students in our country and state to enter the workplace without the skills necessary to compete in an ever-changing and global economy. This also means there has never been a more important time for the leaders of our schools and communities to recognize the value of quality career and technical education (CTE) programs that produce students with marketable skill sets tied to their community and states economic and workforce needs. By ensuring students graduate with skills needed by local businesses, Gulf County Schools is ensuring students have access to career opportunities while also ensuring the development of an ongoing talent supply chain that strengthens the competitiveness and economic well being of the entire community, said Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton. These demonstration projects focus on middle school grade students earning nationally recognized industry certi cations in Microsoft and Adobe, two of the worlds leading digital literacy vendors. In looking at the data, it just makes sense to focus on Information Technology (IT) as these skills are foundational to many STEM occupations and support competitiveness across industry sectors which are vital to Floridas economy, said Whetstone Group president Melissa Bumpers. The goal, according to the Workforce Florida press release, is establish a talent pool supply chain essential to business recruitment and retention strategies while also experiencing many of the additional positive outcomes associated with these career academy initiatives; outcomes such as increased funding through the Florida Career & Professional Education Act, decreased disciplinary actions, decreased drop-out rates, increased academic scores and graduation rates. Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to HomeGeorge E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy,cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy.Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independenceby optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) County junior highs part of IT pilot program

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, August 16, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) THE16THANNUAL CLASSIC CAR SHOW SPONSORS: The Star, St Joe Ace Hardware, Catheys Ace Hardware, Napa Auto Parts, Mango Marleys, Steamers Hot Dogs, Sharons Cafe, Killer Seafood, Chris Williams, Advanced Auto Parts, Bluewater Outriggers, The Port Fine Wine and Liquors, Mexico Beach Marina, Toucans, Half Hitch Tackle, Peggy and Cletus Heaps, St. Joe Auto Parts, Auto Value, Port St. Joe Police Department and The First Baptist Church. RONNIE Bs RESTAURANT GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A. The Gulf County Chamber and 2012 Scallop Festival Committee would like to thank all of our sponsors, vendors, and volunteers for their hard work & generosity in making this years festival a success. CATHEY CONSTRUCTION By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Mexico Beach Chief of Public Safety Brad Hall submitted a letter to city administrator Chris Hubbard on Aug. 2 informing Hubbard that Hall would be retiring effective at 4:30 p.m. CT on Oct. 2. Halls retirement comes at a time when the Department of Public Safety is in upheaval. Hall, as well as two of cers, is currently on paid administrative leave pending inquiries or investigations by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. In addition, leaders of the volunteer re department have expressed dissent with several budget proposals from the city council to cut funding to the department, resulting in a threat to disband the department. According to the Sheriffs Ofce, FDLE has completed its initial inquiry, opening the way for the Sheriffs Of ce to undertake an investigation, which just got underway. According to Hubbard, who addressed the subject at last weeks city council meeting when asked by Councilwoman Tonya Castro, Halls retirement plans did not negate or stop the investigations in progress. The announcement that Hall was retiring was met by an audible gasp from the audience during the meeting. The FDLE inquiry was launched in May into what to date have been unspeci ed allegations. The council asked the BCSO to undertake an internal investigation after the FDLE was through. Castro said she wanted the council to look into hiring an independent agency to vet candidates for the chiefs position, and not to simply hire internally without a more in-depth search, although, she added, current Mexico Beach police of cers could apply for the position. No decision was made at last weeks meeting. In his retirement letter, Hall noted that he has been associated with the City of Mexico Beach since the age of 12 when he became a Chief of the Junior Fire Department. He served later as a volunteer re ghter, auxiliary police of cer, reserve of cer, full time of cer and was promoted from corporal to sergeant to lieutenant and nally chief of the Department of Public Safety, created in the late 1990s to consolidate police, re and EMS services. He noted that his tenure has featured ups and downs but I have many great experiences and memories to take with me on my next endeavors in life. Saying he would be grateful to assist in the process of administrative transition, Hall added that, I want to thank all of the citizens who supported me and gave me the opportunity to serve them as a true public servant for the last 21 years. This will be my greatest memory of all, I will forever cherish my public service. There will be a special city council meeting at 5 p.m. CT tonight at the Civic Center as the council discusses the design and plans for the new city hall and police department to be constructed within the rehabbed Parker House, which the city purchased last year.Hall to retire from Mexico BeachI want to thank all of the citizens who supported me and gave me the opportunity to serve them as a true public servant for the last 21 years. This will be my greatest memory of all, I will forever cherish my public service.Brad Hall, Mexico Beach chief of public safety

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A4 | The Star USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 How highs the water, mama? Its two feet high and rising. We can make it to the road in a homemade boat, Thats the only thing we got left thatll float, Its already over all the wheat and oats That Johnny Cash classic referring to a very real flood from his boyhood days in Arkansas is hitting just a little too close to home this morning. If it rains anymore Im gonna start looking for that Old Testament guy with the large boat and all those two by two animals on board. Dog days didnt come and go. They came and stayed! Its enough to make you search for your snorkel and goggles. I figure about one more day of this and ebay or Amazon.com will reinvent the term galoshes. We used to try to figure it out. Me, Leon and David Mark would sit out on the porch, with the rain pelting down, and discuss the scientific and weathermetric cause and effects that dogs had on the monsoon type rain that beset us every August. Leon declared it to be tied to some Sirius Dog Star constellation. It all took place high above the earth. The moon and the stars lined up just right and pressed, or maybe compressed, some cumulus clouds and the result was a steady stream of water hurling down on the whole world. I would lean over the side of the porch and peer skyward. It had been so cloudy we hadnt seen the sun, much less a star, since the middle of July! It was hard to test out that Dog Star theory if you couldnt see it! I will tell you this for a fact; our dogs knew something was amiss. Duke would hardly come out from under the house. He wouldnt run a coon. He didnt eat nothing, which wasnt like ole Duke at all. He did howl a lot. He barked at shadows. Hed chew on his tail. And hed fight those swarming mosquitoes like it was the war to end all wars! David and I thought it was just a coincidence that it rained a little more in the late summer. It was like a harbinger of the impending, and dreaded, new school year that was about to crank off. Daddy would bemoan how we could have used some of this rain back in the spring. I had trouble accepting that our dogs were the culprits. But it was as plain as the nose on your face that our canine crew knew more about the downpour than they were telling! But still, I really liked Duke. And I never thought it quite fair to blame forty-seven straight days of rain on him. We are all too quick to point fingers when we are standing up to our arm pits in water. And besides, it was pretty clear to us out at the end of Stonewall Street that dogs werent the only thing affected by the dark, ominous weather. While we were deeply engrossed in this meteorologistic hyperbole Mr. Walter Higgins drove by in his International three-quarter ton pickup truck. Folks, his two daughters were riding in the back, drenching wet, while Mr. Higgins and a couple of his prized beagles were living high and dry up in the cab. Didnt none of us speak till the truck turned on down the Como Road and went out of sight. It made no sense to me. I knew Charlene and Raylene fairly well. We wrestled sometimes in that field down below Terry Browns old house. They were not the prettiest girls in town by a whole heap, but they were nice enough. Raylene could toss you over her head and slam you to the ground if you werent careful. She put Ricky Gene in a headlock once till he turned pure purple. Both had enough sense to get in out of the rain! It appears, Leon broke the silence, Mr. Higgins opted for beauty over brawn. Grown-ups would be a tad more short tempered discussing hog prices in MaCadams Tractor and Implement Companys show room. Fights would break out among life long friends. No marriage was safe. Ive seen it raining so hard Calvin Purvis wouldnt come out from the Gulf Station and put gas in your car. All my girl friends told me its over for good in August, midst a downpour, usually with a little anger attached to their declaration. Sometimes I howled for joy, sometimes not. Mothers cakes would drop. Hens wouldnt lay. Milk cows would balk at being touched. I reckon every facet of life was affected by some aspect of the continuing rain. Were not mowing the grass. Leon always saw the glass half full. Course, he couldnt think past next Tuesday! Eventually the rain was going to stop and the yard would be knee deep to a Tyrannosaurs rex and wed have to bale it as we mowed! We chided Leon for being shortsighted. Hed shove me. Id hit Dave. As you might imagine, three teenage boys couldnt be confined to the porch very long. Wed both dump Leon out of the swing. The chase was on! Leon was World War II older than us and maybe a tad faster. But neither David nor I wanted that whipping hed give us if he caught us. We ran like the wind down Stonewall Street oblivious to the rain, the dogs, that Sirius Star or some weather report coming out of Memphis predicting dont put up your umbrellas just yet. I wonder today what Mr. and Mrs. Brooks or the Kennons or Vonell Webb must have thought as they sat on their front porches watching that scene unfold. I figure they either shook their heads and sighed, those Colbert boys again...or rightly surmised it was just another common place, every day, ordinary, phenomenon of Dog Days. Respectfully, KesRaylene was as tough as she looked HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert Back in July, I went back to see Ms. Fannie Lou in Vernon, Florida. Over a year ago, I had traveled back to Vernon to rekindle memories of RC Cola and MoonPie adventures with my Papa, who used to take me to Vernon, Fla., on adventures over 40 years ago. Ms. Fannie Lou was kind enough to invite me in her house and talk to me about Vernon when I came back in 2011. A magazine publisher recently called me to tell me that Ms. Fannie Lou was planning on moving to a retirement home soon. I needed to see her in Vernon one more time. We found her eating one Sunday afternoon at the United Methodist Church in Vernon. My children stood and stared as I sat down at the table with Ms. Fannie Lou and the other women. Im sure this house out back of the United Methodist Church, was for these types of events (eating, socials, etc.). I opened the door and went right in. Sometimes folks think I make up the people I write about. I dont. People from in and around Vernon, Fla., know Ms. Fannie Lou is real and is more wonderful than I could ever explain. Ms. Fannie Lou would probably remind you of someone from your hometown or perhaps a relative, maybe even your grandmother. Everyone in Vernon and I do mean everyone knows Ms. Fannie Lou. As a matter of fact, folks in Vernon have usually seen her, talked to her or waved at her within the last couple of days. Since rst writing about Ms. Fannie Lou, I have been getting messages from people who either know her or are related to her. They simply say things like, She is wonderful, We love her, or I will always remember her. Ms. Fannie Lou makes a difference. What more should one want out of this life? During the past 90-plus years, she has been a part of the wonderful little city called Vernon. She is a cherished friend, a good neighbor and the type of citizen every city needs regardless of size. According to the latest Census numbers, Vernons population is about 750. Vernons present Mayor, a very nice lady, was elected this year by a vote of 59-51. Papa always said he wanted to be Mayor of Vernon. I think I would rather just be a citizen. Vernon is a place where time stops, people speak to each other and folks love each other for who and what they are. Honestly, I think everyone has a Mayberry in their mind. It doesnt have to be in the South, it doesnt even have to be in America. I guess it doesnt even have to be real but, let me tell you, Vernon, Fla., is real. Now, what did Ms. Fannie Lou have to say? She was just as sweet and kind as she was the rst time I met her. I told her I had heard rumors about her plans to move to a retirement home. She conrmed that she would be moving and noted it was a very nice place she was going to. This made me happy. We talked about how my Mama had lived in a retirement home in Alabama and it went something like this. Ms. Fannie Lou asked, Did she like it? I said a lot of stuff, but this is what I remember saying. Mama didnt like it at rst, but then she started meeting folks she knew from long ago and rekindling old friendships. Mama wasnt very keen on the social events when she got there, but she then decided she liked them. She got to paint, lead Bible studies and eat with folks she knew every day. Ms. Fannie Lou looked at me like a little girl about to go out the door on her rst day of school. However, she did it with the beautiful eyes of a woman who had spent more than 90 years loving folks, helping them and being an important part of their lives. The other ladies sat around the table just kind of staring me. I understood why. Therefore, I changed the conversation to something else; I didnt know what else to do. I started talking about my Papa and our trips to Vernon over 40 years ago. The RC Colas, MoonPies, hoop cheese, boiled peanuts, green tomatoes and other things that made the trip and the destination perfect. The ladies around the table smiled and piped in with I remember and Do you remember? and Did you know? The minister was anxious to get the meal blessed and the ladies fed. I understood. My objective had been met. I saw Ms. Fannie Lou in Vernon, Fla. One of the nice ladies helping with the meal gave me two handfuls of pears she had picked in her yard. After I correctly identied them as sand pears, my children and I stayed until the minister had asked the blessing. We all know Ms. Fannie Lou will make new friends and meet old friends at her new home. She will continue to successfully do what I have tried to do with my stories about Vernon, Fla. Ms. Fannie Lou will share Vernon with those who might not know about it and revel in Vernon with those who do. I went to the car and cried. My children understood. They werent sad tears; they were happy tears joyful tears of Vernon, the people there and my memories that will always be there. Some folks poke fun at me for getting emotional over such things and say that I try to nd a story everywhere I go. To that, I must confess, Yes, I do. Im sorry if you dont fancy those stories and you dont get emotional over places like Vernon. In my opinion, this life is just a book of short stories. We can make the RC Colas, MoonPies and Vernon, Fla. OpinionThursday, August 16, 2012Much was made of the size and complexity of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act when President Obama signed it into law in 2010. But now that the Supreme Court has upheld much of the acts constitutionality, its a good time to review key provisions that already have gone live and to plot out whats expected to happen in the next two years. Changes already in place include: Children under 19 cannot be denied coverage because of preexisting conditions. Adult children may remain on parents medical plan until they turn 26. Lifetime insurance maximum payouts were eliminated. In addition, annual coverage limits are being phased out. Effective September 23, 2012, the annual limit increases to $2 million. All new plans now must provide certain preventive services for free, such as mammograms, immunizations and colonoscopies. People who have been refused insurance because of preexisting conditions may now be eligible for coverage through a high-risk pool program. Go to https://www.pcip.gov/ for information and to apply online. Medicare Part D participants who reach the infamous doughnut hole now receive a 50 percent discount on brandname prescription drugs 14 percent on generics. (These discounts will gradually increase until 2020 when the doughnut hole will disappear.) Many core features of the Affordable Care Act wont take full effect until 2014 and details are still being nalized, but here are highlights of whats expected to happen between now and then: By Aug. 1, 2012, insurance companies that didnt spend at least 85 percent of 2011 premium dollars for large group plans (more than 50 employees) on medical care must refund the difference, through refund checks or discounted future premiums (80 percent for individual or small group plans). By Oct. 1, 2012, plans must begin adopting rules for the secure electronic exchange of health information this will reduce paperwork, costs and medical errors. By Jan. 1, 2013, new federal funding will be in place to state Medicaid programs that choose to cover preventive services to patients at little or no cost. By Oct. 1, 2013, states will receive two additional years of funding to continue coverage for children not eligible for Medicaid. Effective Jan. 1, 2014, most key provisions will be in place. For example: Individuals and those whose employers dont offer health insurance will be able to buy it directly from state-based Affordable Insurance Exchanges, which will offer a choice of health plans that meet certain benets and cost standards. Most who can afford basic health coverage will be required to obtain it or pay a fee to offset the costs of caring for uninsured Americans. Americans earning less than 133 percent of the poverty level will be eligible to enroll in Medicaid. Refundable tax credits will be available to those earning between 100 and 400 percent of the poverty level to help pay for affordable insurance. They also may qualify for reduced copayments, coinsurance and deductibles. Annual coverage dollar amount limits will be prohibited. Adults will no longer be refused coverage due to preexisting conditions. These are only a few of the many health care changes we will see as a result of the Affordable Care Act. To learn more, please visit www. HealthCare.gov. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney. What does health care reform mean for you? JaASON ALDERMa AN CRaANKS MY TRaACTORBN HeardSee CC RaANKS A5

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A5 | The StarVoting in BabylonDear Editor: As the election season heats up Christians have been given a dilemma: voting and the faith of a leader. The simple solution: Our political leaders are not our spiritual leaders, they merely need to be qualied to perform the duties of the ofce of President. It is true that a candidates stated faith and actual practice thereof will tell a lot about their character. What if their deeds are in contrast to their stated faith? Then you can expect mixed results, including total failure. Our example is Christ, the One whose Word does keep the duties of The Church out of structure of world government but His character is to be inclusive in our work. American voters have unwisely moved to put the charitable deeds of The Church under the banner of government to the perversion of those deeds by pagan servants. An act that would have made Caesar proud! If a candidate merely borrows Christs name, not holding to salvation, it is better if they are the kind of pseudo-Christian who will keep to their job of rather than making further encroachments on the charitable function of The Church thus making us slaves of his government! America needs a leader performing the duties of the ofce, not a manipulator who will justify governmental overreach into duties of The Church with blasphemous spiritual rhetoric to a spiritually blind audience! The American political structure was not designed to be a charitable organization but a secure nation of charitable, free individuals who can give charity in the name of The LORD, or whatever idol they choose so long as it is outside of government control. To the spiritually blind the government is their church, ask Hitler. Why dont the charitable voices just start voluntary foundations instead of forcing ideology and forcing taxes on everyone managed by corrupt politicians that use that force to further secure their tyranny? Because corrupt pastors and people have forfeited their duty to the government! For Christians, our structure is in The Bible. I am voting for politicians who wake up and tell pastors, Christians and pagans to quit telling them to do their charitable duties, the Christian duty: fasting (self-denial, Isaiah 58) to feed the poor, to clothe the naked, to care for the sick and to house the homeless. (No mention of retirement.) Let politicians govern and house the lawless. Or, has the church of the lawless taken over the lawless as well as the lawful? Indeed, if Christians examined themselves and their pastor as closely as the job of the president you might nd the source of the problem. Candidates need to tell the pastors to teach the full breadth of justice and hold their ock accountable to their failures so the lawmakers do not have cause to step in. No, the corrupted pastors and ocks scold the politicians on charity and the politicians happily take over the charitable duties of The Church as they take idolatrous hearts into submission to their control; no more freedom, compulsory taxes have taken over freewill offerings. Pastors are too weak to teach hard lessons, boy, these lessons will be hard indeed. We have sold our freedom and The Church for the sake of a false doctrine of social justice that offers retirement to our Sabbath duties a day for Gods work, not rest and rejection of honest, well-portioned preaching. Every member of a church or denomination for any government entitlement or subsidy should quit paying their tithe and submit to the authority of the politicians and just pay their taxes, or get a different pastor. We have a common practice applicable for voting, example: workers are hired to do their job, right, the Ofce of President is not Pastor in Chief but Commander in Chief. The media is not shaping narratives around the duties of the ofce; they are manipulating followers of faiths with spiritual narratives designed for the cult of personality, not Jesus Christ. I will never get spiritual advice from a president; that is not his calling. Ask yourself, is the candidate and his surrogates willing to perform the duties of the ofce, equal justice for all, big and small, or must they tempt the souls of voters and buy them with thefts, taxation, from others that have been renamed entitlements that assemble and destroy the duties of The Church, little dog treats they redistribute so his government can keep representing a voters oppressors? Contemporary America is built on these thefts that are the evil omens Jacob rejected because that wise man perceived the evil intent to enslave his children (Genesis 42:27-28, 35-36; 43:1-15). Corporations steal in the name of national security. We cheer as one state steals from other states, cleverly labeled as pork. A generation steals from its own children with unfunded entitlements. Your politicians didnt fund all that. And the granddaddy of them all is the bad debt we sell around the world to fund our prodigal lifestyle. America could be blamed for breaking down the entire economic structure of the world once we bottom out (Revelation 18). We simply need justice and it has to start with pastors and their people who have aided the governments assimilation of the needs of the needy that have been gradually reshaped into wanton dependencies of the greedy while pandering to church sensibilities to a country that has grown spiritually dull due to excess and indulgence (Deuteronomy 28:47). The Church has outsourced its duties to pagan hirelings and we have enslaved ourselves to taxes rather than voluntary service and tithing and fasting! Gods rst action in restoring a land is with righteous leaders who speak all of Gods Word (Isaiah 1:26-28). Church members should be ineligible for all government assistance, per The Bible, or the church should lose all special tax statuses that do nothing more than give tax shelter to a false, apostate church that now uses its funds to fund retirement and pay bloated salaries (heresies). Did you know there is no Biblical support for the retirement of healthy people? None, only warnings. Churches with the deeds of Babylon should be honest, they belong to Babylon. God will not allow the best leader to surface in this generation of thieves (Isaiah 3:6-7). Now, consider this: If we all do as we are to believe and not as we are, we are acting, look at how fast our budgets balance and our debts pay down. Christians in America need to revisit all the commands on fasting, work and duty; duties that are not optional. There is no rapture to the nal, most evil generation of mankind built on theft and rejecting duty. A comment sure to generate indignation instead of contrition or conviction. Voting to outsource your duty to Caesar by supporting an apostate church is not doing your duty, no, you are willingly creating your own curse and forfeiting your freedom, a sublime deception indeed. Vote for the one who will hold us accountable to the duty we have abandoned. We need a leader who will remove charity out of government and put it back to the people. America will not have a leader we can be proud of until there is a revival repentant to Jesus. Apathy and patriotism will only bring on civil war and the Christian Holocaust. Turner Echols Port Saint Joe, Fla.Humane approach to feral cats neededDear Editor: It has come to my attention that the Gulf County Board of Commissioners is in the process of rewriting the ordinances r egarding  Animal  Control et al. They will  soon nalize their draft being written by J .  Novak and present it to be made into law. A very disturbing section will be added. THE PROHIBITION ON FEEDING FERAL A NIMALS.  We, who do so in order  to trap them,  so as  to then  neuter/spay/ vaccinate  homeless, stray  cats, would be vilied. Citizens who understand the only way to control the excessive breeding by T NR (trap, neuter, return)  are being undermined by those without a working knowledge of modern t echniques.  Every Vet School advocates TNR and the subsequent e stablishment of Colonies.  These vetted  cat colonies are then  tended to by very dedicated care givers around town. Most do this at their own expense. Instead of taking away the right to care for a helpless, starving animal, by compassionate p eople,  the county should address the real underlying problem. What needs to be written, mandated, and funded is low cost SPAY and NEUTER. The people who allow their unsterilized animals to roam and breed are the real problem. M any cities and  counties including Bay  advocate these established programs. Bay also is in the process of offering a program called OPERATION SPAY BAY. The Wiregrass has a s imilar outreach program.    Animal control ofcer Rolands position is that the only good feral/homeless cat is a dead one. This is indeed a very dangerous opinion being held by a person in a position of a uthority.    I hope that The Gulf County C ommissioners  listen to reason and adapt  a humane approach when it comes to this issue. The irony is that t hese  ordinances  are being rewritten to prevent animal abuse and yet adding that language on feeding strays is just that. Do they really w ant  the notoriety  as the community that advocates animal cruelty as a method of control? Starvation is not an acceptable alternative. Thank you,Nancy LeistPSJ Alley Cats TeamScallop memoriesDear Editor: As I observed the Scallop Festival and all the activities, my thoughts were how times have changed since 1936 when I was 14 years old. We lived at the end of 4th Street (presently Captain Freds Place) on the waterfront now known as Maddox Park. I would walk around barefoot in the grass beds in the bay in front of our home feeling for scallops. When I had collected enough I would shuck them and my mother would cook scallops for our family. Sometimes I would get enough to ll a quart jar after they were shucked. This was before we had face masks and SCUBA gear. I would pour cold water over them in the jar and hitchhike to Beacon Hill to sell them for 10 cents a quart. There were only a few houses out there at this time and people from Marianna and Dothan came to spend time at the beach. Times were hard back then during the Great Depression and a dime was big money to me.Capt. Dave MaddoxPort St. Joe decision to nd, remember and write about the good ones in our life books or we can complain, cry and dwell on all the bad ones. My children and I drove up the road to Wausau to see the Possum Monument. It is worth seeing. Some folks have written to me and told me their stories about Vernon and how much they love it. Other folks have written to me and said that I am guilty of generalizing too much about folks from other parts of the country (other than the South). I agree with you, it is unfair for me to say that ALL folks from the north or from Hollywood make fun of the South. There are wonderful people from everywhere and there are wonderful cities and places throughout the country. The next letter I get will be about how I capitalize South, and not north. The person will tell me that it is grammatically incorrect. They may also point out my spelling of Mama or Grandmama as being wrong. Yes, they are incorrect, if you go by the book or the map. The way I see it, I capitalize South because it is my home in the same way I capitalize Mama, Daddy, Papa and Grandmama, because they are mine. They were my Mama and my Grandmama, so I spell it the way I want to. You miss a lot of good stuff, if you simply go by the book or the map. Vernon, Fla., is one of those places you might miss. Dont miss it. Go to Vernon stop, get out of your car and talk to people. If youve traveled to Vernon with me, you understand. My children heard the excitement in my voice when I saw the Vernon City Limit sign. Papa knew. He loved me so much that he took me to this wonderful place called Vernon six hours away from his home in Alabama and let me hang my head out the window along the way. We stopped and talked to folks and drank RC Colas and ate hoop cheese, crackers and boiled peanuts. When he said, Lets go to Vernon, he was saying, I love you. Now that I think about it, Papa was also probably saying, Ive had enough of Cora Belles nagging, lets get out of here. Cora Belle was my Grandmama, she was sweet and wonderful, but she sometimes could get Papa ustered. It could be at any time of the day or night. He would open his eyes real wide, clear his throat, scratch his orange-tinted at-top with his left hand, pick his little dog up and put him under his right arm and say, Lets go to Vernon. Therefore, Grandmama should also get a little credit for me getting to go to and knowing about Vernon, Fla. As of the last City Council meeting in July, I am very proud to say that I am an Honorary Citizen of Vernon, Fla. Read more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, August 20, 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, August 28, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discucc and act on the following: 1. Variance Application Mickey and Sharon Winchester Parcel ID # 03805-130R Located in Section 23, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback. 2. Development Policy, Ordinances, Comprehensive Plan, and LDR Revisions Comprehensive Plan Amendments Transmittal of proposed military support and other comp plan amendments Comp Plan and LDR review of vested private properties within conservation land use amendment Occupational License Additional development & planning issues 3. Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. (2012.83) Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S CRANKS from page AA5 LettersThursday, August 16, 2012 Letters to the EDITOR

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E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR THE ENTIREYEAR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, August 1685 7740% Fri, August 1785 7740% Sat, August 1884 7750% Sun, August 1984 7660% Mon, August 2084 7660% Tues, August 2184 7660% Wed, August 2285 7660% 16 Mo 824am 1.8 702pm -0.2 17 Tu 906am 1.9 734pm -0.2 18 We 945am 1.9 800pm -0.2 19 Th 1023am 1.8 822pm -0.1 20 Fr 1101am 1.7 838pm 0.0 21 Sa 1143am 1.6 846pm 0.2 22 Su 1230pm 1.3 841pm 0.4 23 Mo 130pm 1.0 810pm 0.6 24 Tu 355am 1.0 327pm 0.7 1053am 0.6 630pm 0.6 25 We 352am 1.2 117pm 0.4 26 Th 419am 1.4 240pm 0.1 27 Fr 505am 1.7 349pm -0.1 28 Sa 602am 1.9 451pm -0.2 15 Su 426am 1.2 1201pm 1.5 652am 1.3 910pm -0.1 16 Mo 452am 1.2 1254pm 1.5 802am 1.3 950pm -0.1 17 Tu 518am 1.3 146pm 1.6 856am 1.3 1024pm -0.1 18 We 540am 1.3 235pm 1.6 941am 1.3 1055pm -0.1 19 Th 600am 1.3 322pm 1.6 1021am 1.2 1122pm -0.1 20 Fr 618am 1.3 410pm 1.5 1100am 1.1 1147pm 0.0 21 Sa 634am 1.3 500pm 1.5 1141am 1.0 22 Su 652am 1.4 555pm 1.4 1212am 0.1 1226pm 0.9 23 Mo 712am 1.4 657pm 1.2 1238am 0.3 118pm 0.7 24 Tu 735am 1.5 813pm 1.1 105am 0.5 220pm 0.6 25 We 803am 1.5 951pm 1.0 133am 0.7 336pm 0.5 26 Th 836am 1.6 200am 0.9 505pm 0.3 27 Fr 918am 1.6 629pm 0.1 28 Sa 1010am 1.6 739pm 0.0 29 Su 1113am 1.6 838pm -0.1 Inshore Offshore SPONSORED BY Inshore action continues to be dominated by trout in St. Joe Bay. Good trout catches are still reported in Pig Island and the surrounding areas. Most of the action is on live shrimp; however, arti cials such as Gulp and D.O.A. lures will work ne also. Large amounts of mullet are also in these waters right now. Good grouper catches are still coming to the docks in St. Joe. Most action can be found on the live bottom or hard bottom sites due south of Cape San Blas. Good shing for gag, red grouper and scamp grouper are all found here. King sh are still hanging around the buoy line, but not in great numbers right now.Team Reel Smoker wins shootout; king shing Kadels take 2nd placeBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The King sh Shootout gave leukemia research a shot in the arm, and a pair of angling prodigies scored big again. The ninth annual shootout raised $35,000 for the Leukemia Research Foundation and gave 45 boatloads of shermen a weekend of fun. The weather was perfect by all accounts, but the king sh must have been warned because they were in short supply. Team Reel Smoker out of Panacea shing with boat captain Blake Gardener took the gold and a check for $5,000 with a 48-pound whopper. The team already holds the record for the tourney with a 53pound monster caught last year. Team BudK captained by Bud Kadel of Thomasville took second place on Saturday with a 36-pound sh landed by 9-year-old Nic Kadel. On Sunday, big brother Alex, 11, caught a 38-pound sh that replaced Nics catch in the No. 2 spot for the shootout. The Kadels, or the boys as competing shermen dubbed them during the tournament, already had proven to be shing prodigies when Alex took rst place in the juniors division with a record-setting 48-pound king and Nic took second place for king sh during the Big Bend Saltwater Classic in June. Nic and little brother Will also took home ribbons for red snapper in that tourney. The boys attribute their shing success to a secret bait. Mom and dad said the boys will not sh as juniors in the Saltwater Classic next year but are jumping up to the recreational category. Father Bud said the $4,000 purse earned on Sunday will be divided among the team, and most of it is going into college funds for Alex, Nic and 5-year-old Will who also shes on team BudK. Though king sh were scarce, the tourney was the setting for a very unusual catch. Max Lawhon, son of Mary Lawhon the tournament organizer, landed a sail sh on Sunday. Max Lawhon said the sh was not even hooked but became entangled in the shing cable. The sh was 70 inches long and took 45 minutes to land. Landing that beautiful animal was as good as it gets, Lawhon said. Team Yes Dear was shing in 68 feet of water on Millard Collins boat the Smooth Drag when he landed the sail sh. The rare catch was returned unharmed to the Gulf after a few photos were snapped with a cellphone. Collins, C-Quarters dockmaster and a cornerstone of tournament since its beginning in 2003, was honored and presented with a Yeti Cooler during the awards ceremony. Collins said he appreciated the thought, but the cooler will probably not be big enough to hold his average catch. The Hayes family of Camilla, Ga., was honored for their fundraising efforts. The family sold $12,000 in raf e tickets before the tournament. Son Matthew, who attends Auburn University, is a leukemia survivor. The King sh Shootout, dedicated to the memory of Lisa Crowder Jackson, is the largest privately organized fundraiser for the Leukemia Research Foundation. Organizer Mary Lawhon said she was very pleased with the amount of money raised for research this year. She thanked the shootouts sponsors, C-Quarters and everyone who helped make the shing fun. She said plans are already under way to make next years No. 10 tourney bigger and better than ever. GATOR SEASON IS HERESPECIAL TO THE STARThis 14-footer is the biggest gator processed by Kents Alligator Processing Plant in Wewahitchka so far in the 2012 season.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTeam Reel Smoker of Panacea with their 48-pound, rst-place sh.SMOKIN THE COMPETITIONLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTOP: The Kadel family with their 38-pound king, from left, are Alane, Will, Nic, Bud and Alex. ABOVE: A sail sh was landed by Max Lawhon during the tournament.Page 6 Thursday, August 16, 2012

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com ASectionStar Staff ReportLast year was the most successful in the history of Gene Raf eld Football with all three of the Port St. Joe teams winning the Big Bend Football League Championship. The young players cant wait for the new season to begin. Sign-up for ages 7 through 12 will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET Saturday, Aug. 18 at the Port St. Joe Fire Station on Williams Avenue. Please bring $60 for the fee, evidence of health insurance and, if the player was not a member of the league last year, a copy of his birth certi cate. Every player must have a physical exam before playing. The league suggests you get this done as soon as possible. Equipment distribution will be done immediately following registration so the player must be present. There will be two teams rather than the three teams of last year. The Dolphins will eld players that are 7, 8 and 9 years old; Jaguars will be 10, 11 and 12 years old. This change will insure that all the cities in the Big Bend League will be able to eld teams in every age division. To make it possible for all players to get plenty of playing time, each game will feature a fth quarter that will not count but will give the younger players game experience to better prepare them for great things to come. Last year, for the rst time, videos were made of each game available so parents would have a record of their young players achievements. The program was very well received so it will be available again this year. Cost is $45 for videos of every game, $10 for individual games. We also will have both Dolphin and Jaguar T-shirts available at very reasonable prices. If you have any questions whatsoever about this great program, please contact Matt Herring at 247-9842 or Dona Sander at 227-4839. JOESLAWN CARE 850.323.0741JOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM People, Natural Gas & SafetyDigging? If you are planning to install a pool, fence or any other construction that requires digging on your property the law requires that you call Sunshine State One Call at 811 before digging. This will ensure that all underground utilities have been located. Check with your contractor before excavation because, as a home owner, you may be responsible for making that call. What Should You Know About Gas Odor? Natural gas doesnt normally have an odor. A substance is added by your natural gas company to give natural gas a rotten-egg smell should it escape. Become familiar with the smell. Should you detect this odor, it does not positively tell you that there is a gas leak: but this your gas company and have them investigate. What Can You Do To Reduce The Possibility Of An Accident? First keep the emergency phone number of your gas company handy. A good place to write this number is in the front of your Natural gas supplies vitally needed energy to thousands of homes, businesses and industries in Florida. Energy, whether it be in the form of gas, electricity, oil, water, etc., when uncontrolled can be dangerous. Even though a record of safe operations has been established over the years by the regulated gas industry, knowledge of the information contained in this ad can assist you in recognizing a potentially hazardous condition and take appropriate action to safeguard life and property. Why & Where? Natural gas is cleaner and cheaper than other forms of energy available for your home or business. Because many people use Natural Gas it is likely that you have a gas line on or near your property if you live in our service area. We have 2 types of lines that are both located underground. Main lines are located on the side of most roads and their purpose is to deliver the gas that is needed for a particular area. Service lines which are located on customer property and are used to feed gas to the customer from the main. phonebook along with other emergency telephone numbers such which should be done to improve safety as well as conserve energy are: 1. Teach children that they are not to play with any appliances in the home. 2. Clean the burners and have them checked for proper adjustment periodically. 3. Repairs, installations and removal work. 4. If lighting of an appliance is required. ALWAYS light match and hold at ignition point of burner before you turn on the gas. 5. Follow the manufacturers instructions for operation and care of gas appliances. 6. Never take a chance. If you think you smell gas, call your gas company. What Should Be Done If The Smell Of Gas Is Believed To Be Present? There are many possible conditions which could be encountered, thus it instructions for every situation: The following examples provide general instructions which should assist: 1. If a slight odor is detected in a localized area or room of a buildingin the area; call the gas company immediately. 2. If a strong odor is detected in a do not operate electrical switches, however, do open windows and doors to ventilate the area (caution: dont turn on exhaust fans) leave the building and call the gas company. 3. If a strong odor is detected in a building and/or va hissing sound is heard-do not operate electrical switches, lights or other devices: do evacuate the building leaving exit doors open on your way out, warn persons to stay clear of the building company immediately from another location. 4. If the odor of gas is detected outside (in the yard, at the sidewalk, etc.)-immediately call the gas company.ST. JOE NATURAL GAS COMPANY301 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL Phone 229-8216www.stjoegas.com www.theappliancesolution.com Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 7By JASON SHOOT747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com Chuck Gannons return to Port St. Joes football coach came with one particular caveat. The Tiger Sharks were going to step up their efforts in the weight room. We demand it of the kids, and they did a good job, Gannon said. The kids have been here two or three times during the summer. Weve gotten a little bit stronger since I took over in January. One thing we really tried to stress was getting ourselves in the weight room. We have to get back to play what Port St. Joe football was in the past: Getting (stronger) physically and teams knowing they have to go through us for four quarters. PSJ was 3-7 overall last year and 1-3 in District 4-1A and struggled to keep pace with district rivals Blountstown, Liberty County and West Gadsden. Gannon, who served as the teams head coach from 1996 to 2001 and was the defensive coordinator last year, hopes a team that is a little older and a little more experienced will hold up better this fall. Gannon said the team will have about two dozen players on the roster and as many as seven or eight athletes playing on both sides of the line of scrimmage. That placed added emphasis on the weight room, where players can put on the muscle and bulk necessary to endure the seasons daily grind. We have a lot of kids going both ways, he said. One of things we try to explain is that the weight room is going to help them. Its going to be a long season. We have a great conditioning coach (track coach Kenneth Parker) who does a great job. Thats one of the things we have to sell em. We want to be as fresh in the fourth quarter as in the rst quarter. Coach Parker does a good job getting the kids in shape, and thats a big mental thing. Gannon will turn to senior quarterback Ramello Zaccaro to run the offense. Zaccaro got a chance to run the offense during spring practice. He did a good job, Gannon said. Hes a senior, so were hoping hes got some leadership and got some athletic qualities. Im not sure if hes really a true quarterback, but hes the best one weve got as far as athleticism. Hell help get the ball off to people, and he can throw it a little bit. Gannon said PSJ has a stable of running backs ready to contribute. Seniors Dusty Richter and Decorian North will share carries, and Gannon said North has bounced back from a high ankle sprain that hampered him during the spring. Another senior, Joe Love, and junior Natron Lee also will contribute. Jack Cummings is a 6-foot-2, 225-pound transfer from Texas who will get some carries, too, Gannon said. As it is at most programs of similar size, depth along the offensive and defensive lines will prove to be crucial for the Tiger Sharks. Weve got to keep everybody healthy, Gannon said. Were pretty good across the front of the offense and defense with our starting group. Were trying to develop that backup role. We play a split look up front (defensively), and we try to get where we have three defensive ends we can rotate around, and we try to get three defensive tackles inside we can rotate around. Most of these guys are not only going on offense and defense but on every special team weve got. Cummings will line up as a defensive end but can shift to linebacker if necessary, Gannon said, and senior Ricky Pennington will line up at the other end position. Reggie Smith and Jacobi Jones will contribute at defensive tackle. Senior Dallas Burke and Lee have been tabbed the teams inside linebackers, and Cummings will play some downs there when hes not lined up at defensive end. Richter, North and Jakice Davis are among the athletes competing for playing time at outside linebacker. Zaccaro, Jack Riley, Carter Thacker and Josh Cabaniss lead the group of players starting in the defensive back eld. Gannon stressed that many of the players on the defensive side of the ball are interchangeable and can be moved around. The team may have a limited number of players on the eld, but it will help that several players arent tied down to a single position, he said. If we can play aggressive defense, swarm to the football, make it physical, then hopefully well be around in the fourth quarter and have a chance to win the ball game, Gannon said.Tiger Sharks prep for seasonTime is here to sign up for Gene Raf eld Football

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-8310 MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITS KARAOKE & DJ IN THE CROWS NEST HOLLY ADKINS & LUKEABBEYON THE POOP DECK COMEENJOYTHESUNSETRANDYSTARK WITH ART LONG ON SAX ON THE POOP DECK KARAO K E & DJ IN THE CROWS K E & DJ IN THE CROWS K N EST N EST N UPCOMING EVENTS dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp An account has been established at Centennial Bank in Everett Gants name to assist the family in defraying medical costs. Gloria Gant thanked the community on behalf of her family for the outpouring of support, thoughts and prayers since the shooting rocked the community. When people read about what happened, they might think this is the most awful community, Gloria Gant said. But it is not. This is the warmest, most generous community, and we cant thank everyone enough for their support. We would not be getting through this without that support. We have just been amazed with all the people who have reached out. We have been amazed by the number of people Everett has touched. I know my son and he is just a gentle boy. The family thanks the community for everything and hopes the community will keep Everett in their thoughts and prayers. Gant, a black man, was shot by Butler, who is white, at the Pine Ridge Apartments in Port St. Joe. According to the arresting af davit, an incident occurred earlier in the day when a woman came to Butlers apartment in the apartment complex on Garrison Avenue with a child in tow. Butler immediately used a racial slur to refer to the child. Investigators discovered Butler had been making similar racial slurs to other children in the complex during recent days. The woman became upset and left Butlers apartment. Gant then went to Butlers apartment to discuss the comments. Upon arriving at the apartment, Butler shot Gant between the eyes and shut his door, leaving Everett Gant to bleed outside the door. Butler called 911, nished cooking supper, sat down and began eating. Nugent arrived on the scene and contacted Butler by phone, at which time Butler told Nugent to come in, he was eating dinner and had put up the gun. Nugent said Butler acted as if inconvenienced when put under arrest, saying he could not understand the problem as he had only shot a (racial slur). for a certi cate holder of property taxes for 2004 on the former Gulf Pines Hospital site. The process of application to tax deed and tax sale, city attorney Tom Gibson said, likely will take about two months, allowing commissioners time to explore their options. We knew all along wed have to deal with (the three outstanding tax certi cates), Gibson said. This is a little sooner than we hoped. The city is trying to get the hospital property the state closed the facility permanently in 2005 cleaned up and back on the property tax roll. The city hopes to make a few bucks with a bounce back of the real estate market, but the property has become an eyesore and health hazard, and razing it and getting it on the market remain the primary goals. The city is working with the Internal Revenue Service, which has taken a $1.7 million tax lien down to a last offer of $75,000. However, the IRS, which is at least considering wiping the debt clean, would like the city which took deed earlier this year to address outstanding local property taxes to avoid a private entity from bene ting from the elimination of the federal tax debt. The IRS has indicated it would consider an application for wiping away its tax lien if the local property tax issues are dealt with. The Gulf County School Board and Board of County Commissioners have agreed to work with the city on tax debts of recent years, but one certi cate holder has the ability to press for a tax deed. The downside for the certi cate holder, a company out of Central Florida that specializes in buying tax certi cates that accrue interest during their life cycle, is that it would be on the hook for the full federal tax lien if it presses for the tax deed. Gibson has said that would be his bargaining approach to any entity seeking a tax deed there is one other tax certi cate that could be the foundation for an application for a tax deed in the future. In short strokes, Gibson has said any entity seeking a tax deed, and in turn securing ownership the city currently holds deed to the property but can walk away at any time would be on the hook for cleanup of the property as well as the federal tax debt. The city is in the best position to take this property, City Commissioner Rex Buzzett said. The city, on the other hand, would like to develop the land, just more than two acres, in keeping with the neighborhood, by creating four to ve single-family residences. Though not fully costout, the project likely would leave the city slightly in the hole, although if the IRS and local property taxes can be addressed, there is a solid chance the city could make a small pro t. Part of any pro t would be returned to residents in the neighborhood who put up the money for a required appraisal and the county and school board, depending on what arrangements can be made with those governing bodies. SHOOTING from page A1 LIGHTHOUSE from page A1no party af liation; neither had a primary opponent. Incumbent Commissioner Bill Williams chose not to stand for re-election. McFarland and Norris each coasted to victory and earned four-year terms. McFarland garnered 3,041 votes to easily outpace Brian Hill (1,598) and Jarred Patterson (627). Norris earned nearly three times the votes of challenger Keith Jones in the race for Clerk of Courts, taking 74.91 percent of the ballots to 25 percent for Jones. Wood, who beat Farrell for the District 3 seat 629-336, and Quinn, who beat Lois Byrd for the District 4 seat 382-263, also easily won new four-year terms. The general election campaign for Gulf County property appraiser, to replace retiring Kesley Colbert, will be among Mitch Burke, who beat Jamie Lester 1,092-906 in the Republican primary, Dan Christie, who is running with no party af liation, and Democrat James Rish, who did not have a primary opponent. The campaign for the next supervisor of elections Linda Grif n is retiring was whittled to two, John Hanlon beating Brittany Alford Beauchamp 71-29 percent, winning the Republican primary, and Wyvonne Grif n Pickett beating Shawn Butler 1,593-1,413 in the Democratic primary. Superintendent of Schools Jim Norton will face Democratic primary winner Jay Bidwell. Bidwell and Phil Lanford were close all night until the nal results pushed Bidwell to a 1,783-1,315 vote victory. That was the way our whole campaign went, smooth, Lanford said. We both worked hard. Neither of us was negative in any way. In state and federal races, Glenn Hess took 61 percent of the county vote, Jamey Westbrook edged Halsey Beshears 34-32 percent in Gulf County in the District 7 Republican race and Robert Hill garnered 45 percent in the Democratic primary for the same seat. Al Lawson, who once represented Gulf County in the Florida Senate, easily won the Democratic race for the 2nd Congressional District, and Bill Nelson won the county vote in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate. ELECTION from page A1

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Thursday, August 16, 2012 By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com With nearly $2.5 million invested into the community, the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA) has plenty to boast about as the agency hits the seven year mark. From improved parking and streetscapes downtown, faade and sign improvements and most importantly expansion of the former Downtown Improvement Agency to include nearly all of the central and business districts of Port St. Joe, the agency is celebrating seven years of investment. Small-town development expert Robert Gibbs suggested during a visit in 2006 that Port St. Joe should make the business district look like somebody cares, said PSJRA executive director Gail Alsobrook. Many took that to heart certainly the PSJRA did and now it shows. The PSJRA adopted its new moniker and acronym after the expansion of its boundaries to include all of the neighborhood known as North Port St. Joe. Since a scuf ing beginning a lawsuit muddied goals and in turn progress before being dismissed the PSJRA has linked the north and south ends in several ways. The construction of David Langston Drive provided a thoroughfare between disparate business districts, creating a seamless connection. Lighting PSJRA celebrates 7 years The Billy Joe Rish Memorial Parking Lot is one of the latest improvements to downtown infrastructure sponsored and funded by the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency.TIM CROFT The Star See PSJRA B6By Bill Bishop and Roberto GallardoSpecial to The Star Gulf County has experienced a brain gain in the last 40 years, joining the rest of the country in what has been a massive increase in the number of adults who have earned college degrees. In 1970, 5.7 percent of those over 25 years of age had college degrees in Gulf County. By 2010, 13.6 percent of adults here had completed college. The percentage of adults with college degrees in Gulf County was less than the national average of 27.9 percent in 2010. The collegeeducated rate here was less than the Florida average of 25.9 percent. The number of adults in the United States with college degrees has almost tripled since 1970, when only 10.7 percent of adults had graduated from college. But the percentage of adults with degrees in rural counties, such as Gulf County, while increasing, has generally fallen behind the proportion of college-educated residents in urban counties. The loss of young, welleducated residents has posed a long-standing dif culty for rural communities. One of the problems that rural areas face is that in order to get a college education, young people often have to leave, says Judith Stallmann, an economist at the University of Missouri. Once you leave, that introduces you to other opportunities that you might not have seen had you not left.County sees increase in college graduatesSee GRADUATES B6 MBARA king sh tourney next SaturdayStar Staff ReportThe Mexico Beach Arti cial Reef Association is set to have its 16th Annual MBARA King sh Tournament on Saturday, Aug. 25. This one-day tournament is the biggest fundraiser for this all volunteer organization which has raised over a million dollars and built over 200 new arti cial reefs since 1997. We are so thankful for all of the support we have received from our members over the years who know how important arti cial reefs are to our area for shing and diving, said Ron Childs, tournament director. It brings tourists to the area which means jobs and economic development for the local area. Just this spring we built over $100,000 worth of new reefs -actually we try to build new reefs every year. The tournament will host a Captains Party on Friday night at Beacon Hill Veterans Memorial Park right outside of Mexico Beach which will include smoked sausage, drinks, door prizes, Miss King sh and more. This is a change from the past when the Captains Party was at the El Governor Motel. The new location will be really nice with a view of the Gulf and plenty of parking and space for the thousand or so anglers who show up for this event, Childs said. We will have some great door prizes provided by Bluewater Outriggers and Half Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe. The prize payout will be $3,000 for the rst place king, $2,000 for the second place king and $1,000 for the third place king. A special payout of $1,000 will go to the biggest Wahoo and $500 for the biggest Spanish mackerel. Second and third place Spanish will pay $300 and $200, respectively. The weigh-in will still be at the Mexico Beach Marina in Mexico Beach from 1-5 p.m. CT. Entry fee is $150 per boat, and the tournament shing begins at 5 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. CST. The number of anglers on the boat is not limited. For complete details go to www.mbara.org and click on tournaments. You can pre-register online at the same website or go to Bluewater Outriggers and Half Hitch Tackle in Port St. Joe or Mexico Beach Marina in Mexico Beach. The weekend will conclude with a huge party on Saturday night at Toucans Restaurant and Bar in Mexico Beach for everyone in the tournament. Special to the StarLast years winners Larry Lemieux and Russell Stewart with Miss King sh.FLORIDA PIONEERS By Beverly Mount-DoudsEditors note: This is another chapter in a continuing series on local pioneers. This story, the second part of which will appear next week, concerns how the community of Jones Homestead came to be. This is a story shared by a granddaughter of one of the children raised by the Jones family.D r. Adolphus Winston Jones was born at Columbus, Ga., Sept 20, 1864, the son of Joseph and Mary E. Jones. He was given a dental education by the Seaboard Railroad and for several years he was employed at the State Hospital and practiced dentistry in River Junction. He also carried the R.F.D. mail from there for four years. He moved to Port St. Joe in 1908 where he lived on a homestead several miles south of town, practicing his profession here and in Franklin and Liberty counties. He built his present home in 1918. He and Miss Ada Belle Rogers of Smyrna section near River Junction were married in 1894. They raised a large family of children of their own and took care of a number of motherless children. Dr. Jones and Ada Belle raised, six sons, Henry, Rutherford, Marcellus, George W. and Clyde W. and Richard B. Jones; and one daughter, Mrs. Sarah (Jones) Johnson. Here is the childhood memoirs of Katherine Ethel Milstead Lombard (as told to her daughter Childhood memories recalled of Jones HomesteadSee PIONEERS B5COURTESY OF KATHY FREEMANBefore becoming Miss Gulf County, Ethel Milstead was crowned Miss Port St. Joe in 1934.

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Thursday, August 16, 2012 Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyMeet Macklin a Labrador Retriever/Mix. Macklin has learned to walk on his leash and is a very patient puppy. He loves the attention of kids and loves to play with them. He loves his puppy friends but is still a little timid around kitties. Macklin will grow up to be a very big dog one day. This great puppy deserves a loving, forever home of his very own. If you can give him one let us know and we will tell him. WE ARE IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH SOME GENERAL MAINTANCE, CLEANING, PAINTING ECT VOLUNTEERS ARE ALSO NEEDED FOR PET SOCIALIZATION AND FOSTER HOMES. SCHOOL CREDIT AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. We are now proud partners with www.petsforpatriots.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Our shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! IF YOU ARE MISSING A PET, PLEASE CHECK WITH US!Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FloridaInsuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals, Families or Small Businessess Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Your Local Agency for B2 | The StarStar Staff ReportTallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will be closing its Port St. Joe satellite location as of Sept. 20. Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic will be available for your continued orthopedic care at its other locations. For appointments call 850-526-3236 or 850-229-1177 If you would like copies of records you can contact the TOC office at 850-877-8174 or Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic, 3334 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 400, Tallahassee, FL. 32308.SPECIAL TO THE STARFrom singing to dancing, piano playing, joke telling and inspirational writings, the residents at The Bridge at Bay St Joe have many talents! The funlled resident talent show was held on Thursday, Aug. 2 with a packed audience. The panel of judges was Serenity Healthcare corporate consultants who were visiting from Louisville, KY. First place honors were given to Wilma Tipton for her beautiful singing of the gospel song Had He Not Been. Second place was given to Louise Setterich for her dynamic reading of the poem Footprints in the Sand. Virginia Rogers won the third place honor for her inspirational poem she wrote and presented. Mrs. Tipton received a trophy and cash award, Mrs. Setterich received a trophy and Mrs. Rogers was presented a ribbon. Everyone enjoyed the fun event and the residents at The Bridge at Bay St Joe are busy working on their talents for the next show. Special to The StarSteve Kerigan will be coming to discuss the mission of the Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf Guild. He will provide statistical information and all the new services and doctors that they have at the hospital now. It is their goal to increase awareness and involvement throughout our community and let others know how they can help make this hospital and even greater success! If you are interested in hearing Steve speak, please contact Sunset Coastal Grill at 850-2277900 to reserve a seat at lunchtime. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon on Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, please contact Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Gibson and Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Gegenheimer request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their children, Margaret Sandifer Gibson and Michael Eugene Gegenheimer at 4 p.m. Central Time on Saturday, October 13, 2012 at the Wood Place Farm near Abbeville, AL. All friends and family are invited to attend. A reception will follow the ceremony. No local invitations will be sent. For directions, please contact the parents of the bride. Jimmy and Diane Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University in 2010. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in Dec. 2012. Jessica is currently employed as a second grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, and a 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is currently employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012 at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with a reception to follow at the Centennial Building.Happy 8th birthday Eva! Love Mom, Dad, & Emily WHO HAS TALENT?TOC of ce in Port St. Joe closing Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engaged SocietyWheeling around with RotaryMargaret Gibson, Michael Gegenheimer WEDDING

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The Star| B3Thursday, August 16, 2012 Calling All Beginner Artists!Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep.Glynis Holcombe OSCI(One Stroke Certied Instructor)www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 $10.00 OFF SERVICE WITH THIS AD(850) 647-2772goodwinapplianceservice.comNow Servicing Gulf and Bay CountyPART SALES &SERVICE20 years experience Licensed and Insured All work guaranteed Factory authorized & trained Servicing all makes and models NO matter where you purchased themPrompt Dependable Same Day Service24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE 7008 Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach, FL 32456 (850) 647-6167 MEDICARE PLANSEXCELLENT COVERAGE ANYONE CAN AFFORDTOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAURoss E. Tucker, Agentsince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE2ndCDBG Public HearingThe City of Port St Joe is considering applying to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), Department of Community Planning and Development for a grant under the Neighborhood Revitalization category for an amount up to $650,000 under the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-NR) Program. For each activity that The proposed project Activity Budget (Approximately) LMI % (Approximately) Replace +8,700LF Waterline $570,000 >51 And Fire Hydrants and patch. Administration $52,000 >51 Engineering $28,000 >51 policy. The Citizens Advisory Task Force has considered and approved the approach for the application. A public hearing DEO on or around September 28th. To obtain additional information concerning the application and public hearing, contact ing special mobility accommodation at this meeting should contact Charlotte Pierce at the City Hall, or by phone at (850) PORT ST. JOE IS A FAIR HOUSING School NewsStar Staff ReportStudents, teachers and volunteers at Port St. Joe Elementary School came together during the 20112012 school year to raise $1,359.81 in the Pennies for Patients fundraising program. The program, a School and Youth Program fundraising effort for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), raised more than $660,000 in the Northern and Central Florida Chapter during the 20112012 school year. Funds raised support blood cancer research and patient services. Its almost unbelievable to me that one school can raise so much money to help nd a cure for blood cancers, said Kelley Lesperance, Executive Director of the Northern and Central Florida Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Were honored that Port St. Joe Elementary School put forth so much effort to be the winning school in Gulf County this year, and were proud to partner with the school to make such an impact on research and patient services. Nationally, more than 27,000 schools engaged in service, leadership and teamwork on behalf of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to raise money to help save lives. Through these programs, students connected with the LLS mission, collected spare change, and learned they could make a real difference in the lives of others. Across the nation, the LLS School & Youth Programs raised more than $26 million! Pennies for Patients is a coin collection and classroom competition program that encourages service learning, team work, and philanthropy while raising signi cant funds for blood cancer research and patient services. For more information about the program, or to learn how your school can participate, visit www. schoolandyouth.org/nc About the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the worlds largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkins disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services. To learn more about the local chapter, please visit www.lls.org/nc Special to The StarAs the summer winds down, the faculty and staff at Faith Christian School are making preparations for your child. A family atmosphere with nurturing teachers and a stimulating, God-based curriculum is the foundation of Faiths educational principles. If you would like for your child to experience academic excellence through Godly instruction, FCS is the place for you. Faith Christian school is taking applications for new students. Interactive learning will be a part of your childs day, along with Spanish classes for all grades. Discovery learning days are incorporated into the academic year, and technology classes enhance the elementary program. Faith Christian has a website (www.FaithChristianPSJ.net). We urge you to take a few minutes and browse through our different links. Communication with teachers will be available through this site as well as the latest news. Partial scholarship opportunities for tuition are available for K5 through the eighth grade. Contact the of ce at 229-6707 to ensure your childs spot. Special to The StarAn opportunity for licensed pesticide applicators to earn CEUs will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. EDT Aug. 21. An applicator will be able to earn up to six FDACS approved CEUs in various categories for pesticide licensing recerti cation credit. The event will be conducted via polycom from the Gulf County Extension Service, located in the Old Courthouse Building ,200 North Second Street, Wewahitchka. Also two CEUs will be offered for Chapter 482 Applicators. Sessions for these licensed pesticide applicators will start at 1 p.m. EST and end at 3 p.m. EST. If you have further questions concerning this matter please contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909.Special to The StarThe 2012-13 term at Gulf Coast State College is about to begin, and reports and surveys from inside and outside the College point to an exceptional outlook for incoming and returning students. According to the 2011 National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP), Gulf Coasts combined graduation/ transfer rate was almost 11% higher than the national average. Additionally, the cumulative rstyear GPA of Gulf Coast students at transfer institutions was 5.2 percent higher. And a recent student satisfaction survey at Gulf Coast found that 100 percent of students felt they were prepared when they transferred to a four-year institution, and 99 percent of students would recommend Gulf Coast to others. GCSC graduated 1,377 students for the 2011-12 term, representing a 14 percent increase over the 2010-11 number. For some students, the road to success may take a little longer. GCSC is well-suited to meeting those students unique needs as well, committed to ensuring that education remains accessible as well as affordable. For the students who arent quite prepared for rstyear college coursework, Gulf Coast provides developmental courses and tutoring to get them prepared. GCSCs success rate theremeaning students who demonstrate pro ciency in the basic skill areas so they can go on to pursue their goals is again higher than the national average in math and writing. That translates into more graduates, more productive workers in our economy. Further, the NCCBP revealed success in Gulf Coast students mastery of core courses. Students must complete the fundamental courses their degree or program requires, and in all core areasWriting/Comp I, Writing/Comp II, Algebra and Speech GCSC students again surpassed the average. The commitment and involvement of the Gulf Coast faculty goes a long way in recruiting, retaining, graduating and preparing students for the life ahead of them. Kerley is quick to note the value GCSC students nd in the quality of education and training at this local institution. Gulf Coast State College offers a variety of twoyear transfer tracks, multiple workforce programs, continuing education classes, and two bachelor degrees. In addition to the main campus in Panama City, the College operates the North Bay Campus in Southport, the Gulf/Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe and the Tyndall Education Center on Tyndall Air Force Base. Visit www. GulfCoast.edu for more informationGCSC scores high in student, national surveys PSJES wins county Pennies for Patients competition The Lions TALEUniversity of Florida IFAS CEU Day The Lions Tale

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FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.com Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM 10:30 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE TIME 9 11 AM MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM WEDNESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 8 AM & WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL(850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week.Thursday, August 16, 2012Mrs. Ruby L. Jean Stephens, 88, of Port Saint Joe, passed away Saturday, August 11, 2012, in Panama City following a lingering illness. Born in Louisville, AL, she has been a resident of Port Saint Joe since 1952 and was a member of the First Baptist Church. She married her childhood sweetheart, Emory Stephens, who preceded her in death. She is survived by her children, Lorraine Daniel of Pelham, AL, James Stephens and wife Melody of Port Saint Joe, Billy Stephens and wife Phyllis of Marion, SC, and Arden Stephens and wife Susan of Tallahassee; eight grandchildren; 13 greatgrandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. The funeral service was held at 10 a.m. EDT Tuesday, August 14, 2012 at the First Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Howard Browning and the Rev. Dr. Jeff Pinder. Interment will follow in the family plot in Holly Hill Cemetery. The family received friends at the church from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. E.S.T. on Monday. Those who wish may make donations in her memory to The Gideons, P.O.B. 422, Port Saint Joe, FL, 32457, or to Covenant Hospice, 107 W 19th Street, Panama City, Fl 32405. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Ruby L. Jean StephensEunice Marie Wynn, age 88, went to be with the Lord on August 8, 2012, in Port St. Joe, Florida. She was born in Blountstown, Florida on December 9, 1923, to the late Maude and Gordon Burch. She was a faithful servant of the Lord having played the piano and organ at the Oak Grove Assembly of God Church in Port St. Joe for over 50 years, and, more recently, at Beach Baptist Church in the St. Joe Beach community. She was a loving mother to two children, Joyce Wynn of Wewahitchka, and Jerry Wynn and wife Jane of Chattahoochee. She was born into a large family that included ve surviving siblings: Fred Burch and wife Dorothy Nell, James Burch, Jeanette Lee, Annie Ruth Carone and husband Carl, and Marjorie Carr and husband Doug. She also left behind a loving sister in-law, Verna Burch, and her caregiver, Lee Perry. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ed Wynn, her brothers, Roy Burch and Cecil Burch, and her sister, Edna Bush. Ms. Wynn is also survived by six grandchildren: Jamie Lester, Wendy Wynn Roberson, Amy Wynn Driggers and husband Stacey, Jenny Wynn Simmons and husband Aaron, Ted Wynn, and Jamey Holt. Her great grandchildren include Jered, Jesse and Travis Roberson; Jordan Heath; Jillian and Jenna Driggers; Trey and Luke Lester; Hunter Simmons; and Andrew, Gavin and Rylee Holt. An artist by many de nitions, her love of music was only part of the many things for which she was known. She was avid about drawing and painting and even taught art at Gulf Coast College. She loved to sh, to travel, to witness about her faith and to take care of the elderly. She was a member of the Rebecca lodge and served as the local and state musician for that esteemed organization. Services for Ms. Wynn are scheduled for Saturday, August 11, 2012, at Beach Baptist Church, St Joe Beach, at 3 p.m. ET, with visitation preceding the service in the church at 2 p.m. ET. Burial will follow at Holly Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe. Donations may be made to Beach Baptist Church at St. Joe Beach, the childrens program or roo ng fund at the First Baptist Church in Chattahoochee, FL, or to a favorite charity. The family would like to express special appreciation to Dr. Oksanen and the staff of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Southerland Family Funeral Home 100 East 19th Street Panama City, FL 32405Eunice Marie WynnFranchon Williams, 72, of Port St. Joe, FL passed away Saturday, August 4, 2012 in her home after a long illness. Fran was born in Harrison, Arkansas and lived in Port St. Joe for the past 20 years. She was a homemaker and member of Beach Baptist Chapel. Through the years Fran was active both in her church and her community. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, Jim Williams; children, Sheila Godwin of Lake City, SC, Mark (Kathy) Williams of Pottstown, PA; sister, Barbara Kempter of Richardson, TX; granddaughter, Michelle Godwin; and grandson, Chris Williams. Also, special friends Janet Calvarese, India Miller and Jenni Pitts. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. ET on Thursday, August 9 at Beach Baptist Chapel in St. Joe Beach. The family will receive friends at the church from 10 to 11 a.m. EDT prior to the service. Interment will be in Harrison, Arkansas. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to: Beach Baptist Chapel, 311 Columbus Street, St. Joe Beach, FL 32456. Wilson Funeral HomeFranchon Fran Williams7-18-23 8-6-12 Wayra Peterson passed away on Monday, August 6, 2012 at 6:45 am at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee, Florida. A faithful and devoted wife for 66 years, she is survived by her husband, Clynton C. Peterson of Port St. Joe, FL. She was a loving and beautiful mother of four children, Norma Basham and husband, Terry; Jan Colbert and husband, David; Kathy Shelton of Tallahassee, and Ray Peterson and wife, Susan of Colquitt, Georgia. She has one surviving sister, Juanita Cassidy from DeFuniak Springs, FL, seven grandchildren, and four great grandchildren. She was predeceased by her mother and father, J. and Doni Laird, two brothers, Kylea and Dwaine Laird, and one sister, Eula Scott. She was a member of the Highland View Baptist Church, and was dedicated to her family and her faith. She fought a tough battle for too long, unquestionably, considering her familys needs. Her suffering has ended and she is now resting in peace and tranquility among her family in heaven. The world has lost a masterpiece here in earth, and she will truly be missed. Services were provided by Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850-385-2193, www.bevisfh.com) 11 a.m. CT on Friday, August 10, 2012 at the Sandy Creek Baptist Church in Ponce De Leon, Florida. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to the Alzheimers Project, Inc., 301 E. Tharpe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 and/or Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32308.Wayra B. (Laird) Peterson FRANCHON WILLIAMS WAYRA PETERSON Obituaries Philadelphia Primitive breakfast salePhiladelphia Primitive Baptist Church will sponsor a breakfast sale from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. ET on Saturday, Aug. 18. For a $5 donation, you can eat in or take out a full meal with bacon or sausage as an entre. All tickets sold for July 21 will be honored, and must be presented when breakfast is picked up. You may call ahead at 229-6692 to place an orderNew Life Christian Center World Explosion New Life Church and Pastors Johnny and Shirley Jenkins would like to invite everyone to come out and join them in a three night World Explosion Service Aug 15, 16 and 17 starting at 7 p.m. ET nightly. The speaker will be Pastor Michelle Bradley of Mobile, Ala. She operates in the of ce as a Pastor, Evangelist and Seer. Please come and be blessed. The church is at 504 6th Street. Women Fashioned by God programA Women Fashioned by God program will be held at Philadelphia Primitive Baptist Church at 7 p.m. ET on Sept. 8. During this program, local community women will be honored. Everyone is invited. For further information see Sister Freddie Davis, program coordinator. Faith BRIEFS

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, August 16, 2012Kathy Freeman), stepdaughter to George Jones. To my dearest Mother, I pursued this project as a tribute to you who along with Dad provided me with memories of a happy childhood.KathyBeginningsThere was one boy and three girls. Lilly Mae was the oldest. Lilly was small and petite, but feisty. She used to pull herself up proudly and say, I may be small but Im loud! Harry was the only brother, admired and loved by all of us girls. Pauline was the next in line. She was the quietest child. I was the youngest but also tallest of all.standing at 5 feet 3 inches. We lived in Mobile, Ala., where my real Daddy, Jefferson Milstead, worked. I recall he was of medium height and had brown hair. I remember Mama vividly. She was slim with long, dark brown hair and brown eyes. Harry was the only child who inherited her brown eyes. All of us girls had blue eyes. Mama was a very smart, sweet, gentle and kind person who loved us children dearly. Sadly, Mama and Daddy divorced when I was quite young. Later, Mama met a man by the name of George Jones (Papa) who worked at a shipyard in Mobile. They dated for some time. One night, he asked her to marry him. She burst into tears and told him she could not. When he asked her the reason, she led him into the bedroom where all of us children were asleep. He told her it did not matter to him if she had children; he still wanted to marry her. Finally she was convinced of his love and accepted his proposal. George was dark haired, slightly heavy set, and just a nice man. Before their marriage, George took Pauline and me by train to Port St. Joe to meet Grandpa and Grandma Jones. During the trip, Pauline and I sang songs. One of the songs was, Im a little teapot, short and stout, here is my handle, here is my spout, pour me out, pour me out. People who were sitting nearby smiled at us and thought we were so sweet.A homestead in Port St. Joe After a while, George and Mama got married and moved to a forty acre homestead in Port St. Joe. The homestead was owned by Georges Daddy whom we called Grandpa Jones. Uncle Henry, Aunt Celia and their children lived down the road from us for a while. Eventually they moved back to Heron Bay, Ala., which was Aunt Celias hometown. Papa planted crops and sold them to the public to make a living. He also sold milk from his small dairy. Each day Harry took the milk and sold it to the hotel in Port St. Joe. Mama was an industrious lady. She cleaned rooms at the local hotel. She also picked up the very dirty clothes of some of the sherman, took them home, washed them and returned them. She was an exception not many women worked in that day Mama milked the cows in our small dairy. We only had a few cows but one cow got his tail caught so it was forever shortened. Every time Mama milked that cow, the short tail switched in her face. Finally she got a piece of cloth and tied it to the tail. Then one of children held the cloth while she milked the cow. A few years passed and Mama got very sick. They took her to the Mobile Inrmary (hospital) in Mobile, Ala. Sadly, she was diagnosed with advanced cancer. When she realized how bad it was, she made Papa promise he would take us children back to Port St. Joe after she died. Papa worked at the shipyard in Mobile and stayed in a boarding house during Mamas illness so he could be near her. Aunt Sarah and her husband also went to Mobile to be with them during this time. Her husband worked at the shipyard along with Papa. Harry, Lily, Pauline and I were placed in an orphanage for a short time while Mama was sick. Since I was so young, it was difcult for me to be separated from her. I cried and cried. Papa, Aunt Sarah, and her husband stayed in Mobile the entire time Mama was sick. The men worked but aside from that, they all helped take care of Mama until she died.Keep the children togetherBefore Mama died with cancer, she made Papa and Aunt Sarah promise to keep us children together. She knew she was not going to live long so she tried to make arrangements for our future. After Mamas death, we all went back to Port St. Joe and lived in Grandpa and Grandma Jones house. Grandpa Jones was a dentist by trade. Grandma took care of the house. Uncle Joe had no children and always wanted to raise Harry but Mama would not let him while she was alive. After her death, Harry talked to Lilly, Pauline and me. He explained why it would be best for his future to leave. Although we were just children, we understood his reasoning so before long he went to live with Uncle Joe. Uncle Joe worked for the railroad and provided a good home for him. Harry was talented as an artist. After he moved in with Uncle Joe, he stayed busy painting murals on walls for different businesses. Each summer he came back to Port St. Joe to visit us. One time he brought me a notebook of his drawings that he drew from the characters in the newspaper. Since I was still in school, I took the notebook and showed it to some of my school friends. They were so impressed with his work. Grandpa and Grandma lived in a two-story house that was one block away and faced the highway. We could look over the palmettos and see the highway from the house. Our cousin, June, lived in a nearby house. Of course, since this was Florida and not too far from the beach, the front yard was nothing but sand. Grandma did everything she could to change the soil. Grandpa even built a walkway out of red clay that hardened so we could walk on it. The house was built with a wraparound porch. When we walked onto the porch, we could go through the door or walk down the porch to the entrance of the kitchen.Life with Grandpa and Grandma JonesGrandpa Jones plowed the elds each summer and Grandma planted watermelons for us to enjoy. After they ripened, we girls went to the eld, picked one up, dropped it and ate it right there. They tasted so good! There were two grapevines in the garden. There was a large scuppernong on one side and a small grapevine on the other side. The small vine was called Little Willie after a pet dog that died and was buried under the vine. The grapevines were trained to grow along a wire that had supports. When the grapes ripened, Grandma spread sheets under the vines. Then June and I crawled on top of the vines, picked them up and shook them. The ripe grapes fell onto the sheets. We took the sheets lled with grapes to the side porch, removed the stems, washed the grapes, cooked and canned most of them. Grandma made wine out of the remaining grapes. The wine was kept in a wooden barrel under the house. Although we had chores to do, many times we went swimming in the bay after we ate dinner. We swam for a while, went home, completed the chores, and went swimming again. I kept a nice tan due to the Florida sun. (After my sisters left home, my cousin June and I often sunned on the side porch of the house.) Grandma Jones was not only a good homemaker but a good quilter. She made a quilt for each one of her ve sons. She designed each quilt with the initial of the son in the center of every other block in the quilt. Once a year, Grandma took all the bedding including the mattresses to the side porch for cleaning. When my sisters and I beat the cotton lled bedding with switches, we removed the dust and made the bedding soft again. Then we shook the mattresses well. I was always amazed at the amount of dust that came out of the bedding! Near the grapevine was a huge chinaberry tree that we played under. It also provided shelter while washing clothes since the Florida sun was so hot. Grandma had two iron wash pots that we useda large one and a small one. When we washed clothes, we used a rub board to soap and clean them. The clothes were boiled, rinsed, rubbed and rinsed again. Since Grandma was old, I usually did the rubbing. Incidentally, the rub board gave me a slim waist! The clothesline stretched out across the side porch. The clothesline was unusual because clothespins were not needed. There was a twist in the wire about every 12 inches or so. We took the clothes, pushed them into the twist and they easily hung there. Grandma had a scrubber that had a long handle and a piece of wood attached to the bottom of it. The wooden scrubber had holes that went all the way through it. We took cornhusks and pulled them through the holes. Then we used the husks to scrub the oors. The cornhusks spread out and really cleaned the wooden oors well. The husks were sturdy and lasted through several scrubbings. When they became thin, we replaced them with new ones. The depression arrives The depression began and money became scarce. Instead of buying a new broom when it was needed, Grandma made hers. She had been raised in the country and was familiar with making those kinds of things. She made the broom out of a bushy type of weed and tied it together at the top. The brushy part on the bottom would spread out and was used as a broom. The pump was at the end of the porch next to the kitchen. Grandpa ran the pipe up the side of the porch so we could stand on the porch and pump water. That was really something for that day! We played hard, got hot, ran to the pump, primed it, pumped it until the water ran cold and drank it. It tasted so cold and good! Just inside the front door of our house, there was a hall with stairs on the right side, a short distance from the door. Grandpas telephone hung there on the wall. When it rang, all three of us girls scrambled to answer it. One day we girls were at home by ourselves. The telephone rang and Pauline beat me to it. Well, Pauline always had a little trouble in pronouncing some of her words. I listened as she told the caller, Grandpa, he not here. He gone to Wewawhiskey! Translated, Grandpa is not here. He went to Wewahitchka! (A nearby town) It was so sweet! I laughed about that for many years! The living room was on the left side of the hall. After Grandpa got older, the living room doubled as his dental ofce. One day one of his patients arrived to have a baby tooth pulled. Grandpa began working on her and she started screaming. She screamed throughout the entire procedure! I was thoroughly disgusted with the little girls behavior over such a simple thing! The phonograph stood tall in a corner of the hall. We played it a little but were very careful with it since it did not belong to us. It was owned by a daughter-in-law, Celia Jones. The hall opened up to a dining room. The staircase had a small closet like opening underneath it. It was built low and Grandma had to stoop over when she used it. She kept her canned goods in this pantry. Each summer she set a goal of canning one hundred jars of food. She canned anything she could get her hands on including lots of blueberries. During the depression, sugar was scarce and expensive so she canned some things without sugar or with very little. Times were very hard then. Next week, the depression hits hard, silent movies arrive and Port St. Joe continues to grow. We cannot guarantee when this offer will be repeated in the newspaper. Clip this offer and please call today! $10,000.00Bene t $7,000.00Bene t $5,000.00Bene t $3,000.00Bene t Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85 Male 32.50 36.00 45.00 55.00 66.00 89.00 121.00 166.00 Female 27.00 30.00 37.50 42.00 51.00 69.00 98.00 139.50 Male 23.05 25.50 31.80 38.80 46.50 62.60 85.00 116.50 Female 19.20 21.30 26.55 29.70 36.00 48.60 68.90 97.95 Male 16.75 18.50 23.00 28.00 33.50 45.00 61.00 83.50 Female 14.00 15.50 19.25 21.50 26.00 35.00 49.50 70.25 Male 10.45 11.50 14.20 17.20 20.50 27.40 37.00 50.50 Female 8.80 9.70 11.95 13.30 16.00 21.40 30.10 42.55 Your a ordable monthly rate will lock-in at your enrollment age ...Or enroll online at www.mutualofomahalifedirect.comNow, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company ...Whole Life Insurance.Are you between the ages of 45 and 8 5 ?Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU!>> 4 bene t levels up to $10,000! >> Rates lock-in at age you enroll! >> Call for FREE all-by-mail enrollment packet!NO medical exam! NO health questions! Our graded death bene t whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, nal medical expenses...or other monthly bills. Right now, you can make a decision that could help make a di cult time a little easier for your loved ones. You may have been putting o purchasing life insurance, but you dont have to wait another day. is policy is renewable to age 100**! Plus, your policy will never be canceled EVER because of changes in health. So call today! Why this policy? Why now? AFN44167Life Insurance underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha NE 68175; 1-800-775-6000. United of Omaha is licensed nationwide, except New York. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505). This policy contains reductions, limitations, and exclusions, including a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership **In FL, policy is renewable until age 121. This is a solicitation of insurance, an insurance agent may contact you. PIONEERS from page B1COURt T Es S Y OF Kat AT HY FF REEMa A NEthel Milstead poses with a neighbor at the time, Alma Daugthry. Top, Ethel Milstead, once crowned Miss Gulf County in the late 1930s, was stepdaughter to George Jones his family founded Jones Homestead and grandmother to Kathy Freeman.

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012The good news for rural America is that it has caught up in every other measure of education. In 1970, 7.8 percent of adults in rural counties had some education after high school, but less than a college degree. By 2010, 27.4 percent of rural adults had attained some post high school education without earning a college diploma. That level of education was close to the national average of 28.1 percent. In Gulf County, 6.4 percent of adults had some college in 1970, rising to 24.7 percent in 2010. The Florida average in 2010 was 29.1 percent. Gulf County had 5,274 adults (those over 25 years of age) in 1970 and 11,785 adults in 2010. Overall, Stallmann says, the trends show rural people have responded to the demand for increased job skills by the increasing their post secondary education. Only 22.3 percent of the adult population in Gulf County had failed to graduate from high school in 2010. Nationally 15 percent of adults had not completed high school; in Florida, the rate was 14.7 percent. Mark Partridge, a rural economist at Ohio State University, says that regional differences in college graduation rates have increased in recent years. Partridge said his studies have found that rural counties and counties with small cities in the South and West didnt fare as well as those in the Midwest and Northeast in attracting college graduates. Even though the Sunbelt has seen tremendous growth over the past few decades, the Souths rural counties havent kept up in terms of attracting adults with college degrees. But the problem of keeping college graduates in rural America is a national issue and one that is also enduring. Missouri economist Stallmann said this is a reection of the kinds of jobs that are generally available in rural communities. If there are fewer jobs demanding college degrees in a community, there are likely to be fewer college graduates. Its a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you dont see a lot of jobs that require a college education, Stallmann said. Young people graduating from high school dont see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they dont think about coming home once they leave for the university. There can be a selfreinforcing cycle in rural communities, Stallmann said young people leave to gain higher education, they dont come back after college because there arent jobs that demand such education, and their absence diminishes the chances that more of these kinds of jobs will be created. Nationally, rural counties and counties with small cities have caught up with urban counties in the percentage of adults who have some post high school education. Stallmann sees this as a sign that there are perhaps more jobs in rural areas that require post secondary education but not college. Both Stallmann and Partridge said the data on college education rates told them that rural communities should consider the kind of jobs being created locally. Rural communities may need to think about the types of jobs being created, Stallmann said. There are some communities that are doing things like getting local businesses to put an emphasis on hiring local kids who got a college education. It really suggests that rural communities that arent thinking about making themselves attractive to educated people are really going to suffer, Partridge said. Bill Bishop is co-editor of the Daily Yonder (www.dailyyonder.com), an online news publication covering rural America that is published by the Center for Rural Strategies. The Center for Rural Strategies (www. ruralstrategies.org) is a nonpartisan, nonpro t organization whose mission is to promote healthy civic discourse about rural issues. Roberto Gallardo is an assistant extension professor at the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University, (srdc.msstate. edu) For the raw information included in this story and charts, graphs and a map, visit this site: http://www. dailyyonder.com/education-and-rural-americadata-page/2012/07/06/4165 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847TODAY!CALL 227-7847 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction National Formidable Footprint Hurricane Exercise Saturday August 25 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon ESTGulf County EOC, 1000 Cecil G Costin Sr. Blvd. Bldg 500 Port St. Joe, FL 32456Local Community groups and neighborhood associations are being sought to participate in the Formidable Footprint A National Neighborhood Exercise to be held on Saturday, August 25 from 9:00 AM 12:00 Noon EST. The three-hour disaster training event will focus on a hurricane scenario and is part of an ongoing series of nationwide disaster exercises. tional participation across the different United States time zones. For important exercise and registration information please go to:www.FormidableFootprint.org designed for local organizations such as Neighborhood Watch and Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT), Fire Corps and faith / community-based organizations that work to support the needs of community and neighborhood residents during and following a disaster. To-date, 2,097 neighborhood associations, community response teams, community / faith-based organizations and local governments across the United States have sucThe Formidable Footprint National Neighborhood Exercise series is underwritten by a team of national, regional and state organizations with the joint goal of providing an opportunity for local organizations to assess their disaster preparedness, response and recovery capabilities. For more information contact Gulf County Emergency Management. Stephanie Richardson 850-229-9110MEDIA ADVISORY(2012.84) AUTOMATIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7**PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATIONNo lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENERAC standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT:$4500.00**Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com has since been a priority. The road, which was a collaboration between the PSJRA and several private contractors who donated work, is just one of the many infrastructure improvements totaling $1.449 million that the PSJRA has funded in part or in whole. The Billy Joe Rish Memorial Parking Lot along U.S. Highway 98 and the Dr. Joe Memorial Parking Lot and Park on Williams Avenue provided much needed parking for visitors to downtown. Reid Avenue, Williams Avenue and U.S. 98 and State Highway 71 in the business district received badly needed facelifts and the PSJRA was crucial to the creation of Jetty Park along the waterfront behind the Port St. Joe Marina and Miss Zolas Drive, which provides a connection from downtown to the bayfront George Core Park. The agency has also invested nearly $1 million in the business community through faade improvement grants, landscaping, banners and branding and planning and visioning for the future of downtown, in ve years, in 10 years and beyond. The PSJRA has also leveraged its base funding, known as Tax Increment Financing, which re ects a small percentage of any taxable property value increases in its service area. Through a variety of grant awards, the PSJRA has brought in more than $1.12 million in funding, equaling a return on investment of its TIF funds of some 53 percent. For example, in the 2012 scal year alone, the PSJRA nearly doubled the TIF through grants awards: the agency received $249,231 from the county and City of Port St. Joe and received another $215,000 in grant awards. I think it demonstrates to the community that we provide a valuable asset, Alsobrook said. An asset with demonstrable results. PSJRA from page B1 GRADUATES from page B1Its a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you dont see a lot of jobs that require a college education. Young people graduating from high school dont see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they dont think about coming home once they leave for the university.Judith Stallmann economist at the University of Missouri

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 16, 2012 The Star | B7 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 89133 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 11 000512 CA WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, AS TRUSTEE FOR CARRINGTON MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-RFC1, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES Plaintiff, vs. CLETUS F. HEAPS, III, ET. AL. Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated August 7, 2012 entered in Civil Case 11 000512 CA of the Circuit Court in and for GULF County, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at on the 13th day of September, 2012 at 11:00 AM, AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456 the following described as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: EXHIBIT A THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: LOT 17A, PONDEROSA PINES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW ) OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 1979.80 FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST, 267.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, 100.07 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST, 267.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST, 100.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 18, PONDEROSA PINES, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW ) OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30, SAID POINT BEING S00E, 1879.73 FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE N 89E, 267.00 FEET; THENCE S00E, 100.07 FEET; THENCE S 89W, 267.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 30; THENCE ALONG SAID WEST LINE, N00 W, 100.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS CONTAINING 0.61 ACRE, MORE OR LESS. Address: 401 PONDEROSA PINE DRIVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Dated this 13th day of August, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60 days after the sale. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk David Bakalar, PA Attorney for Plaintiff 2901 Stirling Road Suite 208 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312 (954) 965-9101 11-01559 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the office of the Court Administrator, GULF County Courthouse, at 850 229 6112 within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Sale; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) for hearing impaired or 1-800955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. August 16, 23, 2012 88943 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2012 PR 33D Division IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH M. MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH SUCHAN (KOSTAL) MARCHUTE a/k/a ELIZABETH MAE SUCHAN, deceased, whose date of death was June 7, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Rm. 148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 16, 2012. Personal Representative: Diane E. Suchan 105 Ocean Ridge Lane Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Attorney for Personal Representative: Charles L. Hoffman, Jr. Attorney for Diane E. Suchan FL Bar No: 229768 SHELL FLEMING DAVIS & MENGE 226 Palafox Place, 9th Floor Post Office Box 1831 Pensacola, FL 325911831 (850) 434 2411 Fax: (850) 435 1074 E-Mail: choffman@ shellfleming.com August 16, 23, 2012 88653S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000431 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. JERMAINE ROBINSON AND URSULA ROBINSON, HIS WIFE, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in July 13 2012 in the above-styled cause, the Clerk shall offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash on August 23, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the COURTHOUSE LOBBY of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL, the following described property: EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A 4 SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED) FOR A DISTANCE OF 225.60 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD (HAVING A 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 211.56 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 105.78 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L. B. NO 6596, THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 481.29 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES. 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 411.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE AND TOP OF BANK OF STONE MILL CREEK; THEN TURN RIGHT AND MEANDER UPSTREAM ALONG THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE AND TOP OF BANK FOR 208 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE AND THE TOP OF. BANK, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 326.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 6596; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 431.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2006 Nobility, Kingswood 66 x 28 manufactured home, Serial No: N8-12961AB, located on the property. Property Address: 1842 Stone Mill Creek, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 26, 2012 Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88687S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 2012-89 EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELIA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-89-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT A Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northwest Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Sect. 23, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; and thence go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East along the North Boundary line of said SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 (as monumented) for a distance of 432.33 feet; thence go South 00 degrees 25 minutes 22 seconds West for a distance of 41.2.00 feet, thence go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 52.73 feet to a point on the Westerly right of way line of Creekview Drive (having a 66 foot wide right of way) for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning go Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 131.00 feet and a central angle of 0,1 degrees 57 minutes 18 seconds for an arc length of 4.47 feet (Chord bearing South 21 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds East for 4.47 feet) to a Point of Reverse Curve; thence continue Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 366.88 feet and a central angle of 15 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds for an are length of 99.54 feet (Chord bearing South 14 degrees 34 minutes 18 seconds East for 99.23 feet); thence departing said right of way line go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West for a distance of 242.00 feet, more or. less, to the waters edge of Wetappo Creek; thence go Northerly along said waters edge to a pint which is North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West, 293.40 feet, more or less, from thb Point of Beginning; thence departing said waters edge go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 293.40 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land being known as Lot 6 of the UNRECORDED PLAT OF CREEKVIEW ESTATES. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88685S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2012-02CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., and administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/s SWAMPYS by and through its Director, Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 201202-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., an administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/a SWAMPYS, by and through its Director Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 30 and 31 of Macks Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, according To the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. AND The North Six (6) Feet of Lot 29 of Macks Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida According to the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in Plat Book 1, Page 14 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88737S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-482 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KC LLC, a Florida limited liability company, KAY W. EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS, and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS, Defendants. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 5th day of April, 2011, in Case Number 10-482 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK. N.A., is Plaintiff, and KC LLC, a Florida limited liability company, KAY EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 23rd day of August, 2012, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 4, Block 6, RIVERSIDE ESTATES ADDITION TO IOLA UNIT NUMBER 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, rights, oil and gas rights, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property), including a 2001 Claz mobile home, ID# CLS097249TN. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 31st day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: B. A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 89033S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS RFP 2012-07 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Thursday September 13, 2012. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Thursday September 13, 2012 at 4:15 PM EST, in the City Commission Room. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidders name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for City of Port St. Joe Hwy71-98 Maintenance DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Work consists of landscape and grounds maintenance of the following sites: Highway 71 median from the corner of Hwy 71 and 98 north to Woodward Ave. and Hwy 98 right of ways from the corner of Hwy 98 and 71 west to Ave. A, Port St Joe, FL 32456. The landscaping services required include weeding, cultivating, trimming, pruning, mowing, edging and maintenance. A more detailed description of the work requirements is available in the bid package. BID NO: RFP 2012-07 Copies of the Bid Package are available at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, and may be examined at this address or obtained free of charge. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the Citys purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (30) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer This notice dated August 9, 2012 Submitted by: John Grantland, Public Works Director August 16, 2012 88919S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2012-90-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. PAUL P. KUMARICKAL; ET AL., Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICES IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 13, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on August 30, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lot 3, Block 35 of SAINT JOSEPHS ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NUMBER THREE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale Dated August 6, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 89035S PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL Bayfront Recreational Facilities Concept and Plan The Port St Joe Redevelopment Agency (PSJRA) is seeking proposals from qualified firms to provide professional design services for a Bayfront Recreational Facility in Port St. Joe, FL. Proposals should include proposed fees, statements of qualifications, and examples of similar completed projects. General project scope includes, but is not limited to, Conceptual Design for recreational activities and structures intended to increase public access and enjoyment of St. Joseph Bay; Conceptual Design of a Coastal Cultural Center; integration of the plan into the existing Waterfront Master Plan; public workshops; programming; entitlements; and design/build specifications, cost estimates, and schedules as required to solicit further funding and qualified design/ build construction/development of the project. Full proposal and bid requirements are available on request from the PSJRA Executive Director Gail Alsobrook at 850-229-6899 or Gail@PSJRA.com or www.psjra.com. The proposal deadline is 2:00 PM EDT on Friday, August 31. The Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency reserves the right to accept or reject any and all proposals in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new proposals, or to postpone the proposal deadline. Each proposal shall be valid to the Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency for period of (120) days after the proposal deadline. August 16, 2012 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Port Saint Joe : 682 Dolphin St. in Highland View Sat. 8/18th 7-?h YARD SALERain or Shine, Many items to see clothing knick knacks 13 box t.v., motorcycle chaps, helmet, saddlebags, & motorcycle stand ,etc Text FL20706 to 56654 Hunting Lease Member Wanted near Port St. Joe. 1,600 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $500. For details: 850-227-5052 2 br, 1 ba, apartments for rent. call Kenny 850-227-6077 or Phil 850-227-6241 Government assistance accepted Port St Joe: 2br, 2ba 1cg, kitchen, LR, Balcony, long rental, near bay & dock, close to downtown, excellent area, 850-624-4264 Text FL20904 to 56654 Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 FOR RENT: 2br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets, $500 month + $400 dd. Call: 850-229-6495 Text FL20096 to 56654 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 24/7 Experienced Care giver looking for a private in home senior, care giver or sitter job. In Gulf County, please call 850-639-3029 Text FL19665 to 56654

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B8| The Star Thursday, August 16, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By Bridget Quigg Imagine the following scenario. S omeone asks you how work is going and y ou say, Not bad. The pay is great and t he stress is manageable. According to r esearch from online salary database P ayScale.com, that could be your reality if y ou choose one of the following well-paying j obs where workers report below-average l evels of stress. PayScale.com collects salary and job i nformation from employees around the c ountry and has found the most enviable g igs are typically knowledge-based and r equire highly specialized training and e ducation. Being smart at something really helps y ou feel happy, says Katie Bardaro, lead r esearch analyst at PayScale.com. The m ore preparation you put into a career, the m ore you can define your career, such as b eing able to set your schedule and your t asks. She adds that not having the pressure o f being a cog in the machine alleviates s ome stress. It seems that being able to w alk into a room and command everyones a ttention as you share your expertise m akes you less likely to crave that sixth c up of coffee. Perhaps the promise of a career like t his will inspire you to get the degree or a dditional job training you need to land one of these five high-paying, low-stress jobs.1. Optometrist Median annual salary $99,200Good attention to detail and a strong background in the sciences help optometrists diagnose vision problems, prescribe vision-correcting eyewear and help manage eye diseases such as glaucoma. In addition to earning a bachelors degree and doctorate, optometrists must pass state and national exams. After all that, apparently, they are pretty happy. Job prospects are excellent, with 24 percent job growth expected through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).2. Materials scientist Median annual salary $90,600Synthetic fibers, lubricants, leakproof materials these are a few of the products created by materials scientists. They need strong chemistry backgrounds and at least a bachelors degree to get started. Those holding a Ph.D. often specialize in areas such as analytical chemistry or polymer chemistry. 3. Economist Median annual salary $85,600Economists pay attention to the distribution of goods and resources. They might focus on money, natural resources or other valuables, and often work to predict future outcomes. Those with a Ph.D. fare best in what can be a very competitive job market. You have to be willing to produce plenty of reports and analyses based on hours of number crunching. The government employs the majority of economists, according to the BLS.4. Aeronautical engineer Median annual salary $82,800Who would not feel inspired working on the wonder of flight every day? From lowering aircraft weight and fuel needs to improving safety, aeronautical engineers spend a lot of time rethinking and improving how we travel through the air. Aeronautical engineers typically have a bachelors degree to start, but many earn masters degrees and pass both licensing and professional advancement exams.5. User experience designer Median annual salary $79,100User experience (UX) designers optimize any experience where humans interact with objects, such as board games, ATMs and cars. For example, in a world where almost anyone can create a website in hours, leading companies often hire UX designers to make their site more attractive and easy to use. UX designers come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, industrial design and anthropology. I work on projects just as they start or even initiate the project myself, says Mike Bibik, a senior UX designer in Seattle. This affords (me) a greater amount of influence, and I am not dealing with the stress of project decisions or directions with which I disagree.5 high-paying, low-stress jobs Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! HELP WANTEDFast pace of ce Must have excellent computer, organizational,& phone skills. Bring resume by of ce located at : 106 Reid Ave Port St. Joe Mon Fri 9:00 5:00No phone calls please. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34216824 Text FL16824 to 56654 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020