<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/03853
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date: 08-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:03853

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 74, NUMBER 43 Thursday, AUGUST 9 2012 Opinion ....................................... A4-A5 Letters to the Editor ................... A5 Outdoors ..................................... A10 Sports ........................................... A11 School News ................................ B3 Faith ............................................. B4 Obituaries .................................... B4 Classi eds .................................... B11 By TIM CROFT 227-7827|@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Melissa Ash, who confessed to the 1999 murder of Hilton (Bobo) Sewell in Oak Grove, was arrested this past week by Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce investigators. Ash was arrested and charged with murder in 1999 but was declared incompetent to stand trial and charges were dropped. A co-defendant, Esmond Joseph, 20 years old at the time, spent seven years in the Gulf County Jail and also spent time at the Chattahoochee State Facility. Sewell was found dead in his home on Iola Street in Oak Grove during the afternoon of Oct. 5. He had been stabbed to death. According to news reports at the time, former Gulf County Sheriff Frank McKeithen and investigators gathered information and interviewed 15-20 suspects before developing Ash and Joseph as suspects. The investigation revealed the Ash and Joseph went to Sewells home with weapons. Ash allegedly stabbed Sewell and she and Joseph left the residence. They confessed their involvement to investigators. According to current Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent, drugs were involved and there were allegations made by Ash that Sewell had raped her, charges that were never substantiated. Ash has spent time at Chattahoochee and another state mental health facility since the murder, but Nugent indicated that, working with the family, investigators had developed suf cient evidence to recharge Ash with murder. We think she is competent, Nugent said. The arrest was necessary to taking the next step in proving Ash is competent. Nugent said her defense attorney would likely raise the issue again, forcing the court to direct Ash to undergo a competency exam. If she is again found incompetent, that would be the end of the case, Nugent said. Charges could no longer be brought. However, if Ash is found competent to understand the charges and assist in her defense, Nugent said the State Attorney would resume to press the case forward to trial. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star The primary election day arrives this coming Tuesday, Aug. 14, with polls open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET throughout the county. Voters should check at www. votegulf.com to learn their precinct polling place. Early voting is underway and continues through Saturday. Early voting is held each weekday from 7:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. ET in Port St. Joe and 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT in Wewahitchka. On Saturday, hours are 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT in Wewahitchka and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Port St. Joe. Early voting ends Saturday. Voters may cast their early ballots in Port St. Joe at Supervisor of Elections Linda Grif ns ofce, located at 401 Long Avenue; Wewahitchka voters may cast their ballots at the Wewahitchka Public Library, located at 314 N. 2nd Street. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star The summer of cially ends for county public school students on Monday. Schools, several with a new and improved look about them, will open bright and early to welcome students back after teachers and administrators have spent the past week preparing for their arrival. Everybody is excited, said School Board chairman Billy Quinn, Jr. I have talked to a lot of the kids in the community and some cant wait to get back and others would just as soon have another couple of weeks. But it is coming for real on Monday. The new year will bring some changes in faces and looks at nearly all schools. This past Tuesday, the board was filling some final openings, hiring a speech therapist and approving the transfer of math teacher Denise Ethridge from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School to Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School to replace Selena Flowers, who left the district. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com In front of an admiring throng, BZ arrived home this past Sunday. BZ, a rehabilitated green sea turtle, was returned to the waters of St. Joseph Bay on Sunday as onlookers packed the dock behind Scallop Cove on St. Joseph Peninsula to snap a photo and observe the turtle green sea turtles are an endangered species ap into the water with something of a celebratory swim. BZ was the latest turtle rehabbed at the Gulf World Marine Institute in Panama City Beach and arrived back home on the same day that the Institute received a check for $500 from Mike and Jill Davis, owners of Scallop Cove, as a donation toward the facilitys sea turtle rescue program. It represented the rst corporate donation to the sea turtle rescue program. Election Day arrives Tuesday MELISSA ASH Suspect charged again in 1999 murder School starts Monday See ELECTION A8 See SCHOOL A8 Heading home Rescued green sea turtle returned to St. Joseph Bay PHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The Star Above: Scarring is shown on BZ the sea turtle from the shing line that had snarled a front ipper and been swallowed by the turtle. Right: BZ is released. See TURTLE A12 Law enforcement trained in bear hazing | B1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners on Tuesday unanimously approved amendments to the citys nuisance ordinance and two ordinances to regulate homeless shelters and de ne loitering in public parks. The ordinances mirrored ordinances passed last month by the Board of County Commissioners. The amendments to the nuisance ordinance deem that any property to which law enforcement has been called at least ve times during a 30-day period to be a nuisance and subject to civil and potential criminal penalties. City commissioners provided one exemption calls involving domestic violence, addressing a concern voiced by the Northwest Florida Regional Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). It is not our intent to keep anybody from calling 9-1-1, said Mayor Mel Magidson in response to a letter from the ACLU, which stated that the nuisance ordinance made calling 9-1-1 something to fear and avoid. The homeless shelter ordinance regulates the permitting of a homeless shelter and designates areas, such as areas within a half-mile of a tourist corridor, where a homeless shelter would be prohibited. Any shelter would receive a permit of no more than 12 months and would be subject to annual evaluation pending renewal. The operator of the facility would have the burden, when applying for a permit, to establish that a proposed PSJ commissioners approve ordinances See PSJ A8

PAGE 2

ApplemanForState At torney.com We Need Appleman by our current State Attorney on inmates awaiting trial. $30,000 Per Day of your tax dollars are being wasted POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY JIM APPLEMAN, REPUBLICAN, FOR STATE ATTORNEY 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DID YOU KNOW? is is why... Summary Reporting System prepared by OSCA, Statistics & Evaluation Data pulled 6/4/12, data shown is from 7/2011 3/2012 I welcome your input and will gladly meet with you or your grou p Contact me at 229-1040, 340-0828, or e-mail keith@keithjonesforclerk.com The Clerk of the Circuit Court, who derives authority and responsibility from constitutional and statutory law and therefore SHOULD SERVE YOU THE TAXPAYERS as a: County Watchdog for citizens of Gulf County to ensure funds are expended for a public purpose and for the benet of the public as a whole. County Auditor performing a critical comptroller function which includes pre-auditing invoices prior to payment to ensure they are properly authorized and documented. BELOW ARE EXAMPLES OF WHERE THE CLERK HAS NOT PERFORMED THE DUTIES OF THE OFFICE OVER THE PAST 8 YEARS! Example 1 : The Countys independent auditors reported expenses of the TDC were made without proper authorization or proper documentation. Your Clerk of the Court signed each and every check without performing the proper pre-audit of these expenses! (As reported in the TDC audit dated January 31, 2012) Example 2 : The Gulf County TDC director was red for misappropriation of funds, when the Clerk of Court signed the checks! Who red the Clerk? Now is the VOTERS opportunity to do so! Example 3 : Gulf County taxpayers paid for rst-class air travel. The Clerk of Courts job is to ensure that ONLY coach travel is paid for by the taxpayers of Gulf County. Delta Flight 2706 from Reno, NV to Salt Lake City, UT on July 21, 2010 paid from county funds. Delta Flight 152 from Los Angeles, CA to Atlanta, GA on July 21, 2010 paid from county funds. The Clerk IS NOT performing the duties of the ofce so critically needed by the taxpayers of Gulf County. I am giving you the opportunity through my candidacy to hold the ofce of the clerk A CCO U NT ABL E I have the education for the job which includes an accounting degree from Florida State University. I have been professionally licensed as a certied public accountant for 17 years. I have over 22 years of experience in government, corporate and private business. I AM PREPARED TO LEAD THIS OFFICE AND INSURE OUR COUNTY DOLLARS ARE PROPERLY SPENT FOR ALL THE CONSTITUENTS OF GULF COUNTY. I HUMBLY ASK FOR YOUR SUPPORT AND VOTE TO BE YOUR NEXT CLERK. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for and approved by Keith Jones, Democrat, for Clerk of Court Lance Mayers FICF Area Manager Phone: (850) 769-9212 lamayers@woodmen.org Local A2 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012PHOTO COURTESY OF H EATHER R AFFIELD More than 100 people gathered last Wednesday for a candlelight vigil to pray for the recovery to health of Everett Gant. Gant was shot in the head last Monday night by a neighbor. He remains in guarded condition at Bay Medical Center. On Tuesday, Gloria Gant, Everetts mother, thanked the community for its support and prayers. She said while some might read what happened to Everett and think Port St. Joe is a horrible place, the support the family has received, from all colors and station, dispels the image. CANDLELIGHT VIGIL

PAGE 3

Local The Star| A3 Thursday, August 9, 2012 By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@starfl.com Gulf County has only five months left to construct a three-year implementation plan for upcoming RESTORE Act funds, but the amount of funding and date for distribution are still unknown. Thats the part we still dont know, said Bill Williams, Gulf County Chairman and President of the Florida Association of Counties. We dont know what the settlement will beits in the courts hands now. While the settlement amount for clean water penalties to be paid by British Petroleum is still looming in litigation, Williams outlined the distribution of the unknown RESTORE funds at a special meeting of the appointed RESTORE Committee Tuesday. The committee includes County Administrator Don Butler, Attorney Jeremy Novak, TDC Director Jennifer Jenkins, Port St. Joe Commissioner Bill Kennedy, County Chair Bill Williams, Chamber president Guerry Magidson, Port Authority chairwoman Johanna White, Kim Bodine of the Workforce Board, Wewahitchka Mayor Phillip Gaskin, Loretta Costin of the Gulf/Franklin Center and Dewey Blaylock. Through the implementation of RESTORE, 80 percent of the penalties imposed by the Clean Water Act will go directly to the ve affected states instead of the money owing directly to the U.S. Treasury. Its estimated the penalties could range anywhere from $5 billion to $20 billion. Although the trial is set for January 2013, Williams said it is expected BP will settle before the case goes to trial. Once appropriated, the ve affected states will split 35 percent of the penalties; in Florida the allotted amount is being split among the affected Gulf Coast counties based on the severity of oil spill impact. Gulf County will receive 6.02 percent of Floridas funding. This portion is to be used for ecological and economic restoration of counties. Sixty percent of the states penalties will be directed to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council. The council would use half of those funds to implement a comprehensive federal environmental plan and distribute the other half to the ve affected states for ecosystem restoration under the federal comprehensive plan. The remaining ve percent of funding will go toward research. Williams said the county cannot sit on the money; they must spend it right and move forward. There are a lot of moving parts to how this goes, Williams said. We dont know all the rules of this. Williams also provided an overview of Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) projects the county has outlined as a result of the 2010 oil spill during the meeting. Williams said an estimated $100 million could be coming in early restoration money from NRDA. We didnt get a lot of product damage, we had a lot of human-use damage, Williams said of Gulf County. The question is going to be, what do we want to be when we grow up? The county has vetted about 15 potential projects to complete with the funds, but, as Williams said, they are still working without a dollar amount. Many of the projects channel the countys strategic plan for improvement over the years. Major potential projects outlined include improvements to the Highland View and Indian Pass Boat Ramps, construction of shing piers at Windmark Beach and Beacon Hill Park, land acquisition of the Presnells Marina property, and land acquisition and construction of a boat ramp on Cape San Blas. We are going to be project-speci c, Williams said. At the end of the day I do see this (committee) vetting individual projects. Williams said the key to success will be determining what projects will be best for the future of Gulf County as a whole. You have got to look beyond yourselves, Williams directed the RESTORE Council. We cannot afford to have a food ght locally. Dont let us faillets be clear, lets be transparent and lets not ght with each other. I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FR EE tobacco cessation classes in Gulf County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE N I COT I NE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! Paid by Bill Koran, Republican, for County Commissioner Dist. 5 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Open & Honest Government = JOBS! A Prosperous Business Environment To attract new industry, tourism & new home ownership. established VOTE (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Williams leads rst RESTORE Committee meeting You have got to look beyond yourselves. We cannot afford to have a food ght locally. Dont let us fail lets be clear, lets be transparent and lets not ght with each other. Bill Williams Gulf County Chairman and President of the Florida Association of Counties THE PORT ST. JOE STAR FIND US ON FACEBOOK @ PSJ_Star FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

PAGE 4

Our Olympic Games back home werent broadcast on worldwide HD television. We didnt stand side by side at the conclusion of each contest while a band you couldnt see from far off somewhere played the Star Spangled Banner. There was no music at all associated with our games. Although I did hear some loud humming the afternoon we were doing the standing broad jump over Mr. Archie Moores electric fence and my left foot got tangled in the top wire. We didnt bother with matching uniforms; white tee shirts were the norm for the day. We didnt spend $42 million on our opening ceremonies. We didnt have to wait four years. And we didnt hug and kiss our opponent before and after each event. Our games were much too serious for that! We didnt worry about doping implications as most everyone was raised on fatback, hog jowl and turnip greens. The only injections any of us ever suffered were for small pox and the Salk vaccine. Leon did get a tetanus shot when he jumped off the top rail of the back fence and landed on a nail. But Leon was a mite older than us and we gured him winning so often was because of his age.. and not on account of any performance enhancing drugs. Other than that, our Games were about like you see on TV today. A foot race could break out on the way to town, walking to the barn or as we headed over to Mr. Archies pond for the swimming events. We didnt run exactly 100 yards or 400 meters. We raced to the curve down by Aunt Jessies house. Or to the big oak tree in Miss Brooks front yard. Or sometimes wed run till someone had such a big lead there werent no use to continue. Distance running was always a favorite. Buddy or Richard Lynn would say something like, I could beat you guys to the front steps of the Methodist Church or maybe theyd choose, the light pole across from the telephone ofce. We were off in a ash. Either place was a mile and half away. You could run right straight down Stonewall Street. Or you could take a short cut through Bob Edwards back yard. Now, it wasnt legal to catch a ride. But if one of those cattle trucks was turning off of Magnolia onto Stonewall, you could hop on the running board and hang on till you got down by city hall and you were near bout assured of victory. That is, unless, Buddy or Rick caught a ride with Mr. Holland on the milk truck. I didnt say we wouldnt cheat to win. I just said we didnt take drugs to do it! Wrestling was another crowd pleaser. About the only difference between us and the Olympics today was theyre not allowed to use any foreign devices. If Leon was awhipping me pretty badly, Id reach for a screwdriver or a pitchfork or a handful of dirt. I wasnt just going to lay there and take it! We gured the underdog ought to do something to even the odds. Listen, when we decided on a winner, the less bloody body usually raised his hand. You couldnt beat the swimming events on a hot August afternoon. Wed run the cows out of the pond and race from one side to the other. We mostly did the freestyle as we discovered early that butterfly and backstrokes just slowed you down. We wouldnt have been caught dead doing any synchronized swimming. We substituted drowning instead. Wed grab our opponent by the throat and try to hold him under the water till he went limp. You talk about exciting! Ive seen swimming, wrestling, boxing and mayhem all combined into the same event. Even the cows would gather back along the shore and watch! We had a couple of events that the Olympic Committee today would be well advised to look into. Grape vine swinging was one of them. Wed cut a giant vine off and swing across the big ditch down below George Sextons house like we were Tarzan or Jungle Jim. The object was simple. You had to make it to the other side. The winner was the one who made it the furthest across. The loser was the guy who hit the opposite bank or worse, let go in the middle of the swing. It was a far piece to the bottom of the ditch. It wouldnt usually break anything if you fell, but it would stove you up somewhat! We filed it under no pain, no gain. Often times the score conscious among us could get in a summersault with half gainer twist before crashing into the mud below. Id like to see ditch-jumping added to the Olympics. Maybe make the chasm a little wider and deeperand add some alligators in the stream below to make it interesting. We didnt have a javelin or discus. But wed cut a limb off of a mimosa tree, whittle out a sharp end and toss that thing toward the outermost haystack. And our crabapple throws werent for distance; we threw them at each other! We called it the chunk and duck portion of the events. We didnt shoot targets. Ammo cost too much. We practiced on squirrels, rabbits and possums. We used knocked down trees as balance beams. And Mrs. Kennons clothesline served as our parallel bars. If spitting at the crack was an ofcial event, Michael Phelps would have to swim another Olympiad or two to approach Bobby Brewers record. Of course, we didnt actually give out gold medals back in 1959. But I have lived over half a century knowing that, after 23 straight tries, I nally beat Leon in the top rail fence running game and that, dear hearts, is reward enough. Respectfully, Kes Buttermilk is a touchy subject with some folks. They either dont want to get near it or they dont understand what it is. They ask questions like, What do you do with a carton of buttermilk? These are the folks that needed just half a cup or a cup for a recipe. It stays in their refrigerator for a while, and then they start asking, How can you tell when buttermilk is bad? Everyone has been told that buttermilk is just sour milk. Therefore, you should be able to keep it in your refrigerator forever. Im pretty sure that after all of the culturing and pasteurizing that real buttermilk is almost impossible to get in the supermarkets these days. If you research it, youll nd out that buttermilk is not merely sour milk. That being said, I am not a buttermilk expert. To be honest, Ive never had a glass of buttermilk. Like most folks, Ive cooked with it and studied the How long will it last? question on many occasions, but thats it. Im actually embarrassed that I have not had real buttermilk. Daddy was known to overdo things. He just liked to go all the way; he would cook all of the bacon we had, cook enough cabbage to feed an army, and fry liver to the point that the smell eased out from under the doors and windows into the yard. He overdid loving us, too. You cant ask for more. My fondest buttermilk memories are of my Daddy sitting in his chair or at the table with a glass (or carton) of buttermilk and a plate of cornbread. He overdid the buttermilk and cornbread every time. It wasnt just a piece of cornbread; it was a whole pan or skillet. Now that I think about it, I dont remember Daddy using a glass much unless he had intentions of soaking the cornbread in the buttermilk before he ate it. He sat down with a carton of buttermilk, and nished it. It was a meal to him. Somewhere, there must have been memories of his childhood in that meal. Real buttermilk may be illegal, Im not sure. I just know that Id like to try it. It would be a tribute to my Daddy, and just maybe Id like it. In searching for my rst glass of buttermilk, I ran across a fellow down in Pelzner, South Carolina. Folks say his cows put out a nice glass of buttermilk. They travel from all around South Carolina to drink it. The next time I go through South Carolina, Im planning on stopping in and trying it. This South Carolina farmers name is Tom Trantham; he is the owner/operator/farmer at the Happy Cow Creamery. He calls himself, Farmer Tom. Back in the 1980s, Farmer Tom had one of the top producing dairy farms in the state of South Carolina. This still didnt pay the bills. Being on top and getting trophies and plaques is all ne and good, but there has to be somebody to pay the bills. As the story goes, Farmer Tom was ready to give up and give it all to the bank. He had become so disheartened with his situation that he didnt bother to round up his cows after they broke loose one day. He just let them go. According to Farmer Tom, the renegade cows had a leader who was able to open gates and bust out of any connement. Ive read where this leader was known as Tarzan and also Houdini. You get the picture, this was a cow leader on a mission; I would think she would have a tough sounding Southern ladys name like Maude or Mildred. Shes not mine to name. The cows broke loose into a pasture of April growth (rye grass, clover, fescue, etc.) that hadnt been fertilized and proceeded to eat the top half of the green stuff. Farmer Tom rounded up the cows and milked them. Those cows produced close to Thursday, August 9, 2012 Cornbread and buttermilk CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See BUTTERMILK A5 The news last Monday night was jarring. A young man shot in the head. The alleged shooter, according to Sheriffs Ofce reports, using the vilest and debasing of racial slurs in the process. The alleged shooter indicated inconvenience at his arrest for after all, given his choice of language, he had only shot a lower form of species. As we stated online, it was a sad day for the community. We may never know or fully understand the thinking of shooter and victim in those fateful seconds before a meeting that left a young man bleeding from his head on the ground while the alleged shooter continued to cook his supper inside. There have been no shortage of theories offered up online during the week, some reasonable while others stem from an ignorance as malevolent as the source of those racial slurs uttered last Monday night. Read the thread of comments online at the www.star.com or the The Port St. Joe Star Facebook page and become illuminated about the miles traveled since the country woke up to the horrors of the racial divide and the miles left to travel. Not that the South just three generations removed from school integration in Gulf County and Jim Crow has any kind of monopoly on the racial insensitivity and bile on display last week. As a teenager I watched and listened as large swaths of nearby Detroit and my hometown of Toledo, Ohio went up in the ames of race riots during a hot summer not all that long ago. I attended a high school that drew from a large demographic in Toledo, a school that itself was embroiled, with words and sticuffs, in the war for civil rights that was raging around the country. Reports this week out of Wisconsin, the Dairy State for heavens sake, reveal an ethnic and racial divide that can lead, in a few, to homicidal rage. Men and women shot for their differences, for their choice of clothes and headwear, the color of their skin. But as last week progressed in Gulf County there was an outpouring, a gathering of like minds and hearts to speak out, in a fashion, against the kind of narrow-minded thinking that left 32-year-old Everett Gant bleeding on the stoop of Walton Butlers apartment. One of the hopes here is that Everett Gant one day fully recovers to understand the extent to which he touched so many peoples lives in Gulf County, in Port St. Joe. Gant is a bear of a fellow, but an easy-going lovable teddy bear sidling through life with a general sense of purpose to be helpful and to make the peace where that is possible, because as he once told me in the parking lot outside our ofce where his sister once worked drama was not his game. Sure, Everett has his faults. Until the second coming that would apply to us all. But the stunning thing in the aftermath of his tragic shooting has been the ladles of love, thoughts and prayers poured in the direction of the Everett and his family. The messages across social media in the days following the event reected a horror, almost a sense of shame, a sense that this is not who we are, a wish for healing, not just for Everett but the thoughts behind that trigger. A Facebook page was up by Tuesday evening providing an outlet for all those who had been touched by Everett, were friends with Everett, who were stunned and saddened by the news that this kind and gentle giant had been injured in such horric circumstances. A roadside sign in Port St. Joe encouraged everybody to Pray for Everett. George Duren, owner of the Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe, lit up the large Port City Shopping Center sign with a Praying for Everett message. The Port St. Joe Lions Club seeded and established a bank account to help defray medical costs. On Sunday, my wife and I traveled to the peninsula to watch the release of a green sea turtle. While there, I overheard a conversation about Everett, about his current condition and the shock over the events of last week. I asked the two young ladies how they knew Everett and where they were from and it turned out they were two young women from Wewahitchka and somehow, someway, Everett had walked into their lives and left behind his huge footprints. That is Everett and the thoughts and prayers of a community reached out to him and his family last week. Thanks in large measure to the passion of Heather Rafeld, a candlelight vigil was organized on the y for last Wednesday night. Many sent messages that they would be unable to attend but would be there in spirit and thought. More than 100 folks turned out to light a candle and pray for the full recovery of Everett Gant. Black and white, young and old, it was a community gathering, one that ignored rail lines and status, and celebrated not what can divide us, but what unites us humanity. In a sense, maybe, they also sought a kind of redemption from the callous bigotry so awfully on display last Monday, to provide a testament that Butler did not reect the values of this community, that the community carries intolerance to his thinking, his alleged hatred of skin tones. On some level, Butlers words and deeds diminished us all. A communitys response to those words and deeds offered a pathway back to the high road. From tragedy, a sense of community TIM CROFT Star news editor Brewer was our Michael Phelps HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert OpinionA4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINGS USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688

PAGE 5

200 pounds more milk that they normally did (about 2 pounds more per cow). Before the Great Cow Escape, Farmer Tom said he would spray to kill weeds, plant his crops and use fertilizers to help them grow. Farmer Tom would mow the elds down, put the grain in the silo, and feed the cows. His cows were con ned on cement (kind of like a city slickers), and werent allowed to graze. The cows wanted to go out to eat, play a little and help with the farm work. Farmer Tom studied what the cows were eating and the fact they were eating only the top half of the growth and found that more nutrients and good stuff were in the top halves. The cows knew what they were doing. Farmer Tom got the idea to start giving his cows the run of the place and feeding them like it was April year round. He stopped using chemicals on his elds. He calls his system the 12 Aprils planting guide. The bottom line is the cows always have a eld where they can graze; knock off the top half of the growth and then move on to another eld to do the same thing. The farm didnt go bankrupt, like other folks, Im sure theyve had their challenges but, they are still producing ne milk that isnt homogenized and is free of additives. Honestly, I dont understand the details of Farmer Toms 12 Aprils grazing program other than the cows wanted to eat stuff that was better for them and they paid Farmer Tom by producing more milk. It goes to show you that cows and farmers can make pretty good decisions if you just let them. What does Farmer Tom say about it all? He simply thinks the cows are happy going out to eat and as a result they produce more (and better) milk. Sometimes folks are too bull-headed to listen to and watch their own cows. They want to watch someone elses cows (and business). Farmer Tom not only listened to his cows, he watched them and gured out what they were after and what made them happy (and he continued to work hard). What is the moral to this story? Work hard, leave the gate open (if you dont have at least one smart cow) and never give up. Now, Im ready for that glass of buttermilk. Somebody get the skillet hot. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. MARRIED TO BUDDY FOR 48 YEARS LINDA, BUDDY, SON EDWARD, & DAUGHTER CATHERINE...ALL PSJHS GRADUATES GRANDCHILDREN CAITLIN, CHANDLER, AND GABRIELLE...ALL FUTURE PSJHS GRADUATES 40-YEAR MEMBER AND SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHER AT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH THE WOOD FAMILY HAS OWNED AND OPERATED WOODS FISHERIES FOR 5 GENERATIONS Paid for and approved by Linda Wood, Candidate for School Board District 3 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) FOR HOMETOWN EXPERIENCE...VOTE LINDA WOOD RE-ELECT LINDA WOOD for SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 3 North Florida Child Development, Inc. is recruiting for governing board(s) members. NFCD is a 501(c) (3) organization that provides comprehensive early education and development to the young children and their families in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Madison, and Wakulla Counties. The governing board(s) maintains a formal structure of shared governance through which parents and community representatives can participate in policy making and other decisions. Please contact Sebrina McGill for more information at (850) 639-5080 ext 10 or Pd. Pol. Ad. COUNTY JUDGE FOR Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE YOUR OPINIONS BUTTERMILK from page A4 Saying no on county-wide voting Dear Editor: With the new election in full swing I have had the opportunity to talk to many of the candidates running for seats on the Gulf County Commission. I was not surprised when most all of them said they supported county-wide voting. Most said they supported county-wide voting only because the people of Gulf County had voted for it previously. Now for the rest of the story. If you want countywide voting, please know the facts about it, for it is a good possibility you could end up getting what you want, and then have it bite you in the back side because you did not understand all the facts associated with what you requested. Point 1 The major voting population is located in our two cities, Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. These two populations will more than likely render enough votes to elect all ve county commissioners if we have county-wide voting. Point 2 The Constitution of the State of Florida states the two cities, Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe, because they have their own city commissions, can opt-out of issues passed by the County Commission. In other words, these two cities have the votes to elect all ve commissioners, but are not bound by the actions of the Commissioners they elected. Case in point: there was a 140 mph wind speed ordinance imposed by the Gulf County Commission on the whole county a few years ago. Commissioner Brian Cox from the City of Wewahitchka came before the Board of County Commissioners and stated Wewahitchka did not want the 140 mph wind restriction; they thought it was unfair. Commissioner Cox stated the Florida Constitution gave them the right to opt-out, which they did. Do we the people who live in the county proper want the two cities to elect our Commission and then not be bound by what they do? I think not. If county-wide voting becomes law, will the ve commissioners spend more time trying to please the folks in the cities who elected them rather than the people in their districts under the premise they want to work for all of the people of Gulf County? There is a new issue coming to the County. At the June 26 County Commission meeting it was stated the States septic tank ordinance was not dead as I had been led to believe, but was turned over to the counties. The counties can now decide whether they want to have us pay to have our septic tanks inspected every ve years. My question is would I want the city folks who do not have septic tanks to elect my County Commissioner who may have to decide this issue and other issues for me? I personally want each Commissioner to be elected only by the people in his district. Yes, he can and should help on issues for the welfare of the entire county, but I want him to look for votes only to those in his district on Election Day. Timothy W. Stein Wetappo Creek Estates Reaching uninsured children Dear Editor, It is unbelievable to imagine but there are more than 500,000 uninsured children in Florida right now. The fact that many will be heading back to school this Fall without an annual checkup, which would include a hearing and vision exam, means there might be a generation of youth that is underachieving. These students may be driven to distraction when they cannot see the blackboard or hear instruction in the classroom. Healthy Start strives to ensure all women experience healthy pregnancies and have healthy babies. Having insurance and access to prenatal and infant medical care is necessary for this to happen. In addition, we realize that school-age children also need regular health care in order for them to grow physically as well as academically. Healthy Start is a community partner with Florida KidCare, an affordable, low-cost insurance for children from birth through age 18. Some of the services Florida KidCare covers are: doctor visits, check-ups and shots, hospital visits, surgery, prescriptions, vision, hearing, dental and behavioral health. It is easy to apply for this insurance at www. oridakidcare. org. Applications and assistance also is available at our of ce, 1-800-895-9506. Thank you for helping us bring attention to this issue Sharon Owens Executive Director Bay, Franklin, Gulf Healthy Start Thanks SHH, TOC Dear Editor: On behalf of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and its coaching staff, I would like to thank Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic staff and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf physical therapists, nurses and physicians for providing the recent athletic physicals. You were very helpful in setting up and screening our student-athletes on July 10 and July 12, which is required by the Florida High School Athletics Association. These physicals are free to our students. This is invaluable service to our school and community. We appreciate all the hard work and cooperation that TOC and SHH on the Gulf has shown. Chuck Gannon Athletic director Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High Thanks for supporting Marsha Posey Dear Editor: I would like to extend a big thank you to all of you and you know who you are who have helped out with fundraising efforts to aid long-time Port St. Joe resident Marsha Posey, recently diagnosed with cancer in her lung and hip. A special thank you to Mr. George Duren who has given so much to the cause and helped with the fundraiser of two weeks ago that raised $1,075 in less than three hours. Marsha is undergoing treatment in Tampa. Also, I would like to note an error I made on the fundraiser announcement. Marsha works for Keith Jones and does have medical insurance. Thanks to the community for their support. Only in Port St. Joe. Irene Acree Port St. Joe Gulf Countys real crime numbers Dear Editor: Several friends have asked recently why I, having voted for Glenn Hess in the last election, would not be supporting Jim Applemans return to the of ce of state attorney. My reasons are obvious to anyone who has seen a crime victim or observed criminal activity going unpunished in Gulf County. In 2011, violent crime in Gulf County was up 29.3 percent. How can this be when crime for the same period in Florida was down 13.1 percent? In 2009-10, county law enforcement led 286 cases in circuit court. Of these cases, the state attorneys of ce carried no burglary or robbery cases to trail, and only two of 64 drug cases went to trial. While crime may not pay, 98 percent of cases led in Gulf County and the 14th Judicial Circuit result in plea deals, dropped charges or transferred cases. Obviously, we are losing the war on crime in our court rooms. This eight-year trend favoring criminals over victims can be corrected by returning Jim Appleman to the state attorneys of ce where his hard work and successful prosecutions dropped crime by 11 percent. Jim Appleman will again staff the state attorneys of ce in Gulf County with prosecutors unafraid of the dif cult trial work required to take criminals off our streets. It is time to stop making deals with criminals. Please give members of our law enforcement agencies the support they deserve in the courtroom by voting now to return Jim Appleman as state attorney. Bob Willis Port St. Joe Thursday, August 9, 2012 Letters to the EDITOR Opinion A5 | The Star

PAGE 6

Local A6 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to Home George E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy, cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy. Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independence by optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for by Lois Byrd for School Board District 4 STAR STAFF REPORT During a recent meeting, the Gulf County School Board honored its retirees from the 2012 school year. Among those honored are pictured here: Lewanna Patterson, who served 38 years with the district; Chuck Worley, who served the district for more than 20 years; and Margaret Padgett, who also spent more than 20 years with the district. Others recognized, but not present were Virginia Hogue, Gwen Lowery and Debra Richards. DISTRICT HONORS RETIREES

PAGE 7

Local The Star| A7 Thursday, August 9, 2012 Paid by John Hanlon, Rep., for Supervisor of Elections EXP E RI E NC E THAT COUNTS Pd.Pol.Ad. It has been my pleasure serving as your Assistant Supervisor of Elections. Now I ask for your consideration and support on August 14th, to become your next Supervisor of Elections. Your vote is greatly appreciated. I welcome any questions or comments at my email address John4SOE@gmail.com or my cell (850) 247-9538 I have the professional background and personal determination necessary to help solve the problems that we face: Pending Budget Shortfalls Jobs and Responsible Economic Growth Resolution of Needs Water and Sewer Issues Responsible Management of Potentially Tens of Millions of Dollars in Funding to Gulf County Through RESTORE Act If I am elected, you will my communication style to be assertive, articulate, and respectful. I need your help to make a difference in Gulf County and I am asking for your vote. PLEASE VOTE AUGUST 14th Or early vote now through August 11th at the Supervisor of Elections Pd.Pol.Ad. Joanna@Vote4Bryan.com 850-615-5015 www.Vote4Bryan.com Paid for by Joanna Bryan, Republican, for County Commission Dist. 3 Joanna@Vote4Bryan.com 850-615-5015 Joanna@Vote4Bryan.com 850-615-5015 Decisive Determined Dependable I promise to work for all of the people of Gulf County not just a few Pending Budget Shortfalls Jobs and Responsible Economic Growth Resolution of Needs Water and Sewer Issues Responsible Management of Potentially Tens of Millions of Dollars in Funding to Gulf County Through RESTORE Act By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com After a community health assessment ranked Gulf Countys health levels 40th out of Floridas 67 counties, area health workers and community players are constructing a plan for improvement. The Gulf County Health Department conducted a workshop July 31 to analyze the areas health strengths and weaknesses and outline goals for improving problem areas, with major issues surrounding substance abuse and mental health. Other goals outlined include working to provide access to high quality and affordable health care for all people, increasing awareness of community health resources and strengthening the competitive environment to conduct business, encourage economic growth and create jobs. The workshop is part of the nal stages of the health departments Community Health Improvement Plan. Using the Florida (Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships) MAPP Field Guide, communities are able navigate to a healthier future. Were analyzing the data and statistics about Gulf Countys health and trying to gure out how we successfully reduce those negative trends, said Health Education Program Manager Sarah Hinds. Were trying to identify why this is happening and what we can do to change it. About 30 health care and community players attended the meeting, along with a few residents eager to be a part of the change, Hinds said. There are so many people in there that truly care about the health of the ecommunity, Hinds said. Its great because were nally doing something on a community level. One of Gulf Countys major challenges comes from mental health and substance abuse. Statistics from the community health assessment show that the percent of excessive drinking reported in the 45-65 age group is 171 percent the state rate and the Gulf County rate of alcohol-related deaths is 447 percent the state rate. The percent of adult residents who smoke tobacco is 174 percent the state rate. The health assessment also reported challenges with student drug use across the board. In Gulf County the use on LSD, PCP or mushrooms is 145 percent of the state rate, cocaine use is at 413 percent, use of club drugs is 254 percent, methamphetamines and heroin use are at 200 percent, depressants 160 percent and use of prescription amphetamines is approaching three times the statewide rate. In order to address these issues the health department has determined a need for health services to address excessive alcohol use with drinking and driving interventions. It has also been determined student drug interventions should focus on the outstanding use of club drugs, methamphetamines, prescription amphetamines, cocaine and heroin. The health department hopes to address these issues through public awareness of resources available to curb mental health and substance abuse resources. Floridas ranking in the community health assessment is based on a measure of residents health behaviors based on personal choices and environment, with the lower ranking counties representing those with the highest health risks. The health factors list examines four areas: health behaviors such as tobacco use, diet and exercise, alcohol use and high risk sexual behavior, access and quality of care, social and economic factors such as education, employment and income, and physical environment. We can improve the health of this community if we work together to see that goals have been met, Hinds said. More importantly, these goals were designed to best t the needs of our citizens. Community health workshop outlines goals

PAGE 8

Local A8 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Schools have also received something of a facelift. The front of ce at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School was overhauled into a gleaming and welcoming rst impression for students, teachers and parents. Work is ongoing to rehabilitate the boys locker room at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. The high school also includes a new suite for its Bridges special education students. At Port St. Joe Elementary, students will begin the year eating in the gym while renovations continue to the kitchen and cafeteria. The expectation is the construction will be done before the rst of 2013. Open houses will be held at both ends of the county in the coming days and all parents are encouraged to get their students registered for school. The district also has good news on enrollment. As many as 20 new students are registered for this fall, a possible signal that a multi-year trend of declining enrollment in an honor roll and Academically High Performing District might be abating. It appears we picked up some kids this summer, said Superinten(Pd.Pol.Ad.) Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jamie Lester, Republican, for Property Appraiser Citizens of Gulf County, For a number of years, you have been fortunate to have had Mr. Kesley Colbert serve as your County Property Appraiser. On August 14th, you will have an Colbert is vacating through retirement. That gentleman is James E. (Jamie) Lester, Jr to hit the road running and insure that your ad valorem tax assessments are fair and equitable, that your maps are accurate, and that everyone deserving s greatest assets is that he is a people person and will go the extra mile to listen to you and help you any way possible within the law. How do I know Jamie so well? Because I grew up in Wewahitchka where our families were next door neighbors, and I have known him ever since. Jamie served in the did an outstanding job. Prior to that, he served as the Okaloosa County Value Adjustment Board Special Magistrate where he heard taxpayer appeals and Appraiser, borrowers and lenders throughout Northwest Florida. His appraisal experience goes on and on. I cannot imagine that anyone else in the race is remotely as opportunity to choose your next Property Appraiser. I hope you will take advantage of it and vote to elect Jamie Lester. I assure you, the Gulf County Sincerely, Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: PJ00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon RE-ELECT REBECCA L. BECKY NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Pol. Adv.approved & paid for by Becky Norris, Dem., for Clerk of Court (Pd.Pol.Ad.) During the past 8 years, it has been my privilege to serve you, the citizens of Gulf County as your Clerk of Court. It has been both rewarding and, at times, challenging. The responsibilities of the ofce are broad and complex, and needs a leader with experience and integrity. I strive daily to serve the public by treating all with respect, honesty, and professionalism. These are the values I ran on 8 years ago, and the same are the ones that I believe are required of public servants today. Please allow me to continue to serve you by voting for me, Becky Norris, on August 14th If re-elected, I pledge to continue making sure that the Clerk of Court Ofce is one that is accessible, responsive, accountable, and transparent. Please call me @ 850 596-3653 if you would like to help support my efforts or if you have questions that I might answer for you. I respectfully thank you for your consideration and vote. Becky Norris TIM CROFT | The Star The front of ce at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School is among the areas that received a facelift this summer. Grif n urges every voter to have a photo and signature identi cation ready when you arrive to cast their ballot, whether during early voting or the Aug. 14 primary. If a voter has moved since the last election it is also crucial that they contact Grif ns of ce at 229-6117 with the address change before you vote. It is a felony to vote in a precinct in which one does not reside. The ballot is packed. Some 35 candidates are vying for 17 elected positions, with primaries involving three seats on the Board of County Commissioners, two School Board seats, superintendent of schools, county judge, property appraiser, clerk of courts and supervisor of Elections. ELECTION from page A1 SCHOOL from page A1 location is appropriate; that the shelter will provide basic essentials for life; and that the shelters trained professionals provide all medical care and access to social services. Shelter staff must provide all transportation for residents; provide security, including badges or names tags identifying an individual as a resident; operating rules; a community liaison to outside agencies; selfsuf cient plans for dealing an emergency or natural disaster; and a structured discharge plan. The facility would also have to meet all building regulations and pay a permit fee. There is a due process provision in the event of violations of the ordinance, allowing the operator 10 days to address problems, and there is a 24-evacuation provision should the operator fail to adequately address violations of the ordinance. The third ordinance, addressing activities in the citys parks, bans glass containers and prohibits actions, such as constructing a tent or shanty and sleeping in a park, that could be construed as loitering. Christine McElroy, who spearheaded a committee that crafted the basic language of the ordinances, thanked Mayor Mel Magidson for challenging her to come back with a proactive ordinance to protect the community from impacts of a homeless shelter. She said the committee reviewed ordinances from around the country to arrive at a document that protects the community and prevents the outsourcing of potential costs for law enforcement and medical needs of shelter residents to taxpayers. Matt Scoggins, who teamed with the Panama City Rescue Mission to establish the Gulf Coast Hope Center, which ignited a controversy that has raged for more than year, said he felt compelled to speak out about his experiences, which have included threatened boycotts of his business and a series of newspaper ads. He noted that he had promised commissioners that he never has, never will, want to establish a homeless shelter and said it was a sad day when a mans word was no longer trusted. He said the ordinances passed by the county and city were the product of radicals with the wherewithal to push their ideological ideas onto the community. He said in being proactive, the city was discriminating against a class of people and said the Hope Center has assisted more than 50 families and individuals while being wellreceived in the community. This is silly, ridiculous and hatred-driven, Scoggins said. This is not what Port St. Joe is about. Lets not become a city of hatred and class warfare. PSJ from page A1 dent of Schools Jim Norton. I think we picked up about 20 students compared to where we were last year. At $3,000 per student, that is some badly needed revenue. The following are the public school bus schedules for the 2012-13 school year. WEWAHITCHKA SCHOOL BUS SCHEDULE Bus No. 89 driver, Bruce Husband; W. State Highway 22, Kemp Cemetery and Williamsburg Road Bus No. 81 driver, Ginger Respress; Highway 386, Whispering Pines, Lester Drive Bus No. 82 driver, Eddie Price; Dalkeith County Highway 381, S. State Highway 71, 5 Acre Farms Bus No. 77 driver, Royce Watkins; Courthouse, Lands Landing, Roberts Cemetery Road, Forehand Road, Hysmith Drive, Angela Court Bus No. 87 driver, Carol Clayton; State Highway 22 east of Creamer Road, Redbull Island, Lakegrove/ Dam Road, Jehu Cemetery Road Bus No. 74 driver, Carolyn Ranie; Stonemill Creek, Gary Rowell Road/ State Park, Lakeside Lodge, County Line South Bus No. 75 driver, Pam Stiles; N. State Highway 71, Dead Lakes Fish Camps, E. Diana Street (Stonemill Creek) PORT ST. JOE SCHOOL BUS SCHEDULE Bus No. 86 driver, Paul Davis; Jones Homestead, Simmons Bayou, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass Bus No. 80 driver, Sherri Matthews; Mexico Beach Bus. No. 84 driver, Cookie White; White City, Howard Creek Bus No. 85 driver, Debbie Gillespie; Beacon Hill, Overstreet, Highway 386 Bus No. 88 sub driver, Gulf Aire, St. Joe Beach, WindMark and Highland View (Whitting Street and Victoria Avenue Bus No. 73 driver, Sheila Fennell; North Port St. Joe-Avenue D-F (Avenue D-Battle to Peters; Avenue E-F Hodrick to Peters Street) Bus No. 68 driver, Pam Harris (p.m. only); Busy Bee, Lizville, Avenue A Bus No. 76 driver, Shirley Williams; Highland View Bus No. 78 driver, Shirley Bryant; North Port St. Joe-Avenue B-D (U.S. Highway 98 to Battle Street) Bus No. 65 driver, Equillar Gainer (Gal, a.m. only); Lizville, Avenue A and Long Avenue (9th Street)

PAGE 9

Local The Star| A9 Thursday, August 9, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad) AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com Theres a lot of ground to cover in Florida House District 7. The new district covers more area than any other district in the state, and with seven candidates vying for the spot, each hailing from a different county, the race also has more candidates than any other state legislative election. District 7 encompasses nine counties including Liberty, Gulf, Franklin, Calhoun, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Wakulla and Lafayette, and also a small portion of Leon County. Due to redistricting, there is no incumbent for the seat. Marti Coley, who represented a large por tion of the new district previously, is seeking reelection in District 5. Although the candidates are all from different areas of the district and represent two separate parties, job creation and a focus on edu cation are top issues across the board. All candidates also disagree with the privatization of Florida prisons and hope to protect the areas natural water resource. Seeking the Democratic slot for the November general election are retired law enforcement ofcer A.J. Smith, attorney and adjunct biology professor Thomas Dickens and Liberty County Clerk of Courts Robert Hill. Smith, an Apalachicola native, worked in law enforcement for 25 years, serving as a deputy sheriff, a swat team specialist and the Chief of Law Enforcement with the states Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco. He places importance on protecting small businesses in the district, which make up about half of private sector employers. He believes party preference and plat forms are not as important in the rural district as listening to and be ing accessible to constituents. Dickens, who was a U.S. Army Captain for 13 years, serving one tour of duty in Iraq, is focused on pursuing the states need for alter native energy sources to help the environment and garner privatesector jobs for the area. I served in Iraq and while I was there I determined we didnt need to be anywhere for energy security, Dickens said. We have tools in District 7 to gain energy independence. Hill, a Bristol resident, has served three terms as Liberty County Clerk of Courts and is also a former Liberty County Superinten dent of Schools. As a former educa tor, he vows to ght for adequate funding of public schools and de fend the rights of state employees. On the Republican side of the District 7 race are Monticello nurs ery owner Halsey Beshears, Taylor County forester Don Curtis, former state Rep. Jamey Westbrook of Port St. Joe, and nancial advisor Mike Williams from Madison. Thus far in the game, Beshears has raised the most money, more than $150,000, with the bulk com ing from his own pockets. He is an advocate for common sense gov ernment based on conservative values and basic, common sense decision-making. Beshears feels that shrinking government is the only way to bol ster the District 7 economy, by rid ding the area of heavy regulations for small business owners. Curtis garners similar goals to reduce regulations if elected, and believes that District 7s biggest export is its kids, driven away by lack of jobs. Many people in these rural counties are just frustrated by the lack of jobs, Curtis said. Florida cant seem to get its act together to compete. We have everything we need but cant seem to compete with our neighbors. Republican Mike Williams is also running on a platform focusing on reducing regulations and pro moting private sector job creation at its center. He believes experience gained through owning his own small business and serving on various public service volunteer positions shows no intent to simply ll his pockets or improve his career path if elected. Westbrook has owned and op erated the same oil drilling com pany for the past 35 years, and has been a farmer for 25 years. He also served one term in the Florida Legislature as a Democrat from 1996-1998, citing his party change because he identies with the GOPs scal and moral values. Westbrook hopes to bring the gov ernment back to the people, putting an emphasis on private-sector job creation and road improvements. The small counties are not represented like the big counties in the legislature, Westbrook said. Im up for the challenge. Lots of candidates, ground in House District 7 race

PAGE 10

E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A By JESSICA BASHAM THERRIAULT Special to The Star What is that dark green or brown stuff all over the beach? The material, usually in a line where the waves roll in, is known as beach wrack. When rst setting eyes on wrack, you might think it is only dried, dying seaweed. But it is very much alive and lled with sea organisms that are essential to beach life and the creatures that live there. Marine organisms that wash up with this wrack are an important part of a beach ecosystem. Tiny crabs, sea cucumbers, seeds and pods are only a few of the things you can nd in wrack. Once, while walking the shore at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys, I found a brown hamburger bean. Thats right, a hamburger bean! It is circular in shape, like a marble, with a thick brown or black line that goes around its center. On each side of the thick line the color is a lighter brown, making it look like a hamburger bun. These little beans are from tropical rainforests and are native to the West Indies and western Africa. Can you believe the things we nd on Florida beaches travel that far? Another neat little treasure I found in beach wrack was on St. Augustine Beach just a few weeks ago. While pushing my toes through the wrack, I spotted a purse crab. These crabs get their name because female purse crabs have a purselike chamber for holding their eggs. The little crabs live in shallow, sandy environments like beaches and are often found washed ashore in wrack. Beach wrack eventually gets pushed high on shore because of the tides. When the tides go out, the grasses start to dry and die. Dying grasses bring all sorts of life to the beach. As the grasses die, fungi and other organisms attract tiny species like beetles, beach hoppers, ghost crabs and more. These small insects and crabs become food for shorebirds. Dunlin sandpipers and other shorebirds migrate thousands of miles a year and depend on wrack during their journey for food. Without wrack and the organisms that live in it, the birds can die. Not only can you nd neat sea critters, shells, seeds and birds near beach wrack, but wrack is also the rst stage in forming sand dunes. Sand dunes are natural barriers against wind and water, and they prevent erosion. They form when wrack starts to collect blowing sand. As sand and other plant material collect in the wrack, the plant material can start to sprout and root. This continual process is how dunes form. So now you know that beach wrack isnt just icky seaweed that sits on the shore; it is a beautiful ecosystem important to the beach and beach life, as well as a place for unique nds and hours of curiosity. Have fun searching the wrack. Page 10 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, EV AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, EV Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at End Of Summer Sale! Two Days Only!! Fri. AUG 10th Sat. AUG 11th HUGE SAVING S ON MANY ITE MS T H RU-OUT T H E S TORE T ACKLE, ROD S REEL S AND APPAREL, TOO M UC H TO NA M E! WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JO SE PH B AY AP ALAC HI C O LA B AY W ES T PASS TI DE T ABLES M O N TH LY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat P oint Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East P ass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald P oint Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call T oday! 227-7847 Date H igh Low % P recip T hu, August 9 85 77 50 % Fri, August 10 84 76 40 % Sat, August 11 85 76 30 % Sun, August 12 84 77 40 % Mon, August 13 85 77 60 % T ues, August 14 85 76 60 % Wed, August 15 85 76 60 % 9 Mo 535am 1.0 732pm 0.6 10 Tu 503am 1.1 439pm 0.4 11 We 510am 1.3 355pm 0.2 12 Th 534am 1.4 422pm 0.1 13 Fr 610am 1.6 501pm 0.0 14 Sa 653am 1.7 544pm -0.1 15 Su 739am 1.8 625pm -0.2 16 Mo 824am 1.8 702pm -0.2 17 Tu 906am 1.9 734pm -0.2 18 We 945am 1.9 800pm -0.2 19 Th 1023am 1.8 822pm -0.1 20 Fr 1101am 1.7 838pm 0.0 21 Sa 1143am 1.6 846pm 0.2 9 Mo 815am 1.3 822pm 1.0 148am 0.4 304pm 0.6 10 Tu 840am 1.4 954pm 1.0 211am 0.6 416pm 0.5 11 We 908am 1.5 1158pm 1.0 234am 0.8 528pm 0.4 12 Th 942am 1.5 258am 1.0 635pm 0.2 13 Fr 1023am 1.5 733pm 0.1 14 Sa 1109am 1.5 825pm 0.0 15 Su 426am 1.2 1201pm 1.5 652am 1.3 910pm -0.1 16 Mo 452am 1.2 1254pm 1.5 802am 1.3 950pm -0.1 17 Tu 518am 1.3 146pm 1.6 856am 1.3 1024pm -0.1 18 We 540am 1.3 235pm 1.6 941am 1.3 1055pm -0.1 19 Th 600am 1.3 322pm 1.6 1021am 1.2 1122pm -0.1 20 Fr 618am 1.3 410pm 1.5 1100am 1.1 1147pm 0.0 21 Sa 634am 1.3 500pm 1.5 1141am 1.0 22 Su 652am 1.4 555pm 1.4 1212am 0.1 1226pm 0.9 Thursday, August 9, 2012 Summer beach safari Whats in that brown, dried seaweed on the beach? By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A program started locally is spreading from shore to shore as boat owners reach out to military veterans. John Captain Tater Swanson decided he wanted to give back to those who protect our freedom and what he decided to offer them is what he loves most, a quiet day on the water, shing. He began offering free trips on his boat to active and retired military in March 2011 and, that summer, he did about ve trips with veterans. Now, he said his program is going nationwide. Its grown remarkably fast, said Swanson. Military veterans are the best networking people in the world. One guy in Texas nds out about it and he has buddies he served with in Kentucky or Georgia and soon theyre all talking about it. Its a spider web effect. Swansons organization, Fishing for the Brave, arranged for seven veterans and one spouse to sh in this years Big Bend Saltwater Classic on four different boats. They were based in Carrabelle, Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. One of the soldiers, Martin Miller, who sailed out of Carrabelle with Captain Chester Reese, took fourth place for Spanish mackerel. Last weekend, Swanson sailed out of Port Canaveral with a second boat carrying seven vets for a day of shing and he is in the process of arranging several trips in Texas. He said hed been contacted by a veterans group there with 300 members and is trying to arrange trips to accommodate them. Fishing for the Brave, is statewide, said Swanson, and we are in the process of going nationwide. Swanson works at Altrua Marketing and Design in Tallahassee. He said they have been very supportive of his shing outreach and have allowed him to print yers and banners at their facility. Swanson is in the process of becoming a charter captain so he can take out paying trips. The plan, he said, is for every paid trip to fund one free trip for a veteran. From small beginnings, he has now joined forces with the Wounded Warrior program to provide shing trips for disabled vets and with the Veterans Center in Tallahassee. He said doctors at the center sometimes recommend a day of relaxing inshore angling for soldiers suffering from post traumatic stress syndrome. From piloting a boat, Swanson has now taken on the added role of matching boat owners who want to help with vets who want to sh. He said he takes time to talk to each volunteer captain to nd out what they have in mind. Placing soldiers with disabilities on a boat takes a good deal of planning and consideration. Anyone, even a sherman with a small skiff can take a soldier out for an afternoon or an hour. Swanson said he personally tries to do at least one trip with a vet a month and has a dozen scheduled between now and Christmas. If I could have guys on the water 365 days a year, I would, he said. If you would like to take a soldier shing or donate to Fishing for the Brave or arrange a shing trip, you can contact Captain Tater online at Fishing for the brave.com; email him at Fishingforthebrave@ live.com or call 326-7706. Fishing for the Brave is also on Facebook and Twitter. Warriors become anglers through Fishing for the Brave Above: Beach wrack attracts shorebirds. Inset: In the beach wrack at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, not only can you nd neat sea critters, shells, seeds and birds, but the wrack is also the rst stage of forming sand dunes. LOISSWOBODA | The Times Captain Tater at the Big Bend Saltwater Classic Inshore Offshore SPONSORED BY Amberjack is back on the menu and are plentiful in the 100 to 150 foot range out of Mexico Beach. Try shing live blue runners for the better sized sh; however, at-sided and diamond jigs will work as well if no live bait can be found. King sh are still hanging around the buoy line out of Mexico Beach right now as well. Conditions on St. Joe Bay seem to be improving this week. Water temperatures are still high, but the water clarity is better. Good trout and red sh reports from the Pig Island and Eagle Harbor areas are the best bet. Scalloping is still a challenge this year, but the shells are growing!

PAGE 11

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com A Section Thursday, August 9, 2012 Page 11 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) www.VoteMitchBurke.com 850-227-5702 11 Commandments for the Public Servant Taxpayers are the most important people in our community. 1. Taxpayers arent dependent upon you; you are dependent 2. upon them. Taxpayers arent an interruption of work; they are the purpose 3. of our work. Taxpayers do you a favor when they call or walk into the of 4. you are not doing them a favor by waiting on them. Taxpayers are part of your work; they are not outsiders. 5. 6. They are human beings with feeling and emotions just like you and I. Taxpayers are not people to argue with, match wits with or 7. ridicule. Taxpayers are people who need your assistance; it is your job 8. to provide professional quality service. Taxpayers are deserving of the most courteous and attentive 9. treatment that you can give them. Taxpayers are the people that make it possible for the elect 10. and staff to be paid. Taxpayers are a vital part of government and every division 11. thereof. ~Author Unknown Mitch It has truly been a pleasure meeting with the voters of Gulf County over the past several months. Thank you for welcoming me into your homes and allowing me the opportunity to speak with you. The response to my candidacy has been humbling and the level of support has been truly encouraging. I humbly ask for your vote on August 14th. JOES LAWN CARE 850.323.0741 J OE S _L AWN @Y A H OO .C O M New softball league forming Star Staff Report The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is inviting all local businesses and organizations to join its new softball league. The Bridge staff hopes this will be a fun league and a great opportunity to build relationships in the community. Come join the fun. Teams fees will be $250 to cover costs only. For more information, call or email Ron Reid at 229-8244 or admin.baystjoe@signaturehealthcarellc.com. Please respond by Aug. 31 so no one misses out on the fun. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Thomas University added some bite to its baseball team last week by signing a pair of Wewahitchka Gators. Justin Flowers and Hunter McDaniel, the Gators two leading hitters this past season, inked letters of intent last week to attend the private Thomasville, Ga.-based NAIA Division II school later this month. Flowers and McDaniel, both out elders, begin school Aug. 15 and will be playing during the fall season, and likely, Wewahitchka coach David Barnes said, a lot. They are probably going to play right out of the box, Barnes said. Thomas University has two teams, a junior varsity that plays a community college level schedule and a varsity. They lost six out elders to the Major League Draft this summer, and Justin and Hunter had this opportunity. The door opened, and they walked through. That is what you have to do, take advantage of the opportunity. Barnes said he enjoyed having Flowers and McDaniel for only a single season, half a school year, after he was hired by Wewahitchka to take over the baseball program. He said he never had the opportunity to attend college on a scholarship, these were his rst players as a coach to earn opportunities to the next level, and he hoped Flowers and McDaniel represented the beginning of a tradition. These two guys were the leaders of our team and played really well, Barnes said. They parlayed that into a chance to continue their education and play ball. (Thomas University) will be getting two very good out elders. Justin, playing center eld, gets a good jump on the ball. Hunter didnt make an error all season. They are also good hitters. Thomas is going to get two very solid out elders and two very solid hitters. The sky is the limit for them. Thomas is getting two good players. McDaniel, hitting from the No. 9 spot in the order, led Wewahitchka with a .360 batting average last season and led the team in stolen bases. Flowers, hitting leadoff, was second on the team with a .350 and also led the team in home runs. I asked Hunter again and again if he wanted to move higher up in the order, but he wanted to stay where he was, Barnes said. We had two leadoff men basically in the back end of our order. Flowers and McDaniel wanted to make college a package deal. We were looking at that from the beginning, Flowers said. We were hoping to stay together. They looked at and considered other schools, but when the opportunity at Thomas University presented itself an assistant coach at WHS had contacts at Thomas and knew about the effect the draft had on the baseball program the two jumped in with both feet. We had a lot of possibilities, especially locally, like Chipola or Gulf Coast, but in the long run Thomas looked like the best deal and best situation for us, McDaniel said. We were trying to stay together, and they needed out elders. Wewahitchka High athletic director Dennis Kizziah noted before the signing, which took place in front of family and friends at the high school, that McDaniel and Flowers had worked hard to be in position to move to the next level. Give credit where credit is due, Kizziah said. These two young men played a lot of ball and reaped the bene ts of that work. They have a real opportunity to get their education and do something they love for four more years. By TIM CROFT 227-7827|@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Talk about a whirlwind romance. Last Monday Rakeem Rock Quinn was looking for a college to attend after a redshirt baseball season at Tallahassee Community College. Three days later, he signed a full ride to attend Alabama Southern Community College in Monroeville, Ala., which nished fth in the national JUCO tourney last year. It feels good, Quinn said after a signing ceremony in the home of one of his biggest local fans, Zebe Schmitt. They wanted me out of high school, but I had my heart set on TCC. I know if I perform the way I can, I see this as a stepping stone to the next level. Quinns journey to Monroeville was a winding one. He went to TCC after he graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 2011 where he hit .445 with 45 RBIs and four home runs his senior year with the intent of stepping into the starting catcher position. But a wrist injury derailed his season, and he sat out with a redshirt. During the summer, Quinn traveled to California to play summer amateur ball and excelled. Hometown connections set up a trip to Monroeville. Cameron Likely, who starred in baseball at PSJHS, was a teammate of Alabama Southern head baseball coach Daniel Head. The two had been teammates at South Florida, and Likely told Head, who had recruited Quinn hard out of high school, Quinn was seeking a change of scenery. Likely also told Head about Quinns summer in California and put Head in touch with Quinns summer coach. The coach, Head said, raved. He had a terri c summer, according to his coach, Head said. He was someone we had been following since he was a junior in high school, so we were interested. Head had one scholarship remaining to ll. Head called Quinn last Monday and asked him to come up for a workout. Quinn ran the 60-yard dash, worked three batting cage sessions and caught some Eagle pitchers in the bullpen. I signed because they had always been interested in me, they had one scholarship open and they had only one catcher on the roster, said Quinn, 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. I came up through little league as a catcher. I converted in high school to the out eld my sophomore year, but went back to catcher. I like to catch. Coaches and scouts say I have the frame for it, and I like the position. I know how to work and move behind the plate. You are involved in everything. The personal workout last week punctuated what Head already knew about Quinn from high school. He came and he tried out, and he has several kinds of tools he can bring, Head said. His bat was so impressive. He is also very athletic, and that matches what we do on the eld. We are very aggressive on offense and like to have as much athleticism as we can on the diamond. He runs, catches and drives the ball. The catcher position is wide open. I see him providing depth at several positions this year and taking over the lead (catcher) role no later than his sophomore season. Quinn said he has yet to decide on an academic major, saying he would pursue an associates degree and gure out a major as he went. The top priority is the opportunity to continue his education while advancing his baseball career. I need to work harder behind the plate and get into the batting cage and just work to get ready for the fall, Quinn said. Ill be ready. Sports SHORT SPECIAL TO THE STAR Justin Flowers, left, and Hunter McDaniel, right, signed to play baseball at Thomas University last week. Flowers, McDaniel sign with Thomas University SPECIAL TO THE STAR Rock Quinn signed with Alabama Southern last week in the home of one of his biggest fans, Zebe Schmitt, while surrounded by family and friends. Quinn signs with Alabama Southern

PAGE 12

Local A12 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Our Current State Attorney plea bargained 98% of cases last year. POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY JIM APPLEMAN, REPUBLICAN, FOR STATE ATTORNEY 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT ApplemanForState At torney.com ApplemanForState At torney.com We Need Appleman is is why... DID YOU KNOW? Summary Reporting System prepared by OSCA, Statistics & Evaluation Data pulled 6/4/12, data shown is from 7/2011 3/2012 What separates Jay Bidwell from other candidates for Gulf County Superintendent of Schools? Experience. only Personal commitment. only parent Qualications. only Choose the experienced candidate. Choose the committed candidate. Choose the qualied candidate. Please vote for and elect Jay Bidwell for Gulf County Superintendent of Schools! Phone: (850) 639-2949 Cell: (850) 890-4851 Email: jaybidwellforsupt@fairpoint.net POLITI C AL ADVERTI S EMENT P AID FOR AND A PP ROVED B Y JAY BIDWELL, D EMO C RAT FOR SU P ERINTENDENT OF S C HOOL S Honesty & Fairness for ALL Gulf County (Pd.Pol.Ad.) ELECT MELISSA FARRELL FOR SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 3 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) For The Education of the Children in Gulf County. Vote Tuesday, August 14th or By Absentee Ballot Paid for and approved by Melissa Farrell for School Board, District 3 A NEW VOICE TURTLE from page A1 Weve always supported the (cold) stun events in the past, said Jill Davis. Scallop Cove has provided equipment and people to the effort of rescuing turtles and dolphins stranded or cold-stunned in the bay. Several years ago, nearly 2,000 turtles were pulled from the bay during a cold-stun event. Its really a good community contribution, she continued. We support the wildlife and our environment. We encourage other businesses to step up and contribute. BZ came to Gulf World entangled in shing line. One ipper was completely enmeshed and there was mono lament line coming from his mouth with a hook dangling out from the line. X-rays at Gulf World revealed no hooks inside the turtle as was the case with a recent patient nicknamed Captain Hook, who passed away despite delicate surgery to remove the hook. BZ, by contrast, needed only a steady diet of sh oil, medicine to heal a wounded ipper and just over a month to pass the mono lament line through his system. He was eating when we got him which was good, said Secret Holmes-Douglas, director of the Gulf World Marine Institute. BZ, rid of the lament, was clearly eager to return to his natural environment as employees of Gulf World carried him to the dock and the bay waters. The cost of BZs rehab? Nearly $2,000. This is a primary reason Jill and Mike Davis made their donation as Gulf World Marine Institute prepares to formally launch its non-pro t. The Institute has received its non-pro t status and has an elected board, which includes two Gulf County residents, Julia Cunningham and Dewey Blaylock. Once the summer season quiets, said Pam George, marketing director at Gulf World, the facility will of cially launch the non-pro t. The goal is to help defray the costs of rescuing and rehabbing marine animals in the Northwest Florida region in which Gulf World is effectively the rst responder for strandings or coldstun events. Gulf World has been doing this for years and just absorbing the costs, George said. That meant, Holmes-Douglas said, that funding for rescues and rehabs was taking away from the operations of the park. Establishing a non-pro t makes it easier to accept donations and pursue grants, George said. Mainly, the idea was so we could have a stranding facility out behind our place. We hope to have a rehab and research facility behind our place. Holmes-Douglas said another potential goal would be establishing a satellite intake facility in Gulf County. George noted that the expense of rehabilitation can be daunting; depending on the shape the animal is in, on degree of injury or illness, x-rays, medicine, staf ng for rehab time and purchasing of proper equipment takes dollars. People watch the rescues and they see the release, but they are not really aware of the costs, George said. Holmes-Douglas added that the non-pro t allows a foundation for partnering with asset providers, such the South Gulf County Fire Department which had provided equipment for rescues and releases, within their service area. And, at a fundamental level, bringing private investment to the rescue of marine animals starts with community investment purchased through awareness and education. Awareness is very high on the list for us, George said. The more awareness we can bring about shing lines and hooks, about plastic bags and the dangers, the better. Bringing more awareness to the community is all part of what we are trying to do. So, prior to having anyone handle BZ or place him in the water, Holmes-Douglas told the crowd the turtles story and lessons to be taken away. You can see her one ipper is scarred, Holmes-Douglas told about 40 gathered folks of all ages on the Scallop Cove dock. You need to be aware when you are shing that you are not catching or hooking any other creatures. If you see a turtle that is in distress because it is tangled in shing line, give us a call.

PAGE 13

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Thursday, August 9, 2012 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe police of cer Jake Richards screamed at the brown bear silhouette, which appeared to have come down with a case of the blue chicken pox. As he screamed Get out of here bear Richards let loose with a shotgun blast called the Hornets Nest that carries all the audible subtlety of a rework on the Fourth of July. If the silhouette had been a real Florida black bear, the blast would have done little more than alarm the bear with a loud noise and send plastic buckshot, if aimed correctly, into the heavily-muscled shoulder or rump of the bear. The goal: make that bear think twice about another encounter with humans. Wild bear or not, when it comes to shooting something at a bear, lethal or not, they are going to run, said Dave Telesco, coordinator of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions Bear Management Program. We want to move the bear out of the area. If we shoot it, it goes out of the area and that is what we want. When the bear comes back, A few bear hazing tips Heres how to chase a bear away and not get hurt A projectile red from a starters pistol provides a surprising effect to scare a bear by sight and sound. TIM CROFT The Star See BEAR HAZING B10 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Each month this newspaper will publish a list of potential volunteer opportunities for those in the community. This country was started by men and women who were willing to give their time and use their skills to build a nation where they could have a better life, said Trish Petrie of The Friends of the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge and owner of Turtle Beach Inn. They were volunteers. Today so many people expect so many things to be done for them and so much to be provided for them. We need to take a step back and participate with our time to help get this country back on the right track. With all the problems with the economy and balancing budgets, there will continue to be a reduction in the services and the bene ts that federal, state and local governments will be able to provide. It is time for a resurgence of volunteering. It will be up to us the people who care about our communities, our parks, our arts, our Come make a difference today By Khrysten Keys Star Staff Intern The Goodwill Career Training Facility would like to extend a helping hand to Gulf Countys unemployed and employed. The training facility offers free skills training for those seeking a job or simply a better job. For those without a high school diploma Goodwill also offers free GED preparation classes. The program is not exclusively for people seeking employment it also nds employees for employers. We will prescreen employees for companies, said the facilitys Employment Specialist, Tandra Burns. The Goodwill Career Training Facility is planning to host a job fair in August. Employers who are interested in participating in the fair are to call Burns at 2291273 to reserve a table. Our mission is to help people achieve independence through employment, Burns said. To ensure that the mission is met, the facility not only follows the employee for six months after employment but offers a 12-week job club class. This will include classes on anger management, applications, time management and skill and resume building. Elderly people who want to better familiarize themselves with computers also are urged to visit the training facility. All the classes are self-paced and the equipment is easy to use even if they have seeing problems. Although the program is relatively new to the Port St. Joe area, the Goodwill Career Training Facility, funded by sales from the Goodwill store and donations, has been offered around the country since the turn of the century. We want to stress that everything here is free, Burns said. The Goodwill Career Training Facility is next to the Goodwill store at 208 Highway 98 Port St. Joe. Goodwill offers career training facility TIM CROFT | The Star Hiram Nix, branch manager, and Joan Cleckley, business development with Centennial Bank, donated $500 to the Christian Community Development Fund last week. From home repairs to assisting homebound elderly to providing needs assessment and outreach, the CCDF continues to leverage donated dollars and eager partners to improve the lives of many. Diana Burkett had done an outstanding job as executive director with the CCDF and we are proud to be a part of this endeavor, Hix said. Centennial is proud to be a part of this community and believes in the importance of community involvement, he added. CENTENNIAL BANK DONATES TO CCDF See DIFFERENCE B6 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The 16th annual Florida Scallop and Music Festival set a new record for attendance this year. The festival, held last Friday and Saturday, drew more than 7,500 attendees this weekend, generating more income than any previous Scallop Festival. More than 70 booths displayed crafts and goodies and there was an assortment of games to delight both young and old. The kids zone included arts and crafts activities, pony rides and a bouncy house. An array of food wagons provided something to tempt every taste bud. The scallop plates served up on site and the ve-gallon buckets of frozen shell sh available to carry home were not harvested from St. Joe Bay but still were tasty. Photos by TIM CROFT | The Star and DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.com Sizzling tunes and steamy scallops make this years festival a success ALL SMILES AT FESTIVAL See FESTIVAL B6

PAGE 14

Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida Insuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals, Families or Small Businessess Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Your Local Agency for OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Meet Macklin a Labrador Retriever/Mix. Macklin has learned to walk on his leash and is a very patient puppy. He loves the attention of kids and loves to play with them. He loves his puppy friends but is still a little timid around kitties. Macklin will grow up to be a very big dog one day. This great puppy deserves a loving, forever home of his very own. If you can give him one let us know and we will tell him. WE ARE IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH SOME GENERAL MAINTANCE, CLEANING, PAINTING ECT VOLUNTEERS ARE ALSO NEEDED FOR PET SOCIALIZATION AND FOSTER HOMES. SCHOOL CREDIT AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. We are now proud partners with www.petsforpatriots.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Our shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! IF YOU ARE MISSING A PET, PLEASE CHECK WITH US! Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Society B2 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Account established to aid stroke victim Star Staff Report On July 20, Wanda Wheeler, a long-time resident of Port St. Joe, suffered a massive life-changing stroke. The family has established an account at Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union in Wandas name to help defray medical costs for her ongoing care and long-term recovery. Wheeler is employed at Bo Knows Pest Control and has worked for Watson Brothers Construction and Monumental Fabrication. Donations are greatly appreciated. Star Staff Report The American Cancer Society is seeking volunteers in Port St. Joe walkers, cancer survivors, caregivers, community leaders, anyone wanting to make a difference to join the Relay For Life of Gulf County. The organization is seeking volunteers who are interested in getting involved in the ght against cancer through fundraising in its signature fundraising event, Relay For Life. Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at an athletic track, park or other gathering area, with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. The events are held overnight to honor and mirror a cancer patients journey through treatment. To learn more about the Relay For Life of Gulf County and how to volunteer, to sign up your team or to attend the next team party, call Stephanie Bird at 785-9205, ext. 3509. Relay For Life is all about our community uniting with the American Cancer Society and supporting its efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays, said Kristi Dorman, operations chairwoman. Volunteers and participants who are willing to give their time and energy to this exciting event are making a commitment to let Gulf County know that cancer can be defeated. Funds raised at Relay For Life of Gulf County help the American Cancer Society to impact the lives of those touched by cancer within the community. In 2011, the Relay For Life events across Florida raised more than $21 million to help cancer patients and their families in local communities and to fund lifesaving cancer research. The Relay For Life of Gulf County raised $61,123 that helped fund lifesaving programs and services locally. Our most requested program, Road to Recovery, provides transportation for patients to and from lifesaving cancer treatments. Last year, 3,538 rides were given to patients in Gulf County. All of this is made possible by Relay For Life. All are welcomed to join the ght against cancer. For more information, call Carolyn Witten or Kim Kurnitsky at 227-4093. One of Floridas native plants is the wax myrtle. Its a small tree or large shrub that can grow anywhere in Florida. Wax myrtle does well in a moist environment, so its excellent for use in poorly drained soils. However, the plant also grows well in drier soils. Since this plant is so durable and can serve many uses in the landscape. I thought it was a good idea to pass some facts about the plant on to our readers. My information was provided by Emeritus Extension Urban Horticulturist, Dr. Robert J. Black. Wax myrtle is unisexual, with male and female owers produced on separate plants. Female owers grow in close bunches, and produce fruits that are round, light green, and about an eighth of an inch in diameter these fruits are coated with a thick, bluish wax that may be used in making candles. One of the unique features of wax myrtles is its fragrance. When the foliage is crushed, wax myrtle produces a very pleasant aromatic fragrance, know as bayberry. A northern relative of wax myrtle is the bayberry tree, which produces larger berries, and is used extensively for making the popular and fragrant bayberry candles. Wax myrtles can reach a height of 25 feet. Their leaves are evergreen narrow at the base and broader toward the upper end of the leaves. About midway up the leaf toward the tip, coarse teeth appear on the leaf edges. Wax myrtles produce suckers, which are small plants that sprout from the roots, these suckers grow into large clumps, or clusters, and eventually grow into a very large, dense plant. However, if you remove these suckers from around the main trunk, an attractive, small tree can be produced. The trunk of the wax myrtle is grayish white and reminds one of northern birch. These trees are used extensively in patio planting and as landscape screens. Wax myrtles can be grown from seeds, cuttings and simple layering techniques. When growing them from seed, be sure to sow the seed as soon as it matures. Seeds can be started in a mixture of equal parts sand and peat moss. Another method for propagating wax myrtle is to dig established plants during the winter months. Cut the plants back to within a few inches of the ground. Dig out the root clumps and set them in containers. In a few months, a fairly good-sized plant will grow. A small tree, say 10 to 12 feet in height, will take a few years to grow, using this method. Being a native plant, wax myrtle is well suited to Gulf Countys soils and climate. In fact, this plant is often seen growing along highways, close to roadside ditches, and other uncultivated areas. The plant is cold hardy, salt-tolerant and relatively free of diseases and insects. There is only one serious pest of wax myrtle: a caterpillar, which chews leaves and ties terminal leaves together. In summary, wax myrtles are among the most desirable plants for use in the Florida landscape. Their leaves give off a pleasant aromatic fragrance of bayberry, and their waxy fruits can be used for making candles. The plants thrive in moist, sandy soils, need very little maintenance and are rarely bothered by insects or diseases. For more information on wax myrtle contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u edu. Relay For Life seeks Gulf County volunteers ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Growing wax myrtle in home landscape Star Staff Report Senior citizens needs help Gulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of non-perishable foods for our low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients that love to play bingo several times a week. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items listed above can call Debbie at 229-8466. Learn about eBooks A class on eBooks will be 1-2:30 p.m. Aug. 28 at the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Gulf County Library meeting room. The class will teach participants how to download free eBooks to your Kindle, Nook, iPad or other device. Class size for this free class is limited so registration is urged. Call 229-8879 to register and reserve your seat. Amateur radio license exams Ham it up, and get on the air. Get your rst time ham radio license or upgrade your present license. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio license exams at 10 a.m. ET Saturday at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe. If assistance in obtaining a ham license is needed or for registration and exam details, call C.H. Tillis at 648-8251. News BRIEFS

PAGE 15

Masters Degree Business Administration Dear Friends, Over the past several months I have tried real hard to get the message out about my candidacy for your property appraiser. I have tried to go door to door and have extremely enjoyed the visits and talks we have had. The weather has hindered me on some days and I know I have missed many of you when I visited and no one was at home. the tools needed to make a good decision on voting for me as your property appraiser. I the property owner and the county appraiser. I hope that message has been received. I have also given to you the thoughts of what I will do for you, which has included more spiked property values, my strong since of helping others, and my strong desire to to thank you for listening, thank you for reading my ads, my literature, and thank you for your consideration. My attempt to solicit your vote truly comes from the heart and a strong desire to serve you. I have tried so hard to help others in their real estate appraisal needs, real estate needs in general, and help others as a friend would. I hope to work hard for you supported my campaign for your property appraiser. Thank you once again and please Jamie Lester (Pd.Pol.Ad.) School News The Star| B3 Thursday, August 9, 2012 Loretta Costin inducted into FACTE Hall of Fame Star Staff Report Loretta Costin wont be in trouble for her re cent absence from her new job as director of the Gulf/Franklin campus of Gulf Coast State College. She was in Ponte Vedra for her induction into the Florida Association of Career and Technical Edu cations Hall of Fame. Throughout your service, your vision, innova tion and commitment has truly made Florida a recognized leader in Career and Technical Educa tion, said Rod Duckworth, Chancellor, Division of Career and Adult Education, Florida Department of Education. The Hall of Fame was established in 1988 to recognize the most outstanding and distin guished professional career and technical educa tors who have made a long-term signicant effect on career and technical education in the state. This is a great honor, and it was so good to see many of my colleagues from around the state at the luncheon, Costin said. Dan Davis, FACTE president, presented her with a plaque at the recognition ceremony July 24. Costin most recently served as chief of staff to the commissioner of education, Florida DOE, be fore joining Gulf Coast State College in June. Her earlier experience as vice chancellor for Floridas Division of Workforce Education and as chancellor for the Division of Career and Adult Education at DOE involved working with business and industry leaders to develop workforce education programs and ensure Florida has the skilled workforce need ed to grow and diversify its economy. Were thrilled to have Loretta on our team, leading the Gulf/Franklin Campus. Her energy, ideas and experience are critical to our continued efforts to serve our students there and ll our vital role in the region, said GCSC president Dr. Jim Kerley. Costin was nominated for induction into the Hall of Fame by Robert Crawford, director of the Atlanta Technical Center and Technical High School, Coconut Creek. Throughout Lorettas 30 years of service, she has distinguished herself as a true leader and visionary. In each of the many roles that she has held during her illustrious ca reer, she has done it with dedication, passion, com passion and in a rst-class way that is all Loretta, Crawford said. The FACTE is a non-prot organization com mitted to the development of education that will prepare both young and adult Floridians for suc cessful careers. Star Staff Report Correctional ofcer basic standards course A new correctional ofcer basic standards class is scheduled to begin Aug. 22 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe. This class is required for anyone who wishes to become a correctional ofcer at any state, county or private correctional facility throughout Florida. This will be the last class offered this year in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School open house Port St Joe Jr./Sr. High School will conduct an open house at 5:30 p.m. ET Thursday. Come out and meet the faculty and staff. You also can pick up student class schedules and take a tour of the school. There will be an opportunity for you to spend a few minutes with each teacher. There will be a simulated class day and the bells will ring to announce time to change classes. Each teacher will greet you in the classroom setting for that class period. Parent meeting, open house at PSJES There will be a meeting for parents of sixth-graders at 11:30 a.m. Friday followed by a Title I Open House for all grades pre-K through sixth from noon to 1 p.m. ET. All parents and students are invited to come and meet the teachers. School BRIEFS Dan Davis, FACTE president, presents Loretta Costin with her plaque signifying entrance into the FACTE Hall of Fame.

PAGE 16

FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Thursday, August 9, 2012 Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME 507 10th Street Port St. Joe (850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIS T AND T O MAKE H I M K NOWN ST. JAME S E PI S COPAL C HURCH 800 22ND STREET, P ORT ST. JOE 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org Come worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC (Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4 th Thursday of Every Month The Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. The Rev. Lou Little, Priest Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOME W. P. Rocky Comforter L.F.D. (850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your home First Church of the Nazarene 2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship .............. 6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith Church HOME OF T H E POWER H OUSE YOUT H M INISTRIES Pastors Andrew & Cathy R utherford W elcome you to worship with us: S unday 10:30am S unday N ight Prayer 6pm W ednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323 R eid Ave ~ Downtown Port S t. Joe, F L ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander, Minister to Students New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor Sunday Sunday School ............. 9:00 am Worship Service ............ 10:30 am Youth Groups ............... 5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist Church Sunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Wednesday Wednesday Night Supper .............. 5:00 6:15 pm ............................ 5:45 6:10 pm Nursery ........................................ 6:00 7:30 pm ....................................... 6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry ........... 6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey ..... 6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal ........ 6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting ........................... 6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band ............................. 7:30 9:00 pm (Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WOR S HIP AT SUN S ET P ARK 8 AM 10:30 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BI B LE CLA SS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE T IME 9 11 AM M ONDAY : L IFE T REE CAF 7 PM W EDNE S DAY : MEN S B I B LE S TUDY 8 AM & WOMEN S BI B LE STUDY 5 PM 1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL (850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Emma J. Creamer Evans, daughter of Frank and Della Creamer, born March 20, 1914, she went to be with the Lord on Aug. 1, 2012. She was preceded in death by her husband, Auther Edward Evans; son, Joseph D. Evans; and daughter, Opal Cooper. She is survived by her daughters, Louise Fincher of Beverly Hills, FL, Myrtice Chambers of Eastpoint, Esther (Edward Harris) of Eastpoint, Rachel (John L Glass) of Eastpoint; sons, Paul Evans, Aaron Evans both of Eastpoint; 28 grandchildren; 47 great-grandchildren; and 36 great-greatgrandchildren. Services were held at United Baptist Church in Eastpoint at 1 p.m. ET Monday, August 5, 2012 with the Rev. Bobby Shiver officiating.. Interment will follow in Eastpoint Cemetery. Comforter Funeral Home will be in charge of funeral arrangements. Emma J. Creamer Evans David Wallace Manning, 64, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away Monday, July 23, 2012. Arrangements are being handled by Anderson-Long-Klontz Funeral Home Ltd., 6825 Weaver Road, Rockford, IL 61114, phone 815-654-2255. David Wallace Manning Jean Irene Mims, 69, of Overstreet passed away Aug. 4, 2012. She was well known for her arts and crafts. She owned, Lets Knit Yarn Shop, in Port St. Joe, and she also was a nurse and radiology technician for Gulf Pines Hospital and for many years she was nurse for Dr. Shirley Simpson. She was preceded in death by her parents, father, James Monte LeMaster and her mother, Irene Pearl Walker. She is survived by her husband, Peavy Mims of Overstreet; her children, Tammy Mims of Ponce de Leon, Jamie Mims of Dothan, AL., Sharie Moore and husband Jim of Lynn Haven, Tim Mims and wife Melissa of Howard Creek; nine grandchildren; and one sister, Jodie Welchko. Graveside services were held 11 a.m. ET Wednesday, August 8, 2012 at Pleasant Rest Cemetery in Altha, FL, with the Rev. Don Hodges of ciating, In lieu of owers those who wish may make donations to Emerald Coast Hospice, Post Of ce Box 1520, Lynn Haven, Florida 32444-4611 in Mrs. Mims memory. All services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. Jean Irene Mims Robert Leslie Taylor, age 74 of White City, Fla., born June 12, 1938, in Gorin, Mo., passed away July 31, 2012, at Covenant Hospice of Bay Medical Center. He is survived by his wife, Zola, of 55 years and their six children, Marla, Susan, Robert (Alisa), Mathew (Teresa), Angie (John), and Charles (Kate); 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and sisters Dolly and Onnalise. He was preceded in death by his mother, father, step-father and brother. He is a veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard (four years) as well as the U.S. Navy Seabees (13 years). He completed two combat tours in Vietnam. After nishing his military service, he became a general contractor and Facilities Manager for Bay St. Joseph Care Center. There was a memorial service beginning at 3 p.m. ET on Saturday, Aug. 4, at White City Baptist Church with visitation from 2-3 p.m. ET. Local services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Robert Leslie Taylor SPECIAL TO THE STAR If you have driven down Garrison Ave in the past few weeks you will have noticed that Faith Christian School, on the corner of Twentieth St. and Garrison Ave., has undergone a facelift. The beauti cation process has taken several weeks but has been worth every minute. Thank you to Austin and Dena Sapp, Brian and Megan Burkett, Mitch and Sabrina Burke, Mark and Kayce Costin, Michael Hammond, Sylvia Costin and other friends of FCS. Terry Helms, 67, of Port St. Joe, Fla., and Two Rivers, Wisc., began his new journey Monday, July 9. He went peacefully into the next phase armed with all the love of his family and friends. Free of pain and able to breathe, he moved on. As he said, There will be no sad songs and slowwalkin music when I go. We are to celebrate his courage, dedication, character (and he certainly was a Character), his sarcasm, his wit and his sobriety. A decorated Vietnam veteran, he was an avid sherman and bluegrass music lover. Terry returned to Atlanta, Ga., after the service to work as a re ghter for 30 years before retiring to Port St. Joe, Fla., with summers spent in Two Rivers, Wiscn. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Pamela Garmon-Helms, Port St. Joe, Fla.; son, Jason Helms of Oakwood, Ga.; daughter, Dani Helms Weaver; granddaughters, Hannah and Elizabeth Weaver, Duluth, Ga. An October memorial is planned for Port St. Joe. Deja & Martin Funeral Chapels, 1506 18th Street, Two Rivers, assisted with local arrangements. The family would like to thank Heartland Hospice of Wisconsin with a special thanks to Stacey Kluthe, RN, who walked with her uncle through lifes nal stages. Terry L. Helms TERRY L. HELMS Obituaries The Lions Tale To view all of the obituaries and sign a guestbook, visit star .com.

PAGE 17

Local The Star| B5 Thursday, August 9, 2012 Vote for Phil Lanford Superintendent of Schools (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid by Phil Lanford, Dem., for Superintendent of Schools Tent Revival to feature Evangelist Thomas Boozer There will be a Salvation and Healing Tent Revival at 1249 Hwy. 22 South in Wewahitchka beginning Aug. 3. The revival will be held nightly, excluding Sundays, at 7:30 p.m. CDT. Evangelist Thomas Boozer will be preaching the word of God. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information call (229) 465-3312. Come expecting your miracle. First Baptist to hold AWANA Clubs Because kids matter to God. First Baptist Church will have AWANA Clubs meetings beginning 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Aug. 15. The clubs are in three age groups: Cubbies (ages 3 and 4, 3 by Sept. 1), Sparks (K through second grade) and T&T (grades 3 through 6). For more information, call First Baptist Church at 227-1552. New Life Christian Center to host World Explosion service New Life Church and Pastors Johnny and Shirley Jenkins would like to invite everyone to come out and join them in a three night World Explosion Service on Aug 15, 16 and 17 starting at 7 p.m. ET nightly. The speaker will be Pastor Michelle Bradley of Mobile, Ala. She operates in the ofce as a pastor, evangelist and seer. Come and be blessed. The church is located at 504 6th Street. Zion Fair to host musical benet Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will host a benet musical program at 5 p.m. ET on Sunday, Aug. 12, for our member, Sister Jean Whitley-Thompson. Donations raised for this program will be used to repair the roof on the old family house located on Avenue C, so that she can have a home to live in; after the fact of suffering the loss of her personal home due to unexpected circumstances. The following church choirs scheduled to participate: New Bethel Baptist, Mt. Carmel, New Life, Philadelphia Primitive Baptist, Thompson Temple Holiness, Church of God, New Covenant, Victory Temple, Port St. Joe Church of Praise, Zion Fair Baptist, Body of Christ, Amazing Grace, New Bethel AME, New Covenant, The Body of Christ, and North Port St. Joe Community adult and youth Choirs. Our special guest choir will be Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church Choir, with the Rev. Dr. Craig Riley of Tallahassee. The pastor of Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church, Rev. Wilson Hall of Tallahassee and the members welcome the Holy Spirit in any interested church choir to come out to participate, and show your love for this much needed Christian duty cause. Faith BRIEFS You were given a mission, when you accepted Jesus as Lord of your life. Have you had a problem with it enough to cause you strife? There are places youll take a risk when witnessing for the Lord. The things of the world and Jesus are not in accord. In many places people will cause you uneasiness and strife. There are also places that can cost you your life. We even have problems with brothers and sisters in the Lord. It truly is a shame when we cant be in one accord. God have given me a talent, but some dont like what I write. As a matter of fact, last week, a fellow kinda got uptight. As it stands right now, I might be taking a risk too. Im sorry if you dont like my writings, but Ill keep writing for the ones that do. Billy Johnson Witness at your own risk By ED MCAT EE R Contributing writer So you are thinking about joining the military. Well, you probably have hun dreds of questions. Through the years, I have counseled high school and college men and women about joining a military service. It never fails, you have all these questions, but once you walk into the re cruiters ofce; you cannot remember any of them. Being looked at the former US com mander in Afghanistan, Stanley McChrys tal, in June of 2012, pushed Congress for a reinstatement of the draft. Many Ameri cans are in support of his idea, myself in cluded, because of the strain it is placing on our military personnel who have been deployed many times for long durations. His recommendation would provide more troops at a lower training cost and help to ease the rotation strain of the current vol unteer force. Regardless, there are several ques tions you need to make sure you ask your recruiter and several things you need to make sure your recruiter knows. There are so many benets and so much informa tion about the military, it is impossible for your recruiter to cover everything. Here are ve important questions you need to ask or tell your recruiter. First, when do I take the Armed Servic es Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)? This is an important question because what you do in the military is dependent on this test. Being prepared and scoring as high as possible will give you the most choices when you start your military ca reer. There are several ways to prepare. You can buy a study guide or visit the Mili tary.com online ASVAB Preparation and Practice Tests. Most recruiters will give you a practice test to help predict your score on the ASVAB. Next question is how soon will I leave for basic training? Joining the military and leaving for basic training are two different things. When you join the military, you are qualifying rst by testing and second by taking a physical. After qualifying in both areas, you will pick your job and swear-in. You are NOT leaving for basic training now. It is important that your recruiter, and the Military Entrance Processing Sta tion liaisons know when you are available to leave for basic training. It is always bet ter to get your career started as soon as possible but not everyone can do this. For instance, if you are attending college you probably will not be available until the end of the semester. If you are a high school senior, you need to make sure you know when your graduation date is and when you are available to leave. When will I know what my job is go ing to be? This is an important question. Each branch of the service has its own ways of assigning jobs. For example, the Navy will give you a job while you are at the MEPS. The Air Force can give you a job at the MEPS but usually will have you come up with a list of jobs and put you on a qualied and waiting list. Just make sure you understand what job you are selected for and when you leave for basic training. What documents do I need? Most people know where their drivers license is and probably their social security card, but many people cannot nd their birth certi cate, high school diploma, etc. quickly. Your recruiter will give you a list of the documents needed. Start gathering them as soon as you decide to join. The list may include a government issued ID (Driv ers License), social security card, high school diploma, birth certicate, college transcripts, marriage license, medical documents, court documents, or adoption documents, to name a few. What about medical and legal records? Recruiters need to know your complete medical history and information about all legal infractions trafc tickets, misde meanors, felonies, and so forth. Recruit ers are trying to help you, not disqualify you. Disclosing your medical history and getting supporting documentation for medical issues will give you the best pos sible chance of qualifying for the military. Law violations work much the same way, disclosing them up-front will give the re cruiter the best opportunity to run a waiver when applicable. Being up-front with your recruiter about medical and legal issues will keep you from wasting your time and the recruiters time. Remember, there are many questions you need to ask you recruiter and many things you will need to tell them. Write down your questions! One young man I helped wrote down 83 questions. The re cruiter spent three hours going over his list. The recruit felt much better because he was informed. He is now on his second term in the United States Air Force. Get some answers about joining the military

PAGE 18

Local B6 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 natural resources, to give our time and use our skills to preserve what is important to us. This country cannot continue to operate with an attitude of entitlement and spending beyond our budget. The Star is running this monthly column, Volunteer Opportunities on the front page of the Community section of the paper once a month. Those interested can also nd the story at www.star .com and The Port St. Joe Star Facebook page. Please help make that difference! Contact the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Petrie or Tim Croft at tcroft@star .com to provide additional opportunities for this column. Here are a few opportunities: Abused and neglected children need a voice in court! There are currently several children without volunteer advocate representation in Gulf County. The 14th Circuit Guardian Ad Litem Program wants these children spoken for. Be a strong, dependable voice, appointed by the court, to support these children. Training classes are starting in August. Please call 747-5180 for more information and an application. Volunteers are needed to assist greeting guests and doing of ce duties at the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge of ce in Apalachicola. Introduce visitors to displays and information about St. Vincent Island. Call (850) 6538808 and ask for Charlotte if you can help on Mondays and/or Wednesdays. Able-bodied volunteers are needed to help with outdoor work on St. Vincent Island. You need to be able to tolerate heat and sweat, but the island and wildlife are amazing. Call Shelley at (850) 527-8535 if you can help on the island. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer L P ort S aint Joe area D esign professionals on premise C P rofessional I nstallation 2760 H W est P ort S aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $ 50 Off purchase of $ 750.00 or more T ile starting at C arpet starting at TM 1-850-309-1996 shredit.com Gun Show August 11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2080433 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING DIFFERENCE from page B1 This year, in addition to the traditional fried shell sh, Provisions, Gourmet by the Bay and the culinary school at Gulf Coast State College each prepared a special scallop dish special for the festival. Provisions prepared scallop sliders, small sandwiches with little cakes prepared from ground scallops and served with garlic lime aioli. The sliders were paired with sweet potato res and a scallop cocktail like a Bloody Mary but avored with the celebrated shell sh. The cooking school brought a delicious ceviche and served up the succulent shell sh raw and Gourmet by the Bay went ethnic with a scallop quesadilla. On Saturday, there was a classic car show where vehicles of all kinds were gathered and displayed. Categories included prewar antiques, muscle cars and specially modi ed rides. Aaron Tippin headlined the musical line up. His performance on Saturday night drew wild applause from a big crowd. Recording star Reed Waddle also was welcomed to the stage when he performed on Friday afternoon. Waddle wrote much of his own material. The award-winning Kevin Jacobs Band from Panama City followed Waddle on Friday evening performing classic rock by artists like the Doobie Brothers, Journey and Cheap Trick that brought the crowd to its feet cheering and dancing. Monticellos Premier Southern Rock and Country Band 19 South, opened for Tippin on Saturday and they were followed by Hits and Grins a trio of Nashville songwriters who also are talented performers. A few raindrops fell on Saturday but it wasnt enough to dampen the spirits of scallop enthusiasts and music lovers and even helped to cool off the steamy park. FESTIVAL from page B1 Photos by TIM CROFT | The Star and DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.com

PAGE 19

Local The Star| B7 Thursday, August 9, 2012 Paid by Barbara Radcliff, Republican, for County Commissioner District 5 I will work diligently for everyone in Gulf County regardless of their last name or street address. I will respond to voter concerns with the same the county and its citizens will always be my number one priority not any special interest group. I do not want a career I want to make a difference. I ask for your vote on August 14, 2012. Honesty...Integrity...Common SenseAccessibility DedicationAccountabilityPassion...Commitment Pd. Pol. Ad. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp (Pd.Pol.Ad.) INTEGRITY DILIGENT DISCIPLINED DEDICATED EXPERIENCED Our Children are the Future! Paid by Billy C. Quinn, Jr. for School Board 7008 Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach, FL 32456 (850) 647-6167 THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGH T S PECIALS 6:00 9:00 HOURS : 236 R eid A ve (850) 229.7121 8 OZ RIBEYE SPECIAL O R SHRIMP SPECIAL WITH 2 SIDES: $11.95 Orders served with: C H EESE GRITS, FF, BAKED POTATO, S ALAD AND BREAD ** A W ARD W INNIN G DESSERTS ** Goodwill Big Bend to host job fair Star Staff Report The Goodwill Career Training Center in Port St. Joe will host its rst job fair from 1:30-4:30 p.m. ET Aug. 15 at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association Building, 120 Library Drive. Your participation in this event will be a great support to the community as well as to the Goodwill mission of helping people find suitable employment and looking for the right individual for your business. There are 15 tables available for this event, so we ask employers to register early. Set up and tear down will be provided. Companies should provide company identi cation for your table (banner, name plate), employment applications or printed instructions on application process, and a representative to man your table. Goodwill will spread the word about this great event throughout Gulf, Bay and Franklin counties. The group will notify the Work Force centers in Port St. Joe and Panama City and expects a diverse group of potential employees to attend. To register, call Tandra Burns at 850-229-1273 or email psjctc@goodwill bigbend.com. Star Staff Report The Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves is sponsoring its second Nature Photo Contest. The entry deadline is Aug. 27. Winning photos will be exhibited beginning Sept. 8 at the City of Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art and later at the St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center at the Buffer Preserve. Once again, the Apalachicola Center is allowing the friends to use its facilities to exhibit winning photos. This year, photos will be exhibited at the same time as locally-renowned nature photographer John Spohrer. Winning photos from the rst contest can be viewed at http://stjosephbaypreserves.org/photo-contest/ contest-winners_2.html. Entry fees from this annual event will bene t the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves. Friends pay a discounted fee of $10 per photo. Other entrants pay $20 each or $50 for three photos. The hope is that some of the exhibited photos showcasing the natural beauty of St. Joseph Bay and surrounding region will inspire others to protect the natural areas and heritage of St. Joseph Bay. Download entry form and contest rules at st.josephbaypreserves. org/photo-contest. Entries must be received by Aug. 27. Download a membership form for the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves at http://stjosephbaypreserves.org. For more information, email Bill Boothe at PhotoNaturalist@NatureIn Focus.com or call 643-2583. Friends of St. Joe Bay sponsors photo contest Hand to dramatize Family Portrait By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com An accomplished playwright, familiar with comedy, plans to strike a more serious note, as his newest work, The Family Portrait is set to premier at the Dixie Theater. Barry Hands two-act drama, featuring a cast of seven, all local performers, will take the stage at 7 p.m. Aug. 17-18 at the Dixie. This is absolutely not a comedy, said Hand, who formerly was employed with Gulf County Solid Waste. Its a highly energized drama with suspense, secrets and revelations. Hands talents with playwriting date back to when he was a sophomore at Apalachicola High School, and have blossomed over the years with his writing of 13 plays. This latest work, written in 2010, takes on the more serious themes of unforgiveness, manipulation and frustration and is set in the 1950s, at the home of the late Cecil Lane, in an unnamed American town. The s and the s are intriguing to me personally because I am a history buff, Hand said. I wanted to tease my mind, I wanted to challenge my mind. Presently the pastor of Apalachicolas Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Hands Christian faith has no doubt inspired his creativity but it wont be front and center like one of his Sunday sermons might be. Instead, Hand has shown a knack for weaving his message with subtlety as he draws three-dimensional characters in the show, which he also directs. When it came time to cast the play, Hand said he turned to people who he had observed before hand in their roles in the Franklin County community. By knowing them and their personalities, and believing how they could make the characters come alive, I called them up. Some wanted to read the script rst, and some trusted my expertise, he said. I feel humbled and blessed to have this cast. One actress destined for a part was Hands younger sister, Alisa Hand Hendels, who portrays Plasy, the trusted housekeeper of Vera Lane, the widow of Cecil Lane and matriarch of the family. Hands sister rst appeared in his plays when she was in the eighth grade, and for the last 27 years has been in all of her older brothers works. Liz Sisung, one of the countys most accomplished actresses, portrays Vera Lane, who is hosting a gathering at her home for the purpose of staging a family portrait. But it turns out to be anything but, said Hand, offering no further hints. Appearing as Roy, Lanes son who has traveled home for the portrait, is Adam Cannon, y outh pastor of the Apalachicola St. George Island United Methodist Church Cooperative Parish. Apalachicola artist and shopkeeper Katie McFarland portrays Roys wife, Carol. A second member of the local clergy, Craig Hicks, pastor of Apalachicolas Living Waters Assembly of God, assumes the role of the Lanes family physician, Dr. Watkins. Rounding out the cast are Trina Ford as Mary Alice, Plasys sister, and Maranda Moses as Mona, a young woman with an illness. Hand said nothing in the show is offlimits to children, but cautioned that much of the shows impact may be lost on the younger set. They would not be able to comprehend the plot and subject line, he said. The show, which runs about 90 minutes, also features original music and lyrics written and performed by Hand. Cannon, Moses and Ford all are part of the singing. Sally Crown handles the stage manager duties, with rehearsals ongoing on the stage of the former Apalachicola High School. The show is produced in conjunction with Mt. Zion Pictures, Hands company, with a future lm now in the works. Tickets for the show, $13 in advance and $15 at the door, are available at the Dixie box of ce or by calling 653-3200. VERGIL MARSHALL | Special to the Times Appearing in The Family Portrait are, seated from left, Trina Ford, Maranda Moses, Liz Sisung, Adam Cannon and Katie McFarland. Standing, from left, are Alisa Hand Hendels and Craig Hicks.

PAGE 20

Local B8 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Special to The Star PENSACOLA Sacred Heart Health System and Ascension Health have announced the appointment of Susan Davis as the president and CEO of Sacred Heart Health System. Davis was selected as the interim president and CEO of Sacred Heart in February and recently was named the permanent CEO. Davis said that when she arrived in Pensacola to succeed Laura Kaiser as the Sacred Heart CEO, she intended to serve as only the interim leader until a permanent CEO was chosen. After discussions over the past few months with the leaders at Ascension Health and Sacred Hearts Board of Trustees, I decided to make a long-term commitment to lead Sacred Heart, Davis said. I am excited about the opportunity to lead a great team of employees and to build stronger relationships with the many loyal physicians who have made Sacred Heart a leader in excellent patient outcomes. A number of factors led to my decision to stay as Sacred Hearts CEO, she added. Over the past four months, I have fallen in love with the Sacred Heart family and the communities it serves. I also saw the opportunity to provide Sacred Heart with a vision for the future and a renewed focus on quality, safety and patient satisfaction. She leads a Health System that includes hospitals in Pensacola, Walton County, Panama City and Port St. Joe, as well as a network of physicians stretching from Gulf Shores, Ala. to Apalachicola, Fla. In addition to her role at Sacred Heart, Davis also will serve as Ascension Healths Ministry Market Leader for Florida, the Gulf Coast, New York and Connecticut. Ascension Health, the parent organization for Sacred Heart, is the nations largest Catholic and nonpro t healthcare system. Davis has served as the CEO of St. Vincents Health in Bridgeport, Conn., since 2004. She began her healthcare career as a nurse in New York City. She served for 18 years in leadership roles at Vassar Brothers Medical Center in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., where she began as vice president of patient care services and then became the chief operating of cer and eventually the CEO. She holds a bachelors degree in nursing from Mount Saint Mary College, a masters degree in nursing administration from Columbia University in New York, and a doctorate in education from Columbia. About Sacred Heart Health System Sacred Heart Health System is Northwest Floridas leading provider of high quality health care to children and adults. The hub of the Health System is the 466-bed Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola that includes the regions only Womens and Childrens Hospital. In 2011 and 2012, Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola was rated in an independent national study among the top 5 percent in the nation for superior patient outcomes. Key services also include a Regional Heart and Vascular Institute, a regional Stroke Center, Level II Trauma Center, a Cancer Center af liated with M. D. Anderson Physicians Network, and a large regional network of primary care and specialty doctors stretching from Foley, Ala. to Apalachicola, Fla. In 2003, the Health System opened Sacred Heart Hospital on the Emerald Coast, a 58-bed community hospital in Walton County that is rated among the top hospitals in the United States for patient satisfaction. In March 2010, the new Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, a 19-bed hospital, opened in Port St. Joe. This year, Sacred Heart formed a joint venture with LHP Hospital Group to lease and operate Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Sacred Heart has approximately 4,500 employees and is part of Ascension Health, the nations largest system of Catholic and nonpro t health care facilities. For more information, call 416-7000 or visit www. sacred-heart.org. About Ascension Health Ascension Health (www.ascensionhealth.org) is transforming health care by providing the highest quality care to all, with special attention to those who are poor and vulnerable. Ascension Health, which provided $1.2 billion in care of persons living in poverty and community bene t programs last year, is the nations largest Catholic and nonpro t health system. Our Mission-focused Health Ministries employ more than 121,000 associates serving in more than 1,400 locations in 21 states and the District of Columbia. Paid by Wyvonne Grifn Pickett, Demo. for Supervisor of Elections Shes our lady... FOR SUPERVI S OR O F E LECTION S Paid by Wyvonne Grifn Pickett, Demo. for Supervisor of Elections Paid by Wyvonne Grifn Pickett, Demo. for Supervisor of Elections vote WYVONNE GRIFFIN PICKETT ( P d. P ol.Ad.) Davis named president, CEO of Sacred Heart Over the past four months, I have fallen in love with the Sacred Heart family and the communities it serves. I also saw the opportunity to provide Sacred Heart with a vision for the future and a renewed focus on quality, safety and patient satisfaction. Susan Davis president, CEO of Sacred Heart Health System Is it the time to buy? Special to The Star The housing market in our area is starting to see some signs of recovery. Prices might be down, but sales are up. Looking at the areas of Gulf County and Mexico Beach, the rst half of 2011 saw 123 residential sales with total sales equaling $24,777,769. The rst half of 2012 saw 171 sales with total sales equaling $32,986,800. Mexico Beach/St. Joe Beach accounted for 94 sales totaling $18,409,500; Cape San Blas/South Gulf, 40 sales totaling $11,118,800; Port St. Joe, 27 sales totaling $2,484,000 and North Gulf County, 10 sales totaling $974,500. The sales of lots and land also increased. The rst half of 2011 saw 80 sales totaling $5,365,500. During the rst half of 2012, 161 sales totaled $9,936,505. Mexico Beach/St. Joe Beach had 34 sales totaling $2,411,800; Cape San Blas/South Gulf, 96 sales totaling $6,861,600; Port St. Joe, 19 sales totaling $507,525; and North Gulf County, 12 sales totaling $155,580. With the mortgage interest rate the lowest it has been in years, a mortgage deduction tax savings for homeowners and a shrinking housing inventory, now is the right time to buy.

PAGE 21

Local The Star| B9 Thursday, August 9, 2012 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 227-7847 T ODAY! C A LL 227-7847 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour E mergency Water E xtraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-9663 15 Years of Service! Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction Calling All Beginner Artists! Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep. Glynis Holcombe OSCI (One Stroke Certied Instructor) www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 PUBLIC NOTICE A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Develop ment Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, August 20, 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Com missioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, August 28, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Adminis tration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discucc and act on the following: 1. Variance Application Mickey and Sharon Winchester Parcel ID # 03805-130R Located in Section 23, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback. 2. Development Policy, Ordinances, Comprehensive Plan, and LDR Revisions Comprehensive Plan Amendments Transmittal of proposed military support and other comp plan amendments Comp Plan and LDR review of vested private properties within conservation land use amendment Occupational License Additional development & planning issues 3. Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. (2012.83) 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR F AVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRIT S KARAO K E & DJ IN THE CROWS N EST N EIL JAMES O N THE POO P DE CK C OME EN J O Y THE S U NSET R AN DY S TAR K WITH A RT L ONG ON S AX O N THE POO P DE CK UPCOMING EVENTS 10% OFF ALL RET A I L (No Double Discounts) RET 7 FO I LS $25.00 Cut/Style NO T included M-F 9-7 9-5 SUN 12-5 M-F 9-7 9-5 M-F 9-7 9-5 BACK T O SCHOOL HOURS 10% OFF 10% OFF $25.00 S HO W Y OUR SPI R IT Fashion Color E xtensions $8.00/each The Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce will be conducting vehicle safety checkpoints and DUI check points during the month of August. The check points will be held throughout the county to include Highway 98 near St. Joe Beach, Highway 98 and Garrison Ave, C-30 Simmons Bayou, Highway 71 North of White City, Highway 22 and Highway 22A, Highway 71 and Westarm Creek, Highway 71 Dalkeith Area and Highway 71 near the Calhoun line. Gulf County arrests July 30 Investigators went to Narvaez Street to do a follow-up on a theft report. While on the property they found marijuana plants growing in a pot in the back yard. Troy Dewonne Williams, 33, was arrested for cultivation of marijuana and taken to the Gulf County Jail. Deputies responded to a shooting call at Pine Ridge Apartments. During the investigation it was learned that Walton Henry Butler, 59, had shot Everett Gant with a .22 caliber ri e. Butler was arrested and charged with attempted murder. He is currently in the Gulf County Jail held without bond. July 31 Thomas Dewitt Harper, 40, was arrested on a warrant for grand theft. It is alleged that he stole a 26-inch racing-type bicycle from a house in the Windmark area and then pawn it at a Panama City pawn shop. Lacey Dupree Williams, 22, was stopped for a traf c violation. She was asked to perform several sobriety exercises which she did poorly on. She was arrested for DUI and refused to take a breath test. Deputies responded to a residence in the Wewahitchka area in reference to a disturbance. They made contact with John Rogers Grice, Jr., 51, who was obviously intoxicated and agitated. They attempted to calm him but were unable to do so. Grice was tased and became compliant. He was arrested and charged with disorderly intoxication, resisting without violence and assault on a law enforcement of cer. August 1 Melissa Ash, 31, was arrested on a warrant for the murder of Hilton Dewayne Sewell which occurred in 1999. She was originally arrested in 1999 and charged with murder but found incompetent to stand trial in 2000. The state of Florida has probable cause to believe at this time that Ash is now competent to stand trial. Ash is currently being held in the Bay Jail without bond. August 2 Estanisio R. Fernandez, 30, was arrested on a warrant from Broward County as he was due to be released from Gulf Correctional Unit. August 3 Larayon Joseph Reddice, 20, was arrested on a warrant for violation of probation; the original charge was sale of a controlled substance. It is alleged that he committed a new law violation. August 4 Jerry Donell Curry, 44, was operating a vehicle that was stopped for speeding. The deputy noticed the odor of an alcoholic beverage about his person. The deputy asked Curry if he knew where he was and he told the deputy he was on the Ross Clark Circle near Dothan. When he performed badly on several sobriety tests he was placed under attest for DUI. Jessie Huskey, 33, was arrested for disorderly conduct when he was found walking in the middle of U. S. Highway 98 while intoxicated. Port St Joe Police Department arrests July 31 Yolanda Aquilla Robinson; criminal mischief, resisting with violence August 1 Gary Lee Richardson, 38, DWLSR August 3 Rodney Dewayne Adkison, 31, violation of probation August 4 John Robert Cannon, 51, leaving scene of a traf c crash William Alex Hull, 39, warrant out of Sarasota County Gulf County sheriff arrest log ARREST REPORT

PAGE 22

Local B10 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 B10 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 88903 PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF MEXICO BEACH SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE IV ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Mexico Beach will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing the: CITY OF MEXICO BEACH -SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE IV Plans and specifications can be obtained at the City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410. Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. Central Time, Friday, August 31st at City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410 and will be opened and read publicly immediately thereafter. All Bids shall be submitted in an envelope clearly marked Sealed Bid -Sidewalk Project Phase IV. The City of Mexico Beach reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The City also reserves the right to reject contractors who in the Citys opinion are not qualified to perform the work based on the questionnaire submitted. All Bids shall be firm for a period of 90 days after opening. This includes material prices. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Point of Contact will be Chris Hubbard, City Administrator, at 850. 648.5700 or by email at c.hubbard@mexicobeachgov.com. All bidders shall comply with all applicable state and local laws concerning licensing, registration, and regulations of contractors doing business in Florida. The City shall award the contract to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder; provided however, the City reserves the right to award the contract to a bidder who is not the lowest responsive and responsible bidder if the city determines in its reasonable discretion that another bid offers the city a better value based upon the reliability, quality of service, or product of such other bidder. August 9, 2012 88351S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1543 Application No. 2012-32 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 06269-896R Description of Property: Lot 11, Block D, Seagrass Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 5, Page 1 Name in which assessed: Seagrass Properties, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 22nd day of August, 2012. Dated this 17th day of July, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2012 88353S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1542 Application No. 2012-31 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 06269-892R Description of Property: Lot 9, Block D, Seagrass Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 5, Page 1. Name in which assessed: Steven Delonga and Ryan Dwyer All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 22nd day of August, 2012. Dated this 17th day of July, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2012 88355S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1073 Application No. 2012-30 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 03607-000R Description of Property: Lots 12, 14, and 16, Block 7, of Beacon Hill Addition, according to the plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, according to the plat filed by M.D. Taylor and H.H. Bullard and other plats and records filed in the Office of the Circuit Court Clerk, Gulf County, Florida. Said lots lying in Original Lot Three (3) and being in Section Thirty (30) and Thirty-One (31), Township Six (6) South, Range Eleven (11) West. Name in which assessed: Charlie Mack Brock All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 22nd day of August, 2012. Dated this 17th day of July, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2012 88577S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000210 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, CHARLOTTE ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE M. ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE MONIREA ODOM, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, CHARLOTTE ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE M. ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE MONIREA ODOM, DECEASED. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: THE WEST 60 FEET OF LOT 3 AND THE EAST 8 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, C.L. MORGANS ADDITION TO WEWAHITCHKA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 2004 FLEETWOOD OAK KNOLL 28X52 DOUBLE -WIDE MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBERS: FAFL334A76671-0K31 AND GAFL334BY6671-OD31, WHICH PERMANENTLY AFIXED AND LOCATED ON THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. A/K/A 127 JM GRIFFIN DRIVE WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 2nd day of July, 2012. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 2, 9, 2012 88617S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 12-31 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of JAMES FRANK FINCHER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JAMES FRANK FINCHER, deceased, File Number 12-31 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and that personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF and they will come back, we want them to have a fear for humans. Richards, and several other ofcers and Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce dep uties, were taking up arms and raising voices last week as part of training in bear aversion or bear hazing. Taught by the FWCC, un der which the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce will carry a permit to use non-lethal techniques to move bears from unwanted areas, the training was to show the wide array of techniques available to ofcers serving in bear country as Gulf County and surrounding ar eas are referred. They learned a lot and they enjoyed it, said Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent. Telesco explained that the aversion training was to ensure bears stay away from places that they are not safe or welcome, for instance a residential backyard, a park or the trash cans on the roadway. Aversion training is aimed as something of a piggy-back on what the FWC informs the public about bears ensure there are no attractions such as food not fully secured. Bear hazing is a tool in conjunction with the com mon sense of how to avoid having bears roaming around humans in the rst place. We encourage residents to haze bears, whether by banging pots and pans or motion alarms, Tele sco said, while emphasizing that humans should never confront or rush bears and should do everything, includ ing just staying inside until law enforcement arrives, to avoid bears. Telesco and the FWC em phasizes that a bear in full run covers a lot of ground quickly, they are agile climb ers and when it comes to food or, more importantly, a female protecting her cub all but fearless. The key is to make them uncomfortable, fearful of humans. And last week Telesco trotted out a series of tools and techniques that local law enforcement could use in protecting the public from black bears. From the rudimentary, a slingshot with a hard round ball, to the sophisticated, a shotgun loaded with plastic buckshot, ofcers experi enced a range of tactics. Telesco used a paint ball gun hence the blue chicken pox and its canis ters, a starters pistol with pyrotechnic rounds and the thunder of the Hornets Nest to show and train ofcers in how to use tools at their disposal. Telesco emphasized that voice was also a key every ofcer was required to shout at the bear as they were r ing, essentially letting the bear know there is business afoot. You have to show them that you mean it, Telesco said. There are other times, he cautioned, when that is the last thing ofcers should do. If a female black bear is with a cub, it might inter pret a hazing technique as a threat to her cub and at tack. If the bear has entered cover, climbed a tree or is in a trap, hazing should not be considered, Telesco said. You must be aware of situational hazards, he told ofcers. Under the operational FWC permit, the GCSO will document all instances of hazing to the FWC, including the time and date, what tool or weapon was used and the result. Those reports pro vide data to allow the FWC to further rene techniques, Telesco said. The agency has been us ing this training outreach since 2007, Telesco said, as part of the states bear man agement program. To date a number of county sheriffs ofces, local police depart ments and military bases have undergone the train ing, which has reached more than 800 ofcers, he added. The key is the bear thinks, people not good. That is what hazing is sup posed to accomplish, Tele sco said. THE BEAR FACTS Black bears are the only species of bear in Florida and they once roamed the entire state. FWC biologists estimate there are 2,5003,000 black bears in Florida. Florida bears are generally black with a brown muzzle and may have a white chest marking called a blaze. Adult black bears typically weigh be tween 150 to 400 pounds; males are usually larger than females. Female bears have their rst cub at about 3 years of age and generally have one to three cubs every other year. In Florida, the breeding season runs from June to August and cubs are born in late January or early February. Bears of all ages are excellent climbers and will climb trees when they are frightened or looking for food (e.g. acorns). About 80 percent of a black bears diet comes from plants, 15 percent from insects and 5 percent from meat. If a bear comes into your yard If you encounter a black bear at close range, remain standing upright, back up slowly and speak to the bear in a calm, as sertive voice. Do not intentionally feed or attract bears. If a bear is eating something on your property, take note of what it is and secure it after the bear has left the area. Never approach or surprise a bear. Keep as much distance between you and the bear as possible. Make sure you are in a secure area and the bear has a clear escape route to leave the area then yell, bang pots and pans or use an air horn to scare the bear away. Do not turn your back, play dead or run from a black bear. Back away slowly into a house, car or building. Report any bear threatening the safety of humans, pets or livestock or causing property damage to the FWC. In this area, call 265-3676. Warning! It is illegal to injure or kill black bears under Florida state law. If you are found guilty, you could face nes and/or jail time. BEAR HAZING from page B1 Photos by TIM CROF T | The Star A larger shell shot from a shotgun contains buckshot intended to apply a bit of hurt to a bears shoulder or rump. Right, ofcers are shown a bean bag that contains rubber balls that are red at a bears shoulder or rump to put a scare in the bear.

PAGE 23

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 9, 2012 The Star | B11 24/7 Experienced Care giver looking for a private in home senior, care giver or sitter job. In Gulf County, please call 850-639-3029 Text FL19665 to 56654 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 2, 2012 Ancillary Personal Representative RANDALL C. FINCHER 124 Valley Circle Calhoun, GA 30701 Attorney for Ancillary Personal Representative THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A FL BAR NO. 0350583 116 Sailor’s Cove Drive P.O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 229-8211 August 2, 9, 2012 88653S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000431 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. JERMAINE ROBINSON AND URSULA ROBINSON, HIS WIFE, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in July 13 2012 in the above-styled cause, the Clerk shall offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash on August 23, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the COURTHOUSE LOBBY of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL, the following described property: EXHIBIT “A” COMMENCE AT A 4” SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED) FOR A DISTANCE OF 225.60 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD (HAVING A 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 211.56 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 105.78 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L. B. NO 6596, THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 481.29 FEET TO A 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES. 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 411.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND TOP OF BANK OF STONE MILL CREEK; THEN TURN RIGHT AND MEANDER UPSTREAM ALONG THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND TOP OF BANK FOR 208 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING THE APPROXIMATE WATER’S EDGE AND THE TOP OF. BANK, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 326.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 1/2” DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 6596; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 431.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2006 Nobility, Kingswood 66 x 28 manufactured home, Serial No: N8-12961AB, located on the property. Property Address: 1842 Stone Mill Creek, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 26, 2012 Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88657S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-00037-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, An Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA P. WIBBERG, a/k/a DEBRA M. PEDEN, the unknown spouse of Debra P. Wibberg, a/k/a Debra M. Peden, Barrier Dunes Homeowners Association, Inc., and unknown tenants or other parties in possession, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Order Adopting Report and Recommendation and Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 13, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on August 23, 2012, the following described property: UNIT 153, 128 PARKVIEW COURT, BARRIER DUNES Commence at the Northwest Corner of Government Lot 4, in Fractional Section 36, Township 8 South, Range 12 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 12 minutes 24 seconds East, along the Easterly Boundary Line of Government Lot 2 in said Fractional Section 36, for a distance of 999.95 feet: thence leaving said Easterly Boundary Line of Government Lot 2, run North 89 degrees 47 minutes 36 seconds West for a distance of 348.31 feet: thence run North 05 degrees 33 minutes 00 seconds East 588.54 feet to a point on a non-tangent curve, thence run Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 32.91 feet, through a central angle of 94 degrees 16 minutes 37 seconds, having a radius of 20.00 feet (said curve bearing South 41 degrees 34 minutes 53 seconds East 29.32 feet) to a point on a curve to the right, thence run long said curve Southeasterly for an arc distance of 59.20 feet, through a central angle of 38 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds, having a radius of 88.00 (said curve bearing South 69 degrees 26 minutes 21 seconds East 58.09 feet), thence run North 38 degrees 02 minutes 13 seconds East a distance of 27.51 feet, thence run South 49 degrees 34 minutes 55 seconds East 16.00 feet, thence run North 40 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds East 7.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run South 49 degrees 34 minutes 55 seconds East a distance of 16.00 feet, thence run North 40 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds East a distance of 42.00 feet, thence run North 49 degrees 34 minutes 55 seconds West a distance of 16.00 feet, thence run South 40 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds West a distance of 42.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. DATED on July 26, 2012. Becky Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 2012 88681S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012-CA-000038 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH LOYD AND CRYSTAL LOYD, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in 2012-CA-000038 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and KENNETH L. LOYD JR. A/K/A KENNETH LEE LOYD; CRYSTAL ANN LOYD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A JOHN WALSH; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A RHONDA WALSH are the Defendant(s). Benny Lister as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 AM E.T. on August 23, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTH ONE HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 59’26” EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER, 472.891 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53’39” EAST 134.547 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF HURD STREET (HAVING A 60 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 23’12” EAST ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE 245.33 FEET, THENCE DEPART SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59’26” WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COLLEEN STREET (HAVING A 60 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY) 124.35 FEET, THENCE DEPART SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 46’05” WEST 245.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCRIBED AS “PARCEL 2” IN PLAT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 433 PAGE 978 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must rile a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012 Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 2012 88661S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2012-06 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for replacement of a Diesel Engine at the Chipola Pump Station will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday August 17, 2012. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday August 17, 2012, at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “Replacement of #1 Pump Diesel Engine at the Chipola Pump Station”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Provide and install, diesel engine (per codes/regulations) and final drive (gear reduction unit) equal in final (pump) power and speed to replace existing Caterpillar D13000 engine and gear reducer. Engine equipped with at least standard controls and at least one dry contact for engine trouble monitoring. Alignment will be documented through all components including coupling to #1 pump. Max pump speed under load will be verified at 460 RPM. Provide basic training for operation. All components will be new (exception; pump coupling may be used), and listed separately or within an owner’s manual. (two copies). Provide acceptable plan for engine exhaust connection to existing through wall piping. Provide estimated start and completion dates. For questions concerning this project, please contact Bob Lyles at 850-229-6390 or Cell (850) 527-4688. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer August 2, 9, 2012 88685S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2012-02CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., and administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/s SWAMPYS by and through its Director, Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 201202-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., an administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/a SWAMPY’S, by and through its Director Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 30 and 31 of Mack’s Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, according To the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. AND The North Six (6) Feet of Lot 29 of Mack’s Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida According to the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in Plat Book 1, Page 14 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88683S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-42-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in internet to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WATERFRONT GROUP WETAPPO, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; WATERFRONT GROUP FLORIDA, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; MARK R. ADKINS; WILLIAM N. ADKINS; and WETAPPO PRESERVE OWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not-for-profit corporation Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23rd, 2012, in Case No. 12-42-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM ET, on August 23, 2012 the following described property: Lots 13, 20, 39, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 94, 95 122 and 164 of WETAPPO, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 36, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED: July 27, 2012 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 2, 9, 2012 88687S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 2012-89 EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELIA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-89-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT “A” Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northwest Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Sect. 23, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; and thence go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East along the North Boundary line of said SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 (as monumented) for a distance of 432.33 feet; thence go South 00 degrees 25 minutes 22 seconds West for a distance of 41.2.00 feet, thence go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 52.73 feet to a point on the Westerly right of way line of Creekview Drive (having a 66 foot wide right of way) for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning go Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 131.00 feet and a central angle of 0,1 degrees 57 minutes 18 seconds for an arc length of 4.47 feet (Chord bearing South 21 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds East for 4.47 feet) to a Point of Reverse Curve; thence continue Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 366.88 feet and a central angle of 15 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds for an are length of 99.54 feet (Chord bearing South 14 degrees 34 minutes 18 seconds East for 99.23 feet); thence departing said right of way line go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West for a distance of 242.00 feet, more or. less, to the water’s edge of Wetappo Creek; thence go Northerly along said water’s edge to a pint which is North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West, 293.40 feet, more or less, from thb Point of Beginning; thence departing said water’s edge go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 293.40 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land being known as Lot 6 of the UNRECORDED PLAT OF CREEKVIEW ESTATES. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88737S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-482 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KC “LLC”, a Florida limited liability company, KAY W. EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS, and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS, Defendants. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 5th day of April, 2011, in Case Number 10-482 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK. N.A., is Plaintiff, and KC “LLC”, a Florida limited liability company, KAY EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 23rd day of August, 2012, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 4, Block 6, RIVERSIDE ESTATES ADDITION TO IOLA UNIT NUMBER 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA “Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, rights, oil and gas rights, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”)”, including a 2001 Claz mobile home, ID# CLS097249TN. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 31st day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: B. A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88783S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given the Executive Committee of The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting to consider invoices on August 16, 2012 at 10:00am, CST. The meeting will be held at the Panama City City Hall, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, FL. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or apaulk@gc-inc.com August 9, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com YORKIE AKCAdorable 8 week old puppies. Health Certified and 1st shots. Female $600 Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Port St. Joe: 212 12th St. Fri. Aug 10th & Sat Aug. 11th 8:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.Large Yard SaleIncluding stationary ex ercise bike, medical equipment, house hold items, clothing and much more Text FL19674 to 56654 Port St. Joe307 16th St Saturday 8am-untilIndoor Yard SaleLiving room sofa, loveseat, chair, queen & king bedroom set with dresser and end tables, set of Franciscan apple dishes with glassware and morel. Hunting Lease Member Wanted near Port St. Joe. 1,600 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $500. For details: 850-227-5052 2 br, 1 ba, apartments for rent. call Kenny 850-227-6077 or Phil 850-227-6241 Government assistance accepted Port St Joe: 2br, 2ba 1cg, kitchen, LR, Balcony, long rental, near bay & dock, close to downtown, excellent area, 850-624-4264 Text FL20074 to 56654 FOR RENT: 2br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets, $500 month + $400 dd. Call: 850-229-6495 Text FL20096 to 56654 Panama City CLOSEOUT SALE: Unbeatable Prices, D/W & S/W. Most are Zone III. Kensinger Housing, 3424 E. 15th, St, Call (850) 785-0693.Text FL16550 to 56654 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

PAGE 24

B12| The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today A great resume and solid interview skills may place job seekers in the running for a position, but a survey conducted by OfficeTeam, a leading staffing service, finds that the results of a reference check can really be what makes „ or breaks „ a job search. Hiring managers interviewed for the survey said they remove about 21 percent of candidates from consideration after speaking to their professional references. Managers also were asked, When speaking to an applicants job references, what is the most important information you hope to receive?Ž Their responses: Description of past job duties and experience: 36 percent A view into the applicants strengths and weaknesses: 31 percent Confirmation of job title and dates of employment: 11 percent Description of workplace accomplishments: 8 percent A sense of the applicants preferred work culture: 7 percent Other/dont know: 7 percent When hiring managers narrow the field to a few potential candidates, the reference check often becomes the deciding factor,Ž says OfficeTeam executive director Robert Hosking. To distinguish themselves from the competition, job seekers should assemble a solid list of contacts who can persuasively communicate their qualifications and professional attributes.Ž OfficeTeam offers five tips for creating a reference list that works in your favor:Choose WiselySelect people who can discuss your abilities and experience that directly relate to the position, not just those with the most impressive job titles. Offer a mix of contacts who can address different aspects of your background; for example, a former peer may be able to describe your interpersonal skills, while a past direct report can talk about your management style. Check in BeforehandAlways call potential references first to get their permission and evaluate their eagerness to talk to hiring managers. Be sure to give all references a copy of your resume, the job description and the name of the person who will likely call.Be Prepared Provide clear contact information for your references, including their names, titles, daytime phone numbers and email addresses. Also, offer a brief explanation of the nature of your relationship with each individual. Consider supplying more references than are requested, so you wont miss out on the job offer if the hiring manager cant get in touch with one of your contacts.Think Outside the BoxIts common for employers to seek out additional references for new hires „ either online or through their own networks. Since you never know to whom a hiring manager might reach out, you should not only remain on good terms with your past supervisors and colleagues (if possible), but also be selective about whos in your online network, on professional networking sites such as BeKnown and LinkedIn.Give ThanksExpress your gratitude to people who agree to serve as references, even if they arent contacted by employers. Keep them updated on the progress of your job search and offer to return the favor by providing a recommendation should they need one.What employers want from job references Admin/ClericalAdministrative Assistant, Health Sciences(Gulf/Franklin campus)To serve as the main contact for student program inquiries, maintain student files & records. Requires HS diploma/ equivalency + 3 yrs. administrative exp. & strong MS Office skills. Range begins at $10.50/hr. Apply by 8/14/12. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed) will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Officer (850) 872.3866 Web ID#:34219967Text FL19967 to 56654 Project/Program MgtUpward Bound Grant Project Coordinator(Federally Funded) Manage all aspects of the Upward Bound project & supervise and lead Upward Bound Grant staff & resources. Requires MS in guidance & counseling or related field + 3 yrs. exp. as a teacher, counselor or administrator; supervisor exp. & exp. working with educationally/ economically disadvantaged youth. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Apply by 8/10/12. Only those who provide GCSC Application (must be completed) + transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional information: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Officer (850) 872.3866 Web ID#:34219975 Text FL19975 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler CaregiversAre needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP Web ID#: 34219153 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications Part-time Maintenance Office Clerk Must have good customer service, organization & computer skills. 4 days a week including weekends. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34216824 Text FL16824 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW



PAGE 1

50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 74, NUMBER 43 Thursday, AUGUST 9 2012Opinion .......................................A4-A5Letters to the Editor ...................A5Outdoors .....................................A10 Sports...........................................A11School News ................................B3Faith .............................................B4 Obituaries ....................................B4Classi eds ....................................B11By TIM CROFT227-7827|@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Melissa Ash, who confessed to the 1999 murder of Hilton (Bobo) Sewell in Oak Grove, was arrested this past week by Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce investigators. Ash was arrested and charged with murder in 1999 but was declared incompetent to stand trial and charges were dropped. A co-defendant, Esmond Joseph, 20 years old at the time, spent seven years in the Gulf County Jail and also spent time at the Chattahoochee State Facility. Sewell was found dead in his home on Iola Street in Oak Grove during the afternoon of Oct. 5. He had been stabbed to death. According to news reports at the time, former Gulf County Sheriff Frank McKeithen and investigators gathered information and interviewed 15-20 suspects before developing Ash and Joseph as suspects. The investigation revealed the Ash and Joseph went to Sewells home with weapons. Ash allegedly stabbed Sewell and she and Joseph left the residence. They confessed their involvement to investigators. According to current Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent, drugs were involved and there were allegations made by Ash that Sewell had raped her, charges that were never substantiated. Ash has spent time at Chattahoochee and another state mental health facility since the murder, but Nugent indicated that, working with the family, investigators had developed suf cient evidence to recharge Ash with murder. We think she is competent, Nugent said. The arrest was necessary to taking the next step in proving Ash is competent. Nugent said her defense attorney would likely raise the issue again, forcing the court to direct Ash to undergo a competency exam. If she is again found incompetent, that would be the end of the case, Nugent said. Charges could no longer be brought. However, if Ash is found competent to understand the charges and assist in her defense, Nugent said the State Attorney would resume to press the case forward to trial.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star The primary election day arrives this coming Tuesday, Aug. 14, with polls open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET throughout the county. Voters should check at www. votegulf.com to learn their precinct polling place. Early voting is underway and continues through Saturday. Early voting is held each weekday from 7:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. ET in Port St. Joe and 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT in Wewahitchka. On Saturday, hours are 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT in Wewahitchka and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Port St. Joe. Early voting ends Saturday. Voters may cast their early ballots in Port St. Joe at Supervisor of Elections Linda Grif ns ofce, located at 401 Long Avenue; Wewahitchka voters may cast their ballots at the Wewahitchka Public Library, located at 314 N. 2nd Street.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star The summer of cially ends for county public school students on Monday. Schools, several with a new and improved look about them, will open bright and early to welcome students back after teachers and administrators have spent the past week preparing for their arrival. Everybody is excited, said School Board chairman Billy Quinn, Jr. I have talked to a lot of the kids in the community and some cant wait to get back and others would just as soon have another couple of weeks. But it is coming for real on Monday. The new year will bring some changes in faces and looks at nearly all schools. This past Tuesday, the board was filling some final openings, hiring a speech therapist and approving the transfer of math teacher Denise Ethridge from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School to Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School to replace Selena Flowers, who left the district.By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com In front of an admiring throng, BZ arrived home this past Sunday. BZ, a rehabilitated green sea turtle, was returned to the waters of St. Joseph Bay on Sunday as onlookers packed the dock behind Scallop Cove on St. Joseph Peninsula to snap a photo and observe the turtle green sea turtles are an endangered species ap into the water with something of a celebratory swim. BZ was the latest turtle rehabbed at the Gulf World Marine Institute in Panama City Beach and arrived back home on the same day that the Institute received a check for $500 from Mike and Jill Davis, owners of Scallop Cove, as a donation toward the facilitys sea turtle rescue program. It represented the rst corporate donation to the sea turtle rescue program.Election Day arrives Tuesday MELISSA ASHSuspect charged again in 1999 murder School starts Monday See ELECTION A8 See SCHOOL A8 Heading homeRescued green sea turtle returned to St. Joseph BayPHOTOS BY TIM CROFT | The StarAbove: Scarring is shown on BZ the sea turtle from the shing line that had snarled a front ipper and been swallowed by the turtle. Right: BZ is released.See TURTLE A12Law enforcement trained in bear hazing | B1 By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners on Tuesday unanimously approved amendments to the citys nuisance ordinance and two ordinances to regulate homeless shelters and de ne loitering in public parks. The ordinances mirrored ordinances passed last month by the Board of County Commissioners. The amendments to the nuisance ordinance deem that any property to which law enforcement has been called at least ve times during a 30-day period to be a nuisance and subject to civil and potential criminal penalties. City commissioners provided one exemption calls involving domestic violence, addressing a concern voiced by the Northwest Florida Regional Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). It is not our intent to keep anybody from calling 9-1-1, said Mayor Mel Magidson in response to a letter from the ACLU, which stated that the nuisance ordinance made calling 9-1-1 something to fear and avoid. The homeless shelter ordinance regulates the permitting of a homeless shelter and designates areas, such as areas within a half-mile of a tourist corridor, where a homeless shelter would be prohibited. Any shelter would receive a permit of no more than 12 months and would be subject to annual evaluation pending renewal. The operator of the facility would have the burden, when applying for a permit, to establish that a proposed PSJ commissioners approve ordinancesSee PSJ A8

PAGE 2

ApplemanForStateAttorney.com We Need Applemanby our current State Attorney on inmates awaiting trial.$30,000 Per Day of your tax dollars are being wasted POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY JIM APPLEMAN, REPUBLICAN, FOR STATE ATTORNEY 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DID YOU KNOW? is is why...Summary Reporting System prepared by OSCA, Statistics & Evaluation Data pulled 6/4/12, data shown is from 7/2011 3/2012 I welcome your input and will gladly meet with you or your group Contact me at 229-1040, 340-0828, or e-mail keith@keithjonesforclerk.com The Clerk of the Circuit Court, who derives authority and responsibility from constitutional and statutory law and therefore SHOULD SERVE YOU THE TAXPAYERS as a:County Watchdog for citizens of Gulf County to ensure funds are expended for a public purpose and for the benet of the public as a whole.County Auditor performing a critical comptroller function which includes pre-auditing invoices prior to payment to ensure they are properly authorized and documented.BELOW ARE EXAMPLES OF WHERE THE CLERK HAS NOT PERFORMED THE DUTIES OF THE OFFICE OVER THE PAST 8 YEARS!Example 1: The Countys independent auditors reported expenses of the TDC were made without proper authorization or proper documentation. Your Clerk of the Court signed each and every check without performing the proper pre-audit of these expenses!(As reported in the TDC audit dated January 31, 2012) Example 2: The Gulf County TDC director was red for misappropriation of funds, when the Clerk of Court signed the checks! Who red the Clerk? Now is the VOTERS opportunity to do so! Example 3: Gulf County taxpayers paid for rst-class air travel. The Clerk of Courts job is to ensure that ONLY coach travel is paid for by the taxpayers of Gulf County.Delta Flight 2706 from Reno, NV to Salt Lake City, UT on July 21, 2010 paid from county funds. Delta Flight 152 from Los Angeles, CA to Atlanta, GA on July 21, 2010 paid from county funds.The Clerk IS NOT performing the duties of the ofce so critically needed by the taxpayers of Gulf County. I am giving you the opportunity through my candidacy to hold the ofce of the clerk ACCOUNTABLE! I have the education for the job which includes an accounting degree from Florida State University. I have been professionally licensed as a certied public accountant for 17 years. I have over 22 years of experience in government, corporate and private business. I AM PREPARED TO LEAD THIS OFFICE AND INSURE OUR COUNTY DOLLARS ARE PROPERLY SPENT FOR ALL THE CONSTITUENTS OF GULF COUNTY. I HUMBLY ASK FOR YOUR SUPPORT AND VOTE TO BE YOUR NEXT CLERK.(Pd.Pol.Ad.)Paid for and approved by Keith Jones, Democrat, for Clerk of Court Lance Mayers FICF Area Manager Phone: (850) 769-9212 lamayers@woodmen.org LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012PHOTO COURTESY OF HH EATHER RR AFFIELDMore than 100 people gathered last Wednesday for a candlelight vigil to pray for the recovery to health of Everett Gant. Gant was shot in the head last Monday night by a neighbor. He remains in guarded condition at Bay Medical Center. On Tuesday, Gloria Gant, Everetts mother, thanked the community for its support and prayers. She said while some might read what happened to Everett and think Port St. Joe is a horrible place, the support the family has received, from all colors and station, dispels the image. CANDLELIGHT VIGIL

PAGE 3

LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, August 9, 2012By VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@starfl.com Gulf County has only five months left to construct a three-year implementation plan for upcoming RESTORE Act funds, but the amount of funding and date for distribution are still unknown. Thats the part we still dont know, said Bill Williams, Gulf County Chairman and President of the Florida Association of Counties. We dont know what the settlement will beits in the courts hands now. While the settlement amount for clean water penalties to be paid by British Petroleum is still looming in litigation, Williams outlined the distribution of the unknown RESTORE funds at a special meeting of the appointed RESTORE Committee Tuesday. The committee includes County Administrator Don Butler, Attorney Jeremy Novak, TDC Director Jennifer Jenkins, Port St. Joe Commissioner Bill Kennedy, County Chair Bill Williams, Chamber president Guerry Magidson, Port Authority chairwoman Johanna White, Kim Bodine of the Workforce Board, Wewahitchka Mayor Phillip Gaskin, Loretta Costin of the Gulf/Franklin Center and Dewey Blaylock. Through the implementation of RESTORE, 80 percent of the penalties imposed by the Clean Water Act will go directly to the ve affected states instead of the money owing directly to the U.S. Treasury. Its estimated the penalties could range anywhere from $5 billion to $20 billion. Although the trial is set for January 2013, Williams said it is expected BP will settle before the case goes to trial. Once appropriated, the ve affected states will split 35 percent of the penalties; in Florida the allotted amount is being split among the affected Gulf Coast counties based on the severity of oil spill impact. Gulf County will receive 6.02 percent of Floridas funding. This portion is to be used for ecological and economic restoration of counties. Sixty percent of the states penalties will be directed to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council. The council would use half of those funds to implement a comprehensive federal environmental plan and distribute the other half to the ve affected states for ecosystem restoration under the federal comprehensive plan. The remaining ve percent of funding will go toward research. Williams said the county cannot sit on the money; they must spend it right and move forward. There are a lot of moving parts to how this goes, Williams said. We dont know all the rules of this. Williams also provided an overview of Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) projects the county has outlined as a result of the 2010 oil spill during the meeting. Williams said an estimated $100 million could be coming in early restoration money from NRDA. We didnt get a lot of product damage, we had a lot of human-use damage, Williams said of Gulf County. The question is going to be, what do we want to be when we grow up? The county has vetted about 15 potential projects to complete with the funds, but, as Williams said, they are still working without a dollar amount. Many of the projects channel the countys strategic plan for improvement over the years. Major potential projects outlined include improvements to the Highland View and Indian Pass Boat Ramps, construction of shing piers at Windmark Beach and Beacon Hill Park, land acquisition of the Presnells Marina property, and land acquisition and construction of a boat ramp on Cape San Blas. We are going to be project-speci c, Williams said. At the end of the day I do see this (committee) vetting individual projects. Williams said the key to success will be determining what projects will be best for the future of Gulf County as a whole. You have got to look beyond yourselves, Williams directed the RESTORE Council. We cannot afford to have a food ght locally. Dont let us faillets be clear, lets be transparent and lets not ght with each other. I am quitting smoking for my family. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Gulf County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need.For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-482-6500 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE NICOTINE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! Paid by Bill Koran, Republican, for County Commissioner Dist. 5 (Pd.Pol.Ad.)Open & Honest Government = JOBS! A Prosperous Business Environment To attract new industry, tourism & new home ownership. established VOTE (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Williams leads rst RESTORE Committee meetingYou have got to look beyond yourselves. We cannot afford to have a food ght locally. Dont let us fail lets be clear, lets be transparent and lets not ght with each other. Bill Williams Gulf County Chairman and President of the Florida Association of Counties THE PORT ST. JOE STARFIND US ON FACEBOOK @PSJ_StarFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

PAGE 4

Our Olympic Games back home werent broadcast on worldwide HD television. We didnt stand side by side at the conclusion of each contest while a band you couldnt see from far off somewhere played the Star Spangled Banner. There was no music at all associated with our games. Although I did hear some loud humming the afternoon we were doing the standing broad jump over Mr. Archie Moores electric fence and my left foot got tangled in the top wire. We didnt bother with matching uniforms; white tee shirts were the norm for the day. We didnt spend $42 million on our opening ceremonies. We didnt have to wait four years. And we didnt hug and kiss our opponent before and after each event. Our games were much too serious for that!  W e didnt worry about doping implications as most everyone was raised on fatback, hog jowl and turnip greens. The only injections any of us ever suffered were for small pox and the Salk vaccine. Leon did get a tetanus shot when he jumped off the top rail of the back fence and landed on a nail. But Leon was a mite older than us and we gured him winning so often was because of his age.. and not on account of any performance e nhancing drugs.     Other than that, our Games were about like you see on TV today. A foot race could break out on the way to town, walking to the barn or as we headed over to Mr. Archies pond for the swimming events. We didnt run exactly 100 yards or 400 meters. We raced to the curve down by Aunt Jessies house. Or to the big oak tree in Miss Brooks front yard. Or sometimes wed run till someone had such a big lead there werent no use to continue.  D istance running was always a favorite. Buddy or Richard Lynn would say something like, I could beat you guys to the front steps of the Methodist Church or maybe theyd choose, the light pole across from the telephone ofce. We were off in a ash. Either place was a mile and half away. You could run right straight down Stonewall Street. Or you could take a short cut through Bob Edwards back yard. Now, it wasnt legal to catch a ride. But if one of those cattle trucks was turning off of Magnolia onto Stonewall, you could hop on the running board and hang on till you got down by city hall and you were near bout assured of victory. That is, unless, Buddy or Rick caught a ride with Mr. Holland on the milk truck.   I didnt say we wouldnt cheat to win. I just said we didnt take d rugs to do it!     Wrestling was another crowd pleaser. About the only difference between us and the Olympics today was theyre not allowed to use any foreign devices. If Leon was awhipping me pretty badly, Id reach for a screwdriver or a pitchfork or a handful of dirt. I wasnt just going to lay there and take it! We gured the underdog ought to do something to even the odds. Listen, when we decided on a winner, the less bloody body usually raised his hand.   Y ou couldnt beat the swimming events on a hot August afternoon. Wed run the cows out of the pond and race from one side to the other. We mostly did the freestyle as we discovered early that butterfly and backstrokes just slowed you down. We wouldnt have been caught dead doing any synchronized swimming. We substituted drowning instead. Wed grab our opponent by the throat and try to hold him under the water till he went limp. You talk about exciting! Ive seen swimming, wrestling, boxing and mayhem all combined into the same event. Even the cows would gather back along the shore and watch!  W e had a couple of events that the Olympic Committee today would be well advised to look into. Grape vine swinging was one of them. Wed cut a giant vine off and swing across the big ditch down below George Sextons house like we were Tarzan or Jungle Jim. The object was simple. You had to make it to the other side. The winner was the one who made it the furthest across. The loser was the guy who hit the opposite bank or worse, let go in the middle of the swing. It was a far piece to the bottom of the ditch. It wouldnt usually break anything if you fell, but it would stove you up somewhat! We filed it under no pain, no gain. Often times the score conscious among us could get in a summersault with half gainer twist before crashing into the mud below. Id like to see ditch-jumping added to the Olympics. Maybe make the chasm a little wider and deeperand add some alligators in the stream below to make it interesting.  W e didnt have a javelin or discus. But wed cut a limb off of a mimosa tree, whittle out a sharp end and toss that thing toward the outermost haystack. And our crabapple throws werent for distance; we threw them at each other! We called it the chunk and duck portion of the events.  W e didnt shoot targets. Ammo cost too much. We practiced on squirrels, rabbits and possums. We used knocked down trees as balance beams. And Mrs. Kennons clothesline served as our parallel bars. If spitting at the crack was an ofcial event, Michael Phelps would have to swim another Olympiad or two to approach Bobby Brewers record.   O f course, we didnt actually give out gold medals back in 1959. But I have lived over half a century knowing that, after 23 straight tries, I nally beat Leon in the top rail fence running game and that, dear hearts, is reward enough.  R espectfully,  Kes   Buttermilk is a touchy subject with some folks. They either dont want to get near it or they dont understand what it is. They ask questions like, What do you do with a carton of buttermilk? These are the folks that needed just half a cup or a cup for a recipe. It stays in their refrigerator for a while, and then they start asking, How can you tell when buttermilk is bad? Everyone has been told that buttermilk is just sour milk. Therefore, you should be able to keep it in your refrigerator forever. Im pretty sure that after all of the culturing and pasteurizing that real buttermilk is almost impossible to get in the supermarkets these days. If you research it, youll nd out that buttermilk is not merely sour milk. That being said, I am not a buttermilk expert. To be honest, Ive never had a glass of buttermilk. Like most folks, Ive cooked with it and studied the How long will it last? question on many occasions, but thats it. Im actually embarrassed that I have not had real buttermilk. Daddy was known to overdo things. He just liked to go all the way; he would cook all of the bacon we had, cook enough cabbage to feed an army, and fry liver to the point that the smell eased out from under the doors and windows into the yard. He overdid loving us, too. You cant ask for more. My fondest buttermilk memories are of my Daddy sitting in his chair or at the table with a glass (or carton) of buttermilk and a plate of cornbread. He overdid the buttermilk and cornbread every time. It wasnt just a piece of cornbread; it was a whole pan or skillet. Now that I think about it, I dont remember Daddy using a glass much unless he had intentions of soaking the cornbread in the buttermilk before he ate it. He sat down with a carton of buttermilk, and nished it. It was a meal to him. Somewhere, there must have been memories of his childhood in that meal. Real buttermilk may be illegal, Im not sure. I just know that Id like to try it. It would be a tribute to my Daddy, and just maybe Id like it. In searching for my rst glass of buttermilk, I ran across a fellow down in Pelzner, South Carolina. Folks say his cows put out a nice glass of buttermilk. They travel from all around South Carolina to drink it. The next time I go through South Carolina, Im planning on stopping in and trying it. This South Carolina farmers name is Tom Trantham; he is the owner/operator/farmer at the Happy Cow Creamery. He calls himself, Farmer Tom. Back in the 1980s, Farmer Tom had one of the top producing dairy farms in the state of South Carolina. This still didnt pay the bills. Being on top and getting trophies and plaques is all ne and good, but there has to be somebody to pay the bills. As the story goes, Farmer Tom was ready to give up and give it all to the bank. He had become so disheartened with his situation that he didnt bother to round up his cows after they broke loose one day. He just let them go. According to Farmer Tom, the renegade cows had a leader who was able to open gates and bust out of any connement. Ive read where this leader was known as Tarzan and also Houdini. You get the picture, this was a cow leader on a mission; I would think she would have a tough sounding Southern ladys name like Maude or Mildred. Shes not mine to name. The cows broke loose into a pasture of April growth (rye grass, clover, fescue, etc.) that hadnt been fertilized and proceeded to eat the top half of the green stuff. Farmer Tom rounded up the cows and milked them. Those cows produced close to Thursday, August 9, 2012Cornbread and buttermilk CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardSee BUTTERMILK A5The news last Monday night was jarring. A young man shot in the head. The alleged shooter, according to Sheriffs Ofce reports, using the vilest and debasing of racial slurs in the process. The alleged shooter indicated inconvenience at his arrest for after all, given his choice of language, he had only shot a lower form of species. As we stated online, it was a sad day for the community. We may never know or fully understand the thinking of shooter and victim in those fateful seconds before a meeting that left a young man bleeding from his head on the ground while the alleged shooter continued to cook his supper inside. There have been no shortage of theories offered up online during the week, some reasonable while others stem from an ignorance as malevolent as the source of those racial slurs uttered last Monday night. Read the thread of comments online at the www.star.com or the The Port St. Joe Star Facebook page and become illuminated about the miles traveled since the country woke up to the horrors of the racial divide and the miles left to travel. Not that the South just three generations removed from school integration in Gulf County and Jim Crow has any kind of monopoly on the racial insensitivity and bile on display last week. As a teenager I watched and listened as large swaths of nearby Detroit and my hometown of Toledo, Ohio went up in the ames of race riots during a hot summer not all that long ago. I attended a high school that drew from a large demographic in Toledo, a school that itself was embroiled, with words and sticuffs, in the war for civil rights that was raging around the country. Reports this week out of Wisconsin, the Dairy State for heavens sake, reveal an ethnic and racial divide that can lead, in a few, to homicidal rage. Men and women shot for their differences, for their choice of clothes and headwear, the color of their skin. But as last week progressed in Gulf County there was an outpouring, a gathering of like minds and hearts to speak out, in a fashion, against the kind of narrow-minded thinking that left 32-year-old Everett Gant bleeding on the stoop of Walton Butlers apartment. One of the hopes here is that Everett Gant one day fully recovers to understand the extent to which he touched so many peoples lives in Gulf County, in Port St. Joe. Gant is a bear of a fellow, but an easy-going lovable teddy bear sidling through life with a general sense of purpose to be helpful and to make the peace where that is possible, because as he once told me in the parking lot outside our ofce where his sister once worked drama was not his game. Sure, Everett has his faults. Until the second coming that would apply to us all. But the stunning thing in the aftermath of his tragic shooting has been the ladles of love, thoughts and prayers poured in the direction of the Everett and his family. The messages across social media in the days following the event reected a horror, almost a sense of shame, a sense that this is not who we are, a wish for healing, not just for Everett but the thoughts behind that trigger. A Facebook page was up by Tuesday evening providing an outlet for all those who had been touched by Everett, were friends with Everett, who were stunned and saddened by the news that this kind and gentle giant had been injured in such horric circumstances. A roadside sign in Port St. Joe encouraged everybody to Pray for Everett. George Duren, owner of the Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe, lit up the large Port City Shopping Center sign with a Praying for Everett message. The Port St. Joe Lions Club seeded and established a bank account to help defray medical costs. On Sunday, my wife and I traveled to the peninsula to watch the release of a green sea turtle. While there, I overheard a conversation about Everett, about his current condition and the shock over the events of last week. I asked the two young ladies how they knew Everett and where they were from and it turned out they were two young women from Wewahitchka and somehow, someway, Everett had walked into their lives and left behind his huge footprints. That is Everett and the thoughts and prayers of a community reached out to him and his family last week. Thanks in large measure to the passion of Heather Rafeld, a candlelight vigil was organized on the y for last Wednesday night. Many sent messages that they would be unable to attend but would be there in spirit and thought. More than 100 folks turned out to light a candle and pray for the full recovery of Everett Gant. Black and white, young and old, it was a community gathering, one that ignored rail lines and status, and celebrated not what can divide us, but what unites us humanity. In a sense, maybe, they also sought a kind of redemption from the callous bigotry so awfully on display last Monday, to provide a testament that Butler did not reect the values of this community, that the community carries intolerance to his thinking, his alleged hatred of skin tones. On some level, Butlers words and deeds diminished us all. A communitys response to those words and deeds offered a pathway back to the high road.From tragedy, a sense of community TTIM CROFTStar news editorBrewer was our Michael Phelps HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert OpinionAA4 | The Star Keyboard KLATTERINKLATTERINGSS USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688

PAGE 5

200 pounds more milk that they normally did (about 2 pounds more per cow). Before the Great Cow Escape, Farmer Tom said he would spray to kill weeds, plant his crops and use fertilizers to help them grow. Farmer Tom would mow the elds down, put the grain in the silo, and feed the cows. His cows were con ned on cement (kind of like a city slickers), and werent allowed to graze. The cows wanted to go out to eat, play a little and help with the farm work. Farmer Tom studied what the cows were eating and the fact they were eating only the top half of the growth and found that more nutrients and good stuff were in the top halves. The cows knew what they were doing. Farmer Tom got the idea to start giving his cows the run of the place and feeding them like it was April year round. He stopped using chemicals on his elds. He calls his system the 12 Aprils planting guide. The bottom line is the cows always have a eld where they can graze; knock off the top half of the growth and then move on to another eld to do the same thing. The farm didnt go bankrupt, like other folks, Im sure theyve had their challenges but, they are still producing ne milk that isnt homogenized and is free of additives. Honestly, I dont understand the details of Farmer Toms 12 Aprils grazing program other than the cows wanted to eat stuff that was better for them and they paid Farmer Tom by producing more milk. It goes to show you that cows and farmers can make pretty good decisions if you just let them. What does Farmer Tom say about it all? He simply thinks the cows are happy going out to eat and as a result they produce more (and better) milk. Sometimes folks are too bull-headed to listen to and watch their own cows. They want to watch someone elses cows (and business). Farmer Tom not only listened to his cows, he watched them and gured out what they were after and what made them happy (and he continued to work hard). What is the moral to this story? Work hard, leave the gate open (if you dont have at least one smart cow) and never give up. Now, Im ready for that glass of buttermilk. Somebody get the skillet hot. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. MARRIED TO BUDDY FOR 48 YEARS LINDA, BUDDY, SON EDWARD, & DAUGHTER CATHERINE...ALL PSJHS GRADUATES GRANDCHILDREN CAITLIN, CHANDLER, AND GABRIELLE...ALL FUTURE PSJHS GRADUATES 40-YEAR MEMBER AND SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHER AT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH THE WOOD FAMILY HAS OWNED AND OPERATED WOODS FISHERIES FOR 5 GENERATIONSPaid for and approved by Linda Wood, Candidate for School Board District 3(Pd.Pol.Ad.) FOR HOMETOWN EXPERIENCE...VOTE LINDA WOODRE-ELECT LINDA WOOD for SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 3 North Florida Child Development, Inc. is recruiting for governing board(s) members. NFCD is a 501(c) (3) organization that provides comprehensive early education and development to the young children and their families in Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Madison, and Wakulla Counties. The governing board(s) maintains a formal structure of shared governance through which parents and community representatives can participate in policy making and other decisions. Please contact Sebrina McGill for more information at (850) 639-5080 ext 10 or Pd. Pol. Ad. COUNTY JUDGEFOR Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star .comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for veri cation and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE YOUR OPINIONS BUTTERMILK from page A4Saying no on county-wide votingDear Editor: With the new election in full swing I have had the opportunity to talk to many of the candidates running for seats on the Gulf County Commission. I was not surprised when most all of them said they supported county-wide voting. Most said they supported county-wide voting only because the people of Gulf County had voted for it previously. Now for the rest of the story. If you want countywide voting, please know the facts about it, for it is a good possibility you could end up getting what you want, and then have it bite you in the back side because you did not understand all the facts associated with what you requested. Point 1 The major voting population is located in our two cities, Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe. These two populations will more than likely render enough votes to elect all ve county commissioners if we have county-wide voting. Point 2 The Constitution of the State of Florida states the two cities, Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe, because they have their own city commissions, can opt-out of issues passed by the County Commission. In other words, these two cities have the votes to elect all ve commissioners, but are not bound by the actions of the Commissioners they elected. Case in point: there was a 140 mph wind speed ordinance imposed by the Gulf County Commission on the whole county a few years ago. Commissioner Brian Cox from the City of Wewahitchka came before the Board of County Commissioners and stated Wewahitchka did not want the 140 mph wind restriction; they thought it was unfair. Commissioner Cox stated the Florida Constitution gave them the right to opt-out, which they did. Do we the people who live in the county proper want the two cities to elect our Commission and then not be bound by what they do? I think not. If county-wide voting becomes law, will the ve commissioners spend more time trying to please the folks in the cities who elected them rather than the people in their districts under the premise they want to work for all of the people of Gulf County? There is a new issue coming to the County. At the June 26 County Commission meeting it was stated the States septic tank ordinance was not dead as I had been led to believe, but was turned over to the counties. The counties can now decide whether they want to have us pay to have our septic tanks inspected every ve years. My question is would I want the city folks who do not have septic tanks to elect my County Commissioner who may have to decide this issue and other issues for me? I personally want each Commissioner to be elected only by the people in his district. Yes, he can and should help on issues for the welfare of the entire county, but I want him to look for votes only to those in his district on Election Day.Timothy W. SteinWetappo Creek EstatesReaching uninsured childrenDear Editor, It is unbelievable to imagine but there are more than 500,000 uninsured children in Florida right now. The fact that many will be heading back to school this Fall without an annual checkup, which would include a hearing and vision exam, means there might be a generation of youth that is underachieving. These students may be driven to distraction when they cannot see the blackboard or hear instruction in the classroom. Healthy Start strives to ensure all women experience healthy pregnancies and have healthy babies. Having insurance and access to prenatal and infant medical care is necessary for this to happen. In addition, we realize that school-age children also need regular health care in order for them to grow physically as well as academically. Healthy Start is a community partner with Florida KidCare, an affordable, low-cost insurance for children from birth through age 18. Some of the services Florida KidCare covers are: doctor visits, check-ups and shots, hospital visits, surgery, prescriptions, vision, hearing, dental and behavioral health. It is easy to apply for this insurance at www. oridakidcare. org. Applications and assistance also is available at our of ce, 1-800-895-9506. Thank you for helping us bring attention to this issue Sharon OwensExecutive Director Bay, Franklin, Gulf Healthy StartThanks SHH, TOCDear Editor: On behalf of Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and its coaching staff, I would like to thank Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic staff and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf physical therapists, nurses and physicians for providing the recent athletic physicals. You were very helpful in setting up and screening our student-athletes on July 10 and July 12, which is required by the Florida High School Athletics Association. These physicals are free to our students. This is invaluable service to our school and community. We appreciate all the hard work and cooperation that TOC and SHH on the Gulf has shown.Chuck GannonAthletic director Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. HighThanks for supporting Marsha PoseyDear Editor: I would like to extend a big thank you to all of you and you know who you are who have helped out with fundraising efforts to aid long-time Port St. Joe resident Marsha Posey, recently diagnosed with cancer in her lung and hip. A special thank you to Mr. George Duren who has given so much to the cause and helped with the fundraiser of two weeks ago that raised $1,075 in less than three hours. Marsha is undergoing treatment in Tampa. Also, I would like to note an error I made on the fundraiser announcement. Marsha works for Keith Jones and does have medical insurance. Thanks to the community for their support. Only in Port St. Joe.Irene AcreePort St. JoeGulf Countys real crime numbersDear Editor: Several friends have asked recently why I, having voted for Glenn Hess in the last election, would not be supporting Jim Applemans return to the of ce of state attorney. My reasons are obvious to anyone who has seen a crime victim or observed criminal activity going unpunished in Gulf County. In 2011, violent crime in Gulf County was up 29.3 percent. How can this be when crime for the same period in Florida was down 13.1 percent? In 2009-10, county law enforcement led 286 cases in circuit court. Of these cases, the state attorneys of ce carried no burglary or robbery cases to trail, and only two of 64 drug cases went to trial. While crime may not pay, 98 percent of cases led in Gulf County and the 14th Judicial Circuit result in plea deals, dropped charges or transferred cases. Obviously, we are losing the war on crime in our court rooms. This eight-year trend favoring criminals over victims can be corrected by returning Jim Appleman to the state attorneys of ce where his hard work and successful prosecutions dropped crime by 11 percent. Jim Appleman will again staff the state attorneys of ce in Gulf County with prosecutors unafraid of the dif cult trial work required to take criminals off our streets. It is time to stop making deals with criminals. Please give members of our law enforcement agencies the support they deserve in the courtroom by voting now to return Jim Appleman as state attorney.Bob WillisPort St. JoeThursday, August 9, 2012 Letters to the EDITOR OpinionA5 | The Star

PAGE 6

LocalA6 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to HomeGeorge E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy,cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy.Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independenceby optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for by Lois Byrd for School Board District 4 STAR STAFF REPORTDuring a recent meeting, the Gulf County School Board honored its retirees from the 2012 school year. Among those honored are pictured here: Lewanna Patterson, who served 38 years with the district; Chuck Worley, who served the district for more than 20 years; and Margaret Padgett, who also spent more than 20 years with the district. Others recognized, but not present were Virginia Hogue, Gwen Lowery and Debra Richards. DISTRICT HONORS RETIREES

PAGE 7

LocalThe Star| A7Thursday, August 9, 2012 Paid by John Hanlon, Rep., for Supervisor of ElectionsEXPERIENCETHAT COUNTSPd.Pol.Ad. It has been my pleasure serving as your Assistant Supervisor of Elections. Now I ask for your consideration and support on August 14th, to become your next Supervisor of Elections. Your vote is greatly appreciated. I welcome any questions or comments at my email address John4SOE@gmail.com or my cell (850) 247-9538 I have the professional background and personal determinationnecessary to help solve the problems that we face: Pending Budget Shortfalls Jobs and Responsible Economic Growth Resolution of Needs Water and Sewer Issues Responsible Management of Potentially Tens of Millions of Dollars in Funding to Gulf County Through RESTORE Act If I am elected, you will my communication style to be assertive, articulate, and respectful. I need your help to make a difference in Gulf County and I am asking for your vote.PLEASE VOTE AUGUST 14thOr early vote now through August 11th at the Supervisor of Elections Pd.Pol.Ad.Joanna@Vote4Bryan.com 850-615-5015 www.Vote4Bryan.comPaid for by Joanna Bryan, Republican, for County Commission Dist. 3 Joanna@Vote4Bryan.com 850-615-5015 Joanna@Vote4Bryan.com 850-615-5015 Decisive Determined Dependable I promise to work for all of the people of Gulf County not just a fewPending Budget Shortfalls Jobs and Responsible Economic Growth Resolution of Needs Water and Sewer Issues Responsible Management of Potentially Tens of Millions of Dollars in Funding to Gulf County Through RESTORE Act By VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com After a community health assessment ranked Gulf Countys health levels 40th out of Floridas 67 counties, area health workers and community players are constructing a plan for improvement. The Gulf County Health Department conducted a workshop July 31 to analyze the areas health strengths and weaknesses and outline goals for improving problem areas, with major issues surrounding substance abuse and mental health. Other goals outlined include working to provide access to high quality and affordable health care for all people, increasing awareness of community health resources and strengthening the competitive environment to conduct business, encourage economic growth and create jobs. The workshop is part of the nal stages of the health departments Community Health Improvement Plan. Using the Florida (Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships) MAPP Field Guide, communities are able navigate to a healthier future. Were analyzing the data and statistics about Gulf Countys health and trying to gure out how we successfully reduce those negative trends, said Health Education Program Manager Sarah Hinds. Were trying to identify why this is happening and what we can do to change it. About 30 health care and community players attended the meeting, along with a few residents eager to be a part of the change, Hinds said. There are so many people in there that truly care about the health of the ecommunity, Hinds said. Its great because were nally doing something on a community level. One of Gulf Countys major challenges comes from mental health and substance abuse. Statistics from the community health assessment show that the percent of excessive drinking reported in the 45-65 age group is 171 percent the state rate and the Gulf County rate of alcohol-related deaths is 447 percent the state rate. The percent of adult residents who smoke tobacco is 174 percent the state rate. The health assessment also reported challenges with student drug use across the board. In Gulf County the use on LSD, PCP or mushrooms is 145 percent of the state rate, cocaine use is at 413 percent, use of club drugs is 254 percent, methamphetamines and heroin use are at 200 percent, depressants 160 percent and use of prescription amphetamines is approaching three times the statewide rate. In order to address these issues the health department has determined a need for health services to address excessive alcohol use with drinking and driving interventions. It has also been determined student drug interventions should focus on the outstanding use of club drugs, methamphetamines, prescription amphetamines, cocaine and heroin. The health department hopes to address these issues through public awareness of resources available to curb mental health and substance abuse resources. Floridas ranking in the community health assessment is based on a measure of residents health behaviors based on personal choices and environment, with the lower ranking counties representing those with the highest health risks. The health factors list examines four areas: health behaviors such as tobacco use, diet and exercise, alcohol use and high risk sexual behavior, access and quality of care, social and economic factors such as education, employment and income, and physical environment. We can improve the health of this community if we work together to see that goals have been met, Hinds said. More importantly, these goals were designed to best t the needs of our citizens. Community health workshop outlines goals

PAGE 8

LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012Schools have also received something of a facelift. The front of ce at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School was overhauled into a gleaming and welcoming rst impression for students, teachers and parents. Work is ongoing to rehabilitate the boys locker room at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. The high school also includes a new suite for its Bridges special education students. At Port St. Joe Elementary, students will begin the year eating in the gym while renovations continue to the kitchen and cafeteria. The expectation is the construction will be done before the rst of 2013. Open houses will be held at both ends of the county in the coming days and all parents are encouraged to get their students registered for school. The district also has good news on enrollment. As many as 20 new students are registered for this fall, a possible signal that a multi-year trend of declining enrollment in an honor roll and Academically High Performing District might be abating. It appears we picked up some kids this summer, said Superinten(Pd.Pol.Ad.)Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jamie Lester, Republican, for Property AppraiserCitizens of Gulf County, For a number of years, you have been fortunate to have had Mr. Kesley Colbert serve as your County Property Appraiser. On August 14th, you will have an Colbert is vacating through retirement. That gentleman is James E. (Jamie) Lester, Jr to hit the road running and insure that your ad valorem tax assessments are fair and equitable, that your maps are accurate, and that everyone deserving s greatest assets is that he is a people person and will go the extra mile to listen to you and help you any way possible within the law. How do I know Jamie so well? Because I grew up in Wewahitchka where our families were next door neighbors, and I have known him ever since. Jamie served in the did an outstanding job. Prior to that, he served as the Okaloosa County Value Adjustment Board Special Magistrate where he heard taxpayer appeals and Appraiser, borrowers and lenders throughout Northwest Florida. His appraisal experience goes on and on. I cannot imagine that anyone else in the race is remotely as opportunity to choose your next Property Appraiser. I hope you will take advantage of it and vote to elect Jamie Lester. I assure you, the Gulf County Sincerely, Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: PJ00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon RE-ELECTREBECCA L. BECKY NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURTPol. Adv.approved & paid for by Becky Norris, Dem., for Clerk of Court(Pd.Pol.Ad.)During the past 8 years, it has been my privilege to serve you, the citizens of Gulf County as your Clerk of Court. It has been both rewarding and, at times, challenging. The responsibilities of the ofce are broad and complex, and needs a leader with experience and integrity. I strive daily to serve the public by treating all with respect, honesty, and professionalism. These are the values I ran on 8 years ago, and the same are the ones that I believe are required of public servants today. Please allow me to continue to serve you by voting for me, Becky Norris, on August 14th If re-elected, I pledge to continue making sure that the Clerk of Court Ofce is one that is accessible, responsive, accountable, and transparent. Please call me @ 850 596-3653 if you would like to help support my efforts or if you have questions that I might answer for you. I respectfully thank you for your consideration and vote. Becky Norris TIM CROFT | The StarThe front of ce at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School is among the areas that received a facelift this summer.Grif n urges every voter to have a photo and signature identi cation ready when you arrive to cast their ballot, whether during early voting or the Aug. 14 primary. If a voter has moved since the last election it is also crucial that they contact Grif ns of ce at 229-6117 with the address change before you vote. It is a felony to vote in a precinct in which one does not reside. The ballot is packed. Some 35 candidates are vying for 17 elected positions, with primaries involving three seats on the Board of County Commissioners, two School Board seats, superintendent of schools, county judge, property appraiser, clerk of courts and supervisor of Elections. ELECTION from page A1 SCHOOL from page A1 location is appropriate; that the shelter will provide basic essentials for life; and that the shelters trained professionals provide all medical care and access to social services. Shelter staff must provide all transportation for residents; provide security, including badges or names tags identifying an individual as a resident; operating rules; a community liaison to outside agencies; selfsuf cient plans for dealing an emergency or natural disaster; and a structured discharge plan. The facility would also have to meet all building regulations and pay a permit fee. There is a due process provision in the event of violations of the ordinance, allowing the operator 10 days to address problems, and there is a 24-evacuation provision should the operator fail to adequately address violations of the ordinance. The third ordinance, addressing activities in the citys parks, bans glass containers and prohibits actions, such as constructing a tent or shanty and sleeping in a park, that could be construed as loitering. Christine McElroy, who spearheaded a committee that crafted the basic language of the ordinances, thanked Mayor Mel Magidson for challenging her to come back with a proactive ordinance to protect the community from impacts of a homeless shelter. She said the committee reviewed ordinances from around the country to arrive at a document that protects the community and prevents the outsourcing of potential costs for law enforcement and medical needs of shelter residents to taxpayers. Matt Scoggins, who teamed with the Panama City Rescue Mission to establish the Gulf Coast Hope Center, which ignited a controversy that has raged for more than year, said he felt compelled to speak out about his experiences, which have included threatened boycotts of his business and a series of newspaper ads. He noted that he had promised commissioners that he never has, never will, want to establish a homeless shelter and said it was a sad day when a mans word was no longer trusted. He said the ordinances passed by the county and city were the product of radicals with the wherewithal to push their ideological ideas onto the community. He said in being proactive, the city was discriminating against a class of people and said the Hope Center has assisted more than 50 families and individuals while being wellreceived in the community. This is silly, ridiculous and hatred-driven, Scoggins said. This is not what Port St. Joe is about. Lets not become a city of hatred and class warfare. PSJ from page A1dent of Schools Jim Norton. I think we picked up about 20 students compared to where we were last year. At $3,000 per student, that is some badly needed revenue. The following are the public school bus schedules for the 2012-13 school year.WEWAHITCHKA SCHOOL BUS SCHEDULEBus No. 89 driver, Bruce Husband; W. State Highway 22, Kemp Cemetery and Williamsburg Road Bus No. 81 driver, Ginger Respress; Highway 386, Whispering Pines, Lester Drive Bus No. 82 driver, Eddie Price; Dalkeith County Highway 381, S. State Highway 71, 5 Acre Farms Bus No. 77 driver, Royce Watkins; Courthouse, Lands Landing, Roberts Cemetery Road, Forehand Road, Hysmith Drive, Angela Court Bus No. 87 driver, Carol Clayton; State Highway 22 east of Creamer Road, Redbull Island, Lakegrove/ Dam Road, Jehu Cemetery Road Bus No. 74 driver, Carolyn Ranie; Stonemill Creek, Gary Rowell Road/ State Park, Lakeside Lodge, County Line South Bus No. 75 driver, Pam Stiles; N. State Highway 71, Dead Lakes Fish Camps, E. Diana Street (Stonemill Creek)PORT ST. JOE SCHOOL BUS SCHEDULEBus No. 86 driver, Paul Davis; Jones Homestead, Simmons Bayou, Cape San Blas, Indian Pass Bus No. 80 driver, Sherri Matthews; Mexico Beach Bus. No. 84 driver, Cookie White; White City, Howard Creek Bus No. 85 driver, Debbie Gillespie; Beacon Hill, Overstreet, Highway 386 Bus No. 88 sub driver, Gulf Aire, St. Joe Beach, WindMark and Highland View (Whitting Street and Victoria Avenue Bus No. 73 driver, Sheila Fennell; North Port St. Joe-Avenue D-F (Avenue D-Battle to Peters; Avenue E-F Hodrick to Peters Street) Bus No. 68 driver, Pam Harris (p.m. only); Busy Bee, Lizville, Avenue A Bus No. 76 driver, Shirley Williams; Highland View Bus No. 78 driver, Shirley Bryant; North Port St. Joe-Avenue B-D (U.S. Highway 98 to Battle Street) Bus No. 65 driver, Equillar Gainer (Gal, a.m. only); Lizville, Avenue A and Long Avenue (9th Street)

PAGE 9

LocalThe Star| A9Thursday, August 9, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad) AUTOMATIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7**PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATIONNo lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENERAC standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT:$4500.00**Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com By VALERIE GARMAN747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com Theres a lot of ground to cover in Florida House District 7. The new district covers more area than any other district in the state, and with seven candidates vying for the spot, each hailing from a different county, the race also has more candidates than any other state legislative election. District 7 encompasses nine counties including Liberty, Gulf, Franklin, Calhoun, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Wakulla and Lafayette, and also a small portion of Leon County. Due to redistricting, there is no incumbent for the seat. Marti Coley, who represented a large portion of the new district previously, is seeking reelection in District 5. Although the candidates are all from different areas of the district and represent two separate parties, job creation and a focus on education are top issues across the board. All candidates also disagree with the privatization of Florida prisons and hope to protect the areas natural water resource. Seeking the Democratic slot for the November general election are retired law enforcement ofcer A.J. Smith, attorney and adjunct biology professor Thomas Dickens and Liberty County Clerk of Courts Robert Hill. Smith, an Apalachicola native, worked in law enforcement for 25 years, serving as a deputy sheriff, a swat team specialist and the Chief of Law Enforcement with the states Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco. He places importance on protecting small businesses in the district, which make up about half of private sector employers. He believes party preference and platforms are not as important in the rural district as listening to and being accessible to constituents. Dickens, who was a U.S. Army Captain for 13 years, serving one tour of duty in Iraq, is focused on pursuing the states need for alternative energy sources to help the environment and garner privatesector jobs for the area. I served in Iraq and while I was there I determined we didnt need to be anywhere for energy security, Dickens said. We have tools in District 7 to gain energy independence. Hill, a Bristol resident, has served three terms as Liberty County Clerk of Courts and is also a former Liberty County Superintendent of Schools. As a former educator, he vows to ght for adequate funding of public schools and defend the rights of state employees. On the Republican side of the District 7 race are Monticello nursery owner Halsey Beshears, Taylor County forester Don Curtis, former state Rep. Jamey Westbrook of Port St. Joe, and nancial advisor Mike Williams from Madison. Thus far in the game, Beshears has raised the most money, more than $150,000, with the bulk coming from his own pockets. He is an advocate for common sense government based on conservative values and basic, common sense decision-making. Beshears feels that shrinking government is the only way to bolster the District 7 economy, by ridding the area of heavy regulations for small business owners. Curtis garners similar goals to reduce regulations if elected, and believes that District 7s biggest export is its kids, driven away by lack of jobs. Many people in these rural counties are just frustrated by the lack of jobs, Curtis said. Florida cant seem to get its act together to compete. We have everything we need but cant seem to compete with our neighbors. Republican Mike Williams is also running on a platform focusing on reducing regulations and promoting private sector job creation at its center. He believes experience gained through owning his own small business and serving on various public service volunteer positions shows no intent to simply ll his pockets or improve his career path if elected. Westbrook has owned and operated the same oil drilling company for the past 35 years, and has been a farmer for 25 years. He also served one term in the Florida Legislature as a Democrat from 1996-1998, citing his party change because he identies with the GOPs scal and moral values. Westbrook hopes to bring the government back to the people, putting an emphasis on private-sector job creation and road improvements. The small counties are not represented like the big counties in the legislature, Westbrook said. Im up for the challenge. Lots of candidates, ground in House District 7 race

PAGE 10

E-mail outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A By JESSICA BASHAM THERRIAULTSpecial to The Star What is that dark green or brown stuff all over the beach? The material, usually in a line where the waves roll in, is known as beach wrack. When rst setting eyes on wrack, you might think it is only dried, dying seaweed. But it is very much alive and lled with sea organisms that are essential to beach life and the creatures that live there. Marine organisms that wash up with this wrack are an important part of a beach ecosystem. Tiny crabs, sea cucumbers, seeds and pods are only a few of the things you can nd in wrack. Once, while walking the shore at Bahia Honda State Park in the Florida Keys, I found a brown hamburger bean. Thats right, a hamburger bean! It is circular in shape, like a marble, with a thick brown or black line that goes around its center. On each side of the thick line the color is a lighter brown, making it look like a hamburger bun. These little beans are from tropical rainforests and are native to the West Indies and western Africa. Can you believe the things we nd on Florida beaches travel that far? Another neat little treasure I found in beach wrack was on St. Augustine Beach just a few weeks ago. While pushing my toes through the wrack, I spotted a purse crab. These crabs get their name because female purse crabs have a purselike chamber for holding their eggs. The little crabs live in shallow, sandy environments like beaches and are often found washed ashore in wrack. Beach wrack eventually gets pushed high on shore because of the tides. When the tides go out, the grasses start to dry and die. Dying grasses bring all sorts of life to the beach. As the grasses die, fungi and other organisms attract tiny species like beetles, beach hoppers, ghost crabs and more. These small insects and crabs become food for shorebirds. Dunlin sandpipers and other shorebirds migrate thousands of miles a year and depend on wrack during their journey for food. Without wrack and the organisms that live in it, the birds can die. Not only can you nd neat sea critters, shells, seeds and birds near beach wrack, but wrack is also the rst stage in forming sand dunes. Sand dunes are natural barriers against wind and water, and they prevent erosion. They form when wrack starts to collect blowing sand. As sand and other plant material collect in the wrack, the plant material can start to sprout and root. This continual process is how dunes form. So now you know that beach wrack isnt just icky seaweed that sits on the shore; it is a beautiful ecosystem important to the beach and beach life, as well as a place for unique nds and hours of curiosity. Have fun searching the wrack.Page 10 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, EV AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, EV Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at End Of Summer Sale! Two Days Only!! Fri. AUG 10th Sat. AUG 11th HUGE SAVINGS ON MANY ITEMS THRU-OUT THESTORE TACKLE, RODS, REELS, AND APPAREL, TOO MUCH TO NAME! WEEKLY ALMANAC ST.JOSEPH BAY APALACHICOLA BAY, WESTPASS TIDETABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!227-7847 Date HighLow%Precip Thu, August 985 7750% Fri, August 1084 7640% Sat, August 1185 7630% Sun, August 1284 7740% Mon, August 1385 7760% Tues, August 1485 7660% Wed, August 1585 7660% 9 Mo 535am 1.0 732pm 0.6 10 Tu 503am 1.1 439pm 0.4 11 We 510am 1.3 355pm 0.2 12 Th 534am 1.4 422pm 0.1 13 Fr 610am 1.6 501pm 0.0 14 Sa 653am 1.7 544pm -0.1 15 Su 739am 1.8 625pm -0.2 16 Mo 824am 1.8 702pm -0.2 17 Tu 906am 1.9 734pm -0.2 18 We 945am 1.9 800pm -0.2 19 Th 1023am 1.8 822pm -0.1 20 Fr 1101am 1.7 838pm 0.0 21 Sa 1143am 1.6 846pm 0.2 9 Mo 815am 1.3 822pm 1.0 148am 0.4 304pm 0.6 10 Tu 840am 1.4 954pm 1.0 211am 0.6 416pm 0.5 11 We 908am 1.5 1158pm 1.0 234am 0.8 528pm 0.4 12 Th 942am 1.5 258am 1.0 635pm 0.2 13 Fr 1023am 1.5 733pm 0.1 14 Sa 1109am 1.5 825pm 0.0 15 Su 426am 1.2 1201pm 1.5 652am 1.3 910pm -0.1 16 Mo 452am 1.2 1254pm 1.5 802am 1.3 950pm -0.1 17 Tu 518am 1.3 146pm 1.6 856am 1.3 1024pm -0.1 18 We 540am 1.3 235pm 1.6 941am 1.3 1055pm -0.1 19 Th 600am 1.3 322pm 1.6 1021am 1.2 1122pm -0.1 20 Fr 618am 1.3 410pm 1.5 1100am 1.1 1147pm 0.0 21 Sa 634am 1.3 500pm 1.5 1141am 1.0 22 Su 652am 1.4 555pm 1.4 1212am 0.1 1226pm 0.9 Thursday, August 9, 2012Summer beach safariWhats in that brown, dried seaweed on the beach?By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A program started locally is spreading from shore to shore as boat owners reach out to military veterans. John Captain Tater Swanson decided he wanted to give back to those who protect our freedom and what he decided to offer them is what he loves most, a quiet day on the water, shing. He began offering free trips on his boat to active and retired military in March 2011 and, that summer, he did about ve trips with veterans. Now, he said his program is going nationwide. Its grown remarkably fast, said Swanson. Military veterans are the best networking people in the world. One guy in Texas nds out about it and he has buddies he served with in Kentucky or Georgia and soon theyre all talking about it. Its a spider web effect. Swansons organization, Fishing for the Brave, arranged for seven veterans and one spouse to sh in this years Big Bend Saltwater Classic on four different boats. They were based in Carrabelle, Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. One of the soldiers, Martin Miller, who sailed out of Carrabelle with Captain Chester Reese, took fourth place for Spanish mackerel. Last weekend, Swanson sailed out of Port Canaveral with a second boat carrying seven vets for a day of shing and he is in the process of arranging several trips in Texas. He said hed been contacted by a veterans group there with 300 members and is trying to arrange trips to accommodate them. Fishing for the Brave, is statewide, said Swanson, and we are in the process of going nationwide. Swanson works at Altrua Marketing and Design in Tallahassee. He said they have been very supportive of his shing outreach and have allowed him to print yers and banners at their facility. Swanson is in the process of becoming a charter captain so he can take out paying trips. The plan, he said, is for every paid trip to fund one free trip for a veteran. From small beginnings, he has now joined forces with the Wounded Warrior program to provide shing trips for disabled vets and with the Veterans Center in Tallahassee. He said doctors at the center sometimes recommend a day of relaxing inshore angling for soldiers suffering from post traumatic stress syndrome. From piloting a boat, Swanson has now taken on the added role of matching boat owners who want to help with vets who want to sh. He said he takes time to talk to each volunteer captain to nd out what they have in mind. Placing soldiers with disabilities on a boat takes a good deal of planning and consideration. Anyone, even a sherman with a small skiff can take a soldier out for an afternoon or an hour. Swanson said he personally tries to do at least one trip with a vet a month and has a dozen scheduled between now and Christmas. If I could have guys on the water 365 days a year, I would, he said. If you would like to take a soldier shing or donate to Fishing for the Brave or arrange a shing trip, you can contact Captain Tater online at Fishing for the brave.com; email him at Fishingforthebrave@ live.com or call 326-7706. Fishing for the Brave is also on Facebook and Twitter.Warriors become anglers through Fishing for the Brave Above: Beach wrack attracts shorebirds. Inset: In the beach wrack at St. Joseph Peninsula State Park, not only can you nd neat sea critters, shells, seeds and birds, but the wrack is also the rst stage of forming sand dunes. LOISSWOBODA | The TimesCaptain Tater at the Big Bend Saltwater Classic Inshore Offshore SPONSORED BY Amberjack is back on the menu and are plentiful in the 100 to 150 foot range out of Mexico Beach. Try shing live blue runners for the better sized sh; however, at-sided and diamond jigs will work as well if no live bait can be found. King sh are still hanging around the buoy line out of Mexico Beach right now as well. Conditions on St. Joe Bay seem to be improving this week. Water temperatures are still high, but the water clarity is better. Good trout and red sh reports from the Pig Island and Eagle Harbor areas are the best bet. Scalloping is still a challenge this year, but the shells are growing!

PAGE 11

PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SP O RTS www.starfl.com ASectionThursday, August 9, 2012 Page 11 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) www.VoteMitchBurke.com 850-227-5702 11 Commandments for the Public ServantTaxpayers are the most important people in our community. 1. Taxpayers arent dependent upon you; you are dependent 2. upon them. Taxpayers arent an interruption of work; they are the purpose 3. of our work. Taxpayers do you a favor when they call or walk into the of 4. you are not doing them a favor by waiting on them. Taxpayers are part of your work; they are not outsiders. 5. 6. They are human beings with feeling and emotions just like you and I. Taxpayers are not people to argue with, match wits with or 7. ridicule. Taxpayers are people who need your assistance; it is your job 8. to provide professional quality service. Taxpayers are deserving of the most courteous and attentive 9. treatment that you can give them. Taxpayers are the people that make it possible for the elect 10. and staff to be paid. Taxpayers are a vital part of government and every division 11. thereof.~Author UnknownMitchIt has truly been a pleasure meeting with the voters of Gulf County over the past several months. Thank you for welcoming me into your homes and allowing me the opportunity to speak with you. The response to my candidacyhas been humbling and the level of support has been truly encouraging. I humbly ask for your vote on August 14th. JOESLAWN CARE 850.323.0741JOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM New softball league formingStar Staff ReportThe Bridge at Bay St. Joe is inviting all local businesses and organizations to join its new softball league. The Bridge staff hopes this will be a fun league and a great opportunity to build relationships in the community. Come join the fun. Teams fees will be $250 to cover costs only. For more information, call or email Ron Reid at 229-8244 or admin.baystjoe@signaturehealthcarellc.com. Please respond by Aug. 31 so no one misses out on the fun. By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Thomas University added some bite to its baseball team last week by signing a pair of Wewahitchka Gators. Justin Flowers and Hunter McDaniel, the Gators two leading hitters this past season, inked letters of intent last week to attend the private Thomasville, Ga.-based NAIA Division II school later this month. Flowers and McDaniel, both out elders, begin school Aug. 15 and will be playing during the fall season, and likely, Wewahitchka coach David Barnes said, a lot. They are probably going to play right out of the box, Barnes said. Thomas University has two teams, a junior varsity that plays a community college level schedule and a varsity. They lost six out elders to the Major League Draft this summer, and Justin and Hunter had this opportunity. The door opened, and they walked through. That is what you have to do, take advantage of the opportunity. Barnes said he enjoyed having Flowers and McDaniel for only a single season, half a school year, after he was hired by Wewahitchka to take over the baseball program. He said he never had the opportunity to attend college on a scholarship, these were his rst players as a coach to earn opportunities to the next level, and he hoped Flowers and McDaniel represented the beginning of a tradition. These two guys were the leaders of our team and played really well, Barnes said. They parlayed that into a chance to continue their education and play ball. (Thomas University) will be getting two very good out elders. Justin, playing center eld, gets a good jump on the ball. Hunter didnt make an error all season. They are also good hitters. Thomas is going to get two very solid out elders and two very solid hitters. The sky is the limit for them. Thomas is getting two good players. McDaniel, hitting from the No. 9 spot in the order, led Wewahitchka with a .360 batting average last season and led the team in stolen bases. Flowers, hitting leadoff, was second on the team with a .350 and also led the team in home runs. I asked Hunter again and again if he wanted to move higher up in the order, but he wanted to stay where he was, Barnes said. We had two leadoff men basically in the back end of our order. Flowers and McDaniel wanted to make college a package deal. We were looking at that from the beginning, Flowers said. We were hoping to stay together. They looked at and considered other schools, but when the opportunity at Thomas University presented itself an assistant coach at WHS had contacts at Thomas and knew about the effect the draft had on the baseball program the two jumped in with both feet. We had a lot of possibilities, especially locally, like Chipola or Gulf Coast, but in the long run Thomas looked like the best deal and best situation for us, McDaniel said. We were trying to stay together, and they needed out elders. Wewahitchka High athletic director Dennis Kizziah noted before the signing, which took place in front of family and friends at the high school, that McDaniel and Flowers had worked hard to be in position to move to the next level. Give credit where credit is due, Kizziah said. These two young men played a lot of ball and reaped the bene ts of that work. They have a real opportunity to get their education and do something they love for four more years.By TIM CROFT227-7827|@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Talk about a whirlwind romance. Last Monday Rakeem Rock Quinn was looking for a college to attend after a redshirt baseball season at Tallahassee Community College. Three days later, he signed a full ride to attend Alabama Southern Community College in Monroeville, Ala., which nished fth in the national JUCO tourney last year. It feels good, Quinn said after a signing ceremony in the home of one of his biggest local fans, Zebe Schmitt. They wanted me out of high school, but I had my heart set on TCC. I know if I perform the way I can, I see this as a stepping stone to the next level. Quinns journey to Monroeville was a winding one. He went to TCC after he graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 2011 where he hit .445 with 45 RBIs and four home runs his senior year with the intent of stepping into the starting catcher position. But a wrist injury derailed his season, and he sat out with a redshirt. During the summer, Quinn traveled to California to play summer amateur ball and excelled. Hometown connections set up a trip to Monroeville. Cameron Likely, who starred in baseball at PSJHS, was a teammate of Alabama Southern head baseball coach Daniel Head. The two had been teammates at South Florida, and Likely told Head, who had recruited Quinn hard out of high school, Quinn was seeking a change of scenery. Likely also told Head about Quinns summer in California and put Head in touch with Quinns summer coach. The coach, Head said, raved. He had a terri c summer, according to his coach, Head said. He was someone we had been following since he was a junior in high school, so we were interested. Head had one scholarship remaining to ll. Head called Quinn last Monday and asked him to come up for a workout. Quinn ran the 60-yard dash, worked three batting cage sessions and caught some Eagle pitchers in the bullpen. I signed because they had always been interested in me, they had one scholarship open and they had only one catcher on the roster, said Quinn, 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. I came up through little league as a catcher. I converted in high school to the out eld my sophomore year, but went back to catcher. I like to catch. Coaches and scouts say I have the frame for it, and I like the position. I know how to work and move behind the plate. You are involved in everything. The personal workout last week punctuated what Head already knew about Quinn from high school. He came and he tried out, and he has several kinds of tools he can bring, Head said. His bat was so impressive. He is also very athletic, and that matches what we do on the eld. We are very aggressive on offense and like to have as much athleticism as we can on the diamond. He runs, catches and drives the ball. The catcher position is wide open. I see him providing depth at several positions this year and taking over the lead (catcher) role no later than his sophomore season. Quinn said he has yet to decide on an academic major, saying he would pursue an associates degree and gure out a major as he went. The top priority is the opportunity to continue his education while advancing his baseball career. I need to work harder behind the plate and get into the batting cage and just work to get ready for the fall, Quinn said. Ill be ready. Sports SHORTSPECIAL TO THE STARJustin Flowers, left, and Hunter McDaniel, right, signed to play baseball at Thomas University last week.Flowers, McDaniel sign with Thomas University SPECIAL TO THE STARRock Quinn signed with Alabama Southern last week in the home of one of his biggest fans, Zebe Schmitt, while surrounded by family and friends.Quinn signs with Alabama Southern

PAGE 12

LocalA12 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 Our Current State Attorney plea bargained 98% of cases last year. POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY JIM APPLEMAN, REPUBLICAN, FOR STATE ATTORNEY 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT ApplemanForStateAttorney.com ApplemanForStateAttorney.comWe Need Appleman is is why... DID YOU KNOW?Summary Reporting System prepared by OSCA, Statistics & Evaluation Data pulled 6/4/12, data shown is from 7/2011 3/2012 What separates Jay Bidwell from other candidates for Gulf County Superintendent of Schools?Experience.only Personal commitment.only parent Qualications.only Choose the experienced candidate. Choose the committed candidate. Choose the qualied candidate. Please vote for and elect Jay Bidwell for Gulf County Superintendent of Schools! Phone: (850) 639-2949 Cell: (850) 890-4851 Email: jaybidwellforsupt@fairpoint.net POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENTPAID FOR AND APPROVEDBY JAY BIDWELL, DEMOCRAT FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. Honesty & Fairness for ALL Gulf County(Pd.Pol.Ad.) ELECT MELISSA FARRELL FOR SCHOOL BOARDDISTRICT 3(Pd.Pol.Ad.)For The Education of the Children in Gulf County. Vote Tuesday, August 14th or By Absentee Ballot Paid for and approved by Melissa Farrell for School Board, District 3 A NEW VOICE TURTLE from page A1Weve always supported the (cold) stun events in the past, said Jill Davis. Scallop Cove has provided equipment and people to the effort of rescuing turtles and dolphins stranded or cold-stunned in the bay. Several years ago, nearly 2,000 turtles were pulled from the bay during a cold-stun event. Its really a good community contribution, she continued. We support the wildlife and our environment. We encourage other businesses to step up and contribute. BZ came to Gulf World entangled in shing line. One ipper was completely enmeshed and there was mono lament line coming from his mouth with a hook dangling out from the line. X-rays at Gulf World revealed no hooks inside the turtle as was the case with a recent patient nicknamed Captain Hook, who passed away despite delicate surgery to remove the hook. BZ, by contrast, needed only a steady diet of sh oil, medicine to heal a wounded ipper and just over a month to pass the mono lament line through his system. He was eating when we got him which was good, said Secret Holmes-Douglas, director of the Gulf World Marine Institute. BZ, rid of the lament, was clearly eager to return to his natural environment as employees of Gulf World carried him to the dock and the bay waters. The cost of BZs rehab? Nearly $2,000. This is a primary reason Jill and Mike Davis made their donation as Gulf World Marine Institute prepares to formally launch its non-pro t. The Institute has received its non-pro t status and has an elected board, which includes two Gulf County residents, Julia Cunningham and Dewey Blaylock. Once the summer season quiets, said Pam George, marketing director at Gulf World, the facility will of cially launch the non-pro t. The goal is to help defray the costs of rescuing and rehabbing marine animals in the Northwest Florida region in which Gulf World is effectively the rst responder for strandings or coldstun events. Gulf World has been doing this for years and just absorbing the costs, George said. That meant, Holmes-Douglas said, that funding for rescues and rehabs was taking away from the operations of the park. Establishing a non-pro t makes it easier to accept donations and pursue grants, George said. Mainly, the idea was so we could have a stranding facility out behind our place. We hope to have a rehab and research facility behind our place. Holmes-Douglas said another potential goal would be establishing a satellite intake facility in Gulf County. George noted that the expense of rehabilitation can be daunting; depending on the shape the animal is in, on degree of injury or illness, x-rays, medicine, staf ng for rehab time and purchasing of proper equipment takes dollars. People watch the rescues and they see the release, but they are not really aware of the costs, George said. Holmes-Douglas added that the non-pro t allows a foundation for partnering with asset providers, such the South Gulf County Fire Department which had provided equipment for rescues and releases, within their service area. And, at a fundamental level, bringing private investment to the rescue of marine animals starts with community investment purchased through awareness and education. Awareness is very high on the list for us, George said. The more awareness we can bring about shing lines and hooks, about plastic bags and the dangers, the better. Bringing more awareness to the community is all part of what we are trying to do. So, prior to having anyone handle BZ or place him in the water, Holmes-Douglas told the crowd the turtles story and lessons to be taken away. You can see her one ipper is scarred, Holmes-Douglas told about 40 gathered folks of all ages on the Scallop Cove dock. You need to be aware when you are shing that you are not catching or hooking any other creatures. If you see a turtle that is in distress because it is tangled in shing line, give us a call.

PAGE 13

COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionThursday, August 9, 2012 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe police of cer Jake Richards screamed at the brown bear silhouette, which appeared to have come down with a case of the blue chicken pox. As he screamed Get out of here bear Richards let loose with a shotgun blast called the Hornets Nest that carries all the audible subtlety of a rework on the Fourth of July. If the silhouette had been a real Florida black bear, the blast would have done little more than alarm the bear with a loud noise and send plastic buckshot, if aimed correctly, into the heavily-muscled shoulder or rump of the bear. The goal: make that bear think twice about another encounter with humans. Wild bear or not, when it comes to shooting something at a bear, lethal or not, they are going to run, said Dave Telesco, coordinator of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions Bear Management Program. We want to move the bear out of the area. If we shoot it, it goes out of the area and that is what we want. When the bear comes back, A few bear hazing tipsHeres how to chase a bear away and not get hurt A projectile red from a starters pistol provides a surprising effect to scare a bear by sight and sound.TIM CROFT The StarSee BEAR HAZING B10 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Each month this newspaper will publish a list of potential volunteer opportunities for those in the community. This country was started by men and women who were willing to give their time and use their skills to build a nation where they could have a better life, said Trish Petrie of The Friends of the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge and owner of Turtle Beach Inn. They were volunteers. Today so many people expect so many things to be done for them and so much to be provided for them. We need to take a step back and participate with our time to help get this country back on the right track. With all the problems with the economy and balancing budgets, there will continue to be a reduction in the services and the bene ts that federal, state and local governments will be able to provide. It is time for a resurgence of volunteering. It will be up to us the people who care about our communities, our parks, our arts, our Come make a difference todayBy Khrysten KeysStar Staff Intern The Goodwill Career Training Facility would like to extend a helping hand to Gulf Countys unemployed and employed. The training facility offers free skills training for those seeking a job or simply a better job. For those without a high school diploma Goodwill also offers free GED preparation classes. The program is not exclusively for people seeking employment it also nds employees for employers. We will prescreen employees for companies, said the facilitys Employment Specialist, Tandra Burns. The Goodwill Career Training Facility is planning to host a job fair in August. Employers who are interested in participating in the fair are to call Burns at 2291273 to reserve a table. Our mission is to help people achieve independence through employment, Burns said. To ensure that the mission is met, the facility not only follows the employee for six months after employment but offers a 12-week job club class. This will include classes on anger management, applications, time management and skill and resume building. Elderly people who want to better familiarize themselves with computers also are urged to visit the training facility. All the classes are self-paced and the equipment is easy to use even if they have seeing problems. Although the program is relatively new to the Port St. Joe area, the Goodwill Career Training Facility, funded by sales from the Goodwill store and donations, has been offered around the country since the turn of the century. We want to stress that everything here is free, Burns said. The Goodwill Career Training Facility is next to the Goodwill store at 208 Highway 98 Port St. Joe.Goodwill offers career training facilityTIM CROFT | The StarHiram Nix, branch manager, and Joan Cleckley, business development with Centennial Bank, donated $500 to the Christian Community Development Fund last week. From home repairs to assisting homebound elderly to providing needs assessment and outreach, the CCDF continues to leverage donated dollars and eager partners to improve the lives of many. Diana Burkett had done an outstanding job as executive director with the CCDF and we are proud to be a part of this endeavor, Hix said. Centennial is proud to be a part of this community and believes in the importance of community involvement, he added. CENTENNIAL BANK DONATES TO CCDFSee DIFFERENCE B6By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The 16th annual Florida Scallop and Music Festival set a new record for attendance this year. The festival, held last Friday and Saturday, drew more than 7,500 attendees this weekend, generating more income than any previous Scallop Festival. More than 70 booths displayed crafts and goodies and there was an assortment of games to delight both young and old. The kids zone included arts and crafts activities, pony rides and a bouncy house. An array of food wagons provided something to tempt every taste bud. The scallop plates served up on site and the ve-gallon buckets of frozen shell sh available to carry home were not harvested from St. Joe Bay but still were tasty. Photos by TIM CROFT | The Star and DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.comSizzling tunes and steamy scallops make this years festival a success ALL SMILES AT FESTIVALSee FESTIVAL B6

PAGE 14

Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER 1229 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, FloridaInsuring Lives. Enriching Futures. Our experienced sta will help you choose a plan that suits your needs. Health Solutions for Individuals, Families or Small Businessess Benet Plans for: Call 850-747-0288 Your Local Agency for OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyMeet Macklin a Labrador Retriever/Mix. Macklin has learned to walk on his leash and is a very patient puppy. He loves the attention of kids and loves to play with them. He loves his puppy friends but is still a little timid around kitties. Macklin will grow up to be a very big dog one day. This great puppy deserves a loving, forever home of his very own. If you can give him one let us know and we will tell him. WE ARE IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO HELP WITH SOME GENERAL MAINTANCE, CLEANING, PAINTING ECT VOLUNTEERS ARE ALSO NEEDED FOR PET SOCIALIZATION AND FOSTER HOMES. SCHOOL CREDIT AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS. Please do not hesitate to email townsend.hsdirector@gmail.com or adoptbaystjoe@gmail.com or call the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society at 850-227-1103 and ask for Melody or Debbie! Online applications are available at www.sjbhumanesociety.org Adoption fees include our cost of spay/neuter and current vaccinations. We are now proud partners with www.petsforpatriots.org Our hours for the shelter are Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am-4 pm! Our shelter location is 1007 Tenth Street in Port St. Joe! IF YOU ARE MISSING A PET, PLEASE CHECK WITH US!Follow us on Facebook: St. Joseph Bay Humane Society SocietyB2 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012Account established to aid stroke victimStar Staff ReportOn July 20, Wanda Wheeler, a long-time resident of Port St. Joe, suffered a massive life-changing stroke. The family has established an account at Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union in Wandas name to help defray medical costs for her ongoing care and long-term recovery. Wheeler is employed at Bo Knows Pest Control and has worked for Watson Brothers Construction and Monumental Fabrication. Donations are greatly appreciated.Star Staff ReportThe American Cancer Society is seeking volunteers in Port St. Joe walkers, cancer survivors, caregivers, community leaders, anyone wanting to make a difference to join the Relay For Life of Gulf County. The organization is seeking volunteers who are interested in getting involved in the ght against cancer through fundraising in its signature fundraising event, Relay For Life. Relay For Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at an athletic track, park or other gathering area, with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. The events are held overnight to honor and mirror a cancer patients journey through treatment. To learn more about the Relay For Life of Gulf County and how to volunteer, to sign up your team or to attend the next team party, call Stephanie Bird at 785-9205, ext. 3509. Relay For Life is all about our community uniting with the American Cancer Society and supporting its efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays, said Kristi Dorman, operations chairwoman. Volunteers and participants who are willing to give their time and energy to this exciting event are making a commitment to let Gulf County know that cancer can be defeated. Funds raised at Relay For Life of Gulf County help the American Cancer Society to impact the lives of those touched by cancer within the community. In 2011, the Relay For Life events across Florida raised more than $21 million to help cancer patients and their families in local communities and to fund lifesaving cancer research. The Relay For Life of Gulf County raised $61,123 that helped fund lifesaving programs and services locally. Our most requested program, Road to Recovery, provides transportation for patients to and from lifesaving cancer treatments. Last year, 3,538 rides were given to patients in Gulf County. All of this is made possible by Relay For Life. All are welcomed to join the ght against cancer. For more information, call Carolyn Witten or Kim Kurnitsky at 227-4093. One of Floridas native plants is the wax myrtle. Its a small tree or large shrub that can grow anywhere in Florida. Wax myrtle does well in a moist environment, so its excellent for use in poorly drained soils. However, the plant also grows well in drier soils. Since this plant is so durable and can serve many uses in the landscape. I thought it was a good idea to pass some facts about the plant on to our readers. My information was provided by Emeritus Extension Urban Horticulturist, Dr. Robert J. Black. Wax myrtle is unisexual, with male and female owers produced on separate plants. Female owers grow in close bunches, and produce fruits that are round, light green, and about an eighth of an inch in diameter these fruits are coated with a thick, bluish wax that may be used in making candles. One of the unique features of wax myrtles is its fragrance. When the foliage is crushed, wax myrtle produces a very pleasant aromatic fragrance, know as bayberry. A northern relative of wax myrtle is the bayberry tree, which produces larger berries, and is used extensively for making the popular and fragrant bayberry candles. Wax myrtles can reach a height of 25 feet. Their leaves are evergreen narrow at the base and broader toward the upper end of the leaves. About midway up the leaf toward the tip, coarse teeth appear on the leaf edges. Wax myrtles produce suckers, which are small plants that sprout from the roots, these suckers grow into large clumps, or clusters, and eventually grow into a very large, dense plant. However, if you remove these suckers from around the main trunk, an attractive, small tree can be produced. The trunk of the wax myrtle is grayish white and reminds one of northern birch. These trees are used extensively in patio planting and as landscape screens. Wax myrtles can be grown from seeds, cuttings and simple layering techniques. When growing them from seed, be sure to sow the seed as soon as it matures. Seeds can be started in a mixture of equal parts sand and peat moss. Another method for propagating wax myrtle is to dig established plants during the winter months. Cut the plants back to within a few inches of the ground. Dig out the root clumps and set them in containers. In a few months, a fairly good-sized plant will grow. A small tree, say 10 to 12 feet in height, will take a few years to grow, using this method. Being a native plant, wax myrtle is well suited to Gulf Countys soils and climate. In fact, this plant is often seen growing along highways, close to roadside ditches, and other uncultivated areas. The plant is cold hardy, salt-tolerant and relatively free of diseases and insects. There is only one serious pest of wax myrtle: a caterpillar, which chews leaves and ties terminal leaves together. In summary, wax myrtles are among the most desirable plants for use in the Florida landscape. Their leaves give off a pleasant aromatic fragrance of bayberry, and their waxy fruits can be used for making candles. The plants thrive in moist, sandy soils, need very little maintenance and are rarely bothered by insects or diseases. For more information on wax myrtle contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200 or 229-2909 or visit http://gulf.ifas.u edu.Relay For Life seeks Gulf County volunteers ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension director Growing wax myrtle in home landscape Star Staff ReportSenior citizens needs helpGulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of non-perishable foods for our low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients that love to play bingo several times a week. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items listed above can call Debbie at 229-8466.Learn about eBooksA class on eBooks will be 1-2:30 p.m. Aug. 28 at the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Gulf County Library meeting room. The class will teach participants how to download free eBooks to your Kindle, Nook, iPad or other device. Class size for this free class is limited so registration is urged. Call 229-8879 to register and reserve your seat.Amateur radio license examsHam it up, and get on the air. Get your rst time ham radio license or upgrade your present license. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio license exams at 10 a.m. ET Saturday at the EOC Building in Port St. Joe. If assistance in obtaining a ham license is needed or for registration and exam details, call C.H. Tillis at 648-8251. News BRIEFS

PAGE 15

Masters Degree Business Administration Dear Friends, Over the past several months I have tried real hard to get the message out about my candidacy for your property appraiser. I have tried to go door to door and have extremely enjoyed the visits and talks we have had. The weather has hindered me on some days and I know I have missed many of you when I visited and no one was at home. the tools needed to make a good decision on voting for me as your property appraiser. I the property owner and the county appraiser. I hope that message has been received. I have also given to you the thoughts of what I will do for you, which has included more spiked property values, my strong since of helping others, and my strong desire to to thank you for listening, thank you for reading my ads, my literature, and thank you for your consideration. My attempt to solicit your vote truly comes from the heart and a strong desire to serve you. I have tried so hard to help others in their real estate appraisal needs, real estate needs in general, and help others as a friend would. I hope to work hard for you supported my campaign for your property appraiser. Thank you once again and please Jamie Lester (Pd.Pol.Ad.) School NewsThe Star| B3Thursday, August 9, 2012Loretta Costin inducted into FACTE Hall of FameStar Staff ReportLoretta Costin wont be in trouble for her recent absence from her new job as director of the Gulf/Franklin campus of Gulf Coast State College. She was in Ponte Vedra for her induction into the Florida Association of Career and Technical Educations Hall of Fame. Throughout your service, your vision, innovation and commitment has truly made Florida a recognized leader in Career and Technical Education, said Rod Duckworth, Chancellor, Division of Career and Adult Education, Florida Department of Education. The Hall of Fame was established in 1988 to recognize the most outstanding and distinguished professional career and technical educators who have made a long-term signicant effect on career and technical education in the state.  This is a great honor, and it was so good to see many of my colleagues from around the state at the luncheon, Costin said. Dan Davis, FACTE president, presented her with a plaque at the recognition ceremony July 24. Costin most recently served as chief of staff to the commissioner of education, Florida DOE, before joining Gulf Coast State College in June.  Her earlier experience as vice chancellor for Floridas Division of Workforce Education and as chancellor for the Division of Career and Adult Education at DOE involved working with business and industry leaders to develop workforce education programs and ensure Florida has the skilled workforce needed to grow and diversify its economy. Were thrilled to have Loretta on our team, leading the Gulf/Franklin Campus. Her energy, ideas and experience are critical to our continued efforts to serve our students there and ll our vital role in the region, said GCSC president Dr. Jim Kerley. Costin was nominated for induction into the Hall of Fame by Robert Crawford, director of the Atlanta Technical Center and Technical High School, Coconut Creek. Throughout Lorettas 30 years of service, she has distinguished herself as a true leader and visionary. In each of the many roles that she has held during her illustrious career, she has done it with dedication, passion, compassion and in a rst-class way that is all Loretta, Crawford said. The FACTE is a non-prot organization committed to the development of education that will prepare both young and adult Floridians for successful careers.Star Staff ReportCorrectional ofcer basic standards courseA new correctional ofcer basic standards class is scheduled to begin Aug. 22 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe. This class is required for anyone who wishes to become a correctional ofcer at any state, county or private correctional facility throughout Florida. This will be the last class offered this year in Port St. Joe. For more information, call  Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507. Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School open housePort St Joe Jr./Sr. High School will conduct an open house at 5:30 p.m. ET Thursday. Come out and meet the faculty and staff. You also can pick up student class schedules and take a tour of the school. There will be an opportunity for you to spend a few minutes with each teacher. There will be a simulated class day and the bells will ring to announce time to change classes. Each teacher will greet you in the classroom setting for that class period.Parent meeting, open house at PSJESThere will be a meeting for parents of sixth-graders at 11:30 a.m. Friday followed by a Title I Open House for all grades pre-K through sixth from noon to 1 p.m. ET. All parents and students are invited to come and meet the teachers. School BRIeEFsS Dan Davis, FACTE president, presents Loretta Costin with her plaque signifying entrance into the FACTE Hall of Fame.

PAGE 16

FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.comThursday, August 9, 2012 Jerry Arhelger, SOUTHERLAND FAMILY FUNERAL HOME507 10th Street Port St. Joe(850) 229-8111 TO KNOW CHRIST AND TO MAKE HIMKNOWNST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH800 22ND STREET, PORT ST. JOE8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45 www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.orgCome worship with us! Rector Father Tommy Dwyer St. Peters Church, ACC(Traditional Services 1928 BCP) Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M. Community Healing Service 6:00 P.M. 4th Thursday of Every MonthThe Rev. Dr. D. Pete Windham, Priest The Rev Lou Little, Deacon Services Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library DriveAn Unchanging Faith In A Changing World Morning Prayer & Holy Communion Sunday...............10:00 A.M.The Rev. Lou Little, PriestServices Temporarily at Senior Citizens Center, 120 Library Drive An Unchanging Faith In A Changing World COMFORTER FUNERAL HOMEW. P. Rocky ComforterL.F.D.(850) 227-1818 www.faithchristianpsj.net (850) 229-6707 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Our Church can be your homeFirst Church of the Nazarene2420 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 (850) 229-9596 Give unto the Lord the glory due His name, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness. Psalm 29:2Sunday School............................10 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship ...........11 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ..............6 p.m. Wednesday Evening Service ....... 7 p.m. A Spirit Filled Outreach Oriented Word of Faith ChurchHOME OF THE POWERHOUSE YOUTHMINISTRIESPastors Andrew & Cathy Rutherford Welcome you to worship with us: Sunday 10:30am SundayNight Prayer 6pm Wednesday 7pm www.familylifechurch.net 323Reid Ave ~ Downtown Port St. Joe, FL ~ 850-229-5433 Deborah Tuttle Wednesday: Children: 6:15 p.m. ET Youth: 6:15 p.m. ET Choir: 7:00 p.m. ET First Baptist Church 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education Bobby Alexander,Minister to StudentsNew Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am Sunday School & Worship Service ................. 10:30 am Sunday Evening Adult Bible Study ................. 6:00 pm Wednesday Night Supper .......................... 5:30 pm Wednesday Night Adult Prayer Meeting ............. 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Children's Ministry activities ....... 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities ........... 6:30 pm www.fbcpsj.org Wednesday Night Youth Ministry activities www.fbcpsj.org Jeff Pinder Pastor SundaySunday School.............9:00 am Worship Service............10:30 am Youth Groups...............5:30 pm New Service Schedule for First Baptist ChurchSunday School & Worship Service .................. 9:00 am WednesdayWednesday Night Supper..............5:00 6:15 pm ............................5:45 6:10 pm Nursery........................................6:00 7:30 pm .......................................6:15 7:30 pm Surrender Student Ministry...........6:15 7:30 pm The Unshakable Truth Journey.....6:15 7:30 pm Celebration Choir Rehearsal........6:30 7:30 pm Prayer Meeting...........................6:30 7:30 pm Praise Band.............................7:30 9:00 pm(Rehearsal in Sanctuary) SUNDAY : WORSHIP AT SUNSETPARK 8 AM 10:30 AM ON THE 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH SUNDAY: BIBLE CLASS 9:30 AM SATURDAY : COFFEE TIME 9 11 AM MONDAY : LIFETREE CAF 7 PM WEDNESDAY: MENS BIBLE STUDY 8 AM & WOMENS BIBLE STUDY 5 PM1602 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL(850) 890.1424 www.livingwateratthebeach.com Emma J. Creamer Evans, daughter of Frank and Della Creamer, born March 20, 1914, she went to be with the Lord on Aug. 1, 2012. She was preceded in death by her husband, Auther Edward Evans; son, Joseph D. Evans; and daughter, Opal Cooper. She is survived by her daughters, Louise Fincher of Beverly Hills, FL, Myrtice Chambers of Eastpoint, Esther (Edward Harris) of Eastpoint, Rachel (John L Glass) of Eastpoint; sons, Paul Evans, Aaron Evans both of Eastpoint; 28 grandchildren; 47 great-grandchildren; and 36 great-greatgrandchildren. Services were held at United Baptist Church in Eastpoint at 1 p.m. ET Monday, August 5, 2012 with the Rev. Bobby Shiver officiating.. Interment will follow in Eastpoint Cemetery. Comforter Funeral Home will be in charge of funeral arrangements.Emma J. Creamer EvansDavid Wallace Manning, 64, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed away Monday, July 23, 2012. Arrangements are being handled by Anderson-Long-Klontz Funeral Home Ltd., 6825 Weaver Road, Rockford, IL 61114, phone 815-654-2255.David Wallace ManningJean Irene Mims, 69, of Overstreet passed away Aug. 4, 2012. She was well known for her arts and crafts. She owned, Lets Knit Yarn Shop, in Port St. Joe, and she also was a nurse and radiology technician for Gulf Pines Hospital and for many years she was nurse for Dr. Shirley Simpson. She was preceded in death by her parents, father, James Monte LeMaster and her mother, Irene Pearl Walker. She is survived by her husband, Peavy Mims of Overstreet; her children, Tammy Mims of Ponce de Leon, Jamie Mims of Dothan, AL., Sharie Moore and husband Jim of Lynn Haven, Tim Mims and wife Melissa of Howard Creek; nine grandchildren; and one sister, Jodie Welchko. Graveside services were held 11 a.m. ET Wednesday, August 8, 2012 at Pleasant Rest Cemetery in Altha, FL, with the Rev. Don Hodges of ciating, In lieu of owers those who wish may make donations to Emerald Coast Hospice, Post Of ce Box 1520, Lynn Haven, Florida 32444-4611 in Mrs. Mims memory. All services are under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home.Jean Irene MimsRobert Leslie Taylor, age 74 of White City, Fla., born June 12, 1938, in Gorin, Mo., passed away July 31, 2012, at Covenant Hospice of Bay Medical Center. He is survived by his wife, Zola, of 55 years and their six children, Marla, Susan, Robert (Alisa), Mathew (Teresa), Angie (John), and Charles (Kate); 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and sisters Dolly and Onnalise. He was preceded in death by his mother, father, step-father and brother. He is a veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard (four years) as well as the U.S. Navy Seabees (13 years). He completed two combat tours in Vietnam. After nishing his military service, he became a general contractor and Facilities Manager for Bay St. Joseph Care Center. There was a memorial service beginning at 3 p.m. ET on Saturday, Aug. 4, at White City Baptist Church with visitation from 2-3 p.m. ET. Local services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home.Robert Leslie TaylorSPECIAL TO THE STARIf you have driven down Garrison Ave in the past few weeks you will have noticed that Faith Christian School, on the corner of Twentieth St. and Garrison Ave., has undergone a facelift. The beauti cation process has taken several weeks but has been worth every minute. Thank you to Austin and Dena Sapp, Brian and Megan Burkett, Mitch and Sabrina Burke, Mark and Kayce Costin, Michael Hammond, Sylvia Costin and other friends of FCS.Terry Helms, 67, of Port St. Joe, Fla., and Two Rivers, Wisc., began his new journey Monday, July 9. He went peacefully into the next phase armed with all the love of his family and friends. Free of pain and able to breathe, he moved on. As he said, There will be no sad songs and slowwalkin music when I go. We are to celebrate his courage, dedication, character (and he certainly was a Character), his sarcasm, his wit and his sobriety. A decorated Vietnam veteran, he was an avid sherman and bluegrass music lover. Terry returned to Atlanta, Ga., after the service to work as a re ghter for 30 years before retiring to Port St. Joe, Fla., with summers spent in Two Rivers, Wiscn. He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Pamela Garmon-Helms, Port St. Joe, Fla.; son, Jason Helms of Oakwood, Ga.; daughter, Dani Helms Weaver; granddaughters, Hannah and Elizabeth Weaver, Duluth, Ga. An October memorial is planned for Port St. Joe. Deja & Martin Funeral Chapels, 1506 18th Street, Two Rivers, assisted with local arrangements. The family would like to thank Heartland Hospice of Wisconsin with a special thanks to Stacey Kluthe, RN, who walked with her uncle through lifes nal stages.Terry L. Helms TERRY L. HELMS Obituaries The Lions Tale To view all of the obituaries and sign a guestbook, visit star .com.

PAGE 17

LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, August 9, 2012 Vote for Phil LanfordSuperintendent of Schools(Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid by Phil Lanford, Dem., for Superintendent of Schools Tent Revival to feature Evangelist Thomas BoozerThere will be a Salvation and Healing Tent Revival at 1249 Hwy. 22 South in Wewahitchka beginning Aug. 3. The revival will be held nightly, excluding Sundays, at 7:30 p.m. CDT. Evangelist Thomas Boozer will be preaching the word of God. Everyone is invited to attend. For more information call (229) 465-3312. Come expecting your miracle. First Baptist to hold AWANA ClubsBecause kids matter to God. First Baptist Church will have AWANA Clubs meetings beginning 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Aug. 15. The clubs are in three age groups: Cubbies (ages 3 and 4, 3 by Sept. 1), Sparks (K through second grade) and T&T (grades 3 through 6). For more information, call First Baptist Church at 227-1552.New Life Christian Center to host World Explosion serviceNew Life Church and Pastors Johnny and Shirley Jenkins would like to invite everyone to come out and join them in a three night World Explosion Service on Aug 15, 16 and 17 starting at 7 p.m. ET nightly. The speaker will be Pastor Michelle Bradley of Mobile, Ala. She operates in the ofce as a pastor, evangelist and seer. Come and be blessed. The church is located at 504 6th Street. Zion Fair to host musical benetZion Fair Missionary Baptist Church will host a benet musical program at 5 p.m. ET on Sunday, Aug. 12, for our member, Sister Jean Whitley-Thompson. Donations raised for this program will be used to repair the roof on the old family house located on Avenue C, so that she can have a home to live in; after the fact of suffering the loss of her personal home due to unexpected circumstances. The following church choirs scheduled to participate: New Bethel Baptist, Mt. Carmel, New Life, Philadelphia Primitive Baptist, Thompson Temple Holiness, Church of God, New Covenant, Victory Temple, Port St. Joe Church of Praise, Zion Fair Baptist, Body of Christ, Amazing Grace, New Bethel AME, New Covenant, The Body of Christ, and North Port St. Joe Community adult and youth Choirs. Our special guest choir will be Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist Church Choir, with the Rev. Dr. Craig Riley of Tallahassee. The pastor of Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church, Rev. Wilson Hall of Tallahassee and the members welcome the Holy Spirit in any interested church choir to come out to participate, and show your love for this much needed Christian duty cause. Faith brBRIefEFS You were given a mission, when you accepted Jesus as Lord of your life. Have you had a problem with it enough to cause you strife? There are places youll take a risk when witnessing for the Lord. The things of the world and Jesus are not in accord. In many places people will cause you uneasiness and strife. There are also places that can cost you your life. We even have problems with brothers and sisters in the Lord. It truly is a shame when we cant be in one accord. God have given me a talent, but some dont like what I write. As a matter of fact, last week, a fellow kinda got uptight. As it stands right now, I might be taking a risk too. Im sorry if you dont like my writings, but Ill keep writing for the ones that do. Billy JohnsonWitness at your own risk By ED MCATee EE RContributing writer So you are thinking about joining the military. Well, you probably have hundreds of questions. Through the years, I have counseled high school and college men and women about joining a military service. It never fails, you have all these questions, but once you walk into the recruiters ofce; you cannot remember any of them. Being looked at the former US commander in Afghanistan, Stanley McChrystal, in June of 2012, pushed Congress for a reinstatement of the draft. Many Americans are in support of his idea, myself included, because of the strain it is placing on our military personnel who have been deployed many times for long durations. His recommendation would provide more troops at a lower training cost and help to ease the rotation strain of the current volunteer force. Regardless, there are several questions you need to make sure you ask your recruiter and several things you need to make sure your recruiter knows. There are so many benets and so much information about the military, it is impossible for your recruiter to cover everything. Here are ve important questions you need to ask or tell your recruiter. First, when do I take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)? This is an important question because what you do in the military is dependent on this test. Being prepared and scoring as high as possible will give you the most choices when you start your military career. There are several ways to prepare. You can buy a study guide or visit the Military.com online ASVAB Preparation and Practice Tests. Most recruiters will give you a practice test to help predict your score on the ASVAB. Next question is how soon will I leave for basic training? Joining the military and leaving for basic training are two different things. When you join the military, you are qualifying rst by testing and second by taking a physical. After qualifying in both areas, you will pick your job and swear-in. You are NOT leaving for basic training now. It is important that your recruiter, and the Military Entrance Processing Station liaisons know when you are available to leave for basic training. It is always better to get your career started as soon as possible but not everyone can do this. For instance, if you are attending college you probably will not be available until the end of the semester. If you are a high school senior, you need to make sure you know when your graduation date is and when you are available to leave. When will I know what my job is going to be? This is an important question. Each branch of the service has its own ways of assigning jobs. For example, the Navy will give you a job while you are at the MEPS. The Air Force can give you a job at the MEPS but usually will have you come up with a list of jobs and put you on a qualied and waiting list. Just make sure you understand what job you are selected for and when you leave for basic training. What documents do I need? Most people know where their drivers license is and probably their social security card, but many people cannot nd their birth certicate, high school diploma, etc. quickly. Your recruiter will give you a list of the documents needed. Start gathering them as soon as you decide to join. The list may include a government issued ID (Drivers License), social security card, high school diploma, birth certicate, college transcripts, marriage license, medical documents, court documents, or adoption documents, to name a few. What about medical and legal records? Recruiters need to know your complete medical history and information about all legal infractions trafc tickets, misdemeanors, felonies, and so forth. Recruiters are trying to help you, not disqualify you. Disclosing your medical history and getting supporting documentation for medical issues will give you the best possible chance of qualifying for the military. Law violations work much the same way, disclosing them up-front will give the recruiter the best opportunity to run a waiver when applicable. Being up-front with your recruiter about medical and legal issues will keep you from wasting your time and the recruiters time. Remember, there are many questions you need to ask you recruiter and many things you will need to tell them. Write down your questions! One young man I helped wrote down 83 questions. The recruiter spent three hours going over his list. The recruit felt much better because he was informed. He is now on his second term in the United States Air Force. Get some answers about joining the military

PAGE 18

LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012natural resources, to give our time and use our skills to preserve what is important to us. This country cannot continue to operate with an attitude of entitlement and spending beyond our budget. The Star is running this monthly column, Volunteer Opportunities on the front page of the Community section of the paper once a month. Those interested can also nd the story at www.star .com and The Port St. Joe Star Facebook page. Please help make that difference! Contact the Gulf County Chamber of Commerce, Petrie or Tim Croft at tcroft@star .com to provide additional opportunities for this column. Here are a few opportunities: Abused and neglected children need a voice in court! There are currently several children without volunteer advocate representation in Gulf County. The 14th Circuit Guardian Ad Litem Program wants these children spoken for. Be a strong, dependable voice, appointed by the court, to support these children. Training classes are starting in August. Please call 747-5180 for more information and an application. Volunteers are needed to assist greeting guests and doing of ce duties at the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge of ce in Apalachicola. Introduce visitors to displays and information about St. Vincent Island. Call (850) 6538808 and ask for Charlotte if you can help on Mondays and/or Wednesdays. Able-bodied volunteers are needed to help with outdoor work on St. Vincent Island. You need to be able to tolerate heat and sweat, but the island and wildlife are amazing. Call Shelley at (850) 527-8535 if you can help on the island. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer LPort Saint Joe area Design professionals on premise C Professional Installation2760 HWest Port Saint JoeLOCALLYOWNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $50 Offpurchase of $ 750.00 or moreTile starting at Carpet starting at TM1-850-309-1996 shredit.com Gun ShowAugust11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2080433Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING DIFFERENCE from page B1This year, in addition to the traditional fried shell sh, Provisions, Gourmet by the Bay and the culinary school at Gulf Coast State College each prepared a special scallop dish special for the festival. Provisions prepared scallop sliders, small sandwiches with little cakes prepared from ground scallops and served with garlic lime aioli. The sliders were paired with sweet potato res and a scallop cocktail like a Bloody Mary but avored with the celebrated shell sh. The cooking school brought a delicious ceviche and served up the succulent shell sh raw and Gourmet by the Bay went ethnic with a scallop quesadilla. On Saturday, there was a classic car show where vehicles of all kinds were gathered and displayed. Categories included prewar antiques, muscle cars and specially modi ed rides. Aaron Tippin headlined the musical line up. His performance on Saturday night drew wild applause from a big crowd. Recording star Reed Waddle also was welcomed to the stage when he performed on Friday afternoon. Waddle wrote much of his own material. The award-winning Kevin Jacobs Band from Panama City followed Waddle on Friday evening performing classic rock by artists like the Doobie Brothers, Journey and Cheap Trick that brought the crowd to its feet cheering and dancing. Monticellos Premier Southern Rock and Country Band 19 South, opened for Tippin on Saturday and they were followed by Hits and Grins a trio of Nashville songwriters who also are talented performers. A few raindrops fell on Saturday but it wasnt enough to dampen the spirits of scallop enthusiasts and music lovers and even helped to cool off the steamy park. FESTIVAL from page B1 Photos by TIM CROFT | The Star and DEBBIE HOOPER | joebay.com

PAGE 19

LocalThe Star| B7Thursday, August 9, 2012 Paid by Barbara Radcliff, Republican, for County Commissioner District 5 I will work diligently for everyone in Gulf Countyregardless of their last name or street address. I will respond to voter concerns with the same the county and its citizens will always be my number one priority not any special interest group. I do not want a career I want to make a difference.I ask for your vote on August 14, 2012. Honesty...Integrity...Common SenseAccessibility DedicationAccountabilityPassion...CommitmentPd. Pol. Ad. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp (Pd.Pol.Ad.) INTEGRITY DILIGENT DISCIPLINED DEDICATED EXPERIENCED Our Children are the Future! Paid by Billy C. Quinn, Jr. for School Board 7008 Hwy. 98 St. Joe Beach, FL 32456 (850) 647-6167 THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGHTSPECIALS 6:00 9:00HOURS: 236ReidAve (850) 229.71218 OZ RIBEYE SPECIAL OR SHRIMP SPECIAL WITH 2 SIDES: $11.95Orders served with:CHEESE GRITS, FF, BAKED POTATO, SALAD AND BREAD **AWARD WINNINGDESSERTS** Goodwill Big Bend to host job fair Star Staff ReportThe Goodwill Career Training Center in Port St. Joe will host its rst job fair from 1:30-4:30 p.m. ET Aug. 15 at the Gulf County Senior Citizens Association Building, 120 Library Drive. Your participation in this event will be a great support to the community as well as to the Goodwill mission of helping people find suitable employment and looking for the right individual for your business. There are 15 tables available for this event, so we ask employers to register early. Set up and tear down will be provided. Companies should provide company identi cation for your table (banner, name plate), employment applications or printed instructions on application process, and a representative to man your table. Goodwill will spread the word about this great event throughout Gulf, Bay and Franklin counties. The group will notify the Work Force centers in Port St. Joe and Panama City and expects a diverse group of potential employees to attend. To register, call Tandra Burns at 850-229-1273 or email psjctc@goodwill bigbend.com.Star Staff ReportThe Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves is sponsoring its second Nature Photo Contest. The entry deadline is Aug. 27. Winning photos will be exhibited beginning Sept. 8 at the City of Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art and later at the St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center at the Buffer Preserve. Once again, the Apalachicola Center is allowing the friends to use its facilities to exhibit winning photos. This year, photos will be exhibited at the same time as locally-renowned nature photographer John Spohrer. Winning photos from the rst contest can be viewed at http://stjosephbaypreserves.org/photo-contest/ contest-winners_2.html. Entry fees from this annual event will bene t the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves. Friends pay a discounted fee of $10 per photo. Other entrants pay $20 each or $50 for three photos. The hope is that some of the exhibited photos showcasing the natural beauty of St. Joseph Bay and surrounding region will inspire others to protect the natural areas and heritage of St. Joseph Bay. Download entry form and contest rules at st.josephbaypreserves. org/photo-contest. Entries must be received by Aug. 27. Download a membership form for the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves at http://stjosephbaypreserves.org. For more information, email Bill Boothe at PhotoNaturalist@NatureIn Focus.com or call 643-2583.Friends of St. Joe Bay sponsors photo contest Hand to dramatize Family PortraitBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com An accomplished playwright, familiar with comedy, plans to strike a more serious note, as his newest work, The Family Portrait is set to premier at the Dixie Theater. Barry Hands two-act drama, featuring a cast of seven, all local performers, will take the stage at 7 p.m. Aug. 17-18 at the Dixie. This is absolutely not a comedy, said Hand, who formerly was employed with Gulf County Solid Waste. Its a highly energized drama with suspense, secrets and revelations. Hands talents with playwriting date back to when he was a sophomore at Apalachicola High School, and have blossomed over the years with his writing of 13 plays. This latest work, written in 2010, takes on the more serious themes of unforgiveness, manipulation and frustration and is set in the 1950s, at the home of the late Cecil Lane, in an unnamed American town. The s and the s are intriguing to me personally because I am a history buff, Hand said. I wanted to tease my mind, I wanted to challenge my mind. Presently the pastor of Apalachicolas Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Hands Christian faith has no doubt inspired his creativity but it wont be front and center like one of his Sunday sermons might be. Instead, Hand has shown a knack for weaving his message with subtlety as he draws three-dimensional characters in the show, which he also directs. When it came time to cast the play, Hand said he turned to people who he had observed before hand in their roles in the Franklin County community. By knowing them and their personalities, and believing how they could make the characters come alive, I called them up. Some wanted to read the script rst, and some trusted my expertise, he said. I feel humbled and blessed to have this cast. One actress destined for a part was Hands younger sister, Alisa Hand Hendels, who portrays Plasy, the trusted housekeeper of Vera Lane, the widow of Cecil Lane and matriarch of the family. Hands sister rst appeared in his plays when she was in the eighth grade, and for the last 27 years has been in all of her older brothers works. Liz Sisung, one of the countys most accomplished actresses, portrays Vera Lane, who is hosting a gathering at her home for the purpose of staging a family portrait. But it turns out to be anything but, said Hand, offering no further hints. Appearing as Roy, Lanes son who has traveled home for the portrait, is Adam Cannon, youth pastor of the Apalachicola St. George Island United Methodist Church Cooperative Parish. Apalachicola artist and shopkeeper Katie McFarland portrays Roys wife, Carol.A second member of the local clergy, Craig Hicks, pastor of Apalachicolas Living Waters Assembly of God, assumes the role of the Lanes family physician, Dr. Watkins. Rounding out the cast are Trina Ford as Mary Alice, Plasys sister, and Maranda Moses as Mona, a young woman with an illness. Hand said nothing in the show is offlimits to children, but cautioned that much of the shows impact may be lost on the younger set. They would not be able to comprehend the plot and subject line, he said. The show, which runs about 90 minutes, also features original music and lyrics written and performed by Hand. Cannon, Moses and Ford all are part of the singing. Sally Crown handles the stage manager duties, with rehearsals ongoing on the stage of the former Apalachicola High School. The show is produced in conjunction with Mt. Zion Pictures, Hands company, with a future lm now in the works. Tickets for the show, $13 in advance and $15 at the door, are available at the Dixie box of ce or by calling 653-3200. VERGIL MARSHALL | Special to the TimesAppearing in The Family Portrait are, seated from left, Trina Ford, Maranda Moses, Liz Sisung, Adam Cannon and Katie McFarland. Standing, from left, are Alisa Hand Hendels and Craig Hicks.

PAGE 20

LocalB8 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012Special to The StarPENSACOLA Sacred Heart Health System and Ascension Health have announced the appointment of Susan Davis as the president and CEO of Sacred Heart Health System. Davis was selected as the interim president and CEO of Sacred Heart in February and recently was named the permanent CEO. Davis said that when she arrived in Pensacola to succeed Laura Kaiser as the Sacred Heart CEO, she intended to serve as only the interim leader until a permanent CEO was chosen. After discussions over the past few months with the leaders at Ascension Health and Sacred Hearts Board of Trustees, I decided to make a long-term commitment to lead Sacred Heart, Davis said. I am excited about the opportunity to lead a great team of employees and to build stronger relationships with the many loyal physicians who have made Sacred Heart a leader in excellent patient outcomes. A number of factors led to my decision to stay as Sacred Hearts CEO, she added. Over the past four months, I have fallen in love with the Sacred Heart family and the communities it serves. I also saw the opportunity to provide Sacred Heart with a vision for the future and a renewed focus on quality, safety and patient satisfaction. She leads a Health System that includes hospitals in Pensacola, Walton County, Panama City and Port St. Joe, as well as a network of physicians stretching from Gulf Shores, Ala. to Apalachicola, Fla. In addition to her role at Sacred Heart, Davis also will serve as Ascension Healths Ministry Market Leader for Florida, the Gulf Coast, New York and Connecticut. Ascension Health, the parent organization for Sacred Heart, is the nations largest Catholic and nonpro t healthcare system. Davis has served as the CEO of St. Vincents Health in Bridgeport, Conn., since 2004. She began her healthcare career as a nurse in New York City. She served for 18 years in leadership roles at Vassar Brothers Medical Center in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., where she began as vice president of patient care services and then became the chief operating of cer and eventually the CEO. She holds a bachelors degree in nursing from Mount Saint Mary College, a masters degree in nursing administration from Columbia University in New York, and a doctorate in education from Columbia.About Sacred Heart Health SystemSacred Heart Health System is Northwest Floridas leading provider of high quality health care to children and adults. The hub of the Health System is the 466-bed Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola that includes the regions only Womens and Childrens Hospital. In 2011 and 2012, Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola was rated in an independent national study among the top 5 percent in the nation for superior patient outcomes. Key services also include a Regional Heart and Vascular Institute, a regional Stroke Center, Level II Trauma Center, a Cancer Center af liated with M. D. Anderson Physicians Network, and a large regional network of primary care and specialty doctors stretching from Foley, Ala. to Apalachicola, Fla. In 2003, the Health System opened Sacred Heart Hospital on the Emerald Coast, a 58-bed community hospital in Walton County that is rated among the top hospitals in the United States for patient satisfaction. In March 2010, the new Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf, a 19-bed hospital, opened in Port St. Joe. This year, Sacred Heart formed a joint venture with LHP Hospital Group to lease and operate Bay Medical Center in Panama City. Sacred Heart has approximately 4,500 employees and is part of Ascension Health, the nations largest system of Catholic and nonpro t health care facilities. For more information, call 416-7000 or visit www. sacred-heart.org. About Ascension HealthAscension Health (www.ascensionhealth.org) is transforming health care by providing the highest quality care to all, with special attention to those who are poor and vulnerable. Ascension Health, which provided $1.2 billion in care of persons living in poverty and community bene t programs last year, is the nations largest Catholic and nonpro t health system. Our Mission-focused Health Ministries employ more than 121,000 associates serving in more than 1,400 locations in 21 states and the District of Columbia. Paid by Wyvonne Grifn Pickett, Demo. for Supervisor of Elections Shes our lady...FOR SUPERVISOR OFELECTIONS Paid by Wyvonne Grifn Pickett, Demo. for Supervisor of Elections Paid by Wyvonne Grifn Pickett, Demo. for Supervisor of Elections vote WYVONNE GRIFFIN PICKETT(Pd.Pol.Ad.) Davis named president, CEO of Sacred HeartOver the past four months, I have fallen in love with the Sacred Heart family and the communities it serves. I also saw the opportunity to provide Sacred Heart with a vision for the future and a renewed focus on quality, safety and patient satisfaction.Susan Davis president, CEO of Sacred Heart Health System Is it the time to buy?Special to The StarThe housing market in our area is starting to see some signs of recovery. Prices might be down, but sales are up. Looking at the areas of Gulf County and Mexico Beach, the rst half of 2011 saw 123 residential sales with total sales equaling $24,777,769. The rst half of 2012 saw 171 sales with total sales equaling $32,986,800. Mexico Beach/St. Joe Beach accounted for 94 sales totaling $18,409,500; Cape San Blas/South Gulf, 40 sales totaling $11,118,800; Port St. Joe, 27 sales totaling $2,484,000 and North Gulf County, 10 sales totaling $974,500. The sales of lots and land also increased. The rst half of 2011 saw 80 sales totaling $5,365,500. During the rst half of 2012, 161 sales totaled $9,936,505. Mexico Beach/St. Joe Beach had 34 sales totaling $2,411,800; Cape San Blas/South Gulf, 96 sales totaling $6,861,600; Port St. Joe, 19 sales totaling $507,525; and North Gulf County, 12 sales totaling $155,580. With the mortgage interest rate the lowest it has been in years, a mortgage deduction tax savings for homeowners and a shrinking housing inventory, now is the right time to buy.

PAGE 21

LocalThe Star| B9Thursday, August 9, 2012 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN227-7847TODAY!CALL 227-7847 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! 229-1324 PROFESSIONAL FLOOR CARE, INC.Residential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery CleaningServing the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic Tile and Grout Cleaning RVs Cars Trucks Vans 24 Hour Emergency Water Extraction J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Dri Brite Brite Brite Brite Brite 850-229-966315 Years of Service!Steam Cleaning & Remediation 24 Hour Water Extraction Calling All Beginner Artists!Painting Classes specially designed for new painters using the tried and true technique of One Stroke Painting. Classes are $35.00, 3 hours, and include all materials; as well as a starter set of brushes to keep.Glynis Holcombe OSCI(One Stroke Certied Instructor)www.pieceocape.com 850-229-1185 PUBLIC NOTICEA Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Monday, August 20, 2012 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, August 28, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discucc and act on the following: 1. Variance Application Mickey and Sharon Winchester Parcel ID # 03805-130R Located in Section 23, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida encroachment into road setback. 2. Development Policy, Ordinances, Comprehensive Plan, and LDR Revisions Comprehensive Plan Amendments Transmittal of proposed military support and other comp plan amendments Comp Plan and LDR review of vested private properties within conservation land use amendment Occupational License Additional development & planning issues 3. Public and Open Discussion The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room 311. (2012.83) 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT THE MEXICO BEACHCITY LIMITS (850) 647-8310 MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 9454 HWY 98 BEACON HILL AT T H E MEXICO BEAC H C ITY L I M ITS (850) 647-8310 GREAT SELECTION OF ALL YOUR FAVORITE BEER, WINE & SPIRITS KARAOKE & DJ IN THE CROWS NEST NEIL JAMES ON THE POOP DECK COMEENJOYTHESUNSETRANDYSTARK WITH ART LONG ON SAX ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS 10% OFFALL RETAIL(No Double Discounts) RET 7 FOILS$25.00Cut/Style NOT includedM-F 9-7 9-5SUN 12-5 M-F 9-7 9-5 M-F 9-7 9-5 BACK TO SCHOOL HOURS 10% OFF 10% OFF $25.00 SHOW YOUR SPIRITFashion Color Extensions$8.00/each The Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce will be conducting vehicle safety checkpoints and DUI check points during the month of August. The check points will be held throughout the county to include Highway 98 near St. Joe Beach, Highway 98 and Garrison Ave, C-30 Simmons Bayou, Highway 71 North of White City, Highway 22 and Highway 22A, Highway 71 and Westarm Creek, Highway 71 Dalkeith Area and Highway 71 near the Calhoun line. Gulf County arrests July 30 Investigators went to Narvaez Street to do a follow-up on a theft report. While on the property they found marijuana plants growing in a pot in the back yard. Troy Dewonne Williams, 33, was arrested for cultivation of marijuana and taken to the Gulf County Jail. Deputies responded to a shooting call at Pine Ridge Apartments. During the investigation it was learned that Walton Henry Butler, 59, had shot Everett Gant with a .22 caliber ri e. Butler was arrested and charged with attempted murder. He is currently in the Gulf County Jail held without bond.July 31Thomas Dewitt Harper, 40, was arrested on a warrant for grand theft. It is alleged that he stole a 26-inch racing-type bicycle from a house in the Windmark area and then pawn it at a Panama City pawn shop. Lacey Dupree Williams, 22, was stopped for a traf c violation. She was asked to perform several sobriety exercises which she did poorly on. She was arrested for DUI and refused to take a breath test. Deputies responded to a residence in the Wewahitchka area in reference to a disturbance. They made contact with John Rogers Grice, Jr., 51, who was obviously intoxicated and agitated. They attempted to calm him but were unable to do so. Grice was tased and became compliant. He was arrested and charged with disorderly intoxication, resisting without violence and assault on a law enforcement of cer.August 1Melissa Ash, 31, was arrested on a warrant for the murder of Hilton Dewayne Sewell which occurred in 1999. She was originally arrested in 1999 and charged with murder but found incompetent to stand trial in 2000. The state of Florida has probable cause to believe at this time that Ash is now competent to stand trial. Ash is currently being held in the Bay Jail without bond.August 2Estanisio R. Fernandez, 30, was arrested on a warrant from Broward County as he was due to be released from Gulf Correctional Unit.August 3Larayon Joseph Reddice, 20, was arrested on a warrant for violation of probation; the original charge was sale of a controlled substance. It is alleged that he committed a new law violation.August 4Jerry Donell Curry, 44, was operating a vehicle that was stopped for speeding. The deputy noticed the odor of an alcoholic beverage about his person. The deputy asked Curry if he knew where he was and he told the deputy he was on the Ross Clark Circle near Dothan. When he performed badly on several sobriety tests he was placed under attest for DUI. Jessie Huskey, 33, was arrested for disorderly conduct when he was found walking in the middle of U. S. Highway 98 while intoxicated.Port St Joe Police Department arrests July 31Yolanda Aquilla Robinson; criminal mischief, resisting with violenceAugust 1Gary Lee Richardson, 38, DWLSRAugust 3Rodney Dewayne Adkison, 31, violation of probationAugust 4John Robert Cannon, 51, leaving scene of a traf c crash William Alex Hull, 39, warrant out of Sarasota CountyGulf County sheriff arrest log ARREST REPORT

PAGE 22

LocalB10 | The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 B10| The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 88903 PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF MEXICO BEACH SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE IV ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS The City of Mexico Beach will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in constructing the: CITY OF MEXICO BEACH -SIDEWALK PROJECT PHASE IV Plans and specifications can be obtained at the City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410. Bids will be received until 2:00 p.m. Central Time, Friday, August 31st at City of Mexico Beach City Hall, 1202 Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, Florida 32410 and will be opened and read publicly immediately thereafter. All Bids shall be submitted in an envelope clearly marked Sealed Bid -Sidewalk Project Phase IV. The City of Mexico Beach reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The City also reserves the right to reject contractors who in the Citys opinion are not qualified to perform the work based on the questionnaire submitted. All Bids shall be firm for a period of 90 days after opening. This includes material prices. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Point of Contact will be Chris Hubbard, City Administrator, at 850. 648.5700 or by email at c.hubbard@mexicobeachgov.com. All bidders shall comply with all applicable state and local laws concerning licensing, registration, and regulations of contractors doing business in Florida. The City shall award the contract to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder; provided however, the City reserves the right to award the contract to a bidder who is not the lowest responsive and responsible bidder if the city determines in its reasonable discretion that another bid offers the city a better value based upon the reliability, quality of service, or product of such other bidder. August 9, 2012 88351S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1543 Application No. 2012-32 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 06269-896R Description of Property: Lot 11, Block D, Seagrass Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 5, Page 1 Name in which assessed: Seagrass Properties, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 22nd day of August, 2012. Dated this 17th day of July, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2012 88353S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that NuTax 1 GP the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1542 Application No. 2012-31 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 06269-892R Description of Property: Lot 9, Block D, Seagrass Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, in Plat Book 5, Page 1. Name in which assessed: Steven Delonga and Ryan Dwyer All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 22nd day of August, 2012. Dated this 17th day of July, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2012 88355S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Wells Fargo Bank OBO Tax Liens the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1073 Application No. 2012-30 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No. 03607-000R Description of Property: Lots 12, 14, and 16, Block 7, of Beacon Hill Addition, according to the plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida, according to the plat filed by M.D. Taylor and H.H. Bullard and other plats and records filed in the Office of the Circuit Court Clerk, Gulf County, Florida. Said lots lying in Original Lot Three (3) and being in Section Thirty (30) and Thirty-One (31), Township Six (6) South, Range Eleven (11) West. Name in which assessed: Charlie Mack Brock All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 22nd day of August, 2012. Dated this 17th day of July, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk July 19, 26, Aug 2, 9, 2012 88577S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011-CA-000210 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, CHARLOTTE ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE M. ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE MONIREA ODOM, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, CHARLOTTE ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE M. ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE MONIREA ODOM, DECEASED. Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST A S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Gulf County, Florida: THE WEST 60 FEET OF LOT 3 AND THE EAST 8 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, C.L. MORGANS ADDITION TO WEWAHITCHKA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 2004 FLEETWOOD OAK KNOLL 28X52 DOUBLE -WIDE MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBERS: FAFL334A76671-0K31 AND GAFL334BY6671-OD31, WHICH PERMANENTLY AFIXED AND LOCATED ON THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. A/K/A 127 JM GRIFFIN DRIVE WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 2nd day of July, 2012. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 2, 9, 2012 88617S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. CASE NO. 12-31 PR IN PROBATE IN RE: The Estate of JAMES FRANK FINCHER, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JAMES FRANK FINCHER, deceased, File Number 12-31 PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Gulf County Courthouse, Probate Division, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The name and address of the personal representative and that personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF and they will come back, we want them to have a fear for humans. Richards, and several other ofcers and Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce deputies, were taking up arms and raising voices last week as part of training in bear aversion or bear hazing. Taught by the FWCC, under which the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce will carry a permit to use non-lethal techniques to move bears from unwanted areas, the training was to show the wide array of techniques available to ofcers serving in bear country as Gulf County and surrounding areas are referred. They learned a lot and they enjoyed it, said Gulf County Sheriff Joe Nugent. Telesco explained that the aversion training was to ensure bears stay away from places that they are not safe or welcome, for instance a residential backyard, a park or the trash cans on the roadway. Aversion training is aimed as something of a piggy-back on what the FWC informs the public about bears ensure there are no attractions such as food not fully secured. Bear hazing is a tool in conjunction with the common sense of how to avoid having bears roaming around humans in the rst place. We encourage residents to haze bears, whether by banging pots and pans or motion alarms, Telesco said, while emphasizing that humans should never confront or rush bears and should do everything, including just staying inside until law enforcement arrives, to avoid bears. Telesco and the FWC emphasizes that a bear in full run covers a lot of ground quickly, they are agile climbers and when it comes to food or, more importantly, a female protecting her cub all but fearless. The key is to make them uncomfortable, fearful of humans. And last week Telesco trotted out a series of tools and techniques that local law enforcement could use in protecting the public from black bears. From the rudimentary, a slingshot with a hard round ball, to the sophisticated, a shotgun loaded with plastic buckshot, ofcers experienced a range of tactics. Telesco used a paint ball gun hence the blue chicken pox and its canisters, a starters pistol with pyrotechnic rounds and the thunder of the Hornets Nest to show and train ofcers in how to use tools at their disposal. Telesco emphasized that voice was also a key every ofcer was required to shout at the bear as they were ring, essentially letting the bear know there is business afoot. You have to show them that you mean it, Telesco said. There are other times, he cautioned, when that is the last thing ofcers should do. If a female black bear is with a cub, it might interpret a hazing technique as a threat to her cub and attack. If the bear has entered cover, climbed a tree or is in a trap, hazing should not be considered, Telesco said. You must be aware of situational hazards, he told ofcers. Under the operational FWC permit, the GCSO will document all instances of hazing to the FWC, including the time and date, what tool or weapon was used and the result. Those reports provide data to allow the FWC to further rene techniques, Telesco said. The agency has been using this training outreach since 2007, Telesco said, as part of the states bear management program. To date a number of county sheriffs ofces, local police departments and military bases have undergone the training, which has reached more than 800 ofcers, he added. The key is the bear thinks, people not good. That is what hazing is supposed to accomplish, Telesco said. THE BEAR FACtTS Black bears are the only species of bear in Florida and they once roamed the entire state. FWC biologists estimate there are 2,5003,000 black bears in Florida. Florida bears are generally black with a brown muzzle and may have a white chest marking called a blaze. Adult black bears typically weigh between 150 to 400 pounds; males are usually larger than females. Female bears have their rst cub at about 3 years of age and generally have one to three cubs every other year. In Florida, the breeding season runs from June to August and cubs are born in late January or early February. Bears of all ages are excellent climbers and will climb trees when they are frightened or looking for food (e.g. acorns). About 80 percent of a black bears diet comes from plants, 15 percent from insects and 5 percent from meat.If a bear comes into your yardIf you encounter a black bear at close range, remain standing upright, back up slowly and speak to the bear in a calm, assertive voice. Do not intentionally feed or attract bears. If a bear is eating something on your property, take note of what it is and secure it after the bear has left the area. Never approach or surprise a bear. Keep as much distance between you and the bear as possible. Make sure you are in a secure area and the bear has a clear escape route to leave the area then yell, bang pots and pans or use an air horn to scare the bear away. Do not turn your back, play dead or run from a black bear. Back away slowly into a house, car or building. Report any bear threatening the safety of humans, pets or livestock or causing property damage to the FWC. In this area, call 265-3676. Warning! It is illegal to injure or kill black bears under Florida state law. If you are found guilty, you could face nes and/or jail time. BEAR HAZING from page B1 Photos by TIM CROFt T | The StarA larger shell shot from a shotgun contains buckshot intended to apply a bit of hurt to a bears shoulder or rump. Right, ofcers are shown a bean bag that contains rubber balls that are red at a bears shoulder or rump to put a scare in the bear.

PAGE 23

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 9, 2012 The Star | B11 24/7 Experienced Care giver looking for a private in home senior, care giver or sitter job. In Gulf County, please call 850-639-3029 Text FL19665 to 56654 Turn to classifieds Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 2, 2012 Ancillary Personal Representative RANDALL C. FINCHER 124 Valley Circle Calhoun, GA 30701 Attorney for Ancillary Personal Representative THOMAS S. GIBSON RISH, GIBSON & SCHOLZ, P.A FL BAR NO. 0350583 116 Sailors Cove Drive P.O. Box 39 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 (850) 229-8211 August 2, 9, 2012 88653S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000431 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. JERMAINE ROBINSON AND URSULA ROBINSON, HIS WIFE, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in July 13 2012 in the above-styled cause, the Clerk shall offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash on August 23, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (EST), in the COURTHOUSE LOBBY of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL, the following described property: EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A 4 SQUARE CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (AS MONUMENTED) FOR A DISTANCE OF 225.60 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD (HAVING A 60 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE GO SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 211.56 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE OF STONE MILL CREEK ROAD FOR A DISTANCE OF 105.78 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L. B. NO 6596, THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY LINE, GO SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 481.29 FEET TO A 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. NO. 6596, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES. 00 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 411.0 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE AND TOP OF BANK OF STONE MILL CREEK; THEN TURN RIGHT AND MEANDER UPSTREAM ALONG THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE AND TOP OF BANK FOR 208 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH BEARS SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING THE APPROXIMATE WATERS EDGE AND THE TOP OF. BANK, GO NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 326.5 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO 1/2 DIAMETER IRON ROD AND CAP, STAMPED L.B. 6596; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 431.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 2006 Nobility, Kingswood 66 x 28 manufactured home, Serial No: N8-12961AB, located on the property. Property Address: 1842 Stone Mill Creek, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 26, 2012 Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88657S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-00037-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, An Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA P. WIBBERG, a/k/a DEBRA M. PEDEN, the unknown spouse of Debra P. Wibberg, a/k/a Debra M. Peden, Barrier Dunes Homeowners Association, Inc., and unknown tenants or other parties in possession, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Order Adopting Report and Recommendation and Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 13, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on August 23, 2012, the following described property: UNIT 153, 128 PARKVIEW COURT, BARRIER DUNES Commence at the Northwest Corner of Government Lot 4, in Fractional Section 36, Township 8 South, Range 12 West, Gulf County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 12 minutes 24 seconds East, along the Easterly Boundary Line of Government Lot 2 in said Fractional Section 36, for a distance of 999.95 feet: thence leaving said Easterly Boundary Line of Government Lot 2, run North 89 degrees 47 minutes 36 seconds West for a distance of 348.31 feet: thence run North 05 degrees 33 minutes 00 seconds East 588.54 feet to a point on a non-tangent curve, thence run Southeasterly along said curve for an arc distance of 32.91 feet, through a central angle of 94 degrees 16 minutes 37 seconds, having a radius of 20.00 feet (said curve bearing South 41 degrees 34 minutes 53 seconds East 29.32 feet) to a point on a curve to the right, thence run long said curve Southeasterly for an arc distance of 59.20 feet, through a central angle of 38 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds, having a radius of 88.00 (said curve bearing South 69 degrees 26 minutes 21 seconds East 58.09 feet), thence run North 38 degrees 02 minutes 13 seconds East a distance of 27.51 feet, thence run South 49 degrees 34 minutes 55 seconds East 16.00 feet, thence run North 40 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds East 7.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run South 49 degrees 34 minutes 55 seconds East a distance of 16.00 feet, thence run North 40 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds East a distance of 42.00 feet, thence run North 49 degrees 34 minutes 55 seconds West a distance of 16.00 feet, thence run South 40 degrees 25 minutes 05 seconds West a distance of 42.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. DATED on July 26, 2012. Becky Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 2012 88681S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2012-CA-000038 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH LOYD AND CRYSTAL LOYD, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in 2012-CA-000038 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and KENNETH L. LOYD JR. A/K/A KENNETH LEE LOYD; CRYSTAL ANN LOYD; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A JOHN WALSH; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A RHONDA WALSH are the Defendant(s). Benny Lister as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Lobby 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 AM E.T. on August 23, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTH ONE HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE NORTH HALF OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER, 472.891 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID LINE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 EAST 134.547 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF HURD STREET (HAVING A 60 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 23 EAST ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE 245.33 FEET, THENCE DEPART SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COLLEEN STREET (HAVING A 60 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY) 124.35 FEET, THENCE DEPART SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 46 WEST 245.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2 IN PLAT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 433 PAGE 978 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must rile a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012 Rebecca L. Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 2012 88661S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2012-06 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe for replacement of a Diesel Engine at the Chipola Pump Station will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday August 17, 2012. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday August 17, 2012, at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidders name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for Replacement of #1 Pump Diesel Engine at the Chipola Pump Station. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: Provide and install, diesel engine (per codes/regulations) and final drive (gear reduction unit) equal in final (pump) power and speed to replace existing Caterpillar D13000 engine and gear reducer. Engine equipped with at least standard controls and at least one dry contact for engine trouble monitoring. Alignment will be documented through all components including coupling to #1 pump. Max pump speed under load will be verified at 460 RPM. Provide basic training for operation. All components will be new (exception; pump coupling may be used), and listed separately or within an owners manual. (two copies). Provide acceptable plan for engine exhaust connection to existing through wall piping. Provide estimated start and completion dates. For questions concerning this project, please contact Bob Lyles at 850-229-6390 or Cell (850) 527-4688. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the Citys purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer August 2, 9, 2012 88685S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2012-02CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., and administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/s SWAMPYS by and through its Director, Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 201202-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and BAR TEN LAND DEVELOPMENT, INC., an administratively dissolved Florida corporation, d/b/a SWAMPYS, by and through its Director Officer and Trustee, THOMAS NEESE, CITY OF WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA, and TLC PROPERTIES, INC., a Louisiana corporation, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 30 and 31 of Macks Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida, according To the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. AND The North Six (6) Feet of Lot 29 of Macks Addition to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida According to the Official Map or Plat thereof on file in Plat Book 1, Page 14 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88683S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-42-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in internet to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WATERFRONT GROUP WETAPPO, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; WATERFRONT GROUP FLORIDA, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; MARK R. ADKINS; WILLIAM N. ADKINS; and WETAPPO PRESERVE OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not-for-profit corporation Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23rd, 2012, in Case No. 12-42-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM ET, on August 23, 2012 the following described property: Lots 13, 20, 39, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 94, 95 122 and 164 of WETAPPO, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 36, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED: July 27, 2012 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk July 2, 9, 2012 88687S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO. 2012-89 EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELIA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 24, 2012 and entered in Civil Case No. 2012-89-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ESTATE OF ROBERT LEE HOLAND, deceased, JOANN HOLLAND WRIGHT, GENEVA KAY HOLLAND, PAMELA KAREN HOLLAND and BUCHANAN & HARPER, INC., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 23rd day of August, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: EXHIBIT A Commence at an iron pipe marking the Northwest Corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Sect. 23, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; and thence go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East along the North Boundary line of said SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 (as monumented) for a distance of 432.33 feet; thence go South 00 degrees 25 minutes 22 seconds West for a distance of 41.2.00 feet, thence go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 52.73 feet to a point on the Westerly right of way line of Creekview Drive (having a 66 foot wide right of way) for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point of Beginning go Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the left which has a radius of 131.00 feet and a central angle of 0,1 degrees 57 minutes 18 seconds for an arc length of 4.47 feet (Chord bearing South 21 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds East for 4.47 feet) to a Point of Reverse Curve; thence continue Southeasterly along said right of way line along the arc of a curve to the right which has a radius of 366.88 feet and a central angle of 15 degrees 32 minutes 40 seconds for an are length of 99.54 feet (Chord bearing South 14 degrees 34 minutes 18 seconds East for 99.23 feet); thence departing said right of way line go North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West for a distance of 242.00 feet, more or. less, to the waters edge of Wetappo Creek; thence go Northerly along said waters edge to a pint which is North 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds West, 293.40 feet, more or less, from thb Point of Beginning; thence departing said waters edge go South 89 degrees 34 minutes 38 seconds East for a distance of 293.40 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land being known as Lot 6 of the UNRECORDED PLAT OF CREEKVIEW ESTATES. DATED this 27th day of July, 2012 REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88737S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-482 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KC LLC, a Florida limited liability company, KAY W. EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS, and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS, Defendants. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 5th day of April, 2011, in Case Number 10-482 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK. N.A., is Plaintiff, and KC LLC, a Florida limited liability company, KAY EUBANKS a/k/a KAY WOOD EUBANKS and CLAYTON TERRENCE EUBANKS are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., Eastern Time, on the 23rd day of August, 2012, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lot 4, Block 6, RIVERSIDE ESTATES ADDITION TO IOLA UNIT NUMBER 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, rights, oil and gas rights, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property), including a 2001 Claz mobile home, ID# CLS097249TN. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS NO LATER THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF SALE. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 31st day of July, 2012. REBECCA NORRIS Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: B. A. Baxter As Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88783S PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given the Executive Committee of The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting to consider invoices on August 16, 2012 at 10:00am, CST. The meeting will be held at the Panama City City Hall, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, FL. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or apaulk@gc-inc.com August 9, 2012 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Extra Mile Pet SittingHome visits/overnight in the comfort of your pets home. Gulf & Bay County Diana 227-5770 Dan 227-8225 extramilepetsitting.com YORKIE AKCAdorable 8 week old puppies. Health Certified and 1st shots. Female $600 Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Port St. Joe: 212 12th St. Fri. Aug 10th & Sat Aug. 11th 8:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.Large Yard SaleIncluding stationary ex ercise bike, medical equipment, house hold items, clothing and much more Text FL19674 to 56654 Port St. Joe307 16th St. Saturday 8am-untilIndoor Yard SaleLiving room sofa, loveseat, chair, queen & king bedroom set with dresser and end tables, set of Franciscan apple dishes with glassware and morel. Hunting Lease Member Wanted near Port St. Joe. 1,600 Acres. Deer and Turkey, etc. Member fee $500. For details: 850-227-5052 2 br, 1 ba, apartments for rent. call Kenny 850-227-6077 or Phil 850-227-6241 Government assistance accepted Port St Joe: 2br, 2ba 1cg, kitchen, LR, Balcony, long rental, near bay & dock, close to downtown, excellent area, 850-624-4264 Text FL20074 to 56654 FOR RENT: 2br, 2 ba 14 x 70 Mobile Home. C/H/A, no pets, $500 month + $400 dd. Call: 850-229-6495 Text FL20096 to 56654 Panama City CLOSEOUT SALE: Unbeatable Prices, D/W & S/W. Most are Zone III. Kensinger Housing, 3424 E. 15th, St, Call (850) 785-0693.Text FL16550 to 56654 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

PAGE 24

B12| The Star Thursday, August 9, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today A great resume and solid interview skills may place job seekers in the running for a position, but a survey conducted by OfficeTeam, a leading staffing service, finds that the results of a reference check can really be what makes or breaks a job search. Hiring managers interviewed for the survey said they remove about 21 percent of candidates from consideration after speaking to their professional references. Managers also were asked, When speaking to an applicants job references, what is the most important information you hope to receive? Their responses: Description of past job duties and experience: 36 percent A view into the applicants strengths and weaknesses: 31 percent Confirmation of job title and dates of employment: 11 percent Description of workplace accomplishments: 8 percent A sense of the applicants preferred work culture: 7 percent Other/dont know: 7 percent When hiring managers narrow the field to a few potential candidates, the reference check often becomes the deciding factor, says OfficeTeam executive director Robert Hosking. To distinguish themselves from the competition, job seekers should assemble a solid list of contacts who can persuasively communicate their qualifications and professional attributes. OfficeTeam offers five tips for creating a reference list that works in your favor:Choose WiselySelect people who can discuss your abilities and experience that directly relate to the position, not just those with the most impressive job titles. Offer a mix of contacts who can address different aspects of your background; for example, a former peer may be able to describe your interpersonal skills, while a past direct report can talk about your management style. Check in BeforehandAlways call potential references first to get their permission and evaluate their eagerness to talk to hiring managers. Be sure to give all references a copy of your resume, the job description and the name of the person who will likely call.Be Prepared Provide clear contact information for your references, including their names, titles, daytime phone numbers and email addresses. Also, offer a brief explanation of the nature of your relationship with each individual. Consider supplying more references than are requested, so you wont miss out on the job offer if the hiring manager cant get in touch with one of your contacts.Think Outside the BoxIts common for employers to seek out additional references for new hires either online or through their own networks. Since you never know to whom a hiring manager might reach out, you should not only remain on good terms with your past supervisors and colleagues (if possible), but also be selective about whos in your online network, on professional networking sites such as BeKnown and LinkedIn.Give ThanksExpress your gratitude to people who agree to serve as references, even if they arent contacted by employers. Keep them updated on the progress of your job search and offer to return the favor by providing a recommendation should they need one.What employers want from job references Admin/ClericalAdministrative Assistant, Health Sciences(Gulf/Franklin campus)To serve as the main contact for student program inquiries, maintain student files & records. Requires HS diploma/ equivalency + 3 yrs. administrative exp. & strong MS Office skills. Range begins at $10.50/hr. Apply by 8/14/12. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed) will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Officer (850) 872.3866 Web ID#:34219967Text FL19967 to 56654 Project/Program MgtUpward Bound Grant Project Coordinator(Federally Funded) Manage all aspects of the Upward Bound project & supervise and lead Upward Bound Grant staff & resources. Requires MS in guidance & counseling or related field + 3 yrs. exp. as a teacher, counselor or administrator; supervisor exp. & exp. working with educationally/ economically disadvantaged youth. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Apply by 8/10/12. Only those who provide GCSC Application (must be completed) + transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional information: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Officer (850) 872.3866 Web ID#:34219975 Text FL19975 to 56654 EducationInfant/Toddler CaregiversAre needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs @ our Apalachicola location. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP Web ID#: 34219153 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications Part-time Maintenance Office Clerk Must have good customer service, organization & computer skills. 4 days a week including weekends. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34216824 Text FL16824 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW